Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd July 1817.
Reference Number: 18170702
Reference Number: f18170702-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Over and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delibery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Dld Bailen; ON WEDNESDAY, 2nd of JULY, 1817, and following Days; Being the Sixth Session in the Second Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, 74, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1817.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Curtis , Bart.; Sir Charles Price , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq,; Joshua Jonathan Smith, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester ,Bart. Recorder of said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , Knt.; Christopher Magnay , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and J. Vaillant , Esq. his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury,

William Lefevre ,

John Donaldson ,

James Savage ,

Samuel Sewell ,

Isaac Ackerman ,

Joseph Todhunter ,

James Crockey ,

Thomas Duplock ,

John Mathews ,

John Tringham ,

Robert Mayhew ,

Christoper Coates .

London Jury,

(Special Commission.)

George Shuttleworth ,

William Lefevre ,

James Savage ,

Samuel Sewe

Isaac Ackerman ,

Joseph Todhunter ,

James Crockey ,

Thomas Duplock ,

John Mathews ,

John Tringham ,

Robert Mayhew ,

Christopher Coates ,

1st Middlesex Jury,

Thomas Stone ,

John Biggs ,

Thomas Bryan ,

I.F. Parkinson ,

William Whyber ,

Thomas Hughes ,

William Jarrat ,

William Slade ,

Richard Turner ,

Francis Search ,

John Nicholson ,

John Reid .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Richard Powis ,

William Sadler ,

Thomas Parkinson ,

Edward Jeffreson ,

Stephen Warwick ,

John March ,

William Fullerd ,

John Gale ,

Thomas Jones ,

John Wilkinson ,

Charles Greenwood ,

George Phillips .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JULY 2, 1817.

WOOD, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION IN THE SECOND MAYORALTY.

Reference Number: t18170702-1

926. THOMAS HERRING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Cane , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 25th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, eleven live pigs, price 20l. , his property.

JOHN COLBY . I am cow-driver to Thomas Cane , who lives in the parish of Heston, in Middlesex . On the 25th of April, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I shut his seventeen pigs into the sty, in the yard, fastened the door with a latch, and pinned it outside; I also fastened the yard gate. The sty and house are enclosed with a fence all round. At half-past six the next morning I found the sty door unpinned, the pin on the ground, and the pigs all gone; I went round the premises, and found seven of the pigs in my master's field. The yard-gate was shut-there are three or four gates round the yard, they were all shut and fastened as usual. There was a ball pig among them. I had fed the pigs with wheat the day before, and traced them by their dung across a field, but then lost the trace.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The sty is against the barn. There are eight more men sleep in my master's house besides myself.

THOMAS KING . I am a patrol of Bow-street. From information that I received I went to the prisoner's house at Mitcham, which is about fouteen miles from the prosecutor's, on the 26th of April, which was the day after the robbery, and found nine pigs there, dead; they appeared to have been killed the day before - I saw the offal of them. The prisoner kept a pork-shop about half a mile from his house - I went there, and found several pieces of pork, and two pigs' heads. Smith was with me.

Cross-examined. I knew the prisoner before. I told him what I came for. I knew it was his shop also - I have bought meat of him there. We found him at his house, and he went to the shop with us.

STEPHEN SMITH. I am the prosecutor's servant, and went to the prisoner's house with King; I saw nine pigs there, among which was a ball pig, and two others, which I knew to be Mr. Cane's. I afterwards saw the heads of two more-they were the same sort of pigs that my master lost. I saw their dung at the prisoner's house-it was wheat dung.

Cross-examined. I knew one of them by its not being the proper shape, and another had a particular mark on the head - They had been killed about a day. Mr. Cane's house is completely surrounded by a fence-there is no gap that they could get out at. The sty is within the railing; the mark on the pig's head was a defect in the skin, which was visible. I knew the pigs immediately.

RICHARD GALLIERS I receive the toll at the Upper Newton gate, near Epsom, it is about fifteen-miles from Heston. On the 26th of April, about six o'clock in the morning, I took toll for eleven pigs, from the prisoner, they were black spotted pigs, he was by himself. I asked him where he was going to take them, he said, to Croydon. He went towards London-that road would take him to Mitcham-it is the longest way, by a great deal.

SMITH. That is the description of my master's pigs.

MARY ANN WOOD . I am servant at the Red Lion, at Southall, which is about three-quarters of a mile from Heston - I know the prisoner; I saw him at our house at about half-past eight o'clock on the night before the robbery, there was another man with him. The prisoner stopped about an hour and a half, and the other man left about a quarter of an hour after him.

JAMES CURNOCK . I am constable of Norwood, in Middlesex, about a mile from Heston. On the 25th of April, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner and another man, at the Wolfe public-house there. I am sure he is the man.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 46.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-2

927. JAMES WRIGHT was indicted, for feloniously marrying Mary Halfpenny , on the 12th of February, 1810 , Eliza, his former wife, being then alive .

JERVIS DIXON. I am the father of Eliza Dixon ; I have known the prisoner eight or nine years. He used to come to my house to keep company with my daughter, and proposed to be married to her. On the morning of the 27th of January, 1808, he went out with her; my daughter told me, in the presence of the prisoner, that they were going to be married at St. Luke's church; they afterwards lived together, and he used to call her his wife. I heard

her say that the banns were published at St. Luke's church, he lived in that parish.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. My daughter has been dead three years.

PHOENIX MURPHY. I have known the prisoner seven years, and was present at St. Giles's church, about seven years ago, when he was married to Mary Halfpenny .

MARY HALFPENNY. I was married to the prisoner at St. Giles's church, on the 12th of February, 1810. I have the certificate.

Cross-examined. I am now a prisoner in Newgate.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the first marriage.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-3

928. SAMUEL CHAPMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Collins , about ten in the night of the 4th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one sheet, value 3s.; one blanket, value 7s., and two quilts, value 10s. , the goods of John Hayes .

JOHN HAYES . I lodge with Mr. Collins, 32, George-street, Grosvenor-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - I am certain that he is the house-holder. On the 4th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I was up with the lodger's and my own wife, on the first-floor - We were not gone to bed. I have the back parlour. My mother-in-law (Grace), called me, I came down and found the prisoner in the custody of Greaves in my back parlour. I searched him, and found three skeleton keys in his pocket and one in his hat - He said nothing. I took him to the watch-house, and when I returned I found the things rolled up ready to be taken away. I had been in my parlour about half an hour before, and shut the door after me; I had been in the house two hours. When I first went up stairs I left my wife in the room.

ELIZA HAYES . I am the wife of the last witness. I remained in the room about half an hour after he went up stairs, I then shut the door and went up also; I saw the street - door fast about half an hour before. We were called down and found the prisoner in custody. I had made the bed before I went up stairs, when I came down I found the two quilts, one blanket, and one sheet, rolled up, and laying on the bed - I had left it quite smooth. It was half-past ten o'clock. I am certain that it was quite dark.

WILLIAM GREAVES . I live at Mr. Collins's, and sleep in the kitchen. I went up stairs between ten and eleven o'clock, it was quite dark, Mrs. Grace had given the alarm - I saw Hayes's door open, and spoke, thinking it was Mr. Hayes; I then went in and found the prisoner in the back room-there was no light in the room. I caught hold of him, he begged pardon, and said he had come for something, and then said "is this Hart-street;" he was at the foot of the bed. I saw the keys found on him.

PETER GRIST . I am constable of St. George's parish Hayes gave me the keys, I tried the latch-key to the street - door of Mr. Collins's house and it opened it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man came up to me in Oxford-street, and offered me a shilling to take a parcel to Mrs. Smith, No. 32, Hart-street, I thought that was the street, and seeing No. 32, I knocked at the door, and went into the parlour - I kept knocking, and they came up.

MARY HAYES . I am sure I left the bed quite smooth; the blanket and quilt were not rolled up before.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-4

929. JAMES LINDSAY was indicted for that he, on the 1st of March , did felonionsly and falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and willingly act in the falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain order for the payment of 20l. , with intent to defraud Edward Frowd and George Rose .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously uttering and publishing, as true, a like order, he knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only stating it to be to defraud Robert Snow and John Dean Paul .

FIFTH COUNT. That he, on the 1st of March, did feloniously make, forge, and counterfeit, and willingly assist in the falsley making, forging, and counterfeiting, an order for the payment of 10l., with the like intent.

SIXTH COUNT. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true the like instrument.

SEVENTH AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same as the fifth and sixth, only stating the intent to be to defraud Robert Snow and John Dean Paul .

MR. EDWARD FROWD . I am a solicitor , and reside in Searle-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, the prisoner had been my confidential clerk for five or six years; he used to go to and fro between me and Messrs. Snow and Paul, who are my bankers . The prisoner lived opposite Southampton-buildings, in Chancery-lane. On the 17th of April, 1815, I drew a check for 10l. payable to Eliza, for house, or bearer (looks at it), it now appears to be date the 27th of September, 1816, but it is the same check that I drew on the 17th of October, 1815, I have the tally, which exactly fits; the date has been altered, and the alteration, I am positive, is the hand-writing of the prisoner - I have a pertect knowledge of his hand - He had no authority to alter it. It appears by my banking account to have been regularly paid on the 17th of October, 1815, and also to have been paid a second time on the 28th of September, 1816, the day after the altered date. The prisoner, almost invariably fetched my checks from the bankers. I have occasionally missed a few checks, and have asked him about them, he said, "the bankers sometimes will mislay them. On the 8th of April last he absented himself from my service, in the course of my inquiries after him, a letter, in his hand-writing, fell into my hands, addressed to a Mr. Mann; in consequence of which I got a warrant and searched Mann's livery stables in Carey-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, in company with Mr. Warry and Ruthven.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. My checks are numbered altogether.

Q. There were only two letters and two figures. Can you positively swear, small and blotted as they are, they

are the hand-writing of the prisoner - A. I am positive of it. The check never came into my custody after it was first paid. The prisoner was fourteen years of age when he came into my service.

EDWARD WILSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Snow and Paul. I have known the prisoner about two years (looks at the waste book). On the 17th of October, 1815, there is an entry of the payment of a 10l. check, drawn by Mr. Frowd (looks at the check), this answers the description, all but the date. On the 28th of September, 1816, I find an entry, in my own writing, of a check for 10l. drawn by E. Frowd. I do not know to whom it was paid.

HENRY GUBBINGS. I am the ledger-keeper; there are my figures on the check, which refer to the folio of the ledger; I there find 101. paid to Eliza - I turn to the 17th of October, 1816, and find 101. paid also to Eliza.

Cross-examined. There is only one reference to the figures on the check. I may have omitted it.

MR. FROWD. I did not draw any check for 10l. payable to Eliza, between July and December, 1816.

GEORGE RUTHVEN. I am an officer. On the 19th of April, I went with Mr. Frowd and Warry, to Mr. Mann's premises, Mr. Warry found a bundle of papers stuffed into the end of a truss of straw in the stable-there are several checks among them, drawn by Messrs. Frowd and Rose.

Cross-examined. The checks have not been out of my possession since, except when they were before the Grand Jury.

MR. WARRY. I am an attorney, and was with Ruthven. I took the bundle out of a truss of straw.

ANN MANN. I am the wife of William Mann , who keeps a livery-stable in Carey-street;. I know the prisoner. He gave me the bundle of papers, as private memorandums of his own; his mother came for them. I had had some words with my husband about them, and hid them in the straw.

Cross-examined. He has frequented our house since November last. He gave me the papers on the 7th of April; they laid in my drawer for sometime, and I put them in the stable the evening before Mr. Warry found them. I told them where to find the papers.

THOMAS KING. I live in High Holborn. The prisoner lodged with me. My house is in Middlesex.

COURT to WILSON. Do you not usually, when you pay checks, draw your pen through the signature - A. Yes; if a check had been presented with a mark across the name I should not have paid it.

Q. The check appears to be crossed out only once - A. if it was paid twice it must have been omitted the first time.

(Letter put in and read as follows.)

"Mr. Mann-Unless you give the papers, immediately, to my mother, or the bearer, I must give Mr. Frowd a full statement of the transactious between you and myself; I really cannot tell what you mean by keeping the bundle of papers, none of which relate to you, and which I particularly want. Your conduct to me and my mother, I must say, I do not deserve.

"18th April." JAMES LINDSAY ."

"P.S. Nobody knows of what has passed between us, nor shall they, if you act as you ought towards me."

Prisoner's Defence. I was tried last Sessions on a similar charge, at the suit of the same prosecutors, and acquitted; the same evening I was apprehended again at the suit of Snow and Paul. Mr. Rose made a charge of embezzlement against me, I was remanded till the next day, and then committed here for stealing 22l. 8s. It is extraordinary that Mr. Frowd does not call his clerks to prove the hand-writing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-5

930. JAMES WILLEY and SAMUEL HUTCHINSON , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Matthew Whittey , on the King's highway, on the 6th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two 3s. bank tokens; one memorandum book, value 1d., and 4s. 6d. in monies numbered , his goods and monies.

MATTHEW WHITTEY . I live in Little Gray's-inn-lane. On the 8th of June, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I was coming up Russell-street, Covent-garden , I stepped off the pavement for a necessary purpose, and the prisoner, Willey, came up, with two more, and used very ill language to me, he gave me a severe blow on my head which knocked me down. I caught hold of his breast in falling, I held him 'till assistance came up, I called out, Mr. Bury came up in five minutes, I had a three shilling token, a half crown, and some small silver, in my pocket, in all 10s. 6d. which I lost. I also lost a pocket-book; I did not know I had lost it until after the prisoners were taken to the watch-house; I was then going to get some drink, and missed my money out of my waistcoat pocket-my book was in my inside pocket. I could not have dropped the money; I was stunned by the blow; when I came to myself I found them all gone from me. I am sure Willey is the man who struck me.

WILLEY. Q. Was you not intoxicated - A. I was not. When Bury came up I was quite insensible. I am groom to Sir John Malcolm.

JOSEPH BURY. I am a constable. I heard the prosecutor call out, I went up to him, and found him holding Willey by the neck, the prisoner, Hutchinson, and another man were running away, the prosecutor was half up and half down, he appeared insensible and not drunk. Willey was trying to get away, I laid hold of him, he struck me several times and got from me, I called after him, and Bartlett stopped him. I knew both the prisoners before. I fetched the prosecutor to the watch-house, he went out and returned in ten minutes, complaining that he had lost his money and pocket-book. I went with him to the spot where the scuffle took place, and found the pocket-book laying in the gutter. I am certain it was the same place.

WILLEY. Q. Did he not ask you the way to Gray's-inn-lane before the scuffle took place - A. Yes; and I directed him - He was quite sober.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am the watch-house keeper. I heard the cry of murder! and stop thief! proceed from Russell-street, and saw a man running, and seized him-it was the prisoner, Willey - He made a very strong resistance.

SMITH. I am patrol. On the 17th of June, I apprehended Hutchinson, in Bow-street.

(Pocket-book produced and sworn to.)

WILLEY'S Defence. When I was at the watch-house he charged me with an assault, and afterwards with the robbery.

WILLEY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

HUTCHINSON- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-6

931. WILLIAM MOORE , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 43lbs. of wool, value 2l.; two pieces of hempen cloth, value 1s., and one other piece of cloth, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Martin and George Thomas Martin ; and THOMAS BROTHERS for feloniously receiving the same goods, well-knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

THOMAS TURNPENNY. I am an officer. On the 15th of May, I had directions to watch in Coleman-street , with Smith; I saw the prisoner, Moore, come from his master's premises, about eight o'clock in the morning, with two bags and a book in his hand, he went into the house of the prisoner, Brothers, in White-rose-court, about one hundred yards from his master's house; he remained there two or three minutes, and came out without anything. I collared him, and took him into the house, I asked him where the two bags were that he brought into the house? Brothers was present. Moore said, what bags? I have brought no bags in here; I then asked Brothers, and he said he knew nothing about any bags being brought in. I found several rolls of paper, and one bag of fine wool, in the shop; I asked him again where the bags were that he had brought in? they both answered, that there were no such things brought in there - I found them on the landing of the first-floor, and knew them to be the same. Brothers said he slept at the top of the house - I went there, and found a roll of cloth, the bags had wool in them. I took them both into custody. Moore asked one of us to go with him to his masters' warehouse, for fear it should be robbed, as he had left it open.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. They did not see me; I took notice of the bags as he carried them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Brothers's house is under repair-the workmen were all over the house; he was in the shop. If Brothers had been in the parlour he must have seen Moore go in with the wool.

SMITH. I am an officer, and was with Turnpenny. I saw Moore come out with the bags of wool on his shoulder. They both said they knew nothing about it. I went back with him to his master's house, by his desire, and found the candle burning; he offered me 1l. to let him see his master.

WILLIAM WELCH. I lodged with Brothers. The wool was not brought to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. The door is kept open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD BROWN (witness for Brothers). I am a milkman. I was at Brothers's house at the time the officers were at his door; I had been in the place ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before they came; Brothers was sitting down behind the counter, and had no intercourse with anybody. Any person could go in or out without his knowing it. I did not see the man come in.

Cross-examined. I was serving him with milk; it is a small shop - They could not come into the shop without my seeing them.

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

BROTHERS- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-7

932. JOSEPH REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one cask, value 1l. the goods of Matthias Prime Lucas , John Drinkald , and John Blenkarn .

JOHN BLENKARN. I am in partnership with Matthias Prime Lucas, and John Drinkald . On the 24th of May, in the morning, the prisoner was lurking about the wharf by the hogsheads, and in the evening one of the men brought him back, with one of the casks-it was directed to Mr. Potts, Boro'; the prisoner saw the direction, and said he had it from Mr. Potts, St. John-street. We lost three casks that day.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I was at work for Mr. Blenkarn. I saw the prisoner come out of the wharf with the cask on his back, I followed him and secured him, and brought him back with the cask on his shoulder.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-8

933. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , one watch, value 5l. the goods of Septimus Miles .

STEPHEN MILES . I am brother to Septimus Miles, who is a watchmaker in Ludgate-street . The prisoner came into the shop, at nine o'clock in the morning of the 31st of May, and asked to look at a watch, I gave it out of the window to him, and he immediately ran out with it-Smeeten pursued him and brought him back. I am sure he is the man.

PETER SMEETEN . I am servant to Mr. Miles; the prisoner came into the shop and ran out as soon as he got the watch, I pursued and never lost sight of him - He turned down Ave-Maria-lane and went into Stationer's-court, he was then stopped by two men, when he took the watch out of his waistcoat-pocket, and gave it to Mr. Watson.

THOMAS WATSON. I am a porter. I was going up Stationer's-court and heard the alarm; the prisoner was stopped by two men - I seized him and took the watch out of his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-9

934. JOHN BOWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 9lbs. of sugar, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Case and George Case .

MR. HENRY CASE. I am a grocer , in partnership with George Case , and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate. On

the 29th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, I heard him move a chair, which attracted my attention, and I missed two loaves of sugar; I went round the counter, without taking any notice, and seized him - He had one loaf in his right hand; he said he had no companion, but the other loaf was in his trowsers, and immediately drew it out. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-10

935. WILLIAM BEES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , one handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of John Matthey , from his person .

JOHN MATTHEY. I am a stockbroker . On the 8th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I was walking on Holborn-hill , with a gentleman; the prisoner, in company with another man, was walking behind us - I turned round and saw the prisoner's hand come out of my pocket, with the handkerchief; I seized him, and accused him with taking it - He denied it, and at the same time threw it behind him - I saw him do it. I picked it up, and took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-11

936. MARGARET POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , six quarts of rape seed, value 2s. , the goods of Kilpin Warner and William Seaman .

KILPIN WARNER. I am a seedsman , in partnership with William Seaman. The prisoner was employed by us to pick seeds . On the 6th of June I told the Officer to watch her.

THOMAS STERRY . I am a constable. On the 6th of June, about one o'clock, the prisoner came out of the shop - She appeared bulky. I stopped her about fifty yards from the house, and found a bag of seeds tied to her pocket-strings, under her gown.

GUILTY . Aged. 24.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-12

937. DANIEL BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one pair of trowsers, value 18s. , the goods of Richard Cleobury .

JOHN BURGESS. I am shopman to Mr. Cleobury, who is a clothier , and lives in Cheapside . On the 24th of May, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner take the trowsers from the door, and put them into his apron - He then ran across the road, and through Bow-churchyard; I pursued, calling out stop thief! he took them out of his apron and threw them away. I secured him behind a cart in Cloak-lane, and am sure he is the boy. He stood at the door three or four minutes. I lost sight of him, but soon found him again - He was running. I picked the trowsers up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-13

938. JOHN GOWER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Richter , from his person .

THOMAS RICHTER . I am an accountant . On the 12th of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon. I was walking along the Strand , a person tapped me on the shoulder at the corner of Beaufort-buildings , I turned round and a young man told me my pocket was picked-The prisoner was running. I immediately pursued, and saw my handkerchief on the pavement, some person picked it up and gave it to me. I continued running, and at the corner of Exeter-change the prisoner was stopped and given into my charge. I believe him to be the man I was pursuing.

ELISHA TURNER . I am a hosier, and live in the Strand. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Mr. Richter's pocket. I am sure he is the man. I told Mr. Richter, and he pursued him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-14

939. WILLIAM HOLDEN and WILLIAM TRUEMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , sixteen live tame geese, price 3l. , the property of Benjamin Bavin .

BENJAMIN BAVIN. I am a labourer , and live at Staines . On the 2d of June I had sixteen geese taken off the common. I saw them again at Mr. Wood's, about two miles from my house, and knew them to be mine.

THOMAS EASTGATE . I am a constable. On the 2d of June I had information that some men were picking geese in Mr. Wood's grounds; I went there, and the prisoners came out-Trueman had a sack on his back, I went up and asked him what he had there - He said, geese. I secured them both. Bavin claimed the geese.

Both the prisoners pleaded distress.

HOLDEN - GUILTY . Aged 46.

TRUEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-15

940. JOHN CROXFORD was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Bowen Willoughby on the King's highway, on the 23d of May , putting him fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 10l.; three seals, value 7l.; and one watch-chain, value 7l. , his property.

JOHN BOWEN WILLOUGHBY . I am servant to Mr. Barnet, who was on a visit in town in Baker-street. On the night of the 23d of May, I was going to see a friend at Kensington. I was in Hyde-park, between Grosvenor and Cumberland-gates - I was about two hundred yards from Grosvenor-gate , and hearing the clock strike eleven, I turned back; two men accosted me, and asked me who I had been speaking to - A man in a soldier's dress had accosted me just before, and asked for relief. The prisoner was one of the two who asked me who I had been speaking to - They both asked me. They then seized me; the prisoner seized my right arm, and the other my left. I told them the man had asked me what was o'clock (which he did, as well as asking relief); they then asked me if I had a watch. They both collared me as I answered them, and knocked me down. I called out, "If you are not out of hearing, come back!" being in hopes that the man who first spoke to me was not quite gone. I was on my back; one of them tore my face, and put their hands into my neck handkerchief. I felt them put their hands into my right-hand waistcoat pocket, where my watch was; they tried to take it, I tried to keep it. I said, "do not murder me, and I will give you what I have got," and gave them the watch and seals-it was a gold hunting-watch, three gold seals, and a gold chain-they ran off; I did not see them again. It did not last more than four minutes-it was a very bright moon-light night. I gave information to the watchmen outside the rails of the Park. In the morning I heard a person was taken up - I went to Marylebone watch-house, saw the prisoner there, and was sure he was the man. Before I saw him, the watch-house-keeper asked me to describe him, which I did, and when I saw him I immediately recognized him.

Cross-examined by MR. LONG. I have been four years in my place.

Q. How long have you been in possession of this property - A. I have had the chain and seals five years, and the watch three - I bought them myself. I believe the watch cost fourteen guineas.

Q. Have you ever given a different account to any other person as to what it coast - A. I have been asked what the property that I lost was worth altogether; I said I could not replace it under 30l.

Q. Do you know Chaff - A. I do not. I have been threatened with vengeance by the prisoner's father. I did not speak to any person in the Park afterwards - I got to the gate in two minutes, and then told of it.

Q. Did you not say you lived with a lady - A. Yes. I am a lady's servant.

Q. Are you in the habit of going to Kensington at so late an hour - A. I only arrived in town on the 20th, and wished to see my friend.

Q. When you gave information of the robbery, did you describe the prisoner's dress - A. I described him to have a long, dark, slouchy coat on, and either a glazed or old oil-skin hat; and the other man as having a lightish coat on. I saw them walking towards me, and put my watch and seals into my waistcoat pocket quite concealed.

JOHN CREIGHTON . I am a watchman; my beat is on the Edgware-road. On the night of the 23d I had just called eleven o'clock, and heard the cry of murder in the Park; I could see nothing-it was moon-light. I took the prisoner up on another charge, between half-past ten and eleven o'clock, just by Tyburn-turnpike, which is about six hundred yards from where the robbery was committed - He was walking with another man, apparently from the Park; they abused me very much, which made me take them up. They were taken to the watch-house about twelve o'clock.

Cross-examined. The man who was with him was Sibley, who lives in the Edgeware-road; I knew him.

WILLIAM SELLERS. I am a constable of Marylebone. The prisoner was taken up on another charge. I saw him the next morning, and the prosecutor charged him with the robbery.

WILLIAM NEWIT . I am assistant watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house between eleven and twelve o'clock by Creighton. The next morning the prosecutor came, and asked if we had any person in the watch-house; I told him we had several. He described the prisoner to me, and said he had been robbed by two men, one having a light and the other a dark dress. He said one of them struck him; he thought it was the man in the light dress. I asked him if there was any difference in the size of them. He said the man in the light dress was the tallest-the prisoner was dressed in a dark brown long coat. In consequence of the description he gave me, I let him see the prisoner alone - He said he was one of them. I had no person else in the watch-house answering the description of the other man. I saw Sibley come into the watch-house with the prisoner; he had a light dress on, and was rather taller than the prisoner.

GEORGE ROCHFORD. I am a watchman at Cumberland-gate. Just as I had called eleven, I heard a cry of murder in the Park. When I had called half-past eleven, I saw three men standing at the corner of Park-lane; two appeared dressed in dark, and one in light clothes-neither of them were dressed like a soldier. One of them said "Away!" and the other two set off down Oxford-street, towards Tyburn-turnpike-Sibley was one of them. I heard the rattle sprung by Creighton.

JAMES DAVEY. I am constable of the night. The prisoner and Sibley were brought in between eleven and twelve o'clock. The prisoner had a dark coat on, and Sibley a light one.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Sibley, and he asked me to walk down to Knightsbridge barracks with him. We got there at six o'clock, and staid drinking till eleven, and coming home we met the watchman; we were singing, he took us to the watch-house. The next morning the prosecutor said he believed I was one of the men. I know nothing of the robbery.

ROGER CHAFF. I am a musician. I had been at Lord Carlisle's, in Grosvenor-place, and returning home, just by Grosvenor-gate, I met the prosecutor; it was half-past eleven o'clock - He gave an account of his being robbed(it must have been about half-past eleven); he was coming from the Park-he said he had been robbed by two men. I asked him particularly how they were dressed; he said they were dressed in white jackets. I asked him what brought him into the Park at that time of night? he said he was a servant, and could not get out before ten o'clock - He said he was going for a little air. When he came out of the gate, he told a different story to the

watchman; he said he had been robbed of his watch, which cost him thirty guineas, and that he was returning from Kensington; he said he was making towards Cumberland-gate, and coming back, knowing that he could not get out; he was throttled by two men, and if he had not delivered his watch he should have lost his life.

JOHN SIBLEY. I am a pipe-maker, and live in Bell-street, Marylebone. On the 23d of May, I was in company with the prisoner; we went from Bell-street between four and five o'clock in the afternoon to Knightsbridge barracks; we got there about five o'clock, and remained there till a quarter before eleven, and returned home through Edgeware-road, up Park-lane-no person was with us. We had a parley with the watchman; this was about a quarter before eleven o'clock, and lasted a quarter of an hour - We were both taken into custody.

Court. Q. Do you know Rochford, the watchman at Cumberland-gate - A. No. I was not standing at the corner of Park-lane, with the prisoner and another man. We never stopped until we were with the watchman. I was dressed in a short white jacket. The prisoner had a dark, long great coat. I do not know what hat he had on-it was a shabby one. I do not know whether it had an oilskin or not; I cannot recollect.

JOHN WILCON. I keep a canteen at Knightsbridge. The prisoner and Sibley were at my house till about a quarter before eleven o'clock; they were both intoxicated. Sibley brought me some pipes.

Court. Q. What time did they come to you - A. At three or four o'clock in the afternoon; on person was with them. I did not know the prisoner before.

JOHN BOWEN WILLOUGHBY re-examined. The witness, Sibley, told me at Marlborough-street that he was out of the prisoner's company for a quarter of an hour; this was when he was taken up on suspicion. I am not certain that I saw Sibley before this time.

Q. Did you ever say the two men had white coats on - A. No. I described one as having a light coat on.

Q. What did you say about taking the air - A. I do not know that I said so, but I might if any person had inquisitively asked me.

Q. It has been stated that you said you had lost your watch, worth about thirty guineas - A. I said the watch, chain, and seals were worth thirty guineas. I did not say I had come from Kensington. I said I intended to go there, but found it too late.

SIBLEY re-examined. Did you see Willoughby at Marlborough-street - A. I did; I was taken up on suspicion, but he would not swear to me. He said he could not be certain.

Q. On your oath, did you not say at Marlborough-street that you had been out of the prisoner's company for a quarter of an hour - A. About ten minutes-this was on the way from the barracks.

Q. Why did you tell me you had not been out of his company - A. He was behind me all the time.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-16

941. BARNET LEIPMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Sanders on the King's highway, on the 1st of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one seal, value 10s., and two gold rings, value 15s. , his property.

JOHN SANDERS . I am a tailor , and live in the Edgeware-road. I went to Bow Fair on the 31st of May, and returned about three o'clock in the morning. I was coming along Whitechapel-road , and eight or ten fellows met me-one of them made a snatch at my watch, broke the ribbon, and ran off with the seals, key, and gold rings. The watchman came up, and secured the prisoner - He was rescued from him and secured again; he was rescued a second time, and I took him the third; he was then rescued from me, and got off. I am sure he is the man that the watchman laid hold of; I did not point him out. I did not say that he took the seals, but he put his hand round me at the time that my property was taken.

SHELAH FRANCIS. I am a watchman. I saw a mob in the road fighting-Sanders went to look atthem; the mob came round him - I went up; he said he had lost his seals, and I secured the prisoner. I did not see him take them.

Q. Was you not examined before the magistrate - A. Yes. I thought I saw him make a snatch at him. I have known the prisoner from a child.

Q. On your oath, did you see the prisoner make a snatch at Sanders - A. Yes.

Q. After that, did you see him put his hand into his own pocket - A. Yes; I laid hold of the prisoner. He was rescued twice from me and once from Sanders. I gave information to Coombs.

ROBERT COOMBS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-17

942. JAMES LINDSAY was again indicted for the forging of a 10l. check on Robert Snow and John Dean Paul .

The evidence in this case was, precisely the same as that produced against the prisoner on the first day, (see No. 929), excepting that this was a piece of paper bearing the signature of Messrs. Frowd and Rose, which had been filled up in the form of a check for 10l.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-18

943. JAMES LINDSAY was again indicted for embezzling the sum of 19l. from Edward Frowd and George Rose , his masters and employers .

MR. EDWARD FROWD . I am partner with Mr. George Rose . On the 3d of February last, the prisoner was employed as our clerk , and entrusted to receive money on our account.

JAMES CHRISTMAS . On the 3d of February I paid the prisoner 19l. for Messrs. Frowd and Rose, at their office; he gave me a receipt for it.

Court. Q. How did you pay it to him - A. In Bank of England notes. I do not know what notes they were-they were not all of one description.

MR. JUSTICE PARK. I am of opinion that the case cannot be made out. It was paid in bank notes, but the wit

ness cannot tell us what notes-the proof differs from the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-19

944. JAMES LINDSAY was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , one Bank of England note for the payment of 20l. , the property of Edward Frowd and George Rose .

MR. EDWARD FROWD . On the 22d of March last I sent the prisoner to pay 22l. 8s. into my banker's; among it was 20l. note - I gave it into his hand myself. He left the room, as I supposed, to go there; he entered it previous to his going out.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was on a Saturday morning, about eleven o'clock.

Q. Was it not four o'clock - A. Certainly not-it was before twelve o'clock. I did not ask him to let me see the banker's book. I did not go out of town that evening. There was money in his hands to answer any necessary purpose in the office.

MR. HENRY GUBBINGS . I am ledger-keeper to Messrs. Snow and Paul. There was no money paid in between the 13th and 29th of March.

MR. CHARLES GUBBINGS . I refer to the waste-book. There is no entry of money received on the 22d of March-there was 100l. paid on the 29th.

MR. FROWD. There was 100l. paid in on the 29th of March. I do not know who took it.

Court. Q. I thought you said you always entered the name of the person who took the money - A. I think I sent it by another person. I made the prisoner enter the 22l.

Q. If you had not seen the entry in the book should you have known that he took it - A. Yes, I should. I remember giving it to him when I received it, independently of my book.

Prisoner's Defence. The money was paid at the office. I entered it in the book-it was not paid till four o'clock. Mr. Frowd sent the boy out, and when he returned it was too late to send it to the banker's.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-20

945. LAWRENCE DAVEREN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , one portmanteau, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Lane and Allen Billing .

THOMAS LANE . I am a trunk-maker , in co-partnership with Allen Billing ; we live in St. Paul's Church . On the 7th of June, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner was brought into the shop with the portmanteau, which had been taken off the step of the door.

WILLIAM BRYANT . I am a trunk-maker. On the evening of the 7th of June, the prisoner passed my door, with the portmanteau under his arm-suspecting him, I had him secured, and found Mr. Lane had lost one.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress and intoxicated.

GUITLY . Aged 58.

Confined Two Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-21

946. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , one veil, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Clarke .

ROBERT CLARKE . I live on the Pavement, in Moorfields . At eight o'clock in the morning of the 27th of June, the veil hung at my door. My apprentice gave the alarm, and pointed the prisoner out - A man brought him back. I picked the veil off the ground-it was about two yards from him when he was taken.

THOMAS FRENCH . I am shopman to Mr. Clarke. I was in the cellar under the shop; as I was looking up, I saw two boys scuffing about under the window; I ran up and told Mr. Clarke - He ran out, the veil was gone. I am certain that the prisoner was one of them. As soon as I got into the street I saw him drop the veil.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-22

947. GEORGE SHARPE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , nine pairs of stockings, value 20s. , the goods of James Wilson and James Barnard Dew .

JAMES WILSON . I am a hosier , in partnership with James Barnard Dew , we live in Cheapside . On the 7th of June, I lost my stockings.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a locksmith. I was passing up Cheapside about two o'clock, and saw the prisoner in company with another man dressed like a sailor, walking backward and forward by the corner of Foster-lane. The sailor held his apron against the wall, while the prisoner drew the stockings from the door, and put them into the sailor's apron. They ran down Cheapside - I told Mr. Dew, and ran down Friday-street, but lost sight of them, and returned to the shop; in about two minutes the prisoner was brought back with the stockings. I am sure he is the man - I had watched them for some time.

EMBLIN STEVENS. I was in Cheapside, and saw two men lurking about the shop - I watched them, and observed the prisoner go up to the window two or three times, and then went back to the tavern door, and called the sailor to him-both then went to the window. A lady went into the shop, and as soon as she got in, the prisoner took the stockings, and put them into the sailor's apron. I pursued after them down Friday-street - they turned down a lane, I lost them, and saw them standing against a post, and pointed them out to Pretty. They had the stockings tied up in an apron, which was then off. I pursued them down Basing-lane, stopped them, and asked what was in the apron-the sailor dropped it, and ran off; I secured the prisoner. I am certain he is the man who took them.

Prisoner. Q. What did I say when you took me - A. You said you was not the man.

FRANCIS PRETTY . I am a patrol. On the 7th of June, about two o'clcok in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner and a sailor (who had the bundle), running. I heard that the stockings had been taken. Stevens asked me to follow them. The sailor dropped the bundle - We secured the prisoner, and I picked up the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Transported for Seven Years . GUILTY . Aged 35.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-23

948. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , one mare, price 2l., and one gelding, price 2l. , the property of Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES . I had a horse and a mare at grass at Baldock , on the 3d of May. Next morning, the field gate was open, and they were gone. I went to look for them, and about five o'clock I had information of them.

JOHN BUNYER. I keep the Greyhound, in West Smithfield. On the 30th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, a man, named Hussey, came to my house with the prisoner and another young man. Hussey said he had bought two horses of them for 3l. 5s. - he asked me if I knew them; I said I knew their faces, and both of them said they had brought meat to my house often, and I must recollect them, and that they lived near Fleet-market. Hussey paid the prisoner 3l. 5s., and the other man remarked that he had got a good bargain. They had three glasses of gin, which the prisoner paid for. The next evening Hussey came and said the horses proved to be stolen. I went with him to look for the men, and found the other man, who shewed us the prisoner, and we secured him.

HENRY HUSSEY . I am a horse-dealer. On the 30th of May I was in Smithfield; the prisoner asked me to buy the two horses for 4l. I left him, and when I came down the market again, he said I should have them for three guineas. He said his name was Brown - I am sure he is the man.

MATTHEW ALLEY. I am foreman to Mrs. Moore, who bought the horses of Hussey-the next day they were claimed.

JOHN JONES . I have seen the horses, and will swear they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have two witnesses to prove that I bought them.

JAMES GOODE . I keep the George, at the corner of Compton-street, St. John-street. On the 30th of May, I saw two men coming from towards Islington - They came into my house; the prisoners agreed to give them 4l. 10s. for the horses which stood at the door - He was in the house before. I took particular notice of him. I saw him give 4l. 10s. for them.

ANN ALLEN. I deal in cat's-meat. I saw the prisoner at the public-house, bargaining for the horses. Just before that, I saw the two men driving the horses in Northampton-square. He gave 4l. for them. I did not know the prisoner before.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-24

949. ABRAHAM MOSES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , one watch, value 1l.; one chain, value 3s.; one seal, value 15s.; and one key, value 3d., the goods of James Hudson , from his person .

JAMES HUDSON. On the 14th of June, about twenty minutes after nine o'clock at night, I was going up Crooked-lane , and so was the prisoner; he was before me, and when I got to a building which was being repaired, he turned quick round and passed two persons who went before me, came back, and pressed against me as if he was in a great hurry-all of a sudden I found my watch was gone. I looked at him, and he pushed me one side; I turned round to pursue after him, when some person caught hold of my collar - I got loose and ran after the prisoner, gave the alarm, and followed him to the end of Crooked-lane, but lost him in the crowd; I got into Fish-street - hill, and saw him in Monument-yard - He was secured in Pudding-lane. I am sure he is the man. I felt my watch go from me - I did not see anybody with him until I turned round and was collared.

JAMES CRADDOCK . I am porter to Mr. Bailey, Pudding-lane. I heard the cry of stop thief, and opened the door-the prisoner passed and reeled down by Mr. Williams's step, he went to set down and then another man collared him; in about three minutes I heard a watch was stolen, I went out and saw a man find the watch on Mr. William's step, close by the door where the prisoner was found.

ANN OATES. I am servant to Mr. Williams, Pudding-lane. I heard the cry and went to the window, a man came up to our door and found the watch on the step-four or five of them went up the lane with it.

JAMES HUDSON. I have not recovered the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, and ran after the man that collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-25

950. ALEXANDER STEEL was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 122 shawls, value 15l., the goods of Joseph Wood , privately in his warehouse .

JOSEPH WOOD. I am a warehouseman , and live in Lawrence-lane, Cheapside, in the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry .

RICHARD WILLIS . I am warehouseman to Mr. Wood. On Monday, the 23d of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, as I was writing in the warehouse, Roberts came in and asked if I had sent a man out with some shawls. I was writing and knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a ticket-porter. On the 23d of June, about half-past four in the afternoon, I was sitting on the bench under the church at the bottom of Lawrence-lane, and saw a man come out of Mr. Wood's warehouse with a quantity of shawls under his arm; I remarked to my fellow-porters how he ran with them, and said, "surely he has not stolen them!" I immediately went over to Mr. Wood's to inquire of the warehouseman, and found he had not sent any out. I said there was a man gone out with a quantity, as hard as he could run - He sent me after him. I went out, and took the direction that the prisoner had, which was up Lawrence-lane, and through Castle-court into Milk-street. I saw him going up by the side of Honey-lane-market, in Milk-street - he had the shawls under his arm; I brought him back; he used some very bad expressions. I told him he must take them back, and kept hold of him; he then dropped the shawls from under his arm, put up his fist, and gave me a smack on my head, a person took them into the warehouse, and I secured the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-26

951. JAMES COTTERELL . was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , one waiter, value 3s. , the goods of the Rev. Richard Allott , clerk, Dean of Raphoe, Ireland .

JANE COULIN . I am servant to the Dean of Raphoe, who lives in Orchard-street . On the 12th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I found the prisoner behind the door in the housekeeper's room, with the waiter in his hand; he said he was begging for bread, and took it up to look at it. I suppose he must have got in at the area, which leads into the room. I sent for the Dean.

REV. RICHARD ALLOTT. I am Dean of Raphoe. I was called down, and found the prisoner behind the door, with the waiter in his hand, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-27

952. WILLIAM TOMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one coat, value 1l. 10s. , the goods of John Hardman .

JOHN HARDMAN . I am a coachman . On the 31st of May I put my coat into the coach, which was on the stand in Foley-place , about ten o'clock, and went to get some refreshment; when I returned I missed it, and did not see it again until the 11th of June, when I found it on the prisoner's back. - I accused him with taking it, he then took it off and gave it to me, saying he had only burrowed it. I gave him in charge. He told the magistrate that it was left in his care.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was left in my care by a man.

EDWARD EVANS . I was at the prisoner's stables on the 21st of June, when the coat was delivered to him; the man gave it to him to take care of, as his own stables had been broken open lately. The man's stables were just by the prisoner's, and soon as it happened he went away. It was about the 21st or 22d of June.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-28

953. EDWARD EGAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Byers , about seven in the evening of the 25th of June (the said Alexander Byers , and other of his family in the said dwelling-house then being), and stealing therein two table spoons, value 20s.; five tea-spoons, value 5s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; eleven 1l. bank-notes, and one warrant for payment of 5l. , his property.

ELIZA BYERS . I am the wife of Alexander Byers , we keep a public-house in Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . The prisoner had used our house for two months. On the 25th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, he called and had a pint of beer, there was no person in the house but him, he came and drank it in the back-parlour, where I was; while he was there my daughter brought me down the key of my bed-room, and laid it on the table. I was called into the bar, and forgot the key. Sometimes after the prisoner had drank his beer I saw him come down stairs, and asked him what he was doing there? he said he was going for Mr. Curry, as he had heard of a place for him, who was a lodger of ours-this was between eight and nine o'clock. I was going to put my child to bed between nine and ten o'clock, and missed my key; I did not miss it before. After I had seen the prisoner come down he went into the parlour and finished his beer - I was in the bar; he was gone when I missed the key. I tried the door, it was locked, we got it open, and I missed the property stated in the indictment out of my drawers, which were shut, but not locked; there were eleven 1l. notes and a 5l. check in the pocket-book. I saw the spoons again at the office.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Curry lived on the two pair of stairs. I sleep on the first-floor-the prisoner did not stay long after he had finished his beer. Curry had been out all day, and was then out.

ALEXANDER BYERS. My wife said she had not got the key; I broke the door open, and missed the property; from what she said I suspected the prisoner, and got an officer. We searched the prisoner's lodging, but found nothing there; we found him at a public-house in Davies-street, I gave him in charge; the watchman took him away, and let him go, he sprung his rattle and secured him again; we immediately searched him in the street, and found eleven 1l. notes, five tea-spoons, two tablespoons, and the sugar-tongs, upon him; we neither found the check or the pocket-book.

Cross-examined. He was not drunk - He was quite able to run.

SAMUEL PLANK. I am an officer. On the 25th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I went to the prisoner's lodging with Byers; I afterwards heard the cry of stop thief, and the rattle sprung; I pursued, and found Byers, the watchman, and the prisoner, struggling together; I searched him, and found fourteen 1l. notes, and one 2l. note, upon him, with the spoons and sugar-tongs; he struggled very hard to prevent me searching him, and I was obliged to cut his pocket off - He then said I had put the things into his pocket, which I did not upon my oath.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Curry had been with me. It is not likely I should remain in the house if I had got the property.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-29

954. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hudson , the elder , about seven in the afternoon of the 15th of June (John Hudson, the younger, and other persons being therein), and stealing therein one coat, value 6l.; one pair of breeches, value 4s.; one shawl, value 2s.; one gown, value 5s.; one petticoat, value 1s.; two handkerchiefs, value 4s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 14s.; one watch, value 1l.; one watch-chain, value 1l., and one seal, value 10s. , the property of William Brooks Lardner .

JOHN HUDSON , Sen. My house is in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On the 15th of June William Brooks Lardner lodged in my first-floor.

WILLIAM BROOKS LARDNER . I lodge at Mr. Hudson's. On Sunday the 15th of June, at five o'clock in the afternoon, I went out and returned about eight, when I missed the articles stated in the indictment; my watch was taken from the head of my bed, the rest of the things were in different places-some of them were in my burean, and others in the bed-room. I found five skeleton keys on my bed with the breeches, which were in the bureau before. The prisoner was at the watch-house before I came home.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. My wife had the key of the bureau-it was broken open. I also found a chisel on the bed. I left my servant at home, she had the key of the door.

FRANCES CAMP . I am servant to Mr. Lardner; he went out and left me in the front room, which was the sitting-room, I went down stairs and left the door locked, keeping the key in my hand. About seven o'clock I went up stairs again, and unlocked the door, but could not get in-it was bolted inside. I called Mr. Hudson's apprentice up, and he could not open it. I went down stairs, and stopped about three minutes with the apprentice, and then went up by myself, and found the door on the latch - I went in and found a large bundle behind the door - I called Mr. Hudson up. I did not go into the bed-room.

JOHN HUDSON re-examined. Camp said she could not get into the room, I told her to stay in my kitchen-soon after she gave the alarm of thieves; I went into the front room and found the bundle, behind the door, and the things about the room, quite in confusion, and the skeleton keys at the foot of the bed; in about five minutes after I saw the prisoner in the custody of Thoroughgood, on the second-floor landing. My son was at home at the time.

WILLIAM THOROUGHGOOD . I keep the Nag's Head, public-house, in the same street. I was sent for to the house, about half-past seven o'clock-it was day-light; I found the prisoner concealed behind a screen in the passage of the second-floor. I gave him in charge.

JOHN WATSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody, and found a skeleton key upon him; I took him to the watch-house, I then went back and found the watch under the mat of the landing where I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCES CAMP re-examined. When I first went down stairs I stood outside the door until I went up and could not get in. The lodgers were in the house all the time, and the apprentices.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who took me to the house, and told me to go up to the second-floor and whisper Harry, and tell him to come down - I did so, and as I returned a man met me, and said, "for God's sake run up and hide yourself!" which I did, for fear of the thieves.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-30

955. JAMES PITFIELD and CHARLES JACKSON , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Keily , about three in the afternoon of the 21st of May (he and others in the said dwelling-house then being). and stealing therein, one watch, value 30s.; one chain, value 6d.; one seal, value 10s., and one watch-key, value 4s., the property of George Doubikin ; six tea-spoons, value 30s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; one desert-spoon, value 6s.; one broach, value 6s.; one seal stone, value 5s.; two rings, value. 10s.; one snuff-box, value 3s., and one 10l. bank note , the goods and property of William Mott .

JOHN KEILY. I rent a house in Castle-street. Oxford-market, in the parish of St. Marylebone ; Mr. Mott lodged with me. On the 21st of May I was at home all day.

WILLIAM MOTT . I lodge with Keily, in the front room on the second floor; I went out about three o'clock in the afternoon, locked my door, and left the property in my room, and my nephew's watch, his name is George Doubikin - He is in the 3d regiment of Guards, to which regiment the prisoners also belong; it was a silver watch, a chain, one seal, and a key, the rest of the things were all safe; one of the rings was an old-fashioned mourning ring, with an urn worked in hair, the motto was " William Mott , Esq. obit October 14, 1771." There were also an old paste ring, a crystal, ready cut for a seal, and a 10l. bank note, which I had received on the 9th of April, at the Long Annuity Dividend Office, I took the number and date of it when I received it-it was in a small box, which was locked, and contained all the property. I came home between four and five o'clock, and missed the property. I knew the prisoner, Pitfield, before, he had called upon me with my nephew. I have seen the 10l. note and the watch since, but have not seen the rest of the property.

GEORGE DOUBIKIN . I am Mott's nephew. I left my watch with my uncle on the 20th of May; on the 21st I saw the prisoner, Pitfield, about nine o'clock in the morning, he asked me where I was going, I told him I was going to the Docks, on guard; he asked me where my watch was - I told him it was at Mott's - He then left me. He knew that my duty at the Docks would keep me twenty-four hours-as we always march off at ten o'clock, and stay twenty-four hours, which is the regular way. He had been to Mott's with me twice before this, and knew he was my uncle. About a week or ten days before this happened he advised me to leave my watch at home, that it might not be made away with.

MARY ANN SULLIVAN . I am Mr. Keily's servant. On the day that the apartment was robbed, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming down stairs, and met the prisoner, Pitfield, on the first-floor stairs, he went to Mr. Mott's apartment-our street - door is always left open. I had seen him with Mr. Mott's nephew two or three times before, and knew him. I told him Mr. Mott was not at home - He did not ask me any questions; he then went up, and I saw no more of him. I went into the parlour, stopped there about ten minutes, and then saw him come down again and go out, I did not speak to him; before I saw him come down I went out at the side door, and saw a person standing under the gateway, very much like the prisoner, Jackson, dressed as a soldier. I am not sure it was him. I am certain Pitfield is the man that went up stairs.

Court. Q. Do you think that seeing Jackson in custody makes you believe he is the man - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HOGG . I live with my parents, in Keily's house. On the day of the robbery, between four and five o'clock, I was playing on the stairs, and saw the prisoner, Pitfield, on the staircase of the second-floor, I said nothing to him, but saw him go into Mott's room; he was pulling the door about - I do not know how he got in, he had no key; I went out for an errand, and did not see him come out. When I went out I saw a man under the gateway, I believe it was Jackson, I only looked at him as I passed him; I took notice of him because I had seen Pitfield(who is also a soldier), up stairs.

Court. Q. Did you say he opened the door - A. He pulled it about with his hands; when he went into the room he pulled the door to. I returned in five minutes, the soldier was still under the gateway when I came back, I heard of the robbery the same afternoon.

Q. Did you not tell the magistrate that Jackson was the man - A. I could not say that it was him. I think if I had seen him with more soldiers I could have picked him out.

JAMES SCHOFIELD. I am in the same regiment with the prisoners and Doubikin. On the evening of the 21st of May, between nine and ten o'clock, I was at the King's Head, public-house, in the Tower, with the prisoner, Pitfield - He had a silver watch with a metal chain. I saw something in his other hand, but do not know what it was. He changed a 1l. note to pay for his beer.

CHARLES JAMES JOYCE. I am shopman to Graham and Stokes, pawnbrokers, Strutton-ground; I have a watch which was pledged by the prisoner, Pitfield, the 23d of May, for 1l., in the morning before twelve o'clock, in the name of James Lane. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM KINGHAM. I am a waiter at the Gun Tavern, Pimlico. On the 24th of May, the prisoner, Pitfield, and two more men, one a soldier, and the other a blacksmith, were at our house, one of them gave me a 10l. note; I took it to Mr. Clancey and changed it. I am sure Pitfield was one of the men. Jackson was not one. A man of the name of Palmer was one of them.

JOHN CLANCEY. I am a haberdasher, and live at Pimlico. On the 22d of May Kingham brought me a 10l. note; I changed it for him, and put my mark on it.

WILLIAM HOOLD . I am a clerk in the Accountant's Office, in the Bank; I produce the note-it came regularly into our office.

JOHN CLANCEY. It is the same, it has my private mark on it. It has also the name of Shand on it, who is the andlord of the tavern.

JAMES BARTON . I am a clerk in the Dividend Office(looks at his ledger), from my entry, I can say I paid that note, No. 12,808, dated 5th of March, 1817, to a person signing the name of Mott, for a Long Annuity Dividend.

WILLIAM MOTT . The dividend warrant has my signature.

DANIEL DOLPHIN . I am servant to Mr. Morritt, pawnbroker, York-street, Covent-garden. On the 22d or 23d of May, the prisoner, Jackson, brought two or three rings to our shop, one of them had an urn on it, and the name of " William Mott , Esq." it was an old-fashioned mourning ring; he also brought a piece of crystal, cut ready to be set in a seal; we declined buying them, because they were old-fashioned.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody; Pitfield was taken on the Friday after the robbery, and examined the next day. Hogg saw him on the 26th.

PITFIELD, in his Defence, stated, that Mr. Mott took him to his lodgings, and gave him the watch to induce him to consent to certain indecencies, which so alarmed him that he ran out of the room with it, and then pledged it.

JACKSON'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

WILLIAM MOTT re-examined. Q. Did you, on the 21st of May, invite Pitfield to your lodgings - A. I did not; I was not out of the house all day. It was a very wet day - I did not see him at all that day.

Q. Did you at any time ever give him your nephew's watch - A. No; nor did I ever make any proposal to him of the nature he has alluded to, at any time whatever. Doubikin married my neice. I was at home until eleven o'clock, I then locked my door, went down, and spent the afternoon with my landlord, stopped there until about five o'clock, I then went up stairs and found my door broken open.

Q. Then you was actually at home at the time of the robbery - A. I was in the parlour with my landlord. The prisoner has spoken falsely.

JOHN KEILY (called on the part of the prisoner PIT-FIELD). I was at home all day-Mr. Mott came into my apartment between four and five o'clock, before the robbery, and stopped until it was found out. He set half an hour with me.

DOUBIKIN re-examined. Mr. Mott is my wife's uncle. I never knew him at any time to have the least propensity to any such indecency.

PITFIELD - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

JACKSON- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-31

956. CHARLES KEMLEY and JOSEPH SMITH , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Gibbins , about one in the night of the 13th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, ten yards of linen cloth, value 1l. 10s.; one tea-caddy, value 2l.; two umbrellas, value 1l. 10s.; two sheets, value 2s.; nineteen spoons, value 4l., and one shoe, value 2s., his property; and three pair of boots, value 4l.; one umbrella, value 10s., and one pair of gaiters, value 3s. , the goods of William White ; and WILLIAM WHEELER was indicted for that he, on the same day, one pair of boots, value 1s. 6d.; two sheets, value 2s.; ten yards oflinen cloth, value 1l. 10s., and one shoe, value 2s., part and parcel of the said goods, feloniously and burglariously stolen, feloniously did receive, knowing them to have been feloniously and burglariously stolen .

JOSEPH GIBBONS . I live in Upper Thornhaugh-street, in the parish of St. Pancras . On Saturday, the 14th of June, soon after three o'clock in the morning, I was disturbed by White (my son-in-law), who lives with me; I got up, went down, and found the back-kitchen window broken open, the square of glass was broken, and the sash pushed up-the inner shutter cut through, and

the bell taken away, so that a man could put his hand through the hole and take the bar out. Three pair of boots were taken from the front kitchen-the plate was taken out of the celleret drawer in the dining-room - I missed the articles stated in the indictment; my cellar-door was broken open, and also my bureau. The prisoner, Wheeler, lived in China Mews, which is at the back of my house, within about sixty yards of it; his place is opposite the back of No. 16, which is two doors from my house - He is a coach-broker and dealer in marine stores. I got a search-warrant about three o'clock the same afternoon, and went with Plank and Jefferies to his house. We found the seven yards of linen cloth stuffed in his mattress under his bed - A pair of the sheets were in the same mattress. We found my wife's shoe in an old chariot. Mr. White's boots were also found among some rubbish. I told Wheeler that we came to search for my things - He said he had nothing, and that we were welcome. When I got up between three and four o'clock in the morning, I saw Wheeler looking out of his place, but did not suspect him-it was known in the neighbourhood that we were robbed.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Wheeler deals in old things. The door of his place was open.

WILLIAM WHITE . I am Mr. Gibbons's son-in-law. The night before the robbery, about eleven o'clock, I saw the shutter closed and barred, and the bell put up. About three o'clock in the morning I heard the rattle sprung; I alarmed my father, went down, and found the things as he has described. I missed two umbrellas, a hat, and a pair of boots. I went into the garden, and saw footsteps which I traced quite to the wall, and the other side of the wall, I observed several persons looking over the wall of the next house, No. 15-the watchman gave the alarm. I went out, and I believe I saw Wheeler standing at his loft-door.

GEORGE BICK . I am coachman to Mr. Smith, whose carriage is kept in China Mews. I sleep over the coach-house. On the 14th of June, about a quarter after three o'clock. I heard a dog barking - I went to the window, and looked into the Mews. I saw a man coming out of No. 15 in the Mews, which is also No. 15, Thornhaugh-street-my stable comes against No. 15, Thornhaugh-street-it is a wash-house. A person going in there could get out of the garden of No. 15, and over the wall to No. 14. He had three umbrellas under his arm, and ran across towards Wheeler's. I do not know that he went in - I could not see, as a carriage stood before the door. I dressed myself and came down, and ran to the washhouse, but could see no person-the door was open. I ran towards Wheeler's, and looked into the boots of the carriages which stood there, to see if any property was concealed there, but found none. Stooping by the door, I heard a talking in his stable, and called out, "Wheeler, are you up?" He answered, "Yes, Captain." His voice came from within the stable-the door was shut. He said a person knocked him up, and said he was broken down. I told him a man had run across from No. 15, with three umbrellas. He said he had just been to the gateway, and had seen no person; the gateway of the Mews fronts his stable; I went round but could see no person; and as I returned I saw Wheeler talking to the watchman.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. It was quite light-the prisoner, when he ran across, appeared as if he had the yellow jaundice.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Wheeler did not let me in - I did not ask him. I heard a talking in his stable.

MATTIHAS RALPH. I am the watchman of China Mews, Upper, Thornhaugh-street. As I was calling half-past three o'clock, I saw Wheeler looking over his half-batch; he said, "Watchman, there is a man come out of the doorway under the lamp (which is No.15), and is gone round the corner, and the coachman after him." I sprung my rattle and went round, but could see no person. I went to the wash-house door of No. 15, and found some broken bottles there, and some wine in them. I found the other door was on the latch, and went into the garden, and saw several footsteps which led over the walls of 16 and 14 - They went close up to the walls on each side. Wheeler had not got his coat on. There was no appearance of a carriage having broken down.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. My beat is in Thornhaugh-street. I did not go to look if a carriage had been broken done.

SAMUEL PLANK. I went with a warrant to search Wheeler's premises. I asked him if he had heard of Mr. Gibbons being robbed? he said he had. I asked him if any person could have concealed property there without his knowledge? he said that it could not be without his knowledge. I told him we came to search his premises - He said, "you are perfectly welcome, there is nothing here." We went up stairs, and between the sacking and his bed, in an old hair mattress, we found the piece of linen and two sheets stuffed into the mattress. At the further end of the stable, behind a great deal of lumber, in an old chaise seat we found a pair of boots. Mr. Gibbons gave me the shoe out of a coach-body - We also found an umbrella. I went to Wheeler, and asked him again if it was possible for any thing to be concealed without his knowledge? he said it could not. I shewed him the boots and shoe-he said he knew nothing about them, and could not tell how they came there. We then went up to, make a second search - He was present when we found the linen. On our going up the second time he appeared much agitated, and said "as you have found these things, it is of no use denying it. I will tell you the truth." He said, two men came to him on the morning between two and three, and called him up, saying there had been a coach broken down, and they wanted something to repair it-that they brought the things and asked him to take care of them, and they would call in the morning or afternoon for them, and he expected one of them almost immediately. We were then in the hay-loft. At that instant he said, "here is one of them coming up the loft-stairs." I saw Kemley coming up. The moment he saw me, he turned round, and endeavoured to run down - He knew me to be an officer; I secured him and pulled him up. I asked him what he came there for? he said for nothing. I left him with Jefferies, and asked Wheeler if he knew the other - He said he should. I asked him to go with me, and see if he was waiting about the house. He went to several places with me, and at last to the King's Head, in the New Road, we found Smith there-Wheeler pointed him out as the other man. I told him I

came to apprehend him for a felony. He had a drab great coat on, and a whip in his hand - He was behind the table; he saw Wheeler with me - He told me I should not take him. I caught hold of his whip - We struggled together for sometime; several in the tap-room encouraged him. He got his coat off - I asked Wheeler to assist me, which he did, and we secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I knew Wheeler before, and have reason to believe he knew me. I never had any conversation with him.

CHARLES JEFFERIES. I was with Plank, and heard the conversation with Wheeler. He said it was of no use to deny it, and he would tell us all about it, as it would be better for them to be hanged than him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The Mews is a thoroughfare, and leads into the fields-Wheeler's house does not command a view of the fields.

GEORGE BICK re-examined. Q. You said you saw a tall man cross the Mews, which looked as if he had the yellow jaundice - A. Yes; I believe the prisoner, Smith, to be the man - I had seen him before.

Cross-examined. I did not say he was the man before, because I was not asked - I mean positively to say he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KEMLEY- NOT GUILTY .

SMITH. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

WHEELER. - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-32

957. JOHN BOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one pair of boots, value 15s. , the goods of Robert Essex .

RICHARD JOHN BOYCE . I am servant to Mr. Essex, who is a pawnbroker , in Aldersgate-street . On the 24th of May, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was told that the boots were taken from the door. I went out and saw a man running, he was pursued by Warren, who secured him.

JAMES POUNCE . I am a gentleman's servant. I was was passing by the shop, and saw the prisoner go up to the shop and take the boots off the rail; I gave information-he was pursued and taken.

SAMUEL WARREN. I am an officer. I was coming up Silver-street, and heard the alarm, and joined in the pursuit of the prisoner, he run up a court where there was no thoroughfare, and I secured him and found the boots just by him. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-33

958. MARY ARNOLD , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , one watch, value 1l.; one chain, value 2s. 6d.; two seals, value 10s.; and one key, value 6d., the goods of Alexander Strachan , from his person .

ALEXANDER STRACHAN . I am a pastry-cook . On the 24th of June, about half past twelve at night, I was in Bishopsgate-street , going to my work, the prisoner accosted me, and wanted me to go home with her; I told her I wanted nothing with her; she still intruded, and I told her to go along, she went, and I immediately missed my watch, I run after her and laid hold of her. She fell down, and said she had thrown my watch away. The watchman secured her.

EDWARD MOULDER. I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutor in pursuit of the prisoner; she fell down, and said she had thrown the watch into the road, I picked it up, and gave it to him.

JOHN MENZIES . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, I secured the prisoner; she said she had thrown the watch away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-34

959. DAVID AUSTIN and WILLIAM LEE , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Gastineau , from his person .

HENRY GASTINEAU . I am an artist . On the 25th of June, I was at the end of Fleet-street , a person told me my handkerchief was gone, and produced it.

JOHN HUGGINS . I am a tide-waiter. On the 25th of June, I was going up Fleet-market, and saw the two prisoners following several gentleman; the prosecutor passed and they turned round and followed him, Lee put his hand into his pocket and drew his handkerchief half out, and they followed him until they came to the corner of Bridge-street ; Austin then took it quite out; I secured him and took it out of his hand. Cooke took Lee.

CHARLES COOKF . I was going up Fleet-street, and met Huggins, who told me to watch the prisoners. Lee said to Austin, you had better stop till you come to the next turning, we followed them to Bridge-street, and Austin then took it out. I secured Lee.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

AUSTIN'S Defence. The handkerchief dropped between us; there were ten or twelve people round.

AUSTIN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-35

960. THOMAS BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , twelve pounds weight of lead, value 2s., belonging to Edward Grey , William Whitworth , and Samuel Gilbee , from the dwelling-house of Samuel Gilbee .

SAMUEL GILBEE. I am a linen-draper , living in Leadenhall-street . On the 23d of May I lost some of the water-pipe out of my cellar. I had lost a great deal a few days before.

JOHN WILLIAMS. I am an insurance-broker. I saw the prisoner in the cellar, and he said he came there for a necessary purpose, he had a bag with him; I asked him what was in it, he said cinders, it contained a great deal of leaden pipe. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-36

961. JOHN ELDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , one pair of trowsers, value 11s. , the goods of Thomas Blacket .

WILLIAM TRAPP . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Blacket, who is a tailor , living in Newgate-street . On the 5th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, the trowsers hung inside the shop at the door, I came to the front of the shop and saw them hanging partly down, a man in a green coat came and drew them quite off, and gave them to the prisoner; I followed them, they both had hold of the trowsers. I secured the prisoner but the other got away; they fell between them.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. I saw both take hold of them.

Prisoner's Defence. A man shoved me against him, and he secured me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-37

962. WILLIAM MILES and CHARLES DOUGLAS , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , one handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Houseman , from his person .

WILLIAM HOUSEMAN. On the 23d of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, during the fire at Mr. Mist's house, I was passing up Fleet-street ; I pressed my handkerchief down in my pocket, and occasionally felt to see that it was safe, soon after I missed it; and saw it found on the prisoner, Miles.

THOMAS WHITE . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners in the crowd, and saw them attempt several pockets, they were watching Mr. Houseman; at last I saw the prisoner, Douglas, make a motion which induced me to suspect them. I seized them, and found the handkerchief upon Miles, and Houseman claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MILES'S Defence. I picked it up.

MILES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

DOUGLAS- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-38

963. JOSEPH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , one handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Bosworth , from his person .

JOHN BOSWORTH . I am an herald-painter . On the 29th of May, I was passing down Holborn, about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard the cry of "stop thief," and saw the prisoner run from behind me; Smith followed after him; the prisoner threw a handkerchief down, Thompson picked it up, I found it to be mine.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a watchman. I was with Thompson, I saw the prisoner and another man, standing, watching the people passing. When Mr. Bosworth came by, they followed him towards Brook-street, the prisoner took the handkerchief half out, and then quite took it; he turned round, saw me and ran off. I called out stop thief, and seized him, the prisoner threw the handkerchief down. I never lost sight of him.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am an officer. Smith has spoken correctly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence, and I beg for mercy. I have been misled by wicked boys, who said they would have some fun. I did not know what they meant to do.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-39

964. BENJAMIN BROWN and THOMAS NEWMAN , were indicted for feloniously having in their possession and custody, two forged Bank of England notes, knowing them to be forged .

To which indictment the prisoners pleaded.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

965, JOHN GRIGG and JOHN BAMBER , were indicted for a like offence.

The prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

966. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for a like offence.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-40

967. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously disposing of, and putting away a forged Bank of England note, for the payment of 1l., he well knowing it to be forged, with the intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . - DEATH .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-41

968. BENJAMIN BROWN and SAMUEL NEWMAN were indicted for forgery .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

969. JOHN GRIGG and JOHN BAMBER were indicted for the like offence.

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

970. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for the like offence.

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-42

971. THOMAS WHITE , WILLIAM POTTER , JOSEPH SALMON , JAMES CARTER , and ROBERT MILTON , were indicted, for that they, with other persons unknown, to the number of twelve or more, on the 27th of May , at Heston , unlawfully, riotously, and tumultuously, did assemble together to the disturbance of the public peace, and that they being ordered (by the Rev. Henry Scott Trimmer , clerk, one of the Justices of the Peace,) to depart quietly and peaceably to their several habitations and lawful occupations, upon the pains contained in the Act made for preventing tumults, and not with standing the said proclamation was so made; openly, feloniously, and tumultuously, did remain and continue together, for the space of one hour after the proclamation was made, against the statute .

MR. ANDREWS, on the part of the prosecution, stated that there were difficulties in this case, which induced him to decline offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-43

972. FLORENCE M'CARTHY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Willis , about ten o'clock on the night of the 3d of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one bed, value 1l. 5s., and one quilt, value 6s. , his property.

ANN WILLIS . I am the wife of Charles Willis , who lives in Farmer-street, Shadwell . On the 10th of June, about half past eight o'clock, I went out, locked my door and left the key with Newman to make the bed, she lives two doors from me; she fetched me back about ten o'clock, I found the door broken open, and the bed gone. I saw it again at the office.

MARIA NEWMAN . I went to make the bed at a quarter after ten o'clock, and I saw the door broken open, and the bed gone.

GEORGE BAILEY . I am a patrol. I met the prisoner, about twenty minutes after ten o'clock at night, on the 3d of June, in Old Gravel-lane, with the bed and quilt on his shoulder, it was about 200 yards from Willis's house; he said he was going to sell it in Rosemary-lane. I secured him. It was just dark.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought in with the bed and quilt, he said they were his own. I asked him what it was stuffed with, he said feathers and cotton. It was not so.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry it to Rosemary-lane.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing only .

Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-44

973. JAMES HIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , in a certain out-house, belonging to the dwelling-house of Lawrence Rowe , one 5s. bank dollar, and two 1l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS CROUCH. I am servant to Mr. Lawrence Rowe, who lives at Brentford , the prisoner was also in his service. On the 16th of June, in the evening, I observed him with his body half in and half out of the counting-house-window, which is six feet from the ground, it pushes up; the counting-house is about five feet from the dwelling-house; there is an outward wall which surrounds both, I told the groom and he came back to look, we then saw him getting down the wall and pulling the window after him. I asked him what business he had to get up to the counting-house that way, he said he had been for the keys to lock the coal-warehouse. I told him he could not have been for that, for he had them out in the morning. He said if he had acted wrong he would take them back; I did not see them in his hand, I told him to do so. He went away, and came back in about six minutes, and told me he knew he had acted wrong, but he had not taken anything. I told him I did not say he had; he said I might search him if I chose. I told him I should not, for I had no business to search him, he then said, you will not say any thing to my master, will you? I told him if I did not the rest of the men would, for they all knew it - He then left me.

Court. Q. When he first left you did he go out of your sight - A. Yes.

GEORGE CARVER . I am the constable of Brentford. On the 16th of June, Mr. Thomas Rowe applied to me, about a quarter after eight o'clock, I went with him to look for the prisoner. I found him at the Magpie, about a quarter of a mile off; it was about twenty minutes before nine. I secured him and found a 1l. bank note, No. 53,061, and 24s. in silver on him, there was no dollar among the silver. I then went to Franklin's and got a 1l. note from him, No. 54,614, I showed them to Mr. Rowe. As I was taking him along he said he had not taken it.

JOHN FRANKLIN. I keep the Magpie, at Brentford. On the night of the 16th of June, the prisoner came to my house and had three pots of porter, he staid there about an hour; he was not sober when he came in; he paid me a 1l. note and I gave him the change, and I put it into my pocket with others; the officer picked a note out, I cannot say that it was the one I received from the prisoner, I had ten or eleven altogether. I took two or three 1l. notes the same day.

THOMAS BARRY ROWE . I am the son of Lawrence Rowe, the prisoner was in his employ in June last. The counting-house is in an enclosed yard, and used with the dwelling-house, it is one renting, and is in the parish of Ealing. On the 16th of June, about six o'clock, I left the counting-house; I had seen the notes there that very evening, there were forty or fifty 1l. notes, Carver brought me two notes; they are part of those that were there that evening, they have my marks on them; they have the name of Fantham on them, I had received them that day about one o'clock. I did not pay them to the prisoner.

Court. Q. Did you tell the constable of any marks by which you should know them - A. I think I did.

GEORGE CARVER . Mr. Rowe shewed me the name on the note I took from the prisoner, which enabled me to pick the other out from Mr. Franklin's notes, there was only one of that name.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-45

974. JOHN GEORGE DELBRIDGE was indicted for feloniously and sacrilegiously stealing, on the 15th of June , two scarfs, value 2l., the property of the Rev. William Greenlaw ; one book, value 2s., the property of the Rev. Alexander Greenlaw ; one pair of shoe-buckles, value 2s, the property of Charles Avins ; two books, value 4s, the property of James Stanborough , and seven loaves of bread, value 7d., the property of the Overseers of the Poor of the parish of Isleworth , in the church of the said parish .

CHARLES AVINS . I am the clerk of the parish of All Saints, Isleworth . On Saturday, the 14th of June, I went to the church in the evening, and left all safe. I keep one key, the curate and sexton have each a key. I went to it again the next morning (Sunday), at half-past nine o'clock, and found the vestry window opened - A pain of glass had been taken out close to the latch, apparently for the purpose of admitting a hand to open it. The iron chest had been forced. I missed seven 1d. loaves, and a pair of black buckles out of the closet over the chest, which had also been forced open-they were my property. I missed two black scarfs out of another chest, belonging to the Rev. Mr. Greenlaw, the lecturer, and a quantity of prayer-books belonging to different persons, and a latin bible, in four volumes.

JOHN BUCKLEY . I am in the Life-Guards. On the 21st of June, I went into the Park in search of a person, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner laying down by a clump of trees, apparently asleep; I spoke several times to him, and asked him where he came from, at last he got up, and asked what time it was. I took him into custody, and brought him to the barracks, afterwards the officers came and searched him.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer. On the morning of the 21st of June, I searched the prisoner at Knights-bridge Barracks; he was sitting close against the wall. I found sixteen duplicates down at the bottom of his breeches, and a black scarf, under his shirt, next to his skin, divided into two pieces.

JAMES MOSMAN . I am in the Life-Guards. I found a pair of black buckles near the wall, outside the room where the prisoner was confined - They were in one of the air-holes in the wall - He could reach the hole from where he sat; I found them there about twenty minutes or half an hour after he left the Barracks. I was sentry over him.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not three or four more sitting by me, in custody - A. There was one, who sat at the other end of the form while I was sentry; we took up three men that night.

HUGH WRAY. I am servant to Mr. Dry, pawnbroker, South-street, Manchester-square. I have two prayer-books, which, I believe, I received from the prisoner. I took in one of them myself on the 17th of June, in the name of James Wood , for 2s. - I do not know who brought it. I took in another on the 18th of June, it has the name of James Stanborough written in it - I believe I received this from the prisoner. I wrote a ticket for the person who brought it, the one found on the prisoner is it; it is pledged in the name of James Stanborough , for 2s. 6d. On the next day (the 19th), I took in a French bible, which is also pledged in the name of Stanborough. I believe the prisoner to be the man who brought it, as the duplicate found on him is mine. All three of them are in my hand-writing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the duplicates in the Park that evening. I was confined with other persons.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-46

975. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Phipps , on the King's highway, on the 14th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one coat, value 7s.; one pair of trowsers, value 10s.; two waistcoats, value 6s., and one handkerchief, value 6d. , his property.

JOHN PHIPPS. On the 14th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Church-street, Bethnal-green; at the end of Cock-lane , the prisoner came behind me and struck me on my arm, and snatched my bundle from me, which contained the articles stated in the indictment; I was not aware of his coming, and did not resist-the bundle fell from me when he struck me. I followed behind him. He was secured. I am certain he is the man. It was a clear night.

WILLIAM IRONS . I am a patrol. I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running. I secured him. Phipps said he was the man.

JESSEE LUDFORD. I am a weaver. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running, with a bundle under his arm; as he passed, me he said, "D-n me, I shall get off now." I pursued, and saw him throw it away. I never lost sight of him till he was secured.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-47

976. GEORGE HIDE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , one watch, value 3l., and one book, value 3s., the goods of John Phillip Waeick , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN PHILLIP WAEICK . I am a baker , and live in Tottenham-court-road , the prisoner lodged in my house. On the 22d of April he left me - I had given him notice. On the 19th of June I missed my watch out of the bake-house, where it usually hung.

JAMES ALDOUS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street, Soho. On the 19th of April, the watch was pledged with me; I do not know who pledged it. The duplicate found on the prisoner is mine.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. On the 2d of May, the prisoner was in custody, he told me that he lived at No. 17, Cumberland-street, Middlesex Hospital. I went there, and opened the garret-door with a key that he gave me, and found the duplicate of the watch pledged with Aldous.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Of stealing, to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-48

977. THOMAS COLEMAN and THOMAS SAVELL , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , four bullocks, price 40l. , the property of Richard Wallis ; and JAMES ROGERS and THOMAS BRACE for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

RICHARD WALLIS . I am a farmer , living at Childerditch, in Essex; part of my farm is at Warley . On the 12th of June, I had twelve bullocks in my field, on the 14th I missed four of them; I saw them again at Haggerston, near Hackney, in the possession of Smith, on the 16th, and knew them to be mine - I have not the least doubt of it; they were Highland scots. I described them before I saw them.

JAMES CHAMPION . I am Wallis's son-in-law. I saw his bullocks, on the 12th of June, in the field at Warley-they were all right then; I missed four of them the next evening. The gate of the field was off its hinges, it was fast the night before. I saw them again on the 17th, in possession of Smith, at Haggerston. I am sure they are the same, I have seen them frequently.

WILLIAM COPLAND . I live at Childerditch. I know the field where Mr. Wallis keeps his cattle, I live about seventy roods from it. On the 12th of June, the day they were stolen at night, I saw the prisoners, Coleman and Savell, go by my shop about twelve o'clock in the day. I did not see them again that day - I knew Coleman before.

GEORGE COPLAND . I am the last witness's brother, and live with him. On Thursday, the 12th of June, I saw the prisoners, Coleman and Savell, about twelve o'clock, at the same time that my brother did. I saw them again at nine o'clock in the evening, and noticed them particularly - They were strangers to me.

Court. Q. Which way were they going when you first saw them - A. They were coming from the field. When I saw them at nine o'clock they were going towards it. I heard of the robbery the next night.

THOMAS COOK . I am a corn-dealer, and live in Kingsland-road. On the 13th of June, about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners, Coleman and Savell, in the Kingsland-road - I never saw them before; they were driving four oxen, they were Highland Scots; they drove them out of the road into a bye lane-they drove them into Mr. Clement's fields, and over some very high banks into Mr. Smith's field; there was no road, only a footpath. I went into Smith's field and told him-they went away directly.

Court. Q. What is the distance from Childerditch to this place - A. Twenty-two miles.

Q. Is it possible, between nine o'clock at night, and half-past six in the morning, to drive cattle that distance - A. It is possible.

JOHN SMITH. I live at Haggerston, in the county of Middlesex, and in the parish of Shoreditch. Cook informed me that four bullocks had been put into my field. I went there, and saw the prisoners, Coleman and Savell, and asked them who gave them authority to put them in my field - I am sure they are the men. They both said they brought them by Rogers's order - I knew Rogers very well. I afterwards saw Rogers (in about an hour and a quarter), and asked him how he came to put the beasts into my field; he said they should not be there above half an hour. I told him what the prisoners had said to me. He said if I liked to take them on my own account at 40l. I might have them. I told him I thought they had not come honestly by them, and I would have nothing to do with them, nor should they be in my field. I called Rogers out-all the four prisoners were together. I met Brace before I had seen Rogers; he asked me if I had seen Rogers, before I suspected him-this was after I had seen Coleman and Savell; he said Rogers ought to have been there at half-past four o'clock in the morning, to take the bullocks away, for they ought to have been killed before that time. He said they had brought the beasts twenty-one miles. I gave information at the Public Office.

Q. Do you recollect (on Tuesday night, the 10th), any conversation between Rogers, Brace and Savell about a dog - A. Yes; they came to me, and asked me to lend them a dog to go into the country. They said there were four deer lying in a gentleman's paddock, and they wanted to get them. I told them I had not got one.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. They were all three together. I will swear that I never had any disagreement with Brace - I never saw him before that day. I saw Rogers at his own house. The cattle were quite broken down and overcome-their tongues hung out of their mouths.

THOMAS MAYCOCK . I am a constable of Shoreditch. From information that I received on the 13th of June, I went to Smith's field. In going there, I met the prisoner, Brace, coming from the field-it was about seven o'clock in the morning-the cattle were laying down. He went across Haggerston to the Kingsland-road, and there I saw him join Coleman and Savell; I was some distance off. I and Armstrong went to the Hackney-road, and took Brace and Rogers. I told Brace I apprehended him on suspicion of stealing beasts - He said he knew nothing of any beasts; he had just come from the Eagle and Child,(which is on Epping Forest), and had slept there that night. We found Coleman and Savell at a public-house in the Kingsland-road. I told Savell I took him on suspicion of stealing four beasts - He said he knew nothing of any, but found four on the road near the turnpike.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. Maycock has spoken correctly. I took Coleman in the Kingsland-road - I told him I took him on suspicion of stealing four bullocks - He said he knew nothing about any beasts whatever. I asked him if he knew a man named Rogers, and if he had not been at his house that morning? He said he knew no such a man, nor had he been to his house. When I took Rogers I told him what it was for - He said he knew nothing about any beasts.

COLEMAN'S Defence. I know nothing about them - I was going to Smithfield to buy a horse.

SAVELL'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

ROGERS'S Defence. I never saw either of them. Smith called me out, and asked me to lend him a horse; the officer took me.

SMITH re-examined. I said I wanted a horse. The officer told me to make some excuse-when I first went to them, I found them all four together.

COLEMAN. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

SAVELL. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

ROGERS. - NOT GUILTY .

BRACE. - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-49

978. GEORGE WATSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joshua Wrenn , the younger , on the King's highway, on the 13th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one bag, value 6d., and 1l. 14s. 11 1/2d. in copper monies numbered , the goods and monies of Joshua Wrenn the elder .

JOSHUA WRENN , JUN. I am the son of Joshua Wrenn . On Friday evening, the 13th of June, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I was coming through Princes-street, Finsbury-square, with the bag, containing 1l. 14s. 11 1/2d. in halfpence, on my shoulder-it was my father's money-and saw three men; one of them came up to me, and rubbed a handful snuff down my face and into my eyes; it made them smart afterwards, but not directly; another man snatched the bag off my shoulder, and ran away with it. I ran after him, and called out stop thief! - I am certain the prisoner is the man that took my bag from me-it was a moon-light night; he let the bag fall. Thompson and Forbes ran after him with me; I saw Thompson lay hold of him. He was not out of my sight until Thompson laid hold of him. I did not see him afterwards. I picked the bag up.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am a constable. On the 13th of June, I and Forbes were in Barbican, and saw the prisoner, with two more, loitering about, we followed them all three into Finsbury-square, they followed the boy across the square, and then crossed over on the opposite side in Princes-street, and got before him and then crossed, and all three rushed upon him at once - They faced him; I was not near enough to see them take anything from him; I heard him call out violently, the prisoner and another ran from him, I heard something fall but do not know who dropped it, I seized the prisoner, a scuffle ensued between us and he made his escape, he got about four yards from me and Forbes seized him; I found a snuff-box upon him. I brought him back to the spot, the boy had gone home, and came back to me quite agitated, the snuff run out of his mouth.

JOHN FORBES. I was with Thompson, and saw the prisoner in Barbican, I knew him before, I laid hold of him when he got away from Thompson. I am sure he is the man.

JOSHUA WRENN , SEN. (Examined by the prisoner.)

Q. When your son came home with the bag, how long was it before the officers brought me to your house - A. Not more than a minute; he went back to Thompson, I went with him, after he was brought to my house.

Q. Did not your son say he had no knowledge of me - A. Thompson said, is that the man who robbed you, he said he did not know, he was much alarmed, and did not know what he was about when he was at the office, the next morning he picked the prisoner out from twenty more.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy said I did not rob him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 41.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-50

979. WILLIAM KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 22 handkerchiefs, value 5l., the goods of Joseph Griffin , privately in his shop .

PAGE WARD . I am servant to Joseph Griffin . As I was taking down the shutters on the 9th of June, about seven o'clock in the morning, and carrying them into the private passage, I heard a noise, and looking into the shop, I saw the prisoner going out - I immediately followed him. He crossed over Ratcliff-highway, down Breeze's-hill, and in the middle of the hill I saw him throw the handkerchiefs down; when he got a little farther he threw off his hat - I still followed and secured him - He was never out of my sight; I gave him in charge - They were worth 5l. I had seen them safe on the Saturday night. Tailor picked them up. I am certain I did not discover the prisoner until I saw him going out of the door. I did not see him take the handkerchiefs.

CARR TAILOR. I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running and Ward pursuing. The prisoner dropped the handkerchiefs, and I picked them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 14.

Recommended to mercy on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-51

980. JOHN BYRNE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 20 pieces of stained paper, each piece containing 12 yards in length, value 3l., the goods of Richard Wood , privately in his shop .

RICHARD WOOD. I am a paper-hanger , and live in Hart-street, Bloomsbury . On the morning of the 30th of June I missed twenty pieces of stained paper from my shop - I had seen them the evening before at four o'clock-they were in the farthest part of my shop from the door. I was at home at eight o'clock in the evening before; I had been out before that. The same afternoon, at three o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Davies's, in High Holborn; I knew nothing of him.

EVAN DAVIES . I am a paper-hanger. On the 30th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I bought the paper of the prisoner for 2l. - he has worked for me. He told me his father (who is a paper-stainer) wanted to sell them for some money to pay a bill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Bloomsbury-square, who asked me to sell it for him. Davies gave me 1l., and told me to call for the other to-morrow. Davies sent for me, and the officer secured me. The man was to give me 5s. for selling it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-52

981. JOHN LANE was indicted for feloniously assaulting William M'Kewan on the King's highway, on the 25th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5l.; one ribbon, value 1d.; and one key, value 1s. , his property.

WILLIAM M'KEWAN. On the 25th of May, about a quarter before eleven o'clock at night, I was going down Castle-street, Bloomsbury, into Drake-street ; some person came behind me, and knocked me down into the kennel - I lost my senses for sometime-three gentlemen picked me up - I recovered myself. When I got home I missed my watch out of my fob.

JEREMIAH MAIDMANT . I am an officer. On the 25th of May, in the evening, I was at the Coach and Horses in Charles-street, Drury-lane, which is about four hundred yards from Castle-street, Bloomsbury. The prisoner came

into the house just at eleven o'clock, with a watch in his hand. He asked the landlord if he would let him leave a watch, and lend him 3s. till the morning-the landlord refused. I heard him use the word "watch." He inquired for some person, and went out up Charles-street. I followed him till he came to the end of Short's Gardens, and asked him what he had got; he said he had got nothing. I said,"have you not got a watch?"-he said he had. I asked him where he got it; he said he bought it in France when he was discharged. I asked him what he gave for it - He said 15s., but it had been in pledge, and his mother had taken it out for him the Friday before. I took it from him and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-53

982. WILLIAM DRUMMOND , ELIJAH SWAINSON , and THOMAS WAINWRIGHT , alias LEONARD , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Taylor on the King's highway, on the 19th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 5l.; one ribbon, value 6d.; two seals, value 1l. 15s; and one key, value 5s. , his property.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am clerk to the Hon. Mr. Primrose , who lives in Paper-buildings, in the Temple - I have lived six years in his service. On the 18th of June, I spent the evening at Lord Roseberry's (who is my master's brother), in Portman-square. I left there about half-past one, or a little before two o'clock in the morning. I met a friend in South Audley-street, talked a few minutes with him, and then came direct home. When I got under Temple-bar , I was stopped by three men, within about two feet of the City side of the Bar. They came up to me-two of them collared me, and the third drew my watch out of my fob; I felt it go. I can swear that the prisoners, Swainson and Drummond, are two of them. I do not know who took the watch - They surrounded and pinioned me before they took it. Swainson got hold of my arm, which I had put round Drummond's neck at the time I was trying to secure my watch. I called out, "you have robbed me!" and"watch!" I saw them hand it from one to the other, and heard the seals jibgle. Drummond's hat fell off-he picked it up, and ran away round the Bar into the Strand. I followed Swainson, who went the same way - I never lost sight of him. I came up to him before he got through the Bar. He turned into the road - I secured him, and said, "you have stolen my watch!" - He said he had not. I said he was one of the party, and gave him in charge of Allden, the watchman, who came up at my cry; we took him to St. Dunstan's watch-house-nothing was found on him. I went out with the constable into Fleet-street, Wainwright was given in charge by some person, I do not know who. I only recollect the persons of two of them. I have not recovered my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I never saw them before. It was about five minutes after three o'clock, quite daylight. I was not the least intoxicated.

THOMAS LEFEVRE. I am a collector of the City tolls. On the morning of the 19th of June, I was walking backward and forward, between Chancery-lane and Templebar, to collect the tolls; I knew all the prisoners by sight - I have known Swainson and Drummond particularly well for a fortnight. I had seen Wainwright one or two nights before. I suppose I saw him pass me, in the course of the night of the robbery, about twenty times, in company with Swainson, between Temple-bar and Chancery-lane-another person was with them, it was not Drummond. About one o'clock in the morning, I had occasion to look at a book, and went under the gas-light to look at it; the prisoners, Swainson and Wainwright, came, and stooped and looked down under my hat. Knowing them, I put the book into my pocket; they went away-this drew my attention to them. I saw them walk backward and forward several times after. About three o'clock I saw all the prisoners standing together at the end of Shire-lane, on the City side of the Bar-they were talking together, and walked backward and forward. I got very near to them at one time, and heard a voice say, "Come along over!" I do not know who spoke. They went into the road, under the archway, and on the pavement on the opposite side, on the Middlesex side of Temple-bar. I crossed over to observe them, and placed myself on the City side of the Bar, next door to Messrs. Child's banking-house. In a minute or two, I saw the prisoners, Drummond, come along directly after Mr. Taylor, who was coming towards the Bar-all the prisoners were on the Middlesex side. Drummond came under the Bar first, walking very slowly, Mr. Taylor came next, and the prisoners, Swainson and Wainwright, came behind him-Mr. Taylor was between the three. I saw Swainson and Wainwright seize him by the collar.

Q. In what situation was he at that time - A. About a foot, or a foot and a half, within the City, the farthest side of the Bar is in the City. Directly as they seized him, Drummond turned round, his back was then towards me. I saw him, just at that moment, lift his arm up, as if he had made a snatch in a hurry-that moment Mr. Taylor put his arm round Drummond's neck, and said, you have robbed me, and called out watch! While he was calling out, the prisoners, Swainson and Wainwright, laid hold of his arm, lifted it up, and Drummond got away. As soon as he got his head from under Mr. Taylor's arm, I saw him stoop down and pick his hat up which fell off in the scuffle - He picked it up with his right hand. I looked down, and saw a watch in his left hand; he ran under Temple-bar, and turned into the carriage-road, into the City again, and started up Shire-lane - I saw no more of him. I kept my eye upon the others, and heard Mr. Taylor say, "you are one of them." He laid hold of Swainson. Swainson said,"I have not got your watch." Allden took him in charge. When I found the prosecutor had not given charge of Wainwright, I kept my eye upon him - He was never out of my sight. He stood, and appeared very much alarmed. When he found he was not noticed, he walked gently up towards the watch-house-by that time Swainston had gone up the court to the watch-house. I walked by the side of Wainwright, counting some halfpence. Just as I got to the end of the watch-house court, he said to me,"Do you know what they are going to do with that poor man?" - I made no answer. He said, "Do you know whether he has taken a pocket handkerchief?" I told him I did not know, as I had my business to mind. I staid

by his side a few minutes, and the first watchman that I saw, I told that he was one of them - He was secured; a man named Turner took him. The next day I described Drummond to Gimber and Turner.

Cross-examined. Wainwright did not attempt to get away. Drummond held my place formerly. I never said right or wrong he should not have it again.

CHARLES GIMBER . I am constable of the night. On the 19th of June, about ten minutes after three o'clock, the prisoner, Swainson, was brought to the watch-house by Allden, and Taylor, the prosecutor. Nothing was found on him. He said he had not seen Taylor before. He said, that having been in trouble before, he saw the bustle, and endeavoured to avoid it, but Mr. Taylor came forward and gave him in charge. Wainwright was brought in soon after, and called himself Thomas Leonard-Mr. Taylor did not know him. Lefevre described Drummond to me, and told me his name was Drummond. I apprehended him at Waterloo. Fair on the same day. I took him into a public-house and searched him. He said,"What do you want with me? I know nothing about the matter; I know nothing about the watch - I have been in Shire-lane this morning at seven o'clock; and is it likely, that if I had got the watch that I should be without money?" This was before I searched him.

Court. Q. When you first saw him, did you tell him what you took him for - A. Not a word of the kind - I never told him what I took him for. He said he knew nothing of the watch, without having any thing said to him about it.

WILLIAM TURNER . I was with Gimber and took Drummond. Gimber has spoken correctly - He said nothing to him about the watch. He said he was there, but knew nothing about the watch.

JOHN ALLDEN . On the 19th of June I was standing by Temple-bar, on the City side - I heard the alarm - I was opposite Chancery-lane at the time; I went up immediately-Mr. Taylor had got Swainson, and gave him into my charge. I took him to the watch-house.

Court to THOMAS TAYLOR. Q. At the time the three prisoners assaulted you, did you perceive any other persons near - A. I did not. It was not in my power to see any but the three who assaulted me.

DRUMMOND'S Defence. Lefevre saw me about the Bar. I go there to see what money he takes, as I was going to buy the toll. He said I was no better than a thief, and that he would do for me in some way or other.

SWAINSON'S Defence. Unfortunately for me, Mr. Taylor has mistaken me for the right man. I was coming by, saw the scuffle, and tried to avoid it. Lefevre has sworn falsely - I was not about the Bar before.

DRUMMOND - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

SWAINSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 40.

WAINWRIGHT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-54

983. EDWARD EVANS and RICHARD WRIGHT , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , one handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Gaulter , from his person .

WILLIAM GAULTER . I am a printer , and live in the City-road. On the 27th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was going towards Holborn; as I was crossing Giltspur-street, the officer told me I had lost my handkerchief - I missed it; I had felt it safe when I was in Newgate-street - he had Evans in custody; I saw it in Evans's hand. I had seen Evans looking into the confectioner's shop in Newgate-street, while I was there.

THOMAS BROMLEY . I am a constable. On the 27th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming along Skinner-street, and observed the two prisoners lurking about the door of an oil-shop, which made me watch them. They came into Newgate-street; Mr. Gaulter came out of a pastrycook's shop. They passed the door before he came out, and returned again. Wright came back, and left Evans standing towards Cheapside. Immediately as Mr. Gaulter passed, Wright turned round and fellowed him. Evans came up to him-they walked together, and Wright put his hand into Mr. Gaulter's coat-pocket, took out the handkerchief, and gave it to Evans. I seized Evans with it in his hand-Wright turned up towards Giltspur-street Compter. I called out stop thief! - He was secured immediately. Evans got from me; he was stopped immediately.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EVANS'S Defence. Necessity compelled me to commit the offence.

WRIGHT'S Defence. Necessity compelled me to do it.

EVANS. - GUILTY . Aged 27.

WRIGHT. - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-55

984. DANIEL SYMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th November, 1815 , two waistcoats, value 2l. 12s. 6d.; one pair of breeches, value 2l.; and one handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Aaron Israel .

AARON ISRAEL . I am a tailor , and lives in Duke's-place , Commercial-road. In Nov. 1815, the prisoner came from the country and lodged at Howard's coffee-house, Duke's-place. I was there one evening and he gave me an order for a waistcoat and pair of breeches, I made them, and took them home on the 25th, I gave them, to him upon his credit, he said he would pay me in an hour. I never saw him afterwards, the articles stated in the indictment were in the bundle with his things, but were not for him, he took them also; I never saw him again till the 19th of May last. I had him secured.

BENJAMIN BENJAMINS . I keep the coffee-house, I saw Mr. Israel deliver the bundle to the prisoner, he laid it on the table and said there was Symons's clothes; he said he would try them on and went away. I never saw him again.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Exeter. I told Israel I could not pay for the clothes at present, he said he would trust me; I went to Bath; it has never been in my power to pay him; there were no other clothes with them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-56

985. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 4th of June , one shawl, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Trout .

THOMAS TROUT. I am a linen-draper , and lives in Bishopsgate-street. On the 4th of June, the prisoner

came into my shop to match a piece of print, I saw her take it off the counter and put it under her great coat, I let her go to the door and then stopped her, and took it from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-57

986. JONATHAN COOPER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Collins on the King's highway, on the 2d of June , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2l. 5s. , his property.

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-58

987. HARRIET MOLYNEUX HAMILTON was indicted, for that she, on the 6th of June , did feloniously and maliciously by fraud, take and carry away, a certain male child, under the age of ten years; to wit, about the age of six months, with intent to deprive Henry Porter , and Martha his wife , the parents of the said child, of the possession of it, by concealing and stealing it from them its parents, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to deprive Louisa Wood , a person having the lawful care and charge of the said child, of the possession of it.

THIRD COUNT, the same as the first, only stating her intent to be to steal, one beaver hat and feather, value 4s.; one cloth cloak, value 4s.; one frock, value 2s.; two petticoats, value 2s.; one shirt, value 6d.; one cap, and a pair of socks, value 3s., the property of the said Henry Porter , and being upon and about the said child, against the statute.

LOUISA WOOD. I am servant to Mr. Porter, who lives in Quebec-street. I am fourteen years of age. On the 6th of June, I had the care of his little boy, who was six months old that day; I was by Lady Montague's house with two more girls, who also had children, the prisoner came up to me and said what a pretty child it was; she gave the other girls a penny, and told them to go and take a walk which they did; after they were gone, she asked me to go on an errand for her, she said I will hold your child while you go, I said I would take it with me; she told me to go to No. 21, Lower Berkeley-street, and she took the child out of my hands, and said I shall sit here till you come back. This was in George-street, she sat at the step of a door; she gave me sixpence, and said she would give me sixpence more, and told me to go and tell a young woman to come directly. I went, and found there was only nineteen houses in the street; when I came back she was gone and the child also. I was alarmed.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. It was after six o'clock in the evening. The girls who were with me live in Mr. Porter's house; Mrs. Porter desired me to stay with these girls and not to trust myself alone; the prisoner was not dressed as she is now. When I first got home my mistress was gone to look for the child. I described the prisoner when she returned, and said I should know her again; the prisoner said I could not knock at the door if I took the child with me. I wished to take it.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. When you returned and found it gone, did you go home directly - A. It was not long. I told all the people; my mistress had heard of it before I got home.

JOHN ARMROD. I am a waterman at the coach-stand at Paddington-street, which is about five minutes walk from Lady Montague's house.

Q. If a person were going from Lady Montague's to Quebec-street, would they go through Paddington-street - A. No it is quite a different direction.

On Friday, 6th of June, a little before seven o'clock, the prisoner came with a child and took Mr. Woolhead's chariot; I first saw her in Crawford-street, she was going towards the stand, I asked her if she wanted a coach, she said yes, and gave me the child; she looked rather hot in the face; she told me to tell the coachman to go to Piccadilly; the child had a white frock and cloak on; she immediately contradicted the order, and said, go to Charing-cross.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. The prisoner was a stranger to me.

Court. Q. How soon after did you hear that a child had been lost - A. About eight o'clock, a man came about it; I told him, that she went away in Woolhead's chariot.

THOMAS WOOLHEAD . I am the owner and driver of a hackney chariot which stood in Paddington-street. On the 6th of June, in the evening, the prisoner got in with a child. I am certain it was her; she told me to go to the White-horse-cellar, in Piccadilly, and immediately afterwards she said "drive to Charing-cross, and make haste." On the road the child cried, I looked back and saw the prisoner putting a clean frock and petticoat on the child. I drove on, and as I was going along Cockspur-street, she let down the glass, and said I will not stop here, go over Westminster-bridge, which I did; when I got to the obelisk, I asked her which way I was to go, she said "to the Elephant and Castle, road but go gently, as the shaking of the coach frightens the child;" I passed the Elephant and Castle, and went to the Bricklayer's-arms; she asked me where the Elephant and Castle was, I told her we had passed it, and this was the Bricklayer's-arms; she said with the fatigue of the child she did not know where she was; she asked where the Brighton stages went from, I told her the Elephant and Castle; she said I must go back there; I got her a pint of half-and-half, and she drank it, I asked her why she flurried herself so, the child was wranglesome; we went back, she told me to enquire for a return chaise to Croydon, that it might forward her to Brighton. I could not get one; I got the child some milk, and something for herself; she asked me what I would take her to Croydon for; I agreed to take her for twentyfive shillings, and to stop at any place she required to pacify the child; I went on till we got to the Horse and Groom, at Streatham, which was about nine o'clock, it was dark; the landlady took the child and nursed it, and brought it to her again. When we got to Croydon, she

asked me to get her a post-chaise; I put her into one at the Greyhound, to go to Reigate, which is the first stage to Brighton; this was about half-past ten o'clock. I got back about half-past four the next morning, and found a child had been lost. I went to Mr. Porter and told him what had passed; I immediately took him, and his father, to Croydon, and got there about five o'clock in the morning, we went on to Reigate and through Brighton, and found the prisoner and child at Chichester, about two o'clock in the afternoon; it is about eighty-three miles from London. It was the same child.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Her treatment to the child was very kind.

HENRY PORTER . I am a butcher, and live in New Quebec-street, Portman-square, my wife's name is Martha. I was married 14th of April, 1816, at St. James's-church, and had a male child, six months old, and its name was Henry. On the 6th of June, Louisa Wood had the care of it, about half-past five o'clock in the evening she went out with it; and at a quarter before seven, I was informed something had happened to him, in consequence of which, my wife went out in one direction and I in another. About a quarter before eight I received information, and went to Woolhead's house; he called on me about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning; I, and my father, went with him to Croydon immediately, in a chaise, from there we went to Reigate, from thence to Ilinton, and to the Golden Fleece at Chichester; and was informed there was a lady just gone up with a child. I went up into the bed-room and saw the prisoner and my child, it was crying on the bed, and she was leaning over it, and patting it with her hand to quiet it; the child immediately recognized me and laughed; I said, "ah! Henry, have I found you," it immediately recognized me; it had not got my frock on-the prisoner appeared confused. She was carried before a magistrate, and was conveyed to town; immediately that I went into the room, I asked her for my child's clothes; she said they were tied up in a bundle on the floor. I brought them to town with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever known the prisoner before - A. Not to have any acquaintance with her; I told her, I believed I had seen her about Crawford-street before.

RICHARD HALLIDY . I am the landlord of the Golden Fleece, at Chichester, which is eighty miles from town, by the Brighton-road. In June last, the prisoner came to my house with the child, about one o'clock in the afternoon; I saw her get out of the chaise. Mr. Porter afterwards came, I shewed her to him.

JOHN MURRAY , ESQ. I am a magistrate at Chichester. The prisoner was brought before me, what she said was not taken down in writing; I asked her how she could be so cruel as to deprive the parents of their child, and if she was married herself; she said she was a mother; I told her I did not think it possible for a mother to be guilty of such an act; I asked her what she intended to do with it, she said she intended to return it to its parents. Mr. Porter stated the very distressed state in which he had left his wife; I sent her to Bow-street immediately; she begged I would not send her, an the mob in Chichester would tear her to pieces.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable of Marylebone. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Clothes produced and sworn to.)

MRS. MARTHA PORTER. I am the wife of Henry Porter . The child is still at my breast, it was dressed in different clothes when it returned.

The prisoner put in a very long written defence, which stated that she did not intend to take the child from its parents for ever, nor to ill-treat it; that she was not actuated by malice towards the child or its parents, or towards Louisa Wood , as she did not know either of them; that she had been led to understand that a malicious intent should be proved expressly, and not to be drawn by inference; and that she had no intention of stealing its clothes, as she put far better on it than she took off.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-59

988. WILLIAM BALL was indicted (by virtue of a special commission), for the wilful murder of Sarah Ball his wife .

JOSEPH LUCAS. I am a merchant. On the 21st of October last, I resided at Heligoland . The prisoner was a married man, and lived in a house belonging to me, with his wife; about five o'clock in the evening on the 21st of October, I heard a noise proceeding from the street leading from the barracks, I looked through the window and saw the prisoner, in the street, strike his wife twice, the noise I heard was quarrelling, I took no notice of it; he appeared to strike her at the lower part of her head, and on her shoulder, he struck her with his hand and fist. I saw no more.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I was eighty feet from them; I do not know whether the blows were violent or not.

DANIEL RYAN . I am a private in the Third Garrison Battalion. On Monday, 21st October, at six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in a lane, about five hundred yards from the barracks, with his wife, they were going towards home; I heard her say "Ball, are you going to strike me," he said "no you bl-y w-e, I will settle with you by-and-by." I went away.

Cross-examined. I did not see him strike her.

PHILIP RICKWOOD . In October last, I kept a public-house in Heligoland, the prisoner and his wife were at my house at two o'clock in the afternoon of that day, he remained there sometime and was joined by his wife, they drank together for sometime, she went away and returned and they drank together again; she left about four o'clock, and the prisoner about five, they returned again and stopped till seven, during which time they were quite sociable; they were the worse for liquor; the prisoner returned again and stopped till eight o'clock. I saw no more of him.

Cross-examined. I always thought him a humane man, and very good-natured.

JAMES GRAY . I am in the Third Garrison Battalion, and was at Heligoland on the 21st of October, I saw the prisoner's wife about half past six o'clock in the evening, in a lane about three hundred yars from the barracks, she

appeared intoxicated; she was going from home, and fell down twice, I lifted her up; she said she was going to look for her husband. I told her to go home but she would not. I saw the prisoner next day about ten o'clock, very drunk.

PETER SCHWARTZ . I am a bricklayer, residing at Heligoland; the prisoner lived in the same house with me, in the next room, there is only a thin partition between the two rooms. On the 21st of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard the prisoner and his wife quarrelling, she said "dear Ball," dont strike me; I heard a knock on the floor as if somebody had been knocked down, I heard groaning or snoring, and thought she was asleep. At eight o'clock, I heard a noise got up and went into their room, and saw her lying dead on the bed, and five or six people in the room; the prisoner was on the bed, with his hand round her, apparently attending her; he was crying and appeared concerned.

Cross-examined. They very often quarrelled.

MARGARET M'OWEN. I lived at Heligoland, next door but one to the prisoner. On the 21st of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was alarmed by a heavy noise, I opened my door and saw the prisoner run out of his house, and call out

"what shall I do, my wife is dead;" I asked him if he had struck her, he said, no; he returned home and I followed, when I came into the room I found the body lying across the floor, she laid on her back, not near the bed - She was quite cold; I went and called my husband; Mrs. Newman came back with me, we laid her on the bed; there was a small cut on her right brow and blood on it; the prisoner was crying and in great trouble; I asked him what I should do, he said, do what you like; I went for the surgeon, the prisoner remained in the room.

Cross-examined. He was very much agitated, and gave the alarm himself; he washed her temples himself.

PETER SCHWARTZ , re-examined. Q. You say you heard words between them, did you hear his voice at all - A. I did not, I only judge he was there, by her calling, Dear Ball.

EDWARD M'OWEN. I went to bed at half-past seven, I left the prisoner and his wife talking together; I live next door but one to him; they spoke loud and appeared to have been drinking; I heard them say it was time to be at home; my wife alarmed me; I went and found his wife dead on the floor, I put her on the bed, and went for the surgeon, at the prisoner's request.

Cross-examined. He seemed remarkably sorry; I always thought him a very humane man.

MR. WILLIAM PARROT . I am surgeon to the garrison. On the 21st of October last, I was called to look at the deceased, I found her on the bed; understanding that she was senseless, I tried to bleed her but could not; she was quite dead, and cold. I noticed a lacerated wound about the right eye-brow, and several severe contusions above and below both ears and on her neck, and bruises on her neck and chest; she had a small cut below her ear, which appeared to be the marks of finger nails, and had penetrated through the skin; I opened the body the next day and fond a considerable effusion of blood on the head, upon the vicia, which is sufficient to produce death; there are other causes which could have produced death. I found a great quantity of extravasated blood on the chest, which I attributed to the violence of the blows; it might have been from other causes; the prisoner laid on his left side crying over her, and it was with difficulty I persuaded him to leave her; he said if he had been beating or ill-treating her, he should not have been surprized at her death; the wound was from an inch to an inch and half long below the ears, which I should have judged had been given by some weapon; the fist might have produced it, and so might a fall; the whole of the bruises could not have been produced by a fall.

Cross-examined. The mark over her right eye-brow might have arisen from the fall. Supposing a person had been intoxicated, and had repeatedly fallen down, it might have produced the wound on the eye.

Q. What do you think could not have proceeded from the falls - A. The contusions about the ears could not have proceeded from the fall and would have caused death; if a person had been convulsed and had struggled, it might possibly have had that appearance. I have attend ed the deceased often-from what I have observed, she was addicted to intoxication, and rather inclined to be plethorical; with that inclination, encouraged as it must be by extravasation of the brain, it might have produced it.

Court. Q. Do you conceive the extravasation of the brain to have been the immediate cause of her death - A. Either would have caused it.

Q. Is the bursting of the vessels of the brain, the immediate cause of death - A. Drinking alone might have caused extravasation of blood on the brain.

Q. Supposing an extravasation of blood to be caused by a fall, would the party be able to walk afterwards - A. A very short distance; they would retain strength for a short time.

Prisoner's Defence. The two women who came, said there was no blood; it is very strange that there was no blood on the body or the floor, as she had cut her eye.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined Six Months .

Special Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-60

989. HENRY HACKROOT was indicted, (by virtue of a special commission,) for the wilful murder of William Fitzpatrick , at Whampoo-reach near Canton, in China .

SAMUEL REMINGTON. I was chief mate of the ship Cornwall on her voyage to China, the prisoner was quarter-master ; we took him on board from Gravesend, and arrived at China in August, the vessel came to her moorings in Whampoo-reach, which is about eighteen or twenty miles from Canton; she was moored about one hundred and fifty miles from the mouth of the river, and two hundred from the forts, the river there is about a quarter of a mile wide, the land on each side is in the Chinese dominions.

JAMES STEWART . I sailed on board the Cornwall as quarter-master, the prisoner was also quarter-master. I recollect while the vessel was at Whampoo-reach, a party of us had leave to go to Canton, Brown, Glanville, Fitzpatrick, and the prisoner were of the party; we returned from Canton towards the ship, between five or six o'clock in the

evening of the 24th of October, there were eight of us; I had the command of the boat. Brown said, Fitzpatrick had not pulled an oar since we left Canton, and that he had better lay it in; Fitzpatrick said he could not pull on account of the chest which was in his way. - Glanville offered to change places with him, they got up to change, Fitzpatrick was going farther aft in the boat, next the prisoner; the prisoner said he would heave him overboard if he did not pull. Fitzpatrick was twenty-one years of age, and rather slender. Fitzpatrick said he could not, and was in the act of sitting down on the seat, when the prisoner took him by his back and trowsers, and shoved him over-it was between seven and eight o'clock; we were about half way down the reach, towards the ship-the river is about a quarter of a mile broad there, and six or seven feet deep-the tide was very strong, and going down. When the prisoner had thrown him over, he said, "there you are." I was upon the bow-oar, I jumped aft, and took his place; the prisoner wished to jump overboard to make away with himself; we stopped to look for the body. It was dark. We saw no more of him. We laid there eight or ten minutes, calling out, but could hear nothing; the river was very deep with mud about the place; we then made for the ship, and got there about half-past nine o'clock. The prisoner was secured. In seven days after the body was brought alongside. I knew it was his body, by the dress, and the hair on his upper lip; his face was muddy.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. If a man had been thrown in there, and got on his legs, he would be unable to stand. The body was not brought on deck. It was his body.

GEORGE GLANVILLE . I was in the boat, Brown said, the deceased, did not pull his oar, I made the same remark; the deceased and I were going to change places, my back was towards him. I heard the prisoner say, if he did not pull better, he would heave him overboard; the deceased said, thank God, he could not do it, or he dare not; the prisoner said, "Can't I." I was turning round to take my seat, and the prisoner threw him overboard. We stopped the boat, but never saw him again. I afterwards saw a body brought to the ship, his clothes appeared the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. We were all friends. I got into his place and rowed very well-there was no chest to hinder me. There was no chaplain on board. The body that I saw afterwards was dressed like the deceased.

Court. Q. Did not the prisoner express great anxiety and distress immediately, that the body did not rise - A. He did; he was very much agitated, and wished to throw himself over, and was held down to prevent it; he said, several times, that he had been the cause of a man's death, and wished we would let him jump overboard also. The deceased could not swim.

THOMAS CARR . I was on board the Cornwall. A body was brought alongside the ship. It was Fitzpatrick's body, I knew it by the dress. I am certain of it.

JOHN LAW. I was on board the ship. I had known Fitzpatrick about eight months. I saw the body-it was his.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to take his life; I only meant to duck him, and haul him in again.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined Six Months .

Special Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-61

990. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Wright , on the 2d of June (no person being therein), and stealing one hat, value 8s.; one writing-desk, value 4s.; three gold rings, value 1l. 10s.; two broaches, value 2l.; one snuff-box, value 5s., and one box, value 5s. , his property.

ELIZA LINCH . I am servant to Mr. Wright. On the 2d of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon. I went out, and returned in about half an hour, and found the house broken open, and the property gone.

JOHN SMITH , SEN. I work for Mr. Wright. I saw the prisoner about half-past four o'clock, upon the lawn beyond my master's house; I accused him with the robbery - He denied it. I know nothing else about it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-62

991. JAMES MIDDLEYARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , one pocket-book, value 3s.; one pencil-case, value 1s.; one 40l. bank note, and one 1l, bank note , the property of Ralph Burn .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, except his own confession, which was extorted from him, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-63

992. JOHN MOLE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Esther Leathard , on the King's highway, on the 2d of June , and putting her in fear, and stealing from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 21s. , the goods of Giles Leathard .

ESTHER LEATHARD . I am the wife of Giles Leathard. On the 2d of June, about half-past ten o'clock at night, as I was going home with my husband, we had just got to our house, my husband went on to get the door open, the prisoner came behind me, and snatched my shawl off-it was not fastened-it was gone in a minute. I fell down with fear, and made no resistance - He did not throw me down. I gave the alarm.

GILES LEATHARD. I am the husband of the last witness. I ran after the prisoner, and secured him.

THOMAS HAYCOCK . The prisoner was given into my charge. I searched him. The shawl dropped out of his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing from the person only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-64

993. DAVID BARNARD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , in the dwelling-house of John Hudson , the elder , one 30l. and one 10l. bank note , his property.

JOHN HUDSON, SEN. I am a hatter , and live in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green . On the 21st of May. I lost a 30l. and a 10l. bank note.

JOHN HUDSON , JUN. I am the son of the last witness. The prisoner is a copper-plate printer - We were acquainted together. On Tuesday night, the 21st of May, I met him in White Lion-street, about half-past seven o'clock - We usually met there. We were walking along, he asked me to let him look at the notes. I had told him on that day week that my father had had a little money, and was going to put us to school with it; I did not know the amount. He said, if I would let him see them, he would tell me what they were. I took him home. I knew my father had put them under the flap of the table. I could not read writing. He looked at them, and said it was a 30l. and a 10l. - I wrapped them up, and put them under the table again; I went out, and left him in the room by himself; he used to go to my father's sometimes. I was called away, and returned in about half an hour, but never saw the notes after.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I have known him about five years. My father thought I took them. I was not given in charge myself.

WILLIAM FLINT . I am a headborough. On the 24th of May, the prisoner was in my custody-his father and mother came to him in the watch-house, and said it would be better for him to confess. In consequence of what he said, I went with him to his master's house, and immediately the prisoner took us into the privy, and put his hand down the hole, and gave me a parcel, which contained a 30l. note, with a 5l., and one 2l. together. I produced them.

WILLIAM SHIRLEY. I searched the privy. Flint has spoken correctly.

JOHN HUDSON , SEN. The 30l. note is mine - I know it by the number and date - I got the number from the banking-house where I received it, before it was found out, but after it was lost. I do not know whether my son can read writing, or not.

WILLIAM FLINT re-examined. I went to the privy by the prisoner's desire. The charge made against him was for stealing a 30l. and a 10l. note.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-65

994. JOHN CONNELLY and JAMES WARREN FITZGERALD were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , one pair of boots, value 10s., the goods of John Bartlett , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am servant to John Bartlett, who is a shoe-maker , and lives in St. Giles's . On the 3d of June, at two o'clock in the afternoon, Scott came in and told me that two men had taken the boots from the shop, and pointed them out to me. I did not see them in the shop; the boots hung in the shop by the door - They could not be reached without coming into the shop. I followed the prisoners with Scott. He secured Fitzgerald, and I pursued after Connelly, and secured him - I never lost sight of him. I saw him throw the boots away in Compton-street.

JAMES SCOTT . I live in Litchfield-street, Soho-square. On the 3d of June I was standing opposite St. Giles's Church, and saw the prisoners in company together. Connelly went up first, and took one boot off the nail, and Fitzgerald took the other, it being inside the door. I do not know whether, if the door had been shut, it would have been enclosed by the door or not. I alarmed Bartlett, followed them with him, and secured them.

JOHN BATES . I am a glass-cutter, and live in Union-street, Borough. I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw Counelly pass by me and throw the boot down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FITZGERALD'S Defence. I saw the crowed and went up - They secured me.

CONNELLY - GUILTY. Aged 38.

FITZGERALD - GUILTY. Aged 39.

Of stealing, but not privately . Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-66

995. JONAS GOLDSMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , two hats, value 8s., the goods of Charles Dyer , privately in his shop .

CHARLES DYER . I am a hatter , and live in Fashion -street, Spitalfields . On the 18th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went out, I returned in ten minutes, and saw the prisoner come out of the shop with the two hats-my wife was in the parlour; she is not here. He said he was going to shew them to his father; I never saw him before. I secured him and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Of stealing, but not privately . Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-67

996. WILLIAM DEAR was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Perkins , about eight in the forenoon of the 10th of June (no person being therein), and stealing therein one bed, value 4l., and one bed curtain, value 4s , the property of George Perkins .

GEORGE PERKINS. I am a milkman . I rent a house in North-street, Whitechapel . On the 10th of June, about half-past six o'clock in the morning I went out-my wife went out before me. I left no person in the house - I double-locked the door, add returned about nine o'clock-my wife had not been home. I had met a woman about half a mile before. I got home; she told me something that hastened me home. I found my door broken open; the staple was wrenched off. I missed the bed and curtain, which were taken from the room on the ground-floor, where I sleep; there were other things there that were not taken-the prisoner is quite a stranger to me. About eleven o'clock the same day, I saw the bed and curtain at the watch-house; the prisoner was in custody. I knew it to he mine.

WILLIAM ROLT . I am a labourer, and live in Garden-row, North-street, near Mr. Perkin's. On the 10th of June, I was at work at Mr. Ley's yard, he is a stone-mason, which is about forty yards from Perkins's, and saw the prisoner, a little before eight o'clock in the morning, go by the yard, which is on the same side of the way as Perkins's with the bed on his shoulder - I did not see where he came from; he was a stranger to me. A wo

man came up, and asked me if I had seen a man pass with a bed? I told her I had, and in consequence of what she said, I went after him, and stopped him before he got out of my sight. I caught him coming out of a court, about a mile off; I ran after him directly the woman gave me information - I had lost sight of him before, and I called out stop thief! he had got over Hare-street Fields-it was about a quarter of an hour after I had seen him go by; when I first saw him again, he was coming out of Hare-court - He was stopped ten or twelve yards from me; he ran as fast as he could; he had not got the bed then - I am sure of his person. He was stopped about a mile from where I work - I secured him. A mob came round, and said, I should get into trouble if I did not let him go - He said if I would let him go he would walk quietly by me; I did so - He immediately threw his coat off into the road, and ran off as fast as he could; he was pursued,and secured just by Spitalfields, and given into the charge of Boston. I am positive he is the man I saw go by with the bed.

Prisoner, Q. Where did you first see me, after you saw me go by with the bed - A. Coming up Hunt-court, which is about a mile from the yard.

SAMUEL LAMBE. I live in Blackfriars-road, and work for a bone-boiler in North-street, Whitechapel. On the 10th of June last, I was at work about eight o'clock in the morning, just by Perkin's house; I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner about forty yards from Mr. Perkins's house, with a bed on his shoulder; I followed him and never lost sight of him all the way; he went down Hunt-court, I followed him and there he went into a house; I saw Rolt collar him. I am sure the prisoner is the man, he was taken to the watch-house. I saw him take the bed into a house and come out again; I went back and found it in the front room of the same house; it was an empty room on the ground-floor.

JAMES BOSTON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge from a mob; he was charged with stealing a bed an cutains; I took him to the watch-house, and asked him where the bed was, he said the people were all mad, and he knew nothing about it; I asked him his name and where he lived, he said he did not know the name of the street, having been there but a very little time. Lambe took me to Hunt-court, there we found the bed in a house, tied up in the front room, by Lambe's directions; Perkins claimed it.

WILLIAM CASH . I sell fish about the streets. On the 10th of June, in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Brick-lane, with the bed; it was about half an hour before he was secured. Rolt laid hold of him, and asked me to assist him, which I did; the prisoner asked me to let him walk, which we did, he pulled off his coat, threw it behind him, and ran away; I ran after him, and caught him. He said he would be the bl-dy butcher of me if I did not let him go. I kept hold of him, and gave him to the constable.

Prisoner. Q. Were any other personer round when you took me - A. I caught him first,and the rest came round.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-68

997. BENJAMIN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one silver watch, value 30s.; one chain, value 2d.; two keys, value 1d.; 9s. 6d. in monies numbered; and one bag, value 1d., the goods and monies of George Shand , from his person .

GEORGE SHAND . I am a baker , and live in Wardour-street. On the 24th of June, about a quarter after nine o'clock at night, I was by the King's Mews-three men met me, one of them asked me the way to Paddington - I directed them to the Haymarket - They came straight up Whitcomb-street with me, and kept jostling me; I looked at them several times-the prisoner was one of them; it was day-light. I went on till I came to the corner of Meard's-court, they then got round me. I felt one of them take my watch out - I did not miss my bag till afterwards. I called out stop thief! and ran after them. Two went up the court, through Queen-street, into Bateman's-buildings, and Soho-square. I was pursuing them, and missed one of them. I followed the prisoner into the square, and he was stopped there. I never lost sight of him, and am sure he is the man. I came up as soon as he was stopped; he asked me if I could swear he was the person who took my watch? I had not mentioned a word to any person about a watch. A gentleman brought the watch up immediately-the case came off in the fall; another man brought the case, and said he found it about two yards from the place where he was stopped. I am positively certain he is the man.

SAMUEL CRAWLEY. I am a jeweller, and live in King-street, Soho. I was crossing Soho-square, heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running, as hard as possible, from the corner of Bateman's-buildings; I endeavoured to stop him - He was running from the cry, a man was pursuing him - I stopped him. He stooped down to the knees of his breeches; I thought he was putting something there, and he said "I have not got it." The mob came round, when Shand came up, and said he had been robbed, and that the prisoner was the man. The watch was produced by a gentleman, who said he picked it up just round the corner-the case was afterwards produced.

RICHARD CONSTANCE . I live in Rathbone-place. I was going along, and heard the cry, which came from Bateman's-buildings. The prisoner stopped and pulled up his stockings. Shand came up - A person picked up the watch, and another the case.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, they stopped me. Shand came up and said I was not the man, and let me go, and then gave me in charge again.

GEORGE SHAND. I never said he was not the man - I never had any doubt of it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-69

998. JAMES HANSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one coat, value 4l. , the property of the

Right Honourable Henry Richard , Earl of Brooke and Warwick .

WILLIAM HEARNDEN . I am coachman to the Earl of Warwick. On the 11th of June, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I put my coat on the coach-box, in the coach-house in Farn-street Mews; I missed it, and found the prisoner in Grosvenor-square with it, and secured him.

JOHN COLEMAN . I am a shoemaker. I was at work a few yards from the coach, and saw the prisoner take the coat off the box, and go off with it - I gave the alarm; we followed him up Berkeley-street into Grosvenor-square, and secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. They have spoken falsely.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-70

999. EDWARD YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 14lbs, of almonds, value 1l. 8s., the goods of Robert Lawrence , privately in his shop .

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I am a grocer , and live in Great Portland-street, Marylebone . On the 18th of June, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in my parlour behind my shop, there was no person in the shop - I had my face towards the shop, and saw the back of the prisoner going from the door, he was on the step outside the door, going out - I had not seen him in the shop; the parlour is some distance from the door. I was coming out of the parlour into the shop, and I saw him go out. I suppose he must have come in as I was going out of the shop into the parlour, my back being then turned. I am certain that I did not seen him until he was going out; I ran after him. As I passed through the shop, I missed a parcel of almonds, which I had put up for a customer. My shop is about twenty feet long - I was about three yards from the door. I pursued, and saw him with the parcel under his arm - He turned round and saw me coming, and began to run, he was walking before-he dropped the pareel and was secured; I picked it up and did not pursue, as no person was in the shop.

JOHN KENNEDY . I am a tailor. On the 18th of June, I saw Mr. Lawrence with the parcel under his arm, the prisoner was running. Mr. Lawrence called out stop thief! I followed and collared him, and told him he must come with me - He said he would come without being coltared. I took him to Mr. Lawrence's house; Mr. Lawrence said the prisoner had stolen the parcel-the prisoner said he was a poor lad, and begged to be let go.

Prisoner. Q. You did not stop me - A. I did; another man was running after him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. LAWRENCE. I am quite sure the prisoner is the boy that took the parcel. When he came back, he begged I would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along Foley-place, I saw a lad with the parcel under his arm; the gentlemen called out stop thief - I ran after him, and they stopped me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-71

1000. GEORGE HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , two sheep, price 5l. the goods of Thomas Sanders , and ESTHER PARROTT was indicted for feloniously receiving them, well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

THOMAS SANDERS . I am a butcher , and live in the parish of Islington, opposite the church. The week before Whitsuntide, I bought seven sheep, and gave them to John Beasley , to drive. I saw him ochre them on the back and off hip; they had O branded on the rump-they were put into a field behind the Pied Bull Inn, in Islington parish . On the 6th of May, I killed five of them - I saw the others safe between four and five o'clock that afternoon. The next morning, at eight o'clock, I missed them. My house is at Upper Islington. I have some pens at the back of my house. If I wanted to go from the Pied Bull to Cross-street, the nearest way would be to pass the front of my house; there is another way by the back road. When I lost the sheep, I sent for Beasley; the next morning he made a communication, which made me suspect the prisoner Harvey. At eleven o'clock the next morning, I went with a constable to Castle-street, Clerkenwell, and took him up-we found him bed. I believe he said he had been to Portsmouth. I next went with Beasley, French, and Lack, to the house of the prisoner, Parrott, in Blue-gate-fields, Shadwell. I found her at home, sitting in the shop, which was fitted up like a butcher's shop; there were a few hooks in the window, and two knuckles of mutton laying on the window. I found a neck of mutton laying on the board, with the lamb, exposed for sale. I searched further, and found a shoulder of mutton behind a great coat in the shop. The constable opened a cupboard, and found two pair of hind-quarters of mutton hanging up, covered with a dirty cloth; the cupboard was in the shop, the door was not locked. The constable went up stairs, and brought down a pair of fore-quarters and a brisket, with a cloth over them; they were fat mutton, and answered to one of the hind quarters; all the joints corresponded, and were fat mutton.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I do not know whether Parrott has a husband. The fore-quarters were cut up by a butcher; the hind-quarters were together. The cupboard was a very improper place to keep meat; it should be hung in an open place.

JOHR BEASLEY. I am a drover. The last witness gave me orders to drive seven fat sheep to his house at Islington. I marked them on the back, and along the off hip; they had an O branded round the tail. I took them to his house. On Monday, the 26th of May, I was sitting on the bench at the Thatched-house, Lower Islington, just at the bottom of Cross-street, about a quarter before five o'clock; I saw a young man named French, drive two sheep down by Paradise-place, by the mad-house - They were fat sheep. I asked him where he was going with them? he said he found them in the back road, and did not know where he was going with them. I saw the O on them, but did not observe the other marks-the O was just above the tail - They were just turning the corner. I told Mr. Sanders, and afterwards took French to him.

Cross-examined. There are a number of sheep marked with an O on them.

SAMUEL FRENCH. I know the prisoner, Harvey, and re

member seeing him last Whit Monday just by Smithfield-bars; he said he would give me a job to drive two sheep. I went to the Pied Bull, at Islington, with him; when he got there, he told me to go round by the back road to the Rainbow public-house, and stay there till he came to me. I went, and very soon afterwards he came to me - He came out of the pens by the Pied Bull - He was driving two sheep through the palings. He brought them to me, and told me to drive them and follow him. I went round to Upper-street, Islington, and down a street. I saw Beasley at the Thatched-house - He asked me whose sheep they were? I told him I found them in the back road, and did not know whose they were; upon which the prisoner (who was just by me), ran down by the river. I drove them on, and saw him again soon after - I saw him just by Shoreditch Church turnpike, turning down to Bethnal-green; he went on before me, into the Commercial-road, and left the sheep at the prisoner's, Parrott, house. Harvey went on there before me, and I drove the sheep in. He told her to give me 2s. I went to the house and saw her there; I did not stay five minutes - I heard him tell her to give me 2s., which she did. The sheep were put into a little bit of a shed, like a small slaughter-house. I went away. They were marked on the back, and down the off side, with ochre, and an O put at the back of the tail, branded with tar. Beasley came to me on the Monday morning, and I afterwards went to the prisoner, Harvey's house. He told me, if any person stopped me, I was to say I found them.

Cross-examined. Parrott's house is a butcher's shop; it was market-day at Smithfield. Harvey used to be a master-drover.

WILLIAM LACK. I am an officer. On the 28th of May I went to Harvey's house and found him in bed. I told him I came about two sheep which belonged to Mr. Sanders - He said he knew nothing about them. I took him to Hatton-garden, and then went to Parrott's shop-her shop looks more like a cat's-meat shop than a butcher's. I asked her if she knew a man of the name of Harvey-she said, No. I asked her if she knew that boy (I had French with me), she hesitated, and then said she had seen him before, she did not say when. I asked her what she had done with those sheep which the boy had brought there? she gave me no answer. I asked her if she should know the man that came with the boy; she said she should. After the meat was found, I asked her what became of the skins - She said the man who brought it there had taken them away. I had spoken to her of Harvey being the man, before I searched the house. A table stood before the cupboard door; I removed it, opened the door, and found the hind-quarters of two fat sheep. I went up into the bed-room, she remained below. I found a clothes-basket against the head of the bed, and two fore-quarters of fat mutton in it, covered over with a cloth; this was all I found there. I went back again the same day, as she told me I had not got all. I searched the same room, and found a fore-quarter of mutton hanging behind the door, covered over with a petticoat.

Cross-examined. I believe there was some cat's-meat hanging up in the window. I do not know that she has a husband. I searched for sheep-skins, but could not find any.

THOMAS SANDERS re-examined. Lack brought the last fore-quarter to me-that, together with what had been previously found, made two whole sheep, except the offal. It appeared to be nearly fresh killed.

Q. If you employ a drover to drive sheep, and he employs a boy, who pays the boy - A. He does. I have known Harvey fifteen or sixteen years - He is a drover. When a butcher buys sheep the skins belong to him.

HARVEY'S Defence. The boy has spoken falsely. I was quite lame, and could not follow the sheep.

PARROTT'S Defence. I have a lawful husband. I did not know but what he had bought them; he is a butcher. I have often paid the drovers for bringing the sheep home.

Jury to FRENCH. Q. You say, when Beasley spoke to you the prisoner ran away, and you did not see him again till you got to Shoreditch turnpike - A. He had told me to go to the Commercial-road when he first spoke to me. I knew the road very well.

HARVEY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 36.

PARROTT - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-72

1001. JAMES FITZWILLIAMS , HENRY WILKINS , and WILLIAM BULL , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Cartwright , about two o'clock in the night of the 3d of July , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three coats, value 10l.; seven waistcoats, value 2l.; three pair of trowsers, value 2l.; three pair of breeches, value 2l.; three shirts, value 2l., ten pair of stockings, value 10s.; eight pair of gloves, value 8s.; two pair of gaiters, value 5s.; three silver lables, value 3s.; one shirt-pin, value 10s.; one eye-glass, value 1l.; three silver thimbles, value 5s.; one toothpick, value 2s.; one pencil-case, value 1s.; one opera-glass and case, value 1l.; one telescope case, value 30s.; one pair of snuffers, value 5s.; three handkerchiefs, value 7s.; three combs, value 5s.; one knife, value 2s.; one flute, value 5s.; one pair of spectacles, value 5s.; seven keys, value 7d.; and one seal, value 3s., his property-two coats, value 6l.; and one pair of boots, value 1l., the property of William Cartwright ; and two bank notes, value 1l. each, the property of the said Richard Cartwright .

MR. RICHARD CARTWRIGHT . I live at No. 15, Hunter-street, Brunswick-square, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury - I have lived there four years. On the 4th of July, at six o'clock in the morning, I was called up by a knocking at the door. I was the last person up at night, and fastened the doors before I went to bed, which was about a quarter after twelve o'clock. I examined every thing, and saw the doors and windows all fast. My family consists of my wife, son, nephew, niece, and servants. I had been in the parlour before I went to bed-there is a bookcase there. I did not leave a candle there. In consequence of the knocking at the door, and what I was told, I came down undressed - I did not find any person in the house. The street - door was shut, but neither locked nor bolted - I had seen it safe when I went to bed; there are two bolts, a chain, and a lock to it. I found the door of my library open, and every thing that laid in the front

taken out. On the edge of the bookcase, there were marks of a candle which had been burning, and marks of fire; it was not burning then, the candle was not in the candlestick. The prisoner Bull lived servant with me for two years and one month, and quitted my service about three months ago; I searched my house and missed a great quantity of things. My son's name is William, he is twenty-two years of age. The room-window was also broken open by cutting a pane of glass out by the fastening, undoing it, and lifting it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. CURWOOD. The shutters and windows were quite open; if they had had daylight, they had enough to do without lighting a candle.

THOMAS WHITE . I am servant to Mr. Cartwright, I came into his service when Bull left it; I sleep in the pantry under the back parlour in question. I am seventeen years of age next August. On the night between the 3d and 4th of July, I went to bed about half-past twelve o'clock, I went to sleep and awoke as I heard the clock strike two, I heard something like the breaking of a bottle almost immediately, and persons walking about the rooms over my head. After the clock struck three, I heard somebody come down stairs to my door, it was not locked; I did not hear them go away again; I heard something like the wrenching of drawers and locks; they did not come into my room. I was afraid to get up; I did not get up until my master called me.

SAMUEL BUMPSTEAD . I am a milkman. On Friday morning, the 4th of July, I was going from the barn with my milk; I was passing Mr. Cartwright's house; I turned round and saw the prisoners, Fitzwilliam and Wilkins, come out of Mr. Cartwright's house, they had bundles with them, each of them had a bundle, or more than one each; I saw them go round the corner; I then saw the prisoner. Bull, standing inside the house holding the door and looking at me, thinking that I was watching him; Blyth came up, and we both went over to the house, and just as we got up to the door the prisoner, Bull, said,"what do you want?" and shut the door in our faces, it was not shut before. I am certain that he is the man; I knocked at the door twice, Mr. Cartwright came to the window we told him, he came down. Before he came down, I looked through the key-hole and saw Bull going backwards; I saw a light from the back of the house so as to see that he went through the passage; I told Mr. Cartwright that there was a man in the house; we went round to the back of the house, and saw Bull getting over the paling of Mr. Cartwright's house; there is a brick-field there; he got over before we could lay hold of him; I sent Blyth round and he secured him. I told Line, in the presence of Bull, that he had been robbing the house, and there had been two more gone out with bundles, and told him which way they went. I am sure the other two persons are the men I saw come out of the house.

JOSEPH BLYTH. The last witness has spoken correctly; I know the three prisoners; I saw them - I saw Bull in the house that morning, and afterwards took him. I am sure he is the man; I saw him getting over the wall. I am certain he is the man I saw at the door.

WILLIAM LINE . I am a journeyman bricklayer. On the morning of the 4th of July, I was going to work, and saw the two last witnesses with Bull, in custody, in consequence of what they said to me, I immediately went after the other two, by the Foundling, up James-street, into Gray's-inn-lane; I saw both the prisoners at the corner of Henry-street, Gray's-inn-lane, each of them had two bundles, I asked them where they were going, they said they were moving; I seized Fitzwilliam by the collar, and told him what I took him for, he resisted and said he would not be taken; in the struggle a bottle of wine was broken; Judd met me, he seized Wilkins about five yards from me.

ZACHARIAH JUDD. I saw Line with Fitzwilliam, and I took Wilkins.

JOSEPH MAYHEW . I am a constable. I went to Mr. Cartwright's house, and found the middle pane of the upper sash in the front parlour, just over the fastening broken, the shutters were on the inside, one part of the shutters had been taken off; I went down to the watch-house, and saw Bull searched, and the property found on him; I search ed Fitzwilliam and found three wine labels; I took a pair of boots off his feet at the office; I searched Wilkins and found seven picklock keys, a phosphorous bottle, a gold seal, and seven other keys upon him.

PETER WHITEHALL . I am the watch-house keeper of Somers-town; the prisoner, Bull, was brought in by Blyth; I searched him and found a shirt pin, an eye-glass, three silver thimbles, a pencil-case, three pair of stockings, several gloves and a handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FITZWILLIAM'S Defence. I was going by the house and found the bundles.

WILKIN'S Defence. I was in bed at the time of the robbery; I was not able to carry the bundles, and never had them in my possession.

BULL'S Defence. I must confess myself guilty, I was certainly in the house; the two men know nothing about it.

THOMAS HAMSLEY. I am out of place. I slept in George-street last night; I have only seen Wilkins twice at a friend's house. On Friday morning last, I saw him at a frined's house in Earl-street, Seven-dials, between two and three o'clock; on my oath, I saw him there between two and three o'clock.

Court. Q. How near to two was it - A. About half-past two; I had been sitting up for him, and got supper for him; I slept in Earl-street that night; I did not sleep any where the next night; he went away about half-past two o'clock with his wife.

FITZWILLIAM - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

WILKINS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

BULL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-73

1002. JAMES FRANCIS , THOMAS GROGAN , THOMAS HOWARD , JOHN JACKSON , THOMAS JONES and HANNAH JONES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Thompson , about twelve o'clock on the night of the 25th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein seven jackets, value 3l.; one sheet, value 9s.; three coats, value 2l.; two pair of trowsers, value 6s.; and one shirt, value 6s. , the goods of Henry Jacobs .

JAMES CHAMBERS . I am shopman to Henry Jacobs ,

whose shop is at 112, Rosemary-lane ; his dwelling-house is at 14l, which is on the other side of the way; the shop is a building which joins a butcher's-shop, and is part of the house kept by Ann Thompson ; we get into the shop by a back-door; Mrs. Thompson's servant always let us in; there is a door in the shop which leads into the back parlour of her house; when we go out at night, we go out at the back-door of the house. On Sunday morning, the 25th of May, between six and seven o'clock I went to the shop, and found the back-door of the house a-jar; I found the shop-door burst open, the padlock was forced off, and several of the shelves cleared of the property; the window-shutters were forced, and the windows thrown open; I mean the back-windows of the yard, the bolt was wrenched off and the sash up. I told my mistress, and got an officer; I went round to look for the property and saw the prisoner, Grogan, in Blue-anchor-yard, which is about one hundred yards from the house, with a bundle on his shoulder; I knew him; Ellis was with me, we went up to him and took the bundle from him, and Ellis secured him; this was between nine and ten o'clock.

ALEXANDER ELLIS. I was with Chambers and took Grogan into custody, and took charge of the bundle, which I produce.

MARY JACOBS . I am the wife of Henry Jacobs. I left the shop at half-past ten o'clock on the Saturday night; I am certain that the things were in the shop then. I left the window down, and the shutters bolted, and the back-door padlocked, I did it myself; Ann Thompson lives in the house; the things in the bundle are worth 2l. 7s.; the whole that I lost are worth 46l.

ALEXANDER ELLIS re-examined. I live in the neighbourhood, about half-past seven o'clock (before I took Grogan), I was sweeping before my door; I am a slopseller; the prisoners, Howard and Thomas Jones, came to me and brought three jackets on their backs. Howard asked me, in the presence of Jones, if I would buy a jacket, I said I would; I went into the shop. Howard produced one, and asked 4s., for it; having my suspicions I sent my boy to Mrs. Jacobs; she came, I heard she had been robbed, two jackets were taken from Howard and one from Jones; Jones wore one of them, and Howard two. I took the prisoner Jackson at Wapping, about three o'clock the same afternoon; I found a coat and trowsers on him tied up in a bundle.

THOMAS HARRISON. I received Jackson into my custody from Ellis, and on opening his jacket, I found a shirt folded up in his bosom and a pair of nankeen trowsers in his hat.

JOHN SHAW . I took Francis into custody about half-past five o'clock that afternoon, and found a shirt on his back; he said he bought it.

JULIA SIGGERSON . I live in Blue-anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane; the prisoner, Hannah Jones, brought me a bundle to take care of for her, between one and two in the afternoon of the 25th of June. I gave it to the officers.

THOMAS FREEMAN . I received the bundle, it contained two jackets; I went to Blue-anchor-yard and found Grogan making great resistance with Ellis. I took him to the watch-house and took a shirt off his back, which he was wearing, and a hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GROGAN'S Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

HOWARD'S Defence. I received them from Francis and Grogan.

JACKSON'S Defence. I bought them of a sailor.

JONES'S Defence. Francis asked me to go and sell them; I did so, not knowing they were stolen.

CHAMBERS re-examined. I saw dirty foot marks about the place. It was a wet morning.

GROGAN - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 20.

HOWARD - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 30.

JACKSON-GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 32.

THOMAS JONES - GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 33.

Of Stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of the burglary .

FRANCIS- NOT GUILTY .

HANNAH JONES- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170702-74

1003. CHARLES COOMBS and ROBERT COOMBS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ezekiel Baker , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 14th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein twelve pistols, value 30l. his property.

MR. EZEKIEL BAKER. I live at 24, Whitechapel-road, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel , on the north side of the road, about one hundred yards beyond the church; I have a work-shop at the back of the shop; my counting-house is between the front and back shops and communicates with the dwelling-house; it is under the same roof, it is separated from the shop by glass sashes. On the night of the 14th of June, I had some pistols in my workshop, two of them were marked BASS on the back of the barrel; I had also several of my own; I locked the counting-house at half-past ten o'clock, and went to bed at eleven; there is a door which leads into a court; I was not disturbed myself, but between five or six o'clock in the morning, my servant called me, I found two squares of glass cut out of the window, and the cross bar taken off, so that a man could get through, I tried to open the counting-house-door but could not, the lock had been strained and hung on the bolt; I put my porter through the hole and he let me in, I found the lock wrenched off, and the handle laid on the counter; I missed twelve pistols which I had locked up in my desk, and the counting-house strewed over with papers; my name was on most of the pistols; two of them had the name of BASS on them; I saw them at the office on the 18th.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. When I was first alarmed, it was broad day-light; the window that was broken is an inner one.

MISS JANE BAKER. I am the daughter of the last witness; I sleep in the room over the counting-house. On the night of the 14th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I heard the noise of glass breaking; I went to bed at eleven o'clock, and had been in bed about an hour; I am certain I did not go to sleep before I heard the noise; I also heard a sawing, which continued about ten minutes,

and then a violent crush; it seemed to proceed from the counting-house.

Cross-examined. I am certain I had not been asleep; it was quite dark.

THOMAS FRANCIS. I am porter to Mr. Baker; I left the house about nine o'clock, on the 14th of June; the door which leads from the work-shop was safe; I went out at the front-door; between four and five o'clock the next morning, I was called up, and went to the work-shop door that leads into the court, and found it half open; I went in and found the counting-house windows were all cut open; I called my master, he came down and went with me to the counting-house.

HOWARD LEWIS . I live in Cable-street, Whitechapel; I am a salesman. On the 19th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners came to me, and asked me if I would buy a pair of pistols, I said, yes, and asked where they were, they said they had not got them, but would go and fetch them, they went away and returned about four o'clock. Robert Coombs brought them; I looked at them, and asked if they had any more; they said, yes, but I had better buy those pistols; I said I would rather buy them altogether, they said they would go and fetch them; they went away, leaving that pair with me, I went to the officer Morris; they came back again in two or three minutes, and brought ten more, each of them had some; I took them up stairs and kept them in discourse about them; I asked what they would have for them, they said

"give us what you like, 2l. or 3l. for the lot;" being twelve of them, they are worth 40l Morris came in at that time and secured them; I kept the first pair, Morris took the others.

Cross-examined. I am a dealer in clothes.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a constable. On the 19th of June, I came to Mr. Lewis by his desire, and found the prisoners there and took them into custody; I found the pistols on the table, they said they bought them of a Jew for 2l. I produce them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES COOMBS'S Defence. I was with my brother, and a Jew sold them to us for 2l., we said we would pay him when we had any money.

ROBERT COOMBS 'S Defence. It is as my brother has said.

CHARLES COOMBS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

ROBERT COOMBS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170702-75

1004. JOHN CAFFIN was indicted for a rape .

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 43.

A Jury of half Foreigners and half English, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18170702-76

1005. MICHAEL M'DERMOT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Swan Belsham , about one in the night of the 22d of June , with an intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one counterpane, value 5s., and one handkerchief, value 6d. , his property.

JOHN BELSHAM. My father is a watchman and lives in Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row , in the attic; I went to bed about a quarter after one o'clock, soon after two o'clock I was awoke, I heard some person walking about the next room where my grandmother slept; he knocked a stool down, my grandmother called out Swain, thinking it might be my father, a stranger's voice answered, there is no Swain here; she then called me, saying, there was a thief in the house; I opened the window and called out murder; I went down and found the street - door shut to but not fastened, and Swain at the door, I asked him to go up while I went for the watchman; when I returned, there were several of the neighbours on the stairs, and the prisoner was lying by my grandmother's bed, he might have got under the bed if he liked; he said Jem had brought him there; I do not know who he meant - He was secured-my grandmother went to bed before me-the street - door was open when I went to bed-there is a door on the top of the stairs which shuts in one floor, that was bolted-it can be opened outside, there was a counterpane in a handkerchief laid on the table quite smooth, before I went to bed, it had just come from the mangle; when we found the prisoner in the room, it was still on the table, but rumpled as if it had fell down and been picked up again; it was also on a different part of the table.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. While I was getting out of bed he told me to lay still; he did not appear intoxicated.

ELIZA BELSHAM . I am the last witness's grandmother; a little girl sleeps with me; I was awoke by a man coming to my bed-side, between one and two o'clock, I turned myself and clapped my hand upon his face, I thought it was my son and said Swain is it you, he said there is no Swain here; I called to my grandson, that there was a thief in the room, he got out, and the man said

"lay still you b-g-r;" assistance came, and we got a light, and we found the prisoner in the room; he was secured. The counterpane was lying on the same table, but it appeared as if some person had taken it up and shook it. It was rumpled.

Cross-examined. Vann came up when the people were gone. I was alarmed. I thought it was my son come home drunk. I felt his beard - He was close to the bedside, and he had his coat off.

JAMES SWAIN. I live in Eagleston-place, nearly opposite to Belsham's. About two o'clock in the morning I was alarmed, got up, and went to Belsham's house, hearing the cry of murder, and saw John Belsham at the door; I went up and found the prisoner in the room with his coat off, lying by the bedside, his coat was under his head; he said Jem brought him there; it was a Saturday night. He did not appear intoxicated. I searched him.

Cross-examined. His coat was under his head, as if he had been sleeping there; he might have been drinking, but was not insensible.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Swain. I went to the house-the counterpane was folded up, a person, by putting their hands upon it might have rumpled it as it was. He appeared intoxicated, but not insensible; he had been drinking a great deal.

Prisoner's Defence. I had received my wages, and went with my fellow-workmen to a public-house near the place; I got intoxicated, and went in by mistake.

SARAH NUNN . I live on the ground-floor of Belsham's

house. I know the street - door was fastenod back that night-it was wide open. I went to bed at eleven o'clock, John Belsham was not at home when I went to bed; about a quarter before two o'clock I heard some person go up stairs, and say, Jem.

JOHN BELSHAM re-examined. I came home a little after nine o'clock; I am sure it was not eleven.

FANNY BOYD. The prisoner lodged with me in Greek-street, Jem Haydon lodged with him - They worked together.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-77

1006. GEORGE RALPH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Stanforth , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 11th of June (no person being therein), and stealing therein two spoons, value 2s., his property; one watch, value 20s., and one key, value 6d. , the goods of Ann Folkes .

ELIZA STANFORTH. I am the wife of James Stanforth; we rent the front room on the second-floor in Mr. Oxbury's house, he does not live in it. Ann Folkes is my sister, and lives with us. The house is let out in tenements. On the 11th of June, soon after two o'clock in the afternoon, I locked my door, and went out, I left no person in the room; I was gone about ten minutes; Folkes went out before me; her watch hung up over the mantle-piece. Folkes came to me while I was out, I gave her the key; we went home together - She went up to the room first, and called me several times. I heard two persons run down stairs-one of them was my sister; she called out stop thief! I ran up and missed her watch and our silver spoons, which I had left in the cupboard, it was not locked; in about half an hour I saw the spoons and watch at the watchhouse-the prisoner was in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you offer to make it up with me for 30s. - A. I did not; his mother proposed it to me, but I refused.

ANN FOLKES . I am Mrs. Stanforth's sister, and was living in her room. About two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 11th of June, I came home with her, took the key of her, and went up stairs; just before I got to the room door I saw it open, and called my sister several times, but she did not answer; as I was going in at the door, the prisoner came out of the room - He was quite a stranger to me. The outer door of the house is generally left open. The prisoner asked me if Mr. Mulls lived there; there was no such person living there. I called out stop thief! he ran down stairs, and I followed him, still calling out - He was secured near the house; I never lost sight of him. I went home and missed the watch and spoons. I had left the watch in my sister's room when I went out, I saw it again at the watch-house, and knew it to be mine; there was no force used to the door. The prisoner continued running as I called out stop thief!

ELIZA STANFORTH re-examined. I have lived in the house six years, and never knew a person of the name of Mulls there. I am sure I locked the door-there was no force used to the lock. I saw the keys tried to the door, they unlocked it quite easy.

HENRY HOWARD . I am the keeper of St. Pancras watch-house, the house is in that parish. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; the watch and spoons were delivered to me, and Stanforth and Folkes claimed them. I went to the house with the picklock keys, two of which opened the door very easily. I produce them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES WARNE . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Little Charlotte-street, Goodge-street. I heard the cry of stop thief! and saw two of my neighbours in pursuit of the prisoner. I am sure he is the man. He was stopped in John-street, which is next to Windmill-street - he was running. I assisted in taking him to the watch-house, and took the spoons out of his pocket, and saw the gentleman take the watch out of his hand. I saw the prisoner thrust his hand into his left-hand pocket, I thought he was going to throw something away, and put my hand in and took the spoons and skeleton keys out-they were wrapped up together in his pocket-handkerchief; he did not say how he came by them. Those produced are the same.

Prisoner's Defence. They have all sworn falsely.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-78

1007. ANTONIO JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Byers , on the King's highway, on the 27th of June , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one purse, value 2s.; two 3s. and one 1s. 6d. bank tokens, and a 1l. bank note , his property.

WILLIAM BYERS. I am a mariner , and live in James-street, Shadwell. On the 27th of June, at half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I had been into a clothes shop in Rosemary-lane , the prisoner, and three others, were on the outside, looking at the clothes. I came out and got about twenty yards from the door, the prisoner laid hold of my arms, pinioned me, and pushed me against the wall, while the others took my purse out of my pocket. I laid hold of him, he made off with the rest, I ran after them, and secured him, he said it was not him, but that the others had got my purse, and shewed me which way they were gone. I went after them, and left him with the crowd, but could not catch them; when I returned I found the prisoner had got away. I ran after him, secured him, and gave him in charge. I am sure he is the man.

NATHANIEL NUTT. I live in Old Gravel-lane. On the 27th of June, I saw Byers come out of the shop, he pulled his purse out to count his money, and put it into his pocket again; the prisoner took hold of his trowsers and pushed him against the wall, when another man took the money out; there were three others with him-they ran away. Byers caught the prisoner, he said it was not him; Byers let him go, to run after the others. He caught him again. I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-79

1008. JOHN COWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , five gallons of spirits, value 20s. , the goods of John Haig .

FIVE OTHER COUNTS. Stating it to be the property of different persons.

JOHN DAVIS CLARK . I am a tide-surveyor of the Excise, the prisoner was a tide-waiter . The Lord Melville came into the river on the 14th of May, she had twentyfour casks of whiskey on board. On the 15th I put the prisoner and Bois on board, in charge of her; on the 17th I went to the vessel again, the prisoner was not there, he had broken his arm on the same day that he went on board. I gauged four casks, the ullage of three of them was four inches and a quarter dry, and the other three and a quarter, which is an unusual ullage-the casks were new. I discovered a spoil in the top of the bilge, which had been cut off even with the cask, the cask was perfectly dry on the top. I rummaged the ship, and found twelve gallons and a half of whiskey in the lockers, in two kettles, a teapot, and some stone bottles.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Bois has also been suspended.

JOHN NICHOLSON. I was on board the Lord Melville; the prisoner came on board on the 15th of May; I cleared away for stocking the casks-the prisoner then asked me, Tully, and Backers, to go into the hold with him. When we got there he handed me down four quart bottles, and told me to fill them - He found a crane - I filled them, and returned them up the galley to Tully, he handed them to Backers. When I was drawing off, he said the crane was not big enough by half an inch, and asked if I or any of the ship's company had a funnel, to put water into the cask; I told him I had not. The crew were all on deck. He took the crane out of my hand, and drew the liquor off himself, saying, that I was no hand at it. I filled all the bottles, and drew out two tin pots full, one of which contains about three pints, and the other two quarts; he handed them to me. I handed them up the galley - We filled other vessels, when we had done, he said, "such casks as I have not taken into stock, you may take what you want out of them, for the crane cannot hurt these casks; but when you have done, be sure and spoil them up, and cut it off snug, and I shall bore in the same holes, so that our betters may ******." We were there about ten minutes after that, and then went up. Moore is an apprentice on board. About two o'clock I saw Bois speak to the prisoner. They went up with one bottle, and the prisoner fell down, broke his arm, and went on shore.

Cross-examined. I never saw the prisoner before. This was all done in two hours. Tully and Backers saw what passed. I am now in confinement. On the 17th the officer came on board, and found the whiskey.

BRISBANE MOORE. I am an apprentice on board the vessel. I saw the prisoner go into the hold with Nicholson, Tully, and Backers, between eleven and twelve o'clock. I was in the kitchen at dinner-time, and saw a tin-pot standing on the table with whiskey in it-it would hold about a quart. While I was there, some whiskey was handed up from the hole in a tin-pot-the prisoner and Nicholson were in the hold at the time.

Cross-examined. I was first asked about them two days after it had happened. I drank once of it.

JOHN GATTY . I am a police-officer. On the 20th of May, I went on board the Lord Melville. A bladder was handed to me by Moore-it had a cork in it, and can be used to carry spirits.

Prisoner's Defence. Is it likely I should steal in the presence of strangers!-what benefit could I reap, and ran the risk of losing my situation?

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-80

1009. JOHN LEONARD was indicted for that he, on the 11th of June , unlawfully and feloniously did put off to John Caine , 12 pieces of counterfeit money, at a lower rate than they by their denomination did import, and were counterfeited for .

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable. I had taken two women into custody. From information that I received, I had some conversation with John Caine , who is the son of one of them. I gave him a 3s. piece, a half crown, and a sixpence, which I marked-he was to go to the prisoner's house to purchase base coin-Lines was with me. I saw him go to the prisoner's house myself; he keeps the house. Caine stopped there about twenty minutes. We placed ourselves about twenty yards off-on his coming out, he gave me a signal that he had got the money; we went up and laid hold of him; the prisoner had got the door in his hand letting him out. I searched Caine in his presence, and found a paper, containing 12s., which I produce. They were folded up separately. I asked Caine where he go them from? he said at first he did not know. I asked him if he got them from the prisoner; he said, in a low tone of voice, that he did-the prisoner heard me ask him. I then searched the prisoner, and found 21s. in good silver on him - I did not find those that I had given to Caine. I went up stairs to search, but found nothing; I afterwards went up again, and found a board loose in the floor of the garret, I took it up, and found the marked money which I had given to Caine; I also found a quantity of base coin. The prisoner was with me - He said he knew nothing about it. There was no other person in the house-there are only three rooms in it, one above the other; I took him into custody, and returned and researched again, and found a melting-pot in the cellar, and in the garret I found a vice and a black-lead pot. I took up another board in the garret, and found a great many papers which appeared to be of the same kind as that the money was wrapped in.

JOHN CAINE. On the 11th of June last my mother was in custody. I afterwards saw Lines and Jones. He gave me a 3s. piece, a half-crown, and a sixpence. I went to the prisoner's house and found him there - He shut the door, and took me into the kitchen. I told him my aunt was very bad, and could not come herself, and I was to have 6s. worth of Derbys. I did not know what it meant. He told me to speak softly, and he would go and fetch them for me. My aunt had sent me once before, and told me to ask for Derbys. I put the money that Jones gave me into my waistcoat pocket, and gave it to him. He

locked me up in the kitchen and left me there; he came down to me again, and gave me a paper, telling me to put it into my pocket before I got to the door. I put it into my waistcoat-pocket. He said the people could see them there; I said they could not. When I got to the door, I scratched my head, to give Jones a signal that I had got them, which I had agreed to do. Jones stopped me on the step, and put his foot against the door to prevent its being shut, and asked me what I had got? I told him nothing, as I was afraid of the prisoner's striking me-there was no other person in the house. He searched my pocket and found them there; I never opened them-it was the parcel that the prisoner gave me.

Court. Q. Are you sure you was there once before - A. Yes; I had 2s. worth of them on the Friday.

JOHN LINES . I am a beadle of Limehouse. I and Jones sent Caine to the prisoner's house; I saw him go in and come out, and had him in sight all the time, except while he was in the house. On his coming out, Jones took a paper from him. I afterwards went into the house, and found a paper, up stairs, which contained the marked money that was given to Caine. Jones found a paper containing ninety-eight bad shillings, and four punches with letters on them, with which the old shillings were marked; I also found a paper containing eight counterfeit shillings and six 1s. 6d. tokens, apparently new, and three separate papers, containing forty bad shillings in each, imitating the new coinage.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The twelve shillings taken from Caine are all counterfeit, and resemble the new coinage. The three papers, containing 40s. each, are also counterfeit, and of the same die as the twelve - They are each wrapped in separate papers, to prevent their rubbing. They have never been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw Caine before this day - I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-81

1010. JAMES GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , one watch, value 2l.; one pelisse, value 1l.; one waistcoat, value 10s.; one handkerchief, value 2s.; and one pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of John Burnikell .

JOHN BURNIKELL . I belong to a Newcastle ship . The prisoner was also on board the ship. We arrived in the river in May, and were moored near the Tower, on the Middlesex side of the river. I missed my things on the 28th of May. My watch was at my bed's head, and the other articles in my chest-the prisoner could get at it. Suspecting him, I got an officer, and he was taken two days afterwards. I went directly, and saw my watch in Wright's window - He is a pawnbroker. The prisoner had been on board nine or ten months.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer. On the 28th of May Burnikell described the prisoner to me-on the 30th I found him at the George, in St. Ann's-lane, Westminster, and found the duplicate of the watch pledged at Wright's in his pocket. He was in bed; he got up. The prosecutor claimed the clothes which he had got on - He confessed they were his.

JAMES COURTNEY. I live with Mr. Wright, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Tothill-street, Westminster. On the 28th of May I took the watch in pledge from the prisoner for 1l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Confined Three Months . GUILTY . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18170702-82

1011. JOHN ROPER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , two table cloths, value 7s.; one tea-spoon, value 3s.; and one 2l. bank note, the property of George Harlow , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE HARLOW . I live in Charles-street, Hatton-garden ; the prisoner was apprenticed to my son-in-law, who lives in my house, which is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . On the 20th of last month, I lost a 2l. note out of my pocket-book, which was in my coat-pocket, and hung over a chair; I had other notes there; I then took the numbers and dates of the rest, and hung the coat over the chair as usual. On the 24th, I lost another 2l. note; I had worn the coat; I missed the note about eleven o'clock in the day-time. (Reads.)

"It was No. 32,719, dated 24th Feb. 1817," there were other notes in the book at the time; I have seen it since; I missed a tea-spoon, and saw that also at the office. The prisoner is a turn-over apprentice and had been in the house about five months; he had an opportunity of going into the room where my coat hung; the door used to be open; I sent for an officer and apprehended him on suspicion. My son-in-law is a tailor.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody at his master's house, searched him, and found a pocket-book in his coat-pocket, which contained several duplicates; one of which applies to the tea-spoon. The prisoner said it was a duplicate of an apron belonging to a young woman; I also found the duplicate of two table-cloths. On the Thursday, I found the bank note under the drawers in the room where I searched him, it was a 2l. note. Mr. Harlow told me the number of it before he saw it. After I had searched the prisoner, I told him he must have done it, and asked him where he had put it; he said he threw it under the drawers while I was searching him.

JOHN LAPPAGE . I live with Mr. Dumball; he is a pawnbroker, and lives at Somers Town. I have the two tablecloths and a spoon, pledged at our house. I do not know who pledged them-the duplicates found on the prisoner belong to our house. One table-cloth and a spoon were pledged with us on the 22d of May, for 5s.; the other table-cloth was pledged on the 20th of February, for 2s.2d.

Q. Do you mean to swear you do not know his face at all - A. No; I do not. They were pledged in the name of Roberts - I took them in myself. I do not know that I ever took any other articles in of him.

GEORGE HARLOW . The bank-note corresponds in number and date; it is mine; it has my son's hand-writing on it. The rest of things are mine.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18170702-83

1012. JOHN MORELAND was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eliza Johnston on the King's highway, on the 1st of July , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, four 1l. notes, and 10s. in monies numbered , her property.

ELIZA JOHNSTON . I live in Cock-court, New-street, Golden-square. On the 1st of June, about half-past twelve o'clock at night. I was going to see a young woman in St. James's-street. When I was at the corner of Silver-street, I asked the watchman the way - He directed me into Swallow-street; the prisoner was listening to what I said on the other side of the way, with four others, it was moonlight. I went towards Swallow-street - all five followed me till I came to the corner of Vigo-lane , the prisoner then caught hold of my arms, another held my mouth to hinder me from speaking, and another turned my pocket out. The prisoner said, "hand over your money." There were four 1l. notes 10s. in silver in my pockets. They immediately left me and went down Swallow-street, towards Piccadilly. I went along Sackville-street, and as soon as I met the watchman I told him. I cried out when they first went away, but there was no person near me-the watchman went after them with me. As I was going into St. James's-street, and was telling the watchman of it, I saw the prisoner standing by a hackney-coach in Piccadilly, and gave him in charge - He did not run away; he stopped till the watchman came up and took him-nothing was found on him. I am positively certain that he is the man.

Court. Q. What are you - A. An unfortunate girl. I was not intoxicated. I had received the four 1l. notes that night of a gentleman.

JOHN BUCHANAN . I am a watchman; my beat is in Sackville-street - I go to the very bottom of the street. I met the prosecutrix about one o'clock in the morning of the 1st of July. I saw about four or five men at the corner of Vigo-lane; they went down Swallow-street. She called to me, and said she had been robbed by the five men; I did not go after them. She kept walking with me till we got to the bottom of Sackville-street, I stood there, and saw four or five men following her again; they appeared to be the same men-it was about five minutes after I had got to the bottom of the street. I followed behind them, and was about ten yards off - She was about four yards before them; they came up to her again. One of them, with a blue coat, demanded some money of her for shewing her the way to St. James's-street. I got up to them; she said she had none, for they had robbed her of all she had; she accused them of taking it, and turned round to me and said

"here is one of the men."

Court. Q. You saw five of them - A. The four separated from her.

Q. Why did you not seize them immediately - A. She did not give them in charge-she told me to take a man by the coaches, he stood on the pavement. I laid hold of him - He acknowledged he was one of those that had spoken to her.

Q. You know there is a 40l. reward - A. Yes; I never spoke to her about it.

Prisoner's Defence. She asked me the way to St. James's-street, and gave me in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18170702-84

1013. TIMOTHY BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , three pieces of timber, value 5s. , the goods of John Richardson and Thomas Want .

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am a builder , in partnership with Thomas Want , we live in Swallow-street . On the 15th of June we lost a piece of fir timber, and two boards, which were nailed up at a window in my yard. At six o'clock in the evening I was told the prisoner was in custody. He had worked three years with me.

RICHARD DICKMAN . I am servant to Messrs. Richardson and Want. On Sunday morning, about five o'clock, I was getting up, and saw the prisoner knock down the two boards at the window, and get through into the yard. I watched him, and saw him bring a piece of timber out into the street, and put it on the top of my master's cart; he went about twenty yards farther, then returned, took the boards on his shoulder, and walked into Air-street with them. I followed and secured him with the boards. He threw them off his shoulder.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18170702-85

1014. DAVID ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , two pistols, value 3l.; one ring, value 8s.; one dressing-case, value 2l.; one box, value 20s.; 26 gold pagodas, value 8l.; and 80 silver rupees, value 8l. ; the property of Henry Middleton Sterndale .

HENRY MIDDLETON STERNDALE. I am an officer in the Marine Service ; the prisoner was a seaman in the service. On the 5th of June he was employed to take two boxes from the Globe Tavern, Blackwall, to my lodgings at Bow Cottage, Bromley.

THOMAS TURNER . I am a waiter at the Globe Tavern. On the 5th of June I ordered the prisoner to take the boxes to Mr. Sterndale's lodgings, Bow Cottage, Bromley. I told him to return for another trunk, but he did not.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me a written direction-A. No.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a broker, and live in Church-road, St. George's in the East. On the 6th of June, Mrs. Dempsey, who lives next door to me, and keeps a broker's shop, came to me, and said a man had brought some things which she thought had been stolen, and asked me to come into her shop, while she followed him, as he said he was going for another parcel. I went, and saw one of the boxes lying open on the floor, with a pair of pistols and some loose papers in it. She returned, and said she had watched him, and had lost him just by the Wheatsheaf. Just at that moment, the man returned with another mahogany box, in a canvas bag. I asked him what he brought them there for? he said,

"your master knows." I told him he must have been wrong informed, and that I should detain him till I sent for an officer. He wanted to go out, and seemed very much agitated. I delivered him to Williams. It was not the prisoner; it was a man named Afflect.

MARY ANN DEMPSEY. I am a broker, and live in Church-road, St. George's in the East. I was standing at my door - A man ran in with the box into my back room. I asked him what he had got there? he said, "your

master knows." He said he had another to fetch, I let him leave it. it was open - I lifted up the cover, and saw some pistols in it; I got Williams to watch my door, and followed him, but lost sight of him; he returned with the other box, and was secured. It was Affleck.

WILLIAM AFFLECK. I am a cordwainer. On the 5th of June I was sitting at work about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in with a box under his arm, and his wife with another box, they requested me to let them leave the things there while they went a little further; knowing them, I did not suspect any thing was wrong, and let them leave them, expecting they would return and take them away as they promised; no person came-but the next morning his wife came, and asked if her husband had been to fetch them - She went away, and I saw no more of them. At five o'clock the next day I went to his house, and saw his son, he lives at No. 2, Church-road; the boy said his father and mother were locked up for things they had left at my house. I went and told the patrol - He advised me to send for an officer, I thought I had better send them to the prisoner's house, but instead of going into No. 2, I went to No. 4 (which is Dempsey's), by mistake, and left them there-when I came with the second box, I was taken into custody. I put the box into a bag that the things might not fall out-it being open.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I took Affleck in charge; both boxes were left open-the pagodas were all gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not find out the cottage; I met an old shipmate and got intoxicated, and meant to return to the tavern the next morning. I asked Affleck to keep them safe for me, and gave them to him as I received them; he must have taken the money himself, he should have been indicted instead of me.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-86

1015. JOHN ISAACS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Langton , on the King's highway, on the 6th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2l., and one chain, value 5s. , his property.

JOHN LANGTON . I am a calico-glazier . On the 6th of July, about a quarter after twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from Stratford, I was near the New Church in the Strand-Mr. Parsons was with me-as I was going along, the prisoner put his hand to my fob, and took my watch out of my pocket. I said, "Sam, they have stolen my watch;" upon which Mr. Parsons went in search of the prisoner, and called out stop thief! I immediately received a violent blow on my breast, and one on my eye, which completely stunned me, and knocked me down - I do not know what passed after! I was taken to the watchhouse, and when I got a little better the prisoner was shewn to me, and my watch. I only saw one person come up at first - I did not see anybody afterwards.

SAMUEL PARSONS . I was in company with Langton, near the New Church, I had hold of his arm; I saw the prisoner's hands against his fob - He instantly made off-the prosecutor said he had lost his watch; I run after him very quick towards the church, and had him in sight till he had turned the corner. I took notice of his dress. He turned up a court at the back of the church, when I came up the court I found him in custody. I am positive he is the man. I found my friend in a passage, very much bruised, lying on his back, insensible; I saw the prisoner's hand close to his fob, and he gave a jerk; there was no other person near.

EDWARD LANGLEY. I am a constable, and live in Drury-court; I heard the cry of stop thief! I went to my door, and the prisoner was the first man that passed. I laid hold of him - He was running as fast as he could; he said "what do you want with me, I have done nothing." The moment I turned round Parsons came up, and said,"what, have you got him." I took him to the watchhouse, but found nothing on him. Gregg brought a watch, which he said he had picked up on the stone railing of the church, where the prisoner must have passed; there was no other person in the court. I could see clearly. No person could have passed before him.

JOHN GREGG . I am a watchman; I picked the watch up on the stone of the church railing-the prisoner must have passed it.

JOHN BEAL . I am a patrol; I heard the cry of stop thief! and saw the prisoner run along on one side of the church, and Parsons following him, into Drury-court. I followed and never lost sight of him till he was taken. I came up immediately.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was taking a walk.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-87

1016. JOHN PARKER and THOMAS HALL , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Harridance , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 29th of June (no person in the same dwelling-house then being), and stealing therein one watch, value 2l.; two gowns, value 10s.; one shawl, value 4s.; one frock, value 1s.; one handkerchief, value 3s.; and 5s. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of the said Mary Harridance ; one coat, value 1l.; one waistcoat, value 8s.; one pair of breeches, value 12s., the goods of of Thomas Chapman ; and one pair of breeches, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Beard .

MARY HARRIDANCE. I am a single woman , and live in Booth-street, Spitalfields, in the parish of Christchurch . On the 29th of June, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, my house was broken open. There was no person in the house. I came home and found it so about two o'clock. I lost the articles stated in the indictment; and found all the things about the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I am a single woman. Mr. Chapman has the yard; he does not pay the rent.

JOHN ALLEN. I am a journeyman weaver. On the 29th of June, between one and two o'clock, I was looking through my window, which has a clear view of Mrs. Harridance's house, I saw the prisoner, Parker, come up the yard to the house, lift the latch up, the door was fast, and go into the stable-immediately after the other prisoner.

went into the stable to him; they had not been there more than half a minute, when the prisoner, Hall came across the yard with a key in his hand, and tried to undo the door - He could not open it; he went back into the stable, and brought another, which opened it quite easy - He went in and pulled the door almost to, the other prisoner went in and shut the door; I sent my wife to give the alarm, she returned, saying, there was nobody there; about five minutes after the prisoner, Parker, came out with a bundle, tied up in a yellow handkerchief, and took it into the stable; I sent for Porter, who got over the wall, and took Parker, with the property, in the yard.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. The yard gates were shut. The yard is called Chapman's yard. I do not know that he lives with Mrs. Harridance.

SAMUEL PORTER . I am a publican. On the 29th of June, Allen's wife called me, saying, there were thieves on the premises; I could not get in at the gate, but having the key of the adjoining premises, I got in and called Rider, who got over the wall and took the prisoners into custody; the prisoner Hall said,

"do not lay hold of me, I am no thief, I will give you my address;" I got over and went into the house, and found every thing thrown about and laying on the ground; we took the prisoners to the watchhouse, and returned to the premises, and found the bundle of clothes, a crow-bar, seven picklock keys, a silver watch, a 5s. paper of penny-pieces and a bag of farthings, in the stable.

WILLIAM RIDER . I went with Porter, and found the prisoners trying to get out of the gate as I went over the wall; I asked them what their business was there, they said they came to look at the horses in the stable; there were some horses in the stable; I told them I must know more about it before I let them go; I took the prisoner, Hall, to the watch-house. The watchman took Parker.

JOHN FOULTER . I am a rope-maker. I found the bundle in the stable, and a phosphorous box. I produce them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PIKE. I found a crow-bar in the stable.

THOMAS HART . I found the picklock keys, one of them opens the gate, and the other the door.

PARKER'S Defence. I met the other prisoner and he said, let us go and see if the carman is here; the wicket was open - We went in, and several persons came and asked us what we did there, we said we came to see the carman. Mr. Porter said he was very sure of getting 40l. and he would put it into a school.

HALL'S Defence. We went there to see the carman-the people came out and asked us how we got in; we said we came in at the gate - They said it was not so.

MR. PORTER. On my oath, I never said such a word.

PARKER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

HALL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-88

1017. ANN PEYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th June , in the dwelling-house of Mary Smith , one yard of muslin, value 5s.; one hair-front, value 1s.; 2s.6d. in copper monies numbered, and two 5l. bank notes , her property.

MARY SMITH . I am a widow living at No. 3, Market-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . I keep the house, the prisoner, who was a servant out of place , had lodged with me about a month - She left my house on the 26th of June, and went to live in a situation in Seymour-place, Somers-town. She had told me, that if she did not get a situation in a very little while, she did not know what she should do, as she was in distress. The evening that she left me, I saw her bring in a very large bundle. On Thursday, I missed two 5l. notes and 2s.6d. in copper, in a brown paper, and one yard of sprig muslin; I should not know my notes again; I suspected her, and got an officer, and sent for her over to a public-house, opposite to where she lived, and told her I had been robbed - I neither promised or threatened her. She seemed confused for a short time; I told her I had every reason to suspect her; she denied having any knowledge of it for sometime. I gave her in charge, she then confessed she had taken them. The constable did not promise her, she said she had taken the two 5l. notes; I asked her what she had done with them, she said she had laid them all out; I then told her I had lost one yard of sprig muslin, she said she took it, and had torn it up one day while she was with me; I then told her I had lost half-a-crown worth of halfpence; she denied it for some time, and then said she took them before she took the notes, and begged I would forgive her; I had not done anything to induce her to think I should forgive her.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. She confessed every thing - I gave her in charge before she confessed it. I did not say it would be better for her to confess.

SUSANNAH LATLEY . I am a servant out of place; I live in Upper Harley-street; I went with Mrs. Smith to the public-house, the prisoner was sent for, and charged with the robbery; she denied it at first, and then confessed taking the two 5l. notes out of the drawer; we neither promised or threatened her. I said nothing to her.

CORNELIUS BOWER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge on Monday, 30th June; Mrs. Smith took me to the public-house, saying she suspected the prisoner, who lived in Seymour-place, New-road; she sent for her, and when she came, she said,

"you are the person I want;" I have been robbed, and you are the person who did it; she denied it at first. Mrs. Smith asked her how she came by her new linen and bonnet; she said, she could not give any account. Mrs. Smith said she should give her in charge - I shut the door - She began to cry - I neither promised or threatened her. Mrs. Smith said,

"you are the person and no one else;" she then confessed taking the two 5l. notes, and asked me if I could forgive her - I told her I could not - She said she had changed one of the notes at a linen-draper's in Holborn. Mrs. Smith and I went to trace it, but could not trace either of them. I am quite sure that I said nothing to induce her to confess.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to mercy .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-89

1018. LAWRENCE CAIN was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Laing , on the King's highway, on the 31st of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his per

son, and against his will, one seal, value 16s.; two keys, value 8s.; one hat, value 5s.; and two 3s. bank tokens , his property.

JAMES LAING . I am a jeweller , and live in George-street, Adelphi. On the 31st of May, soon after nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Montague-place, Russell-square ; I was surrounded by a gang-they came behind me, stopped my eyes and mouth with their hands, and one held my legs, so that I could not move; they forced my ribbon, seals and key off; the ribbon broke and left the watch in my fob; they tore my pockets out - They then knocked me down. I received several severe blows on my body; they run away-my hat fell off, and in getting up I picked a hat up, and saw a man running without a hat, in a slanting direction from me, I called out stop thief! he turned into Gower-street - I lost sight of him while he turned the corner, but saw him again immediately; he was stopped in Montague-place, it proved to be the prisoner; I asked him whether the hat that I had, was his; he said, it was; it must have belonged to one of the men who accosted me, it was close by my side. I gave him in charge.

JOHN SUMMERS. I am in the 2d Regiment of Life-Guards, I was going up Keppel-street, and heard the rattle sprung and the cry of stop thief! I saw the prisoner running fast down the street without a hat; I met him, he dodged me, I laid hold of him - He said, "let me go, I am not the thief!" I gave him in charge.

RICHARD SMITH. I am a patrol; about half-past nine o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief! and saw the prisoner running very fast, without a hat, in the middle of the road, just by Montague-place; I followed him - He was stopped in Keppel-street. I never lost sight of him - He claimed the hat.

JOHN SMART. I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought into the watch-house. He claimed the hat.

DAVID MYLAND. I am a watchman. I heard the alarm; the prisoner went from the end of Montague-place without a hat. I tried to stop him, but he got from me.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the scuffle, and went to look at them; one of the men knocked my hat off; I heard the cry and tried to make my escape, to avoid disgrace.

SMART. The prisoner did not give this account at the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-90

1019. GEORGE STEWARD and JOHN JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , two trusses, value 10s. , the goods of John Edy and John Taylor .

THOMAS COOKE . I am a constable. On the 3d of June, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners passed my window in Castle-street, Leicester-square; Steward had a bundle concealed under his coat; I went out and overtook them, and asked them what they had got, Steward said it was nothing; I took the bundle from him, and found two trusses; I asked him where he got them, he said, from a broker's shop in Duke's-court; he said he was going to take them to Monmouth-street to the woman's brother. I secured them, and found they belonged to Edy.

ANN EDY . I am the wife of John Edy, who is a truss-maker , and lives in Dean-street, Soho , in partnership with John Taylor. I missed the trusses at eight o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

STEWARD'S Defence. I found them in a timber-yard, by Westminster-bridge.

JONES'S Defence. I met him with them.

STEWARD. - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

JONES- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-91

1020. FRANCIS TINSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one knife-tray, value 7s.; one bread-tray, value 7s.; and one toast-stand, value 4s. , the goods of John Methley , Thomas Tapster and Miles Maskew .

JOHN METHLEY . I am a furnishing-ironmonger , and live in Frith-street, Soho , in partnership with Thomas Tapster and Miles Maskew; the prisoner had lived sixteen months with us, in consequence of information which I received, he was going to leave our employ, on the 11th of June, as he was going away, I desired to see his lodgings, which he granted readily, and went with me; I found several things which belonged to us, and among others, the property stated in the indictment; he said they were our property and begged for mercy; he is a single man, and had ninety guineas a year and his breakfast.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-92

1021. JOSEPH COLLINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , two gowns, value 1l.; three petticoats, value 10s.; five shifts, value 1l.; ten caps, value 10s.; five habit-shirts, value 9s.; four pairs of stockings, value 6s.; four aprons, value 4s.; four handkerchiefs, value 2s.; two pair of shoes, value 10s.; one shawl, value 4s; one spencer, value 5s.; and one 1l. bank-note , the property of Susannah Battle .

SUSANNAH BATTLE. I am a servant , and live in Paradise-row, Bethnal-green, the prisoner used to go on errands. On the 4th of January, I had just come to my place and sent him to No. 8, Russell-court, Whitechapel , for my box at Mrs. Stebbing's, he never brought it to me, it contained the articles stated in the indictment. On the 4th of June, he was apprehended.

MARY STEBBING . I live in Russell-court. Susannah Battle lodged with me before she went to her place, she left her box with me. On the 4th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to me and asked for Battle's trunk; it was locked - I gave it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was robbed of it in the fields.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-93

1022. PETER MAXWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of Francis Oxley , from his person .

FRANCIS OXLEY. I live in Addington-place, Camberwell. On the 24th of June, I was walking very fast by

Postern-row, Tower-hill ; all of a sudden, I felt my pocket lightened and missed my handkerchief, I turned round, and saw the prisoner conveying it into his bosom; I laid hold of him and secured him with it; he said it was given to him-two Jews were near him, and desired me to give him a kick and let him go about his business-they were very impertinent-the prisoner also desired I would give him a kick and let him go. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-94

1023. JOHN BARRS and JAMES LOADER were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , one sack, value 2s., three bushels of oats, beans and chaff, (mixed), value 9s.; and one truss of hay, value 3s. , the goods of William Horne .

JOHN HORSLEY . I am servant to Mr. Horne, who is proprietor of the Golden-cross Inn . Charing-cross, he sends the hay to the different stations, for the horses on the road. On the 4th of June last, I loaded the caravan with hay and twenty-seven sacks of mixed corn, beans and chaff, and saw it packed up tight with a tarpaulin over it; it was corded down, and half a truss of clover was put on the top for the horses on the road; the twenty-seven sacks were for the horses on the stage, to be delivered at Slough and Hounslow-it was Mr. Horne's corn-it was delivered to the prisoner, Barrs, to take to Slough.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY. There are different proprietors of the coaches-Mr. Horne pays me-it is his corn, and only his.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am the constable of Hammersmith. On the 5th of June, I was desired to watch for the caravan, and saw it come up to the three Pigeons at Hammersmith, about three o'clock in the morning. Barrs went into the tap-room, and Loader came out and untied the cords and tarpauling, and took out a bundle of hay from the hinder part, and put it into the hay-place by the door; he went in again, and in about ten minutes Barrs came out and got on the shafts, and untied the front cords of the tarpaulin, and threw it back, and pulled a sack out from under it, Loader came and took it into the public-house; in about ten minutes after this, they both came out and made all fast again. I stopped a few minutes, they went in doors and I followed them, and saw the prisoners and the landlord together, in the back private room; Loader had a little basket of corn in his hand, when he saw me, he threw it under the seat; I found the sack of corn in the stable, I asked the landlord who put it in the stable, he said there had been nobody there to his knowledge; I think he must have seen it go through, the prisoners heard what the landlord said, they made no reply; I secured them, and asked Barrs what he left corn there for, he said, he left it to get a few shillings for himself. It was mixed oats, beans and chaff.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The master was not giving Loader any directions. I did not see him till after it was taken in.

THOMAS DALBY . I am a carpenter, and was with Edgson, he has spoken correctly; I saw Loader take the truss, and Barrs take the sack of corn; I counted the sacks afterwards, there was only twenty-six left in the caravan.

JOSEPH BRITTEN. I am clerk to Mr. Horne; the corn was his.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. He finds the corn for the two first stages on the road. The corn was not for the horses.

BARRS'S Defence. I left it to feed the horses.

BARRS - GUILTY . Aged 36.

LOADER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Years , and Publicly Whipped near the Three Pigeons .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-95

1024. BARNARD BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one box, value 6d., and 70 wine glasses, value 25s. , the goods of James Robins .

JAMES ROBINS . I keep a glass-warehouse in Bishopsgate-street . On the 13th of January I lost a quantity of glasses from my door; next day, Collins, my man, brought me a dozen of them to sell - I told him they were mine. I got an officer, and found a great many of them at the prisoner's house.

ABRAHAM COLLINS . I am a shopman. The glasses were brought to my house when I was out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-96

1025. JOHN SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , two saws, value 8s., the goods of George Harden ; and two saws, value 10s. , the goods of John Everson .

GEORGE HARDEN . I am a carpenter . On the 5th of June, I was at work at a building in Camden-street, Camden-town . I went to breakfast, and when I returned I missed my saws.

JOHN EVERSON . I am a carpenter. I missed two saws, and two great coats, from the same building.

JOHN WILLIAMS. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chapel-street, Westminster. On the 5th of June the prisoner pledged four saws with me, for 8s., at ten o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE ROBINSON . I am a constable. Between five and six o'clock in the morning I heard the cry of stop thief! I opened my window, and saw the prisoner on the top of some houses in Johnston-street, Somers-town, endeavouring to escape by unroofing the houses - He was secured. I found the duplicates of the saws in his coat-lining.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-97

1026. DANIEL FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , 29lbs. of lead, value 4s., the goods of John Atkinson , then fixed to a certain building .

JOHN ATKINSON . I am an oilman , and live in Oxford-street. On the first of June I lost some lead off my building in Spitalfields , from some stables which join the dwelling-house. I was sent for, and found some lead. I asked him what he meant to do with it? He begged forgiveness, and said he meant to take it away.

THOMAS WALBANK . I am an oilman. On the 1st of June, between four and five o'clock in the evening, I was going up Mr. Atkinson's yards, and saw a man up in his loft. I asked him what he did there? he said he had been there to sleep, and that he was in liquor. I told him if he had had his sleep out, he had better go off the premises, instead of which he went to the privy. I found the lead cut off the gutter - He made the best of his way out of the yard, I followed and secured him. I asked him why he cut the lead off? he said because he was a fool, and hoped I would forgive him, as he was in distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-98

1027. WILLIAM KAYE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , one picture, value 5l., the goods of Charles Hayter , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Ann Hayter .

CHARLES HAYTER . I lodge in Wells-street, Oxford-street , the house is not mine - I am a miniature-painter ; the prisoner had introduced himself to me as Mr. Jackson the artist, soliciting charity. I lent him a book on painting, to have his opinion on it. On the 7th of September last, about two o'clock, I had been out; when I came home I missed the picture, and found the books, on the table, which I had lent him-it was painted by my daughter; I have never seen it since-it was safe twenty minutes before, hanging up in my room.

SARAH COOPER . I am Mr. Hayter's servant. A man came to the door, and asked for Mr. Hayter; I told him he would be at home in a quarter of an hour, and asked him up into the drawing-room he took a book out of his pocket, and wrote the name of Jackson on a piece of paper, and laid it on the table with the book. I shewed him into the room where the pictures were, and went down. In about ten minutes I returned to the room, found him gone, and the street - door open. The man was very much like the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not let me out - A. No; no other person had been in the room.

JAMES FLETCHER. I am a constable. Mr. Hayter gave the prisoner in charge, and called him by the name of Jackson; he then said his name was Kaye.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and know nothing of the picture.

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Of stealing only . Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-99

1028. SOLOMON COHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 675 yards of silk, value 200l. , the goods of Joseph Foot .

BENJAMIN GOULDING. I am servant to Mr. Joseph Foot, who lives in Church-street, Spitalfields - He was out of town. On the 9th of June the prisoner came to Mr. Foot's shop-this was the first time that I saw him. He desired to look at some umbrella silks; he looked at one piece, and agreed to buy two, he was to pay ready money for them. He ordered them to be sent to his house at five o'clock, and gave me a printed card, from which I copied his direction-it was " Solomon Cohen and Co., Ship Agents, Newroad, St. George's" - I returned the card to him. The two pieces came to 40l. 9s.; I went with them myself, and found Solomon Cohen and Co. Ship-agents, written on the door. I saw the prisoner there, he paid me in the counting-house, which appeared to be a place of great business, there were some slop-goods there-he did not take a receipt. The next day, about eleven o'clock, he came again, and ordered two more pieces of the same sort; I took them to his house at five o'clock as before. He told me to bring them to his house after Change hours - I left them there without the money; he said he would call with it the next morning, which he did-he paid me 25l. 18s., and ordered two pieces of umbrella silk, and one piece of parasol silk, amounting to 60l. 3s. - I delivered them between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. He then told me he expected a large order from a captain, and if we could serve him well, he would give it to us. On the 12th of June (next day), about eleven o'clock in the morning, he came and paid me 61l., which left a balance of 17s., and ordered twenty-four pieces of umbrella silk, and said they must be very low, and I must take off ten per cent. discount, as he bought for cash - I had only taken off five per cent. before. The order being large, and for ready money, induced me to consent to take off ten per cent.; they were to be delivered that evening, after Change hours; he fixed five o'clock for me to deliver them, and for him to pay for them. I looked out eighteen pieces-the amount of them was 472l.; after deducting the discount it was 425l. I went with Pearl, a ticket-porter, who carried them. I only took eighteen pieces, because I thought the order was large, and I wished to be cautious. I made the invoice accordingly. I took a blank receipt stamp with me. I got to the house at six o'clock, and found the prisoner at home - I was shewn into the counting-house to him; the porter staid in the passage with the goods. The prisoner ordered him to put them down, began looking at them, piled them up upon the floor, and told the porter to go, and said he would give me something for him (this is not customary), the porter did not ask him for any thing. The porter went out. I asked for the money-the prisoner got out his cash-box. The porter staid in the passage; I had desired him not to go away, the prisoner heard me tell him so. The prisoner asked me if I could give him the difference of a check for 700l., he put his key into the box, I do not think he opened it; he neither shewed me the check, nor said what house it was upon. I told him I could not, and asked him if he would favour me with the check; he said it would be of no service to me, as the banking-hours were over; I could not put it to any use, but I might have the money in the morning, as soon as the banking-house was open. I pressed him several times to give me the money, he said he could not pay me, he had only that draft in his box, and was unable to pay me-several words passed about it; I was in

duced to take his word and leave the goods, believing at that time that he would pay me in the morning-it was expressly understood that I was to go for the money at nine o'clock the next morning (he told me to call at nine o'clock for it). I left the house about seven o'clock in the evening. I went back again that evening, not being satisfied in my own mind, in about five minutes, and the servant told me he was not at home-(I had not left the house above minutes, and was in sight of it all the time) - He might have gone out; I did not see him again that night. I went at nine o'clock the next morning, and was told he was gone to Limehouse. He called on me at eleven o'clock, and asked if I had been to his house? I told him I had. He asked me what I had been for? I told him for the money. He said he had come to order the remaining six pieces (which I had left out of the order), to make up the twenty-four, and ordered six more also - He left me to look them out, and told me to bring them at the usual hour, and a receipt with me, for the goods which I had delivered the day before, and those which were now ordered. I asked him for the money for the eighteen pieces I had delivered, as he was out that morning when I called. He said he had been to the captain who had bought them, and was now going to a coffee-house to meet him for the money, and he would pay me for the goods at five o'clock. I told him I would not let him have the goods without the money for the former - He said he would pay me for the whole, and he did not desire me to leave the goods without receiving the whole amount-the amount of the six pieces was 228l.8s.2d.; after deducting the discount it was 200l., making, in the whole, 625l. At five o'clock, Deighton, our porter, went with me with the goods. I told him we should not leave the house without the money or goods. We got there exactly at five o'clock - A female servant opened the door, and said Mr. Cohen was not at home. I took the goods to a neighbouring public-house, staid there till near six o'clock, and then went to the house again, and found he was at home; I fetched the porter and goods, and was shewn into the counting-house. The porter came to the counting-house door-the prisoner ordered him to put the goods down, as he wanted to look at the parasol silks; he said a piece which had been delivered the day before did not please him. He examined one or two pieces, and asked me to take back the piece which had been delivered, as the captain did not like the colour - I told him I would; he did not return it. After examing the goods he piled them up in the same place as he did the former eighteen (they were gone), and asked me if I had brought a receipt for the goods? I told him I had a stamp, but had not written it out, as I did not know whether he would have it made out with the discount put into the receipt, or not. He told me he would have it made out with the discount taken off. I was writing it - He got the cash-box out, apparently to pay me, and told the porter to go away, and he would give me something for him - I ordered him to wait; I supposed the prisoner could hear me, I did not speak low. He then asked me to write out another invoice with the discount taken off - I had written the receipt for 625l., according to his direction, but did not give it to him. The piece he talked of returning had already been paid for, it was one of the two first parcels. He took me out of the counting-house into the parlour, which was next to it, to make out the invoice, and gave me pen, ink, and paper. I left the counting-house-door open. I do not know why I was to write it in the parlour; he took the pen and ink from the counting-house for me-the paper was in the desk in the parlour. The counting-house door was left open, I could see into it; there was plenty of paper in the counting-house-he gave no reason for taking me into the parlour. I wrote it out, and gave it to him; he said it would do, but he must trouble me to wait a moment, for his clerk had not come in from his banker's. In about two minutes a young man came in, I did not see him; I heard neither knock at the door or ring at the bell. The prisoner left me alone, as if to go into the counting-house for something; immediately as he got into the counting-house, he began talking to some person whom I did not see, calling him a blockhead, and appeared in a great rage; he then came into me again, and said "what stupid fellows I have got to deal with!" and that he had made it too late for the banker's. He said he had sent him to the banker's first, and then to Lloyd's afterwards, but that the boy had gone to Lloyd's first, and then made it too late for the banker's. He said he must trouble me to go to a neighbour's house to borrow the money - He said they were in the habit of lending each other money when they were too late to get to the banker's. I went with him. He had a piece of paper in his hand, folded up about the size of a check before we went out, it was then about half-past six o'clock. He took me to a house about a quarter of a mile from his house, the name of Davies was on the door, in the Commercial-road. He asked me to wait outside the door, which I did. He came out in two or three minutes, and said his friend, unfortunately, could only lend him 48l., and putting it into my hand, he asked me to count it, and said he would go into the city and borrow the remainder. I told him that was of no use at all to me, and I would not go without either the money or the goods. He said, he supposed three or four hundred pounds would do for me till the morning - I told him it would not. To urge it, I said I had a bill to pay-he wanted to know the amount of it; I told him it was more than his sum. He took me across the way to count the money. I went up a court, as the wind blew and it rained, and counted it by his desire. He pulled out his pencil, and desired me to write on the invoice, just to say, "cash 48l." I told him it was of no use to receive that trifle. He told me to take it, and he would borrow the rest in the city. I asked him to let me go with him - He said, No; he would not trouble me, as it was very wet, and he had to go to three or four places for the money, and if I would go to my warehouse he would be there in half an hour with the money; with that he ran off, and appeared in great haste - He seemed going while he was speaking. Finding myself left in this way, I went to Shadwell Office, and stated what had happened; from there I went to the prisoner's house, and got there about seven o'clock. The servant opened the door, and said Mr. Cohen was not at home.

Court. Q. When you left the house with the prisoner, did you leave the porter behind you - A. No; he was gone; I did not tell him to go. I went into the passage, and said I would wait till he came in. I saw a man named Vandermulin in the parlour, whom I knew before-he

asked me to walk in, which I did. Vandermeulin staid with me sometime, and then left. I tried the counting-house door and found it fast, the key-hole was darkened; I took my seat in the parlour. After sometime, the servant came up and sat with me, she did not speak to me. After she had been there sometime, Mrs. Cohen came in; I heard no noise before this - She spoke to me; it got towards dusk. I heard a rumbling noise like silk goods being removed; when I heard this, Mrs. Cohen got up and set a musical clock playing (the rest had left), which prevented my hearing the noise; it completely drowned it. When it ceased I heard the noise again-it was rainy, and very windy. I heard a noise like a back-door swinging backward and forward; Mrs. Cohen was coming in and out of the room. After this I heard a repeated bustle and moving, so that I thought they were removing my goods-it appeared to come from the counting-house and the yard; the clock played once or twice; the servant set it playing once, it played as long as it could go. I waited there till eleven o'clock, and then the prisoner made his appearance; he came in stamping his feet, as if he had been travelling a great deal, to beat the dirt and wet off his boots-Mrs. Cohen and servant were in the room at the time. I had heard a knock at the door; some person in the passage told him I was there. He came in and said, he was very sorry he had kept me waiting, and wanted to know what was my pleasure? I told him I wanted the money or goods; Deighton was setting by me at the time.

Q. You said Deighton was gone away - A. Yes, but he came back to me at eight o'clock, and staid till the prisoner returned. Deighton got up, and told him that I must not leave the house without either the goods or money. The prisoner asked who he was? he said he was Mr. Foot's servant. The prisoner opened the door, and told him to walk out, or else he would put him in the watch-house, for he had no business there. Deighton said he would go, he did not want putting out. The prisoner said I hurt his feelings very much by such an untrades-man-like mode of dealing. He then said he had a check in his pocket for 1,700l., he did not produce it. I asked him to give it to me; he said No; he was not going to give me a 1,700 check for 600l. He complained very much, and said I might have the money as soon as I liked after nine o'clock in the morning. I told him I could not leave, and if he did not give me the money I must have the goods back-he said that was impossible, for the goods were sold and gone. He opened the counting-house door to shew me that they were gone, and said, "You see there are no goods." It was shut before this - I do not know how he opened it. I told him, if he would trust me with the check, I would give him respectable references that he might trust me with the balance. He said, "No; you would not trust me, and I will not trust you" - I am sure those were his words. He said he never had such behaviour from any person, and that his house was his castle, and that he would maintain it against any person. He appeared very angry; a great deal passed. I could neither get check, money, nor goods. I never saw the check. I stopped there till after eleven o'clock, and then told him that I was robbed of the goods, and he told me to use no insolence, and said I might have the money as soon as I liked in the morning, and he would pay it on no other consideration than mine; for if he had bought the goods of Mr. Foot instead of me, he would have kept him out of it as long as the law would allow; I told him I was a servant, and as such stood in Mr. Foot's behalf, and could not leave the house without the money or goods, and stuck to it to the last - He got into a passion; I thought I could do no good, and left the house at eleven o'clock, finding the goods were gone; it was a very wet night, when he came in he had no great-coat on, and when he went out he had none; and though he kept stamping his boots about, they were muddy, but the mud was quite dry; I took particular notice of it. I went home, taking the 48l. with me. The next day (which was Saturday, I went to his house again, with Mr. Jones and Deighton, we got there at nine o'clock, but did not find him at home-Mr. Jones and I went again in the evening, and found him at home, he asked who he was; I told him he was a friend of Mr. Foot's. He begged Mr. Jones to withdraw before he would speak a word-Mr. Jones left. I asked him for the money, when he said, if I would come in a peaceable manner on the Monday morning, and had no magistrate, or warrant, with me, he would pay me 100l.; but if I had any thing to do about magistrating, he knew the law as well as most men, and he would go to the extent of it; he said, if I came peaceably on the Monday, he would give me 100l., and ample security, in goods, for the remainder; he did not pretend that he was provided with money for the whole; but, he said, he would only treat with me, and not with a second person. I left the house, and could get nothing.

Q. Did he at any of these meetings tell you what became of the goods - A. On the Friday night he said they were at Limehouse; this was at eleven o'clock, after he returned. The goods have been since returned. The examination before the magistrate was on the following Tuesday; I left the office about three o'clock, the magistrate had adjourned the examination till the evening, and had refused to take bail; about six or half-past six o'clock, after the adjournment of the examination, somebody brought the goods to our warehouse; one of the men that came was a man that I had seen at his house, acting as a clerk; every piece was returned to me in the same state in which it went out of the house. I attended the examination in the evening; the 48l. was delivered to Mr. Isaacs - I had never passed the money from my own hands to my master's account.

Court. Q. Had you ever consented to receive it as any part of the payment - A. No; I told him at the time that nothing but the whole would satisfy me, and refused to receive it, it was forced upon me.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you not give the money to your master - A. No; I kept it separate; I wrapped it up in paper, and gave it to Mrs. Foot to keep separate.

Q. We have given you notice to produce your books - A. I have the day-book they are entered there, the prisoner's name is not in our ledger; he dealt for ready-money; I marked the discount on the bills at the time I was paid.

Q. Was it not mentioned that credit should be given - A. No.

Q. Was it not a matter of doubt whether he would pay you that night or at a future time - A. The last words before he left the warehouse were, that I was not to leave them without the money. I did not count them. I left the goods there because I could not help it. I was alarmed.

Q. When the prisoner told the porter to go away, why did you not tell him to stay - A. I did; he might not have heard me; I should not have let him go if I had not thought that the prisoner was going to pay me.

Q. Were not the goods returned on the Friday - A. No; on the Tuesday; the prisoner was admitted to bail, and has now surrendered; the goods were returned between the first and second examination.

JOSEPH DEIGHTON. I am Mr. Foot's porter, and carried the goods by Mr. Goulding's directions. On the 17th of June, I took twelve pieces of silk, the prisoner was not at home; we waited at a public-house, and in about an hour went again; the prisoner was then at home, and told me to put them down, which I did - He examined them; I heard him say Mr. Goulding should have the money before he left the house. The prisoner said I need not stay any longer, and he would give Mr. Goulding something for me. I went out, and waited at the door sometime; I returned again at eight o'clock, and found Mr. Goulding sitting in the parlour, the servant was there, and the clock playing-Mrs. Cohen came in also and played it. At ten o'clock, when the prisoner was talking to Mr. Goulding about distrusting him, I answered him; he asked who I was, and what business it was of mine, and opened the door, saying, if I did not walk out he would charge the watchman with me. I left, leaving Mr. Goulding there.

MR. JAMES JONES . I went to the prisoner's house with Mr. Goulding, after that I examined the premises, and found there was a back door, communicating with a timber-yard, into a court-goods could be very readily conveyed away.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-100

1029. JOSHUA ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one cheese, value 20s. , the goods of William Wade .

SARAH WADE . I am the wife of William Wade , who is a cheesemonger . On the 11th of June, I went down into the kitchen, when I returned I missed the cheese. I ran out and saw the prisoner at a distance from the shop, with it on his back. I called out stop thief! he was secured and brought back.

RALPH RICHARDSON . On the 11th of June I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner with a sack on his back. I secured him in Bethnal-green-road-the cheese was in the sack.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-101

1030. THOMAS WHITT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , one pocket-book, value 6d., the goods of William Preston Worral , from his person .

WILLIAM PRESTON WORRAL. I am clerk to the Sunderland Pottery Company . On the 13th of June I had been supping at Hackney, and was returning home about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was just by Norton-Falgate-turnpike , three men ran after, and hustled me, and another man, struck my cousin, who was with me; we then passed up Shoreditch, and came to a scaffolding, when a person jumped out and took my pocket-book out of my pocket. I missed it immediately. My cousin knocked him down - We gave him in charge; the book was found on the ground. The prisoner is the man. I was not sober.

JOSEPH TINDALE . I am a hair-dresser; I had been with Worral. Three men rushed against him, I was rather behind them; they then came and rushed against me, and one of them struck me on my eye; we had not got far before the prisoner rushed out from a scaffolding, and took my cousin's pocket-book out of his pocket. I secured him, and saw it in his right hand - He threw it away. I gave him in charge. I was not drunk.

JAMES GIBBS. I am a watchman. About half-past twelve o'clock I heard quarrelling, and saw the prisoner on the ground, I took him to the watch-house - They were in liquor. Tindale was more so than Worral.

JAMES BOIS . I am the constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; all of them were very much intoxicated. The prosecutor said there was from 100l. to 200l. value in his pocket-book. There was a note for 100l. drawn at six weeks after date-it was without a stamp.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the quarrel, went up, and they took me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-102

1031. JAMES RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , six live tame ducks, price 9s. , the goods of Thomas Rees .

JOHN CLAYTON. I am a watchman. On the 24th of May, about four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming towards me, the prisoner had a bundle; I asked him what it was, he said he had nothing, only two ducks; I took it from him, and found there were six ducks in it. Rees claimed them. Three of them had their necks cut, and the other three were wrung - They were quite warm.

THOMAS REES . I am a green-grocer, and live at Whitechapel. I saw the ducks, and am certain they were mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me a cup of coffee to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-103

1032. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , one watch, value 3l.; one chain, value

2s.; one seal, value 2l.; and one key, value 5s., the property of John Gladwin , from his person .

JOHN GLADWIN . I am a publican , and live in Greenstreet, Spitalfields. On the 30th of May, at half-past four o'clock in the morning, I was walking down Whitechapel-road; when I got to Mile-End turnpike , some people passed me-some pushed me on one side, and some on the other - I was quite sober. Just as one of them had passed me, I saw my watch in his hand, and said, "that man has got my watch - He must have snatched it as he passed me." I did not feel it go, but saw it in his hand before he could conceal it. I called stop thief! and ran after him, the watchman stopped him, and found the watch upon him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I had got up to take a morning walk. I had not been to Bow Fair.

HENRY SHOOTER. I am a watchman. I had been on duty. I was walking down the road between four and five o'clock in the morning, and heard the cry of stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and several people after him - He was stopped; I saw him throw the watch from his right hand, I picked it up, and took him to the watchhouse. The prosecutor was quite sober.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-104

1033. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , one fender, value 7s. , the goods of David Bray .

BENJAMIN BRAY. I am brother to David Bray , who is an ironmonger , in Cranbourn-street . On the 25th of June I was at his shop, about two o'clock in the afternoon, and was told the fender had been stolen. I ran out, and found it in the prisoner's possession, in St. Martin's-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to carry.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-105

1034. WILLIAM FAWNS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 300lbs. of lead, value 2l., the goods of William Essex , Jun. , and then fixed to the dwelling-house of William Essex , Sen.

WILLIAM ESSEX , JUN. I am the proprietor of a house, No. 25, in the Polygon, Somerstown -my father resides in it. The portico was covered with lead, on the 21st of May it was stolen. I had seen it fixed.

GEORGE GATES . On the 21st of May, I was a watchman in the Polygon, Mr. Essex's house was in my beat; in consequence of the lead being stolen I was suspended. Wishing to discover the thieves, I watched the next night, with Butler and Jefferson, in Clarendon-street, and between nine and ten o'clock at night, I saw three men in Mr. Johnston's field, which is about 150 yards from the place, they were running backwards and forwards about a hole of muddy water; I went over into another field, and got within forty yards of them - They made off, I suppose they saw me; I followed the prisoner, who was one of them, and never lost sight of him - I secured him; he struck me. I took him to the watch-house, returned to the ditch, and there found three pieces of lead; there was more found.

JAMES BUTLER . I was on the watch, and saw three men by the ditch; one took the lead out and handed it to the prisoner, another man carried it away. I saw the prisoner carry four pieces-they were disturbed, and ran away. I saw the prisoner taken, and am sure he is the man, I never lost sight of him. I found four pieces of lead in the ditch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PETER WHITEHAIR . I am a plumber. I tried the lead to the place, it exactly fitted; I am certain it had been cut from that place-it is worth 4l., and took 10 cwt. to replace it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been into the city, and was returning home, in haste, when they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-106

1035. MARIA DRAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , two sheets, value 7s.; three curtains, value 6s.; two pillow-cases, value 2s.; four blankets, value 10s.; one bolster, value 5s.; and one iron, value 6d., the goods of Henry Oats , in a lodging-room .

MARY OATS . I am the wife of Henry Oats , and live in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch . On the 3d of May, the prisoner took a lodging of me; she is married. On the 27th of May, her husband left; the articles stated in the indictment were left in the room. On the 29th, she went away; I missed them; she gave me no notice; I found her door open, and the duplicates in her drawer.

JOSEPH THIMBLELY. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street-road. On the 28th of May, I took three blankets in pledge in the name of Drake, of the prisoner, and on the 26th of May, two sheets.

GEORGE VINCENT. I am a pawnbroker in Shoreditch. I took a blanket in pledge of the prisoner, on the 19th of May.

JOHN CHARINER. I am a pawnbroker. I took two curtains in pledge of the prisoner, on the 27th of May.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-107

1036. SARAH HATCH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , four pewter-pots, value 4s. , the goods of Charles Cliff .

WILLIAM LICKFOLD. On the 2d of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in Cliff's back yard, with the two pots on her back, tied up in a towel; she had no business there; when she saw me, she ran away. I secured her, she said she would not do it any more.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They fell down, and I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-108

1037. GEORGE BLOXHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , twelve pair of spectacles, value 8l., the goods of Thomas Harris and William Harris , in the dwelling-house of the said William Harris .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am an optician , in partnership with Thomas Harris , residing in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury . On the 10th of May, about five o'clock in the evening, I was at tea in the back-parlour next to the shop; I heard some person come in; Aldous got up and went to the window, in consequence of what he said, I went into the shop; I missed twelve pair of spectacles out of a glass-case on the counter; I had not left the shop above ten minutes; Aldous afterwards brought the prisoner back.

JOHN ALDOUS . I am apprenticed to Mr. Harris. I heard some person. I went into the shop and saw the prisoner there and Mrs. Perring, I asked the prisoner what he wanted? he asked if we wanted an errand-boy, I told him, no; I missed about a dozen pair of spectacles after he was gone; about seven o'clock, I saw him and secured him. I am sure he is the boy; Mrs. Perring did not say anything till after he was gone.

ANN PERRING . I am housekeeper to Mr. Harris's brother, I live in Hyde-street; I was coming by the window and saw the prisoner in the shop; I went in and saw his hand in a glass-case; I alarmed the house; he went out, nobody stopped him - He had his apron twisted up round him - He asked if they wanted an errand-boy - I went out. I am certain the prisoner is the boy, and that I saw his hand in the case.

Prisoner. Q. Why did not you apprehend me at the time - A. Because I did not think he was robbing the shop - I thought he had brought a job in.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I was sent for to Mr. Harris's, about seven o'clock in the evening, and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Drury-lane; the boy came to me, and asked me if I knew the spectacle-maker's-shop in Russell-street - I said I did - He took me back, and the woman said it was me.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing, to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-109

1038. JOHN HOLMES , RICHARD JAMES , THOMAS DAVIS , and JOSEPH HOLLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , forty-eight heads, value 1s.; one coat, value 1l.; thirty yards of lustring, value 9l.; thirty yards of fringe, value 10l.; one doll, value 6d.; one gown, value 5s.; and fifty yards of drugget, value 1l.5s. , the goods of George Colman , David Edward Morris , and James Winston .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating the goods to be the property of Joseph Neeld , Francis Fladgate , the said David Edward Morris and James Winston .

THIRD COUNT. The same, only stating them to be the property of Ann Henrietta Smith .

DAVID EDWARD MORRIS , ESQ. I am one of the proprietors of the Haymarket Theatre ; the other proprietors are George Colman and James Winston. On the 13th of June, I had occasion to go to the Theatre; every thing was in its usual state; I went again on the next day, which was Saturday, and close to the stage-door in Suffolk-street, I observed a doll which was used in the Theatre, and was kept in the ladies' wardrobe; it was not there on the 13th; and in the passage from Suffolk-street door to the stage, there was a quantity of black baize, and going towards the stage, I found a curtain was let down, and some scenes thrown across the stage; I found the things in a different state to what they were on the day before; there had been no performance-the pier-glass had been taken down in the green-room, and part of it taking away-there was writing on the wall-the door appeared to have been burst open-the whole seemed in the utmost confusion-the furniture of the King's box was taken out of the press, and put on a dresser, and appeared to have been packed up to be taken away; it was worth 50l. or 60l., the fringe was all of real silver - We found an iron crow-bar behind the dresser in the wardrobe - I compared it with the marks on the door-it fitted exactly. There was a box of beads opened, but none taken away - A candle had been left burning on the dresser-it was then out - I left every thing in the same state as I found it, and set persons to watch, in consequence of what I heard. On the Monday following, on the 16th, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I went again and saw the doll, which had been in the passage, was removed, I went to the ladies' wardrobe, it was shut and fastened inside; the watchman and patrols who were with me forced it open, and we found the four prisoners there; they were taken into custody, and searched at the watch-house. On Holmes we found some beads, which appeared to be what I had seen in the box on the 14th. On Davis was found a large skeleton key, and I believe twenty-five smaller keys, and on Holmes we found a dark lantborn, and on one of them was found a phosphorus box; I then returned to the Theatre and found a helmet in the pit, and part of the furniture of the King's box was on the ground; the fifty yards of drugget was in the ladies' wardrobe, which was on the stairs on Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. There are only three proprietors of the Theatre, only we three are included in the licence.

Q. Has not Mr. Colman's interest in the house ceased - A. I understand he has mortgaged his interest.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Does Mr. Colman act as one of the joint owners - A. He does, he exercises his vote as a proprietor, and those votes are carried into effect; he acts as a proprietor in every description of the word-no other person attends the meetings, or acts in the arrangements.

Cross-examined by MR. BROADRICK. Every thing appeared in the same state when I went on the Monday, except the furniture of the King's box; part of which was on the floor; the black baize was not in the wardrobe on the Saturday.

Court. Q. Who are Neeld and Fladgate - A. Trustees to Mr. Coleman.

JOHN FLEETHAM . I was with Mr. Morris at the Theatre, on Monday night, and found a skeleton key on James.

PHILLIP PILGRIM. I tried the key to the Suffolk-street door, it opened it. I found the beads on Holmes.

RICHARD JONES . I found seventeen skeleton keys, a turn-screw and a phosphorus box, in the wardrobe.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN HENRIETTA SMITH. I have the care of the ladies' wardrobe-the furniture of the King's box is kept there; it was safe the last time I was in the wardrobe.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. The doors were sealed at the conclusion of the season - I gave the key up - I consider myself responsible, and in possession of the property.

HOLMES'S Defence. We met four women at the corner of Coventry-street - they asked us to go with them-one of them said her father was one of the proprietors of the Theatre, and took us in - They went for some gin, and gave James the key to let them in. The watchman came and took us.

HOLMES - GUILTY . Aged 28.

JAMES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 28.

HOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-110

1039. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Margaret Reece , on the King's highway, on the 14th of May , and putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 5s. , her property.

MARGARET REECE . I live in Chick-lane. On the 14th of May, I went into a public-house in Field-lane, and got a pint of beer, the prisoner and another boy followed me down Field-lane - I had noticed them in the house-the prisoner laid hold of me, and the other boy (who is convicted), took my shawl and ran away - I told the officer Barnett. I am sure the prisoner is the boy.

ANN GAVENER . I went into the public-house about twelve o'clock, and saw the prisoner and the other boy - I did not know him before - I was going up Fleet-market, and met them again, they asked me to go to a coffee-shop with them, and gave the shawl for the coffee-the other boy gave it.

HYAM BARNETT. I took the prisoner into custody - He said, he knew what it was for.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. The evening after the robbery I was in Field-lane, and heard two girls quarrelling about a shawl-Miller, who is convicted, lived with one of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the public-house-Gavener was there also, she was present when the shawl was taken, and gave it herself to the coffee-man.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-111

1040. SARAH CLIPSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , one pocket-book, value 6d.; one pair of spectacles, value 3s.; one 50l. bank note, and one Exchequer-bill for the payment of 500l. , the property of Robert M'Leish , and THOMAS ARGENT for receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

ROBERT M'LEISH. I am a publican . On the 13th of May, I was at the Royal Tent public-house, in Golden-square; I left there at eleven o'clock, and took a walk down the Haymarket ; I had the property stated in the indictment in my book in my pocket - I was accosted by the prisoner Clipston - I am sure she is the woman-another woman came up directly, and asked me to go with her and give her some drink - I walked with them, we stood at the corner of the court talking - I felt one of them lay her hand on my watch - I felt and found my pocket-book safe. The watchman came, and said, we must not stand there - We separated, they came up to me again, and talked a minute or two, and the prisoner left me all of a sudden, and the other stopped about a minute and then she left-they ran away very fast - I immediately missed my pocket-book, and told the watchman-the next day, I offered a reward, and fourteen days after, I was sent for to Bow-street, and saw Webb there; up to that time I had never said anything about losing my spectacles.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. I live next door to the public-house-when I first went to the public-house, I saw two women who were taken up on suspicion, I did not swear to them-there were very much like the prisoner.

ELIZA WEBB . In May last, I lived in Monmouth-street. On the evening of the 13th of May, I was in the Hay-market with the prisoner, Clipston, about twelve o'clock; she spoke to Mr. M'Leish - I came up also, we turned up Coventry-court; she gave me a pair of spectacles to hold, soon after she pulled me and said, "Come along Bet, we are all right," I went with her to Leicester-street, she showed me a pocket-book, and a 50l. note, and we went to Tower-street, Seven-dials; she then changed her bonnet and took me out, and kept me out all night; she lives with the prisoner Argent - He was not at home-she put the book in her box; about seven o'clock in the morning, I went back with her, Argent was then in bed; she told him to get up, and gave him the book - He went out and I saw no more of him. I afterwards gave information.

Cross-examined. I am an unfortunate girl. I never heard of a reward.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-112

1041. JAMES BRETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jasper Browell , Jun. about ten o'clock in the night of the 1st of July , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two pair of pantaloons, value 10s.; one coat, value 2l.; four waistcoats, value 18s.; one veil, value 1l.; one spencer, value 1s.; four aprons, value 4s.; one petticoat, value 5s.; five stockings, value 1s.; two shifts, value 4s.; one pair of sleives, value 2s.; eight napkins, value 4s.; one pocket, value 1s.; one night-cap, value 3d.; one

table-cover, value 1s.; one piece of flannel, value 1s.; and two pieces of muslin, value 3s. ; his property.

JASPER BROWELL. I am a merchant , residing at No. 3, London-terrace, Hackney-road, in the parish of Bethnalgreen . I keep the house. On the 1st of July, it was broken open. I was out of town.

SARAH PARKER . I had the care of Mr. Browell's house, while the family were out of town. On Thursday evening, the 1st of July, about half-past nine o'clock, I was going there to sleep, I met a man whom I suspected, when I got to the gate, I found the first floor-window open, I was alarmed, and stopped about seven or eight minutes. I saw a bundle thrown out of the window, I made an alarm when the patrol and several people came round. I do not know what became of the person. I did not see any body in the house.

MATILDA PARKER. I am thirteen years old. I was going with my mother, and saw a man standing about, my mother said she did not like his looks. When we got to the gate, we found the window open, and the bundle thrown out.

ELIAS TINKIN. I am a butcher. On the 1st of July, in the evening, I was walking along London-terrace, and saw the prisoner in company with two other men, standing opposite the garden-gate of No. 5, I looked very hard at the prisoner. I am certain that he is the man; I have known him these three years; I suspected him by his waiting about; I walked home, and had not been at home more than ten minutes, when I heard the cry of "Stop Thief!" I immediately ran out and pursued the prisoner, and overtook him at the corner of Coal Arbour-street, and with the assistance of Bailey, took him back to No. 3, London-terrace, and then to the watch-house. No. 3 had been robbed. The prisoner was running; it was a little after nine o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. Was I running when you took me. - A. Yes.

THOMAS BATEMAN. I am a patrol; my box is opposite the house. About half-past nine o'clock Bailey came to me, and said he was fearful some person was robbing No. 3, and that he saw a man get into the house, by getting on the balcony, and through the window; I took my bayonet to go over and watch, when the woman called out that there was a bundle thrown out of the window; she unlocked the door, and I went in. The man got away, and in a few minutes Bailey brought the prisoner to me.

SAMUEL ARCHER . I am thirteen years of age. My father is a print-cutter. As I was coming down Hackney-road last Tuesday was a week, I saw the prisoner, and two other men, stand at the corner of Caroline-street. I went home, and in about half an hour I heard the cry of stop thief! I ran out, and saw the people running at the corner of the next street, which is Coal Arbour-street; presently after I saw Bailey go up and lay hold of the prisoner. and Mr. Tinkin went up to help him I knew the prisoner, was one of the men I had seen at the corner of Caroline-street; it was about nine o'clock when I saw him there.

JOSEPH BAILEY. I had been out to take a walk on that evening, and on my return at half-past nine o'clock, I saw three men lurking about the front of my house, which is No. 6, on London-terrace; I took no notice, went in, and went up stairs to watch them, suspecting they wanted to injure the railing; I had not been there more than three minutes before I saw one of them get over Mr. Browell's gate, and stand at the front door two or three minutes - He then got over the rails into the area; he remained there about two minutes, came up again, and got upon the wall which separates the front courts, and got into the balcony in front of the drawing-room windows, he pushed the window open and got in. I went down stairs to see after and inform the watchman of it, but instead of which I walked about two doors farther, and saw a woman waiting at the gate, with a lanthorn in her hand, I took no notice of her, but told the watchman what I had seen, and desired him not to leave the spot. I heard the woman call "watch!" and the watchman left me; I turned round and saw the prisoner get over the front rails. I pursued and took him.

JOHN BAXTER . On the 30th of June, which was the night before the robbery, I slept in the house, in the same room where they got in; I left every thing safe-the drawers were all safe on the morning of the 1st of July. I went there a short time afterwards, and found them broken open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-113

1042. MARY ANN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , one broach, value 2s.; one purse, value 3s.; two 3s. bank tokens, and 9s. , the goods and monies of Mary Ann Cuninghame .

The prosecutrix stating, that her real name was not Cuninghame, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-114

1043. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , one shilling , the goods of Charles Thomas Brooks .

Court. Money is not goods, the prisoner must be

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-115

1044. JOHN BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , one sheet, value 10s., the goods of Francis Dockwray , in a lodging-room .

BRIDGET DOCKWRAY . I am the wife of Francis Dockwray, we live in High-street, St. Giles's . On the 19th of June, about half-past four o'clock in the evening, the prisoner took part of a bed at my house, at four-pence per night, he went out about half-past six, and said he was going for some mackerel - He did not return; I missed the sheet, nobody else had been in the room. About eight days after I met the prisoner in Compton-street, and asked him why he did not come back, he said he never saw me before. I asked him to go back with me, and he ran off. I am sure he is the man.

MARGARET BROWN. The prisoner asked me to recommend him a lodging - I recommended him to Mr. Dockwray. I am certain he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-116

1045. THOMAS FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , one handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Charles Montriou , from his person .

CHARLES MONTRIOU. On the 25th of June I was on the west side of Lincoln's Inn Fields , looking up at a building; the prisoner and another boy were close by me. As I looked down, I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief out of my pocket, and put it into his bosom. I secured him, gave him in charge, and took it out.

JOSEPH FRIAR. I took the prisoner in charge - He begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-117

1046. JAMES BLACKET was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 3l. 10s. in copper monies numbered , the monies of Richard Turner .

ESTHER TURNER . I am the wife of Richard Turner , who is a salesman , and lives in West-street, Spitalfields . On the 12th of June, between three and four o'clock, I was told my door was broken open. I came down and found it so-it was fast when I went to bed. I missed between 10l. and 12l., in halfpence, out of the desk.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The robbery must have taken place between twelve and five o'clock in the morning.

JOHN TURNER . I am the nephew of Richard Turner . I went out about seven o'clock in the evening, and left the copper in the desk. The prisoner is quite a stranger to me. Mr. Turner has a son-in-law of the name of Beadle

JOHN GAY . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. On the 12th of June, about twenty minutes after two o'clock in the morning, I and Forbes saw the prisoner coming down Cow-cross, with a bag of halfpence on his shoulder - I stopped him, and asked him what he had got there? he said they were halfpence, that his name was Matthew Beadle, and that he was going from Mr. Turner's, of Spitalfields-market, to carry some halfpence to Covent-garden to give change. I told him that was the wrong way to Covent-garden - He said the cart was gone on with a load of potatoes, and there was not room in the cart for the bag. He said he was going to a coffee-house in Clerkenwell first to get some coffee. I told him he must go to the watch-house. He said Mr. Turner was a potatoe-dealer, and mentioned several potatoe-dealers in Cowcross. I went to the market, but could not find Mr. Turner's stall. I had a full opportunity of seeing the prisoner. I came back to the watch-house, found him gone, and the halfpence left behind him. On the 16th, I saw him at the watch-house again-Forbes had taken him. I have no doubt of his person.

Cross-examined. I had a great deal of conversation with him. I am positive he is the man.

JOHN FORBES . I am a patrol. I was with Gay, and saw the prisoner coming down Cow-cross. On seeing us, he crossed on the other side. Gay has spoken correctly. He was left with Newton at the watch-house-there was a man there on another charge. I returned to the watchhouse, and found the prisoner had made his escape. I am certain he is the man. On the 16th I found him in Spitalfields near Turner's house.

Cross-examined. I had never seen him before.

JOHN NEWTON . I was the constable of the night. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house about twenty minutes after two o'clock. I stood on one side of the table and he on the other. I did not suspect him from the references he gave. He said he wanted to go into the yard for a necessary purpose. I told him to follow me; I turned my back, and thought he was behind me - I heard the door open; I ran out and found him gone-he got away. On the 16th I saw him again, and am sure he is the man.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. Turner claimed the halfpence by the papers they were wrapped in.

Prisoner's Defence. I have witnesses to prove I was in bed at the time.

JAMES SNAITH . I am an upholsterer, and work for my father, in Paul-street. I remember the Monday that the prisoner was taken up, and the Wednesday before that, I lodged with the prisoner's father, in Clifton-street, Northgreen, Holywell-row, Curtain-road; he deals in asses-milk - I slept with the prisoner in the same bed. On the Wednesday night we went to bed together about eleven o'clock; the door was fastened inside. I got up between six and seven o'clock in the morning, he was still in bed. I awoke once in the night and found him in bed - I have no reason to think he was out of bed all night. In the morning, about six o'clock, a young man came into the room, he lodged up stairs, he is a japanner; he said he was going to work; the prisoner's father locks the door, and keeps the key. I remember his fastening the house that night, in the usual manner, atten o'clock, or a little before.

Court. Q. What makes you remember that night - A. Because we all went to bed together; he did not go to bed generally till after me, we slept in the kitchen. The prisoner's brother slept in the same bed with us. I lodged with the prisoner since Whit-Monday; that was the first time I ever lodged there.

Q. How long was that before this matter happened - A. I think about two, months.

Q. Are you sure you lodged there more than one month before that happened - A. Yes.

Q. Whit-Monday was the 26th of May, and this happened on the 12th of June - A. I think I had lodged there two months, but am quite sure it was one. His father and mother, two sisters, and three brothers, supped there. My father lives in Paul-street, he is a cabinet-maker, and pays 60l. a year for his house.

Q. Instead of being at your father's house, you sleep three in a bed at another's - A. Yes; I have not paid any thing for my lodging yet.

Q. What are you to pay - A. Eighteen-pence per week. I do not know what I am to pay.

Q. How came you to know that Wednesday was the day the prisoner was charged with the robbery - A. I was

sitting at my father's door on the Thursday morning, which was the next day after the robbery was committed. The prisoner's father came to me, and told me that he was taken up on suspicion. This was the next day after I had slept with him on the Wednesday.

Q. He was not taken up until the 16th. What reason have you to know that you slept with him on the Wednesday night - A. We all supped together that night. I removed somewhere else about a fortnight ago, but sleep there again now. I do not usually sup there, but was invited on that night, we sat down to supper, about nine o'clock - We had about a dozen boiled mackarel for supper; the prisoner's sister, who is married, was there, his grandmother, and the prisoner's brother's wife (twelve of us altogether). The prisoner's grand-mother and the married sister went home - I am certain the prisoner slept in the house.

ROBERT BLACKET . I am the prisoner's brother. Snaith lodged at my father's house about Whitsuntide. I slept in the same bed with my brother and Snaith. I remember the Wednesday night before my brother was taken up.

Q. What do you remember it by - A. There was a young man named Boston, that lodged in the house, came down when we were in bed, and talked to us. My three brothers, two sisters, and father and mother were at home. I have a married sister, and grandmother - They were not there.

Q. Did Snaith sup with you that night - A. I do not remember. My grandmother did not sup there that night. If there had been a dozen mackarel for supper I should have remembered it. I do not remember that any person came into the room before I got up.

Transported for Seven Years . GUILTY . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-118

1047. ELIZA EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , seven bank tokens, value 1l. 1s. , the monies of James Dyer .

HANNAH DYER. I am the wife of James Dyer , who is a baker , and lives in Church-street, Bethnal-green . On the 31st of May, I was serving in my shop; I went into the parlour to get change, and found the prisoner's hand in my drawers, taking out the money. I asked her what she was doing? she said, "Nothing." She was a friend who called to see me. I found some 3s. pieces in her hand; my drawers were locked. I saw her put the money down her bosom. I am sure I missed seven 3s. pieces - They dropped from her bosom.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I cannot say what money I lost-there was a great deal of money there. The prisoner lent me 15l.; that was paid again.

ELIZA RUFFY. On the 31st of May, I was in Mrs. Dyer's shop. Mrs. Dyer went into the back parlour, she then said the prisoner had opened her drawers with a false key. The prisoner said the money was her own. She laid some keys on the table, which unlocked the drawers.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge. The prisoner said the keys belonged to her drawers at home. I tried the keys; they unlocked both her drawers and the prosecutor's.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-119

1048. WILLIAM LAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , one watch, value 30s.; one chain, value 10s.; and one seal, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Wright , from his person .

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a turner , and live in Smith-street, Westminster. On the 12th of May, I was at the Hampshire Hog, in Charles-street , between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I had been there since ten o'clock; I was rather in liquor. The prisoner lodged in the house - He was with me the greatest part of the evening. I lost my watch, and about seven weeks afterwards I found it hanging up in the bar of the Goose and Gridiron, St. Paul's Church-yard.

JOSEPH REID. I keep the Hampshire Hog. Wright had a club at my house-Ellen was with him. I saw Wright pull out his watch at half-past nine o'clock. They stopped in my house till twelve o'clock, and then went out and returned again; the prisoner went to bed sometime before they went away - They left about two o'clock, and in about a quarter of an hour they came back again, saying Wright had lost his watch; the prisoner was then in bed-they were intoxicated.

FRANCIS ELLEN. I keep the Goose and Gridiron. On the 26th of June the prisoner called at my house, saying his master was out of town, and asked me to lend him a 1l. note on the watch - I hung it up in the bar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GTILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-120

1049. ANN DEWER MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , two 3s. and one 1s. 6d. bank tokens, and 3s. 6d. in monies numbered, the monies of John Fryer , from his person .

JOHN FRYER . I am a carver , and live in Shoreditch. On the 22d of June, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner accosted me-she then came before me, put her hand into my pocket, and took my money out. I laid hold of her and gave her in charge. She took two 3s. and one 1s. 6d. piece, a half-crown, 1s. from me - They were found on her.

WILLIAM COX . I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house. I found two 3s. pieces, a half-crown, a 1s. 6d. token, and 1s. in her pockets; the prosecutor claimed them.

JOHN JENNINGS. I am a watchman. On the 22d of June, the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it to me, and wanted it back. I refused, and he gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-121

1050. SARAH ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , three silver spoons, value 30s.; three tablecloths, value 7s-; and one pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Remnant .

THOMAS REMNANT . I am a glover , and live in the Strand; the prisoner was my servant . I gave her leave to go to the Theatre on the 30th of June, and she never returned. We missed the three spoons, which had been in use that day. I searched her box, and found a dupli

cate of the table-cloths and stockings, pledged with Hawkins. I had given her warning.

THOMAS WINDSOR ALLEN. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Russell-street, Drury-lane. I have a tablecloth and spoon, which the prisoner pledged for 7s.; she gave the name of Sarah Jones , Belton-street, Long-acre. On the 1st of July, Mr. Remnant applied to me, and next morning the prisoner came to the shop with another spoon. I gave her in charge.

LEWIS FURNERUX . The two table-cloths and an iron were pledged with me by the prisoner.

CHARLES SAMUEL SMITH. I have a table-cloth which the prisoner pledged with me for 3s., and the next day she came and had 2s. more on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to return them. I unfortunately committed the act having been left with two children.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-122

1051. GEORGE WATKINS was indicted for stealing on the 6th of June , one silver spoon, value 10s., the goods of James Brown , from his person .

JAMES BROWN . I am a stationer , and live in Mile End Road. On the 6th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Great Garden-street, Whitechapel-road, on my way home. The prisoner introduced himself to me, and asked me how far I was going? I told him I was going down the road. He said he was going that way, and was fatigued, having been up all night at Ascot Races, and wanted to get home - He sometimes kept close to me. When I came to Whitechapel-mount , I felt my coat move, I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my table-spoon; I turned round and missed him also. I called out stop thief! and ran after him, the watchman stopped him. I came up at the same moment. While he was going to the watch-house, I saw him drop the spoon. The watchman told me to pick it up.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. I had been to a club in Newgate-street. I felt the spoon safe a little before. I was not drunk.

WILLIAM EAGER . I am a watchman. On the 6th of June, about one o'clock in the morning, I heard the cry of stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me - I stopped him-Brown was within five or six yards of me, he gave him in charge. I saw the prisoner's hand in his pocket, and heard the spoon drop on the pavement immediately.

Cross-examined. Brown was sober.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-123

1052. RICHARD WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , two sow pigs, price 1l. 4s. , the goods of John Saunders .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am a farmer , and live at Stanmore . The prisoner was my servant , and left me the beginning of May. I missed my sows on the 20th - I saw them again at Mr. Skins's, at Wilsden, and am sure they are mine - They weighed four stone.

EDMUND SKINS . I am a farmer, and live at Wilsden. On the 20th of May, about one o'clock in the day, I bought the pigs of the prisoner; he said he had eight of them. I asked him who they came from? he said they came from Saunders's - I thought he was his servant. Mr. Saunders claimed them afterwards. He lives twelve miles from me.

JOHN SAUNDERS re-examined. I never gave the prisoner permission to sell them; he had left my service. I am sure they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-124

1053. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , one coat, value 5s., and one knife, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Moncrief .

MARY MONCRIEF . I am the wife of Thomas Moncrief , we live in Rennington-street . On the 8th of June the prisoner came to our house and took a lodging. He went out about five o'clock in the morning, and we immediately missed the coat. I did not lend it to him.

THOMAS JENKS . On the 8th of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, I came down stairs, found the prisoner gone, and the door open. I found the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, with the coat on his back - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A sailor, who slept in the same room with me, gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-125

1054. SARAH TRASSAM and MARGARET FITZGERALD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , one pelisse, value 4l., and 17 yards of lace, value 30s., the goods of William Samuel Garford , from the person of Mary Walker .

WILLIAM SAMUEL GARFORD . I am a haberdasher . On the 4th of June the prisoner, Trassam, came to my shop, and ordered a pelisse, which was to come to about 5l., she ordered it to be sent to 51, Old Nichols-street, Bethnalgreen, where, she said, she kept a chandler's shop. I asked her for a deposit - She said she had no money with her. The next day she left 10s. 6d. as a deposit. She came and tried it on, and desired it might be sent home any time on Saturday evening, and some lace with it for children's caps, as she wanted to consult her husband about them. On Saturday night, about six o'clock, I sent Mary Walker, and my boy, home with it, and the lace. She came back, saying, we were to take it again in an hour or less. The prisoner, Fitzgerald, came and said, we were to send them home directly, as her mistress was now disengaged. I sent Mary Walker with it. When she had been gone about twenty minutes, a person came to my shop-from

what he said I went to the house, and found Mary Walker crying in the shop. I went into the house, and saw there was a side-door in a passage-they must have made their escape through it - I saw no more of them. On the Tuesday following, I went round to the pawnbroker's and found the pelisse at Mr. Harris's, in the Minories; about a quarter after nine o'clock the same evening, I met the prisoner, Trassam, in the Minories, in company with a man named Burke, I secured her and he rescued her. The next morning, Mr. Harris sent for me, I went and found the prisoner, Fitzgerald, who had come to redeem the pelisse. I received the lace from the prisoner's mother.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. I did not go up stairs; the prisoners might have been in the house. Fitzgerald said she was Trassam's servant, and then her cousin.

MARY WALKER . I am shopwoman to Mr. Garford. I took the pelisse home, both the prisoners were standing in the shop - They shut the door and said they would try the pelisse on. Trassam said her stays were dirty, and she would change her dress and try it on up stairs. I said, if she would allow me, I would try it on as I should see if it wanted any alteration; she said she could try it on up stairs and come down in it, and would not detain me a minute. I had six cards of lace with me, she said she would take them up and shew them to her husband. I took them out of her hand and said, I would shew them there, as we never suffered our laces to go out of our sight. She picked out four pieces, saying she would take them to her husband, as he was engaged up stairs with a gentleman. I said I could not allow that - She immediately went up with them; Fitzgerald said she would not keep me many minutes; I said that I was in a hurry. She opened the door, and went out into the street, saying she was going to fetch her child. I saw no more of them, but am certain they are the women.

Cross-examined. Fitzgerald appeared to be Trassam's servant.

WILLIAM TOMLINSON . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, who is a pawnbroker. On the 10th of June, the prisoner, Trassam, pledged the pelisse at our house for 8s.; Mr. Garford came there soon after and claimed it, and ordered me to stop them if they came again the next day; Fitzgerald came and asked me to lend her some more money on it, I said I would - She came again in half an hour to redeem it; I kept her in conversation till he came and secured her. She said it was her own.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . On the 12th of June, I took Trassam into custody.

CHARLES DEBENHAM . I keep the house in Old Nichol-street. I let the shop and parlour to Trassam.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TRASSAM'S Defence. The man that lived with me, said I must not buy it.

FITZGERALD'S Defence. I went with her to buy it - I am her servant .

TRASSAM - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

FITZGERALD- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-126

1055. ANN SLATER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , one watch, value 1l.; one seal, value 6d.; one key, value 3d.; and one 3s., bank token , the property of Robert Young .

ROBERT YOUNG . I am a hatter , and live in Wood-street, Cheapside. On the 1st of June, about twelve o'clock at night, a woman accosted me - I went home with her, immediately after the prisoner came into the room, I sent the woman out for something to eat, she returned - I paid 4s., for the expences, the other woman went out of the room; the prisoner remained - I had put my watch under the pillow, and my clothes on the chair; the prisoner sat by the bed-side, in a moment she went towards the door and run down stairs, I immediately missed my watch, and run after her; I caught sight of her at the top of the court; I called out watch, several times-it was in Georgeyard, Golden-lane; I found the prisoner and watch at the watch-house - I picked her out from three others. I did not give it to her.

JOSEPH WILLIAMSON . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of "stop thief! she has got my watch," I saw the prisoner run out of George-yard, across Golden-lane, into Cupid's-court, which has no thoroughfare, I followed and secured her - I charged her with stealing a watch, she said she had no watch - I found it in her hand - She wished to go back and give it to the man - I would not let her. I went to George-yard, and saw the prosecutor - he came to the watch-house and picked her out from three others; his name was on the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-127

1056. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , one mirror, value 3l. , the goods of James Barnes .

JAMES BARNES . I am an upholsterer . On the 24th of May, the mirror hung at my door in Well-street, Oxford-street . The officer brought it to my house.

JOSEPH BERRY . I am a constable. On the 24th of May, I was in a coffee-shop in Middle-street, St. Giles's, at eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in with the mirror under his arm, I asked him where he got it, he said it was his mother's, and was going to take it to George-street. I secured him - I found it belonged to Barnes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-128

1057. JOSEPH ROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , two seals, value 40s.; one ring, value 3s.; and one key, value 3s., the goods of George Billett , from his person .

GEORGE BILLETT . I am an auctioneer . On the 7th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, I went to Whitechapel-market , and was bustled by two or three men, in Whitechapel; I felt a drawing at my fob, and laid hold of my chain, the prisoner laid hold of my seals, and by a sudden jerk snatched them off the ring, the ring gave way; he got away afterwards - I took him and never lost sight of him - He said he had thrown the seals into the mud.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a constable. About ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner and several more men together; in consequence of several robberies having taken place there, I followed them, and saw the prisoner and three others run against Billet near Petticoat-lane, the prisoner made a snatch at his watch. I secured him; he said the seals were on the ground.

WILLIAM GALE . I am a watchman. I found the key and ring on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-129

1058. BENJAMIN NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , five yards of lace, value 3s. , the goods of John Modlin .

JOHN MODLIN . I am a laceman , and live in Shoreditch . On the 6th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, I observed a rustling in my window, I went out and saw the prisoner pulling the lace through the screw-hole of the shutter. I secured him - He did not draw it all out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-130

1059. HENRY ERRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one wooden till, value 3s.; two locks, value 1s.; two bell-cranks, value 1s.; and eighteen keys, value 1s. , the goods of a certain person or persons unknown.

JOHN FLEETHAM . I am the beadle of St. Martin's parish. On the 30th of June, a little before nine o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner with a box on his shoulder, containing the articles stated in the indictment. He threw it down.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-131

1060. SARAH COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June, twenty-four yards of serge, value 30s. , the goods of Sarah Etheridge .

JOHN SHIPWAY . I am servant to Sarah Etheridge, who is a dyer . On the 24th of June, I found twenty-four yards of serge had been cut off from a whole piece that morning; the prisoner worked for us; soon after twelve o'clock I received information and went after her, I found her about seven o'clock and took part of it from under her clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GAYLER . I am servant to Mrs. Etheridge. the women left work at eleven o'clock that day, I saw the prisoner in the loft where the property is kept at twelve o'clock; she appeared very bulky.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-132

1061. ISAAC CROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , one hearth-rug, value 2s. , the goods of George Alger .

MARY ALGER. I am the wife of George Alger , who is a broker . On the 31st of May, the rug hung at the door, a boy gave the alarm about one o'clock, and I missed it.

BENJAMIN POWIS. I am a file-cutter. I saw the prisoner take the rug from the door; he was pursued and taken, he threw it into a shop in Broad-court. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM STUBBING. I am a pawnbroker, the prisoner ran by my door, I found the rug lying at my side door.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. I secured the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-133

1062. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , two shovels, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of Samuel Griffiths and George Major .

SAMUEL GRIFFITHS. My partner's name is George Thomas Major .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-134

1063. CHRISTOPHER EMERY , CHARLES PRIEST and ROBERT SPAW were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , seven pounds of beef, value 3s., and two pounds of bread, value 6d. , the goods of William Henry Saulez Penley .

WILLIAM HENRY SAULEZ PENLEY. I am a drawing-master , and live in Shouldern-street, Brompton-square . On 8th of June, about three o'clock in the morning, the watchman called me and said the house was robbed. I missed the meat and bread from the area.

THOMAS WHITE. I am a watchman. I saw the three prisoners pass me with two bundles about three o'clock in the morning; I followed them into Queen-street, Edgware-road, and into the fields; another watchman sprung his rattle and two of them ran across the fields - I secured Spaw, another watchman secured the other two, they had passed me just by the house. I am certain they are the men. The bundle contained a piece of beef, half a peck loaf and part of a quartern loaf.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am constable of the night. I searched Emery and found a hook in his pocket, to pull the meat out of the areas with.

THOMAS WHITE . I saw the prisoner, Spaw, take the beef, and Emery the bread. I am certain they are the men.

MARGARET PENLEY . I saw the beef and bread and knew them to be ours.

PRIEST'S Defence. We picked them up.

SPAW'S Defence. I was not with them.

EMERY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

PRIEST - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SPAW - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-135

1064. GEORGE DRISDALE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , one chaise-cart, value 9l.; and one set of harness, value 1l. 10s. , the goods of Richard Read .

RICHARD READ. I am a wheelwright , and live in Old-street - road. On the 21st of March, the prisoner and another man came to me and said, he wanted a chaise-cart and harness for the day, to go to Enfield; he was to pay 4s. 6d., for the day, and hired it for that day only, he gave me 3s., and said he had no more change except a 5l. note; I asked him for his direction, he said, his name was Wisden, No. 7, Whitecross-street, St. Luke's, opposite the Two Brewers; he never returned it - I made enquiry at No. 7, Whitecross-street, and could not hear of any such person. On the 28th of March, I saw my cart in possession of Cooke.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. He said he had a horse - I found he lived in White-street, Moorfields, not Whitecross-street, St. Luke's - He has no impediment in his speech - He did not say his name was Drisdale. I only let it for one day.

MARY READ . I was present when the cart was hired; the prisoner said his name was Wisden, No. 7. Whitecross-street, St. Luke's, opposite the Two Brewers.

STEPHEN GIBBS. I am a livery-stable-keeper, and live in Little Moorfields. On the 21st of March, the prisoner brought a horse, cart and harness to my stable; on the 20th of May, it was sold at Dixon's Repository, for the expence of the keep, which came to 9l. 12s.; I gave him notice that I must sell it, he made no objection. He lived in White-street, Moorfields.

Cross-examined. They all sold for 6l., together, he now owes me 3l. 12s., he would not fetch it away. I have asked him ten or twelve times for the money.

JAMES CLARKE . I am hostler to Mr. Gibbs, the prisoner and his servant, brought in the cart and horse to Mr. Gibbs's stables on the 21st of March. On the 24th, he was going to take them out, I asked him for the money-he could not pay - I refused to let him have them, I wanted 14s. 6d., of him; he said, he generally paid once a week-they were two months in our possession.

JOHN PARKES . In May, I bought the cart at the Repository for 2l. 10s., of a person who had brought it there for sale. Read claimed it.

WILLIAM HARNWAY . I live at No, 7. Whitecross-street, St. Luke's; the prisoner never lodged with me-there is no other No. 7.

Prisoner's Defence. I hired it to go to Enfield; I went to get it at the stable, and went back for the money; I was taken ill and confined three weeks; I told the stable-keeper I should receive some money soon and would pay him. I never said I lived opposite the Two Brewers, but gave the name of Drisdale, No. 7, White-street.

ANN EDWARDS . The prisoner lives in White-street, he was confined to his bed in March last, for five or six weeks.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. There is no sign of the Two Brewers in the street.

Confined Six Months . GUILTY . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-136

1065. GEORGE DAVIDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 30lbs. of steel, value 20s. , the goods of Henry Peto .

BENJAMIN SCADDING. I am clerk to Mr. Peto, who is the contractor for building the New Custom House , the prisoner was foreman of the smith's shop , Wedlock and Butler worked under him - He had the entire controul over them. I did not miss the steel until after he was taken up.

ROBERT WEDLOCK . I worked at the Custom-House, under the prisoner; about seven week ago, he told me to take a bar of steel from under the bellows, and to follow him, we went out at the north gate, to his house on Tower-hill - He said it was his; we went on until we came to Ratcliff-highway, he then told me to put it into my house and to take care of it until he called or sent for it; it remained there about two weeks, he desired me on the Saturday night, to go home and fetch his bar away, which was at my house - He and Butler fetched it away that night; he told Butler to take it, and said it was his property-they took it.

JOHN BUTLER . I am a smith, and was employed at the Custom-House; the prisoner discharged several men. Wedlock and him were quarrelling, the prisoner told me to come with him and fetch the bar away. I went to Wedlock's house with him-he told me to take the bar, as it was his property. I followed him until we got to Ratcliff-highway, he said he did not like to go over Tower-hill - We went into Whitechapel, and stopped at a public-house - We got intoxicated, and were taken into custody.

DANIEL ELLINGHAM . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner, Butler, into custody, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, he had the bar and said it was his, and that he worked at the Custom-House; the prisoner said it was his property, and that he bought it at Messrs. Sparrow and Wright's, in Smithfield, and that he had got the bill and receipt, but he had not; and that he gave 11d. per lb. for it last week. When Mr. Peto asked him about it, he said he bought it of the same people two years ago.

MR. THOMAS WRIGHT . I am in partnership with Mr. Sparrow, in Smithfield; we are ironmengers; we do not keep that kind of iron.

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible to go through the gate with property. The men have sworn falsely-it is my steel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-137

1066. CHARLES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , one truck, value 20s. , the goods of Robert Reeve .

ROBERT REEVE. I am a porter in Gray's Inn . On the 30th of May, I employed the prisoner to assist me in conveying some goods on my truck to Tabernacle-walk, I then discharged him, and left the truck in the care of Mr. Edwards, understanding I should have to remove them again; the prisoner said he would wait till I returned, but when I came back I found him, and the truck, gone. The next day I found him, and my truck, at the watch-house.

EPHRAIM SMITH . On the 30th of May, the prisoner asked me if I would buy a truck - I said I would look at it, he said it was in Hollywell-lane, and he would fetch it; he was not gone above three minutes, he said he bought

it in Smithfield for 25s., to do work with, but he had now got a place, and did not want it. I said, if he would give me his address I would call and take it next day. I followed him to Sidney-grove, where he lived. I gave him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-138

1067. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one watch, value 3l.; one chain, value 1l.; three seals, value 1l., and one key, value 2s., the goods of Richard Field Smith , from his person .

RICHARD FIELD SMITH. On the 24th of June, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was walking by Temple-bar , and felt a jerk at my fob-my watch was gone instantly - I called out stop thief! I saw a man running from me - He was pursued and stopped in Shire-lane. I never lost sight of him.

MARK PITT . I am a law-stationer. I was standing at my door in Shire-lane, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I heard the cry of stop thief! and found the prisoner strnggling with my lodger. I secured him.

JOHN THOMAS BYRNE . I am a constable. I was at Temple-bar, and heard the cry of stop thief! I run up Shire-lane, and found the prisoner in the custody of Pitt; as we were going to the watch-house, he said, "remember, Mr. Byrne, I have not used the gentlemen ill; "he was fumbling about his pockets - I put down my hand and caught hold of the watch, which was half in and half out of his pocket; he was taking it out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-139

1068. HENRY ROGERS , JOHN ROSE , and EDWARD CHAPLIN , were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 100lbs, of lead, belonging to Margaret Pugh , and fixed to the dwelling-house of John Gurnell .

WILLIAM JONES . I am a grocer , and live in Roodlane; Margaret Pugh is my aunt. The lead was fixed to the top of her house, 37, Sloane-square, Chelsea , which is let to John Gurnell - I saw it fixed to the building.

CORNELIUS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman. On the 14th of June, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was called by the servant of No. 36, Sloane-square, who said she was sure some persons were in the next house. I went into the area and found the door open; I then went up to the top floor, and heard some persons making their way out on to the roof. I found the lead in the garret. I went on to the roof, over three houses, and found the three prisoners concealed in a gutter, behind some chimneys - I tied them together, and brought them down; I met Maybank in the house coming to assist me. I found two knives and a screw-driver, with the lead. I saw the lead fitted afterwards.

RICHARD MAYBANK. I went up and found the prisoners on the roof with Reynolds, we took them to the watch-house, and fitied the lead to the house-top-it exactly fitted.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROGERS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

ROSE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CHAPLIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-140

1069. RICHARD WILSON , WILLIAM WHEELER , and JOSEPH BOWYER , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , fifteen yards of printed cotton, value 19s. , the goods of Jonathan Frank .

JONATHAN FRANK. I am a linen-draper , and live in Sloane-street . On the 25th of June, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at a house opposite to my own, and saw the prisoner, Bowyer, attempt to release a piece of print that was pinned to the iron, he could not get it off-he went a door or two farther to the other two prisoners, returned again and examined it, and went to them again, three times, and then came and released it from the pins; he then came with Wheeler, Bowyer took the print off, and put it into Wheeler's apron-Wilson waited at the corner (two doors off); I and Morgan came out and secured Wheeler, with the print in his apron. I secured Bowyer. Wilson attempted to run past us, and in endeavouring to take him Bowyer got away from me - I secured Wilson. Bowyer was taken again.

THOMAS MORGAN. Mr. Frank was at my house. I secured Wheeler with the print in his apron.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am a constable. I heard the alarm, ran out, and saw Bowyer running away, and secured him. I never lost sight of him,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WHEELER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BOWYER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-141

1070. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one jacket, value 1s. 6d.; one pair of pantaloons, value 1s.; one hat, value 2s.; one shirt, value 2s.; two waistcoats, value 2s.; one pair of stockings, value 6d., and one handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of John Sutton .

JOHN SUTTON . I am a labourer . On the 11th of June I lost my things out of my lodgings in White's-yard, Whitechapel-the prisoner lodged in my room; the next day I heard he was secured, and found my things at the watch-house.

DANIEL BLYTH. I am an officer. On the 11th of June, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner at Limehouse, with the things; he said he bought them, and was going to sell them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Confined Three Months . GUILTY . Aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-142

1071. HENRY NORTON and HENRY HOPKINS , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , one coach-glass, value 30s. , the goods of William Paynter .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of James Wortley .

JAMES WORTLEY . I hired a coach of Mr. Paynter, on the 24th of June I left it quite safe within two yards of my door, in Bleeding Hart-yard, Charles-street, Hatton-garden, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; and about three o'clock in the morning the watchman called me, saying the glass was stolen, and he had one of the men. I got up, and he brought Norton to the watchhouse soon after. Hopkins was sometimes employed by me.

ROBERT LONDON . I am a watchman. I was in Bleeding Hart-yard, at a quarter after three o'clock in the morning, I saw the coach body moving, and the prisoner, Norton, handing the glass out to Hopkins; they saw me, and ran down Union-court - I sprung my rattle, and went down George-alley, they were there, and threw the glass down - I heard it break; I saw them turn into Field-lane, but then lost sight of them; I still pursued, another watchman pointed up Brewer's-yard - I found Hopkins there. I am certain he is the man. I secured him.

RICHARD AYRES. I am a watchman. I was on Saffron-hill, heard the rattle sprung, and saw the prisoners running. Hopkins was taken in the yard, up two pair of stairs. I stopped Norton.

NORTON'S Defence. I went to get my breakfast.

NORTON - GUILTY . Aged 25.

HOPKINS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-143

1072. GEORGE HEWLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , one bill-hook, value 2s., and two brass cocks, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Aldridge ; and one bell, value 3s., his property, and fixed to a fence belonging to his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM FRANKLIN. I am a carpenter, and live at North-end, Hampstead; Mr. Aldridge is a horse-salesman ; the bell was taken from his fence, and the cocks from the water-butt.

JAMES WICKS. I am a watchman. About a quarter before three o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner on Hampstead-heath, and took him into custody. I found five bells, a bill-hook, and a brass cock, upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Confined One Year . GUILTY . Aged 65.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-144

1073. EDWARD GOOGE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 2lbs. of copper, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Major Rhode , the elder , and Major Rhode , the younger .

ARCHIBALD M'GIBBON. I am an engineer. On the 24th of May, between six and seven o'clock, I stopped the prisoner on Messrs. Rhodes' premises, with the copper-they are sugar-refiners, in Leman-street; the prisoner was a bricklayer employed on the premises; it had been cut off to introduce a pipe.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-145

1074. JOHN CROKER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , one copper-boiler, value 5s.; one saucepan, value 3s., and one frying-pan, value 1s. , the goods of Philip Wright .

JANE WRIGHT . I am the wife of Philip Wright, who lives at Camden-town . On the 17th of June, I missed the things from the wash-house about eight o'clock in the morning.

WILLIAM SIMPSON. I am a watchman. On the 17th of June, about two o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner, and another man, with the property; the other man knocked the patrol down. I secured the prisoner - He knocked me about a great deal.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-146

1075. WILLIAM PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one fixture (that is to say), one copper, the property of George Joshua , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

GEORGE JOSHUA . I am a currier , and live in Brownlow-street, Drury-lane . On the 28th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I missed my copper, which was fixed in my kitchen safe, about half an hour before. My street - door is generally open.

JOSEPH SOLOMON . I live in Mr. Joshua's parlour; at about a quarter after two o'clock in the afternoon, I heard somebody go through the passage - I went to the door, and saw the prisoner with the copper; I ran after him and secured him. He said a man sent him for it. He tried to get away. I tried the copper to the place afterwards-it exactly fitted.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-147

1076. WILLIAM GREENWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , one watch, value 30s.; one chain, value 1d.; and two seals, value 6s.; the goods of William Searles , from his person .

WILLIAM SEARLES . I am a turner , and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the 1st of June, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I went out. I was returning about half-past four o'clock - I was nearly opposite Thrawl-street, Brick-lane , and was hustled by five or six men - I am sure the prisoner was one of them; I saw them together before. They came up - I had three young women with me who were friends; we had been to see my cousin off by the Bromley coach. The men took my watch from me - I felt it go. One of the young women ran after the man who took it. The prisoner was afterwards secured. I saw him at the watch-house - He said he was one of them.

CHARLOTTE SINFIELD . I live in Lamb-alley, Bishopsgate-street, and took a walk with Searle to see his cousin. Gregory and Leach were with me-Searles altered his mind and would not go - We went as far as Mile-end Turnpike. As we were returning down Brick-lane, five or six men crossed over from the other side - I am certain that

the prisoner is one of them. He caught hold of Ann Gre gory; Linch and Searles were together. A young man stooped under my arm, and shoved me against them. In half a minute Searles said his watch was gone. The prisoner said, "Oh no, it is not." A man ran across the road with it, at the same time Gregory crossed the road after him-the prisoner held her, and would not let her go; the man ran down the street with the watch. The prisoner then let us go, and when we got to the street he drove us back-they all held us. The prisoner said the man had run another way. Gregory fainted. I called out stop thief! The prisoner was taken while he was attempting to stop her mouth, to hinder her calling out - She came to, and laid hold of him. When he got to the watch-house, I said his name was Greenwood; he said it was Greenlaw - He afterwards said it was Greenwood.

ANN GREGORY . I was with them. Five or six men came up together and hustled us; I am sure the prisoner was one of them. Searles's watch was taken. I saw the man run across the road-the prisoner ran after me, and held me tight round the neck to prevent my following him - I fainted. When I came to, Linch had hold of the prisoner, who was standing by me. I am certain he is the man. I am a weaver.

MARY LINCH . I live in Long-alley, near the Tenter-ground. We were returning home-when we got to Brick-lane, five or six men ran up to us; one of them caught hold of Sinfield, and shoved against us. I laid hold of Searles's arm - They surrounded us-the prisoner held us close together. Searles said his watch was gone. My sister (Gregory) cried out, stop thief! they would not let us go after the man who took it. Gregory had nearly caught him, when the prisoner caught her by the neck-she fainted away. The prisoner said he was gone another way; the watchman came up, I seized the prisoner as one of them, and gave him in charge. I am sure he is the man who hustled us.

RICHARD CLARK. I am a watchman. I heard the noise, went up, and found Gregory fainting. Linch said the prisoner had robbed the young man of his watch - I took him to the watch-house. He struck me in the face, and made my nose bleed.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw Gregory and spoke to her; they said I was one of the men.

Transported for Life . GUILTY . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-148

1077. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , one jacket, value 6s.; one pair of breeches, value 4s.; one jacket, value 5s.; and one pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of Saul Wakelams .

There being no evidence against the prisoner but his own confession, which was extorted from him, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-149

1078. PETER DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 10 yards of calico, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Lynn .

ELIZA LYNN . I am the wife of Henry Lynn , we live in Lamp-office-court, Lamb's Conduit-street . On the 18th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, I went up stairs, leaving the parlour and street-doors open. I was called down, and found the prisoner in custody, with the calico.

FRANCIS FAGAN. I am a mason. I was passing through Lamb's Conduit-street, and saw the prisoner come out of Lamp-office-court, with the calico in his apron - He said it was his own. I secured him; he then said he was in distress, and would shew me where he took it from - He took me to Lynn's. I found two skeleton keys in the cuff of his coat. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-150

1079. WILLIAM BROWN and THOMAS MOULSON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , one gown, value 5s., and one apron, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Perry .

MARY PERRY . I am servant to Mrs. Appleton, at Hampstead. On the 2d of July my things hung out to dry in the garden, which is fenced all round. I missed them between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and about ten the officer brought them to me.

THOMAS GARTON. I am an officer. I met the prisoners in St. John's passage, Clerkenwell, about half past seven o'clock in the morning; Brown had the bundle. I asked him what it was? he said they were two gowns and an apron of his mother's, who lived at Hampstead. They ran away, leaving them behind - I secured Brown immediately-Stains took Moulson, who then said they got them out of a garden at Hampstead.

WILLIAM STAINS . I am an officer. I was with Garton, and secured Moulson.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

MOULSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-151

1080. HARRIET BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , one sheet, value 10s.; one table-cloth, value 2s.; and four pillow-cases, value 8s., the goods of Thomas Winter , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS WINTER . I live in York-place, Banner-street . On the 12th of April the prisoner lodged at my house; the articles stated in the indictment were let with it. On the 30th of May, she left me without notice. She came to me in the name of Williams. A man used to come and see her - He only slept there one night. I missed the property before she went, and told her of it. She said she would bring it the next day, but did not. Matthews had them.

JOHN MATTHEWS. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. The prisoner pledged the articles stated in the indictment with me, in the name of Williams.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to rob him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-152

1081. GEORGE LOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , one saw, value 2s. , the goods of William Filkin .

GEORGE HITCHINGS. I work for Mr. Filkin, who lives in Old-street . I was cutting wood with the saw outside the door - I went into the shop, and when I returned I missed it. The prisoner had helped me up with a plank just before.

JOHN SHAW . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner with the saw under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-153

1082. MARIA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 15 yards of cotton, value 13s. , the goods of John Robson .

GEORGE HUNT . I am servant to John Robson , who lives in Shoreditch . On the 4th of July, the cotton was on the step of the door. I saw the prisoner running, and brought her back - She had not got it.

ELIZA SAVILLE. I was coming by the shop, and saw the prisoner and another woman looking at the print. The prisoner lifted it up, put it into the other woman's apron.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-154

1083. FRANCES SHARLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , one coat, value 1l. 18s. , the goods of Nicholas Temple .

NICHOLAS TEMPLE. I am a waiter at the King's Head, St. John-street, Clerkenwell. On the 29th of June I lost the coat off my bed; the prisoner was employed in the house. I saw the prisoner go out, followed her, and found it round her waist.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Fourteen Days , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-155

1084. EDWARD RAPTON and JAMES CARRE were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , one jacket, value 5s.; one waistcoat, value 2s.; one pair of trowsers, value 4s.; one handkerchief, value 1s.; and three shirts, value 9s. , the goods of Mark Blenkinsop .

MARK BLENKINSOP . I am a mariner , and live at the White Lion, in Catharine-street . On the 26th of June I lost my things out of the drawers. The two prisoners slept in the room that night only - I sleep down stairs. They came down with a bundle. The landlord brought them back with my things.

ABRAHAM RANSON . The prisoners lodged at my house that night. They brought a small bundle with them, when they went out it seemed larger. I went out after them, and secured them. Carre had the trowsers on, and Rapton had the other things in the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RAPTON'S Defence. We were intoxicated.

RAPTON - GUILTY . Aged 34.

CARRE - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-156

1085. JAMES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , two saws, value 4s., and one chisel, value 6d. , the goods of Edward Marsh .

EDWARD MARSH . I am a carpenter , and was at work at a building in Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel , on the 31st of May . I went to breakfast at eight o'clock; when I returned, I found the door unlocked and my saws gone.

JOHN GIBBS. I am a broker, and live in Backchurch-lane, Whitechapel. On the 31st of May, at nine o'clock, the prisoner sold me the saws for 3s. 3d. Marsh claimed them.

DOMINICA UPSTALL. I live in Charlotte-street. I saw the prisoner open the door, and go into the house. I knew him before - He is a locksmith .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-157

1086. FREDERICK MACKINTOSH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , one saw, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Cochran .

SAMUEL COCHRAN . I am a carpenter . On the 1st of May I was repairing a house at Wapping; I left it at seven o'clock, and returned at ten - I missed my saw, and found it at Edgel's.

HENRY EDGEL . I live in Brick-lane. On the 1st of May, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner sold me the saw for 2s. 6d. - I am sure he is the man. The next day he brought another saw, and I detained him.

Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-158

1087. ROBERT HALL , THOMAS FISHER , and JOHN LOCKTON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 4lbs. of lamb, value 4s.; 1lb. of bacon, value 1s.; and 2lbs. of butter, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Burnage .

ANN SMITH . I am servant to Ann Burnage, who lives in Markham-place, King's-road, Chelsea . On the 18th of May, at night, our safe in the area was cut open, and the things taken. I saw them again the next day, and knew the bacon.

THOMAS PIKE. I am a labourer. On the 18th of May, about a quarter after five o'clock, I met the prisoners in Brompton-row. Hall had a great deal of meat in a basket-he asked me to buy the bacon; I knew him before. I bought the bacon and butter of him for 1s. 8d. - he put them in my handkerchief, and the watchman came up. All three ran away, leaving it with me. The other prisoners had some mutton or lamb in their aprons. I ran after them, with the watchman, and secured them.

Cross-examined. Hall's father sells meat.

THOMAS WESTLEY . I am a watchman. I came up, and the prisoners ran away. Pike brought them back.

GEORGE WEST . I am a watchman. On the 18th of May, about half past five o'clock in the morning, I saw the

prisoners go across the fields-two of them had bundles, which they handed over a back wall. I ran to the front of the house, and saw Pike running after them. I found a shoulder of lamb and some veal-cutlets in their aprons.

(Bacon sworn to.)

HALL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

FISHER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

LOCKTON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-159

1088. SARAH EVERETT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June, 1815 , two gowns, value 4s.; one petticoat, value 6s.; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; one frill, value 2d.; and one shawl, value 1s. , the goods of Ann Trotter .

ANN TROTTER. I live in Chichester-rents, Chancery-lane . On the 25th of June, I gave the prisoner permission to sleep in my room; when I awoke, she was gone and the property. She was taken on the 30th of June, with my frill on her neck.

FRANCIS PRETTY. I am a patrol. On the 30th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I apprehended the prisoner - Mrs. Trotter was with me, and claimed the frill. The prisoner confessed, and took us to her lodgings, where we found the other things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-160

1089. ISAAC ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , one jacket, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Wright .

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a labourer . On the 21st of June, I was at work in the fields at Hackney , and laid my jacket on the bank.

WILLIAM GRANGE . I saw the prisoner go into the ditch and take the jacket. I secured him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-161

1090. WILLIAM BATTEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , one goose, price 4s., and four ducks, price 12s. , the goods of William Burrows .

WILLIAM BURROWS. I live on Chelsea Common . On the 1st of June, about five o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed, and missed four ducks and one goose, which I had fastened up in my cellar under the shop-it was not locked. I saw them again about a quarter of an hour after-the prisoner was in custody. He lived in the neighbourhood.

JAMES LEEPER . I am a watchman. On the 1st of June, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another man near Burrows's; each of them had a bag - I watched them. They were driving poultry, and going into people's yards-they saw me. I went home, altered my dress, and went out again. I found the prisoner near Burrows's door, giving the poultry corn - I concealed myself, and saw both of them together again. I got assistance, and secured the prisoner, and found the poultry in a bag on his shoulder. He said, if I did not let him go, he would butcher me. He knocked me down - I kept fast hold of him, and found four ducks and one goose in the bag, dead, but quite warm.

JAMES BETTEL. I heard the alarm - I live on the Common. I saw the watchman knocked down, and the prisoner over him - I secured him. He said the bags were his property.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-162

1091. WILLIAM BURKE and SARAH TRASSAM were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , two tabs, value 1s.; one tea-cannister, value 1s.; and one snuff-jar, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Debenham .

CHARLES DEBENHAM. I let the prisoner a lodging, and the things were let with the lodging.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-163

1092. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , one handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Barns Hawley , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-164

1093. JOHN DYE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , one pair of breeches, value 5s. , the goods of Moses Fowler .

MOSES FOWLER . I live in Silver-street, Golden-square . On the 5th of July, the breeches hung at the door - I saw the prisoner take them. I ran out, and overtook him-he threw them away.

JAMES SMITH. I saw the prisoner throw the breeches away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-165

1094. WILLIAM MANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , three loaves of bread, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of John Caves .

THOMAS PATERSON . I am servant to Mr. Caves. On the 5th of July, about one o'clock, I left my basket in Montague-square, and when I returned, I missed three loaves.

ROBERT EDDEN. I saw the prisoner take the bread out of the basket, and stopped him.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-166

1095. SARAH PERRYMAN was indicted for that she, on the 27th of May , upon Ambrose Castles , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously did, by menaces, demand money of him, with a felonious intent to rob him of

his monies, from his person, and against his will, feloniously and violently to steal .

(The particulars of this case are of too indelicate a nature for publication).

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170702-167

1096. THOMAS NEWMAN and RICHARD ARNOLD were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , thirty-six yards of sheeting, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Garner .

ROBERT WARREN . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Garner, linen-draper , King-street, Holborn . On the 26th of June, about half-past twelve o'clock in the morning, I was informed that the linen was taken-it hung outside the door.

WILLIAM ASHLEY. I am a broker, and live in Russell-square. I was coming along Orange-street, Red Lion-square, between twelve and one o'clock on the 26th of June, and saw the prisoner, Newman, with the cloth under his arm, and a shop-ticket hanging to it - I followed him into the square-he ran across, and another man came up and threw a handkerchief over it, and ran away with it towards Leigh-street, I followed them; they parted, I lost them. I only saw Newman with the cloth-Arnold is very much like the other man.

SAMUEL DICKINS . On the 26th of June, about half-past one o'clock, I took the prisoners into custody at the end of Broker's-row, Long-acre; Arnold had the bundle; they were together; he said it was given to him to carry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NEWMAN'S Defence. I found it, and gave it to Arnold.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

ARNOLD- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-168

1097. JOSEPH PARKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , one jacket, value 2s.; one waistcoat, value 1s.; and one knife, value 3d. , the goods of James Henderson .

JAMES HENDERSON . I am a mariner . I was on board the Nancy, which laid at Stone-stairs, Stepney . On the 6th of June, I missed my property; and found it on the prisoner - He was in custody. He was quite a stranger to me.

JAMES WHITE. I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner at three o'clock in the morning, just coming on shore with the property in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-169

1098. JOSEPH PARKIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, one jacket, value 5s., and one pair of trowsers, value 3s., the goods of Robert Varney ; and one other jacket, value 4s.; one pair of trowsers, value 3s.; and one knife, value 3d. , the goods of Robert Henderson .

ROBERT VARNEY. I was on board the Clinker, in the same tier of ships, and lost my things.

JAMES WHITE. I took the prisoner with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-170

1099. EVAN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , two yards and three quarters of woollen-cloth, value 3l., and five yards of silk, value 1l. 10s., the goods of James Scott , from his person .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of George Armstong.

JAMES SCOTT . I am a tailor , and live in Litchfield-street, Soho. On the 27th of May, about half-past four o'clock, I was at the bottom of King-street, Golden-square , taking a bundle home; the prisoner snatched it from me and made off with it - I knew him before - He got away. I met him again last Friday, and secured him. He said he would satisfy me. I gave him in charge.

WILLIAM REID . I took the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-171

1100. JOHN COLLINSON , JOSEPH JACKSON , and ROBERT WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one watch, value 1l.; one chain, value 1s.; and one seal, value 6d., the goods of John Corbett , from his person .

JOHN CORBET. I am a leather-cutter , and live in White Lion-street . On the 30th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in my back room; the three prisoners came into my shop and asked if I sold nails - I looked very hard at them; Jackson was leaning over the counter, and drew himself back; I came in the front of Jackson - They all began laughing; I asked him where the knife was which laid on the counter? he said he had not got it. I said, before I served them with the nails, I would find the knife; I thought I had better serve them. I looked for the scales; Jackson drove towards the counter again; he suddenly stretched his arm over the counter, laid hold of my chain, and snatched my watch out. Walker ran out first, Jackson next, and Collinson remained behind, and then went out; I came round into the street and raised the cry of Stop thief! and ran up the street; about seven doors further on, Collinson ran against me, knocked me into the road, and threw me down, he gave me a violent push, which bruised my shoulder and side. I am certain the prisoners are the men.

EMANUEL JERVIS. I am a bricklayer. On the 30th of June, at six o'clock, I was at the Cheshire Cheese, Chelsea; the prisoner, Jackson and Collinson, came in. I heard of the robbery the next day, and told the officer.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I received information, went to Collinson's lodgings, and found him and Jackson there. I secured them. Jackson was concealed under the bed.

COLLINSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-172

1101. HENRY CREMER was indicted for embezzlement .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was .

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-173

1102. WILLIAM DOWSET was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one bed value 40s. , the goods of George Mitchell .

The prosecutor not appearing , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder .

Reference Number: t18170702-174

1103. MARY DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th May , one gown, value 7s. , the goods of Eliza Wells .

The prosecutor not appearing , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-175

1104. JOSEPH HOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , one sheet, value 5s.; and one shawl, value 1s. , the goods of Richard Fowles .

MARY FOWLES . I live in Pewter-platter-yard, St. John-street . On the 30th of June I lost my things , I had been distrained for rent . I did not know who to suspect but the prisoner, who had been in possession ; he called soon after, and said he came for a bed- wrench which he had left; my husband said he had robbed us; he ran away immediately; my son brought him back, and he confessed it.

JOHN CONST . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge; he said he pledged the things and destroyed the duplicates . I found the things at Sowerby 's.

HENRY SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker . I took the things in pledge on the 30th of June .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-176

1105 . JAMES KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one coat, value 7s. , the goods of Moses Davis .

MOSES DAVIS . I am a salesman , and live in Gray's-inn-lane . On the 8th of July, my coat was taken out of my shop; I was called directly, and the prisoner pointed out to me; I secured him and found the coat under a water-butt, where I found him .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 18 .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr . Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-177

1106. CHARLES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one saucepan and cover, value 5s ., the goods of John Pearl , and one fixture, (that is to say), one copper, his property, and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN PEARL . I keep the Robin Hood , in Duck-lane , St. Giles 's . On the 20th of June , my copper, which was fixed in my kitchen, was taken away about four o'clock in the morning .

JOSEPH ANDERSON . I am a labourer. I saw the pri soner come out of the court behind my house , a little after four o'clock in the morning ; he went up Chick -lane. I am certain he is the man.

LEWIS ROBERTS . I am a watchman. On the 20th of June, I was asked if I had seen a boy with the copper; I went into Chick- lane , the prisoner was pointed out to me; we found the copper in an old iron-shop, and tried it to the palce-it fitted exactly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor boy, and was out of employ .

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170702-178

1107. JOSEPH WILDGOOSE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , two sheets, value 1l.; one tablecloth, value 12s.; and two pillow-cases, value 2s., the goods of Jane Cummings , in a lodging-room .

JANE CUMMINGS . I live in Riley-street, Gray's-inn-lane , where I let the prisoner a kitchen and a sleeping- room , at 2s., per week. He paid the first month , and stopped eleven weeks; the articles stated in the in dictment were let with the room. He left, and I missed the things.

JOHN LAPPAGE . I am a pawnbroker . I took a sheet in pledge of the prisoner and a table-cloth.

GUILTY . Aged 69.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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