Old Bailey Proceedings, 19th February 1817.
Reference Number: 18170219
Reference Number: f18170219-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 19th of FEBRUARY, 1817, and following Days; Being the Third Session in the Second Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, 74, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1817.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir George Holroyd , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn, Bart; Sir John Perring , Bart; Sir Charles Flower , Bart; George Scholey , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; and William Heygate , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart. Recorder of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, and J. Vaillant, Esq his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Evans ,

James Coombe ,

William Potter ,

Thomas Dudley ,

James Lermitte ,

William Davis ,

William Nutman ,

Henry Mitchell ,

Lewis Lloyd ,

William Brown ,

Thomas Harris ,

Timothy Chaddaway .

London Jury.

(Special Commission).

William Davis ,

Lewis Lloyd ,

William Brown ,

Thomas Harris ,

Timothy Chaddaway ,

John Vaughan ,

James Podd ,

Charles Haskins ,

James Forsyth ,

Thomas Harvey ,

John Mills ,

James Seeley ,

First Middlesex Jury.

James Stephens ,

William Grant ,

Joseph Nightingale ,

James Green ,

William Iredale ,

William Goslet ,

James Ratcliffe ,

Isaac Curtis ,

Emanuel Lovic ,

John Death ,

William Parker ,

James Miller .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Seeley ,

Peter Rutherforth ,

William Sellman ,

John Franks ,

Thomas Milan ,

John V. Broughton ;

James Friar ,

John Forty ,

John Wilson ,

Edward Parish ,

Nelson Gibbon ,

William Turner .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 19, 1817.

WOOD, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION IN THE SECOND MAYORALTY.

Reference Number: t18170219-1

363. SAMUEL KIRBY and JOHN STREW , were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , in the dwelling-house of Alexander Cameron , three books, value 3s.; 2l. 16s. in monies numbered, and seven 1l. Bank of England notes, his property .

ALEXANDER CAMERON. I keep the sign of the Three Lords public-house, in the Minories , in the county of Middlesex; there is a club of tailors held at my house, the box which contains their money and books is left in my charge - I consider myself answerable for it. On the 15th of January, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners came to my house, with a man named Thomas Orford , they said they had some business to settle belonging to the society, and requested the box; I asked them what they wanted with the box, they said it was to settle some business of the society. Kirby was clerk to the society , the other two were only members. I asked him if he had the keys-there were three locks to the box, the prisoner, Kirby, kept one, and the two stewards the other two; Kirby said, he had got them. I brought the box, and gave it them; they had some liquor to drink after they had the box. Kirby and Orford said, they would take the books with them, and that they would not stay long. In about ten minutes time I saw the prisoners come down stairs, and go out at the private door - They did not tell me they were going away, which raised my suspicion; I went up to the room where the box was and found it broken open (producing it), before I gave it them there were 7l. in bank-notes, and 2l. 16s. in silver, and three account books in it, the money and books were gone; I saw Orford about ten minutes after. The prisoners were taken into custody about three weeks after. I made enquiry for them, but could not find them. When they were apprehended Kirby said, he had broken open the box, and took the money, but that it could not be helped now, he did not expect it would have gone so far as it had done. Strew said, he thought it could be made up, and that he would sell even the bed that he lay upon to make it up. I told him the law must take its course. Strew blamed Kirby for leading him into such an error, and said, it was the first trouble that ever he got into. Kirby laughed, and said, we have got into it now, and must get out of it as well as we can. The box has three different keys, Kirby said, he had all of them, but he had but one, as the box was broken open. I found a chisel by the box-it was mine, I believe it was in the room before they came. An officer apprehended them.

Prisoner KIRBY. Q. What security did you give for the money - A.Only my own word.

ROBERT BARRY. I am a tailor. In consequence of a direction that I got from Cameron, I went to look after the prisoners; on the evening of the 15th of January, I found them at the Ship and Shovel public-house, in St. Thomas's-street, in the Borough, drinking punch; the prisoner, Strew, handed me a glass. I told him I supposed he knew the business that I came upon. I had another person with me. Strew said, yes, he knew it; and that they had got the money, and we might do our best. They used very abusive language. I left them and went home. They both followed me out, and Strew trod on my toe three times. They were both apprehended the day after last sessinos. When Strew was taken to Kirby, he hung down his head, and said, "Oh Sam! how could you bring me into this dilemma." Strew asked if he could be bailed, or if he could not make the matter up; and said he would sell his bed and all that he had, to make it up; we told him the law must take its course. I did not take an officer with me the first time. I went to where Strew worked, and found him at his usual place.

DAVID HARBOROUGH . I am a steward of the society; we meet at Cameron's house; the prisoners had no business with either the books or money, at that time of the day; there were regular meetings on the Tuesday night, when the business was transacted. The two stewards have each a key, and Kirby, who was clerk, had also a key. My lock is now locked. The last witness has spoken correctly.

KIRBY'S Defence. It was considered by part of the society, that the matters were not conducted properly, about twelve proposed that I and Orford should take the money, and we took it for them. The society consisted of about forty members.

KIRBY - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

STREW - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 39.

Recommended to mercy, particularly Strew, as being led away by Kirby.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18170219-2

364. PATRICK BROWN , was indicted for feloniously assaulting, William Simmons , on the King's highway, on the 14th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one bank token, value 3s., and two other bank tokens, value 3s. his property .

WILLIAM SIMMONS . On Tuesday evening, the 14th of January, about half-past five o'clock, I was on horseback in Green-lane, going towards Southgate , I was stopped by a man who had a dark great coat on, I do not know who he was. - It was nearly dark. The man resembled the prisoner, he stopped my horse, and presented a pistol to me, and demanded my money. I got off my horse immediately, as I was afraid he would fire at me-he was on foot; I gave him six shillings, and said, you shall have what I have got; it was one 3s. and two 1s. 6d. bank tokens, I had nothing else about me; there were people passing by at the time. I caught hold of the man and got him down; the people were coming towards me at the time I gave him the money. I seized him, got him down, and called for assistance, the people went on the road, and another man came and pulled me off the person to whom I had given the money; the pistol was a dark kind of a barrel-it was not a bright one; the man was talking to the people that were going by, in an abusive way, I took him to be an Irishman, by his voice. I saw the prisoner at Bow-Street, three days after the robbery, I heard him talking there, and it appeard to me to be the same voice as the man that stopped me - I will not swear to his voice, it, was like it. The man left me immediately he had robbed me, and did not speak afterwards. I should not know my money again. He went towards Southgate, and the man that pulled me off him, went after him; they were both Irishmen.

JOHN UPTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Friday evening, the 14th of January, I, in company with Edwards and Shiers, was going over Ball's-pond common, a man came up to me. In consequence of information that he gave me, I went down to the turnpike at the end of the common, it was near six o'clock, and made enquiry about the robbers. I laid hold of the prisoner on one side and Edwards took hold of him on the other-it was on the common. I rubbed him down, and Edwards took a pistol from him. It was as near six o'clock as possible. The place where we found the prisoner is about a mile from where the prosecutor was robbed, it is between the place where the robbery was committed and Southgate, and in the road to Southgate. As we were taking him to the public-house, Shiers was with us, a man called out, there is the other man; Edwards and Shiers went after him, and left me alone with the prisoner - He asked me what I was going to do with him? I told him I was going to give him a pot of porter; he said he would go no further, and began to make a very desperate resistance; he laid hold of my private parts once or twice, and endeavoured to throw me on my back, but I was too strong for him; he then tried to get my cutlass out, which was buttoned in my coat; I called my brother officers back, and we secured him and took him to the public-house. In searching him, I found one 3s. and two 1s. 6d. tokens in his waistcoat pocket, I think it was his left hand waistcoat pocket. I found a bag of gunpowder upon him, and about thirteen or fourteen slugs in it - He had no silver about him but the tokens. I told him that I took him on suspicion of a footpad robbery. When we laid hold of him, before he attempted to escape, I told him I was an officer, and wanted to see if he had a pistol about him, When I found the pistol, I told him he must go with me, as I believed him to be the man who had committed the robbery, and that I had heard of a footpad robbery. He was secured. The prisoner told me that he lived in Whitechapel; I knew, by his voice, that he was an Irishman. He was coming in a direct road from the place where the robbery was committed - He was coming from Southgate.

EDWARDS. I am a Bow-street patrol, and was with Upton on the 14th of January, and assisted him in taking the prisoner, it was a little before six o'clock. While Upton and I were at the turnpike, inquiring about the robbery, I observed the prisoner go through the gate, he was coming from Southgate; we followed him, Upton and I laid hold of him, and found the pistol in his right hand, with the muzzle up the sleeve of his great coat; I was on his right hand, the butt end was in his hand, I took it from him, and told Upton to hold him, for I had found the pistol. We were taking him to the public-house, when we were told that the other man was walking by the side of a turnip cart; Upton said he should be safe with the prisoner, if we left him; when we had got about a hundred yards, I heard Upton call for assistance, we returned to him, and found the prisoner fighting, with him. The pistol was loaded and primed, I took the priming out(producing it). I accompanied Upton, with the prisoner, to the Green Man, Ball's-pound; the prisoner was searched, and a 3s. and two 1s. 6d. bank tokens, found upon him, also a knife, and a few halfpence. I do not know where the tokens were. There was a bag of shot and gunpowder found upon him - I saw Upton take it from him-there were slugs in it to fit the pistol. He had no other money about him. The place where we took the prisoner is nearly a mile from where the robbery was committed. The prisoner is an Irishman, by his dialect. He was dressed as he is now, except his handkerchief, which was a dark one.

WILLIAM SHIERS . I am a patrol of Bow-street, and assisted Upton and Edwards in taking the prisoner; the account they have given is correct. I held the prisoner's hands while the tokens were taken from him, they were in his right hand waistcoat pocket. He was dressed as he is now, except his handkerchief, which was dark.

WM. SIMMONS re-examined. Q. When the tokens were taken from you, did you observe where the man put them - A. I rather think he put them in his waistcoat pocket, he put them in as soon as I gave them to him I-remember seeing him do it. I believe I gave them into his right hand, the pistol was in his left hand; I do not know which waistcoat pocket he put them in; he appeared to me to put them into the same side pocket as the hand he took them with. I am sure the pistol was in his left hand, he held it in his left hand when he presented at me, and kept it in the same hand. I did not notice his handkerchief. He appeared to be dressed as he is now, with three or four garments on. He had dark clothes.

Prisoner's Defence, When they took me, they asked

me who was with me, I did not tell them till I was in the House of Correction two or three days, I then told them, and they took some of the same party.

SHIERS. There were no promises held out to him. I saw him in the House of Correction, he told me if I would take him before a magistrate, he would tell the whole truth about the robberies he had committed; he communicated the name of a man to the magistrate, and we apprehended him-it was for another robbery; no person besides the prisoner, was taken up for robbing Mr. Simmons.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-3

365. DANIEL FERGUSON and JAMES COTTON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Taverner , about twelve in the night of the 25th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one fixture, (i.e.), one copper, value 20s., his property, and fixed to his dwelling-house, the prisoners having no title or claim to it; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; one pair of scissars, value 2d.; one bottle, value 1d.; three pints of gin, value 3s., and one loaf of bread, value 1s., his property .

JOSEPH STEPHENS . I am a patrol of St. Paul, Shadwell; I was on duty, the 24th of January, near Miss Jacks's house, about one hundred and fifty yards from it; as I was calling the hour of three, she called out of her window to me - I went to see what was the matter; I then went to the place where I thought the persons must have got in, I placed myself there, and called to William Blake to come to my assistance - He came, and I placed him at the other corner; he called to me, and said, there was a man who would assist us; I went up to him, and saw the prisoner, Ferguson, just by Blake, I told him to secure him, and he did. Before he was taken away I searched him on the spot, and took a pair of scissars from his jacket pocket, I delivered them to Morris on the Monday following, I kept them safe untill I gave them to him. We went to look at the premises, and searched Miss Jacks's house, and found the tiles taken off, and the laths cut away, leaving room for a man to get in. We found a hole leading to the privy of the adjoining house, I went down the hole and found the prisoner, Cotton, in the adjoining house-it was not Taverner's house. I endeavoured to take him to the watch-house, but on the road he slipped his arms out of his jacket, and ran away, leaving his jacket in my hands, I called out stop thief! Tuck found him and brought him to the watch-house; I searched his jacket, and found a tinder-box and steel, a candle, some halfpence and farthings. I found nothing more in his other clothes. The place where I first saw Cotton was about sixty yards from Taverner's, there are several houses between, we traced them from Jacks's premises to Taverner's house. We found a stocking, and another pair of scissars, in the place where we found Cotton, in the shed, which is above the hole that leads into the privy; and in another part of the shed where we found him, there was a shirt and a stockings, which appeared to be the fellow stocking to that which I had found. We went to look at Taverner's premises the next day, he was with me at the back part of his premises; the tiling was broken through large enough for a man to get through, it leads into a room adjoining his bar. I delivered the scissars, stockings, and shirt to Morris. No person claimed the last pair of scissars. I found copper upon both of them.

JAMES TAVERNER . I live at Shadwell , and keep a public-house . I went to bed about half-past twelve o'clock on the 26th of January, and got up at half-past six, came down and found the stone bottle removed, and the cork taken out-it was empty, it was not empty the overnight. There were three pints of gin in a green bottle gone; I missed a pair of scissars out of the kitchen, which I had seen safe the overnight; I also missed a pair of worsted stockings off the horse by the kitchen fire, and a quartern loaf off the table in the kitchen, it was there the night before I am sure, I missed it about ten minutes after I came down; six tiles were removed from the washhouse roof, over the water butt, there appeared room enough for a man to get through, the laths were cut at one end and broken at the other, I am sure it was safe the overnight. The wash-house joins my dwelling-house, the tap-room door comes into it; there is a street behind the wash-house, a person could get to the top of the washhouse from the back street, the roof is about seven feet from the ground. Stephens looked at it with me afterwards. I saw my things on the Monday after the Saturday that I was robbed. I saw a pair of stockings and a pair of scissars, they are my property. I knew the scissars as well as the stockings. I found my green bottle under the water butt, the gin was in it; I am sure it was in my bar when I went to bed. I also lost a candle and some farthings, which were in a till in the bar, which I keep on purpose for them.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer; I produce the things which I received from Stephens.

JOSEPH STEPHENS . I only found the pair of scissars on Ferguson, Mr. Taverner claimed them. (Producing them).

JAMES TAVERNER re-examined. The scissars are mine. I saw them in the window the overnight; the points are broken, I have had them four or five years; the stockings are also mine. Jacks lives fifty or sixty yards from me, her house is upon the same road at the back as mine. The copper was fixed to my premises the overnight, I found it had been pulled down, and moved about three-quarters of a yard from where it was fixed.

FERGUSON'S Defence. I was not near the premises, the watchman took me in the street. I was in liquor, he pressed me to go home.

COTTON'S Defence. I had been bottling porter on board a ship; I had the candle on board the ship. I was with Ferguson, I knocked at Jacks's house for a night's lodging, and Ferguson put me over the wall to get in, and they took me.

FERGUSON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

COTTON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-4

366. JOHN DAVIS , MARY LOWE , SAMUEL HILL , and JAMES DAWS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Hembrey , on the King's highway, on the 26th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 6l.;

three seals, value 2l.; one key, value 1s., and 1l., in monies numbered, his property .

WILLIAM HEMBREY. On the 26th of January, I left Holborn about five minutes after eight o'clock in the evening. I went into King-street, Drury-lane, and the moment I got into King-street , three or four men met me, some were behind and some before, they came against me and hustled me down; as I fell one of them struck me a violent blow on my chest; the moment they got me down, they put their hands before my mouth - I could not make any neise. This was about a quarter after eight o'clock, as near as it could be, they held both my arms and feet; I found my watch, ribbon, two seals, and about 20s. in silver, were gone. I felt my watch go from me, and felt a hand in my breeches pocket, where my silver was; they did not hold me down more than a minute and a half; it was just under a lamp. They held my cheek-hones quite tight, but did not close my eyes; I noticed them, and the prisoner, Davis, was the first that caught me by the throat, I observed his dress, it was as it is now; the prisoner, Hill, was holding me while I was being robbed. I saw those two in particular. I am sure Hill is the man, he was dressed in black; there was also a man of the name Fox, who has escaped. I only saw three men. Just as they were taking my watch, one of them called out,"Mary," with a low voice; the prisoner, Lowe came, stooped down, and then ran away with them. I am positive it was her. I did not see Daws. They all ran away but the prisoner, Davis, he kept his knee on my chest, and stopped my mouth. He ran away, and as soon as I could make a noise, I called out that I had lost my property; the watchman was about twenty yards off, he took Daws as he was running from me; some people came out and took me into a house; I was very much hurt with the blows that I had received; the watchman pursued the prisoners, and took three of them, he came from the watch-house, and asked me if I should know them; I was rather better, and described them to him, but I was not well enough to go to look at them. I went home in a coach. I was so ill the next day that I could not go to Marlborough-street. I described the woman to the watchman the next morning, and he took her. I was robbed on Sunday, the 26th, and went to the office on the Monday week after, and saw the four prisoners in custody, I then perfectly recollected the three that I have spoken to. I am sure Hill was one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I had been to the Castle Inn, Holborn, I did not stop there five minutes, and was going home; I live in the Westminster-road. King-street is near the end of Drury-lane. It was about a quarter after eight, I left the Castle five minutes before eight o'clock, it could not be more than that; the Castle is about half a mile from St. Giles's church - I walked by myself all the way. I had not seen either of the prisoners before; it was a tall man, with a great coat on, that made his escape, he must have been six feet high - I described him to the watchman. I did not see the prisoners again till eight days after. Crawley came and told me that the men were apprehended the same night. The officer did not tell me that Hill was dressed in black. Nobody was passing at the time, but on my crying out some people came up.

JOSEPH TRIMBEY . I am a watchman. On the 26th of January, I was going my rounds, I had just called eight o'clock; when Mr. Hembrey was attacked, I was coming back, at about the middle of my beat, which is Cross-lane, one end of which goes into Parker's-street, and the other end into Newton-street, which leads into Holborn: there is a passage in Cross-lane, that comes out of King-street; I saw the prisoner, Daws, and a sailor, running in great haste down the passage, out of King-street, I am not quite sure that it was Daws; there are three steps which come down into Cross-lane, when they came down the steps. I was within two yards of them - I knew Daws before. After they had passed me I heard somebody call out, "I have been robbed, I have lost my watch!" as I was going towards King-street, I turned round, and followed them into the Coach and Horses, in Charles-street; as soon as they went into the house I sprung my rattle, when Crawley and the private watchman came to my assistance; we went into the back parlour and found Daws there-the sailor was not with him; I gave him into Crawley's custody, and went back towards King-street to look for the prosecutor, I found him in a chair in the street, he was very much hurt, and could hardly speak - We took him into a shop; I asked him, if he should know either of them, and if one was a sailor? he described the sailor to me as being dressed in a sailor's blue jacket and trowsers; he only described one of them to me them. About an hour afterwards we took Davis from the same house (the Coach and Horses). I secured him in the watch-house, and went back to the prosecutor, he had a surgeon with him, and was sent home in a coach. I went to his house the next day, he was not able to attend, and the prisoners were detained. I took Lowe the next day.

Cross-examined. He told me it was a tall man that had escaped, with a dark coat.

Prisoner DAVIS, Q. Was I not in the parlour when you took Daws - A. He was not.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman; I heard the rattle spring, and was with Trimbey when he took Daws, nobody else was in the room; we went to the prosecutor the next morning, and he described Lowe to us, from his description I went to her lodging - She was not at home, we found her and took her; I had taken Daws on the Sunday night, about eight o'clock. As we were taking him to the watch-house, the prisoner, Hill, crossed me several times, I told him to keep off-there were several people following me to the watch-house, he would not keep from me; when I had secured Daws in the watchhouse, I went out and secured Hill, and took him in - He was pushing against me, and wanted to rescue Daws. I asked him if he knew any thing of Daws, he said, no; but when Furzeman searched him, he said he did know him, and had known him a long time, and that Daws had worked for his father. We went back to the prosecutor, he described Davis to us, and we went to the Coach and Horses and took him.

Cross-examined. It might then be near nine o'clock.

WILLIAM READING. I am a watchman. About half-past eight o'clock on Sunday evening, the 26th January, the rattle sprung. I went up and found Trimbey at the door of the Coach and Horses. He sent me to the back of the house to prevent any body from escaping. They

brought Davis out. Crawley took him to the watchhouse. As we were going along, we were pressed several times by Hill. I am sure it was him. I spoke to him several times, and pushed him off the curb to prevent his pressing us. I told him to keep clear off, he had no business with our prisoner. He muttered and grumbled, and went down the Coal-yard. When we got to the watchhouse, Crawley came out and took him. At first, he said, he did not know Daws, and then he said he did. Trimbey returned, and we all went to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. It was St. Giles watch-house. I first saw Hill following us in Drury-lane, we had Daws in custody there, he was between us. Hill pressed me a great deal. He came by the side of us, and between us. I told him to keep away. It was about half-past eight o'clock. I did not hear him say any thing.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am the watch-house keeper. On the 26th of January, Crawley brought Davis in about twenty minutes before nine o'clock. Hill was brought in about three minutes after.

JOHN THOMAS GEARING. I am a constable. The prisoners, Hill and Daws, were brought to the watch-house before I got there. Davis was brought in about half-past ten o'clock, and the next day Lowe was taken.

RICHARD JENKINS . I am a bricklayer, and work for Mr. Stubbs, in Camden Town. I live with my father in Kentish Town. I have known the prisoner, Hill, four years, he lives with his father in Kentish Town. I was in his company on Sunday, the 26th of January. I met him at the King's Arms, in Kentish Town, about four o'clock in the afternoon, nobody was with him, we remained there till near seven o'clock - We were quite sober when we left. We went to the Three Brewers, in Moor-street, at the bottom of Crown-street, which leads in a line from Oxford-road to Seven Dials. We got there about twenty-five minutes before eight o'clock, we stopped there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, we did not meet any body there. From there we went to James-street, Covent-Garden, to a public-house at the corner of the Piazza, and waited there about half an hour, we came out at half-past eight o'clock, and parted. The watchman was calling half-past eight o'clock as we came out, and the public-house clock was half-past eight. Before we parted, we agreed to meet at the top of Monmouth-street, Tottenham-court-road end, to go home together, he said, he would meet me there in a short time. We only came to town for a walk. I went there and stopped an hour, he did not come. The next morning I heard he was taken up.

DAVIS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

LOWE - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

HILL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

DAWS- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18170219-5

367. THOMAS WILCOX and WILLIAM HAINES , were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one barrel, value 1s. 6d., and 224 lbs. of salt fish, value 2l. 10s. , the property of Nathaniel Saunders .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a waterman. I was standing at the bottom of Darkhouse-lane, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning of the 7th of February. I saw three young men come down the lane. I was standing at the King's Head, at the bottom of the lane. I saw the two prisoners and another man. The barrel stood upon its head, the other man threw it down and tried to roll it away, he could not; but the prisoner, Haines, rolled it away from Darkhouse-lane to Botolph Wharf, I there lost sight of the barrel and the three men. I went round Billings gate to look for Smith, who had the barrel in his charge, he went to look after the men and took them. I am suret he two prisoners are two of them. Willcox was with them when they rolled it away.

Prisoner HAINES. Q. Did you see me on the quay at the time it was done - A. I am sure I saw him roll it away.

ARTHUR RANDALL . I am a waterman. I was at Billingsgate plying-place . My back was toward the prisoners at the time it was taken. The last witness said, it was stolen - I missed it immediately. Mr. Smith went over London-bridge and I remained in Thamas-street. I saw the man who escaped and the prisoner, Wilcox, with it, at the foot of the bridge, I stopped to watch them till Smith returned, he secured Wilcox, and I took care of the barrel; the other man ran away. The prisoner, Haines, was coming down Fish-street-hill, I attempted to stop him, he said, if I did not let him go, he would cut my bl-dy head off, and put himself in a posture of defence. I afterwards took him, with the help of others.

HENRY NEWMAN . I am porter to Mr. Ward, of Thames-street. As I was coming from my breakfast, I saw the prisoner, Haines, rolling the barrel, he rolled it to the top of Thames-street and put it under one of the town carts, and left it there, and went across. Wilcox and another man came and took it up, and put it on the curb. I followed Haines up Fish-street - hill. We then both took him, he wanted to fight Randall. I am sure he is the man that I saw with the barrel.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a ticket-porter. On the 7th of February, as I was coming down Darkhouse-lane, Walker told me one of the barrels was taken. I ran up the gateway and over London-bridge to Tooley-street. I returned and could not see the barrel in any of the carts as I passed, when I came to the bottom of the bridge at the archway of the church, I saw it against the post, the two prisoners were standing within three yards of it; when Haines saw me he ran away. I seized Wilcox, he said, he knew nothing of the transaction, that he was only standing there for a cart, as his father was gone to Billingsgate. I told him I should detain him. I slackened my hand from his collar, and he ran as far as Fishmonger's-hall - He was secured again.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am an officer of Bridge Ward. At a little before ten o'clock, I was coming over London-bridge, and saw the cask standing by the church. I was told it was stolen and took Haines into custody. I took both the prisoners. I am sure they are the men.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Wilcox's Defence. I was looking for my father's cart.

WILCOX - GUILTY . Aged 19.

HAINES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-6

368. JOSEPH HEMPSTEAD and JOSEPH HUDSON , were indicted for stealing on the 18th of January , twenty-seven penknives, value 6l. 10s., the property of Joseph Nowill and Joseph Burch , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Burch .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said Joseph Nowill and Joseph Burch .

JOSEPH NOWILL . I am the partner of Joseph Burch , we are wholesale stationers , living in Jewry-street , in the parish of St. Catherine's Cree-church. My partner, Burch, resides in the house. The two prisoners were in our employ as porter s. They did not live in the house. On the 18th of January last, as they were going home, I stopped them, Brown and Martin were with me, they were in the house, it was eight o'clock in the evening, which is the time they generally leave, we found twenty-five pen and sportsman's knives on Hempstead, and two sport-man's knives on Hudson, they said they were our property; they are worth 6l. 10s. Those found on Hempstead are worth 6l.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. I have been in partnership with Burch ever since the 20th of July, before that I was in partnership with Whitrow, that was regularly dissolved; the knives were entered into the new partnership account, they were my property before, and never belonged to Whitrow; they were not mixed with the partnership property. They have been entered into the account with Burch as our joint property. The prisoners were in the same room together. I will not swear they were not taken at different times. The prisoners had been home that day, the property was found on them at one time. The two knives found on Hudson, were taken from the same room, but not from the same parcel. After the property was found on them, they both said they were our property.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I went to Nowill's house, on the 18th of January, to search the porters, as they came out of the warehouse. I found twenty-five knives on Hempstead.

JOHN MARTIN. I am an officer. On the 18th of January. Mr. Burch fetched us, and called the prisoners into the counting-house. I told them their master had been robbed, and I supposed they would not object to being searched. I searched Hudson and found two knives on him. (Property produced and sworn to.)

HEMPSTEAD. - GUILTY. Of Stealing to the value 6l.

Judgment Respited .

HUDSON. - GUILTY. Of Stealing to the value of 10s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-7

369. JOSEPH HUDSON , was again indicted for that he, on the 18th of January , feloniously did steal and take twelve packs of playing cards, value 2l. 5s.; twenty books of leaf gold, value 1l. 10s.; eleven pencils, value 9s.; one piece of India rubber, value 2s.; seventy-nine knives, value 5l.; four prayer-books, value 1l. 10s.; one umbrella, value 5s.; fourteen bound books, value 15s.; nine brushes, value 3s.; four leather cases, value 16s.; two silver tooth pick cases, value 2s.; two pair of tweezers, value 1s.; one magic lantern, value 5s.; one box of dominoes, value 3s.; one fire-box, value 2s. 6d.; one almanack, value 1s. 9d.; two memorandum books, value 3s.; two pamphlets, value 1s. 6d.; one ink pot, value 1s.; one pair of dividers, value 1s.; one purse, value 2s.; one box, value 1s.; one magnetic table, value, 5s.; one silver pen, value 4s.; six quires of paper, value 3s.; and two pounds in monies numbered; of the goods and monies of Joseph Nowill and Joseph Burch , and sixty-seven 1l. bank-notes; the said bank-notes at the time of committing the felony aforesaid, being the property of the said Joseph Nowill and Joseph Burch, and the said several sums of money payable and secured, and upon the said bank-notes being then, to wit, at the time of committing the felony aforesaid, due and unsatisfied to the said Joseph Nowill and Joseph Burch, the proprietors thereof, against the statute .

JOSEPH NOWILL . I also lost the articles started in this indictment, and gave Brown direction to search the prisoner's lodging. We had frequently lost bank-notes and silver.

Cross-examined. I had three porters, none of them had the keys of the till. Four of my servants, had keys of the till. Kirkman had the care of the till. He told me we had lost the money. We deal in the articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I searched the prisoners apartments in Newman's-place, Bishopsgate-street, and found the property. Burch and Nowill sent me there. I found 67l. in 1l. notes and 2l. 17s. 6d. in silver.

JOSEPH NOWILL . I and Burch gave the officer directions to go there.

DAVID POOLE . I am an attorney. On the night that the prisoner was apprehended, I was sent for. The prisoner was brought into the counting-house, and asked were he lodged, he said were he lodged, and according to that direction, we sent and searched the prisoner's lodgings.

Cross-examined. I do not remember where he said he lodged, it was in some court in Bishopsgate-street. He did not mention the number.

Court. When the things were produced before the magistrate, what did the prisoner say - A. The officer said, where he found the property-he made no reply.

JOHN BROWN. I found the things at the place where I was sent to. I received directions in the counting-house to go there. I produced the property before the magistrate, and said, I found it in the prisoner's apartments - He said nothing. (I produce the property.) I found the notes altogether in a bundle, in the bureau.

JOSEPH NOWILL . I can identify four of the notes, they have my private mark on them.

Cross-examined. I do not know whether they have been paid to my customers, or not.

GEORGE KIRKMAN . I am in the employ of Messrs.

Nowill and Burch. I kept their cash accounts. I had often missed money, sometimes silver and sometimes above 1l.

Cross-examined. I do not keep their books now, I left that branch in January. I always mentioned it when I missed the money.

Court. Q. Do you know the notes - A. I can identify four of the notes to have been my master's property. I was present when the prisoner said that the notes belonged to his sister, I told him they could not belong to her; he said, he found the whole 67l. and the silver, in a bag.

Cross-examined. I have seen the prisoner in Newgate. I went to him to know where he found the notes.

Q. Did you not say, he had better say they were your master's property, or they would become the property of the sheriff - A. I said, if he expected mercy, he must tell the truth.

Q. Will you swear, you did not say, they would belong to the sheriff - A. I told him they must be our property, and he had better acknowledge it.

GUILTY . - Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-8

370. MARY DICKINSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one pound of candles, value 9d.; one pound of powder-blue, value 2s.; two glasses, value 2s.; one pound of soap, value 9d.; and two cloths, value 6d. , the property of Thomas Sharp .

THOMAS SHARP. I am an indigo blue maker , and live in Newgate-street . The prisoner was my servant . She had lived five or six weeks with me. She has lived with me twice. I suspected her and had her watched.

MARTHA FOSTER . I am servant to Mrs. Reid, sextoness of Christ Church, Newgate-street. Last Tuesday week, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Sharp's kitchen window, and give a bundle to a man who was standing in Christ Church-passsage - He took it away.

HENRY HONEY . I am an officer. I was set to watch, and stopped a man the name of Dickinson, and took the bundle from him, which contained the articles staled in the indictment.

MARTHA FOSTER . It was a tall man. I saw the man who was taken, and I am sure it was the man to whom she gave the bundle.

HENRY HONEY . I shewed the prisoner the bundle, she said, she took it to serve a man who was out of work. She said he was her husband.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Three Months , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-9

371. JOSEPH FOLLIT and THOMAS WILLIAM PENTON , were indicted for having in their possession, a forged Bank of England note, knowing it to be forged

To which indictment both the prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen. Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-10

372. JOSEPH FOLLIT and THOMAS WILLIAM PENTON , were indicted for forgery .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-11

373. THOMAS HENDERSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one waistcoat, value 2s.; two pair of trowsers, value 10s.; one jacket, value 2s.; one pair of shoes, value 1s.; one handkerchief, value 6d.; and one pair of boots, value 4s. , the property of John Laarss .

JOHN LAARSS . I am the mate of a Prussian vessel. Our ship was at Limehouse, in the London Docks . On the 1st of February, between twelve and one o'clock at night, our captain gave the alarm. I got up, and took the prisoner on our deck. He had my waistcoat and boots on, the other things were laying close to him; the prisoner did not belong to the ship.

JOHN HEMING . I am a watchman, at Limehouse. The captain fetched me on board about half-past one o'clock. I took the prisoner in charge. The officer took the waistcoat off his back at the watch-house.

JOHN WILSON . I am a constable. The prisoner and property, were brought to the watch-house about two o'clock in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-12

374. CHARLES SMITH , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas North , about two in the afternoon of the 23d of January ,(the said Thomas North and others of his family in the same dwelling-house then being), and stealing therein, one watch, value 5l., and one seal, value 1l., his property .

THOMAS NORTH . I am a watch-maker , residing in St. Ann's, Westminster . On the 23d of January last, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my back parlour talking to a gentleman, with my wife, my two servants were in the back workshop. Hearing the sound of glass breaking, I went into my front shop and saw the window was broken, and a vacancy between my watches. I went out, and heard the cry of stop thief! and seeing people running, I followed and saw the prisoner running. Mr. Hall took him before I came up to him. I missed a watch, which was safe a short time before.

THOMAS HALL . I live opposite Mr. North. On the 23d of January, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming down, nearly opposite Mr. North's, and saw the prisoner looking at his window, where the watches hung, in a stooping position. I am sure he is the man. I looked a second time and saw him raise his hand, I them saw him strike it into the window and catch at something, he missed the first catch; I then saw him make a second attempt and run off. I did not see him take it. I was within fifteen yards of him. I pursued him for about three or four hundred yards, and took him. I lost sight of him as he turned the corner. I saw him again in a minute, he appeared to be stopping for want of breath. I did not see any thing in his hand, nor did I see him throw any thing away. I am sure he is the boy that I saw make a snatch at the window and run off. I have not the least doubt of it. A person told me that the watch was thrown over a wall.

JOHN ATKINSON . I was coming along about half-past two o'clock on the 23d of January. I had a parcel on my shoulder. I saw the prisoner put up his hand and

knock it into Mr. North's window. I was the first that gave the alarm. I am sure it was the prisoner. I pursued, and saw Mr. Hall take him. As I was pursuing him, I saw him make a stop by the wall, at the corner of Grafton-street.

ROBERT HILL . I was in my house looking at some hay, a person knocked at my gates which are in Grafton-street. There is a wall sixteen feet high before my house. My man, who was taking some hay near the gate, told me that a watch was thrown over - I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running with the mob.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18170219-13

375. JOHN OLSOZ , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , in the dwelling-house of Ann Cuthell , one pocket-book, value 1s.; one handkerchief, value 2s.; four bank-tokens, value 12s.; one shilling, and eleven 1l. bank-notes, the goods, monies, and property of Edward M'Ginnis

EDWARD M'GINNIS . I am a sailor . On the 7th of February, I lodged with Ann Cuthell , in Star-court, East Smithfield . About three weeks before that time, I changed a 10l. bank-note and received ten 1l. bank-notes for it. I kept them in my pocket-book, with three other 1l. notes, that I had before. On the 7th of February, I had eleven 1l. notes in my pocket-book, which I kept at the bottom of my chest, in my bed-room-it was locked. A little after nine o'clock in the morning, I went out. I had taken 1s. 6d. out of my pocket-book that morning, and saw my notes safe then. I put my book at the bottom of my chest, and locked it. There was also a pension ticket in the book, some papers, four 3s. tokens, and 1s. I did not return till half-past nine o'clock at night. The prisoner lodged in the same room with me. He did not sleep in the same bed. He knew I had the money. He went down stairs before I went to my box in the morning. When I came home, I found the lid of my chest had been forced from the asp of the lock, it was still locked, but the lid broken from it. My pocket-book, with its contents were gone, and a black silk handkerchief. I went out to look for the prisoner, but could not find him. I returned home, and found him there, and asked him if he knew any thing about it; he said, he did not. I had him taken to the watch-house, where he was kept all night. I went there at six o'clock in the morning, they told me he was gone. I found him at a coffee-stall. I was on the opposite side of the way, and saw him give the woman who kept the stall, a shilling. I kept on the other side of the way, she scrupled to take it, and gave it to her little girl to go over the way for change. As the girl came over the road, I asked her to let me look at it, which she did, and I knew it to be the same shilling that was taken out of my box, by a large T on one side, and a stroke on the other side, which I observed when I took it. It had been it refused because it was French. I saw the woman give it to the girl, and heard what she said. I gave it to the girl again, and told her, to take it to her mother, and tell her not to part with it, and I would speak to her as soon as the prisoner was gone. I saw her put the shilling on the table, and her mother take it up. I went over and told her not to part with it. I followed the prisoner into the Star public-house, in Well-street-he did not see me. I heard him ask the potboy, how long it would be, before his master got up, when the master got up, the prisoner was in the tap-room, but did not know that I was in the house. I got an officer and had him searched, the landlord handed out three notes from the bar, and a black silk handkerchief. I can swear to one of the notes.

ANN CUTHELL . I am a widow. The prosecutor and prisoner both lodged in my house, which is in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate. There were two more men who lodged in the same room. The prisoner went out about twenty minutes before M'Ginnis, he returned between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, and staid in the lower part of the house till between one and two o'clock. He then went up stairs, and staid there not quite a quarter of an hour. I asked him what he went up stairs for, he said, to mend his shoes. He came down and went out. Nobody was up stairs, from the time that M'Ginnis went out till he returned, but the prisoner. They lived in the one pair of stairs room. I heard no noise. The prisoner returned again, about ten o'clock at night. I had seen M'Ginnis with money. He once gave me his pocket-book to take care of. His money was all in 1l. notes.

MARGARET WILLIAMSON . I keep a coffee stall opposite Wapping watch-house, in Dock-street, East Smithfield. The prisoner came to my stall, on the 8th of February, in the morning, and had some coffee. I am sure it was the prisoner. He gave a shilling, I did not like it, and gave it to my little girl to get it changed. I observed M' Ginnis. The girl came back, and told me not to part with it. She had not got above ten yards before she came back. She gave me the shilling directly into my hand. I am sure it was the same shilling I had given her. There was a T on it, which I had observed, it was marked round the edge. The man came and told me not to part with it. I kept it separate from my other money, and I am sure, I gave the same shilling to the officer.

JOHN MYERS . I keep the Star public-house, in Well-street. On Friday evening, the 7th of February, about five o'clock, the prisoner came to my house and had some gin, he gave me three 1l. bank-notes to take care of for him till the morning, saying, that he was going into bad company, and was afraid he should lose them. I put them in a drawer by themselves, and locked the drawer and took the key. When I came down the next morning, my boy told me, in the prisoner's presence, that a person had been robbed, and was gone for an officer, and that I was not to deliver the money till he came back. The prisoner said. I was to give him the money, and if the officer wanted it he would give it to him. I told him that I must keep it till he came. The officer came directly and I gave him the same notes that the prisoner delivered to me the night before. I did not know the prisoner before.

JAMES STIRLING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. Myers gave me the three 1l. notes and a bundle, a pair of boots were delivered to me, and a silk handkerchief; the bad shilling was given to me at the examination (I produce them).

EDWARD M'GINNIS . I can swear to one of the notes, I

wrote "30th of March, 1816," on it, I am certain I did not part with it; I saw it the morning that it was taken, it was the outside note of the roll. The shilling is also mine, and I had a handkerchief like the one produced; I believe it to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with another man who took the money, and gave me 5l. 4s. to say nothing about it, this is the truth.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged. 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-14

376. PETER DENTON , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one coat, value 7s.; one waistcoat, value 1s.; two pair of breeches, value 7s.; four shirts, value 2l.; one handkerchief, value 6d.; three pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d.; one pillow, value 2s.; one counterpane, value 3s.; one bank token, value 3s.; and one guinea. the property of Thomas Janes , in the dwelling-house of Archibald Ellis .

THOMAS JANES . I am a journey man carpenter ; I lodged with Ann Ellis , the prisoner lodged and slept in the same bed with me. On the 15th of January I missed a guinea out of my box, I charged the prisoner with taking it, he denied it, and left the house; I gave information at Hatton-garden, I afterwards went to his lodgings, in Ann's-street, Pentonville, with Wood, we found him in the two pair of stairs room, and the articles stated in the indictment were in the room; he said he had bought them over the way. I knew them to be mine.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. On the 15th of January last, I went to the prisoner's lodging, and found the articles stated in the indictment - He said, he had bought them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the stockings in July.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined Six Months , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-15

377. WILLIAM BEESON , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Shepherd , two handkerchiefs, value 7s.; one hat, value 8s.; one pair of shoes, value 2s.; one coat, value 15s.; one purse, value 2s.; 18s. in monies numbered, and four 1l. bank notes, the monies and property of James Tarbuck .

SARAH SHEPHERD . I am the wife of Samuel Shepherd , who lives in the parish of Edmonton , and keeps the Cherry Tree public-house . On the 26th of January last, the prisoner came to our house soon after nine o'clock in the evening, and asked for a night's lodging, we told him he might have a bed; he went out for a short time, and returned again, and staid in the house; at eleven o'clock my servant shewed him up to bed. Sometime after he had been up stairs my daughter gave the alarm, and called for a light, the maid took up the candle, and I saw the prisoner come down stairs directly. I was in the bar, it was about a quarter of an hour after he had gone up. I took up my candle and followed him, he made towards the door, Pugh, the hostler, came up to him, and told him he had got a great coat on that belonged to a gentleman's servant, Pugh pulled it off. The prisoner was secured. I had no knowledge of him before.

EDWARD PUGH . I am hostler to Mr. Shepherd; the prisoner came to my master's house on the 26th of January, a little after eleven o'clock, I saw him go out of the kitchen, I remained in the kitchen; I heard the alarm, and my mistress called to me to stop him, for he had got the coachman's coat on; it was John Grapes 's coat, which had been left under my care; I stopped the prisoner in the passage, and asked him where he was going, he said he was unwell, and was going out; I told him he had got the coachman's coat on, and I pulled it off, I think it is worth 5l.; I had put it with my master's coats-it was in my master's care. When I pulled the coat off, I saw he had got another coat on, that belonged to Mr. Tarbuck, who was gone to bed in our house. Mr. Mand came down and assisted me. On taking the prisoner into the kitchen, we took Tarbuck's coat off; we also took off a hat and a pair of shoes, which were Tarbuck's. I then fetched Dean, the constable, who found a purse, containing four 1l. bank notes, and a quantity of silver on him; there were two handkerchiefs and other things, found upon him, that belonged to Tarbuck.

SAMUEL MAUD . I assisted Pugh in taking the things off the prisoner; he has spoken correctly.

JAMES TARBUCK . I lodge at Mr. Shepherd's; I went to bed at ten o'clock that night. I had a purse, containing four 1l. notes, one shilling, which was French, and, I believe, four sixpences, in my breeches pocket. I am not certain whether there were three or four sixpences. I had fourteen or fifteen shillings in my other pocket. I put my breeches close to my bed side; I always burn a light in my room; I did not hear any body come in or go out. - I awoke and found my candle was out; a few minutes after, I heard somebody go by my door, and called that my candle was out, the maid came in and lit it, and went out directly; the landlady came up soon after, and told me there was a thief in the house, and that he had got my purse and money.

JOHN DEAN . I am a constable. On the 26th January, I was called in and took charge of the prisoner; the clothes were taken off before I came.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the money out of his pocket. They have not left me much room to plead innocence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 45.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18170219-16

378. HENRY HAINES and WILLIAM HALL , were indicted for feloniously assaulting, James M'Donald in the King's highway, on the 25th January , and putting him in fear and taking from his person, and against his will, forty yards of linen, value 45s.; two pieces of stuff, value 5s., and 2l. 5s. 6d., his property .

JAMES M'DONALD . I am a hawker . On Friday night, the 25th of January, I was at Hammersmith , between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was going to Hampshire, and went into the Chaise and Horse public-house , to enquire for the waggon; when I came out of the house, Haines collared me on the left hand, and Hall on the right. Haines said, he was head constable, and Hall said, he was a con

stable, and that they would take me to the watch-house; they dragged me through Hammersmith; I told them that I had a licence, and if they would come to the light, I would shew it to them; they took me into a dark lane. I said, I would give them all the money I had got if they would let me go; they said they would not till they got to the watch-house. Haines asked me if I was ever on board a ship, I said, yes; he took two pieces of black stuff from me; when they came to a house in the lane, they hallooed out, and a man let them in-Hall beat me in his presence. The woman went for a constable. I had two pieces of Irish which they took from me. I produced my licence, and wanted to go out for a constable; I got out, and met the constable, he asked me if I had not been robbed, I told him I had. I was in great alarm. I might have dropped my money. I am sure the prisoners are the men; I went back with the constable. The master of the house said he would fetch him. I believe the door was open; they did not attempt to hinder me from going out. Hall stopped in the house. The constable took them.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. It was in the high road. I told them that I had a licence; I was quite sober; I asked the women to give me a bottle, and I would get some liquor, in order to get away. Hall said he would be five-pence towards some gin, and the prisoner Haines, went with me to look for the constable; we found Hall still within the house. The woman of the house is not here, because she is in labour. I did not know that it was necessary to bring her husband.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable. I met the man about two hundred yards from the house; the master of the house was with him. I had seen the two prisoners in the night-house in the evening; the landlord sent me to the house, I found the door open, and the prisoners and the patrol, there-M'Donald gave them in charge; he said they had called themselves constables, I asked them for their protection, they said they had not got any. I took them into custody, Hall appeared rather intoxicated. The landlord of the house is a gardener, the prisoners lodged with him.

THOMAS JAMES . I am patrol of Hammersmith; the watchman told me of the robbery, I went up the lane and met the prisoner, Haines, and M'Donald, M'Donald said he had been robbed at a cottage in the lane. I went into the house, Hall was by the fire, the property was on the table, Haines followed us in; I detained the prisoners till the constable came. I did not meet any body in the lane but Haines and the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-17

379. WILLIAMS EVANS , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one pair of shoes, value 9s. the property of Charles Goulding , privately in his shop .

CHARLES GOULDING . I live in Tothill-street, Westminster . On the 29th of January, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another man, came into my shop, and asked for a pair of shoes; the prisoner stood by the counter while the other man took me to the window to look at some shoes, I turned round and saw the prisoner, who appeared as if he was secreting something under his coat; I suspected all was not right, and called for a light, as an excuse to get somebody into the; the prisoner made towards the door to go out, I pushed it to, he opened it, and said something to his companion, who was trying on the shoes, my son came with a light, and the prisoner rushed into the street, I seized him, and told him he had some of my property, I pulled his coat back, and found the shoes under it, and I threw them into the shop; he set off again, I pursued him about forty yards, and took him; my son came up and helped me. I am sure he is the man.

EDWARD GOULDING . I am the son of Charles Goulding , my father has spoken correctly. I saw the shoes under the prisoner's coat. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Of Stealing only.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-18

380. ANN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Ware , about four in the afternoon of the 13th February , Martha the wife of the said Thomas Ware , being therein, and stealing therein, one tool called a quand, value 2l.; one other tool, called a fore-tooth, value 4s.; one saw, value 2s., and one bag, value 6d. his property .

MARTHA WARE . I am the wife of Thomas Ware , we live in French-alley, Goswell-street , St. Lukes; my husband is a hartshorn shaver . On the afternoon of the 13th of February, about four o'clock, as I was coming down stairs I saw the prisoner come out of the room where the tools were, I asked her what she wanted, she said she had been sent to do half a day's work by a person down the alley - She had something in her left hand, under her apron; after she was gone I missed the articles stated in the indictment directly, I had seen them safe half an hour before. I followed her, and asked her what she had taken out of the room that she had just come out of, she said, she had taken nothing. I found the tools under her apron, and brought her back.

THOMAS WARE. I am the husband of the last witness. My wife gave me the tools, and I gave them to the patrol. They are worth more than 3l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The room appeared to be empty;

I saw the iron things among some shavings.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 50.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-19

381. THOMAS HOPKINS and RICHARD WILTSHIRE , were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one great coat, value 10s. , the property of Samuel Bell .

SAMUEL BELL . I live in Gough-square . On the 20th of January my coat hung up in the passage, the prisoner, Hopkins, came to the door with a note, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I opened the door to him, he gave me the note, and said it came from Mrs. Brown, Stanhope-street; I left the passage with the door open; I went into the parlour, and gave my father the note, and came out

directly, and found he was gone and my great coat also. I am sure it was there when he came to the door. I ran into the square, and saw him running down Harp-alley, I laid hold of him, but he had not got the coat; a few minutes after the prisoner, Wiltshire, was taken. I am sure, Hopkins is the man, the letter was directed to my father, and soliciting charity, signed Mary Brown ; we did not know any such person.

WILLIAM MATTINGLY . I live in Brick-lane. On the 20th of January, I was going by Wine-Office-court, which is close to Mr. Bell's house, I heard the alarm, I saw the prisoner, Wiltshire, pass me and drop the coat; I pursued him, and took him in a gateway in the court, within six yards from where he dropped the coat, he was secreted in one of the gardens-as soon as he saw me he began to run towards Fleet-street, I pursued him down Waterlane and took him. I told him I had got the property that he had dropped. He said he was no thief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOPKINS - GUILTY . Aged. 18.

WILTSHIRE - GUILTY . Aged. 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-20

382. JOSEPH GEE , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 46lbs of beef, value 16s. , the property of William Lintott .

GEORGE SIMMONDS . I live opposite Mr. Lintott, in Leadenhall-market , the beef was on the bench, and I saw the prisoner take it off, I pursued him and took him; he dropped the beef, it weighed 46lbs. I asked him how he came to take it, he said he never touched it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Whipped, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-21

383. GEORGE LOCK , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 37lbs. of mutton, value 37s. the property of Henry Stokes .

ROBERT BLACKFORD . I am servant to Mr. Stokes, salesman , Newgate-market . On the 27th of January, about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, the watchman brought the prisoner and mutton into the shop, we had missed it a few minutes before, I knew it to be my master's, by the score; it is worth 1l. 17s.

JAMES WINTER . I am a watchman, my beat is in Warwick-lane. About a quarter after six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Bell-yard, with the mutton on his shoulder, I followed him towards Newgate-market, thinking he might be a porter; he passed the market, I asked him where he was going, he said, to Fleet-market, but did not know to whom he was going to take it; he said he got it from Mr. Stokes, and was to have half-a-crown to take it to Fleet-market. I took him to Mr. Stokes, when he got there, he put it on the same hook from which, he said, he had taken it, and wanted to go away, Mr. Stokes said he had not employed him. I secured him.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, when he said he had stolen the mutton.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the mutton to carry to Fleet-market.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months , and Publicly Whipped in Newgate-market .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-22

384. JOHN NEWTON , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one handkerchief, value 2s., the property of Francis Brabazon Wallace , from his person .

FRANCIS BRABAZON WALLACE. I live in Bath-place, New-road. On the 7th of February, about ten o'clock in the day, I was in Cornhill , stopping to look at a horse that had fell down, I felt something at my pocket, and turned round, and found the prisoner putting my handkerchief in his bosom; I said, ah! he dropped it, and ran off; I picked it up and pursued him, an alarm was given, and he was taken before he got out of my sight. I am sure the prisoner is the man that I saw with my handkerchief, when I first turned round.

JOHN FULLBROOK . I took the prisoner into custody, and found a piece of wire in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-23

385. MARY ANN PEARSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th January , one frock, value 1s.; three stockings, value 1s.; one pair of scissars, value 3d., and one purse, value 6d. , the property of Lewis Israel .

SARAH ISRAEL . I am the wife of Lewis Israel , who is a butcher , and resides in Duke-street . The prisoner had lived servant with me for sixteen months. On the 28th of January, when we came down in the morning, we found the door open and the prisoner gone.

BENJAMIN HARRIS . I am a watchman. On the 28th of January, about six o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner, with a bundle, in Dorset-street, Spitalfields. I stopped her, and asked her, what she had got in the bundle, she said, clothes, and that she was going to Rose-lane, I told her that was the wrong way. I opened the bundle, and found it contained the articles stated in the indictment. She said they were her own property, and that she had left service, and her master had stopped her box; she run from me, and fell down. I took her. She then said, she lived with Mrs. Israel. Mrs. Israel claimed the things, the prisoner did not deny it. There were other things in the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-24

386. MARY ANN PEARSON , was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , six sheets, value 34s.; one counterpane, value 12s.; one pair of breeches, value 2s.; and one pair of shoes, value 5s. , the property of Lewis Israel .

SARAH ISRAEL . The day before the prisoner absconded, I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN CREED DEXTER . I am servant to Mr. Dexter,

pawnbroker, Whitechapel. I have six sheets, and one counterpane, pledged with me on the 16th of January, and three sheets, and one pair of breeches, on the 17th of January, they were all pledged by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-25

387. ANN JACKSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , two gowns, value 16s. , the property of Mary Haskwell .

MARY HASKWELL. I live in St. Bartholomew's-Hospital . The prisoner was assistant nurse to me. I lost the gowns out of the room where the prisoner used to wait on me, they were safe on the 19th of December; I missed them a fortnight after.

WILLIAM WILLIAMSON . I am servant to Mr. Blackburn, pawnbroker, Saffron-hill. I took the gown in pledge, on the 24th of December, from a woman. I do not know whom. (Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury. before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-26

388. JAMES BAKER , was indicted for stealing, on the the 27th of January , 2lbs. of mutton, value 1s. , the property of Susanna Starkey .

SARAH FURLIGER . I live opposite Mrs. Starkey, in Little Britain . Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take the mutton from the block. I gave the alarm - He was taken. I lost sight of him, but I am sure he is the boy.

BENJAMIN NORTH. I am servant to Mrs. Starkey. I overtook the prisoner just by Bartholomew-close, he had not got the meat. When I brought him back, he said, he had taken it, and given it to a coachman.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-27

389. JOHN ABRAHAMS , was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , ten pieces of ribbon, containing 210 yards, value 5l., the property of John Herbert , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES WHITTEM . I am servant to Mr. Herbert, ribbon manufacturer , Wood-street, Cheapside , in the parish of St. Matthew. The prisoner came to our warehouse, about one o'clock in the afternoon, and told me he wanted about 70l. worth of ribbon; and asked me, to show him a sample, which I did on the counter, and told him the prices. I said, that I had better give him a written list of them. I went to the desk to write it. During this time, he walked about near the counter where the goods lay. I gave him the list; he asked me, if we had got any figured satin ribbon. I went to another part of the warehouse to get them, and he went with me. I pulled open the drawer and shewed them to him, he asked me to look out some to the best of my judgment, as he wanted them for shipping and the colours must stand, as he had shipped some before, and they had flown. I observed him put his right hand into his breeches pocket more than once, and saw some ribbon in his hand at the time. He still continued talking about ribbons. After he had put his hand into his pocket several times, he said, he was in a hurry, and would thank me to let him out, and he would call again in a short time - He went out. Before I saw him in the warehouse, I had taken an inventory of the goods on the counter, the warehouse was on the first floor. I followed him down stairs immediately, he run down as fast as he could. When I caught sight of him in the street, he was still running. He had turned into Shovel-court, a little below our house, which was no thoroughfare, and I secured him just at the end of the court, and told him, I suspected that he had property which did not belong to him; he made no answer. I took him into the King's Head public-house, and gave him in custody to Fullbrook, who was there, and searched him in my presence, and found ten pieces of ribbon on him; the whole of them where Mr. Herbert's property, and part of those that I had been shewing him.

GEORGE HERBERT . I am the son of John Herbert. I saw the prisoner in my father's warehouse, the same day that he was taken, in the morning. I saw him there again at one o'clock as I went out.

JOHN FULLBROOK . I was in the King's Head public-house. Whittem gave the prisoner in charge, and desired me to search him, and I found ten pieces of ribbon on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-28

390. JOSEPH ANDERSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , sixty-five yards of cotton, value 5l. , the goods of William Bennett .

JOSEPH SUTCLIFFE . I am shopman to William Bennett, linen-draper , Piccadilly . On the 30th of January, at nine o'clock in the morning, the cotton was on the steps outside the door. I was piling the things at the door, a lady came into the shop. I was going to the counter, and heard the cry of stop thief! I ran out, and saw the cotton on the ground, and the prisoner in custody.

ROBERT HAWKES . I am shopman to Mr. Taylor, who lives next door to Mr. Bennett. About nine o'clock in the morning of the 30th of January, I went to the door, and saw the prisoner, and another boy, looking in Mr. Bennett's window. I watched them. They saw me and went to the next corner, and looked in at the window a little while; they then went back to Mr. Bennett's. The prisoner and another went up to the pile, the prisoner held his coat to conceal them, and the other boy took three pieces of print and gave them to the prisoner; both run off. I pursued the prisoner; he dropped them, and I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-29

391. THOMAS FINCH , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , four towels, value 4s; five handkerchiefs, value 3s.; and two pillow-cases, value 2s , the property of William Reece .

ANN REECE . I am a laundress , and live at Edmonton . On the 5th of February, my things hung on a hedge in a field, adjoining my cottage. I went into the field and saw the prisoner taking the things off the hedge. I told him to put them down, and he run away with them. I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

ANN ANDREW . I heard the cry of stop thief! and saw the prisoner running past my house; I took hold of him, and asked him what he had been about, he struck me, and said, what was it to me; I told him I would follow him, which I did till he was taken.

THOMAS WORGAN . I was in the road and heard the cry, and saw the prisoner lift his arm up and strike Andrew. I run after him, and secured him; he had the things with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-30

392. HENRY HARRIS , was indicted for the wilful murder of John Robinson , on the 1st of February .

EDWARD BROWN . I am a surgeon, residing in Ravenrow, Spitalfields. On the 4th of February, I opened the body of the deceased, I found a turgidness in his stomach arising from inflammation. I cannot say what was the cause of his death. I found no external marks of violence whatever. There was no appearance of bruises being the cause of his death. If I had opened the body, without knowing that there had been violence, I should not have suspected external violence to have been the cause.

GEORGE JACKSON . I am a surgeon, residing in Bishopsgate-street. I was called to the deceased, about a quarter of an hour after he died. I examined him externally; there were no bruises. I could not form any opinion as to the cause of his death. I saw the body again on the 4th, after it had been opened, there was an appearance of inflammation in his stomach; it was not considerable, in my judgment it was not sufficient to cause his death. I had attended him two years before this, for an inflammation of his stomach, he soon recovered from that.

MR. REYNOLDS, counsel for the prosecution, declined proceeding farther. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-31

393. SARAH PERRY , was indicted for the wilful murder of a certain female infant child .

CHARLOTTE ARMSTRONG . I live with Mr. King, Manchester-street, Manchester-square . The family consists of my master and mistress, and three servants. The prisoner was our cook . She slept with me; she said, she was a married woman. I had observed that she was large, and told her of it; she said it was her clothes. We slept in the garret. On Monday, the 20th of January, she went to bed about eleven o'clock. I had set up, with my fellow-servant, for my mistress till one o'clock. When I went to bed, the prisoner begged that I would be as quick as possible in getting into bed. About five o'clock, Roots called me, and begged I would come down stairs, as the cook was ill in the scullery. I did not dress myself, but came down directly, and went into the kitchen, and asked her what was the matter. I did not see her, she was in the scullery-it was quite dark. There is only a thin partition of boards between the kitchen and scullery, which do not go to the top. She said, she was very ill with a pain in her bowels. I struck a light. The scullery door, I believe, was shut. She still begged of me not to come in, as she was undressed. She had desired me not to come in when I first came down. My mistress rung the bell and I went to her. She desired me to leave the light in the kitchen - I did so. I returned in ten minutes. As I was coming down stairs, the prisoner called out to me not to come in. She met me at the kitchen door. She put her hand to my breast, pushed me back, and bolted the kitchen door. I waited there some time and begged of her to come up stairs, she told me to go and she would follow me. After waiting some time, I went up to bed. She came up about half-past six o'clock, with the light in her hand; the moment she came into the room she put the light out, and came to bed. I asked her why she went down, she said, she was dreadfully ill in her bowels, and went down for fear of disturbing her master. I offered to get up and get her any thing, she said, she had made a fire, and got some milk and water. She got up about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, and I got up at eight o'clock. I went into the scullery about ten o'clock in the morning, and observed some blood in the crevices of the stones and on the stones, there was some blood in a red pan, and some on a board on which she used to stand to wash the dishes; there were finger marks of blood on the scullery table, and on the posts which support the cistern. I also observed marks of blood on our bed-room floor and on the bed. If these marks of blood had been either in the bed-room or in the scullery the day before, I must have seen them. There was some blood on the night-gown in which she slept that night. On Wednesday, I asked her, what was the reason of the blood being in the scullery, she said, it must be from a calf's-heart which she had, had to dress. We had not had any thing of the kind in the house for three months before; upon that I told my mistress, and she went to Bow-street. On Thursday, Jefries came and searched the house, but found nothing; he searched again on the Monday following.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The scullery is a flat smooth pavement; the marks on the cistern-posts were about a yard from the ground. The prisoner had the care of the provisions. I know all the meat that comes into the house.

WILLIAM ROOTS . I am footman to Mr. King. I sleep even with the kitchen, and can hear any noise in the scullery. On the 20th of January I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock. At half past three in the morning I was awoke by the dog barking; he sleeps in my room. I did not hear any thing from that time till half past four o'clock; I then heard a pail rattling as if it was put down; at the same time I heard something of a voice like somebody in pain, but could not tell what it was. I got up and went into the kitchen; it was quite dark. I asked what noise it was; the prisoner answered

me from the scullery, saying, "For God's sake do not come here; I am not dressed." She said she had a pain in her bowels. I asked her what she came down into such a place as that for, and why she was in the dark? She said she was only come to get a little water to wash herself, and was going to bed directly. With that I was satisfied, and went to bed again. In about half an hour I heard a violent groaning. I could not tell whether it was a male or female voice. It was about half past five o'clock. I got up and went into the kitchen; it was quite dark. - The prisoner was in the scullery, making a groaning noise as if she was in pain; at the same time I distinctly heard the cries of a child coming from the scullery; I heard it for five minutes, at different times. She begged I would not come in or alarm the house, and said, if I would go to bed she should be very well in a minute. I asked her where her fellow-servant, Charlotte, was - She said she was up stairs, and begged of me not to call her. I went up and told her to come down; she did directly. I heard her ask the prisoner where she was, and what was the matter. She said she had been very ill with a pain in her bowels. Mrs. King rang the bell, and Charlotte struck a light and left it on the table, and went up stairs. She was gone about ten minutes, during which time I was in the passage between the kitchen and my bed-room. Charlotte came down, and the prisoner begged her not to come in. The prisoner came out of the scullery and met her at the kitchen door, and said you shall not come in here, pushed her back, and bolted the door. Charlotte staid at the door some time. I went to bed, and got up at eight o'clock. The prisoner was up before me. I went into the scullery about nine o'clock, and observed some blood in the crevices of the stones. They were wet as if they had been washed. There were finger-marks of blood on the cistern, on the scullery table, and on the scullery door. These marks were not there on the Monday, I am sure. There had not been a calf's heart dressed in the family for some time. I said nothing to the prisoner about it. Jefferies the officer came and took the prisoner away on Friday he came again and searched but found nothing. - He came again on Monday; I was with him, and searched the coal-cellar in the front area; the scullery is quite at the back of the house. He found a bundle in the coal-cellar, among the coals, near the door, the coals were over it. I saw the bundle opened; it contained a new-born female infant; the same child was afterwards examined by Mr. Leese. Jeffries took the child out of the bundle and put it in the pantry, exactly in the same condition as he found it; he locked the door and took the key. The Coroner and Mr. Leese saw it there afterwards.

Cross-examined. The prisoner has been four years in the family. I understood her to be married. I had observed her to be in the family way. The prisoner knew that I slept down stairs. It was some time before I heard the child cry.

Q. Will you take upon yourself to swear that it was not the voice of a woman you heard - A. I will swear that it was a child. The blood-marks were not high.

Court. - Q. When you saw the child was there any thing about its month - A. There was a coarse cloth put into its mouth when I first saw it, and I am sure that nobody touched the cloth before it was taken into the pantry.

WILLIAM JEFFRIES . I am a Bow-street officer. I went to Mr. King's on Thursday, the 23d January. I went into the kitchen, and told the prisoner I had a warrant for her, and told her what it was for. She said it must be a mistake, and she went towards the table, where there was a large carving knife; I told her she must not leave me. She seemed very much agitated. I told her to put on her things and go with me; she said she would; I went with her to get them. She put her hand into her pocket; I asked what she had got there, she said she had nothing in it; she pulled out a small piece of rag (producing it); it was stained with blood; she said she had had a piece of meat in it. She asked me to give it to her, saying that it was of no use to me - I refused. I took her to the House of Correction. It was too late to search the house that night. I searched it the next morning, and found a great quantity of her clothes which were stained with blood. I did not search the coal-cellar, I searched it on the Monday morning; I found the bundle in the left hand corner of the coal-cellar, about two feet form the door and six inches under the coals. Nothing could be seen from the surface of the coals, and there was a large plank put over that part of them. I took it up exactly as I found it, and laid it in the pantry in the presence of Roots. I did not open it till I put it on the pantry table, and the first thing that I observed were the legs of a child. As I removed the clothes, I found the head part with a coarse cloth over the face and neck. I looked down sideways, and said"Why the mouth is full of coarse cloth!"-it was three inches within the mouth (Here the witness produced the cloth, which was quite hard, and formed the complete shape of the cavity of the mouth)-it was a female child. I left it in the pantry, and locked it up and kept the key. The next morning I went, with the Coroner, to Mr. Leese; I opened the door for them, and found the child exactly as I had left it. I removed the cloth out of its mouth by direction of the Coroner-it is now precisely in the same shape as it was when I took it out of the child's mouth-the child was wrapped up in a petticoat and other things-(I produce them).

CHARLOTTE ARMSTRONG . The petticoat belongs to the prisoner. I have seen her mend it several times; I am sure it is her's.

EDWARD LEESE . I am a surgeon. On Friday, the 28th January I attended the Coroner's Inquest. I went into the pantry and saw the child on the table. Roots and the officer were with me; the cloth was not in the child's mouth, it lay by its head. I examined the child's body could find no external marks of violence. I took the cloth and applied it to the child's mouth-it was compressed together in a hardened mass; the lump exactly fitted the internal part of the mouth, and resembled the cass of the mouth, as if it had been put in, and became hardened while in the mouth; there was a redness about its neck and head as if arising from strangulation-supposing the child to have been alive, it was quite sufficient to strangle it-it could not breathe. The child appeared to me to be perfect, and I have no doubt but that it was born alive.

Cross-examined. It is difficult to tell whether a child is born alive or-not I will not swear it. It had come to maturity, apparently. I did not look for blows-if the

child had fallen on the stones at its birth, it would have caused its death.

JEFFRIES.re-examined. Before Mr. Leese saw the child the Coroner, and Jury, had seen it. I removed the cloth then before Mr. Leese came.

THOMAS STIRLING , Esq. I am Coroner for the County of Middlesex. The Jury, Roots, and Jeffries, accompanied me-the child was lying on its back, with a coarse cloth, apparently a dish-cloth, pressed very tight into its mouth, as far as it possibly could-the whole cavity of the mouth appeared to be full-it was taken out in my presence; it came out like a bung. If the child had been alive, the cloth must have suffocated it.

The Prisoner put in a written paper, as follows: "The prisoner never had a child before, and being inexperienced, thought she had two months of her time to go. Her reason for not making her situation known was, that she might remain in her place as long as she could."

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18170219-32

394. FRANCIS EWER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Miller , about four in the night of the 7th of February , with intent to steal .

DAVID MILLER . I am an oilman , and live in Bunhill-row, St. Luke's . On the 7th February I bolted and locked my doors before I went to bed-about eleven o'clock I fastened my private door-my cellar has an iron grating over it, which was quite secure. About four o'clock I was alarmed, and found the coal-cellar padlock wrenched off, and the house broken into. Two boards were broken down; the iron grating had been forced up, high enough for a man to enter; the wood-work was broken.

THOMAS GRENVILLE . I am a watchman-my box is opposite Miller's house. On the morning of the 7th of February I was going my rounds, and heard Mr. Miller's private door jar; I went to it, and found it about four inches open. I asked who was there, several times-nobody answered. The door was drawn back from within, and a man came out - I secured him-the prisoner came out after him, and gave me a violent blow, and struck me with a piece of wood, called a stretcher, which cut my lip; when he was coming up to strike me, the other man said,"Give him a nice one." - I was knocked down. I saw the prisoner come out at the door he had a white apron on. I am sure he is the man-it was moon-light - I saw his face. I gave the alarm - I could not spring my rattle, as I had hold of the man with both hands. The prisoner ran towards Bunhill-row. Cleaver and Newton came to my assistance. I am sure the prisoner is the man that struck me; I saw him again five minutes afterwards.

WILLIAM CLEAVER . I am a watchman. I was going round my beat in Bath-street and Old-street, and looking round Bunhill-row, I saw a scuffle between the watchman and some other men. I ran to them, and saw the prisoner coming from the watchman - I was on the opposite side of the prosecutor's house. I took the prisoner - it was about twenty yards from the house; he was running as hard as he could nobody else was running-Grenville said he was the man that came out at the door, and struck him-the prisoner made no answer; he had nothing in his hand - He had a green coat on and a white apron.

ISAAC NEWTON . I am a patrol. My attention was called to the prosecutor's house about four o'clock in the morning of the 7th of February. Grenville called out, which led me there. I saw a man run from him with a white apron - He was brought back about ten minutes afterwards. Grenville was laying on the ground, senseless; he was unable to stand. I went directly to the prosecutor's door, and found a hat and a dark-lanthorn on the step - I alarmed the prosecutor directly-the door was wide open. On going down into the cellar, I saw a white handkerchief laying under the grating, where it was forced up-the inner cellar had the boards broken down and the padlock forced. Grenville was laying just off the curbstone opposite the prosecutor's door.

Prisoner. Was you not in Banner-street when you heard the watchman call - A. Yes, but not above a dozen yards from the spot. Grenville was laying opposite the door, in Banner-street. One side of the prosecutor's house is in Banner-street and the other in Bunhill-row-the dark lanthorn has had oil in it.

THOMAS VANN . I am constable of St. Luke's. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house in the morning, before he went before the magistrate. I found a box, a peg, and a piece of candle in his pocket-the peg is a plumber's tool-the lining of his hat was burnt - I took it out-it appears to me to be fresh burnt-the candle was pressed flat.

JOSEPH MADDISON . I am an headborough. I locked the prisoner up - I saw the grating the next morning-the partition was broken down and the lock forced off the door - I found it just by.

DAVID MILLER. I fastened the door myself, at eleven o'clock; the grating was then quite secure.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a plumber by trade. On Friday last I went to a house of call for plumbers - A man said Mr. Brown, of Edmonton, wanted a hand; I got up in the morning to go there - I heard a noise and saw the men pass by over the way, and I got out of the way and was stopped. The man came and said, he was almost sure that I was the man. I am a plumber by trade; we always use candle. I had been at work on some leads, and burnt the lining of my hat.

Jury to MADDISON. When Grenville came up what did he say - A. He said, he was certain that he was the man - He did not say he was nearly positive.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-33

395. JOSEPH MORPETH MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , in the dwelling-house of Samuel John Neele , ten 1l. bank notes, the property of James Neele .

It being proved, that the notes were the property of Samuel John Neele , instead of James Neele , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-34

396. THOMAS RAWSTER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Moseley , about eight o'clock in the night of the 15th of

January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one broom, value 1s.; one jar, value 1s. 6d.; and two quarts of pickles, value 3s. his property .

ELEANOR MOSELEY. I am the wife of James Moseley , we live in Margaret-street, Shadwell . On the 15th of January, about eight o'clock, somebody took the things from my shop - I missed them about eight o'clock; I had been serving pickles from the jar about a quarter of an hour before. The shop-door was shut - I was in the room behind the shop.

ROBERT BESTHALL . I am constable of Hackney. I was in the Hackney-road on the night of the 15th of January, and passed the prisoner and another man, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's house. I was going to Hackney - I knew the prisoner before - He had the broom on his shoulder, and swore that the first that stopped him he would knock them down. I returned towards town; I met them again, and asked them what they had got-the other man said it was some pickles that they had got from a relation, at Whitechapel. I told them they were coming the wrong way, and I must detain them. The other man ran away, and left the pickles on the ground, and I took the prisoner - He had the broom on his shoulder.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the other man, and he gave me the broom to carry.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18170219-35

397. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one mare, value 9l. the property of Joseph Tilt .

JOSEPH TILT. I am a farmer , and live at Dorking . I turned my mare out on the common; she had a particular mark down her face - I turned her, and her foal, on the common on the 14th of January, and missed them on the 15th. I went towards London in search of them. I came to Smithfield on the Friday, and saw the prisoner coming up Hosier-lane on my mare. I was sure that it was my mare, and am sure the prisoner is the man - I think he knew me. I asked him whose mare it was, he said it was his own. I gave him in charge - He went very willingly. I found my foal on Merton common as I returned home.

WILLIAM HARKER . I am servant to Mr. Tilt. I went with him to look for the mare. The prisoner was in Smithfield with her. My master has spoken correctly.

JOHN TOPPING . I live at Merton, and am employed to watch the common there - I knew the prisoner very well. In January last I found a stray mare, and foal, on the common; I turned them off-the prisoner said they belonged to him, and asked me to buy them. In two or three days after, the mare was gone, and the foal left behind.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them between Merton and Kingston - I gave 4l. 4s. for them; two young women were with me at the time. I was sent to Guildford to be tried, and was discharged by proclamation. I knew the men. I bought them of, but they are so very unsettled I cannot find them; I had witnesses attending there.

JOSEPH TILT. I was bound over to prosecute here, not at Guildford.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-36

398. ANN HAMMOND FISH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one 5l. bank note , the property of Samuel Bangs .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-37

399. THOMAS COXHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one snuff-box, value 2s. the property of John Levens , from his person .

JOHN LEVENS. I live in Nicholas-square. On the 31st of January, about half past five o'clock I was in Guildhall-yard ; it was dark-there had been a Common Hall that day, there was a crowd there. I felt something behind me - I put my hand to my pocket and missed my snuff-box. I turned round; the prisoner was close behind me; I accused him with taking it - He denied it - He was concealing something under his apron - I took my box out of his small- clothes.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am a marshalman. I was attending the Common Hall, just as the Lord Mayor was getting into his carriage, the prisoner was given into my charge. He at first denied it, and afterwards said he was sorry for it, and pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-38

400. JAMES FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , one handkerchief, value 4s. 6d. the property of Thomas Reilly , from his person .

THOMAS REILLY. I am an agent , and live in Leadenhall-street. On the 22nd of January, about one o'clock in the afternoon, as I was going along Cheapside, I thought I felt somebody at my pocket; I put my hand to it, and found my handkerchief safe. When I got to the middle of the Poultry I found the prisoner in the act of taking it out, and seized him with it in his hand - He made a great resistance.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-39

401. WILLIAM TOMLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 52 lbs. of beef, value 14s. the property of Thomas Bonsor .

THOMAS BONSOR. I am a butcher in Newgate-market . On the 19th of February, about six o'clock in the morning, 52lbs. of beef laid at Messrs. Allens' for sale - They are salesmen. I was in the shop; a gentleman gave the alarm, and the prisoner was taken with the beef in his hands.

WILLIAM CAFFIN . I am servant to Mr. Taylor, of Newgate-market. I was coming through a court leading to the market, and met the prisoner with the beef - He was alone; Baron was with me. I ran to give information, and as I returned I met the prisoner in custody, with the beef.

JOHN BARON . I was with Caffin; I saw the prisoner take the beef from the shop - I took him - He said he had got a small piece of beef, it was 52lbs.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Months , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-40

402. EDWARD SMITHERMAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one broach, value 4s., and seven glass sights, value 16s. , the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I am a lapidary , and have a shop on Ludgate-hill , the prisoner was my servant ; about the beginning of December I missed my things, I received a letter, with some duplicates, about four days after the prisoner had left me. I went to the pawnbroker's and found them.

JOHN HOMER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 29th of December, the prisoner pledged the sights and broach with me. I am sure it was him.

Prisoner. Have I not often pledged things with you - A. He has.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get my wages, and the prosecutor told me to pledge them to pay myself. He often sent me to pledge things to raise money. I packed the duplicates up in the letter and sent them to him.

SMITH. I never sent him to pledge them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-41

403. CHRISTIAN FREDERICK WEIR was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one cheese, value 7s. , the property of William Stidolph .

JOHN HUGHES . About eleven o'clock in the morning of the 5th of February, I saw the prisoner, with two boys, he was making signs to them to take a ham - They attempted it two or three times, but did not take it; the prisoner appeared to be in a passion with them; he was about four yards from the cheese; one of the boys was about four years of age, the other about eighteen. My wife told me that the cheese was taken, I turned round, and saw the prisoner put it under his arm.

MARY HUGHES . I am the wife of the last witness. I saw the prisoner directing the two boys; I saw him take the cheese, and put it under his arm.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-42

404. MARY BELL was indicted for stealing two gowns, value 15s., and one shawl, value 7s. , the goods of Mary Joyce , widow .

Mary Joyce having never been married, and the indictment stating her to be a widow, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-43

405. THOMAS SAWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one coat, value 5s. , the property of James Holloway .

JAMES HOLLOWAY. I am a carter . On the 4th of February my cart stood against the Whitmore's Head, at Hoxton ; as I was coming out of the house, I saw the prisoner take my coat, I followed him, secured him, and took it from him. I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-44

406. WILLIAM WEIR , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , one watch, value 2l.; one key, value 1d.; a piece of ribbon, value 1d.; 18 yards of printed cotton, value 1l.; four sheets, value 1l.; one waistcoat, value 2s., the property of William Swain , in the dwelling-house of Mary Swan .

ELIZA SWAIN . I am the wife of William Swain. On the 1st of February, the prisoner lived with my mother, Mary Swan , she keeps a public- house. On the 2d of February. I went up to my drawers for a pair of sheets, and found they were gone; I also missed the articles stated in the indictment, they are worth 4l. The prisoner slept in the garret, in going up to his room, he must pass the room where the property was; I always keep the door locked, but had left it open on that day and the day before. I saw the watch again the next day after I had missed it. I had seen the things safe three days before.

ELIZA SWAIN . I am the daughter of the last witness: the prisoner lived at my grandmother's; I saw him up stairs on the 2d of February, he opened my mother's door. and come out of her room-it was in the morning. I am sure it was him.

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable. On the 3d of February, I and Hemmingway went to the Jolly Anglers public-house, Bath-street, St. Luke's, and found the prisoner there; I told him that I wanted him, he asked me to let him drink the rest of his beer; while he was drinking it he got towards a man, and I caught him putting a duplicate into his hand; I took it out of the man's hand; it was the duplicate of the watch, pledged on the 2d of February, in the name of Weir, at Mr. Matthews.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 2d of February the prisoner pledged a silver watch with me, he seemed in a great hurry, and desired me to give him silver. I lent him 16s. upon it. The duplicate found upon him is mine. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ALLEN . I was at the public-house; the prisoner put the duplicate into my hand; I did not know what it was then. I knew him by his often coming to the house.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Of Stealing, to the value of 39s. only.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18170219-45

407. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Trend , about twelve in the night of the 14th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, four table-spoons, value 1l. 12s.; eight tea-spoons, value 1l. 3s.; two salt-spoons, value 2s.; and one gold ring, value 2s., his property .

ROBERT TREND. I am a publican , and live in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel . On the morning of the 15th of February, between five and six o'clock, I came down stairs, before it was light, I observed the glass over my parlour door, towards my bar, was broken; I alarmed my family, went into the parlour, and found two squares of glass at the bottom sash of the window, right and left, broken, in order to turn back the fastening that kept it down-the outside window-shutter was broken to pieces, and the iron bolt bent double; the shutter had been forced, and the glass taken out, I found a large ironcrow behind the parlour door, the sash of the window was up-any person might get in or out. I found my tills had been emptied, and the money gone. I also missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were on the table in the bar, the overnight, at eleven o'clock. The prisoner had often worked for me, he had painted several houses for me at different times. The crow was my property, and usually kept in the cellar of the next house, which is mine; I saw it there the morning before, and ordered my servant, John Hube, to take it into my own cellar, but he did not. The prisoner has often been in the cellar of the adjoining house, I kept paint and other things there; he has been there with me and by himself. He has not worked for me for sometime, but has been in the habit of being about my house, he was there the night before the robbery, I saw him in the tap-room; he came to my house again at night, and I charged him with the robbery. I gave him in charge.

JOHN HUBE . I am servant to Mr. Trend. I fastened up the house on the night of the robbery, I fastened the shutters of the back parlour window, and bolted them with two bolts - I am sure of it; I drew down the sash after me, all the squares of glass were in then. My master got up first in the morning, when I came down, I found the crow behind the parlour door and the shutter broken open. I saw the crow-bar in the next house the day before. I did not bring it into the dwelling-house. I took it into the cellar of the adjoining house, two or three days before. Mr. Daws lived in that house. My master used to keep his things in the cellar, it is not kept locked; if the prisoner said he was sent by my master, he could get into the cellar. I tried the crow-bar with the shutter, and the marks fitted, it appeared that the window had been broken open with it.

WILLIAM MERCHANT . I am a headborough. I was called to Mr. Trend's, about ten o'clock on Saturday evening. Mr. Trend gave the prisoner in charge; I searched him, and found a ring on him, he refused giving any account of it; I told him, it would be better for him to confess. The prisoner went with me, and pointed our Simmonds's, at the corner of Leather-lane, Holborn, on Sunday. I went there on the Monday, and Simmonds went with me to Mr. Alderman Cox, Little Britain, the spoons were produced there; Merchant took them - I also found two 1l. notes on the prisoner.

JOHN LOCKINGTON SIMMONDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Holborn. On Saturday evening, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and sold me two table-spoons for 1l. 8s. 6d.; he came again in a quarter of an hour, and sold me some tea and salt-spoons, for 1l. 3s.; he said, he had an execution in his house, and wanted to make up the money. I sent my son to sell them at Mr. Alderman Cox's. I did not send the salt-spoons. The two 1l. notes that were found on the prisoner, are the same that I gave to him. I am sure, he is the man.

WILLIAM MERCHANT . I am a city officer. I went with Simmonds to Mr. Alderman Cox's; the tea and tablespoons were delivered to me there; Simmonds had the salt-spoons.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD PLUMKIT . I am a night constable. I was with Merchant when he took the prisoner. I prodouce the ring that was found on him - I saw Merchant take it from him.

ROBERT TREND . It is mine, I know it by the inscription; I saw it taken from the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 46.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-46

408. JAMES RICE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Gibbs , the elder , about eight in the night of the 27th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two waistcoats, value 5s.; three images, value 6d.; the property of Robert Gibbs, the younger ; one bed, value 40s.; one bolster, value 4s.; one pillow, value 1s.; three blankets, value 5s.; two sheets, value 4s.; and one counterpane, value 1s, the property of the said Robert Gibbs, the elder .

ROBERT GIBBS, jun. I am the son of Robert Gibbs . I live in Long-alley, Moorfields . I have the bottom room of Mr. Bishop's house. My father hired the room, and always paid the rent - I always kept the key. On the 27th of January about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening, I fastened my door and window, there was a bed and bedding in my room, which belonged to my father, some of the things were mine; I returned about half-past ten o'clock, and found the asp of my padlock out, and the padlock on the floor. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The bed, bolster, pillow, three blankets, two sheets, and a counterpane belonged to my father, and the rest were mine. The prisoner had worked for my father five or six years, off and on. Bishop did not live in the house.

THOMAS HEAD . I am a patrol of Spitalfields. I was on duty on the 27th of January, I saw the prisoner at the bottom of Fashion-street, Spitalfields, between eight and nine o'clock, he was walking with a bundle on his back; I stopped him, he said he was going to his brother's in Long-alley; he said, he had got a bed; I asked him where he brought it from; he said, from Spitalfields; and then said, he was going to his brother's in Half-Moon-alley, and that I might go with him; I asked him again, where he brought it from; he said, from the Loggerheads, which is a very different place from Spitalfields. Andrews came up, and asked him if he knew who kept the Loggerheads, he said, no; he then said, he brought it from the Bird-cage, which is near the Loggerheads; we secured him. When we came near the watch-house, he threw the bundle off his back, and ran off; I took it up, and Andrews

secured him. He was brought to the watch-house about five minutes after. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I saw the prisoner in the custody of Head, he said, he brought the bundle from the Loggerheads, he ran away and threw it down; I pursued him, and he was taken in Spitalfields-market. I am sure, the prisoner is the man, he was not out of my sight more than a minute.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to carry.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-47

409. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Dane , about six in the night of the 27th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one watch, value 20l., his property .

THOMAS DANE. I am a watch-maker , and live in Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone. On the 27th of January, I was down stairs in my kitchen, and heard glass crash as if it was my shop window; it was about a quarter before six, the lights had been lit nearly an hour-it was quite dark. I ran up stairs and found my glass broken-it was a very thick plate glass. There were some watches hanging just by it. I ran out, and heard the cry of stop thief! I ran with the people, and overtook the prisoner within three doors of my house. Wilmot pointed him out to me. I laid hold of him and took him into my shop. There was a void between the watches. I did not know how many were gone - They were safe when I went down stairs. The prisoner's right hand was cut and bleeding. A person brought the gold case into the shop, which I knew to be mine; somebody else brought in the gold watch-the face and glass was broken, and it was bruised; the case was not hurt. It was worth twenty guineas.

THOMAS WILMOT . In the evening, of the 27th of January, I was in Oxford-street, it was quite dark, I looked at my watch at the time, it wanted exactly a quarter to six-the lamps were lit. I was near Holly-street, and heard a great crash, I turned round instantly to where the noise came from, and saw the prisoner running towards me; nobody else was running-there was a cry of stop thief! he instantly stopped and began walking towards me, there being a strong light from the shop; I stopped him, and told him he was the thief; he wanted me to let him go - I refused. I was going to take him to the place where the glass was broken, and heard something fall. A lady instantly said, the man had thrown something down the area, the sound was close to us; I returned and I saw something lay on the area railing. Mr. Dane came up, and I gave the prisoner up to him. I went to the railing and found it was a watch case, the lady picked it up and gave it to me, the case was open and lay across the area bar, it was three houses from Mr. Dane's; I gave the prosecutor the case.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me break the window - A. No, when I took the prisoner's hand out of his pocket, he made a great resistance-his hand bled very much.

EPHRAIM TERRY . My master resides three doors from Mr. Dane. On the evening of the 27th of January, about six o'clock, it was quite dark, somebody came into the shop, and said, a man had stolen a watch, and thrown it down our area; I went into the area, and found a gold watch - I gave it to Mr. Dane.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house; I took him in charge, his hands were bloody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the window break and I stopped; they took me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18170219-48

410. WILLIAM EWEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Gurzon , about three in the afternoon of the 14th of February ), Sarah Gurzon , Elizabeth Clark , and others of his family being therein), and stealing therein, five waistcoats, value 1l.; one pair of breeches, value 5s.; one pair of knee caps, value 1s.; one prayer-book, value 2s.; one handkerchief, value 1s.; and one pair of stockings, value 1s., the property of John Bullman .

JOHN BULLMAN. I am a groom , and lodge with Mr. Gurzon, in High-street , he is a publican . On the 14th of February I went to bed at ten o'clock, and got up at eight in the morning, and missed my things, I had not seen them the over night, they were all safe the morning before, except the boots, which I missed on the Wednesday.

HENRY THREDDER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, Holborn. Last Friday the prisoner brought a pair of breeches and a pair of gaiters to our shop; I gave him 10s. for them. I am sure it was the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the property on him.

ELIZA CLARKE . I am servant to Mr. Gurzon. The prisoner called at my master's house, between three and five o'clock in the afternoon, and had some beer; I missed him for half an hour, I do not know where he went, he came back again; he went away about half-past five o'clock. I did not see him with the things, he might have gone out of the house when I missed him. I left Mr. Bullman's door locked in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Of Stealing only.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-49

411. ELIZA MACKENZIE and MARY BROWN , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , two boots, value 12s., the property of James Walker , privately in his shop .

JAMES WALKER . I am a shoe-maker , and live at Hatton-Wall , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. On the 23d of January, my wife called me down stairs, I missed two boots out of the shop window, I had seen them safe about ten minutes before. My wife went to the door, and pointed Mackenzie out to me. Mrs. Thorn had her in custody; she found the boots on her; and she said, the other prisoner had stolen them, and that she was bringing

them back, I took them from her, she was close to the shop. Mrs. Thorn fetched Wainwnight, and he took her. The boots were mine, they were odd boots and worth 12s. The prisoner, Brown, went into the shop, and asked, what had became of her sister, in about half an hour; my wife said, that she was the girl who was in the shop with Mackenzie. Brown said, she never took the boots, and asked what I was going to do with her; I gave her to the officer.

SARAH WALKER . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 23d. of January, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoners came into our shop, I was in the yard, when I came in I found them in the shop; Mackenzie asked for a pair of highlows, she said, they were for the other prisoner; Mackenzie said, she was going over the way to get a pint of beer, and would try them on-Brown then said, she was going over the way too, and would call again; Mackenzie went first and Brown followed. I went into the street to look after them, they did not go the way to the public-house. Mrs. Thorn crossed the street, and stopped Mackenzie. I went to the shop window and saw the lamp swinging, which made me think somebody had been taking the shoes. I called my husband to see if any thing was gone, he missed the boots. Mrs. Thorn had taken her with the boots. In about half an hour, Brown came to the shop, and asked if the other girl had stolen the boots - I told her she knew it; she said, she did not, for the girl had found them at the door; this was before I said any thing about them. I am sure they were our boots. When Mackenzie was in the shop, she was folding her gown round her waist.

MRS. THORN. On the 23d of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoners at the corner of Saffron-Hill, about five doors from Walker's, they were coming from Walker's house; Mackenzie had something folded in her lap, I asked her what it was; she said, they were boots; I asked her, where she got them from; she said, she picked them up at the door. I turned her round and took her back to Walker's; she winked her eyes at Brown, and she escaped.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, Mackenzie.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. The prisoner, Brown, was given to me in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MACKENZIE's Defence. I picked them up at the door.

MACKENZIE - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 10d. only

Judgement respited .

BROWN- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-50

412. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing on the 7th of February , one pair of shoes, value 7s., the property of James Taylor , privately in his shop .

JAMES TAYLOR . I live in Brewer-street, Golden-square , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. On the 7th of February last, I went out, and returned at nine o'clock, when King said, that the prisoner was in custody.

JOHN KING . I am shopman to Mr. Taylor. On the 7th of February, the prisoner came to my master's shop, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening - I was busy serving some customers; when I had served them, they were going out, and I saw the prisoner going out with them. Mr. Taylor's two sons were in the shop as well as myself, one of them was serving the customers with me, the other was gone out for change; when the prisoner was in the shop, he did not offer to buy any thing-about a minute after he went out, Mr. Wyatt brought him into the shop, and called me as a witness. I saw him take a pair of shoes from under the prisoner's coat; they were my master's. I did not suspect the prisoner, when he was in the shop. I did not see him look at them. My master's sons were busily employed.

Prisoner. Q. Were not Mr. Taylor's sons in the shop - A. I cannot exactly say, they might have been there part of the time.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you the price of the shoes - A. I do not recollect.

JOHN WYATT . On the 7th of February, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner looking into Mr. Taylor's window, I was in my shop which is opposite, he waited there about half an hour; I suspected and watched him. Two persons went into the shop to purchase some goods, and in two or three minutes I saw the prisoner go in; I still watched him. After some time the persons came out, and the prisoner came out before them. I did not see him take any thing in the shop. When he got out I thought he had something under his coat. I called him, and asked him to go into the shop with me, and told him, that I thought he had got something that did not belong to him. I took the prisoner into the shop, and took a pair of shoes from under his great coat. King claimed them as his master's property. I gave them to Chadwell.

WILLIAM CHADWELL. I am a constable of the night. The prisoner and shoes were delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of one of the sons. I tried them on, in the shop.

JOHN KING . My master's sons stood by me, serving the customers. I am sure neither of them sold the shoes, they did not know the price, without asking me. One of them is eleven years old, and the other nine.

JOHN WYATT . When I took the prisoner he begged for pardon. I saw him all the time he was in the shop, he did not try any shoes on.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18170219-51

413. DANIEL JAMES NEWLAND was indicted for stealing on the 9th of February , two watches, value 5l.; two seals, value 1s.; and one chain, value 6d. the property of John Cayhill , in his dwelling-house .

JULIA CAYHILL. I am the wife of John Cayhill, shoemaker; we live in Type-court, Type-street ; the prisoner had lived nine weeks with us. On the 9th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I and the prisoner, and another man, named Nowland, who also lodged with us, were on the ground-floor room; the watches hung up over the mantle-piece, I lighted a candle and went up stairs-as I came down again I saw the prisoner run out of the passage into the court, with my husband's watches, one in each hand-Nowland was asleep in the room. I called

to the prisoner to come back, he would not; I told him he had got my husband's property.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. - I was not four yards from him - I saw him outside the door, I am sure the watches were in his hand.

THOMAS WADMAN . I am a patrol. The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge.

JOHN CAVHILL . I saw my watches safe at eleven o'clock at night-they cost me eight guineas. I did not know the prisoner was going away; he was taken the next day.

Cross-examined. When I bought the watches they were second-hand; I have had them these twenty years; they have been repaired several times.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-52

414. WILLIAM BEALES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 58 flutes, value 35l. the property of Christopher Gerrock .

CHRISTOPHER GERROCK . I am a musical instrument-maker . The prisoner came sometimes to my house to tune flutes ; I have been losing property for a long time, and on the 25th of January I questioned the prisoner about it. I told him that I must have all my men before the Lord Mayor, and that something very particular hung over him; he fell down on his knees and begged for mercy. I told him he must go to the Lord Mayor - He referred me to some persons where I might find my things. I found some of them at several places, by his direction-most of them are finished; they are worth 35l.

JAMES CORDY . I produce seventeen flutes-they were pledged on the 9th of February, 1816. - At different times the prisoner has pledged flutes at my house.

JOHN CORDY . I am the brother of the last witness, he lives at Snow-hill; I took two flutes in in the name of Simpson; we never buy our own duplicates-(duplicate shewn to the witness)-that is my writing; it means Longlane-it is not written Long-lane, but means so-the man said his name was Simpson.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I live in Compton-street, Soho - I have seen the prisoner two or three times - I have thirteen flutes, pledged in the name of Ann Beales - They were pledged by a woman, who, the prisoner said, was his wife.

JOHN DAVIS . I have seven flutes, pledged in the name of Beales, 65, Compton-street. I have seen the prisoner, but will not swear that he pledged them. One of them has Mr. Gerrock's name on it.

WILLIAM NEWBY . I am servant to Mr. Cotterell, Shoelane - I have five flutes and a clarionet-the man who bought them is not in Mr. Cotterell's service. The flutes have the name of Briggs on them - We had that name put on.

JOHN ADAMS . I live with Mr. Barker, High Holborn. I have a flute, pledged at our house fourteen months ago.

DAVID JONES . I am a silversmith in Whitechapel. On the 26th of January I went with Mr. Gerrock to the prisoner's lodgings, in Compton-street. I told the prisoner it was clear hat he had been imposing on Mr. Gerrock, and that he had better tell him where he had sold the property, that he might take steps to recover it. I held out no promises to him. After a pause, he said he had pledged about two dozen six-key flutes at Mr. Cordy's, on Snow-hill, besides eight others. I asked him what he had done with the tickets, he said he had sold them to Cordy, and that he pledged the flutes in the name of Simpson-he said he did not think they asked him where he lived - I went there and found the flutes, the desk, and several of the books.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-53

415. JEREMIAH TIBBETS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one bank dollar, one half crown, 7s. and four 1l. bank notes , the property of John West .

ABIGAIL WEST . I am the wife of John West , who is a coal-dealer in Fleet-lane . The prisoner used to take out our coals . On the 25th of January he told me that a person wanted two bushels of coals, and change for a 5l. note, and that I must take for a bushel that was owing. I gave him four 1l. notes, a dollar, a half crown, and 7s. I told him to be careful of it - He did not bring me the 5l. note first. I asked him if he was sure it was right; he said it was - He went away-finding that he did not return I went after him, and found the person had never seen him. He was taken the third day after.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I apprehended the prisoner, on the 30th of January, at the White Horse, in Turnmill-street. I asked him what he had done with his master's money - He said be had spent part of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I got drunk and spent part of the money, and was afraid to go back.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-54

416. EDWARD DYKES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , four pounds of sugar, value 2s. the property of William Smith , Francis Kemble , John Towgood Kemble , and William Adams .

JAMES JENNINGS . I live with Messrs. Smith and Co. Philpot-lane . The prisoner was employed to do some plumber's work in the house - I watched him, as he was going out at eight o'clock in the morning; he had been several days at work on the premises. I stopped him before he got to the door, and asked him what he had got about him, as I saw his pockets bulky - He said he had only got a little sugar for his breakfast - He had no right to take it. I detained him till the foreman came, and found four pounds of raw sugar in his pockets - He begged of me to let him go - He was given in charge.

ABRAHAM STERLING. I am a constable - I took the prisoner into custody - He begged pardon.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Whipped and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-55

417. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the property of David Prowett , from his person .

DAVID PROWETT. I am a purser , and live in Nelson-square. On the 9th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-street , walking towards Bridge-street. Somebody called out, I turned round, and found the officer had got the prisoner; I found my handkerchief gone.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a patrol. On Friday evening, about half past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner. with another man, close by Chancery-lane - I watched him - I saw him go up to Mr. Prowett, and put his finger and thumb into his right-hand pocket, just by St. Dunstan's-church - He pulled the handkerchief a little way out - I could see him very well; the man who was behind appeared to follow him - I still watched him till he got to Fetter-lane, he then pulled it out a little further. When he got a few doors from Fetter-lane there is a dark place, he then took it quite out, and put it into his hat - I laid hold of him; three or four men then surrounded me, and one of them took my stick away.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-56

418. JAMES DINNIGAN was indicted for a fraud and misdemeanour .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-57

419. WILLIAM HOLMES was indicted for, that he, in the 55th year of his Majesty's reign , feloniously and falsely did make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause to be falsely made, forged and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in falsely forging and counterfeiting a certain transfer of a certain interest, or part, to wit-200l. interest, and property of the said William Holmes and one William Crispe , of certain annuities, transferrable at the Bank of England, by certain Acts of Parliament, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like transfer, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged.

THIRD COUNT, stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud William Crispe .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be to defraud William Dixon .

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, the same, only varying the manner of laying the charge.

WILLIAM GILES . I am chief clerk at the Navy 5 per Cent. Annuities Office. I turn to the account of William Crispe and William Holmes ; I look at my book and find, that on the 26th of May, 1814, there was 2,650l. stock entered in their joint names;-on the 27th of May, 1814, there appears to have been 500l. sold out, in three different sums, as follows:-200l. to J. Armitage; 100l. to William Gooding; and 200l. to A. Tully.

WILLIAM HAYDON . I am a stock-broker. I have known the prisoner ten or eleven years; when I first knew him, he lived at Westwell, in Kent. In the year 1814, I knew a person of the name of William Crispe - I had seen him before 1814, but only once, I believe. It was two or three years previous to that time-Mr. Holmes introduced him to me two or three years before that time. On the 27th of May, 1814, application was made to me to sell 500l. stock Navy 5 per Cents for him and Crispe, by the prisoner - Mr. Crispe was with him - I knew him to be the same person that I had seen with Holmes before, and who, at that time, Holmes called Mr. Crispe.

Q. If that person had come by himself, did you know enough of him to identify him, without Holmes saying he was the man. - A. I should have known him to have been the person I had seen before, but I should have asked him to refer me to some person in the neighbourhood, or some person in the Bank, to identify him as being Mr. Crispe. Holmes told me to sell out 500l. for him - I did so, and prepared the necessary transfer tickets; it was sold to two different brokers. I sold 300l. to Carter and Campbell, who are brokers, and 200l. to Charles Bennett, who is also a broker, the names given by Mr. Giles are correct. The brokers buy for principals, and give me the names of the persons for whom they buy the stock. When the stock was sold, I attended Holmes to the Bank; the person called William Crisp attended also. When they came to me, the prisoner said, "This is Mr. Crispe, whom you have seen before with me, (or words to that effect) - We wish to sell out 500l. which is standing in our names." I attended the prisoner and that other person to sign the transfer. He only gave me a verbal order-it is not usual to give written orders (looks at the ledger.)-These are the three transfers of the 500l. Navy 5 per Cents. which I sold by the prisoner's direction. The first, is a transfer to James Armitage , Spread-eagle-court, Finch-lane, Cornhill, of the sum of 200l. - he is a glazier. The second, is 100l. to William Gooding , and 200l. to A. Tully. I attended at the time the transfer was made; it is signed William Holmes and William Crispe . William Holmes is in the prisoner's own hand-writing, and William Crispe is signed by the person who was with him. - I was present, and attested the identity, they are all signed in the same way-it is also attested by Mr. Belcher. After this, they went to the Black Swan, in Lothbury, while I collected the money from the different brokers, to whom I had sold the stock. I met Holmes and Crispe there, and paid them; I put the money down, and Holmes took it up, in the presence of the other, and we parted. I saw the same persons again respecting the sale of 200l. on the 7th of April, 1815, and sold 200l. more to George Bolton ; they attended at the Bank in a similar way. In July last, I believe it was the 16th, the same man (Crispe) came to the Bank again. I had not seen him from the 7th of April. 1815, to July, 1816. In July, 1816, I saw Crispe at the Bank. I did not then know that there had been any doubt about him - I was informed of it at that meeting; Mr. Crispe was there-it was the same man that I had sold the stock for. I was told by Mr. Ferdinando, on that occasion, that there was some doubt about him.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I have seen the person who is acknowledged to be Mr. Crispe.

Q. When at the Bank, you saw the real Mr. Crispe in July 16, 1816, did you not believe it to be the person you sold the transfer for. - A. I believe it to be the same person.

Q. When you was sent for, was you not desired to look round the room, and point out Mr. Crispe, if he was there. - A. I was.

Q. Did you not immediately point out the real Mr. Crispe, without any reference being made to him. - A. I did; and immediately stated to Mr. Ferdinando, and another gentleman, that he was the man who had signed the transfer.

Q. Was Mr. Crispe, at that meeting, desired to write his name. - A. He was, and I saw him write it.

Q. Do you believe that the name he then wrote, was the hand-writing of the same man. - A. I am sure it was the same hand-writing that signed the transfer-It was compared with the hand-writing here-(pointing to the book)-Mr. Ferdinando was present, I believe; I pointed out Crispe as the same person I had seen before - I believe him to be the same man. I have not the most distant doubt of it.

Re-examined by MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. When you attended at the Bank, was there any stranger, beside Crispe. - A. There was - I attended at the 5 per Cent. Office.

Q. On the 16th of July, was there anybody there besides Mr. Crispe and the Clerk at the Bank. - A. It was in the 5 per Cent Office, under the letter H.

Q. Did you not attend at Mr. Domino's office. - A. Not on that day. When Crispe had wrote his name, the gentlemen were so well convinced that it was his hand-writing, that they shut the book up altogether.

JOHN MOULDER BELCHER . I am a Clerk at the Bank of England. I am witness to the three transfers on the 7th of May-my name is there as witness; it is done in the usual way.

JOHN BONUS CHILD . I am one of the brokers at the Bank. I purchased the sum of 700l. Navy 5 per Cents. in the name of Crispe and Holmes, on the 31st of January, 1817. I received payment for the amount of stock from the Bank.

JOHN CHAPEL . I have the transfer of 700l. in the names of William Holmes and William Crispe (looking at the ledger) I witnessed it on the 31st January, 1817-it is the same that is spoken of by Child.

ROBERT BEST, Esq. I am Secretary to the Bank. I have the release in my hands (producing it).

WILLIAM CRISPE . I am a butcher , at Maidstone. I and the prisoner were joint executors to Mr. Crispe, of Leeds, in Kent - He died in 1808. I and the prisoner met in London, for the purpose of managing his affairs. I was in London, in October 1811; I saw the prisoner at that time, to sell 350l. stock, that was in our names in the bank, as executors to Mr. Crispe. We had 3000l. there, before we sold out, it was in the Navy 5 per Cents. When I went out of town in October 1811, there was 2,650l. standing in our names in the bank. I was not in London, in May 1814. Between October 1811, and May 1814, I had not seen the prisoner, Holmes. I had had no communication with him within that period, about selling out any of our stock. Holmes received the dividends - I never received any. They were applied to pay annuities of 150l. per annum under Mr. Crispe's will. I had had no communication with the prisoner, within the times I have spoken of. I was not in London, in April 1815. I never had any communication with Holmes, after 1811 about selling out stock, which stood in our joint names. In consequence of some suspicion which I entertained, I came to town, in July 1816, and went to the bank. I there found, that 700l. of the stock had been sold out, which stood in the prisoner, Holmes's name and mine I went to the bank, on purpose to enquire and see if the money was safe there. I knew the hand-writing of Holmes when I see it, (looking at the transfer.) I believe it to be his hand-writing-there is the name of William Crispe under it; that is not my hand-writing. I think it resembles it-there are three transfers on the same sheet. I am positive that the name of William Crispe there is not my hand-writing. I was not in London at that time. I have my day-book, in which I put down occurrences on that day - I make these entries from day to day; it is my day-book for 1814 (producing it). - I look at it. On the 27th day of May, I was at home in my own business.

Court. Q. What is there in your book that makes you know that you was at home. - A. Because the entries are made in my own hand-writing, so that I must have been at home to have made them. The entries in the book were made on the day that the particular occurrences took place, for instance-if they took place on the 27th, I put them down on the 27th. I do not transcribe this book from another - I write the meat down as it goes out of the shop; it is my day-book, and always lays in my shop-the entries are entries of the different quantities of meat sold to my different customers in the morning; they are entered as it is sold; there are thirteen entries on that day(May 27) - They are all in my own hand-writing; there are no other entries of anybody serving in my shop. I have another book, which I keep for my fat and skins-(looking at it) - I keep an account of the days on which I sell fat and skins; the entries are made on the days to which they refer. I slaughter on a Friday, and sell my skins to one person. I am enabled positively to say, that I was at my own shop at Maidstone the whole of that day - I have not the least doubt of it at all. I did not come to town till October, 1815, after October, 1811. I was not in London at all between those times. I came to town for medical advice - I did not see the prisoner there - I did not see him there until he was taken. When I was absent from the shop, Mrs. Crispe always made the entries; she is my wife; upon all other occasions, I make my own entries. I look at my fat and skin-book, and find I sold, on the 27th of May, both fat and skins.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I know I was not in town on that day. Maidstone is thirty-four miles from London.

Q. Do you give that as a reason. - A. I was not in town from 1811 to 1815, because I made entries.

Q.Cannot you come to town, do business, and go back again the same day. - I will swear the entries were made on the morning of that day - I will swear that they were made in the forenoon.

Q. What time of day did your skins go out - A.About eleven or twelve o'clock in the forenoon. I will swear it. There is no hour in my book. I will swear it from memory. You can go to town from Maidstone, remain in town four or five hours, and go back again the same day. I was in town the 16th of July, I was at the Bank. I do

not recollect that the broker pointed me out. I was called upon to write my name.

Q.Did you not swear, before the magistrate, that both the signatures of Holmes and Crispe, were in Holmes's hand-writing - A. I did not.

Re-examined. If your books had not been here, have you a particular recollection, that you was not in London between the times you have mentioned - A. I have, independent of my books.

Q.Did you make any transfer with Holmes, except that in the year 1811 - A. I did not make any other.

Q.by MR. CURWOOD. Did you not give as your reason for not being in town, that you was ill - A. I never gave that reason.

MARY CRISPE . I am the wife of the last witness, when he was absent from his shop, I made the entries in his books.

Q. In the year 1814, was you in the habit of making entries when he was absent - A. I think I have - I looked at the book, there are no entries of mine on the 27th of May; it is my husband's hand-writing, if he had been absent, it would have been my employment to make the entries. Mr. Crispe was not absent in the year 1814, sufficient time to go to London. I remember his going to town in 1811, I remember he went for medical advice - I was with him. I never remember my husband going to town on a Friday, he is always particularly employed, it being slaughtering day, and Saturday is market-day. I never recollect his being absent upon a slaughtering day.

Cross-examined. I never remember his coming to London, or his going any distance - He is not absent much, he goes to Rochester market, but he is not absent many hours. You can go to London in the morning, and come back again in the evening.

Re-examined. Rochester market is always on a Friday; he is never absent on a Friday, except for an hour or two, but not for a whole day.

THOMAS SMITH . I am an assistant to the constable of Seven Oaks. In September 1816, I went to the prisoner's house, it is called White House Farm, near Stafford Woods, within three miles and a half of Eden Bridge. I went there to apprehend him-it is near twelve miles from London. I went on a Friday to Bow-street, on the Sunday following he was taken. I went there about nine o'clock on the Sunday morning, and Robert Burgess went with me - We saw the prisoner. I told him a gentleman wanted to see him at the White Horse, Eden Bridge; he said, if he went he would ride, and called for his horse immediately; I told him he had better walk with me, he said, he should not. I did not tell him what we wanted him for. He went towards his house, and I followed him - He went in doors, and so did I; he pulled off his smockfrock and hat, and went into the wash-house, to wash his hands. I went into his wash-house, and saw him running down his garden; I called to Burgess to run one way to meet him, and I followed him the other. Just as I had got nearly close to him, he turned round, we seized him by the collar, threw him down, and tried to hand-cuff him, without success - He made a great resistance; in the struggle he threw the hand-cuffs away, while we ran after them he got up and went towards his house. I seized him again. He repeatedly asked me to shoot him; we had each a pistol. When we got him down, he had his servants round, I charged a man to assist me, he said, he was his father, and he would not, and went away. The prisoner went into his house with Burgess and me - We took him in. I think I told him he must go to Eden Bridge. I asked his servants to go after the gentleman to Eden Bridge, but he would not let any of them go. After about half an hour, as we could not persuade him to go, Burgess went to fetch the gentleman from Eden Bridge, it was Foy, the officer; he left me alone with the prisoner; after he had been gone a little time, the prisoner said he wanted to write a letter; there were several persons about, and I was much alarmed for fear he should get away, not that he would injure me; he wanted to go up stairs to write the letter - I refused, but he would go up. I went up as far as the room door with him, but he would not let me go in; he came down stairs very quietly, and sealed it. He then walked about, talking to a person who called himself Bright, and asked him if he would write a letter to a man at Chaddy, whom, he said, owed him some money. He went up stairs a third time, and, by some means or other, got out of the window, and went away. I had told him that I had got a warrant for him, but I did not tell what it was for. I looked after him several nights and days, and searched his house several times, but could not find him.

JOHN PHILPOT. I keep the Chequers, at West Farley, in Kent, it is nearly twenty miles from Eden Bridge. On Christmas Day last, I saw the prisoner at my house, I detained him, and sent a letter to Crispe. I received an answer from Crispe, and told the prisoner that I detained him for selling out money from the Bank of England; he begged that I would let him go back from whence he came. I told him I could not, for I had pledged my word not to let him go; he said he would give me any thing if I would let him go back again. I told him Mr. Crispe had had a great deal of trouble, and I had pledged my word to stop him if he came my way. He said, he was afraid I had wrote to somebody else to come besides Mr. Crispe. I told him I had not, and shewed him my letter, and the answer. He said, he had fully intended to replace the money again, but that he had been deceived by the Earl of Thanet, and times had turned out bad, that he had not had it in his power. I told him I did not exactly know how the money had been sold out; when he said he was very sorry that he had ever ran away. I told him Mr. Crispe had desired me to stop him. I did not tell him the manner in which the money had been sold out. He said, a friend had persuaded him to run away, and he was very sorry he had done it. Sometime after, the prisoner asked me for a sheet of writing paper; when my brother came to the door for the writing paper, I was standing just outside the door, when my brother stood at the door-way, he said, "half a sheet will do;" and at the same time opened the window out of the room that went backwards-the prisoner was in the room; my brother stood at the door, asking me for the writing paper, he said, half a sheet will do, and jumped out instantly. I heard a noise the same minute that the window was pushed up, he said half a sheet will do. He ran away, through my yard, and down a meadow-nobody was with him at the time. I

and my brother pursued him-my brother got up to him first, I was close upon him; the prisoner turned round, and said, "You cannot blame me for trying." We brought him back. and secured him in a room. I do not know what passed afterwards. He said, "I cannot die above forty years before my time, and they shall not have me and the money both." He wrote a letter (a letter put into the witnesses hand), it is the same, I saw him write it. I kept it, I did not send it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you that the money was sold by him and Crispe, for his use, and that he had given an undertaking for it - A. He did not. I came up on Saturday by the Maidstone coach. I did not say, I should make a very good thing of it. I did not say, I should hang one, and that it would go hard with the other. A stranger said so; I did not.

WILLIAM PHILPOT , My brother has spoken correctly.

THOMAS POWELL . I am the keeper of the House of Correction, at Maidstone. On the 27th of December last, I was sent for, to Mr. Philpot's house - I found the prisoner there, and told him, I was come on some business respecting the Bank; he said, he understood it perfectly well, that it was a very bad job, and that he had not a minute's happiness, since it had been done; he also said, that the stock would have been replaced long before, only his friends had deceived him; he said, he had been to France, and had only returned three days; I said, you have done little Smith; he said, he had, and should have done Philpot the same way, only he had broken a glass getting out of the window. Before that, I told him, it was my duty to search him; I did, and found two papers upon him - I put my initials on them, (one put into witnesses hand) this is one of them. As I was bringing him to London, he said, Lord Thanet had deceived him. When we were at the George Inn, in the Borough, he said, he would endeavour to raise the money then, if that would do, but they should not have him and the money too.

Letters read-directed to,

Mr. W. Holmes,

Hopfield-Health, Charing,

(with speed) Kent.

Brother T.S. - I wish you to come to me at Winford, Kent, for I am detained there; do not fail-directly, &c.

Brother T.S. - I hope you will come to me, as the landlord has detained me; he says, he has orders from the lawyer at the Bank to stop me. Pray come as soon as you can, and settle something as soon as you can for the money.

WILLIAM GILES re-examined. I have been a bank clerk forty-eight years, and I am very well acquainted with the manner of making transfers in all my time. When stock has stood in the joint names of two or more persons, it is required that all the parties should invariably make the transfer. I never knew an instance to the contrary; we always require the signatures of all.

(Transfer read.)

Prisoner's Defence. In 1814, I was very much in want of money. I applied to Crispe to let me sell out stock, intending to replace it. He went with me to sell out the stock. I was not able to raise the money to replace it, and went away.

Jury to CRISPE. Q. What reason had you be think, that the stock was not standing as you left it.

A. I had no particular reason. I was coming to town to the doctor's, and my wife told me to enquire if the stock was all right, from the manner in which Holmes had been going on. I came to town to see Dr. Babington.

Q.When you came to see Mr. Ashley Cooper . did you go to the Bank - A. No.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 44.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18170219-58

420. MARY SWAIN was indicted, for that she, on the 27th of October , in the 56th year of his Majesty's reign, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly aided in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain transfer of a certain interest, and part of, in certain annuities, established and made transferable at the Bank of England by Acts of Parliament, to wit, 28l. of the said annuity, belonging to Mary Maguire , in the book of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, there named, Mary Maguire, and of, and belonging to Owen Mulhern , in right of Bridget Mulhern, his wife, in the said book described, Bridget Mulhern , widow, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like forged transfer, knowing it to be forged.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be, to defraud Robert Tutt .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be, to defraud Mary Maguire , Owen Mulhern , and Bridget Mulhern , his wife.

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, varying in the manner of laying the charge.

WILLIAM GILES . I am one of the principal clerks in the Navy 5 per Cent Annuities office. I turn to my ledger. On the 8th of September 1814, there was 40l. standing, in the names of Mary Maquire and Bridget Mulhern. There appears to have been an alteration in the name of Maquire to M'Quire. There was an affidavit made, in consequence of which, it was altered.

ROBERT WILLIAM RUMFORD . I am a stock-broker.(holding the stock receipt). I purchased the stock to which this refers. There is the name of Maquire in it. The prisoner brought me this stock receipt; she told me, that previous to her bringing it to me, she had been to the Bank with it, and had presented it to some of the Bank Gentlemen, and that they sent her to the office, her name being wrong; she said, her name was wrong, and that she wished to have her money (which she told me she had paid) immediately, for she was fearful of losing it. The prisoner was a long time at my office, and was extremely clamarous, which made me notice her. She requested me to alter her name from Maquire to M'Quire, in consequence of which, I directed my clerk to draw out an affidavit. I had a great deal of difficulty to satisfy her, that the money was safe. This is the affidavit, (looking at it.). I had a great deal of difficulty to get her to leave the receipt, in order that I might draw up the affidavit - She was unwilling to leave it. She did leave it, and about four days after, she came, and brought a person with her, to sell 12l. out of the 40l. stock. I should not know the other person again. I am sure, that the prisoner is the person that came to me, and the person for when I get

the alteration made. I had bought the stock originally. I had no recollection of the person for whom I bought it; it was the 18th of September 1814, and this transaction was in September 1815. Whens he came with the other woman, she said, she wanted about 10l. in money - I sold out 12l. stock. She introduced the other woman as Bridget Mulhern , on whose account, with herself, I caused the sale to be effected; this was on the 12th of September 1815, and on the 28th of October following, she brought a woman again to have 28l. sold out, which was the remainder of the money. I believe it was the same woman; we sold it for her. I knew her person at that time - I considered her to be Mrs. M'Quire. George Norris attended the transfer, and signed the identity, by my direction.

GEORGE NORRIS . I am clerk to Messrs. Rumford and Ashby, stock-brokers. I know the prisoner. I recollect her coming to my master's in September 1815. There was another woman with her. I went to the Bank with them, for the purpose of transfering 12l. stock, it was done. I saw her again in October 1815; there was another woman with her - I do not know whether it was the same, or not. I went to the Bank with them then, they both went with me for the purpose of transfering 28l. stock, which was done; then, as witness, I saw the name and the mark made-one of them wrote M'Guire, and the other made a mark. The money for the stock was paid at our office. I do not know whether I saw it paid, or not. They went back with me to the office after they made the transfer. I am sure, the prisoner is the person - I have not the smallest doubt of it.

JOHN BARKER MANSELL . I am a clerk in the bank. I look at the transfer. I am the subscribing witness, it is signed, Mary M'Quire , and a mark X made for Bridget Mulhern . I saw one person write the name, and the other person make the mark; two persons must have been present.

EDWARD GOLLEDGE . I am likewise subscribing witness. I saw the mark made. When there is a person who cannot write, we have two witnesses to the mark instead of one.

NATHANIEL MARTIN , I am also clerk in the bank. I have the affidavit in my hand, (producing it) in consequence of which, I made the alteration from Mary Maquire to Mary M'Quire.

JOHN BONUS CHILD . I purchased 40l. in the Navy 5 per Cents for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, by their order, for Mary Maquire and Bridget Mulhern.

JOHN CHAPEL . I look at the book. I have the transfer of 40l. Navy 5 per Cents into the names of Mary Maquire and Bridget Mulhern, on the 31st of January 1817.

ROBERT BEST , Esq. I am secretary to the Bank of England. I signed the release for the Company, it is a release to Mary Maquire , Owen Mulhern, and Bridget Mulhern, his wife-(producing it).

MARY MAQUIRE. I am a widow, and live in Kent-street, Borough. I know Bridget Mulhern. In September 1814, I went with her to the Bank. We went to Mr. Rumford's office, and saw him; we gave him 40l. and he gave us 2l. out of it. He went out. We waited there till he came back. He gave us a paper, (looking at the stock receipt), I believe that is it, he gave it into Mulhern's hand - We went home immediately. When we got home, we sewed the receipt up in a green gown lining by the consent of each-it was Mulhern's gown. We sewed it up immediately, and in about six months after, we put it into a trunk, and pledged the trunk with Mr. Barber on the 18th of March 1815 - He is a pawnbroker, and lives opposite St. George's Church, in the Borough. The next day I went to Scotland, and got in trouble there, and got into the county gaol at Sterling. When I was there, I desired somebody to write a letter for Bridget Mulhern, and ordered it to be directed to Swain. He passed as the prisoner's husband. I had lodged with the prisoner a few days before I went to Scotland. I returned to London about the 9th of March, and went to Mr. Barber's. I went first to look for the prisoner, and found she was gone away. I afterwards went to Barber, the pawnbroker, and found Bridget Mulhern's box was not there, nor my own either, (my own trunk had been pledged there also). I did not go to the Bank after the time that I bought the stock in with Mulhern. I never sold out any of the stock. I did not see the prisoner from the time that I went Scotland till she was in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not write to me to go to the Bank and sell the money - A. Never. I did not give her any authority to sell the money.

Q. How could you write to me, to send a letter to Mulhern, when you know she was in Middlewich gaol - A. I did not know it then. I went into goal to her, about two years ago. Before I went to Scotland, I sent to the prisoner to tell Mulhern, that I was in custody, and wanted some money and clothes. I desired the person who wrote the letter for me, to tell her to go to my sister, meaning Bridget Mulhern - She is not my sister, but I call her so. He wrote to her, that as soon as she received the letter, to go to Barber's and get the trunk and clothes, as the money was enclosed in the trunk. I enclosed the duplicate of her trunk in the letter. She knew that the receipt of my money was in the trunk. The duplicate of my trunk, and three 1l. notes were also in her trunk; she was to take the receipt out, and go to the stock-broker's to see if he would give her the interest of my part of the money that was in the Bank-there was one year's interest due. She was to send it to me, with three pounds, which the prisoner owed me. I had lent it to her in the presence of Mulhern; she was to send them to me with some clothes. After I had left Mulhern in custody, I had not seen or heard of her; she was taken into custody for passing as a soldier's wife, and taking their travelling charge. They would not take bail for her. This was five months after I had wrote to her. I had wrote to the prisoner to tell her of the trouble that I had got into; and she wrote to me, to say, that she thought Mulhern would be in town soon. I was in gaol for being in company with women, who called themselves soldier's widows, and drew money under false pretences. I was in custody eight months. I had been there four months, before I wrote the letter. I came to town when I was liccrated; I was acquitted of the charge. I walked to town, except occasionally geting a lift. I had no money sent me from England after I wrote the letter for the money. I was obliged to be relieved by the different parishes that I came through.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. I did not steal out

of gaol. I went to Scotland to see my sister. I was taken up the first day I was at Sterling. I have also been in Lewes goal.

BRIDGET MULHERN . I am the wife of Owen Mulhern . I joined with the last witness in putting some money into the Bank. I am a soldier's wife. I am the person who applied to Mr. Rumford, to have the money put into the Bank. I never went to transfer it, nor did I make a mark, or sign my name, to have it transferred. I was not at the Bank in October, 1815. I went to the stock-broker's in 1815, to enquire for my money, if it was drawn out, it was after I had been to the pawnbroker's. I went to Mr. Barber's, in October, 1815, where the receipt had been pledged in my trunk, it was stitched up in the lining of my gown, and put in my box. I kept the key of my box myself. I went to him to enquire for my box; he told me, that Swain had been and released it. I went to Swain's house with Mary Matthews; it was in Kent-street, Borough-the prisoner met me at the door. I asked her, if she had got my trunk; she said, she had got it. The other witness had not a key of it. I desired her to let me see it; she took me up stairs, and shewed it to me. It was shut down, but the lock was broke open, there was nothing in it. I asked her where my property and clothes were; she said, she was in distress and had taken the liberty of pawning my clothes, but would immediately get them for me. I asked her, if she had seen the receipt of the bank, or the duplicate of Maquire's trunk, or if she had taken it out of the green gown; she said, she had. I asked her to give it to me; she said, she would not; for she had had a letter from Mary Maquire to secure her property, and that she would produce nothing until Maquire came forward. I told her, I would go to the Bank, and that she would be made to produce it. She saw I was determined to go to the Bank, and she then confessed, that she had drawn the money out, she said, "I unfortunately signed Maquire's name-do not go to the Bank, I drew the money," she said, she might as well confess the truth to me. I said nothing to her about telling me, she confessed of her own accord. I asked her, how she could do that, when nobody could take the money out but us two; who went to the Bank together. She said, the stock-broker saw no more in her face than he did in Maquire's, and that he did not know the difference. I had received no letter from Maquire containing the duplicate; I asked her, to let me see the letter; but she would not.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not settle with me, in the presence of Matthews - A.Never.

Q. Did you not lodge with me till February, at different times - A. I did live with her sometimes.

Court. Q. Did you lodge with her before you knew that she had sold the stock, or after - A.Before and after.

Q. How came you to lodge in her house after you knew she had sold the stock - A. I had no where else to live; she told me, I might live with her until she could make up the money, and until her husband's quarterly pension came due; she said, she would pay me 10l. in hand, and the rest the next pension day; I told her as she had taken it out of the Bank, she must put it in again, and Maquire would come forward; I told her I would not consent to taking it back.

Prisoner. Q.Have you not received 4l. 14s. 9d. of the first payment - A. Not a farthing - I told her I could not.

Q.Did you not leave your son at my house, while you went to Hastings - A. Yes, and agreed to pay 5s. per week for him. I returned before the week expired. I never was in Carlise gaol.

MARY MATTHEWS. I know Bridget Mulhern, and the prisoner. I went with Mulhern to the prisoner's, in October, 1815, we saw her; she told Mulhern, that she had unfortunately signed Maquire's name, and drawn the money out. Mulhern had asked her, where the check was belonging to the money, and she made that answer. Mulhern also asked her about her clothes and trunk; she said, that she had drew the money out, but that she would pay 10l. in hand at pension time.; Mulhern said, that she could not take the money, but she must pay it to the Bank till Maquire came forward; that was all that passed in my presence.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell Mulhern in your presence, that Maquire had wrote to me, that there was 3l. in her trunk, but Mr. Barber had seen that there was only 2l. - A. I believe she did; the prisoner said, that Maquire had wrote to her, to secure her property.

ABRAHAM BARBER . I am the nephew of John Barber, who is a pawnbroker. I am his shopman. I remember the box being pledged on the 8th of March, 1815, by Bridget Mulhern. I did not know what it contained. The prisoner applied for it several times, she brought a letter; we would not give it up to her, until she brought the duplicate. She brought a letter in her hand; I did not take any notice of it, but told her it would not be delivered without the duplicate was produced. She applied four or five times, and at last produced the duplicate, and the box was delivered. I saw it opened, there was some money in it; I cannot say how much. I think the trunk was broken open-there was 2l. in it, and perhaps more.

MARGARET MAGUIRE . I know the prisoner. She applied to me on the 15th of September, 1815, to lend her some money, (stock receipt put into her hand), she produced this to me, and asked me, to lend her 5l. on it - I lent her 3l. 5s. on it. I gave it to Hall the constable. I pledged my clothes, to get her the money.

ROBERT HALL . I am a constable. (looks at the receipt), I received this from the last witness, on the 30th of December, 1815. (looks at a piece of paper), I received this from the prisoner; she gave it to me when she was before the magistrate, on the 10th of January, 1817; she said, it was part of the letter which Mrs. Maquire had written to her; I marked it at the time (read).

will you form my sister of this circumstance my Ba receipt for 40l. is in my trunk and will thank you to draw the interest thereof along with the 3l. which is in my trunk directed he 3l. which Mrs. Swain owes me to me care of Mr. Peter M'Gibbon, gaoler, Stirling*.

*This Letter being very much damaged, the blank part was not discernible.

HANNAH MORRISON . I live at No. 9, Old Belton-street, Long-Acre. Some time after the 22d of December, 1815,

the prisoner sent for me. I know it was December, because my husband came home that month, it was after he came home. The prisoner's husband fetched me; I went to her - She put on her things, and we went out together. I asked her, where she was going; as we were walking along, she said, she had received a letter with a Bank paper in it, authorizing her to draw part of the money from the Bank and send it to them, as they were in great distress, and that they were in gaol; she said, they were acquaintances of her's, she neither mentioned their names nor shewed me the letter. We went to the stock-broker's; she said, if they should ask for my name, I was to say, it was Bridget Mulhern. We went to the Bank with the stock-broker's clerk; she said, that she had been to obtain it, but could not get it without a second person being present - We went to the Bank. A gentleman took down a book, and asked me if I could write; I told him that I could not - He then wrote in the book, and desired me to make a mark; I did so, and drew back from the counter. I do not know what passed afterwards. I was afraid that some other questions might be asked, that I could not answer. The prisoner introduced me to the stock-broker as Bridget Mulhern. The gentleman did not ask me any questions. Some months before that, I had lent the prisoner 7l. - she paid me 3l. of it on that day. I have had nothing for this business. She told me it was out of kindness to the poor woman in gaol, and would be of no consequence to me, because what she had said was a fact. In October I went again; she said, she was going to draw the remainder of the money out, and when she saw the women she would give it to them; we went every way as before. She said, she would give the money to the women with as much advantage as if it had been in the Bank. She introduced me again as Mulhern, and we went to the Bank and signed the book as before, (looking at the Transfer Ledger) it was a large book like this. I always make a mark like this, when I take my husband's money. I will not swear that it is my mark. I saw the money paid to the prisoner each time, but do not know how much it was.

(Transfer, and Stock receipt, put in and read).

Prisoner's Defence. Maquire wrote me a letter and stiled me her sister, desiring me to take her trunk out of pawn, to take care of the Bank receipt, and to go to the Bank and draw her dividend, and send her 5l. to employ a counsellor, which I did. The duplicate was enclosed in the letter. Mulhern came to me, and asked me, if Maquire had not sent me the duplicate of her trunk; I told her, yes. She had received 4l. 14s. 9d. towards her share, and was satisfied that I should pay it off so.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-59

421. GEORGE ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two handkerchiefs, value 10s. , the property of Thomas Willis Jones and William Simons .

HENRY JOHNSTON . I am shopman to Messrs. Jones and Simons. On the 7th of February, about half-past five o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop and asked for some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed him some. I saw him put his hand on two of them, they were together. I said nothing but watched him. I shewed him several, he objected to them all. I presently saw him put the two handkerchiefs into his great coat pocket. He offered me five shillings and sixpence for those that I asked him eight shillings and sixpence for. I came from behind the counter; and asked if he really would give five shillings and sixpence for one; he then said, he would rather give one shilling, and moved towards the door. I followed him and got before him; he drew back to the counter, and as he was pulling them out of his pocket, I secured him. He had been to the shop several times before, but never bought any thing. He struck me twice in attempting to get away.

RICHARD COLBOURN . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge; he had one shilling and eight pence in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year , and Fined One shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-60

422. WILLIAM FELLOWS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , three frocks, value 6s.; three petticoats, value 3s.; two pair of stockings, value 2s.; three aprons, value 1s.; one pincloth, value 6d.; one shift, value 2s.; four yards of cotton, value 4s.; one pair of shoes, value 1s.; two books, value 5s.; and one box, value 1s. , the property of Thomas Moxon .

SECOND COUNT, stating the goods to be the property of Elizabeth Mary Moxon .

THOMAS MOXON . I am a lapidary . On the 3d of January, I sent the articles stated in the indictment, to Mr. Chambers's carman, to be sent to my daughter, at Beechhill - She is fourteen years old.

JOHN ANDERSON . I am carman to Mr. Chambers, Beech-hill. On the 4th of January, I received the box about eleven o'clock in the day time, and put it into the cart, it was directed to Miss Moxon. I was told it was taken, and saw the prisoner with it, about one o'clock. My cart was standing in Donk-street. I went down a place for a load of dung. I came back, and saw the prisoner drop the box.

ROBERT WARNER . I am a labourer. My window faces Donk-street . As soon as the cart stopped, I saw the prisoner climb up the wheel and take the box out. I am sure it was the prisoner. I pursued him, but lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. I am sure it was the prisoner, I have often seen him.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 4th of January, I was going down the street, and heard the cry of stop thief! I saw a man like the prisoner coming with the box. I followed him, but lost sight of him. I apprehended him on the 30th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-61

423. MARY ANN YORK was indicted for having in her possession a forged Bank of England note, she well knowing the same to be forged .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-62

424. MARY ANN YORK was again indicted for forgery .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-63

425. CHARLOTTE HARRISON was indicted for having in her possession a forged Bank of England note, she well knowing it to be forged .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-64

426. CHARLLOTTE HARRISON was again indicted for forgery .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170219-65

427. JOHN CLARKE and GEORGE WALL were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Jones on the King's highway, on the 30th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two watch-keys, value 18s.; three seals, value 3l. and one ring, value 6d., his property .

ROBERT JONES . I live with my father and mother at Hoxton. On the 30th of January last, I left my father's house to go to Laurence Pountney-lane-it was on a Thursday. I went into the Curtain-road , and was knocked down by some persons whom I do not know. On receiving the blow, I fell, and was quite senseless. I did not recover until the next day. When I left my father's house, I had a watch in my pocket, with three gold seals, two gold keys, and a gold ring attached to the ribbon. When I came to my senses the next day, I found myself in St. Bartholomew's Hospital. I found that I had got my watch, but not my gold seals, key, or ring; the ribbon was also gone. I am sure that they were all in my possession up to the time that I was knocked down. I was deprived of my senses. I also received several cuts on my face-it was about twenty minutes after seven o'clock. My seals hung out quite visible; I had no great coat on. The cuts appear to have been done with some sharp instrument-one of my teeth was also broken. I remained in the hospital until the Sunday following. I saw my seals afterwards, in the custody of the pawnbroker's man; there was an officer with him-it was either Gleed or Armstrong. I cannot say whether the prisoners were with the persons who rushed against me.

MARY FRIDGER . I am servant to Mrs. Alabaster, who lives at No. 6, North-green, Chapel-street, near the Curtain-road. On the 30th of January, I was in the Curtain-road; I saw Mr. Jones there, by Holywell-lane - He was on the same side of the way that I was - I was following him. We were both going in a direction from Holland-street. When he came to the pent-house there, three men rushed out and knocked him down. I am sure that one of the three men knocked him down. I was too frightened to raise an alarm; I was close to Mr. Jones at the time. I believe the prisoner, Clarke, is the man that knocked him down, by his features, but I cannot swear to him - He was dressed in a long blue great coat, trowsers and shoes - I mean the man that knocked Mr. Jones down - He appeared similar in size to Clarke. After they had struck Mr. Jones a second time, they ran away. I will not swear to Clarke's features, but he is, to all appearance, the same man. There was no light but that of the moon-Mr. Jones was in the shade; the moon enabled me to see their persons.

Prisoner CLARKE, Q. Did you not say, at Worship-street, that the man had a blue jacket on. - A. No; I said, a long blue great coat. I cannot swear to his features-to the best of my knowledge, the prisoner, Clarke, is the man, by his bulk and dress; I will not swear positively to him.

THOMAS PETO . I live with Mr. Killingworth, who is a pawnbroker, in Brick-lane, which is about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour's walk, from the Curtain-road. On Thursday, the 30th of January, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, Clarke, came to my master's shop - I never saw him before that time - He came to sell the two seals and a key, with a ring attached to them; my master looked at them - He asked 16s. for them. Mr. Killingworth asked him who they belonged to - He said they were his own, and that he had won them, at a raffle, the evening before. My master said he did not care to buy them, but if 8s. was worth his acceptance, he would give that for them. The prisoner immediately took up the seals, and went to the door, as if he declained taking the money; he then returned and took the 8s. As soon as he went out, I went to the door to shut up; it was about eight o'clock-the prisoner, Clarke, immediately crossed over the way-there was a man and a lad waiting for him; they all walked away together. I do not know the other two; there were three in company together. I was present the whole of the time that Clarke was talking to my master, and am quite sure that Clarke is the man who produced the seals for sale. I am quite positive that he is the man. There was no ribbon attached to the seals. I do not know whether Wall is, or is not one of the other men. Clarke had a blue jacket and trowsers on-my master did not suspect him. The seals and key were worth about 15s.

Prisoner CLARKE. Q. Neither of the other men, who were in the shop, can swear to me, but this man. - A. The person who was in the shop at the time is here, her name is Susanna Swinbourn. Killingworth's son was present - He is not here - He was at the further end of the shop at the time.

Q. Has he not sworn that I was not the same man. - A. He was examined before the magistrate; his examination was taken in writing. I do not know why it was not signed. I heard what he said, and saw his writing, but should not know it again. I was examined, and signed my examination.

Court. Q. Did he not swear that he was not the same that he was stouter, and he did not believe he was the same person. - A. He did. Killingworth, jun. was employed at the further end of the shop - I was nearer to the prisoner than he was.

SUSANNA SWINBURNE . I live in Gulston-place, Whitechapel. On the 30th of January, I went to get some articles out of pledge-it was between seven and eight o'clock. I saw the prisoner, Clarke. there; I am positive that it was him; he brought some seals in his hand. Killingworth, sen. asked him what he wanted; he said he did not want to pledge, but to sell them. I heard Killingworth ask him what he wanted for them. I had never seen him before, but am quite sure the prisoner, Clarke, is the man that produced the seals. I heard him say, he had won them at a rafile, the overnight. I saw Killingworth pay him for them. I stopped in the shop for something that I wanted - I saw him go out at the door. I am sure that the man that I saw produce the seals, and go out, was the prisoner, Clarke. There was one lamp and three candles in the shop.

JAMES PLEDGER . I am a painter, and live in the Curtain-road. I saw Mr. Jones there on the 30th of January ast - He was laying on his back, under a shed, or penthouse-he was very much hurt. I heard the cry of murder; he could not speak - He was struggling - I took him up; he was completely insensible. I followed him to the surgeon's, and took him to the hospital, and left him there, after seeing his wounds dressed. He came too a little in the cock, and kept getting a little better every yard that we went. Before we got to the hospital, he said he lived at Ivy-place - He said he had lost his watch.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer of Worship-street, In consequence of information that I received, I went to make inquiry about the seals, the day after the robbery, I went with Armstrong, sen. to Killingworth's - He shewed us some gold seals and a gold ring. I afterwards assisted Armstrong and his son in taking the prisoners into custody. From the description I received from the pawnbroker's man, I went and apprehended the two prisoners, at the Bull, in Kingsland-road. When we had put them in the watch-house, I went back for a boy, who had been described to us, but he was gone. The boy was in the house when we took the two prisoners, but we were not certain that he was the right one. He was in the tap-room, but I do not know whether he was in company with the prisoners. I told them what we took them for - They said they knew nothing about it.

JOHN ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. I assisted in taking the prisoner into custody. I took Peto, the pawnbroker's man, to Mr. Jones, with the seals - He claimed them. The prisoners went with us directly. The prosecutor was very much hurt when I searched him at the doctor's - He could not speak. I did not find the watch on him. (Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARKE's Defence. It is through poverty that I have not people here to prove an alibi.

CLARKE- GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

WALL. - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-66

428. THOMAS HALLARD and GEORGE HANDLEY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eleanor Bright , about two in the afternoon of the 8th of January , ( Martha Green in the said dwelling-house then being) and stealing therein eight silver tea-spoons, value 16s.; one desert spoon, value 3s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; three pieces of woollen cloth, value 1l. 5s.; three gowns, value 2l.; seven yards of sarsnet, value 1l.; twenty-six yards of printed cotton, value 1l. 6s.; ten table cloths, value 1l. 10s.; six towels, value 3s.; five pillow-cases, value 3s.; two pair of sheets, value 1l. 10s.; three pair of stockings, value 2s.; three handkerchiefs, value 6s.; one ring, value 2s.; two shawls, value 10s.; 6l. 6s. in monies numbered; and three bank-notes for payment of, and value 1l. each, her property .

MARTHA GREEN . On the 8th of January last, I lived with Eleanor Bright , at No. 4, Northampton-street, Battle-bridge, St. Pancras . On that day, about two o'clock in the afternoon, a woman called on her, and took her to the Bank of England. We had some apartments to let, and a bill in the window. About a quarter of an hour after she was gone, a man and woman knocked at the door. I have seen the man since-it is the prisoner Hallard. I saw him at Hatton-garden. He came with the woman. The woman asked me if there was not a room to let; I told her there was. She asked me which it was; I told her the front parlour, and opened the parlour door, and they both went in. While we were in the parlour, I stood against the parlour door; I had shut the street - door - A second knock came at the door, and while I went to open it, the people who were in the parlour shut the parlour door close I found the prisoner Handley at the street - door as soon as I opened it-he leaned his arm against the door-post, and said, "Pray is Susan at home?" (There had been a person of that name lodging at our house). I told him Susan had left. He said, "Left!" and seemed much surprised. He said, "How long?" I told him about a week, and gave him her address. He rushed into the house very quick, and went down stairs into the kitchen - He said nothing more then. The kitchen is under ground-the staircase may be seen from the door. I followed him. When I got down stairs, he was resting his elbows on the mantle-piece, and said, he wished to know the particulars of Susan's leaving; I told him it proceeded from a quarrel between Mrs. Bright and herself, and that she had left. At that moment, I heard a crash up stairs, like the breaking of a door. I left the kitchen, and went up one pair of stairs, above the parlour. When I got up, I saw the the prisoner, Hallard, breaking Mrs. Bright's bed-room door open. I said, "For God's sake, what are you doing?" he said, "I am looking for the woman that I brought in." I said, "The woman you brought in is now sitting in the front parlour." (I had seen her as I went up stairs-the parlour door was then open) I told him so. The prisoner, Handley, followed me directly out of the kitchen, and stood close against my left arm. He did not touch me then. The prisoner, Handley, looked up at Hallard, and asked me, whether I knew him (meaning the man who was breaking open the door); I said, "No, I do not." He said, "Did you ever see him before?" - I said, "No, not to my knowledge; he is a total stranger to me." He then looked in my face, and said, "Do you know me?" I said, "No, I do not; you are likewise a stranger to me." He took me with a grasp round the waist, and took me down into the kitchen; as soon as he got me into the kitchen, he put his hands into the breast of his coat, and pulled out a double-barrelled pistol, and said, "Now you know what I am

come for." He then went to a drawer in the kitchen, and and took out a piece of canvas, and tied it about my mouth - He tied it behind. I said, "For God's sake, do not take my life!"-He said, "I will not, at present." he desired me to give him my hand, and said, "By the word of a man-by G-d I will not, at present." He then took a large piece of dyed cotton, and doubled it, and tied it over the canvas on my mouth, so as to prevent my calling out. I was not able to call out - He tied it most violently tight. I put up my hand to relieve my mouth, and he said, "If you lift up your hand against me, I will give you the contents of this pistol down your mouth;" - He had the pistol in his hand. After this, he took a piece of printed cotton, and tied my hands together, and said, "Now you must consent to every thing." There was a turn-up bedstead in the place; he took the bed down, and said, "You must consent to go and he smothered in that bed." He then said, "But stop a moment!" and took the cotton off my hands. He had a leather strap, and strapped my hands behind my back, and brought it round my waist-(it was like a gentleman's brace) - He took me to the bed, and laid me on it. He opened the kitchen door, and called out,"Tom, have you got a rope?" I did not hear any answer; he shut the kitchen door, and said it was all right. He went to the table and loaded the pistol; he put two small bullets into it, and put some powder into the pan - He took the powder out of a little piece of paper, which he took out of his waistcoat pocket. He came, and rested his right arm on my left shoulder - He had the pistol in his hand-and said, "Now you must make up your mind to take the contents of this as soon as you are able to receive it; it will be better for you; for when you are dead you can swear to nobody, because I should be sorry if you should be brought into any blame." He then said, "But I have a few more questions to ask you."-There was a small chest of drawers by the bed-side; he put his finger to the ring of the drawer and pulled it, but found it locked, he said, "It does not matter-when you are no more, we shall soon know the contents." At that moment, a double knock came at the street-door - I heard it-at this time I was on the bed. There were two double knocks. The person knocked twice, and came down to the kitchen. The door fastens inside; there was a handle outside-nobody could enter from the outside, if it had not been left open-it was a gentleman; he came down. The prisoner, Handley, was in the kitchen, standing at the door; he left me the moment that he heard the knock at the street - door - He got up from the bed; he went and stood with his feet against the door, to prevent it from opening-the gentleman tried to push the door open, and the prisoner said,"You cannot come in." A voice from the outside, desired to come in, and the prisoner, Handley, said, "Nobody shall come in here." The person from the outside forced the door open with his umbrella-it turned out to be a gentleman. The kitchen door came open a little way; the prisoner started from the bedside, looked at the person a little while, and made a start and got off-it was Mr. Buttery. When I came to myself, I went over the house, and saw no more of the prisoners. The other prisoner, and the woman, were gone away. I went up stairs in about ten minutes. I do not know how I was untied, I was in such a fright - I said, "My life! my life!" to the gentleman; meaning he had saved my life. He went to alarm the neighbours. Mr. Best came in. I found Mrs. Bright's drawers were all emptied, and put on the bed-the property was gone; it was very soon after the prisoner went out. Mrs. Bright returned about four o'clock. I did not tell her what had passed for sometime, I was so far gone in fright-it was near six o'clock before I could tell her, what had happened. - She came back with one of the lodgers of the house. Mr. Best went to the Police-Office with her before I told her the particulars, I suppose. Mr. Best's wife was in the house with me when Mrs. Bright came back-she came into the house directly after her husband had seen the state of Mrs. Bright's bed-room, and stopped with me. Mr. Best brought her, and she remained with me till Mrs. Bright came back. I did not see either of the prisoners till about a week after, when I went to the Police Office, and saw the prisoner, Hallard, in custody.

Q. On the solemn oath you have taken, have you any doubt that the prisoners are the two men - A. I have not the least doubt of it. I had a full view of them at the door, when they were breaking it open. None of the property has been found.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. They came in about a quarter past two o'clock. I should have gone into the parlour to Hallard, and the woman, if the other man had not gone into the kitchen.

Q. On the solemn oath you have taken, do you not let rooms out for half an hour, or an hour - A.No.

Q. Does Mrs. Bright - A. Not that I know of. I have lived with her nine months.

Court. Q. Does she permit men and women to come to the house - A. She does.

Q. Did not the man and woman, when they came, ask for a room for half an hour. - A. No; they asked if there was not a room to let for a lodging; I did not ask them for a shilling. There was a girl, who was gone with Mrs. Bright, she is one of this description. Mrs. Bright has got a son; he does not live with her. I never was in a Court of Justice before. We had a person named Susan living with Mrs. Bright once. I gave a description of the prisoners to Limbric and Reid; Mrs. Bright's son took it down on paper from my mouth. I gave the description, for the purpose of its being given to the officer-it was read over to me, before it was given to them. Reid, the officer, brought Hallard up to me at the office; he was hand-cuffed; he was by himself. This was the first time that I saw him, after he left Mrs. Bright's house; I said he was one of the men; I knew him by his face. I saw Handley in Newgate, and knew him as soon as I saw him; he had the very same coat on that he wore on the day of the robbery. I was alarmed, but not insensible - He did not cover my eyes; I am sure that he put two bullets into the pistols; he put the powder into the pan. I have heard that there is a reward. Buttery did not appear at Hatton-garden. I told where he lived.

Court. Q. In the course of your examination, you have said, that the man loaded the pistol with powder and bullets - A.He put one bullet into each barrel; he put the powder into the pan; he did not put any powder in the barrels.

ELEANOR BRIGHT. I am a widow. I live at No. 4, Northampton-street, Battle-bridge, St. Pancras. On the

8th of January, I went to the Bank. I left my house a little before two, and returned about four o'clock. I had left every thing safely locked up when I went out; I left Martha Green in the house by herself. I found my door and cupboard locks broken, as well as my drawers; the drawers were left empty on my bed; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment. I am sure they were all safe when I went out. When I came home, I found a picklock-key in my room-door, and a crow-bar on my bed. Martha Green was all but dead in the kitchen; she was speechless. I found a handkerchief on the bed in the kitchen. Green could not tell me any thing for some time when I came home. I found Best and his wife in the house; they live next door. Directly that he had shewn me the state of my place, I sent him to the Police-Office.

Cross-examined. Best was the first that told me that the house was robbed. I have known Buttery for five years; he used to come to see my lodgers; the magistrate told us to find him - We found out where he lived; it was at No. 7; Brill-row, Somers-town, he is a music-master. I have paid for his subpoena.

WILLIAM BEST . I am a carpenter, and live next door to the prosecutrix. On the day of the robbery, I saw a man looking at her house, about two o'clock; it was the prisoner Hallard, he had a woman with him; they were walking on the opposite side of the way, as if they were looking for a lodging; I took notice of them, as I had a lodging myself to let. I went on, and when I came back, I saw them coming out of No. 4, which is Mrs. Bright's house; it was the same two persons. I am quite positive that the prisoner, Hallard, is the man. I saw him at Hatton-garden, about a week after. About half an hour after, I heard the house had been broken open; I went in and saw the servant there. My wife afterwards went into the house, and remained there two hours.

Cross-examined. It is a lodging-house. I will swear that Hallard is the man; I saw him quite sufficient to swear to him. He had a long, loose, dirty great coat on. I returned in about twenty minutes - He had no bundle when he came out. They walked quite leisurely towards Edward-street. I did not see a bundle with either of them. The woman had a great shawl on - She might have many things concealed under it.

Q. How long would it take to break open thirteen locks - A. You could break open more than thirteen in twenty minutes. Hallard was very stout when he came out, A gentleman called me into the house; I found Green in a very bad state-after a little while, she told me what had happened, as well as she could. She said, that the man had tied her mouth and hands, and fastened her to the bed. When Mrs. Bright came home I went to the Office.

Court. Q. When you first saw Green, in what situation did she appear - A. She was very ill, trembling and shaking; she appeared to be very frightened; I had seen her before. When I first saw her, a gentleman was with her. A person, who had put on the appearance of fright would not appear as she did. I really think that she was frightened. The lock of the drawer was burst open, apparently by the foot, it was wrenched. Green said, that there had been a party in the parlour.

REBECCA RANDAL . I live opposite to Mrs. Bright. I saw a man very much like the prisoner, Hallard, coming out of her house on the same day that the robbery happened-it was about an hour before I heard of the robbery. I saw him go in, and about an hour before the alarm was raised, I saw a man come out, but do not think it was the same man that I saw go in. I saw Hallard at Hatton-garden, about ten days afterwards - He is the man that I saw go into the house - He is very much like him; he is the same man. I will not swear to him.

Cross-examined. The man that I saw go in had a blue coat on; I think I saw him go in about two o'clock, or a quarter after; the servant let him in - I afterwards saw her come out, very much alarmed, and go into Best's house next door. The man that came out had a pint pot in his hand; he did not appear so tall as the man who went in; there was a woman went in with the man; the woman went in, and the man followed her; she shut the door.

JAMES BOTLAS. I know Mrs. Bright's house, I live opposite to it. On the day of the robbery, I saw two men walking about to and fro, and another went in; I did not see him come out; I saw no woman.

JOHN LIMBRIC . I am a police-officer. I went to look after Buttery; he lives at Somers'-town; the servant directed me there; I could not see him, I left a notice with his wife, for him to come here to-day. I went after him last night; they gave me his name. After Best came to the Office, I examined Bright's house, and found it broken open. They said there was a gentleman there; I afterwards learned his name. Green said, a gentleman, who lives at Somers-town, was in the house.

MARTHA GREEN re-examined. I did not know his name at that time, I had seen him before.

JOHN LIMBRIC re-examined. I found the bed-room door broken open, and a skeleton key forced into the lock; I could not get it out. The drawers were broken open and emptied; it appeared to me to have been done with an iron crow; I found one in the room, and compared it with the marks on the drawers-it agreed with them. It would take great strength to break open the door. Green gave me a piece of leather, a piece of canvas, and a piece of dyed cotton. On the 13th of January, I apprehended Hallard, in consequence of the description I received from Green. I took him at a public-house. He asked me if it was concerning a warrant; I told him it was not. He asked what; I told him, if the people could not identify him, I would let him go. As soon as he got to the door of the Office, he ran away. I took him again.

Cross-examined. I was present at all the examinations. Green gave Buttery's address; she said she did not know his name. I went to look for him last night.

Q. Did not Mr. Rainsford expressly order that he should be brought before him - A. He did; the examination was adjourned, in order to have him produced. I never could find him out. I did not apply to Green to go with me. I thought the man would come forward.

Q. After Mr. Rainsford directed that the man should be brought forward, why did you not enquire for him - A. I did last night. I have had a great deal of trouble with him to bring him forward. I never attempted to find him till last night.

ELEANOR BRIGHT re-examined. Limbric never knew where Buttery lived till I went to take out the subpoena, which was on Saturday. I have found him out within the

last fortnight; I did not know where he lived till then - A Mrs. Hamilton told me. It was after all the examinations were over.

MARTHA GREEN re-examined. I knew Buttery's name about a fortnight afterward. His name was not given to the magistrate; it was not known till after the prisoners were committed.

Q. Did you not say, that you knew where the person lived - A. I said, I would make every inquiry. I said, I saw him go into a house at Somer's-town. I did not know his name.

ELEANOR BRIGHT re-examined. I attended all the examinations. Green said she had seen him go into a house in Somers-town, and would try to find him.

Q. Did she not say she knew where he lived - A. No; she said she had seen him go into a house, but did not know where he lived.

MARTHA GREEN. The things produced, are the things with which I was tied.

HALLARD's Defence. I am totally innocent of the charge.

MARTHA GREEN re-examined. Did you not tell the magistrate that Buttery was a married man, and it would hurt his family if he came forward - A. He asked me if he was a married man; I said I did not know. I neither knew his name, nor where he lived.

HANDLEY'S Defence. At the time I was first introduced to the prosecutrix, the woman denied me - She swore to another man instead of me-the turnkey told her I was the man.

HALLARD. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

HANDLEY. - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough

Reference Number: t18170219-67

429. JAMES TREE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eleanor Wilson , on the King's highway, on the 13th of February , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, seven yards of moreen, value 18s., her property .

ELEANOR WILSON. I am a single woman . On Thursday, the 13th of February, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I and my sister were coming along High-street, St. Giles's , by the end of the Hampshire Hog-yard. I had a bundle under my arm, containing seven yards and a quarter of moreen, which I had been to buy for Mr. Dray, of Tavistock-place. I bought it with my own money. I was going home, towards Broad-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner rushed out from somewhere, and snatched the bundle from under my arm; he struck me on the arm, and pulled the bundle three times-it was on my left arm. My sister had hold of my right arm-it laid across my arm; I held it with my hand; he snatched at it three times - He struck the upper part of my left arm. He struck me as he was taking the bundle; it was the first time that he snatched that he struck me. He took the bundle from me at the third snatch. I fell upon my knees when he snatched it from me - I held it tight. I fell on my knees by the force of the snatch I held the bundle as tight as I could; he struck me with the side of his hand, not very hard. I caught hold of his coat; he got away, and ran up Hampshire Hog-yard; my sister and I ran after him. As he turned round, I had a full view of his face. I am sure that it was the prisoner; I saw him by the light of the shop-window, and a lamp over the corner of the place; I could see him distinctly, and I am quite positive that he is the man. I have such a recollection of him, as to he confident that he is the man - He got away.

SARAH WILSON . I was with my sister, and had hold of her right arm. I had been with her to buy the moreen. My sister screamed out as he hit her. He snatched the bundle from her after making three snatches, and ran down Hampshire Hog-yard. When he made the third snatch he got the bundle, and she fell on her knees; she caught hold of the prisoner by his coat, he gave a spring and run up the yard, we ran after him, but lost him-he got away with the bundle; when my sister screamed out, I turned round and saw him by the light of the shop. I saw his face distinctly and the rest of his person. I am sure that the prisoner is the man-it did not last many minutes; he did it in a minute or two. I saw his face when he made the third snatch; the light of the shop reflected on it-nineteen shillings were paid for the moreen. We paid two shillings and sixpence per yard for it.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I was in High-street, St. Giles's, in company with Roberts, that evening; I saw the prisoner there, and another man with him, between seven and eight o'clock - I had seen him several times before that. I ordered him to go about his business, and not let me see him there any more; he said he would, and went off very quietly; he had a white coat on at that time. I and Roberts went to the watch-house, and at a little before twelve o'clock we had information of the robbery. On the Monday following, the prosecutrix's father came down to me; I went in search of the prisoner, but could not find him. On the Thursday following, I was going up High-street, and saw the prisoner, and another man, coming from Hampshire Hog-yard. He had an umbrella in his hand, walking. They both went into the coffee-shop. He gave the umbrella to the other man. I crossed over, and asked the man, where he got the umbrella; the prisoner came out. I asked him, what he had done with his white coat; he said, it was old, and that he had given it away. I told him, that he must go with me, and I secured him. I told him that I had information, and by the description which I had received, I thought it was him; he denied it.

ELEANOR WILSON , re-examined. The man had a light coat on, it had a dark patch on his right shoulder; I do not know whether it was dirt or mud. There were four more men; one stood at each corner. I thought they had been playing, and throwing mud at each other.

SARAH WILSON. The man had a light coat on.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I was with Furzman; he has spoken correctly. GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-68

430. WILLIAM WILDING EDWARDS and LEWIS LEVICK , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , twelve silk shawls, value 10l. , the goods of Joseph Todd , James Morrison , and John Edward Todd .

GEORGE POTTS. I am warehouseman to Mr. Coulter, of Watling-street. On the 12th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I took twelve shawls to the prosecutor's house for sale. I got them from Mr. Littlewood, who is servant to Mr. Knott, linen-draper, Holborn.

GEORGE CROW . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors, who carry on their business in Fore-street. Potts brought me twelve shawls, on the 12th of February; having some suspicion, I shewed them to Mr. Morrison, in consequence of which, application was made to Potts, to know where he got them.

WILLIAM COPE. I am also warehouseman to Messrs. Todd, and Co. I purchase for them. When I buy the articles, I mark the price on them that they are to be sold at; it was the duty of the last witness to sell them for that price. The prisoner, Edwards, was a seller ; he was to sell the goods at the price which they were marked. I put the mark on the goods, and the party who sell them, are to sell them at that price only; they are not at liberty to take a less price. The twelve shawls, the last witness spoke of, were shewn to me. In consequence of what had passed. I accompanied Brand to Mr. Knott's, in Holborn; I saw Littlewood there, and a large quantity of silk goods, that were our property.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. What is the duty of the person when he sells goods - A. He is to see them entered in the day-book immediately. The daybook is kept in the warehouse on the first floor. There are four day-books, they are placed in different parts of the warehouse. If he sells in the lower part of the warehouse, he must go to the back of the warehouse and put them down. They are all took to that part of the warehouse to be entered; the clerk enters them for him. If a person wants their goods immediately, his duty is to see them entered. If he sells for ready money, they are to be entered, but they are sometimes entered after they are delivered, in the warehouse-book. Edwards has lived nine months with Todd, and Co. He was authorized to sell.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. We mark the lowest price on the goods, it is a private mark.

Q. When a person comes into the shop, he has no means of knowing whether the price asked, is right or not - A.He has not. Goods have been bought at our shop at a very low price - We have bought them at a very low price. The seller has no right to lower the price. I have seen Levick at the shop once, perhaps oftener. When goods are sold, they are put into a drawer kept for the purpose. There are ten drawers, each seller has a drawer.

JAMES LITTLEWOOD . I live with Mr. Knott, who is a linen-draper, and lives in Holborn. I manage his business. I spoke to the prisoner, Levick, to send me twelve shawls, on Tuesday the 11th of January; it was the evening before the shawls were stopped at Messrs. Todd and Co.'s house; a little boy brought them to me - I believe he was in Levick's employ. I saw Levick after they were delivered to me; I told him, that I was not certain whether I should take the twelve shawls or not, meaning those which his boy had brought to me. I gave Potts the same shawls that I spoke to Levick about. Levick was a dealer in those articles, he was in the jobbing line. I only knew him, by his bringing goods for sale. I never enquired how he got them.

Q. If any body brought them, would you buy without asking how they got them - A. We buy many in that way. Levick named eleven shillings, or eleven shillings and two pence, for each shawl, and I told him, he might send me twelve. I gave them to Potts.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I bought the goods for myself, not for Mr. Knott. Levick has sold Knott those kind of goods. I did not know where he got them.

Q. Is it a common thing for men to job about, and bring goods to the shop with them - A. It is. I do not exactly know the value of the goods; we sometimes buy of the jobbers as agents, and sometimes as principals.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What quantity of goods of this description, has he sold your master - A. Three or four dozen; we sold them for eighteen or twenty shillings.

Q.On your oath what did you sell them for - A.Some for eighteen shillings, others for sixteen shillings.

Q. How came you to say, you did not know the value - A. That is not the value; I bought them for myself.

Court. Q. Is it the custom of your trade, for a shopman to buy and sell the same articles as his master - A. I believe it is not customary.

Q. To under-sell your master in his house, while you are receiving his wages to sell his goods - A. There are shopmen who buy goods without their master's knowledge-we sell them to our private friends. We buy things without enquiring how the parties come by them.

WILLIAM BRAND. I am a City marshalman. The shawls were delivered to me by Mr. Cope, at Mr. Knott's.

Q. When Levick came to Mr. Knott's, did any conversation take place about them - A. Levick came in, I asked him what he had got; he said, he had got shawls; I asked him, where he purchased them; he said, at Mr. Todd's, and produced a bill of parcels; I told him a suspicion had fallen on Edwards, who was Mr. Todd's servant, and that I found he (Levick), had sold Mr. Knott a quantity of shawls, and asked him how he came by them; he said, he had regularly bought them at Mr. Todd's, at different times, of Edwards; I asked him, if he had bills of what he had bought; he said, he had bought both gloves and shawls at Mr. Todd's, but he believed he had not got bills of all the shawls; I asked him, if he had any more than those he had sold Knott; he said, he had sold different parcels to different persons, and mentioned their names; he said, if he had not got bills of parcels, he had entries in his own book at home, of all the goods which he had bought, and if we would go with him, he would produce his books and show us what documents he had; I asked him, if he had any goods at home, previous to that, we had found a bag of shawls; he said, he had no more to his knowledge - We went home with him, and found thirty-five shawls in a parcel, and two scarfs in a clothes box, one of which he said he had selected for his wife, from a former parcel, and the other for a friend. He produced his book - We found a number of entries of goods bought and sold, of gloves and shawls, but no bills of parcels of shawls, except one; I told him it was a singular way of doing business, by buying goods in large quantities, and having no documents to shew; he said, he had generally bought for ready money, and frequently brought the goods away himself, and sometimes he sent a lad, who was a relation of his, for them. We went down to Mr. Todd's, leaving Levick in a coach in the street, till we had examined Edwards. Edwards was fetched into the parlour, and Mr. Todd asked him, if he knew a man named Levick, and if he had not had some dealings with him; he said, he had known him about two

years, and he had at times bought goods; I asked him if he had sold him any shawls, and how many; he said, he had sold him two or three at a time; I asked him, if he could recollect how many he had sold him in all, after a short pause, he said. he believed three dozen to be all he had sold him; I asked him how many he had sold at one time; he said, two or three or so, but being pressed, he said, he believed he had sold him as many as sixteen, and at another time eight, which was the eight that Levick had bought that morning. I repeated the questions as to the number of the whole, and he gave the same answers. I asked him what he had done with the money, and if they were paid for; he said he had always placed it to his master's account. (I should have mentioned that in the course of the conversation with Levick; he said he had paid Edwards a 50l. note, for goods; I understood him it was the day before; he said that he had the number of the note). I questioned Edwards as to the receipt of the note, and he acknowledged receiving it. I asked him what he had done with it, he said he had left it on the warehouse mantle-piece when he had sold the goods, and went down stairs, leaving Levick in the warehouse, and when he returned the 50l. note was gone, and he knew nothing further of it. I asked him why he did not pay it to the account of his master; he said he intended to have the goods back that Levick had had, and to return him his money; we then questioned him whether he had made entries in the books of the money he had received; he acknowledged that he had not. I told him that I had Levick outside, and brought him up. Edwards said, he had sold the things to Levick. I afterwards found the 50l. note in the ceiling of the cellar of Mr. Todd's house, there was 138l. in all, there, including the 50l. note, and a letter with it (I produce it).

BENJAMIN JOHNSTON. The prisoner, Levick, lived servant with me, he left my service about a month ago. I had an opportunity of seeing his hand-writing, it looks like his hand-writing; it is in pencil, I believe it to be his hand-writing.

WM. BRAND. The note is directed to Mr. Edwards-(reads)-"Mr. Levick will be obliged to Edwards to send by bearer, twelve shawls; and to say how many more he has on hand, and the price of the damask scarfs Mr. L. looked at, with 35s. per cent. off." I told Levick that I had discovered the 50l. note that he had paid Edwards, and that the number he had given answered; he appeared glad of it. I asked Levick about the different payments he had made, and if he had paid for all his goods; he said he had not, for there was a balance due to the firm; he said, that he had been dealing with Todds, through Edwards (I produce the shawls).

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Edwards told me that he had not paid the money, because he hoped to get the goods back, as he had done wrong.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I only knew where Levick lived, by his telling me it was 75, Portland-street. We found the shawls laying open on the table, in the first room we entered; he told me the number of the 50l. note. He said he considered himself as dealing with Todd, through Edwards, as his servant.

MR. JAMES MORRISON . I am in partnership with John Todd , and John Edward Todd; after the discovery was made, the prisoners were together, in my presence, Edwards charged Levick with having biassed his mind; that observation was in answer to my question, whether he had taken off a discount; he replied, that he did not himself understand discount, but that Levick had biassed his mind. I asked him how the balance of money was to have been paid, seeing that he had made no entry of the goods in our books; Edwards said, that they were to have had a meeting that afternoon or evening, when it was to have been fully arranged.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Edwards had been nine months in our service; we have considerable property exposed to the mercy of our servants. I never suspected him before, but always had a very high opinion of him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I may have seen Levick at our house; but do not remember seeing him there.

Q. Did you know of his dealing with you for a considerable number of bandanas - A.Only from an invoice which he gave up, it was regularly made by people in our employ. I do not remember seeing him before he was taken; he had a regular invoice of some of the things, but not for these articles; he produced two more invoices of other shawls.

Q. When Edwards said Levick had biassed his mind, did it arise from an observation about discount - A. I had asked Edwards, generally, about the robbery, his answer was, that he was biassed.

Court. Q. Are we to understand you, that he meant to say, that his mind was biassed by Levick, as well as to the robbery, as the discount - A.Certainly so.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he not say, that Levick was not to blame - A. Not a word like it.

Q. Did you not say so - A. I might have made an observation of that kind, when we were going to his house, before we were aware of things.

Court. Are we to understand you, that Edwards said to Levick, that he had been biassed both with respect to the robbery, as well as discounts - A. I understood him to say so, he spoke generally, I had spoken to him about discounts.

WILLIAM THOMAS. I was also employed in Messrs. Todd and Co.'s warehouse. I remember Levick dealing with Edwards for some shawls, on the 8th of March, they are the same kind of shawls; he said he had given a guinea for worse some time back, he bought eight; I do not know what he paid for them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He did not say how long ago. I have not known such a falling in price, as from 21s. to 12s. I never knew such a difference.

WILLIAM COPE re-examined. I have an invoice of some shawls, which I purchased on the 12th, the price paid for them was 15s. 9d. they are the same sort, not quite so good in quality as were offered at our shop for 11s. 3d.; the shawls for which 11s. 3d., was offered, were better shawls than those that I paid 15s. 9d. for, the same day, they are worth 18s. The shawls produced are my master's property, they were brought to me by Crow, they have our private mark on them, made by myself. We do not always take the private mark off the goods when they are sold; we generally take it off, if the purchase

takes them with him we should not take it off. We may have sold several hundred of them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The prisoner, Levick, used to come to deal at your house - A. I may have seen him there before he was apprehended, once or twice.

MR. WILLIAM PAYNE , chief clerk to the magistrates at Guildhall, was then called, who read the examination of Edwards, wherein he stated, that he had been in the habit of selling goods to Levick, and that the money was not entered in his master's books, and that he intended to get the goods back.

The prisoner, Levick, put in an exceeding long defence, stating, that the whole of his dealings with the prisoner, Edwards, were publicly before the rest of the persons in the warehouse; and that he was in the habit of buying goods cheap, and selling them again. That Edwards told him Messrs. Todd and Co. were in the habit of purchasing goods very low, and he always considered himself as dealing with Edwards as their servant, in the presence of the rest of the servants; and that Mr. Morrison had often seen him dealing with Edwards.

THOMAS BARNER . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Todd and Co. - I have often seen the prisoner, Levick, at Messrs. Todds', and have asked him if I should serve him, but he would not let me-he said he would wait for Mr. Edwards. I sold in the same department as Mr. Edwards. When Edwards has been engaged, Levick has waited, from five to ten minutes, for him, after I had offered to serve him-he was always served by Edwards.

MR. NOTT. I am a linen-draper. Levick has sold me shawls two or three times - He did not keep a shop. I bought goods of him when he lived with Johnston in the jobbing line. We buy shawls, from 8s. to 18s.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When he brought goods to your shop, did he not tell you he bought them of distressed tradesman? - A. Yes, he did. I never inquired how he came by the goods.

Q. Is that the way you trade. - A. I understood him to be a partner with Johnston.

BENJAMIN JOHNSTON. The prisoner, Levick, has been in my service-he has left me about a month. I did not know of his doing business on his own account while he lived with me. He had a commission from me for selling hosiery and lace, but not for silks-silk is out of my line. I should not allow him to deal in any goods but mine.

MR. WILLIAM EVERINGTON. I am a linen-draper, I live on Ludgate-hill; Levick has sold me shawls - He described himself as a partner with Mr. Johnston.

MR. ALLEY. Did he not tell you he had them from the country. - A. He did - He said he had them from Macclesfield.

W.W.EDWARDS. - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One year , and Fined One Shilling .

LEVICK. - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-69

431. JOSEPH HEMPSTEAD and JOSEPH HUDSON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one ream of paper, value 2l. 5s.; six packs of cards, value 1l. 2s. 6d.; and twelve pen-knives, value 1l. 2s. ; the goods of Joseph Nowill and Joseph Burch , and WILLIAM CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOSEPH NOWILL . I am the partner of Joseph Burch ; we live in Jewry-street, Aldgate . In the early part of last month, we missed some property, in consequence of which we apprehended the prisoners, Hempstead and Hudson, who were our porter s, on the 18th of January; we charged them with the robbery. Hempstead took us to the house of the prisoner, Chapman, in Baldwin's-gardens, Gray's-inn-lane. I asked Chapman if he knew Hempstead - He said he did, and brought forward a ream of paper, and said he had bought it of him for 17s.; he also said he bought six packs of cards of him for 1s. 6d. per pack; and twelve knives, which were my property, he said he bought of him. The wholesale value of the paper was 2l. 5s. and the cards 1l. 2s.; he said he had known him four years.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He produced the articles when I told him my business; he is a stationer . Hempstead has lived six years with us.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a police-officer. I accompanied Mr. Nowill to Chapman's house; Hempstead was with us. I told Champman, that stolen property was suspected to be in his house. I asked him if he had bought any paper of Hempstead; he said he had bought a ream, and produced it; he said he was to give 17s. for it. We asked Hempstead if he had sold him any thing else - He said he had sold him six packs of cards. Chapman fetched them; Hempstead said he sold them for 1s. per pack-Chapman said he gave 1s. 6d.; he also brought eight penknives forward.

Cross-examined. They were in his shop for sale.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES TATE (witness for the prisoner Chapman). I am a wool-stapler. I went to Chapman's shop to buy a book, a little before Christmas-the prisoner, Hempstead, was there with some paper. I heard Chapman ask him how he came by it; he said he was selling it for a friend - I did not know either of them before.

Cross-examined. I met Chapman's wife about a week ago; she asked me if I did not remember it - I said I did. I saw Chapman give him 2l.

HEMPSTEAD. - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

HUDSON. - NOT GUILTY .

CHAPMAN. - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-70

432. JOHN HIETT and ELEANOR HIETT were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Ward , on the 18th of February , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 11s. 6d. in monies numbered, and seven 1l. bank notes, his property .

JOHN WARD. I am a mariner . On the 18th of September, I was paid my wages at the Plough, at Blackwall. I received 14l. 7s.; it was about two o'clock in the afternoon. About twelve o'clock the same night, I was passing by St. James's Church, near Old-street, St. Luke's - I was perfectly sober - I had been to Drury-lane Theatre

with some of my shipmates; I had not taken any lodging; I came from the play between nine and ten o'clock; I fell in with two women in the street, who asked me to treat them. I went to a public-house with them; the prisoner, Eleanor Hiett was one of them. John Hiett was not with them at the time. I do not know where the public-house was; I stopped with them nearly an hour, and treated them with supper; we came out of the public-house together, and then took a coach. I told the coachman to drive to Whitechapel; both of the women got into the coach with me; it drove to Old-street, near the Lying-in-Hospital. We went to a room where they told me that they lived; I was perfectly sober at the time, and am quite sure that I had 7l. 12s. 6d. about me at the time. I bought some clothes before I went to the play. I went to their room, as the room of two women of the town; it was in James-court , in the two pair of stairs front room. When I got in, I gave the prisoner, Eleanor Hiett , 1s. 6d. to get a pint of gin. She went, and when she came back, she told me she had met some people, who had spilt part of it-the other woman remained with me. When Eleanor Hiett returned, they both stopped with me. I took off my clothes, and went to bed. After I had got into bed, the other woman said she was ill, and left me; she did not return again. After she was gone, two men came up stairs; there was only one bed in the room. The prisoner, Eleanor Hiett, put out the candle - They came in after she put it out-she left the room as soon as they came in. When I got into bed my money was in my fob-my notes were there. The men came in immediately as she put out the light, before she left the room. She had no opportunity of taking my money before the men came in. I took my trowsers, and put them under my arm, and went to the door, meaning to go out, but they stopped me. The room-door was open. One of them opened a knife; there was a light that came through the window; I could see what passed in the room perfectly well; it was a bright light. I could not see any light in the passage. One of the men caught me by the collar, and the other seized my clothes from under my arm, and took my money out; the other man was holding me by my shirt-collar. The man who took my trowsers, took seven 1l. notes out. I saw him take them, and give them to the other man; they counted them in the room, at the window, before my face. He said,"there is only seven," and came back to me, and asked me if I had any more. He had the knife open in his hand. I was frightened at two men, and one with a drawn knife. I said, I believed that I had no more. He shook my under-waistcoat pocket, and said, "You lie; there is more money here." There was 11s. 6d. there - He took that also. They went down stairs, and I followed them.

Q. At the time they came to you and took the money, did they say any thing to you - A. He gave me no reason for taking it; he said, I should not lose it. When he counted the money, he said, "Do not be afraid, mate, you shall not lose it." He said nothing about the women. He did not accuse me of getting into company with his wife. The man who took the notes is not here. The prisoner, John Hiett , is the man who had the knife in his hand, and he is the man who said I should not lose the money. I did not see how I was to get it again. I dressed myself, and as soon as I got my clothes on, I came down - They did not leave the room until I had dressed myself; they ran down first, and I followed them. They ran into James-street - I lost them. James-court comes into James-street. I went to a light, and called out, Stop thief as soon as I got down. I am quite sure that there was light enough for me to see that the prisoner, John Hiett, is the man who had the knife in his hand. I went into a house about three doors further, where I saw a light, at the opposite side of the court, and told a woman; she dressed herself, and we went to the watch-house and gave information. After this, I went back with her, and laid down by her fire-place; she went to bed with her husband. About nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, John Hiett , came into this woman's house where I was. I went into the cupboard to see him, to be sure that it was him. It was a private house - I watched him, and knew that he was the man. I heard him say that he had made a fine haul last night, and that he had shared the notes between himself and his partner; he then went out to fetch half a pint of gin-the woman was not in the house at the time - He was talking to her husband; when he came back to the door, he saw me, and ran away. I had been to the officer-he took him in my presence. I am quite sure he is the man. He was searched in a baker's shop. I saw two 1l. notes taken from him. I should not know my notes again; - They were 1l. notes that I lost. While he was in the shop, the prisoner, Eleanor Hiett , came to the shop-door among the crowd. I knew her directly, and said she was the woman who was with me the night before. She was not in the room when the notes were taken.

Prisoner, JOHN HIETT . Did you see me with the knife in my hand - A. I am quite sure he is the man who had the knife; he opened it in the room.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. About four o'clock in the morning I heard that the prosecutor had been robbed-the officer of the night informed me of it. He called on me about half past seven o'clock in the morning. I went with him to James-court, where we waited to find the prisoners. As I was standing there the prisoner, John Hiett , came by with some gin in a bottle in his pocket - He was going into James-court. I did not then know that he was the man. Just at that instant, Margaret Dennett came up to me, and made signs that he was the man. She is the woman who lives in the house where the prosecutor was after he was robbed. We went into James-court, and the prisoner, John Hiett , was coming out of the house-the prosecutor waited in the court, and called out, "this is the man:" and tried to stop him himself, but he got by. I pursued him, with Burchall - We took him in the court, and the prosecutor charged him with the robbery. I searched him in a baker's shop, and found 2s. 6d. in copper, and 11s. in silver in his jacket pocket, and in his fob I found two 1l. notes. He was very particular to have the numbers of the notes - I gave them to him. There was a crowd round the shop-door. The prosecutor pointed out Eleanor Hiett as one of the women, and gave the same account that he has now. She was taken. When we got to the watch-house, I asked the prisoner how he got the money - He said that he had been at work on board the Bridgewater, and got it there for his wages the Thursday before-this was on a Wednesday morning. He said, Mr. Sims, the owner of the ship, had paid him the money. I

asked him if he was sure that Mr. Sims had paid him the money. He then said, Mr. Sims had only paid him 18s. and that he had sold his bedding and got the notes for that. I found a clasp knife in his possession-the prosecutor said it was a clasp knife that he had, for he heard it snap as he opened it. The prosecutor said, that he received the notes from Messrs. Borradale's, in St. Helen's-place.

EDWARD BURCHALL . The prosecutor came to me a little before two o'clock in the morning, and gave the same account that he has given here. Vann has spoken correctly. I afterwards went to search the apartments where the robbery was committed. I searched the room where the prosecutor said he had been robbed, and found a pair of stockings among the bed-clothes, which the prosecutor claimed; he had no stockings on when he came to give the information. I found 29 duplicates on the man - They were in a little box. He denied the charge. The prosecutor went away without putting on his stockings.

MARGARET DENNETT. I live at No. 10, James-court, which is three doors from the house where the robbery was committed-it is on the opposite side of the way. The night that he was robbed, I had a light in my room, I was going to bed with my husband, on the ground floor; the prosecutor knocked at my window - I let him in, he said that he had been robbed at the corner house, on the right hand side, and begged of me to let him in. The prisoners have lived in that house a long time; the male prisoner has been from sea more than two months. I let the prosecutor sleep in my room; the prisoner, John Hiett , had been at my house the evening before the robbery, between eleven and twelve o'clock, to ask for a light; the next morning, about eight o'clock, he came again, the prosecutor was in the room at the time; I was coming in at the door as he ran out. I was not in the room with him. I only saw him come out. I had been out of an errand.

ALBANY HOGGINS. I am clerk to Messrs. Hobart and Co. ship-brokers. I have John Ward's receipt for 14l. 7s. I paid it to him all in 1l. notes; we paid about forty men, and paid them all in 1l. notes. I can positively swear that I paid the men with the notes which we received from Messrs. Borradale, they were all dated the 5th of February, 1817, they were fresh from the Bank. I paid them on the 18th of February.

JOHN WARD. The last witness is the person who paid me my wages. I made my mark to the receipt.

AUGUSTUS BARKER . I am clerk to Messrs. Borradale. I paid the captain of the ship 700l. in 1l. Bank of England notes; the two notes found on the prisoner, are of the number which were included in the sum that I paid; they were all dated the 5th of February, 1817. I had them fresh from the Bank.

Prisoner JOHN HIETT, The woman is innocent.

JOHN HIETT - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

ELEANOR HIETT- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-71

433. DANIEL WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of February , about five in the night, being in the dwelling-house of the William Williams , feloniously did steal therein one jacket, value 8s.; one pair of trowsers, 12s.; one waistcoat, value 7s.; one handkerchief, value 2s., and two 1l. bank notes, the goods and property of Edward Seneway , and that he after, about five in the night of the same day, burglariously did break and get out of the same .

MARY WILLIAMS . I am the wife of William Williams , who rents the house, No. 44, Lower Conwell-street, St. George's in the East . I am sure that is the parish. I know the prisoner. He was in our house on the 22d of February-it is a private house. He came there about ten o'clock, with Seneway, who lodges there, he left the house about eleven o'clock at night. I gave Seneway the key, (the prisoner was with him) to let themselves in. About five o'clock in the morning, I heard somebody coming down stairs; I did not hear him come in again. I sleep in the parlour. I asked who was there three times - No answer was given. I heard the watchman call five o'clock in the morning, it was quite dark in the room, the shutters were to. I heard the street door open, it was bolted and locked. I heard him unlock the door; he went away. When I got up in the morning, I missed a large shawl which hung on a line, and a jacket which belonged to a gentleman, whom I wash for. I got up about eight o'clock in the morning; I missed nothing else-that was all that belonged to me. The jacket hung on a line, in the same room in which I slept. They must go through my room to go up stairs. It was a white linen jacket. I had only let Seneway the lodging three weeks.

EDWARD SENEWAY . I was in company with the prisoner. I met with him at the Kettle-Drum, in Denmark-street, and took him to my lodgings about half-past ten o'clock at night, he went in with me; it was on the 22d of February. I lodge in the one pair of stairs; he was to sleep with me that night. We went out about half-past eleven o'clock, he went with me. Mrs. Williams gave me the key; I returned with the prisoner to my lodgings about twelve o'clock, he went into my room with me; he said, it was too late for him to go home, and he would sleep in my room that night. We let ourselves in with the key, and left the key on the table in my room. I am quite sure that I locked the door when I went in. The prisoner slept in the same bed with me. We both got up about three o'clock in the morning; he wanted to go into the yard. I went down with him. We returned to bed again. I awoke at half-past four o'clock - He was not gone then. I awoke again at half-past seven-the prisoner was then gone. I found the key of the street door on the table. It is a spring lock and goes back without the key. I missed the things I had taken off the overnight; it was a pair of trowsers, value 12s., a waistcoat, a silk handkerchief, a jacket, some stockings, and two 1l. notes. The prisoner was taken up the same morning about half-past eight o'clock; he had my clothes on.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any more people slept in the same room - A. There was another man, he was in bed when I awoke. He did not get up in the course of that morning.

MARY WILLIAMS. I am quite sure that the jacket was safe in my room the overnight.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I took the prisoner at St. Catherine's. Seneway claimed the clothes that were on his back. Mrs. Williams did not speak of her jacket at the time, she spoke of her shirt. I asked the prisoner about the

money; he said, if I would go to a public-house, he would produce the two 1l. notes; he afterwards, said, that he did take the shawl. (I produce the clothes).

EDWARD SENEWAY. These are the things that I took off the overnight, the jacket, trowsers, waistcoat, and stockings, are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken up, I said, I could go to the house where I brought the clothes; I shewed the man whom I bought them of.

MICHAEL MORRIS . It was the man who had apprehended him, he lodged with Seneway.

EDWARD SENEWAY . I was sober when I went to bed, and I will swear that I had the notes in my possession when I went to bed.

GUILTY . - DEATH .

Of Stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of the Burglary.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-72

434. JOHN BLAKENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , one veil, value 20s., the property of Sarah Palmer , from her person .

SARAH PALMER . I live in Thomas-street, Bethnal-Green. On the 29th of December, about nine o'clock at night, I was walking in Brick-lane with Sarah Beatly - I was going home. Somebody came behind and snatched my veil off; I saw the prisoner take it. I saw him cross the road; it was moon-light. He was taken before I lost sight of him.

SARAH BEATLY. I was with Sarah Palmer , and heard her cry out; I turned round, and saw the prisoner taken.

ABRAHAM COKELY . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner with the veil in his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-73

435. GEORGE WALKER was indicted, for that he, about four in the night, being in the dwelling-house of George Dodson , feloniously did steal therein, one pump chamber, value 30s.; one key, value 1s.; and one coat, value 4s., his property, and that he about the same hour of the same night, burglariously did break out of the same .

GEORGE DODSON . I am a ship pump maker , and live in Lower Shadwell . My son lives in the house, I do not live in it; it is my house. The prisoner was my servant , and lived in the house.

JOHN PERRY . I am a watchman. On the 14th of February, about half-past five in the morning, the prisoner passed me with something under his great coat, I asked him what it was, and he ran away. I followed him; he fell down and the pump fell from him. I secured him. I never lost sight of him.

RICHARD PLUMPKIN. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house. I asked him where he got the property; he said, he found it. When I left the watch-house, I found a key in the lock-up-room, and asked the prisoner, why he concealed it there; he said, "what, my master's street-door key!" nobody else had been in the room but the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE DODSON. I lost the key six months ago, it exactly fits my lock-the prisoner had lived with me ever since last May.

GUILTY , - Aged 31.

Of Stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-74

436. WINIFRED KIRKWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , four bed curtains, value 40s.; one cloth, value 5s.; three quilts, value 12s.; two table cloths, value 4s.; and two waistcoats, value 16s., the property of William Springall in his dwelling-house .

SARAH SPRINGALL . I am the wife of William Springall , who keeps the World's End Tea Gardens, at Stepney . The prisoner had been servant to me for four months. On the 7th of February, I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The prisoner asked me for some money to get something. I sent the pot-boy out with the beer which she usually carried, when he came back, he said the person whom I told him to ask for some money, said that it was paid; when the prisoner came back, I told her of it, she absconded.

JOHN MICHAEL WHITE . I live with Messrs. Nicholson and Co., pawnbrokers, Ratcliff. I have a bed curtain and quilt which I took in pawn on the 21st of December, for three shillings; and another curtain on the 22d of December. The prisoner pledged them.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I took the prisoner into custody, and found the duplicates relating to the property, on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-75

437. THOMAS BANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , one cheese, value 30s., the property of Thomas Lewis , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a watchman. On the 12th of February, I saw the prisoner in Broad-street, St. Giles's with something on his back. I asked him what he had got, he said, it was a cheese, that he was going to take to Fleet-market; he said, he brought it from Hammersmith.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS LEWIS . My door was shut. A person must go through the passage to my shop.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-76

438. MARY BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one watch, value 4l.; two seals, value 4l.; and one key, value 12s., the property of James Dew , from his person .

JAMES DEW. I am a musician , and live in Castle-street, Long Acre. On the 21st of January, I was going home from my club, about two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in Dyott-street , at an eating-house, I went in for a plate of meat; I did not like the meat, I gave it to her and went out. Shortly after, she followed me, laid hold of my arm, and asked me for some gin; I told her, I was going home. She snatched my watch and

seals from me, and ran away. I am sure that the prisoner is the woman. She was taken six days afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. I was sober; there were more women in the room. I knew it was a bad place.

TIMOTHY CORBETT . I serve in the eating-house. The prisoner had her supper there, and soon after the prosecutor came in, and had some meat, and gave it to the prisoner; he got up to go out - I saw his seals hanging out, and told him to take care of his watch; the prisoner asked, what it was to me, so that nothing was done in my house. Six days after the prosecutor called on me to enquire for the prisoner, and said, he had lost his watch; he said, he should know her again; I told him to bring the officer to me, which he did; and we went to a public-house in Drury-lane, and met her at the door - He immediately knew her and gave her in charge. I am sure she was the woman.

Cross-examined. I do not know whether the prosecutor was drunk, or not. He did not come to me till six days after.

WILLIAM COWLEY . I am a patrol. I went to Drury-lane, on the 28th of January, and the prosecutor pointed the prisoner out; I took her. She said, if she had got twenty guineas, she would give it to make it up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-77

439. ELIZABETH LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one watch, value 6l.; one seal, value 15s.; and one key, value 2d., the property of Ralph Lambert , from his person .

RALPH LAMBERT . I am a baker . On the 7th of February, I was going down Whitechapel, about ten o'clock at night, I met a young woman who took me to her room, in Wheeler's-rents ; I sent her out for some gin. The prisoner, and another young woman, came up with a candle, I was in the dark before. The prisoner wanted me to go with her - I refused. She then snatched my watch from my pocket, and ran away. I followed her. I fell down, and she escaped. I am sure the prisoner is the woman. As I was going home, I met a man who went back with me, and the prisoner came out - We sent for the watchman.

JOHN BRAND . I am a watchman. I was sent for - I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-78

440. STEPHEN WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one pelisse, value 20s. , the property of Thomas William Jones and William Simons .

ROBERT PAGE . I am a carpenter. On the 7th of February, about one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner go to Messrs. Jones and Simon's shop, and look at the pelisses; I watched him, and saw him throw the sleeve over the bar, he then walked about, and then went up and took it and ran away. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I saw him again on the 9th, but could not leave the place where I was, it was at an Exhibition. I described him to the constable, and he took him.

THOMAS COOKE. I am a street-keeper. The prisoner was described to me, and I took him on the 14th of February.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-79

441. BENJAMIN RODGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , two sheets, value 30s.; one counterpane, value 12s.; one shift, value 4s.; two table cloths, value 2l.; and six towels, value 9s. , the property of John Collyer .

JOHN TRAVESS . I am a gardner On the 22d of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner creeping on his hands and knees under the hedge where the things hung, I went and told Mrs. Collyer;-when I came away, he was half out of the field - He saw me and ran away. I did not lose sight of him till he got to Ball's-pond. He tried to hide himself in an old house there. Collyer was with me; we secured him. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOHN COLLYER . The last witness told me, the prisoner had been taking the linen. We found him - I never lost sight of him, till I took him. I went to the drying ground and saw the things stated in the indictment, lying on the ground, and the place broken.

ANN COLLYER . The alarm was given; I went into the drying-ground, and saw a man by the fence.

GUILTY . - Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-80

442. WILLIAM BRIDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one basket, value 3s., and 31lbs of butter, value 40s. , the goods of William Batten .

DANIEL MACK . I am a watchman of Leadenhall-market . I had seven flats of butter put under my care for Mr. Batten. At half-past five o'clock in the morning of the 5th of February, I saw the prisoner take one of them, I thought he was Mr. Dean's man; when I came to deliver the butter, I found one short. I had seen the prisoner before that time. I am sure he is the man.

BENJAMIN HARRIS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in Dorset-street, about a quarter after six o'clock in the morning, with the butter on his shoulder; I asked him what it was; he said, poultry, from Leadenhall-market - I took him. When we got to the door of the watch-house, he threw it at me and sprained my wrist, and got away. I sprung my rattle, and described him to Hughes, and he took him. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

MICHAEL HUGHES . The prisoner was described to me. I remembered seeing him pass me, about half-past six o'clock - I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-81

443. MICHAEL RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , twenty yards of flannel, value, 15s. , the goods of William Harris .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a hosier , and live in Charlotte-

street, Fitzroy-square . On the 4th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the flannel was outside my door. I was told it was taken, and went in pursuit of the men. I took the prisoner in St. Giles's.

GEORGE SHEWNEY. I am a bricklayer. I was at work on the top of a house in Charlotte-street, and saw the prisoner and three more go by the shop. The prisoner took the flannel in his hand and looked at it. The three men went to the corner, and the prisoner went up to them - They talked together for five minutes, and the prisoner and another man walked as far as a jeweller's shop, and came back to the other men. The other men took the flannel, and the prisoner took it and put it under his arm, and ran up Goodge-street. In about five minutes he returned again. I sent to Mr. Harris, and we went into Percy-street after the prisoner, and took him. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN REARDON . I was with the last witness. I saw the prisoner take the flannel from the other man. I am sure it was him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-82

444. WILLIAM MARLE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one pair of boots, value 12s. the property of William Gosling .

THOMAS THWAITES . I am shopman to Mr. Gosling, who is a pawnbroker , and lives in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch . On the 21st of January, about one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner take the boots from off the nail at the shop-door. I ran after him - He ran up into one of our private boxes, up the alley. There is no thoroughfare in the alley. I secured him, and found the boots thrown down an area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-83

445. JAMES GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , one firkin of butter, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of David Yeates and Thomas Acocks .

WILLIAM AINSLEY . I am servant to Messrs. Yeates and Co. On the 21st of February I put a firkin of butter outside the door, to be put in the cart-it was taken.

JOHN BAYLIS . I am a porter. I saw the prisoner take the firkin into the Glazier's Arms, Water-lane - A gentleman followed him in-it was about three o'clock. I saw the gentleman give him some money, and told him to take care of it till he came back - A man came in and claimed it; and the prisoner said the gentleman would be back in half an hour; he did not return.

CLARA COLLINS. I live in Great Trinity-lane , opposite Messrs. Yeates and Co.'s. I saw a man go down the lane with a firkin on his shoulder - He was alone.

AARON HALE . I live in Huish-court, Water-lane. About half past three o'clock, I saw a man with a firkin on his shoulder. A man asked me soon afterwards if I had seen him, and I told him there was another man with him, in a green coat and top-boots.

NATHANIEL MINES. I am a beadle. I went to the public-house, and found the prisoner in the privy. He said a man gave him the butter to take care of.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me, and told me to wait for him while he fetched his cart.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-84

446. JOHN RYAN was indicted for that he, on the 1st of February , did unlawfully and wilfully utter a counterfeit 3s. token, knowing it to be counterfeit, and at the time of his so uttering the said counterfeit token, he had, in his possession, another counterfeit token, whereby he became a common utterer .

SECOND COUNT, charging him with offering instead of uttering.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, charging him as a common utterer.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 32.

To the Single Uttering.

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties for Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-85

447. MARY HUGHES was indicted for unlawfully uttering to Sarah Goddard , on the 15th of February , a false and counterfeit token for the sum of 3s., knowing it to be false and counterfeit; and that at the time she uttered the said counterfeit token, she had in her possession another counterfeit token, whereby she became a common utterer .

SECOND COUNT, charging her with offering instead of uttering.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, not charging her as a common utterer.

SARAH GODDARD . I live in Bull and Mouth-street , and keep a chandler's shop . On the 15th of February last, the prisoner came to my shop, about eight o'clock in the evening-it was candle-light - She asked for half a quartern loaf and a penny candle, which came to 9d.; she tendered me a 3s. token; I told her it was bad - She said it was not. I called my son, Howell Goddard, down - He took it in his hand, said it was bad, and gave it to her - She went away.

HOWELL GODDARD . I am the son of the last witness. On the 15th of February, my mother called me down-the prisoner was in the shop - A 3s. token was put into my hand; it was a bad one. I marked it, and gave it to the prisoner again. I told her she had better not offer it. She said she took it of a gentleman in the street, and would go back with it - She went away. I followed her as far as Aldersgate-street and Long-lane; she went into a butcher's shop; I saw her buy some meat, and the person gave her some change. When she came out, I followed her along Barbican. I met Taylor, who accompanied me. I saw her go into a liquor-shop, at the corner of Golden-lane; she came out, and went down Golden-lane. I followed her into No. 1, Nag's-head-court. I looked over the shutter into the room, and saw another woman with her-the prisoner had a 3s. token in her hand, shewing it to the woman. We went in, and told her she must go with us. She threw something down on the table. Taylor said, "is that a key?" the woman said it was-but it was a 3s. piece. We took her to the butcher's, in Eong-

lane, and asked if she had not changed a 3s. piece there; the prisoner said she was there. but had not offered the same 3s. piece that she had tendered me. The prisoner gave me the 3s. piece - I knew it immediately to be the same which she had offered in my mother's shop, and which I had marked. I gave it to Mr. Westwood.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a street-keeper. On the 15th of February I met Goddard. We followed the prisoner down Barbican; at the corner of Golden-lane, she went into a gin-shop; I followed her in, and she went out directly - We followed her into Nag's-head-court, and there lost her. We looked over the shutters, and saw her with a 3s. piece, and went in and told her she must go with us. She threw something down on the table; I said, "is it a key?" and the woman said "yes." It was a 3s. token. I took it up-(I produce it.)

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I am a teller at the Bank. The tokens produced resemble those issued by the Bank of England-they are both counterfeits.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties for Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-86

448. MICHAEL MULLINS was indicted for uttering a counterfeit 3s. token on the 1st of January , and at the same time having in his possession a counterfeit shilling .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be offering instead of uttering.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, omitting to charge him with having a counterfeit shilling in his possession at the time.

RICHARD SMITH PRATT . I am a linen-draper, in Bishopsgate-street. On the 23rd of January, the prisoner came to my shop about four o'clock in the afternoon, and asked for some handkerchiefs - I asked him 2s. for one; he offered me 1s. 6d. for it - I refused to take it. He desired me to cut one off. I asked him for the money - He put a 3s. token in my hand; a person came in, and told me to detain him and the token-(looking at one)-this is the token he offered me. The officer took him - He struck the officer, and tried to escape.

GEORGE FERRIS . I am a constable. I went into Pratt's shop; the prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge - He struck me and hurt me very much.

THOMAS SAPWELL. I am a beadle. I went into Pratt's shop and took the prisoner. I searched him, and found 3s. 8d. in loose copper in his pockets, and a 5s. paper of halfpence, and seven 1s. 6d. tokens, all good, and a counterfeit shilling (looking at one)-that is it. He behaved very violent.

VALENTINE TOONE. I am a hosier, and live in Bishopsgate-street, about twenty doors from Mr. Pratt. On the 29th of January, the prisoner came into my shop, about four o'clock in the afternoon - He asked the price of some stockings, and gave me a 3s. token - I told him it was bad; he took it up and went out with it, and brought me another. I watched him into Twell's, and told Sapwell of it.

GRIFFITH EDWARDS. I am shopman to Mr. Twell, in Bishopsgate-street. On the 29th of January, about four o'clock, the prisoner came into our shop and looked at a handkerchief, which came to 2s.; he tendered me a 3s. token. I told him it was bad, and asked him if he had got another - He said, No, and went away.

GEORGE MOODY . I live in Red Lion-street, Spitalfields. On the 29th of January, I was at a public-house, and saw the prisoner there; he had some beer, and tendered a 3s. piece; the man said it was bad, and I saw it was bad; he said he had no more money, except two-pence-halfpenny, and the man took it for the beer, which was one farthing short. I afterwards watched him into several shops.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD. The token resembles those issued by the Bank-it is counterfeit-the shilling also is counterfeit-it is only washed; they have never been in circulation.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-87

449. WILLIAM HENRY SAMUEL was indicted for a fraud and misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-88

450. RICHARD ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one watch, value 1l. 10s. the property of Richard Croft .

JOSEPH ROSE . I am an auctioneer. I was coming down Charles-square, Hoxton-the prisoner was pointed out to me as having stolen a watch. I ran after him, and took him; he threw the watch down.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE. I am a milkman. I saw Mr. Rose take the prisoner. I asked him if the door was open where he took it from - He said Yes.

LYDIA AYRES . I saw the prisoner drop the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-89

451. ANN HERBERT was indicted for stealing one shawl , the property of William Symonds .

It being proved the shawl was the property of --- Shoebridge , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-90

452. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , at St. Marylebone , one pelisse, value 3l. the property of Ann Anderson , in the dwelling-house of Mary Petre .

The prosecutrix not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-91

453. HENRY GURNEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Piercey (the said John Piercey and others being therein), about eight o'clock in the forenoon, of the 20th of February , and stealing therein one picture-frame, value 10s., and one drawing, value 1l. the property of John and Edward Piercey .

JOHN PIERCEY . I am the partner of Edward Piercey ; we live in Titchborne-street -we are carvers and gilders . About eight o'clock in the morning of the 20th of February, a man came into our shop, and asked me if I missed any thing - I found the picture and frame were gone. The door had been left on the latch; it opens into the shop - I cannot swear that it was shut close. In about two hours I found my property at Mr. Wise's, in Long-acre.

WILLIAM WISE . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Longacre, On the 20th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I bought the picture and frame for 1l. 11s. 6d. I am sure the prisoner is the man - He was about ten minutes with me. He came twice to my shop; the first time was, to ask if I purchased pictures - He said it was his own-that he had bought it. Mr. Piercey claimed it about an hour afterwards.

GEORGE ODDY . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody on the 22d of February - He said he had sold Wise the picture.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SARAH BALL . I was chairing at Mr. Piercey's, on the 20th of February. I went out, and shut the door after me, and shut it when I returned. James Piercey , jun. went out after me - I do not know whether he shut the door or not.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it me to sell for him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Of Stealing to the Value of 39s. only, but not of Breaking and Entering.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-92

454. WILLIAM DUGGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , one tea-spoon, value 3s. the property of William Elsden .

JAMES SNAPE . I am servant to Mr. Elsden; he keeps the Paul's-head, in Paul-street, Finsbury-square . On the morning of the 1st of February, I was lighting the fire; I saw the prisoner take the spoon out of an empty glass, which was on the table, aRd go out - I did not follow him. In about half an hour he returned. I charged him with it - He said he had not got it.

EPHRAIM SMITH . I was in North-green, Paul-street, the prisoner was standing near me. Snape came to him, and told him he would take him up for something, I did not hear what. I saw the prisoner go away, and put something under a heap of stones - I went to the place, and found the spoon, and took it to Elsden.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded derangement.

ANN PEARCE . I live next door to the prisoner. I believe he is sometimes out of his mind.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-93

455. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one watch, value 10s.; one violin. value 10s.; one violin bow, value 1s.; one coat, value 4s.; one waistcoat, value 1s; one pair of shoes, value 1s.; and one pair of gaiters, value 6d. , the property of John Connor .

WILLIAM MOXON . I am a pawnbroker, residing in South-street, Manchester-square. I have a violin and bow, and a silver watch-the watch was offered to pledge about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 22d of January, by the prisoner. I had information that they had been stolen. and detained the prisoner. He had only the violin and bow with him at the time. He said, that he gave 30s. for the watch some years back - He afterwards said he gave a Jew 12s. for it last Monday. He wanted me to let him go. I went to the shop-door to look for the man - I had sent for the prosecutor, and he ran out at the side-door. I stopped him, and took him to the watch-house. He then said, he had left some things in a bag behind the counter, he desired me to get them-they were the violin and gaiters; he had the gaiters on his legs when he came into the shop, but while I detained him, he took them off, and put them into the bag.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am a constable; I was in the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in. He was asked what he had done with the coat and fiddle - He said he had left the fiddle at the pawnbroker's-he had the waistcoat and shoes on him; he said he had parted with the coat. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-94

456. THOMAS BEVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 15s. 8d. in monies numbered, and four 1l. notes , the property of William Franklin .

WILLIAM FRANKLIN . I keep the Goat, in Grosvenor-street ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 3d of February, in the evening, he said that he was to take change for a 5l. note to Mr. Pedley, in Grosvenor-street, and that I was to deduct for the beer that was owing. The next morning, about nine o'clock, he asked me for the change - I gave him four 1l. notes, and 15s. 4d. - he did not give me the 5l. note. He went out for the pots, and I sent a person to look for him, who found the pots tied up to the railing. I went to Mr. Pedley, who said he had not brought the change. I took him in Golden-lane.

THOMAS COOPER . I am servant to Mr. Pedley, in Grosvenor-street; we deal with Franklin. We did not send for change for a 5l. note at any time whatever. The prisoner used to bring our beer.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a tailor. I sold the prisoner a coat and waistcoat for 1l. 3s. - he gave me two 1l. notes, and I gave him change. I have parted with one of the notes-the prosecutor claimed the one I had left-(I produce it).

WILLIAM REID. I am an officer. On the 14th of February, I took the prisoner in charge. He told me he bought the clothes in Field-lane. The prisoner said, if he had taken the notes the evening before, as he intended, we should never have taken him.

WILLIAM FRANKLIN. The note produced is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-95

457. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 18lbs. of lead, value 3s. belonging to

and being the property of William Tillard , Esq. and fixed to a certain dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to a certain building.

GEORGE TERRY . I am surveyor to Mr. Tillard, he is the freeholder of the house in Norton Falgate.

WILLIAM FLINT . I am a beadle of Norton Falgate. I know Mr. Tillard's house in Elder-street, Norton Falgate . About a fortnight before the robbery, I was at the house and saw the water-pipe secure and fixed to the building; it came through the house into the yard. Mr. Harlow had the key. I saw the house when the prisoner was taken, on the 15th of February, and found the waterpipe completely twisted off, and laid on the ground in the yard. It was worth 3s. We secured the lock and heard the prisoner enter the house, and bolt the door after him; we went and found him in the parlour.

RICHARD EVESON . I am an headborough. About one o'clock in the morning, of the 5th of February, I found the padlock of the outer-door loose. We went into the house and found the leaden cistern taken - We went to the house about six o'clock in the morning, with Byrne and Hall; we found nobody there. We went into the front room, and in about a quarter of an hour, I heard the door open, and footsteps come in; the door was shut. We went into the back room which leads into the yard, and found the prisoner there. We found a crow-bar in the yard. The padlock of the door appeared to have been forced by the crow-bar. We watched the house from ten o'clock till six.

FLINT re-examined. I was with them. The pipe was taken away, it was safe the last time I was there. The crow-bar was there. I compared the crow-bar with the marks in the sink of the cistern-it fitted. When we went out, we left the padlock on the door, as if it was shut; nobody could tell that it was open. The sink was worth fifteen shillings.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-96

458. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 60lbs. of lead, value 5s., and one fixture, (that is to say) one copper, value 20s., belonging to Eliza Brown , and fixed to a certain dwelling .

SECOND COUNT, the same only stating them to have been fixed to a certain building.

ELIZA BROWN. I live at Kentish Town. The house No. 5, Devonshire-street, Queen-square , is mine, it was unoccupied. The copper was safe on the 16th between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I missed it the next morning.

ROBERT HORNSEY . I am a carpenter. On Monday the 17th of February, about ten minutes before seven o'clock in the morning, I was going to do some work at Mrs. Brown's house, No. 5, Devonshire-street. I put the key in the door, and found it unlocked, there was something behind it, I could not open it. I found two men behind the door with loads on their backs. I took hold of a man who dropped his load and knocked me down, and gave me a black eye. My fellow workman struck one of them a violent blow over his arm with his axe - They both ran away. The man pursued and brought the prisoner back. I believe the prisoner to be one of the men. He left his hat and knot in the house. When the prisoner was taken to the watch-house, he sent to the house for his hat. He had the copper on his head and some lead.

JOHN GOULD . I am a carpenter. I opened the door and found the prisoner, and another man, behind the door; the prisoner had the lead on his head. I struck one of them. They both rushed out. I pursued the prisoner and took him. I am sure the prisoner is the man. He asked me to let him go, and he tried to knock me down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men took me to the house, and gave me the copper to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-97

459. JAMES GATFIELD was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD BARROW . I am a surgeon . The prisoner was employed to take out my bills , but not to receive money.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-98

460. THOMAS BURN and RICHARD HOLMES , were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 11lbs of beef, value 2s. 6d. , the property of Richard Christopher .

RICHARD CHRISTOPHER . I am a butcher , and live in Cross-street, Hoxton . On the 1st of February, I missed the beef, and in about ten minutes after, the prisoners, and beef, were brought to my house by the patrol.

ROBERT LOCKE . I am a patrol. On the 1st of February, I saw the two prisoners and another man, coming along with the beef; I asked them what they had got; they said it was beef, which they had bought at Hoxton. The prisoner, Holmes, had it in his hand - He ran away when I took hold of him.

(Property Produced and sworn to.)

BURN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

HOLMES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-99

461. JOHN DUGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 106lbs of lead, value 40s., belonging to Job Powell , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be fixed to his out-house.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the property to belong to Andrew Reid , William Wigram , George Hobson , and David Hunter .

JOB POWELL. On the 24th of January, I lived at the New Inn, Tottenham-court-road . My window, except the sky-light, is covered with lead, it was safe when I went to bed at half-past eleven o'clock; I hold the house of Messrs. Reid and Co. When I went to bed I heard a noise over my head, I looked out of the window, and saw a man cutting the lead - He was dressed in white trowsers and had no hat on - He was folding the lead flat. I called out to him, what are you doing, and stop thief! I saw him drop over the parapet-wall. I got a light and found the

lead was entirely moved off the place that it was cut from, and folded up. I do not know whether the prisoner is the man, or not.

JOHN JOYCE . I am a labourer in the India House. On the 1st of February, I was crossing towards Mr. Powell's house, I heard the cry of stop thief! and saw a man in white trowsers jump off the place; I was about six yards from him. He ran away - I pursued him, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped. The prisoner is the man. He had no hat on. He was taken not far from the spot. I am sure I never lost sight of him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

462. JAMES TACTER was indicted for the same robbery.

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-100

463. GEORGE DODD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , five waistcoats, value 15s.; nineteen pinafores, value 10s.; five night gowns, value 5s.; twenty-six pair of stockings, value 26s.; eleven sheets, value 2l.; six pillow-cases, value 6s.; two bolster-cases, value 2s.; twenty-one towels, value 21s.; nine table cloths, value 2l.; two aprons, value 2s.; one counterpane, value 2s.; nine petticoats, value 7s.; twenty-five napkins, value 25s. , the property of James Absolam and John Mills .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of James Absolam only.

JAMES ABSOLAM . I am a carrier . and live at Clapham. I am the partner of John Mills . I received a bundle containing the articles stated in the indictment, on the 3d of February. I put it on the tail-board of my cart, to take it to Clapham. I went into the Spotted Dog, in the Strand , I came out in two minutes, and was informed the man had taken the bundle. I run after him up Newcastle-street.

WILLIAM WEBLIN . I am a carrier. I saw a man take the bundle off the cart, and told Absolam of it.

HENRY GUTHRIE . I am servant to Mr. Absolam. I went up Newcastle-street and Wych-street. I saw the prisoner in Blackmore-street, he was walking with the bundle on his shoulder, there was another man with him; he was going to rest, and I laid hold of the bundle, and he ran away. I left the bundle in a shop and pursued him, calling out stop thief! he was stopped. I am sure the prisoner is the man. He left his hat behind him. He had no hat on when he was taken.

RUPERT TURNER . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running; I took-him he had no hat on.

RICHARD SHAW . I am a patrol. A hat was brought into the watch-house, which the prisoner said was his.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-101

464. BARNABY SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , one coat, value 16s., the property of Isaac Woodhouse , and one table cloth, value 5s. , the property of James Ricketts .

ISSAC WOODHOUSE. I am servant to Mr. Ricketts, who lives at Hertford. On the 4th of January, my cart was in Wentworth-street . My coat was in the cart, and a table cloth of my master's was in the pocket. I lost it between seven and eight o'clock in the morning.

RICHARD WALLY . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the cart; I secured him. I am sure he is the man. (Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-102

465. MARGARET READING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , two pillow-cases, value 4s.; two sheets, value 6s.; one blanket, value 5s.; one teakettle, value 2s.; one saucepan, value 2s.; one looking-glass, value 2s. 6d.; one pair of tongs, value 1s. 6d.; one poker, value 6d., the property of Susan Howe , let by contract to the prisoner with a certain lodging .

SUSAN HOWE. I live in Long-alley, Moorfields . The prisoner took a room of me at 3s. 6d. per week, she only staid two days. The articles stated in the indictment were let with the room. I went into her room and found the things gone. She came back that night, and when she saw me she ran away. I met her soon after and secured her.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am an headborough. On the 31st of January, the prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge; as we were going to the watch-house, she asked me what the consequence would be; she would not tell me what she had done with the things.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-103

466. ELIJAH RAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , twelve handkerchiefs, value 18s. , the property of James George .

No person attending to swear to the property, the prisoner was,

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex, Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-104

467. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one petticoat, value 2s.; one shift, value 1s.; four pair of stockings, value 3s.; and two towels, value 1s. , the property of Eliza Brown .

ELIZA BROWN. On the 13th of February, a man brought the articles stated in the indictment to my door; I had hung them in my garden.

WILLIAM OSBORN . I was in the King's-road, Chelsea , about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner and another man looking over the garden wall; I watched them, and saw the prisoner go over the wall and the other man waited on the other side; I asked the man what he wanted there, he ran away. I waited till the prisoner came over the wall with the articles stated in the indictment; I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-105

468. TIMOTHY MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one deal plank, value 6d. , the property of James Burton , Esq .

LUKE BARR . I am employed to watch Mr. Burton's buildings, in Charles-street, Pall Mall . I saw the prisoner coming out of Market-street, between four and five o'clock in the morning, with the timber under his arm; I secured him, and asked him where he got it from, he said from Charles-street; I commanded him to take it back, and he did.

ICHARD DAVIS . I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-106

469. JAMES BOWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one hat, value 4s. , the property of James Sparshot .

JAMES SPARSHOT. I keep a Chandler's shop on Saffron-hill . On the 10th of February, I left my hat in my shop; I missed it.

RACHAEL BARNET. I live in Field-lane. On the 10th of February the prisoner came into my shop, to sell a hat for eighteen pence; he said it was his father's who kept a stall in Fleet-market; I told him to send his father and I would pay him for it; I sent my little girl with him, with the money; he then said, he got the bat in Spa-fields. The next day the prosecutor claimed the hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-107

470. WILLIAM RYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one watch, value 1l.; one piece of ribbon, value 1d.; one seal, value 1s.; and one key, value 1d. , the property of Robert Winterbottom .

ROBERT WINTERBOTTOM. I am in the first regiment of Life Guards -the prisoner was in the same regiment. On the 26th of January, early in the morning, I found my box broken open, we were both quartered in the same room at Hyde Park Barracks . I suspected the prisoner as he had been in the room by himself, and reported him to our quarter-master; his box was searched, and a pair of compasses found there, that exactly fitted the marks on my box lid. The next day, I found my watch at a pawnbrokers. All the men were brought into the same room with the prisoner, and the pawnbroker came down and pointed the prisoner out among them, as the man who had pledged it. I had seen the watch the afternoon before.

WILLIAM KING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cambridge-street, Golden-square. On the 25th of January, the prisoner pledged a watch with me for seventeen shillings. I am sure the prisoner is the man. It was between six and eight o'clock in the evening.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner stated, that he could prove an alibi, but called no witnesses for that purpose.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-108

471. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , four pounds of feathers, value 3s., the goods of John Vince , the said goods being in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house, let by contract by him to the prisoner, to be used with the lodging .

JOHN VINCE . I am a box-maker , and live in Domingo-street, Old-street . I let the prisoner a furnished room, at 4s. per week. He did not pay his rent regularly; I asked him why he did not pay it - He said it should be paid the next evening. He asked me to go up stairs, which I did, and my wife followed me - We missed some feathers out of the bed. I heard him come down stairs soon after, and I went into the passage; he had got a bundle in his hand. I asked him what it was - He said it was nothing but his work; he was a tailor ; he was all over feathers. I asked him what he had been about; he said, he had been sweeping the room. I stopped him at the door, and went up into his room, and found the bed turned down, and the feathers about the room-some of them were under the grate, and some sticking to the broom with which he had swept the room. We took him up stairs, and he shook his bundle in the room; it contained a stuff gown, and some feathers-the feathers exactly corresponded with those in the bed.

MARY ANN VINCE . I am the wife of the last witness. I found the bed had been ripped open about a quarter of a yard, and sewed up with white cotton; it was perfectly sound before that. I found a needle and cotton in the drawer-the bed was a great deal less than before-there might have been more taken out than what he had got there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My father gave me the feathers.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-109

472. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October, in the 57th year of his Majesty's reign , one watch, value 20s.; two seals, value 2d.; one key, value 2d.; and four shillings , the property of John Coleman .

The indictment stating the robbery to have been committed in October, in the 57th year of his Majesty's reign, which period has not yet arrived, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-110

473. SAMUEL NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 8lbs. of pork, value 6s. , the property of John Selliss .

JOHN SELLISS. I am a porkman . I live in Church-street, Hackney . On the 30th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I heard my shop-door open, and went to see what it was - I found nobody there, but missed the pork out of the window. I ran out, but could see nobody. The officer brought the prisoner into my shop, with the pork. I am sure it was mine.

ROBERT PRESCOD . I am a beadle of Hackney. On the 30th of January, soon after six o'clock, I met the prisoner, with something under his great coat, just by Selliss's house. I asked him what it was - He said pork that was

given him by a man, who brought it from the country. I took him to Mr. Selliss's house, and he claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-111

474. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 17lbs. of bacon, value 4s. 6d. , the property of Thomas Hood .

THOMAS HOOD. I am a cheesemonger , and live at Pentonville . On the 3d of February, I lost my bacon between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning.

SAMUEL LANE . I live opposite Mr. Hood's, and saw the prisoner, on the 3d of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, go into his shop and take the bacon out; I ran out, and followed-him he threw the bacon down, and was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-112

475. RICHARD DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , one handkerchief, value 2s., the property of Joseph Wrightson , from his person .

JOSEPH WRIGHTSON. I am a plasterer . On the 13th of February, I was in Palace-yard, Westminster , at the meeting; I felt a hand in my pocket, I turned round, and found Reid had got the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM REID . I am an officer. I was on duty at the meeting, and saw the prisoner attempt several pockets, and at last I saw him take the handkerchief out of Mr. Wrightson's pocket - I took him, and he threw it away.

WILLIAM REID , sen. I saw the prisoner following several persons, and saw him take the handkerchief out of Mr. Wrightson's pocket. I asked him how he came to do it when he saw me, he said he did not think I would take him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-113

476. RICHARD BAX was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 70lbs. of candles, value 40s.; and one basket, value 1s. , the property of John Treacher , Benjamin Treacher , James Treacher , and Edward Treacher .

JOHN TREACHER . I am the partner of Benjamin, James and Edward Treacher ; we are tallow-chandlers -the prisoner was our carman .

JOHN GAY . I am a patrol. On Sunday morning, the 26th of January, about twenty minutes after seven o'clock, the prisoner was coming down Cow-cross, with the basket on his shoulder. I stopped him, and asked him what he had got there - He said it was soap and candles. I asked him where he was going - He said, to the Cross Keys, in St. John's-street. I told him he was going the wrong way, and took him to the watch-house. He said, he lodged in Shoe-lane. I went there, and found where his masters lived.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 26th of January, a hamper, containing the articles stated in the indictment, was brought to the watch-house. The prisoner said it was soap and candles, which he was going to take into the country. I told him there was no direction on it. He said, the carman knew where to take it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-114

477. ANN BURTON and ELIZA FORD were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one gown, value 4s.; three yards of calico, value 3s.; one apron, value 6d.; and one handkerchief, value 2s., the property of John Daly ; and two towels, value 1s. , the property of Alexander Marsden .

MARY DALY . I am the wife of John Daly; we live in George-street, Hanover-square , I am house-maid to Mrs. Marsden, who lives there. On the 5th of February, I had been in the parlour - I came down and missed the things out of the kitchen. I saw the two prisoners going up the area steps, and followed them. Burton had the bundle-they had no business in the house. I overtook them in Princes-street; they separated just as I came to them. Ford had a box of millinery. I stopped Burton, and brought her back; I took the bundle from her-it contained the articles stated in the indictment - They were carelessly tied up. She said, the other girl took them off the shelf, and gave them to her - They were all mine, except the towels. In about five minutes, the other prisoner came back to look for Burton; I sent my husband to take her. I am sure she was with Burton.

JOHN DALY. I am the husband of the last witness. My wife had got Burton, and in a few minutes the other prisoner came down, and I took her. I told her what I took her for - She said nothing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM NEWITT . The prisoners said they found them.

BURTON - GUILTY. Aged 11.

FORD - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-115

478. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one handkerchief, value 2s., the property of John Donne , from his person .

JOHN DONNE . I am a solicitor's clerk , and live in Edward-street, Blackfriars-road. On the 29th of January, I was in Bedford-row , between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day. I felt something at my pocket, and put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief. I turned round, and found the prisoner and another person with him; the prisoner had the handkerchief in his hand - I charged him with it - He said nothing. Mr. Hammond came up and secured him; the other man ran away.

CHARLES HAMMOND . I am an oilman, and live in Brownlow-street. I was standing at my door, and saw Donne walking, and two men behind him, attempting his pocket. I followed them into Bedford-row, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out. I took him - He attempted to run away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-116

479. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one live tame fowl, price 3s. , the property of Peter Cassanet .

PETER CASSANET . I live at Prospect-row, Hackney . On the 19th of February, I saw the prisoner take the fowl, as I was coming out of my gate; he walked about twenty yards with it, and put it down; I immediately took him - He said he did not take it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-117

480. THOMAS SHELDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one sack, value 6d., and 112lbs. of potatoes , value 3s., the property of George Bowler .

GEORGE BOWLER . I keep a potatoe-warehouse , in James-street, Covent-garden . On the 30th of January, the sack of potatoes stood against my door, about eleven o'clock in the morning - I missed them; I had seen them safe at ten o'clock. A person told me they were taken, and I asked the prisoner where his cart was; I had seen him at our door before, and knew him. He said, he had not brought it with him that morning. I found his cart, and my potatoes in it. He laid hold of me, and said, if I took them out of his cart, he would bring an action against me. I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. People sometimes carry potatoes for other persons.

WILLIAM SELWYN . I saw my master's potatoes in the prisoner's cart; I knew the sack.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Several persons gave the prisoner a good character.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-118

481. CHARLES WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one hat, value 14s., the property of Robert Bryan , from the person of Charles Bryan .

CHARLES BRYAN. On the 10th of February, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the evening, I had my uncle's ( Robert Bryan ) hat in my hand. I was in St. Margaret's Church-yard, Westminster , going towards the Bridge; the prisoner came up to me, and asked me what was o'clock, and snatched the hat out of my hand. I ran after him, and called out, stop thief! he was stopped near the gas-lights. He was only out of my sight while he turned the corner. After he was taken, he said another person had thrown the hat away, and shewed me where it was-it was mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. I am sure he is the boy.

MATTHEW WARE . I am a hearth-stone-maker. I heard the cry of stop thief! I saw the prisoner running away - I stopped him; he was not far from Bryan; he told me where the hat was-the boy claimed it.

Cross-examined. The prisoner pointed to the place.

LIEUT. JAMES STEWART . I was passing Palace-yard, and heard the alarm. I saw the prisoner running; I came up when he was stopped; he said he threw the hat into the church-yard.

CHARLES SMITH . I live in Portland-road. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running out of the churchyard - He was running from the cry; nobody else was running.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-119

482. JOHN WATERHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 60lbs. of butter, value 1l. 16s., and one firkin, value 1s. the goods of Charles Pricket .

ROBERT MORGAN . I am servant to Mr. Charles Pricket , who is a cheesemonger , and lives in St. John's-street, Smithfield . On the 19th of February, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was taking some firkins from my cart into the shop. I heard the cry of stop thief! and missed one of them.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I was in St. John's-street, and saw the prisoner, in company with another man, pointing to the shop several times. There were several firkins outside the door; I saw the prisoner go up to one; his companion took hold of one end, and the prisoner took hold of the other-they went towards Smithfield. I called out, and the prisoner threw the firkin down. I secured him; the other ran away.

JOHN GAY . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner and another man by the shop. The other man helped the firkin on the prisoner's shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-120

483. HENRY STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one hat, value 5s.; one pair of boots, value 3s.; and two pair of shoes, value 2s. , the property of William Hobson , jun .

WILLIAM HALL . I am servant to Mr. Hobson; he lives at Hampstead-hill . On the 19th of February, the servant told me there was a man in my master's dressing-room. I saw the prisoner about fifty yards from the house, going towards town; he had the articles stated in the indictment with him; it was about two o'clock. He dropped the boots - I had seen them safe in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-121

484. DAVID PICKARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , fifteen yards of calico, value 1l. , the property of William Rickaby .

THOMAS GARNER . I am servant to Mr. Rickaby, who is a linen-draper , in Oxford-street . On the 15th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I found the prisoner in custody with the cotton-it hung outside the shop.

DRAKE SEWELL . I live in Oxford-street. I saw the prisoner take the cotton from the door. I secured him - He then put it down.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-122

485. GEORGE PIPE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 100 pieces of mahogany, value 18s.; 100 pieces of beech, value 12s.; and one chissel, value 6d. , the property of John Deacon .

JOHN DEACON . I am a chair-maker , and live in Riding House-lane, Portland-street . The prisoner was my journeyman ; I had frequently missed property. On the 25th of February, he was brought to me by my son and foreman-they accused him with taking my property, and produced some pieces of mahogany, which, they said, they found at his lodging. He denied taking them, but did not deny their being found at his lodging - He was taken into custody. I told him, I would send for an officer - He fell down on his knees, and begged my pardon, and said, that he had taken them, but they were the only things he had taken in his life, and wanted me to let him go. We went to his house with a search-warrant, and found several pieces of mahogany belonging to chairs, which were my property, and a table-flap, which I had missed a day or two before, shut up between two press bedsteads; I also found several chair-feet, and a piece of mahogany on his drawers, covered over with linen; and his bureau contained several tools, one of which had my name on, and another appeared to have had the name filed out. We found several pieces of mahogany in a dark hole under the kitchen stairs, covered with fire-wood.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. I have 60 workmen. I said nothing to induce him to confess.

SAMUEL BINNS . I am foreman to Mr. Deacon. I missed some wood. I saw the prisoner go out on the evening of the 25th, and thought he had something under his coat. I told Mr. Deacon of it. I went to the prisoner's house, and found five chair-back legs, which were Mr. Deacon's property. I asked the prisoner what he did with them - He said, they were not Mr. Deacon's, for he had had them by him for a long time, and had cut them by a mould which he had made at the place he worked at, before he came to our place. He went with me to Mr. Deacon's. He denied taking them. Mr. Deacon went for his great coat, and the prisoner told me he hoped he would not be hard with him, for he had only taken two back feet, and it being such a trifle, he hoped he would look over it. I told him, I hoped this was all, as I missed other things. He said, he had no more. I told him Mr. Deacon had sent for a constable. Mr. Deacon came back, and I told him, that the prisoner confessed taking the chair-feet. The prisoner kneeled down, and begged of him to forgive him - He was taken into custody. On the 27th of January, we took out a search-warrant, and went to his house, and found the property stated in the indictment; some of it was wrapped up in sheets in the bed, some in another bed, and some on the drawers, and a great deal under the staircase in the cellar; we also found several tools, one of which had Mr. Deacon's name on it. I can swear to the property.

Cross-examined. They are cast in a common mould.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. I went with the witness with the search warrant. They have spoken correctly. I took a cart load away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I should not have confessed, if Binns had not said it would be better for me.

SAMUEL BINNS. It is totally false.

GUILTY . - Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-123

(His Majesty's Special Commission was then put in and read, empowering the Court to proceed to the trial of.)

486. JOHN BEAN HANNAY , who was indicted for feloniously carrying away, and removing as slaves, and for the purpose of being sold, transferred and dealt with as slaves, twenty persons from a certain part of Africa, called Calabar , on the 20th of January , in the fifty-sixth year of His Majesty's reign.

SECOND COUNT, for having wilfully and feloniously received, detained, and confined on board a schooner, twenty other persons, for the same purpose, and from the same place.

THIRD COUNT, for wilfully and feloniously employing a schooner, for carrying away and removing twenty other persons.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating it to be within the jurisdiction of the Admiral.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating it to be without the jurisdiction of the Admiral.

JOSEPH EVANS . In December, 1814, I was shipped on board the James, at Liverpool, the vessel was from three to four hundred tons burthen. Joseph Porter was then captain. The ships complement was thirty-two souls. We had a schooner on deck. The prisoner was chief-mate . Our cargo consisted of salt, iron, guns, powder, rum, &c. We left Liverpool in December, bound for Africa. We first went to Cork, from there to Madeira, from there to Trade Town on the coast of Africa; we traded there - We came to Calabar in the August following. In October, the captain was taken ill and died, upon which the prisoner succeeded him - I was then made mate. The ship went eighty or ninety miles up the Calabar river; the Qua river flows into the Calabar river, before it goes into the sea. Before we arrived at Calabar, we had some irons on board, they were not proper handcuffs, but were intended for handcuffs; five of them were taken from the ship, and put on board a Portuguese schooner. When we were up the river, the prisoner told me, there was a cargo of slaves for me to carry, belonging to Duke Ephraim. We had a schooner on board. While we were on the coast of Africa, it was used to carry ivory and blackwood. When we were at Calabar, the prisoner ordered the ships bulk-head to be knocked in, to make a bulk-head to the schooner with it, to divide the male and female slaves; the ivory and wood could be better stowed in the schooner without this partition. This alteration was made the morning before I went with the slaves; I went on there for palm oil, and returned on board the ship in the afternoon, and the prisoner told me, that the schooner was ready to take in the slaves. The partition had been put up while I was on shore. I was ordered to bed at seven o'clock in the evening, and called up at ten o'clock, by James

Renton the steward; he told me, that the canoe was coming, I got up, it proved to be a canoe of yams; I did not know that they were coming. When I got on deck, Renton was there, the canoe went alongside the schooner that was along side our ship; the yams were put into the schooner. I was called down into the cabin - I found the prisoner there. I left Renton on deck, looking out for the slave-canoe. The prisoner said, there is a cargo of slaves, call at Qua River, at which place you will get ten more - I went on deck, and in ten minutes another canoe came with slaves. The prisoner told me, to make the best bargain I could for the slaves, for the good of himself and the owners. I was to take the ten slaves to Camarooms, about three hundred miles south, down the coast, by the prisoner's orders; he said, keep in shore, whatever you do. If a Man of War's boat, or a Man of War falls in with you, they will take you, and condemn the ship. When the canoe came, it had nine black men and twelve women slaves; they were brought alongside the schooner tied hand and foot. The men were put in the fore hold and the women in the cabin, on board the schooner. John Dean and I went on board the schooner, we took water, beef, and brandy, from the ship with us; we had four muskets, six cartridge-boxes, two pistols, and four cutlasses; two men belonging to Calabar went with us to assist us. While the slaves were being removed out of the canoe into the schooner, the prisoner told me to count them, I counted twenty-one and told him so; he was on deck when the canoe first arrived, and saw them moved from the canoe to the schooner, and told us to shove broad off, and make the best of our way to Qua River-this was between ten and eleven o'clock at night, in January or February. We proceeded to Qua River and got one female slave there, and then proceeded to Camarooms with the slaves. When we got there, a Portuguese boat came alongside with King Aqua in it; he said, he could not purchase them. The Portuguese captain said he would, as he kept them in his factory on shore - I said, very well; and they were taken on shore that night. I went with them, and made an agreement with the captain, to have a pipe of brandy, two gang casks, which contain about thirty gallons each, two barrels of gunpowder, sixty iron bars, and two pieces of Manchester cloth, for the twenty-one slaves. We brought one female slave back, because she had a sore leg, and the articles that we had bargained for. On our return, we reported what we had down to the prisoner, and shewed him my book, containing an account of what we had got in exchange for the slaves. The brandy was taken on board, and the rest of the things went on shore with the female slave. I used to keep the log-book ever since the 25th of October; after I had sold the slaves, I asked the prisoner, if I should enter the slaves in the log-book, he said, "No, do not do that whatever you do; it will be worse for ourselves." Five of the handcuffs, were sent on board the Portuguese schooner at Calabar, a little before we went with the slaves; they kept three pair and returned two, as they were to small. One of the slaves had jumped over-board of the Portuguese vessel; Duke Ephraim, who was on board at the time, asked me if there were any irons; this was another slave ship, which lay alongside our ship. The prisoner ordered Renton to bring them up, and put them in the Portuguese canoe which came alongside our ship. The handcuffs were first put on board our ship at Liverpool; in the course of the voyage two pari had been put on our men.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The Portuguese ship was not the same that I afterwards saw at Camarooms. I had been at Africa twice before this. The prisoner was on board when we sailed for Liverpool. We were in the Calabar river when the captain died. Duke Ephraim spoke English. The bulk-head was taken down to make room for a cargo of oil; there was one taken down for that purpose six months before, and the materials were thrown away. We did not keep regular watch at Calabar. We go quite to another part of the coast to King Aqua.

Q. Were not the slaves carried for Duke Ephraim, the prisoner having no property in them - A. I do not know. I was never told, that I should be prosecuted for this transaction.

JAMES RENTON . I was steward on board the James. We sailed from Liverpool, in December, 1814, bound for Calabar; we arrived there in August. The crew consisted of thirty-two souls. Porter was the captain; he died at Calabar, and the prisoner took the command of the ship. After this, we had been some time at Calabar, and the prisoner told me to call John Wright , the carpenter, to him, I heard him tell him to knock the bulk-head of the ship down, and make a bulk-head to the schooner; after this alteration, the prisoner went on shore and remained there a few hours; and about an hour after he told me to tell him, when every thing was ready, meaning when the bulk-head was ready; he went on shore and returned on board at nine o'clock at night; I was on deck when he returned - He asked me who was on deck; I told him nobody but myself and Macdonald; he asked if the rest of the crew were gone to bed; I told him they were. I lit him down to his cabin, and he then told me to go on deck and loot out for a canoe, that would come from the creek. I went and staid on deck till I saw one coming towards our ship, she had yams and plantains in her, which the negroes eat. I was then alone on deck. I went and told the prisoner. He told me to call Evans, the mate, which I did; and we went to the prisoner in the cabin. The prisoner told Evans, that he had got a cargo of slaves for him, and to take and do the best he could with them, as he expected them on board directly. Evans came on deck, and soon after the canoe made the ship, she brought black slaves, both men and women. Duke Ephraim's people stood with muskets to guard them. I went and told the prisoner they were arrived, he came on deck and said, "that will do;" and told Evans and John Decam , to get on board the schooner, and he told Evans to count them-after they were in the schooner, Evans told him there were tweenty-one. The prisoner then asked one of the Duke's men if that was all, the man said, "all at this time," but the schooner is to go between Parracloud and Qua River and will receive more; the yams and plantains were took on board the schooner, with some beef, bread, and rum. The prisoner told Evans to shove broad-off, and make the best of his way to Camarooms, to make the best of them that he could, and to deliver them to King Aqua, who would see them properly disposed of;

their hands were tied-the men were put in the hold, and the women in the aft, with the bulk-head between them; their feet were loose. The schooner was absent about twelve days, and then returned. I was on board the James when she returned; she brought rum, cloth, powder, and iron bars, part of which was sent on shore, and the other part was received on board our ship. One of Duke Ephraim's canoes took it to shore. There was a Portuguese vessel at Calabar.

Cross-examined. Part of the rum was sent on shore afterwards-some of it was taken in gang casks-the rest was kept on board for the ship's use. The schooner had been trading for the ship before. When she took arms with her, it was to sell them.

DONALD M'DONALD . I shipped myself on board the James. We went to the coast of Africa. The captain died and the prisoner took the command. We took the schooner with us from Liverpool. We had the bulk-head of the schooner taken out to make her hold more oil; she was employed to carry oil, ivory, and wood, we could carry more ivory without the bulk-head. The bulk-head was put up again in the same way, and the floor laid, by the prisoner's orders-the materials were taken from the ships bulk-head, which was broken down for that purpose. As soon as this was done, the prisoner told me to go on shore, and tell Duke Ephraim that all was ready - I did so; and the Duke said, very well. I returned on board and told the prisoner, Duke Ephraim was on board the ship, when I returned. The next morning a canoe came from the shore alongside the schooner, which was alongside the ship, and brought some yams and plantains, which is negro food, and put them on board the schooner-the bulk-head made a division in the schooner; after this, the canoe went ashore and another canoe came with black slaves; this was at night. Renton, Evans, the prisoner, and I were on deck, the rest of the crew were in bed. I was boatswain. There were twenty-one slaves, in all, male and female; some of them were about thirteen years old, apparently. There was about five guards with them, who had fire-arms. The slaves were naked. The men had their hands tied before them, quite helpless; they were put in the hold, and the women were put aft, with a partition between them. The prisoner gave orders for taking them in; he then asked Evans if he was ready, and told him to shove broad-off and go away. The canoe went ashore. Some of the guards went into the schooner with Evans and Decam-it returned in about thirteen days. Evans and the schooner was absent from the ship all that time. He brought some liquor in a pipe, two gang casks, cloth, and iron; I believe the liquor was Portuguese brandy. The prisoner was on board when the schooner returned. The liquor was brought on deck, and the other things remained in the schooner-one of the female slaves returned with them; she had a sore thigh and was sent on shore with the guards. We afterwards returned to England.

Cross-examined. Some of the brandy was drank by the ship's crew.

Prisoner's Defence. Having a desire to obtain an intimacy with the natives, I lent Duke Ephraim the schooner to convey the slaves to King Aqua. I knew it was contrary to the laws of my country. I did not receive any emolument myself from the traffic.

GUILTY . - Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Special Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18170219-124

487. GEORGE NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one hat, value 6s. 6d. , the property of Daniel Gardiner .

RICHARD HOLMAN. I am servant to Daniel Gardiner , who is a hatter , residing in Chiswell-street, Finsbury-square . On the 6th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take the hat off the rail at the door; I saw him about the window some time before he took it. I pursued him and brought him back.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-125

488. JOHN KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one deal plank, value 7s. , the property of William Mountford .

JOSEPH BUTTON. I am clerk to Mr. Mountford, timber-merchant , New Crane Wharf, Shadwell , On the 5th of February, at seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take the plank and carry it away. I stopped him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-126

489. ELIZABETH MACKENZIE , MARY BROWN , and ELIZA HARWOOD , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , two wine glasses, value 2s. , the property of John Thorn .

CHRISTIANA THORN . I am the wife of John Thorn . I keep a glass-shop in Liquorpond-street . On the 23d of January, between 11 and 12 o'clock, I heard the bell of my shop door ring, I found the prisoner, Mackenzie, in the shop standing with her back to the door, so that I could not open it; I asked her what she wanted; she said some chipped china; I told her I had not got any; she kept in the shop, she had her apron rolled up and kept eating, I thought she was an idiot; she went out, and I missed two glasses; I pursued her to Saffron-hill. The prisoner, Brown, was with her.

JOHN LIMBRIC . I am an officer. I took Mackenzie and Brown into custody. Brown said, she had not got the glasses, but that Mackenzie had given them to Harwood. Mackenzie did not deny it. I found the glasses at Harwood's lodgings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MACKENZIE - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment respited .

BROWN- NOT GUILTY .

HARWOOD- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-127

490. HENRY MARMET was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , one handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the property of John Stamford , from his person .

JOHN STAMFORD . I am a carpenter , and live in Adam-street, Manchester-square. On the 26th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I was in Hyde Park , I saw a mob there and went up to it. I felt for my handkerchief and missed it-it was safe ten minutes before. I ran from the mob, and saw about five boys standing together, I went up to them, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I secured him, and the other boys went away.

M. A. MORTIMER . I was in the park and went up to the mob, who were looking at two boys fighting. I saw the prisoner attempt to pick several persons pockets, nobody was with him at first. I saw him draw the prosecutor's handkerchief out of his pocket - I told him of it, and he took the prisoner.

RICHARD FAULKNER . I took the prisoner in charge, and found three handkerchiefs on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-128

491. WILLIAM HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, 2lbs of sugar, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Norman .

JOHN NORMAN . I am a grocer , and live in Goswell-street-road . On the 12th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, who was my porter , was down stairs, where I kept my sugar. I watched him, and saw him put his hands into a hogshead of raw sugar, and take some out; I went to him, and asked him if it was not breakfast-time; he said it was. I desired him to fetch the scales out. He went to the corner and tried to push me away. I took off his hat, and found 2lbs of raw sugar, loose, it-it was mine.

JOHN LUMLEY . I took the prisoner in charge, and found a great quantity of sugar at his lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Whipped, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-129

492. JOHN HUGHES and MICHAEL RICHARDS , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , two jackets, value 3s.; 3lbs of soap, value 1s.; 5lbs of sugar, value 2s.; three knives, value 1s.; and two forks, value 6d. , the property of Philip Barnes .

PHILIP BARNES. I am a ship rigger . On the 8th of February, I had the care of a ship which was in the West India Export Dock . The things were safely locked up in the cabin at four o'clock in the afternoon. The next morning I found the fore-scuttle forced up, and the things gone.

THOMAS LATHAM . I am an officer. About six o'clock in the evening of the 8th of February, I stopped the prisoners at the gate of the Docks, they were coming out. I found a jacket on Hughes, and a knife and fork in his pocket, and 2lbs of raw sugar, loose, in his hat. I put him in my box while I searched Richards, and when I took him out, I found the soap in my box. I found a jacket, 3lbs of sugar, and a towel, on Richards.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HUGHES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months , and both publicly Whipped in the Docks .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-130

493. WILLIAM DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , three bushels of coals, value 4s. , the goods of Jonas Brown and George Armstrong .

THOMAS MOODY . I am a constable. On the 1st of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner on board Messrs. Brown and Co.'s barge, lying off Bell Wharf, Ratcliff , laden with coals. He was dipping the coals out of the barge with a saucepan, and emptying them into his boat four or five times - He endeavoured to escape. I secured him and found three bushel of coals in his boat, which had neither name or number on it. Mr. Brown claimed the coals.

JAMES BROWN. The coals were mine.

Prisoner. It was only the sweepings.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-131

494. ELEANOR COULSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , two pair of stockings, value 7s.; one pair of stays, value 7s.; four yards of ribbon, value 9.d, and one gown , the property of Thomas Annett .

HARRIET ANNET . I live in Lucas-street, Brunswick-square . The prisoner was my servant . I had been out; when I came home, she opened the door to me. I suspected her, and found a young man behind the kitchen door. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. I found them in her box; she said, she found them in my room.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The man was an apprentice. Her box was open in the kitchen. It was not a dirty clothes box. She left me that night, and came back again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress gave me the things.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-132

495. WILLIAM ASHWELL , GEORGE BEECH , and JAMES JOHNSTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 120lbs. of bacon, value 3l.; 80lbs. of cheese, value 1l. 18s. and one bushel of seeds, value 13s. , the goods of John Freeman ; and RICHARD FOX for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN FREEMAN. I am a grocer , living at Harpenden. On the 13th of January, I came to town to buy cheese, bacon, seeds, and other things for my business. As I was returning home, my cart was overturned at Whetstone , opposite the Bull and Butcher-it was after ten o'clock at night. Several persons came to my assistance; the goods were all put in, and the persons went into the Bull and

Butcher, after I had satisfied them for their trouble. I went into the Bull, which is about a quarter of a mile farther, and left my cart in the Bull yard, with the goods in it. When I got up, at six o'clock in the morning, I missed the articles stated in the indictment. I sent for the patrol, and we went to the Bull and Butcher, and searched the premises, and found a piece of blank paper in the stable where Hutchinson worked. I thought it was the paper in which some of my sugar was wrapped, and gave Hutchinson in charge.

NATHAN JACKSON. I am a patrol of Bow-street. I went with Freeman to the Bull and Butcher, a little before eight o'clock in the morning. We found a piece of paper in the stables, and took Hutchinson up; he was at work there; he gave me some information, and we went to the prisoner, Ashwell's house, which is about a quarter of a mile from the Bull and Butcher; he was not at home. We found two sides of bacon, three cheeses, and a bag of seeds there. After that, I went to the prisoner, Fox's house, and found one side of bacon under his mattress, and a cheese under his bed, with a piece cut out of it, and some oatmeal in a bag. The night before this, I had seen Hutchinson, Ashwell, Johnson, and Beech, in company, at the Bull and Butcher, about twelve o'clock. I heard Ashwell say, "we will go down to the Bull, and see what is to be done with the old cheeseman, and see if there is any bacon or cheese to be had." Fox was not with them. They went away. I took Ashwell afterwards at the Bull and Butcher. Hutchinson had told me that two sides of bacon and three cheeses were at his house; he cried, and said they were there - I afterwards found them there. I took beech and Johnston at the same time. I told them I had been with the others that took the property - They made no reply. I took Fox about an hour after, at his own house. I told him Hutchinson said, that he awoke him in the morning, and said that he had stolen the things, and offered him half to keep them in his house, as he did not like them to be in the stable - He did not deny it. When he came to Hutchinson, he said, "You have brought me into a pretty job."

JOHN RICE . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was with Jackson, and confirm what he has said.

JOHN HUTCHINSON . I was horse-keeper at the Bull and Butcher. When the cart broke down, I, with Ashwell, Beech, and Johnston, helped the goods in again. I was with them at twelve o'clock, and Ashwell said he would go down to the Bull, and see the old cheeseman, and have some beer. I went there with him, Beech and Johnston; we had some beer, and when we came out, we went to the gates to see if we could get round to Freeman's cart. Ashwell said,

"we will get round to it." Ashwell, Beech, Johnson, and I, went to the gates, and Beech lifted me up. I got over the gate, and unfastened it, let them in, and shut it again; we all went in, and each loaded himself with what he liked. We took three sides of bacon, four cheeses, and a bag of seeds, and brought them to my stables. One piece of bacon, one cheese, and some oatmeal, were left for me; they said they would take the rest to Ashwell's house. I took them to Fox's house about five o'clock in the morning. I knocked at the door, he got up - He was not with us the night before. I took them into his house - He shut the door. I told him they came from an old man's cart, which had been overturned by the Bull and Butcher, and that I had fetched them from the Bull Inn yard, and mentioned the party. I told him, if he would take care of them, he should have half for his trouble. He said he would, and that I might have it cookde at his house. I left the bacon against the bed, and stood the cheese against the wall. I breakfasted with him, and went to my work-the officer took me up, and I told him about it.

Cross-examined. We were not alone at the public-house-anybody might have heard what Ashwell said. Ashwell did not pay the rest for their shares. I was in the stable when they took me they took a piece of paper out of the binn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ASHWELL - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BEECH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

JOHNSTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

FOX - GUILTY . Aged 21,

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-133

496. HANNAH BROOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one watch, value 40s.; a handkerchief, a dollar, and a 1s. 6d. token, the goods and monies of William Abel , from his person .

WILLIAM ABEL . I am a back-maker , and live at Mazepond, Borough. On the 27th of January, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Long-lane, Smithfield. I was a little intoxicated, and met the prisoner there. She took me to a house - I went to sleep for two hours. When I awoke, there was another girl in the room with the prisoner - there were several lodgers in the house. I missed my property. I found somebody feeling about me, which awoke me. The prisoner ran down stairs; I could not overtake her. I found her in another room down stairs, but there was a man who would not let me go in; I got the constable to take her.

GEORGE STEDMAN . I am a constable. Abel came to me about half past one in the morning - He was intoxicated. I found a dollar and a 1s. 6d. token on her person - She was also intoxicated.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON . I am a watchman. The prisoner said, he had lost his watch and money, and took me to a very bad house in Bell-alley, Goswell-street ; I found the prisoner there - They would not let me in; I got in at another door. He gave the prisoner in charge. I found a dollar and a 1s. 6d. token upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. Before the man came to me, I saw him go down an alley with another girl.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-134

497. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , two loaves of bread, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Kan .

JAMES GREIG . I am servant to Mr. Kan, who is a baker . On the 31st of January, I left my barrow in Clarke-place, Islington . I missed two loaves.

WILLIAM LACK . I am an headborough. I saw the prisoner take the loaves out of the barrow, and run away. I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-135

498. CORNELIUS BROWN was indicted for stealing on the 13th of February , one watch, value 40s., and one chain, value 1s., the property of the Reverend Thomas Dobson , clerk , from his person .

REV. THOMAS DOBSON. I am a Roman Catholic Clergyman . On the 31st of January, at a little before seven o'clock in the evening, I was accompanying two ladies home to the Minories; my watch-chain hung out; the prisoner, in company with two others, ran against me, and said to his companions, "Do not shove so:" I was in a line with them. Thinking they might want to molest me, I turned round, and missed my watch. I cried out, stop thief! and took hold of him by the coat - He got away. I took one of his companions, who also escaped. The prisoner was immediately surrounded by people.

JOHN REDWAY . I am a labourer. I was in Leman-street , walking close behind Mr. Dobson. I saw the prisoner, and two others, run against him-the prisoner was nearest to Mr. Dobson - I saw him draw the watch out of his fob, and give it to the boy next to him. Mr. Dobson called out - I took the boy; he threw the watch down, and got away, and I pursued the prisoner. I am sure I saw him take it. I gave Mr. Dobson the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-136

499. WILLIAM BADDERLEY was indicted for stealing on the 25th of January , one copper, value 3l. 10s. belonging to William Day , fixed in a dwelling-house, he having no title or claim to it .

SECOND COUNT. The same only stating it to be fixed to a certain building.

The prisoner produced a receipt, signed by the prosecutor for 3l. 10s. for the copper.

WILLIAM DAY . The receipt, produced is my hand-writing - I gave it to the prisoner.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-137

500. GUSTAF A'LUMBERG was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , one looking-glass, value 1l.; one counterpane, value 3s.; one sheet, value 2s.; and one set of bed furniture, value 10s., the goods of John Deckman ; the said goods being in a lodging in his dwelling-house, let to the prisoner, to be used with the lodging .

JOHN DECKMAN . I live in Raven-row, Spitalfields . On the 27th of January, I let the prisoner my top room-the articles stated in the indictment were let with the lodging. He left the house between six and seven o'clock in the morning of the first week, without giving me notice or paying his rent. I missed the property out of his room, and he was taken the same day.

ANN DECKMAN . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner gave me no notice - I found his room open, and the things gone. I also missed a French grammar.

JOSEPH ANDREWS . I work at Mr. Bryan's, trunk-maker, Ludgate-hill. On the 5th of February, about a quarter after nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into our shop, and asked if he might leave the things there till four o'clock. I never saw him before. I gave him leave, and he went away. At a quarter before one, he came for them. - I had got the officer in attendance at the time; he asked the prisoner if the property was his; he said it was, and that he had brought it from an hotel. The officer said he would go with him. There was a French grammar among the things, which had the prosecutor's name in it.

JAMES SNOW . I am officer. I waited in Mr. Bryan's shop-the prisoner came in; I asked him who the property belonged to-he claimed it, and said he brought it from an hotel. I desired him to shew me the hotel - He took me to the Swan with two Necks. I found he had been there, but they knew nothing about him. I secured him, and found Mr. Deckman out, by his name being in the grammar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-138

501. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two window curtains, value 3l.; five carpets, value 16s.; two blankets, value 8s.; one quilt, value 6s.; and four chairs, value 4s. , the property of James Stewart .

JAMES STEWART. I live in Park-street, Grosvenor-square. I have two houses-one in Baker-street , and the other in Berkeley-square , which I let out ready furnished-the prisoner had the care of them. On the 17th of January, the window-curtains belonging to Berkeley-square were brought to my house; in consequence of what I heard, I went to my house in Berkeley-square, and missed three carpets, a blanket a quilt, and four chairs-the prisoner was taken up two hours afterwards. The next day, I went to my house in Baker-street, and missed two carpets. I went to the prisoner's house with a search-warrant, and found the property there. I had a threatened the prisoner about the curtains, and at night they were sent to me in a parcel.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Mary Ann Clarke lived in the house before the prisoner had the care of it - He has been employed by me eighteen months. Wilmot brought the parcel-it was wet when I opened it. I never lent the prisoner any furniture.

JAMES STONE . I am a constable. On the 17th of January, I apprehended the prisoner. I told him what I took him for - He denied it. On the Monday, I went with a search-warrant to his house, and found two carpets in his loft-the prisoner said it was his house. Mr. Stewart was with me. I then went to No. 4, Bury-street, St. James's, and found three carpets and four chairs-they were laid down as the furniture of the room, and a quilt

and two blankets on the bed. I knew this was also the prisoner's house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

-WILMOT. Mrs. Stewart sent me to take down the curtains - I found they were taken down before I got there. I took a bundle to Mr. Stewart's house - I saw the prisoner put curtains into that bundle-It was not out of my sight till I delivered it.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Stewart gave me the things.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-139

502. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , one watch, value 20s.; one chain, value 6d.; one key, value 1d.; one bank dollar; and 3s., the goods and monies of Joshua Hall , from his person .

JOSHUA HALL . I am a labourer in the London Docks . On the 17th of February, I was intoxicated, and was taken to Whitechapel watch-house till I got sober. My property was safe when I was taken in-the watch was in my fob, and the money in my pockets. I had changed a 1l. note at eight o'clock, and received a dollar and a 3s. piece in change - I was sober then.

MOSS MOSES . I am a watch-house-keeper. The prosecutor was brought into the watch-house intoxicated, about one o'clock. He was put into the lock-up-room, and went to sleep. The prisoner was afterwards brought in, charged with some offence. I searched him - He had no watch about him then; I put him into the same room with the prosecutor - nobody else was in the room that night. About four o'clock, the prosecutor got sober, and complained of losing his watch and money - He said he had it safe when he was brought in. I found the watch in the prisoner's stocking, on his leg-Hall claimed it.

SIMON SOLOMON . I saw the watch found in the prisoner's stocking. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-140

503. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one coat, value 2l.; four books, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Wait ; and 10 bottles of blacking, value 7s. 6d.; five brushes, value 3s.; 27 tools, value 4s.; four pair of shoes, value 8s.; one boot, value 3s.; and one bag, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Wait .

JOSEPH WAIT . I am a shoemaker , and live in Bowle-street, Westminster. I left my stall, in Derby-street , at eight o'clock in the evening of the 6th of February, and gave the key to my son.

JOHN WAIT . I am the son of Joseph Wait . About a quarter after nine o'clock at night, I went to the stall to get something; I locked it up again, and left it safe. I was going by at ten o'clock, and saw a light there. I found the staple had been wrenched off - I opened the door, and saw the prisoner with a bag, containing the articles stated in the indictment - He had put them into the bag; I secured him; I found a piece of iron on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-141

504. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one watch, value 4l. 4s.; two seals, value 3l.; and one ring, value 3s., the property of John Simmons , from his person .

JOHN SIMMONS. I am a carpenter , and live in Bell's-buildings, Salisbury -square. I work for Mr. Pitcher. On Sunday evening, the 16th of February, about half-past nine o'clock, I was in Whitechapel , returning home with Taddenham, the prisoner and two more men pushed up against me. I missed my watch. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I pursued him; the other two got away. The prisoner was taken before he got out of my sight - He was about fifty yards from me. I called, stop thief! and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. It was the other side of the church. I saw him by the gas-lights.

THEOPHILUS TADDENHAM . I am a carpenter. I was walking in Whitechapel with Simmons. Three men met us-the prisoner is one of them. They would not let us pass, neither on one side or the other. As soon as we passed, Simmons missed his watch. We pursued the prisoner - I never lost sight of him till he was stopped.

Cross-examined. He ran away - We were quite sober.

THOMAS ELVES . I am an officer. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running and stopped him. Simmons appeared a little intoxicated, but the other was not. Simmons was sensible - He said the prisoner was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer told him to say I was the man.

THOMAS ELVES . I did not tell him so. The prisoner ran from them through a passage.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-142

505. MARY SMITH was indicted, for stealing, on the 7th of February , one feather-bed, value 20s.; one bolster, value 4s; two pillows, value 2s.; four blankets, value 8s.; one stove, value 2s; two knives and two forks, value 10d., the goods of Eliza Forster , the same being in a lodging-room, let by her to the prisoner to be used with the lodging .

ELIZA FORSTER . I live in Walbridge-street, St. George's in the East . On the 30th of January, I let the prisoner a lodging - She then informed me that she was married. I have learned that she is not married. The articles stated in the indictment were let to her with the lodging. The stove was fixed. She remained in the lodging a week-she gave me no notice; she left me between two and three o'clock in the day, and never returned again till the Monday following. I had her door opened, and missed the things. She was taken in the evening.

MICHAEL MORRIS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 10th of February. I afterwards found two curtains and a knife and fork at her house in Dock-street - She did not deny living there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-143

506. JOHN SPINKS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one seal, value 20s., and one key, value 1s., the property of Bowen Dunn Meredith , from his person .

DORCAS MINE . I live in Monmouth-street, Whitechapel-road. On the 31st of January, I was in Mr. Jennings's butter-shop, opposite Whitechapel church, about half-past eleven o'clock, Mr. Meredith stood next to me; the prisoner came into the shop behind me, and pushed between me and Mr. Meredith; I turned round and saw the seals in his left hand, and a black ribbon between his thumb and finger, he had something bright in his hand, which appeared to be a pair of scissars. I saw him cutting the seals off, and said, "he is cutting your seals off," and took hold of his hand. Mr. Meredith laid hold of him.

BOWEN DUNN MEREDITH. I live in Whitechapel-road. Between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, on the 31st of January, I was in Jennings's shop, Mine told me the prisoner was cutting my seals off - I caught him by the collar. My seals were safe when I went into the shop, I missed them, and distinctly saw the prisoner drop them. The seals and key were found just behind him; I found a pair of scissars in another part of the shop. My watch ribbon appeared to be cut with scissars.

WILLIAM MONK . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18170219-144

507. HENRY SHIRLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , three live tame ducks, value 6s. , the property of Michael Hurlock .

MICHAEL HURLOCK. I live in Whitmore-row, Hoxton . On the 6th of February, about five o'clock in the evening, I missed my ducks, the next day I saw them at Mr. Purden's, in Shoreditch, who told me how he came by them. The prisoner sometimes worked for me. I believe he was in distress.

JAMES PURDEN . I am a poulterer, and live in Shoreditch. On the 6th of February I bought the ducks of the prisoner, and put them out at my shop for sale. I gave him six shillings for them, about six o'clcok in the evening, he had asked me in the afternoon, if I would buy any ducks, and I told him I would look at them. I knew him before, he lived near Hackney. He told me he had bred them; the next day the prosecutor claimed them. Armstrong was passing at the time, and he went with me and apprehended the prisoner, at his lodgings, behind the prosecutor's house; he said he took them through distress.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went with the last witness to look for the prisoner, we found him in bed at Hoxton. He said he took them through distress. I knew him before, and always believed him to be a very honest man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Weeks , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18170219-145

508. SAMUEL HALL , WILLIAM WELLS , and GEORGE BIRD , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , sixty-four yards of calico, value 5l. , the goods of William White ; and ELIZA JAQUES for feloniously receiving the same goods, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

CHRISTIANA BLACK . I am servant to Mr. Lewis, of the Navy Office. On the 9th of January, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Newcastle-street , and saw the three prisoners, Hall, Wells, and Bird (I knew Hall and Bird before by sight, having seen them several times), talking together, I was going up the street, and saw Wells go from the rest, as far as Mr. White's shop-door, I was standing at the door of a school - He returned, and spoke to the other two; then Bird went down to the shop and took the cloth off the chair, that was outside the door-it was a bundle - He ran up the street with it; he passed me quite quick; he said nothing to the other prisoners, they walked up the street. White's shop is twelve doors down, in an opposite direction. I crossed over, and told Mr. White that I knew two of the boys.

Prisoner BIRD. Q. Did Wells follow me - A. They went the same way.

EDWARD FISHER . I am apprentice to Mr. White; I tied three pieces of calico together, and put them outside the shop door, I missed them about half-past nine. Black gave me information-there were fifty-four yards. I sent for an officer, and accompanied him to No. 2, Charlescourt, Ship-yard, Temple-bar, and found the things. The prisoner, Jaques, run out and went away. I am sure it was her, I followed her but she got away.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am an officer of Bow-street. I accompanied Fisher, and found the three pieces of calico, each of them had been cut, they were concealed behind the bed; the prisoner, Jaques, run out as I went in; she acknowledged going out, and taking Wells under her gown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH BERRY. I am a constable. I apprehended all the prisoners by the description which Smith gave me. I have known Hall and Bird sometime. I took Hall at his house in Shire-lane, near Ship-yard. I took Wells in Holborn, and Bird, on Holborn-hill. I took Jaques on the 14th of February, in Oxford-road.

HALL. - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WELLS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

BIRD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

JAQUES- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. J. Vaillant, Esq.

Reference Number: t18170219-146

509. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , fourteen deals, value 9s., the goods of John Edmeades and William Moseley ; and 100lbs of rope, value 16s. , the goods of John Edmeades , William Moseley , and George Perry .

JOHN EDMEADES . I am the partner of William Moseley . George Perry was in the firm about a year ago. On the 21st of January, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock, I went to our premises, where we are building, in White Lion-street, Spitalfields ; I saw a man there, and thought it was my partner. I called out, Moseley, but received no answer - We had been robbed before; a man

came off the premises, it was the prisoner, he had the deals in his hand; there was another man with him, he ran away; just as I came up to him he dropped them, and I gave the prisoner in charge. Before I took the prisoner the deals were twenty foot from where he dropped them, against a wall. He had no business upon the premises.

WILLIAM MOSELEY . I was walking on the premises about eight o'clcok in the evening, I saw the prisoner, and another man, get over the wall, and take the deals. I seized the prisoner at the same time as Edmeades.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-147

510. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , two decanters, value 15s. , the goods of James Helsden .

MARGARET DONALDSON . I live in Castle-court, Strand , next door to Mr. Helsden; I saw the prisoner, and a man, go by my door, the prisoner put his hand forward and took the two decanters-the shop-window was open; I collared the prisoner, the other got away; he threw the decanters down and broke them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-148

511. DANIEL NELDER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , eighteen glass drops, value 3s. , the goods of James Homer .

JAMES HOMER . I am a glass-cutter , and live in Pitfield-street, Hoxton , the prisoner was my servant . I missed glas drops several times. On the 7th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, my wife missed some drops; I went to the prisoner's coat, which hung up by the wall, and found several drops in his pocket - They are mine. I let them remain there, and desired my wife to watch him; he went to dinner, and took his coat with him; at night, when he was going away, I charged him with the robbery. I gave him into custody, but found nothing on him.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. I am not licensed. I do not require a license, as I do not melt glass. I have a small furnace, merely to soften the glass.

Q. If a man were to bring tumbler-bottoms of his own, he could melt them by your furnace - A. He could, I have no doubt.

ANN HOMER . I had noticed the prisoner's bench on the 7th of February, I counted the drops the evening before, and in the morning I missed two dozen. I saw the prisoner warm and cool some drops, and put them in his coat pocket.

Cross-examined. I did not see any bottoms of tumblers. He used our glass to make the drops. I did not give him any tumbler bottoms.

JAMES EASY . I am servant to Mr. Homer. I saw the prisoner make the drops, and put them into his pocket.

Cross-examined. I think I have seen tumbler bottoms in his possession; I have seen him put them into the furnace. He made the drops from my master's glass.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's house for drops, but found none. I took his wife into custody afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. I made them from tumbler bottoms of my own.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-149

512. GEORGE GASCOYNE was indicted for embezzlement .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-150

513. FRANCES CARRADINE . was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one watch, value 15s. , the property of Alice Tyzack .

ALICE TYZACK . I am servant to Mr. Brown, of the New-road . I kept my watch hanging up over the kitchen dresser. On the 19th of February, the prisoner came to see my fellow-servant, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, my watch was then safe; she staid there till about twenty minutes before eight, about a quarter of an hour before she went, I left her alone in the kitchen, while I let my master out. I missed my watch about five minutes after the prisoner was gone. I am sure I left her alone in the kitchen.

THOMAS COX. I am servant to Mr. Barker, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Upper George-street. On the 19th of February, a little before eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged a watch with me. I am sure she is the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-151

514. JOHN BANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 10lbs of beef, value 2s. 6d.; 10lbs of mutton, value 2s. 6d.; and 10lbs of pork, value 2s. 6d , the property of George Anderson .

JOHN PIPPIN . I am a watchman. On the 15th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was standing in Long-alley, about twenty yards from Anderson's shop, and a man came by with an apron full of meat, three more of his companions came up to him and looked in his apron, another man came by with an apron full of something, the three went to the shop and my son followed them; my son came back and said, they had broken the shop open, and that he had watched them; and told me that one was coming towards us, with a piece of meat under his coat; I secured him - He threw the meat at me and ran up Crown-street; my son followed him. I believe it was the prisoner. I will not swear to him.

EDWARD PIPPIN . I was standing in Long-alley, with

my father, and saw a man go by with an apron full of something, three other men met him, and looked into it; another man came up with something in his apron, but I do not know what - He went in the same direction; the three men came as from Anderson's. I then saw the prisoner go towards the shop. I am positive that he is the man, I knew him before - He went across to Anderson's shop; the other three were walking on the opposite side of the way. When the people were gone by, all four went up to Mr. Anderson's shutters, and put their arms as if they were getting something out of the shop. I was on the other side of the way. I then saw the prisoner come away from them, and put something under the left side of his coat - I went and told my father; he attempted to stop him, when the prisoner threw a loin of pork from under his coat, I ran after him, calling stop thief! but he got away. On the Monday following I saw him in George-alley, I ran to Worship-street, and Garton went with me and took him. Anderson's shutters were pushed in at the top, there was sufficient room to get out the meat. The rails were stripped as far as they could reach. I carried the pork back to Anderson.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I always was sure that the prisoner was the man.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went with Pippin, and saw the prisoner coming out of Angel-alley with two more; I told him I wanted him for robbing Anderson's shop, he made no reply. Pippin pushed him out.

GEORGE ANDERSON . I am a butcher , living in Crown-street, Finsbury-square . Pippin brought me a hand of pork; it had been hanging up in my shop the night before-he said, he should know one of the men. I lost 30lbs of meat. My shutters was knocked in at the top - They were quite secure when I went to bed.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-152

415. PETER GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , two foreign gold coins, value 3l.; one pair of pantaloons, value 20s.; one gold ring, value 5s.; one guinea, and two half-guineas; one 10l. bank-note; and one 5l. bank-note , the property of Christian Benson .

CHRISTIAN BENSON . I am a mariner . On the 22d of January, my property was safe in my trunk on board the Lucky Charlotte, lying in the Surry Canal . The prisoner had been on board twice. About nine o'clock in the morning, I found my trunk had been broken open and my pocket-book gone, containing the money stated in the indictment, and a pair of pantaloons. I had seen the prisoner on board the day before; while he was there I was on deck. My trunk was in the steerage. I had seen my things safe a day or two before.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer. On the 22d of January, about half-past nine o'clcok in the morning, I heard of the robbery, and about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prosecutor gave the prisoner in my charge. I found one 5l. and three 1l. bank-notes on him, and two foreign gold coins, two guineas, one half-guinea, and a gold ring, in his shirt. The prosecutor claimed them. The prisoner begged for mercy, and said he had changed the 10l. note, but could not tell where, as he was drunk; he said he would make it up the first voyage he went.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-153

416. JOHN GARR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Needles .

CHARLES DOWNER . I live with Mr. Needles, who is a pawnbroker . On the 12th of February, the stockings hung by the door. The prisoner and a lad came into the shop to pledge a handkerchief; he went out. There was a looking-glass in the shop; I saw by the reflection, that that the prisoner was taking the stockings. I pursued him; he ran down Gun-street - I lost him. About twenty minutes after, they both passed the shop again - I ran out and secured him. I did not find the stockings on him, but I am positive that I saw him take them.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Whipped, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-154

417. ROBERT ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 18lbs of hay, value 3s. , the property of James Sant .

AMBROSE NEWTON . I am Mr. Sant's stable boy. I saw the prisoner come out of the stable with some hay under his arm; he had no business there. At night he came by the stable door again, and the officer took him. I am sure the prisoner is the man. He is a coal dealer , and keeps a horse.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-155

418. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of John Bartlett .

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am shopman to John Bartlett , who lives in High-street, St. Giles's . On the 15th of February, I was standing at the door, and was told the prisoner had taken the shoes. I pursued him and took him. I saw him throw them away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-156

419. HENRY GRIFFITH was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM WILCOX . I am a watch hand maker . The prisoner was my apprentice . On the 8th of February, I sent him to Mr. Harris to sell some hands, he brought me back ten shillings, and said, that was all he could get for them. He has lived ten years with me. When he was detected, he said, he had lost three shillings.

TIMOTHY HARRIS . The prisoner brought me some goods on Saturday night - I paid him thirteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the money, and was afraid to tell my master, as he would keep me without my victuals, which he has frequently done.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-157

520. HENRY GRIFFITH was again indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-158

521. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , two shirts, value 5s., and one handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of John Langly .

JOHN LANGLY , I am a mariner . My things were on board a ship, in the bason of the London Docks . I lost them on the 16th of February.

MARTIN KELLY. I am a sailor. I heard a noise on deck, and saw the prisoner about ten yards from the ship; I followed him, and secured him. I found two pieces of beef in his hand, which belonged to our ship. The shirts and handkerchief were found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-159

522. ELIZABETH FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , one copper pot, value 6s. , the property of Mary Meadows .

GEORGE WILLIAM TYSON . I am servant to Mrs. Meadows, who is a dyer . I saw the prisoner come out of the wash-house with another woman; I stopped the prisoner and took the pot from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-160

523. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , forty-three yards of ribbon, value 7s. , the property of Dennis Peele .

JOHN GILLMAN . I am an officer, and lodge with Mr. Peele, who is a haberdasher , and lives in Old Gravel-lane . On the 7th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was going up stairs, and saw the prisoner in the shop; I watched him. The young woman handed him down the ribbon box; he put his hand into the box, as if he was pointing at a piece. I saw him put a piece up his sleeve, and then into his pocket-he paid for one yard of ribbon. He then had another box down, and took another piece, and put it into his pocket. He bought two yards. He was going out - I stopped him and searched him. I took two pieces of ribbon out of his pocket, and found another piece on him. There were forty-three yards altogether. He pleaded distress. He had one shilling and threepence in his pocket, and several small pieces of ribbon.

GRACE PEELE . I am the daughter of Dennis Peele . I served the prisoner; he paid me fourpence for one yard of ribbon, and threepence for the other. I saw the three pieces taken from him.

GUILTY . Aged 72.

Confined Two Years , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-161

524. ALEXANDER BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 9lbs of cheese, value 3s. , the property of Francis Holborow .

FRANCIS HOLBOROW . On the 19th of February, the cheese was at my window. The prisoner was pointed out to me - I ran out and secured him, and took the cheese from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Whipped, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-162

525. JOHN BENNET was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 4lbs of bacon, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Britten .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 20th of February, I saw the prisoner lurking about several shops in St. John-street, with another man. I watched him into Goswell-street , and saw him walk by Mr. Britten's shop several times, he then went in and brought something out. I pursued him and took him. He threw the bacon down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped, and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-163

526. JOHN FREDERICK BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , one handkerchief, value 1s., and one shirt, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Miller .

THOMAS MILLER. I keep a sale shop in Ratcliff Highway . On the 29th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was pointed out to me - I ran after him and brought him back, and found the shirt and handkerchief under his waistcoat. I have seen him in my shop before. He had another man with him, who ran away. The things were taken from my counter.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined One Year , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-164

527. HENRY WRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , one pair of stockings, value 1s. , the property of Samuel Fuller .

ROBERT PERRY . I am servant to Mr. Fuller, who is a hosier in Middle-row, holborn . I saw the prisoner take the stockings from the door, and run away. I pursued him and took him. I did not lose sight of him. He threw the stockings down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-165

528. CORNELIUS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 19lbs of beef, value 3s. , the goods of David Barkley .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was, ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-166

529. THOMAS SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , one firkin, value 1s., and 56lbs of butter, value 2l. , the goods of George Jones .

GRORGE JONES. I am a cheesemonger , living in Whitecross-street . On he 21st of February, I missed my butter from the side of my door. Some person directed me the wrong way. My boy got the firkin, and told me which way the prisoner was gone. I found him in a privy in Chequer-alley.

JAMES SUMMERS . I saw the prisoner run down the alley with the butter; he tried to get over a wall. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES NEWMAN . I was in the alley, and saw the prisoner drop the butter. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-167

530. CHARLES SHRIEDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , one jacket, value 18s.; one pair of trowsers, value 5s.; and one waistcoat, value 6d. , the property of James Davidson .

JAMES DAVIDSON . I lodge in Cornwell-street, St. George's . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me. My things were in my chest. I asked the prisoner on the 19th of February, to put the key of my chest on the shelf. He went away that night. I missed my things the next morning.

WILLIAM TOMLINSON . On the 20th of February, at eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to Mr. Harris's shop, and pledged the clothes for twelve shillings. I am sure the prisoner is the man. Davidson claimed them.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the things under his hat lining.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170219-168

531. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , seven shirts, value 7s.; two pair of pantaloons, value 2s.; three jackets, value 7s., the property of John Cornelius , and one jacket, value 1s.; one waistcoat, value 1s., and one pair of pantaloons, value 1s. , the property of John Roberts .

JOHN CORNELIUS . I am a seaman . On the 20th of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, my things were in a bag in the ship, lying in the canal . I had been ashore; I returned and missed my things from below. I saw the prisoner on board with the bag; he said, my shipmate had given it to him. He was quite a stranger. He ran away with it.

JOHN ROBERTS . I was on board. The last witness called me, and asked me if I had given the prisoner the bag; I said, I had not. We both pursued him, and he dropped the bag; he was stopped.

JOHN HERBERT . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutor following him - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-169

532. HANNAH KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , two sheets, value 4s.; one counterpane, value 6s; and one blanket, value 2s. ; the goods of Edward Wild .

EDWARD WILD . I live in James's-court, Featherstone-street . The prisoner lodged in my garret; I missed my things on the 5th of February.

ANN FAIRMAN . I had a room in Wild's house. I went away on the 1st of February-my week was not up till the 5th. My husband was taken up on suspicion of the robbery. I found the rug, counterpane, and blanket at Thompson's, in Brick-lane.

ELIZA THOMPSON . I am a broker, and live in Brick-lane. The prisoner brought me the rug, counterpane, and blanket - She said she was selling them for a person in distress; I told her to call again. Before she called, Mrs. Fairman came to know if I had the things. I shewed them to her - She knew them to be the things that her husband was taken up for stealing. The prisoner came soon after, and I told her they were stolen, and that a man had been taken up for stealing them. She said it served him right, for she was selling them for him.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. Fairman was given into my custody - He had not given the key up.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet pledged on the 14th of February, in the name of Ann Freeman . I do not know who pledged it.

JOHN FAIRMAN . I lodged with Wild. I did not give the prisoner any things to pledge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Two Years , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-170

533. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , three yards of oil-cloth, value 6s. , the property of Samuel Haynes .

SAMUEL HAYNES . I am a broker , living at Islington . On the 22d of January, I heard a person come into my shop - I sent my servant up. I went to the back door, and the prisoner passed me with the cloth under his coat - He was secured. I saw him throw it down.

WILLIAM BLACK . I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-171

534. WILLIAM FABER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , one pair of boots, value 2s. , the goods of Peter Burchell .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-172

535. WILLIAM ENSOR was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , one sheet, value 5s., the property of Eliza Russell , from a lodging-room, let by her to the prisoner, to be used with the lodging .

ELIZA RUSSELL . I live in Duke-street, Ratcliff . I let the prisoner half a bed, at 2s. 6d. per week - He was to sleep with another man-the prisoner slept there only one night, and took the sheet away in the morning. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES CRIX . I am a shoe-maker. I live in Mrs. Russell's parlour. I heard the prisoner go down stairs on the morning of the 20th of February. She ran down after him, calling stop thief! - I ran out-she secured him, and brought him back. He unbuttoned his coat, and dropped the sheet out of it.

ELIZA RUSSELL . When he came down, he wished me good morning. I followed him and secured him - He dropped the sheet out of his coat. George Hart took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-173

536. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , one bridle, value 10s. , the property of Robert Crosby , Samuel Clay , Thomas Clay , and Henry Clay .

ROBERT WRIGHT . I am servant to Messrs. Crosby, Samuel Thomas and Henry Clay , oil-merchants , St. John's-street . On the 22d of February, the waggon was at the door. I saw the prisoner take the bridle from the middle-horse, and walk away. I ran out, and asked him what he was going to do with it - He said he picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170219-174

537. MARY BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , two gowns, value 15s., and one shawl, value 7s. , the goods of Mary Joyce .

MARY JOYCE . I am a servant . On the 22d of January, the prisoner slept in my bed - She had lived in my place before me - I missed the things in the morning, and had her secured.

THOMAS COOK . I am an officer. On the 22d of January, I found the prisoner at her mother's house, and told her I wanted her, and asked her where the gown and shawl was - She said, she had them to wash, and produced them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY JOYCE . I never gave them to her to wash.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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