Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th January 1818.
Reference Number: 18180114
Reference Number: f18180114-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 14th of JANUARY, 1818, and following Days; Being the Second Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER SMITH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1818.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER SMITH , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Charles Price , Bart; John Ansley , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxham , Knt.; Christopher Magnay , Esq.; George Bridges , Esq., and Robert Albion Cox , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Johnson ,

John Dyson ,

Ralph Smith Kirby ,

Edward Gedge ,

John Lynn ,

Thomas Whitehouse ,

William Norris ,

Joseph Coward ,

Robert Towler ,

George Stainton ,

Thomas Hood ,

George Bishop .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Warren ,

Henry Robley ,

Thomas Langley ,

John Hebditch ,

William Edwards ,

Matthew Read ,

Edward Kempton ,

Andrew Reckhouse ,

John Dickinson ,

Charles Hussey ,

John Lewis Ford ,

John Beart .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Daniel Cannon ,

John Barker ,

Joseph Coulden ,

Edward Gaunt ,

George Gray ,

William Walker ,

Charles Tickle ,

Edward Cox ,

John Davis ,

John Fowler ,

William King ,

John Adam Laurn

.

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 14, 1818.

SMITH, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

Reference Number: t18180114-1

167. RICHARD CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one bedstead, value 23s. , the property of Thomas Havens .

THOMAS HAVENS . On the 29th of October, I lived in Monmouth-street , and went home for some materials for my work, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning of that day, and saw the prisoner sitting at breakfast with my wife - I had known him before, but did not expect him to breakfast; I immediately shut the door, and asked him what he wanted there? he caught hold of me, and of my wife also, and begged of her to open the door for him; by struggling he threw me across the bed - She opened the door, he immediately let me go, struck me, and went out of the house. I never saw him again until a fortnight afterwards, when I had a warrant out against him for striking me - I then took him to Bow-street, and he was committed for want of bail; I missed these goods, and my wife, on my return home again in the evening of the 29th of October.

(Upon a further investigation of this case, it appeared that the prosecutor's wife had assisted the prisoner in carrying off the property in question, and had cohabited with him from the time of his absconding until his apprehension.)

Upon an objection taken by Mr. ARABIN, on the part of the prisoner,

THE COURT ruled, That no person could be convicted of a felony, alleged in stealing goods, where such goods came into his possession by the delivery of the proprietor's wife.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park

Reference Number: t18180114-2

168. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one coat, value 5s. , the property of Thomas Clarke .

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. On the 5th of November, about one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner at the bar, with a coat under his arm, on the left-hand side of Lincoln's-inn-fields, coming from Great Queen-street into Holborn-knowing him before, I turned round and looked after him; observing that he saw I was looking after him, I turned about and followed him; he mended his pace, and seeing I was following him, he threw the coat over the iron railing into the front court of one of the houses in Lincoln's-inn-fields; I picked it up, followed, and secured him. I have reason to think that he knew I was an officer. When I took him into custody, he said, "What do you want with me? I have done nothing." I asked him what he ran away for, if he had done nothing? He said, "a gentleman gave me that coat to carry to the George and Blue Boar, in Holborn, and gave me two shillings." I asked him where the money was, but he said the gentleman had not paid him.

ANN PEAKE . I am servant to Mr. Clarke. In November last, after I had been informed that a young man had been stopped running away with a great coat, I missed my my master's coat out of the back parlour.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-3

169. JOSEPH PICKETT and PHILIP WOOD were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Perry , on the King's highway, on the 6th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3l., and one chain, value 1s., his property .

JAMES PERRY . I am a baker , and live in Westminster. On the 6th of January last, I was returning home in my cart, about nine o'clock at night, in company with a butcher, named Thyer; as we rode along near Westminster Abbey , one of the wheels of my cart came off-whether by accident, or done wilfully by some one, I do not know; I was knocked out, and as I was rising I received a violent blow on the back of my head, which knocked me down again. As soon as I recovered myself I saw several people about me. I got to the railing opposite the Abbey, as soon as I could, and had much to do to stand; I supported myself by the railing, and then I observed the prisoner, Pickett, take hold of my arm, saying, he would see me home, if I would go, I refused; that is all I know. I had been drinking, but was perfectly sensible before I received the blow.

THOMAS THYER . I saw the prisoner, Pickett, have Mr. Perry, by the arm. I found my pocket was turned inside

out, and I had lost 15s.6d. I told to Mr. Perry I thought he had lost his watch, and he missed it.

WILLIAM GARRETT . As I was coming home I saw Mr. Perry holding by the rails that inclose the green, and the prisoner, Pickett, attempting to release his hands from them-which he did, and Mr. Perry crossed over to some wood rails, nearly opposite - He caught hold of them, and then the prisoner, Pickett, crossed over too, and appeared to endeavour to release his hands from the wooden rails, but Mr. Perry held the rails so tight that he could not do it; I also attempted to release his hands, but he would not let me. A short time after that I saw the prisoner, Pickett, pull the watch from Mr. Perry's pocket - He pulled it up in a very forcible way, and could hardly get it out. There was a great number of costermongers standing about; I saw him deliver it to the other prisoner, Wood, who was close to his elbow. Perry was at this time close to the rails - I believe he was in liquor; then Wood walked round to the other side of Perry, and gave Pickett the watch back again, he then put it into his great coat pocket, and they both crossed over towards Tothill-street; I followed them half-way up Tothill-street, and then Wood returned - I lost Picket - I do not know where he went to, and I also missed Wood. The next morning I saw Pickett passing by the shoemaker's, and he was apprehended.

Prisoner WOOD. Was it light enough to see me - A. Yes; I was close by the side of you; there were gaslights on the other side - I knew both the prisoners before, by sight, and also the name of Wood.

Q. How came you not to speak to me when you first saw me in the public-house-A. I was afraid to speak to him in the public-house, but I swore to him as soon as the officers got him out. I went down with them, after I had described him, to the Crown, and he was there.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square Office. The last witness described to me the persons of the two lads who had committed the robbery, the morning after the robbery, and according to his description of them we immediately knew who we had to look for - They exactly answered his description, in dress, and in every other particular, when they were apprehended. The boy was afraid to speak to Wood in the public-house, because there were many others, but he swore to him afterwards.

JOSEPH COOPER corroborated the evidence of the last witness.

PICKETT'S Defence. I was going to Covent-garden-market, when Mr. Gillmore laid hold of me, for what reason I do not know.

WOOD'S Defence. They fetched me out of the public-house, but I know nothing at all of the robbery.

PICKETT - GUILTY. Aged 17.

WOOD - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of Stealing from the Person only .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-4

170. ANN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one coat, value 2l., and one sheet, value 9s., the property of Benjamin Ogers , in dwelling-house .

MARY OGERS . My husband's name is Benjamin; we live in Crown-street, Mile End, New Town . On the 29th of December last I went out about twelve o'clock at noon, and returned in about half an hour. When I returned I met the prisoner nearly on the last step of the stairs, coming down; as I had lodgers up stairs, I asked her if she had been up to any of them, but before she could answer me one of the lodgers came down behind her; I asked him if he knew the prisoner, and he said he did not. As I saw she had a bundle in her apron, and observed the corner of the coat, which I knew, sticking out, I shoved her into the parlour, and sent for an officer - We found the coat and sheet in her apron. When I went out I left them in the bed-room. When the prisoner was taken into custody I went up stairs, and saw that both sheets had been dragged off the bed, but she had dropped one in the room. The prisoner was a perfect stranger to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-5

171. MARY ALDER , JAMES ALDER , and SARAH WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , at the parish of St. Ann, Westminster, one writing-desk, value 10s.; five watches, value 12l.; twenty-three spoons, value 4l.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 10s.; four broaches, value 2l.; six seals, value 50s., and two rings, value 10s., the property of James Keat , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT. Against the said Mary Alder , for stealing the said goods in the same dwelling-house, on the same day, and at the same parish.

THIRD COUNT, Against the said James Alder , and Sarah Wilson , for receiving on the same day, and at the same parish, the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES KEAT . I live at No. 2, Crown-street, St. Ann's, Westminster . I am the housekeeper. On the morning of the 13th of December, I got up about half-past seven, and went out, leaving my desk safe. It was a little portable desk. It was locked, and the room door was locked also. I came home about twelve or one o'clock, at dinner time, and saw Mrs. Alder, the mother of the two prisoners(Alder) - She was there, charing for us. Directly after I came in the prisoner, Mary Alder , came in with my child; she had been in the habit of being in my house, but not lately, as I rather rebuked my wife for letting her be about my place, and she was desired to go about her business. I went away, and did not go into the room where I had left the desk; I returned again about half-past five or six, went in, and found my wife crying. I am a dealer in marine stores . I missed nothing at that time. I went to Marlborough-street office, and brought down Mr. Jeffries, we then went into the room, and I missed my desk. It was entirely gone. When I left it, locked up, there were six watches in it; one gold, three silver, one tortoiseshell, and one was gilt; three of them were not mine; and the rest of the articles stated in the indictment. I suppose they were worth about 60l. I went to look for the girl,

Mary Alder , to the Seven Dials, but did not find her there. About half-past seven o'clock I saw her just by my own door, and took her into the shop; she was interrogated by my wife, and her mother, in my presence, respecting the desk, and denied all knowledge of it. When I took her to the watch-house there was a seal found in her possession, but not that I saw. I took her instantly to the watchhouse.

ELIZA GILLON . I am the watch-house-keeper's wife. I remember the girl, Mary Alder , being brought into the watch-house - I searched her, and found two seals on her, one of which Keats, the prosecutor, claimed. The other Mr. Keats said was not his property. She had them in her pockets.

ELIZA DOBSON . I live at No. 10, Belton-street, Longacre. I know all the three prisoners, but they did not live in the same house with me. I was sitting in a room at No. 10, where I live, and the three prisoners came into the room with the desk, about a quarter before six o'clock in the evening. It was a small mahogany desk with brass handles- Sarah Wilson carried it in her apron, twisted up. It was put on the table, and the prisoner, James Alder, took a chisel out of his pocket, and broke it open; the contents were then put into Sarah Wilson 's apron, and she took them away-they all went out together. I saw the spoons marked I.K. - I think there was half a dozen; and also a bunch of seals, and several watches, but did not take particular notice of them. I saw some rings taken out of a little drawer by the side of the desk, with some broaches and shirt pins. The desk was left to be burnt; they all three asked me if I would burn it; the next morning I burnt the inside of it. I saw the prisoners, Sarah Wilson and James Alder , in Short's-gardens, Belton-street, about three-quarters of an hour afterwards, they asked me if I had burnt the desk, I told them I had not. They said "then go home and burn it; because," said Sarah Wilson , "it was taken from my master's." She then desired James Alder to give me a shilling out of his pocket, and she gave me two shillings. Sarah Wilson also told me they had got 2l.10s. each, but they were afraid Mary Alder had been taken into custody - They then went away. In about an hour or two I saw them again, Sarah Wilson had bought herself a new bonnet and shawl, and they told me Mary Alder was at Marlborough-street. James Alder had a small watch and a broach, Sarah Wil son said, "give them to me, and I will go and plant them." I understood by "planting them," she meant biding them so that they could not be found; and I believe he did give them to her.

CHRISTIANA MANN . I live servant with Mrs. Brothers, in Great White Lion-street. I know the prisoner, Sarah Wilson ; she lived in the same house, on the second-floor, with her mother; I remember about five o'clock on the day in question, I saw her come into the house with something in her apron, in the shape of a small box; she went to the foot of the stairs, in the passage, and called "mother!" three times-her mother was out at the time; she went up stairs a little way, came down again in about three minutes afterwards, and went out. I do not know whether she carried what I saw her with out again; I saw her go out, but her back was towards me.

MARY BUSH . I live at No. 19, Great White Lion-street, at Mrs. Brothers's. I saw the prisoner, Sarah Wilson , in my room, on the 13th of December; she went out, as she said, to go and look for Mary Alder , to get some money from her to buy a pair of shoes; I never saw her from that time until I saw her at the bar this day, as she absconded. I remember the prisoner, James Alder, coming to me on the Friday night; he asked me if I had seen old Mrs. Wilson, for he wanted to see Sarah Wilson, the prisoner; it was a week after the robbery, all but one day. I asked him how his sister got on; he said, if there was no more property found on her than the seal, she would he turned up. On the Monday following he came to me and said,"Bush, I have seen Sal. Wilson, and she says there is a watch and a broach buried in your cellar, and Mrs. Brothers will not let me in." I said, "I am going down presently for some water, you shall go with me, and have a light." He went down, I went with him, and took a small shovel with me, from my own fireside - He dug in three different places, but found nothing. I do not think he ever went there again.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer of Marlborough-street Office; I took the prisoners into custody. I did not find any thing on either of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY ALDER 'S Defence. I have nothing further to say, than that my brother is perfectly innocent of breaking the desk.

JAMES ALDER'S Defence. I never had any thing to do with the robbery, and know nothing about it. The prosecutor bought all the property knowing it to be stolen. I saw every bit of it bought myself. The officer that has been called and another, have come into the house to search for stolen goods, when the prosecutor has kept them in the parlour, while this girl, my sister, has thrown stolen pots down the privy.

Prisoner SARAH WILSON . James Alder is perfectly innocent of the crime that he is here for.

ELIZA DOBSON re-examined. I am sure that the prisoner, James Alder , came into the room with the other two prisoners, and I am positive he took the chisel out of his pocket, and broke the desk open; I saw him again in the evening, when he gave me a shilling. I was sitting near the fire-it is not a very large room, and the table was near the fire. I was near enough to the table to see the marks on the spoons.

M. ALDER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

J. ALDER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

S. WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

On the 3d Count.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-6

172. JOSEPH THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , at St. Martin's in the Fields, one cloth pelisse, value 1l.5s., the property of James Appleby , privately in his shop .

THOMAS GOOKE . I am a constable. About a quarter before five o'clock in the evening of the 6th of January, I saw the prisoner in St. Martin's-court, in company with another person. They were loitering about the court. I watched them for about three-quarters of an hour, or rather better, they then separated, one went down the court towards Castle-street; the prisoner turned back, and went

past Mr. Appleby's, which is in the broad part of St. Martin's-court -he passed it. He then went to the corner, turned back again, and passed the shop twice afterwards; he then went into the shop, and I missed him for about half a minute; I saw him go into the shop and come out again with something in his apron. I then came from the place where I was concealed, and took hold of him, about twenty yards from Mr. Appleby's shop - I was in the alley, at the back of Slanghter's Coffee-house, where he could not see me. I took him with one hand, and laid hold of his apron with the other, and took him back to Mr. Appleby's shop-the pelisse was in his apron. Miss Wheeler was in the shop, but no other person.

SOPHIA WHEELER . I am shopwoman to Mr. James Appleby, the prosecutor. His house is in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields. On the 6th of January last, I remember the last witness bringing the prisoner into the shop, about half-past five o'clock in the evening; I saw the pelisse taken from the prisoner, and knew it to be the prosecutor's; about ten minutes before I saw it hanging with two more, by the counter. I had never left the shop, but had been at the other end, and did not miss it before Gooke brought the prisoner in. There was no other person in the shop besides me. The pelisse is worth 25s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-7

173. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , at the parish of St. Martin in the Fields, one coat, value 3l., the property of James Taylor ; and two sheets value 2l., the goods of John Wilson Croker , Esq . in his dwelling-house .

CATHERINE ROOK . I am servant to Mr. Croker; he lives in the Admiralty . On Thursday evening, the 8th of January, about five o'clock, I was in the kitchen, and saw a woman go out of the door - I had not seen her come in; she was making towards the door to make her escape; my fellow-servant inquired if we had seen a woman of her description in the passage; I was looking for her when my fellow-servant, the laundry-maid, called out "here is the woman." I desired her to shut the door immediately, and went up to the prisoner, took her by the arm, and found a coat and a pair of sheets under her arm. I asked her what her business was there? she said she was a poor distressed woman, and came in to speak to the housekeeper. I asked her why she did not inquire for her, but she made me no answer. I then asked her what possessed her to do so; she said she was a poor deranged woman, and begged I would pardon her.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am servant to Mr. Croker. I heard a bustle in the passage on Thursday the 8th of January, on looking I saw the prisoner coming towards the pantry; I went to inquire who and what she was, and in a few minutes I saw her in the pantry, and my coat, and a pair of sheets, taken from under her left arm. I had seen my coat about ten minutes before; it was almost new; I had only worn it four or five times, and it cost me 5l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a soldier's widow , and came to town to get some prize-money - I had only one penny in my pocket. There was plate and other valuable things about, that I could have taken if had been so disposed, and I never took any of these things.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 59.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-8

174. CHARLES LAING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Mitchell , Esq . about the hour of five in the night of the 9th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one coat, value 8s., and three handkerchiefs, value 3s., the property of Jacob Harding .

AMELIA HARDING . My husband's name is Jacob; he is coachman to John Mitchell, Esq. who lives at No. 42. Charles-street, Cavendish-square. The stables are behind the house, and connected with it - They are No. 42, Lambeth-mews ; my husband was not in town at the time of the robbery, and I and my children slept in the room over the stable. On the night of Friday, the 9th of January last, the witness, Carr, came to Ogle-mews, where I was, and called me, I went to the stable and did not miss anything at first, but afterwards I missed the coat in question, from a box, and the handkerchiefs. I had been at the stable, and left all safe about four o'clock that afternoon; I did not miss the things until after the prisoner had been taken.

AMELIA HARDING . I am the daughter of the last witness. I locked up the stable, and left all safe; the things had all been taken from different boxes.

JOHN CARR . I am groom to Mr. Badewell, Queen-street, May Fair. I went to the prosecutor's stable to ask for the coachman's son, and saw a light up stairs; as soon as I touched the door it flew open, I went in, and saw two men on the stairs - I could see them by the light that was above; I came out directly, they shut the door after me and bolted it. I went to a coachman, who was at a stable on the opposite side, and told him; he went and listened at the door, and heard the latch go, we then went up a little further, and two men came out, one of whom was the prisoner, he passed by me, but I did not speak to him. They ran off.

WILLIAM SCRUTON . I was in the mews on the night in question, and saw two men come out of Mr. Mitchell's stable-the prisoner was one of them. I pursued him, and caught him before he had got out of my sight.

JOHN PETTIT . I am a coachman. I was in Lambethmews on the night in question, and heard a cry of, Stop thief! I came down stairs directly, and saw the young man secured. I picked up the property on Mr. Mitchell's dung-heap-the prisoner must have ran past that dungheap in endeavouring to make his escape.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-9

175. JOHN WARREN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Blackwell , about the hour of eight in the night of the 25th of December .

The prosecutor's name being William Backwell the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-10

176. RICHARD ALLEN and JOHN NIGHTINGALE were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Kater , Esq . about the hour of one in the afternoon of the 9th of January , with intent to steal, and feloniously stealing therein one box-coat, value 4l. his property .

WILLIAM HUNT . I am servant to Henry Kater. I lived with my master, in Union-place, Marylebone . On Friday the 9th of January, about two o'clock, Purday called and said something to me, in consequence of which I looked for my master's coat, and missed it from the hall, where it had been hanging. The hall-door was latched, as usual, the last time that I saw it before the coat was taken.

RICHARD PURDAY . I am toll-collector at the turnpike near Mr. Kater's house; I saw three men near the house, the prisoners, who were two of them, went into the front garden together; Nightingale then came out of the garden into the road, and Allen went into the house, he stopped there about ten minutes; both the gate and door were shut - He opened them, and went in; he had nothing with him when he went in, but when he came out he had the tail of his coat up-the other prisoner was loitering outside. They then both went in to the middle of the road and ran up Nottingham-place; I immediately gave information to the servant. I have seen both the prisoners often up that road, selling wood, with a donkey. They were pursued but not taken at that time. I gave a description of them to the gentleman, as well as to the constable; I went with him in the evening, and saw them both drinking in a public-house, between eight and nine o'clock.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody. I had received a description of them from the last witness.

JOSEPH GEARY . Purday has spoken correctly.

CAPTAIN CATER. It was my driving coat, made in the usual manner, with large capes; the hall where it hung is not far from the door.

ALLEN'S Defence. I know nothing at all of the robbery. I went down Nottingham-place, calling bare-skins all the way; my father is a witness that I never was up that road selling wood in all my life.

NIHGTINGALE'S Defence. I own I went in at the gate, but I did not do any thing; I came out again, and saw Purday - He laughed at me, and I laughed at him.

ALLEN - GUILTY. Aged 14.

NIGHTINGALE - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-11

177. MOSES DANIELS and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Jewell , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 24th of December , at the parish of St. Marylebone (Fanny, his wife, and others of his family being therein), and stealing therein one counterpane, value 5s.; one pair of sheets, value 7s.; two window-curtains, value 5s.; eleven frocks, value 11s.; nine pair of trowsers, value 9s.; one spencer, value 6d. one pair of pantaloons, value 1s.; two gowns, value 2s.; five petticoats, value 5s.; one box, value 3s.; one bed-gown, value 1s.; and five towels, value 2s. , his property.

FANNY JEWELL. I am a married woman; my husband's name is Joseph; we live in Charlotte-street, Portland-place, in the parish of St. Marylebone . We are lodgers, but our landlord does not live in the house-it is let out in different tenements. The landlord's name is John Watson ; I do not know where he lives, except in Redford-place, Russell-square; there are four lodgers in the house besides myself. Our property was taken from the garrett. We occupied the shop, parlour, one room on the second-floor, and the garrett. On the 24th of December last, I shook up my bed and left it; I did not go up again until seven o'clock in the evening; I left the room, with my bed clothes, and every thing else, quite safe. I do not know as to the door; I generally lock it, but am not certain that I locked it at that time, I took the key out of it as though it was locked; it shuts and catches with a brass handle - I can say it was shut and latched, and the articles stated in the indictment were in the room. I left the room at twelve o'clock. On going up stairs and putting the key in the door, I found it was unlocked, and missed the box with the articles already enumerated. I told my husband of it, and gave them up as lost until I saw them advertized in the paper.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am a patrol. On the 24th of December, about a quarter after four o'clock in the afternoon, I received information, and went to Vine-street, Chandos-street, to a one pair of stairs back-room; I found the door fast, and knocked, the persons within refused to open it; I forced it open, and found the prisoners, and Sarah Perry , there; there was a large deal box in the room, broken open, the lock was forced, and the lid split in two, and the property about the room. I secured them.

SARAH PERRY. I live in Vine-street, Covent-garden, at the house which Edwards has spoken of. I asked the prisoner, Daniels, to drink tea with me about a quarter before three o'clock; I never saw the other prisoner there.

Q. Did you ever see the other prisoner before to-day - A. I saw him on the 24th of December; I went out, and when I returned I found him in the room; I do not know how he came there - I had been out for some butter, when I returned the box was in the chair, I had not seen it there before-it was open. I did not hear the prisoners say any thing about it. Just as I got up the stairs the officers came in at the door, and I went in and locked the door. I did not see what was in the box, but the things were on the ground; the officer said they were counterpanes and sheets. I never saw the prisoner, Smith, before that day, and asked him how he came in my room. I had invited Daniels to tea that morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIELS'S Defence. Perry asked me to tea; I was going there, and met the prisoner, Smith, with a box, which, he said, he was going to take to the Golden Cross; I told him after he had been there to come to tea at Perry's, as I was going there. He came and said he had let the box fall, and wanted to replace the things. The officer burst open the door before I could open it.

SMITH'S Defence. A man asked me to carry the box; I carried it as far as Crown-street, where I met Daniels.

I lost the man who gave it to me to carry. I pitched the box at the bottom of St. Martin's-lane, the lock broke open, and I took it to the house to replace the things.

FANNY JEWELL . The things were not at all dirty-there was no direction on the box.

DANIELS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

SMITH - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-12

178. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , two coats, value 6l.10s., and three pair of pantaloons, value 3l.10s. , the goods of Charles Stokes Edsall .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-13

179. CHARLES WOOD and JOHN VALE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , at St. Sepulchre's, one gelding, price 35l. , the property of Joseph Pennington .

THOMAS HOOK. I am servant to Mr. Joseph Pennington , who lives at Godstone . On the night of the 4th of December I put the horses up in the yard, and fastened the gate at eight o'clock, the bay gelding was safe then. I returned next morning, about a quarter before six o'clock, and the gelding was gone-it came home afterwards. I am certain it was my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Godstone is about twenty-two or twenty-three miles from Smithfield. There were four horses in the yard at night, and I only found three there the next morning. My master has had the gelding ten years; I have lived six years and a half with him, and have had the care of the gelding during that time, and knew it again.

WILLIAM COOPER. I am servant to Mr. Pennington. On the 5th of December, about five o'clock in the morning, I went to my master's premises, the yard gate stood open, there are two yard gates-the horses were in the corn-yard; the gelding was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I have seen the horse since; it has a white foot, and a bald face; I should know it among a thousand.

JOHN KIRKBY MOORE. I manage Mr. Pennington's farm for him, he is the only occupier of it. Hook informed me that the gelding was gone, and I immediately came to London; I have known the horse about eighteen months; I saw it again in Giltspur-street, in the possession of John Ayres. After some conversation with him about it, the prisoner, Wood, came up, I asked him if he was the owner of the horse, he said, Yes. I asked the price, he said 24l. I told him it was too much, and asked him its age; he said it was six years old. I told him it was more; he said it was not more than seven. He then offered it to me for 23l. I said it was too much.

Q.Did he say any thing more about the horse-A. He said he knew it very well, and would put it into a cart to shew me how it would go. He said it was a Suffolk bred horse. I went for a constable, and on my return I met Ayres, leading the horse, in Smithfield, and Wood near him. I asked Wood if he would take 20l. for it - He said 22l. was the lowest-the constable came and took him, and I gave the landlord charge of the horse. After the examination before the magistrate I took the horse back into the country, the two witnesses saw it-it was the same horse. When I got into the country, I and Jones went and apprehended the prisoner, Vale, at Heaver, in Kent, on a Sunday, where he lived.

Cross-examined. I never saw the prisoner, Wood, until I saw him in Smithfield. I went up to him as if I meant to buy the horse-it stood alone, in the care of Ayres. Wood asked 24l. for it. I was gone about twenty-five minutes for the constable, I returned, and talked with him again about the horse.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you give him any reason, at first, to suppose you suspected him - A. None at all.

JOHN AYRES . I assist the hostler at the Green Dragon, in Smithfield. On the 5th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the horse in the stable, I did not see the man bring it in, but I saw the prisoners in conversation about it. Wood asked me to go and have something to drink with him, and took me to the Denmark's Head, in the Old Bailey-Vale was there. Wood asked me what time the horse-market began; I told him about one or two o'clock, and not before. He said he had bought the horse of Vale, and wished to sell it again-Vale was present. Wood said he gave Vale 18l.10s. for it; he then put his hand into his pocket, and said, I have got to give you two shillings to make up the 18l. 10s., and he gave him two shillings-Vale took it. I asked Vale who he bought the horse of; he said he bought it coming along the road that morning. I asked him if he knew the man of whom he bought it, he said no, only that he told him his name was James Buckle . I told him I thought it was a stolen horse, and if it was, I thought he had brought it to a very likely market to have it owned. Wood asked me to lead the horse into the market for him, and said he would satisfy me for my trouble - I said I would; he then told me to get him ready, and tie his tail up to take him into the market. We came out of the public-house, Vale asked the way to Pimlico, I told him, and they both went down the Old Bailey. I did not see Wood again until he came to have the horse in the market, at the time Mr. Moore was asking me the price of it - I heard him ask the price. He has spoken correctly.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I am not much acquainted with horse selling. I was not in the way when the horse came. Wood took me out of the stable to the Old Bailey, he seemed anxious to sell the horse; he said he bought it of Vale, Vale set close to me and heard him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I do not know who brought the horse, I first saw Wood at a little after seven o'clock; we found Vale in the Old Bailey; I had a bad opinion of the business, and said, before them both, that I thought if it was prigged, he had brought it to a wrong place. After this Wood still went to Smithfield with me - He never attempted to go away; when Moore came I called him to me, and he was taken. Wood said he bought it of Vale before and after I had said I thought it was stolen, and still desired me to take it to Smithfield.

STEPHEN VINCE . I am hostler at the Green Dragon, in Giltspur-street. On the morning of the 5th of December, the prisoner, Vale, alone, brought the gelding; I was

opening the gates to let a waggon in, about a quarter to six o'clock - He called for the hostler, and I answered; he said he wanted to put the horse in the stable to bait; I shewed him the way - He led it in, and tied it up himself. Wood came about seven o'clock, looked at the horse, and had him ran up and down the yard; he asked Vale if he,(Vale,) was not the man who bought the horse that morning, he said he was. I asked Vale if the horse was for sale, he said, Yes. I asked him if he knew who he bought it of? he said the man told him his name, but he did not know where he lived - He did not tell me his name; he said he bought it at Kennington turnpike, coming to town. After that he went into the yard, and returned in about half an hour, Wood had not been then; he ordered his horse a quartern of corn, which I gave him. Wood came down as if he was a stranger, and asked the questions which I related before; he said, "you are the man who bought the horse, if you had not bought it I should." I said, "if you will give him something for his bargain, he will let you have it." They appeared to be strangers to each other. They talked together; the horse was ran up and down the yard, and afterwards taken into the stable again. I did not hear them make any agreement.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. You told all this before the magistrate-A. Yes; I will not say I told it word for word. No person has been talking to me about it. Wood is not the man who brought the horse.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You said Vale was the man-A. I will not swear to him.

COURT. Q. You have sworn before the magistrate that the person who was dressed as Vale was before the magistrate, was the man, what do you believe now of Vale-A. To the best of my belief he is the man; I have not the least doubt of his being the man.

JURY. Q. How did the horse appear when it came into the stable - A.It appeared as if it had come off the road, being very thin and dirty. It had a broken halter on.

JAMES JONES. I am constable of Edenbridge, Kent. I have known the prisoners from their childhood; they lived at Eaver, which is twenty-seven miles from town, and were very well acquainted. Edenbridge is twentysix miles from town. Godstone is between Eaver and London, but not the nearest way. I was applied to on Sunday, the 17th of December, by Moore, and took Vale into custody. I told him I was not certain what the charge was against him. As we were coming to town, he said he did not steal the horse; I had said something about a horse, but I do not remember what. He said he did not take the horse, nor yet sell it.

Cross-examined. I am a constable in the neighbourhood. I had not heard of the horse having been stolen.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Wood lived at Edenbridge, and had a very good character; he is a collar maker.

MR. MOORE re-examined. The value of the gelding is 35l.

WOOD'S Defence. I did not steal it.

VALE'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

WOOD - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 28.

VALE - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-14

180. MARY THORNHILL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , one purse, value 6d.; one sovereign; 8s. in monies numbered; and four 1l. bank notes, the property of Samuel Tapsell , from his person .

SAMUEL TAPSELL . I am a porter . On the 30th of December, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Cow-lane , she asked me for something to drink, I told her I did not want her company; she kept with me until I got to Aldersgate-street , and frequently put her hand to my left side - I missed my purse. I had not stopped. I told her she had robbed me, and held her-she returned me the purse; I told her the money was not in it, and she returned me two 1l. notes. I gave her in charge. Nothing was found upon her. I lost 3l. out of 5l.8s., two 1l. notes and a sovereign; next morning I found the sovereign at the place where I missed my purse. I was pretty sober.

JAMES IRISH . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house a little after eleven o'clock. I found two shillings on her, but no bank notes.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me to go with him; I refused, and he charged me with the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-15

181. ELIZA PLEASANT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one watch, value 1l., and one key, value 1d. , the goods of John Ridge .

SUSANNAH RIDGE. I am the wife of John Ridge, who lives in Edmund-street, Battle-bridge. On the 18th of December I went to see my mother, who was ill; at two o'clock I went out to get her a jelly, and when I returned I missed my ridicule off the table-the prisoner lodged in the house-she did not return home until two days after; when she came back I accused her of the robbery, and she gave me the duplicate. My mother was confined to her bed. I gave her in charge.

BENJAMIN COX. I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of December I took the watch in pledge of a woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner, in the name of Charlotte Campbell . The duplicate produced is mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated when I took it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-16

182. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one pair of half-boots, value 8s. , the the goods of William Figg .

SARAH FIGG . I am the wife of William Figg , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Stonecutter-street, Fleet-market . On the 9th of December I saw the prisoner take the boots from the door, and gave the alarm; in a few minutes a gentleman brought him back with them. I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I am an officer. I met the prisoner running down the Old Bailey, a person, who was pursuing, told me to take him - I did so, and found the boots wrapped up in his apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was an alarm, I ran after the man, and picked the boots up; I still followed the man.

THOMAS NEWMAN re-examined. He did not give this account before.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-17

183. GEORGE WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 6s. in monies numbered , the property of John Woolcott .

JOHN WOOLCOTT. I keep the Bear and Ragged Staff, public-house, in Bear-street, Leicester-square ; the prisoner used my house.

CHARLES THORNTON. About seven o'clock in the morning, on the 5th of January, I was cleaning the tap-room out, the prisoner came in and asked for a man named Turner. - I told him he had not been there. I went into the sitting-room, returned in about a quarter of an hour, and found the bar-door open, and saw the prisoner on his knees, in the bar, with one hand in the till. I asked him what he did there? he begged of me to say nothing about it. I called the landlord, and he secured him. He found 6s. worth of halfpence on him, and a key.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-18

184. ANN CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one gown, value 7s.; one bonnet, value 15s.; two pair of stockings, value 3s.; two shifts, value 3s.; four caps, value 4s.; one pair of stays, value 1s.6d.; two pair of boots, value 16s., and two handkerchiefs, value 2s., the goods of Eliza lmber ; one gown, value 8s.; one petticoat, value 4s.; one shift, value 2s., and one scarf, value 3s., the goods of Eliza Wild ; and one hat, value 4s.; one pair of breeches, value 7s.; one pair of drawers, value 1s.6d., and one shirt, value 2s., the goods of Edmund Imber , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA IMBER. I live with my father, in Steven's-buildings, Marylebone ; the prisoner slept with me from the 1st to the 7th of January, as a lodger. On the 4th I gave her notice to quit on the 8th. I went out on the 7th, when I returned she was gone, and I missed the articles stated in the indictment; I found her again in Oxfordcourt, in bed, and my things under her pillow; and a gown which belonged to Wild.

EDMUND IMBER . I missed my breeches, and the other things; the prisoner told me she hat sold the had in the Edgware-road - I found it there.

ELIZA WILD . I missed my things, and went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found them there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-19

185. LAURENCE DENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , St. Ann's, Westminster, one cheese, value 2l.5s., the goods of Charles Richardson , in his dwelling-house .

MARY HINCHLEY . I am niece to Charles Richardson, who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Dean-street, Soho ; I was standing at his door on the 26th of December, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, there was a pile of cheeses in the shop, near the door, they were a very little way in; while I stood there the prisoner crossed the road, came up to me, and told me not to be alarmed, he then took a Cheshire cheese, and gave it to another man who was close by-there were two men came, the other man ran away with it, the prisoner stopped at the door; I called my aunt, she came and collared him, and said he should not go out until my uncle came home. He said a little dog that was with him drew him into the shop; he was detained till my uncle came home. I am sure the prisoner gave the cheese to the other man.

Prisoner. Q.Did not my dog fly at a cat - A. No; his handkerchief was tied to the dog, and he held the other end in his hand; the dog made no noise.

CHARLES RICHARDSON . I live in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster. I came home about half-past five o'clock, on the 26th of December, and found the prisoner in the shop. When I went out I left a pile of cheeses in the shop, about a foot and a half from the door, each cheese weighed 60lbs. and cost me 91/2d. per pound - I missed one of them. The prisoner made no resistance, but denied having taken the cheese.

HAMMOND WEBR . I was standing by the watch-house door, about half-past five o'clock, on the 26th of December, which is about seventy yards from the prosecutor's, and saw a man go by with a large cheese; he came in the direction as coming from Mr. Richardson's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing with my dog, he flew at something at the door, and my foot slipped; I told the girl not to be alarmed, when she ran in and said I took the cheese.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 67.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-20

186. JOHN NORTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Jenkins , about six in the night of the 20th of December , at St. James's, Clerkenwell, with intent to steal .

MARGARET JENKINS . I am the wife of David Jenkins; we live in Peartree-court, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell . On the 26th of December, I went out about four o'clock and returned at half-past six in the evening, and found the street - door open, which I had locked when I went out; I went in and saw the prisoner, and another man walking down stairs, I seized the prisoner, and held him until Vicary came, when I gave him in charge. I found a picklock-key in the keyhole, but nothing had been taken. I am sure he is the man; he tried to get away, and pulled me out of the house, but I still kept hold of him.

THOMAS VICARY. I heard Mrs. Jenkins call, and went to her assistance - She had the prisoner in custody; I sent for an officer, who searched him, and found a small key upon him.

WILLIAM STRINGLE . I am an officer. I corroborate Vickery's statement.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not enter the house. I was coming up the court and the prosecutrix seized me. The key found on me is the key of my trunk.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-21

187. FRANCES LEVY and SARAH LEVY COHEN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jeremiah Sullivan , on the 26th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two gowns, value 8s.; two pieces of lace, value 1s.; one gold pin, value 3s.; one pelisse, value 3s.; and one frock, value 1s. 6d. , his property.

MARY SULLIVAN . I am the wife of John Jeremiah Sullivan; we live in Silver-street, Stepney . On the 26th of November we went out, and locked the door; we returned at ten o'clock at night, my husband tried the door, and found it bolted inside. We went through another house into the back yard, found the back-door broken open, the drawers all open, and the property stated in the indictment gone. The door of the first floor was broken open, and the bed tied up ready to be taken away. There is a field behind the house. There were several footmarks on the wall, which is five feet high. The prisoners were taken into custody at their lodgings, and several of our things found there.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner, Frances Levy, pledged a shawl with me in November last, in the name of Jacobs.

JOHN FORGER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner Levy's house, and found a gown, a pelisse, a gold pin, some muslin, and some lace. Sarah Levy Cohen was in the house, and working up some of the muslin; the prisoner, Levy, sells caps and other things.

MARY SMITH. I live next door to the prosecutor. I heard a noise in the back yard about nine o'clock.

LEVY'S Defence. I deal in old clothes. The other prisoner bought the things when I was out.

COHEN'S Defence. I do needlework. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-22

188. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , three books, value 2l., the property of John Mann , privately in his shop .

JOHN MANN . I am a bookseller , and live in the Commercial-road . On Saturday, the 18th of October, in the afternoon, I left my shop, when I returned, between five and six, I missed three books from the shelf where they had been exposed for sale - I saw them before I went out. I missed them immediately on my return to my parlour. The same evening I went to several pawnbroker's, and described the books; on the Monday following I found them at Mr. Avilla's.

MATTHEW PRICE . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Avilla , pawnbroker, who lives in Well-street; I know the prisoner. I saw him on the 18th of October, he came to my master's shop, brought three books, saying, he brought them from his father, and that he lodged in Lisbon-street, Commercial-road, which is about five minutes walk from our house. I lent him twelve shillings upon them. I gave him the money before I heard the books had been lost by Mr. Mann. Five or six weeks after the prisoner pledged the books he came to offer a time-piece. He was disguised. I made an excuse, to detain him while I sent for the prosecutor. I pretended not to know him, and said time-pieces were cumbersome, and I did not like to take them in from strangers. He said, "I am no stranger, you may remember my bringing some books sometime ago;" mentioning these very books, the Bible, in two volumes, and the prayer-book. I asked him if he was the person who pledged them? he said, "Yes, in the name of William Davis ." I sent for Mr. Mann. The prisoner then said he did not bring the books from his father, but from William Moore, a person in the seafaring line, who had since gone to sea; but could give no account where the young man, William Moore , lived. The prisoner was dressed as a cheesemonger when he first came; and when he came the second time he had got on a sailor's dress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday the 18th of August, as I came home from work I met a young man named Moore, who had those books under his arm; he asked me if I was in the habit of going to pawnbrokers, and if I would pledge them for him? I said I would, and according went to the pawnbroker's and asked 1l. on them; they lent me twelve shillings, and I went to the young man, gave him the money, and he gave me a glass of liquor for my trouble.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-23

189. DANIEL STOCKWELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Walklett , about the hour of six in the night of the 8th of December , at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one boot, value 3s. , his property.

THOMAS WALKLETT. I live at No. 88, Cromer-street, Gray's Inn-lane, in the parish of St. Paneras , and am a boot and shoemaker . On the 8th of December last, a few minutes before six o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in my parlour behind the shop, with my family, which shop is part of my dwelling-house, and heard the shop-window smash, upon which I immediately went to the shop-door, but found it fast-it was tied to the paling, I saw the rope; one boot was gone from the shop, which had hung over the pane of glass that was cut-it was dark at the time; I had seen that boot hanging there in the course of the day.

COURT. Q. Could a person reach it by putting their hand through a pane of glass-A. Yes, when the pane of glass was broken, it touched the square of glass when it was hanging up. I was pulling at the door to get it open when Teasdale cut the rope, and brought the prisoner into the shop by the collar.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am a headborough of the parish of St. Pancras. I know the prosecutor's shop in Cromer-street. I saw some persons about his shop on the evening of the 8th of December. I saw the prisoner at the bar, and another man with him-they passed his shop repeatedly, and looked into the window several times; at the time the window was broken I stood in a passage nearly opposite, and saw them go up to the window, and heard the window break; the moment I heard it break I crossed the road, seized the prisoner, and took him into custody, the other man ran towards Gray's Ion-lane, but I had not sufficiently seen him to be able to swear to him. I have an opinion in my own mind who it was, but I cannot swear to him. When I took the prisoner into the shop his hand was bleeding a little, at the thumb point, and he had a white handkerchief about it. I took him to Hatton-garden office.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden. I searched the prisoner, and examined his hand also; the thumb of his right hand was fresh cut, and the little finger of his left hand was bleeding; he had a handkerchief round his right hand, which has the marks of blood on it now; those marks were wet at the time I took it from him.

Prisoner. There was a sore that had been knocked off, and it was that which was bleeding.

WILLIAM THISSELTON re-examined. The thumb was cut, but the little finger of the left hand had a sore, which had been knocked off.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Mr. Adams, the brickmaker, to take an order for Mr. Duggins, and as I was walking along Mr. Teasdale laid hold of me, and took me into the shop. I know nothing whatever about the business.

ROBERT TEASDALE re-examined. Jury. Q. Did you see these men tie the door-A. No, I did not see them tie it; I could not, as it was dark low down; but I saw them stoop several times. I took the rope.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-24

190. WILLIAM BAILEY and ROBERT SPENCER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Zachariah Boote , Esq. at St. Luke's, Chelsea, about the hour of two in the night of the 22d of December , with intent to steal .

ZACHARIAH BOOTE. I am a housekeeper, and live in York-place, Chelsea . About half-past two o'clock in the morning of the 22d of December, I was alarmed by the watchman springing his rattle; I got up and opened the window; he desired me to come down immediately, saying, there were two men in the area. I went down stairs, the watchman still springing his rattle; the men were in the area when I went down, and remained so until the patrol came to the watchman's assistance. It is an area with steps-there is a door to it, and the gate was fast; it has wooden rails round it. The watchman was outside the rails, with a pistol in his hand, which he presented at the men, and swore that if they attempted to move, he would blow their brains out. After they were secured, and we had taken them to the watch-house, we examined the premises. In the road proceeding to the watch-house, the prisoner, Bailey, endeavoured to relieve himself of a centre-bit which was concealed under his coat, by droping it, but the watchman caught it before it fell to the ground. On our arrival at the watch-house both the prisoners were searched, and we found a phosphorous box on the prisoner Bailey, who wished to extricate himself from it, but his trowsers were too tight, and it would not pass at the knee. We returned to the premises and examined them. On searching the cellar, which was open into the area, we found a crow-bar, with a candle, and a short knife, sharpened at both edges. On examining the window we found the lower square of glass in the middle, above the division of the sash, was broken, and the latch which fastened the lower part of the sash down, had been pushed back, and the lower part of the sash thrown up as far as it would go, and a hole made in the shutter with the centre-bit. The piece of wood was not actually cut out, but it had been in the progress of being taken out. They could not have got at that part of the shutter without first breaking the pane of glass, and undoing the latch. The shutter is about two inches from the glass of the window; the pane that was broken was in the middle, but the second from the top, and the third from the bottom. The incision in the shutter was not opposite that pane which had been broken.

LYDIA SIMMONS . I was last up in the house the night previous. It was about twelve o'clock when I went to bed. I fastened the kitchen window about five o'clock in the evening-my duty was in the kitchen-there is only one window in it; the shutter was fastened in the inside with a bar which latches, and the window fastens with a book which hitches. After I had fastened it I tried if it was fast, by pushing it up, and it would not go up. I did not remain in the kitchen all the evening, for I went to church; when I came home the window was in the same state.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I did not examine the window when I came from church; the bar on the inside appeared just as it was when I went out.

Re-examined by the COURT. My way home from church was past that window, and if it had been thrown up I must have seen it.

MR. BOOTE. The shutter was nearly close to the window, and the fastening on the inside of the shutter was as it had been left, but a pane of glass broken.

COURT. Q. Where the mark of this machine was, was it opposite the pane of glass that was broken, or where the window was thrown up - A. Where the window was thrown up, at the lower part.

JOHN LEEPER. I am a watchman. I was going my rounds about two o'clock on the night in question, and turning the corner of York-place I saw a man lottering about; I stepped back to the railing, the person then proceeded on about eleven houses, when he had got nearly halfway he made a motion as if to evacuate, and when I got very near him he gave me the meeting. I stopped about Mr. Boote's place for a short time, and heard a great noise in the area, I looked about and saw that Mr. Boote's garden gate was not as I had left it at one o'clock. I then went in at the gate, up to the area railing,

and looking over the railings I saw two men, one of whom was apparently very busy, doing something at the area window. I immediately drew out my pistol, cocked it, levelled it at them, and threatened to shoot the first person that attempted to move either up or down. In the mean time I sprang my rattle, and was at least twenty minutes springing it, with the pistol in my right hand. While I was springing my rattle the patrol came up, drew his cutlass, and held it over the prisoners, while I got over the area rails and secured them. When we had secured them, I and the patrol entered the kitchen - I cannot say who opened the door. From thence we proceeded to the watch-house, and when we got about half way, the patrol tapped me on the shoulder, and also tapped Bailey on the shoulder, finding something was there, and said,"That is a pistol, I suppose." When it was about his middle I caught it in falling-it was the centre-bit. I am quite sure it fell from him. When we came to the watchhouse, the watch-house-keeper searched him, and took a box of phosphorus out of his trowsers, it was half way down to the knee. I returned to the house, but did not try the centre-bit at the window. I found a crow bar. The premises were found as Mr. Boote has described them. The candle was picked up under the steps where the prisoners stood, and this knife, in a leather case.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Spencer was standing at the back of Bailey, who was within four or five steps of the bottom - He appeared to be busy with his hands. I did not see him doing any thing with the centre-bit, but I believe he had it. He was four or five steps from the bottom of the ladder.

Q. Then his hands would be some distance from the shutter - A. The window is about up to a man's middle from the area bottom.

Re-examined by the COURT. The place where he stood on the ladder would be most convenient for him to work with the bit on the shutter.

THOMAS M'GEE. I am patrole of Kensington. I heard the rattle sprung, and went to the assistance of the watchman. I went up to the railing, looked down the area, and am sure the two prisoners at the bar were the men that were standing in the area. The account the watchman has given is correct.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am the watch-house keeper. I went the next day, and tried the centre-bit to the window it fitted exactly, and one more turn would have taken the bit out. I have kept these things ever since.

(MR. ADOLPHUS objected, that though there was a breaking in this case, there was not a sufficient entering to constitute a felony. The objection was left for the decision of the Twelve Judges.)

BAILEY'S Defence. I was coming along York-place, saw two men come out of the gate, and said to Spencer,"Here are two men coming out, it does not look well." We then went down into the area, found the centre-bit and phosphorus-box, and before we could well bring them out the watchman came.

BAILEY - GUILTY. Aged 49.

SPENCER - GUILTY. Aged 19.

(As the hand was put in to turn aside the latch, this point was reserved for the opinion of the Judges also.)

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-25

191. GEORGE SCOTT and ISRAEL CHAPMAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Palmer , on the King's highway, on the 13th of December , at the parish of St. Botolph Without, Aldgate, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one bag, value 1d., and 14s. 1 1/2d. in monies numbered , his property.

JAMES PALMER . I am master of a vessel . On Friday night, the 12th of December, I was at the Seven Stars, public-house, in Seven Star-court, Lower East Smithfield , between eleven and twelve o'clock - I did not think it was so late; when I came away the watchman was crying one. There were several persons drinking there. When I went out, three persons followed me-the prisoner, Scott, was one of them. As soon as I got a few yards from the house, he took hold of me by the side, and took my money out of my pocket, which I tried to prevent; he laid hold of me behind, and put his arm round me-Chapman was also about me. He felt me, to try if I had a watch, or any thing of that kind, and then struck me a blow between my eyes, which knocked me down. I immediately called out,"Watch! I am robbed!" The patrol came up: I thought they had got my hat also, but that was on the ground. When I came to the door, I found Scott in the custody of the patrol. We all went back again into the house, Chapman was sitting there. I am sure both the prisoners were the persons who robbed me - They had been forcing their conversation on me before in the house. They took from me half a sovereign, a 3s. piece, one shilling, a sixpence, and three halfpence; I was perfectly sober, and had drank only two pints of porter and some tea.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I was not in any bad company that night. I do not know two girls of the town of the names of Fortica and Richards-there were women of the town in the room; one of them came to me, and asked me for sixpence to buy a quartern of gin; I asked her why she supposed I should give it her? - I at last gave her sixpence, they then brought the quartern of gin to me, and wanted me to drink, but I would not. The blow that was given me was after I lost my purse.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I always swore that Chapman was one; he was taken from the public-house. Scott was taken to the watch-house first.

JOSEPH TARSON . I am a watchman. I was in Seven Star-court on the night of the robbery, crying the hour of one, and heard the captain cry out that he was robbed, at the same time, the prisoner, Scott, and another man, ran against me. I called out to the patrol, "I believe the thieves are gone up Seven Star-court." I had seen Scott about the neighbourhood, and am sure he is one of the men who ran by me. I had heard something like a blow, but could not make out what it was until I heard the captain cry out he was robbed. I saw the captain on the ground, and pursued the thieves - I saw him again in about ten minutes; Scott made a little round, and came back again into Seven Star-court.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I went to the watch-house with him when he was taken-Chapman did not go with him the first time, but we came back for him. The captain was sober.

JAMES SIMMONDS . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 13th of December Tarson told me of the robbery; I

went through Seven Star-court and stopped Scott - He was running, and another man passed by me just as I stopped Scott - A stout man with a dark dress on; I cannot say I should know the man. We went to the Seven Stars, public-house. I took him there, and found the captain outside the door; he was making for the door, I believe. The prosecutor swore to Scott directly as the man who robbed him. The captain's nose was bleeding, he had received a blow between the eyes. He pointed to Chapman, who was in the house, as the other man - He was sitting down. He did that before Scott was taken to the watch-house - I did not take Chapman at that time. The landlord said he would be answerable for the appearance of Chapman for 50l. When Scott was in the watch-house, he seemed grieved because Chapman was not brought with him; we then went back and fetched Chapman. A man of the name of Burt gave in a canvas purse, containing the money in question. The captain did not appear to be in liquor, he was confused from the blow, A woman came, who used to cohabit with Scott; I have seen her with him.

JOHN BURT . I was in company with Simmonds that night, when he laid hold of Scott. I found the purse in Seven Star-court, with the money in it. The captain said he believed Chapman was another one; that was before we took Scott to the watch-house. The captain's nose was cut.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Chapman was sitting down smoking his pipe - We went away, and left him there. There was a shortish man run by us when we were taking Scott - He run back to the public-house by the back-way-there is a back-way. I did not see any women running at the time Scott was laid hold of.

Prisoner SCOTT. Q. Was I not running towards the public-house when you stopped me - A. He was running towards the Seven Stars public-house; but there are many turnings, and he had been all round.

SCOTT'S Defence. I was running up the court facing the house, and was stopped by the patrol, but know nothing of the robbery. It is not likely that if I had done the robbery. I should be going towards where it was done.

CHAPMAN'S Defence. I was taking a bason of soup for my supper, when the night-constable came in, and the prosecutor swore to me; and how is it likely that I could be in the court, when the house shuts up at eleven o'clock?

JOHN ELLIS . I was constable of the night. Scott was brought in first, by the patrol and the watchman, and the prosecutor came in with them. The patrol said that there was another at the public-house, but that the publican was answerable for him - I told him that could not be, as it was a highway robbery. Accordingly, I went down, and brought him up. When Chapman was produced, the prosecutor said he could not take upon himself to swear to him, but, to the best of his belief, he was one of them.

SCOTT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

CHAPMAN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18180114-26

192. JOSEPH HOWARD and GEORGE CASLAKE were indicted for stealing, one barrel, value 1s., and 800 herrings, value 30s. , the goods of John Nattress .

MR. ARABIN stated, that the prisoner, Howard, had been swindled out of the herrings; and, finding them at the prosecutor's house, he took them under an erroneous idea, that he had a right so to do. The Court ruled that it could not be felony, though he had no right to take them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-27

193. JAMES BENNET was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , at the parish of St. Catherine Cree Church, in the dwelling-house of John Key , one pocketbook, value 2s.; three guineas, two sovereigns, one half-guinea, two half-sovereigus, one 7s. piece, 5l. 13s. in monies numbered, and eleven 1l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS TIMBERLAND FARR . I am shopman to John Key, who is a chemist , and lives in the parish of St. Catherine Cree Church . The shop is open on Sundays. On Sunday, November the 9th, there was a pocket-book in the till, which contained three guineas, two sovereigns, a half-sovereign, a half-guinea, a 7s. piece, 5l. 13s. in silver, eleven 1l. bank notes, and a banker's draft for 19l. 14s. I lost it out of the till - I saw it safe at half-past six o'clock in the evening, and missed it between nine and ten. I produce the pocket-book which contained the money-Mr. Hickman gave it to me. The next day Duproy was taken into custody.

CHARLES DUPROY . I have been examined here before. I lived next door to the prisoner - I knew him before the 9th of November; I have known Seymour ever since Bowfair. On Sunday, the 9th of November, I met the prisoner Bennet, about six o'clock in the evening, in Brick-lane-Seymour was with him, they both met me; Bennet asked me to go and take a walk with him up Whitechapel - I asked where to? and said, I was going to chapel - He said, "never mind," I said, I would go with him. I did not then know what I was going to do; they took me up by Aldgate, and kept walking about from the five lamps towards the watch-house - I did not know what I was going to do. Bennet said, "I will go in, and buy a halfpenny worth of horehound." We were then opposite Mr. Key's shop; he went in, and brought out some horehound; Seymour told Bennet that there were some notes, as he had watched them on Saturday night, and saw them put them in the till, and told him to go in-Bennet said,"Is there? I will go in;" he pulled off Munroe's hat directly, put it on, and went in, and brought out a pocketbook, and gave it to Seymour, who was at the door. I and Munroe were walking backwards and forwards-Munroe had joined us in Whitechapel-Bennet walked on the other side of the way. Seymour told me and Munroe to come on and follow him; he took us to his house in George-street, which is near Wentworth-street. When we got there, we found Bennet there; he and Seymour divided the money out of the pocket-book; there was some bank notes, guineas, and silver, there was a great deal of silver; they gave me some notes. After they had parted the money, Seymour and Munroe threw the pocketbook away by the sugar-baker's, near Seymour's house. Before I left Seymour's house, he took my share away from me; I slept at Seymour's house that night, and went out with him next morning about seven o'clock. - He took me to a hatter's, and bought a hat for each of us,

which came to 17s.; he had a 3s. piece in change for a 1l. note. I returned home to Seymour's, and went out again with him to a clothes shop, near Black Lion-yard, and to other places, and laid out part of the money. - (Looks at a pocket-book.)-This is the one, I know it by the reading on it-it is the pocket-book that was thrown away opposite George-street, in Wentworth-street - Bennet, Seymour, and Munroe threw it away.

THOMAS MOREHOUSE . I am a batter, and live in Whitechapel-road. On Monday, the 10th of November, Duproy came to my shop, with Seymour (who was convicted here last sessions); Seymour bought a hat for him for 8s.; I then shewed one to Seymour, which came to 10s.; he offered me 17s. for the two, I took it, and gave him 3s. out of a 1l. note.

GEORGE JACOB HICKMANN . I am a sugar-baker, and live in George-street. I found the pocket-book which has been produced on Sunday night, between nine and ten o'clock, close to my sugar-house, in George-street, and gave it to Mr. Farr-it had some papers in it, but no money.

THOMAS TIMBERLAND FARR re-examined. It is the pocket-book which contained the notes and silver-there was more than 40l. in it. I was present when the prisoner was examined at the Mansion-house; the Lord Mayor asked him what he had to say - He was neither threatened or promised - He denied taking it, and said Duproy took it out - He said that he was one of the party, and received part of the stolen property, but denied taking it. This was after Duproy had charged him with being one of the party.

JOHN WAUGH . I was present at the prisoner's examination-Mr. Farr has spoken correctly.

WILLIAM STAHIM . I was present when the prisoner gave this account. I took him into custody.

JAMES HARDEN. I was present, and heard the prisoner give this account.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with Duproy, Seymour, and Munroe, when Duproy took the money. He went over to the counter, and took the pocket-book out of the till, and brought it out. He would not give it to any body; he took it to Seymour's, and then threw it away by the sugar-baker's - We all had a part.

MR. FARR. It is Mr. John Key's dwelling-house; he has no partner in the house.

(The record of the conviction of William Seymour was put in and read.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-28

194. RICHARD HAWKE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , three ends of cloth, value 36l., the goods of Mark Ramsca , in the dwelling-house of Mary Ryan .

MARK RAMSCA . I am a warehouseman , and have a warehouse in Pancras-lane -the rest of the house belongs to Mary Ryan . The prisoner was my servant ; he generally fetched the key of the warehouse from my apartment. On Monday morning, December the 22d, he not coming as usual raised my suspicion; I went to his grandmother's, with whom he lived - I could not find him; I returned to my warehouse, and missed four ends of pelisse cloth. The next day his grandmother gave me a letter from him, stating that it was owing to his getting into bad company that he had done what he had. I went to Rumford on the 24th of December, and found him there - I asked him about 13l. which he said he had received from a Mrs. Burt - He said he had appropriated it to his own use. I asked him if he had taken any thing else? he said he had taken four ends of pelisse cloth, and pledged them. I asked him for the duplicates - He said he had destroyed them. - He said he pledged two at a house at the corner of Queen-street and Watling-street, and the other two in London-wall. I asked him if he had any money? he said he had 1l. and a few shillings in his trunk - I found 6l. in it, which he gave me. I told him he must go to town with me - He went to his grandmother's with me - I gave him in charge. I went to the pawnbrokers, and found two pieces at Messrs. Watson and Co.'s, in Watling-street, and the two other pieces at Purse's, in London-wall. They were my property. He had lived sixteen months with me.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you would not prosecute me if I made a full confession - A. I said I would not prosecute for the 13l. - the four ends are worth 36l.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am servant to Mr. Purse, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in London-wall. On the 6th of November the prisoner pledged an end of pelisse cloth with me for 6l. On the 20th he pledged another.

THOMAS SAPWELL . The prisoner was brought to my house; he said he took the four pieces of cloth, and that his master promised to forgive him if he told the truth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor promised to forgive me if I confessed it-my master used to send me to the pawnbrokers.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of Stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-29

195. JOHN DICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Gunn , from his person .

JOHN GUNN. I am a warehouseman . On the 15th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was walking in St. Paul's Church-yard -the prisoner came behind me - I felt him draw my handkerchief out of my pocket; I immediately turned round, and saw him with it - He ran off, I pursued, calling out "Stop thief!" he run between the coaches and the railing of St. Paul's; turning round he was stopped - He got away, and was taken again - I saw him throw the handkerchief down, and picked it up. I never lost sight of him - I am certain he is the man. Atter he was taken to the watch-house, seven or eight more handkerchiefs were found on him.

THOMAS LAING . I am a trunk-maker, and live in St. Paul's Church-yard. I heard the alarm, run out, and stopped the prisoner, and gave him to the patrol. I saw seven or eight handkerchiefs found on him, some in his hat, and some in his pocket.

GEORGE READ . I am a patrol. I was on duty, heard

the cry, and run across the street, and found the prosecutor with the prisoner in custody. I found four silk and two cotton handkerchiefs on him, four in his hat, and two in his pocket. I also found eight duplicates on him, all of them for handkerchiefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the six handkerchiefs-it was a wet night - A man run by me, and threw the handkerchief at me - I being wet, it fastened on my coat.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-30

196. GEORGE SPICER and JOSEPH REEVES were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 13 lbs. of indigo, value 5l. , the property of William Walker .

BENJAMIN BELES . I am a merchant's clerk. On the 2d of January, about twelve o'clock, I was in Philpot-lane, and saw the prisoner, Spicer, in Mr. Walker's show-room, tying up the indigo; I went in, and told Mr. WalkerReeves was in the passage; Spicer brought several parcels out, and put them on the slab in the passage; Reeves took them-we pursued, and stopped them in Philpot-lane.

WILLIAM STEED . I am clerk to Mr. William Walker , who is a merchant in Philpot-lane. Beles informed me; I saw Reeves take a parcel of indigo, and run out with it; the other prisoner came out of the passage-I pursued, and took Reeves-the other stood by till the constable came, and brought them both back. I took the indigo from Reeves.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SPICER's Defence. I was going up the yard, with samples of apples, and Beles came out and secured me.

SPICER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

REEVES - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-31

197. JOHN RAY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , twenty yards of cloth, value 20s. , the goods of Henry Hitchman .

HENRY HITCHMAN . I am a linen-draper , and live in Cheapside . I lost the cloth.

THOMAS MIDWOOD . I am a warehouseman. I was going along Cheapside, about half-past five o'clock on the 9th of December, and saw the prisoner rush from the pavement with such great violence, that he ran against a cart, and knocked himself down. I went towards him to help him up; before I got to him he was up, and looking for his hat, which had fallen off. I told him it was under the horses' feet - He got under their bellies; I saw a bundle in his hand, part of it dragged on the ground. I told him he was a thief, and run round the horses to take him; he run off, and left his hat behind, which I picked up, and pursued him, calling "Stop thief!" When I got to Milk-street, he threw the bundle down - I picked it up, it was a piece of print. He was taken in Milk-street.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. On the 9th of December I heard the alarm, and run towards Milk-street. Mr. Midwood had the prisoner in custody, with the goods.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-32

198. WILLIAM BRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Clarke .

JOSEPH ANSLEY . I am an apprentice to Thomas Clarke, who is a hosier , and lives in Barbican . On the 3d of January, about six o'clock, I was behind the counter, and saw the line at the door jerk, where the stockings hung; I run to the door, and missed a pair, and saw the prisoner run across the road - I pursued and took him; he threw the stockings away, I picked them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-33

199. JOHN HEARN was indicted for feloniously having in his possession a forged Bank of England note, he well knowing it to be forged .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-34

200. LOUISA KEMBLE and CATHERINE BROWN were indicted for a like offence .

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-35

201. ANN PILKINTON and JOHN RILEY were indicted for a like offence .

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-36

202. ANN LODGE and MARY GILLIS were indicted for a like offence .

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-37

203. WILLIAM BENHAM was indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-38

204. WILLIAM NICHOLS , WILLIAM BELCHER , and THOMAS LAWRENCE , were indicted for a like offence .

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-39

205. THEODORE O'CALLAGHAN , THOMAS JAMES PHELAN ,and CHARLES NEWBOLD were indicted for the wilful murder of Edward Bailey .

MR. WILLIAM ADAMS . I am a currier, and live at Little Chalk Farm, England's-lane, near Hampstead, Middlesex . On Monday morning last, the 12th of January, a little after nine o'clock, I was in bed unwell, and heard the report of fire-arms so close together, that I apprehended some gentlemen were fighting a duel. I opened my window, and saw four gentlemen in the field opposite my house; two stood at stationary distances, and two together on the left of them; they were about twelve or thirteen yards apart. I dressed myself as fast as possible; they were fifty yards or more from my house; it was not a clear morning. Just as I got over the field-gate I heard the report of two other pistols, and saw one of the gentlemen make a kind of a turn, which induced me to suppose he had been hit; the other gentlemen immediately run to him, he took hold of two of their arms, and all four advanced towards me. My intention was to stop them if I had been in time. When I met them, the deceased had got his waistcoat and pantaloons unbuttoned; I have since learned his name is Edward Bailey . I observed to them that it was an unfortunate affair; one of them said "Yes, it is; it was not our quarrel originally, we are all friends;" they all assented to what he said. They said they were to be seconds the preceding morning in another quarrel, which occasioned this; they anxiously enquired for a house where they could take the deceased - I offered mine, they took him there; they also anxiously enquired if a surgeon could be immediately obtained for the gentleman; I directly sent to Hampstead for Mr. Rodd. Mr. Bailey was taken into my parlour, and placed on a sofa. In about half an hour Mr. Rodd came; the deceased was still alive; Mr. Rodd extracted a ball from his left side. Before Mr. Rodd came, and soon after he was placed on the sofa, he called Mr. O'Callaghan to him; he appeared in great agony; he desired him to shake hands with him, stating that he freely forgave him, that every thing had been conducted most honourably, and asked him, if he had been in his place, would he have done so? Mr. O'Callaghan replied, "Yes, my dear fellow, I wish I had been wounded instead of you; I felt your first ball about my legs, I wish it had taken effect, for that would have put a stop to it - I wish I had been wounded." Mr.O'Callaghan exhibited his trowsers, which were both cut through at the legs, and one of his boots, apparently by a ball. After that Mr. O'Callaghan went to Hampstead, to procure a coach; he brought one, and afterwards went to Chalk Farm, with Mr. Newbold, to get Mr. Bailey a lodging. After Mr. Rodd had examined and found Mr. Bailey in a dangerous state, he advised him, if he had any thing to communicate, to see his friends; he named Mr. Phelan; we left him with him-about ten minutes after which, Mr. Phelan went to twon, to execute some commissions for him; after which I asked Mr. Phelan, and the other prisoners, if they meant to meet the thing? Mr. Bailey being under apprehension, and having declared in their presence, that he could not live, Mr. Rodd had also declared it in their presence-the prisoners were all fully aware of the dangerous situation of the deceased; I asked them if they meant to meet it? they all replied,"Most certainly," and wrote me their names and addresses themselves. I sent for an officer, two of them surrendered, and so did Mr. Phelan when he returned from town; they had said they meant to meet it before he went to town. About two hours after the first shaking hands between the deceased and Mr. O'Callaghan, he called Mr. O'C. to him again, desiring him to take his hand and rub it in a particular position, as he found ease from it; he did so for a considerable time, and then the other prisoners did the same; all of them shewed every possible attention to him, and appeared exceedingly affected; Mr. Newbold cried bitterly; the other two shed tears. Mr. Bailey lived three or four hours, and then died.

COURT. Q. Was not something else said by the deceased in the course of the morning - A. Yes; he said, "God bless you all, and I thank you for your attention." I did not see the hands that fired the two first shots; the second time that I heard the report, as I was getting over the gate, I saw smoke about two or three hundred yards up in the air-it came from the spot.

Q. Did you observe any person actually fire any pistol - A. Before I left my room, I saw a pistol fired over the hedge, quite away from every body - I was not near enough to see who fired it.

Q. After you saw the pistol fired over the hedge, did you see any thing else - A. When I saw the four persons I observed nothing particular till I got into the field myself.

Q. At what period was it that you saw two persons at stationary distances, and two together on the left flank - A. Just as I got over the gate, not before; I then saw two retire, and two go to particular distances; this was before I heard the report of the two last pistols. I afterwards found two pistols lying on my table, with a powder-flask and bullet-mould.

Cross-examined by Mr. NOWLAND. Q. Did not they say none of them were to blame - A. They did, and the deceased said so several times. Mr. Bailey mentioned the persons who were to blame; he said the quarrol originated with those persons whom he named.

MR. GEORGE RODD . I am a surgeon, and live at Hampstead. I was called upon to go to Mr. Adams's on the 12th of January; I got there soon after ten o'clock in the morning, and found Mr. Bailey on the sofa, with his right side bloody; he said he considered himself near death, and I told him so myself; shortly after I extracted a ball from his left side. After his death I opened him, and found the ball had penetrated the intestimes in three different places; in my judgment, the appearances were sufficient, and did undoubtedly cause his death. After I extracted the ball, I asked him if every thing had been fair between them? he said, "decidedly so." I then told him if he had any thing to communicate to any private friend, he had better do it; he selected Mr. Phelan - I left the room. Shortly after Mr. O'Callaghan was present, and cought hold of the deceased's hand, and held it up; the deceased requested him to hold it still higher, as it afforded him considerable ease. From the nature of the wound it would give him case-it relaxed the surface of the muscles. He said, "God bless you, I thank you all for your attention;" Mr. O'Callaghan then said, "I hope, my dear fellow, we shall be walking together again in three

weeks;" the deceased said,"No, I shall be in Heaven before then." I received all the assistance possible from the three prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Was their attention uniformly kind - A.Perfectly so; the greatest anxiety was shewn by them all to render every assistance.

GEORGE NEVILL. I belong to the tax-office, at Somerset-house. I was present at Mr. Adams's, and saw the deceased on the sofa.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. Q. While you were in the room, was every possible attention shewn by the prisoners towards the deceased-A. There is no doubt of it.

O'CALLAGHAN'S Defence, (written.) My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I never apprehended that I should appear in a Court of Justice to answer for a crime; I never had a disposition to commit a crime. I only express my confidence in your integrity and justice. You may believe me, that no man, however deeply connected with the valiant man now no more, can more lament the unfortunate occurrence than myself.

The other prisoners made no defence.

Ten most respectable witnesses gave the prisoners most excellent characters for humanity and gentleness of mind.

O'CALLAGHAN - GUILTY. Aged 26.

PHELAN - GUILTY. Aged 31.

NEWBOLD - GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of Manslaughter only . Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-40

206. WILLIAM WHITE and JOHN READ were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , at Harrowon-the-hill, one ewe sheep, price 20s. , the goods of Robert Snow , Esq. , and John Dean Paul , Esq.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating that they feloniously killed the said sheep, with intent to steal the carcase.

SAMUEL BRUSH. I am bailiff to Robert Snow and John Dean Paul, Esqrs., who are in partnership in a farm at Greenhill, Harrow . On the 21st of December I missed an ewe sheep between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; I had seen it on the 20th at noon; I went to the prisoner, White's, house in the evening of the 21st, near Harrow-weald Common, with Howell, the constable, and found the whole of a sheep, except two breasts and one leg, hanging up in a room at the top of the stairs; it was cut up into joints - I found the head in a cupboard below. White was not at home-in about half an hour he came to the door with a beatle on his back; Howell and Clark came in and secured him, and told him we had found the meat at the house; he said we might find the sheep-skin on Harrow-weald Common, among some furze-he took us there, and shewed it us; I have got it here, and know it to be my master's, by the mark on the left hip, which I put on it myself.

BENJAMIN CLARK . I took the prisoner, White, into custody, and went with him to the place where the skin was found. I took Read about half an hour after, and told him White had said that he accompanied him in killing the sheep from Messrs. Snow and Paul; he made no reply, but went quietly with us. Next morning we took him before the magistrate.

WILLIAM HOWELL . I assisted in taking White, and went with Clarke to take Read. I told him I had taken White for stealing Messrs. Snow and Paul's sheep at Greenhill, and that White had said he was with him, he made no answer - I had seen them together that evening at Greenhill, at a public-house; they left there between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; they went towards Messrs. Snow and Paul's farm, which is not their way home. I was present when Read was examined before the magistrate; what he said was taken down, and he put their marks to it-(looks at a paper)-this is it - I saw them put their marks to it.

SAMUEL BRUSH re-examined. I saw the prisoner, Read, after he was taken-there were marks of blood about the field, as if the sheep had been killed there, and the footmarks of two men. They persuaded White to confess.

WILLIAM HOWELL re-examined. I was in the room when Read was brought before the magistrate - He asked him if he knew any thing of White, and if he was in his company on Saturday night? he said he was, that he was in liquor, and that White persuaded him to go and kill the sheep.

(The confession of Read was then put in and read as follows: "On Saturday night last I went with William White , and saw him kill one sheep, the property of Messrs. Snow and Paul, and assisted him in carrying it home, and concealing the skin, and afterwards received part of it."

(Signed) JOHN READ , X his mark.

Taken before me, A.R. Chauvel, December 22d, 1817.

READ's Defence. I was on the other side of the road when he did it.

WHITE - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 37.

READ - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-41

207. JOHN WILLIAMS and JOHN HENRY PERKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , fifty yards of ribbon, value 30s., the goods of James Cowen , privately in his shop .

MARY ANN COWEN. I am the wife of James Cowen, we live in Spencer-row, Goswell-street - road , I do not know the parish. The prisoners came into my shop, and asked for some yellow and red ribbons to make bows for their horses - I shewed them a box of ribbons-Williams put his hand across the box, and asked the price of a piece - I told him it was 7d. a yard, and the others were 2d.; he put his hand across the box again, and took another piece; I told him that the seven-penny ribbon was not the sort he wanted. I did not like their appearance, and put the box on the stool behind me. They asked for patterns - I cut them some to get rid of them. Williams said he supposed I could take a halfpenny a yard off if they had a whold piece, which his master would have - I told him I could not. The instant they were gone I missed two pieces of ribbon, which cost 29s. - I am sure they were there when they came in. On Saturday they came again; Williams said they wanted six yards of two-penny ribbon, which they had taken the patterns of the Wednesday before; I told my husband that the two fellows were come again. When Williams saw my husband coming

out he said, "Come, we can go to another shop, they don't seem inclined to serve us." A friend, who was in the shop, followed and brought them back; we shut the door, and sent for an officer - We told them they had stolen the ribbons on the Wednesday; Perkins said, "Well, we will pay for them, rather than have a piece of work-leave 10s. for them." Williams immediately pulled out some silver and four gold rings, and offered to leave them to pay for the ribbons. When the shop was shut up at night, we found a piece of ribbon behind the shutter, which was not ours.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I am certain they are the men; my servant was in the parlour when they came in the shop the first time - You can see out of the parlour into the shop.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

PERKINS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-42

208. MARY GILDERSLEEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one tea-chest, value 1l.; three spoons, value 7s.; two pair of sugar-tongs, value 7s.; two gowns, value 7s.; one pelisse, value 10s.; one spencer, value 5s.; six pair of stockings, value 6s.; two petticoats, value 4s.; one night-gown, value 1s.; seven caps, value 7s.; two handkerchiefs, value 5s.; one box, value 1s.; two broaches, value 6s.; two pins value 2s.; one pair of ear-rings, value 3s.; and two books, value 3s., the goods of William Bunting , in the dwelling-house of John Wiltshire .

SOPHIA BUNTING . I am the wife of William Bunting, who lives in John Wiltshire's house, in Peter's-lane , we have the back-room on the second floor. On the 4th of December, my husband being in the country, my landlady asked me to let the prisoner sleep with me a few nights till she could give her a place. She slept with me on the 4th and 5th of December; on the morning of the 6th she went out for two hours, and returned about six o'clock at night. I was ill - She persuaded me to lay a-bed. She went out about six; she told me if I would lay down she would do my ironing for me. I slept-when I awoke I missed her and the property stated in the indictment.

ELIZA HARDY . I lodge in the house. On the 7th of January I saw the prisoner in Drury-lane, with a large work-bag of things and a basket. I followed her down White Hart-yard, took hold of her arm, and said, "Caroline!" which was the name she went by at our house. She said, her name was not Caroline. I said she was the person who robbed Mrs. Bunting; she said I was mistaken, and wished me to go home with her. I took her into two shops, and begged of them to get an officer - They would not. I took her to Bow-street myself, and gave her in charge. There was a cap and a pair of stockings in her bag, which Mrs. Bunting claimed.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office. I found a great quantity of duplicates on her which relate to the property.

GEORGE BRAGG. I am shopman to Mr. Neat, who is a pawnbroker. On the 12th of December the prisoner pledged a tea-chest with me for 7s. 6d.; the duplicate found on her is mine.

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am shopman to Mr. Morritt, pawnbroker. On the 15th of December two aprons and a handkerchief were pledged with me. The duplicate found on the prisoner is mine.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am shopman to Messrs. Morritt and Lee. On the 26th of December the prisoner pledged a broach with me for 2s. 6d.

JOHN GAMMON. I am shopman to Mr. Mercer, pawnbroker. Two books were pledged with me by a woman for 4s.6d. The duplicate found on the prisoner is mine.

JOHN MAY . I am shopman to Mr. T. Ward, pawnbroker. I have a broach pledged with me in the name of Mary Ryan for 1s.

JAMES BENNETT . I am shopman to Mr. Brooks, pawnbroker. I have a pelisse pledged with me for 7s. in the name of Ryan.

THOMAS REEVE . I am shopman to Mr. Benton, pawnbroker. The spoons were pledged with me on the 6th of December by a woman for 4s. 6d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-43

209. MARY GILDERSLEEVES was again indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , at St. James's, Clerkenwell, eight gowns. value 14s.; twenty napkins, value 15s.; two shirts, value 2s.; one shift, value 1s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2s.; two petticoats, value 4s.; one gown, value 2s.; one mustard-pot, value 1s.; one sheet, value 10s.; one pair of boots, value 7s.; one jug, value 9d.; ten caps, value 6s.; one frill, value 9d.; one tea-chest, value 2s.; one canister, value 4d.; one spoon, value 1d.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 6d.; one shawl, value 2s.; one cloak, value 3s.; four aprons, value 3s.; five shirts, value 3s.; one pair of ear-rings, value 2s.; and one piece of net-lace, value 1s., the goods of Elizabeth Lange , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Reynolds , widow.

ELIZABETH LANGE. I am a widow . On the 2d of December, I lodged in Little Sutton-street, Clerkenwell , in Elizabeth Reynolds 's house. On the 2d of December the prisoner came to lodge with me - She slept with me that night and the next. On the 4th of December I went out about twelve o'clock, and left her ironing my things-some were my own, and others I had taken in to wash; she said she would iron them for me - I left no person there but her. I returned at nine o'clock, and found my place covered with rags; my drawers, boxes, and every place were open, every thing off my bed, and all that I was possessed of taken away. I never saw her afterwards till she was at Bow-street. I found nothing of mine there except a silk handkerchief, which she had round her neck. I found eight gowns, twenty napkins, three handkerchiefs, two petticoats, a mustard-pot, a jug, ten caps, a tea-chest, a pair of sugar-tongs, a shawl, a cloak, a pair of ear-rings and a piece of lace, at the different pawnbrokers, who gave them up-the articles were worth 3l. 1ls. When I saw her at the

office, I told her it was a very hard case, as she knew my husband was dead. I claimed the handkerchief on her neck-she said it was mine, and gave it to me. I asked her where the other things were? she gave me the duplicates of some of them-she did not deny it.

JOHN SMITH. I am an officer. I was present at Bow-street when the prosecutrix claimed the handkerchief. I found the duplicates on her, and obtained the things from the pawnbrokers.

HENRY PEACHEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, which was pledged with me on the 4th of December. One of the duplicates found on the prisoner is mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-44

210. JAMES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one gelding, price 28l. , the property of George Hanger , Esq., Lord Colerain of Ireland .

BENJAMIN THOMAS . I am a wine-merchant, and live in the Haymarket. Lord Colerain requested that a horse might be put up at Tattersall's in my name; it was put there for sale on the 17th of November-the next day the prisoner called on me and asked the price of it. After some conversation, I agreed to take 28l. for it-the prisoner desired it might be sent to his stables, in Landsdown-mews, Guildford-street-he was to pay for it on delivery. I sent it by Lord Colerain's servant, and ordered him not to leave it without the money. About five o'clock in the evening the prisoner and servant came to me; the prisoner produced a cheque to settle for the horse. I told him it was not dated-he said the bankers were not open that day, and it would not be paid that day. He went away with the servant, saying he would get the money.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not at your house at one o'clock - A. I am not sure. He only came once.

JOHN ASHALD . I am servant to Lord Colerain. On the 17th of November, as I was bringing the horse from Tattersall's, the prisoner stopped me, and said he should like to purchase it - I referred him to Mr. Thomas. After that, Mr. Thomas told me to take it to Mr. Wilson's, in Landsdown-mews, and not to deliver it without the money. I took it on the Wednesday, which was the day the Princess Charlotte was buried, about eleven o'clock. The prisoner said he had not enough money, but had sent his servant to the Bank of England with a cheque - I was to stay till he returned - He returned in about a quarter of an hour after he went out; I saw him go out as I took the horse in. He told the prisoner that the Bank was shut up, and he could not get it. The prisoner said he had not got money enough, but would go to Mr. Thomas with me, which he did, and told him he had sent to the Bank of England with a cheque, and could not get it paid. Mr. Thomas looked at it, and said it was no wonder, as it was not dated. He said, he saw his error, why it was not paid, and would go and rectify it. I went as far as Coventry-street with him; when we got to the corner of Rupert-street, he said, "this is my way, for I have got to be at a place by eleven o'clock," and went away. I set off to Landsdown-mews as fast as possible, found the horse was gone, and have never seen it since. When the officer took the prisoner, he said his name was not Wilson. We went to the Mevy six or seven days before we could find him - We took him on a Sunday. I had not agreed with the prisoner to bring the horse at all - I did not hear him send his servant to the Bank.

BENJAMIN THOMAS . He gave me a printed card, with" John Wilson , 4, Landsdown-mews," on it. The cheque was signed "Bolt." The prisoner said he had sold Bolt a horse the night before-it was not on the Bank of England.

JOHN ASHALD. I told him the Bank was not shut up. He said he had seen one of the porters, who told him so. His servant's name is Holt or Bolt.

JOHN DAVIS. I am a constable. On the 30th of November I took the prisoner in Landsdown-mews-Ashald pointed him out. I said, "Mr. Wilson" - He said, "my name is not Wilson. As soon as he saw Ashald he said nothing. I cannot find Bolt.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a horse-dealer - I went to buy the horse in a fair way. I was disappointed in the payment of a cheque. The next day I saw myself advertised, which alarmed me, and I absconded.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-45

211. MARY WELCH and ELIZA DOUBLE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , from the person of Joseph Johnson , four 1l. bank notes , his property.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I am a linen-draper , and live in Holborn. On the 5th of January, about half-past one o'clock at night, I was in Newgate-street; the prisoner, Double, accosted me, and asked me to go home with her - She was alone. I was crossing the street - She kept walking by me, until I got across to Pannier-alley . She asked me to go up there, I refused-at that instant she put her hand into my breeches pocket, and took out the notes and some silver - I had four 1l. notes in my pocket; I immediately put my hand to my pocket and missed them - I saw no person near her. I seized her, and called watch! at the end of St. Martin's le Grand - He did not come, he must have heard me. At that moment three girls came up, Welch was one of them - I secured her; they all pulled at me as hard as they could, and tried to rescue Double. I was very near letting her go, when another watchman came up. I have never found my notes. I am sure I went no where with her.

JOHN HEBBERD. I am a watchman of Newgate-street. I heard the prosecutor call, came up, and took DoubleWelch was close by her - He told me to take them both. He said Double had robbed him, and the other assisted her-nothing was found on them. He said in their presence that they had conveyed the notes away to others, Welch replied that he had dirtied her shawl. Double said she had nothing about her.

DOUBLE'S Defence. He left two women, and caught hold of me. One of them said, "Do you want to serve her as you have us?" - He called "Watch!"

WELCH- NOT GUILTY .

DOUBLE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-46

212. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 2lbs of wool, value 7s., the goods Andrew Laughnan .

DAVID SCOTT. I am clerk to Andrew Laughnan, who is a merchant . On the 15th of December I was at Wool Quay seeing a cargo of wool landed. Stone, the officer, brought 2lbs of the wool down to me.

JOSEPH STONE . I am officer. On the 15th of December I saw a cart, loaded with wool, stop at the bottom of Tower-street - Deacon drove it-the prisoner went to the tail-board, took some wool out of a bag, and put it in his breeches; I stopped him and took it from him. Several others were at the tail of the cart.

JOHN DEACON. I drove the cart, which had ten bags of wool in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Month , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-47

213. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , one pint pot, value 8d. , the goods of Thomas Shepherd .

THOMAS SHEPHERD . I keep the King's Head, in East Cheap . On the 12th of December, about one o'clock, the prisoner brought his dinner to my house, and had a pint of beer, which he paid for, and went out; a person gave me information of the prisoner, I followed, and caught him in Gracechurch-street; I told him he had taken a pint pot; he then gave it to me out of his jacket pocket, and pleaded distress. He ran away, but I brought him back again. The constable searched him, and found another pot on him.

THOMAS NADAULD. I saw the pot taken from the prisoner-he ran away, I pursued and brought him back.

ABRAHAM STARLING . I took the prisoner in charge, and found another pot upon him, which belonged to some other person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Fourteen Days .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-48

214. ROBERT KERSWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , two saws, value 14s. , the goods of John Putman .

JOHN PUTMAN. I am a carpenter . On the 2d of January, I was working at Albion-place, Kingsland-road , and left the house for about ten minutes, the prisoner was at the back of the building; when I returned I missed my saws. I found them at Perkins's.

RICHARD PERKINS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street, in the City. On the 2d of January the prisoner pledged the saws with me for 4s. - the prosecutor claimed them; on the 6th the prisoner brought two more and I detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-49

215. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one sheet, value 8s., the goods of William Brant , in a lodging room .

ELIZA BRANT . I am the wife of William Brant , we keep the White Horse, at Cripplegate . On the 20th of December the prisoner took a bed at our house, for which he paid 1s. - there was one sheet on the bed; between eight and nine o'clock the next morning, he was going out, we stopped him, he opened his waistcoat, and took the sheet out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-50

216. JOSEPH CLARE was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Gregory Pridden .

THOMAS CUTHBERT. I am a coachman. On the 23d of December , the deceased ( Gregory Pridden ), and the prisoner, were at the Three Wheatsheaves, public-house, at Islington , about half-past two in the afternoon - I was in the tap-room eating my dinner; the prisoner had been sitting near the fire, but left his seat and went out; the deceased came in before he returned, and took his seat; in a few minutes the prisoner came back, and said the deceased had got his seat - They had several words; the prisoner said he would pull him out of the seat. The deceased jumped up in a passion, and by some means, the prisoner being in liquor, he fell upon him. They pushed each other about, the prisoner fell, and the deceased fell upon him; they then got up, and the deceased went away; he returned again in a short time, the prisoner was then in his former seat, and they had more words, the prisoner got up, they scuffled together, and the deceased fell against the table - I cannot say whether it was accidental, or whether the prisoner pushed him; the prisoner had not got hold of him - They were both in liquor. There were no blows struck on either side; the deceased's left side went against the table, he did not complain, but went out. I went out also, and saw no more.

WILLIAM CARTER . I was at the public-house; the prisoner was sitting by the fire, the deceased came in, and sat opposite him-the prisoner left his place, and the deceased took it. The prisoner came in again, when they had some words, and scuffled about-there were no blows struck - They both fell, and the prisoner was under the deceased; I got between them to prevent their quarreling. They sat down again and had more words, the deceased fell against the table by his left side, he was not pushed; he said he thought he had hurt his left side; he then went out, and the prisoner sat down. In about five minutes the deceased came to the window, and muttered something.

ELIZA PRIDDEN . I am the wife of the deceased. I met him at a quarter before three o'clock, returning from the public-house - He was very well before; he complained of being ill - He was leaning against the stile - He said, he had got his death-blow at the Wheatsheaf; he died on the 26th. He was always positive, after this blow, that he should die. He said he got into the man's seat by the fire, that the man came in and said it was his seat; he did not get up immediately; the man collared him, and threw him against the table. He complained of being hurt in his left

side. He went to bed directly-he was not the worse for liquor. Next morning he went to the hospital, and died there.

WILLIAM WILTON . I am a surgeon, and live in Bartholomew-close. On the 24th I saw the deceased at the hospital - He complained of a pain in his left side, his rib was fractured - He died on the 26th. I did not think him in a dangerous state at first; he appeared to have a disease in his viscera. I examined his body after death. The complaint would not have caused his death so soon without the fracture of the rib. The liver and spleen were very much diseased, and the lungs much disordered. The fracture of the rib certainly hastened his death.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-51

217. WILLIAM KELLY was indicted, for that he, on the 30th of October , at St. James's, Clerkenwell , did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note (setting it forth), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, For feloniously disposing of, and putting away a like forged instrument, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD COUNT, For feloniously offering to James Creed Eddels a like forged bank note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

FOURTH, FIFTH, AND SIXTH COUNTS, the same as the three former, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a bank note.

SIX OTHER COUNTS, The same as the six former, only stating his intent to be to defraud John Creed Eddels .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-52

218. WILLIAM KELLY was again indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-53

219. The said WILLIAM KELLY and THOMAS SPICER were indicted for that they, on the 26th of November , at the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note, No. 61,370 (setting it forth), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same as the former, only stating their intent to be to defraud Joseph Braidey .

WILLIAM KELLY pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

JOSEPH BRAIDEY. I am a pork-butcher , and live at 73, St. Martin's-lane, which is opposite Long-acre. On the 26th of November last, the prisoner, Kelly, came to my shop about five o'clock in the evening, and asked me to give him change for a 5l. note. I asked him who it was for? he said, for Mr. Crease, his master - I asked him where Mr. Crease lived? he said, in Long-acre, and that he was a plasterer. He had a white jacket, apron, and a paper cap on. I asked him what number? he said 26. Knowing Mr. Crease was a customer, I gave him five 1l. notes, and put Mr. Crease's name on the 5l. note (looking at one) this is it-(looking at five 1l. notes)-two of these have been in my possession; No. 27,334 and 21,372 - They have my hand-writing on them. I took one of them on the Monday or Tuesday, and the other on the Tuesday before the 26th of December, which was Wednesday.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. My name is on the front of the two 1l. notes, they have no date written on them by me. One of them is dated March 1816, the other in October. I always mark notes when I take them. The 5l. note was in my possession from the time Kelly gave it to me till I gave it to the officer. I never saw Spicer except at the office. My shop is at the corner of Great Newport-street - it was lit up; it is surrounded by windows.

MR. REYNOLDS. Q. How soon after you received the 5l. note, was your attention called to the two 1l. notes - A. I saw them at Bow-street about half an hour after. I did not leave the shop till the officer came in.

COURT. Q. From how many 1l, notes did you select those you gave to Kelly-A. I might have ten or twelve.

SAMUEL M'DOWEL. I live at No. 26, Long-acre, and have lived there six years; no person of the name of Crease lived there in November last.

HENRY CREASE . I am a painter and plasterer, and live in Great Queen-street, I have lived there twenty or thirty years-there is no person of my name and business living in Long-acre. I had a brother there about six years ago. Kelly was never in my employ, nor did I give him a 5l. note to get changed.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 26th of November I saw the prisoners in company together in St. Martin's-lane, Smith was with me. I watched and followed them about thirty yards in company together on the other side of the way. Kelly had a flannel jacket, a paper cap, and an apron on; I followed them until they came to Long-acre, opposite Mr. Braidey's shop. Kellythen left Spicer, crossed over, and went into Braidey's shop. I went away, disguised myself, and saw Spicer on the opposite side, looking over to the shop; it was about five o'clock in the afternoon. I crossed over to the shop, saw Kelly in it, and saw some notes pass from Mr. Braidey to Kelly; he came out, crossed St. Martin's-lane, and joined Spicer, who stood at the corner. I crossed over after them, they went up Long-acre on the right-hand side-Kelly took the paper cap off his head, and put it in his pocket - He was then without any thing on his head-some words passed between them. Kelly said to Spicer, as soon as they joined, "Come along, it is all right," or words to that effect - He had not then been out of the shop more than half a minute. When they joined, their hands were close together, and something passed between them.

I distinctly saw their hands together. I was not near enough to see whether Kelly had any thing in his hand; I continued to follow them. They crossed Long-acre, and went down Mercer-street and Castle-street. When they came into King-street, Seven Dials, I told Smith we had better secure them. I laid hold of Kelly by both his hands, opened a shop-door, pushed him in, and searched him.

Q. From the time you saw Kelly come out of the shop until that time, had he joined company with anybody but Spicer - A. No person at all; he had no opportunity of giving any thing to any person. I found 18s. on him.

Cross-examined. I did not see any other person there; it was dark when I took Kelly. I did not look to see if he had thrown any notes away.

JOHN ROGUIN SMITH . I am a Bow-street officer, and was with Limbrick on the 26th of November. The first that I saw was Spicer at the corner of St. Martin's-lane, after that I saw Kelly going along King-street - he was before Spicer; I followed Limbrick. Limbrick came to me at the corner of St. Martin's-lane; I saw Spicer about three minutes after. In about four minutes I saw them both in King-street, Kelly was four or five yards before Spicer. Limbrick told me to go and apprehend Spicer, which I did, nearly at the top of King-street. In bringing him along the street, by the light of a shop, I saw him endeavouring to put his hand into his left-hand breeches pocket-on observing it, I pushed him into a shop, searched him, and found in his left-hand breeches pocket five 1l. bank notes, and 5s. in silver - I took him to the office. I marked the five 1l. notes before I parted with them (looking at them) these are them.

Cross-examined. King-street is two or three minutes' walk from the pork-shop. They went the nearest wayone was before the other.

MR. CHARLES CHRISTMAS. I am inspector of bank notes to the Bank of England (looking at the 5l. note)-it is not a genuine note, it is neither the Bank-paper nor plate; the signature is the name of a signing clerk, but not his hand-writing. It is forged in every respect.

(The note was then put in and read, No. 61,370, dated August 4, 1817.)

SPICER'S Defence. The notes I had were my own.

SPICER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

On the Second and Fourth Counts.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18180114-54

220. JAMES SECKERSON was indicted for that he, on the 4th of December , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note, for the payment of 5l. (setting it forth,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously disposing of and putting away a certain forged note, with the like intent, he well knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for the payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud John Scrase .

JOHN SCRASE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Middlesex-place, Hackney-road. On the 4th of December, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a pair of pumps, which came to 10s.6d.; he tendered me a 5l. note, I asked him his name? - he gave me the name of "George Meson." I asked him where he lived? he made a motion with his hand, and said, "through the turnpike, (pointing towards Cambridge-heath). I asked him if it was Newmarket-terrace? he said, "Yes." I indorsed the note"G. Mason, Newmarket-terrace, 4, 12, 17," (looking at it)-this it. I gave him four 1l. notes, and the rest in silver - He went away. About three weeks after I went to Newmarket-terrace to inquire, but could find no such person.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. It was about seven o'clock in the evening. I had never seen the man before. He had a great-coat, striped waistcoat, leather breeches, and top-boots-the leather breeches appeared dirty. I paid the note to Mr. Neave, at Aldgate.

COURT. Q. How long was he in your shop-A. Not more than ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour (looking at him) - I am sure he is the person.

WILLIAM COE. I am a tax-gatherer of Bethnal-green. There is no person of the name of Mason on Cambridgeheath - They may be lodgers.

JOHN EDEN. I am servant to Mr. Pocock, shoemaker, who lives at Shoreditch. I remember the prisoner coming to my master's shop about a month before; he gave me a note - He was with a friend, who bought a pair of shoes, and left a pair of pumps. On the 14th of October, which was a month after, I was standing at the door, he came in, and asked if his friend had called for his pumps? I said he had got them for him. He asked to look at a pair of Wellington boots in the window - He tried them, and bought them, they came to 15s. He pulled out about 12s., and said he had not got enough, and I must give him change for a 5l. note. He gave me the note, I asked him his name? he said, "Perkins, Nelson-terrace, City-road"-(looks at a note) this is it - I indorsed it. I went to Goddard's to get it changed.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I had seen him about a month before - He had a snuff-coloured coat on. About six weeks after I heard the note was forged. I saw him on the Monday at Cold-bath-fields; a great many people went with me to see him - He was brought down by himself.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long had you an opportunity of observing him - A.About ten minutes the first time-the second time, I delivered him the pumps, knowing he was the man who had been with his friend to buy the shoes - He was in the shop about a quarter of an hour.

CHARLES PAUL THORPE. I am a shoemaker, and live in New Inn-yard, Shoreditch. I know the prisoner. On the 13th of November, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, he came to my shop, and bought a pair of shoes, for himself, and a pair of boots for his wife, as he said - They came to 15s. - he was there about a quarter of an hour - He gave me a 5l. note; I asked him his name - He said, "Mason, Nelson's-terrace, City-road," which I wrote on the note-(looking at one)-that is the note he gave me; it was fastened together, which I observed to him; he said, he had half from the country one week, and the

other the next. I went out, got change, and gave it to him, he went away. About a fortnight or three weeks after I saw him coming out of Gregory's shop, in Shoreditch (the note had then been returned to me). I did not see his face. I followed him into Brown's-lane - He went all the back way; I followed him about half a mile. I got a glimpse of his face, and knew him again - He went into a public-house. I found out where he lived, and went home.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I am positive it was the 13th of November; he was dressed in a grey great coat, corded breeches, and top-boots; he had a black enamelled ring on his finger - He had not got pantaloons on. I was fetched there to see him by Gregory's shop-man, who followed him, with me, into the Laurel Tree public-house. I saw Locke, the beadle, and told him my business; he said if he was the man, he could find him any day.

Q. Did he not offer to take him, if you was sure he was the man-A. I believe he did. He was taken a week or a fortnight after. I never said I could not swear to him.

Q. You never said to Miller, the officer, that he wrote the name and address himself-A. No.

SOPHIA THORPE . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 13th of November I saw the prisoner in my husband's shop; he bought a pair of shoes, and a pair of boots for his wife, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; we had a lamp and candles in the shop-(Looking at the notes.)-the hand-writing on the back is my husband's-the prisoner told him what to write. I saw the prisoner again in the parlour of the Fir Tree public-house, Whitechapel, soon after. I went into the room-there was about twenty gentlemen there. I had not been told that the prisoner was there - I picked him out immediately; I have no doubt of his being the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. A person fetched me there. I went into the parlour alone - I went into the middle of the room and sat down - I knew him immediately.

Q. Were not the company desired to stand up - A. I knew him immediately I went into the room. After I sat down the company were desired to stand up - I do not know why; I do not know why I sat down; I did not know why I was sent there; I was desired to walk in; when I came out Miller asked me if I knew any body there? I said the man in the grey great-coat was the man who gave my husband the note.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a linen-draper, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. On the 7th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop; he bought a piece of Irish and two squares of muslin, which came to 4l.5s.; he tendered me a 5l. note; I asked him to write his name and address on it - He wrote "Collins, 17, Little Moorfields;" I put my initials to it-(looks at it)-this is it - I took it to the Bank next morning.

Q. Did you give him the change-A. No; I told him I must enquire if he had given a right address; he said I could send my lad with him - I told him I should go myself; he walked gently to the door, while I was taking the change, and going to the door I found he was gone, and had left the goods - I could not find him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. About Christmas I heard there was a man in custody answering the description then given; he had a snuff-brown coat on, corded breeches, and top boots. I am sure he is the man.

JOSEPH DORRELL. I keep an umbrella shop in Old-street-road. I know the prisoner perfectly well - I have no doubt of him; he came to my shop on the 8th, 9th, or 10th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and bought a silk umbrella for 27s., and tendered me a 5l. note, giving me the name of " James Wilson , No. 19, Nelson-terrace, City-road;" he wrote it on the note himself-(looking at it)-this is it. I saw him again last Saturday in Newgate, with five or six more, and picked him out without the least hesitation; I asked him if his name was Seckerson? he said it was, and that he knew what I came about.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. He was then under a charge of forgery; I am certain he is the man; he had on top boots, dirty leather breeches, and a light coloured frock coat.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS. I am an inspector of bank notes to the Bank of England. The note uttered to Scrase is a forgery-it is neither the bank plate or paper, nor is it the signature of the person it purports to be-(looking at the four other notes) - They are all forged in every respect.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner - A. Yes, at the Hope public-house, in Pollard's-row, on Saturday night, the 18th of December; there was about twenty persons in the room - He was one of them. A gentleman of the name of Jordan said he had heard that Seckerson had uttered a 5l. forged note to a Mr. Thorpe, of New Inn-yard, Shoreditch; that Thorpe had afterwards watched him to several places, and that it was supposed he went into different houses to avoid him; that they then watched him to a pawnbroker's, opposite Brown's-lane; the prisoner admitted that he had been to the pawnbroker's, but denied going to any other place. Jordan said it was necessary the prisoner should clear his character; it was hinted that I being in the room was not acting right, by not making enquiry. I asked the prisoner to go to Thorpe with me; he refused - I asked him to appoint some other time, which he also refused. I then said he must-several of the company came round, and abused me, and said I should not take him; I got assistance, but did not take him away that night.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I live within eleven doors of the house, and go there frequently. I do not remember seeing the prisoner there before. Messrs. Wood, Homewood, Wilson, and Jordan were there; neither Mr. Homewood or Mr. Jordan abused me; it was on the 20th. On the Monday the prisoner attended at the office-Homewood engaged to produce him there.

Q. Did you tell him you would take him into custody, or that he had better put himself under your protection - A. I said he had better put himself under my protection, and I would see him righted.

(The note was then put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I am a silk-weaver in Mr. George Ransom 's employ. On the 26th or 27th of November I was at Gregory's, where I always deal; I then went to Richards's, the pawnbroker, in Brick-lane;

when I came out I observed a crowd - I asked what was the matter, and understood it was about a note; not being concerned in it, I took no notice; I saw Mr. Windsor at the door of the Laurel Tree public-house-we went in and drank together. The same day I went with Mr. Wood to Mr. Homewood's, the Hope public-house, in Pollard's-row; Mr. Welch, who was there, told me I had been followed by a man who had taken a bad note, and thought it was me, and if he could have sworn to me, I should have been apprehended, as the officers were with him; the company laughed at the mistake; I thought no more about it-it was mentioned one night when Mr. Christmas was there. On Saturday night, the 20th of December, three weeksafter, the conversation was brought up again; Mr. Christmas, who was one of the company, told me to put myself under his protection - He at length told me I must go with him - I felt indignant at it, and refused; my employer and Mr. Homewood, who was there, offered 1,000l. for my appearance. I remained in the room for an hour and a quarter-Miller and Freeman, the officers, came - They said information was given them of a person like me, but they were satisfied I was not the man; they said if I would come to the Fir Tree, public-house, on Monday at twelve o'clock, they would collect the persons who had followed me; to this I agreed, and was there punctual to the time. I there saw Thorpe, who said I gave him a 5l. note, and wrote the name on it myself, and that his wife would know the man in a moment; I was desired to write my name to compare with the note - I begged that Thorpe's wife might be sent for - She came, and staid in the room at least ten minutes; the company were told to stand up with their hats off; at length, from my having a coloured coat on, she went out, and asked if I was not the man. I do not mean to say that the witnesses swore wantonly against me, but, from my likeness to somebody else, they are mistaken. After Thorpe had seen the note, he said he wrote the name himself.

(The Defence then went on to state, at a considerable length, circumstances which appear in the following evidence.)

CHARLES PAUL THORPE re-examined. I never said he wrote the address himself.

Q. Did Miller request him to write his name to see if it was like it - A. Not to my knowledge.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS. The prisoner's master offered 500l. for his appearance, and Mr. Homewood gave his word for it.

RICHARD WOOD. I am a silk-weaver, and worked with the prisoner in December last, and for six months before that; he lived in George-street, Bethnal-green, I lived there with him for four months. When I went to work at eight o'clock in the morning, I generally found him at work; I used to leave off work at eight o'clock at night, and, from the quantity of work that the prisoner did, he must have worked till ten. When he went out he was either dressed in a blue or green, and not a striped waistcoat, chocolate coloured trowsers, a blue coat, and a grey great coat. I never saw him in a different dress, except in a different waistcoat; he had got a chest, which contained his clothes - He generally wore shoes, I have seen him wear Wellington boots. On the 6th of December he moved to Wellington-place - He worked for Mr. George Ransom. On the 4th of December I was finishing my work in George-street, in order that we might move on the Saturday; we wanted to knock the looms down, and take them away-they were taken down on the 5th; I had an opportunity of seeing him on the 4th; I was there in his house at work from half-past eight o'clock in the morning till a quarter to nine; I boarded with him - He worked with me the whole day. When I left him at a quarter to nine o'clock he was at work - We were both at home the whole day; I work in the same shop with him - He could not be absent without my knowledge - He was in his working dress.

Q. Do you remember the 12th of November-A. I do. On the Wednesday morning the house was broken open, and his work, which was a damask scarf, was taken away-it was between the 11th and 12th. On the 13th, in consequence of the robbery, the prisoner and myself went to Mr. George Ransom 's, in Church-street, Bethnal-green, to get his cane to make fresh work-this was about four o'clock, we went out together - I left the prisoner at the corner of Pollard's-row.

COURT. Q. How far is Middlesex-place, Hackney-road, from where you work - A. About a mile and a half from George-street.

Q. Was he on the 4th of December so long absent as to go a mile and a half and return without your knowledge - A. It is impossible. I saw him about half an hour after I left him at the Hope, public-house, in Pollard's-row, which Homewood keeps; he had his cane-it is about a quarter of a mile from his master's-Mr. Bartlet and Mr. Homewood were with him - He had neither boots or breeches on, he had pantaloons on. I staid at Homewood's with him till about five o'clock - He went away to go home - He came to the Hope again about half-past six, with his master; he did not bring his cane with him-his dress was not changed; we staid there together till about nine o'clock. When he left I remained there with Ransom - He continued to work till he surrendered himself to the magistrate. Homewood's is about a mile from New Innyard.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. I worked in the same room with him - I believe he did not go out of the room - I am sure he was not absent - He worked late to finish his scarf on the 4th of December.

Q. Will you swear he was not absent an hour on the Friday evening - A. Yes - He was taking down the looms.

WILLIAM CLARK. I have worked for the prisoner ever since Whit Monday. I used to go to him at six o'clock in the morning, he began to work then. Wood and him worked together in the same room-the prisoner left off work at nine o'clock.

Q. Do you remember the day he moved from George-street to Wellington-place - A.He did move - He took the looms down on the Sunday morning; I think it was Tuesday morning that he moved.

Q. Do you remember whether he was at work in particular on the day before the looms were taken down-A. He had a fresh cane, he was ill with the govt-he used to wear a brown jacket, black waistcoat, trowsers, and buckled shoes to work in-when he went out he used to wear brown trowsers, a mixture coloured great coat, and

a blue under coat. I had an opportunity of seeing his clothes, I used to put them away - He had got a pair of boots without tops - He mostly were shoes.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. He was very bad before he moved, and could not walk.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You went to live with him on Whit-Monday; where did he live then - A. In Castle-street; he moved from there to George-street.

Q.Was what you have been telling us when he moved to George-street, or when he moved from George-street to Wellington-place-A. When he moved to George-street; I remember his moving from George-street to Wellington-place not long before Christmas; at that time the looms were taken down on the Friday, and he moved on Saturday. Wood worked for him in George-street - he used to come at eight o'clock in the morning, and dine with my master; my master was hard at work to get done, to take the looms down - We worked till ten o'clock on the Thursday night, and finished on Friday at one - I was in the house all day on Friday-my master was not out of the house all day. What I said of his having the gout was before he moved from Castle-street.

ROBERT RIGG. I am a carrier. I moved the prisoner's looms from George-street to Wellington-place on Saturday, the 6th of December.

GEORGE RANSOM . I am a silk-manufacturer; the prisoner worked for me. On the 13th of November, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, he came to me - I know it was the 13th, because he was robbed on the 12th; I saw him with Wood at the corner of Pollard's-row - I stopped with him about a quarter of an hour - He then went to the warper's, in Quaker-street-Wood left him at the corner of Pollard's-row. I saw him at the Hope, public-house-the prisoner came there with his cane about half-past four o'clock, I left him, with Wood and Bartlett, about five. I returned to the Hope about seven o'clock, and found him there, and left him there after eight o'clock-he had brown pantaloons, a blue coat, grey great coat, and shoes on - He had not got leather breeches, or top-boots on, I never saw him dressed so; from the quantity of work that he did, he must have worked twelve hours a day.

Q. Do you remember seeing Thorpe at the Fir Tree, public-house-A. Yes; there was a quarrel about a note-to the best of my recollection, Thorpe said the man wrote the name on the note himself.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. He must have gone to the warper's himself, they would not have given the cane to any body else. I saw him again between four and five o'clock at the Hope, public-house. New Inn-yard is full a mile from the Hope. On the 8th of December he brought to me sixteen scarfs.

THOMAS HOMEWOOD. I am the landlord of the Hope, public-house. The prisoner has frequented my house two or three times a week, for an hour or two in the evening; I have known him seventeen years. There used to be a party of neighbours meet at my house in the evening - I remember in November last, the day after he was robbed, he came to my house with his cane, Messrs. Bartlett, Ransom, and Wood were with him. I found him there at five o'clock, when I came down stairs; he was in my house about an hour after that time - He returned about a quarter or half-past six o'clock-Mr. Ransom came again. I remember the 20th of December-it had been rumoured that he had been followed on suspicion of having passed forged notes; I told him of it for three weeks or a month before the 20th. Mr. Christmas used to come to my house every night for many years-the prisoner had opportunities of seeing him there, and knowing what he was. On the night the accusation was made there was some words between Mr. Christmas and the gentlemen - I offered 500l. for the prisoner's appearance - He has an excellent character - I never saw him dressed in leather breeches and top-boots in my life, or with a ring on his finger.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. I believe he returned about half-past six o'clock - He being robbed makes me remember it - I collected some money that evening to make up his loss.

GEORGE DIBBEN. I am shopman to Mr. Fremont, a stationer. I was called upon to attend at Lambeth-street office to prove who uttered a forged note to me. The prisoner was accused of it, he is very much like the man-but, upon looking attentively at him, my opinion is that he is not the man.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. I am quite sure he is not the man - I should know the man directly if I saw him.

EDWARD RANSOM. I am a tobacconist, and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. I knew the prisoner two years. About the latter end of November my wife called me down to give change for a 1l. note-the man was dressed very much like the prisoner. I did not change the note - He is about his height and age, and had a ring on his finger, and a mixture coat on.

ANN SAMS . I have known the prisoner four or five years. About five weeks ago I met a person in Shoreditch whom I took for him, and was going to speak to him, thinking it was the prisoner.

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. - The prisoner went to the office with me on the 22d of November at the charge of Thorpe. I went and searched his house, but found no bank notes there, good or bad. - There was a pair of old boots, not top-boots. I found no umbrella there, or leather breeches.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. This was on the Monday-the charge had been made against him on the Saturday.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-55

221. JAMES SECKERSON was again indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession a forged 5l, bank note, knowing it to be forged .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-56

222. CUTHBERT WINGHAM WHITFIELD was indicted for embezzling a 100l. bank note , the property of Sir William Curtis , Bart. , Abrabam Wildney Robarts , and William Curtis .

MR. ABRAHAM WILDNEY ROBARTS. I am in partnership with Sir William Curtis and William Curtis . The prisoner was our clerk , and has been so for the last fifteen years.

On the 9th of December, in consequence of information which I received, I desired to see him, and made inquiry of him about a particular circumstance, after which I asked him if his depredations were confined to that particular point? - he hesitated sometime. I neither threatened nor promised him with respect to this charge. I asked him if it was possible, notwithstanding our system of book-keeping, that we could be defrauded? He then told me that we had been defrauded to the extent of 600l. He alluded particularly to a Treasury bill of 500l.

MR. THOMAS LONDON. I am superior clerk to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis. If we have any Treasury or private bills payable at the Bank, they are made up regularly every day, and a list, which we call the Bank Charge, and the bills, are delivered to a porter to carry to the Bank for payment. They generally give a ticket. If he receives payment, he is to bring the bank notes which he receives. If any objection is made to any bill on the ground of irregularity, or supposed irregularity, it is returned to the house. I look at the prisoner's book of the 10th of November; it was his duty to make out the Bank charge of that day-it is in his own hand-writing. There is a 100l. specified to be for a Treasury bill; he discharges himself of that 100l., by debiting the Newcastle Bank 100l., as if the 100l. to be received on that account had not been paid, but returned. The entry of the debit is,"100l. Newcastle"-(Looks at a Treasury bill for 100l.)-it appears to have been indorsed to our house by the Newcastle Bank, and to be due that day-it appears to have been received on that day by our porter.

Q. Does it appear that the entry of the 100l. applies to that bill-A. I have no doubt of it. When a bill is not paid at the Bank, it must be entered in that form to discharge himself of it, and to balance that account. In the column in which the 100l. is entered, he has not made any entry of the 100l. being paid by the Bank upon that Treasury bill, if he received it, there was 100l. deficient-the entry represents it as unpaid. It would be the prisoner's duty, if it was not paid, to make a debit ticket. I have one in my hand made out by him respecting this bill (reads)-"Debit Newcastle Bank on Treasury, 100l., 10th November."This represents that the Newcastle Bank were to be debited 100l. on account of this bill not being paid, which was done,

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. He charges himself with having sent out the bill-his debit ticket cannot apply to any other bill. The entry is in his hand-writing.

JAMES GILBERT. I am in the Public Drawing-Office in the Bank. All Treasury bills are paid there. On the 10th of November, a Treasury bill, (100l.) was presented to me by Davis, from the house of Messrs. Robarts and Co. for payment. I examined it, marked it, and drew a ticket on the pay-clerks for the porter to receive the money. He receipted the bill for Robarts and Curtis.

JOHN WILSON . I attend on the Bank-note Pay-office in the Bank. On the 10th of November Green gave me a ticket which Davis brought. He stood by me in the office. I paid it with a 100l. note, No. 10,789, 24th October, 1817.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am in the same office with the last witness. The ticket was delivered to me - I entered it, gave it to Wilson, and posted it to Messrs. Curtis and Co.

JOHN DAVIS. I am porter to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis. On the 10th of November I took the Treasury bill for 100l. to the Bank, received the money, carried it back, and delivered it to the prisoner.

THOMAS LONDON re-examined. I look at the prisoner's book. When he received the notes from Davis, it was his duty to enter the notes and dates to the credit of the Bank charge. The 100l. bank note, No. 10,789, 26th of October, 1817, is not entered to the Bank charge - He ought to have entered it to the credit of the Newcastle Bank. On the same day, I find the bank note, of that number and date, is entered as received from Johnston of the Coal Exchange, for a bill of 168l. 7s. 6d.; there is still a deficiency of 100l. in his account.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. There must be a deficiency.

Q. If Johnston had to pay him 68l. and he entered it 168l,, the bankers would not be defrauded at all - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. It occurred in error.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-57

223. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously and without lawful excuse, having in his possession three forged and counterfeit bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 27th of November I was with Gleed, opposite Field-lane, Holborn, and saw the prisoner and another man come from the Thatched-house. We followed them down Fleet-market, Ludgate-hill, and up the Old Bailey, into the Star, public-house, with another man in a butcher's dress. Suspecting them, I immediately went in, took the prisoner into custody, and told him I took him on suspicion of passing forged notes. He said he knew nothing about it, nor should he know a forged note from a good one. I took him in a coach to a public-house next door to Worship-street office - We held his hands until he got into the back parlour. I told him I would search him, he said, no person should search him. I found 27s. in silver in his left-handbreeches pocket, and three 1l. bank notes in his right-handbreeches pocket. He said he should like to mark them, which I let him do, keeping hold of them while he did it-(looking at them)-these are the notes; they were quite new, not the least rumpled, and did not appear to have been in circulation. He said he had them from Blackfriars Bridge, and gave 30s. for them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did he not say he gave 30s. in silver, and the rest in larger coin - A. He might. I should have taken the notes myself, if I had not been told they were forged.

BARNARD GLEED . I was with Armstrong, and saw the prisoner, between six and seven o'clock, with another man. I followed him, with Armstrong, up Fleet-market - He stood talking at the corner of Fleet-market for about

ten minutes. We then followed him to the Old Bailey, where he met a butcher-the other man left him - They went into the Star public-house; we followed and took him to the office. He said he would not be searched. We found 27s. in his right-hand pocket, and three 1l. notes in the left - He marked them-(looking at them) - They are the same.

MR. THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . I was present at he first examination-what the prisoner said was not taken down. He said he gave 30s. for them - He immediately recollected himself, and said he gave 60s. for them to a stranger in a public-house.

MR. THOMAS LEES. I am an inspector of bank notes-(looking at them) - They are forged in every respect. They are all from one plate and paper, and the same hand-writing, though different names-they are the names of signing clerks (read).

Prisoner's Defence. The officers have not told the truth.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-58

His Majesty's Special Commission was then put in and read, authorizing the Court to proceed to the Trial of

224. SAMUEL HARVEY BROWN who was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Thomas Pearse , on the 13th of July , at Dumpling Island, in North America, without England .

HENRY GILLARD. I was at Dumpling Island, on the coast of Labradore, in North America, splitting fishBurnslow, Henley, and Pearse, the deceased, were there. The prisoner called Pearse a great eater. Pearse collared him, gave him a shove, and told him if he did not leave off calling him names, he would give him a hiding. We had knives to cure the fish with. Pearse left the prisoner, who still kept calling him a great eater. Pearse took up the stick (about the size of my finger), and gave the prisoner three or four blows across the shoulder, they did not appear to be very hard. The prisoner said, "If you do that again, I will run you through." Pearse again struck him across the shoulder with the same stick; the prisoner took the knife off the table, and stuck it into his left breast. Pearse said, "Cut away! cut away! I shall die - He has stabbed me!" He fell on his back. We carried him to the house - He died in twenty minutes. The knife was what we used in cutting fish; this is it-(producing it).

EDWARD HENLEY . I was in the service of Mr. Beard in July last, on the coast of Labradore. Thomas Pearse was killed.

Prisoner's Defence. (written). We had been wrangling together - He called me a great eater, knocked me down, and struck me. He came behind me, without my seeing him, and unfortunately received the knife in his body; he said I had killed him. I ran away and hid myself. I have been used cruelly there. I have been heavily ironed, and nearly starved.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-59

225. SUSAN TURNER and JAMES DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , three sheets value 40s.; and one table-cloth, value 30s., the goods of Benjamin Smith ; one piece of velvet, value 6s.; four pair of gloves, value 10s.; one towel, value 1s.; two chairs, value 10s.; three saucepans, value 6s.; two tin covers, value 2s.; one candlestick, value 2s., and one bag, value 1s., the goods of John Carter , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, against the said Susan Turner , for stealing the said goods in the said dwelling-house.

THIRD COUNT, against the said James Davis , for feloniously receiving the said goods, he well knowing them to have been stolen.

JOHN CARTER, ESQ. I live in Duke-street, Westminster . In August last I left town, leaving the prisoner, Turner, who was my cook , in care of my house. I returned about the middle of October, in consequence of what I heard, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, and others of considerable value.

JAMES APPLEBY . I am a cheesemenger, and live in Broadway, Westminster. On the 16th of October, I met the prisoner, Turner, about a quarter after eight o'clock in the morning, by St. Clement's church, going towards Temple-bar, with a large bundle on her arm, with a towel over it. I said, "Cook, are you lost?" she said she was in a hurry, and passed me. The bundle appeared to contain linen; the towel did not quite cover it. I watched her till a waggon interrupted my view - I then went home. In about an hour and a half she came to my shop with a large bundle of greens, twice as large as the one she had before. I said, "Cook, are you returned?" she said, "I am. I said, "How you are splashed! where have you been?" she said, "to the King's Bench. I said that was not the road - She said, "No, to the King's Bench Chambers, which are her master's. She said, "The house has been robbed, and I have been to tell Mr. Pullen, the clerk, and he is coming down." I asked her where she was during the robbery? she said she slept at the top of the house. I asked her how she discovered it? she said, when she came down in the morning, she found a candle and a tobacco-pipe on the hall table. I asked her what they had taken? she said they had broken her master's drawers open, and had taken out the jewels and trinkets-that it was the painter's fault, as he desired her to leave the drawing-room windows open. She went away, saying she was going to the painter's. About eight o'clock in the evening, I went to Mr. Carter's house with Mr. Smith - She was then in the kitchen. I said, "Cook, do you deny having seen me this morning?" - I had been told she did. She said, "I do not deny meeting you, I deny having a bundle." I said, "You had a large bundle, and (pointing to the greens which laid there), tied up in the same towel." She said, "Yes, I had those greens." I said she had them when she came to my shop, but I could swear that when I met her at St. Clement's she had not those greens. She said I might swear any thing, and she would swing for it. I went away.

GEORGE PULLEN. I am clerk to Mr. Carter. About half-past nine o'clock in the morning of the 6th of October the prisoner came to me at the Chambers, and said the house had been robbed - I said I would come down immediately - She had no bundle.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 16th of October, about one o'clock, I examined the house, there were no marks of violence whatever. I learned that Turner was acquainted with Davis - I went to him, and found him at Hungerford-market, and asked him where he slept last night? he said at his lodgings in Hungerford-market. I told him that something unpleasant had happened at Mr. Carter's - He said he had heard of it, and was sorry for it. I asked him how he heard of it? he said he had seen the cook that morning, and she told him. I asked him if he had any objection to my searching his lodgings? he said, none whatever, and told me where they were. He said he wished he had slept at Mr. Carter's that night, as he had slept there so long - He thought if he had been there the robbery would not have happened. I went to his lodgings, leaving him with Bly; they were in Hungerford-market. In a cupboard on the stair-case I found some saucepans, a candlestick, and a shovel, in a bag - I also found three chairs there. I asked him how he got them? he said he bought the kitchen things at a sale at Deptford, and the chairs at different brokers, one at a time, as he was going to be married to Turner in May. I found he had not slept at his lodgings that night. I found a bag at Mr. Carter's, corresponding with that in which the things were. Between his second and third examination, I was in conversation with him - He said the cook gave him the things towards going to housekeeping, that he wished he knew where the rest of the things were, and he would tell. I went with Bly to Mrs. Baxter's, in Shire-lane, and found a bundle of linen under the bed.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. When you went for him you met Parry, told him you wanted the prisoner, and he fetched him - A. I did. He told me where the things were, and said he bought the things because he did not want to have the cook brought into trouble.

JAMES BLY . I was with Gillmore. He has spoken correctly.

MARY BAXTER. I live in Shire-lane. The bundle was left there when I was out, thirteen weeks ago last Thursday. I came home at nine o'clock in the morning, and found it there. I know the prisoner, Turner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES COX. I lodged with Davis in Hugerford-market - He slept in the same bed with me. He left off sleeping with me, but did not give up the room - He did not sleep at home the night before the search was made - He told me that he slept in Duke-street, and kept company with Turner. He brought the chairs to the room about a fortnight before he was taken.

JAMES GILLMORE re-examined. The drawing-room paint was hardly dry. If any person had come in at the window there must have been marks-there were none.

JAMES APPLEBY re-examined. When I lost sight of the prisoner she was on the same side of the way as Shire-lane, within three doors of Ship-yard.

JAMES COX re-examined. About three weeks before Davis was taken, he brought the bag home at eight o'clock in the morning - He said it was some things which Turner had given him, and her mistress had given them to her.

TURNER'S Defence. We are innocent. When I came down I found the house robbed.

DAVIS'S Defence. I know nothing of the robbery. I slept in the house.

WILLIAM PARRY . Gillmore told me he wanted Davis - I told him two officers wanted him; he said he would go, as he had done nothing amiss. I offered to row him away, as I thought they wanted him about a bastard child. He went to them.

TURNER - GUILTY. Aged 29.

DAVIS - GUILTY. Aged 35.

On the Second Count,

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-60

226. THOMAS WATSON was indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession, three forged bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 28th of December , in consequence of information, I and Forster watched the prisoner - He is a hawker -his caravan was in the Commercial-road . About ten o'clock at night I saw him come from his caravan, cross the way, and turn down Gray-street to his stables - He appeared to have his hand in his breeches pocket, and his lanthorn in his right hand. He got to the stable, and unlocked it with his right hand; I caught hold of him, and told him I wanted him - He made great resistance. In the scuffle he threw something white from him, with his left hand, out of his breeches pocket-it hit the pail which was behind the door. Forster picked up a bag, which contained four 1l. notes-(looking at them)-these are the notes; they were folded up in a small compass. We found a bad shilling in the pail, and another out of it. We found a 25l., two 10l., two 2l., and six 1l. notes on him, all good, and ten guineas in gold, wrapped up with the good notes, in his coat pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. His left hand would be near the lock of the door - A. He threw them behind the door. I am positive that I saw him do it.

WILLIAM FORSTER . I am an officer. I was with Freeman, and saw the prisoner throw something away with his left hand, after Freeman had seized him. I found the canvas bag about two yards from him; one shilling in the pail and one out, both bad.

Cross-examined. I saw him throw them. I found 23s. 6d. in his left-hand breeches pocket.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS. I am an inspector of bank notes-(looks at them) - They are all forged in every respect, and all of one plate and paper-two of them are of the same number and date. They are the names of signing clerks, but not their hand-writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not throw it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-61

227. CHARLES MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , four curtains, value 3l.; three handkerchiefs, value 8s.; and two shifts, value 6s., the goods of John William Burt , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN WILLIAM BURT . I live in Craven-place, Bayswater . In December last I went out of town, and left the prisoner's father and mother in care of my house, and forbade the prisoner coming there to see them. On the 26th of December I returned, and missed the property; the prisoner's father gave me a letter, enclosing three duplicates, after which I had the prisoner apprehended.

SARAH GRAHAM. I am servant to Mr. Burt. I put the articles stated in the indictment in the drawer-my mistress locked it.

MRS. BURT. I locked the things in the drawer-when I returned I found it had been opened, apparently with a picklock - They are worth 34s.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I took the prisoner into custody on the 3d of January, at a smith's shop in the Edgware-road. I told him what I wanted him for; he said he committed the robbery himself, and that his father and mother were innocent-that he pledged the goods, and sent the note to Mr. Burt, with the duplicates.

EDWARD JENKINS . I am a pawnbroker. I have four bed-curtains, which were pledged with me for 1l.

GEORGE HUNT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt and a handkerchief, which were pledged with me by the prisoner.

(Letter read.)

"Sir, - I hope when you come to hear what I have been guilty of you will not reflect on my parents, who are innocent; none but myself is guilty. I beg of you to let your vengeance fall on me. I am in Merchant-street, Bristol. C.M."

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of Stealing to the value of 34s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-62

228. THOMAS CASEY was indicted for, the property of stealing, on the 2d of January , at Edmonton, two sheep, price 3l. William White .

GEORGE DELLER . I live with Mr. William White , who is a farmer at Edmonton . On Friday, the 2d of January, at four o'clock in the afternoon, the four sheep were safe; they were marked B on the right hip; at eight o'clock the next morning I missed two out of the field, which is about half a mile from my master's house. On Sunday morning they were shown to me by Wager; they were alone, I knew them to be the same. The prisoner lives about three quarters of a mile from my master's farm-the prisoner knows the farm - He has been in the poor-house. I know a man named John, he has absconded. When I left the sheep I pinned the gate-it was a new fence, it was not broken - They could not get out; I found the gate unpinned.

RICHARD FLOWER . I am hailiff to Mr. White. I missed the two sheep out of the field - I had seen them at two o'clock the day before. I saw them again on Monday, they were my master's.

WILLIAM WAGER . I am drover to Mr. White. I found the two sheep about a mile and a half from his house, in a field, in consequence of information I had received-they were marked B on the right hip, and branded. I saw them in Mr. Greenhill's field, which is about a quarter of a mile from Mr. White's field; there was a flock of sheep near them, which belonged to a man named Dove.

THOMAS ELSMORE . I live at Edmonton, and know the prisoner. On Friday afternoon he asked me to take a walk with him, which I did; as we returned Farmer John met us; the prisoner and him asked me if I would go and help them to steal two sheep; at first I said I would-as we were in a bye-lane, I was afraid to refuse. When I got into the high-road the prisoner told me not to let my heart fail me; I said, no, but I believed it would; he said, "I shall not bid you good night, you must meet me here about six o'clock." I went home, and did not go out again. Next morning I went to his house - He said,"You was not so good as your word." His father came home, and said White had lost two sheep; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it; he told me that he caught both the sheep himself, tied their legs together, and he and John carried them; and as he was going over the bridge with one, he fell into the water-that he got him out, and carried them through a turnip-field to Bow's farm, and left them there, with their legs tied; that John went to call up Davey to kill them, but he did not get up.

THOMAS AUSTIN. I am constable of Edmonton. On Saturday morning I was about half a mile from where the sheep were taken, and saw a butcher there with a cart - He was quarrelling-it was getting light - He went away without taking any thing. I was present when the prisoner was before the magistrate; he was cautioned before he signed any thing, that it would be given in evidence against him. I saw the magistrate and prisoner sign this paper.

(Reads) "Banton, John, and myself went together, on Friday last, to Bow's Farm; John went to see a man. We left Banton - I came across the field, and met John again. John and I agreed to go after the sheep. John and I went to Mr. White's mead, at Edmonton, and took two sheep; I carried them a little way, and John carried them the rest, and put them in a field."

THOMAS CASEY , X his mark.

Taken before me, E.R.Mores, Magistrate.

THOMAS ELSMORE re-examined. I used to be called Banton.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-63

229. LUCY MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , three table-cloths, value 16s.; one petticoat, value 3s.; eight shirts, value 2l. 9s.; four sheets, value 1l. 16s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 8s.; three handkerchiefs, value 3s.; two waistcoats, value 14s.; three pair of breeches, value 1l. 16s.; one coat, value 30s.; four pillow-cases, value 4s.; five spoons, value 15s.; and one pair of buckles, value 10s., the goods of John Williams , in the dwelling-house of George Baker .

JOHN WILLIAMS. I live in Perceval-street, Clerkenwell , at Mr. Baker's, public-house. On the 14th of October I missed the articles stated in the indictment. I had been ill, and the prisoner nursed me; I asked her if she had seen some spoons? she said, yes; I asked her where

they were? she made no answer; at last she said she had made free with them; but if I said nothing she would get them again. I asked her if she had pledged them? she said yes - I then asked her about the shirts; she began crying, and said she would go and drown herself; she went out, and returned in an hour. I insisted on having the duplicates; she took a thread-case out of her pocket - I took it from her, and found thirty-five duplicates in it; she said five guineas would get them all again. I told her she was an ungrateful woman; she said she was guilty, and that I might hang or transport her, whichever I liked. After that she gave me six more duplicates.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. She had been with me ever since the year 1816. She might have taken them at separate times.

ROBERT PETO. I am shopman to Mr. Chapman, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in St. John-street. Twenty-three of the duplicates found on the prisoner belong to our house. The largest sum advanced on one article is 6s.

HENRY PEACHEY. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged eighteen of the articles with me. The largest sum advanced on one article is 6s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY. Aged 65.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-64

230. JOHN PLUMMETT and JOHN PERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , one seal, value 30s., the goods of Richard Penfold Ganthony , privately in his shop .

RICHARD PENFOLD GANTHONY. I am a watch-maker , and live in Lombard-street . On the 10th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoners came into my shop to look at some seals; they staid a considerable time looking over the goods, and then went out. In about an hour or two afterwards I missed the seal, which was a very remarkable one, and told my man if he should see them again to secure them. Next morning Plummett came, and not seeing me, he was to call in about an hour; he came in about five hours- I told my man to go to the banker's, by which I meant to get an officer; the moment he went out Plummett left the shop, and ran away- he was secured. I am sure the prisoners are the men that came the first time. I never found the seal- nobody had been in the shop after them till I missed it. I saw Plummett handle it.

HENRY SAVERY . I am shopman to Mr. Ganthony-On the 10th of November the prisoners came to the shop to look at some gold seals- I reached the case, they said they were too dear. Plummett handled several of them, and the last in particular - We afterwards missed it. Next morning Plummett came again, I called Mr. Ganthony - He said he could not stop, but would return in a quarter of an hour. Between twelve and one o'clock he came, I went for an officer, when I returned he was gone.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER. On the 29th of November I was sent for to Mr. Bamfield's, in Cheapside, and the prisoners were given into my custody.

PLUMMETT'S Defence. They asked 38s. for the seal, I offered 30s., and went away-next morning I went again, and asked if they would take it, the gentleman said no, and I left.

MR. GANTHONY re-examined. Not a word of the kind passed- he asked to see my goods, and then ran away.

PERRY'S Defence. I went to the shop with Plummett.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-65

231. BENJAMIN GEEVE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , one dead hare, value 4s.; one dead pheasant, value 8s.; two dead partridges, value 5s.; one basket, value 1s.; and a warrant for the payment of and value 150l. , the property of William Walker .

(MR. ALLEY, on the part of the prosecution, stated that there were difficulties in this case which induced him not to offer any evidence.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-66

232. THOMAS MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , one table-spoon, value 8s. , the goods of Rebecca Denton .

HENRY WEBB. I am waiter at the Cock and Woolpack, Finch-lane, Cornhill . On the 8th of January, about half-past four o'clock, the prisoner came into the dining-room, and called for a bason of soup, which I carried to him, with a silver spoon; he eat the soup, paid for it, got up, and walked out of the room. I went to the table to see if it was gone, and found it exchanged. I went down stairs, and charged him with having exchanged it, he denied it- I told him he had left a metal one in the room of a silver one. I called Shafe, and told him, and insisted on his being searched. He immediately pulled off his hat, and threw the spoon on the stairs- I gave him in charge. Rebecca Denton keeps the house.

WILLIAM SHAFE. I am waiter at the Cock and Woolpack. Webb called me, and said the prisoner had changed the spoon, he denied it; he took off his hat, took the spoon out of it, and dropped it on the stairs, I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-67

233. THOMAS MORGAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one table spoon, value 10s. , the goods of John Harper .

JOHN HARPER . I am servant at the Hercules tavern, Threadneedle-street . On the 6th of January the prisoner came in, and called for a bason of soup; he paid for it; I gave him a silver spoon with it. When he was gone I found it exchanged for a metal one. I found the spoon at Mr. Harper's, at Temple-bar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-68

234. WILLIAM HOLT and THOMAS WILKS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one dial, value 4l. , the property of David Green , Campbell Majoribanks and Valentine Connelly ; and THOMAS REDFORD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he knowing it to have been stolen .

ELIZA LOVERING. I live at the Cannon, public-house, in the Minories . The dial hung in the tap-room. On the 17th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in, and called for a pint of beer, and asked for a pen and ink. Redford and Holt went out and came in again; they said something about some bread, I said I sold it, they asked for some. I went to the cupboard for it, and while I turned my back they went out; they had hardly drank any beer- they did not return. In about five minutes I missed the dial, which hung up in the box where they were. Between nine and ten o'clock Jackson came in, and told me to attend at the office. I am in care of the house for Green and Co. until it is let.

LOUISA BRINDLE . I am servant at the house. On the 17th of November, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoners came in, and had a pint of porter and the pen and ink; Wilks paid for it; I gave him a farthing in change; Redford was then gone out-shortly after Holt went out, leaving Wilks there; he had a great coat under his arm; soon after Holt came to the door, and said something about bread and cheese; my mistress said she sold it- Holt said they would have some; while she hurried to get it they both went away from the door, leaving their beer; they never returned. I missed the dial about ten o'clock; Jackson told us to go to Shadwell office, where we saw Redford.

JONAS VINCENT . I am a patrol. I was on duty on the 17th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, in Church-lane, St. George's. The prisoner, Redford, passed me with something under his arm, wrapped up; I asked what he had there? he made no answer, but walked on- I followed, and asked him again - He said it was a Dutch clock, which he brought from over the water, from West-square, Blackfriar's-road, and he was going to take it to his sister's, in Kingsland-road. I asked who it belonged to? he said to his mother, that he knew the maker very well, there were two brothers of them, and he went to school with them, and their names were Baggs. I took him into custody; there was a boy before him, without a coat, and a man behind him; the man followed us to the watch-house; I cannot say whether it was Wilks, I think Holt is the boy.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer of St. George's. On the 17th of November the prisoner, Redford, was brought to the watch-house with the dial- I questioned him about it; at last he said it was of no use to tell a falsehood about it- that he had been innocently led into it, and that it came from a house in the Minories. He then said the two lads that were with him gave it to him to carry; that they went into a public-house with him. He went out for a sheet of paper to write a letter for them, on his return he met them outside with the dial, and told him to come along, he must not go in any more- in conequence of which I apprehended Holt and Wilks the next morning; the dial was wrapped up in Holt's great-coat. When I took Holt I told him there was his coat; he said it was his coat, but he had lent to his brother to go into the country with. I found two spoons, a chisel, and a new lock and key on him. I also found a small iron chisel, a knife, and a quantity of wire on Wilks. I told him he had come out of his way. He said he had to call at Wapping.

WILLIAM SUMMERS. I am an headborough. I went with Jackson to New Michael-street, Bethnal-green. After waiting there till twelve o'clock, Holt came in; we secured him, and then Wilks came in.

ANN RICHARDSON . The prisoners, Holt and Wilks, lodged with me in New Michael-street. They said they were brothers, and attended the Theatres. The coat that the dial was in is Holt's. On the 17th of November he came home without a coat about eight o'clock- Wilks came in after him.

JOHN NORTON. I am clerk to Messrs. David Green, Campbell Majoribanks and Valentine Connolly, the proprietors of the house, which is in the city- the dial is their's.

HOLT'S Defence. I was at work at the time.

REDFORD'S Defence. I met a man, who asked me to carry it for him, took me into a public-house, and said he had two men in custody, and if I would say it was them I should be admitted an evidence against them.

FRANCIS JACKSON . It is false. He gave me information where to find the other two prisoners.

HOLT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

WILKS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

REDFORD - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-69

235. JOHN ROSSER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , two table spoons, value 30s.; one candlestick, value 5s.; one pair of snuffers, value 1s.; and one extinguisher, value 1s. , the goods of Jane Blair .

JAMES BLAIR . I am the son of Jane Blair , who lives in Devonshire-place , the prisoner was our butler . On the 15th of December Plank brought the articles stated in the indictment to me, which had been missed-the prisoner was still in our service. We had him apprehended.

JAMES ALDOUS. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street, Soho. On the 15th of December the prisoner came to pledge four table spoons; he asked 3l. for them, I told him it was too much, he said they were new. On examining them I saw a crest had been erased, I told him so. He asked to look at them, and tried to get them foreibly from me. I detained them, telling him that was not the act of an honest man. I sent for Plank, who secured him. He said he bought them of a pawnbroker, in Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square.

SAMUEL PLANK. I am an officer. I secured the prisoner. He refused to tell where he lived, he at last told me. I took him to Mrs. Blair's, and went to his lodgings

in South-street, Manchester-square, and found a candlestick and a pair of snuffers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress. I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-70

236. WILLIAM HENRY RAWLINSON , JOHN RAWLINSON , JUN., and JOHN RAWLINSON , SEN. were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , at St. Dunstan, Stepney , 600 yards of lace, value 100l., and 98 handkerchiefs, value 18l., the goods of Henry Pope , in a certain boat upon the navigable river of Thames ; MARY GRIFFITH was indicted for feloniously receiving nine handkerchiefs, value 30s., part of the aforesaid goods, well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen; and SARAH COX was indicted for feloniously receiving 30 yards of lace, value 5l., and seven handkerchiefs, value 1l. 4s., other part of the aforesaid goods, well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

SECOND COUNT, against the Principals, the same as the first, only stating the goods to be the property of Edward Sage . Against the said Mary Griffith , for feloniously receiving a like part of the last-mentioned goods; and against Sarah Cox , for feloniously receiving other like part of the last-mentioned goods.

JAMES HOBSON . I am warehouseman to Gillman, Lucas and Co., who live in Newgate-street. In consequence of directions from them, I packed seventy-five lengths of lace in a lace-box, tied a string round it, and gave it to Charles Cross .

CHARLES CROSS. I am servant to Messrs. Gillman and Co. I assisted in packing the box containing seventy-five lengths of lace, and a large quantity of silk handkerchiefs, with other things, in a hair trunk, from Mr. H.Pope, who is a Manchester warehouseman-it was locked, matted and corded, and the key, as is usual, fastened to the handle under the mat- the lace was worth 110l., and the handkerchiefs 46s. per dozen-there were twenty dozen. I delivered the box to Joseph Saunders to take to the quay. When the trunk returned there was a deficiency of eight dozen and two.

JOSEPH SAUNDERS . I am porter to Messrs. Gillman and Co. On the 2d of December, Cross gave me the trunk. I delivered it at Galley Quay, Thames-street, to Edward Payne .

EDWARD PAYNE . I am servant to Messrs. Smith and Barlow, the proprietors of Galley Quay. On the 2d of December Saunders delivered a trunk to me; it continued there till Friday, the 5th - I then took it to the Searcher's Office, brought it back to the quay, and delivered it to the prisoner, William Henry Rawlinson, with the same property in it as when I received it. It was returned to me from the Custom-house, packed in the same manner as before-it must have been opened there. The prisoner, William Henry Rawlinson, was in the employ of Mr. Sage, who is a lighterman, he was to take it in a boat to the ship John Palmer - He carried it down the river. I saw it put in the lug-boat. I saw the prisoner, John Rawlinson , Jun. there with him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was four days in our possession, and was kept in the warehouse-only three of us had access to it. I did not see it opened at all-it always remained in one place. I am sure it is the same package that Saunders brought to the warehouse.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You would not let any one open it in the warehouse - A. No.

HENRY STRETTON. I was at the Custom-house when Pope's trunk was examined - I saw it examined-it contained silk handkerchiefs and a box of lace. I have seen the box since. While it was at the Searchers' office nothing was taken out. I saw it closed and locked - I have seen it since empty.

Cross-examined. There were two boxes of lace in it.

CHARLES CROSS. I only packed one box-there were two put in.

Cross-examined. Mr.H. Pope is a merchant. We deal with him as Henry Pope .

EDWARD SAGE . I am a lighterman. The prisoners, William Henry Rawlinson, and John Rawlinson , Jun., were in my service-the latter is the son of my foreman. I was employed to take some property to the ship John Palmer, which was in the river. I gave the prisoners, William Henry and John Rawlinson, Jun. instructions to deliver the property on board that ship- they accounted to me for having delivered it. There was a trunk from Payne's among it. I gave them directions to make great haste, and forward the property to the ship. They left London about one o'clock on the day of the 5th of December. I furnished them with a sail. They ought to have arrived at Gravesend before day-light the next morning. I expected them to return about nine o'clock on Sunday morning - They did not return till Sunday night. When property is delivered to a vessel going abroad, a receipt is given by the master of the ship - They returned me the receipt. In consequence of what was then written I asked them how the goods happened to get wet? (having heard they were wet)- they said it was with rain and the sprey of the water.

Cross-examined. I succeded their father in the basiness. I sent them to Galley Quay, which is in the city-from there they get into the middle of the shipping in the lower parts of the Pool, which is very public.

Q. Very soon after that they get into the counties of Essex and Kent - A. Yes, at Limehouse-hole.

Q. If they had made haste, would they not have got to Gravesend at night - A. It was not probable that they would have reached there till night, or early in the morning. If they were delayed by rain, I should not think much of their being two or three hours later. I heard it was a windy and rainy night- I do not know it myself. They would have no occasion to leave the boat. They have a very good character. The other prisoner is their first-cousin. They have been a year and a half in my empty.

COURT. Q. How far is it from Galley Quay to the Pool - A.About a mile and a half. When they passed the Pool it must have been day-light.

GEORGE RICH. I am a searcher at the Custom-house at Gravesend. Mr. Pope applied to me to go on board the

John Palmer , and open the trunk-it was opened in my presence. The matting was un-nailed, and the key tied to the handle, the box was in it. It appeared to have been unpacked and emptied-the paper that it appears to have been wrapped in laid by it. This was on Sunday, the 7th of December, about two o'clock. There was a vacancy in the trunk, beside where the box was, as if other goods had been taken out-the handkerchiefs lost might safely be packed in that place. The box was carefully repacked, and given to Mr. Pope.

DANIEL M'GILLIVRAY. I keep a chandler's-shop at Limehouse, within a hundred yards of the water-side. I know all the prisoners. On Friday, the 5th of December, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoners, William Henry Rawlinson and John Rawlinson , at Limehouse. I was standing on the wharf, they came ashore to me - I do not know what boat they came from. We went into the Horns and Chequers, public-house, kept by Mr. Backway, and drank together. They said they were going to Blackwall, and expected to have something for me when they came back - They went away immediately- they both drank with me. About nine o'clock the same night they came to my house, which is in Middlesex, and went up to my bed-room- my wife was at home. They said they had some silk handkerchiefs and some lace; they took them out, and laid them on the bed- they had them about their persons, under their great-coats. I asked them what they wanted for them? they said they were worth a great deal of money- there were about forty pieces of handkerchiefs, each containing three. There might be nine in a piece for what I know - I never counted them-some looked larger than others; they refused to settle about them till they saw something else. On Sunday, about one o'clock, the three male prisoners came while I was at dinner - They dined with me. My wife and son, who is about fifteen years old, were at home. I sent my son for a pot of beer, and then sent him to church. After dinner, we all four went up stairs, and agreed about them. They said they were worth 100l. - I said I would give no such money for them, as they were all very common. I at last offered 45l. for them, which they agreed to take. I said I would give them some money as soon as I could. They staid about an hour with me. They said they came from Gravesend. After they went away, I went to Backway's public-house to see the newspaper, and saw them there. I had half a pint of beer before I saw them - I put it into the pot out of which they were drinking. Mrs. Backway served us.

Q. Before they left you was any appointment made - A. Yes, at the house I told them I would meet them in the Borough on Monday, about two o'clock. I did not meet them, because the eldest came to me on the Monday morning, and told me there was something the matter, and not to meet them, and that if I had any thing in the house, I had better put it away- I put the things that I had bought of them out of the house. I took a piece of silk handkerchiefs to the prisoner, Griffiths, she lives at Limehouse. I told her I had some, that I wished to turn them into money, and that she should have them at 2s. 6d. a piece. I gave the prisoner, Cox, two cards of lace. I told her on the Sunday night I had some lace and handkerchiefs, and she might have some, if she could do anything with them. On the Monday, at tea-time, she came, had two cards, and a few yards of another piece, for which she paid me 9s. - my wife cut it off. I do not think any price was settled for the two cards.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I am now come from prison. I was examined three times before. I said nothing about these men. I never was in this Court before, nor was I apprehended for felony before.

Q. What time did the prisoners come to you on the Friday - A. Between two and three o'clock- I believe it was after two. They said they were going to Blackwall. When they came at nine o'clock it was dark, and they brought the property- I am no judge of it. This was on Friday night. My wife might have been in the bed-room part of the time with us- nothing was pulled out down stairs. On Sunday all three dined with me - I dine at one o'clock. I saw them at the public-house at three.

MARY M'GILLIVRAY. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 6th of December I remember seeing the prisoners, William Henry Rawlinson , and John Rawlinson , Sen. at our house at about three o'clock in the afternoon - They spoke to my husband; they staid in the shop a very little while - They came again about seven o'clock in the evening, it was dark. My husband took a candle, and went up to the bed-room with them. I went up, and saw some lace and silk handkerchiefs - They were plaided, and shot with blue and red - They said they were worth a good deal of money-this was on Friday night. On Sunday, about dinner-time, the three male prisoners came between one and two o'clock - They talked about the lace. My husband agreed to give them 44l. or 45l. for them - They dined with us, my son was there. On Monday morning, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner, Cox, came to my house; she said she came for some of the goods that my husband had been speaking about. I took her up to the bed-room; they were in the blankets at the foot of the bed - I shewed them to her; she took two pieces and one card of lace, and a piece of handkerchiefs-one of the pieces of lace was nine yards and a half, and the other between twelve and thirteen; she was to pay 3s. a yard for one of the pieces of lace, and 2s. 6d. for the other, and 2s. 8d. a piece for the handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. I knew they were stolen. They came to me on the Friday, about three o'clock. The two eldest came first, the other came and called them out of doors-my husband was there at the time, and my son was at home. On the Sunday his father sent him to church; he came in again, and went out; it was then about half-past two. I heard my husband agree to give them 44l. or 45l. for them; I was in the room; they talked it over several times.

COURT. Q. Did your husband stay at home on the Friday after they left till they came in the evening - A. He was in and out - He did not leave his business - He went out in the afternoon; I do not know what time. He went out after tea - He staid at home till tea-time.

Q. How were you able to see the length of the lace - A. It was marked on the paper-the card was marked thirteen yards; it was to be 1s. per yard-the nine yards and a half were to be 3s. per yard. There was another piece which was to be 2s. 6d. per yard. I am sure she came about nine o'clock on Monday morning; my husband was

out at the time. She came again at tea-time. She took the lace and handkerchiefs the first time.

Q. Do you remember either of the men coming to your house on the Monday - A. John Rawlinson , Sen., came between one and two o'clock, to tell us to put the things away. My husband had talked about going to the Borough. We were at dinner on the Sunday when they came-there was a pot of beer on the table. I do not know whether my husband or son fetched another - I think it was my husband. I heard my husband say he was told to put the things away. I did not tell Cox they were stolen - She might have thought them smuggled.

DANIEL M'GILLIVRAV re-examined. Q. What time was you to meet them in the Borough - A. About two o'clock. The elder prisoner came to me about nine or ten o'clock in the morning-my wife was in the shop at the time where we were; she had not been out.

Q. Was she present during all the conversation between you and them- A. She was in the shop, and might have heard it. I do not know whether she took any notice.

EDWARD M'GILLIVRAY. I am apprenticed to a shipwright. On Sunday, the 7th of December, I remember seeing three young men, very much like the prisoners, at my father's house- I nevcer saw them before. I do not know by what names they were called. I staid there about a quarter of an hour after they came. I was sent for a pot of beer after dinner. My father sent me to church - I came in again, as it was too soon; church begins at three o'clock. I afterwards left them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was not quite half-past one o'clock when they came in - We were at dinner. My father sent me to church at a quarter before two o'clock. I came in again, and staid half an hour. The men went out while I was waiting. I went to church before three o'clock-the bells were ringing. I left my father and mother at home. I returned from church about a quarter after four, he was at home then - He had been out before dinner. I cannot tell whether he went out while I was at church.

ANN REEVES. I am servant to Mr. Backway, who keeps the Horns and Chequers, public-house, at Limehouse. On the Friday before M'Gillivray was taken up, I served him with half a pint of beer, about half-past five o'clock-two young men were with him - I did not know them. I am sure that was the time.

JANE BACKWAY . My husband keeps the Horns and Chequers, public-house, at Limehouse. On Tuesday, the 2d of December, I saw M'Gillivray at our house, between three and five o'clock in the afternoon - I took him half a pint of beer, he ordered it to be made a pot; three men were there when he came in; he sat down in the same box with them. I was ill on the Friday.

JAMES WHITE. I am a Thames Police officer. On the 8th of December I apprehended the two young Rawlinsons at No. 21, Mark-lane. I neither threatened nor promised them. Before their examination they were together, and both stated that they had been on board the lugboat, and took it down to Limehouse-hole about two o'clock; from thence they went to a public-house to get refreshment; from there they proceeded to Blackwall, to inquire if the John Palmer had gone from thence to Gravesend. From there they went to Chalton-it was then low water, and they waited till high water. On the 12th of December the other male prisoner asked me if he could be permitted to see either of the Rawlinsons? I asked him his name? he said it was George Jones , that he was a fish-shorer and fellowship-porter, and was to be found at the Lord Nelson, at Southwark. He was allowed to see John Rawlinson, jun. On the 9th of December Joseph Powis took Sarah Cox at Barclare's-buildings, near the East India Docks-it was a butcher's-shop, and her husband is a butcher. There was a parcel of silk handkerchiefs lying on the counter, in her bonnet, and in a work-bag which hung by the fire-place I found two lengths of lace. She said she would tell from whom she got them when she got to the office.

Cross-examined. I took M'Gillivray on the 10th of December, at Mr. White's, in Lisle-street, Little Newport-street - I had been looking for him for two days. I found him out by information which the prisoner, Griffiths, gave me. Part of Bow Creek is in Middlesex, and part in Essex. It is above two miles from Limehouse.

JOSEPH POWIS. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, Cox, at her house, on the 9th of December. When we went in she was placing a small paper parcel in the crown of her bonnet, containing three silk handkerchiefs. I asked her where she got them? she said she would tell the magistrate. She told the magistrate she had them from M'Gillivray. She said she knew they were British.

JOHN GATTY. I am a Thames Police officer. I assisted in apprehending Griffiths. When she got to the office I told her I must search her - She said I should, after she had taken her money out. She was fumbling a long while. I heard paper rustle, and put my hand to her pocket, but found nothing. I desired her to get up off the chest on which she sat- I found three silk handkerchiefs in a paper. She at first said they were not her's, and afterwards that she had received them from M'Gillivray. I received some lace from James Hoggart. The whole of Limehouse is in Middlesex.

JAMES HOGGART. I keep a public-house at Limehouse. M'Gillivray gave me the lace, which I gave to Gatty.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD PAYNE. I saw the two young Rawlinsons in the boat with the trunk.

SARAH COX's Defence. I bought them for smuggled goods.

W. H. RAWLINSON. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

JOHN RAWLINSON . - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

JOHN RAWLINSON , SEN.

MARY GRIFFITHS ,

SARAH COX ,

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-71

237. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Smith and Francis Smith , about twelve in the night of the 7th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one box, value 5s., and 3l. in monies numbered, their property .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, but his own confession, which had been extorted from him, he was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-72

238. LUCY MASSARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eliza M'Cabe , about six o'clock in the night of the 21st of December , with intent to steal .

THOMAS M'CABE. I live with my mother, at Newington . We were at dinner on the 21st of December, about half-past five o'clock, and heard footsteps in the drawing-room; I went up, but could not get in. I got the key in about ten minutes, went in, and found no person there. The window was open, which looked into the garden-there were foot-marks in the garden; a person had evidently jumped out of the window. Suspicion fell on the prisoner, who was our servant . Her box was searched, a brooch, and a coat and trimming, of our's found in it.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. The prisoner was waiting at dinner. We found a ladder in the garden at the window.

COURT. There is no charge of stealing-the prisoner must be ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-73

239. WILLIAM SIMS , JAMES COLE , WILLIAM COLEBROOK , and JAMES MAY were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Gallaway , on the King's highway, on the 8th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 4d., and one bag, value 4d., his property; and 80 yards of silk, value 10l., and six bobbins, value 2d. , the goods of Benjamin Jeffrey and Richard Cox .

JOHN GALLAWAY . I am a weaver . On the 8th of December I went to Messrs. Jeffrey and Cox's, and got eighty yards of silk to weave. When I got to Crown-street, Finsbury-square , four men accosted me - They gave me a violent blow on my head, which knocked me down, and tried to get the silk from me. My son, who was behind, came up and collared Sims. While we were taking him to the watch-house, Cole and Colebrook came up, with another man, and struck my son.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was half-past eleven o'clock at night - I got my silk from Messrs. Jeffrey and Cox's at three-it rained very hard. I stopped at a public-house - I was in liquor. Sims was near me. The watchman asked him what he was about? he said he was helping me up. I never said I lost my watch. We had drank four or five pots of beer and a quartern of gin between my son, another man, and myself.

JOSEPH GALLAWAY , JUN. I was carrying home some work - I met my father at the Dolphin, public-house, between four and five o'clock, and had a pot of beer and a quartern of gin; it rained very hard, we went into another house, and had about six pots of beer; we left there about eleven o'clock. When we got to Crown-street my father called out, I was behind him - I ran up to him, he said he had lost his silk-Sims was standing over him; he said my father had charged him with robbing him, but that he had not; I took him to the watch-house, he went willingly-Cole and Colebrook came up, and struck me several times-when the watchman came up they left me. The next night I found them at the Flying Horse, public-house, and had them secured.

Cross-examined. We had a quartern of gin at both houses - I was sober - I do not remember the watch-housekeeper refusing to take the charge.

JAMES RICE. I am a watchman. At twelve o'clock at night I saw six men at the corner of Crown-street - I dispersed them, and went away. I came up again, and saw the prisoner, Sims, and the two witnesses - They gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. There was no attempt to rescue while I was there, or any noise; the prosecutor's son was not so drunk as himself.

WILLIAM CLARKE. I am constable of the night. I heard a noise, and came out, and heard a man say,"Clarke is coming, we will go;" May, Cole, and Colebrook went away, they were with Sims; Sims was brought to the watch-house, the bobbins were found on the ground. Gallaway, jun. had a black eye, which he said one of the men gave him; he was not in liquor. The prosecutor said he lost his watch, but found it in his pocket. I think the son was sober.

WILLIAM ATFIELD. I am an officer. I searched the prisoners Cole, Colebrook, and May, and found nothing on them.

SIMS'S Defence. I went to help the prosecutor up; in a little time after he said he lost his silk, and I must know about it-his son collared me.

JOSEPH GALLAWAY, JUN. re-examined. When I went up, Sims was assisting my father up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-74

240. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sophia Barnet on the King's highway, on the 11th of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, nine yards of bombazeen, value 1l. 8s. 6d.; two yards of cotton, value 2s. 3d.; one yard of calico, value 10d.; one yard of muslin, value 3s.; and one handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Barnett .

SOPHIA BARNETT. I am the wife of Thomas Barnett , we live in Bedford-road, Bethnal-green. On the 11th of November, about twenty minutes after five o'clock, I was at the corner of King's Head-court, Beach-street, Barbican , with Zagnane, going home; I had a bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment, in a yellow handkerchief; a man on my left pushed me into the kennel, and snatched the parcel from my arm-it laid across my arm, I held it with my hand, I did not fall - He did not use any violence to get it from me - He ran up King's Headcourt, I followed him, I was very near him - He turned round and struck at me, but did not hit me; I turned back, and lost him; he had the parcel under his coat; two men were engaged in it. I went to Van, and described him-the prisoner was taken seven weeks after.

MARY ANN ZAGNANE. I live with Mrs. Barnett, and was with her on the night of the robbery. Somebody pushed her off the pavement, at the corner of King's Head-court - I did not see the parcel taken - She cried out - I had observed Porter follow us.

GEORGE PORTER. I live in Blides-court, Whitecross-street. On Tuesday, the 11th of November, I was in a coffee-shop in Chequer-alley, about one o'clock-the prisoner came in - I said I would go and take a walk-he

was a stranger to me; we went out together over Blackfriars-bridge to a public-house, and staid there about two hours; I then said I must go - We both left together. When we got into Beach-street, the two ladies were before us, at the corner of King's Head-court; the prisoner shoved the prosecutrix into the kennel, and snatched the bundle out of her hand; I did not know he was going to do it - He was about six yards from me; the ladies, and several other persons, ran after him - I went away.

Q. You did not attempt to pursue - A. No, I was as had as him. I went to the coffee-shop-the people were talking about his being there with a bundle under his coat - I did not see him - I came out-the prisoner called to me, I went into the yard to him - He had the bundle under his coat; the little girl belonging to the house opened the door; he said, "Here they come;" she went in; I went to a house with him, and sold it for 5s. 6d.; I do not know the woman's name, I showed the officers where it was; the prisoner treated me with a pot of beer - I slept with him that night. I had none of the money - I was taken up for it, and told this then.

ELIZA NELSON. I live at the coffee-shop, in Chequeralley. I saw the prisoner and Porter together in the yard, about six o'clock; Porter had the bundle under his arm; the prisoner said, "Here she comes;" I had heard of the robbery; they ran under the bench, and got out of the yard through the next house; they both came into the house together; my mother sent them out - They were both in the house together that morning; the bundle was in a yellow handkerchief.

HENRY CLARK . I live in Adam and Eve-court, Whitecross-street. I saw the prisoner run into the Swan, public-house, in Whitecross-street, about a quarter before five o'clock on the 11th of November, with a yellow bundle under his coat - I knew him before.

THOMAS VAN . I am a constable. On the 11th of November the prosecutrix informed me of the robbery. On the 30th of December I took the prisoner in Type-street; he saw me, and ran away as fast as he could, I stopped him; he knew me very well; he took me to a house in Wentworth-street, where he said he sold the things. Porter was taken up soon after, and said that that was the house.

THOMAS GARTON . I was with Van, and confirm his testimony. The prisoner said that Porter had part of the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of Stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18180114-75

241. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one great coat, value 12s ., the goods of James Hoppe .

JOHN FORRESTER. I am an officer. On the 6th of January, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner, and another man, go up the Minories, and come back again; the prisoner went up to Mr. Hoppe's door, at Sparrow-corner , and snatched the coat down, and ran away - I stopped him, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-76

242. MARY DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , two milk pails, value 13s.; two quart measures, value 3s. 6d.; one pint measure, value 9d.; one yoke, value 13s.; and three gallons of milk, value 6s. , the goods of Edward Jones .

SARAH JONES. I am the wife of Edward Jones , I am a milk-woman. On the 26th of December, about three o'clock, I left my pails at the public-house door while I went to serve some milk; I returned in about a quarter of an hour, and missed them. I saw the prisoner about a quarter of a mile off with some pails like mine - I said nothing to her.

WILLIAM BARBER . I was standing by the Crown and Anchor, public-house, on the Pavement, Moorfields ; the prisoner came up to the pails, and took the yokes in her hand- I went in, and when I came out she was gone with them. I had seen Jones leave them.

WILLIAM GOULD. I saw the prisoner take the pails from the place.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I received information on the 8th of January, and got the pails from a person named Rawley. The spot where the robbery was committed is in the City.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-77

243. WILLIAM PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , one pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of John Such .

FREDERICK TAYLOR. I am servant to John Such , who is a boot-maker . On the 4th of January the boots hung at the door at half-past one o'clock - I missed them at two o'clock.

JOHN FORRESTER. I am a constable. I met the prisoner, and another man, in Houndsditch, at two o'clock, running, with the boots in his apron; I followed him to Petticoatlane, and took him offering them for sale to a Jew. He said a sailor gave them to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-78

244. JAMES WORBIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one handkerchief, value 1s.6d., the goods of Thomas Sledge , from his person .

THOMAS SLEDGE. I live in Friday-street. On the 6th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in

Queen-street , and heard the cry of "Stop thief!" the prisoner was stopped, and a handkerchief taken from him - I missed mine. I will not swear it was mine.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-79

245. ELIZA OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one shirt, value 4s.; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; and one piece of carpet, value 1s. , the goods of John Francis Dalton .

CLEMENTINA DALTON. I am the wife of John Francis Dalton , who is an officer at Hyde-park barracks. The prisoner was my servant , and had the shirt and stockings to wash. On the 28th of December I told her to bring them up stairs, she said they were not done; I at last told her to bring them up, washed or not, she said she would; she said I did not want white stockings, as I wore black, and brought me up an odd one of hers, telling me I might put that on; she left me without notice. I found the shirt at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. The prisoner's husband was at Vittoria, and she was there with him. The carpet was found in her room.

HENRY PARNEL. I am shopman to Mr. Timberland, who is a pawnbroker at Knightsbridge. On the 15th of December the prisoner pledged the shirt with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get my wages.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-80

246. HENRY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, two table spoons, value 1l. 10s.; six tea-spoons, value 1l.; and one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s., the goods of John Stone , in his dwelling-house .

JANE STONE . I am the wife of John Stone , who keeps the Duchess of York, public-house, in Kingsland-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . The prisoner lived servant with me for three weeks, and left on the 11th or 12th of November; we kept him a week longer; he did not leave the house until the 20th of November. On that morning, when I came down stairs, I missed the articles stated in the indictment - I had seen them at half-past eleven the night before in the bar cupboard; the prisoner had not then left the house; I did not know that he was then in the house, but thought he was gone to his place. I heard of him the Friday week following-(looking at a letter)-it is his hand-writing.

ANN SMITH. I received the letter by the two-penny post, it is directed to me-(read)-"I write to inform you that I am in Horsemonger-lane; I hope you'll come and see me. I expect to come out on Monday. Come and see me, and I'll tell you all about it - You know what I mean-HENRY HALL." - I went to him, as I had some linen to wash for him, and asked him what brought him there? he said it was for making a riot in the street; I said, "No, it is for Mr. Stone's property;"he asked me how I knew any thing about it? I told him that Mr. Stone told me the officers had been there; I asked him where the property was? he said he sold the six tea-spoons to Mr. Bland, of Norton-Falgate - I asked him where the sugar-tongs were? he gave them to me out of his breeches pocket.

ROBERT HALL. I took the prisoner into custody at Mr. Hase's shop, in Blackman-street, Borough, offering the tea-spoons for sale. I took him to Mr. Stone's - I neither threatened or promised him; he said he came down stairs about half-past three o'clock in the morning, opened the bar sliding-window, and took the spoons and sugar-tongs out; that he sold the six tea-spoons for 15s., and that he had the sugar-tongs about him. When I searched him I found a snuff-box, which he said he paid 3s. for, and he had 11s. left, and a comb, which he had bought with the money.

JAMES BLAND. On the 20th of November the prisoner sold me the tea-spoons; he said they were his mother's, who was ill, and could not come out - I gave him 15s. for them, which is the full value as old silver. The tablespoons and sugar-tongs weigh five ounces and three-quarters, and are worth 30s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have neither father or mother.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-81

247. ANN CALE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , at St. Ann's, Westminster, six yards of silk, value 18s., the goods of Samuel Downes , privately in his shop .

GEORGE GARRETT. I am servant to Mr. Samuel Downes , who lives at the corner of Cranbourn-alley, Castle-street, Leicester-square . On Friday, the 9th of January, the prisoner came into the shop, between eleven and twelve o'clock, to match a piece of stuff. I shewed her several pieces, and turned round to get another piece - She immediately walked out, saying there were none that would suit her. I immediately missed a piece of sarsnet, and followed her - She had got into Castle-street; I secured her with six yards of sarsnet under her shawl - She struggled-nobody was in the shop except the prisoner and myself.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. We had no words.

THOMAS FRASER. I am a constable. Garrett gave me the sarsnet and the prisoner in charge. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St.Ann, Westminster.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He showed me some stuffs that would not do. I said I would call again; he said he did not think I wanted any; I asked him if he thought I was a thief? he said I might be, and told me to go out - He jumped over the counter, I took up the silk to strike him with, and he said I was going to steal it, and behaved insolent. I lived in Castle-street.

GEORGE GARRETT re-examined. It is totally false. I

did not see the silk till I brought her back - I had not missed it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-82

248. WILLIAM GRACE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hodge , about six o'clock in the night of the 2d of January , at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one watch, value 20s.; one chain, value 6d.; one seal, value 6d.; and three watch keys, value 6d. , his property.

SARAH HODGE. I am the wife of William Hodge , who keeps an eating-house in Brook-street, New-road, St.Pancras , and rents the house. On the 2d of January my watch hung by the side of the shop-window-any person could get it by breaking a pane of glass, and putting their hand through. I saw it safe about a quarter before six o'clock in the evening, it was then dark. I was in the back-room, and heard the glass break suddenly. I immediately ran into the shop, and missed the watch; I went to the door, and found it tied with a cord - I could not get out-the window was broken - A hand must have been through to take it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at the office.

JOHN WHITAKER . I am a servant to Mr. Dobree, who is a pawnbroker in Oxford-street. On the 8th of January M'Gaff pledged a watch with me for 12s.

ELIZABETH M'GAFF. I pledged the watch with Dobree for 12s.; I received it of Thomas Ryan on the 8th of January. He owed me some money for lodging, and gave it me to pledge for it.

Cross-examined. I live in Market-street, Fitzroy-market. I know the prisoner.

THOMAS RYAN. I gave M'Gaff the watch to pledge. On the Friday before the 8th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my lodgings-it was between six and seven - He asked me to buy a watch, and said I should have it for 15s. - I offered him 12s., he took it. I wore it for a week-my landlady wanted my rent, and I gave it her to pledge.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the 10th of January.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the New-road-the glass was cracked. The witness said if I would come to his landlady he would see what it was - I did, and sold it.

GEORGE BLAKE. I met the prisoner that evening - He said he had found a watch; I saw him take his handkerchief out, and wipe it I asked him to go to my lodgings - We took it there, and offered it for sale.

ELIZABETH M'GAFF re-examined. Blake lodges with me - He did not come home with the prisoner that night.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-83

249. CHARLES SIMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Maple , about three o'clock in the night of the 10th of January , at St. Andrew's, Holborn, with intent to steal .

THOMAS MAPLE . I keep the Mitre, public-house, in Gray's-inn-lane, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . On the 9th of January I went to bed at twelve o'clock, and saw all the doors and windows fast. About three o'clock in the morning the watchman alarmed me; I came down, and found him at the door-the cellar flap was raised up - I had shut and bolted it myself at ten o'clock the night before. I got the key, and went into the cellar with Hatton. I went to the flap, and saw the foatsteps of some person, and I found the prisoner lying down by the butts, and gave him in charge. I found a crow and a lanthorn, with the bolt, lying under the tlap.

JAMES LOOK . I am a watchman. I alarmed the prosecutor; there had been great violcuce used to the flap-it was a littel open - I had seen it before secure. I took the prisoner to the watch-house. I found a parcel of skeleton-keys, and other keys, a turn-screw, and a phosphorous box on him.

RICHARD HATTON . I am a constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and the things found on him.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-84

250. CHARLES RASSELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Barnes , spinster , about ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 13th of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn (no person being therein), and stealing therein three shifts, value 12s.; one gown, value 2s.; one shawl, value 5s., and one petticoat, value 3s. , her property.

SARAH BARNES . I am a single woman, and live in Gray's-inn-lane ; the landlord does not live in the house. I rent the back room on the second floor. On the 13th of January I went down to the first-floor - I locked my door-and left the key on the outside; in about ten minutes I heard a noise, I ran up, and found the prisoner on the stairs; I saw my room door open, and accused him of going into the room, he said, "so help me G-D, I have not. He had something in his hand like my shawl; I asked him what it was, and he ran down stairs; I followed him until he got into Holborn, where he was secured. I took my shifts from him, and found my shawl on the stairs - He dropped it as he ran down. The things are worth 1l. 9s.

GEORGE COPPEN. I am a constable. I saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutrix pursuing; she took her shifts from him when I secured him.

CHARLES BROWN. I am an officer; I took the prisoner in charge. I found two shifts in his trowsers, and a petticoat and gown in his bat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-85

251. MATTHEW SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , at St. Matthew, Bethnalgreen, in the dwelling-house of William Jones , one box, value 1s.; three bank tokens, value 9s.; one guinea, and

one 5l. bank note , his property; and CHARLOTTE BROOKS was indicted for that she well knowing the said Matthew Sullivan to have done and committed the said felony, afterwards, to wit, on the same day, did feloniously receive, harbour, and maintain him, against the statute .

ELIZA JONES. I live in George-street, in the parish of St.Matthew, Bethnal-green , and am the wife of William Jones - He rents the house; the prisoner, Sullivan, had lived four years with us, as our errand-boy - He has no parents - I did not dismiss him. On the 28th of December I sent him to the one pair of stairs room to put some coals on the fire, which he did; there was a little box in the clock-case, which was in the room, it contained a 5l. note, a guinea, and a 3s. token-the box was locked, and I had the key. I saw no more of him, and did not know where to find him. I missed the box out of the case. On the following Saturday I was informed he was at the prisoner Brooks's house, in Red Lion-court, George-street - I did not know her before; I went there on the Saturday evening, and found him hid under the bed, his aunt pulled him out-Brooks was not there. I knocked at the door, the candle was put out before it was opened; I had seen a light at the window before I got there, and through the key-hole - I insisted on having a light. His aunt asked him what he had done with the box of money; he said he had given it to his sister, who is twenty-two years of age; she was brought to him, and he then said he had not given it to her, but he had hid it in a cellar in a court where Brooks lived - He afterwards said he gave it to Mrs. Brooks. She left her house the very night he was taken. She was taken up on the 7th of January.

WILLIAM COX . I am a headborough. Jones's house is in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I searched Brooks's premises on the 4th of January - She was not there then; I found two pair of gloves, which Sullivan said was bought out of the guinea that was changed. I apprehended Brooks on the 7th of January, at Bethnalgreen, and found two duplicates upon her; she said she was very sorry for what she had done. I asked her what she had done with the money; she said she had bought a suit of clothes between Sullivan and her own child; a handkerchief, a pair of shoes and a pair of stockings, which she had on her feet; and that she bought her child some things out of the guinea, at Mr. Harford's, at Kingsland; that she changed a 5l. note at Mr. Cotton's, Shoreditch. She said she bought the suit of clothes of a Jew, named Joseph, in Holywell-lane.

JOHN SAWREY. I am headborough of Shoreditch. I saw Sullivan, I neither threatened or promised him; he said if I would go with him he would tell me all about it; he said four weeks ago he took a 1l. note, and next he took a guinea, and then he took another 1l. note, out of the box, and gave them to Brooks. I asked him about the 5l. note, he said he gave that to Brooks also. I took Brooks, she said she was sorry she had any thing to do with the boy.

THOMAS HARFORD . I am a linen-draper, and live at Kingsland. At the latter end of last December Brooks bought a pair of child's shoes and a pair of stockings, and two pair of gloves of me; she gave me a guinea, and I gave her change.

THOMAS CHERMER . I am servant to Mr. Cotton, who is a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch. On the 1st of January the prisoner Brooks pledged a child's suit of clothes, a hat, and a handkerchief, in the name of Brooks, Brick-lane.

JOSEPH JOSEPH. I live in Holywell-lane. On the 29th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, Brooks, bought a boy's suit of clothes of me, for 16s., she gave me a 2l. note. I returned it to her, telling her it was a 2l., she gave me a 1l. note. The clothes pledged with Chermer are the same.

JOHN LONG. I am servant to Mr. Cross, Shoreditch. On the 29th of December, the prisoner, Sullivan, came to my master's shop, with a woman, about seven in evening, the woman bought a boy's hat and handkerchief, which came to 7s. 9d., she tendered me 5l. note; I gave her one 2l. and two 1l. notes, and 12s. 3d. She gave me the name of "Cadman, Brick-lane," to write upon it.

BROOKS'S Defence. I did not know they were stolen.

The prisoner Sullivan made no defence.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . - DEATH Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy.

BROOKS - GUILTY . - Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-86

252. JOHN WHEELER and WILLIAM EFFER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two horse-cloths, value 5s.; one hood, value 1s.; one roller, value 1s., and one rug, 1s., the goods of Matthew Milton , privately in his stable .

WILLIAM BEAN . I am foreman to Matthew Milton, who keeps a stable in Pitt's Head-mews, Park-lane . We lost the articles stated in the indictment at different times.

WILLIAM SPENDLOVE. I deal in harness, and live in Charles-street, Manchester-square. On the 10th of January the prisoner, Effer, asked me to buy some horsecloths, I told him to bring them on Monday, which he did, and said the coachman at Dorset-mews gave them to him for money he owed him - I detained them. Milton came and said they were his.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am a constable. I took the prisoners into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WHEELER'S Defence. Effer said the man had detained the horse-cloths on suspicion of their being stolen, and asked me to say they were mine.

EFFER'S Defence. Wheeler's brother sent me to sell them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-87

253. JOHN LUCAS and WILLIAM GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , at St. Martin's-in the Fields, forty-six yards of carpeting, value 5l., the property of Richard Langford , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD LANGFORD . I am a carpet-manufacturer , and rent a house at Charing-cross, in the parish of St. Martin-in the Field s. On the 13th of January I received information, and missed a roll of carpet out of my shop, which was worth 5l.

DAVID PICKETT. I live at Westminster. I was sweeping a crossing, and saw the prisoner, Lucas, cross from the

road - He beckoned to the prisoner, Green, who was by Scotland-yard gate; they went and spoke together-Green went back, and Lucas went by the carpet-shop, looked in at the door, returned again, passing it three times, and then went to Green - They spoke together-Lucas went by the shop again - He went up the fourth time, went into the shop, and came out with a piece of carpet on his shoulder, and took it towards Scotland-yard-Green and him ran down Scotland-yard with it, together.

MARY LUDGROVE. On the 13th of January, as I was crossing the road at Charing-cross, I saw the prisoner, Lucas, looking in at the window of a carpet-warehouse - He then went into the shop, came out with a roll of carpet, and went into Scotland-yard with it-Green followed him - I saw them both looking in at the window.

EDWARD GREEN. I am a constable. I received information, and went after the prisoner. I took Lucas at the Dacre's Arms, Broadway, about four o'clock that day - I took Green in Wood-street. I took them upon information I had received.

LUCAS'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

GREEN'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

LUCAS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

GREEN - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-88

254. HENRY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 30s. in monies numbered, one 2l. and four 1l. bank notes, the property of Edward Holden , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD HOLDEN . I keep the Rose and Crown, in Church-lane, Whitechapel . On the 6th of January the prisoner was at my house; I had to send a person 7l.10s. in change for a cheque. There was four 1l. and one 2l. notes, and 30s. in silver; I put it in my desk, at the farther end of the bar, about nine o'clock in the evening, and missed it about half-past ten; the next day I accused the prisoner with stealing it, and the day after I took him before a magistrate - He was bailed until that day week, during which time he came to my house frequently, as usual; I took a shilling of him the day after, which, I am sure, was one of those I put with the other money-there is a mark like the letter Y on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. There were a great many people in the house. There was raffle there. I had not marked the shilling.

ELIZA HOLDEN . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 6th of January the prisoner was at our house - He was in the bar that night. I gave my husband 20s. to make up some change (looking at the shilling), I will swear this shilling was one of those I gave him - I had had it a week. The prisoner used to go into the bar sometimes. I always left some person in the bar when I left it.

Cross-examined. He was nearly an hour in the bar after I gave the cheque.

SARAH BRAME. I am servant at the house. I saw the prisoner leaning over the desk.

Cross-examined. His arms were folded. He could get at the desk-it is a drawer.

MARY WATKINS . I was charing at the house. I saw the money put in the drawer, the prisoner stood by at the time. He went into the bar, and staid there three-quarters of an hour after.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18180114-89

255. JOHN ROWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 7lbs. of nails, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Cubitt .

JOHN CALLOW. I am daily watchman to Mr. Cubitt, who is the contractor for building the London Institution, in Moorfields . On the 13th of January, about three o'clock, I found a bag of nails hid under some bricks. I told Conner to watch who came for them; about five o'clock he called to me, and had the prisoner in custody, with the nails in his breeches. He said he only took a few to repair a hog-sty. There was 7lb.

JAMES CONNER . I am a watchman at the building. About a quarter after four o'clock the prisoner came to the place, I asked him what he was doing, he said he came for twopence which he had put in a hole. I went away. I saw him there again, I went up, and he took the nails from his breeches.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-90

256. ELIZA WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one scarf, value 15s., the goods of Joseph Morris , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH MORRIS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Fleet-market . On the 16th of January the prisoner came to my shop about three in the afternoon, my young man asked her what she wanted, she gave him no answer, but staid at the counter-three persons were serving in the shop; she was going out, I asked her what she wanted, she said she wanted a whittle, but would call again-several persons were in the shop. I went to her and asked her what was under her shawl, she immediately threw the scarf on the counter, and begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to look at.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-91

257. PATRICK HOGAN was indicted for that he, on the 13th of December , did unlawfully utter to William Cheesman a counterfeit shilling, as and for a good and lawful one, well knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

WILLIAM CHEESMAN . I keep the Green Dragon, St. Andrew's Hill, Blackfriars . On the 13th of December the prisoner came to my house about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, by himself, and had a glass of gin, which came to 2d - He gave me 1s. I gave him 6d. and 4d.. I held the shilling in my hand, suspecting it was a bad one - I had just taken a bad one of a woman. I compared the two together, they corresponded; they are now together, and I cannot distinguish one from the other-one of them was given to me by the prisoner. I went out after him immediately, and saw him come out of Atkin

son's house; we followed and secured him in Carter-lane. He was searched, and another bad shilling found on him-(looks at them)- these are the two, one of which the prisoner gave to me.

ANDREW ATKINSON . I keep the Bell, public-house, on Addle-hill. The prisoner came to my house on the 13th of December, and had a glass of gin, he gave me a shilling. I looked at it, and asked him for another, thinking it bad - He said he had not got another. I told him he had given me a bad one the day before. He said, "I did not change that shilling." I told him to go away, returned his bad shilling, and took the gin from him, telling him not to try it again, as he would get into trouble. He said he had no more money of any kind. Cheesman came in, and we went out together and took him.

NATHANIEL MINES . I am a beadle. The prisoner was given into my charge. I found 1s. and 6d. on him.

JAMES CARPENTER . I am a ticket-porter. On the 12th of December I saw the prisoner in Pancras-lane, with a woman named Kelly. I went into the Green Man, public-house, in Bucklersbury, the woman followed me, the prisoner came in after her, called for a glass of gin, and offered a shilling, which Mr. Humley said was bad. He said it was a hard thing for a man to have a bad shilling, and took it away, saying he had no other.

HENRY HUMLEY. I keep the Green Man, public-house, in Bucklersbury. The prisoner came to my house in December, had a glass of gin, and gave me a bad shilling, which I returned him.

MR. CALER EDWARD POWELL. I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. Both the shillings are counterfeit, and of the same impression. The one found on the prisoner is also counterfeit, and of the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold a bed for 7s. and received that money for it. GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties for Six Months longer .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-92

258. CHARLES PENRY was indicted for that he, on the 27th of December , did unlawfully, and by false pretences, obtain from Samuel Hazeland , 7lbs. of pepper, value 1l. 1s. , the goods of Miles Stringer and Thomas Richardson .

SAMUEL HAZELAND . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Miles Stringer and Thomas Richardson, of Monument-yard, tea-dealers . On the 27th of December, the prisoner called and produced this order-(reads).

"27th of December, 1817.

"7lbs. of white pepper, "R. STERRY and Co." by which I understood that he came from Sterry and Co. for 7lbs. of pepper for them. I gave it to him, and he took it away. I asked him his name - He said it was Clarke. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM FAULKNER. I am warehouseman to R. Sterry and Co. The prisoner formerly lived servant with them, and was discharged in 1816-the order is his hand-writing, and is not their order.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-93

259. MARY SMITH and JOHN SMITH were indicted for that they, on the 4th of November , did unlawfully utter to Allison Smart , one counterfeit shilling, as and for a good and lawful one, they knowing it to be counterfeit, and at the same time having one other counterfeit shilling in their possession .

ALLISON SMART. I am the daughter of Mrs. Smart, who is a baker, and lives in Angel-street, St. Martin's-le-Grand . On the 4th of November, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner, Mary Smith , came to the shop for a 3d. loaf, and gave me a shilling, which I did not think good. Goddard came in, and I gave it to him.

HOWEL GODDARD . I am a beadle. On the 4th of November I was in Aldersgate-street, and saw the female prisoner, whom I knew before, standing at the corner of Falcon-street - she went towards St. Martin's-le-Grand, the other prisoner joined her; they walked together to the corner of Dean's-court - She left him, and turned up Angel-street into Mrs. Smart's shop, which is about twenty yards from where they separated - I was watching them - I saw her give Miss Smart a shilling; I went in and asked to see it - I found it was a bad one. I told the prisoner she had not left off her old tricks; she asked what old tricks? I told her I had her in custody before for offering a bad shilling - She then recollected me - I took her into custody, and went to look for the man, but could not find him; he could see me go into the shop. I took her to the Compter, returned and found the man standing at the corner of Angel-alley - I secured him. I told him he had sent a woman in to pass a bad shilling; he said, he knew no woman, and put his hand into his waistcoat pocket - I tried to keep it out. We had a great scuffle, during which five counterfeit shillings fell on the ground, I heard them fall. He would not say where he lived. He said the money was not his. The woman said her name was Smith. I knew him before by the name of Hughes.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL. The shillings are all counterfeit, and merely washed.

MARY SMITH'S Defence. I took it in selling fish.

JOHN SMITH'S Defence. The money was on the ground. He took me two hours after.

JOHN SMITH - GUILTY .

MARY SMITH - GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years longer .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-94

260. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one cheese, value 46s., the goods of Thomas Moulton , privately in his shop .

THOMAS MOULTON. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Bishopsgate-street , in the City. On the 16th of January, the cheese was taken from my door-the prisoner was brought in with it.

GEORGE METHALL . I am servant to Mr. Moulton. On the 16th of January a man told me the cheese was taken. I went up a court, and saw the prisoner with it. I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 41.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-95

261. LOUISA KEMBLE and CATHERINE BROWN were indicted for forgery .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-96

262. WILLIAM NICHOLLS , WILLIAM BELCHER , and THOMAS LAWRENCE were indicted for a like offence .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-97

263. ANN PILKINGTON and MARY GILLIS were indicted for a like offence .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-98

264. JOHN RILEY and WILLIAM BENHAM were indicted for a like offence .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-99

265. JOHN LODGE and JOHN HEARN were indicted for a like offence .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-100

266. JOSEPH ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one silver spoon, value 10s. , the goods of John Harris .

JOHN HARRIS . I live in Lincoln's-inn-fields , where the Verulam Club is held - I keep the house, and am responsible for the property.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Orange-street, Bloomsbury. On the 21st of November the prisoner sold me two spoons - He said they were his own, that he was reduced in life, was obliged to part with them through distress, and that his own family crest was on them. I afterwards saw a hand-bill, giving a description of the prisoner, and gave information at Bow-street.

CHARLES RESTALLEE . I am servant to Mr. Harris. About three weeks or a month before the prisoner was taken, he came to the Verulam Club-house, and inquired for Mr. Sergeant Best, who is a member of the club. I told him he was not there - He went away; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. He came again in about a quarter of an hour, spoke to another servant, and went out. On the 24th of December he came again, and asked if Mr. Sergeant Best was dining there? we said he was (he was not there) in order to get him in - We apprehended him, and told him we detained him for stealing some spoons. He said he never saw the house before. We lost five spoons in all - They are generally in the passage.

JOHN MACDONALD. I am also a waiter in the house. The prisoner had been described to me. On the 24th of December I saw him standing at Mr. Sergeant Best's door, which is next to our's - He did not knock; he then came in, and inquired for Mr. Sergeant Best - We detained him.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 67.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-101

267. ANN LOUISA TALICKET was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one hat, value 7s., and one umbrella, value 3s. , the goods of John Phillimore , Esq.

CHARLES DEW. I am an officer. On the 20th of December I saw the prisoner in Scotland-yard with the hat and umbrella under her cloak, and detained her.

ELIZA EVES . I am servant to John Phillimore, Esq., who lives at Whitehall . On the 20th of December, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I left the umbrella in the passage while I went to the foot of the stairs-the door was open; I returned, and missed it and the hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-102

268. JOHN TURNER and THOMAS FULLER were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , two bushels of coals, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Taplin .

JOSEPH TAPLIN. I am a coal-merchant , and live at West Drayton, the prisoners are boatmen . I have a warehouse on the side of the Grand Junction Canal . On the 10th of January I received information, went to my warehouse, found it broken open, and two bushels of coals taken away.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. There were twentyfour chaldrous in the place. There was a space that would contain two bushels.

JOHN KINGSTON. I am a boatboy, and so are the prisoners - They belong to Mr. Mags's boat, which was in the canal. I saw the prisoners go to the warehouse, and break a board down at the end, the coals then fell out. They put them into a bag, and carried them into the cabin of their boat. I am sure they are the men. Harris and Cox were with them. I was going to get my father's horse, and saw them do it.

Cross-examined. I was about ten yards off. Two took the coals, and two were watching. I had seen them before.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am a boatman. I was dressing myself in the cabin-Turner was in the same boat with me. Fuller and Cox belong to another boat. Turner took the poker out of the cabin - I asked him what he was going to do with it? he made no answer. When I had dressed myself he brought in a small tub full of coals - I do not know where he got them from - I did not see them taken.

Q. Was you not near the warehouse - A. I did not see what they did with the poker. He brought a nose-bag full of coals in. I saw the board broken down at the corner of the warehouse.

Cross-examined. I was taken up for it. I was not watching. I did not see Kington there.

JOHN KINGSTON re-examined. Turner and Harris took the coals-Fuller and Cox were standing to see if any person came. They broke the board with a hammer.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

FULLER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-103

269. FRANCIS SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , one pair of shoes, value 6s. 6d., the goods of Andrew Wake , privately in his shop .

ANDREW WAKE. I am a brush-maker , and live at Uxbridge . I sell shoes . On the 13th of December I lost a pair of shoes from my shop, and followed the prisoner. When he saw me he began to run, and threw the shoes away. He had a stick with a three-pronged fork at the end. I secured him, and picked the shoes up.

REBECCA WAKE. I and my brother were sitting by the fire. On looking into the shop, I saw the prisoner draw his arm from the counter and go out. We ran out - I saw him throw the shoes away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I cannot deny it.

GUILTY. Aged 46.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-104

270. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 142 yards of woollen stuff, value 8l., the goods of Charles Robinson , privately from his shop .

CHARLES ROBINSON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Great Warner-street, Clerkenwell . On the 3d of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise at the door, and looking towards a pile of goods, I missed a bundle of stuff that was on it-it was about two feet from the door. I immediately saw some person pass the window with it. I went out, and secured the prisoner with the goods under his arm. He said, "Let me go, as you have got your goods. He resisted very much.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not privately . Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-105

271. CHARLES WILLIAMS , THOMAS SMITH , and SAMUEL WRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , seventeen shawls, value 25s., and fourteen yards of cotton, value 20s., the goods of Joseph Smith , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH SMITH. I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Poplar . I lost the property on the 13th of January.

JAMES THOMPSON. I am a corn-dealer, and live in High-street, Poplar. I saw the prisoners run up to the corner of Queen-street into Mr. Holles's lobby; I there saw them tying up some things - I told Renfold to watch them while I went to see who had lost any thing; when I returned they were gone up Poplar - I ran after them, and left Renfold watching there, and went for Smith, the officer, and gave them in charge of Thompson, the officer. When we took Wright he said he would cut my throat.

JOSEPH RENFOLD. I am a corn-dealer. I saw the prisoners standing at the pawnbroker's lobby door, wrapping something up; I ran up Hale-street, came down again, and stopped the prisoner, Smith, with a bundle, and asked him what he had got? he said, what was it to me - I told him I thought he had not come honestly by it; he said he brought it from Shadwell to pledge at Poplar, and would show me where he got it.

JAMES THOMPSON. I took the prisoners in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS - GUILTY. Aged 17.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 20.

WRIGHT - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-106

272. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eliza Brice , about six o'clock in the night of the 13th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 12lbs. of leather, value 20s. , her property.

ELIZA BRICE. I am a leather-cutter , and live in York-street, Westminster . On the 13th of January, about six o'clock, I saw the street - door open, it had been latched before with a spring latch-the shop-door was also open-it is an inner door in the passage; my lodgers go through the passage, and can go out and in. My son brought the prisoner in; I do not know whether the lodgers came in or out after I latched the door - I had been in my room half an hour.

JOHN HYMAS. I am a butcher, and son-in-law to Mrs. Brice. As I was going out of the parlour-door from tea, I saw the shop-door open, and the prisoner rush out; I pursued, and brought him back. He had a quantity of leather - I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of Stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-107

273. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Florey , about ten o'clock in the forenoon of the 9th of January (he and others of his family being therein), with intent to steal, and stealing therein three petticoats, value 30s. , the goods of James Newman .

SARAH NEWMAN. I lodge in Mr. Florey's front kitchen. On Thursday morning I put the petticoats in the back kitchen to dry; I left the window shut, and locked the door, and gave the key to the landlady, as she, and the other lodgers, dry their things there also. Next evening I went there, and missed them - I do not know when they were taken.

CHARLES FLOREY . I am the landlord of the house. On Thursday and Friday I saw the window shut down.

MARY FLOREY . I had the key of the back kitchen, and saw the things safe on Thursday evening. I put the key in the shop.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. On Friday morning, the 9th of January, I met a young man in Charles-street, Drury-lane; he turned two or three times, and looked towards Drury-lane, from where he came; suspecting something, I stood a moment or two, and saw the prisoner on the opposite side, looking down Charles-street - he saw me cross towards him, and he crossed directly opposite Short's-gardens; I stopped him, and asked him what he had in this bundle? he said it was some things for his sister, and that he brought them from his mother. I found they were three wet petticoats. It was about half-past eleven o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met two young men in the Newroad; they told me to come with them; the prosecutor's daughter called one of them in - He came out with the bundle, gave it to me, and old me to go on, and said he would follow. When we came to Oxford-street he said it was stolen.

JOHN WILD. I am a hair-dresser. On the 9th of January, about a quarter after nine o'clock, I saw two lads come out of the house; they had nothing in their hands - I did not see the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of Stealing only . Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-108

274. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Wilson , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 13th of December (certain persons being therein), and stealing therein one gown, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Walling .

LUCIA WALLING . I am the wife of Joseph Walling , who is a labourer , and lives at Homerton . Robert Wilson lodges with us. On the 13th of December I was at work; a little before nine o'clock my husband came home, and found the windows broken. I searched my drawers, and missed the gown. I suspected the prisoner, who lived in the neighbourhood; we went to look for him several nights, and gave information to the patrol to stop him.

WILLIAM FULLBROOK. I am a patrol. On the 18th of December Walling told me to look for the prisoner - A little before twelve o'clock that night I saw him go up a turning - I crossed over, he turned back, and made away from me - I took hold of him, and asked him what he did about the streets at that time? he made no answer - I asked him if his name was not Simmons? he said, yes - I charged him with getting into Mrs. Walling's room, and taking her gown; he said he did do it, and that he had pledged it for 5s. at Shoreditch - He gave me the duplicate.

GEORGE KNIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. On the 13th of December the gown was pledged with me for 5s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of Stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-109

275. ROSE O'HARA , MARGARET HUMPHREYS , and HANNAH BRIANT were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Redman , on the 14th of December , at St-Paul's, Shadwell, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 15s. in monies numbered , his property.

JAMES REDMAN . I am a carpenter , and live at Cottage-place, Poplar. On the 14th of December, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went to the Ship and Shears, public-house, at Shadwell ; the prisoner, O'Hara, was there, and asked me several times to go home to breakfast with her - She lived opposite the Ship and Shears. I went home with her, but saw no preparation for breakfast; it was between eight and nine o'clock. I had been at the Ship and Shears sometime. She asked me to go up stairs with her daughter, who is the prisoner Briant; I went up, and, not liking the appearance of the place, I wanted to go down, when she struck me several times in the face with her fist. O'Hara came up, and struck me across the breast, and held me while Briant took some halfpence out of my waistcoat pocket. I went down stairs, they followed me-O'Hara demanded 2s. for the use of the room, which I gave her. Briant struck me several times again - I went towards the door, which I found fast. O'Hara, Briant, and Humphreys (whom I had not seen before), came to the street-door, and knocked me down-O'Hara put her knee on my breast, and held me down-Humphries held me also, while Briant took my silver out of my trowsers pocket. I called out murder several times, when she put her apron into my mouth to stop my breath; a great many people came about the door and windows - A young man came up, and called through the window to them; they rose from me-the young man said he would fetch an officer-an officer was brought, and they were taken to Shadwell-office. This was on the ground-floor-the window is close to the door.

Q. Why did you not call out when you was up stairs - A. I did, but nobody came to my assistance till I got down. I was not in liquor - I lost 15s;

WILLIAM HENRY STEVENS. I am a butcher. I was cleaning my horse in Elbow-lane, and heard a man crying out; being used to hear disturbances at Mrs. O'Hara's house, I did not notice it particularly. After some time, hearing him again, I went to the door, and found it fast; I went to the window, looked through a broken pane of glass, and saw the prosecutor in the act of getting up from the floor, with his mouth bleeding in a very violent manner-his pockets were turned inside out, and his money laying on the floor. I saw the prisoners, Briant and Humphreys, take it off the floor, and carry it to the fire-place, where O'Hara was sitting. O'Hara turned her head, and saw me overlooking her; she gave the other two to understand that somebody was overlooking them, and then they stood still as if nothing had happened. I told them they ought to be ashamed of themselves to treat a man in that way, as not to be satisfied with robbing him, but wanted to murder him. They denied what I accused them of, and used very bad language. I went to Shadwell-office, and got Brown - We went into the house; it is in Elbow-lane, opposite the Ship and Shears.

Prisoner O'HARA. Q. Was I drunk or sober - A. Sober, and so was the prosecutor. All the prisoners lived in the house.

THOMAS BROWN . I am an officer. I was sent for, and

took the prisoners in charge. Briant denied taking the money; when I was going to search her she gave me 7s. 6d., which she said she picked off the floor. O'Hara was not drunk, she had been drinking-the prosecutor was perfectly sober; his mouth was cut, and bled much - He was crying; the flap of his trowsers and pockets were torn off. I found 10d. in copper on O'Hara, but nothing on Humphreys. I afterwards learned that O'Hara was spending money for liquor, and went to the watch-house to her, and found 2s. 7d. on her. There were two 3s. pieces among the money which Briant gave me; the prosecutor said there were two 3s. pieces among his money.

O'HARA'S Defence. The prosecutor came to my house between eleven and twelve o'clock. Humphreys was sitting in a chair - He behaved very rude to her, and made a great noise, which brought Briant down from bed. I told him to go home - He pulled out two 3s. pieces, a 1s., and a 6d., saying he had money, and he would stop. He struck Briant, she got up and struck him - He fell on the floor, and called out murder-the two women picked the money up, and gave it to him - He would not take it, saying there was more, and pulled his pockets out. He laid the money on the table till the officer came - I never touched it.

HUMPHREYS'S Defence. It is as she has said.

BRIANT'S Defence. The noise awoke me, I came down stairs - He laid hold of us, and asked us to go up stairs with him. I told him to go home, he struck us, and pushed us about - I pushed him, and he called out murder. He was not sober.

WILLIAM HENRY STEVENS re-examined. The prisoners are not relations.

O'HARA - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 38.

HUMPHREYS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

BRIANT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-110

276. JOHN GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one looking-glass, value 2l., the goods of John Rothera , privately in his shop .

JOHN ROTHERA . I am a broker , and live in Drury-lane . I keep an open shop. On the 17th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was up stairs; when I came down I missed the glass off a chest of drawers.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am an officer. On the 17th of December I met the prisoner running up Drury-lane with the glass - I stopped him, he said he found it - He afterwards said he did it through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of Stealing, but not privately . Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-111

277. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , at St. George's Hanover-square, three coats, value 2l.; two pair of pantaloons, value 10s.; three waistcoats, value 3s.; five neckcloths, value 5s.; and one sheet, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Bulkley , Esq -in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BULKLEY , ESQ. I live at Long's Hotel, Bond-street . I lost the articles stated in the indictment out of my room.

WILLIAM DELL. I am a waiter at Long's Hotel. On the 12th of January I was at the bar, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the prisoner coming from the staircase; he appeared very bulky, as if he had something about him. I followed him, and overtook him about eight or ten yards from the door, and asked what he had been doing up stairs? he said he had been to the water-closet, and that the housemaid had showed him up. I told him I thought he had something about him which did not belong to him, and asked him to come back. He then said he had lived in the house, which I knew to be false - I collared him, and brought him back, and put him into the coffee-room, and sent for an officer. While the officer was gone for, he pulled the things from under his clothes, and some from his pockets. The officer came and took him.

Prisoner. Q. What parish is the house in - A. St. James's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of Stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-112

278. THOMAS AMOS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one wash-hand stand, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Bracher .

SARAH BRACHER . I am the wife of Thomas Bracher , who is a carpenter, and lives in Broad-street, Golden-square. On the 16th of December I saw the prisoner take the wash-hand stand from the door - I ran out, and secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-113

279. SAMUEL KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Burge , from his person .

JOHN BURGE . On the 24th of December, at eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Covent Garden-market , buying some things; I felt some person at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round, and saw the prisoner walking away very fast; I collared him, and accused him of taking it; he said he had not got it - I insisted on searching him - He opened his arms, and it fell from under his left arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-114

280. ROBERT CARRUTHERS and WILLIAM SPEARS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , one box, value 1s., and 64 lbs. of candles, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Robinson , Sen. and Thomas Robinson , Jun.

THOMAS ROBINSON , JUN. I am in partnership with

Thomas Robinson, Sen., we are tallow-chandlers , and live in St. George's in the East . The prisoner, Carruthers, was our carman . On the 20th of December, about nine o'clock in the evening, he went out to get his clothes, he slept in the house - He did not return; I missed the box of candles. On Sunday Lewis called on me; I went with him, and found the prisoner in custody, and the box of candles.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman, and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. On the 18th of December the prisoner, Spears, came to my shop, and asked the price of a handkerchief; he asked permission to leave two baskets which he had, at my house till the evening - He did not call for them; next morning he came, and said he wanted other things, and that he could serve me with a few candles - I said I had no objection; he left the baskets till next morning. He came again on Saturday night, with a box, containing 64 lbs. of candles; I told him I did not want that quantity; he said they were not all for me; I told him they would not suit me - He went away, I followed about one hundred yards from him. I met Fair and Morris, and informed them; they went with me, and stopped him in Red Lion-street. I had not seen the other prisoner. I went home, and in about half an hour the prisoner, Carruthers, came, and asked if a young man had been there with candles? I said, no; he said he was his partner, and he told him he was coming there, and he not returning, made him come for him. I told him he had better wait, and asked him up stairs. I sent for the officers; he said his name was Thompson, that he lived with Godfrey, a tallow-chandler, in the Commercial-road. The officers came and secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. They were strangers to me. I was tried here twelve months ago, and acquitted.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I believe it was six months ago that I was tried here. I was a witness here three times last Session, and once the Session before. I buy pawnbroker's duplicates.

JAMES FAIR . I am an officer. On the 20th of December, about nine o'clock in the evening, Lewis gave me information; I followed Spears into Red Lion-street, with a box on his shoulder - I secured him. The box contained candles. I afterwards went to Lewis's house, and took Carruthers.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I assisted in taking Spears; he said he was carrying the candles for a man. About three-quarters of an hour after Lewis sent for us; we went and took Carruthers. He said the candles came from Godfrey's, in the Commercial-road, and that he lived with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARRUTHERS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SPEARS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-115

281. JOSEPH TRUNDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one watch, value 20s.; one ribbon, value 1d.; and one key, value 1d., the goods of Joseph Shwamenkruge , from his person .

JOSEPH SHWAMENKRUGE. I was servant to Mr. Balfour, of Portland-place, who is now dead. On the 25th of December I was at the Mason's Arms, public-house, Charlotte-street, Portland-place, I dined there, the prisoner sat next to me; we were very comfortable together-there were a great many persons in Company. Just as it got dark the prisoner began to get quarrelsome, and wanted to fight; he fought with one man, after which he began upsetting the glasses; we wanted him to leave the room, he refused, and abused the landlady; I told him he should not stay in the room, and collared him to turn him out - We took him into the street, he slipped down-as soon as he got up, he advanced towards me - We closed, he threw me, and cut my head; he was pulled away. I went into the parlour, and in about twenty minutes I missed my watch-it could not have fallen out. I went out, collared him, and charged him with taking it; he said he knew nothing about it. I gave him in charge; my watch was found in the area of the next house, I heard it fall from him into the area.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The watch could not fall out in the scuffle-the blow made me insensible.

JOHN BRICK. I am a watchman. On the 25th of December I was going up Charlotte-street, the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge; he went backwards from the middle of the street till he got to the area - He then took the watch out of his waistcoat pocket, and threw it down - I saw him do it.

MICHAEL NEALE . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner throw the watch down the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-116

282. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , from the person of Mary Port, 20s. in monies numbered, and three 1l. bank notes , the property of John Nixon .

JOHN NIXON . I keep the Black Swan, public-house, in Ryder's-court, Leicester-square . On the 6th of January, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner came to my house, and said he was recommended by a person at Meux and Reid's to buy some wine of me; that he kept a dancing room in Wardour-street, and wanted four bottles of wine sent there, with change for a 5l. note; the girl was to go with him - I sent Mary Purt , my servant, with him, and gave her three 1l. notes and 20s. in silver. He particularly asked to have as many sixpences as I could send. he was to give the girl 5l. note when she delivered the wine; she was cautioned not to part with the money till she got the note. They left my house together. In about half an hour she returned, crying, and produced a blank piece of India paper to me. I never received the note.

MARY PURT . On the 6th of January the prisoner came to my master's house, and ordered four bottles of wine; he said I was to go with him to Wardour-street. My master gave me three 1l. notes and 20s. in silver, in a piece of paper. I went with him as far as Dean-street; he took me down Mead's-court, in a dark place, and told me to wait five minutes till he brought the note from his uncle; he returned in about five minutes, and gave me a piece of paper. The wine stood on the ground; he snatched the

money out of my hand, and ran away, leaving the win behind. I called out "Stop thief!" and went back to my master. Next morning I saw him in custody - I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody in Peter-street, Soho. The girl picked him out from several other persons. I found a piece of India paper on him similar to that he gave her, and a 1l. note, which Mr. Nixon claimed.

JOHN NIXON re-examined. The 1l. note has my writing on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-117

283. ALEXANDER EDMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one tub, value 1s., and 50lbs. of butter, value 30s. , the goods of Richard Bailey .

CHARLES CLITHERO . I am an officer. On the 6th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I was at Norton Falgate, Middlesex, and saw Bailey's cart going by loaded with butter-tubs; the prisoner, and several others, passed by the tail of the cart from the pavement to the road-the prisoner turned back, and took the tub out of the cart, and put it on his shoulder, and ran down White Lion-street - the other men followed him; I pursued, calling out, Stop thief! he threw the tub off his shoulder - I secured him. I am sure he is the man.

BENJAMIN BEVES. I am a headborough. I heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner. No other person was running. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I ran after the man, and they took me. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-118

284. JOHN LOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , one shirt, value 4s. , the goods of John Birt .

BENJAMIN BALDWIN. I am servant to John Birt , who keeps a ready-made linen warehouse . On the 11th of December, the bar at the shop-door fell down, the shirts were hanging at the door, I ran out and stopped the prisoner with the shirt - He three it down.

HENRY JAY. I saw the prisoner take the shirt, and saw him drop it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BOND. I took the prisoner into custody; the bar on which the shirts hung was cut away.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-119

285. WILLIAM COLE and MARGARET STIFF were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one handkerchief, value 1s., and one apron, value 1s. , the goods of William Vickers .

CLARA VICKERS . I am the wife of William Vickers, who lives at Wanstead, Essex . On the 25th of November I lost the things out of my yard, where they hung to dry.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I am an officer of Lambeth-street Office. On the 27th of November I heard of the robbery, I went and found the prisoners in Swan-yard, East Smithfield, and told them I came to search the room-it was Cole's room; I found a handkerchief and an apron there which the prosecutor claimed; Coles said they belonged to his wife, pointing to Stiff. I found she flounce of the prosecutrix's gown in her work-bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COLE's Defence. I let the bed out to different people.

STIFF's Defence. I went to Cole's room that night, and know nothing of it.

COLE - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

STIFF- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-120

286. JOHN SAMUELS and JOSEPH PARKER were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , certain brass cocks (i.e. two copper cans with brass cocks, value 2l. 10s.) , belonging to the Company of Proprietors of the West Middlesex Water Works , then fixed to a certain building of their's (the prisoners haveing no title, or claim of title to the same).

The Act of Parliament constituting the Company, being produced, the Court were of opinion that it did not empower them to prosecute under that name, and that the indictment contained no distinct averment.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-121

287. WILLIAM HENRY RAWLINSON , JOHN RAWLINSON , JUN., and JOHN RAWLINSON , SEN. were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , nine pair of boots, value 18l., the goods of George Marsh and Thomas Charles Cadogan , in a certain boat, on the navigable River of Thames .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Edward Sage , Sen.

The evidence in this case was the same as that produced against the prisoners in the former Trial (See No. 236), except that part of the property was found in possession of John Rawlinson, Sen. The goods being stolen from a lighter instead of a boat, as the indictment stated, the Jury found

W. H. RAWLINSON - GUILTY.

J. RAWLINSON, JUN. - GUILTY.

J. RAWLINSON, SEN. - GUILTY.

Capitally convicted before.

Aged 47.

Of stealing, but not from a boat on the navigable River of Thames .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-122

288. MICHAEL LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one gown, value 1s.; seven napkins, value 4s.; one quilt, value 2s.; and four brushes, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Sarah Hoare ; and one iron, value 2s. , the goods of Eliza Cox .

MARY WELLS. I live in Rumford-mews, Marylebone . One the 15th of December the prisoner came to lodge in

my one-pair front room. On the 19th, about half-past ten o'clock at night. I was alarmed, and told that my things were thrown out of window. He must have broken open my drawers, tied them up in a bundle, and threw them out.

JOHN FISHER. I live next door to the prosecutrix. On the 19th of December, at ten o'clock at night, a gentleman came, and asked me to take a trunk to Piccadilly. While I was talking to him at my door, two men were standing at a stable-door opposite. I stood at my door a few minutes-the watchman came by, calling ten - He went up, and sent them away; one went one way, and the other another-one abused him very much. I remained at my door till they got into Dorset-street. I heard the watchman tell him to go about his business. In about two minutes the other man passed me. I went out-there was a great mob collected; the man was abusing the watchman, and denied being at the house at all. I pointed the other man out who was with him - They followed me home. I went to bed, and in about two minutes I looked out of window, and saw them quarrelling again. I told the watchman I thought something wrong was going on - He went away. I still kept looking out. When the watchmen got to the other end of the mews the men came in again, stood opposite my door, and whistled. I heard the window open. The watchman came into the mews again, and the men went away. The watchman went out again, and the men returned to the same place again, and whistled again. One of the men looked up and said," All is right." I looked up, and saw the bundle thrown out. I called out Stop thief! he was alarmed and ran away; I called the watch. the prosecutrix opened her door - I told her the bundle had been thrown out, and she picked it up. I went up to the prisoner's room, he had just undressed himself - We brought him down.

THOMAS COFFIN . I am a watchman. The last witness has spoken correctly. I went up to the prisoner's room, he was then undressing himself. There was no other person in the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-123

289. WILLIAM STOREY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one portmanteau, value 5s.; one coat, value 2l.; two pair of breeches, value 2l.; and 12 waistcoats, value 2l. , the goods of Sir James Graham , Bart.

THOMAS HODDEL . I am butler to Sir James Graham , Bart. On the 4th of December, at six o'clock in the evening, the portmanteau, containing the articles stated in the indictment, was strapped behind the carriage, which was in Laughan-place, Portman-place - I got off the dickey, and missed it. A man came up, and said a person was in custody with it. I ran along Laughan-place, it being foggy, I saw no person, returned, and found the prisoner in the custody of two watchmen. Clarke said he was one of the men who took it.

CHARLES CLARKE . I was in Chandos-street - I saw three men following the carriage. When they got to Laughan-place they pulled the trunk down. I was going to run to a man just by-the prisoner asked me what I wanted there, and put up his arm to prevent me from telling the man. I am sure he is one of the men.

THOMAS MAIGNEY. I am a watchman. I met the prisoner, and Clarke pursuing him, who said he was one of the party. I told him to stop - He ran quicker. I secured him. The cover of the trunk was found within a few yards from where he was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-124

290. JOHN THOMASON and JOHN COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2s. 3d. in copper monies numbered, the goods of John Freake , from his person .

JOHN FREAKE. I am a shoemaker . On the 13th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I stopped to hear a song, at the corner of Somerset-street, Whitechapel . In three or four minutes I felt some person at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner, Thomason, with my pocket in his hand - He had cut it off. He gave it to the prisoner, Collins, who went immediately on the other side of the crowd. I collared Thomason, and called out Stop thief!-Collins ran away. I kept hold of Thomason. I had 2s. 3d. in copper money in my pocket. Collins ran about two hundred yards and was secured.

THOMAS RODGERS. I am a waiter. As I was coming by the end of Somerset-street, the prosecutor turned round, collared Thomason, and called out, Stop thief! Collins ran by me. When I got close to him he put his hand in his coat-pocket, and threw the halfpence from him. I secured him.

CHARLES ANGAS. I was coming out of my house in Whitechapel, about half-past seven o'clock of the 13th of December, heard the alarm, and saw Collins running. When I got to Castle-street he was stopped. A great many halfpence were picked up just by him.

THOMASON'S Defence. I deny it. He wanted me to give him 2s.

COLLINS'S Defence. I was hearing the song. I did not move.

THOMASON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-125

291. MARY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , two live fowls, price 3s. , the goods of Henry Elliot .

HENRY ELLIOT. I am a boot-closer , and live in Brickcourt, Great Shire-lane , the prisoner lodged with me. I lost my fowls, and found the feathers in her kitchen, and the fowls boiling in her pot.

WILLIAM ELLIOT. I am the son of the prosecutor. On the 13th of December, the prisoner came to the kitchen several times for water-when she came out of the kitchen the second time she had something bulky in her apron.

ESTHER ELLIOT. I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 13th of December we lost the fowls-at night the prisoner borrowed a large saucepan of me - She said it was to boil a large piece of pork and greens-this made

me suspect her. About her dinner-time (twelve o'clock), I went up, and told her I wanted my sancepan, and I would lend her another. Her husband said I should not stop her pot from boiling. She said I only wanted to see what was in the pot. I said,

"if there is nothing there that you are ashamed of, why do you object?" Her husband asked me if I had lost any thing? I told him he knew I had. I sat there sometime, and said I would dine with them - They said I should have none of their dinner. I said I would see them eat. I stopped there two hours. At last she took the pot off, and emptied it into the slop-pail in the cupboard - They were two fowls; there was no pork. Her husband said he did not know how she got them. They began eating them, saying, if they were to go prison they would go with their bellies full. I gave them in charge. We found some feathers in the room.

JOHN BRIGHT. I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. She said she bought the fowls at Charing-cross for 3s. 6d.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a higler.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-126

292. DANIEL MALONY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , one gown, value 5s. , the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH. I live in Mercer-street, Long-acre . I went over the way, a young man said there was a man in my house, I turned round and saw the prisoner come out with the gown under his arm. I secured him. He threw the gown away, and I picked it up.

THOMAS JONES. I searched the prisoner, and found six new combs in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-127

293. WILLIAM LACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , one show-glass, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Dawson .

CHARLES DAWSON. I am a confectioner , and live in Crown-street, St. Giles's . On the 10th of December, about nine o'clock at night, I missed my show-glass from my window; I ran out and met the prisoner with it; I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-128

294. WILLIAM NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , one carpenter's plane, value 8s., and seven plow-irons, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Walker .

HENRY WALKER. I am a carpenter . On the 24th of December I left my tools at Mr. Hawes's shop, St. Martin's-lane ; I went again on the 5th of January, and missed them.

ROBERT PILSWORTH. I am foreman to Mr. Hawes. The prisoner was his apprentice . He stopped away from work, I went to him, and asked him about the tools; he said he pledged them.

THOMAS BALFOUR . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Green-street. On the 1st of January the prisoner pledged the plow and irons with me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-129

295. LAZARUS LEVY and SARAH ROSE were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 500 lbs. of sugar, value 18l. , the goods of John Francis Puist .

JOHN FRANCIS PUIST . I am a sugar-refiner , and live in Old Montague-street, Whitechapel . On the 2d of January, between two and three in the morning, the watchman alarmed me-the house was secured before I went to bed. I found the sugar-house open, and a hogshead broken open-two moulds were empty; we traced the sugar, by its dropping, up to the step of a door in Finch-street, about 150 yards off; a man ran out of that house, and escaped. We traced the sugar, by its falling up the stairs, to the one pair room, where we found it in a drawer, which was drawn out-there was nearly 5 cwt. of it. The prisoners were in bed in that room.

WILLIAM HORNBLOW. I am a watchman. Between two and three o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise in the sugar-house; before I got the door two men rushed out, knocked me down, and ran away. I gave the alarm.

WILLIAM DOWNS. I am a watchman. I pursued after the men that ran out, and traced the sugar to the house, up stairs to the room where the prisoners were found-the door was about a foot open; some of the sugar laid on the floor, in a heap, and some in a drawer-the prisoners said they knew nothing about it; there was a washhand stand in the room, and some person had been washing there. Rose said it was her room. There was no appearance of sugar any where else. It would take two or three persons to remove the sugar. I found a dark lanthorn in the sugar-house.

CHARLES ANGUS. I am a headborough. I traced the sugar to the house, and found it there.

LEVY'S Defence. It was in the house all night. I know nothing of it.

ROSE'S Defence. Two men asked me to let them leave it there, and they brought it.

LEVY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROSE- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-130

296. SARAH LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one pair of sheets, value 7s.; one pillow-case, value 6d.; one pillow, value 3s., and one looking-glass, value 4s., the goods of James Tolman , in a lodging-room .

JAMES TOLMAN . I live in Vine-street, Chandos-street . On the 1st of January the prisoner took a furnished-room of me at 9s. a week; on the 5th she left, without notice; I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of her room.

THOMAS WEBB. I am shopman to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, Brydges-street. On the 2d of January the pri

soner pledged the sheet and pillow-case with me for 3s.6d,(Property produced and sworn to.) Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-131

297. ROBERT WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , seven ounces of solder, value 3d.; seven ounces of wire, value 6d.; sixteen brass rods, value 16s.; one hammer, value 1s., and two screw-drivers, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Moore .

THOMAS MOORE , I am an iron and tin-plate worker , and live in Little Earl-street, Seven Dials; the prisoner was my servant . On the 16th of December, having some suspicion, I told my men I must search them; I found the solder and wire in the prisoner's coat-pocket, which hung up; I gave him in charge. I went to his lodgings, and found the rest of the articles stated in the indictment there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I have six men.

RICHARD BECKERTON. I took the prisoner into custody. He said if I would go to his lodgings he would give me the property (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-132

298. WILLIAM JACKSON and MICHAEL FLYNN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d December , 100 printed bound books, value 5l. the goods of William Fox .

WILLIAM FOX. I have formerly been a bookseller, and am now the proprietor of the Minor Theatre, in Catherine-street , which I let to James Watson . I have a room there which contains a large quantity of books. The prisoners were employed as porters at the Theatre, but they had no business in the room where the books were. I turned Watson out of the premises in September, a few days after I went there and found the front door forced open, and the inner door also - I missed above hundred books, which were safe the day before; I found a great quantity of them at Porter's, they had been sold for waste paper.

Cross-examined by ADOLPHUS. Watson left before the premises were broken open, the prisoners knew the property was mine.

JOSEPH PORTER. I am a cheesemonger, and live in Blackmoor-street, Clare-market. I have bought waste paper of the prisoner Jackson, several times in December last-it was brought to me with the covers off. The prisoner Flynn, sold me a small quantity about the middle of December. I bought 210lbs. of them, at different times, at 3d. per pound, about 20lbs. or 30lbs. at a time. I neither asked their names or where they lived. Mr. Fox saw about 220lbs, and claimed it.

Cross-examined. We often buy books for waste paper. The booksellers themselves sell them sometimes.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I apprehended the prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JACKSON - GUILTY . - Aged 17.

FLYNN - GUILTY . - Aged 22.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-133

299. JOHN FARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , at St. Botolph, Without Aldgate, two pair of boots, value 14s., and nine pair of shoes, value 2l., the goods of Samuel Emmens , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL EMMENS . I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in King-street, Tower-hill, in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate . On the 26th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, a man brought the prisoner to my shop, in custody - I had not seen him before. The man that stopped him took his hat off, and took two pair of shoes out of it; a pair was taken out of each of his sleeves, and several pairs out of his bosom. My wife was in the back-parlour, which commands a view of the shop-none of my servants were in the shop.

FRANCES EMMENS . I was at work in my back-parlour, and saw the prisoner going out of the shop - I ran after him; I missed a great quantity of shoes out of the window-the parlour door was open, in order that I might see into the shop. My husband was up stairs. I ran after the prisoner, calling Stop thief; he was stopped, and the goods taken from him.

JOHN CASSADY. I am a salesman. The prisoner was running up Queen-treet, about twenty-four houses from the prosecutor's, and a woman pursuing him, my master stopped him, but he got away again; I stopped him, and took him back to Emmens's shop; he had nine pair of shoes, and two pair of boots, about his person. He begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-134

300. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 9lbs. of soap, value 6s. , the goods of Robert Ogdin Halliwell .

WILLIAM SKELTON. I am servant to Mr. Robert Ogdin Halliwell , who is an oilman , and lives in Whitechapel . On the 9th of December I saw the prisoner take a parcel off the oil-cistern, and walk out of the shop with it. I followed and brought him back - He threw it into the kennel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-135

301. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , about the hour of twelve in the night, from a nursery ground belonging to Thomas Jenkins , 12 roots and shrubs, value 20s. , his property.

THOMAS JENKINS . I keep a nursery-ground in the New Road, Marylebone . On the 25th of November I lost twelve train-trees, which were growing and standing against the pales in the nursery-ground - They were worth 3l. at the trade-price.

WILLIAM TOWNSEND. I am foreman to Mr. Jenkins. I lost twelve train-trees, which were growing and standing

in the ground - I missed them at eight o'clock in the morning; I had seen them the night before at dusk. I went to Mr. Beauclerc's, in the Hampstead-road, and found them all there. I am sure they are the same which were lost.

ELIZA WELLS . I am servant to Mr. Beauclerc, who lives in the Hampstead-road. I paid the prisoner 34s. for the twelve trees, at the latter end of November-he was a stranger to us - He said he was a gardener. Mr. Beauclerc employed him as a gardener.

JOHN SMITH. I took the prisoner into custody. He said he bought them of a man at Highgate. I produce one of the trees.

WILLIAM TOWNSEND . I planted them myself, and have had the management of them for three years. I am sure they are the same trees that were taken out of my master's ground.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in the highway. I cannot produce the man that I bought them of.

MR. THOMAS JENKINS. Fruit-trees are never hawked about in the highways. They are peach or nectarine trees. Any gardener could tell that they were of that species. They are plants.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-136

303. WILLIAM CLARK was again indicted for steel-for stealing, on the 22d of November , 48 currant-trees, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Graham .

ROBERT GRAHAM . I am a nurseryman , and live at Camden Town . In the beginning of November I had been robbed twice, and on the 22d I ordered my man to take up the currant-trees, which stood in a regular form, to sort, and divide the large and small. He took them out of the ground, and was sorting them on the 22d and 23d. On Sunday, the 23d, Smith, the officer, came - I told him, and asked him to look at the remainder of the trees, that if he saw any like them he might know them-some had been taken away the night before. I lost five or six hundred in all. We went to Mr. Mills's, public-house, in the Hampstead-road - I told him not to tell me which he had bought, and I would point out my trees myself. The first I saw in his garden was mine. I pointed out twelve which I knew. He said he bought them of the prisoner. I found twelve more in the next garden, which I knew. I went into four gardens, and found twelve in each - I pointed them out myself. The other gardens belong to Barnes, Showler, and Baldwin.

JOHN TIGHE . I am servant to Mr. Graham. I took the trees up ont of the ground a day or two before - I know them to be the same that I took up.

WILLIAM DEACON. I am gardener to Mr. Graham. I know the trees to be his property perfectly well.

WILLIAM SHOWLER . I live in the Hampstead-road. The trees that were taken out of my garden I bought of the prisoner - (looking at them)-these are them; I gave him 14s. for the whole. I am certain he is the man. I bought them on a Saturday, I believe.

THOMAS MILLS . (looking at the trees) - I bought these currant-trees of the prisoner about a fortnight or three weeks before he was taken - I gave him 9s. for three dozen.

JOHN BARNES . I bought a dozen currant-trees of the prisoner, and one dozen of gooseberries for 4s. 6d. - (looking at them)-these are the same.

JOHN SMITH. I apprehended the prisoner. The trees answer the description the prosecutor gave me.

ROBERT GRAHAM . The three parcels of trees produced are mine, and are the same trees which were pulled up and placed in my garden. I know one in particular, by its being broken in removing.

JOHN TIGHE . I know them all-the one that is broken in particular.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-137

304. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , one watch, value 3l.; two seals, value 1l.; one ribbon, value 1d.; one handkerchief, value 6d.; and two 1l. bank notes , the property of Peter Ewen , and JOHN GOUGH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

PETER EWEN . I am a sailor . On the 22d of December, I met the prisoner, Brown, in Drury-lane, and went home with her to Parker's-lane . In the morning, when I awoke, I missed my watch, found her gone, and the door fastened outside. I was tipsy.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. I apprehended Gough in Parker-street. I received information, went to Bermondsey, and took Brown. I found the watch in Gough's coat-pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.)

Reference Number: t18180114-138

305. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one hat, value 4s. , the goods of David Moses .

DAVID MOSES . I am a slopseller , and live in Parsons-street . On the 7th of January I lost the hat.

SAMUEL MOSES . I was in my father's shop between six and seven o'clock of the 7th of January, the prisoner came in and asked to look at some blue trowsers. While I went to call my father, he ran off with the hat.

REUBEN SOLOMON. I saw the prisoner take the hat from the door.

RACHAEL MOSES . Between six and seven o'clock of the 7th of January, the prisoner offered a hat to me for sale - I would not buy it.

NATHANIEL NATHAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-139

306. JOHN SHEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Boiden .

ABRAHAM LANGLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Boiden , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Houndsditch . On the 26th of December, about one o'clock, I heard the cry of Stop thief! ran out, and saw the prisoner with the cotton, which he had taken from the door.

WILLIAM WOODFORD. I am a cabinet-maker. I saw the prisoner go to the door, take a piece of cotton down, and put it in his apron - I secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man-dropped it by me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before. Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-140

307. JOHN STRUGNELL and JAMES DENTON were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , one pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of John Ross .

JOHN ROSS . I keep a shoe-stall , in Feather stone-street . On the 19th of December I went to my leather-dresser's, and saw the prisoners at the corner of the street - they watched me - I did not like their looks. I returned in about five minutes, and missed the boots. I am sure they are the men.

EDWARD RICHARDSON. I saw the prisoner, Denton, come from Ross's stall with something under his apron, and go towards Tabernacle-walk-the other prisoner was with him, walking after him, and looking behind. I am sure they are the men.

JOHN BLAKE . I saw Denton take the boots from the nail, when the prosecutor was gone. Strugnell stood at the corner, and when he saw any person coming he whistled - He also whistled when the prosecutor was gone. I am sure they are the boys.

THOMAS VANN . I apprehended the prisoners. Denton said he sold the boots in Petticoat-lane.

DENTON'S Defence. I never saw them.

STRIGENELL GUILTY . Aged 15.

DENTON GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-141

308. GEORGE BRITTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , two sheets, value 4s.; one pillow, value 2s.; two pillow-cases, value 1s., and one iron, value 6d., the goods of Charles Wickham , in a lodging-room .

CHARLES WICKHAM . I live in Monmouth-row, St. Luke's . I let the prisoner a furnished room at 4s. per week - He lodged five months with me. On the 30th of December I missed the prisoner and the articles stated in the indictment, which were let with the room.

SAMUEL LANGFORD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet and an iron, which the prisoner pledged with me at different times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, my wife was laying in.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-142

309. WILLIAM SPRINGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one saddle, value 20s. , the goods of James Cook .

WILLIAM BORSLEY . I am servant to James Cook , who lives at Hackney . On the 2d of January I locked the stable door-next morning I found it broken open, and the saddle gone.

JOHN CROMWELL. I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 2d of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner with the saddle. He said he was going to take it to Shoreditch to get it repaired.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-143

310. JOSEPH SHEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one hat, value 3s., the goods of John Williams , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a tailor . On the 7th of December, at half-past one o'clock in the morning. I was coming down Holborn - I had been drinking. The prisoner came and snatched my hat off. I gave the alarm, and he was stopped.

GEORGE PERRY. I am a watchman. I heard the cry and stopped the prisoner - the hat dropped from him - They were both intoxicated. The prisoner said he had been drinking with the prosecutor, and took it in a lark.

(property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-144

311. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , four deal boards, value 6s. , the goods of Russell Monday .

RUSSELL MONDAY . I am a bricklayer , and live in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell. On the 9th of December, at six o'clock in the morning, I missed four scaffold boards.

WILLIAM CHIEVAL. I am a lamplighter. Between one and two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prosecutor's door open, and the prisoner came out - He had nothing.

THOMAS BARTON. I am a wood-cutter. I bought the boards of the prisoner for 2s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-145

312. MALCOLM LOGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 3lbs. of pork, value 2s. 6d., and 4lbs. of mutton, value 2s. , the goods of John Clark .

JOHN CLARK. I am a butcher , and live in Clerkenwell . On the 7th of January the meat was taken from my door.

MARTHA DAVIS. I saw the prisoner run into the shop and take the meat. I gave the alarm, and he was stopped.

THOMAS MARKHAM . I saw the prisoner running with the meat, and stopped him - He dropped it.

GEORGE LANE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. He said his mother had turned him out, and he must steal. GUILTY . Aged 15.

Sent to the Refuge for the Destitute .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-146

313. JOSEPH LONNON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , from the person of John Mills , one pocket-book, value 2d.; one 1l. bank note; and a promissory note for the payment and value of 1l. , his property.

JOHN MILLS . I am a bricklayer . On the 27th of December I was at the Swan, public-house, Mile End ; the prisoner asked me for a glass of gin, which I gave him; he followed me out, and caught hold of me in the passage; when he left me I missed my pocket-book.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I saw the prisoner at the public-house; the prosecutor pulled out his pocket-book, and the prisoner looked at it; as soon as the prosecutor went out, the prisoner followed.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-147

314. MARIA HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , one watch, value 6l., and one chain, value 6d., the property of Thomas Riddell , from his person .

THOMAS RIDDELL. I am a cabinet-maker . On the 8th of December I was in Oxford-street ; a woman accosted me, I will not swear that it was the prisoner; it was twelve o'clock at night; she asked me to the something round her hand, and said I was not a gentleman if I refused; she took hold of me - A man came up, and shoved me round; my watch went from my fob just at this time. I did not miss it, nor do I know who took it - I told her to go away. I found my watch at the pawnbroker's next morning. I will not swear the prisoner is the woman.

SAMUEL COATES. I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and the duplicate of the watch found on her. She said it belonged to a man whom she lived with.

EDWARD CONNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wardour-street. On the 9th of December a woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner, pledged the watch with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person gave me the duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-148

315. MARIA HOWARD was again indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one watch, value 2l., and 8s.4d. in monies numbered, the property of Henry Pugh , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-149

316. SARAH POLLY was indicted for bigamy .

There being no proof of her first marriage, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-150

317. WILLIAM HODGETTS was indicted for stealing' on the 22d of December , one shirt, value 1s., and one bible, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Charles ; and one gown, value 5s. , the goods of Sarah Charles .

THOMAS CHARLES . I live in Greenhill 's-rents. I lost the things from my room, where the prisoner and myself slept.

SARAH CHARLES . I lost my things from the same room.

WILLIAM BROCKWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Tiller, pawnbroker, Smithfield-bars. The gown, shirt, and bible were pledged with me, on the 29th of December, by the prisoner.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. He told me where to find the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-151

318. ANDREW HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , two sheets, value 5s.; two blankets, value 18s.; and one rug, value 10s. , the goods of William Kershaw .

JOHN CROSS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I met the prisoner at Ball's-pond Common, on the 30th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, with a bundle. I asked him what it was? he said it was his clothes, which he had brought from Mr. Kershaw's; that he had been painting the house, and slept in the stable while he was there. I took him back to Mr. Kershaw's, who claimed the bundle.

ULYSSE HARRISSON. I am servant to Mr. Kershaw. The prisoner was not employed about the house.

WILLIAM KERSHAW . I live at Newington Green. The things were in my stable for the use of my groom, who slept over it-the prisoner is his brother. The stable was broken open. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-152

319. MARIA RIX was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one seal, value 1s.; one comb, value 2d.; and 8s.6d. in monies numbered, the property of William Johnstone , from his person .

WILLIAM JOHNSTONE . I am a labourer , and live in St. Martin's-lane. On the 15th of December, about twelve o'clock at night, I was going up Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields , towards home, and met the prisoner, who took hold of my arm, and wanted me to go home with her. I told her I was in a hurry, and had got no money, in order to get rid of her. She asked me to give her something to drink, I gave her some halfpence; she still kept hold of me, and put her hands round me; I found her hand in my pocket, on looking round-it was turned out; there was a clean shirt in it, and the rest of the things stated in the indictment. I caught hold of her, and gave her in charge. My comb, seal, and 4s. was found on her. I saw her drop 4s.6d. as she went along - I picked it up. I went no where with her.

PATRICK CARMODY. I was coming up Wild-street, and heard the prosecutor call out - I went up to him, he gave the prisoner in charge. When I took hold of her she dropped 4s.6d. I found 4s. and the comb and seal on her.

NATHANIEL MADDEN . I saw the prisoner drop the money. The prosecutor was quite sober.

(Comb and Seal sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-153

320. JOSEPH DAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one shirt, value 8s., and three handkerchief, value 12s. , the goods of Gideon Acland .

THOMAS BURLTON. I am a pawnbroker, and live at East Smithfield. On the 2d of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner offered to pledge a shirt and a silk handkerchief, which he said were his own, and that he had bought them of a man who lodged with him. I suspected him, and detained him. Mr. Acland afterwards claimed the property.

MARY CHURCH . I am servant to Mr. Acland, who lives at Peckham . The things were safe in the laundry on the 2d of January at eight o'clock in the morning - I missed them soon after.

JOHN SHAW . I took the prisoner into custody. He said he bought the things six days before, and afterwards said it was six weeks since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said I bought them four weeks ago.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-154

321. THOMAS JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one bridle, value 5s. , the goods of John Glansfield .

JOHN GLANSFIELD. I live at Weldhill, Herts. On the 27th of December my father's stable was broken open, and the bridle taken away. I locked it at ten o'clock at night, and found it broken open at six the next morning. I saw the bridle again at Bow-street, where the prisoner was taken. He lived about a mile from me.

JOHN UPTON . I am a patrol. On the 27th of December, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in Goswell-street - road, with the bridle on his shoulder, and twelve dead fowls, quite warm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-155

322. JOHN MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , two saws, value 4s. , the goods of John Causley .

JOHN CAUSLEY . I am a carpenter . On the 9th of January, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I left my saws at a house in Ashford-street, Hoxton - I returned at five, and missed them.

THOMAS WALKER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tabernacle-walk. The prisoner pledged a saw with me on the 9th of January, in the evening.

LEONARD MATHEWS. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 9th of January, in the evening, the prisoner pledged a saw with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-156

323. JAMES IFFGRAVE and WILLIAM MORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 13s. , the goods of Joseph Hawkins .

JOSEPH HAWKINS . I am a linen-draper , and live in St. John's-street, Middlesex . On the 12th of January, at three o'clock in the afternoon, the cotton hung at the door-Thompson came in, and I then missed it. He took me to the watch-house, where I found it.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. On the 12th of January, about half-past three o'clock, I was about one hundred yards from Hawkins's shop, and saw the prisoners running together as fast as they could. Morris had something covered over in his apron. I followed them - They turned up Charterhouse-lane - I lost sight of them for half a minute. I knew Iffgrave before - I caught sight of them again, they were running together; Merris ran into a house, I went in and secured him, and took the cotton out of his apron-Iffgrave was brought back. I asked Morris where it came from? he said, from the linen-draper's, in St. John's-street.

JAMES STAINTON. I saw the prisoner running together up Charterhouse-lane, and took Iffgrave.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

IFFGRAVE'S Defence. I was not with the other man.

MORRIS'S Defence. I found it.

IFFGRAVE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-157

324. PETER HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one saw, value 2s. , the goods of William Franklin .

WILLIAM FRANKLIN. I am a carpenter . On the 4th of December, while I was at dinner, I lost my saw from a building at Ratcliffe . The prisoner was employed at the building.

THOMAS WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Mount, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Gravel-lane. The prisoner pledged the saw at two o'clock on the 26th of December for 2s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-158

325. ELIZA HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , two sheets, value 5s., and one quilt, value 1s. , the goods of Ann Shaw .

ANN SHAW . I live in Tothill-street, Gray's-inn-lane ; the prisoner lodged in my back-room. On the 18th of December I missed my things out of my front-room.

JAMES STEVENS . I am servant to Mr. Beach, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Holborn. On the 18th of December the prisoner pledged a sheet with me for 4s. 3d.

CHARLES BROWN. I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I

took the prisoner into custody; she told me where the things were - She was intoxicated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-159

326. JAMES FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , four live tame fowls, price 8s. , the goods of William Nicholls .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a coachman , and live in the Edgware-road. The prisoner drove a coach for me. I received information, and went to his house, at Chelsea, and found three of my fowls. He begged forgiveness.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. They were taken at different times. The prisoner said they flew into his coach, and that he did not intend to steal them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-160

327. MICHAEL FOX was indicted for that he, on the 10th of December , six pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, each and every of them made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, the same not being then cut in pieces, unlawfully and feloniously did put off to Joseph Fryer , at a lower rate and value than the same did by their denomination import and were counterfeited for, that is to say, for 3s.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating that he did unlawfully put off the said pieces of counterfeitmoney at the rate of six of such pieces of counterfeit money for the sum of 3s., being a lower rate and value than the said did by their denomination import and were counterfeited for.

JOSEPH FRYER. I am a constable of Lincoln's-inn-fields, appointed by the trustees. I live in Princes-street, Gate-street. In consequence of information which I received on the 6th of December,I met a man of the name of Baker, who is a constable of Lincoln's-inn, and Spruhan; I did not know them before-we did nothing then. I met them again on the 10th; we went to Seven Dials, about six o'clock in the evening, having received instructions from Mr. Powel, an assistant to the Solicitors of the Mint; Mr. Baker gave me two shillings, an eighteen-penny piece, and a half-crown on the 6th of December - They were all marked.

Q. You went on the 10th to Seven Dials, did you see any body - A.Spruhan left me and Baker together; we all three separated, and Baker stood close by, so that I could see him-Spruhan went down White Lion-court, and returned with the prisoner. Spruhan called me, I went to him, the prisoner was with him; we went to a public-house in Little Earl-street, kept by Owen; Spruhan called for three half-quarterns of gin; we stood at the bar, each drank a glass. Spruhan then said I ought to stand a pot of beer, I said I would; I called for a pot. While we were drinking it, a woman came in, and offered a shilling for a glass of gin; she put it on the bar, the landlord refused it; the prisoner took it up, looked at it, and said it was a very good one of the sort, but what he had was better.

Q. To whom did he say so - A. To Spruhan and me - We stood at the bar, he whispered to us; the shilling was put down, and the woman took it away. The prisoner then took us into the corner of a room, close by the bar, and pulled a counterfeit shilling out of his pocket, as a sample of what he had to dispose of; he said they were all like it. We drank the beer, and came out; we all stood by the side of a court next to the public-house; the prisoner asked me how many I wanted? (meaning how many counterfeit shillings) I told him two dozen; he said he had not got two dozen, he had only eleven, and would let me have them. I told him that I would only take six; he put his hand into his pocket which contained the counterfeit shillings, and gave me six; I then gave him two shillings and an eighteen-penny piece in payment; they were all marked. The rate of dealing was two bad shillings for one good one.

Q. Why did you give him two shillings and an eighteen-penny piece - A. I had no change that was marked. I told him I had given him 3s.6d.; he said he did not know it-Spruhan was there the whole time. The prisoner took the money out of his pocket that I had given him, and said, "You are right, you have given me sixpence too much." He asked Spruhan if he did not want any? Spruhan said, he had no money; he said he would let him have two till the next night, and persuaded him very much to take them; Spruhan declined it. The prisoner went into the same public-house which we had come out of, and got change, and brought sixpence, and gave it to me. We then walked down to Seven Dials. The prisoner asked me if I knew how to make the money ring? I said, no; he told me to lay a knife on the counterfeit money, and put a hot iron on the knife, and then put the money into vinegar when hot, and that would make them ring.

Q. What happened then - A. Baker and I had agreed, that when I had made the purchase, I was to take my hat off, as a signal for him to come up, and take the prisoner - Baker came up, and took him into custody, and asked him what he had been doing? he said, nothing. Baker tried to push him into a shop, which he did; and in going in, the prisoner threw a parcel of counterfeit money about the ground-Baker picked it up. He searched him, and I believe he found four-pence or five-pence in halfpence on him. He threw good and bad money down. I was by his side - I saw the marked money in Baker's hand; Baker searched me, and took from me the six counterfeit shillings I had taken of the prisoner, and the good half-crown, which was marked.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What are you besides a constable of Lincoln's-inn-fields - A. No business. I have been a constable for ten months, before that I went to sea.

Q. Have you ever before this circumstance been engaged in buying counterfeit coin, or detecting people who uttered it - A. Not before the 17th of November. I have since that been engaged in it by Mr. Powell - I never knew the prisoner before. The public-house is the sign of the Rose and Three Tuns. Spruhan paid for the gin. The marked money had been in my possession ever since the 6th of December. Spruhan was with us, and could hear all that was said. He was not examined before the magistrate.

Q. Did you tell the magistrate of the woman's offering the bad shilling - A. I do not think I did.

Q. On your oath did you not tell the magistrate that you neither knew the sign of the house, nor the landlord's name - A. I did - I have since found them out. We did not go into any room; he took me into a corner-there was nobody else in the room when I told him I gave him sixpence too much; he did not say, take another shilling, but got change, and gave me a good sixpence.

Q. Was all the marked money found - A. No; one of the shillings I had given him was missing.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Where do your friends live - A. At Battle-bridge. My father is gardener of Lincoln's-inn, and has been so for fifteen years. I went to sea at fifteen years of age. I do not remember where I lived last - I have never, in particular, been out of a situation.

Q. From whom did you learn what the rate of dealing was for bad money - A. From Spruhan-nothing passed between the prisoner and me about it. When I was before the magistrate I answered the questions that were put to me. Spruhan has got two thumbs on one hand.

JAMES BAKER . I am a special constable, sworn in to attend on the Lord Chancellor. On the 10th of December I went to the Seven Dials, with Fryer and Spruhan. After stopping about five minutes, I saw Spruhan, Fryer, and the prisoner together; I was at the corner of White Lion-street - they came up White Lion-street; Fryer joined Spruhan and the prisoner; they went into the Rose and Three Tuns, public-house, in Earl-street - I was nearly opposite the house; they staid there about twenty minutes-all three came out together, and stood at the corner of Monmouth-court, conversing some time, the prisoner and Fryer in particular. In a few minutes I saw something exchanged between the prisoner and Fryer. In two or three minutes after that Spruhan left them; I saw the prisoner go back again to the public-house - He came out in a moment, and Fryer gave me a signal; they went into Earl-street, and staid at the door of a chandler's shop, talking together. I went up to the prisoner, and asked him what he was about? I told him I was a constable, and that I thought he was doing something wrong; I told him he must go into the shop, and after a great deal of resistance on his part, I saw him trying to get his hand into his right hand breeches pocket, I got him into the shop; as he went down the step he pulled something out of his right hand breeches pocket, and dropped it just as he went into the shop. I picked up five counterfeit shillings - I searched him, and found, in his waistcoat pocket, one eighteen-penny piece, and one shilling, which were marked, I had marked them; I knew them to be the same that I gave Fryer, and told him how he was to use them; I found four-pence in halfpence on him. I asked Fryer what he had been about? he said, nothing; I searched him, and in his waistcoat pocket I found a piece of paper, containing six counterfeit shillings, and the marked half-crown, which I had previously given him. I had also given him two shillings and an eighteen-penny piece. I asked Fryer whom he got the bad money of? he said, of the prisoner - They were close together-the prisoner heard it and did not deny it; he said he had reigned long enough, or something of that kind. I took him to Marlborough-street. I produce the money that the prisoner dropped, and what I found on Fryer. The shilling and the eighteen-penny piece are the same I gave to Fryer.

Cross-examined by MR. NORDEN. I never saw him before. I had received directions about a fortnight before to detect utterers of counterfeit coin, from Mr. Powell. I have assisted in convicting utterers two or three times. I first saw Spruhan about a fortnight before. I understood Spruhan knew the prisoner before. Mr. Powell and Spruhan told me that the prisoner was an utterer a few days before the 10th. I did not see Spruhan after I had taken the prisoner - I saw them all three together in the public-house. Fox went back alone to the house-Spruhan left before I went up to Fox; I saw something pass between Fox and Fryer. I saw Spruhan before the examination - I do not think he was examined. The prisoner dropped the six shillings inside the shop.

Q. Did you ever say that you did not like to give evidence about this, and that you would give your evidence very short, because you did not like to be cross-examined - A. I never said any thing of the kind.

MR. REVNOLDS. Q.Was your first acquaintance with Spruhan through Mr. Powell - A. Yes; every transaction with him was under Mr. Powell's direction.

THOMAS SPRUHAN. I have known the prisoner since last December. A man of the name of Leonard introduced me to him. I gave information to Mr. Powell about the prisoner, and Mr. Powell introduced me to Baker and Fryer. We went together to the Seven Dials. Baker stepped on one side, and I and Fryer went on to White Lion-street - Fox lodges in a cellar there. Fryer stopped two or three doors off; he lived about twenty yards down the street. I went to Fox's lodging-he came out with me, and asked me what kept me till then? I had promised to meet him on the Sunday before, to purchase counterfeit money. I told him I had been to Teddington to see my child. We came up as far as the Seven Dials. I told him there was a particular friend of mine, who wanted a few things, if he could give him them - He said if he did I should come with the person myself. Fryer was quite handy at the time - I told him so, called Fryer to him, and told him that was the man I wished to recommend to him; he said,

"very well." All three went together into a public-house in Earl-street - I asked for a quartern and a half of gin; we all drank of it. After that I told Fryer that he should stand a pot of beer, by way of footing for the recommendation - He did so. While we were drinking it, a woman came in, called for a glass of liquor, and tendered a connterfeit shilling for it, which was refused. I took it up and looked at it; Fryer did the same, and so did the prisoner, and laid it down again-the woman said she would get it changed. We pushed up close to the door. The prisoner took a counterfeit shilling from his pocket, and said the other was a good one of the sort, but the one he produced was better, and all he had were so too, The pot of beer being nearly drank, I said I could stop no longer, as I had left only my child at home-the prisoner said it was time enough. We paid for the beer, went outside the door, and stood at the end of Monmouth-court; the prisoner then asked Fryer how many he wanted? he said, two dozen; he said he could not let him have two dozen then, as he had only ten or eleven about him. Fryer said as he was not flush in them, half a dozen would do for him that night, as it was late. He took a paper from his pocket, out of which he counted six counterfeit shillings,

and gave them to Fryer, who gave him 2s. and a 1s.6d. piece, which the prisoner put into his pocket, and asked me if I was going to have any myself? I told him I had no money, nor time to pass them that night, but would meet him next evening at the Seven Dials. I wished him good night and went home, leaving him and Fryer together. Baker was on the other side of the street, and could see us.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I never knew Fox till the 5th of December, and had known Fryer and Baker about a fortnight before. I have known Mr. Powell four years, and during that time have transacted business of this sort. I have known Leonard ever since August, 1816.

Q. Did you ever tempt Leonard to deal in the same way - A. I do not know a man of the name of Cubit, nor ever had any conversation with him about selling him bad money.

Q. When Leonard introduced you to the prisoner, what was your conversation - A.He told Fox he introduced me as a friend.

Q.Did you, or did you not, undertake to supply the prisoner with counterfeit money, if he would put it off - A. Never. I never had the counterfeit shillings in my hand. I live in Bedfordbury. I have been to the prisoner's house since his confinement.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am principal assistant to the Solicitors of the Mint, and have been so for many years.

Q. Were you acquainted with the three witnesses who have been examined - A. I was. I gave them directions to detect persons who utter counterfeit coin. I introduced Baker and Fryer to Spruhan for the purpose, and gave them directions how to proceed. They reported to me that the prisoner was taken up - I conducted the prosecution, and brought forward such evidence as I thought proper before the magistrate. I had a particular reason for not bringing Spruhan forward. I look at the five shillings found on the prisoner, and those picked off the ground - They are all counterfeit, and of the same die - They are an imitation of the current coin.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I have known Spruhan many years - He introduced himself to me. I first saw him at a police office.

Prisoner's Defence. About the latter end of November Leonard and I were in a public-house, and the man with two thumbs on one hand came in, and talked with us - He went out, and Leonard told me his name was Spruhan. I never saw him again till he called on me on the 10th of December, he then gave me a parcel, and asked me to go and drink with him - He pointed out Fryer as we were going along; he said he was a friend of his, and that he would be thankful to me to give him (Fryer) what he asked me for out of this paper - I did not know what was in it. Fryer joined us - We went to the public-house, and came out. Fryer said he wanted two or three dozen out of what I had got for him. I opened the paper, and found it contained shillings. While I was counting them he said six would do - I gave him six; he gave me 3s.6d., and then said he had given me 6d. too much - I returned him 6d.; soon after, the constable came up and took me. A mob came round, and in the scufile they knocked the other five shillings out of my hand.

TIMOTHY CORBETT. I am a labourer, and work for Mr. Day, a builder, in Compton-street. I know Spruhan.

Q. On the 10th of December, did you see the prisoner, Fox, anywhere - A. Yes, I saw him going towards the Seven Dials, with Spruhan and a man in a blue coat - I did not know the prisoner before. Knowing Spruhan, made me follow them. I saw Spruhan give Fox a paper parcel out of his pocket. They went about a hundred yards up the street; Spruhan put his hand up, and the man in the blue coat went to them; they went into the public-house at the corner of Monmouth-court, I went in after them, and stood behind them all the while; they called for gin. I followed them out, and then went to market; when I returned I saw a mob at the chandler's shop, and saw the man in a blue coat. I told the people what I had seen.

Q. Where was you going when you first went out - A. To market. I had no other reason for following them than knowing Spruhan. I never saw Fox before.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Q. What market did you go to - A. It is what I call market-it is below Marlborough-street, I do not know the name of it. I have been in the habit of going to it for twenty years - I forget the name.

Q. How far is it from the public-house - A. It is about half way to Smithfield; I can go there in ten minutes-it was between five and six o'clock on a Thursday.

Q. What makes you remember its being on a Thursday - A. Because I go to market every day. They could see me in the public-house. I heard of Fox being taken up a week ago. I did not ask what was the matter at the chandler's shop. Three gentlemen told me to come here in the prisoner's behalf.

Q. Do you now remember the name of the market - A. I think it is Clare-market. Lumber-court is in the way from it.

COURT. Q. Now you say it is Clare-market; you said it was not further than from here to Smithfield - A. No.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-161

328. EDWARD SKURM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , one watch, value 20s. , the goods of Samuel Crane .

SAMUEL CRANE . I keep a coffee-shop in Broad-street, St. Giles's . On the 12th of December the prisoner came into the parlour, and asked for his shirt, which I had to wash; he returned again in about ten minutes, went into the yard, and came out again in about eight minutes. I saw him snatch the watch, and run out of the parlour - I went after him and secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I saw him take it. I have received 13s. from his friends - He did not borrow the watch.

WILLIAM JONES. I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. Martin's-lane. On the 12th of December Ann White pledged the watch with me for 10s.

ANN WHITE. On the 12th of December, in the evening, the prisoner applied to my husband to pledge the watch

for him - I pledged it, as my husband was ill, and gave the prisoner the money.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-162

329. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Chapman , from his person .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN. I am a servant . On the 15th of December I was in Spur-street, Leicester-square , about eleven o'clock in the morning, looking into a picture-shop. The prisoner and two others rushed against me all at once. I felt some person at my pocket, put my hand into it, and missed my handkerchief. I turned round, saw it in the prisoner's hand, and Jefferson holding him.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON. I am a Bow-street officer. On the 15th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, in company with two others, at the picture-shop in Spur-street - I saw them close up behind the prosecutor; the prisoner put his hand behind him with the handkerchief. I secured him-the prosecutor claimed it. I found three more in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-163

330. WILLIAM JOYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , one pair of boots, value 6s. , the goods of Francis May .

WILLIAM PRITCHARD. I am apprentice to Mr. May, who is a shoemaker , and lives in Holborn. On the 20th of December the prisoner was brought back to the shop with the boots.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-164

331. GEORGE HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , three yards of cloth, value 15s. , the goods of David Farrar .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of William Fictaling .

HENRY BROMBEG . I am a cloth-worker. I delivered the prisoner the cloth to dye black in April-Farrar, his master, is a dyer.

THOMAS BROMBEG . The cloth was sent to me from William Fictaling to get dyed.

DAVID FARRAR. I am a dyer, and live in Princes-street, Finsbury-square, the prisoner was my servant . I missed several things - I got an officer, who found the duplicate of the cloth on him.

THOMAS PLATTS. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicate of the cloth on him, which was pledged at Gosling's.

THOMAS THWAITE. I am servant to Mr. Gosling, pawnbroker. I took the cloth in pledge-the duplicate is our's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-165

332. JOHN DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one chair, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Johnson .

SAMUEL JOHNSON. I am a broker , and live in Wilks'-street, Spitalfields . On the 27th of December I lost the chair from the outside of my door.

SAMUEL CLARK . I am a broker. On the 27th of December, between four and five o'clock, I met the prisoner, running with the chair, and stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-166

333. MARY ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , two pewter quart pots, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Arnold .

JAMES ARNOLD . I keep the Angel, public-house, in Marylebone-lane . On the 26th of December, about two o'clock, the prisoner came in and had half a pint of beer, which she drank, and brought the pot to the bar. When she was going out, a little girl said she had got a pot. I followed, and asked her where she was going to with it? she gave it to me - I let her go. A boy said she had another; I again followed, took it from her, and gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY WENTWORTH. I was in the passage, and saw the prisoner with the pot under her cloak.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-167

334. JAMES GRINDLEY , HENRY GIBBS , and CHARLES LAING were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 100lbs. of ivory, value 25l. , the goods of John Winch .

JOHN WINCH . I am an ivory-cutter , and live in Foley-street, Marylebone . On the 13th of December I missed a quanity of ivory-the prisoners were strangers to me. My premises must have been entered with a false key.

RICHARD VAUGHAN. I live in Windmill-street, and deal in waste ivory. The prisoner, Laing came to me, and said he had a lot of ivory to sell, and if I would meet him at the New Inn, in Tottenham-court-road, at ten o'clock the next morning, I should see it. I went, and the prisoner, Gibbs, came to me there, and asked me if I was looking for a tall young man, dressed in blue? I said, Yes. He told me he could shew me the articles, and took me to the corner of Norton-street - Grindley opened the door. They took me up stairs, and shewed me the ivory, which was in the wainscot between the first and second floors-it appeared like a cupboard - I should not have thought of finding any thing there; it was s secret place. They shewed me about a hundred weight of ivory-Grindley and Gibbs only were present. I bought 23lbs. at 2s. per pound - They brought it to my house. Next morning they brought 90lbs. more, which I said I would sell for them, if I could - I bought 50lbs. of it; the remainder was taken away. Grindley and Laing brought it, and I paid them for it by a little at a time. The prosecutor saw it about a week afterwards, and claimed what I had left of it.

CHARLES LABAN . I am an ivory-turner. I bought 40lbs. of ivory of Grindley, about the 10th of December, at 3s. per pound - He called on me; and asked me to buy it. Next day he and Laing brought it - I paid them 4l.16s.6d. in part. Grindley sent to me from Newgate, I went to him - He said he was starving, and asked me to pay him the remainder, I refused - He said I should get no good by it. I did not know them before. They said Vaughan had bought some - He lives in my court.

LAING. Q. Did you not send your apprentice out of the way that he should not hear what passed - A. No.

Q. Did you not know the property was stolen - A. No.

JAMES KINSMAN . I am an ivory-turner, and live in Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell. Grindley and Laing came to me, and said they had some ivory to sell. I asked them what business they were? they said they were cabinet-makers. They brought about 40lbs. down that evening. I questioned them how they came by it? they at last said they were commissioned to sell it, and gave different accounts. I said, it did not appear that they came honestly by it, but if they would bring the proprietor, I would buy it. They never came again.

THOMAS ONION . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Adam and Eve-court, Oxford-street. On the 30th of November I met the prisoner, Laing, and another man, in Berwick-street - I knew him before. He said a friend of his had got some ivory to sell. I told him to call on me the next morning, which he did, and said it belonged to his friend's mother. I said I wanted a little. He asked if Mr. Langfield (who is my master), would buy any. He said he had sold some to Kinsman and Vaughan, but his friend's mother was very ill, and wanted ready money for it - I told him my master would give him ready money. He took me to Marylebone-street to see it. Just as I got to the door, I met Grindley; he said it was his mother's house, but she was in the country. Laing left me. Grindley shewed me four pieces of ivory, which weigbed about 60lbs. I bought about three-quarters of a pound of him for 2s.6d. I recommended him to Laban to sell some.

LEWIS PANALMO. I bought some ivory of Vaughan.

HENRY SANZE . I live at Hackney. I also bought some ivory of Vaughan.

HENRY WRED. I bought 10 lbs. of ivory of Vaughan.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LAING'S Defence. The others asked me to sell it. Vaughan knew it was stolen.

GRINDLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

GIBBS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LAING - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-168

335. ANN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one shawl, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Pike .

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am servant to Edward Pike , who is a linen-draper , and lives in Ratcliff-highway . On the 16th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in with a little girl about nine years old, and asked to look at some remnants. I was waiting on another customer, and saw her take the shawl off the counter, and give it to the little girl; the girl put it under her shawl. The prisoner sat on the stool, and the little girl was by her. In a few minutes she looked at the girl-the girl then went out. When she got to the door, I went round, brought her back, and took the shawl from under her arms, covered with her shawl. The prisoner said the child was her daughter. I sent for an officer.

EDWARD INGOFF . I am servant to Mr. Pike. I was waiting on the prisoner - She had a little girl with her. I shewed the prisoner several remnants, all of which she said were too dear. I saw her take the shawl off the counter, put it under her cloak, and then set on a stool. I did not see her give it to the child. The child was brought back, and the shawl taken from her-the prisoner said it was her child. The shawl I was dropped just behind the child at the time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it. It fell down, and my child picked it up. I have ten children; the youngest is seven years old.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-169

336. CORNELIUS BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one coat, value 30s., and two shirts, value 8s. , the goods of Michael Dee .

MICHAEL DEE. I am a bricklayer , and live in Lawrence-street , the prisoner lodged in the same room with me. On the 29th of November I missed him and the things; I never saw him again till the 8th of January. One of the shirts was found on him at the Office.

NORAH DEE. I am the wife of the prosecutor. I went out about four o'clock, and left the prisoner in the room - I returned in about three minutes, and missed him and the things - He never returned, nor had he given any notice of his going.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Lawrence-street. On the 29th of November, about four o'clock, I met the prisoner going down the street with a bundle.

JAMES JORDAN. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and found a duplicate of a coat, pledged in Berwick-street, on him, and the shirt on his back.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor's wife sold me the things, and told me not to let her husband know it.

NORAH DEE . It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-170

337. WILLIAM LEE and JOHN WINGATE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one bag, value 6d., and 12 quarts of hemp-seed, value 7s. , the goods of John Keer .

JOHN KEER . I drive the St. Alban's waggon . On the 29th of December I was going into the Windmill-yard, in St. John-street with the waggon, and lost a bag of hempseed out of it. In about five minutes I saw it in the hands of the constable.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 29th of December, about one o'clock in the forenoon, I saw the waggon go up the yard-the prisoners were in company together, following it - I was watching them. The waggon turned up the yard, and the prisoners followed it up the gateway before I could get inside the yard. They soon came running out-Wingate had the bag in his apron. I collared him, and told the other he had better stop, for I should soon have him again - I told another person to take him. The bag contained hemp-seed. I am sure they were in company.

THOMAS OKELL. I am a lathrender, and live in St. John-street, opposite the Windmill Inn. I saw the prisoners coming out of the yard-Wingate had the bag in his apron - I took Lee.

JOHN BAGNELL . I saw the prisoners following the waggon - I stopped Wingate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WINGATE'S Defence. I picked it up.

LEE's Defence. I was on the other side of the way.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WINGATE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-171

338. ELIZA ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , one gown, value 4s.; one shawl, value 3s.; one bonnet, value 1s.; and 8s. 5d. in monies numbered , the property of William Hughes .

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a labourer , and live in Black Lion-yard, Golden-lane. The prisoner nursed my wife-on the 13th of September she left, and we missed the articles stated in the indictment. On the 23d of December I found her at St. Sepulchre's workhouse, and charged her with the robbery. She said the devil persuaded her to commit it.

MARY HUGHES . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner left in the middle of the night of the 12th of September - I thought she was gone to bed; she never returned. We missed the articles stated in the indictment; I found my gown on her back when she was taken.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-172

339. CHRISTIAN UMBRA was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , one pound and three-quarters of sugar, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of John Henry Wackerbarth .

JOSEPH COLLIN. I am clerk to Mr. John Henry Wackerbarth, who is a sugar-refiner , and lives in Parson's-street, Wellclose-square . The prisoner was his servant - I suspected him, and sent for an officer. When the prisoner left the premises, I followed, and pointed him out to the officer; we followed him a great distance into some fields, when the officer seized him, and found one pound and three-quarters of sugar in his pocket, in an unfinished state. As we took him back he dropped another piece.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He was never out of my sight.

ISAAC FERTH . I followed the prisoner; the officer stopped him, and took the sugar out of his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-173

340. WILLIAM HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one pair of boots, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Willingale .

CHARLES WILLINGALE . I am a shoe-maker , and live in King-street, Soho . On the 13th of January the boots hung at the door. I was called from dinner, and found the prisoner in custody with them.

PHILIP BARTLETT. I live opposite to Mr. Willingale. I saw the prisoner run from the shop - I pursued, and caught him with the boots.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-174

341. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one butt-rope, chain, and hook, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Calvert , Charles Calvert , John Calvert , Thomas Calvert , Edward Calvert , Thomas Hitchkiss Littler , and John Foster .

JAMES BEECHEY . I am a Thames Police Surveyor. On the 29th of December I met the prisoner in the Strand, with the butt-rope, chain, and hook, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I asked him how he got it? he said he had it from Webb, who kept a rope-shop at Westminster, and was going to take it to London-wall - I told him I should take him to Webb. He took me two miles and a half, and would not tell me where he lived - I detained him.

RICHARD PARRET . I am clerk to Messrs. Calvert and Co. Their names are rightly stated in the indictment.

WILLIAM LEE . I am driver to Messrs. Calverts and Co. I left the rope in my dray at six o'clock in the evening, in Well-street - mews, Oxford-road, and missed it next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-175

342. JOSEPH LEE and GEORGE SUTHERNWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 23th of December , 78lbs. of beef, value 28s. , the goods of George Bennett .

WILLIAM DOUGLAS . I am a watchman of Crawford-street. On the 23d of December, about five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoners, together, in Crawford-

street. Lee had the meat on his back - I asked what they had got? both answered that it was beef, belonging to Toms, a butcher, at Paddington, and they were going to sell it for him at Newgate-market. I took them to the watch-house. The beef weighed nine stone six pounds.

GEORGE BENNETT . I am a butcher. The beef was taken from French's slaughter-house-it is mine, I saw it at the watch-house; it was not cut as it ought to be - They had cut it off from the carcase. Suthernwood had been dismissed from my service a fortnight before-Lee lived with my brother.

THOMAS FRENCH . The beef was taken from my slaughter-house, in Salisbury-mews, about three hundred yards from Crawford-street. I saw it there at nine o'clock at night, in the morning I found the carcase cut in a very ragged state.

LEE's Defence. I met a man who gave it to me to sell for him.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SUTHERNWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-176

343. JAMES COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one 1l. Bank note , the property of Godfrey Solomon .

GODFREY SOLOMON . I am a merchant , and live in Leman-street, Goodman's-fields -the prisoner was my porter . On the 8th of December I missed a 1l. note out of my drawer in the counting-house - I charged the prisoner with taking it, and he gave it to me.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge; he took me to his lodgings, and gave me the note, which he took out of the wall in his room.

GODFREY SOLOMON re-examined. It is my note, by the name on it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18180114-177

344. DANIEL CONNER was indicted for that he, on the 9th of January , unlawfully and maliciously did, by menaces, and in a violent manner demand 5l. of and from Thomas Fulcher , with a felonious intent to commit a a robbery on his person, and the said sum of 5l. from his person, and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal against the statute .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-178

345. JAMES BRADY was indicted for embezzelling the sum of 30s. , the property of Peter Harris Abbott and John Young Rand .

EDWARD HEALEY. I keep a public-house in Rosemary-lane, and am a customer to Rand and Abbott. The prisoner was in their service, and has sold me goods for them. In October last I owed the house between 4l. and 5l.; he called upon me to collect; he said his employers told him to keep the account short. He told me to pay a man who was with him 30s., and he would call again in a few days for 50s., and give me a receipt for the whole. I paid the man 30s.; he afterwards called, and I paid him 50s.; he gave me a receipt for the whole.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He delivered the goods in the name of Rand and Abbott. I paid the man the money in his presence. I paid him some shillings - I believe it was all in silver.

THOMAS GUY . I am clerk to Messrs. Rand and Abbott. The prisoner was their dray clerk-his business was to attend the dray, and collect money. He never accounted for 30s. received in October from Healey, which he ought to have done; he kept a book which I have - I turn to October, there is no entry of it. He used to account to me every night for what he received.

Cross-examined. I believe he used to push the trade, and was to have an advantage.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-179

346. THOMAS BENNET was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 2lbs. of pepper, value 1s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of some person unknown.

JOHN BURR. I am a labourer in the East India Company's service, and so was the prisoner. On the 9th of January he was employed at Blackwall in sending away pepper from the pile. I saw him take some, and put it in his breeches, and went for Mr. Brown.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am an elder in the Company's service. I took the prisoner into a private room, and found 2lbs. of pepper in his breeches, in a bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been twelve years in the service.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-180

347. CHARLES WESTERN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 20lbs. of beef, value 10s., and 20lbs. of mutton, value 10s. , the goods of John Smith .

PETER PAIN . I am servant to John Smith , who is a butcher , and lives in White Horse-street, Stepney . On the 5th of January, about half-past eight o'clock, I came home, and missed a quarter of mutton and ribs of beef - I saw it safe when I went out at half-past seven. I left the shop-door bolted-it was a latch door, the upper part was open. On the Wednesday evening following I saw them at Shadwell office - I am sure it was the same meat by the skewers I put in it. I found a stick by the door, with a hook in it.

LEWIS DAVIS . I am a patrol of St. George's in the East. On the 5th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw a black man in Church-lane, with a bundle under his arm - I crossed over to him, he turned into a public-house - I followed him into the passage, and took the prisoner; the meat was on the stairs in a bag. I

asked him where he got it from? he said his captain gave it to him. He would not tell me his name-it was beef and mutton.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy. A man gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-181

348. JOSEPH BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 120 penny-pieces, value 10s. , the goods of John Lang .

COURT. Money is not goods, which the indictment states it to be -the prisoner must be

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-182

349. THOMAS THORP was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of John Algiar .

ANN ALGIAR. I am the wife of John Algiar; we keep a cook-shop in West-street, Saffron-hill . On the 10th of January, about a quarter after eight o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and showed me two or three duplicates, which he wanted me to buy - I refused; he asked me to trust him for some coffee; I gave him a bason of soup; I then turned round to go towards the stairs, leaving him at the counter-the shoes hung on a nail about two yards from him; I turned round again, and saw him buttoning them up in his waistcoat; I was afraid to speak to him - He went out - I knew him before. When my husband came in he sent for a constable, who took him.

JOHN BARNLEY. I am a beadle. I found the prisoner, about ten o'clock on the 10th of January, at the Thatched House. I found 8d. on him. He said he never saw the shoes.

THOMAS ABRAHAM . I am a porter belonging to the Saracen's Head Inn. I was in the Thatched House, in Field-lane-the prisoner came in, with a pair of shoes buttoned in his coat; he offered them for sale, but nobody would buy them; he went out, and came in again with some bread and cheese, and called for a pint of beer.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-183

350. ELIZA HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14the of January , two shifts, value 4s. , the goods of Lucy Bowman .

LUCY BOWMAN . I lodge with the prisoner's mother, in Eagle-street . On the 14the of January her mother sent her up to my room to bring down my two shifts to wash - She returned, and said they were not there. I accused her of stealing them, she denied it. I found one of them at Mrs. Mardon's, in Kingsgate-street.

ELIZA MARDON . I keep a clothes-shop in Kingsgate-street - the prisoner sold me the shift.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-184

351. DEBORAH SANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , five napkins, value 4s., and one pail, value 1s. , the goods of Samuel Burton .

SARAH NASH . I lodge in Mr. Burton's house, in Charles-street, Hatton-garden . On the 12th of December, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming down stairs, and heard a noise-it was very dark, I could see nobody; I asked who was there twice; at last the prisoner said, I might go along, she would not hurt me - She said she had been to see a person up stairs; the bell rang, I went to the door - I turned round, and saw her with the pail in her hand, and the napkins in it. She was followed and secured.

ANN BURTON . I am the wife of Samuel Burton . The pail and napkins were taken from the landing-place.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-185

352. THOMAS SWANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 42 yards of linen, value 1l. 18s. , the goods of John Padmore .

JOHN ALLEN . I am an ironmonger, and live in High-street, Marylebone, opposite Mr. Padmore's; I saw three men standing by his door, the prisoner was one of them. One of them drew the cloth out of the pile, which was inside the door - They had all three been talking together, and all three ran away together; I pursued, the linen dropped from one of them. I seized the prisoner, the others got away. I never lost sight of him. I am sure he was one of them.

GEORGE PADMORE. I am a linen-draper, and live opposite Mr. Allen's. The rope that fastened the pile was cut.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-186

353. ROBERT SPENCER was indicted for stealing on the 13th of January , one pewter measure, value 3s. , the goods of John Moore .

JOHN MOORE . I am a publican , and live in Dean-street, Soho . The prisoner, and another man, came to my house, and called for a pint of beer; I was in the cellar, and heard a noise, I came up, and found the prisoner in the passage, where he had no business - I saw him take the measure from under his coat; he went out, I followed, seized him, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-187

354. ROBERT KNOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one pocket-book, value 3s., the goods of William Nicholls , from his person .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Jermyn-street, St. James's. I was going through Hemmings-row , on the 15th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner, and another man, run by me, I put my hand to my pocket,and missed my pocket-book; I immediately pursed, they turned round, saw me, and ran much faster-as the prisoner ran I saw him put the pocket-book down his bosom - He was stopped before he got out of my sight. He immediately pulled the pocket-book from his side-pocket, and tried to throw it down an area, but the railing stopped it; I picked it up, and gave him in charge.

DAVID PRICE . I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him. I saw him throw the pocket-book down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18180114-188

355. FREDERICK JONES was indicted for stealing on the 5th of December , two saucepans, value 4s. , the goods of James Flather .

JAMES FLATHER . I a furnishing ironmonger , and live in Goodge-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the 5th of December, about five o'clock, I was called up, and found the prisoner, with a man named Parish, in custody; I missed my saucepans, he had them under his arm - He is now dead.

RICHARD BRADSALL . I am a milkman. I saw the prisoner and Parish together, both of them went into the shop, each took a saucepan, and ran away. I took Parish. The prisoner got away; I knew him before, and am sure he was one of them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-189

356. CHARLES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , one wash-hand stand, value 8s. , the goods of Paul Wyman .

PAUL WYMAN . I am a broker , and live in King-street, Clerkenwell . The wash-hand stand was taken from my door.

MOSES JOEL . I am a broker, and live in Long-alley, Moorfields. On the 16th of January I bought the washhand stand of the prisoner for 7s. 6d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-190

357. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , two pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of George Tindall .

GEORGE TINDALL . I am a shoemaker , and live on Saffron-hill . On the 9th of December I saw the prisoner take the shoes from my door; I pursued, and stopped him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-191

358. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , one axe, value 5s.; two plancs, value 8s.; two chissels, value 2s.; and two augers, value 2s., the goods of John Dwight ; one axe, value 2s., and one adze, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Barrett .

JOHN DWIGHT. I am a wheelwright , and live in the Commercial-road . On the 27th of December I left my tools at the shop, when I returned I missed them.

JOHN SMITH . I am a carpenter. On the 29th of December the prisoner came to me, and offered the tools for sale.

JAMES FLETCHER . I bought the two axes of the prisoner.

ANDREW STEVENS. I saw the prisoner offering the articles stated in the indictment for sale.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-192

359. THOMAS CROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , three handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of William Brown and Thomas Farley .

JOHN SHAW . I am constable of Aldgate. On the 26th of December I was coming down North-East-passage, and saw the prisoner, and another man-the man charged him with stealing the handkerchiefs, and wanted him to return - He refused; I took him back to Mr. Brown's, when Mrs. Page came and said he was one of the men. The young man took me round where he had followed the prisoner, and showed me by the dock wall, where, he said, he had dropped the handkerchiefs. I found them there.

JAMES WHEELHOUSE. I am shopman to Messrs. William Brown and Thomas Farley , linen-drapers , Ratcliff-highway . I saw the prisoner run across the street with the handkerchiefs - I followed him - He dropped them by the dock wall, turned round, and struck me. I still followed. Shaw came up and took him. I am sure he is the man. We found the handkerchiefs where I saw him drop them.

SARAH PAGE. On the 26th of December, I was at my door, which is next to the prosecutors', and saw the prisoner pull the handkerchiefs down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-193

360. ELEANOR CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , one gown, value 5s.; one shift, value 3s.; one pocket, value 1s.; one bonnet, value 7s., and one pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Atkins .

ELEANOR ATKINS . I am the wife of William Atkins ; we live in Peter-street, St. James's . On the 3d of January the prisoner came to my house, she used to take care of my child; I went out, when I returned I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and she was gone.

JOHN BARNLY . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I found the bonnet, shawl, and stockings, upon her.

HENRY HOMER. I am a pawnbroker. I have a petticoat and shift, which the prisoner pledged with me.

JOHN GUEST . I am a pawnbroker. I have a gown, which the prisoner pledged with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-194

361. SARAH BRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , one bed, value 2l.; one bolster, value 2s.; two blankets, value 5s., and two sheets, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Davies .

The goods having been let to the prisoner with a ready-furnished lodging, and she not being indicted under that Act , was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18180114-195

362. WILLIAM BARNABY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one purse, value 1s.; one key, value 2d.; one box, value 6s., and 5s. in monies numbered, the property of Sarah Booth , from her person .

SARAH BOOTH . I was at the Theatre, in Tottenham-street, Tottenham-court-road , on the 16th of December, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner stood my side in the gallery; I caught his hand in my pocket, I took it out, and accused him with picking my pocket-he denied it. I sent for an officer, who searched him, and found the articles stated in the indictment, upon him, which I had lost, and a letter.

SARAH JEFFRIES . I belong to the Theatre. I heard the prosecutrix charge the prisoner with picking her pocket. I saw him drop a letter and a key. I picked them up.

HENRY HOWARD. I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge. I found the box and key just by where he stood. I found a 3s. piece, an 18d. piece, sixpence, and 1s. 4d. upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I deny it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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