Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd December 1817.
Reference Number: 18171203
Reference Number: f18171203-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 3rd of DECEMBER, 1817, and following Days; Being the First Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER SMITH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1817.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the King's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR THE

CITY OF LONDON,

AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER SMITH Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley, Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Eamer, Knt. Sir William Leighton, Knt.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Sir William Domville, Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester, Bart. Recorder of the said City; William Heygate, Esq.; John Thomas Thorp, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and John Vaillant , Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justice of Gaol Delivery of Newgate for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Hossack ,

Thomas Noyes ,

John Tyler ,

James Wainman ,

William Ridpath ,

Joseph Reid ,

Benjamin Webb ,

Robert Simpson ,

John Belfield ,

Thomas Cogger ,

Thomas Booth ,

Edward Palmer ,

First Middlesex Jury.

James Boyd , Sen.

William Palmer ,

Sasner Burrell ,

John Hawkins Barlow ,

Francis Godfree Harris ,

Matthew Jackson ,

Thomas Cannon ,

George Daniell ,

James Gaunt ,

Henry Mason ,

William Mower ,

Thomas Coats .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Jackson ,

John Eason ,

Thomas Lay ,

William Burton ,

William Young ,

Robert Harvey ,

Thomas Lloyd ,

Thomas Blankley ,

Ezra Livermore ,

William Kirby ,

Gordon Houghton ,

Richard Weight .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY,

DECEMBER 3, 1817.

SMITH, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

Reference Number: t18171203-1

1. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , one watch, value 2l., and one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Foley , from his person .

THOMAS FOLEY . On the 10th of October I went with the prisoner to her lodgings, in Church-lane, St. Giles's . Between three and four o'clock in the morning, I awoke and found her gone-the door was fastened. I missed my neck-handkerchief and watch from under my pillow; I found them at the pawnbroker's the same day. I met her in the street at night, and secured her. I am sure she is the same woman.

CHARLES HINDES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 11th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I took the watch in pledge of the prisoner - about an hour after she pledged the handkerchief; she said they belonged to her husband.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. On the 11th of October the prisoner was brought into the watch-house; while I was searching her she dropped the duplicate of the handkerchief, and I found the duplicate of the watch upon her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He owed me 2l.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of Stealing, but not from the Person .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-2

2. ELIZA BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , one bed, value 4l.; one bolster, value 1s.; one rug, value 7s.; two blankets, value 12s.; one sheet, value 10s.; one towel, value 3d.; one candlestick, value 2s., and two forks, value 1s., the goods of Henry Snow , in a lodging-room .

ANN SNOW. I am the wife of Henry Snow , we live in White Horse-yard . In March last, the prisoner took a furnished-room of me at 3s. per week, as a married woman, but I never saw her husband with her; after she absconded I got the door broken open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. The constable took her into custody, she then said, she had taken them at different times and sold them-

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a constable On the 26th of September, I broke the door open and the prosecutrix missed the things; I took the prisoner into custody the next day, she said she took the feathers away and sold them.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-3

3. THOMAS RYAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Smith , about seven o'clock in the night of the 23d of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two pair of boots, value 12s.; three shoes, value 3s.; two waistcoats, value 2s., and one frock, value 6d. , his property.

DAVID SMITH. I am a shoemaker , and live at Fulham . On the 23d of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in a room behind the shop, Bryan was with me - He went out - I heard a noise in the shop, and a saw a man run out with the property; I gave the alarm, he was stopped and brought back with it-it was the prisoner. The officer brought the things back.

THOMAS HOOPER. I am a constable. I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running; I saw him drop the things, and I picked them up.

GEORGE BRYAN . I was at Smith's; when I went out I latched the door after me.

STEPHEN TURNER . I was with the officer, he has spoken correctly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My family were starving, which tempted me to do it.

DAVID SMITH re-examined. It is a common latch, I did not hear it opened.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-4

4. EDWARD HOOKER and WILLIAM HARDING were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Cornelius Jackson , about seven o'clock

in the night of the 31st of October , at the parish of St. Martin in the Fields, with intent to steal .

CORNELIUS JACKSON . I keep the Blackmoor's Head, public-house, in Whitcomb-street, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On the 31st of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in my bar, the candles had been lit sometime-three men came into the tap-room and called for three quarterns of gin, the prisoner Harding was one of them - I served them; they afterwards called for a glass of gin and water, and while it was making Harding was walking to and fro in the passage by the bar door, the stairs came into the passage, he could see every thing. I went up stairs and tried my own room door, and am positive that I found it locked; I went into another room that was not locked, but could see no person there - I did not fasten that door. I then heard a whistle, and some person called "Rover," and said,"D-n the dog." I came down for a candle, waited in the passage to watch, and saw the prisoner, Hooker, come down stairs; I met him in the passage, and asked him if he had been up, he said he had, as he had made a mistake, and thought it was the Horse and Dolphin; I told him he should not have gone up; three more men then rushed out of the tap-room and knocked me down, they gave me a violent blow on my head-the prisoner, Harding, was one of them; Hooker joined them and I pulled him over me, and tore a piece of his coat off - He got away - I followed him into Great Suffolk-street, where he was stopped. I never lost sight of him. I returned, went up stairs, and found the back room door broken open, which I had locked myself an hour before-it was not the room that I went to before; I had the key in my pocket at the time; there were marks of a chisel on the side of the door-the stairs that I saw Hooper come down leads to that room-it was the nearest to the stairs, there is no other key to the door-it was forced open. I missed nothing. As I returned from the office, about two hours afterwards, I picked up some skeleton keys, with a wrench and a picklock, in a bag; it was in the direction that he had run, and in the very place where he turned round in Great Suffolk-street, which is not a thoroughfare.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. It was about a quarter before seven o'clock when they came in, I looked at the clock. I suspected them from seeing them watching about. I did not try the door the first time that I went up, I came down on hearing them call "Rover;" I waited in the passage, and saw Hooker come down stairs; he said he supposed he had made a mistake, for he had come to meet a friend at the Horse and Dolphin. At the Office he said he came to see a friend who lodged there. I laid hold of him, but they rushed out and rescued him; I then followed him into the street, and asked him to come back, he said he would.

Q.How long was you gone to Bow-street - A. About an hour and a half. I followed Hooker very close.

Q. If he dropped the bag you must have seen him - A. No; when he got to Suffolk-street I did not pursue him so close, as I knew he could not escape. I am positive the room was locked an hour before; I had the key then.

RICHARD JACKSON . I am brother to the last witness. I was in the tap-room and saw the men come in-my brother left me in the tap-room when he went out; the three men went out, the prisoner, Harding, was one of them. Hooker came down stairs, and my brother called out immediately. I followed close into Great Suffolk-street, and stopped the prisoner, Hooker, at the corner of Little Suffolk-street; he said he would knock any person down that came near him-he struck me twice - I gave him up to the constable. After taking him into the tap-room, while I was holding him, Harding was brought in. He is the same man that was in the tap-room.

Cross-examined. I am a servant out of place. I never saw the prisoners before; they came into the tap-room between six and seven o'clock. Harding was with the other two - He did not sit down, but kept walking about the passage, and looking up stairs.

ROBERT CLAYTON. I am a boot-closer. On the 31st of October I was coming up Whitcomb-street, and heard the cry of stop thief! Harding was before the mob - I stopped him - He was running in a direction from Jackson's house; I brought him back, with the constable's assistance.

Cross-examined. He made no resistance. He asked what was the matter, I told him I did not know. The constable came up and took him.

WILLIAM POWEL. I was in the tap-room, on the 31st of October, when the search was made, a dark-lanthorn was found under a seat with a piece of wax candle in it; I had seen the prisoners sitting in that settle when they were handcuffed - I was not in the house before.

RICHARD JACKSON re-examined. It is the same seat where the prisoners were sitting, only at the other end.

Cross-examined. It was found an hour and a half afterwards; it was under the very place where they sat when they were brought back.

HOOKER'S Defence. An acquaintance of mine, of the name of Williams, lodged in Whitechapel, but had removed; they directed me to the Horse and Dolphin, the first public-house in Whitcomb-street; I went up and knocked at the first-floor door, but nobody answered-as I came down I met Jackson, he asked me to come back, which I did, and he collared me.

HARDING'S Defence. Jackson has spoken falsely to say I knocked him down; I was knocked down myself, and ran after the men, when I was taken. I was calling for my dog which I had lost.

CORNELIUS JACKSON . There was no light on the stairs for a man to find his way up.

HOOKER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

HARDING - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-5

5. ROBERT WEST and WILLIAM WEST were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Messenger , the elder, about six o'clock in the night of the 25th of November , at the parish of St. Luke, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one pair of shoes, value 7s. 6d. , his property.

GEORGE MESSENGER. I am a shoemaker , and rent a house in Featherstone-street, in the parish of St. Luke . On the 25th of November, about five o'clock, I went out, the window was whole then and the shoes safe.

GEORGE MESSENGER , JUN. I am the son of the last witness. On the 25th of November I was in the shop,

minding it, the candles were burning in the shop; I saw the prisoner, William West, break a window with his hand, it was whole before. The prisoner, Robert West, came and took a pair of shoes out, I immediately opened the door, ran out and called stop thief! they were taken directly and brought into the shop - I knew the shoes to be my father's. I took William West myself, he was walking, I collared him-Evans came up and secured him. I am sure I saw him break the window, it was a quarter before six o'clock. I went to see the time directly as they were brought back, it wanted ten minutes to six.

Prisoner WILLIAM WEST. Q. Will you swear I broke the window - A. Yes; I knew his face - I had never seen him before. I stopped him about twenty-yards from the house; I was close to the window when he broke it. There were three candles in the shop, one was near that part of the window that he broke. I am sure Robert West put his hand in, and took the shoes out.

JOSEPH EVANS . I am servant to Mr. Messenger; I was in the kitchen, which is under the shop, I heard the window break, and the cry of stop thief! I ran up, followed George Messenger and found him about twenty yards off, with the prisoner, William West , and brought him back. He charged him with breaking the window-the prisoner denied it.

JOHN WEATHERFIELD. I am a backmaker, and live in Peartree-street. I was coming by and heard the cry of"stop thief," and saw the prisoner, Robert West , going along Banner-street, I stopped him, and asked him, what he had been doing; he said, he had done nothing; I said he must have done something; he then said, he had slipped down and broke a window. I asked him what he had got in his lap - He refused to shew me; I collared him, he then produced a pair of shoes, and offered them to me to let him go. I took him to Messenger's.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody. William West begged of Mrs. Messenger to let him pay for the window; he said he did not break it, but his brother did ( Robert West had his right hand cut, and his wrist and thumb were grazed, the other had no blood about him), the window is about two feet from the ground. George Messenger could see them very well.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM WEST'S Defence. I neither broke the window nor took the shoes.

W. WEST - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy.

R. WEST - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-6

6. CHARLES FAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Husband , two 1l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS HUSBAND . I keep a coal and potatoe warehouse in Tower-street . On the 27th of November I employed the prisoner at my house - He dined with me and my wife; when we were at dinner I put my purse on the table, and told my wife to put it away, but she did not-there was 12l. in it; next day I missed two 1l. notes out of it, and went to look for the prisoner. I found him at St. Andrew's-street, he took a 1l. note out of his pocket and gave it to me; it was one of the notes that I had lost out of my purse.

WILLIAM STEPHENS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to do it.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of Stealing only . Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-7

7. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one shawl, value 2s.; one hat, value 1s.; three feathers, value 1s.; three shifts, value 15s.; one pair of stays, value 2s.; one pair of ear-rings, value 6s.; two pair of stockings, value 5s.; three wreaths of artificial flowers, value 5s.; one snuff-box, value 10s.; one gown, value 2s.; one spencer, value 6s.; one row of beads, value 6d.; two broaches, value 20s.; one ornament, value 10s.; one morocco case, value 6s.; one guinea, and two seven-shilling pieces, the goods of Sophia Tipton , in the dwelling-house of John Burnett .

SOPHIA TIPTON . I live in Goswell-street , in John Burnett 's house; the prisoner was my chair-woman . On the 29th of October, I went out of town, desiring her to clean my apartments, and give the key to the landlord, which she did not. I returned on the 12th of November, and missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN GUEST . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of November the prisoner pledged three broaches with me. I am sure she is the person.

ROBERT PETO. I am a pawnbroker. I have a desert spoon and a broach which the prisoner pledged with me.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a caddy and spoon which the prisoner pledged with me on the 1st of November.

JOHN BURNETT . I rent the house; it belongs to Mr. Warner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-8

8. JAMES SMITH and THOMAS SPYERS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Carter , about twelve o'clock in the night of 5th of November , at the parish of St. Marylebone, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty-five stockings, value 18s.; five night gowns, value 10s.; two napkins, value 1s.; one petticoat, value 6d.; two table-cloths, value 2s.; one pair of drawers, value 2s., and ten towels, value 5s. , his property.

MARY CARTER . I am the wife of Thomas Carter ; we live in Newman-street . I am a laundress. On the 5th of November, about ten o'clock at night. I left the things in the wash-house, at the bottom of the yard, and padlocked the door. I got up about a quarter before six o'clock the next morning, it was light, and found a square of glass taken out of the bottom of the window, by which means they had opened the window, and taken the linen out. I found part of the property at the constable's.

EDWARD HARCUM. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoners and bundle.

JOHN WALKER, I am a labourer. On the 6th of November, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners coming down the road, each with a bundle, about a quarter of a mile from the house; I was with another man, but he would not assist me in taking them. As I returned I met Smith again, and took his bundle from him, it was wet - He said he was going to get it mangled; as we were going on with him we met Spyers, without his bundle, and took him; he had a bundle of dry linen when we first met him. We went down to a boat, and found a quantity of other linen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH PATEY . I am a labourer. I saw the bundle taken from Smith-the water was dropping from it-it was dirty; he said he found it in a hedge in the New Cut - He afterwards said he was going to take it to the mangler's. They denied knowing each other several times, and afterwards said they were going together to see who the things belonged to. I found another bundle of linen in the boat. I had seen the prisoners together about that boat, in company, for several days before.

SMITH'S Defence. I found the bundle; I know nothing of the other prisoner.

SPYERS' Defence. The things that I had were my own.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 16.

SPYERS - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value 39s. but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Barron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-9

8. JAMES CROOKSHANK was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Lewis on the King's highway, on the 27th of October , at the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 2d., two razors, value, 1s; one razor-case, value 4d., and one pair of spectacles, value 1s. , his property.

ROBERT LEWIS . I am a messenger to the Victualing-Office , and live in Dukes-court, Drury-lane. On the 27th of October, about five o'clock, I went to a public-house in Drury-court, Drury-lane, I then went to another public-house in Drury-lane, and stopped there till a little before twelve; I was then going to Little Russell-street, Bloomsbury, where I then lived - I was rather in liquor. I was knocked down in Bow-street , and was knocked down again at the top of Bloomsbury-court , I do not know who by. I lost my handkerchief, two razors in a case, and a pair of spectacles, which I saw again at the watch-house.

JOHN WARD . I am a watchman in St. Giles's; I was calling twelve o'clock in Silver-street, going into Bloomsbury-market, and heard a noise in the court, I saw a man coming along the court and seven or eight following him, Lewis was before them; one of them gave him a desperate blow with his fist, he immediately fell with his face in the kennel; I asked what was the matter-the prisoner is the man who struck him. I never took my eyes off him till I took him - I saw him strike the prosecutor. I uncovered my lanthorn, when the prisoner said, "watchman, what is the matter?" I went up and pretended to raise the prosecutor up; the prisoner was by his side, I seized him while he was asking me what was the matter. I told him he was the man who knocked the prosecutor down; he said, "me!" I said, "yes, I saw you do it." He made no answer. Chibnall came to my assistance, and said he saw him throw something into the water; I saw him take a case of razors out of the kennel, we then took him to the watch-house. I saw two handkerchiefs found in his hat; the prosecutor claimed one of them.

ANTHONY CHIBNALL. I am a watchman. I was calling twelve o'clock at the end of Lyon-street, Holborn, and heard the bustle; I went up and Ward gave the prisoner in my charge; I immediately saw him throw something into the kennel, and told Ward to hold him, I searched the kennel, and found the case of razors there; a handkerchief was taken out of the prisoner's hat, which the prosecutor claimed. He described the razors before he saw them.

WILLIAM GILLOCK. I am a sadler, and live in Silver-street, Bloomsbury-market. I heard the disturbance, and saw seven or eight men run away as I came down Hart-street; I looked down Market-street, saw the prosecutor in the kennel, and a man standing over him, by the passage - I went up; Ward seized the prisoner; Chibnall came up and searched the kennel. The razors and handkerchief were produced at the watch-house, which the prosecutor claimed.

HENRY COOK . I am a patrol. I was at the end of the Coal-yard, Drury-lane, on the 27th of October, just at the bottom of Broad-street, and saw the prisoner and another man cross over to the prosecutor, who was intoxicated - They followed him, he was going towards Bow-street, which leads to Bloomsbury-passage, just as he crossed over somebody pushed against me; I followed them to the end of Bow-street, but no farther.

CORNELIUS BOWERS . I was constable of the night. The prisoner and prosecutor were brought into the watchhouse by Chibnall-the prosecutor was very dirty; he was going to charge the prisoner with an assault, when the razors were produced and he claimed them - He described the razors before he saw them. Next morning I took the prisoner before the magistrate, and he made his escape out of the office yard.

MORRIS WELCH. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house - I took his hat off, and found two handkerchiefs in it, one of which the prosecutor claimed.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to Marlborough-street, but he made his escape out of the office yard. I took him again on the 10th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief is mine.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-10

9. CHARLES HARMER and JOHN ROWTER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jeremiah Sullivan , about nine o'clock in the night of the 16th of November , at the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one watch, value 6l.; one chain, value 30s.; three seals, value 3l.; four gown pieces, value 1l.; nine gowns, value 2l.; four tea-spoons, value

10s.; two coats, value 10s.; one waistcoat, value 6s.; two shirts, value 10s.; one looking glass, value 1s., and five 1l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN JEREMIAH SULLIVAN . I am a Custom-House-officer , and live at Stepney . On the 16th of November I left home, with my wife, about twenty minutes before four o'clock - I left no person at home; but double-locked the door, and put the key into my pocket. I returned about twenty minutes after ten o'clock at night, put the key in the door, and found it fastened inside. I got in through the next house, and found the back door open - I had left it bolted-the bolts were drawn. I found two drawers by the door, which had been taken from a chest in my bedroom. I lost some bank notes which I had received on the 1st of October from Thomas Lee , I had given them all to my wife, except one. I lost the rest of the things stated in the indictment.

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer of Whitechapel. On Monday evening, the 17th of November, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoners standing at the corner of Wentworth-street, Brick-lane - I knew them before. Harmer saw me, and rather retreated; I thought I saw something in his hand, I ran after and secured him; I found the watch-chain, three seals, and a key, in his hand; Freeman was with me, and secured Rowter. While I was searching Harmer, I saw a watch on the place where Rowter had been sitting, immediately as he got up; Freeman searched him, and found two 1l. notes on him.

MARY SULLIVAN . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I went out with him, leaving every thing in order, the drawers were safe; I had put some notes in my purse, which was rolled up in some gown pieces. I lost five 1l. bank notes I put my name on every note that I pay away. Those found have not got my name on them, therefore I could not have paid them away.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I was with Miller, and secured Rowter, and found two 1l. notes on him. I called him up to be searched, and saw a watch immediately under the seat where he sat-he could easily have placed it there. I produce the property.

JOHN JEREMIAH SULLIVAN. They are the same notes that I gave my wife. The watch, chain, and seals are mine, and worth 12l.

THOMAS LEE. I pay the inferior officers at the Custom-House. I paid the prosecutor No. 2833, which is one of the notes. I know nothing of the other.

SAMUEL MILLER examined by ROWTER. Q. Did I set down - A. He did.

Q. Was there nobody else brought in that might have put the watch there - A. There was no other person that sat down.

ROWTER'S Defence. The other prisoner gave me the note - I gave him change for it. Bryan saw me give the change.

ROBERT BRYAN . I know the prisoners by sight. I know Rowter, he is a cooper. I was at a public-house and heard them dealing for a chain, about a fortnight ago-it was about seven o'clock on a Monday evening. I heard them say something about a chain. I think I saw one of the prisoners give the other a 1l. note for 1l. in silver. I believe Rowter gave Harmer the silver for the note, I think, the same day-it was about a fortnight ago. I am Rowter's father-in-law. His wife lives with me.

Q. Court. She has been going backwards and forwards to Newgate to him - A. Yes; but she has never said any thing to me about this.

SAMUEL MILLER re-examined. Harmer said he gave 2l. 10s. for the chain and seals at the Virginia public-house. There was another man in the watch-house.

HARMER - GUILTY. - DEATH. Aged 20.

ROWTER - GUILTY. - DEATH. Aged 27.

Of Stealing the Goods in a Dwelling-house, but not of not the Burglary .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-11

10. CHARLES GOGERLY , WILLIAM GOGER-LY , and JOHN WHITFORD were indicted for stealing, at the parish of St. Martin in the Fields, on the 20th of November , two handkerchiefs, value 7s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Boswell , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH HAMMON . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Bos well, who lives in the Strand . On the 20th of November, the prisoners, William Gogerly and John Whitford came into the shop together, about nine o'clock in the morning; they asked to look at some cheap silk handkerchiefs; I reached a bundle out of the window- William Gogerly said they were not large enough, I reached some larger out - He took off his handkerchief to measure against them, they were the same size; he said they were not large enough, and asked for some of a figured pattern-both of them went out to point out some in the window, but they did not return. I missed one handkerchief, told Mr. Boswell immediately followed them, and came up with them - I found them talking to Charles Gogerly - They parted. I overtook Charles Gogerly, and saw him take two handkerchiefs from his hat. He tried to throw them down an area-this was before I took him; I picked them up, and secured him; I found our shop-mark on them, and gave him in charge to the officer; they are worth 7s. 6d., the selling price is 10s.; they were two of those I had shown to William Gogerly in the first parcel.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. There were no other persons in the shop-Gogerly dealt for them. I watched Whitford as he went out; he saw me, and did not attempt to run away.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Charles Gogerly was not in the shop, he was in Bedford-street, which is about twenty yards from the shop.

THOMAS BOSWELL. I keep the shop and rent the house. On the 20th of November William Gogerly and Whitford came in. I went forward; Whitford said there were some patterns in the window, which he would go and shew me. He went out, Gogerly followed, but neither returned. My shopman immediately missed an handkerchief; we followed them, and found them standing at the corner of Bedford-street, which is about twenty yards off; I secured Whitford, who was in Bedford-street with Wil liam Gogerly -my shopman had passed them to pursue Charles Gogerly . Whitford said he had done nothing, and would go with me - I took him to the shop and sent for an officer. While my young man was gone, I saw William Gogerly at the door, looking in at the two prisoners - He ran away when he saw me; I pursued, and

secured him about twenty yards off; he ran away when he saw me. They were searched, and not a farthing was found on either of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES GOGERLY 'S Defence. My brother asked me to go with him to buy the handkerchiefs. We met Whitford, who went into the shop, and came out and told me to put the handkerchiefs in my pocket, which I did.

WILLIAM GOGERLY and WHITFORD made no defence.

C. COGERLY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

W. GOGERLY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

WHITFORD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-12

11. RICHARD WILLETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , one hydrometer, value 4l., and one case, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Davidson and Eneas Barkley .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of John Hilton .

THOMAS OSMOND . I am warehouseman to Mr. John Hilton, who lives in Lime-street. The hydrometer was sent to him to pack with other things going to the West Indies-the prisoner was also a warehouseman there. I packed it in a puncheon that was going there; it went to the West India Docks on the 25th of October.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It came to us from Mr. Bates's, in the Poultry. I did not open it before I packed it; it was packed with great care. There were three or four tied up together, and put in the middle of the puncheon.

Q. For all you know, it was in the same state as when it came - A.Certainly. The prisoner saw me pack it up. It appeared to be in the same state as when I packed them-it could not be taken out after it was put in the puncheon. When the robbery was discovered the puncheon was fetched from the Docks; one of the hoops was disturbed.

LAZARUS JACOBS. I am a broker, and live in Raven-row, Spitalfields. On the 24th of October the prisoner came to my house, shewed me the hydrometer, and asked 1l. for it, I gave him 18s. for it - I put it out; several persons offered me 14s. and 12s. for it. On the Monday, I sold it to a man who keeps a public-house in Bishopsgate-street, I believe his name is Sterley. I am sure the prisoner is the man who sold it to me.

Cross-examined. It was between one and three or four o'clock; I never bought one before. I was asked concerning it about eight days after.

Q. On your oath, did you not tell the magistrate that it was between three and five o'clock - A. I might. I am no judge of hydrometers. I have dealt with the man whom sold it to once or twice before, not more. I never delivered any goods at his house.

Q.On your oath, have you not - A. I never was at his house till to-day, nor did not know where it was before. I did not know his name.

JOHN GIBBS. I keep the Mail-Coach public-house, in Camomile-street. I bought the hydrometer of Jacobs, for 1l.

Cross-examined. Q. Has he ever been at your house - A. Yes, he brought some chairs to my house himself, and has drank there. As I passed his house he called me in, and asked if I wanted such a thing? I had only got 19s. 6d. - he said he would call for the other 6d.

JOSEPH STERNRY. I am shopman to Mr. Bates. The hydrometer is the same I sent to Mr. Hilton's to be packed up on the 15th of October.

Cross-examined. I sent four paper parcels, which contained the materials of one hydrometer. Gibbs sent it to me afterwards to ask for an explanation of it. I got information, and went to Jacobs's shop with Gibbs.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man till he was brought to our house. I was sent to fetch the puncheon back, and observed the hoops had been moved. If it had been in that state when it went to the Docks they would not have received it. I opened it, and every person said it had been opened at the bottom-every thing was right at the top.

THOMAS FOWLES . I brought the puncheon from the Docks. The bottom did not appear as if it had been fastened by a workman. They are always examined at the Docks, and if the hoops are not fast they will not take them in.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-13

12. THOMAS BROWN and JOSEPH THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , from the person of William Whitmore , one pocket-book, value 1s. 6d.; two 5l., two 2l., and three 1l. bank notes , his property.

MR. WILLIAM WHITMORE. On the 18th of November I was in Throgmorton-street , about a quarter after one o'clock in the day, and met the two prisoners - They were coming one way and I the other; they stopped me on the pavement, which is narrow - They would not make way for me; I desired they would let me pass. Brown came round on my right side and the other on my left. As I passed between them I felt Thomas's hand in my waistcoat pocket. As soon as I got clear of them, I put my hand to my pocket and missed my pocket-book, which contained a 5l., a 2l., and three 1l. notes. I turned round, and saw Thomas a few yards before me; I ran up to him-he took to his heels as hard as he could, and crossed Broad-street - I called out Stop thief! he was stopped; I came up in half a minute - I never lost sight of him. Several people came round him; one of them gave me my pocket-book; the other prisoner was taken and brought up, and the constable took them both. I am positive he is one of them - I saw them both walking together before they came up to me.

CHARLES WOODHALL . I am a bank-porter. I saw the prisoners running, and Mr. Whitmore following them. I saw Thomas drop the pocket-book and run on. When they came to the corner of the street Thomas was stopped. While they were taking him to the Mansion-house, Brown was standing in the street and was secured.

WILLIAM SCOTT. I was in Threadneedle-street about a quarter of an hour before this happened, and saw the prisoners in company together. Brown stepped up to a gentleman, and attempted his pocket, which was rather open-the gentleman turned into a coffee-house. When I returned, I found Thomas in custody, and saw Brown

standing at the corner of Throgmorton-street; I pointed him out, and the officer took him. I am sure he is the boy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-14

13. LEWIS TINDALE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 20 yards of ribbon, value 3s. , the goods of John James .

JOHN JAMES . I am nephew to Mr. John James, who is a haberdasher , and lives on Holborn-hill . On the 7th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop and asked to see some ribbons; I shewed him a box, and gave him a piece out - He asked for a wider piece. While I was looking for some, I saw him put the one I first gave him into his bosom. I went into the back-shop and told Ann Martin, who told Mr. James. I went for an officer.

ANN MARTIN . James gave me information - I told the prisoner there was a piece of ribbon missing, and we must find it. He denied having it, and inquired what woman it was that stood by him while he was looking at them, as if to throw suspicion on her. I told him she could not have it, as she was not looking at them. Mr. James desired the prisoner to give him the property-he still denied it. Mr. James told me to watch him; he dropped it in the back shop while I was engaged. It could not have got there if he had not dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They have spoken falsely; I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-15

14. THOMAS BILLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry Martin , from his person .

HENRY MARTIN. I was in Piccadilly on the 15th of November, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, passing where the houses are being pulled down. I felt some person pull the tail of my coat, I put my hand down, missed my handkerchief, turned round, and found the prisoner at my elbow, in great confusion, putting the handkerchief under his waistcoat. I collared him - He said I had mistaken the person. I took him into a shop to search him. As I was going in at the door, he took it out and threw it on the pavement-he begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-16

15. CATHERINE PATTERSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , three pint pewter pots, value 3s. , the goods of Jeremiah Dean .

JEREMIAH DEAN . I keep the Ship public-house , in Ogle-street, Marylebone. On the 13th of November I received information that the prisoner was taking pots from several doors in Carlton-street , I went out and followed her; she appeared to have something in her apron - I asked her what she had there? she put her hand in her apron and gave me a pint pot; she said she had no more. I felt something hard in each pocket, and took a pint pot out of each of them. I secured her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Two Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-17

16. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one purse, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Taylor .

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I live in St. Martin's-court . On Thursday, the 28th of November, between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing against my window for about half an hour; he went away. Next morning, between seven and eight o'clock, he was there again, and kept watching me for twenty minutes, and then left. I went out, and a young man asked me if I suspected him? I said, No. I looked at my window, and found a pane of glass that had been cracked was pulled out, and some purses taken out. I saw him return again, watched him, and saw him, about two o'clock, take another purse out. I secured him - He gave it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-18

17. HENRY ELLIS , EDWARD BOWEN , SARAH FRANKS , and SARAH PINNION were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Nelham , widow , about seven in the night of the 9th of November , in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one bible, value 12s.; one looking-glass, value 2l.; one carpet, value 1l.; one pair of shoes, value 6s.; one petticoat, value 2s.; one sheet, value 5s.; two pillow cases, value 1s.; one table-cloth, value 4s.; four handkerchiefs, value 10s.; two shifts, value 7s.; two shawls, value 6s.; one coat, value 2l.; one pair of trowsers, value 1l.; and one waistcoat, value 10s. , her property.

MARY NELHAM. I am a widow, and rent a house at Stepney . On Sunday, the 9th of November, a little before six o'clock in the evening, I went out to chapel, it was not quite dark. I returned at eight o'clock, and found the front and back doors open, and a chair against the back-wall in the yard. Bowen lives opposite to me, and Pinnion next door; I saw them walking about by the door before I went out. I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of different rooms. I have found most of them. I locked my doors when I went out, and had the keys in my pocket-there were no locks broken - I do not know how they got in.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I searched the prisoners and found seven duplicates on Ellis, one of which

referred to Annis, one to Matthews, three to Price, one to Flemming, and one to Stevenson, and the leaf of a bible with Mrs. Nelham's name on it - He said he found them. I found a cloth in Pinnion's lap. The prosecutrix gave me a flint and steel which had been left behind.

JOSEPH TEBBS. I am apprentice to Mr. Stevenson, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Whitechapel-road. The prisoner, Franks, pledged two tea-spoons with me on the 10th of November, about the middle of the day, for 4s., in the name of Ann Smith ,. I saw her in custody the next day, and am sure it was her-one of the duplicates is ours'.

THOMAS BENNET . I live with Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker, in the Minories. On the 10th of November, about the middle of the day, the prisoner, Franks, pledged three gowns, an apron, a pocket, a table-cloth, and a pillow-case with me for 10s., in the name of Sarah Smith -one of the duplicates produced is that which I gave her.

THOMAS ANNIS PARSONS. I am servant to Mr. Annis, pawnbroker, Sparrow-corner, Minories. On the 10th of November, the prisoner, Franks, pledged a bible and shawl with me for 5s., in the name of Sarah Smith, about two o'clock. One of the duplilcated produced is the one I gave her.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am servant to Mr. Price, pawnbroker, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel. On the 10th of November the prisoner, Franks, pledged a carpet and glass with me, between twelve and one o'clock. Soon after, on the same day, Ellis came and pledged a sheet, two shifts, and two bed-gowns, in the name of Henry Smith, Rose-lane, for 7s. Two of the duplicates produced are those which I gave him.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. I assisted in apprehending the prisoners. Brown has spoken correctly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. NELHAM. My things are worth 20l. There appeared to be the marks of two persons feet about the house.

FRANKS'S Defence. I was asked to pledge them.

The other prisoners made no defence.

ELLIS - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

BOWEN- NOT GUILTY .

FRANKS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

PINNION- NOT GUILTY .

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of the burglary .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-19

18. JOHN CATON and PATRICK CONNOLLY were indicted for feloniously assaulting, and maliciously cutting and maiming, Patrick O'Neal , on the 7th of November , with intent to maim him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating the intent to be to disable the said Patrick O'Neal , or to do him some grevious bodily harm.

PATRICK O'NEAL. I am the watchman of Church-street, St. Giles's. On the 7th of November, about ten o'clock at night, nearly a dozen people were assembled to see a sham-fight between the prisoners-they were not stripped; Caton said, "I will fight to-morrow;" when Connolly said, "let us have it out now." I desired them to go home, and not collect a mob in the street. Connolly asked me what I wanted - I said I wanted them to go home. I left them, went round my beat, and returned in about a quarter of an hour, found them still quarrelling, and the crowd round them. Connolly said, " Paddy O'Neal , what do you want here?" I said I wanted to disperse them. He said he would go home when he liked. A girl, who was with him, said she would go home when she liked. I said, if they did not go home I would take them in charge for being disorderly. He used vulgar expressions. I went to lay hold of him; the girl came before us to prevent me; he squared at me with his fist, and desired me not to strike the girl - I said I would not. I seized him with my left hand, and collared him by his neck handkerchief - I had my lanthorn on my right arm, and a rattle in my hand, which I sprang. Caton came, pushed himself before us, and shoved us, to make me let go. I sprang my rattle as hard as I could. In a short time he got a knife-both his hands were up to his neck, as I thought, to disengage my hand from him. I felt him cutting my fingers with a knife; I screamed out, Murder! and that he had cut me with a knife. Caton said,"He has no knife" - I said I saw it in his hand. I took my hand from his collar, being afraid; he struck me on the nose and ran away.

Q. What sort of a knife was it - A. A clasp knife. Caton ran after him. I got surgical assistance at the watchhouse. My fingers bled very much, and my nose bled for two days. I gave information, and they were taken about five nights after.

MR. JOSEPH BURGESS. I am the workhouse apothecary. Two days after this took place, the prosecutor applied to me; a piece had evidently been cut from the fourth finger of his left hand - I saw him several times. It is in a fair way of doing well.

SAMUEL ROBERTS. I am the constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house on the 14th. I found a knife on Connolly.

PATRICK O'NEAL. I believe that to be the knife I was wounded with.

CONNOLLY'S Defence. A young man gave me the knife after this happened.

JOHN WATKINSON. I live at Mr. Freeman's, in Goswell-street. I gave Connolly the knife on the 13th of November.

CATHARINE MACARTHY . On the 6th or 7th of November I was coming from a wake, and saw the crowd, The prosecutor collared the prisoner. Several persons desired him to let go. I did not hear him call out.

JOHN FERGUSON. I live in Church-lane. I saw the prosecutor collar the young man. I did not hear him call out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-20

19. JAMES SUMMERS and JOHN KNIGHT , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Phillips , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 9th of November , in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one umbrella, value 5s., his property; six coats, value 10l.; three waistcoats, value 1l.; three pair of pantaloons, value 2l.; three pair of boots, value 2l.; one silver mug, value 2l.; 10 silver spoons, value 5l.; two

punch ladles, value 10s.; and one tea caddy, value 10s. , the goods of Frederick Cox , Esq .

MR. GEORGE PHILLIPS. I am a brass-founder , and rent the house No. 7, Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury . On the 8th of November last Henry Dunn was my servant, he had lived ten weeks with me; I discharged him that night. Next morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I found my house broken open and robbed. I examined my premises, and found a covered cart, which was usually placed in the mews (which was at the back of my finishing shop), drawn up immediately under the door; above the door there were marks of the footsteps of one person; the windows of the finishing shop(which is immediately opposite the mews door looking into the back-yard), were open, which led me to suppose they had got over the roof of the finishing shop-the lock of the mews door was forced inside, and the bolts drawn. On a bench in the finishing shop, I found some bags of copper. I think they must have got in by getting over the roof of the finishing shop. By getting on the cart a person may lay hold of the water-pipe, and so get on the roof, then over two roofs, and drop down to a window, which looks into the finishing shop. I found this window open-it had been painted the day before. There were the footsteps of one person coming in; they would then be in the finishing shop. When he got in he must have forced the locks, drawn the bolts, and let the others in. I found three bags and a pile of copper on the bench, which had been left in the store-room the night before-the bags were not mine, the copper was. The store-room, where it was taken from, is part of my dwelling-house; the only way to the finishing shop is through my own yard. The store-room door was locked as usual. There were marks about, which shewed me the way they had gone. They must have dropped from the finishing shop into the yard, and got into the house by the sky-light, which has no fastening. On a sand-heap, under that skylight, there was the impression of two knees of a person who had worn corderoy breeches. Immediately opposite the sand-heap is the door of the time-keeper's room, where some things had been disturbed-the keys of the store-keeper's room bung there; they could be got at, and the doors opened. The lock of the time-keeper's room, which is part of the dwelling-house, had been forced open and shut again. I missed my umbrella and several things of Mr. Cox's, who lodge with me. I apprehended Dunn, and he made some discoveries to me.

FREDERICK COX, ESQ. I occupy the first-floor in Mr. Phillips's house. I was not at home at the time of the robbery - I came home the next day, and missed all my clothes; five coats, one great coat, three pair of boots, and several silver spoons, a silver mug, a tea-caddy, and several other things.

MARY SHEPPARD . I am servant to Mr. Phillips. I got up at half-past seven o'clock, found the house broken open, and alarmed Mr. Phillips.

HENRY DUNN. I lived ten weeks with Mr. Phillips. I left him on Saturday evening, and went under the Piazzas in Covent-garden, to Bellshaw's public-house, expecting to meet the prisoners. They were not there. I came out, and waited under the Piazzas a minute or two, and saw them come from New-street. Summers said he had been looking for me, and asked, is all right? I said, I believe it is. He asked if I had any money - I said I had. He said he had been nippered three times, at Chelsea, that day. I went into Bellshaw's, and gave them a pint of beer-it was about half-past seven. We then went to Summers's house, in Charles-street, Drury-lane. They asked me to lend them some money. I went down to the parlour, which is a cook-shop, and got 3s. worth of victuals, and took it to them. We left there about ten o'clock, and returned to Bellshaw's, where we met a man named Shannon; he asked me what screws (which means a skeleton key) would do, and shewed me one; I said I thought it was too small; he said, never mind, he would try it; it was to open the door with. We had been talking about entering the prosecutor's house on the Thursday before; it was about eleven o'clock in the day. I was with Summers at Shannon's, in Vine-street, Chandos-street, and we staid there from half-past nine in the morning till nine at night; and the next day I was with Summers from eleven to one o'clock, in Drury-lane.

Q. How long did you stay at Bellshaw's on the Saturday evening? - A. I and Summers went to a person in Vine-street, at an old iron-shop, to get a bag to put the property in; we got six sacks and a dark lanthorn there; the largest sack would hold about a bushel and a half; we hid them in Covent-garden, and went to Bellshaw's again; it was about half-past ten; we staid there drinking till about a quarter after twelve. Shannon said, it is a quarter after twelve, will you go? we all went. Summers and Knight walked together, and I and Shannon; we went to the back part of Mr. Phillips's house, up the mews. Shannon asked me which was the way to get in; I directed him to get up the spout; he climbed up the stable door, but could not get up; we got a cart from the mews, and lifted him up; he got on the roof, and came through and opened the door leading from the finishing room; he forced the lock back; we all three went in. Shannon took the dark lanthorn, and Summers looked round, and saw some ornaments; I told him there was some copper below; he asked how we were to get out; he got down into the yard by the water-butt, and let us out of the door into the yard; we walked along; he asked how we were to get down; he got down by the sky-light in the yard into the foundery; I followed him down; I directed him into the window of the time-keeper's room, and followed him; he got in, and forced a lock back; we then got into the passage of the kitchen; I shewed him the metal-room; he tried his skeleton key, it would not open the door; he returned into the time-keeper's room to look for something to force it; on looking round, he saw the keys hanging up, and said, here is a screw; he tried it; it was the key of the door; we went in, and let Summers and Knight in through the kitchen, out of the yard; we left Summers in possession of the door to whistle if any body came; we three went into the store-room, and filled four sacks with each ten pieces of copper; Knight tied them up; they carried these sacks into the finishing shop; while we were filling them, Shannon asked me what was up stairs; I told him I did not know; he asked if any body lodged there besides my master, and if he was worth property; he said he would go and try; he and Summers went up, and brought down an umbrella, a tea caddy, and a pair of

pantaloons; he ran across the yard to me; I said I should be off, that the gentleman must be in his bed-room; he asked for a sack - We emptied the largest, and gave it to him; he and Knight went up, and came down with it full - I did not know what was in it till it was emptied at Mr. Woolf's, in Bell-yard-there was six or seven coats, about eight pair of pantaloons, eight waistcoats, a great coat, stockings and drawers, a tea-caddy, and an umbrella. Shannon and Knight fetched a coach; we took the clothes away, and left the copper. The coach passed by three doors; Shannon came and said, bring it out - I said I would not carry any thing; Shannon saw the watchman speaking to the coachman; Knight took the sack, and threw it into the coach with the umbrella and things. I got on the coach-box in Drury-lane - We drove to Phillips's, in Wych-street, and then took it to Woolf's, in Bell-yard, Templebar; we got there about two o'clock-he was up ready to receive us; we got 6l. for the clothes. I had known Summers six months, and Knight about four days.

JOSEPH BURTON . I am a smith. I was at the Green Man, in the Coal-yard, in Drury-lane, at half-past eight o'clock that evening; Dunn came in with a man - I knew him. They had half a pint of gin; he took 1s. out of his pocket-book; neither of the prisoners were with him.

JAMES BIRDSEYE . I am pot-boy at Mr. Bellshaw's, corner of James-street, Covent-garden. I saw Dunn there on Saturday night, November 8th, and three or four people with him, about ten o'clock; they kept going out and coming in; I saw nothing in their possession; the first time they came in they had a pot of beer to drink; it was about ten o'clock - They left about a quarter after twelve. I had seen Dunn and the others at our house several nights before; I remember Knight being with him that night; I can hardly recollect whether the other prisoner was there or not - I am sure Knight was there, in company with Dunn; they went away together; the last time I saw them was about twelve o'clock. Dunn and the prisoners were apprehended at our house on the Saturday night following; the prisoners were in company with him when he was taken.

Court. Q. Have you at any other time seen the prisoners in company with Dunn? - A. I have seen them in company before; Shannon was with them.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoners, and Dunn, on the Tuesday evening after the robbery, at Bellshaw's, in consequence of information which Dunn gave me.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I assisted in apprehending them; Dunn told us where we could find them; they were in company together. I found the bags loaded with copper in Phillips's finishing-room.

Mr. PHILLIPS re-examined. The kitchen is on the second floor; I do not think they went further than Mr. Cox's room.

Q. Does the account which Dunn had given appear to be true as to the manner in which the robbery was committed? - A. Perfectly so; it corresponds with the observations which I made.

SUMMERS'S Defence. Dunn came to my father's on Thursday morning, and asked me to rob his master's house; I said I did not like to do any thing of the kind; he said he would bring the copper out, and I should take it away; I refused; he asked me again on Friday - I refused; I met him and Knight at Bellshaw's on Saturday night; he asked me again - I refused to have any thing to do in it, and left there about a quarter before ten; he said he could get others to go; I did not see him again till Tuesday evening, when we were taken.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I was coming through the Piazzas; I went to drink with him; he asked me to rob his master - I refused, and left him; on Tuesday night I met him again.

SUMMERS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

KNIGHT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18171203-21

20. JOHN WILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , at St. George's, Hanover-square, four pair of chaise wheels, value 20l. and two iron chaise wheel boxes, value 5s., the goods of John Tilbury , In his dwelling-house .

JOHN TILBURY . I am a coach-maker , and live in South-street, Grosvenor-square ; the prisoner is employed by Robson, who is a wheeler, and lives in the same street; the prisoner was constantly in the habit of coming to work on my premises, to repair and box wheels; my wheels are kept in my lower warehouse, on the ground floor, which is under the roof of my dwelling-house; the prisoner has been in Robson's employ three years; in the beginning of September I missed four pair of new wheels from my premises, one pair had boxes on them, the others were without; they were intended for tilburys, not for four-wheel carriages. On Thursday last I saw one pair of them in Ogle Mews, on a chaise-it was the pair that were finished; I saw another pair at Mr. Cotterell's yard, in Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square; and another pair in Mr. Prendergrass's back yard. I know them to be my property, and am sure I had not disposed of them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. They are made an inch shorter than others; the prisoner was not my servant.

JOHN ROBSON . The prisoner was in my employ to make wheels for Mr. Tilbury; I have made wheels of the same construction for Mr. Prendergrass.

EDWARD FREDERICK PRENDERGRASS. I live in Duke-street, Manchester-square; Mr. Tilbury saw some wheels on a gig of mine in Ogle Mews, which I bought of the prisoner in the middle of September, for 3l. 3s.; at the end of July or beginning of August I bought another pair of him, which Tilbury saw - They were new.

Cross-examined. I am a school-master; I have dealt in wheel carriages for seven years; I thought he dealt in wheels.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. TILBURY. The value of one wheel is 2l. 11s.

SAMUEL HAZELTON . I am certain they are Mr. Tilbury's; I made them - They are made different from other people's - They are levelled.

-COTTERELL. I live in Chandler-street; the prisoner lodged with me about ten months ago; he put some wheels on my premises; when he left me I still gave him leave to keep them there.

Cross-examined. I understood that he dealt in wheels; I knew he was a journeyman wheelwright; he always brought the wheels himself, and one pair at a time.

Prisoner's Defence. I deal in old and new wheels - I used to buy them of coachmakers where my master worked.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-22

21. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , twenty-four yards of bombazett, value 20l., the goods of Edward Colls , privately in his shop .

EDWARD COLLS. I am a linen-draper , and live in Brazen-alley, Wellclose-square .

JOHN SMITH . I was standing at my own door, which is two doors from Colls's, on the 8th of November, and saw the prisoner put his hand up and take the bombazett from the side of the door - He was not in the shop; I stopped him - He dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Of Stealing only . Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-23

22. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one bag, value 2d., and fifty-six pounds of rice, value 18s., the goods of Joseph Shillcock , privately in his shop .

JOHN GAY. I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. On the 6th of November I saw the prisoner, and another man, under Shillcock's window with a bag; when he saw me he stood before it to bide it; I saw him stoop down to take it up-the other man lifted it on his shoulder. I asked him what he had got - He said he did not know, but was carrying it for a man; I followed him to Cowcross, and there stopped him - He tried to get away, and threw some skeleton keys out of his pocket; he pretended to be drunk-the bag contained rice, which Shillcock claimed.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and found ten skeleton keys on him.

RICHARD SKERRAT . I am servant to Joseph Shillcock , who is a grocer , and lives in St. John's-street ; the bag of rice was at the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men made me drunk; they said they would give me a job to carry a parcel - I fell asleep - They awoke me, and said, it was time to go, and took me to St. John's-street, and put it on my shoulder-the keys must have been put in my pocket.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-24

23. THOMAS DELANEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one pair of shoes, value 5s., the goods of Howard Lewis , privately in his shop .

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman , and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel . On the 5th of November, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came in, and asked the price of a handkerchief; he said it would not do, and went out; I missed the shoes, and ran out and took him with them in his possession - He begged for mercy; there was another person in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to show them to a man.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of Stealing, but not privately . Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-25

24. JAMES MORTIMER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , one saddle, value 20s. , the goods of Robert Hughes .

JAMES GOGGIN . I was painting Robert Hughes 's premises, in Tyler-street , on the 11th of November - I saw the prisoner come into the yard, and walk up to the stable; he looked round - I concealed myself - He took the key of the stable door off the nail, opened it, and went in, and came out with the saddle; I called Prist, and he dropped it - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the place.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-26

25. EDWARD PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , two sheets, value 10s.; one gown, value 3s.; three pair of stockings, value 3s.; one waistcoat, value 5s.; and one handkerchief, value 2d. , the goods of Ann King .

ANN KING. I am a laundress . On the 28th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I missed the things off my lines, and found the prisoner lying down in the wash-house with them - I laid hold of him - He got away, but was taken immediately.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS KING. I found the articles stated in the indictment under his clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-27

26. GEORGE HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , eight yards of stuff, value 6s. , the goods of James Fitch .

JAMES JENKINS . I am servant to Mr. James Fitch, who is a linen-draper , and lives in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 25th November, the prisoner and another man came to the door; the other man took the stuff-and gave it to the prisoner. I went out, secured him, and took it from under his coat. The other man got away.

JOHN HANSELL. I live at the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner put it under his coat and run away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other man pushed it into my arms.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garraw.

Reference Number: t18171203-28

27. JOSEPH TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , two planes, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Pullen .

THOMAS PULLEN. I am a carpenter , and live in Baldwin's-gardens. I had a job in Wellington-square ; I left work about twelve o'clock, returned at half-past two, and missed my planes. The prisoner was at the public-house with me. He went out for about a quarter of an hour.

ALEXANDER BURGESS . I am shopman to Mr. Atterbury, pawnbroker, Wilson-street. There were three planes pledged with me between five and six o'clock of the 3d November. I do not know who pledged them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-29

28. CHRISTOPHER BURK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Godfrey Bromhead , on the 8th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one looking-glass, value 2l., and one coat, value 10s. , his property.

JOSEPH BONSOR. I am a headborough. On the 10th of November I took the prisoner into custody, and found a duplicate on him which refers to Price.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am servant to Mr. Price, who is a pawnbroker. On the 8th of November, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner pledged a coat with me.

GODFREY BROMHEAD. I live in Whitecross-street, and am servant to F. Desanges, Esq., the Sheriff. About a quarter after eight o'clock I lost the things; I was out at the time. I left my servant at home-she is the prisoner's wife.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My wife gave me the property to pledge; I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-30

29. WILLIAM SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , at the parish of St. Catherine Cree Church, in the dwelling-house of John Key , one pocket-book, value 2s.; three guineas, two sovereigns, one half-guinea, two half-sovereigns, one 7s. piece, 5l. 13s. in monies numbered, and eleven 1l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS TIMBERLAND FARR. I am shopman to Mr. John Key, who is a chemist , and lives at Aldgate Within, in the parish of St. Katherine Cree Church . On the night of Sunday, the 9th of November, I lost a leather pocketbook out of the till in the shop; I saw it safe at seven o'clock in the evening; it contained three guineas, 11 1l. notes, a banker's draft for 19l. 14s., two sovereigns and a half, and 5l. 13s. in silver. I went to the till about half-past nine, missed it, and went immediately to the watch-house. The next day the prisoner, Duproy, and a woman, were taken on suspicion.

CHARLES DUPROV . I am between thirteen and fourteen years old. I have known the prisoner since Bow Fair last year - I do not know his trade. On the 9th of November last I met him in Whitechapel, about six o'clock in the evening, by appointment - I was to meet him and James Bennet at the prosecutor's. The prisoner said, when we got to Keys's we were to go in and take the notes out of the till. Bennet went in with Munroe's hat on, and brought out a pocket-book, which the prisoner took away from him, and took it to his house-we all went there; when we got there we divided it-his house was in George-street - They both told the money out. The prisoner, I, Bennet, and Munroe-Munroe is a boy who was with us at Key's shop. We were together when the money was divided.

Q. How did he divide it - A.We each had some. The prisoner took my money away, and bought me some clothes with it. The next morning he gave me some notes and a 3s. piece for my share - I do not know how many. There was some gold, which the prisoner had. There were two 7s. pieces, a half-guinea, and three guineas. The prisoner threw the pocket-book away in the backfield near Wentworth-street, by a sugar-baker's. He stood at the door, and said he would knock the gentleman down if he came out. About an hour after he gave me the money he took it away again. He made me stay with him that night. The next day he took me out about seven o'clock in the morning; he ordered a coach from a public-house in the Whitechapel-road, by Great Garden-street, and we went near Black Lion-yard, where he bought me a fustian jacket and breeches, a small striped waistcoat, and a hat; he paid for them, and bought himself a velvet jacket and breeches, and a striped waistcoat like mine-he paid for them in notes. We then went and bought a great coat for each of us, and a pair of stockings and a shirt for me, by Whitechapel watch-house-he paid for them in notes. We then went down Whitechapel-road, and bought two silk handkerchiefs, which he paid for in silver, and afterwards went back and changed a note for another. We went to a batter's in Whitechapel-road, and bought a hat for each of us - He gave 18s. for the two, and changed a note for them.

Q.When did you take the coach - A. About one o'clock, after we bought the things. I do not know where I was taken to - We went to some of his relations; his mother went with us.

Q. Do you know the Dolphin public-house, in Whitechapel-road - A. I know it by name, and was there in the course of that Monday, between one and two o'clock. The prisoner's relations lived in Black Lion-yard. We went to the Dolphin to have something to drink-it is near Black Lion-yard; he went first, and I followed him. He gave me a 3s. piece there. We were taken up on that night. I never got any of the money from him. I have been confined ever since. There was some reading at the end of the pocket-book - I should know it again if I saw it.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not at home in bed when you brought me the money - A. No.

Court. How long have you known him - A.Ever since Bow Fair, which, I believe, was this summer, but am not sure.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not have the money all night, and give it to me in the morning - A. No; you took it away from me in the morning.

FREDERICK AUSTIN . I keep a sale-shop in Whitechapel-road, next door to the corner of Black Lion-yard. On Monday, the 10th of November, about eight o'clock in

the morning, the prisoner came to my shop, alone, and bought a jacket for 18s., and a shirt for 5s. He went away, and returned again in half an hour with Duproy, the last witness, and bought him a fustian jacket and trowsers and a waistcoat - I believe Duproy has got jacket and trowsers on now - He paid me 16s., in silver, for them. I am sure he is the man - I knew him before.

ABRAHAM LAWRENCE . I live in Church-lane, Whitechapel-road, opposite the watch-house. On Monday morning, the 10th of November, the prisoner bought a great coat for himself, and a great coat, a shirt, and a pair of stockings for Duproy; he paid me two 1l. notes for them.

JOHN WAUGH . I live in Whitechapel-road. On the 10th of November I remember seeing the prisoner at my house between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, with a boy, whom I believe to be Duproy. He asked to see some silk handkerchiefs, asked the price, and went out; he returned again, bought two, and two pieces of ribbon to tie round their hats. The prisoner paid for them in half-crown pieces. In about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, he returned again, and bought another silk handkerchief cut off, and offered me a 1l. note. I told him I did not think I had change - He said I had taken some money of him, and could not want much to make up the change. When he gave me the note I asked his name and address; he gave the name of Johnston, Thomas-street, Whitechapel-road. I said, I did not know Thomas-street, Whitechapel-road - He then said, Thomas-street, Brick-lane, opposite Bacon-street-there is no such a street. I am positive he is the man.

THOMAS MOREHOUSE. I live in Whitechapel-road. I know the prisoner. On Monday morning, the 10th of November, he came to my house with a boy. The prisoner asked for a hat for the boy; I tried one on, and charged him 8s. for it. He came back again and had one for himself, which I charged 10s. for - He offered 17s. for the two, which I took - He produced a 1l. note; he gave me the name of William Seymour to put on it.

HARRIET STEVENTON. I live at the Dolphin public-house, in Whitechapel-road. I knew the prisoner and Duproy. The prisoner came to my house alone, at seven o'clock in the morning of the 10th of November, and asked for change for a 1l. note - I refused it, not having it. Between ten and eleven o'clock he came again with his father - I believe he wanted change for a sovereign, I gave it to him. In the course of that morning I saw him in company with Duproy, and saw some money pass between them. I did not pay any attention to it, being busy. I did not know what money it was.

GEORGE JACOB HICKMANN. I am a sugar-baker, and live in George-street, near Wentworth-street. On the morning of the 10th of November, about ten o'clock, I went with the officer from Mr. Key's, and found a small box. On the Sunday night I found a pocket-book about the middle of the gateway leading to my sugar-house, which is about half a mile from Mr. Key's house (looks at it)-that is it.

CHARLES DUPROV . I know it by the writing at the top-it looks like it. I cannot read.

MR. FARR. It is the pocket-book which contained the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home in bed at the time of the robbery. Duproy came to me and said he found it, and asked me to go with him in the morning to buy some clothes, and he would pay me for my trouble. I laid it out in my own neighbourhood.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-31

30. FRANCES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of John James .

ANN MARTIN . I am shopwoman to Mr. John James, who is a haberdasher , and lives on Holborn-bridge. On the 8th of October the prisoner came into the shop about eleven o'clock in the morning, and asked to look at a pair of stockings; I shewed her several, which she objected to. While I was getting some others, I saw her take a pair; I told Mr. James - He accused her of it, she denied it, and dropped them from under her shawl.

ELIZA SHELLY. I saw the prisoner drop them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-32

31. DENNIS BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 4 oz. of nutmegs, value 2s. 6d.; one fire-box, value 1s.; and two quires of paper, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Keating .

MR. THOMAS KEATING . I am a druggist , and live in St. Paul's Church-yard. The prisoner was my servant . I received information, and sent an officer to his house, in Angel-court, Grub-street, and found the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined. He shewed us the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY PARKER. I was with the officer, and saw the things found.

GEORGE REID . I am an officer. The prisoner told me he took the things.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-33

32. ROBERT DAVEY was indicted for feloniously and knowingly having in his possession a forged Bank of England note .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-34

33. STEPHEN CLIFTON was indicted for the like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-35

34. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-36

35. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-37

36. STEPHEN CLIFTON and JOHN WILLIAMS were again indicted for forgery .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the Governors and Company of the Bank of England, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-38

37. ROBERT DAVEY was indicted for a like offence .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-39

38. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for a like offence

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-40

39. CHARLOTTE CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , eight pounds of bacon, value 5s. , the goods of John Smith .

MARY SMITH. I am the wife of John Smith; we keep a chandler's shop in Tabernacle-walk . On the 21st of November, the prisoner came into my shop about eight o'clock, and asked for some cheese; she returned in five minutes, and had a half-quartern loaf. Soon after, I missed the bacon - I described her to my husband, and he went after her.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Another woman came in at the same time; the bacon was found at the other woman's house.

SAMUEL PRETTY . I am a watchman. I went with the prosecutor to No. 8, Wood-street, to a bad house; I found the prisoner by the door, and the bacon in the house-the prisoner does not live there - I could not find the other woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that the other woman had it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-41

40. MARY COOKE was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Cayne .

JOSEPH DOWNES . I am a bricklayer, and live in Hooper-street . The deceased, Thomas Cayne , and the prisoner lived at my house-they lived together, and were in the habit of quarrelling and fighting. On Sunday, the 6th of October , I heard a great noise, and went up and broke their door open-the prisoner stood against it - I saw the deceased leaning on the table with his hand against his left side-the prisoner had a chopper in her hand; the deceased appeared very bad, and could hardly speak - He said Mrs. Cooke had hit him with the hammer; she said," you should let me alone then; "he told her she hit him with the tongs on the side, and on the head with the hammer in two places - She said it served him right, he should have let her alone.

Court. Q. Did she say whether he struck her - A.She said he struck her on her left arm - He made no answer, he must have heard her; she gave that as a reason for striking him with the tongs - I did not notice her arm - I noticed two places on his head and one on his thigh; I sent for a constable.

Q. Was either of them in liquor - A. Both, I believe; it was about ten o'clock - She showed me her arm, but I did not notice it.

JOHN CONST. I am a constable. I was called in about ten o'clock, and found the deceased sitting in a chair with both his hands pressed to his left side, and bending towards it; the prisoner stood in the room, with her clothes very much deranged, as if from scuffling-his shirt was torn to ribbons; the whole of the room was strewed with pieces of his clothes, and all the glass and crockery about the room, and two panes of glass, were broken. I asked him what had been the matter - He said his wife had been shamefully ill-using him, and had struck him on the head with a hammer until the head of it had flown off, and then she had recourse to the tongs - She went to the opposite side of the room - He said," what, are you hiding the tongs? why do you not give them to him?" - She turned round, and gave them to me; he said they were bent with giving him the blow in the ribs - She denied that, and said they had been bent with her trying to open them with her hand; they were bent-the head of the hammer was in one part of the room, and the handle in the other. The deceased denied giving her any provocation whatever for striking him - He repeatedly observed, "you have done for me at last!" She persisted in saying he did strike her, and pulled her gown up to show me her left arm-there was no mark whatever on it - I particularly observed it. I asked him if he had struck her in the scuffle - He said he had not used any other violence but what was necessary to preserve his life. Whenever he denied using violence she as strongly asserted that he had. I examined the body of the deceased, and observed his ribs were broken, which I considered fatal; the contusion on the side was about half the size of an hen's egg; he told me to take her away - She said, "Tom, you will not let me be locked up, will you?" and then told me it would be of no use to take her, as she knew he would not appear against her. At last he consented to let her remain, and said he would forgive her if she promised not to use him so again; I was going away - He said, "for God's sake don't leave me, or she will murder me;" I asked him why he did not give her in charge if he was afraid of his life? - he made some observations as to her cruelty; she said it served him right, he should not have aggravated her. I took her into custody ten days after, on the Coroner's warrant; her arm was then black all round, as if it had been grasped by a man's hand; it was the same arm that she had shewn me before, and in the same place where she said she was hurt.

Q. Did she say how he hurt his side - A. She said he fell against a box or table; she then said she was going to take the things out of his hand when he was going to strike her, and he said so to. He said she struck him with

the tongs while he lay on the ground, and that she knocked him down with a hammer - She denied every assertion that he made.

Q.Would the head of the hammer have given such a blow as would have laid him on the ground - A. Yes. I saw the deceased after he was dead, but saw little or no appearance of the tremendous bruise which I saw at first on his side. I should not have thought either of them to be in liquor.

THOMAS STREATING . I am a silversmith, and live in Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell; the deceased was in my employ. On the Tuesday morning after he had received the injury, he came to the workshop, there was a great alteration in his countenance - He held his hand to his left side, and had a great difficulty in standing or speaking. I saw the prisoner the morning that he died, there appeared a large bruise on her left arm, about five inches round, she said the deceased gave it her with the bellows-it appeared to have been a violent bruise. The deceased said he had been fighting with his wife, and his landlady was the cause of it - He appeared unwilling to enter into particulars. On the Wednesday or Thursday after he received the blow he was at very laborious work for three or four hours.

MR. WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY. I am clerk of the papers in Newgate. On the 6th of November the prisoner was brought in, I observed her left arm a few days after, it was black nearly from her elbow to the shoulder, it appeared the effect of a severe blow, and not of a grasp; I should have judged that she had received material violence.

THOMAS STREATING re-examined. When I saw the prisoner's arm it appeared to be more likely to be the effect of a blow than a grasp of the hand.

MR. THOMAS SPENCER. I am a surgeon, and live at Islington. On the 4th of November I examined the body of the deceased, the seventh and eighth ribs, on the left side, were fractured, one was united-there were no external marks of violence-the contusion had disappeared; there was no appearance of inflammation either external or internal, on that side of the body. No mortification had taken place. From what I saw that would not have occasioned death without some other causes; the fracture would occasion immediate pain, but without immediate danger. I found the right lung had been in a deseased state for months, or even for years-it must have been above a month. This deceased part had been recently attacked with inflammation, and that inflammation had terminated in an abscess on the root of the lungs, and an effusion of a large quantity of blood in the cavity of the chest, which occasions death.

Q. Did it appear that the blood in the cavity of the chest would have occasioned death - A. I cannot judge what occasioned the inflammation; it might have been occasioned by a variety of causes, such as cold or drinking; or the injury might, possibly, indirectly occasion it.

Q. In your judgment, which was most likely to have caused death - A. I think drinking more likely to have produced it than the injury; but external cold was the most probable cause.

Q. Do you consider it as a matter of serious doubt in your mind whether the blows were the cause of his death - A. I do think other causes as likely; a slight cold, in addition to the deceased state in which he was, would be the most likely to have caused it. From his situation I think he could not have lived long if he had not received an injury. The laborious exercise of his trade would increase his previous indisposition. If had received a fall it might have inflamed his lungs - A cold might inflame them more.

THOMAS STREATING re-examined. He worked laboriously on the Wednesday, which put him in a violent perspiration, but I do not recollect whether he went out in a perspiration. About six or eight weeks before this he fell down some stairs, and was laid up for six or eight days.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-42

41. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for a Rape .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-43

42. JOHN DAINTY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , at the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, one watch, value 5l., the goods of Richard Hoby , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am shopman to Richard Hoby , who rents a house in High Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew . On the 28th of November, between six and half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop and asked to look at a watch, which was marked five guineas - I shewed it to him; he took it in his hand and looked at it, and then asked to see another, which was marked seven guineas - I remembered his face, from his having been in the shop before, and kept my eye upon him; while I was getting the other watch he called out," Tom, come in and look." I jumped over the counter, he ran out with the watch, I called out stop thief! and pursued him; he and another man ran on the pavement for some yards-the other man turned up a court; I still pursued the prisoner, he ran against a man at the corner of a turning, and I immediately seized him - I never lost sight of him. I did not find the watch upon him-it cost us 4l. 2s. cost price.

SAMUEL DAVIS. I am an officer. I was coming up Chancery-lane, on the 8th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and heard the cry of stop thief; I ran across the way, and pursued the prisoner - He was stopped; he said to the prosecutor, "I have got no watch." I took him back to the shop, and searched him, but found no money on him.

JAMES WARD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running and Saunders pursuing him - He stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, and they took me; I was never in the shop.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-44

43. JOHN ATTEL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Johnson , widow , about one o'clock in the night of the 29th of November , at the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein,

one watch, value 15s.; two silver spoons, value 20s.; five gold rings, value 7l.; two pocket-books, value 1s.; one reading glass, value 20s.; eight ounces of lump sugar, value 6d.; two ounces of tea, value 1s.; one silk handkerchief, value 2s.; one 3s. bank token; four crown pieces, value 20s., and 2l. 10s. 6d. in monies numbered , her property.

JANE JOHNSON. I live in Cooper's-gardens, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnall-green . On the 9th of November I went to bed at nine o'clock, and left every thing safe; between twelve and one o'clock I heard a noise like the breaking of a wall - I got up and went to bed again, leaving a candle burning; in a few minutes two persons burst into my room - They came in at a door which I had fastened with a small stick, it joined the privy; one of them laid hold of my hands, and the other took the candle - I had put my pockets on the floor - He struck them to see what was in them, and pulled them up, he then put the candle out, and I could see no more. They both came to my bed side-the prisoner was one of them; I saw him at the office among several others, and knew him immediately; they remained in my room and the next for nearly two hours-one of them afterwards struck a light. The other man was in the next room, and the prisoner stood over me, with a knife in his hand, and said,"where is your notes, or your life." I said I had none. He kept swearing at me, and said he would take my life if I did not say where my notes were. The other man went to rummage for more. The prisoner clapped his hand on my throat, and almost strangled me. Next morning, I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer of Worship-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday morning last, about eleven o'clock, at his room in Peartree-court - I knew him before. I asked him if he had been in possession of any goods for a person in Cooper's-gardens?(this related to another circumstace). I asked him to walk there with me, and shew me the woman. He got up and went with me, Gleed, Warwick, and another man, to the prosecutrix's house. I asked her if there was any person whom she knew? she immediately said the prisoner was the man. We took him into custody, and conveyed him to the watch-house. I told him I should search him. He began to be very violent-at last he was overcome. I took a watch out of his fob; he immediately said,

"That is the old woman's, and a man gave it to me."

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I was with Armstrong - He has spoken correctly. I went to the prisoner's room, and found some tea and sugar, and a chissel, in a bason on the shelf-the sugar was in the cupboard. I also found a dark lanthorn. The chissel looked as if it had been used for breaking down a wall; I compared it with the place where they had broken down the wall of the house, and it fitted it. There was a hole in the wall of the prosecutrix's house, large enough to admit two persons.

HENRY IZARD HUGHES. I keep the Star and Garter, in Shoreditch. The morning that the prisoner was apprehended, I saw him and another man at my house about six o'clock, they had some gin. The prisoner produced two crown pieces, which I bought of him, and two of the other man.

JANE JOHNSON . This watch is mine, and so are the crown pieces-two of them were my father's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I was next door to the prosecutrix's house; a man opened a door, and gave me the watch.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-45

44. BENJAMIN CORDELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Williams , on the 21st of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two blankets, value 2s.; one sheet, value 1s.; one bolster, value 1s.; one counterpane, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Bishop ; two pots, value 1s. 6d, the goods of John Penn ; and one canister, value 3d.; one glass, value 3d., and one gown, value 1s. , her property.

MARY WILLIAMS. I lodge in Frying-pan-alley, Cowcross , on the first-floor. On the 21st of November I went out about nine o'clock at night and locked my door - I returned about half-past ten, and found it broken open, and the property gone.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. The house is let out in lodgings. I do not know whether I shut the street - door.

Q.Was you not taken up for stealing a watch - A. Yes, six months ago-the prosecutor had been with me that night. He lent me his handkerchief - I returned it to him at the office. I took him to my lodgings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL BISHOP . The house belongs to me, I do not live in it.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, with a bundle containing the property. He said he brought it from his aunt's, who was dead. I found the counterpane in his pocket.

GEORGE WILD . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner, with the property, in Turnmill-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it by her door.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-46

45. DANIEL MILLER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Walters , on the 7th of November , with intent to steal .

JOSEPH WALTERS. I am a silk-manufacturer , and live in Bow-lane . The prisoner is a perfect stranger to me, and had no business in my house.

JOHN HUTCHINS . I am a watchman. On the 7th of November I saw the prisoner come out of Cheapside, and go up to Mr. Walter's door. I heard the key rattle in the door, and thought it was Mr. Walters opening his own door; it was twenty minutes after twelve o'clock. I said, "Your key does not seem to act, Sir" - He said, "Yes, it will." I asked him if he wanted a light? he said, No. I was just opposite. I went to my lanthorn, got a light, went over to him and said, "Lay hold of the light, and let me try." I could not open it. The candle went out, I went to get another-at that moment the prisoner opened the door and went in - I suspected all was not right. As he was shuting the door, I put my elbow before the door and prevented its being shut. I went in; the prisoner was at the

bottom of the stairs. I said, "Do you live here?" He said, "Yes." I said, I did not think he did, and asked how long he had lived there? - he said, two days. I asked him what part of the house he occupied? - he made no answer for some time; he at last said, "Watchman, I beg your pardon, I have made a mistake in the door." I asked him where he lived? I took him out of that to several other doors-the key would not fit any; I then took him to the watch-house. He afterwards said, he lived at No. 23, Garlick-hill, which was some distance from Bow-lane. Two other keys were found on him. He would not tell where he lived at first. He did not appear the least intoxicated till I called the patrol - He then appeared to sham intoxication.

GEORGE FOUNTAIN . I am constable of the night. I found two other street-door keys on the prisoner. He said he had lived eight months on Garlick-hill. I at first thought him in liquor; but when I was going to send him to the Counter he was quite rational.

Prisoner's Defence. It entirely originated in a mistake. I was in liquor, and fell down, which confused me. I turned to the left instead of the right. It was the key of my lodgings.

MR. JOSEPH WALTERS . There is a gas-light over my door. It is quite dark over the door on Garlick-hill.

JAMES PATERSON . I am a carpernter, and live on Garlick-hill. The prisoner had lodged with me since July last. The key belongs to my door - I gave it to him. The other two keys, I believe, belong to a warehouse which I have opened for him in Lawrence Pountney-lane, where he carries on an agency business.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-47

46. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , two pieces of napkeen, value 14s.; 12 yards of ribbon, value 1s. 6d.; six pair of stockings, value 12s.; one handkerchief, value 4s.; six pair of gloves, value 9s.; and three yards of muslin, value 12s., the goods of George Blundell , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE BLUNDELL . I am a linen-draper , and live in Gracechurch-street. The prisoner was my servant . I suspected him. On the 29th of November I went to his box, and found the articles enumerated in the indictment.

THOMAS MORRIS. I am shopman to Mr. Blundell. I saw the things found in the prisoner's box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is my first offence - I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s only .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-48

47. JAMES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , one watch, value 4l.; one seal, value 1l.; and one chain, value 6d., the goods of Matthew Bainbridge , from his person .

MATTHEW BAINBRIDGE. I am supervisor of the Excise , and live at Liverpool, On the 4th of November, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopgate-street , near the end of Angel-alley - I had my watch in my fob; a person passed off the curb-stone close before me - I gave way for him; he stepped before me; another came, and walked past me into the alley. Five or six persons came behind me and on my left, surrounded me, and pressed me against the wall. The prisoner came directly in front of me-my watch was at that instant taken from my fob. I do not know who took it. At that moment I saw something glitter in the prisoner's left hand, which he stretched out to a person, which, I believe, was the same that had followed me - He was on the right-hand of me. I immediately seized the prisoner, sent for an officer, and gave him in charge. I am sure it was in his hand that I saw something glitter, and he handed it to his companion. As soon as I seized him the others dispersed very quietly. The person who received it from him ran away.

Cross-examined. He was not pushed in front of me.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD. I took the prisoner in charge. He said, he only came up to ask the prosecutor what was the matter.

Prisoner's Defence. Three men shoved me against the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-49

48. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Hunter Wilcox and Isaac Wilcox , about six o'clock in the night of the 23d of November , with intent to steal .

WILLIAM MANNELL . I am porter to Messrs. Thomas Hunter Wilcox and Isaac Wilcox , who live on Bread-street-hill . On Sunday evening, the 23d of November, about six o'clock, I was in the kitchen on the first-floor, and heard a noise on the stairs; I went to the staircase, and found the prisoner about five or six stairs from the kitchen, without his hat and coat. The prisoner was the man, as far as I can judge from his appearance-he had a jacket on. I gave the alarm of Stop thief! directly, ran out at the street - door, and asked the neighbours to surround the next house, which was empty. The prisoner was taken about seventeen or eighteen yards from the house. He had ran up stairs, and made his escape. I had a candle, and was within a yard or two of him when he was taken-his dress and appearance corresponded. I can with certainty say he is the man.

HANNAH WALKER. I am servant to the prosecutors. I sleep in the garret. I shut the window that evening, about a quarter of an hour before-it was then dark - I had no candle with me. There was a glass on the table close to the window. After the prisoner was taken, I found the window open, and the glass overturned. It had been dark sometime before I shut it.

CHARLES JACKSON . I am a carman. I was passing the house, and heard the alarm, about six o'clock in the afternoon; I saw the prisoner coming from the next house, which was empty, without either coat or hat; he pulled the door open - I secured him, and never lost sight of him.

JOHN GARWOOD . I am a fireman. I searched the empty house adjoining to the prosecutor's, after the alarm was given, and found a coat, a hat, and two handkerchiefs.

Prisoner's Defence. They are swearing my life away falsely.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-50

49. JOSEPH KNIPE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one coat, value 5s., the goods of Charles Kirkpatrick ; one cloak, value 2s. 6d., and one bonnet, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Evans .

CHARLES KIRKPATRICK. I live in Bow-lane . I missed the things from the parlour-the street - door is generally open.

HANNAH EVANS. I am servant in the house. On the 20th of November, about half-past one o'clock, I was in the kitchen, and heard a noise up stairs, and saw the prisoner coming down with a bundle; I asked what he wanted - He said he wanted Mr. Patty-there was no such person in the house. I took him, he made no resistance-the bundle contained the property stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, expecting my goods to be seized, and my family turned out of doors.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-51

50. THOMAS PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , at St. Michael, Queenhithe , three reams of paper, value 4l., the goods of Thomas Dutton , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS DUTTON. I rent a house in Queenhithe, in the parish of St. Michael. The prisoner is quite a stranger to me. I was sitting in my counting-house, at the back of the warehouse-there were three reams of paper put about two yards from the door to be taken away by a cart, with other goods. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner took them up, and ran out of the door with them; I pursued him, and lost sight of him only while he turned the corner - He saw me, and dropped the paper - I saw him drop it; I still pursued - He ran as hard as he could; he was stopped in my presence - He was never out of my sight except while turning the corner; I gave him in charge, and sent Bowyer for the paper - He brought it to me-it is the same that the prisoner dropped; it is worth 4l. 10s., it cost me more.

SAMUEL BOWYER . I went to look for the paper, and found it on a dung-hill, about a hundred yards from the prosecutor's house; I saw the prisoner drop it, and picked it up-Mr. Dutton was pursuing him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-52

51. CHARLES SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one watch, value 3l.; one chain, value 30s.; two seals, value 10s., and one key, value 4d. , the goods of William Westness .

WILLIAM WESTNESS . I am a mariner ; my brig laid at the Custom-house . On the 14th of November I missed my watch-the prisoner was on board, I asked him if he had seen it; he said he had not - I had him taken up afterwards.

FREDERICK BODLEY . I am a salesman, and live in the Kent-road. On the 14th of November, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop with a chain, key, and two seals, which he said he found by the Bricklayer's Arms - They were covered with mud; I told him I could not value them then, but let him have 5s. on them - He left them till next morning, but did not call for them; the prosecutor saw them, and claimed them.

JAMES CRAIG . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge-he denied it, and then said he would show me where the watch was; he took me to Black Lion-yard - A woman produced the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-53

52. ROBERT CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , fourteen pounds of bacon, value 8s. , the goods of John Stephenson .

JOHN STEPHENSON . I keep a chandler's-shop in Gravel-lane. On the 4th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, the officer asked me if I missed any bacon, I told him I had - I saw it next day at the office.

WILLIAM WHITE . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner in Red Lion-street, with the bacon under his jacket, he threw it down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-54

53. WILLIAM HATCHMAN was indicted for that he, on the 5th of November , at St. James's, Clerkenwell , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of 1l. (setting it forth No. 25,786) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously disposing of and puting away a like forged Bank-note, with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, and calling it a promissary note for the payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intention to be to defraud James Rogers.

JAMES ROGERS. I am a pork-butcher, and live at No. 4, Red Lion passage, in the county of Middlesex. On the 5th of last November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop to purchase a lion of pork, which came to 3s. 2d.; he paid me 3s. in silver; before he paid me the 3s., he laid a 1l. note on the counter-while it was on the counter, a neighbour came in, and said he wanted a pound's worth of change, which I gave him, telling him I could spare five or six if he wanted it. During this time, the prisoner took up the 1l. note, and gave me 3s. in silver; he had not produced the 3s. before. After the neighbour was gone, he said

his master was a builder, and frequently wanted silver to pay his men. He then went away; in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes he came again to the shop, in company with another man; Mean, my shopman, was in the shop with me; the prisoner said he had brought some notes, and would thank me for some silver for them, for Mr. Dawson, a builder, in Drake-street. I asked him who it was for, and he said so. Drake-street leads into Red Lion-square. He gave me five 1l. notes - I took and endorsed them, "Dawson, builder, Drake-street; "they appeared clean - I took them, and gave him 5l. worth of silver for them; he put his hand into his pocket, and said,"You may as well give me the other pound," and produced another 1l. note. I endorsed it as before, and gave him the change for it. While he was talking to me, the other man was buying something of my shopman. They then went away; the prisoner was dressed in a flannel jacket. Next morning I discovered that the notes were forged, and informed Mr. Westwood.

Q. Did you afterwards go to a public-house in Field-lane? - A. Yes, to the Thatched House, about eight or ten days after, with Joshua Armstrong, and another officer, and saw the prisoner there with five or six other persons in the same place; I knew him immediately, and pointed him out; he was not dressed then as he is now; (looking at six notes)-these are the notes he paid me-they have my mark on them.

Prisoner. Q. Was it me or the other man that said he came from Mr. Dawson's - A. I cannot exactly say.

Court. Q. If that was said by the other person, was it said in the prisoner's presence, so that he must have heard it - A. Yes. The prisoner himself produced the notes, he pulled the first five out of a canvas bag, and the other out of his pocket.

Mr. REYNOLDS. Q. The first time that the prisoner came he came alone - A. Yes, I never saw him before.

WILLIAM MEAN. I am shopman to Mr. Rogers. On the 5th of November I remember two persons coming to the shop, I was not there the first time-one of them had on a flannel jacket, and the other a black coat and waistcoat. When they came in, the man in the black coat asked me for some pork, the person in the flannel jacket asked for nothing; he was talking to my master - I saw my master give him some change for some notes, I do not know how much; I heard the man in the flannel jacket ask for another pound, which he had - I saw him lay one note down.

Q. Did the man who spoke to you say any thing to the other - A. No, they took no notice of each other at all; he said nothing except talking to me about the pork; they both went out together; I have been to Drake-street, Red Lion-square-there is about ten houses in the street, I enquired at three of them, and could not find a Mr. Dawson there.

BENJAMIN BANKS. I am a tax-gatherer, and live in New Smith-street, Red Lion-square, and have resided in the parish for the last six years; I know every house in Drake-street-there are eleven in all; I know the names of every inhabitant-there is no such person as Dawson living there, there is no builder-there is a Mr. Durston, a blindmaker.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 18th of November, I went to the Thatched House, in Field-lane, with Gleed and Mr. Rogers; the prisoner was in the tap-room, with other persons; Mr. Rogers pointed him out as the man; I took him into custody, and asked him where he lived, he refused to tell me; I afterwards found that he lived at No. 5, Falcon-court, Shoe-lane, Holborn, opposite St. Andrew's church. In searching his lodgings I found a flannel jacket, which I showed him - I told him where I found it, and asked him if it was his-he said it was - He came willingly with me.

JAMES ROGERS re-examined. I should think it is the same jacket which he had on - I am sure he mentioned the name of Dawson, it could not be Durston; I asked the question twice, the name was repeated twice.

Q. Was it repeated each time so that if the prisoner was not the person that spoke he must have heard it-A. It was. I do not recollect the other man speaking to me.

Q. Did you hear the other man say any thing to the prisoner-A. Yes, the other man hesitated about taking the other pound's worth of silver, and said he did not think it would be wanted-the prisoner said they might as well have it.

Jury to JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . Q. Did Rogers identify the prisoner immediately-A. Yes, in a moment.

MR. JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes in the Bank of England. - (Examining the notes) - They are all six forged; the paper is not bank paper, the plate is not the bank plate, the water-mark is not the bank watermark, nor the signatures the bank signatures; they are all off the same plate-the signatures appear to be of the same hand-writing, though of different names. I went to every house in Drake-street - I could not find any such person having lived there, either as lodger or housekeeper, for a great while before. The names at the bottom of the notes are the names of the signing clerks of the Bank, but not their hand-writing.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG re-examined. I searched the prisoner, and found six good notes on him, but no bad ones.

(Note No. 25,876, dated August 13, 1817, read.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 5th of November I was in the same public-house that I was taken in; the man whom Rogers describes came in about four o'clock; I had seen him once or twice before at that house - He said he had got a book in Holborn, which had 40l. in it, and said if I would go out with him, and pass the notes, he would put a pound note in my pocket, as he was afraid they would be stopped. I immediately went with him; when we came to the end of Brook-street, he said that was the place where he got the book, for a horse and cart had fallen down; I told him I would change the notes, as I was going to buy a piece of pork; I bought the pork, and gave 3s. for it; I heard the gentleman say he had plenty of change, and I came out and told the man of it; I said I would not go in without him - We went in, he gave me the notes, and said if they asked him where he lived, he shoul say his name was Dawson, and that he lived in Drake-street; when I came out I gave him the silver - I did not know they were forged, but thought they were stolen.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG re-examined. When I apprehended him I told him what I took him for; he said nothing about this, if he had, I should have tried to have found the other man.

JAMES ROGERS re-examined. When he was at the office he said the man in black was a man he had frequently seen at the house, and he thought he would be there again.

Q.When he was taken did he give the same account as he has now - A.No. When he was at the office he did; this was about an hour after his apprehension.

Q. Are you sure whether the prisoner gave the name of Dawson or the other person - A. I am not certain - He must have heard it.

WILLIAM MEAN re-examined. Q. Was the person who came in with the man engaged with you while you saw the money given - A. Yes - I did not hear him say any thing to Mr. Rogers; I was not in the shop when they first came in, I mean when they came in together; I was not there at first - I did not hear the other man say any thing to the person in the flannel jacket.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18171203-55

53. CHARLOTTE NEWMAN and GEORGE MANS-FIELD were indicted for that they, on the 29th of October , at the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note (setting it forth, No. 27, 810, dated 8th of February, 1817) , with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing off and puting away a like forged note, with the like intent, they knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS the same, only calling the forged instrument a promisory note for the payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud William Winkfield.

WILLIAM WINKFIELD. I keep the Long-acre Vine Vaults, in Long-acre, in the county of Middlesex. On the 29th of October last, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, Newman, came to my house in company with a man, whom I do not recollect - She asked for a quartern of liquor, which was fourpence, I served her; she asked me if I could change her a 1l. note - I told her I could, she produced one, and I gave her the change - I observed on the face of the note, "Mrs. Hughes, 6, Grub-street." I took the note, and she and the man went out immediately, together; Plank, the officer, came in directly to me, I shewed him the note which I had taken of them; in consequence of what he said I gave him the note, after endorsing my name on it. I had never parted with it (looks at it), that is the note she gave me.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. I had never seen her before. I will positively swear she is the person - I particularly noticed her dress and her person.

Q. What did you do with the note when you received it - A. I put it in my till, there was more money there - I had noticed the name of Hughes on it. I am certain it is the same note.

Court. Q. The people are served at your bar - A. Yes. The female prisoner and the man came in and went out as companions.

SAMUEL PLANK. I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I have known the prisoners ever since the 29th of October; on that day I saw them together in Bunhill-row - They went into a liquor shop-it was Tuesday; they then went into a house in Whitecross-street, and came out together - I saw them drink at the bar there; I then followed them into another liquor shop on Holborn-hill, they drank there also; they then went into two private houses in St. Gile's, the woman only went into the private houses, the man waited outside for her, and joined her when she came out. I then followed them to Winkfield's door, the woman looked at the name over the door, and both went in together; I looked through the window, and saw them both standing together at the bar, they came out and turned towards Drury-lane, I immediately went into Winkfield's - I had been in sight of the prisoners for about an hour and a half, and have not the least doubt of their being the persons. There was a disturbance in Holborn, where there is a gas light, they stopped there, which enabled me to notice them.

Q. You went into Winkfield's - A. Yes, and gave him directions; I then came out, and found the prisoners about thirty yards off; I followed them to Smithfield, and then lost them. Winkfield produced a note, I desired him to mark it, which I saw him do - I had it in my hand (looks at it), it is the same that I saw in his possession; the prisoners walked arm-in-arm together, except where a crowd separated them. When I took them I returned to Winkfield's, he produced a note to me, I cannot say whether it is the same that he shewed me at first; he gave it to me, and I put my endorsement on it when I received it of him; it has my endorsement on it now. I had never seen the prisoners before.

Q. When did you see them again - A.On Saturday, the 1st of November, I saw them together in Bunhill-row, Charles Jeffries was with me, we followed them to the same liquor shop in Whitecross-street; from there to another liquor shop on Holborn-hill-they had something to drink; from there I followed them to St. Giles's, until they came opposite the shop of Mr. Bartlett, a shoemaker, at the corner of Denmark-street; they spoke together-the woman crossed over and went into the shop, the man crossed also and placed himself at the window, on the High-street side of the shop, the woman went out of the shop into a room - I was in the street, watching Mansfield, he immediately shifted his place, and went to the Denmark-street side of the shop, which commanded a view of the back room where the woman was sitting, I immediately took him into custody, and Jeffries took him away. I went into the shop and said something to Mr. Bartlett - I saw the woman sitting in a chair, trying some shoes on-she approved of them; I was in the shop, Mr. Bartlett came from her and gave me a 1l. note - I did not see her give it to him - He marked it, and returned it to me; I immediately took her into custody, and slightly searched her, I only found some change upon her; I asked her where she got the note which she had given for change; she said she was an unfortunate woman, and she had received it that morning from a gentleman in a coach. I asked her where she lived, she said, at Westminster, but she would not say where there, as her father laid dead, and her mother was in a great deal of trouble. I asked her if she had been in company with a man at the door of

the shop, she said she had not-it was about eight o'clock in the evening, or rather later. I took her to the watchhouse, and there searched her particularly, and found a key upon her, which she said was the key of the street-door where she lived. I asked her what part of Westminster she lived at, she said she would not tell; I asked her if she had given that address at the shoemaker's, she said she had not. Mansfield was in the same place, but not in the same room; I found a similar key on him to the one she had given me - He said it was the key of the house where he lived; he was asked where that was, he said he would not tell, as his wife was near the time of her lying-in, and he would not alarm her. About 22s. in good silver, was found on him.

Q. You had seen him originally in Bonhill-row, did you see him come out of any house - A. I had seen him come out of a coal-shed, at No. 52, Bunhill-row; I have seen him carry coals out from there. I went with Foy and Jeffries to No. 52, we took the two keys there, they both fitted and opened the street - door, we went up stairs to the first-floor back room-Mrs. Goodman keeps the house-she gave us the key of the room, and I opened the door, we went in and searched, and on the top of the looking glass, which hung against the wainscot, we found a bladder, which contained twenty-eight 2l. notes - I marked them, and gave them to Foy; we also found some letters and wearing apparel there; and in Mrs. Goodman's room, below, we found a jacket, which I had seen Mansfield wear. I was present at the second examination of the prisoners, with Jeffries; as we were going to the office, Newman asked me what things I had taken out of her room, I told her there was two or three gowns, and some letters. She asked me if I had seen her marriage certificate - I told her there was one. She said there some duplicates with a pocket-book, and a 3s. piece in it; I told her I saw them there, and believed Foy had them; she said she hoped we would return them - I told her we would.

Q. Was there any thing shewn to Mansfield - A. At the third examination some things were produced that we had taken from the room, Newman claimed the gowns, and he claimed the jacket, and gave it to his mother.

Cross-examined. I did not know them before. I saw them in the evening; I followed them for sometime - I did not wish them to know that I was following them; I avoided their noticing me, and did not go very near to them.

Q. Why did you not take them into custody after they went to Winkfield's - A. I was not sure that the note was a forgery, and could not take them myself, any person might be looking into Mr. Bartlett's shop, to see the shoes. I did not know Newman to be an unfortunate girl.

Q. Did not the female prisoner say that the other prisoner was innocent - A. She told him they could not touch him as he never uttered me - He shook his head.

MR. JOHN LEES. I am an inspector of bank notes,(looks at the note, No. 27, 810), it is a forged note in every respect, both paper, plate, and signature.

JOHN BARTLETT. I am a shoemaker, and reside at the corner of Denmark-street. On the 1st of November, in the evening, the prisoner, Newman, came to my shop, she went into the ladies' room, and asked for a pair of half-boots-while my wife was serving her, Plank came in and gave me a caution; I went into the room, she gave my wife a 1l. note, my wife asked her name, she gave the name of"Brown, Brownlow-street;" which I wrote on the note - I heard her say so, and wrote it in her presence (looking at it), that is the note I saw her give to my wife.

Cross-examined. Plank called me aside. She was giving my wife the note when I went into the room after seeing him.

SARAH BARTLETT . I am the wife of the last witness. On the evening of the 1st of November the prisoner, Newman, paid me a 1l. note, which my husband marked.

WILLIAM AVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Penny, who keeps a wine-vaults, at No. 123, Drury-lane. I know the prisoner, Newman. On the 13th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, he came to the shop, in company with a woman whom I did not know. They came to the bar together, and had two glasses of liquor. One gave the order. Newman paid for it with a 1l. note; she asked me to change it. I gave her 17s. in silver, and asked her name-the liquor came to 4d.; I gave her the rest in copper. I generally give 5s. in copper. She gave me the name of "Mrs. Brown, King-street." I said,"King-street, Golden-square?" - She said "No, King-street, here"-which I concluded was Drury-lane. I marked the note (looking at one) that is it-it is marked"13th of the 10th month, Mrs. Brown, King-street." They went away together. I do not know who took the change.

Cross-examined. I had seen her six or seven years before. We do not change without giving copper.

WILLIAM SOUL. I keep the Bull's Head, in Carnaby-market. I know the prisoner, Newman. On the 25th of October, I saw her in my parlour - I did not see her come in-it was about nine o'clock in the evening; she asked for a quartern and a half of gin, which came to 6d., and a pot of beer-she gave me a 1l. note to pay for it. There were other people drinking with her; while she was in the house Jeffries came in, and gave me some information. She gave me a 1l. note - I took it over to the butcher to borrow the change, Jeffries having desired me to do so. I came back and found her still in the parlour. I brought the note back to her, desiring her to write her name on it - She did so. She had given me her address before, at No. 10, Silver-street. I do not know whether she gave me any name. She wrote on the note, "Mrs. Brown, No. 5, Pulteney-street." I gave it to Jeffries, after writing my own name on it (looks at it)-this is it. I made no observation to her about giving me another address.

ANN SOUL . I am the wife of William Soul . On the 25th of October a man and woman came into the parlour. Jeffries came in while they were there. My husband came in for a pen and ink; I saw the 1l. note on the table. He went out to get change, and returned and gave it to them; they came in and went out together, and were in company together. They had three glasses of gin and a pot of beer.

CHARLES JEFFRIES . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I know the prisoners. The first time that I saw them was on the 25th of October, in Bunhill-row together, at a little after seven o'clock in the evening. I followed

them down Chiswell-street. The man sometimes walked before the woman, and sometimes the woman before the man. When they came to Holborn-hill she took his arm. They went into a wine-vaults opposite St. Andrew's church; they came out, and walked arm-in-arm to St. Giles's; they parted, and the woman walked first down Oxford-street and Wardour-street. I followed them into Silver-street, and saw them both go into No. 37 there - They came out in twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour, in company with another woman; I then followed all three into Soul's public-house-the man went in first, and the woman stopped on the opposite side; the man came out again, they crossed to him, and all three went in together - I followed them in, and saw them, through a small pane of glass, sitting in the parlour - I told Soul something, and waited at the door; in a short time he came out and shewed me a note; we went to the opposite house, and saw that they had not marked it. I told him to take it back, and get it marked, which he did, and immediately returned to me with it-we both indorsed it (looks at it)-this it; it is No. 29057. I then waited a short time, and the two prisoners and the other woman came out together-the other woman left them at the door, and the prisoners went together into the market; the man then left the woman. She walked into Broad-street, Golden-square, where she waited for about ten minutes, and finding he did not come, she went down Bennet-street; he came soon after, and appeared to be looking for her. After this, I saw Newman talking to two women in Peter-street.

Q. How long did you see them together that evening - A. About two hours and a half. On Saturday, the 1st of November, I was watching them with Plank, about seven o'clock in the evening, and saw them in Bunhill-row - We followed them into a house together in White-cross-street, it was a public-house at the corner - She had a basket. They came out, and went into a public-house in Holborn; we followed them from there, up Holborn, until they came opposite Mr. Bartlett's. She crossed the way, and went into the shop, leaving the man on the opposite side; he crossed over, and looked in at the window-it is a corner-shop-he went away from that window to the other, which commanded a view of the room where the woman was. Plank and I took him into custody, and conveyed him to the watch-house. On searching him I found 22s. 6d. in silver on him and a latch-key. We asked him his name? he said it was George Mansfield , and that he was a shoemaker; he refused to say where he lived. We asked him if he had been in company with any person? he said he had not. I said, "What, no woman!" he said, "None at all." He said, the key belonged to the street-door where he lived, and that his wife being pregnaut, he would not give his address. When the woman was brought in we asked her her name? she said it was Charlotte Newman , and that she lived at Westminster-that her father lay dead, and her mother was very ill. She denied being in company with any man that evening.

Q.What was said to her-A, She was asked if she had been in company with any man that evening? she said,"No, not a soul." She said, she was an unfortunate woman, and that the note was given to her that morning by a gentlemen, in a coach. I afterwards tried the key to the door of No. 52, Bunhill-row, which it opened. I searched the house with Plank.

Cross-examined. I had never seen them before that time. I repeatedly went very near to them.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. I was with Plank when the room at No. 52, Bunhill-row, was searched, and saw the notes found in a bladder over the looking-glass. I asked Mrs. Goodman for the key of the room-she gave me one.

GEORGE CLAYTON. I lodge at No. 52, Bunhill-row, in the front room on the first-floor; the prisoner, Newman, lived in the back room in November last until she was taken into custody, and for four or five months before.

Cross-examined. There were no other lodgers in the house; Mansfield did not live there.

Court. Q. Did you know him - A. Yes; his father keeps the house, and employs him to carry out the coals; he is always there in the day-time, but does not sleep there. I always thought him a single man - I never heard of his having a wife.

SARAH GOODMAN. I live at No. 52, Bunhill-row; I gave the officer the key of the room; I received it of the prisoner, Newman, she always left it with me when she went out - She had given it to me that day, she left it on the table; it was never out of my custody until I gave it to the officers-no person could have got it.

MR. JOHN LEES re-examined (looks at the notes), No. 16074, uttered to Avis; No. 29057, to Soul, and No. 27815, to Bartlett; all of them are forged in every respect; the four appear to be of two different plates, but the signatures appear to be of the same hand-writing. The twentyeight 2l. notes are all forged, and the signature appears to be the same hand-writing as the other four.

(The note No. 27810 was then put in and read.)

WILLIAM WINKFIELD re-examined. Q, You showed the note to the officer, was that the time that he returned it to you, that you saw the name of "Hughes, Grub-street," on it - A. I observed it the moment I took it of them, before I put it in my till. I have not the least doubt of its being the same - I put it at the top of my till, Plank came in immediately. It is impossible that it could have mixed with any others.

NEWMAN'S Defence. The other prisoner is perfectly innocent, and knows nothing of the transaction.

MANSFIELD'S Defence. Newman asked me to go with her, as she was lame. She said she was going to her brother's. I did not know what she was doing.

C. NEWMAN. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

G. MANSFIELD- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-56

54. CHARLOTTE NEWMAN and GEORGE MANS-FIELD were again indicted for a like offence .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, on the part of the prosecution, declined producing any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-57

55. JAMES KEMP was indicted for that he, on the 8th of November , feloniously and knowingly had in his pos

session divers forged bank notes(setting them forth), he well knowing them to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be for feloniously having one of the said forged notes in his possession.

SAMUEL PLANK. I am an officer. On the 8th of November I was with Foy, and saw the prisoner in Portland-place, about eleven o'clock, walking with his hands in his coat-pockets; we followed him to Titchfield-street, and there seized him. He struggled very much, and drew his hand out of his pocket, put something in his mouth, and began to chew. I took six 1l. notes out of his mouth; he said he found them.

JOHN FOV. I am an officer. I was with Plank. (looks at the notes). They are those which we took from his mouth.

MR. JOHN LEES. I am an inspector of Bank notes - They are all forged in every respect (read).

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-58

56. THOMAS COPE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eliza Garrett , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one box, value 3s.; one bonnet, value 1s., and one pair of stockings, value 1s. , her property.

ELIZA GARRETT . On the 5th of October, about ten o'clock at night, I was coming along St. Giles's from Hampstead-road, with my box, which contained my clothes. There were three or four men walking before me, singing; I crossed to get before them. When I came to the Hampshire Hog-yard I was stopped by four men-one of them laid hold of my collar, and the others took my box. I screamed out-an officer came and secured the prisoner, who was one of them.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a watchman. I heard the prosecutrix scream out - I ran up, and found a gentleman holding the prisoner. He said, the prisoner made a snatch at the prosecutrix's box. The gentleman is gone abroad.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-59

57. HENRY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one watch, value 3l.; one ribbon, value 1d.; and one key, value 1s., the goods of James Barlow , in the dwelling-house of William Ward .

MARY BARLOW. I am the wife of James Barlow, who lives servant with Mr. William Ward , in Bloomsbury-square . On the 30th of November, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I went into the pantry; on my return I missed my husband's watch off the nail in the kitchen, and saw the prisoner going up the area steps. I called Coates-we pursued and secured him. I do not know the value of the watch. I never lost sight of him.

HENRY COATES. I am servant to Mr. Ward. I overtook and secured the prisoner in Brownlow-street. I first caught sight of him in Southampton-street, which is two doors from our house. He ran down Charles-street, across Drury-lane, into Brownlow-street.

JOHN WRIGHT. I live in Bow-street, Bloomsbury. I heard the alarm and secured the prisoner. The watch fell from his hand as I seized him.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. The prisoner passed me; I saw the key of the watch in his hand, and saw him drop the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man said, he would give me 1l. to carry it to the Strand.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-60

58. WILLIAM LILL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 10 pair of shoes, value 20s., the goods of Benjamin Norden , privately in the shop of Abraham Norden .

BENJAMIN NORDEN . I am the son of Abraham Norden , who is a slopseller, and lives in East Smithfield . I received information, ran out of the shop, and secured the prisoner. The shoes were mine.

JOHN SHAW . I am a constable. I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner running, and saw him drop the shoes - I picked them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-61

59. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frederick John Reader , about twelve o'clock at noon of the 4th of November , at the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green,(Sarah Snock and other persons therein being). and feloniously stealing therein, one coat, value 14s.; one waistcoat, value 5s.; one pair of breeches, value 16s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 6s.; one pair of gaiters, value 4s.; three gowns, value 12s.; one silk shawl, value 18s.; one silk handkerchief, value 2s.; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; one petticoat, value 2s.; one tablecloth, value 2s.; one gold ring, value 4s., and two gold pins, value 2s. , his property.

MR. FREDERICK JOHN READER . I rent a house in the Hackney-road . I keep two rooms, and let out the remainder of the house. On the 24th of November I went out at nine o'clock in the morning, and returned at twelve. I had left no person in the house but my lodgers. I went up stairs, and found the door of my upper room had been opened, apparently with a key-it was fastened with a padlock. I went down to my other room, and as I went down stairs I saw the prisoner come out of the room(which had been broken open), with a bundle. I called out, "Who is there?" he made no answer. I pursued him down stairs. He threw the bundle down in the passage. I called out, Stop thief! - He was stopped immediately; I collared him - I never lost sight of him. I brought him back to my passage, and asked him how he could think of robbing me? He said, "There is your things, and what more do you want?" I gave him in charge to Turner. The bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SUSAN READER . I am the wife of the prosecutor - the things are worth 6l.

WILLIAM TURNER. I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and searched him at the public-house in Worship-street. I found a gold ring, two gold pins, and eight skeleton keys on him.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of the breaking and entering .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-62

60. SAMUEL VICARY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one rummer glass, value 10d. , the goods of James Pardy .

BENJAMIN SUMMERS . I am waiter at the Lamb public-house, in Leadenhall-market , kept by James Pardy. On the 30th of October, about four o'clock, the prisoner came in and had a glass of porter in a rummer; he had the newspaper over an empty rummer which was on the table; I took it away - He got up, and went to another table, where there was another empty rummer, and was reading the paper over that; I waited at the door till he came out, and seeing that the glass was gone, I went after him, stopped him, and charged him with taking it; he denied it - I insisted on his coming back - He then took it out of his pocket, and gave it to me, saying he had made a mistake. I took him back to my master's, where he took two more glasses out of his pocket, which were not ours.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the two, and took them out to look at them, and made a mistake by putting three into my pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-63

61. WILLIAM BUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one bonnet, value 10s., and seventy yards of ribbon, value 10s. , the goods of Michael Walford Boyle , Charles Spurden , and Fisher Walford ; and EDWARD GRAY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

William Budd pleaded GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH SMITHERS. I live in Cock-lane. I know the prisoner, Gray, I have seen him meet the prisoner, Budd, several times. On the 4th of October I saw him come out of Wood-street to the corner of Silver-street, and go into the Cooper's Arms-Gray was there; I had followed him from Cock-lane; I saw them together in the house, and saw Budd pull something out of his pocket, and give it to Gray, it looked like ribbons. I found where Budd lived, and gave his master information.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Gray used to frequent Fleet-market.

MR. MICHAEL WALFORD BOYLE. I am in partnership with Charles Spurden and Fisher Walford. We are wholesale haberdashers, residing in Friday-street; the prisoner Budd had been two years in our service; he had access to the whole of our stock, which is very large. Smithers gave me information on the 30th of October; I sent for Budd, and spoke to him about this; in consequence of what passed, I got a search-warrant, and went to the prisoner Gray's apartments, in Pomberton-row, Gough-square, with Cartwright and Armstrong. While we were searching, Gray came in, and said they were his apartments; we found the articles stated in the indictment there, which, to the best of my belief, are our property. There was no appearance of business in the room.

Cross-examined. I will not swear I had not sold them; we do not sell in town-there was a woman in the room.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT. I am an officer. I went with the warrant - I have known Gray a long time, he is not an haberdasher; we found the bonnet in his cupboard, and the ribbons in the table drawer.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-64

62. GEORGE RICHARDS and HENRY GREENWAY were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , one watch, value 10l.; three seals, value 5l.; and one ribbon, value 1d., the goods of Thomas Platt , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-65

63. WILLIAM BARTLETT and JOHN CANE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one pair of folding doors, value 15s.; one lock, value 5s.; four hinges, value 3s.; one iron bar, value 2s.; twenty-four feet of oak joist, value 1s. 6d.; seven feet of deal lop-hole door post, value 1s.; ten feet of oak wood boards, value 1s. 6d.; six feet of elm wood, value 3s.; one hundred and thirty feet of deal wood joists, value 2l.; one hundred and twenty feet of deal wood, value 1l.; and ten deal wood posts, value 1l. 10s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of John Cogdon .

BENJAMIN BRIGSWORTH. I keep a coal-shed, and have a horse and cart. I know the prisoner, Bartlett, he sells fire-wood. On the 27th of November he came to my house to bespeak my horse and cart; I was to meet him at the Brill, which I did, and agreed to go; next morning he called me up at half-past four o'clock - I got my horse and cart, and followed him to Leadenhall-market. We got there a little before six; he told me to back the cart against the gates, which lead into a yard out of the market. I saw the prisoner, Cane, there giving wood into Bartlett's hand, who put it into my cart-it appeared to be old joists; the yard gates were open. When my cart was loaded, Bartlett told me to drive to Cow-cross; there were two carts, the other was loaded-Wilding had the other cart. Bartlett went on with Wilding, and Cane with me to Cow-cross; I unloaded, and Cane carried it into Chipperfield's yard, in Benjamin-street; we got there about half-past nine. I then drove home. Next day I saw Rice, and told him of it - I took him to Chipperfield's, and shewed him the stuff; we were going along Battle Bridge, and saw Bartlett at a public-house; he saw me, I went in, and found Cane there, Rice secured him, and put him into my cart - He resisted very much - We took him to Somers'-town, where he said he lived; we found it was false; as we were taking him back he jumped out of the cart - We secured him again.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Bartlett surrendered himself; he sells fire-wood; I should not sell such wood for fire-wood.

GEORGE BOWLE WILDING . I live in Somers'-town; I keep a horse and cart. On the 27th of November, Bartlett applied to me, about eight o'clock, for it, to go with him next morning; he called me at four o'clock, and said he would meet me in the New Road; I met him there about five o'clock, with my cart; he was in Brigsworth's cart: he took us to Leadenhall-market - We got there about six o'clock; he went into the market, and returned and told me to back my cart towards some buildings, which was next to a yard with a pair of gates, which stood half open. Cane brought out some wood, and gave it to Bartlett; I put it into my cart, it was old beams-both the prisoners assisted in loading it; I drew up on one side the market, while the other cart was loaded; Cane then told me to stay, for it was rather early, and the men had not got to work. We left the market about half-past six. Bartlett told me to go on towards the Bank, he went with me; we went to Cowcross, and had some drink there; Cane said something to Brigsworth; Bartlett told me to go to his house with my load, which I did; he lives ten doors from me; I put the wood in his yard, next day I showed it to Mr. Cogdon.

Cross-examined. I did not know that I was acting wrong.

THOMAS CHIPPERFIELD . I am an auctioneer, and live in Whitehorse-alley, Cowcross; I sell old materials. On the 28th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner Cane brought me a load of old stuff, consisting of joists, door posts, &c. He said he should be glad of a little money to pay the cart hire; I asked his name, and where he lived; he said John Kelly , Middlesex-place, Somers'-town. I lent him 10s.; the same day, about four o'clock, he came again, and said he thought of bringing another load of stuff, but he took it to another yard like mine at Somers'-town; I asked him if he had taken it to Laxton's yard, he said, yes; he asked for a little more money to pay a bill, and said I might depend upon having two more loads on the Monday morning - I lent him 1l.

JOHN RICE. I am a watchman. I was going round Leadenball-market the day after the robbery, about six o'clock in the morning, and saw Brigsworth's cart backed to the East India House gates-the prisoner Cane was in it; I saw the gates off the hinges, and went to call a watchman; when I returned Cane was gone; I overtook Brigsworth's cart; in consequence of what he said, we went in search of the prisoners, and apprehended Cane at the Maidenhead, in Battle-bridge; Brigsworth said he was the man that was with him; he made a great resistance; somebody stood against the tap-room door to prevent my going in. I tied his hands, and put him into the cart, and took him to Chipperfield's; I then went to Bartlett's yard; I took Cane to Giltspur-street Compter, and in going there I found he had got his hands loose - He immediately jumped out of the cart, and ran away; I caught him.

MR. JOHN COGDON . I am clerk of the works to the East India Company; they have a yard in Leadenball-market, where they deposit old and new building materials. The prisoner, Cane, was labourer to Mr. Poynder, the bricklayer; he has nothing to do with the property; I have seen the wood at both the yards-it is the property of the East India Company.

BARTLETT'S Defence. Cane said he belonged to the yard, and that he had some wood to sell; I agreed to go with him to fetch it.

CANE'S Defence. The carman has taken several loads; a man took me there to fetch the loads, when the officer came he ran away.

BARTLETT- GUILTY . Aged 45.

CANE - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-66

64. NATHAN CLEMENTS was indicted for that he, on the 6th of November , about nine o'clock in the evening, in a certain garden ground belonging to William Boulton Poynton , Esq. feloniously did pluck up seventy-five shrubs, value 3l. 15s., his property, in the said garden ground there growing, standing, and being .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously stealing the said seventy-five shrubs, in the said garden ground, there growing, standing, and being.

WILLIAM BOULTON POYNTON, ESQ. I have a house at Fulham . My garden is enclosed by an hedge; there is a road by part of it-the plants were worth 3l. 15s.

WILLIAM PURDEN . I am a gardener, and live in Mr. Poynton's rents, I am one of his tenants. On the 6th of November, about nine o'clock in the evening, I went out, and heard somebody over in the garden - I called Lipscombe; we got over my rails into Mr. Poynton's garden; I heard somebody pulling up plants; as I was going towards one of the beds, I saw two men there; one of them gathered up the roses and ran away; I caught the prisoner stooping down in the act of pulling up the roses-i asked him what he did there? he said he wanted half a dozen to put in his garden; I took him out of the garden, I did not take him into custody, I knew him very well. There appeared to be about seventy-five rose trees torn up and taken away, which must be worth 3s. 15s. The prisoner was secured several days after.

HENRY LIPSCOMBE . I am servant to a gardener, and live next door to Purden; he called me, I went into the garden, and heard some persons rustling among the trees, Purden secured the prisoner there; I distinctly heard another person running out of the garden; the prisoner had a rose tree in his hand; there were some more on the ground; there was several white Provence rose trees taken, besides moss roses; there was a great quantity taken up; he appeared very drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated - I did not think I was doing any damage.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18171203-67

65. MARY ANN JAMES was indicted for that she, on the 10th of April , at the parish of St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain deed (setting it forth, being the usual form of a power of attorney), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England ,

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like forged deed, with the like intention, she knowing it to be forged.

THIRD COUNT. For feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged deed, with the like intent, she knowing it to be forged.

FOURTH, FIFTH and SIXTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Elizabeth Thomas .

SEVENTH, EIGHTH and NINTH COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Toyne .

THOMAS DATEMAN. I am one of the chief clerks of the Navy 5 per Cent. Office, in the Bank. I refer to the lodger, 10th of April, 1817, there appears to be on the morning of that day, 115l. of that stock standing in the name of Mrs. Thomas, of Hendrea, near Bodmin, in Cornwall, and likewise it appears to have been transferred on that day to John Toyne . I refer to the transfer ledger and find a transfer from Elizabeth Thomas, of 115l., to John Toyne of the Stock Exchange, sold by Peter Woodward , by power of attorney. I look at the ledger of the 7th of November, 1817, it appears that 115l. has been transferred to Elizabeth Thomas; by the transfer book I find it was transferred by Jonathan Harrison , and accepted by her.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Is there any stock on the same day, standing in the name of any other Elizabeth Thomas - A. No, not of Hendrea.

CHARLES WOODWARD . I am clerk to Mr. Beetham, who is an attorney, and lives in Cornhill; in April last the the prisoner applied to me to have a power of attorney to transfer some stock in the Bank of England; she said she came from Mr. Twelvetree, of Aldersgate-street, whom I knew to be a client of Mr. Beetham's; she produced two stock receipts - I told her she must apply to a stockbroker, and recommended her to my father.

Q. You saw no more of her for sometime - A. Not in particular. When the stock was sold out my father gave me the money that it was sold for; I paid it to the prisoner, at Mr. Beetham's, it was more than 100l. I paid her the same money that my father gave me. She told me it was given to her by a relation, who she named to be Mrs. Thomas, and said she was going to be married.

Cross-examined. I found that Mr. Twelvetree had recommended her.

PETER WOODWARD. I am a stock-broker. In April last the prisoner applied to me to sell out 115l. Navy 5 per Cents, she was introduced to me by my son - I was to take out the power of attorney for it. She said it was some money a relation was going to advance her to go into business-she said the relation's name was Elizabeth Thomas. I asked her the description of it in the Bank books.

Q.What description did she give you - A. Hendrea, near Bodmin, in Cornwall-she gave me this description verbally, and left the Bank receipts for the stock with me - I returned them to her when the business was done.

MR. THOMAS BEVERLY WESTWOOD. I served the prisoner with a notice to produce these stock receipts on Friday last.

PETER WOODWARD continuing. The two receipts made up 115l. together, Navy 5 per Cents - They corresponded with the description she gave me, except there being no residence mentioned in them. I applied at the Bank and got the forms of the power of attorney (looking at it), this is it. When I got it from the Bank it was all filled up, except the signature, witnesses, and the date; I handed it over to the prisoner, and explained to her the instructions given - She had to send it into the country. Three or four days after I saw her, she returned the power of attorney to me, executed in the form in which it now appears, she gave it to me at my own house, which is in Watling-street, in the City of London; she gave it to me to carry into effect; I went with it to the Bank myself, and acting on it, I sold the stock, transferred it, and obtained themoney. I sold it to John Toyne, of the Stock Exchange. I received the money, made a statement of the transaction, and gave the money to my son to give the prisoner, with the statement which I had made out on a piece of paper. After that I wrote a letter addressed to myself, and delivered it the prisoner - this was a day or two after; she acknowledged receiving the money. I put the paper into her hands, desiring her to carry it to Mrs. Thomas, and tell her to send it to me by post; I supposed she was going to where Mrs. Thomas lived, which she said was at Chard, in Somersetshire. I soon after received the letter by post, in the regular course.

MR. JOHN CATTERSON . I am a clerk in the Navy 5 per Cent. Office. I saw the demand to act, and the transfer signed by Mr. Woodward - I witnessed it.

THOMAS BEST, ESQ. I am secretary to the Bank. I have a book containing an order from the Directors to replace 115l. Navy 5 per Cents. to Elizabeth Thomas , and to pay her 2l. 17s. 6d. the amount of a dividend that would accrue thereon. I have the release of the Bank, I saw the Bank seal affixed to it. The order is made in the usual form, dated 6th of November.

MR. JOHN BONUS CHILD. I am a partner in the house of Coles, Templeman and Child-we are brokers to the Bank; I received their order, signed by Henry Harmer , one of the Bank Directors-it is an order to pay the money for 115l. I bought the stock, previous, by an order of the Bank (this is an order to enable us to receive the money for 115l. which we had previously bought; it was transferred to Elizabeth Thomas). I have an order from the Committee of the Treasury of the Bank to purchase the stock. I do not recollect whether I bought the stock myself. I paid the money to Jonathan Harrison, jun. or his agent.

H.B. SHILLIBUR. I am a conveyancer, and live at Bishops Hull, near Taunton, in Somersetshire. Some time before the 7th of April, the prisoner came to my house with Miss Carrol, a school-mistress, at Taunton; she desired me to be good enough to witness a power of attorney for selling out part of her stock; I said I would when she brought the proper instruments. On the 7th of April she came alone, brought me a power of attorney, and requested

I would witness her signature; I saw her execute it-(looks at it) - I am witness to it.

Q. Did she say any thing about it - A.She said she was going to be married, and wanted to sell part of her stock. It was attested in my presence by William Savory - I got him to do it.

Cross-examined. She signed it in my presence.

(The release was then put in and read.)

ELIZABETH THOMAS . I live in Bath-street, Pool-terrace. I lived at Hendrea, in Cornwall. In the beginning of March last, I had occasion to go to Cornwall by the waggon-the prisoner was also a passenger in the waggon; I did not know her before - She is no relation of mine. We both went from London, as far as Hminster, in Somersetshire; we were four days and nights together; during that time she began talking about her property. She said she had 400l. left her by her grandfather, who was in the Bank, and she had been to London to receive her dividend - I said I had a trifle in the Bank. She said she was going to be married, and wanted a servant. I was out of a situation and engaged with her as a servant-she was to be married on the 6th of April; I was to go into Cornwall to my mother's, and return as quick as possible. She said, she lived with her uncle, Farmer Baker, at the New London Road, Dorset-she wrote the direction herself. She went by the name of Jane Baker , and said, she had a brother in Exeter, who was the proprietor of the Union Coach. I left most of my clothes with her. She said, I had better leave them, as I should return so soon. I was to come back to Exeter, and return in the coach, and she was to meet me. She said I had better leave my papers with her, and she would keep them safe, and lock them up in her drawers. I had got all my Bank receipts for 115l. Navy 5 per Cents., and other papers, which I handed over to her. She said, I had better leave them, as there was one "Squire Edwards, who would get me more money, by the stocks rising and falling, for my benefit. I left them in consequence of this. When I got home, I went to the Post-office, at Bodmin, and wrote into Dorsetshire-my letter was returned to me, it never found her. I never saw her afterwards till she was in custody. On the 27th of September I came to town, and went to the Bank to receive my dividend, but could not (looking at the power of attorney); the name of Elizabeth Thomas is not my hand-writing, nor was it done by my authority (looks at the letter)-the name of Elizabeth Thomas is not written by me, or by my authority.

Cross-examined. We were fellow-travellers - She began the conversation.

Q. You left your papers with her that she might make more money for you - A. No. She was to lock them up for me, as I was to return. She had no authority to dispose of my stock.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 12th of November I apprehended the prisoner in the City-road. I asked her if her name was Mary Ann James? she said, Yes. I told her I apprehended her on suspicion of forging some instrument, and selling some stock out of the funds - She appeared very much alarmed, and said, "I know what you mean-you mean Mrs. Thomas; I did, do it. I was persuaded to do it by a man named Goddard. After I received the money, I took it down to Chard, in Somersetsbire, and gave him the whole of it, except a small sum."

Cross-examined. I found her in very great distress.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. I went with Plank-he has spoken correctly.

ELIZABETH THOMAS re-examined. I never had any other sum of 115l. in the Bank except this. I have bought no stock since April. If any was bought in my name in November last it was not bought with my money. I have received the October dividend on my stock-(looks at a receipt)-this is my receipt for it-(looks at the acceptance of the stock, dated 7th November), it is my hand-writing. I signed it the day that I gave the receipt.

JONATHAN HARRISON , JUN. I am a stock-broker. I look at the stock receipt, it has my signature. I sold the stock to Messrs. Templeman and Co. I was paid for it by a draft. I look at the transfer, it is the same, and relates to the transaction.

(The power of attorney, the order to pay Elizabeth Thomas the dividend, dated 7th of November, 1817, and her acceptance for the same, were severally put in and read.)

MR. CHILD. There is no other transaction of that day, to which the 115l. can refer, except to the order of the Bank.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the country in great distress, and was recommended to a person near Chard, to a situation; after that, I was recommended to a situation of 25l. per annum. The person told me had got an aunt in London, who had got money, and asked me to go to London with him-my father gave me leave to go with him. He went with me to Mr. Twelvetree's, in Aldersgate-street - he asked Mr. Twelvetree to recommend him to a broker, which he did. He told me there would be no harm, and if I would do it he would give me 25l. - I did it. He went back with me to the country with the power of attorney. I received the money of the young man, and went back to the country the same day, and delivered the money to him. In a few days, he pretended that he had his house broken open, and left me. I had no part of the money. His name is Phillip Goddard, of Chard.

H.B. SHILLIBUR. I know that there is a farmer at Chard of the name of Goddard. I do not know whether the prisoner lived with him, or not.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

On the Second Count only.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-68

65. THOMAS BUTTERY and TIMOTHY M'NAMARA were indicted for that they, on the 28th of October , at the parish of St. Botolph, Paul's Wharf , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain last will and testament, partly written and partly printed, (setting it forth, purporting to be the last will and testament of Benjamin Man , dated January 15, 1816) , with intent to defraud the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like forged last will and testament, with the like intent, they well knowing it to be forged.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud James Coggan .

FIFTH AND SIXTH COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud Stephen Dickinson and Thomas Coxhead Marsh , executors of the last will and testament of John Barkworth , deceased, and Thomas Nelson , William Brooks , Thomas Barkworth , and William Spalding .

SEVENTH AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud the said Thomas Nelson , William Brooks , and Thomas Barkworth .

NINTH AND TENTH COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud Stephen Dickinson and Thomas Coxhead Marsh, executors of the last will and testament of John Barkworth , deceased, and Thomas Nelson , William Brooks , and Thomas Barkworth .

ELEVENTH AND TWELTH COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud Mary Mann , widow , Thomas Mann , Robert Mann , Elizabeth Mann , spinster , Ann, the wife of George Nutton Ayres , John Ayres , Emma French , spinster , and John French .

THIRTEENTH AND FOURTEENTH COUNTS, the same, only stating their intent to be to defraud the persons, who by law were entitled to the goods, chattels, and credits of Benjamin Mann , deceased, late a seaman on board a certain ship in the service of the said United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies, called the Barkworth.

RICHARD COOPER. I am witnessing clerk at the office for the payment of seamens' wages. I refer to my book. On the 4th of March, there is an entry of the articles signed " B. Mann" - I saw him sign it myself, The voyage was to St. Helena and China, and home. I have a receipt for impress-money, signed by the same B. Mann, on the same day, for 3l. 10s-it is a very good hand-writing. There was no other B. Mann shipped on board the Barkworth on that voyage.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. It was in the pay-office. He was a stout man, about six feet high.

MISS MARY ANN HART. I live at Colchester. I knew Benjamin Mann , and his brother, Mr. Thomas Mann . I was visiting there in January, 1816; his house is at Monk Seeley, in Suffolk. I went there in December, 1815, and left it January the 9th, 1816. While I was visiting there, Benjamin Mann was at his brother's house - He was a fine-looking man, between nineteen and twenty-one; he had been brought up a cabinet-maker - He wrote a very good hand (looking at the impress receipt) - I believe that to be his signature. Benjamin Mann went to his brother's on the 1st of January, and staid there until the 8th; he left on that day - I did not see him afterwards.

Q. Do you remember any thing happening on the 5th of January which makes you recollect it - A. It was my birth-day; there was a party to celebrate it, and he was there.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. He might have returned again, I did not see him after.

MICHAEL COOPER GRAY. I am steward of the Barkworth. I was intimate with Benjamin Mann ; he was in the habit of writing; he spelt his name Mann - I know his hand-writing; the ship articles and receipts are his hand-writing. There was no other Benjamin Mann on board that ship. He died at sea on the 9th of September, 1816; I attended him in his illness, he was ill some time. I tried to persuade him to make his will - He did not make it.

Cross-examined. He died in the outward-bound passage.

JOHN CHARLES ADAMS . I am clerk at the Pay-office of the East India Company. I have the ledger of wages returned by the owner of the Barkworth; it is made up by his clerk, and sent to us from the Barkworth, as authority to pay the men by. The company pay whatever appears to be due to the men if it appears in this ledger. There appears to be a balance of 6l. 5s. 8d. due to Benjamin Mann for wages, and 12l. 10s. for the sale of his effects. A person property representing the deceased would receive that sum of us.

Q. Was there a probate of this will produced at any time - A. Yes, it purports to be the probate of the will of Benjamin Mann.

Q. What is the practice on the payment of seamens' wills - A. They are always left one month before they are paid.

WILLIAM BRAMPTON. I belong to the Bishop of London's office. I produce the will from that office.

WILLIAM RANDALL. I am clerk in Mr. Oldershaw's office, who is a proctor in Doctors' Commons. I know both the prisoners; I have seen them both write - I have seen enough of their hand-writing to form a belief of it(looks at the will) - I believe the body of the will to be the hand-writing of M'Namara; the whole of the writing in the body is his-(reads)-"My friend Ann Wilson ;" this is repeated three times, and the words "my executrix, 5th of January, 1816. - Benjamin Man , his mark." - I believe all this to be his hand-writing; I will not positively say that the witnesses names are his hand-writing, but I believe them both to be his.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I have the same opinion of the whole.

PRISCILLA ANN GOUGH. I am twenty-one years of age. I was living in Cottage-place until about a month ago; I had lived there two years and a half. I know the prisoners; I had known Buttery for about a week before I was taken up; I only knew M'Namara by seeing him pass my door. I went to lodge in Buttery's house; I lived there with a woman named Kitty Humble, about a week before; I was taken up a day or two after I was in my room; I have two children, and was in great distress. Buttery asked me to carry a letter to an attorney, and said he would give me a few shillings for my trouble; I said I would take it - He said it would be doing him a great service; I asked him why Kitty could not go? he said on account of her being Irish; I said I would go - He went with me; I had a child in my arms, he carried it for me; I wished to leave it at home, he said if it was too heavy for me he would carry it: we went as far as the end of St. Paul's Church-yard, by Ludgate-hill, and there met M'Namara; Buttery spoke to him, I do not know what he said; I stood by the side of Buttery; I did not expect to meet M'Namara; he gave Buttery a paper which he took out of his pocket, and Buttery gave it to me; we all three walked on, they walked first; Buttery went to Mr. Maynard's with me, M'Namara waited outside; Buttery took the paper from me, and gave it to him. Mr. Maynard asked

me if I knew what sum of money it was? I told him I had not seen the paper; I do not recollect his asking me where I lived; he asked me if I knew any thing of Mr. Mann; before I could answer, Buttery said, "I knew him very well, for I shipped him;" we were in the passage, Mr. Maynard went into a room; I do not remember any body telling Mr. Maynard where I lived, but they named the ship that he said he shipped him in, it was the Barkworth East Indiaman; we came out, Mr. Maynard told me to follow him; I turned round and asked Buttery where I was going? he told me to go on, and I should not be detained a moment; Mr. Maynard took me to another gentleman, and gave me a book; the gentleman said something, and told me to kiss the book, which I did; my child cried, so I did not hear what he said; I heard him call over the name of Mann. Buttery went with me as far as Newgate-street. When we came out, we found M'Namara standing across the road; they both went away together, and left me in Newgate-street; they talked together, I do not know what they said. I saw Buttery again about nine o'clock next morning, and asked him how he knew that the man belonging to the money was dead? he said he was sure of it, as M'Namara and him had both visited the India house.

Q. Did any thing pass about the money - A. When Mr. Maynard asked what the sum was, Buttery said it was under 20l. Next day we were sitting by the fire; I said"What was the sum? 120l. I understood Mr. Maynard;" he said no, it was about 16 or 17l. I asked him what he did with it? he said him and three more were to share it between them, and said he would give me something for my trouble. My father lived in Middle-row; I never went by the name of Ann Wilson before - I did not know M'Namara I never lived at Hoggin's row, Deptford.

Cross-examined. I took the book and kissed it - I did not know the meaning of it, or I should not have done it.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you did not know you was taking an oath - A. I do - I had never seen one taken before in my life.

Q. Will you swear you did not know you name was Gough, and not Wilson - A. I swore my name was Wilson.

MR. SAMUEL MAYNARD . I live on Bennett's-hill, Doctor's Commons. On the 28th of October last, the last witness, with an infant, and a man, came to me. I have no recollection of the man. A will was produced (looks at one) this is it; it has my hand-writing on it. I believe the woman produced it; I asked her the usual questions, if her name was Ann Wilson , and if it was spelt it right; I do not know who answered; I dare not say she did that she gave the answer to the name I have no doubt.

Q. Was any question asked where she lived - A. Yes, I took her direction I do not know who gave the direction; I asked what the sum was; one of them said, under 20l.; I placed them in my passage - I took them before Doctor Dobney to be sworn; I have an entry of the instructions which I made at the time; she was sworn before him.

Cross-examined. Q. When the oath was administered, she was made to understand what she was about-A. There is not the least doubt of it. She swore her name was Ann Wilson, and that she was sole executrix to this will.

DOCTOR JOHN DODNEY . (Looking at the will) - I administered the oath, on this occasion; the person was sworn in the usual way. I have no recollection of the circumstance.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am the beadle of Castle Baynard Ward. On the 1st of November, about two o'clock, I was called by Mr. Maynard to take the prisoner, Buttery, and a man named Hawkins, into custody; I took M'Namara about eleven o'clock that day in the Commons. I apprehended Gough on the 9th of November; I found a book in M'Namara's pocket containing memorandums, one of which is in these words (reads) "Barkworth, Ann Wilson, November, 28th, 29th."

WILLIAM RANDALL . I believe that to be M'Namara's hand-writing.

MR. JOHN JAMES WILSON . I am a solicitor. I first saw the prisoner, M'Namara, on the 1st of November; I saw him again the beginning of the ensuing week at the Compter. In consequence of a message that was sent to me, I went to him, with Mr. Lawford; he said he wanted to speak to us; we agreed to see him at six o'clock that evening. At that time Mr. Lawford, Mr. Adams, Kerridge, and myself, went to him; before M'Namara was suffered to speak a word, I told him that nothing he could say would be of any use to him, that we had a very strong case against him, and it could not be of any possible service to him to disclose any thing to us; but if he wanted to say any thing we were there to hear it. Mr. Lawford told him that what he said would most probably be used in evidence against him; he said he knew that, but it was a duty that he owed, for that he was an honest man until these people drew him into it; I asked him what people? he began with Buttery, who was then in custody, but I do not think he knew it. He said that Buttery and another person were concerned, and gave me directions where to find them. Among other transactions that he mentioned, he said that Buttery had got a woman to go as Ann Wilson to get the wages of a person of the name of Mann, a seaman on board the Barkquit; I asked him if he meant the Barkworth, and he said he did. Two or three days after I took the original will, and some others, to the Compter; I neither threatended nor promissed him; I put the wills before him, and asked him whose hand-writing they were? as I laid them before him, he said the whole of the will of Benjamin Man , of the Barkworth, was Buttery's hand-writing. I saw him again in two or three days; he then said the body of the will was his own hand-writing, but the signature was Buttery's, and that Buttery had given him 10s. to fill it up. I afterwards went and inspected the wills at the Commons, myself, and found reason to disbelieve what he had said. A few days after I received a note from Buttery, and went to him in consequence of it, with Mr. Kerridge. M'Namara was called out first; I told him I had received a note from Buttery, and was going to see him. I then repeated my cautions to M'Namara as I had done before, and asked him if he had any thing further to say? he then threw himself in a chair, and said, "Well, then, I did sign the will." He then left us. Buttery was called out; I read his note to him, and asked him if it was his, he said it was; I told him we had a very strong case against him, and that it was of no use his saying any thing; he said he knew that, but it would be a relief to his mind;

he gave me an account of several things; with regard to this will, he said that he had gone to M'Namara, and signed his name to it; that it was too dark to fill the will up, but it was agreed between them, him and M'Namara, that M'Namara should fill it up in the morning, and bring it to St. Paul's Church-yard, and that he and the woman that was called Ann Wilson met M'Namara in St. Paul's Church-yard, when he gave him the will.

HENRY KERRIDGE re-examined. What Mr. Wilson has said is correct, it passed in my presence. I was at the Mansion-house, at the examination, on the 21st; as I was returning with him to the Compter, he said he was sorry for Ann Wilson , for that she was drawn in. I searched Buttery's premises in Murphy's house, in Baker's-rents, Rosemary-lane, who was his landlord; I broke the door open, and in the pocket of a blue jacket I found a pocket-book, containing a ticket with the name of "J.Buttery, Greenwich," and a memorandum with the name of"Ann Wilson, Cottage-place, White Lion-street," on it.

JOHN MURPHY. I keep the house, No.3, Baker's-rents, Rosemary-lane. The apartment that Kerridge searched the prisoner Buttery hired of me; it was his apartment at the time it was searched; he had the key of it, while he was in possession. I did not know Gough till she was in custody; Buttery did not sleep in this apartment; he used to work there, and went to another lodging to sleep.

EUPHRAM ROBINSON. I live in Chamber-street, Prescott-street. The prisoner M'Namara lodged with me, until he was taken up, for a year and a half; Buttery was often there.

(The will was then put in and read.)

In the early part of the cause, MR. ALLEY contended that after the probate of the will was produced under the seal of the Ecclesiastical Court, the Counsel for the Prosecution could not legally produce evidence to prove the will a forgery.

The prisoners made no defence.

BUTTERY - GUILTY. Aged 42.

M'NAMARA - GUILTY. Aged 52.

The point argued was reserved for the consideration of the twelve Judges .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-69

66. THOMAS REED and JOHN JONES were indicted for feloniously assaulting Frederick Howes Bindon , on the King's highway, on the 29th of November , at St. Clement's, Danes, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one gown, value 12s.; one shirt, value 6d.; one table-cloth, value 3s.; one child's dress, value 3s.; and six pinafores, value 6s. , the goods of Benjamin Bindon .

HARRIET BINDON. I am the wife of Benjamin Bindon . On Saturday night, the 29th of November, I gave my son a bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment, to take to the mangler's, in Clement's-lane, Clare-market, which is a very few doors from my house. I live in Holles-street, Clare-market-the things were quite damp.

FREDERICK HOWES BINDON. I am six years old. My mother gave me the bundle to take to the mangler's, in Clement's-lane ; when I had got three doors off, the prisoner Jones came up, and knocked me down.

Q. What did they say first - A. Jones said here are some marbles, and asked for the things; I said I should not take them; Reed knocked me down; it was the prisoners, I had never seen them before. Reed struck me in the face with his fist, and made a mark; he took the things, and ran away, Jones held my mouth, and said"don't speak;" he ran away.

REED. Q. Are you sure I knocked you down, and did you see me take the bundle away - A. Yes.

JONES. Q. Are you sure I put my hand to your mouth A. Yes.

Q. Did you see my face - A. Yes, and Reed's too.

ALEXANDER MACBETH. I live with Mr. Carr, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in the Strand. On Saturday, November 29th, the prisoner Reed pledged a gown at our house, which is about a quarter of a mile from Clement's-lane-there are no other pawnbrokers nearer than our house. He came alone, I lent him 4s. on it; Mrs. Bindon saw the gown the same night - He redeemed a hat which he had pledged before for 1s., at the time.

Court. Q. Are you in the habit of taking such things in of boys - A. His redeeming another thing made me not question him. He pledged the gown in the name of Thomas Williams , Strand-Mrs. Bindon came and redeemed it the same night.

HARRIET BINDON re-examined. It is mine, it had been mangled after I gave it to my boy; It was mangled when I found it at the pawnbroker's; my son called out in the street, and I ran to his assistance.

CHARLES STEVENS . I live in Upper King-street, Bloomsbury. I know the prisoners, I used to play with them. About half-past ten o'clock on the Saturday before last, I saw Reed coming down Swan-yard, in the Strand, alone; he asked where I was going, I told him I was going home; he said he was going the market way, and would go as far as that with me. We met Jones with his sister's pye-stall; he asked me to take it home for him, which I did. When I came out I found him and Reed waiting for me; they asked me if I would mind a bundle for them; Jones spoke, Reed heard it; I said I did not much like it-before this Jones offered me 3d., and Reed 2d. I agreed to do it; they took me to the corner of Exeter-street, Catharine-street; Reed gave Jones a penny, and he, Jones, went to fetch the bundle - He was not gone above three minutes; they asked me to go and get them mangled in Vere-street; I went and got them mangled at a chandler's-shop; Reed waited at the door, and when they were done he gave me two-pence halfpenny to pay for them. He told me to carry them, they asked me to go to Mr. Carr's with them, which I did-Reed went in by himself; I was carrying the bundle, Reed opened it just before we got there, and took the gown out. Jones was standing by, Reed took it into Carr's; when he came out he told Jones he had got 4s.; Jones asked to see the ticket, he shewed it to him. He took a hat out of pledge at Carr's. I went with them to another pawnbroker's, in Bridges-street; Reed took the bundle from me there; we waited at the door until he came out; he then said he must go home; Reed told me to go and ask a woman at a greenshop to let me leave the bundle; I said, "What should I ask that for?" he said, "Never mind, go." I went and left it there. I afterwards went to the watch-house to the

prisoners; Jones asked me to go and sell the bundle, I said I would not. Mousey, who was there, said if I would go and get the bundle he would sell it; he got it, and sold it in Baldwin's-gardens. When we got to the green-shop, I saw the contents of the bundle; there were some shifts, childrens' pinafores, and a child's plaid dress.

JOHN BEAN. I apprehended the prisoners and a boy, named Wright, that night; Bindon was introduced to them about half an hour afterwards - We awoke him out of his sleep, and took him to the watch-house. I did not tell him what it was for, his father might have told him. I put the three together, and he pointed out the prisoners particularly, and said they were the two boys who knocked him down, and took his bundle from him. I asked him if he knew any thing of the other boy? he said, No - They denied it. When I apprehended Reed, I found a hat in his mother's house; he said it was not his, and that he knew nothing about it; he afterwards said he found it. I found four shillings and three-pence halfpenny on him, and the duplicate of another hat.

REED. Q.Did I say where I found it - A. No. I told him I wanted him for a robbery, and if he would go to the watch-house he should be cleared if he was not the person.

ALEXANDER MACBETH re-examined. It appears to be the hat which he pledged with me.

REED'S Defence. I was in Blackmoor-street, Jones came up and said Stevens had found a bundle, and he would take it to a fence (meaning the green-grocer's). The woman would not buy it; he then took it to be mangled. I said I would pledge the gown, as I was going to take the hat out. I gave Stevens the money; he said he would leave the other things at the shop until the morning. The officer took me while I was at supper - He fetched the little boy, and said he would do for us. The watch-house keeper kept kissing the boy, and asked him to say which were the boys.

JONES'S Defence. Stevens came to me, and said he would give me some beer to do them up.

HARRIET BINDON re-examined. We did not tell my son what we were going to the watch-house for.

REED - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 13.

JONES - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 10.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18171203-70

67. HENRY DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , thirty-two pounds of lead, belonging to William Hunt , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN HUNT. I am the brother of William Hunt, who lives in Johnston's-court, Fleet-street . On the 3rd of November I saw the prisoner in the court, taking part of the pavement up, and asked him what he was doing? he said the New River Company had sent him to take up the leaden pipes, and put brass ferrules to them, to make them fix snug in the iron pipes. I remembered his having been employed to lay down the pipes, which made me not suspect him. Between eleven and twelve o'clock I saw him cutting the pipe into small pieces about a foot long-it was part of the pipe that ran under the pavement into my brother's house.

SARAH HUNT . I am the wife of William Hunt. On the 3d of November I saw the prisoner taking up the pipe. He asked me to let him see the pipe inside the house-he took about seven feet from the outside-it ran against the wall inside the house, and was fastened to it by holdfasts. He went to work in the court again. In the evening I missed the pipe-it was cut off close to the wall; nine feet was taken from the inside - He said he was going to put cross-ferrules to it. I had seen him at work when the iron pipes were laid down, which induced me to admit him into the house.

ELLEN GERRARD . I live at Mr. Hunt's. I saw the prisoner come about the pipe, and observed him come up stairs - I missed about nine feet of pipe. I am sure he is the man.

MR. JAMES TREACHER. I am inspector of the New River Company's works-the prisoner never worked for the Company. The iron pipes were laid down by contract, and he was employed by the contractor. The pipe is worth 1l.

Prisoner's Defence. A man told me to do it, and said he would buy it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-71

68. JOHN REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 20 yards of printed calico, value 20s., the goods of William Parnell Fyers , privately in his shop .

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 15th of November, about half-past four o'clock, I was in the Minories, with Garton. The prisoner came by with something in his apron-Garton said, he had got some print; he had just turned down John-street. We pursued him into Crutched-friars, he threw the print into an alley. We secured him.

THOMAS GARTON . I was with Vann - He has spoken correctly. I am certain the prisoner is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Stealing to the value of 4s. 10d. only .

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-72

69. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 10 garnets, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of George Buckenham and William Pool .

GEORGE BUCKENHAM. I am a jeweller , in partnership with William Pool , we live in Cripplegate ; the prisoner was our apprentice . I found the garnets in his box, the officer has got them - He is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-73

70. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Barnet Cohen , from his person .

BARNET COHEN. On the 17th of November I was in Cheapside , at three o'clock in the afternoon, with a friend. I found a person pushing against me, which excited my suspicion - I turned round and saw my handkerchief in

the prisoner's hand - He dropped it, and I picked it up. A person behind collared him. I am certain he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-74

71. SOLOMON AARON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , one eye-glass, value 2s.; one snuff-box, value 14s.; one watch, value 1l.5s.; and 25s. in monies numbered, the property of Robert Barker and George Barker , in the dwelling-house of the said George Barker .

GEORGE BARKER . I am a pawnbroker , in partnership with Robert Barker , we live in Houndsditch - I live in the house. On the 4th of November, about ten o'clock at night, when I came home I found the prisoner in custody.

CHARLES FREDERICK PRETTY . I am shopman to Messrs. Barker. On the 4th of November, about half-past nine o'clock at night, the boy alarmed me; I went into the shop, and found the prisoner secreted in one of the boxes. He said, he came for a night's lodging. I pulled him out, and found the eye-glass and his shoes, by his side, and a quantity of silver and halfpence in his pocket. He said his mother had sent him on errand with the money. I asked him how much there was? he said, 15s. 6d. I said, there was a great deal more. He said, he meant 22s. 6d., which was not correct. I do not know exactly how much there was.

THOMAS WOOLSTENHOME. I am shopman to Messrs. Barker. The apprentice called me up. I found part of the flap of the box up, and saw the prisoner in the corner of it - He had undone part of the door - He had taken a screw out. I told him to strip himself - I found a watch in his trowsers; he tried to hide it behind the ladder. I saw the reading-glass and snuff-box on the floor; his shoes were lying close by his side. He must have got in at eight o'clock, just as the doors were closed, and laid along the floor.

FRANCIS TILLARD. I am an officer. I was sent for, and questioned the prisoner how he got the property - He pointed to the till, and said he got the money out of it, and the snuff-box, glass, and watch, out of the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The money was my own.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-75

72. JOHN WYATT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , at the parish of St. Sepulchre's, one gelding, price 6l.; one saddle, value 1l.; and one bridle, value 5s. , the goods of Nathaniel Rutter .

NATHANIEL RUTTER . I keep the Ohelisk livery-stables . On the 21st of November I lost my horse.

THOMAS SIMPSON . I am servant to Mr. Rutter, who keeps the Obelisk livery-stables, in St. George's-fields . On the 21st of November, the prisoner came to the stables (I knew him before) - He wanted a saddle-horse to go to kew. I shewed him several, none would suit-at last, I shewed him a tall bay gelding. It was about half-past ten o'clock in the morning-it was to be saddled, and taken to Charlotte-street, Blackfriars-road, by eleven o'clock. A shoe being loose, I was obliged to get it shod, which made it rather later than that time. When it was shod, I was taking it to Charlotte-street, and met the prisoner just as I had passed the Circus gate; he asked what made me so late? I told him what occasioned the delay. He wanted the horse - I asked him for the money, which is a customary thing - I asked him for 10s. He took some silver out of his pocket, and said he had but 10s, and would give me 9s., as he must have 1s. left to pay the turnpikes. He said, very probably he might not return until the next day, and if he did not he was to pay me 10s. more for that day, and 1s. that he owed me. Between three and four o'clock I had occasion to take two horses for sale to Smithfield. I had not been there long before Price, who was with me, told me that he saw a young man riding the horse up and down the market. I went up to the young man - He jumped off the horse as soon as he found what my business was, and said he would shew me the gentleman who had hired him to sell the horse. He took me to the prisoner, who had hired the horse. I asked him what he was about? he made no answer. After a short time I sent for a constable, and had him taken up. I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I never saw him before. I did not know his name until he was taken to the Compter. He was to have it for one or two days - He gave me 9s. He might have had it all that day and the next.

JOSEPH PRICE . I am a hackney coach-driver. I was in the stable-yard at the Obelisk. Simpson asked me to go to Charlotte-street with him. He met the prisoner by the Obelisk gate - He asked the nearest way to Kew; I directed him to go towards Vauxhall-bridge - He was on the horse at the time. I am sure the prisoner is the man. In the afternoon I went with Simpson to Smithfield; as I stood on the side, I saw the horse go by with a young man on it; it was without a saddle. I am sure it is the same gelding that was let to the prisoner. I told Simpson there was the horse that the gentleman had hired to go to Kew. I was on a horse at the time-Simpson followed me. I looked at the horse before he came up.

Cross-examined. The prisoner never attempted to go away. I heard him say something about selling the horse - He said the saddle was in the stable.

JAMES DONOVAN . I work at Dixon's Repository, in Barbican. I was not at work on the 21st of November, but was standing in the yard; the prisoner came up to me about two o'clock, and asked me if I could get a customer for a horse which he had no further occason for? I told him I did not know until I saw what kind of a horse it was. I asked him if he had it with him? he said, No; but it was not far off. I asked where? he said, "in Little Britain" - I went there with him to see it; it was standing at Robson's yard, at that place. He asked the hostler to let me see it, the hostler shewed it to me; the prisoner was in the stable with him, and shewed it to me. I examined it, and brought it to the door - I saw it was an old horse. I told him if he would let me take it to Smithfield market (it being market-day), that was the most

likely place to sell it. He said, he would much rather I would bring a customer to the stable than to take it out. I told him, people would not be at the trouble to come to the stable to see it, horses being so very plentiful. He at last agreed that I should take it to Smithfield; and said, if I got a customer I should have 5s. for my trouble. He came with me into Smithfield, and said, he did not like to be stopping there till I got a customer for it, but if I would name any place, he would go and wait there till I found one. I told him the King's Head was the most genteel place. He went as if he was going there - I do not know whether he did. I got on the horse, and walked it once up and down, when one of the witnesses came up and looked very hard at it while I was on its back. I asked him if he would buy it? he asked if it was my own? I told him it was. He asked if I had bought it? I told him I was authorized by a gentleman to sell it, and it was mine while in my possession. He left me for a minute or two, and then brought Simpson to look at it. I told the young man directly that I would shew him the gentleman who employed me to sell it. One seized me, and the other seized the bridle. I went over, as if I was going to the King's Head, and saw the prisoner walking on the pavement outside the house. I told the young man that was the gentleman who employed me to sell it, and pointed to the prisoner. The young man said he was the person to whom he let the horse to go to Kew that day, and said he would send for an officer. The prisoner pulled out 4s. or 5s., and offered it to him not to send for one. An officer was sent for, and took the prisoner to the Compter. Simpson asked him for the saddle; he said it was at the stable. I took Simpson to the stable where I got the horse from, the saddle was not there-it could not be found.

Cross-examined. It was an old bay gelding, worth about five or six guineas.

JAMES STANTON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined. He did not attempt to escape - He peared sober.

NATHANIEL RUTTER. I have got the horse back. I have no doubt of its being mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I hired it from the prosecutor, of whom I have had horses before to go to the country, to settle some business in my way. I met the witness, and asked him what it was worth, and I would give him something for his trouble. He seemed anxious for me to tell him to sell it. I wanted to know what it was worth. He rode it about to try it, when the young man came up. I declare I never intended to sell it, I only wanted to know what it would fetch, to tell my friends, as I was going to sell one in the country.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-76

73. MARY BOSTOCK and MARY CAMPBELL were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one silver waiter, value 5l.; thirty-five silver spoons, value 10l.; two ladles, value 3l.; eight salt spoons, value 2l.; one milk-pot, value 10s.; one pepper caster, value 10s.; six table-cloths, value 30s.; two sheets, value 10s., and twenty-five books, value 5l. , the goods of John Pare , Esq.

JOHN PARE , ESQ. I am a Major-General in the army, and lodged at the prisoner's, Bostock, house, in Portman-street ; the prisoner, Campbell was her charwoman . I went out of town for two months, and returned on the 29th of October - I had occasionally lodged there for three years-when I went away I left my boxes in her care. I desired her to take particular care of one of the boxes, which contained linen, and was put in a closet at the top of the house, for safety; she frequently told me that her landlord would not wait for her rent more than ten days. I said if she was in any difficulty she was to let me know, and I would assist her in the payment of her rent, and on no account to suffer the landlord to seize; she said there was no danger of that. When I returned home I asked her if I could have my apartment, she said, Yes. I enquired how she got on, she said, very well. Next morning to my surprise, the constable and the landlord, came and charged her with something, which raised my suspicion; I enquired about my box of plate and linen; she said she had moved it to friend's house for safety. In about half an hour I told her I had found a friend who would let me move my things to his house, which I wished immediately to do; she said I could not have the box of plate and linen, as the person had been put to bed in the house, and it was in her room. I said I must have it. In about half an hour I sent for her son - He is about fourteen years of age-to shew me the house, and told him to bring it down-it appeared, in his hands, very light, as if it was empty. I fetched the key, and found all the plate and linen gone. We took it to his mother's house, and told her it was empty; she said she knew it, but it was all safe. I asked her how that could be, when she gave me a paper with sixteen duplicates. The next morning she desired I would give her that day to redeem them, as she had contrived to get two or three beds out of the house. I asked her if she had taken any thing else, she said she had taken twenty-five books - She gave me three duplicates of them, but said she could not find the rest; she said the box being heavy, the lid had burst open in moving it. The prisoner, Campbell, said that was the truth. On examining the duplicates I found Campbell had pledged some of the things, and Bostock the others. I got two officers and searched her, and found a large bunch of keys upon her; they asked her to shew them the key she opened the box with, which she reluctantly did. They found above sixty duplicates upon her, some of which related to my property.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. I thought her an honest character. I found she had received 20l. for my things. A gentleman who lodged in the house owed her 40l.

WILLIAM MOSS . I am a pownbroker. I have quantity of plate, linen, and books - A waiter which was pledged by Campbell, for 2l., and two table spoons by Bostock. I advanced 17l. on the whole of it.

GEORGE PICKET. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Duke-street, Manchester-square. I have four silver salts

with glass stands, pledged by Bostock, and other articles, for 2l.

HENRY SALMON. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Marylebone. I have five books and two spoons, pledged by Campbell for 1l.9.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody; I found a quantity of duplicates on Bostock - She shewed me the key that she opened the box with. Campbell said she pledged some of the things, by Bostock's desire; she knew they were General Pare 's, and was in hopes of getting them out; and if she had not been disappointed in getting some money from a gentleman, they would have been replaced.

BOSTOCK'S Defence. I was in distress. I did not intend to steal them. I was turned out of doors by my landlord.

BOSTOCK - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Year .

CAMPBELL- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-77

74. VICTOIRE COTELIN and MARIA CORBIN were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , nine shawls, value 10s., and three yards of calico, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Black , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM FORD . I am servant to William Black, who is a linen-draper , in Grafton-street, Soho . On the 7th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came into the shop together-Corbin bought a yard and a half of muslin, Cotelin stood close to the counter; I did not miss any thing until the next day, when the shawls were produced, which I had seen just before they came in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM TANNER . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 7th of November, Mr. Birt, of Russell-street, gave Cotelin into my charge; I found the nine shawls, and the muslin, upon her. Next day I went to No. 1, Carrington-street, and found Corbin there; I asked her if she was not the person who was at Mr. Birt's with the Frenchwoman? she said she was; I asked her what other shop she was at. She took me to Mr. Beach's. Ford said she had been there with another woman, and claimed the shawls.

COTELIN. I beg for mercy.

CORBIN's Defence. I took Cotelin with me there. I did know she was dishonest - She had lived two months with me.

COTELIN - GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of Stealing to the value 4s. 10d. only .

CORBIN- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-78

75. VICTOIRE COTELIN and MARIA CORBIN were again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one shawl, value 4s. , the goods of John Birt .

JOHN BIRT. I am a linen-draper , and live in Little Russell-street . The prisoners have been to my shop four or five times. They came about six o'clock on the 7th of November. Corbin asked to look at some lace - She went up the shop. While I was showing it the young man said that the other prisoner had stolen a shawl - I took it out of her pocket. Corbin said she was positive it was no such thing, as she was her servant, and had lived seven months with her. I sent for a constable-an officer secured Cotelin, Corbin made her escape. I asked her to walk in till the officer came-she spoke some French to the other woman, and went out. I could not detain her; she did not look at the lace.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. She did not leave her direction with me.

BENJAMIN BALDWIN. I am shopman to Mr. Birt. The prisoners came into the shop; Corbin asked for some lace, and Cotelin stepped towards the window - I saw her take a shawl, and put it in her pocket. I told Mr. Birt, who detained her. Corbin said Cotelin had lived some months with her, and was an honest woman. Corbin made her escape out of the shop; she was desired to stop; I went for an officer-as I went out, I saw her walking about; she went up to the door, and spoke some French to Cotelin. When I returned she was gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CORBIN'S Defence. I went for some lace, and did not see Cotelin take the shawl. I gave Birt my direction and left the shop. I went for my husband (it rained very hard) and he would not come.

COTELIN - GUILTY . Aged 31.

CORBIN - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-79

76. FREDERICK CARRICK was indicted for stealing on the 10th of November , at the parish of St. Pancras, one box, value 1l. 10s.; three gold rings, value 10s.; one locket, value 5s.; one broach, value 5s.; two seals, value 2s.; two strings of beads, value 5s., and 2l. 10s., in monies numbered, the property of John Churchman , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN CHURCHMAN . I am a coal-dealer , and live in Pancras-place, Somer's-town ; the prisoner occupied the second floor in my house, for five or six days before the robbery, which was on the 9th of November; on that day I left a work box on my table in my parlour-it contained the articles and money stated in the indictment; I went to bed at twelve o'clock, and left it, locked, on the table. Between six and seven o'clock the next morning, I heard the prisoner unlock the street - door and shut it again; I got up in about half an hour, missed the box, and had him apprehended about nine o'clock that morning - He was discharged on the 17th. After he was discharged I watched him all the next day, and saw him go into a pawnbroker's, in Long-acre; I followed him in, and saw him offer two strings of beads and a broach, in pledge; he could not see me, but I could see him - I went round to the private boxes, where he was, secured him, and took him to Bow-street. I went to Cherry's house, where I had seen him go in and come out, and found the box which I had lost.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES. I am an officer. I found the box at Cherry's house, in the Almonry, Westminster. I took the prisoner into custody, at the pawnbroker's, and found two rings, a seal, a sovereign, and a half-sovereign, on him. I took the beads, broach, and several other things, which the prosecutor claimed.

SARAH CHERRY . I live in the Almonry, and know the prisoner; he came to my house that morning, between six and seven o'clock, it was dark; he knocked at my door three times, and said he wanted to speak to me - I let him in; he asked me to let him leave the box there until the evening, I told him he might; he left it at my house-the officers afterwards came and took it.

ELLEN TAYLOR . I live at Cherry's; the prisoner came there with another man, and asked for her, I said she was ill in bed; he went into her room with a box, and covered it over with a handkerchief, and put it in the cupboard. They staid there about an hour, and then came down - They opened the box up stairs, it was fastened when they carried it up, but open when they came down; Cherry keeps a lodging-house.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-80

77. SARAH DAUNCEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one mantle, value 10s., the goods of Richard Mount , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM MOUNT . I am apprentice to Richard Mount , who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Gravel-lane. On the 6th of November the prisoner came into the shop for a further advance on a pledge; I asked her for the ticket, she felt and said it was but just pledged; she asked for the copy of an affidavit, I gave her one, and she left the shop. I afterwards missed the mantle, which hung at the door.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I took the prisoner into charge, and found the mantle under her petticoats.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 64.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-81

78. DANIEL DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one pelisse, value 20s. , the goods of John Bonner .

JOHN BONNER . I am a tailor , and live at Ratcliff . On the 6th of November a man pulled the pelisse from the door, and ran away; I ran out, and saw the prisoner running with it - I stopped him.

WILLIAM STIRLING . I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him - He threw the pelisse down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A sailor pulled it down and put it on my shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-82

79. THOMAS CHANDLER and GEORGE BOLTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Catley , about seven o'clock in the evening of the 8th of November , at the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one shawl, value 4s.; two pair of breeches, value 6s.; two table-cloths, value 4s.; two cloaks, value 5s.; two gowns, value 7s.; one coat, value 5s.; three petticoats, value 2s.; three waistcoats, value 3s.; one shift, value 6d.; one shirt, value 1s.; four towels, value 1s.; two pillowcases, value 1s., and one ring, value 5s. , his property.

JOSEPH CATLEY . I am owner and driver of an Hackney chariot , and live in Union-buildings, Leather-lane, in the parish of St. Andrew . On Saturday, November the 8th, I went out at ten o'clock in the morning, returned about half-pst six in the evening, and found my stable-door about one-third part open; I went in, and heard a noise like men walking about; I went into the yard, and looked up at my sitting-room window, there was no light; I expected to have found one there. My rooms are over the coach-house and stable - I heard somebody go down my stairs and come up again; they then got a light, and looked at the clock - I saw all this from the yard; they went into my sleeping-room, and then into another room. I saw them in the sleeping-room two or three times; I then gave the alarm; they opened one of my kitchen doors, and ran out - I secured the two prisoners. They looked out at the door above the stable, and ran down - I secured them, and sent for Limbrick, the officer. I examined my premises, and found them in great confusion. My wife had the key of the street - door, she was out - I found they had got in at the stable-door, and up the rack; the stable-door was not locked, I do not know whether it was latched or not. They had forced the kitchen door open-it had been bolted inside before; one of the staples was forced-an instrument was found, with which, I suppose, they did it.

LUCY CATLEY . I am the wife of the last witness. He went out in the morning; about a quarter before six in the evening a knock came at the door, and a person asked if Mrs. Catley lived there? I said, Yes; they said they had melancholy news to tell me, that my husband had fallen off the coach-box, the axle-tree was broke, and he was much hurt, and was taken to St. Bartholemew's hospital. I went up stairs, got my things, and came out. I found another man at the door, who began talking to me about it. I asked him if he was going back to the hospital; he said his mother was a nurse there, and I was to tell her he would be there as early as possible in the morning. When I got to the hospital I found my husband was not there. I returned home as quick as possible. When I got to Union-buildings I saw my husband, he said he was robbed; it was neither of the persons who came to tell me of the accident. When I went out I bolted the kitchen door inside; it was then about a quarter past six, it was quite dark; I had lit a candle, and left it on the stairs. I found a bundle tied up, which contained the articles stated in the indictment, which I had left safe in the drawers when I went out-the kitchen door was forced open.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the prisoner, Chandler, in the privy, and Bolton in the stable. I found a chissel in Chandler's pocket - I left them in Reid's custody, and went back and found Mrs. Catley there, and the bundle tied up, with a great many things strewed about the rooms; all the drawers were turned out, the kitchen door was broken open, and the staple forced off-the chissel fitted the marks exactly; a candle was close to the bundle, the wick quite soft, as if it was just out.

WILLIAM REID , JUN. I am an officer. Limbrick has spoken correctly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHANDLER'S Defence. I went up the yard, seeing the mob, and they took me.

BOLTON'S Defence. I went up the yard, and they took me.

CHANDLER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

BOLTON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-83

80. CHARLES RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , three shirts, value 2l. 5s., the goods of William Finch , in the dwelling-house of John Reynolds .

ELIZA FINCH. I am the mother of William Finch; we live at Mr. Reynolds's, in the Islington-road . On the 3rd of November I missed three shirts out of the bed-room, which were safe two minutes before. I gave the alarm-Mr. Reynolds went up stairs, and brought the prisoner down.

JOHN REYNOLDS. Mrs. Finch gave the alarm, I went up to the attic, and found the prisoner under the bed, with the shirts.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing to eat for two days.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Week .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-84

81. JOHN MANN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one watch, value 3l.; one jacket, value 5s.; one coat, value 10s.; one pair of boots, value 5s.; and 12s. in monies numbered, the property of Dennis Mahoney , in his dwelling-house .

HARRIET MAHONEY. I am the wife of Dennis Mahoney, who lives in Orange-court, Drury-lane . The prisoner hired half a bed at our house on the 12th of November, and asked me to go and get him a pint of beer. When I returned I missed him, and the property; the drawers were broken open - I found him in Clerkenwell two days after.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. On the 14th of November the prisoner was brought to Bow-street; the prosecutor claimed the coat which was on his back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-85

82. MONTAGUE LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , ten pair of stockings, value 15s., the goods of Samuel Everington , privately in his shop .

The witnesses not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Barron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-86

83. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one pair of boots, value 1l. 9s., and one pair of shoes, value 10s., the goods of Richard Collingdon , privately in his shop .

RICHARD COLLINGDON . I live at Brompton . On the 17th of November I lost the shoes out of my window; my sister gave me information; I went out, pursued the prisoner, and secured him.

SUSAN COLLINGDON . I met the prisoner by the door with the boots, and told my brother.

WILLIAM SPICER . I saw the prisoner run across the road with the boots - I stopped him, he threw the boots down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of Stealing, but not privately . Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-87

84. THOMAS LEONARD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Gadsby , on the King's highway, on the 5th of December , at the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3l., and one seal, value 1s. , his property.

RICHARD GADSBY. I am a shoemaker , and live at Ely, in Cambridgeshire. On the 5th of December, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I went into the Black Horse public-house, in George-street, St. Giles's , and had a pint of beer. The prisoner was there, and asked me to drink with him - I refused - He called for my beer himself. About half-past nine o'clock I got up to go to my sister's, in Bainbridge-street, which comes into George street. The prisoner said to a young woman that sat between him and me, "Is that man going home?" - They appeared to be strangers to each other. I pulled out my watch to see what time it was, and got up to go; he and another man followed me out. There are two doors to go out, and while I was opening the first door they passed before me; about twenty or thirty yards from the door they turned back to meet me; the other man pushed me violently against the wall with his elbow, and at that instant the prisoner snatched my watch out of my fob in a moment - He drew it through my hand; I said,

"You villain, you have robbed me of my watch;" he ran off, the other man came behind me, and pulled my arm and coat; I got away from him, and followed the prisoner up Buckeridge-street; he turned to the left into Carrier's-street, I lost him. I told the watchman, and described the prisoner to him - He had a blue jacket and trowsers on, and a sore mouth. I went home, and was fetched to the watch-house in about an hour, where I saw the prisoner, and knew him to be the man immediately. He was then disguised, he had a smock frock over his blue jacket, and white trowsers-his mouth was sore. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. I was quite sober - I am not used to London-there was a boy, with a violin, in the room.

LOUISA HARMAN . I live in Church-lane, George-street. I am an unfortunate girl. I was in the street, and met the prisoner, and went into the Black Horse to drink with him; I only knew him by sight - We had two pints of beer. The prosecutor came in, and called for a pint of beer, they did not hear him; the prisoner called again for it - He sat over it about an hour; I sat between them. About half-past nine o'clock, the prosecutor went out-the prisoner asked me if that man was gone? I told him he was; he and another young man immediately followed

him out. I did not know the other man - They had been whispering together about five minutes; the prisoner paid when the liquor was brought. I remained in the public-house about an hour, with some other women. The watchman, patrol, and prosecutor came in about an hour after; he said he had been robbed of his watch by the man who sat by me; they asked if he said any thing to me after the prosecutor went out? I told them that he asked if he was gone, and I said, Yes; I understood he was in custody; I did not see the prisoner again, but I saw him at the office the next morning. He then had a white smock frock and white trowsers on, over his blue jacket and trowsers. When he was setting with me he had a blue jacket and waistcoat, and blue trowsers on. I knew him directly - I have known him by seeing him pass for five or six weeks, but had nothing to do with him; he had a sore mouth that night; I did not observe it before - I have no doubt of his being the man.

Cross-examined. I gave this account before the magistrate.

BENJAMIN WYATT. I am a patrol of St. Giles's. I received information from some girls, went into George-street, and told the watchman; as we were returning we met the prisoner in the street, and took him to the watchhouse-it was about half an hour after; he was dressed in a smock-frock and trowsers-nothing was found on him - He had a sore lip. The prosecutor came into the watchhouse, and immediately swore to his being the man.

LEWIS ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I assisted in apprehending the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I drank with the woman, left the house, and went home - I came out again and was taken.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-88

85. JOHN COWLEY was indicted for stealing. on the 5th of December , two pair of shoes, value 10s., the goods of William West , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM WEST . I am a shoemaker , and live at Islington . On the 5th of December, about one o'clock in the day, I was in my kitchen, I was alarmed, ran up, and found the prisoner in custody.

EDWARD COLEMAN . I was passing the shop, and saw the prisoner come out with the shoes - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Stealing, but not privately . Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-89

86. JOHN HALL was indicted for manslaughter .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Barron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-90

87. WILLIAM REILY and JOSEPH CONNER were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one tin box, value 1s. , the goods of Margaret Southern .

MARGARET SOUTHERN . I am ladies' maid at Mrs. Chinnery's, in Montague-street . I lost my box out of the house-keeper's room.

THOMAS REID . I am an officer. On the 5th of November I saw the prisoners walking about Montague-street, and saw Conner go down the area; Reily waited at the top of the steps; he came up again, and spoke to Reily; they walked away, returned again, and Reily went down, he came up again, and gave the box to Conner. I secured them, and found three keys, three knives, and some wires and strings on Reily, which are used to hook things out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

REILY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

CONNER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-91

88. JOHN JETTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of James Wait , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-92

89. LAWRENCE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , six yards of flannel, value 1l. 4s. , the goods of Herbert Jenner , Doctor of Laws .

WILLIAM CLIFTON. I am servant to Herbert Jenner, Doctor of Laws, who lives in Wimpole-street . I was puting some things into a cart, on the 11th of November, and when I went into the house, the flannel was gone.

CHARLES KELLAWAY . I am servant to Dr. Jenner. I saw the prisoner with the flannel under his arm - I pursued him, and secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-93

90. JAMES POCKET was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 25 oz. of tobacco, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Laing .

GEORGE WOCESTER . I am foreman to Mr. Robert Laing , who is a tobacco-manufacturer , and lives in Prince's-street, Westminster-the prisoner was his servant . When he was going to breakfast I found 25 oz. of tobacco in his hat, which was on his head.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-94

91. WILLIAM HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 8lbs. of potatoes, value 4d.; one saucepan, value 2s.; and one apron, value 1s. , the goods of John Pierce .

SARAH PIERCE . I am the wife of John Pierce , we live at Acton . I saw the prisoner pass my door - He got over the garden rails. I went out, and saw him with the saucepan and potatoes.

JOHN PIERCE . I was at work in the field - I heard the alarm, and secured the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Barron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-95

92. MARY FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one shawl, value 2s., and one gown, value 7s. , the goods of Mary Shaw .

MARY SHAW . I live in Archer-street, Portman-square ; the prisoner lived in my service. On the 19th of November I missed her and the things.

EDWARD ALLEN. I am a pawnbroker. I took the gown in pledge of the prisoner, in the name of Shaw.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD COATES . I took the prisoner into custody with the shawl on her back.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix keeps a common brotbel.

MR. WILLIAM ROGERS (a Juryman). I know the prosecutrix, she keeps a bad house. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-96

93. JOHN JONES and PETER DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , one trunk, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Bricknal .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Samuel Beaumont .

SAMUEL BEAUMONT . I keep an errand-cart , between Stanmore and town. On the 15th of November Mr. Bricknal's trunk was in my cart, which stood at a door in Bloomsbury-market , when I returned it was gone. I ran into Drury-lane, and saw the prisoners and trunk in custody.

CAARLES RABNATT. I live in Bloomsbury-market. I saw the prisoner, Jones, take the trunk out of the cart, and go up to Davis, who stood by a gateway. Davis told me not to say any thing - They both went up the gateway.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners running down Smart's-buildings with the trunk, I secured Jones - He threw it down; my brother took Davis.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I secured Davis.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Barron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18171203-97

94. WILLIAM FABER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , three brushes, value 2s. , the goods Charles Allen .

CHARLES ALLEN . I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Kingsland-road . On the 18th of November, about seven o'clock at night, I heard the brushes rattle, and ran out-Winder brought them back.

MICHAEL WINDER. I saw the prisoner running with the brushes in his hand, and secured him. He dropped them. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

Reference Number: t18171203-98

95. CHARLES WILSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Septimus Sadler , on the 18th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one watch, value 10l., the goods of Richard Mount and the said Septimus Sadler .

GEORGE SOWARD . I am shopman to Messrs. Septimus adler and Richard Mount, who are pawnbrokers , in Bishopsgate-street . On the 18th of November, about five o'clock in the evening, I heard a crash at the window and ran out. When I got to Angel-alley, which is four doors off. I saw a man running, and pursued him, but lost sight of him. I caught sight of him again, and followed him up Finsbury-market. I called out, Stop thief! - He was at last stopped-he denied it; I brouhgt him back. I only lost sight of him in turning the corners-it was not dark.

MR. JOSEPH SMART. I am a surgeon. I saw the prisoner break the window, and run up Long-alley. I saw him again in about half an hour in Sadler's shop - I selected him from several others. I am positive he is the man. There was a very good light in the window. I did not see him take any thing.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm and ran after them - They secured me. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-99

96. THOMAS HURLEY was indicted for stealing. on the 14th of November , one handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Gaynam Rackstraw , from his person .

GAYNAM RACKSTRAW. On the 14th of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening. I was in Fleet-street , and felt a hand in my pocket, I turned round, saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand, and collared him. Perry came and took him.

JOHN PERRY . I am an officer. I was on Ludgate-hill on the 14th of November, and followed a party of men whom I knew - I followed two of them up to Bouverie-street after a gentleman. I went on till I came opposite Fetter-lane, where there was a bustle with the coachmen; I crossed over, and saw the prosecutor inquiring for an officer. He gave the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is a troublesome business-let the Jury settle it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-100

97. LEWIS LAZARUS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one watch, value 13l.; one chain, value 1l. 10s.; and one key, value 2s., the goods of John Mason , from his person .

JOHN MASON. I am a clothes salesman . On the 5th of November, I was standing at my door, in the Minories , about seven o'clock in the evening; I had just come home and rang at the bell, the door was not immediately opened - I turned round, the prisoner came up, snatched my watch out of my fob, and ran away-Mr. Gaskill secured him immediately. I never lost sight of him; he only turned round and was stopped.

JAMES GASKILL. On the 5th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the Minories, heard the alarm, and secured the prisoner. He dropped the watch, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-101

98. CASHMORE ISRAEL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , at the parish of St. Botolph Without, Aldgate, one necklace, value 2l. 10s.; one pair of bracelets, value 1l.10s.; three broaches, value 3l.; one pair of ear-rings, value 1l.; four yards of cotton, value 5s.; eight yards of poplin, value 16s.; two rings, value 5s.; and two other broaches, value 3s., the goods of Isaiah Israel , in his dwelling-house .

ISAIAH ISRAEL. I attend auctions, and am a general dealer . I live in Cutler-street, Houndsditch - I keep the house myself, and have a wife and ten children. I am the unfortunate father of the prisoner. Nothing but the greatest necessity could induce me to come forward to prosecute him. On the 11th of November a stranger came to my house to inquire for a person; he went out, leaving the street - door open-it was about eight o'clock-my daughter went up stairs to fetch something, and found the street - door open; she came down, and said that she suspected that a person was hid in the room behind the bed, as she had seen the curtains move. Two young men, who were in the house, went up, but could find nothing, and concluded that it must have been the wind, as the windows were open. I went all over the house, but could find no person - We were all satisfied, and went to bed. Next morning, about ten o'clock, my daughter went up to the same room for two pieces of poplin and a piece of cotton, and missed them, and two rings from the table. I went up with my wife, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. I suspected my son, and got an officer to look for him, but could not find him. We got information, and went to a room between ten and eleven o'clock at night, and found him in bed with another young man in a room - We charged him with the robbery, and desired him to get up. Hackham, the officer, found two duplicates in the room, one of which related to the pearl necklace, and the other to the eight yards of poplin.

BENJAMIN BROWN . I am shopman to Alexander Purse , who is a pawnbroker, and lives at London-wall. On the 12th of November, the prisoner came to our house, and brought a pearl necklace, a pair of bracelets, a pair of ear-rings, and three broaches, which he pledged for 3l. I asked him if they were his own? he said, they belonged to a person whom he knew very well - He said they belonged to Mr. George Lyons, of Cutler-street. I asked him why he did not bring the case with them? he said it was broken, and they would not be left above a day or two with us, and would not hurt. Next morning a person came and claimed them. I am quite certain the prisoner is the person.

GEORGE SOWARD . I am shopman to Mr. Sadler, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Bishopsgate-street Without. On the 12th of November, a young man pledged eight yards of poplin with me for 8s. - it was not the prisoner.

RICHARD THORNTON PERKINS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. I have a piece of cotton, which was pledged on the 12th of November, about twelve o'clock, in the name of Davis. I do not know who pledged it-it was not the prisoner.

THOMAS NORMAN HACKHAM . I am an officer. On the 12th of November Mr. Israel came to the watch-house - I went with him to the room, where the prisoner was in bed sleeping, On searching him, I found two gold ear-rings, two black broaches, and two duplicates, one of which related to the cotton pledged at Perkins's, for 3s., and the other to the necklace at Purse's, for 3l.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear you did not find them at the watch-house - A. I took them out of a saucepan in the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The pawnbroker says another person came and claimed the pearls. I am destitute of friends and every thing else. My father cannot swear to the property, or to the time of its being in the house. My character, I know, will not bear the strictest investigation.

BENJAMIN BROWN. A friend of the prosecutor came and said they were the prosecutor's.

ISAIAH ISRAEL. I can swear they were in the house the morning before.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-102

99. LOUISA PERKINS was indicted for that she, on the 4th of November , a certain child, of the age of five years and seven months, maliciously and feloniously, by force, did take and carry away, with intent to deprive Susannah Potter , its parent, of the possession of the said child, by concealing and detaining it from her .

SECON COUNT, the same, only stating her intent to be to steal on bonnet, value 2s.; one pelisse, value 6s.; one frock, value 2s.; one pair of trowsers, value 2s.; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; and one pair of boots, value 3s., the goods of Susannah Potter, the said clothes then being on and about the person of the said child.

SUSANNAH POTTER . I am a widow , and live in Vere-street, Clare-market . I have an only child, who is five years and seven months old. On the 4th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. I sent her out, with a basket and cloth, to buy some rolls, at the corner of Vere-street; she not returning made me uneasy. I went to see for her, and sent persons in different directions. As I was coming home, between ten and eleven o'clock, a person called to me, and said my child was at home - I found her at home with Mr. Hutchins.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. She was a good-natured child, and easily enticed away.

EMMA POTTER. I live with my mother, in Vere-street, Clare-market-my mother sends me on errands; I go to school by myself. My mother sent me for some rolls-when I went out at the door the prisoner was on the opposite side of the way - I crossed over, and went up the street; she followed me up the street and took hold of my hand, then she loosed it, and I went into the baker's. She then took me up in her arms and carried me - She put me down, to walk, in Lincoln's Inn-fields. We went down Portugal-street - she walked me about the Temple. I went through dark passages, and when I had almost got to Blackfriars Bridge, Mr. Gibson took me away from her.

Q. What did she say to you when she first spoke to you - A. She said she would buy me some biscuits, and make me some doll's things.

Q.Was you not surprised at her taking you by the arm - A. Yes; I said nothing. I am sure the prisoner is the

woman. I had an old coat and bonnet on-she did not take any thing from me. She did not say where she was going to take me. I never saw her before.

Cross-examined. She walked by me, and took hold of my arm. I expected to get the doll's things.

JAMES GIBSON. I am a cooper, and live in Redcross-street, Borough. I was passing through Temple-bar on the 4th of November, about ten minutes after nine o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner holding the child by the wrist, and walking down Fleet-street - the child resisted as much as possible. She appeared to me to have been crying bitterly. I followed her to the archway, leading to the Temple - She dragged the child down there as far as the Piazza-the child resisted very much, and was very unwilling to go with her. She took it through a passage, down two or three steps, and conversed with it. I heard her say she would buy it some biscuits. She came out of the passage, and turned round to the Piazza again - She went down the passage again, through the steps towards the gardens, and attempted to go through, but it was stopped up; she returned, crossed over, and came on the parade. I followed her into Tudor-street (there is a passage which leads from William-street into Tudor-street)-the child resisted very much there. She had a basket and a napkin in her hand, the napkin fell out on the pavement. I crossed over, and attampted to take the child from the prisoner - She was unwilling to let me have it. I asked her what she was going to do with it? the prisoner said, "D-n you, Sir, what is it to you? she is my niece; she has been disorderly and disobedient, and I shall do what I think proper with her."The child still resisted very much, until it got to the corner of William-street, leading to Blackfriars-bridge. I told a person who was passing that I thought she had stolen the child; with his assistance, I took the child away while he held her. I told her I would give her in charge - She said there was no occasion for that, as she was its aunt, and would go to the parents with me. I asked the child where its friends lived? she said, they lived at No. 15, Vere-street, Clare-market. The prisoner said the child was correct, and she would go with me to its friends. I told her, if she would I should feel satisfied, and if not, I should give her in charge. She was willing to come with me. We returned the same road she came. Just as we came to the passage, with the steps, she attempted to run away. I told her I certainly would see the child to its friends. Mr. Hodson, a solicitor, passing at the time, said he would send an officer, he sent Hutchins - I gave him the child to take home. The prisoner stopped with me until he returned, and said he had found its mother almost distracted. He took her in charge.

Cross-examined. No person interfered with me until Hutchins came. I was going into the Borough, and followed her.

JOHN HUTCHINS . Gibson called me to take the child. I went to Vere-street with it, where I found her mother. When I returned he had the prisoner in charge.

Prisoners Defence. I was quite ignorant of any thing - I was insensible at the time.

THOMAS SMITH. She appeared as if she had been drinking. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-103

100. JAMES KING and JAMES SAUNDERS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , eighty pounds of lead, value 4s. , the goods of Frederick Lord Boston .

JOSEPH HOPPEE. I am a bricklayer, and live at Uxbridge . The rectory house there belongs to Frederick Lord Boston. I was employed to repair the house; the lead was taken off the house, and given to the workmen to take care of. The prisoners were employed there; I told King to take the lead into an empty room-it was to be put on the roof again. I missed several pieces; I afterwards saw it brought from Coombes's. The prisoners were apprehended; I said nothing to induce them to confess; King said he was sorry that he had been concerned in it; he was not in want, and that it was very wrong of him, and he deserved all that he should receive.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. I saw the lead taken from the roof, and put into the room.

THOMAS GREEN . I was working with the prisoners; the lead was doubled up, and taken into the cock-loft; the prisoners brought it down, I put a piece in my apron. King said he would put it in the cock-loft till night, and then take it and sell it. When we left work, the prisoners, and myself, took it, and sold it to Coombes, the blacksmith. I gave mine to Saunders - They went in, and sold it for 5s.; they said it weighed eighty-one pounds. They brought the money, and divided it.

STEVEN COOMBES . I am a blacksmith, and live at Uxbridge. The prisoner, King, brought the lead to me. My apprentice asked him if he came honestly by it, he said, Yes. I have been in the habit of buying lead for years.

CHARLES MURRAY . I took the prisoners into custody. King said he was sorry for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KING - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

SAUNDERS- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-104

101. JOHN OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , certain pieces of brass, belonging and fixed to a certain building, the property of Frederick Lord Boston , (i.e.) eight door handles, value 4s.; two window bolts, value 9d.; three escutcheons, value 1s.; and three bolt handles, value 4d.

JOSEPH HOPPEE. I also missed the articles stated in this indictment, from the rectory house. They were fixed to the building; I afterwards found them at Mr. Benham's shop. The prisoner was employed as a bricklayer on the premises; he was charged with stealing the lead-he said he knew nothing about it, but he helped Green to take the brass.

WILLIAM HERON . I am agent to Lord Boston. The house was under repair. I went to Mr. Benham's, at Uxbridge, and found the property there.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am a carpenter. I was repairing the house - I found the things at Mr. Benham's. I have fitted them to the places where they were taken from - They exactly fit.

EBENEZER BENHAM . I am an ironmonger, and live at Uxbridge. Green, and some others, whom I do not know, sold me the brass at my shop; I knew him before, I did not suspect him.

THOMAS GREEN . I was at work on the premises with the prisoner; we broke the brass off the door and windows. The prisoner, myself, and another, sold them to Mr. Benham, and shared the money between us.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-105

102. ANN ROBERTSON and ELIZA KELLY were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , from the person of George Hold , one coat, value 1l. 10s.; 15s. in monies numbered; and five 1l. bank notes , his property.

GEORGE HOLD. I am a mariner . On the 30th of October I met two girls, in Drury-lane, and went home with them to Charles-street , and had a glass or two of liquor. I awoke at daylight, they were then gone, with 12l. 15s. which I had in my pocket, and my great coat. I went down stairs, and found the prisoner Kelly in the room, and told her of my loss - She drove me out of the room. I went to Bow-street, and got her and Robinson apprehended, who I am positive is one of the girls-nothing was found on her.

WILLIAM GODFREY. I am an officer. On the 3rd of November I received information that Kelly was hawking the duplicate of a coat about. I apprehended her, and the pawnbroker said she was the person who pledged it.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am servant to Mr. Turner, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Bridges-street. The prisoner Kelly, and another woman, pledged the coat with me at Mr. Turner's - She lived at the house where the man was robbed.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am an officer. I took Robinson into custody in Charles-street - she was intoxicated, and had some new clothes lying by her side. She said she got them from Mary Clarke .

(Coat sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-106

103. ROBERT KILBY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one book, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Simmons .

EDWARD SIMMONS. I am a bookseller , and live in Barbican. On the 26th of November I lost the book.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 26th of November, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the Curtain-road, and watched him into a bookseller's shop, with something under his jacket; he came out I asked him what it was? he said he had a book, but did not know what book it was; that he bought it of a man in the street. I asked him who he bought it of? he said I had a very good pump, but the sucker was dry, and I might take him where I liked.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Pitfield-street, who said he was in great distress. I gave him 1s. 6d. for it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-107

104. JOHN LECASE and RICHARD THOMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 112lbs. of lead, value 20s., belonging to Charles Blazdall , and fixed to a certain building .

CHARLES BLAZDALL . I am a whitesmith , and live in St. Martin's-lane. I rent a shop by Vauxhall-bridge . On the 26th of October the lead was taken from the roof - I saw it in Mr. Bailey's house.

EDMUND BAILEY . I keep the Roebuck, at Millbank. On the 26th of October, the watchman brought the prisoner, Thompson, to my house - He made his escape. I saw the lead folded up, and laid across the parapet wall of the building-it was moved into my house for security.

CALEB LUDFORD. I am a watchman. On the 26th of October I was going into a garden to feed a horse, and saw three boys standing by the shop, about a quarter before six o'clock at night; as I returned I saw them again. I went into the garden, and told the people to watch them; while I was talking, I heard the tiles rattle - I ran out, and caught the prisoner, Thompson, coming out of the shop without his hat - I took him to Bailey's. I am sure he is the man, I knew him before. Lecase got away - I am sure he is one of them - He spoke to me as I passed the first time.

JOSEPH COOPER. Mr Bailey and I carried the lead into Mr. Bailey's house-next morning I took Lecase - He denied being there. I found the lead in the gutter, rolled up ready to be taken away.

THOMAS PACE . I apprehended Thompson on the 1st of November.

LECASE'S Defence. I saw him take Thompson, and let him go.

LECASE- NOT GUILTY .

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-108

105. ROBERT JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one sack, value 2s., 6d., and four busheis of oats, value 15s. , the goods of William Reynolds .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the sack to be the property of John Bryant , jun.

WILLIAM BROWN. I am servant to Mr. Reynolds, who is a corn-chandler , and lives in St. John-street . On the 27th of November, about five o'clock in the evening, two waggons stood at our door; one of them was unloading - I was informed that a sack had been taken out of the second waggon - I found the prisoner at the watch-house, with the sack of oats which had been taken out of the waggon. I knew it to be my master's.

WILLIAM SALES. I drove the waggon to Mr. Reynolds's door, about five o'clock in the evening - A few minutes after I found the tail of the waggon untied, and a sack taken out - I saw the prisoner at the watch-house with it - I knew the sack.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am an officer. On the 27th of November I was standing at the corner of Charterhouse-lane, in St. John-street, with Forbes. The prisoner ran across the road with the sack of oats on his shoulder, about twelve yards from Mr. Reynolds's; he came from that way. I followed him towards the square, and stopped

him - I asked him what he had got? he said it was a sack of oats which he bought from Mr. Williams, of St. John-street. I said I knew no such person - He could not tell me whethere it was a shop or a private house-there is no such person.

JOHN FORBES. I was with Thompson. He has spoken correctly.

(Sack sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I sent a man to buy me a sack of corn - I went to look for him, met him, and he gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-109

106. JOHN KITCHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one watch, value 1l. 10s., and one handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of John Bainbridge .

JOHN BAINBRIDGE . I am a gentleman's servant , and lodge at the Feathers, public-house, in Hart-street, Covent-garden . Between the 16th and 20th of November I lost my watch, and four handkerchiefs-the prisoner lodged in the house.

JAMES BARTLETT. I am a watch-house keeper. On the 20th of November the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, on suspicion of stealing the property. He began crying, and said if he thought they would not hurt him, he would tell where the watch was - He told me I should find it behind a sand tub in the cellar, at the public-house where he was quartered - I found it there.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am the landlord of the public-house. The prisoner took me to the Rose, in Rose-street, where I found the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-110

107. WILLIAM DRAKE and MARY RICHARDSON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , two sheets, value 10s., the goods of Edward Lock , in a lodging-room, let by contract to the prisoners .

ELIZA LOCK . I let the lodging to the prisoner Drake, only.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-111

108. JOHN NOWLAND , MICHAEL CAMFIELD , and PETER SKILLING were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 20 lbs. of soap, value 16s. , the goods of Joseph Mathers Murphy .

JOSEPH MATHERS MURPHY . I am a soap-boiler , and live in Great Wheeler-street, Westminster; the prisoners were my servants ; I suspected them, and on the 12th of November, got Bly, the officer, to assist me, we marked several pieces of soap, and watched them on the 13th, 14th, and 15th. On Monday, the 17th, I sent Skilling to Pimlico, and Nowland to Lambeth-Camfield remained at home. I told him I was going out, and to have an eye about the premises; I went to the hay-loft, which is over the stable, to watch him; in a short time I saw him take a scraper, and draw out one of the boards from my cutting room-he took a cake of soap, and put the board in its place again, and laid the soap on the hay-loft stairs, and covered it over with hay; he went into the factory, I came down, and put a farthing in the cake, to mark it-there was a mark in it before. He walked up and down the factory for a few minutes-Skilling came in and gave Camfield the money he had received; he then drew out the board again, and handed Skilling three cakes of soap, one by one, Skilling put one cake in his breeches, and the other two between his waistcoat and shirt, and asked Camfield if it made any appearance, he said it did not; he went away, returned in about five minutes, and took three more cakes out; before Skilling returned Camfield took a piece and put it into his own breeches-it was then nine o'clock. Nowland returned from Lambeth, Camfield told him there was a cake of soap laid for him on the stairs-Nowland took it, and put it in his breeches, and all three went to breakfast; I went to Gilmore, who was waiting with me, he stopped Nowland, and took the cake of soap out of his breeches. I gave him in charge. Gillmore brought Camfield in and took a cake out of his breeches. He then went for Skilling, and brought him back - We found no soap on, but made him shew his linen-it was stained with yellow soap.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. Nowland had worked twenty-eight years for me; Skilling nine years, and Camfield twelve years. I saw all that passed.

JAMES GILLMORE . I found two cakes of soap in Nowland's breeches, and one in Camfield's - They were running away; I pursued Camfield for about twenty yards before I took him. I went to Skilling's lodgings, with Bly, and found him there, he had not got any, but his shirt was stained with soap. I saw him come out with something under his waistcoat. A farthing was found in the cake which Nowland had.

JAMS BLY. The prosecutor fetched me. I marked the soap.

NOWLAND'S Defence. I took it to wash my things.

CAMFIELD'S Defence. I thought it worth nothing.

SKILLING'S Defence. I never had any.

NOWLAND - GUILTY . Aged 40.

CAMFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 51.

SKILLING - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-112

109. MARIA THOMPSON , THOMAS JARMAN , ANN FRITH , and ELIZA FRITH were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , from the person of James Anderson , three 20l. bank notes , his property.

JAMES ANDERSON . I am a clerk in a public-office. On the 21st of November, I had been visiting a friend, and was returning home about eleven o'clock at night; just before the Horse Guards, the prisoner, Thompson, accosted me, and asked for something to drink; I took her to public-house, and had some brandy and water - She drank rum and water. I went to her lodgings, in Dukescourt, in the Almonry -the brandy and water got into my head; I was there a very short time before I perceived some person feeling in my pantaloons pocket; I put my hand to my pocket, and found my notes gone - She was the only person in the room; I jumped up and made a noise, she ran from the room, I pursued, and never lost

sight of her. I accused her of robbing me, in the street, when the watchman came up and took us both to the watch-house; I was rather clamorns about my notes, and was detained in the watch-house. Early in the morning, after the constable of the night had left, the watch-house door was opened, and the prisoner entered with the constable of the night, who must have let her out. I was permitted to leave the watch-house. I went to the Bank and stopped the notes. I gave the officers the numbers of the notes. I have no recollection of the other prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I met her at twenty minutes after eleven o'clock. If I had not drank too much I should not have gone with her.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. On the 22d of November I was informed of the robbery, and that the prisoner, Jarman, had been detained for offering a 20l. note, in Oxford-street. I took him and Frith into custody; after that, I received information from Bluet, at Tothill-fields; I went to the watch-house to Jarman, and told him I understood he had a 20l. note about him, and asked him to give it to me. He said, he hoped G-d might strike him dead if he had. I said I was sure he had. He declared solemnly that he knew nothing of the 20l. note which was detained in Oxford-street, and that he went there with Bluet to buy a waistcoat accidentally. I found the 20l. concealed in the lining of his hat (No. 13,014). I asked him what he said now? he said he did not know how it came there. I told him I had information of another 20l. note, which was changed on Saturday morning, and asked him where he had changed it? he said he knew nothing of it, for he never received it. I found he had changed it at Mr. Emery's, the Coach and Horses, in Oxford-street - it was No. 13, 016.

JOSEPH COOPER. I am an officer of Queen-square. After the examination on the 22d of November, I searched the prisoner, Thompson's lodgings, No. 5, Duke's-court, Almonry, and there learnt that she had a servant of the name of Ann Frith , that went by the name of Jarman - I took her into custody, and found that Jarman had been stopped offering the 20l. note, No. 13, 015, at Mr. Bagley's. We found 18s. on Ann Frith - She said her husband gave it to her. I also found a letter on her from Bluet, directed to Duke's-court. We afterwards took Jarman into custody.

JOHN EMERY. I keep a public-house in York-street, Westminster. On the 22d of November, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Jarman, came and asked me to give him change for a 20l. note. I asked him if it was his own? he said it was for a friend, who was waiting for it. I gave him nineteen 1l. notes and 20s. in silver, and indorsed his name on it-it was No. 13, 016.

JAMES GILMORE . After these notes were produced, I asked Thompson what she did with the other? she said she only took three.

JOHN BAGULY. I am servant to Mr. Dobree, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Oxford-street. On the 22d of November Bluet, and the prisoner, Jarman, came to our shop. Bluet bought a silver watch for 2l. 16s. - Jarman approved of it. Bluet handed me a 20l. note. Jarman told him his father would be angry with him if he gave more than 3l., and said Bluet lived in the neighbourhood. I asked Bluet for his address, he gave me the name of"Burt, Swallow-street." He said he was the son of Mr. Burt, the builder. I pretended to go out for change, and went to Mr. Burt. I returned, and questioned him about it; he then said, he said Bird. I went to Bird in consequence of what he said, and detained him. The note was No. 13,015.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am a constable. A man told me he had information from Ann Frith, where I could find 17l. of the money. I went to No. 78, Peter-street, and found 18l. sewed up in a white gown, which belongs to Thompson.

HENRY BLUET. I am a bricklayer. On the night of the 21st the prisoner, Thompson, brought me three 20l. notes, which I did not think honestly come by - I formerly lived with her. I gave them to Ann Frith, she took them to Jarman, whom she formerly lived with. Next morning, Frith took me to Jarman's, where the money was produced. Jarman went out and changed one. She took me with her to Oxford-street, and persuaded me to go into Dobrec's to buy the watch. I tendered one of the notes there which Jarman put into my hand, and was detained.

Cross-examined. I was persuaded to go. I work for Mr. Want, and lodge at No.5, Duke's-court.

MR. ANDERSON. I know them to be my notes by the numbers and dates.

THOMPSON's Defence. The prosecutor said he would stop all night, and afterwards said he must go home. I asked him for some compliment, and he gave me the money.

THOMPSON- GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

JARMAN- NOT GUILTY .

ANN FRITH - NOT GUILTY .

MARY FRITH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-113

110. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for knowingly having in his possession a forged Bank of England note .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-114

111. ANN STORY was indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-115

112. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-116

113. ANN STORY was indicted for forgery .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-117

114. ABRAHAM SOLOMONS was indicted for unlawfully uttering to Charles Beswick a counterfeit shilling, as and for a good and lawful one, he well knowing it to be counterfeit .

CHARLES BESWICK . I live on Ludgate-hill. On the

16th of November I was in Tower-street, where the prisoner was selling oranges. He offered me four for 6d., then five, at last he said I should have eight - I agreed to take them, and told him I would give him a 1s. 6d. piece, if he would give me 1s.; he said he had no shilling. I gave him 1s., he said he would give me 6d. He turned his back to me; I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and take out a 1s., and put it into his mouth - He gave me the 1s., out of his mouth, and said he had no 6d. - it was a bad 1s., I told him so, and gave it back to him. I gave him 1s. 6d. - he did not return my 1s.; he gave me 2s., one was good, and the other bad. I told him of it, and said I thought he had more bad money about him, and I would have him taken up - He ran away. This was about one o'clock. He gave me a good 1s., and wanted the bad one back, I would not return it. I ran after him, but could not catch him. About three o'clock I saw him in Watling-street; he saw me and ran away. I pursued, and called out, Stop thief! Mr. Hendry came up and secured him. Some money was picked up.

ROBERT HENDRY. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody - He was running. He took some money out of his pocket and threw it down-it was 1s., a 1s. 6d. piece, and a 6d. - the shilling was bad. I searched him, and found another bad shilling on him.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The shilling offered to Beswick is bad, and the other shilling also, and appear of the same impression.

GUILTY Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties for One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-118

115. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 3lbs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of James Gosling .

JAMES GOSLING . I am a cheesemonger , and live in East Smithfield . On Saturday, the 1st of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was alarmed, ran out, and found the prisoner in custody, with my bacon.

GEORGE SERGEANT. I live next door to Mr. Gosling. I saw the prisoner take the bacon from the window, followed and secured him. I took it from his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-119

116. JOHN HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , one coat, value 12s. , the goods of James Newbold .

CHARLOTTE NEWBOLD. I am the wife of James Newbold , who is a tailor , and lives in Crown-street, Finsbury-square . On the 1st of December, about ten o'clock, I was in the back room, and saw the prisoner go out of the shop with the coat. I ran out - He was stopped, and brought back with it.

HARRIET SIMPSON. I live in Crown-street. I saw a man looking in at Newbold's window; he opened the shop-door - I saw the prisoner run out, I pursued and stopped him; he threw the coat down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-120

117. SARAH PAVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one sheet, value 1s. 6d., and one apron, value 6d. , the goods of Richard Flannagan .

RICHARD FLANNAGAN . I am a shoemaker , and live in Red Lion-alley, Cow-cross . On the 30th of November I saw the prisoner go out of my door; I followed her, and found the things on her. I did not know her.

CATHARINE FLANNAGAN. I saw the things taken from her. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-121

118. FRANCES SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , two pint pewter pots, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Oliver .

THOMAS OLIVER . I keep the Wheatsheaf, public-house, in Upper Marybone-street . On the 5th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, who was a customer, came to my house, and asked credit for a pot of beer - I refused. About five minutes after, she returned; my wife gave me information, I followed her, and took a pint pot from under her cloak, she had another in her hand with porter in it - I took her to the watch-house. I went to her lodgings, and found a pint pot in the frying-pan on the fire, half melted. I knew the pint pot was in my house the first time that she came. Her husband is a plumber.

ROBERT JEFFRIES. I went to the prisoner's room, and found her husband at the door. He said she had the key; he broke the door open, and we found the pint pot melting in the frying-pan.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-122

119. CHARLOTTE HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 13s. in monies numbered, and a promissory note for the payment and value of 1l., the property of John Roffey , from his person .

JOHN ROFFEY . I am a carpenter , and live at Camberwell. On the 2d of December, about twelve o'clock at night, I had been drinking with my brother. I went into a coffee-shop in Drury-lane, met the prisoner, and went to her room, at No. 1, in Charles-street . I awoke about one o'clock, and heard her go out - I found my money gone out of my pockets. I called the watchman; we went next door, and found the prisoner. My money was found between the bed and the sacking. There was a Dorking 1l. note, and 15s. in silver. No person but the prisoner was in the room - She denied it.

WILLIAM READY. I am a watchman. About one o'clock in the morning I saw the prosecutor. He said he had been robbed at No. 1-the prisoner lodges at No. 2 - I went there, and found her in bed, concealed under the clothes, and between the bed and the sacking I found the money, tied up in her pocket - She claimed the pocket. I took her to the watch-house. Roffey was sober.

JOHN ROFFEY. It is my note.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-123

120. JOHN BROWN was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES GILBERTSON . The prisoner was my servant . I cannot prove that he ever received the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-124

121. ELIZA BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 20 yards of stuff, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Hawkins .

JOHN BEAVER. I live in Winyatt-street. On the 18th of November, between five and six o'clock, I was in Mr. Hawkins's shop, who is a linen-draper , and lives in St. John-street . The prisoner came in-suspecting her, I watched, and saw her take a piece of stuff off the counter and put it under her arm-her apron was over her arm. I told Mr. Hawkins. He pulled her apron on one side and took two pieces from under it; I only saw her take one-Mr. Hawkins claimed them. She begged for mercy.

JOHN HAWKINS. Mr. Beaver told me. I took the stuff from the prisoner, which I knew to be my property.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-125

122. HENRY ELLIS , EDWARD BOWEN , SAMUEL FRANKS , and SARAH PINNION were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , one pair of pattens, value 1s., and one pair of upper-leathers, value 1s. , the goods of William Clarke .

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am a shoemaker , and live at Shadwell . On the 10th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, the pattens hung in the shop, the four prisoners came in; Pinnion bought a pair of boots, which came to 7s., she paid for them and went out, I immediately missed the pattens and upper-leathers; I got the officer, and about eleven o'clock the next morning I saw them at the office. The prisoner, Ellis, stood with his back to the pattens, and Bowen was close to the leather.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I found the prisoners at the Paviour's Arms, public-house, three doors from Mr. Clarke s house, and secured them. When I went into the tap-room they called out, "here is a ding," which is a signal to throw any thing away. Bowen threw the leathers down, and Franks the pattens. The others came to the office voluntarily, the next morning.

JAMES PARTRIDGE . I was with Brown, and saw Bowen put the upper-leathers under the seat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(See No. 17) ELLIS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BOWEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

(See No. 17) FRANKS- NOT GUILTY .

PINNION- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-126

123. WILLIAM FAULKNER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one pair of stockings, value 1s.; eight ounces of tobacco, value 1s.; one handkerchief, value 4d.; eight ounces of soap, value 4d.; one towel, value 4d.; three balls of worsted, value 2d.; one ball of twine, value 2d.; one cup, value 2d.; one pair of scissars, value 1s., and one bag, value 1s. , the goods of John Catley .

JOHN CATLEY . I am a seaman , and belong to the ship John, which was moored at Union-tier, Wapping . On the 29th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I went ashore, leaving my chest aft, on deck, locked; I returned next morning, found it broken open, and the things gone-the officers brought them to me.

JOSEPH HARDING. I am a Thames Police officer. On the 30th of November, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner in a boat, with a boy. I found some fat in the boat, which made me question him; he said he bought it. I found a bag in his pocket containing a ball of twine, a sail-maker's palm, a pair of scissars, and six sail needles - He said he brought them from home; I found they belonged to the prosecutor. I found a cup in the boy's pocket.

ROBERT MARSDEN . I am an officer. I found a bundle behind the backboard of the boat, which contained eight ounces of tobacco, a pair of stockings, and a towel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked a hat up with the things.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-127

124. RICHARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one watch, value 1l. 9s.; one chain, value 6d.; one key, value 6d., and one seal, value 2d. , the goods of William M'Kinley .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-128

125. WILLIAM MATHEWS and CHARLES BA-KER were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one pair of boots, value 5s., and two shawls, value 6s. , the goods of William Saunders .

SUSAN SAUNDERS. I am the wife of William Saunders , and live in Cartwright-street, Westminster . I was in my back room, and heard footsteps in the parlour, I opened the door, and saw the prisoner, Baker, with the boots in his hand - He was a stranger to me. I told him he was robbing me - He snatched the shawl off the chair, and went off immediately; I called out stop thief!-Mathews was walking with him - They both went away together.

REBECCA PORTER. I live four doors from the prosecutrix. On the 14th of November, I saw Baker come out of Cartwright-street, with the boots, the other prisoner was about six yards behind him; several of the neighbours threw up their windows, and said the prosecutrix had been robbed. I knew the prisoners very well by sight. On the Monday following I was told Bly had taken them.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners, on the Monday after the robbery, together, in the same house; I saw them on the day of the robbery, with

the boots, but did not know they were stolen. I observed that Mathews had a handkerchief with something in it, under his arm; I asked him what it was, he gave it me with the boots, and said they were his. I asked him where he got them, he said, from Judd-it was about eight o'clock in the morning when I took them; he said he had returned the boots to Judd-Baker heard him.

BAKER'S Defence. Judd gave them to me - I returned them to him.

MATHEWS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-129

126. ROBERT MARTIN and MICHAEL MARTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one watch, value 4l.; one seal, value 15s.; one coat, value 7s.; one pair of breeches, value 5s., and one umbrella, value 3s., the goods of James Patis , from his person .

JAMES PATIS . I am a potter , and live at Limehouse. On the 19th of November I was intoxicated; I awoke about half-past three o'clock in the morning, found myself in a room in Spitalfields , and my property gone.

JAMES BLY . On the 19th of November, I went to the Bull's Head, public-house, in York-street, and apprehended the prisoners, and a woman; I found the watch and seal on Robert Martin , and the coat, breeches, and umbrella, on Michael Martin - He claimed them-the woman claimed the umbrella. Robert Martin said he bought the watch of a seaman two months before.

GEORGE POPLE . I was with Bly - He has spoken correctly.

WILLIAM DOWD. I am a watchman of Spitalfields. The prosecutor called me to the house in Spitalfields-it is a bad house - He was undressed.

JANE SMITH. I am an unfortunate girl. Robert Martin took a room in Fleur-de-lis-court. I met the prosecutor about ten o'clock that night, I did not notice his being drunk - He went home to that room with me. He went out, and had more drink - I was intoxicated. I got up and missed his things, and went to look for them.

JAMES PATIS. I do not know whether I went with the girl, or not.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARTINS' Defence. The young woman brought us the things.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-130

127. WILLIAM BOZIER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , six shirts, value 20s.; one pair of sheets; value 5s.; two table-cloths, value 5s.; five handkerchiefs, value 5s.; two shifts, value 2s.; three aprons, value 1s; two night-gowns, value 2s; seven pair of stockings, value 3s.; two pairs of pockets, value 2s.; seven caps, value 7l.; one frill, value 6d.; one towel, value 6d.; four napkins, value 2s.; three yards of net, value 3s.; six pinafores, value 2s.; and two pair of trowsers, value 1s. , the goods of William Mapleton ; and JAMES WOODROFF for feloniously receiving two shirts, value 5s.; one pair of sheets, value 5s.; one table-cloth, value 2s.; five handkerchiefs, value 5s.; one shirt, value 1s.; two aprons, value 9d.; six pair of stockings, value 2s.; two pair of pockets, value 2s.; seven caps, value 7l.; one frill, value 6d.; three yards of net, value 3s.; one night gown, value 1s.; six pinafores, value 2s.; and two pair of trowsers, value 1s., part and parcel of the above-mentioned goods, well knowing them to have been stolen ; and JAMES FARTHING was indicted for feloniously receiving four shirts, value 18s., other part and parcel of the said goods, he well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

WILLIAM MAPLETON. I am a butcher , and live in Gloucester-street, Vauxhall. I have a little shop in Budd-street, West-square-the prisoner, Bozier, was my servant . I sent him to my wife, who is a laundress, to take the things home; his not returning, she sent to me to the shop to enquire if he was returned there - He never returned. About half-past ten o'clock next morning I went in search of the linen - I went to Woodroff's house, he is a publican; I asked him if he knew a person of the name of William Bozier , and told him that I had information that he was in his house; he said there was no such person in his house, and he had not seen such a person. Just at that time, a little girl put her head in at the door and said, "Yes, Mr. Woodroff, Bill Bozier was here last night, and had a bundle of linen under his arm." He said, "You young b-h, if you don't go out, I'll kick you out-there is no such person here." I told him if I could get my property again, to deliver it to my customers, I did not wish to prosecute, and I would not mind treating him with a leg of mutton. He said, "D-n your eyes, if you don't go about your business I will kick you out." I went away to the Black Dog, public-house, and there I saw a young man, who asked me what I would give him to find out Bozier? I said I would give him 1l.; we went round, and saw two girls, and had information that he was in Woodroff's house. I went to Bow-street, and got three officers - We went to Woodroff's, and told him we had come to search for Bozier-he said, "I told you before he was not here." I told the officers to search his premises; Woodroff then said, "he is here;" the officers asked in what part of the house? he said in the garret, and he would shew us up stairs; we went up with him-the door was locked-Woodroff put his foot against the door - We found him there - I said he was the man we were searching for-the officers took him to the watch-house. We found a pair of gloves, and an old knife-handle of mine, and 8s. 6d. on him. I went to the Brown Bear to wait for Wilson; in about half an hour Woodroff brought a basket of linen on his shoulder - I said it was my property, it contained part of the linen; he said, "No, it is my property - I have given 2l. for it, and if you choose to give me 2l., you may have it, or I'll be d-d if I won't take it back again." Wilson took the basket, and Woodroff said, "There is no magistrate here now, and therefore I shall take it back again." Wilson forcibly took it from him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not he tell you when you went to his house, to go away, as he would not have any body there during divine service - A. No. I was a stranger to him. I went again in the evening, and found Bozier there drunk. Woodroff did not say he was drunk up stairs, and that he kept him there to get sober. He attended voluntarily before the magistrate, and has surrendered himself here to day.

SARAH MAPLETON. I am the wife of the last witness. Between six and half-past six in the evening, I delivered a basket and a bundle to the prisoner, Bozier; he was to take the bundle to Mrs. Plakes, No. 5, Narrow-wall, Lambeth, and the basket to Mrs. Jarman, No. 99, Strand - They contained the articles stated in the indictment. I expected him to return about nine o'clock, but never saw him till he was apprehended. I found that the basket and bundle were not delivered.

JAMES ROGERS. I keep a sale-shop in Earl-street, Seven Dials. On Saturday evening, the 22d of November, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner, Bozier, came to me very much intoxicated, and wanted to buy a silk handkerchief, which my wife asked 3s. for; he offered 2s., and then 2s. 6d., but would not have it. He had a bundle, which he threw down, and said, "What will you give me for this?" My wife opened it, and said she would not have it, it would not do for her; he was going away, he had got to the door, and asked if he might leave it till the morning; thinking he might lose it, she gave him leave; he never returned. On Monday a man, who said his name was Bruet, came for it - I afterwards went to Bow-street, and saw it there.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON. I am an officer of Bow-street. On Sunday, the 23d of November, Wilkinson informed me of the robbery. I went to the Brown Bear , and saw the prosecutor - I got Rice, and went with him, and the prosecutor, to Woodroff's house, the White Horse, in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane. I left Rice at the door, and went into the tap-room, and asked for him; he came out of the back room - I told him I wanted Bill Bozier; he said he was not there. I told him not to play any tricks, for I would not stand it, and that I knew he was in his house; he immediately took up the candle, and said he was up stairs, very drunk, and fast asleep. I called Rice - We went up to the front garret, the door was locked; I asked Woodroff for the key; he said, "Never mind the key," and kicked the door open. The prosecutor immediately identified the prisoner, Bozier; and we found a knife-handle and a pair of gloves on him, which he claimed. I sent him to the watch-house. Woodroff said he thought he could get the basket, with part of the linen; he said he thought he could hear something of it at No. 8 or 10, in Charles-street, Drury lane. He took us to several houses, but to no purpose. We returned to the Brown Bear , where the prosecutor was-in about half an hour Woodroff brought a basket, containing part of the linen, on his shoulder-the prosecutor claimed it. Woodroff immediately demanded 2l. of him, or he said he would take the basket back - He put his hand on the basket - I told him to touch it at his peril, as it was mine, and I should keep it; he said he had had a troublesome job, and had got no money - I gave him 1s.

Cross-examined. He told me he thought he could find it. When he brought it, he said he had paid 2l. for it.

THOMAS RICE. I was with Wilson; he has spoken correctly.

JOHN GALLERY . I live in Rose-street, St. Luke's. I went with Mrs. Hanmore, to whom the property belonged, to Bow-street. While we were there, a man, named Barnet, brought a bundle, which the prosecutor paid him 2l. for. I went to him, and asked him if he could bring the remainder of the things? he said they were to be got if he had money to fetch them. I told him I would pay him; he went away, and returned in a few minutes, and said, if I would pay the money that they were sold for, he could get them. I went to a house in Drury-lane with him, and told Wilkinson to follow me privately; when we got near the house I told him to wait outside. Barnet introduced me to the prisoner Farthing; it was at a public-house-he was sitting in the back room there; Barnet said, "This is the gentleman that belongs to the shirts;" Farthing then said, he supposed I did not mean to prosecute Bozier; I had not mentioned Bozier's name, I told him two of the shirts belonged to me, and I did not want to be waiting about any longer; he asked me which two were mine? he did not produce any; I told him they were marked E.S.; he asked if it was my intention to return the money they were sold for? I told him I would; he went out with Barnet, and returned in ten minutes, and told me his wife was out, and he could not get them; I said I would wait, if she would return soon; he said he had got but two of them, but an acquaintance, who was a bricklayer, had got the other two. He then said, "I will depend on your word, and if you will take my word, you shall have them to night; and if the two which I have got are not yours, I will get the other two from the person in the evening." I told him if he could not produce them, I should like to have the worth of them, and gave him the address of the owner, in the Strand. He pulled out two 1l. notes, and asked if that would satisfy me as a deposit, that he would produce the two shirts in the evening? I said it would. Just as I got my fingers on the notes he changed his mind, and said he would put them into the hands of the landlady. As he gave them to her he said, whatever the shirts cost, she was to return him the 2l., and pay him for them, which I agreed to. I went out, and gave him in charge to Wilson.

Cross-examined. He never produced any.

JAMES WILKINSON. I am a toll-collector. I went with Gallery and Barnet to the Black Dog, in Drury-lane, Farthing asked Gallery if he belonged to the shirts; he said he could get the four shirts for him by paying what had been paid for them; Gallery said he would pay him for them if he would get them. Farthing went out with Barnet-he returned in about ten minutes, and said his wife was out, or he would have got two of the shirts, but the other two he could not get before eight o'clock in the evening, as a bricklayer had got them. Gallery wished to wait while he went back again; Farthing said he would leave 2l.; he pulled out two 1l. notes, and was going to give them to Gallery, but drew them back, and said he would give them to the landlady; he said, he expected when he brought the shirts, he should have the money that was paid for them. I went and told Wilson that the man was there who had the shirts; he went and took him.

Cross-examined. I lodge at the Black Bear, and go on messages.

JAMES WILSON . On the 24th of November Rice gave me information. I went to the Black Dog - I went to the corner of the street, and saw Farthing standing against the door. Wilkinson said he was the man who had left the 2l. I went into the house, and asked the landlady for the money; she said she should know the man who had left it-I

brought Farthing in - She said he was the man. I took him to the office. The four shirts were sent home to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOZIER'S Defence. I got drunk, but did not intend to steal the things.

WOODROFF'S Defence. Bozier came to my house, and had a pint of beer - He came again about half-past ten o'clock, quite drunk, with the bundle. I took him up stairs, thinking that the parish-officers might report my house, he being drunk. I took charge of the things the while.

FARTHING'S Defence. Bozier and another man came to a public-house, in Wild-street, where I live, with a basket and bundle, and some women. On the Monday two men came, and asked if I knew the prisoner? I said I did not; but a man had been to the house with a bundle, and went to Drury-lane to fetch the man; I said I would go and send my wife to see for him - I returned, and said she was not at home, but I could find the man at eight o'clock, and get them.

EDMUND WANDSMAN . I was at Woodroff's when Bozier came in very drunk, about half-past ten on Sunday morning - He asked for drink; Woodroff took the basket, as he thought he was not able to take care of it himself.

BOZIER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

WOODROFF - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

FARTHING - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-131

128. GEORGE HENRY and JOHN WALTERS were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , one watch, value 2l., and one key, value 2d., the goods of Michael Lowrie , from his person .

MICHAEL LOWRIE. I am a labourer . On the 2d of November I was going into the Nag's Head, public-house, in Tothill street , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I was going into the back room, and met the two prisoners in the passage; they kept pushing me - I asked them what it was for? - Henry whipped the watch out of my fob- the other prisoner said, "let him go." I did not know them before. I said I would not leave go, as they had my property - I brought them up to the bar, and called the publican - I told him that Henry had robbed me of my property as I was going up the passage-Walters tried to rescue him; I called the publican, and he laid hold of him. There was nobody else in the passage but the two prisoners - I got my watch in about five minutes.

JOHN CLARK. I am a publican. On the 2d of November, about half-past seven o'clock, the prisoners came into my house; the prosecutor came in a few minutes after - He called out that he had lost his property - I seized Henry, and asked him what he had been doing? I saw the watch in his hand - He tried to shuffle it under his clothes - He slipped it behind him. I held him till the officer came-the watch was picked up by another person; he begged of me to let him go; Walters was close to him.

ABRAHAM ROGERS . On the 2d of November I went into the house, and saw Henry, between the passage and the bar-the prosecutor said he was robbed. The landlord seized him - He said he drew the watch out of his pocket - I found it on the ground.

RICHARD COX. I am a constable. I took the prisoner, Henry, into custody-Walters tried to rescue him; he said, "D-n me, you are not going in that way, are you?" Henry tried to get away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY'S Defence. I was going into the house, and saw the prosecutor - he said he was robbed, and seized me.

WALTERS's Defence. I saw Henry taken-next day they took me.

HENRY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

WALTERS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-132

129. JOSEPH HORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , one watch, value 30s.; one chain, value 1s.; one seal, value 1s. 6d.; and one key, value 2d., the goods of David Joseph Morrice , from his person .

DAVID JOSEPH MORRICE . I am a Major-General . On the 2d of December, between six and seven o'clock, I was in the Hackney-road , near Cooper's-gardens; a young man, in a jacket, run against me, and said, "God bless me, is it you?" I immediately felt a hand at my fob-on his leaving me I missed my watch; he ran down Cooper's-gardens - I followed him, crying "Stop thief!" When I came to a turning I lost sight of him for two or three minutes. Armstrong took the prisoner - I will not swear that he is the man; I only lost sight of him while he was turning the corner - I believe him to be the man. My watch was found about half-past nine o'clock.

JOSEPH PERCIVAL . I was standing in an entry down Cooper's-gardens, and heard the prosecutor call out Stop thief; I immediately stepped out, and saw the prisoner running by - I ran after him about twenty yards; when I got up to him I found him in Cole's custody. I am sure that he is the man that I saw running.

WILLIAM COLE. I was standing in my garden, in Cooper's-gardens, and heard the cry-the prisoner was running as fast as he could; when he came up to me I stopped him; the prosecutor was following him; no person had run by before or after the prisoner, until the prosecutor came up.

EDWARD MARSHALL. I was in the garden, and heard the cry - I pursued, the prisoner ran close to me - I and Cole stopped him.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office. After he was committed, I went to Cooper's-gardens, and found the watch close to where he was stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry; I heard somebody say, "Come this way;" I ran to the voice, and they stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-133

130. DAVID HEARN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one pair of breeches, value 10s.; one pair of trowsers, value 3s., and one shirt, value 2s. , the goods of John Nicholl .

AGNES NICHOLL . I am the wife of John Nicholl , who keeps a clothes shop in Rosemary-lane , the prisoner was our shop boy . On the 1st of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, Lewis asked to see my boy; called the prisoner up-Lewis said he had been robbing me, and shewed me the things which, he said, he bought of him.

HOWARD LEWIS . On the 1st of November, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and offered me the breeches for sale, at my shop; he said they belonged to another young man - I told him to send the young man; he went away - I watched him to Mrs. Nicholl's, which made me suspect him; I went there and he claimed them. Willmot found the duplicate of the shirt on him, which she also claimed.

WILLIAM TOMKINS. I am a pawnbroker. This shirt was pledged with me on the 30th of October; the duplicate found on the prisoner is mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-134

131. RALPH KELLY and WILLIAM LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 112 lbs. of lead, value 30s., the goods of George Edward Graham , Esq. , and fixed to certain building of his .

GEORGE EDWARD GRAHAM , ESQ. I have a house in Seymour-place -the lead was ripped from the roof, and taken away.

MATTHEW PERKINS . I am a bricklayer. On the 20th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in Seymour-place; I was informed that thieves were in the house, I ran out, and found the prisoner, Kelly, in the custody of the watchman; I went to the house top, and apprehended the prisoner, Long, coming through the trapdoor, off the roof. He said, "I am one of them, do not hurt me;" the gutters were all ripped up, and part taken away. I found an axe within two yards of the place where I took him. The only way to the roof was getting up the rafters.

JOHN YOUNG. The prisoners were catching birds in Bryanstone-square, I told them to go away-they would not. When I returned from dinner, I went to Seymour-place, and nailed a rail up, about two o'clock the door was broken open, the staple of the lock drawn, and taken away, no person had been in the ground but the prisoners. The same night I was going along Seymour-place, and the watchman took Kelly.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYEALL . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house when Kelly was brought in; he was very much bruised, and covered with blood - I found a knife on him. He said the prisoner, Long, had pushed him off the house. Long said he did not push him, but he fell down with the lead.

JAMES MULLINS . I am a watchman. A little boy told me there was some persons in the house; I found it surrounded by a crowd; I went for my lanthorn, and returned to the house, and found the prisoner, Kelly, quite bloody; he said he came there to ease himself, and somebody had thrown a stone at him, and cut his face. I found the lead cut, in the house-as I returned I found Long was taken; I found an axe there, the head of which was bloody. It is an unfinished house.

THOMAS WHITE . I found a chain, a hook, a pair of snuffers, and a whistle, on Long. I found the lead at the bottom of the house.

DANIEL WILLIAMS. I live in another house, just by; there was somebody taken from another house also.

REBECCA WILLIAMS . I live at No. 66, Seymour-place. I heard a noise on the roof of the house, and three people walking over the roofs. I went into the street, and saw a person look over the parapet wall - I gave the alarm; the watchman took Kelly, his face was cut very much-he must have fallen from the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KELLY - GUILTY Aged 15.

LONG - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-135

132. RICHARD NIBLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one watch, value 1l. 8s.; one gold ring, value 3s.; one seal, value 2s., and one chain, value 3s., the goods of Richard Fish , from his person .

RICHARD FISH. I am a baker , and live in the Old Bailey. I took a bed at the Waterman's Arms-the prisoner slept with me; he got up early in the morning, I asked him why he got up so early, he said he was going out. I got up about seven o'clock, and missed my watch. He was taken the next day.

GEORGE BYERS. I am the landlord of the Waterman's Arms. About half-past five o'clock in the morning of the 21st of November, I was awoke by the prisoner, who could not open the door - I let him out - He said he was going to the Docks. When the prosecutor got up he missed his watch. He was taken on the 22d, and the watch found upon him.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and found the watch upon him. He said it was the baker's, and he had sold the seal for 7s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to America; when I got to my ship I found I had taken his watch instead of my own; I was returning to the house with it when I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-136

133. EDWARD LEE and CHARLES STANLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Barnard Wheeler , from his person .

WILLIAM BARNARD WHEELER . I am a warehouseman . On the 11th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the Strand , near the Adelphi, with a gentleman, Thompson, the officer, called to me to stop. I found the prisoners in his custody, and my handkerchief.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I was in the Strand, about seven o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoners attempt the pockets of several persons. The

prosecutor, and his friend, came by, I saw Lee take particular notice of him - He followed them, and with the back of his hand felt his pockets - He immediately returned to Stanley, and said, "Come on." After attempting three or four times to get the handkerchief, I saw him take it out-Stanley was covering him - I seized them both. The handkerchief laid on the ground-the prosecutor claimed it immediately.

JAMES FISHER. I was with Thompson. I saw the prisoners attempt several pockets.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEE'S Defence. I stopped to hear a song, and they took me; I never touched the handkerchief.

STANLEY'S Defence. I stopped to hear the song, and they took me.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

STANLEY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-137

134. THOMAS SHEARS and JOHN ANDERSON were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , two sacks, value 1s., and three bushels of oats, value 14s. , the goods of Samuel Hutchins .

SAMUEL HUTCHINS . I am a farmer , and live at Kensington , the prisoners were my servants - I suspected them, and got the officers to watch them. They had no business in the granary. I believe they took the oats to feed my horses with.

JOHN WILKINS. I am a patrol. I was watching the prisoners; about three o'clock in the morning I saw them go to the granary and take the oats-each took a sack. They said they were going to feed the horses with them.

JOHN CULVER . I was with Wilkins, and detected the prisoners.

MICHAEL KELLICK. I am the prosecutor's stable-boy. One of the prisoners got me to lend him the key, and said he was to take it to the bailiff - I gave it to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-138

135. WILLIAM GRIFFITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one lock, value 3s., and one key, value 2d. , the goods of James Callow .

JAMES CALLOW. I am a broker . On the 7th of November I went out; as I returned home I saw the prisoner come out of my shop with the lock, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-139

136. HARRIET PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one watch, value 20l.; one chain, value 8l.; two seals, value 2l.,; one key, value 3s.; and one reading-glass, value 5s.; the goods of Jeremiah Macdonald from his person ; and LEONARD PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously receiving the said watch-chain, value 8l., part and parcel of the said goods, he well knowing it to have been stolen; and JOHN BLAKE for feloniously receiving one seal, value 1l., other part and parcel of the said goods, he well knowing it to have been stolen .

JEREMIAH MACDONALD . I am an insurance-broker , and live on Windsor-terrace, City-road. On the 20th of November I had been to the Guildhall Coffee-house: I left it about twelve o'clock - I was much the worse for liquor. After I had passed Finsbury-square , a woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner, Harriet Phillips, came up to me laid hold of my arm, and wanted me to go home with her - She remained about eight minutes with me. I had a gold watch, worth 20l., two seals, worth 4l., and a reading-glass. As soon as I got home I missed them. The ring of the chain had been fastened to the button of my waistcoat. I found the button undone-it must have been taken with great violence. I saw the watch again on the Tuesday after in possession of Creswell, the officer. I saw a man, whom I believe to be Leonard Phillips, near the prisoner, Harriet Phillips; immediately as she left me she went to him.

RICHARD HORPWOOD. I am a watch-maker, and live in Worship-street. The prisoner, Harriet Phillips , came to my shop on the 20th of November, at ten o'clock in the morning, and asked for a watch-glass, and produced a gold watch - She asked the value of it? I told her I could not tell the value without weighing the case. I suspected it had been improperly come by-it was worth 12l. or 15l. I made an excuse that I did not know the value of it, and would go to a neighbour's. She waited in the shop. I got an officer - I detained her till he came, and secured her. I asked how she got it? she said it was in pledge for 1l., and she took it out of pledge, in Barbican, that morning, for a girl of the town.

LEONARD MATHEWS. My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Whitecross-street. I have a gold seal, which I took in pledge of the prisoner, Harriet Phillips, on Thursday, the 20th of November, a little before nine o'clock in the morning - I am sure she is the woman. I advanced 7s. on it. On that day week the prosecutor saw it and claimed it.

JOHN WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Mathews. I took the glass in pledge on the 20th of November, for 2s., of Harriet Phillips .

JOHN ASTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 20th of November, at nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, Harriet Phillips , pledged a watch-chain with me - She was ten or twelve minutes in my shop - She said she would redeem it in half an hour. On the same day I heard it had been stolen; the prosecutor claimed it. I advanced 1l. 10s. on it.

JOHN CRESSWELL . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 20th of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was going down Worship-street, Mance met me, and asked me to go with him. We went to Horpwood's shop-door, and saw the two male prisoners standing by the shop, about thirty or forty yards off. I told Mance to go into the shop, and take Harriet Phillips. I went up, and asked Leonard Phillips what he was standing there for? he said he was waiting for the young man, pointing to Blake. I asked him if he was not waiting for a young woman? he said, Yes. I took them both to Horpwood's shop, and asked the woman if she knew them? she said she did very well, for one was her husband, and

the other was her son. I asked her how she came by the gold watch? she said, she had bought it that morning, for 1l., of a woman of the town, and borrowed part of the money to pay for it. Mary Ingram was produced to her - She denied it, and the prisoner said that was not the woman that she meant. I took them all into custody. I saw Mance find a pocket-book on Leonard Phillips.

THOMAS MANCE . I am an officer. I saw the male prisoners about thirty yards from the shop. I apprehended the woman in the shop, and asked her where she got the watch? she said she bought the duplicate of a woman, of the name of Ingram, in Chequer-alley, for 1l., and that the watch was in pledge for 1l., at Burrows's, the pawnbroker, in Barbican - I went there. Ingram was produced, and denied receiving it - She said, she was not the woman. I could find no other woman of that name. I found a 1l. note on Leonard Phillips , also a gold seal on Blake, and several duplicates, one was for a seal, pledged with Mathews that day, in the name of Mary Brown-another for a gold chain, pledged that day in Whitecross-street, in the name of Harriet Brown -one for a glass, pledged with Mathews for 2s., in the name of Mary Brown . The prosecutor claimed the seal which was found on Blake. I found part of a gold key, with the pipe, on the female prisoner-the pipe fits the remaining part of the key which was with the chain.

LEONARD MATHEWS . The duplicate of the seal is that which I gave her.

JOHN WALKER . The duplicate of the glass is the one I gave her.

JOHN ASTON . The duplicate of the watch-chain is the one I gave her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARRIET PHILLIPS 'S Defence. A woman, who said her name was Ingram, came to my bed-room, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, and said she had a watch in pledge, and sold me the duplicate - I gave her 1l. 8s.; she went and got it out. She sent me to pledge a seal for her. I went in to get a glass for the watch-when I came out I could not find her.

LEONARD PHILLIPS 'S Defence. The woman said she bought it, and I went with her.

BLAKE'S Defence. I met my mother, and went with her to pledge it.

HARRIET PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Life .

LEONARD PHILLIPS - NOT GUILTY .

JOHN BLAKE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-140

137. THOMAS RUSTIN and JAMES PERKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , two boots, value 30s. , the goods of Joseph William Snell .

JOSEPH WILLIAM SNELL . I am a shoemaker , and live in the Commercial-road . On the 1st of December the boots hung at my door, inside my shop. I missed them at half-past seven-the prisoners were taken at eight.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman, and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. On the 1st of December, about eight o'clock, the prisoners came into my shop, and offered the boots for sale. I said I must go to the next door, and would return directly. I fetched an officer, and when he came they were gone, and left the boots behind.

RICHARD MELISH. I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoners at half-past eight that night, about two hundred yards from Mr. Snell's shop. A young man said he had seen them lurking about the shop-they laughed at him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RUSTIN'S Defence. I bought them of a young man.

RUSTIN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

PERKINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-141

138. THOMAS REDFORD , WILLIAM HOLT , and THOMAS WILKS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one dial, value 4s , the goods of David Green Campbell Majoribanks and David Connolly .

The offence having been committed in the City of London, the parties were bound over to prefer a bill against the prisoners next Sessions, and on this indictment they were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-142

139. PETER FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am a constable. On the 14th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in Long-acre -two gentlemen were coming from Queen-street, and a boy behind them, whom I suspected. He beckoned to the prisoner - They had some conversation together for a minute - They ran after the two gentlemen, whom I did not know. The boy (who has escaped) drew the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and gave it to the prisoner, who was covering him. He crossed over to the other, and turned towards Covent-garden. I watched to see if they would come back together, which they did, and went towards Drury-lane. I could not go after the gentleman - They laughed together. I saw the prisoner shove something down his coat sleeve; I laid hold of both of them, the other made his escape. I held the prisoner - I was not able to call the gentleman. I took the handkerchief out of the prisoner's coat sleeve.

JOHN FORBES . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner, and a boy, run down Long-acre. Thompson called me. One got away - I pursued, but lost him.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a troublesome business-let the Jury settle it among themselves.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-143

140. MICHAEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , one handkerchief, value 2s., and 14s. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of Charles Sullivan , from his person .

CHARLES SULLIVAN . I am a labourer , and live in Southampton-court, Strand. On the 1st of December, about two o'clock in the morning, I was going to see a friend home; as I returned, I went to a house in George-street, St. Giles's , with a woman. In the morning I

missed my handkerchief and money. The lock of the door was picked.

SUSAN TOWNSEND. The prosecutor went to my room with me. I heard a person in the room, and asked who it was? a woman's voice said, "Jane." I followed the person down stairs, it was the prisoner. I called the landlord, who took him in about half an hour.

TIMOTHY CORBETT. I lodge in the house. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner getting over the wall. The watchman came up with him, and found the handkerchief on him.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner in Hampshire Hog-yard, and the handkerchief and money on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-144

141. CHARLES BILLING was indicted for that he, on the 2d of December , 70lbs. of lead, value 20s., belonging to William Wilson , and fixed to a certain building of his, feloniously did rip, with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT. For stealing, on the same day, 70lbs. of lead, value 20s., belonging to the said William Wilson , and fixed to a certain building of his.

WILLIAM WILSON . I live in Millman-street, Bedford-row. I was building a house in Spafields . On the 2d of December, at eleven o'clock in the morning, the lead was safe on the roof; the next morning I was sent for, and found it ripped up, doubled down, and several slates broken-it was all in one piece, ready to be carried away. There were sixty-seven pounds of it.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a carpenter. I was passing the house, about half-past five o'clock in the evening of the 2d of December, and heard a noise on the roof. I went into the next house, and heard some person pulling the slates off. I got a light, went on the roof, and found the lead ripped off the gutter, and the slates off the roof-the trap-door of the house was open. I went down the other house-when I got down, I found the door of Wilson's house locked. I broke it open, and found the prisoner in the corner of the room on the ground-floor, and sent Cox, who was with me, to take him. There was no other person there.

JOHN COX . I was with Taylor-he was spoken correctly. I took the prisoner in the house, and saw the lead rolled up in the gutter.

EDWARD KING . I am a plasterer. I saw Taylor on the roof, and the prisoner secured. I found a chissel in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-145

142. WILLIAM CARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 200lbs. of lead, value 1l. 5s., belonging to our Lord the King , and fixed to a certain building of his .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of the Right Honourable William Huskisson , William Dacres Adams , Esq ., and Henry Dawkins , Esq. , the Commissioners of his Majesty's Woods, Forests, and Land Revenue , and fixed to their dwelling-house.

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Thomas Sneezum , and fixed to his dwelling-house.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a certain building instead of a dwelling-house.

THOMAS SNEEZUM. I had a house, No. 17, Market-street - I gave up the possession of it to the Commissioners last Thursday.

WILLIAM HARTLAND. I am a private watchman. On the 23rd of November I was in St. James's-market, about half-past six in the morning; I saw the prisoner come out of No. 19, which was uninhabited, with some lead on his shoulder-it was not Sneezum's house; I could not follow him. In about five minutes he returned, and went into the same house; he staid there two or three minutes, and then came out with another load of lead on his shoulder; I seized him, and made him put it down in the passage of No. 19. As I took him to the watch-house he tried to get my stick from me, but could not; he pulled something out of his pocket, and cut me on the head, which bled a great deal; he got from me, I never lost sight of him; Hawskby took him again. I went to the house where the lead was put, and was present when it was compared with the roof of No. 17-it fitted it.

JAMES SMITHERS. I am a watchman of St. James's parish. I was coming off my beat, a little before seven o'clock on the morning of November 30th, saw the prisoner at the top of Eagle-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief; Hartland was pursuing him-Hawksby laid hold of him-they came to the ground together - He knocked Hawksby down; I went up, and took him; Hartland was about twelve yards from him-his temples bled very much; the blood ran down his cheeks.

FRANCIS HAWKSBY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner running in the middle of the road, and Hartland pursuing him - I stopped him, we both came to the ground together; I held him till Suthe came up. I found a knife on him.

THOMAS SUTHE. I am a patrol. I heard the rattle sprung; the prisoner was taken - I found a knife on him; Hartland was very much cut; I found another piece of lead on the roof of No. 17, from which the lead was cut.

JOHN JENNINGS. I am clerk of the works. I compared the lead-it was taken from the roof of No. 17, and was worth 1l. 15s.; it weighed 202lbs.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not leave my home till half-past six o'clock.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-146

143. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , fifty pieces of silk gauze, value 50l., and

twelve handkerchiefs, value 1l. , the goods of James Deboos , John Deboos , and George Deboos ; and WILLIAM SHERWIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods on the same day, he well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

SAMUEL JARVIS . I am servant to Messrs. James, John, and George Deboos, who are silk-dyers , and live in Vinecourt, Spitalfields. On the 6th of November I went to Messrs. Fulten and Co's., in Watling-street, and received fifty pieces of silk gauze, and two pieces of silk handkerchiefs, which I put into a white bag, and took them to the Fountain and Star, public-house, Castle-court, Lawrence-lane, Cheapside, which is a house of call for dyers, and there put them into a cart; and when I got to Fort-street, Artillery-ground, I found they were gone; they were placed near the bottom of the cart - They could not have jostled out.

Cross-examined. I got home a little after five o'clock; I did not stop after I left Lawrence-lane-it must have happened between five and half-past five o'clock; it was the evening that the Princess Charlotte died. I rode in the cart-the tail-board was fast.

WILLIAM BROOMHAM . I am servant to Messrs. Deboos. I was at the house of call in Castle-court, with Jarvis - I put the goods in the cart - They were in a white bag - I walked home. Between five and six o'clock I saw Jarvis, in Fort-street, the bag was then gone; another bag was cut by somebody.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. It was ten minutes after five o'clock, on the 6th of November-it must have been lost between five and six o'clock; the cart got to Fort-street before me.

MR. GEORGE DEBOOS. I am in partnership with James and John Deboos , as we are silk-dyers. On the 6th of November, fifty pieces of gauze and two pieces of handkerchief were coming to our house. I endeavoured to trace the property. On the 24th of November I received information, and went to Mrs. Phelps, a silk-dresser, in Osborne-street - she finishes silk after it is dyed. I saw four or five pieces of gauze, and two pieces of handkerchief, which I had reason to believe were part of the goods sent to me by Messrs. Fulton - I expected to receive fifty pieces of gauze, and two pieces of handkerchiefs, from Fulton's - I went to Messrs. Fulton on the day of the robbery, and he gave me ten pieces of the same sort - I compared them - I Judge them to be of the same manufacture; I took Mr. Fulton to see them. On the 25th of November I made enquiry, which led me to the prisoner, Sherwin's, house; I saw him, and told him I had come to make inquiry respecting some gauze which he had dyed, and sent to Mrs. Phillips - He is a dyer; I asked him if he knew of whom he had them? he said he had them from a stranger, whom he did not know; he delivered me an invoice which he had received of the man; I asked him what day it was delivered to him? he said he believed about the 12th of November; the invoice corresponds with the number lost-there is only a quarter of a yard difference in measure.

Q. Is the invoice in a business-like form - A. Certainly not; it ought to have the name to it. It only says-(reads)"50 pieces, 534 yards, 2 pieces of handkerchiefs, 24 yards." In the course of the transaction, I observed thirty pieces of gauze and two pieces of handkerchief at Phillips's, being a deficiency of twenty pieces of gauze. Sherwin having given me this account on that night, the 25th of November, his wife observed, in his presence, that she wished we had been there half an hour sooner, for that the person who brought the goods had been there, and that she expected to see him again about eleven o'clock next morning. My brother, and Armstrong, the officer, accompanied me. I desired Sherwin, that if the person came next morning, to detain him, and send for me; I did not say I should be there. I left that night, and next morning Armstrong, and myself, went there, a little after eleven o'clock, and asked Sherwin's permission to wait there; we staid till after four o'clock, and no person came; about four o'clock he received a two-penny post letter. After reading it, he handed it to me-(reads)-"Mr. Sherwin-In consequence of the hurry of business, I am under the necessity of immediately leaving town for Coventry, and will be obliged to you to get the remainder of the gauzes done, and sent to me, directed to X.Y.Z., to be left at the Craven Arms, Coventry." He having shewn me the letter, I consulted Armstrong, and desired Sherwin to write an answer; he declined answering it himself; an answer was wrote by another person, and read to him; he went for a friend of his to write it-the purport of it was, that he would not deliver the goods for any person but the one they had come from, and that, on the delivery, he expected the money to be paid; it was signed with Sherwin's name, and directed to X.Y.Z., Craven Arms, Coventry. I told Sherwin if he heard from him to let me know.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. He said he believed he received them on the 12th. He was a silk-dyer.

Q. Is it not common for one dyer to send things to another when there is a particular hurry - A. Yes.

Q. You yourself said you would have taken the goods coming in the same way - A. No - We always have names delivered with the invoices.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I saw them at Mrs. Phillips's, and believe them to be the same.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Is it in the course of business to take fifty pieces at a time without having the customer's name - A. Certainly not; the bill which should have come to me with the goods was signed Fulton and Co.

Court. Q.Sherwin declined answering the letter - A. Yes; and gave as a reason, that the person whom he sent for was in the habit of doing his writing.

HENRY FULTON , ESQ. I live in Watling-street, and am a wholesale dealer in gauzes and muslins. On the 6th of November a quantity of articles were sent from my house to Messrs. Deboos; a bill was sent with them, with our names to it, dated November 6th. I went with Mr. Deboos to Phillips's house, on the 24th or 25th of November, and saw thirty pieces of black-striped gauze and two pieces of handkerchiefs - They had been dyed after they left my house. I have not a doubt of their being my property, and part of the goods I sent to Messrs. Deboos.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. I had not sent any goods elsewhere-Sherwin was a stranger to me.

JOHN ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. I have the thirty pieces of gauze and two pieces of handkerchiefs, which were delivered to me at the office by Mr. Robinson. I was at Sherwin's with Mr. Deboos, on the 24th or 25th of November.

WILLIAM ROBINSON. I am servant to Harriet Phelps, who is a silk-dyer, and live in Ormond-place, Whitechapel. I gave Armstrong the gauze on the 2d of December - They were brought to me by the prisoner, Sherwin's, wife; sixteen pieces of the gauze were brought on or about the 17th of November. When I fetched them down to dress, I suspected they might be part of the silk Mr. Deboos had lost; I immediately gave him notice of it; he came, and saw them; I had only sixteen pieces of gauze and two pieces of handkerchiefs. We settled that if any more came I should let him know. Next day, about five o'clock, Sherwin's wife brought the remainder, making in all thirty pieces. I informed Mr. Deboos; he, and Mr. Fulton, came and examined them; before that, I had received ten pieces from Mrs. Sherwin, of the same kind exactly, which were returned on the 21st of November, and would make forty pieces of gauze and two pieces of handkerchiefs. I returned them as I dressed them; his wife brought them, and paid for them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. FULTON re-examined. The dyer does not get the goods dressed - We send them to be dressed ourselves.

MR. DEBOOS re-examined. It is not customary for the dyer to get them dressed; I never knew an instance of the kind, not even in goods that are sent from the country.

FRANCES PAYTON , JUN. I was in the service of the prisoner Brown, who is a silk-weaver; my mother lives in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields; I live in Brown's house, No. 6, George-street, Bethnal-green. On the 26th of November last he gave me a bag, which he said contained worsted, to take to my mother; I took it, and left it by her bedside; I did not know what was in it. I left it there; my mother was in the room at the time. He told me to leave it there, and call for it by-and-by.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I have lived one year with him. I used frequently to carry things to the dyers. My mother was taken up after I took the bag there; I saw her before she was taken up, at my brother's, in Air-street, but I did not tell her I had put it there. I told her I was going to take some worsted to the dyer's and would leave it there, and call for it by-and-by.

Q. On your oath, did you say one word before the magistrate about the bag containing worsted; did you not say your master told you to take it to the dyer's, without saying what it contained - A. I do not recollect it; I swear that he said it was worsted - He never mentioned any dyer.

Q. Then what did you mean by telling the magistrate that you meant to take it to Walker's, as you knew he was your master's dyer - A. I know I said so, but my master said nothing of the kind.

Q. Did you not tell your mother you would get her out of the mess, and get Brown in - A. No. I am positive he said the bag contained worsted.

Court. Q.You lived with Brown until the 26th of November - A. Yes; he went out of town for a week to see his brother, about three-months before this. If he had gone to Coventry I must have known it.

FRANCES PAYTON, SEN. I am the mother of the last witness - I am a widow; she lived servant with the prisoner Brown. On the Wednesday before the Friday that I was taken up, about twelve o'clock, she came to my room with a bag-about half-past nine o'clock at night, I found it by my bedside; my other daughter came in, I shewed her the bag; she brought Mrs. Gable into the room - We opened it; it contained twenty pieces of black and striped gauze. Next morning the prisoner, Brown, called at my house about nine o'clock, and asked if Fanny had brought any thing to our house. I told him she had not, but I had found a bag behind my bed. Mrs. Gable came out, and said there were gauzes in the bag. Brown said she seemed to know more about it than he did, for he had it as worsted. Nothing more passed. I had orders from a man whom I had seen at Brown's more than once, to take it from my room. I had orders from Brown himself to take the bag from my house to Bishopsgate-street; I did so about half-past twelve o'clock on Thursday, the day after they were left. I met Brown in the street, and gave him the bag. I was apprehended for stealing them and discharged, and told all I knew about it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you tell the magistrate one word about meeting Brown in Bishopsgate-street - A. Yes; and that he took the bag from me; my daughter told me she was going to Walker's, the dyer, with the worsted, and that her master ordered her. I did not find the bag until I went to bed at night.

Q. Did you not tell the magistrate another person came for the bag, and not Brown - A. I was so alarmed that I hardly knew what I said; I am sure he took it from me in Bishopsgate-street.

ANN GABLE . I live in the same house with Payton. I was called into her room on the Wednesday night, by Charlotte Payton , between ten and eleven o'clock, and was shown the bag, which contained twenty pieces of striped silk gauze. I was in the room next morning, and saw Brown come in about half-past nine o'clock - I knew him before; he asked for the bag of worsted which Fanny had left. She said, she did not know that Fanny had left any bag, but there was a bag, and she did not know to whom it belonged-Brown had got the bag on a chair when I went in. I told him, if it was worsted there was no such thing there, and he had no right to take it away without an officer. He said, I seemed to know more about what was in the bag than he did, and he would go and fetch the man who gave it to him. He left it there.

Court. Q. Before he left, did you tell him what you thought about it - A. Yes, I told him I thought they were stolen goods. He said, he would find the man who gave it to him. He asked Payton who else had seen the bag? she said the neighbours in the next room had. I said my husband and son had seen it. He asked how old my son was? I told him he was twenty-six years old. The same day I saw Mrs. Payton take the bag away.

CHARLOTTE PAYTON . I am the daughter of Frances Payton . I went home to my mother's about ten o'clock, and saw the bag in the room. I called Mrs. Gable, and we opened it-it contained twenty pieces of striped silk black gauze-it was put by the bedside.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. It could not be seen without going round the bed.

JOSEPH PAYTON . I am the son of Mrs. Payton, am a silk-weaver, and live in Air-street. I heard my mother was taken up, and went to Brown about it. I told him my mother was in custody about the bag; he said he would endeavour to get her out of the embarrassment next morn

ing - He did not ask me what bag it was. I went to him in consequence of what I had heard from my sister. I called on him about nine o'clock next morning, to meet him by appointment, but he was not there. I did not see him again till he was in custody.

JOHN BAGG . I am a silk-dresser, and live in Flying Horse-yard, Brick-lane. On a Friday in November, the prisoner, Sherwin's, wife brought me a piece of silk striped gauze to dress, of the same pattern as those produced; she then brought me thirteen pieces of gauze and two pieces of handkerchiefs. I was not able to dress them; she had them away undressed. Those produced are the same. I dressed ten pieces for her, and gave her ten back undressed.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I have dressed garments for her before. I tacked them down with whiteybrown thread.

ANN GABLE. One of the pieces in the bag was tacked with whitey-brown thread.

REBECCA DOWNS . I am a weaver. I rented a first-floor in the prisoner, Brown's, house - He has written me receipts for my rent - I know his hand-writing (looks at the letter sent to Sherwin). I verily believe it to be his handwriting.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I have seen him write twice. I should think it his writing, without comparing it with my papers.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. If you had not compared it, could you have sworn it to be his writing - A. No.

CHARLES BUSHER. I am a dyer, and live in Stephen-street, Mile-end. The prisoner, Brown, sends me silks to dye-the goods are accompanied with an invoice signed with his name. I believe the letter to be his hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I believe it to be his hand-writing. He has brought invoices to me.

BROWN's Defence. The singularity of the day on which I am charged with this robbery, leaves every circumstance fresh in my recollection. On that day, Mr. T. Picard came to my house, about twelve o'clock, and told me of the death of the Princess, and said it would be prudent in me to go and buy black goods of persons who were not aware of it. I went to Mr. Bunner's for Bombazeen, he referred me to another person - He had sold his. I went home, and told my wife what had happened, collected all my own goods, and sent them to Coster's, in Lad-lane. I then went to Cateaton-street for some silk; from thence to Messrs. Everett's bank to receive a cheque-from thence to Mr. Hall's, in Brown's-lane, and bought some silk. I then went to Mr. T. Picard's, in Wells-street, he had called on me before - He invited me to tea with him at four o'clock (it is stated that the robbery was committed at five, or half-past five). To prove I was not there, I call Mr. T. Picard and others. After remaining there till about seven o'clock I went home.

THOMAS PICARD . I am a weaver, and live in Wells-street, Spitalfields. The prisoner, Brown, is my brother-in-law. On the 6th of November, when the Princess Charlotte died, at twelve o'clock that day I saw him at his house in George-street, Bethnal-green, which is three or four minutes' walk from my house. George-street is about ten minutes' walk from Fort-street; if a person walks fast they may go there in less than ten minutes. I saw him again about a quarter after four o'clock, he came to my house alone, and waited there till a quarter before six; he was in my house all the while - He was never out of my sight long enough to go to Fort-street and back again.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. He came about a quarter after four o'clock - I looked at the clock soon after he went away, it was six by my clock. George Picard , Mr. Butfoy, and Mrs. Lamthois were there.

Court. Q. How far is Fort-street from your house - A. About five minutes' walk. My clock is in the work-shop. I was not particularly busy that day. I was not examined at the office. I had no particular reason for remembering that I looked at the clock - I never told any person so.

GEORGE PICARD . I live with Thomas Picard. The prisoner, Brown, came there about four o'clock, or a quarter after, on the day that the Princess died, and staid till about five minutes after six. I do not think he was out of the house between those times. The first time that I knew it would be of consequence to know the time was the Monday after he was taken up.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. The house is about five minutes' walk from Fort-street. There were only my uncle, the apprentice, and myself at tea-Brown drank tea with us. After tea I went to Mrs. Lamthois's room. Brown gave me some silk to look at. I have never heard the time that the robbery was committed.

Q. Up to this moment, you never heard the time - A. I have heard it was between five and six o'clock; but there were so many stories about it, I paid no attention to them. I heard of it the day he was apprehended.

Court. Q. How long after this day did you hear of his being taken - A. I do not know - I should think it more than a fortnight.

Prisoner BROWN. Q. Do you remember that there was a newspaper on the table at tea, and you read it - A. Yes, I believe it was the Daily Advertiser-it was the morning paper of the day before.

ABIAH BUTFOY. I am a gold and silver lace weaver, and live in Mr. Picard's house. I was at work in my room on the 6th of November, the prisoner, Brown, came there, the first time, about twelve o'clock; he went away, and came again at four o'clock, and staid there about an hour and a half. I saw him talking in Mrs. Lamthois's room - I do not know when he left the house.

Cross-examined. I am sure I saw him there at twelve o'clock that day, at Mr. Picard's house. He could not have been anywhere else at twelve o'clock. I think that he left it about half-past five. When he came at twelve o'clock, he was talking with Thomas Picard about the death of the Princess. Brown was taken up four or five days after.

ELIZA LAMTHOIS. I have an apartment in Thomas Picard's house. The prisoner, Brown, married my sister, and was in the habit of frequently coming to the house. On the 6th of November he was there about four o'clock - He had been there about two o'clock before. Picard went out about twelve o'clock, saying he was going to Brown's. The prisoner, Brown, first came at two o'clock; Butfoy was at home. Thomas Picard was out at twelve o'clock-the prisoner, Brown, went away and returned about four. I had heard of the death of the Princess when he came at two o'clock. He drank tea with my brother - He went away a little be

fore six o'clock - He came down, talked to me, and left my room about six. His wife desired me to come to her last Saturday. I perfectly recollect the time of his being at my room.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. I believe he was in the house at one o'clock, went away, and came again at two o'clock - He went away again, and returned at four.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

SHERWIN - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-147

144. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , one saw, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of James Bartley .

JAMES BARTLEY . I am a carpenter . On the 8th of April I met the prisoner at the corner of Queen-street ; he asked me if I knew any person who would go to work at Barnet for 30s. per week - I agreed to go. He said, I had better give him my tools to book at the office, which I did, and lent him 1s. 6d. - he did not return. I found my saw in pledge for 3s. I met him in Fleet-market and secured him. Three or four persons tried to rescue him. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM BARTLEY. The prisoner came to our house, and asked me for my father's saw, I gave it to him. He told me to follow him. I followed him to the pawnbroker's, in Stanhope-street. When he came out, he threw the duplicate at me and ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-148

145. WILLIAM UNDERWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Grabham , from his person .

WILLIAM GRABHAM. On the 19th of November, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was opposite the Treasury, and stopped to look at a sailor. I felt a jerk at my pocket, turned round, and missed my handkerchief-the prisoner had been just by me. I followed, overtook him in the Treasury passage, and charged him with it. Limbrick came up, and found the handkerchief in the flap of his breeches.

THOMAS LIMBRICK. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the handkerchief in the flap of his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-149

146. GEORGE PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , one watch, value 20s. , the goods of Ann Townsend .

ANN TOWNSEND . I live in White's-yard, Whitecross-street . On the 24th of November, between two and three o'clock, I missed my watch from my room; the prisoner went out that day, and never returned. He lodged in the house.

THOMAS VANN. I took the prisoner into custody on the 25th of November. He said he sold the watch to a Jew.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-150

147. THOMAS MILDROM was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one coat, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS LEWIS. I am a waggoner , and was in the Whitechapel-road with my waggon, about eleven o'clock, buying some meat - I missed my coat.

JAMES HAWKINS . I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the waggon, which stopped opposite Gulston-street, Whitechapel; he ran down Gulston-street, I pursued him-he stopped to put it into a bag; I asked him what he was going to do with it? he said he was going to sell it to his old master - I asked him where he got it? he said he bought it of a farmer. I took him into custody-the prosecutor claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said I would return it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-151

148. EDWARD DANIEL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , one great coat, value 1l. , the goods of John Campbell .

THOMAS WOOD . I am coachman to Mr. John Campbell. On the 15th of November, between six and nine o'clock, I missed the coat out of the coach-house, in Whetston's park -the door was open part of the time.

DAVID DAVIS . I am a salesman, and live in West-street, Smithfield. On the 17th of November the prisoner offered the coat for sale at my shop - I gave him in charge.

WILLIAM BLACKBIN. I took the prisoner into custody. He said he stole it from Red Lion-square, where Mr. Campbell lives.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-152

149. WILLIAM RYAN and JOHN SERVETT were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Want , from his person .

THOMAS WANT. I live in Newgate-street. On the 3rd of December I was in Goswell-street , between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, with Mr. Cosbald; just at the corner of Compton-street, a young man said, "Mr. Cosbald, your friend has lost his handkerchief, and the person who took it has run down Compton-street." I ran down, and took the prisoner, Ryan, who was running; he said it was the first time he had ever done such a thing, and begged of me to let him go. Mr. Cosbald took Servett, and found the handkerchief in his breast.

CHARLES COSBALD. I was walking with Mr. Want-at the corner of Compton-street, Neale informed me that Mr. Want had lost his handkerchief, and pointed the prisoners out, who were running down Compton-street. Mr. Want took Ryan, and I took Servett, and found the handkerchief in his bosom; he said he found it. As we went to the office, he said he never would be guilty of it again.

SAMUEL NEALE . I was coming down Goswell-street, and saw the two prisoners behind Mr. Cosbald and Mr. Want. Ryan took the handkerchief out - I ran over and told them. I am sure the prisoners are the men - They ran away.

The prisoner begged for mercy.

RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

SERVETT - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-153

150. ABRAHAM COX was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 18lbs. of hay, value 18d. , the goods of John Ambler .

FREDERICK PROPSTRING . I am a patrol. In November I was sent to watch Mr. Ambler's hay. On the 25th, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, who keeps a horse and cart, with his son, about the hay-rick, in Pimlico-fields ; he was searching round the rick, as if to see if anybody was there; he took some hay, and gave it to his son; he then took another bag himself, put it under his arm, and went away. I followed him to his lodgings. When the boy was opening the door, I seized the prisoner, and told him he must go with me; he said I could not take him for a little hay - I told him I had been looking for him several nights.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am a gardener. I was watching the hay; on the 19th of November the prisoner came to it - He heard me, and ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to find my horse, and took the hay to coax it. GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-154

151. MARY CRUMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one table-spoon, value 10s., and one table-cloth, value 8s. , the goods of Roger Holman .

ANN HOLMAN . I am the wife of Roger Holman , who is a tailor . On the 27th of May the prisoner was washing for me; I went out, and when I returned, I missed her, and the spoon and cloth. On the 6th of November Limbrick brought her to me; she said she sold them to a jew for 3s.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . I took the prisoner - She said she sold the spoon and table-cloth to a Jew for 15s.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-155

152. GEORGE BEARD BOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one tin kettle, value 4s. , the goods of William Savage .

WILLIAM SAVAGE. I am a tinman , and live in Holles-street, Clare-market .

GEORGE RUSSELL. I live opposite Savage. On the 12th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner open the prosecutor's door, and go away with a woman; he returned again, went in, and brought the kettle out - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-156

153. BENJAMIN WILLARD , alias NATHAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , three beds, value 4l.; four bolsters, value 1l.; one copper, value 1l; three pillows, value 15s.; three blankets, value 15s.; one cann, value 2s.; one funnel, value 1s.; four bottles, value 1s.; three quarts of ale, value 1s., and one cask, value 2s. , the goods of John Martin .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of Thomas Wildman Goodwyn , George Mathews Hoare , William Evenest , and James Woodbridge .

JOHN MARTIN. I live in Welclose-square. I formerly kept the Crown and Thistle, public-house, Manor-row, Tower-hill . On the 11th of October, I moved from there and left the several things in the house, which I saw safe on the 1st of November. On the 4th of November, I had information, went there, and found the articles stated in the indictment gone. I went into the yard, and traced the copper, by the soot, over into the prisoner's yard, which is next door. They had entered by the back of the house-the goods were taken from the back-door-the soot had fallen from the copper. I got a warrant, and went to the prisoner's house, about four o'clock, and found all the things there. The copper, funnel, and cask, were in the chimney-place of his medicine shop, and covered with a board; the rest of the things were in his cellar.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The prisoner was not present when I searched.

EBENEZER DALTON. I am an officer. I went with Martin, he has spoken correctly. The cellar-door was shut, and a chair put against it.

GEORGE CAIMES. I live next door to the prisoner; there is only a wooden partition, half an inch thick, between our two houses-there are holes in the partition which enable me to see through. On the 3d of November, about a quarter after nine o'clock at night, I heard a bustle in the prisoner's house; I looked through a hole, and saw something very large and black brought in in a hurry, and put in the chimney-place in the shop. I heard the prisoner call out to shut up the shop, which was done in a great hurry. About ten o'clock I had occasion to go to the door; a man went and tapped at the door, the prisoner and his wife came and asked who was there; the prisoner said he must go and get a pint of beer, and come in presently; the man said he had no money; the door opened, and, I believe, somebody gave him some - He went away, and did not return until ten o'clock. I was disturbed again about four o'clock in the morning-the noise appeared to be at the back of the house.

Cross-examined. No person lived there but the prisoner and his wife - He generally shut up about twelve o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Is it possible I could get over, and break the door open?

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-157

154. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , five ounces of black silk, value 1s.; four ounces of bobbin, value 4d.; and one hat, value 8s. , the goods of William Thomas Rork .

WILLIAM THOMAS RORK. I am a weaver , and live in Payne's-gardens, Hackney-road -the prisoner was my journeyman . On the 26th of November he went down stairs, pretending to go to the yard, and never returned. I missed the things.

MARY RORK . I am the wife of the last witness. About half-past six o'clock the prisoner came down stairs, and went into the yard; he went through the room where the things were-he did not return - He must have got over the wall. I went out to seek him, about half-past nine, at the Two Brewers, public-house; he said he knew nothing of them. Nobody but himself could have been there. I saw them safe just before he left.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18171203-158

155. JOHN BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , two eod-fish, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Appleton .

ROBERT APPLETON . I am a fishmonger , and live at Shadwell . I missed two fish-the officer brought them to my house, with the prisoner. I knew one of them by a bruize on it.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer - I stopped the prisoner with the fish at Shadwell, about six o'clock in the evening.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-159

156. NICHOLAS ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one pair of trowsers, value 5s. , the goods of John Russel Law .

JOHN FINCH . I am an apprentice to Mr. John Russel Law , who is a pawnbroker . On the 13th of November I saw the prisoner take the trowsers from the door, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-160

157. ELIZA ROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Alexander Cohen .

ALEXANDER COHEN . I am a shoe-maker , and live in Hollywell-streen; the prisoner lived in my service. On the 1st of November I missed a pair of shoes; Mr. Gabriel said he had bought a pair of her - She denied taking them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Her father gave me 2l. to recommend her to mercy.

MICHAEL GABRIEL . The prisoner sold me a pair of shoes-Mr. Cohen claimed them.

Cross-examined. The prisoner's father gave the prosecutor 2l. not to punish her. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-161

158. THOMAS JAQUES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , one truss of clover hay, value 3s. , the goods of Caleb Whitbread .

CALEB WHITBREAD . I am a cow-keeper , and live at Mile End . The prisoner was my servant . I lost a great deal of clover, and suspected him. I wrote my name on a piece of paper, and put it in the middle of a truss. On the 17th of November, when he came home in the evening, he said he had taken it, and begged for mercy. I had set the officer to watch.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. The prosecutor set me to watch - I saw the prisoner, with a truss of clover, tied behind the wash-tub, which he was taking to a house. I saw him putting the clover into a cart - I seized him, and found the prosecutor's name in the truss.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it for the horse-the horse ran away, and I threw the clover into a cart.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-162

159. DANIEL HARRIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Hill , from his person .

THOMAS HILL . On the 4th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in King-street, Covent-garden , and felt somebody at my pocket - I turned round, and missed my handkerchief. I saw the prisoner behind me - I laid hold of him, and found my handkerchief on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-163

160. WILLIAM GAY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one watch, value 2l. , the goods of John Payne .

MARY PAYNE . I am the wife of John Payne , who is a drayman , and lives at Stepney . The prisoner lived in the house. About five o'clock on the 26th of November he went out - I missed the watch - He never returned.

CHARLES POPE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel-road. On the 26th of November I took the watch in pledge of Coffin for 1l.

ELIZA COFFIN. The prisoner brought me the watch to pledge for him.

ROBERT COOMBS. I took the prisoner into custody-he said he gave Coffin the watch to pledge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-164

161. THOMAS GRIFFITHS and ELIZA GRIFFITHS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , one watch, value 30s.; one chain, value 6d.; and one key, value 6d. , the goods of John Allen .

SUSANNAH ALLEN. I am the wife of John Allen . The prisoners lodged with me, on Saffron-hill -the prisoner, Eliza Griffiths, was in my room about eight o'clock in the morning-soon after I missed the watch she left the house.

JOHN ALLEN . I am the son of the last witness. I saw the prisoner, Eliza Griffiths , take the watch and put it into her bosom.

JOHN LIMBRICK. I took the prisoners into custody, and found the duplicate of the watch in their room.

JOHN WALKER . I am a pawnbroker. I took the watch in pledge from a woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GRIFFITHS - NOT GUILTY .

ELIZA GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-165

162. GEORGE FAWCETT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one spoon, value 8s. , the goods of Eliza Stoddart .

ANN JONES . I am servant to Eliza Stoddart , who lives in Portman-place . On the 4th of December, about half-past four o'clock, I was brewing, the prisoner came for the grains-in about three minutes after I missed the spoon from the table. I went to his mother's, and asked him if he had seen the spoon? I told him it might have fallen into the grains - He said he would look; he did so, but could not find it - He swore that he never saw it. There had been two spoons and a butter ladle on the table. I had him apprehended.

GEORGE PLUMBER . The prisoner's father gave him into my charge. At last he said he had taken the spoon. His mother found it in the grains.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-166

163. THOMAS CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , three shoes, value 1s., and one pair of half-boots, value 2d. , the goods of John Imeson .

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am a cobbler. I was coming by Imeson's stall, who is also a cobbler , saw the prisoner crawl out, and stopped him with the shoes under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-167

164. JAMES SIDEBOTTOM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one 1l. bank note , the property of Thomas Hood .

HANNAH HOOD. I am the wife of Thomas Hood; the prisoner lived six weeks with me. I gave him the 1l. note to get change - He never returned. He was taken the next morning.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-168

165. WILLIAM PRUSSIA and JAMES HAMBLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , two boots, value 30s. , the goods of Richard Cole .

RICHARD COLE . I am a boot-maker , and live in Berwick-street . On the 5th of December I heard my window crack - I went out, Christie told me to follow him, which I did. I saw the prisoners in Portland-street - Prussia was secured, and one of the boots picked up.

JAMES WILLIAM CHRISTIE . I was passing the shop, about five o'clock in the evening, and saw Hambley with his hand through the window-as I passed he took a boot out. I watched, saw him put his hand in again, and pull the other boot out. I told Cole to follow me. I found he was stopped, and the boots found under his jacket. The other prisoner was close to him.

CHARLES TAYLOR . I heard the alarm, and Hambley ran against me. he fell down - I secured him, and found the boots under his jacket.

MICHAEL GIBBON. I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner, Prussia, and secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not run away.

PRUSSIA - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

HAMBLEY - GUILTY Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18171203-169

166. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , three pair of shoes, value 10s , the goods of John Edward Shane .

JOHN EDWARD SHANE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Hatton-garden-the prisoner was my servant . On the 1st of December I found the prisoner's handkerchief in a drawer in the shop, with fifty duplicates in it - He appeared anxious to get them from me; three or four of them were for shoes. In the afternoon, he told me if I would forgive him he would tell the truth. I found no duplicates on him. He said his mother pledged them.

CHARLES SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Finne, a pawnbroker. Three pair of shoes were pledged for 1s., by a woman of the name of Harris.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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