Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th January 1817.
Reference Number: 18170115
Reference Number: f18170115-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On WEDNESDAY, 15th of JANUARY, 1817, and following Days; Being the Second Session in the Second Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, 74, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1817.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the city of London; Sir James Allan Park, Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Borrough , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart,; Sir William Leighton , Knt,; Sir Matthew Bloxam, Knt,; John Ansley , Esq.; Christopher Magnay , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart Recorder of the said City, and Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common Sergeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Gregg ,

James Staines ,

Jonas Atkinson ,

Joseph Barnes ,

William Sparke ,

John Ford ,

George Rumble ,

Joseph Gray ,

James Ritchie ,

Lewis Houghton ,

William Pitt Pratt ,

William Plant .

First Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Fletcher ,

Walter Row ,

Edward Rogers ,

George Streeting ,

Henry Hope ,

Samuel Dyson ,

John Syers ,

Colvin Lamb ,

George Watt ,

Samuel Young ,

William Yeomans ,

Jabez Moore .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Jay ,

Thomas Oriell ,

Edward Morris ,

James Eddington ,

James Caunaby ,

Thomas Pountain ,

James Zeeley ,

William Hepworth ,

Thomas Baines ,

James Greaves ,

James O'Brian ,

Francis Harrison .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 15, 1817.

WOOD, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION IN THE SECOND MAYORALTY.

Reference Number: t18170115-1

148. PETER JOHNSON was indicted for being at large, in this kingdom, before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he had been ordered to be transported .

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-2

149. BENJAMIN HEARNE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wheeler , about the hour of three in the night of the 28th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty-five goblets, value 25s.; two salt-holders, value 3s.; two tumblers, value 2s.; twenty-eight glasses, value 20s.; six mustard-pots, value 9s.; five cruets, value 5s.; one pepper-box, value 1s.; two teapots, value 5s.; seven cups, value 6s.; five jugs, value 5s.; one cream-jug, value 10d.; twenty-three tea-cups and thirteen saucers, value 17s., and one sugar-pot, value 2s. , the goods of James Baker .

ROBERT PEARCEY . I am a watchman at Brentford. On the night of the 29th of December last, about ten minutes past three o'clock, I met the prisoner and another man; I was about one hundred yards from the Castle Tavern; he had a sack with him. I asked the prisoner where he was going with it, he said, to Ealing. East looked into the sack, and said, he had got glass in it. I took him into custody.

JAMES BAKER . I am a dealer in glass, and keep the Castle Inn, at Brentford . I was informed of the robbery; I had left my things safe the day before. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment. I have the saucers which match the cups that were found on the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Jury. How can you swear to them - A. The cups are a pattern which were only made for trial, and I bought them all; I have the saucers that match them.

WILLIAM EAST. I am a watchman; I took the things which have been produced from the prisoner, and gave them to Carver.

GEORGE CARVER . I am the beadle of Ealing; the last witness gave me the articles that I have produced.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my barge, and I met a man who gave me the things to carry to Ealing.

WILLIAM EAST. He was going towards Ealing; he said it was his own property.

ROBERT PEARCEY . When I stopped the prisoner, he said, the things were his own.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-3

150. JOHN DAVIS and JAMES LEMON , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Porteus , Esq. about eleven in the forenoon of the 21st of December , Eliza Porteus , and other persons, being therein, and stealing therein, one silver candlestick, value 2l. 10s. , the property of the said Thomas Porteus .

AMELIA MARKS. I live with Mr. Porteus, in Halfmoon-street, Piccadilly . On Friday afternoon I locked the area gate, and delivered the key to my mistress at eleven o'clock on Friday night. I went to the gate at eleven o'clock the next morning and found it locked; about half an hour afterwards I heard that the candlestick was lost. I am sure that the gate was not opened with our key between the time that I locked it, and the time that the candlestick was missed.

ROBERT MAZEY . I live with Mr. Porteus. On the 21st of December, I was in the back-kitchen, I heard somebody go up the area steps, I ran out, and found the candlestick was gone; I looked up, and the area-gate was half open; I went out, and saw the prisoner, Davis, very near it. I passed him, and looked at him. I met a man, who told me that a man had ran round the corner. I followed the prisoner, Davis, he went towards Lausdown-passage. I then met a man of the name of Barrow, and he went with me. I overtook the prisoner, and laid hold of him, and accused him of taking the candlestick; he looked at me, and said, he was quite struck. A person then came up, and the prisoner unbuttoned his coat, and said, he had nothing about him. Mr. Barrow heard some keys rattle, and asked him to let him look at the keys which were in his pocket; he pulled out, I think, five keys in the whole - I am not sure. Barrow gave them to him again. I asked the prisoner to go back to the house, and walked

by the side of him; as he went along he dropped one of the keys, and I picked it up (producing it), this is the key which he dropped-it is a picklock key. I saw the officer open the area-gate with one of the keys which were found on the prisoner Davis.

Prisoner DAVIS. Was I the first person that you saw when you came out of the area - A. You was.

JOHN BARROW. On the 21st of December, I saw the prisoner, Davis, about thirty yards from the area-gate; he was going towards Cousin-street. I and Mazey followed him. The boy asked the prisoner if he had the candlestick. I demanded the keys, and he pulled out one or two, one of which was a latch-key. I said, you have more, and he pulled out three; I returned them to him; and asked him to give them back to me - He was not willing; he dropped one of them, and we picked it up. The officer, Jeffries, has the keys.

CHARLES JEFFRIES . I am an officer; I tried the keys to the area-gate, and one of them, which was a skeleton-key, opened the gate; there were three skeleton keys in the whole. The keys were given to me, and the candlestick, I produce them. I took the prisoner into custody.

GEORGE ATKINSON . On the 21st of December I was in Half-Moon-street; the prisoner, Lemon, ran past me, about a quarter past eleven o'clock, I saw he had something in his bosom; the two witnesses asked me if I had seen any person, and I told them of it. I looked round and saw him again, standing and looking round the corner of Half-Moon-street, leading to Cousin-street, when the servant said he had been robbed. I went on; and as I was going into Piccadilly, I saw the same boy again, he must have gone through Sheppard's-market, he was running under the wall of the Green-park, towards Bond-street. I took hold of him, and asked him what he had got, he said, nothing. I told him he had got a candlestick; he said, no. I opened his jacket, and found the candlestick wrapped up in his apron, under his jacket. I delivered him, and the candlestick, to Mr. Porteus's servant, at his house. The candlestick produced is the same which I took from him.

Prisoner LEMON. Did you ask me what I had got - A. I did.

WM. TUSON. I was in Lansdown-passage, Barrow asked me to look at the keys; I desired the prisoner to go back, and in his way he dropped the key-Mazey picked it up. When Lemon was brought back, I asked the prisoner, Davis, for the keys to try the area-gate; he gave them to me. I took them, and then he demanded them back as his property. He gave me the three skeleton keys very willingly. He did not give me the latch key. I refused to give them up.

Prisoner's, DAVIS, Defence. On the 21st of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, as I was coming from Kensington I saw the keys in the road, and I picked them up. I passed the house; the servant ran past me, and I walked slowly on, when I came to Lansdown-passage, the footman asked to search me. I gave the gentleman the keys. I went back, and the other prisoner was in the passage.

LEMON'S Defence. A young man came to me by the Park, and asked me to carry the candlestick to Bond-street.

DAVIS - GUILTY. Aged 17.

LEMON - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Their case was reserved for the consideration of the twelve judges .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18170115-4

151. RICHARD WILTSHIRE and SUSAN PAR-SONS , were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , from the person of Robert Haywood , one coat, value 2l.; three waistcoats, value 1l.; seven handkerchiefs, value 1l.; three pair of shoes, value 1l.; three pair of scissars, value 8s.; two razors, value 2s.; one shaving-box, value 2s., and 10s. in monies numbered, and one bank-note, value 1l. his property.

ROBERT HAYWOOD . I am a coachman . On the 10th of November, I was in the Strand, about half-past nine o'clock, the prisoner, Parsons, laid hold of me, and asked me for something to drink; she took me to a public-house in Round-court ; she called for some gin, and handed it to the other prisoner, and another man, who were in the house. The prisoner, Wiltshire, was standing up when I first when in. The landlord asked for the money. The prisoner, Wiltshire, hustled me, and said, he had no money. I had a bundle with me when I went into the house, which I put down on the bench. The prisoner, Parsons, went out with a man, and the landlord asked me if it was my bundle which they had taken; when the prisoner, Wiltshire, went to the door, and said, are you gone? I do not know who he spoke to. I ran out, and gave the alarm, when some person said, it is only a lark. I saw no more of them. The articles mentioned in the indictment were in my bundle. About a week afterwards I saw the prisoners in custody.

WILLIAM HAGYARD. I was in the Strand, and saw the prisoner, Parsons, stop the prosecutor. I am sure she is the girl, I knew her before.

PARSONS' Defence. When I was taken the prosecutor said, he was not sure of me.

WILTSHIRE'S Defence. I was in the public-house; the prosecutor was in liquor; he asked me about the bundle, he took me into custody, and let me go; the next day I was taken again.

ROBERT HAYWOOD re-examined. I am sure I never said, that I did not know the woman. I was quite sober.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-5

152. MARY JOHNSTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eliza Bond , about ten in the night of the 27th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therein three shawls, value 1l. 7s.; one pair of shoes, value 3s.; one great coat, value 5s.; one apron, value 1s.; three caps, value 2s., and one handkerchief, value 4s. , her property.

ELIZA BOND. I live in Broadway, Westminster . I am blind. On the 27th of December, I went out with my sister, who leads me about; in my way home the prisoner came to me, and said, she had travelled sixty miles, and was very hungry; I told her if she would come home with me I would give her some food. She went home with us, and my sister made her some tea. I told my sister to

give her a gown and a pair of stays, as she said she was very naked. She then said, she had pawned a box for five shillings, and asked me to lend her money, and she would pawn one of the gowns which were in it, and pay me. I sent my sister to pledge my ring for three shillings, and lent her two shillings and nine-pence of the money. The prisoner remained with me while my sister went with the ring; when she returned, the prisoner asked me to go to a public-house with her, to see her husband; I and my sister went with her; we had some beer, and then we all came back to my house again; the prisoner came back with us to take her old things away. When we got back the prisoner told my sister she would give her in charge if she did not go home; I told her she should not turn my sister out. I had bolted both my shutters. I went out and locked my door, and asked the prisoner to lead me to my sister's; it was about ten o'clock at night. When the prisoner came out, I locked both the doors, and put the keys in my pocket. She took me the wrong way, and left me in the street, saying, she would return to me-a person came by and took me home. When I got home, I found my door was locked, as I had left it. I let myself in and locked the door after me. I found one of my shutters unbolted, inside, and the window was downa person could get in at the window from the ground; my lodgers were all in bed. I went to my box, which I had left locked, and found it open. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; the box was in the same room that the prisoner was in.

REBECCA BOND. I went out with the last witness, who is my sister; the prisoner stopped us, and asked her for charity. The prisoner went to my sister's, and had tea with us; afterwards I went out and pawned the ring for three shillings, and my sister gave the prisoner two shillings and nine-pence of it; she then went to a public-house with the prisoner, and then we all returned to my sister's house again; in our way the prisoner took the shawl off my shoulders, saying, you will go and pawn that next. Before we went out my sister fastened the shutters. When we returned the prisoner would not let me go into the room, she pushed me, and got my shawl of my sister's bed; I told her I was going to get my shawl, but she said I should not. She pushed me out at the door; I went out and called, through the shutters, to my sister, saying, that the woman wanted to rob her, and not me. The prisoner then came out, and said, she would give me in charge. I went home, and I was afraid to go back again. My sister had not been drinking, except some porter which she had with the prisoner. The next morning I went back to my sister, who told me she had been robbed. If the shutters were open I could get in at the window myself. I knew my sister's clothes, I used to put them away for her.

GREEN. I am a police-officer. I know the prosecutor, and the house, which is in the parish of St. Margaret; she is a lodger, but the landlord does not live in the house. The prisoner was described to me on the 28th of December, I knew her, and went after her to a house which she frequented, several times, at Marsh-gate, Lambeth; I, at last, found her at Moulsey, on the 7th instant; she had this bonnet on her head (producing it,) I met her in the road, and took her into custody; before I said any thing to her, she cried, and said, she knew what I wanted her for. I took her to her mother's, at Moulsey alm-house. I searched her, and found a duplicate on her, it was tied up in a handkerchief, which she threw upon the floor, she said it was the duplicate of a gown that was pledged at Kennington. I went to the pawnbroker's, whose name was upon the duplicate. I produce the gown.

REBECCA BOND re-examined. My sister only rents the room in which she lives, the landlord does not live in the house. The house is let out to different persons.

(Property produced and sworn to by Rebecca Bond.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170115-6

153. THOMAS GOODHALL and GEORGE WIL-SON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Nevel , about eight o'clock in the night of the 17th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, thirty boxes, value 2s. 6d., and thirty sets of dominoes, value 30s. , the goods of John Wyatt .

JOHN WYATT . I am a turner , and live in Mary-le-bone-street ; Sarah Nevel keeps the house, and lives in it. On the 17th of December last, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in my parlour, at the back of my shop, from information that I received from Malim, who was in the shop, I went down the street after the men; I met Frayne, and he directed me to go another way; I could not see them, and went home; about ten minutes after Frayne came into my shop, saying, he would point them out. Before I went out the first time a pane of glass had been cut, and a great number of dominoes and bones taken out - A person could get them out by cutting the glass-Frayne pointed out the two prisoners to me, Goodhall was coming towards me, the other had crossed over the way; I passed Goodhall, his foot slipped, when I thought I heard dominoes rattle; I collared him, and took him to the watch-house, in his way there he attempted to throw something out of his hand, I found it was a domino-box; he was searched at the watch-house, and four more domino-boxes were found on him. I saw the prisoner at Tothill-fields, on the 29th of December, he then said, he was drawn into it by two men of his acquaintance, and that they had taken away about twenty boxes. I took the prisoner, Wilson, on the 21st, the officer was with me, we found him in White Lion-street; he was searched, and some duplicates found on him.

JUDITH WYATT . I am the wife of the last witness. I was in the shop on the 17th of December last, about eight o'clock in the evening, my husband had been out. The prisoner, Goodhall, came into the shop, and asked for a Mrs. Westley, I told him I did not know where she lived; he looked round the shop, and then walked slowly out; about ten minutes after the windows were cut.

JOHN FRAYNE . I am a boot-closer, and live in Piccadilly. On the 17th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the two prisoners talking together at the corner of Francis-street, at the top of Mary-le-bone-street, I had seen them before, at the prosecutor's window; they walked away towards Mr. Wyatt's; I went after them, and saw them run back, and then run up

Brewer-street. I was on the other side of the way. I told Mr. Wyatt which way they were gone; I went round Brewer-street, and met them. I am sure the prisoners are the men. I afterwards went with Wyatt, and saw the prisoners putting the things into their pockets.

WILLIAM SHADWELL . I am beadle of St. James's; Mr. Wyatt's house is in that parish. On the 17th of December the prisoner, Goodhall, was brought into the watch-house. I found four domino-boxes on him. Wyatt gave me another box, which, he said, the prisoner had tried to drop; the prisoner did not deny it.

SAMUEL PLANK. I am an officer. On the 31st of December I apprehended the prisoner, Wilson, at his lodgings. I found a duplicate of a blue coat at his lodgings, which, he said was his. The boy had described him to have been dressed in a blue coat. When I brought him out of the house, I asked him if he knew Goodhall, he said, he did not; when Goodhall saw him at the office, he said, that he knew him, and Wilson confessed it. The pawnbroker brought the coat before the magistrate, and Wilson claimed it as his property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRAYNE re-examined. They were both dressed in blue coats.

Prisoner WILSON. Will you swear to me - A. He is like the man, I am sure of Goodhall.

GOODHALL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

WILSON- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-7

154. JOHN COCHRANE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eliza West , on the King's highway, on the 24th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one handkerchief, value 1s., and one gown, value 2l. , her property.

ELIZA WEST . I live in King-street, Westminster; I was going home, about half-past eight o'clock, on the 24th of December, Sarah Assand was with me; I had a black silk gown in a handkerchief - They were my property. I was in Princes-street , and the prisoner struck me, and took my bundle from under my arm; it was dark, but I could see him by the light of a butcher's shop. He ran into the Park with the bundle. I saw him again at the watch-house the same evening. I am sure is the man.

Prisoner. Are you sure I struck you - A. I am.

WHITING EDMUNDS. On the 24th of December I was constable of the night, and took the prisoner into custody; the prosecutor said, he was the man. Dagnall, and another man, was with me at the time.

THOMAS DAGNALL . I went with the last witness to take the prisoner into custody, we took him to the watchhouse; Mrs. West was there, she said, he was the man who struck and robbed her. He said, he was not the man who took it, but he knew where it was; he then said, it was at No. 4, Duck-yard, Duck-lane. Two boys, named Anderson and Baker, had been taken up before for the robbery. Anderson was brought out to him, and said, the prisoner was the man who had struck Mrs. West. He denied it. Barker was then brought out, he also said, that the prisoner was the man who had struck Mrs. West; and that they had agreed to meet at Tothill-street to divide the money. The prisoner denied it.

STEPHEN NASH. I assisted to take the prisoner to the watch-house. The last witness has spoken correctly.

HENRY CURTIS . I was in the Park when Mrs. West said she had lost her bundle; two link-boys accused Anderson with being in company with the man who took it. As I was taking him to the watch-house he was taken from me. A boy, named Barker, came up to the watchhouse door, and he was taken up also.

SARAH ASSAND . I was with Mrs. West when she lost her bundle. I did not see the man who struck her; she ran into the park after the man.

JAMES ANDERSON . I did not know the prisoner. I was in Princes-street, with Barker, the night Mrs. West was robbed; I saw the prisoner there, he told us to stop behind while he took the bundle. When he was in Princes-street he made a blow at her, pushed her aside, and snatched the bundle. He ran into the Park, and I also went into the Park in my way home. I had seen the prisoner before that day, but had not spoken to him.

Prisoner. Are you sure that I struck her - A. I am.

JAMES BARKER . I know the prisoner; he lived opposide my mother's house; we met him in Tothill-street by chance. He asked me to take a walk with him - I did. When we got into Princes-street, he said, he would snatch the bundle from Mrs. West; he did not desire me to stay. He did not appoint to meet us to divide the money. I saw him snatch the bundle, and run into the Park, and I went home through the Park.

Prisoner's Defence. I met these boys at Westminster; I neither spoke to them, or took the bundle.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170115-8

155. JAMES SIMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Donald Cormack , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 16th of December , with intent to steal .

DONALD CORMAC . I live at No. 31, Frith-street, Soho ; I usually sleep in my shop, it is my general residence; I have no other lodging; the shop has no communication with the house. Mr. Ward keeps the house. I went out on Sunday the 15th of December, about eleven o'clock, and returned on the Monday; I found the door broken open, and my place robbed. The prisoner is a carpenter, and had been at work for the landlady, and I had called him into my shop about a week before, to shew him some alterations which I wanted him to make. On the Sunday night my shop had been robbed of my bed and blankets, which made me sleep out on the Monday night. I went away a little after five o'clock, locked the door, and gave the watchman directions to look out.

JAMES PORTER . I am a watchman of St. Ann's parish; as I was going my rounds, about half-past twelve o'clock, I found Mr. Cormac's door unlocked, I put my stick through the hole, when the prisoner pushed it to from the inside; I called Preston, who is also a watchman, to my assistance; the prisoner opened the door, rushed out, and I stopped him-he threw a steel down; as I was taking him to the watch-house, he threw some matches and a candle away. The next morning I found a skeleton-key by the door. We searched him at the watch-house, and found a tinder-box, and four small, and one large, skeleton keys. Webb

tried the large key, which was found in his pocket, and it fitted Mr. Cormac's door.

Prisoner. Was it not my spectacle case - A. It had either tinder or candle-snuff in it. I had tried the door at twelve o'clock, it was then safe.

PRESTON. I am a watchman; I went to assist Porter. I heard something fall, and found it was a steel; it appeared to come from the prisoner. I saw the prisoner searched, and five skeleton keys were found on him.

HAMMOND WEBB . I searched the prisoner, and found one large and four small skeleton keys, and a box which had had tinder it. I tried this key to the door. and it opened it (produced).

Prisoner's Defence. I went there for my tools. I had got a job to do and wanted them; I was coming by and thought I would call for them. I tried the door, and found it fast; I went away, and a man ran out, I called out watch, and they seized me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 69.

First Middlesex Jury, before Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-9

156. ELIZA ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , twenty yards of ribbon, value 3s. , the property of Thomas Stephens .

WILLIAM DRAYTON , I am Mr. Stephens' apprentice. On the 16th of December, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for some ribbon, another person served her; the drawer was on the counter, I saw her put her hand in and take out three pieces of ribbon, she did it at different times; I was within two yards of her; there was another person with her, who was purchasing. She put the ribbon up her sleeve, and afterwards into her pocket; I told my master, and he sent for an officer, before the officer came she was going out of the shop, my master accused her of it; she said, it must be a mistate, and sat down on the stool. She was taken up stairs and searched, but nothing found on her.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I knew her well, I had seen her before. I am sure I saw her do it.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I am a haberdasher. I was in the shop, and sent for an officer; the prisoner was going out, when I detained her, and told her she had got some of my property in her pocket; she said, she was surprised at the charge, and sat down on a stool, which was six or seven yards from the drawer. She went up-stairs with me, and wanted me to search her - I found nothing upon her. I went down stairs to see for an officer, and under the stool on which she had been sitting, I saw three pieces of ribbon; I can swear to one of them. I gave them to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The ribbon would not be much concealed under the stool.

WILLIAM DRAYTON . When the ribbon was found I saw it. I will swear to two pieces of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I saw her take it very plain.

M'COMBIE. I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody. As I went in Mr. Stephens was picking up the ribbons. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Recommended to mercy. GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Calendar Months , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-10

157. JOHN FRAZER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , four ounces of silk twist, value 8s. , the property of Thomas Stephens .

WILLIAM MASON . I am Mr. Stephens' apprentice. On the 26th of December, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for some twist; I was alone in the shop; when he asked for twist I put the twist drawer on the counter; he wanted three yards' to match three pieces of cloth. I saw him take a ball of twist, and put it up his sleeve, and while I was measuring him a yard, I saw him take another ball, and put it up his sleeve also. I made an excuse to go up stairs for some more twist, and told Mr. Beioly. He came down, and caught hold of the prisoner's right arm, and I took hold of his left, where he had put the twist; he pulled it away, and shook one ball out, Beioly held the other in. The The prisoner looked into the shop before he came in, and could see that I was alone. Beioly took the ball of twist out of his sleeve, and found three more in his pocket. I cannot swear to those which were found in his pocket.

JEREMIAH BEIOLY . I am in Mr. Stephens' service; the last witness called me down, and accused the prisoner of stealing two balls of twist; he said he had not got them, and shook one ball out, I held his arm till the officer came and took the other ball out. The prisoner said, that he was a tailor, and carried twist about him. The two balls are my master's property.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner, and found a ball of twist up his sleeve.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop for some twist; I had some twist in my pocket at the time, but I wanted some of a lighter colour; the other man came down and shoved the ball which I had in my hand up my sleeve.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-11

158. FRANCIS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January , four pieces of printed cotton, containing ninety yards, value 4l., the goods of Robert Haines , in his dwelling-house .

FREDERICK CAREY . I am shopman to Mr. Haines, linen-draper , Fleet-steet, in the parish of St. Dunstan . On Friday evening, between six and seven o'clock, I heard a rustling, and saw the prints, which hang upon an iron-bar inside the door, moving, I went to the door, and saw two of the prints on the ground, about two yards from the shop, the bar and all was gone; I saw the prisoner about ten yards from me, with the iron-bar, and two pieces of print upon it. I saw him drop them. I never lost sight of him till my brother, who lives with me, stopped him. The things are worth £4.

ROBERT SMITH . I am an officer; I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

London Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-12

159. DEBORAH SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , two sheets, value 7s. 6d., and one quilt, value 2s. 6d. , the property of John Flemming .

SARAH EDMUNDS . I was chairing at Mr. Flemming's. On the 6th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner on the stairs, on the third floor, she had a bundle in her apron; I asked her what it was, she said it was nothing to me. Knowing she had no business in the house, I stopped her; she had got two sheets and a quilt, rolled up together; she said, let me pass. She was secured. She said she was sent to fetch them, and was to be paid for her time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man and his wife; she sent me up for the sheets.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Two Calendar Months , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-13

160. WILLIAM POWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , two shoes, value 8s. , the property of Charles Bamfield .

CHARLES BAMFIELD . I am a shoemaker , and live at No. 74, Newgate-street . On the 11th of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked for a pair of shoes and a pair of boots. I showed him the shoes, they fitted him, and I put them aside for him, and fitted him a pair of boots; I had my back towards him. He was to pay me 2l. 6s. for both pair. I was taking some boots from the pegs, and saw him doing something to his pocket. He pulled out four or five shillings, and wanted my boy to fetch some gin; I would not let him; he proposed my going out with him to have some - I refused; he then said, you will not hinder me from going out. I told him I must first know what he had in his pocket; he stepped back, and pulled two shoes out of his pocket - They were mine. I sent for a constable, when he shoved me, broke my window, and run out of the shop. I gave an alarm, and he was brought back. I am sure he is the man.

HENRY HARRIS. I am the officer; I took charge of the prisoner; the next day he told me he was sorry for it, and was afraid he should be transported.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-14

161. ANN MYERS and ELIZA RAINER were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , one watch, value 20l.; one chain, value 3l.; two seals, value 2l.; one key, value 1d., and one other key, value 6d., the property of William Galloway , from his person .

WILLIAM GALLOWAY . I live in Great Pulteney-street, Golden-square. On the 20th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopsgate-street; I was accosted by the prisoner Myers, she took me to a house in Angel-alley , the other prisoner opened the door, and procured a light. I had my watch and seals about my person-it was a stop-watch. We were in the lower part of the house; the light was brought in about a minute; I then did not like the place I was in, and the prisoners were importunate for money; I gave them 1s. 6d. and left the house directly, my watch was then safe; the two prisoners came out with me, and had hold of my arms; as soon as I got into Bishopsgate-street, I felt a hand seize my watch, and the two prisoners left me immediately. I gave the alarm, went back to the house, and offered a reward for the apprehension of the prisoners. Myers was taken on the 8th of January, I knew her again; the other prisoner was taken on the 13th, and I knew her also. I am sure they are the two who took my watch.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable. The prisoners were taken to Lambeth-street. The prosecutor came to me the night he was robbed, and described the prisoners; he did not appear intoxicated. When he saw the prisoners he spoke particularly to them.

Rainer's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor, and know nothing of the other prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-15

162. WILLIAM YARDLY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , one saw, value 2s. , the property of George Larner .

GEORGE BROWN . I saw the prisoner come into my premises and take the saw, I followed him and took him.

(Produced and sworn to).

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Calendar Month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-16

163. MARY ANN BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , two sheets, value 8s.; two curtains, value 6s.; one clock, value 2s.; one counterpanc, value 10s.; and two pillows, value 4s., the property of William Rolph , in a lodging room .

No prosecutor appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-17

164. PHILIP WOOD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Harriet Hunt , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one basket, value 6d., and one brass cock, value 6d. the property of James Hunt .

HARRIET HUNT . I live on Grosvenor-terrace. On the 12th of December , about half-past seven in the evening, as I was going home, I was stopped by some person in Dean-street, Westminster , I had a little basket, with a beer cock in it; a man came up to me, and asked me the name of the street, I said, I do not know; he then seized my ridicule and ran off. My son was with me, and he called out stop thief. I saw the prisoner again about a week after. I cannot swear he is the man.

FREDERICK THOMPSON . I was with the prisoner; he met me, and asked me to go with him; he snatched the bundle from the lady; I ran one way, and he ran another way.

ALFRED POPLE. On the evening of the 12th of December, I saw the prisoner in the company of the last witness, standing at the corner of Dean-street, I watched them from seven o'clock till eight; they were together all that time. I lost sight of them for two or three minutes, when I heard the cry of stop thief!

Prisoner's Defence. Pople secured me, and let me go the overnight, and the next morning he took me again.

POPLE. I did not see him the overnight.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-18

165. ANN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , two caps, value 10s.; one silver tea-spoon, value 7s.; and 1s. , the goods and monies of James Shaw .

ANN SHAW . I live in Denmark-court . The prisoner slept with me on Friday, the 16th of December, and stopped with me the following day, till four o'clock in the afternoon, and then left me; I missed my things the next morning. About a fortnight afterwards I saw her at Mr. Bailey's; she had my cap on her head, and a frill on her neck which was made with the lace off my child's cap.

HENRY LINTHWAITE . I am a salesman; the prisoner brought me a silver spoon, broken in two pieces, I bought it of her, as old silver; she said she had broken it and must make it good.

ISAAC PIKE . I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 28th of December. I took her cap and frill off; she confessed that she had stolen them, and that she had sold the spoon to Linth-

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-19

166. ALICE BLIGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , seven yards of printed cotton, value 16s., the property of John Morris and William Morris , privately in their shop .

GEORGE BANKS. I am shopman to Messrs. Morris, who live in Piccadilly . The prisoner, and two others, were going by the door, I invited them in, and showed them some goods; they did not buy any. They were in the shop about a quarter of an hour. - I suspected the prisoner. I missed the things the moment they went out. I went out, and took the prisoner before she had got to the next door, She had got the things under her arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of Stealing, but not privately ,

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-20

167. JOSEPH RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one coat, value 7s., the property of Thomas Jones and William Simmons , privately in their shop .

ROBERT PIKE . I am shopman to Messrs. Jones and Simmons, mercers , Leicester-square . On the 7th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop, and heard something snatched from the door. I ran out, fixed my eyes upon the prisoner, and brought him back to the shop, and found my master's coat under his coat; he asked me to forgive him. I did not see the coat taken, but I heard it rustle.

E. PEPPER. I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man came up to me, and gave me the coat.

ROBERT PIKE . I suspected the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Calendar Months , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-21

168. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one looking-glass, value 3l., the property of Robert Smith , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT SMITH. I keep a public-house at Knightsbridge . On the 7th of January, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, and another man, came into my parlour, and called for some beer. The prisoner went out, and the other man came to the bar for some rum, and then went out also; I did not see the prisoner go out; this raised my suspicion. I went into the parlour and missed my glass, which hung in the room. I went out, and overtook them at Hyde-park corner, the prisoner had got the glass on his shoulder. I laid hold of him, and gave him in charge to the constable. I have been offered two guineas for the glass.

WILLIAM JARMAN . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave me the glass to take to George-street, Westminster.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-22

169. ENOCH DANKS was indicted for stealing on the 21st of December , thirty pounds weight of woollen yarn, value 3l.; seven pounds weight of tow yarn, value 2s.; one weaver's sleigh, value 20s., and one kuee-roll, value 10s.; the goods of Thomas Lea , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS LEA. I am a carpet manufacturer , and live in Albemarle-street, the prisoner was my foreman . On the 21st of December I missed some yarn. I watched the prisoner, and suspected that he took some yarn away with him every night. On the 14th of December I went to Mr. Weaver's house, and saw a rug exposed for sale, which was made from my yarn; it was a particular kind of yarn. I compared it with my yarn, and it exactly matched. I got a search-warrant, and went with the officer to the prisoner's house, and found a quantity of yarn, and a sleigh in his room, which was mine; and

more yarn in the cellar, which was also mine. I had often observed his pockets bulky. I manufacture my own yarn.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I manufacture my yarn at Wolverhampton and Kidderminster. The prisoner lived with me two years. I believe he once sold carpets by commission.

THOMAS WEAVER . I deal in carpets, and live in Long-acre. I bought a rug of the prisoner; he used to work for himself at over-hours; he lives in Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane. I afterwards gave the rug to the prosecutor. I had bought two or three of him before.

Cross-examined. He used to work at his own house some times.

JOHN SMITH . I am in Mr. Lea's employ; when the officer apprehended the prisoner, he confessed that he had taken the yarn, and that he had sold Mr. Weaver a rug that morning, which he had made with Mr. Lea's materials.

Cross-examined. This was after he was taken into custody. He implored mercy.

PLANT. I am an officer. On the 21st of December I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found some yarn; I took the prisoner into custody at Mr. Lea's house; he said he wished to see his master, who came with the last witness; he begged for mercy. I stopped him in his confession; he said, I will tell the truth let the consequence be what it will.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Court to LEE. What quantity do you think he took away at one time - A. About 5s. or 6s. worth.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-23

170. JOHN HARDWING was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , in the dwelling-house of Edward O'Hara , one pocket, value 1s.; one thimble, value 2d.; one glove, value 3d.; twenty-one shillings, in monies numbered, and two bank-notes, value 1l. each , the property of Robert Wynn .

SECOND COUNT the same, only stating them to be the property of Charlotte M'Ginnis .

CHARLOTTE M'GINNIS. I live with my sister, Ann Wynn , who rents part of Mr. O'Hara's house; the prisoner lived with my sister. On the 21st of December, as I was making the prisoner's bed, I dropped my pocket in his room: I did not know it till next morning. The articles mentioned in the indictment were in my pocket. On the evening of the 28th I saw the piece of sealing wax and the pencil taken out of the prisoner's pocket by the constable. I had asked him if had seen my pocket, and he said he knew nothing about it. My sister told him she thought it was dropped in his room; he persisted in deny-it. We sent for Hartly, the constable, but he did not search him thoroughly; the prisoner then went up to his sister, who lives in the house, and did not come down again. We afterwards sent for Watson, and he found the sealing-wax and pencil on him.

WILLIAM SAYER. I live with, and am employed by, Mrs. Wynn; my mistress told me to watch the prisoner. I saw him go out with his sister; I followed them to St. Martin's-court, when they turned round and saw me, and then dodged me about. I watched them into a gin-shop, in Holborn, I looked through the door, and saw them change a note; when they came out, I went in and told the landlord to keep the note.

THOMAS RAMSEY. I am shopman to Mr. Perryman, who keeps a wine-vaults, in Holborn; the prisoner came to our house with a woman, and had some rum, the woman gave me the £1 note to change; she gave me the name of Jones, No. 25, Broad-street. I gave her the change. The instant they went out the last witness came in.

JOHN WATSON . I am a constable: I apprehended the prisoner at a liquor-shop, in Castle-street, Leicester-square. I found a piece of sealing-wax and a piece of a pencil upon him. M'Ginnis was with me at the time.

MARY ANN WYNN. I am sister-in-law to M'Ginnis. The prisoner worked for me. I live at No. 6, Hemming's-row, St. Martin's-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. The man searched me, but found nothing on me; my sister changed the note. The pencil and sealing-wax were in a basket of cinders which I carried up stairs.

(Pencil and sealing-wax produced.)

CHARLOTTE M'GINNIS. The sealing-wax is bent up in a particular manner; and there is a notch in the pencil, which was done by my sister's child. I am sure they are mine, and that they were in my pocket when I lost it. The prisoner was not in the habit of nursing the child.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170115-24

171. JOHN LAMBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , two watches, value 13l.; one chain, value 5l.; five gold seals, value 8l., and one key, value 7s., the goods of James Dixon , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES DIXON . I am a silversmith , and live in Wardour-street ; the prisoner was my out-door apprentice ; my sleeping-room adjoins the work-room, in the attic. On the 18th of November the prisoner came before I was up; I heard him go into the work-shop, and then run down stairs. I was getting up. I went into the shop, and missed my gold watch, chain and seals, and a diamond pin. I had put them in the shop the overnight when I went to bed. As soon as I went into the shop, before I missed any thing, the prisoner told me my things were laying about the floor (he had come up again), meaning my coat and waistcoat, which hung on a chair - They did not appear to have been on the ground. I missed my watch, and asked him where it was, he said he did not know, they were not there when he came in the morning. I said I should send for an officer; he said I might if I liked. I asked him where he had been when he ran down stairs; he said, to the shop privy. I went there, and found nobody had been there for sometime. I saw some footsteps towards the door, which leads into Duck-lane; they appeared larger than the prisoner's footsteps. I told him what I had observed; he answered me very

impertinently, which made me suspect him. He was searched, but nothing found upon him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-25

172. HARRIETT SLEA was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , fifteen yards of poplin, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Thomas Flint and John Ray , in their dwelling-house .

ROBERT SAMPSON . I am shopman to Thomas Hunt and John Ray , haberdashers , Grafton-street . On the 20th of December the prisoner was at my masters' shop, there were several persons in the shop at the time; I was serving some ladies. One of the shopwomen was near me; she had occasion to go away, and as she passed me she gave me our watch-word, which was a signal for me to look to the goods on the counter. I saw a piece of poplin taken off the counter by a woman in a black veil, who was standing behind some ladies; thinking it was taken to look at, I waited some time, it not being returned, I looked up and saw the prisoner, who had a black veil on, going to the door; I went after her, and took hold of her as she was opening the door; I held her with one hand, and put my other hand to her side to prevent the poplin from falling, which she had under her arm. I took her into the counting-house and took it from her. It was the piece I had seen taken off the counter; it is worth 50s. cost price.

HAMMOND WELLS . I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy, not for myself, but for two fatherless children.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18170115-26

173. JOANNA WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , seven shifts, value 2l., six gowns, value 4l.; nine pair of stockings, value 1l.; four pair of shoes, value 10s.; four shawls, value 2l.; one pelisse, value 2l.; one bonnet, value 1s.; and one pair of scissars, value 6d., the property of Mathew Dalziel , in his dwelling-house .

MATHEW DALZIEL . I live in Dean-street, Soho ; my daughter is a dress-maker, and lives with me. The prisoner has chaired at my house for about five weeks. She slept at my house two nights before the robbery; she went away on the 16th of October, about three weeks after we missed several things. She had my daughter's gown, and my wife's bonnet, on, when at the Police-Office. My daughter is of age, and finds her own clothes.

ANN DALZIEL . I am the wife of the last witness. I was out of town when the prisoner slept at our house; when I came back I missed three new gowns that were not quite made, a new pelisse, a shawl, a piece of bed-furniture, and a pair of new shoes - They were all my own. The prisoner had my bonnet and shoes on when she was taken up.

THOMAS PACE. I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner. I examined the prisoner's box at her lodgings; I brought the box to the office, and the prisoner claimed it. I found a shift and a cap in the box which the prosecutor claimed.

(Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 52.

Of stealing to the value of 1s. only .

Confined Six Calendar Months , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-27

174. SAMUEL WOOLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one great coat, value 2l. the property of Henry Birks .

HENRY BIRKS. I am the driver of the Knightsbridge stage . On the 9th of December last, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, my stage was opposite Lime-street . I got off the box, put my coat inside the stage, and went into the public-house. I came out in a few minutes, and found the door on the street side open, and my coat taken away. It is worth £2. In five minutes after the prisoner and coat were brought into the public-house.

GEORGE CHILDS . I am the driver of the Chelsea stage; I was standing behind the Kensingston stage, and saw the prisoner open the door on the street side, and take the coat out, and I collared him; when four more men came up to us, two of whom said they were officers, and the other two caught hold of me and tried to rescue him. They drove me across the road, when the patrole came up and took the prisoner into custody. I am sure I saw him take the coat out. I was within seven yards of him.

WILLIAM CAMPION . I am a patrole. I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the coat to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-28

175. GEORGE BOWMAN was indicted for stealing on the 3rd of January , one hamper, value 1s. 9d.; eightyfour glass bottles, value 17s. 6d.; and thirty-six pints of essence of anchovies, value 3l. , the property of John Burgess and William Robert Burgess .

GEORGE WICKERS. I am servant to Messrs. Burgess. On the 3rd of January I packed up seven dozen of anchovies in a hamper, and assisted in putting them into the cart, which Purle drove.

ROBERT PURLE. I drove the cart; as I was coming down Redcross-street I missed the hamper out of the cart. I met Palley, and in consequence of the information he gave me, I ran into the Crescent, and met Handley; I soon after saw the prisoner, in company with another man, who had the hamper on his back. I attempted to seize the other man, but he threw the hamper down and ran away. I secured the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. The other man had the hamper. I did not see the prisoner near the cart.

CHARLES PALLEY . On the evening of the 3rd of January, I was at the corner of Jewin-street, I saw the prisoner, and another man, behind the cart; they pulled the hamper out of the cart, and rested it on the other side of the way; two men ran up to them and helped it on one of their shoulders, and then all four ran up Jewin-street. I informed the carter of it, and he ran after them

- I went with him. Handley met us, and the carter went into the Crescent, by his direction. I saw the carter bring the prisoner back. I knew him directly. I am sure he is the man who took it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. The prisoner was a stranger to me. I was on the pavement. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN HANDLEY . I live in Jewin-street Crescent. On the 3rd of January, about five o'clock, I saw two men, with a hamper, going on in a great hurry. I met the carter, and went with him to look after them; the carter collared the man who had the hamper, he threw it down and got away. I laid hold of the prisoner. He was with the man who had got the hamper.

THOMAS WILLY. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the Crescent; a man threw down the hamper, I stopped to see what was the matter.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-29

176. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , fifty-six pounds weight of beef, value 30s. , the property of Giles Silverside .

GILES SILVERSIDE . I am a butcher , and live in Paternoster-row. On the 26th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was sent for to the watch-house; I went and found the prisoner in custody, and about seven stone of beef, which I knew to be mine by the way in which it was cut.

GEORGE READ . I am a constable; I saw the prisoner crossing the top of Ludgate-hill with the beef on his back; he was coming from the market; when he saw me he turned round, and went down Ludgate-hill very fast. I laid hold of him at the top of Creed-lane. I asked him what he had got, he said a man had given it to him, threw it down at my feet, and ran away; I pursued him, and took him to the watch-house; he was not out of my sight. Mr. Silverside claimed the beef.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the beef to carry for him, and when the man stopped me he ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months , and publicly whipped one hundred yards near Newgate-market .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-30

177. WILLIAM BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , one box, value 6d.; thirteen caps, value 13s.; thirteen handkerchiefs, value 6s. 6d.; six yards of ribbon, value 2s.; one wooden box, value 2s; and one other box, value 6d.; the property of Sarah Bennet , from the person of Martha Balam .

MARTHA BALAM . I live in Glocester-place, Commercial road. On the 26th of December, I was with Sarah Bennett , who was going to a situation, and I was carrying her box under my arm; I held it with my hand, we were in Newgate-street . A man snatched it from me, and ran away; I called out, stop thief: we ran after him - I lost sight of him. The prisoner was stopped soon afterwards. I will not swear he is the man who took it.

SARAH BENNET . The last witness was carrying my box; we were going to Tottenham-court-road. I saw the prisoner take hold of the box, I am sure he is the man: he ran towards Holborn; he was stopped soon after. I did not lose sight of him. I saw the box taken from him, it contained the articles enumerated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I am sure he is the man.

RICHARD FISHER. I am a carpenter. I was coming along Newgate-street and heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running towards me, with the box under his arm. I stopped him, and the woman came up directly and claimed the box.

GEORGE GROVE . I am a shoe-maker, I live in Newgate-street. I was in my shop, I heard the cry and ran out. I saw the prisoner run by with the box under his arm; the last witness stopped him just as I came out.

EDWARD TWIGG . I am a patrol: I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-31

178. DAVID BELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , thirteen yards of ribbon, value 5s. , the property of Job Williams .

JOB WILLIAMS. I am a haberdasher , I live at Aldgate . On the 18th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked for some ribbons-my son served him; my son told me he had taken some ribbon, and I sent him for a constable; the prisoner wanted to go out, but I would not let him. I told him I had sent for a constable, and he took the ribbons out of his pocket, and wanted me to measure them, which I did; they came to 13s. 6d.: he had only 5s. to pay for them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I did not suspect him till my son told me he had taken the ribbon; I cannot swear to them-the constable searched him.

HARRIOT TAYLOR. I was in the shop when the prisoner came in; I saw him lay his hand on the drawer and put it in his pocket; I and Mr. Williams' son were close to him: when he was found out, he pulled two pieces of ribbon out of his pocket, and said-here are the ribbons, I have fixed on: they were measured, they came to 13s.; he pulled out 4s. or 5s.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I served the prisoner; I saw him take some ribbons out of the drawer, and put them into his pocket, without asking the price. I went for the officer, he was searched, and 4s. 6d. found on him.

Cross-examined. I do not know whether he had a pocket-book, or not.

JOSEPH SHUBER. I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, and found 4s. 6d. on him.

Cross-examined. When you first came in, was the charge given - A. The prisoner gave me his address, I went and found it true. It appeared to me that Mr. Williams doubted whether he was a thief, or not.

Prisoner's Defence. In the absence of the constable, Mr. Williams measured the ribbon, and charged 13s. 9d. for it; I offered to pay 4s. 6d. for six yards.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-32

179. DENNIS FINN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , ten pounds weight of lead, value 1s. 6d. , the property of Henry Peto .

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am an officer of Tower Ward; on the 21st of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was watching about the New Custom-house. I saw the prisoner coming towards the gate, from within the premises, and make a stop, and looked about; he stooped down, and appeared to draw something from under him; he walked off very quick: I stopped him, and asked him what he had got - He begged for mercy; I found he had got some old lead in his hand, in a bag. I secured him, with difficulty; he ran away after he was hand-cuffed. The lead weighed ten pounds. I saw his hand quite under the gate.

JOSEPH DAVIS , sen. I was with the last witness, the lead was in the gateway where the carts go in.

JAMES OLIVER. I am clerk to Mr. Peto, who is the contractor for erecting the New Custom-house; the lead is his property; it is the cuttings.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw something laying down, I picked it up, and found it was lead.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month , and publicly Whipped 100 yards, near the Custom-House .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-33

180. JOHN HARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , one pair of breeches, value 6s. , the property of George Wm. Brathwhaite , Esq.

SECOND COUNT stating them to be the goods of John Lumsden .

JOHN LUMSDEN . I am groom to Mr. Brathwhaite. I hung my breeches up in the stable, in the morning of the 22nd of December, and missed them at night; about a fortnight afterwards, I found the prisoner with the buttons cut off my breeches, and put on his waistcoat; they had my master's crest on them.

JOHN WHELDON . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Russel-street, Convent Garden. I took the breeches into pledge, about the 30th or 31st of December; I do not know who brought them; there are two buttons on them which have Mr. Brathwhaite's crest.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with stealing the breeches; he had two buttons on his waistcoat, with the crest on them; he said he bought them at Rag-fair. I found two more of the same buttons on his trowsers, which he said he bought at Duck-lane. At his examination, he delivered the duplicate of the breeches, and told the magistrate, that he sewed the buttons on the waistcoat himself.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going to Chelsea, I bought the breeches of a Jew, for 6s.; a few days afterwards I pledged them, after taking the buttons off, and putting them on my waistcoat.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-34

181. DEDRICH BUTT was indicted for the wilful murder of Carsten Henke . He also stood charged on the Coroner's Inquest, with the maulslaughter of the said Carsten Henke.

CHRISTIAN NEUMAN . I work for Messrs. Freaks, sugar-bakers, Thames-street, I live there; the prisoner and the deceased also lived there, and were in their employ. On the 28th of December , the prisoner and the deceased went out together, and came in before nine o'clock in the evening, and came into the place where we eat our victuals; I was there with them, we began to eat our supper: they appeared to be on very good terms. They had worked for Messrs. Freak about four months, and used to sleep in the same room. When the prisoner had done eating, he took up a candlestick which was bent, and began to straighten it with the poker. The deceased was at the table, and had not finished his supper; the prisoner was knocking the candlestick with the poker on the table, the decased desired him to desist. The prisoner continued knocking, and the deceased went from the table to push him away; he stepped back a little, and the prisoner continued knocking; the deceased laid hold of the poker, and they began struggling up and down, pushing one another about, each having hold of the poker, for about five minutes - They appeared to be in a passion with each other; they each let go of the poker with one hand, but holding it with the other, they struck each other with their base hands; they then laid hold of the poker again with both hands, both trying to get it. The prisoner wrenched it from the deceased, and hit him over his head with it twice, and after the last stroke, the deceased fell down. They were both in a passion, and in liquor. The noise brought the people down. The deceased was bleeding.

HENRY WORTHINGTON. I am house-surgeon of St. Bartholomew's Hospital; I saw the deceased at the hospital before his death; when he first applied to me, there was a large wound on his head - He was in a stupor; he died on the Friday evening. I opened his head, there was a large fracture in his scull, which might have been done with a poker; and, in my judgment, that was the cause of his death.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of Manslaughter only ,

Confined One Month , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-35

182. THOMAS KENDALL and JOSEPH SAINT were indicted for the wilful murder of Robert Pope .

The prisoner also stood charged on the Coroner's Inquest, with the manslaughter of the said Robert Pope .

RICHARD ALIEF. On the 10th of December , I was a pauper in Bethnal-green workhouse , the deceased was also there. About two o'clock in the afternoon, the Rev. Mr. Pratt. and the two churchwardens, came to our ward, in

consequence of a disturbance in the ward. Five or six men came and took the deceased from the side of my bed, and carried him down stairs; I went and told Mr. Smith, the master, of it, and then went down to the cellar-the door was fast, I could not get in; when I did get in, the deceased was extended by his two hands, tied to the beam, with rope-yarns. Mr. Smith untied him; I assisted him up stairs. He said he was very much hurt. I did not see the prisoner in the cellar.

HENRY CRUSSELL . I was in the workhouse on the 10th of December last; the deceased was talking to the last witness, and some men came behind and snatched him up very suddenly; I followed them into the cellar-in a few minutes, the deceased was tied up to the beam by his hands, his feet touched the ground; his coat was tucked up, and a man gave him several strokes on his loins with the stave of a butter-tub: somebody was counting the strokes. When I first got down, they said eight. I heard he was to have two dozen. When he had received one dozen, the weapon was shifted into another hand. Only two persons struck him while I was there. I did not know them; I believe the prisoners were in the room at the time, they were paupers in the house. I saw the deceased the next day; he was a weak man, and in a declining state before; he said he was very much hurt, and complained of his loins being sore, several times.

JOSEPH SPRINGAY . I was in the cellar at the time the deceased was brought down; I do not know who brought him down-there might be fifty persons in the cellar; the prisoner, Saint, tied him up. They both struck him with the stave of a butter-tub; the deceased cried murder. It might last ten minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I was in the oakum cellar. This punishment had not been inflicted often; the deceased was a weak man. I heard of his being hurt with the scales, about sixteen days after this transaction, and he died almost immediately after that.

ROBERT FORD . I am the door-keeper of the workhouse. I saw the deceased frequently after the transaction; he always appeared sickly, but he then appeared to be worse; he was forty-seven years of age. On the 10th of December, I was sent up into the ward, and saw him bleeding at the nose and mouth; he died two minutes afterwards. He bled a chamber utensil three parts full of blood.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. I had heard of his receiving an injury in the soup-room. He died the same day that he received that injury.

FREDERICK AGER. I am a surgeon. I was called in on the 20th of December, to examine the body of the deceased; there were some blows about his back which had been done some time: in my judgment, they were not the cause of his death. I opened his body, and found the appearance of a blood-vessel being reptured. I have no doubt but the rupture, and the blood discharged from it, was the cause of his death. That could not have taken place so early as the 10th of December, it is impossible.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-36

183. PATRICK DOWNS and THOMAS WALTON were indicted for the wilful murder of Edward Stanton , on the 28th of December .

JANE JEALOUS. I live in George-street. On the night of the 28th of December, I was at the coffee-shop, in George-street , I went there about twelve o'clock. Stanton, the deceased, came in with a girl soon after me; the prisoners came in soon after. There were more than twenty men, and five women in the room. Stanton called for some coffee, he pulled out his money, and paid for it, and said, if I lose this, somebody must starve. The two prisoners, and several others, took him away from where he was, and drove him into the corner; when he was in the corner, they set him in a chair. The prisoner, Downs, put his hands upon the deceased's mouth, he tried to get away, and Downs put his fore finger and thumb upon Stanton's throat, he kept them there some time, I should suppose ten minutes; and the persons around kept pushing: during that time, the prisoner, Walton, was putting his hands into the deceased's pockets, and gave something around amongst them; they were there about half an hour altogether; he was in the chair about a quarter of an hour, and it gave way, and he sunk in it. The landlord Besthall, then came, and sent them out. The two prisoners took Stanton and led him out; they had been in the corner some time before they put him in the chair. The deceased made a noise with his throat, as if he could not speak; after this Walton asked a boy, named George Graham, if he wanted any money, and told him not to say no, if he did; for he would let him have a dollar; he kept pulling money out, I could not see how much; about twenty minutes after, I went out of the house, by myself, and saw the deceased in the hands of four watchmen; he appeared dead: both the prisoners came into the coffee-room again, and the other men with them; they stopped there, and the four watchmen came in, and asked for the young man who had bathed the deceased's temples with vinegar; nobody answered; and the watchmen went away about a quarter of an hour after. The prisoners stopped there till four o'clock, and then went over to the Turk's Head public-house; I was there when they came in. About five o'clock the prisoner, Downs, went out for a short time, and came in again, and said he had been taken up on suspicion of the dead man, and let out on his own bail; and that he had to appear on the next day, and would swear hard and fast against the d-d b-g-r. Walton was present. The deceased gave Walton 2s. or 3s. when he paid for his coffee.

Q. Prisoner WALTON. Why did you not acquaint the coffee-shop man, or the watchman of it - A. If I had said any thing, one and all of them would have ill-used me. When the watchmen came, I beckoned to one of them to tell him, but he did not understand me; I did not tell the watchmen when I saw them with the deceased, because I was afraid.

Court. Are you sure that Downs did not take hold of his throat, until he was in the chair - A. I did not see him.

Q. Have you never said that Downs took him by the throat, and threw him into the chair - A. I cannot say whether he pushed him in by his neck or his body; I did not hear the noise in his throat until he was led out at the door-he appeared as if he could not keep himself up; the prisoners supported him.

Q. You knew the man was dead, when you was at the Turk's-head - A. I did. I did not drink with the prisoners.

MARY LEES . I am an unfortunate woman; I had no lodging. On the 28th of December, I went to Besthall's coffee-shop, at a little after twelve o'clock; the two prisoners came in after me, with several more. The prisoner, Downs, first went up to Stanton. I did not take particular notice until he was in the corner: Walton was with him. Stanton was sitting in a chair, and Downs had his hand on his shoulders near his neck. Walton was rather more stooping; they were surrounded by persons. I was sitting in a box four yards from them.

Court. If you was sitting down, how could you see them, as they were surrounded - A. I could see them; the chair broke with their restling: Besthall came up, hearing the chair break, and sent them out. The prisoners took the deceased towards the door, and the prisoner, Walton, pushed him out of doors; they did not come back till about twenty minutes after. I went out before they returned; when I returned, the two prisoners came into the shop. Downs said, there is a poor man dropped down dead, and I rubbed his temples with vinegar. Four watchmen came in to enquire for the young man who rubbed the deceased's temples with vinegar; as they wanted to know how it happened. Downs went and hid himself in the corner, he stooped down to conceal himself in a place, where the watchmen could not see him: he must have heard it. Nobody answered. The watchman said they did not want to take him, they only wanted to see him. I did not see Walton in the room at the time. At four o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners went over to the Turk's-head. I went too, nearly at the same time; I sat in the same box with them. There was a young man between me and Downs; one of the beadles came in, and stood with his back to the fire. Downs was laying with his head down, I pushed by him to get out, and he said, D-n you, sit still, do you want him to see me; his head was turned from the beadle. I got out at the other side, and left him in that posture, and left the house. I was afraid to tell the watchman, my life had been threatened.

Court. He was thrust out at the door - A. I do not mean to say that he was dead at that time; I did not hear him make the noise.

ELIZA WILLIAMS . I am an unfortunate girl, I live in George-street. I was in the coffee-shop at the time when Stanton came in; the two prisoners came in soon after; there were a great many men with them. I observed nothing till I heard the crush of the chair, I got up, and said, Oh! my G-d, they have killed the man. I went to the place, the men pushed me about, and said, d-n you, what is it to you. The prisoner's, Downs, arms were towards the neck of the deceased, and Walton had his hands towards his breeches; I did not see him take any thing out of his pocket, he drew his hand backward and forward. Besthall ordered them all out; the two prisoners laid hold of the deceased. They came back afterwards, and I heard Walton say, d-n it, deal fair. I could not see what they were about. Downs was very much agitated, his handkerchief was torn, and his waistcoat unbuttoned. The patrol came in, and asked for the man who had bathed the deceased's temples. Downs was laying his head down.

Prisoner DOWNS. Why did you not tell this at the time - A.I said, they have killed the man; and a man thrust me back, and said, d-n it, hold your tongue.

Court. How near were you to the man when he was taken out - A. About four yards, the crowd was very great; I saw him lifted up in the middle of them. Downs was sitting down when the patrol came in, he did not change his place.

MARY CUERTON . I reside in George-street; on the 28th of December, I was at the coffee-shop, about twelve o'clock. I was sitting in a chair behind the door, and the prisoner, Downs, came up to me, with the deceased, and told me to get up and let him sit there; I got up, and Downs took him by the collar and set him down. The deceased staggered as if he was in liquor. I went away to the other end of the room, and nine or ten men surrounded the chair in which the deceased was put; I heard it crack. Besthall came, and said he would not let us be there any longer. The men all went out together, and the deceased was with them; the deceased staggered very much, he looked ill-he frightened me; I saw Downs with him. I remained in the shop till eight o'clock next morning; several men came back, the watchmen came and enquired for the man who had bathed the deceased's temples: nobody answered. I did not see any body move at the time.

ELIZA CORME . I am servant to Mr. Boilam, who keeps a chandler's shop, nearly opposite the coffee-shop, in George-street. I was standing at the door a little after one o'clock in the morning, and saw the deceased and two men on my side of the way, the deceased came forward by himself, staggered, and fell against me; half his body fell into the passage. I called my master; he brought a light, and the deceased was foaming at the mouth; somebody called for some vinegar, and applied it to his temples.

ALEXANDER BOILAM . The last witness called me to the door, and I saw the man on the ground, with his mouth foaming. Downs came; vinegar was called for, and he bathed his temples; somebody took his handkerchief off, and Downs handed it to me; the watchman took the deceased away. The next morning, about nine o'clock, the prisoner, Downs, told me that he had been taken to the watch-house, and let go on his own word; and, that he would go any time that they wanted him.

HENRY COOKE. I am a patrol. I saw the deceased at Boilam's door, he appeared dead. Downs was bathing his temples.

ROBERT CLARKE . I am a constable of St. Giles's. I apprehended the prisoner, Walton, I found him under the bed in the kitchen, at No. 7, Church-street, St. Giles's, on Sunday last.

JOSEPH BURGESS. I am a surgeon. I examined the body of the deceased about three o'clock in the morning of the 29th of December, he was quite dead, and nearly cold; there was an appearance about his face and neck, which indicated a determination of blood towards the head; the eye was very full, and had a livid appearance. I endeavoured to bleed him in the arms and temples, without effect: these symptoms would proceed from strangulation, or pressure of the throat.

Q. If a person applied his thumb and finger to the necks,

and he died of that, would it have that appearance - A. Most certainly. He appeared to me to have been a healthy man; the foaming would arise from apoplexy.

Q. How long after a man receiving a pinching in the throat, would he live - A. If it continued many minutes, he would have died directly. A man might walk across the street after such strangulation, but he would be in a very exhausted state. If the pinching at the throat had continued a quarter of an hour, he could not walk about. A person subject to a determination of blood in the head, is subject to apoplexy, and liquor would encourage it. I cannot say whether his death was occasioned by strangulation, or apoplexy. I did not discover any marks, the pressure would not leave marks. It is my opinion that it was apoplexy, arising from the pressure.

DOWNS' Defence. I was in the coffee-shop, the other prisoner came in, we were talking together; a few minutes afterwards I heard that the decaesed man was laying down next door to Mr. Boilam's; I went out and told the watchmen, and I asked for some vinegar, and bathed the deceased's temples.

WALTON'S Defence. I was in the coffee-shop with some young women, the deceased came in and had some coffee; soon after a number of men came round, and began talking with the deceased; one of the young women broke the chair, and I went to help the man out. After this the deceased came out, and went into an eating-house, and sat down by me; it is kept by Mr. Adams.

THOMAS ADAMS . I live at No. 10, George-street, and keep an eating-shop; between eleven and twelve o'clock, the deceased and Downs came in, and had supper, they stopped about a quarter of an hour in my house, which is next door to Boilam's; the coffee-shop is further up the street; they seemed on good terms-the deceased paid the reckoning.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I did not see what money he had about him, they left my shop about twelve o'clock; I heard the rattle sprung, about half an hour after; the coffee-shop is on the other side of the way.

MARY ANN NEWTON . I sat next to the prisoner Downs, a young woman was sitting by me; the deceased came, and the young woman got up and broke the chair. Downs was sitting by the fire. I did not see Walton put his hands to the deceased's breeches.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. The deceased went out by himself, quite well, nobody touched him; he was drinking his coffee, nobody put their hands to his pocket; there was no noise. The man was not pushed into the corner.

Q. Will you swear that Walton was not near the deceased all the while - A. I will. The prisoner were in the room before the deceased came in, it was about twelve or one o'clock

EMMA BURFORD. I was in the coffee-shop with the prisoner, Walton; he was in the house before the deceased. I broke the chair, the men were all round me. I jumped up, to save myself, and broke it. The deceased was in another chair by my side, his chair was not broke. Walton was trying to get me out when I broke it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Jealous was in the room when I broke the chair. Walton did not send for me to be a witness here; I saw him on Saturday last.

JANE JEALOUS re-examined. The deceased came into the room with a girl, and before the prisoners came in.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-37

184. WILLIAM NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , nineteen pounds weight of bacon, the property of John Juggins , privately in his shop .

JOHN JUGGINS. I live in Dean-street, Long-acre , my bacon was in my shop at eleven o'clock on the Saturday night; and on the Monday, soon after I had opened my shop, I missed it. I saw it at the watch-house, and knew it by the cut of it.

ROBERT CLARKE. I am a constable. On Saturday, the 7th of December, I and Smith, were coming down George-street, St. Giles's, which is a quarter of a mile from Juggins's, I saw the prisoner and another man going up the street, the other man was first. I set off after the other man, I could not overtake him. I stopped the prisoner, he had something under his coat, I asked him what it was, and took it from him. He said his mother had bought it. He afterwards said, that he found it in Short's-gardens.

JOHN SMITH . I saw the two men; Clarke collared the prisoner, and took the bacon from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a lad with the bacon; he said, he would give me something if I would carry it for him; when he saw the officer, he told me to put it under my coat, and he ran away.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-38

185. JOHN JONES was indicted, for feloniously assaulting Philip Solomon , on the King's highway, on the 13th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch-chain, value 2l., and two seals, value 2l. his property.

PHILIP SOLOMON . I am clerk to Mr. Baring, who lives in Finsbury-square; I was going to the Foreign Post-Office on the 13th of December, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening; I was accosted by three man, at the bottom of Coleman-street , one of them pinioned my arms, the second held my head, and the prisoner threw a handful of snuff over my face, apparently to blind me-it did not go into my eyes. I had a full view of him. He pulled my watch with his other hand; it was in my fob; there being no glass in my watch, the ring got off the watch, and he got the chain and two seals, they were worth 4l. or 5l. together. All three ran different ways. The prisoner ran towards Fore-street; one of the others crossed over, and ran the same way. I called out, stop thief! just as I got up to the prisoner, he called out, stop thief! I collared him; he had not got above a dozen yards - I did not lose sight of him. He had an oilskin hat and a blue neck-handkerchief. I am sure I never lost sight of him; I charged him with being the man, and collared him. Mr. Carter took him into custody. I thought I had lost my watch at the time. He was searched at the Counter, and a tobacco-box found on him, which smelt of snuff, and corresponded with the smell on my face; his coat cuffs were also covered with snuff.

Prisoner. Did you not tell me to stop, and I did - A. He was stopped before I came up.

MICHAEL CARTER. I live in Great Bell-alley, Coleman-street, I am bricklayer. On the 13th of December, I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw people running towards Fore-street. I saw the prisoner standing, facing the prosecutor, between Great Bell-alley and King's Arms-yard; a man had hold of him; the man let him go, when I came up, and the prisoner wanted to get away, saying, he was innocent; the prosecutor gave charge of him, for robbing him of his watch, chain and seals. I searched him, and found a tobacco-box in his left hand breeches pocket-it smelt of snuff; and his sleeves and hands were also very snuffy. The prosecutor's face and neck-handkerchief were marked with snuff.

JOHN STREET . I am porter to Mr. Angel. I was crossing from Lothbury to Coleman-street, I heard the prosecutor call stop thief! I ran after a man who I saw running, with an oilskin hat on; when I got to King's Arms-yard, the prisoner called, stop thief! when I came up the prosecutor stood facing him, and said he had robbed him of his watch, chain and seals; he called for a constable, and Carter came up and took charge of him. As we were going to the Counter, the prosecutor found his watch was not gone. I saw the box found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has spoken false. I am not guilty. I was in company with the man who did it, and I can give information where the seals were disposed of; they were sold for 24s., they have sent me four shillings of the money. Being innocent of the robbery, and knowing the party who committed it, I hope I shall be allowed to give up their names in evidence.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-39

186. SUSANNAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , one shift, value 3s. 6d. , the property of William Hoare .

ELIZA HOARE. I am the wife of William Hoare , who lives in Houndsditch ; we sell linen . On the 1st of January, the prisoner came into our shop, and asked to look at some shifts. I showed her several, none of which suited her; as I turned round to get another bundle, I saw something move from the counter; she turned from the counter as if to go out; I followed her - She had a long cloak on. I saw something under her cloak, I lifted it up, and the shift was under it. I had her secured.

Prisoner. Did not the shift fall off the counter - A. No, it could not.

THOMAS LOWE . I am Mr. Hoare's servant. I saw the shift under her arm.

MATTHEW GILDERSLEVE . I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody; she had only 61/2d. about her.

Prisoner's Defence. I offered her 2s. 6d. for the shift, she said she could not take it. I was going out of the shop. I did not take the shift.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Month , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-40

187. THOMAS BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one gelding, value 20l.; and one cart, value 5l., the property of Edward Gale and James Gale ; and one rocking-horse, value 8l. ; the property of the said Edward Gale,

JAMES VINCENT. I am Messrs. Gales' carter; I was driving the cart and horse, on the 9th of December, there was a matted package in it; I do not know what it was. I stopped at the Three Tuns, in Jewry-street , at ten minutes past five o'clock, for about four or five minutes. I left the cart and horse at the door. when I came out, it was gone; I saw it about an hour afterwards in Well-street, near the Royalty Theatre, the package was then gone. Nobody was with it.

JOHN CLANTON . I am toll-gatherer at the gate near John-street, Minories. I have frequently seen Messrs. Gales' cart. I saw the prisoner go through the gate, from the city, about five o'clock, with a cart and horse like theirs; I cannot say it was theirs. The prisoner was a carman, and had carts of his own. There was a matted package in it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-41

188. JAMES TYRRELL and JOHN GAMMAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , eighty pounds weight of tea-lead, value 8s. , the property of Joseph Smith and Edward Edwards .

HOLLAND SMITH. I live with Messrs. Smith and Edwards. About eight o'clock on the morning of the 8th of January, the prisoners were employed to take away the dust; the lead was near the door, and had been weighed the evening before. I saw the prisoners put a lump into their baskets every time that they passed the counter. When they had removed the dust, I charged them with it; but I let them go, as I knew where their master lived. They said they had only taken a small bit, which they wanted for a particular purpose. I got up into the cart, and took out eighty pounds weight, in seven or eight lumps.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TYRRELL - GUILTY . Aged 42.

GAMMAGE - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Whipped , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-42

189. MARY ANN GREENLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , from the person of Thomas Weston , one half-crown, and four 1l. bank-notes , his property.

THOMAS WESTON . I live in Union-court, Holborn; I met the prisoner in the Strand, about ten or eleven o'clock on the evening of the 17th of December - I was intoxicated. I had a glass or two at different places with her, and I had been drinking before I met her. I had 22l. in notes, one guinea, and four half-crowns, in my pocket. I went to a house with her, and fell asleep; and she afterterwards said she would see me home, and left the house with me. I suppose I had the money when I met her. I do not know. I went home, when I missed 4l. and half-a-crown; I went out, and met the prisoner in Holborn. I gave her into custody. The notes had my employer's

name on them. I do not remember giving her any thing. The constable found four 1l. notes upon her.

JOSEPH SIDEY . I am a watchman; I took the prisoner in charge; she gave the half-crown up, but denied having the notes; they were found upon her.

WILLIAM SMEDLEY . I am constable of the night; I searched the prisoner, and found four 1l. notes on her; she was in liquor.

Prisoner. The man gave me the money.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-43

190. CHARLES JARMAN was indicted for stealing on the 14th of November , one pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of John Walter .

JOHN WALTER . I am a shoe-maker , and live in Cannon-street; the prisoner lived in my service in November. I suspected him. I sent for him on the 28th of November, and told him I suspected his accounts were not correct-he was a shoe-dresser ; he said they were correct. About an hour afterwards I told him I was going to send for a constable; he said, if I would forgive him he would tell me something. The constable came.

JOHN PEARSE. I live with Mr. Sadler, in Aldersgate-street. On the 14th of November, the prisoner pledged a pair of shoes at our house, I took them in. He was in the habit of coming to the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never entered the pawnbroker's shop.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years ,

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-44

191. JOSEPH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , one pocket-handkerchief, value 2s., the property of Antonio Francalanza , from his person .

ANTONIO FRANCALANZA . I live in Leicester-square, and am a fencing-master . On the 8th of January, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the top of Holborn , near St. Giles's; I felt somebody at my pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner putting something in his breast. I took hold of his hand, my handkerchief was in his breast. I secured him.

BENJAMIN WINTER . I was going down Holborn, between two and three o'clock, in the afternoon, on the 8th of January. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket; the prosecutor seized him, and I ran over to his assistance. His friends attempted to get him away, but I would not let them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-45

192. SUSAN BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , fourteen yards of ribbon, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Edward Death .

MARY ANN DYER. I am servant to Mr. Death, who lives at Aldgate ; the prisoner came into the shop, with another woman, about four o'clock in the afternoon; her companion asked for some sewing silk - I showed them some. Some persons were looking at ribbons at the same counter; the prisoner's companion asked to look at some ribbon, and I showed her some. I saw the prisoner with a piece of ribbon in her hand, it was secreted in her hand; I asked her what she was going to do with it; her companion said she was only looking at it. I took it from her, went up stairs, and told Mr. Death. When I returned, her companion was gone, but the prisoner was sitting by the counter; she said her friend would come back, but she did not. The prisoner was taken into custody. She might have gone away if she chose, when I was up stairs.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-46

193. JAMES AHERN was indicted for having in his custody and possession a forged Bank of England note, knowing the same to be forged .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-47

194. JOHN KEYS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , four shirts, value 20s. , the goods of Paul Buckley .

MARY BUCKLEY. I am the wife of Paul Buckley. On the 18th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in my drying ground, at Millbank , taking down my shirts; he had pulled down part of my pailing, which is three feet high, to get in. I called out to him, and he made his escape out of the yard. I did not lose sight of him until he was taken.

PAUL BUCKLEY. I heard my wife give the alarm, and saw the prisoner with the shirts under his arm. I saw him stopped. He struck the man who took him, very violently.

JACOB FULLER . I am a gardener. I heard the cry. Mrs. Buckley pointed the prisoner out to me. He was secured.

FRANCIS SULLIVAN . I am a labourer. I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running through the road. I secured him. He made a very strong resistance, and struck me several times very violently.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-48

195. MARIA HILLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one pair of shoes, value 6s. , the property of George Wright .

GEORGE WRIGHT . I live in St. Martin's-lane; the prisoner was my servant ; she had lived five weeks with me. I missed my shoes on the 16th of December; I charged the prisoner with taking them, and she absconded. She was apprehended.

WILLIAM MASLAND. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Westminster-road. I produce a pair of shoes pledged with me for 3s. 6d., by two women. I think the prisoner was one of them. On the following day, the same two women came to me again, saying, they had lost the duplicate; and I gave them a blank affidavit to get signed by a magistrate, which entitles them to the property without the duplicate. I am sure the prisoner came the second time.

ISAAC PIKE . I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, on the 23d of December; she acknowledged that she had stolen the shoes. I found the affidavit under her cap (producing it).

MASLAND. That is the affidavit which I gave her.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to mercy.

Confined One Month , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-49

196. WILLIAM BURTON and THOMAS NORRIS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Shepherd , at one in the night of the 24th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therein four live tame geese, value 20s. , his property.

WILLIAM CHIEKLEY. I work for Mr. Shepherd, who lives at Southgate . I saw the fowls safe in the yard, at six o'clock on the evening of the 23d of December, and missed them at eight o'clock the next morning; there is a gateway to go into the yard, which is generally locked at night-it opens into the road. There is no latch to the gate; there is a lock, it is always open in the day-time: there was no mark of violence on the gate.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. The gate might have been left open.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a patrol. About three o'clock on the morning of the 24th of December, the two prisoners came behind me in a cart. I asked them where they were going - They said, to buy fish, at Billingsgate. I asked them who they were. Burton said, his name was Burton, from Southgate. I asked him what was in the cart - He said, nothing but empty baskets. Norris said, he was going to seek a place in town; and Burton told me, there was a very suspicious cart behind loaded with furniture, and that I had better go back. I followed them to Newington-green, and then searched the cart with the watchman's lantern, and found three geese, and some fowls. Burton told me, they had fowls and geese, and that he bought them at Mill-hill the day before, of a woman. I secured them

Cross-examined. I never met any body so early in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NORRIS'S Defence. I knew nothing of the robbery. I was going to town to look for a situation.

BURTON'S Defence. I bought the geese of a woman at Mill-hill.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-50

197. JOHN STAFFORD was indicted, for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of John Field , about six o'clock, on the night of the 27th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one feather-bed, value 3l.; and one looking-glass, value 4s. , his property.

JOHN FIELD . I am a bricklayer . I live in Moor-alley, Norton Falgate . I rent the first floor of the landlord, who does not live in the house. On the 27th of December last, I went out at four o'clock in the afternoon, and locked the door, and shut the windows. I returned rather before seven o'clock, and found the door open. I put my head in at the door, and saw a light; I waited about five minutes, and heard footsteps in my room. I was afraid to go in; I asked who was there, and the prisoner rushed out upon me; and said do not make a noise, my name is John Stafford , you know me. I collared him, and called for assistance; a light was brought. I secured the prisoner, and delivered him to the officer. The wainscot between the passage and my room was broken down, and a looking-glass, which hung on the part of the wainscot which was broken, was gone: it was all safe when I went out. I found a box taken from its place, and put against the hole, and my feather-bed was drawn off the bedstead to the door; a flock-bed was also half on the bedstead, and half off. About three-quarters of an hour afterwards, the constable brought me my looking-glass. My door was forced also.

EDMUND JORDAN. I am a broker. I bought the glass of the prisoner; about six o'clock in the afternoon of the 27th of December. Flint found the glass at my house, and took it away; the prisoner told me that he bought it of an Italian.

Prisoner. Did I tell you I bought it of an Italian - A.You did.

WILLIAM FLINT. I am beadle of Norton Falgate. I went to Jordan's and found the glass there. Field claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am often deprived of my understanding, and think I could not be in my right mind at the time. I have several times attempted my life.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-51

198. ABRAHAM ALLEN was indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of William Meadows , about six o'clock on the night of the 3d of January , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, twelve pair of shoes, value 3l. his property.

WILLIAM MEADOWS . I live in Cow-cross ; I am a shoe-maker . On the 2d of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I went to bed, and my wife came to bed at twelve. About half-past six o'clock the next morning, the watchman called me; I came down and found two shutters down, and a pane of glass broken, where my shoes were laying; I missed about three dozen.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I was standing at the corner of Featherstone-street, about ten o'clock on the morning of the 3d of January, the prisoner and another man, were coming towards me with a bundle; they were crossing into Banner-street. Seeing me, they altered their

course, and turned up Bunhill-row: when they got to Artillery-buildings, the other man said, here is a b-y pig, and ran away. I went up to the prisoner, and asked him, what he had got in the bundle. He said, an old jacket and trowsers; he said, there was nothing else. I took him to the watch-house, and asked him again before I opened the bundle, what it contained. He then said, four pair of shoes. I found a jacket and trowsers, and four pair of shoes in it. He said, I might keep them if I would let him go.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. I did not know him before; the prisoner did not run away. The man who was with him was dressed as a sailor.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a police-officer. I went to the office with Meadows, and he claimed the shoes. I had seen the prisoner in St. John-street, about six o'clock the same morning, he was going towards Meadows's house; there were four more with him, two went with him, and two went the other way. I went to Meadows's, he came and saw the shutters down; it was dark.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. There were five of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-52

199. DANIEL LEARY and JEREMIAH SULLIVAN were indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Oates , about nine o'clock, on the night of the 10th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one cruet frame, value 1s. 6d., and three glass cruets, value 7s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Pierrepoint .

HENRY PIERREPOINT. I am a glass-cutter ; I live in Drury-lane . On the 10th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I left my shop, was absent about five minutes, I rent the lower part of the house, of Oates; he lives in it. I had pulled the door to after me; I do not know whether it was fast, or not. As I was returning, when I passed my window, I saw a person standing with one foot on the door cill, and the other in my shop, with his left arm extended, so as to take something out of the window; there was another man with him at the time. I passed them to see if they would go away; they went away together. The tallest man had something under his coat; I pursued them about forty yards, and secured Leary, the other ran away. I called out watch, and Furze-man came up, and I gave him in charge. Three cruets, and a frame, were found under his coat; they were mine, and were in my window when I went out.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I took charge of the prisoner Leary, and found three cruets and a frame on him. The next day Pierrepoint pointed Sullivan out to me, and I took him.

PIERREPOINT. I am sure I saw the prisoner Sullivan at the door, and he was in the shop; there was a lamp in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEARY'S Defence. I met a person in Drury-lane who gave me the things to take to a public-house.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. When I took him, he said he did it from distress.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. I was at my sister-in-laws, in Wild-street, at the time.

SUSAN RICHMOND . On the evening of the 10th of December, I saw the prisoner, Sullivan, in Wild-street, between nine and ten o'clock, the watchman was going half-past nine, when I first met him; I did not leave him till a quarter before ten. I stood talking to him in the street for half an hour; I had seen him at five o'clock that afternoon, he lives at my mother's house, in Drury-lane; he was to sleep at home that night.

Court. What were you talking about - A. I was not in a hurry; the watchman called to me as I was going home. I think it was the 10th of December; we did not go home together - He came home soon after ten: he lives with me; his brother went out and brought him home.

LEARY - GUILTY. Aged 17.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-53

200. ISAAC GREENSLADE and THOMAS GREEN-SLADE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Francis John Gates , about nine o'clock, on the night of the 5th of January , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, six books, value 1l., one counterpane, value 8s.; one gown, value 5s.; one petticoat, value 3s.; two sheets, value 8s.; eighteen napkins, value 2s.; two candlesticks, value 2s.; two pair of snuffers, value 3s.; six cups and six saucers, value 2s.; two tea-chests, value 6s.; six knives and six forks, value 2s.; one cloak, value 1s.; two pair of stockings, value 2s.; one table-cloth, value 1s.; ten glasses, value 6s.; one decanter, value 5s.; and one pepper-box, value 5s. , his property.

FRANCIS JOHN GATES. I live in White Lion-street, St. Giles's , and am a trunk-maker . I rent the front garret, the landlord does not live in the house. The prisoners lodged in the back room, which is parted from mine by a lath and plaister wall. On the 4th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I and my wife went to Paddington. I locked my door with a common lock, and a padlock. I returned about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 6th of January, I found the door-lock had been picked, and the padlock forced; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, they are worth 5l. The next day I found some of my things at two different houses in Great St. Andrew-street.

ROBERT CLARKE . I am a constable. On the afternoon of the 6th of January, I examined Gates's room; there was a great deal of crockery on his bed, and a hole burnt through the door, apparently with a thick wire. I found the wall broke down, and the lock forced. I waited all night, but the prisoners did not come home. The next morning I went out with Gates, we found a picture and a milk-pot at Mrs. Yate's, in Great St. Andrew-street, which he claimed; we found some more things at Mrs. Gray's. In the afternoon I found Gates had got the prisoner, Isaac Greenslade . I afterwards took the other prisoner at a coffee-shop in St. Giles's. He told me that he had sold the things in Great St. Andrew-street. I then went into the prisoner's room, and found a piece of black silk which the prosecutor's wife claimed; there was a large hole in

the wall which would admit a hand through, it had a piece of carpet hung over it. I also found a piece of iron which had been in the fire, and fitted the hole in the door.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN. I am constable of St. Giles's. I went to Mrs. Yates' house with a search-warrant, and found some mugs, and knives, and forks; she sent me to Norfelk-alley, to her aunt's, and I found some cups and books there. I afterwards went to Morrit's, and found some more things.

SUSAN YATES. I keep an old iron-shop. On the 6th of January, a young man sold me the things; he said they were his mother's, and that she was going out to service. I gave him 5s. for all the things; he had more things with him. I do not know the man. I live in Great St. Andrew-street. I bought some things on the 6th of January of a man, who brought them in a bag. I do not think it was either of the prisoners.

GEORGE UNIT . I am the landlord of the house. I do not live in it: I let the prisoners the back room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GREENSLADE - GUILTY.

Of stealing only, to the value of 39s.

Transported for Seven Years .

ISAAC GREENSLADE - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-54

201. DAVID PICKARD was indicted, for feloniously assaulting Mary Clarke , on the King's highway, on the 18th of December , and putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two sheets, value 5s.; three handkerchiefs, value 5s.; and one night-cap, value 6d. , her property.

MARY CLARKE . I live in Grays-Inn-lane. On the 18th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was at the end of Baldwin's-gardens , somebody struck me a violent blow on the back of my head; I fell upon my face. I saw two young men lurking about me for some time; my bundle was taken from me-it contained the articles mentioned in the indictment. I got up, and called, stop thief. I afterwards saw my bundle in the watchman's possession. The prisoner is like one of the men who were lurking about me.

JOHN LLOYD. I am a watchman. As I was going half-past ten o'clock, I heard the alarm; I ran down the garden, and saw the prisoner and another man run through the Hole-in-the-wall public-house, there is a passage through it; the prisoner had a bundle under his arm. I went round another way to meet them. I saw them both run down Beauchamp-street; the prisoner had the bundle still. I lost them. Soon after eleven o'clock, I saw him again, at the end of Drayton-street; I went after him, and he ran away; he threw the bundle away. I am sure it was the prisoner. I took the bundle up, and sprung my rattle.

GEORGE FERRY. I am also a watchman. The last witness described the prisoner to me. I was going to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner with a girl; I took the girl, as I wanted her. The prisoner followed me to the watch-house, and I took him also.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-55

202. CHARLES HUGHES and ROBERT PENMAN were indicted, for feloniously assaulting Isaac Prigg , on the King's highway, on the 28th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 30s.; one seal, value 2s.; two keys, value 2d.; and one chain, value 6d. , his property.

ISAAC PRIGG . I live in White-cross-street; I am a labourer . On the 28th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going along Ball-alley ; it leads from Half-moon-street. I was met by the two prisoners, they pressed me against the wall, they could pass me very well without touching me; it was evidently done on purpose. I said, there is plenty of room, why stop me; they still pressed me against the wall. I saw them turn into Long-alley. I felt, and found my watch gone. I followed them, and gave the alarm; neither of them appeared to be lame. When I came to Crown-street, I saw the prisoner, Hughes, in custody; there was a seal and key on my watch, it was worth 30s. I am sure the prisoners are the men who stopped me. When they had pressed against me, they turned back.

Prisoner PENMAN. Did you not tell the magistrate that you did not know me - A. I swore to him directly.

WILLIAM EADEN . I am a jeweller. I was in Crown-street about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon of the 28th of December, I was just by Long-alley; Hughes run furiously by me, up to Crown-street, and turned up Clifton-street; he was stopped near a low piece of ground dug for the foundation of a house. I saw him throw something white behind him into the low ground. I went there and found the watch, and seals, and key.

WILLIAM SPENCER . I am a painter. I was going down Long-alley, and saw the prisoner, Hughes, running towards me. The prosecutor was running also.

BARNARD GLEED. I am an officer. The prisoner, Hughes, was brought to Worship-street office, on the 28th of December; I received some information from him. I apprehended Penman at a public-house in Wentworth-street; he said, he had not been in company with Hughes, but he had met him in Moorfields that day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HUGHES' Defence. I was going home at the time. I am innocent.

Court to SPENCER. Were there many persons round him - A. Only the person who stopped him.

PENMAN'S Defence. I had met Hughes in Moorfields, as I was going to work; I asked him how he did: that is all that passed.

PRIGG. The passage was very wide.

HUGHES - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

PENMAN- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-56

203. JOSEPH DAWSON was indicted, for feloniously asasulting John Frederick Gerlach , on the King's highway, on the 31st of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 5l.; two gold seals, value 2l.; one watch-chain, value 3s.; and one key, value 1d. , his property.

JOHN FREDERICK GERLACH . I am clerk to Mr. Hicks. About six o'clock in the evening of the 31st of December, I was at the corner of Jamaica-row, St. Luke's ; the pri

soner came behind me, put his arm round me, and pulled out my watch; I turned round and called out, stop thief. Somebody came behind me, and laid hold of my arm, so that I could not pursue. About half an hour afterwards I saw the prisoner at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I saw him plainly; there were two shops and a lamp lit up. I am sure he is the man.

ABRAHAM HEMMINGWAY . I am headborough of St. Luke's. I heard the cry, and stopped the prisoner within one hundred yards of the place, where the prosecutor was robbed; he was running. I took hold of him, and asked him what was the matter; he said, there had been a row, and that he wanted to get out of it; he struck me, and ran away. I took him again. I am sure he is the man that I first stopped.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner before the magistrate; before he got there, he asked me if the matter could be made up. I said, where is the watch; I made him neither threat or promise; he said, it is thrown into a little pool, in the middle of the ruins of the hospital. I found it there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The officer told me it would be better for me to tell; he said, the prosecutor was a good natured man, and would be merciful: he said, he had offered him 1l. if he would get the watch.

HEMMINGWAY. I said I had found the man who had lost the watch, and that he was a very good kind of a man, and asked him where the watch was.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-57

204. CHARLES ERICK was indicted, for that he about five o'clock on the night of the 16th of December , being in the dwelling-house of William Penfold , did steal therein one pair of boots, value 12s.; one pair of stockings, value 6d.; one handkerchief, value 6d.; one quartern-loaf, value 1s. 6d.; one pot, value 2s.; and nine-pence halfpenny in copper monies, his property; and afterwards, to wit, about five o'clock, on the night of the same day, burglariously did break, and get out of the said dwelling-house .

ALICE PENFOLD . I am the wife of William Penfold, we live in Mill-walk . On the 16th of December, the prisoner came to our house to see us; we had known him four or five years: he asked if we would let him set up in our house for the night. We had no lodgers in the house, I gave him leave. My husband went to bed before me; I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock, locked the door, and left the key in the door, and the prisoner in the next room to us; my husband spoke to him, at five o'clock in the morning, and he was answered. I did not hear any body go out; my husband got up about half an hour afterwards, and said that the prisoner was gone out; this was before six o'clock. I am sure it was quite dark. I got up; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment.

WILLIAM PENFOLD. My wife has spoken quite correct; it was quite dark when I got up.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of December, on board the Helder frigate, off the Tower. I told him what I wanted him for; he said, he was very sorry for it, and that he had sold the boots to a man at Rag-fair. He had a pair of stockings on which Mrs. Penfold claimed, and he did not contradict her.

(Property Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-58

205. WILLIAM STURDY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , seven ounces of tea , the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

To which charge the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Three Weeks , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-59

206. DANIEL MACGINNIS and ELIZA MACGIN-NIS were indicted, for feloniously receiving on the 29th of October , twenty-one yards of woollen cloth, value 18l., the goods of William Prosser , which Louisa Ellen, at the gaol delivery of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 4th of December, was convicted of stealing; they well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM PROSSER. I live in Goswell-street. I had a servant of the name of Louisa Ellen , who was convicted of stealing my cloth. I accompanied Vann, the officer, to the prisoner's house, in Middle-street, Cloth-fair, on the 3d of November; the prisoner, Eliza Macginnis was at home, she had a handkerchief on her neck, which I recognized to be the same pattern, as one of Ellen's gowns. I asked her what she had done with my blue superfine cloth, and if she had any. She at first said, she knew nothing about it. The prisoner, Thomas Macginnis was present; I told her I knew she had some, and that I had got proof of it. She told me to search the premises. I found nothing. I asked her about the handkerchief. She said, it was a small remnant that she had bought in Field-lane. I told her she must go with us. She lives in a small room, with a bed in it, and sells greens; when I got her to the watchhouse, I confronted Ellen, who was in custody, with her. Eliza Macginnis said, she knew nothing about Ellen. Ellen said she was the woman who gave her 2l. 10s. for the cloth. Eliza Macginnis then said, she would tell the whole truth, and that she had given her 2l. 10s. for the last quantity of cloth. Ellen said, it was for nine or ten yards; which would be worth 9l. Eliza Macginnis said, she had seen Ellen twice; she said, she had given her a gown of the same pattern as the handkerchief, and 1l. note for the first parcel, and Ellen had that very gown on at the time. Ellen said, that the prisoner, Thomas Macginnis, was not present at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. Ellen had stolen a great deal of cloth from me.

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable. I accompanied the last witness to Macginnis's house; we took them to the watch-house. Eliza Macginnis denied any knowledge of Ellen; she keeps a green-stall. Ellen said, she had sold Macginnis the cloth. She must have heard her. Macginnis at first denied it, and afterwards said, Ellen had brought her the cloth, and that she sold it for 50s.; and gave Ellen the money.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. Mr. Prosser spoke of cloth and kerseymere; Macginnis spoke of two parcels.

(The certificate of Louisa Ellen , being convicted of stealing twenty-one yards of cloth to the value of 39s. only, in the dwelling-house of Mr. Prosser; was then read.)

BENJAMEN HAYDON. I am servant to Mr. Prosser. On the 29th of October last, I saw Ellen go out with a bundle, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, she said it was dirty clothes; she went towards Macginnis's house.

ELIZA MACGINNIS'S Defence. I never had the cloth; I only knew the girl by seeing her pass my house.

THOMAS MACGINNIS - NOT GUILTY .

ELIZA MACGINNIS - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-60

207. ELIZABETH KING and ELIZA MURRELL , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , one bed, value 5l.; one bolster, value 5s.; four blankets, value 14s.; one rug, value 3s.; one set of fire-irons, value 6s.; one tea-kettle, value 1s.; one candlestick, value 6d.; and one tea-board, value 1s.; the property of Hannah Morris , in a lodging-room let by contract to the prisoners, to be used with the lodging ; and JOSEPH RUDD was indicted, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

HANNAH MORRIS. I rent the house, No. 9, Cock-court, Jewry-street . The prisoners, King and Murrell, came to my house on the 9th of December, and took a furnished apartment, and the articles mentioned in the indictment were let with the lodging. On the 10th of December, in the evening, they came into the lodging. On the 11th they went out and took the key with them; they slept there on the 10th and 11th; they did not return; I broke the door open on the next day, and I found the things gone; they had nearly stripped the room; they did not return any more; I saw King in custody on the 16th; about a fortnight afterwards the other prisoner was taken; I went to Rose and Crown-court, and found my property there; the prisoner, Rudd, brought their boxes when they took possession of the lodgings.

WILLIAM BARR. I am a broker, and live in Rose and Crown-court, Moorfields. On the 12th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, King, came to me, and asked me if I would buy a bed, as she was going in the country; I went with her to Peahen-court, Bishopgate; she took me into a room on the two pair of stairs, and showed me a bed; the prisoners Rudd and Murrell were there; they asked 2l. 15s. for the bed, bolster, pillows, and rugg; I offered them two guineas for it; they consulted together, and Rudd said, let him have it; King said, it was hers; and there was only one bed in the room. The prisoner, Murrell, offered me a set of fire-irons; I gave her 4s. for them. I asked Rudd to help me home with them, and I would give him the money; he said, he was going out; King helped me home with them, and I paid her; Mrs. Morris afterwards claimed the property.

BERNARD GLEED. I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 13th of January, I accompanied Armstrong to Norwich; we took the prisoner, Rudd, into custody there; on the 15th, we told him, that we took him for a robbery; he said, he was very sorry for it; it was the first time, and if he got clear, he would not do the like again. Murrell was in Norwich Bridewell; I took her. King was apprehended in London.

MATTHEW GILDERSLEVE . I am an officer. King was brought into the watch-house, on the 14th of January; I took her before the Lord-Mayor: and then she said, she would tell where the things were; as we were going along Broad-street, she told me, that she had sold Mrs. Morris's things to Barr; we found them there.

(Produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH KING - GUILTY . Aged 28.

ELIZA MURRELL - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOSEPH RUDD- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-61

208. WILLIAM MARTIN and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , four pounds and three quarters of bacon, value 3s. ; the property of John Strapp .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-62

209. JOHN HIND and CHARLES EDWARD HIND were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Gray , about seven on the night of the 22d of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one piece of foreign silver coin, value 5d.; one other piece of silver coin, value 4s. 6d.; eleven tea-spoons, value 1l. 1s.; one punch-ladle, value 5s.; two watches, value 2l.; one coat, value 2l.; four pair of salt-spoons, value 1l.; seven guineas; four half-guineas; one seven shilling piece; one 25l. bank-note; three 10l. bank-notes; four 5l. bank-notes; three 2l. bank-notes; and twenty 1l. bank-notes; the goods, and monies, and property , of the said George Gray .

GEORGE GRAY. I keep the Queen's-head, public-house, in Duke-street . On Tuesday night, the 22d of October, my pocket-book, which contained my notes, and my coat, were locked up in the drawers; my watches, spoons, and punch-ladle, were in another chest in the same room; a person can go up stairs from my tap-room. My wife gave the alarm a little before eight o'clock; I ran up stairs, found my bed-room door had been broken open, and the drawers also; and the things gone. I saw my coat again at Hatton-garden, on the 22d of November, when the prisoners were in custody.

SUSAN GRAY . I am the wife of George Gray. The bedroom and drawers were locked at six o'clock on the evening of the robbery. I went out, and returned a little before eight o'clock; and found them forced, and the articles mentioned in the indictment gone. On the 21st of November, the prisoner, John Hind , called at my house, about eleven o'clock in the morning; he asked for my husband; he was not at home; he asked if he would be at home to dinner; I told him he would, although I knew he would not; he called at two o'clock; I then told him, my husband would not be at home that night; he then said, that he had called concerning the robbery; he said, he could

tell me the parties who had done it; that he did not come for the sake of the reward, but for the ends of justice;(we had offered a reward of 20l.) he asked me, who I left to mind the bar, on the day of the robbery. I told him my mother; he asked me, if I could describe the man who had walked the passage and kept her in conversation; he asked me to send for her. I did. He asked me if I should know my husband's coat, and said, that I should not recover any of the property, but the coat. My mother and brother came. He asked for a pen to write down three names; two of whom he was positive were in the robbery, and he suspected the third; he said, that he had over-heard them in an adjoining room; say, how well they had gammoned the old woman, while I and my husband were gone out to see the fire. I left him with Thomas Gray .

THOMAS GRAY . I am the prosecutor's brother. I came to his house, and saw the prisoner, John Hind ; he said, that he could give some clue to the robbery. He wrote down three names on a piece of paper; saying, that would be enough for me, and that he was positive, two of them committed the robbery. I went to St. John-street; as we were going along; he said, we should only get the coat back, and that there might be a gold or silver piece. I told him, that I should apply to the Police officers, Hutt and Limbrie. We agreed to meet the next morning, at the Gentleman and Porter, New-street, Gough-square; but he did not come. I went with the officer, to the address of Charles Hind , (who had been previously apprehended) the same night, at Ball's-pond-common. We knocked at the door, nobody answered; somebody came from next door, and said, that they were not at home; but that John Hind was. The officers got through the next house; and I stopped at the door. Limbrie brought the prisoner, John Hind round, with a double barrelled gun in his hand. I asked him, why he did not meet me at the place appointed; he said, he could not. He then said, he was very sorry for my brother's loss, and would give up all he could. He pulled off his great coat, and then a blue coat; and said, it was my brother's, that he had been robbed of; and gave it to me. He asked who was with me. I told him it was my uncle, not meaning to let him know that he was an officer. We went into the house, and through the garden; I got in at the window. We searched the premises. He assisted us. He said, he was afraid that all the money was made away with. Limbrie and I found a crow-bar under the prisoner's, Charles Hind, bed; we found a number of instruments for house-breaking, and another loaded gun; we found a number of picklock keys up stairs, but nothing relating to my brother's robbery. I saw the prisoner, John Hinde , searched at Hatton-garden; there was a half-frank and a broken tea-spoon found on him. He said, that he could tell, where the property went to; he said, he was in an adjoining room with Charles Hind , who was with the robbers at his mother's house, and heard Charles Hind say, how d-d well they gammoned the old woman, and that it would enable them to smoke a comfortable pipe in the winter; he also said, that he had seen the punch-ladle at his mother's house; and that Charles Hind had offered to lend him 10l. when he wanted it. He did not wish to see Charles Hind. We then locked him up. He said, that he accompanied the party to a house in Goswell-street, to make away with the property. I saw Charles Hind searched, and a quantity of bank-notes found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. The person at Ball's-pond said, that Charles Hind lived there.

Prisoner CHARLES HIND . Was the gun loaded with ball or shot - A. Shot.

MARY GRAY . I am the mother of the prosecutor. I was at the house at the time of the robbery. I was nursing a child at the bar, a man came in by the door that leads into Duke-street, and called for some beer. I had the child in my arms; he came out of the parlour, and lit his pipe by the bar candle, and kept whiffing the smoke about and making a noise with his feet - He appeared agitated; the robbery was discovered soon after; neither of the prisoners are the men. I saw John Hind at my son's house, on the 22d of November. He asked me if I was the old lady; and said that a distant relation of his was concerned in the robbery, and that he was a desperate fellow.

JOHN LIMBRICK. I apprehended the prisoner, Charles Hind , on the 22d of December, Hutt brought him out of the Apple Tree public-house, in Goswell-street. He denied any knowledge of the robbery. I found a guinea, a half-guinea, and five 1l. notes, on him. I also apprehended the prisoner, John Hind. I went to the back part of the house, and Hutt and Gray waited in the front. I found him at the back of the house at Ball's Pond; it was dark. He came upon me before I saw him. We found the things in the house, as the witness has described.

Cross-examined. It was a month after the robbery. He went quietly with me; he made no resistance.

JOHN HUTT . I also searched John Hind. I found a piece of silver money on him, and a piece of silver, like the handle of a tea-spoon. I also produce them and the paper on which John Hinde wrote these names: (reads.) Charles Hind, Pleasant-row, Ball's-pond-common; William Hull , and George Thorn.

SUSAN GRAY, I had a piece of money exactly like that found on the prisoner; it appeared to me to be of the same age and wear, I will not swear to it. We also lost a Napoleon, and a half-guinea, which had a small dent in the middle, like that produced; I had had it five years.

Cross-examined. I do not mean to swear to it. I believe it is the same.

JOHN HIND 'S Defence. I bought the coat of a man, who told me it was concerned with a robbery, and not to wear it till it was altered. The evidence of Mrs. Gray is true. I told her what I did, out of revenge to my brother, in consequence of a family quarrel. I never said the things were taken to my mother's house; and I can produce two witnesses to prove that I was at home on the night of the robbery. I said my brother was concerned in it, out of revenge, that was my only motive.

CHARLES HIND'S Defence. The implements of housebreaking were not found in my room, but in my lodger's.

LIMBRIE. There are only two rooms in the house; I found implements of house-breaking in both rooms.

JOHN HUTT . Those that I found were up stairs.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-63

210. ABRAHAM HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , five locks, value 5s. , the property of Timothy Bramah and Francis Bramah .

JAMES STILWELL . I am watchman to Mr. Brown of Millbank. On the 21st of December, between eleven and twelve in the morning, I saw the prisoner lurking about the house, as I passed, when I returned he was gone; I looked in at the gate, and saw the windows open, heard a door rattle, and saw the prisoner put his head of the parlour-window. I shook my head at him, and he came to the door to me; I asked him why he went into the house? he said the door was open; I told him that it was false, and that he got in at the window. He wanted me to let him go. As I was taking him to Mr. Bramah he threw a screw-driver into the garden. I went back and found it.

JOHN COBHAM. I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to Queen-Square, and I found two locks in his coat pocket, and the nobs in his other pocket. I went, with Taylor, to the house, in Union-place, Millbank, and found eight doors with the locks off: those found on the prisoner fitted two of the doors exactly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken ill, and went into the house. The locks found on me are mine. I am continually pestered with officers. I was once transported, and since I received my pardon I will defy any man to say I I have robbed anybody. I can produce a hundred locks of the same description.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-64

211. JOHN CASHMAN , JOHN HOOPER , RICHARD GAMBLE , WILLIAM GUNNELL , and JOHN CAR-PENTER , were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , twenty fowling-pieces, value 200l.; one musket, value 10l.; two blunderbusses, value 10l.; ten pair of pistols, value 50l.; and twenty steel shot charges, value 40l., the property of William Andrew Beckwith , in his dwelling-house. One Charles Griffin, one George Lidyard , one Edward Hone, one John Roberts, and one Henry Beckwith , being in the said dwelling-house, and being respectively put in fear by the said John Cashman , John Hooper , Richard Gamble, William Gunnell , and John Carpenter , on that occasion, in the said dwelling-house .

ANDREW BECKWITH . I live at No. 58, Skinner-street . I am a gun-maker . On the 2d of December last, I went out between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning; there were a great number of guns and pistols in my shop window. I returned about three o'clock in the afternoon. My house was perfectly safe when I went out; when I returned, I found my house in a very demolished state; the shop window-frame and windows were broken. The shop is part of my dwelling-house. I found I had lost guns, pistols, powder, shot, and shot-charges, amounting, together, to 1349l. 15s. 6d. in value.

JOHN ROBERTS . I was Mr. Beckwith's apprentice on the 2d of December last. A young man came into the shop on that day, about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock; and in about a quarter of an hour afterwards about four or five hundred came, and said they would have the young man out of the shop; he had been taken into custody for shooting Mr. Platt. The young man was afterwards rescued; the mob broke open the shop before they rescued him. The left hand window was broke-the glass was broke first, and afterwards the frame; they then proceeded to take the guns and pistols, by putting their hands in at the window. They afterwards came into the shop and took the guns out. I saw the prisoner, Cashman, there, he was in the shop, opening the drawers, and taking the things out; he took some shot charges out, and some guns, and distributed them amongst the mob. I should think that he took a dozen, all at one time. He was backwards and forwards in the shop; I did not see him go out of the shop, he gave the guns out at the door; he took them out of the counting-house, which is within the shop. I am sure that Cashman is the man who did it. Edward Hone , the foreman, Henry Beckwith, "myself, George Lidyard , and Griffin, were in the shop, when Cashman was there. Two pistols were fired off when Cashman was there; I was alarmed. The mob had colours flying about in the street. I rather think Gunnell broke the windows, but I will not be certain. I did not see how they was broken.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I was repeatedly examined about this, before the Lord Mayor.

Q. You were not always so sure of Cashman as you are now-A. Yes; I was always: I said, I was not certain of the brewer's servant, but was certain of Cashman. I was a great deal alarmed; there was a great mob. My efforts were directed to save my master's property. I am certain Cashman is the man, and always was. I am not sure who broke the window, but I think it was Gunnell; he was dressed as a brewer's servant, and it was a brewer's servant who broke the window.

Court. Then you do not recollect who broke the window - A. There were three or four brewer's servants there, which of them it was I do not know.

Q. Have you any other reason for saying you believe Gunnell was there, than from his being dressed as a brewer's servant - A. He is very much like the man.

GEORGE LIDYARD. I reside in Snow-hill; I am a hair-dresser. On the 2d of December, having heard the report of a pistol, I ran out of my door towards Mr. Beckwith's; I went into his house-when I got to the door, a mob of about eighteen persons were near the door; in a few minutes it increased to about two hundred. They had flags with the words "Justice," and "Trust to Providence" I think, upon them. The mob seemed to ask for their leader, the man who had shot Mr. Platt. Mr. Hone said, that he was gone, in order to get rid of them; but he was, in fact, up stairs. On the west side of the window, there was a man, in the habit of a drayman, who broke one window with a stick: a man like a sailor, broke the other. Upon the windows being broken, the guns were taken out; two boys were taking the pistols out, and the men were taking the guns. Five or six rushed in at the door; they seized the arms out of the glass-cases by the sides of the shop.

A sailor jumped in at the east window, and several with him; almost every thing was taken out of the shop. The mob were making a great noise, and breaking the windows: the flag was brought into the shop by one of the men. I saw the prisoner, Hooper, give the flag to another man, at the door of the shop, before the mob entered. The flag remained opposite the house, and I lost sight of it. About ten minutes afterwards it was brought into the shop. During the time that I lost sight of the flags, my attention was directed to the mob in the shop; I saw the prisoner, Cashman, in the shop: he had hold of Griffin, and another man laid hold of him on the other side. Griffin had been to get hand-cuffs for the man who we had in custody; he was seized by one man, and afterwards I saw him in the hands of Cashman. I saw Cashman go into the counting-house, and take arms out of it twice; the counting-house is at the back af the shop. He took about a dozen out the first time, and eight or ten the second: he threw them out to the mob at the door. I also saw the prisoner, Gamble, opposite the shop: before the windows were broken, he was among the mob, standing close to the east window; he had no gun then, he had nothing in his hands at that time. I saw him shortly afterwards with a gun, he was in the coach-road, among the mob, with a gun on his shoulder, and appeared to be going away; the mob were running at that time. I did not see Carpenter there. After the mob had taken the arms, they went up towards Newgate-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I was only examined once at the Mansion-house; I was there several times to see the different persons who were examined. I only said whether I knew the different prisoners, or not.

Q. Did you ever say before, that you saw Hooper with a flag - A. I think I said so at the Mansion-house: I only answered to what I was asked. I was asked whether Hooper was the man who took hold of Griffin-and I said, no. I said, I never saw Hooper in the shop; and say so now.

Court. Was you much alarmed - A. I was afraid.

CHARLES GRIFFIN . I live in Skinner-street; I am a perfumer. I was in Mr. Beckwith's shop on the 2d of December last, between eleven and twelve o'clock; the first thing I observed, was Warrell, the officer, searhing the man whom he had in custody. I was in Beckwith's counting-house, I stood there about five minutes, and afterwards I went out for some hand-cuffs: I returned in about ten minutes. I went into Beckwith's shop - A mob was on the outside of the house; the shop was then quite safe. The window towards Holborn was first broke by a brewer's drayman, with a broom-stick: Gunnell is the man who did it; I am sure of it. I had observed him before he broke the windows; I saw him break the first window. The prisoners, Hooper and Cashman, came into the shop afterwards, they came from a flag. I had seen that same flag in Hooper's hands, in the Old Bailey, when I was going for the hand-cuffs, it had the words "Soldiers, and Loving Brothers" on it. Hooper and Cashman came to the front door. I was laid hold of by the prisoner, Hooper, and I laid hold of him. Cashman came up and collared me, and asked what was the matter. A third came up, I do not know who he was. Before they came in, Hooper hallowed out "Follow me! Follow me!" upon that a rush was made at the door. There was no windows broke at that time. When they had got hold of me, I said, what do you want of me? I came to rescue the man as well as you: I said so for my own safety. They then let me go. They went towards the counting-house: I followed them. I passed them, and lald hold of a blunderbuss, pulled the trigger back, and put it on my shoulder. Hooper took a pistol from his great coat; he presented it, and said, I can do that as well as you: pointing it at me. I was so terrified that I ran up into the kitchen, and did not come down again.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I have been a hairdresser for twelve years, and lived in this house. I did live with a Mr. Marquis, twelve years ago; he is a hairdresser: I was his journeyman. I left him because I did not agree with him: he did not turn me away - I went away myself. I was at the Mansion-house two or three times a week, for three or four weeks; I went for the purpose of being examined, but sometimes I was not examined. I have been examined there.

Q. Did you ever, until after the examinations had been all gone through, or did you ever, at any one of these examinations, say Hooper was the man who presented the pistol at you - A. I did not.

Q. How long ago did you say so - A. About a week ago, at Mr. Newman's office; I think it was not before all the examinations had been gone through.

Q. Was you ever examined at the Mansion-house after that day - A. I was.

Q. Did you ever say, in the presence of the prisoner, Hooper, that he was the man who presented the pistol to you - A. I did not.

Q. You have also sworn that you saw him displaying the flag; did you ever say so in the presence of the prisoner, until to day - A. I have not. I do not know of any reward being offered for any thing, but for the man who shot Mr. Platt.

Re-examined by Mr. GURNEY. I went to the Mansion-house, when I was directed to go; sometimes I was examined, and sometimes not. There were a great many persons against whom examinations were taken. I always answered, to the best of my knowledge, to the questions that were put to me: I did not know that there was a reward offered.

Court. When you returned to the shop, in Skinner-street, had you the hand-cuffs open in your hand - A. No.

JOSEPH DYNAN . I am a boot-maker, and live at No. 5, George-street, Snow-hill. On the 2d of December last, I was in Skinner-street; I was not there till the mob was at Mr. Beckwith's shop. The mob extended across the street; they had a flag with them: the flag was nearly opposite the shop-door-it had reading on it. I saw the prisoners, Cashman and Carpenter, there. The mob were breaking the windows with sticks. I saw Cashman go into the shop and bring out fowling-pieces, or muskets, to the mob; I suppose he brought out four: he came out with them in his arms, and gave them to the mob at the door, saying, "Here! Here!" and gave the arms to them. He went in again, and brought out three more: he gave two of them away, and kept one himself. I then went home and came back again; the major part of the mob were then gone towards Newgate-street. I then saw Carpenter with two pistols, he was in the body of the mob;

one was a large horse pistol, and the other was a small one: he was going huzzaing, and brandishing the pistols about in his hands. I also saw the windows broken.

Cross-examined by Mr. CURWOOD. I live close by; I told a woman of it.

Q. Did you not say to her, come out, and see the fun - A. I did not. I said no such thing, to the best of my knowledge, I did not. I never said I wished them success. I will swear it.

Q. When you heard that they had laid down their arms, did you not say, that they were bl-dy fools, and that they, ought to have gone to Carlton House - A. I never said so.

Q. Did you not say, that you heard there was a reward of fifty guineas, and that you thought you could pick out two for it - A. I never said so.

Q. You said there was a reward of fifty guineas - A. When I came home, I said, I knew two of them;-there was no reward then. I did not say afterwards that there was a reward, and that I knew two of them: I told the woman I knew two of them, the moment of my coming home. The woman had sent me up to see if her husband was there; she was alarmed for fear of his being in the crowd: I knew her husband perfectly well; I did not see him. When I went home to the woman, I said, I knew two that were there; for I had frequently seen them before the riot. Neither of the prisoners are the two whom I spoke of: it was two men who are not apprehended. There were no rewards at that time; there could be none.

MR. JOHN MIDDLETON. I am a wholesale stationer, in Skinner-street. On the 2d of December last, when the mob were opposite Mr. Beckwith's, I saw a number of persons before my house, pass down to his house. I was standing at my warehouse door, which is about twelve doors above Beckwith's house, but within sight. I heard the report of fire-arms, and a few minutes afterwards a number of persons came opposite my house, between my house and the church; they very soon after returned again to Mr. Beckwith's. I was in the balcony of my drawing-room window: I observed several of the mob. The prisoner, Hooper, most certainly was there; I saw him conversing with the man who held the flag: he appeared to me to be directing the mob. I think he took the flag from the man, but I am not certain; I saw him in the mob for two or three minutes: he had a tri-coloured cockade in his hat-the flag was also tri-coloured, and had letters on it. He had something in his hand, I thought it was a sword; he flourished either a sword or stick, and was directing the persons about him. When the mob returned opposite my house, they appeared to be going to the city; but there was a noise from Mr. Beckwith's house, and they returned there again. The flags moved with them, and Hooper went with them too; he was very near the flag. I did not follow them, I watched them; I saw the windows broken, and a great quantity of fire-arms taken out of the windows; the remainder of the windows were broken, with the muskets which had been taken out. I did not observe any muskets with the mob before this; when they were opposite my house the first time, they had swords. After I saw the windows broken, and the arms taken out, the mob came towards Newgate-street again, when I lost sight of them. I am partly sure that Hooper was there with them; the flag went with them: I have no doubt that Hooper was with them, the last time that they passed my house.

Flag produced. MOTTO: TRUTH TO PROTECT THE INJURED, NATURE TO FEED THE HUNGRY, JUSTICE TO PUNISH CRIME.

JOHN PAGE . I am drayman to Messrs. Calverts. On the 2d of December last, I was in Warwick-lane, with my dray, it leads into Newgate-street, it was about two o'clock, I knew the prisoner, Gunnell, I have known him for six years; I saw him on that day in Newgate-street, he had a gun in his hand - He was with a great many people, going towards Cheapside. I also saw the flag among the mob; the flag went first, and the mob followed - They were all going the same way. I have known Gunnell six years, he was a lame man. I never saw him walk with a stick.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Have you never said that it was not Gunnell, but another man - A. No.

Q. Have you never been dismissed from Calverts' service - A. No.

Q. Have you never been without receiving your wages - A. I was at the Mansion-house for three days, and received no wages for those three days. Gunnell was not working for Calverts' at the time - He had lived with them some time ago.

SIR JAMES SHAW, Bart. On the 2d of December, the day of the riots, I offered the Lord Mayor my assistance; I first saw the mob on the north side of the Royal Exchange, near the north door of the Old Stock Exchange; they had a flag with them: I did not perceive the arms. I seized the flag, that which has been produced, is the one; we dispersed the mob: they flew in all directions. The flag was attached to a long pole: (produced) that is the pole, I know it by a mark.

SAMUEL LEVI . I am a city constable. On the 2d of December last, I was on duty in the Exchange; I saw the prisoner, Cashman, there, he was with the mob; he had a gun with him; I took both him and the gun: I gave the gun to Cartwright, he examined it, it was loaded with small shot and powder.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT. I am a city marshalman. I was on duty on the 2d of December last, at the Royal Exchange, I saw Cashman there with the mob; I assisted in taking him. Levi gave me the gun, which I saw taken from him; I examined it, it was loaded with small shot, and primed. I said to the prisoner, there is plenty here; it was loaded high. He said he knew it, he brought it for the purpose, either to kill, or be killed. I have had it ever since, and now produce it.

ANDREW BECKWITH. I believe this gun was in my shop; I had eight or ten of this description. It has the name of Ing on it, and I had some of that name in my house, on that day - They were stolen. I left them there in the morning, and they were gone when I returned.

ABRAHAM SAMUEL . I know the prisoner, Gamble; I saw him opposite the Exchange on the 2d of December last; he had a gun, and was with the mob. The gun was in his own hand, on his shoulder.

JOHN GOUGH. I am an officer of Union-street. I ap

prehended the prisoner, Gamble, about two o'clock, on the 2d of December, at Queen-street, in the Borough, he had a gun under his right arm at the time; I gave it to May. I am sure the prisoner, Gamble, is the man. I took him. After I had taken him and the gun, I observed his face very black. I asked him where he had got the gun, he said he picked it up in Skinner-street it was a dirty day. I examined the gun, the butt end of it was dirty, but the other part was not dirty-the side was not dirty. The dirt at the butt end was as it would be from putting it on the ground.

JOHN MAY . I produce the gun, which was delivered to me by the last witness. I have had it ever since.

MR. BECKWITH. This gun was in my east side window on the 2d of December, when I went out, it was not there when I returned; it is mine; it is worth 14l. 14s. I made it for a gentleman at Kingston, and exchanged it with him for another, as it was too heavy for him. It is my own work.

JOHN ROBERTS . The gun produced was in the shop on the 2d of December, it was in the window; it was about the third gun from the glass. It was not sold. I was in the shop all day, until the mob came.

THOMAS FRIEND. I am an officer of the Borough. I produce a pistol which I received from Mr. Hill, shopman to Mr. Willis, who is a pawnbroker, in the Borough; on the 6th of December. I apprehended the prisoner, Carpenter, on the 14th of January.

WILLIAM HILL. I am servant to Mr. Willis, who is a pawnbroker, in the Borough. The pistol produced, was brought to me to pledge by Eliza Owen , on the 5th of December; I stopped her and the pistol, and went to Friend.

ELIZA OWEN . The pistol produced, I took to the pawnbroker's to pledge; I got it from the prisoner, Carpenter, he told me to pledge it on that same day, it was the 5th of December.

Mr. BECKWITH. I believe this pistol to be the one which I bought of Mr. Mortimer's, I bought such a pair of pistols of him, it has his name on it; I bought two brace of them: I have the fellow, it was stolen, and I received it from the Lord Mayor at the Mansion House. I have not sold either of the two braces of pistols which I bought of Mortimer; I lost them on the 2d of December.

JOHN HUGGINS . I am a wholesale silk-man, and live in Paternoster-row. On the 2d of December, I was near the north door of the Exchange, I saw the mob there; I saw the Lord Mayor very active, and saw Sir James Shaw seize the flag. I sprung forward and seized the prisoner, Hooper, took him into the Exchange, and held him until the doors were shut. I put my hands into his coat, and found a brace of pistols under his coat; I took them out, and tried one of them, and found it was charged, and loaded with ball. I did not examine the other. I gave them to the officer.

MR. VINCENT GEORGE DOWLING . On the morning of the 2d of December, I was in Spa-fields; I saw a mob assembled round a waggon; I saw the prisoner, Hooper, in the waggon at the time the mob were assembled round it. I did not see either of the other prisoners. There were two tri-coloured flags displayed from the waggon; the one that has been produced was one of them. I saw the mob leave Spa-fields, they went towards Coppice-row, Hooper accompanied them they left the waggon behind. The flags moved with the mob, and a banner also; they quitted the waggon, after way was made for them; Hooper was with them, he was close to the flags they were carried, and he joined them. When they came to Coppice-row they made their way towards the City. I saw Mr. Stafford, with some officers, make a rush towards the flags. He carried off one of the flags and a banner; the other was drawn down, and they went towards the City.

JOHN LIMBRIC. I am an officer of Hatton-Garden. I went into Spa-fields, and saw the waggon, with a great number of persons round, and several persons in it. The prisoners, Cashman and Hooper, were in the waggon. Cashman had a tri-coloured flag with reading on it, it was on a pole. Hooper had a tri-coloured cockade in his hat, this was in the waggon, another man had this banner, (pro ducing it.)

MOTTO.

THE BRAVE SOLDIERS ARE OUR FRIENDS, TREAT THEM KINDLY.

I returned to Coppice-row about twelve o'clock, the mob were coming into Coppice-row; Mr. Stafford was trying to pull down one of the flags, and calling for help. I took a man, and Hooper rescued him from me. I did not see Cashman there.

EDWARD GOODSPEED . I am constable of St. Andrew's, Holborn. I was in Spa-fields on the 2d of December. I saw the prisoners, Cashman and Hooper, in the waggon there; I was afterwards in Coppice-row; I then saw both, Hooper and Cashman in the mob there; I saw Cashman with the flag in his hand; I saw Mr. Stafford there; the mob were knocking him about; he called out for help; he was taking hold of one of the colours; the mob were pressing him; I saw Hooper there, shoving about.

F. WINDERMUDE. I live in Horse-ferry-road, Westminster. I am the proprietor of the waggon which was in Spa-fields, on the day the mob was there. It was hired on the 27th of November, which was the Monday preceding the day. On the Sunday evening, the person who had hired the waggon came to me, the prisoner, Hooper, was with him. I received directions from both of them, to be at the top of Chancery-lane, Holborn end, at nine o'clock; I was there at the time appointed. The other man and Hooper came to me there, and put something in the waggon. I afterwards found it to be colours, those produced are the same, there was a small bundle put in the waggon. After the mob had left Spa-fields, I found the bundle to contain bullets, and a cat of gun-powder, and some bits of lead cut to pieces. I think Hooper put it in, if he did not, he was present at the time. After the things were put in, we proceeded towards Spa-fields. Hooper rode in the waggon; there was a large mob round the waggon in Spa-fields. After some time, the mob left the waggon; Hooper was in the waggon when it was there. I had been paid part of my money for the waggon, he said, I should have the remainder. Hooper was in the waggon when the flags were displayed. Cashman was in the front of the waggon, and had one of the colours. Hooper and Cashman went away with the mob; I delivered the bullets and powder to Gillman.

GILLMAN. I received the bullets and powder from the last witness, there are from sixty to one hundred bullets, about a pound of powder, and some slugs.

CASHMAN'S Defence. I went to the London-Hospital that morning, to see my shipmate, who was ill. I took a letter for a gentleman to the Admiralty; I returned and went to Rosemary-lane; I staid there sometime. I was sent back to the Admiralty, and as I was returing, the people were running, I ran with them. I took the arms from the men, and was taken into custody. The two men, when they were examined before the Lord-Mayor, said, that I was drunk; and so I was. The man who took the musket from me, said I was drunk.

HOOPER'S Defence. I was informed, that there was no material evidence against me, in consequence of which, I was admitted to bail; it now appears to day, that there is frightful, terrible evidence against me. Griffin often came to look at me at the Mansion-house, but he never brought any evidence against me; Lidyard also, never appeared against me till this time, seeing this is the case, I am altogether unprepared to meet it. I never carried the colours; I certainly had a tri-coloured cockade in my hat. On my leaving Spa-fields, I came into the city, for the purpose of calling on the Lord-Mayor, to inform him that they were rioting, and to prevent them from plunder. I never entered Beckwith's shop.

GAMBLE'S Defence. On the 2d of December, I went out to look for work; I was in Holborn, and followed the people to Spa-fields; I followed the mob from Spa-fields to Mr. Beckwith's shop. I picked the gun up in Skinner-street. I went home to Union-street, in the Borough. I was taken into custody about two o'clock.

GUNNELL'S Defence. I am very wrongfully accused of breaking the windows. I had not got a broom-stick in my hands on that day; nor was I in the shop, or near it.

CARPENTER'S Defence. On that day I went to the London-docks to look for work, I could not get any; and was going to Spa-fields. I heard of the riot at the Mansion-house, and went there. The pistol was forced into my hands, powder and shot was offered me; I said, I had no use for it. I took the pistol, as I was afraid of my life. I went home. I was at home by one o'clock; I have witnesses to prove that I was at home by that time.

MR. FRANCIS HOBLER , then read the evidence of Mr. Griffin against Cashman, at the Mansion-house; as follows,"The prisoner, Cashman, came to me and collared me, and I presented the blunderbuss; and Cashman said, he could do that as well as me, and he (Cashman) presented the pistol."

MR. GRIFFIN re-examined. COURT. - Q. It appears by refering to your examination before the Lord-Mayor, that you said, Cashman presented the pistol to you? - A. Hooper, as well as Cashman, were under examination; Hooper was dressed in a great coat, and stood next to Cashman; I was asked whether the man next to Cashman did it; I said the man in the coat. I did not read my affidavit before I signed it.

JOHN CASHMAN - GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 28.

JOHN HOOPER - NOT GUILTY .

RICHARD GAMBLE- NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM GUNNELL - NOT GUILTY .

JOHN CARPENTER- NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-65

212. WILLIAM JACKSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one saddle, value 10s. 6d.; one crupper, value 3s. 6d.; one pair of reins, value 3s.; one pair of traces, value 6s.; one collar, value 4s.; and one bridle, value 3s. ; the property of Harman Dyson .

JOHN WATSON. I am Mr. Dyson's servant. I was in the yard, and saw the prisoner go out with the harness under his arm; I followed him into Piccadilly on one side of the way, and Whitaker on the other. Whitaker took him with the harness under his arm; he said, he had borrowed it, and would bring it back the next day; we took him to Mr. Dyson, who said he did not lend it to him.

WILLIAM WHITAKER . I went with the last witness, and took the prisoner by Lord Gordon's gate; he said, he had borrowed it.

RICHARD FORSTER . I am the beadle of St. George's parish. I took the prisoner and harness to the watchhouse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and my wife was in labour at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-66

213. ANDREW BARTON and JAMES FRAMPTON , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Harley , on the King's highway, on the 23d of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 2s. 6d.; four 3s. bank-tokens; and 4s. 4d. in monies numbered , his property.

WILLIAM HARLEY. I am a watch-maker , and live at Hoad's-green, City-road. On the 23d of December, at ten o'clock at night, I overtook the prisoner, Frampton, at Wilderness-row, St. John-street. I got into conversation with him; I walked all the way with him, to the top of St. John-street; he said, he was going to Islington; I was going the same road, between Ashby-str eet, and the top of St. John-street ; he got behind. I was met by the prisoner, Barton, who instantly struck me over the left eye with a stick, and knocked me down in the kennel and stunned me; the first returning sensation that I felt was a difficulty of breathing; I found the prisoner, Barton, was kneeling on my breast - He had his hands over my mouth and nose; I struggled hard to liberate myself; he pointed a stick between my nose and mouth, and said, if I moved an inch he would blow my brains out. Frampton was turning my pockets inside out. Barton asked him, if he had drawn all out. Barton then struck me on the nose, and left me again insensible; when I came to, I felt the water flow on my neck. I got up to pursue them, with the assistance of the watchman, from St. John-street to Goswell-street, without effect. I went home. I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment. I lost the handkerchief off my neck, and I am sure, Frampton is the man who ritled my pockets. I am also sure, Barton was the other man. I looked particularly in his face, when I was in the kennel; he was between me and the lamp.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. It was dark, but the shops were open; I must have passed one hundred shops with Frampton; I told him, I was going to the City-road; he did not frighten me; he is a little man. - Q. Do

you mean to say, that sixteen days after the transaction, you would know him again? - A. I pointed them out myself. The prisoner, Frampton, was sitting by the fire; and in order to convince myself that he was the man, I turned upon him and he drew his hat over his face, and left the room, his partner was there. I did not see the police officer till I had seen the men; I can swear to them positively.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I am an officer. Mr. Harley gave me the description of the two prisoners; I went in pursuit of them on Wednesday, the 8th of January, to the Angel, in Goswell-street; where the prisoner, Frampton, was drinking and smoaking; I sat down by him, and told him that I wanted him; I took him into the parlour and handcuffed him; he asked leave to send for his father; I told him he might if he came soon; he did not come; there was nineteen others in the room with him; I was obliged to produce my cutlass to protect myself; I put him into a coach; his friends asked me, where he was going; I told them if they wanted to see him they might come to me at Bow-street.

JAMES JEFFERSON . I am a constable. I apprehended Barton and brought him to the office. Mr. Harley swore to him.

JOSEPH BERRY. I am a constable. The last witness applied to me, to know where to find Barton; I went to look for him several times, and at last found him in his father's garret.

BARTON'S Defence. I have witnesses to prove where I was at the time of the robbery.

FRAMPTON'S Defence. I have also, witnesses to prove where I was at the time.

WILLIAM STANLEY . I am a jeweller. I live in Clarke-street, Sutton-street, Goswell-street. I went to No. 53, Vineyard-street, Islington. On the 23d of December, I was in company with Frampton at the Angel, at the corner of George-street, Goswell-street.

COURT. - Q. How do you know that it was the 23d of December? - A. Because the next day being Christmas-eve, made me remember it. I went to the Angel at a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening; Frampton came at half-past; he was on the other side of the room all the evening; he was not absent more than five minutes; I continued there till eleven o'clock at night; I am sure he was there till eleven o'clock, except for two or three minutes; he was drinking by himself on the other side of the room. I have used the Angel, this five years; it is in my neighbourhood. Frampton usually came in, at a little after eight o'clock; he was apprehended at this house; I should suppose he was there, four or five times a week; I go there every night. I am a single man. I get from 1l. 10s. to 1l. 15s. per week.

COURT. Q. If you are there every night, how can you swear to the 23d of December. A. I had to get up the next morning very early, to do some particular work; and my brother came to fetch me that evening.

BARTON - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

FRAMPTON- GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-67

214. CHARLES SMITH , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Woodcroft , about eleven on the night of the 16th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein sixty-six yards of linen, value 4l. 11s.; twenty-three shawls, value 1l. 17s.; eighty-four yards of calico, value 2l. 3s.; and one hundred and eighteen yards of colt calico, value 2l. ; his property.

JAMES WOODCROFT . I keep a linen-draper's shop in Cleveland-street . On the night of the 16th of December, I made my premises safe before I went to bed. I was called up at half-past two o'clock and found a piece of linen on the floor, and another on the counter, which were not there when I went to bed; the fan-light was broken in two places. There was some linen piled under the fan-light, within the reach of a man's arm; two pieces were taken, and the rest of the articles mentioned in the indictment. The fan-light was broken at each end; it reaches across the shop. About 10 minutes afterwards, I heard the rattle spring, and the watchman brought one piece of linen and part of the shawls, saying, he had found them in Cleveland-mews, which is at the corner of my house. I went there. Brown found the remainder of my property. The prisoner was taken soon after.

WILLIAM BROWN. I am a watchman. The last witness called me; I found his house broke open. I examined about and found part of the property in a basket in a cart, in the mews. About four o'clock two men came down Martin-street; one said to the other, it is a very bad job: they went down Howland-street into Russell-mews, which leads into Cleveland-mews. I told the other watchman, and we concealed ourselves, to catch them. I stood behind some dung, and he was behind the court; in five minutes the prisoner came down the mews, and made a stop, opposite the cart, in which we found the property. I laid hold of him immediately, and brought him to the watch-house; his shoulders were covered with muddy feet marks, as if some body had been standing on them. A piece of cotton was found in his breeches pocket; he said, he had slept in a cart, in Fitzroy-market.

EDWARD WEST. I am a watchman. I found the property in a cart in the mews, covered over with a blue apron.

GEORGE EVANS . I am a watchman. I went to the mews with Brown; I hid myself by the cart; in about five minutes the prisoner came down the mews, not quite so far as the cart: Brown laid hold of him, his coat was muddy on his shoulders.

HENRY HOWARD. I am the watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I found a piece of print in his pocket, and a latch key; his shoulders were muddy, as if somebody had been standing on them: it was a dirty night. He said, he picked the print up in the mews, when he went there to ease himself. Fitzroy-market is quarter of a mile from the mews; the print was not dirty at all. (I produce it.)

JAMES WOODCROFT. The print found on the prisoner is mine, and hung over my fan-light, when it was broken; a person standing on another's shoulders might easily reach my fan-light.

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to ease myself.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-68

215. SARAH MAC was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , 19s.7d. in monies, numbered , the monies of Peter Conway .

PETER CONWAY . I am a Greenwich-pensioner , and live in Mary-le-bone-street, I was coming home from Greenwich between eleven and twelve o'clock; I was intoxicated. I met the prisoner in Crown-street, St. Giles's, and went into the King's-head public-house, with her; I gave her some beer, I laid the change of a 1l. note on the table, and she took it up and went out, I had not agreed to give her any thing: I am certain she is the woman.

ROSANNA POWELL. I keep the King's-head in Crown-street , the prosecutor came into my house about half-past ten o'clock, with the prisoner, she asked for a pot of beer; he tendered me a 2l. note, saying he had nothing less. I gave him 1l. note, 19s. and 7d. in halfponee; I went to the bar and came back again, and saw the 1l. note on the table; I asked him why he did not take it up. He gave her 1s. to get some bread and cheese. Seeing him in liquor, I asked him if it was his wife, he said, it was his cousin. He gave me the note to take care of; the silver was not there. He did not complain to me then. She came back and said the shilling was bad, and I changed it.

JOHN DOWLING. I live with the last witness, I was in the tap-room drinking my beer; the prisoner, and prosecutor, came in, and called for some beer: Mrs. Powell served them; she gave the 1l. note, 19s. and 7d. in copper, in the change. The prisoner took the money off the table, except the note, and left the room: just before she came back, he said he had lost his money. When she came back, she said she had not got it: she was absent about a quarter of an hour.

BARTHOLOMEW CRONEY. I was at the public-house; the prisoner and prosecutor, called for some beer, the landlady gave them 1l. 19s. 6d., the prisoner took the money and went out, and came back and went out again. The prosecutor said, he had lost his money: I went out after her and took her, in about a quarter of an hour; she had got it; she gave him 1s. out of her pocket. I am sure she is the woman.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found 1d. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the shilling to get some bread and cheese.

Jury to DOWLING. What money was put on the table - A.19s. 7d. GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-69

216. RICHARD SIMMONDS was indicted, for stealing on the 2d of December , twenty swords, value 20l; one fowling-piece, value 10l. 10s; ten other guns, value 20l.; and twenty pistols, value 20l., the property of Thomas Rea , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS REA . I live in the Minories , and am a gun-maker ; there are lodgers in the house; none of my servants sleep there. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 2d of December, I was in my shop, and saw about two hundred persons coming towards my house, they were then at Messrs. Randall's and Co. house: I got my shop shut up immediately, made the doors and windows fast, and went up and looked out of my garret-window, and saw a great mob in the street with muskets, pistols, &c. Randall and Co's is about one hundred yards from my house; they then came to my shop. I heard the windows broken in; I then got out at the top of the house, and through a neighbour's house, and went home. I returned at a little after three o'clock, and found my shop demolished; the windows and window frames broken. I had left my property in the shop. I found I had lost upwards of 1000l. worth of property; consisting of muskets, pistols, fowling-pieces, blunderbusses, and 7l. in notes, and 30s. in copper. The lodgers have the upper part of the house.

Prisoner. Did you see me there-A. I could not distinguish any man.

JOHN HALL , Esq. I am a merchant. On the 2d of December, I saw the mob in the Minories, they were employed in breaking Randall and Co's shop; there might be at that time about twelve or fifteen armed men. They afterwards went to Rae's shop; by that time they had collected to a larger number: they had fire-arms, and were firing them in the air. I saw the prisoner there: I at first saw him in the Minories with the mob at Randall's door; he had a sabre in his hand, and seemed very active. The noise was great, I could not hear him say any thing; he kept brandishing his sword, and making the various cuts of the broad sword exercise; he was within four feet of Mr. Rea's at the time they broke in. They at first broke in at the south window of the shop, got into the shop and took the arms, they afterwards attacked the back part of the house, the back window looks into the counting horse; there was four or five men with pickaxes, forcing the door, and endeavouring to gain admittance, after some trouble, they succeeded; the prisoner went with them, and brandished his sword, to keep persons off who might attempt to disturb them, some of them went in at the door; they were at Mr. Rae's house. about three quarters of an hour; they made a complete passage through the house, and took a great deal away, some of them came out at the part where the prisoner was, and brought cartouch-boxes, pistols, and other arms. The prisoner was certainly co-operating with those who went into the house.

Q. Were his actions such has to create terror to those in the house? - A. Certainly, they were; I heard him shout.

Q.PRISONER. Did you see me in the house? - A. No.

Q. Did you not ask me if I knew my broad-sword exercise? - A. No.

ABRAHAM SAMUEL. I am a City constable. I was opposite Mr. Rae's shop on the 2d of December, at the time the mob were taking arms. I saw the prisoner there; he had a broad cutlass in his hand, flourishing it about; he was close to the door when the mob were bringing the goods out of the shop. I saw him with his hands in the window handing out some pistols to the mob. I saw him harranguing the mob for half an hour; during the whole time he was the most active man among them.

JOHN WILSON . I am a private in the Ist regiment of Life-guards. On the 2d of December, I was in the Minories, and saw a great mob there with arms, the prisoner was among them; I took the sword from him; he was at a little distance from Mr. Rae's; part of the mob were dispersed; he stood more bold than the rest, flourishing his sword; I demanded that he should lay his sword down; I struck him with the flat side of my sword, and he gave it up.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB . I am a City police-officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of December, at Northfleet, in an outward-bound East Indiaman. Harrison was with me. I told him that I took him on suspicion of having a blunderbuss at the Mansion-house on the day of the riots; he said he was in the mob, but he had no blunderbuss.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the Minories; there was a great crowd there; a man came up to me, and put the sword into my hand. I had drank half a pint of rum. I began to flourish it; I did not take any thing, nor was I in the shop. GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-70

217. WILLIAM MATHEWS were indicted for steal ing, on the 2d December , one pistol, value 30s. , the property of Thomas Rae .

THOMAS RAE. I live in the Minories . On the 2d of December, I lost about fifty or sixty pair pistols, and other things.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. There was a great many people - A. I was not in the shop at the time.

JOSEPH DELANY. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Rotherhithe. On Saturday, the 4th of January, the prisoner came to my house to pledge a pistol. I delivered it to the officer. I saw the name of Rae, 91, Minories, on the barrel. I asked the prisoner if it was his property; he said he was an officer's servant; and produced a paper purporting to be a recommendation from his late master. He said his master bought it at Mr. Montague's. I stopped it.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. It was a month after the robbery.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

JAMES FELL . I am clerk to the Thames Police-Office; the prisoner was examined at our office; Delany was examined, and produced the pistol. The prisoner was asked how he came by it. I took down, from his mouth, what he said (reads.) "I was servant to Lieutenant Prior, he brought it from abroad about two years and a half ago; he went to Chichester, and I dare say he is there now. I was in London at the time of the riots; but do not recolleet where. I was not at the riots. I used to attend clubs before I went to sea, but that led me into bad company, and that was the reason of my going to sea. Lieutenant Prior gave me his pistols, and other things, to the value of 50l. I have sold all the other things, as I was short of money."

Prisoner's Defence. I shall state nothing but what you have heard. GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-71

218. JOHN HANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d December , one gun, value 10l. the property of Thomas Rae .

SECOND COUNT the same, only stating it to be the property of Benjamin Aplin .

THOMAS RAE . I am a gunsmith , residing in the Minories . On the 2d December last, my shop was robbed of arms to the amount of 1000l.; among the rest which were stolen, was a gun belonging to Benjamin Aplin; it had been at my house for a year and a half, for sale.

ABRAHAM SAMUEL. I am a City officer, and was at Mr. Rae's house on the 2d of December, the mob broke it open, and took guns and other arms out, and went away with them; it was between two and three clock; the mob threw down their arms about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards.

EBENEZER DALTON. I am police-officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 2d of December, which was the day that Mr. Rae's house was robbed. I took him in Great Aliff-street, he was coming in the direction from Mr. Rae's house, walking very fast, with a gun in his hand(I produce it). I stopped him, and asked him how he came by it; he said he had picked it up in the Minories. It was a dirty day, but there was no appearance whatever of mud on it. It could not have lain in the Minories, and have been in that state, the streets were very dirty. I took him about half-past two, just after the soldiers came.

RAE. The gun produced is the one which I spoke of; it is Mr. Aplin's property, and worth 10l.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to look for work. The gun lay in the Minories; a man pulled out two pistols, and told me to pick it up, and I did.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-72

219. PHILIP SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , one pistol, value 10s. , the property of Thomas Rae .

ABRAHAM SAMUEL . I was at Mr. Rae's shop; there was a great crowd, they were taking the things out of the windows. The soldiers came up, and they dispersed.

ROBERT IRELAND . I am servant to Mr. Brown, who is a butcher, and lives at Aldgate. I was in Whitechapel, about a quarter of a mile from the Minories, on the 2d of December, near Red Lion-passage, I saw the prisoner there; it was just after the soldiers had been in the Minories; he was going towards Red Lion-street, as if from the Minories; he had a sword in his hand, and was in company with two others, each of whom had a pistol and a gun. I walked behind them, and asked several to assist me in taking the three. They kept together till they came to Red Lion-street, the prisoner then turned down the street; I got assistance, and secured him. My friend asked him if he was an officer, he said, no; I said, how did you come by that sword? he said he found it in the Minories. It was a dirty day, but there was not the least appearance of dirt on it; if it had been picked up, it would not have the appearance that it had. I gave the sword to Dalton. It was not drawn.

EBENEZER DALTON. I am an officer. I produce the sword

GEORGE BROOKS . I am a sadler, and live in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel. On the 2d of December, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner passed me, he was alone; Ireland was following him, and he asked me to go with him. We followed the prisoner as far as Rosemary-lane, and then went up to him, and asked him if he was an officer, he said, no. I told him to give me the sword - He gave it me immediately. I took him to the police-office. He said that he was a labourer, and had picked it up in the Minories.

(Property produced and sworn tc.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to look for work. I saw the arms lying in the street, and picked up the sword.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-73

220. HENRY HOLDSWORTH and GEORGE IR-WIN were indicted for stealing, on the 2d December , one pistol, value 10s. , the property of Thomas Rae .

THOMAS RAE. On the 2d of December I was robbed of a quantity of pistols and swords; I also lost some shot, bullets, and about a hundred flints.

ABRAHAM SAMUEL . I was in the Minories . There was a great mob there; Mr. Rae's house was broken open; when the soldiers came up the mob flew in all directions.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. There were a great quantity of arms lying in the street.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When the soldiers came, they took possession of the spot where the arms had been thrown down A. They did.

JOHN GRIFFITH . I am an officer. I received information that the prisoners were in the George public-house; Bacon and I went in, and found them sitting in a box; I took hold of Irwin, and desired him to get up - He was sitting on the sword. (I produce it.) Bacon took Holdsworth. The pistol did not appear to have been fired. Both sword and pistol were quite clean. Woodward brought me some balls and some shot.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The sword was behind them both; the box was not much longer than the sword. Neither of them could have been in the box without knowing that the sword and pistol were there.

WILLIAM BACON. I was an extra-constable on that day. I apprehended Holdsworth. The last witness has spoken correctly.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . After the prisoners were brought out, I searched Holdsworth; I found two gun-flints, and a small quantity of shot, mixed with powder, on him.

Cross-examined. It was a mixture of different shots.

JOHN GRIFFITH . When I took the prisoners their boots were very dirty, and their clothes also were muddy. The arms were quite clean.

THOMAS WOODWARD . I am a smith; on the 2d of December, I was at the George public-house; I saw the prisoners taken into custody. After they went out I found some shot, balls, flints, and a charge, at the foot of the table where they sat-all on the floor together; I gave them to Griffith immediately after they went out. I did not see them bring any thing in with them; they were alone in the box, it would not hold more than two.

Cross-examined. There might be a dozen people in the room. Nobody had been in the box before them while I was there.

WILLIAM OSMOND. I am clerk at Lambeth-street Police-Office. When the prisoners were examined, after the witnesses had given their depositions, I saw the magistrate make his minutes, and know that they are correct.(reads) "Holdsworth says, I am a footman, I had left my place; I lived with Mrs. Hill, Fore-street, Cripplegate. I went to my mother's on the 2d of December; about half-past nine I went to Mr. Parr's office for servants; I then went to George Howard 's, in Long-lane, and stopped there about two hours. I went to Bishopsgate-street with Howard - I left him there. I was quite intoxicated, and did not know what I was doing; some men told me to come and see what was the matter; I endeavoured to get out of the way. When I was in the Minories, the soldiers dispersed the mob, I then met the prisoner, Irwin, who said we might as well pick up the muskets as the rest, and we did." "Irwin said, I am a painter. On Monday last I went to St. George's, in the Borough, and then to Bishopsgate-street. I met Holdsworth in the Minories. The arms were lying in the middle of the road, and I picked up the pistol."

JOHN GRIFFITH. It was a dirty day; the pistol could not be picked up in the street without being dirty.

Cross-examined. Would not setting onit at the ale-house, clean it - A. it was cleaner than it is now. (produced).

MR. RAE. The pistol is mine. The sword is not mine. Randals', in the Minories, were robbed as well as me.

HOLDSWORTH'S Defence. I saw the mob in Houndsditch, and went with them into the Minories; I was rather intoxicated; I met Irwin, and he said, we might pick them up as well as others. I found the powder in my pocket, I did not know it was there.

IRWIN'S Defence. I saw the arms laying in the road, and thought, I might pick them up as well as the rest.

ESTHER CASEY . I live in Long-lane, Smithfield; the prisoner, Holdsworth, called on my son, on the 2d of December, sometime between eleven and one o'clock, in the morning, and staid a very few minutes.

HOLDSWORTH- GUILTY . Aged 16.

IRWIN- GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-74

221. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted, for stealing on the 2d of December , two blunderbusses, value 24s. ; the property of Thomas Rae .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-75

222. RICHARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , one fowling-piece, value 25s.; and one other gun, value 25s. ; the property of Martin Brander Thomas Potts.

THOMAS POTTS . I live in the Minories . I am in partnership with Martin Brander , we are gun-makers . On the 2d of December, about a quarter past one o'clock in the day, there was thirty or forty persons round our shop, they broke it open, and then got in. I had shut up the

shop before that time; there were fire arms of different descriptions taken away, amounting to about 750l.; there was also powder and shot taken away.

EBENEZER DALTON. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, on the 2d of December, in Church-lane, Whitechapel; between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; it is about a quarter of a mile from the Minories; he had a gun with him, the outside of it was quite clean, it appeared to have been recently discharged.

Cross-examined. When you took him, he had it dragging after him - A. He carried it. It was not on the ground. I know Back Church-lane; if the prisoner had been going from Brander's, to Back Chuch-lane, the place where I met him, would not be the nearest way, it was in the way from Newgate-street; I produce the gun it was not fired while in my possession; nobody could get at it.

MR. POTTS. The gun is mine, and was taken out of my counting-house.

Cross-examined. It had not been fired while it was in my possession, after it was proved; I have no doubt but that it has been fired since it was taken from my shop.

Prisoner. I picked it up.

EBENEZER DALTON. When I took it, it did not appear to have been on the ground.

RICHARD JONES. I live in Old-street; the prisoner, is my son, he is a wood-cutter. On the 2d of December, I sent him out with the cart; Robins went with him. I sent him to St. Giles's, in the Fields; he worked for Mr. Jameson, as well as me.

GEORGE ROBINS. I am the prisoner's brother-in-law. I went with him to sell the wood, we returned at a quarter to twelve, we went up Field-lane, Fleet-market, and to Temple-Bar, we then turned back, and went down Fleet-street into Fleet-lane; when we got to Newgate, the prisoner left me, it was about two o'clock; he went towards Whitechapel; his brother, Thomas Jones, accompanied us with the cart.

DANIEL JAMESON . I live in Back Church-lane, Whitechapel; the prisoner sometimes works for me. I had given him orders to come to me, towards the afternoon, of the 2d of December. GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year , and Fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-76

223. JAMES WATSON was indicted, for that he on the 2d of December , feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault upon Joseph Rhodes , with a sword, and did strike, cut, and stab, the said Joseph Rhodes, with intent, of his malice aforethought to kill and and murder him .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to disable, the said, Joseph Rhodes.

MR. GURNEY. Counsel for the prosecution, in opening the case, stated; that he should not be able to prove, such a malicious stabbing as came within the meaning of the Act, under which the prisoner was indicted; and at the suggestion of the Learned Judge; he declined offering any evidence. The Prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-77

224. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Gill , about twelve o'clock, on the night of the 12th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, thirty-six spoons, value 30l.; five ladles, value 5l.; eight forks, value 8l.; two jugs, value 6d.; one tea-pot, value 7l.; ten skewers, value 10s.; one wine strainer, value 1l.; two knives, value 1l.; one fish slice, value 2l.; five yards of lace, value 1l.; and one cap-caul, value 2s. , his property.

THOMAS GILL. I live in King-street, Finsbury-square . I went to bed on Wednesday night, about twelve o'clock, my house was fastened that night; I was not up the last in the house; an entry was made, by breaking into the Court-yard, at the back of the house, into the area, and getting through the door; there was a latch to the door. I did not see it before I went to bed; the area is covered over, and the covering is connected with the house, running up against it, the hole was broke through the covering. When I saw the area next morning, the hole was broke in the wall; it is a wall of lath and plaster, with boards an inch and a quarter thick. There is no communication without the house to the area, we found this rope (producing it) suspended to one of the joists of the wall of the area, by which means, they must have got down, the hole was eight or nine feet from the ground; my servant was up between seven and eight, and I got up at eight.

LUCY TURNER. I went to bed at half past twelve o'clock. I was last up at night. I got up rather before eight o'clock in the morning. I went down, and found the back door, which leads into the area, open; upon looking further, I found a glass frame, taken from off the iron grate, and several flower-pots had been removed; a large sheet of lead had been taken off the wall; and there was a hole in the ceiling; and the side board had been ransacked. I heard no noise in the night.

THOMAS GILL. re-examined. Upon examination, I I found nearly all my plate gone. I lost the articles stated in the indictment; there were a great many plated articles in the same place, but they were not touched.

JANE GILL . I missed several remnants of lace, and a cap-caul. I have seen them since, in Kennedy's hands.

MICHAEL HUGHES. I am a watchman. On the night of the 12th of December, I was calling four o'clock in the morning, it was nearly half-past four; I came by Mr. Levy's house, in Wentworth-street; I saw the prisoner standing in the court there; I did not know him before, I thought he might live in the court; I went up the court, and took particular notice of his dress, as I passed him; I went on, and returned again; I missed him; I went up the court, and saw Levy's side door was open, it is in the court; I returned to my box, and in a few minutes, the prisoner came by my box; I stepped out, and called to him, he stopped, and I crossed over to him, and asked him what he did at the house round the corner - He said,"what house," and seemed strange. I asked him, what he had got upon him, his pockets appeared full, and bulky - He said, "nothing at all," and that he was of a different character, to what I took him to be. I asked him if he had any thing in his hat, I did not observe any thing in it - He said, he had nothing. Levy's house is

considered a receiving house; I have been on that beat fifteen months; Levy has lived in the neighbourhood some time; the door in the court is not usually left open; but there is a light burning in the room all night. I took the prisoner's hat off; I saw some lace, wrapped on a piece of blue pasteboard; I asked him, what he was going to do with it - He said, he was going to take it to his old woman. I said, "Who is she" - He said, his wife. I asked him where he lived - He said, in Frying-pan-alley; I took him to the watch-house; he wanted me to let him go; but, I refused; I put his hat on again, in taking him to the watch-house; as we were going along, he took his hat off, took out the lace, and took it off the pasteboard, and tried to put it in the puddle, in the street; I laid hold of his wrist, and he said, I wanted to rob him; I then put the lace into his left hand breeches-pocket, and took him to the watch-house, and told Barrs, that the prisoner had got some lace, Barrs asked him for it, and he pulled it out of his pocket, and gave it to him; the cap-caul was with the lace.

JOHN BARRS . I am a constable. The last witness has spoken correctly. He gave me the lace out of his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CRESWELL . I saw the prisoner as he was going to the office; his coat was marked with mortar, his arms in particular; the marks might have been made, by his getting through the ceiling.

HUGHES. I picked up a piece of lace the next morning, at the very spot, where the prisoner tried to drop it, I gave it to Barrs.

BARRS. I produced it.

MRS. GILL. I cannot tell it, it is so dirty; I lost some like it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by the man's box; he called to me, I came to him - He said, you have been to Levy's; what have you got about you; I pulled my hat off, and I said I had got some lace.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Borrough.

Reference Number: t18170115-78

225. EDWARD MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one watch, value 3l.; the property of William Crowther , and George Atkins Blaney , in their dwelling house .

SECOND CANT. The same, only stating it to be in the dwelling-house, of the said William Crowther.

It being proved, that the prosecutor's name was George Atkis Blaney, and the indictment, stating it to be George Atkins Blaney. The prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-79

226. WILLIAM BURTON and THOMAS NORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , twelve live tame fowles, value 18s. , the property of William Acott .

No evidence being offered. The prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-80

227. THOMAS SOUTER was indicted, for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain order, for the payment of money, to whit, 57l. 5s. 10d.; with intention to defrand, John Henton Tritton , David Bevan , Robert Barclay , and John Tritton , the younger, against the statute .

THREE OTHER COUNTS. Only varying, the manner of laying the charge.

The prosecutors not appearing , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-81

228. CHARLES OLIVER was indicted for that he, on the 9th of December , falsely did pretend to John Marshal, servant to Richard Adams , Charles Adams , William Bell , David Lloyd , and Patrick Campbell , that he wanted a piece of 8d. brown sattin ribbon; and one piece of 8d. brown scarlet sarsnet ribbon, for Joseph Gillman, Richard Wood, and John Copling , by means of which false pretence, he did fraudulently obtain from the said John Marshal , thirty-six yards of brown satin ribbon, value 16s.; and thirty-six yards of scarlet sarsnet ribbon; with intent to cheat and defraud them of the same .

JOHN MARSHALL . I am servant to Messrs. Adams and Co., ribbon and silk manufacturers , Bread-street, Cheapside . The prisoner came into their house on the afternoon, of the 9th of December, he was a stranger to me. He asked me for a piece of 8d. brown sattin ribbon; I looked out a piece for him. He then wanted a piece of scarlet sarsnet ribbon; I looked him out a piece, and asked him who they were for; he said, Gillman and Lucas; they deal at our warehouse. The two pieces contained thirty-six yards each; he said, they would do. I gave him a bill of them, made out to Gillman and Lucas. I asked him his name; he said, it was John Nichols ; and I entered the goods, as taken by John Nichols . He left the warehouse and took the goods away with him. A few days afterwards, I went to Gillman and Co. The prisoner came to our house again about a week after, and asked me for a piece of 6d. scarlet sarsnet; we sent for an officer, who apprehended him. I am sure the prisoner is the man who first came.

RICHARD WOOD LUCAS. I am a silk manufacturer. I have dealt with Adams and Co. Our firm is Gillman, Lucas, and Coplin; we live in Newgate-street. The prisoner was never employed to purchase the goods for us.

ANTHONY HARRIS. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. He said, his master, whose name was Harris, sent him for the ribbon. I apprehended Harris the same day.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . - Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-82

229. JOHN HARRIS , was indicted for feloniously obtaining, on the 14th of December , from Robert Hobbs, servant to Richard Adams , Charles Adams , William Bell , David Lloyd , and Patrick Campbell , seventy-two yards of scarlet sarsnet ribbon, value 1l. 10s.; under false pretences .

ROBERT HOBBS. I am servant to Messrs. Adams, and Co. On the 14th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to our house, and said, he wanted a piece of 8d. and a piece of 12d. scarlet ribbon; he said, let

them be very good, for our man had a piece a day or two ago which did not match in colour. I asked him who they were for; he said, for Gillman and Lucas, who were customers at our house. He had two pieces, which came to 1l. 10s. I gave them to him with a bill made out to Gillman and Co. I asked him his name; he said, it was Williams; he took them away with him.

RICHARD WOOD LUCAS . I am a silk manufacturer. The prisoner was never employed by us; and the goods never came to our house. He was formerly a ribbon manufacturer.

ANTHONY HARRIS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of December, at Swan-street, in the Minories. He had not got a farthing nor any clothes on what ever. He said, he had sold the ribbon to Mrs. Taylor, in Rosemary-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to it; I had nothing to eat for three days, and my family were starving.

Recommended to Mercy.] GUILTY . Aged 27.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-83

230. EDWARD JONES , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joshua Allen , about eight on the night of the 4th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one great coat, value 4l. ; the property of Cornelius Holland .

CORNELIUS HOLLAND . I live in Somerset-street, Aldgate . On the 4th of January, I saw my coat safe at seven o'clock on the evening; it was on the first-floor room. I have known the prisoner a long while. He was at my house at seven o'clock that evening; he had seen the coat two or three times that day; he went out with me at a quarter past seven o'clock. I told my wife to go out; he heard me tell her. I parted with the prisoner at Aldgate pump. I went home about nine o'clock, and found my coat gone. I was very intimate with the prisoner. I saw my coat the 17th of January, at Fothergill's. I met the prisoner on the 12th of January, and charged him with the robbery; he denied it.

JANE HOLLAND . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner drank tea with us, on the 4th of January. I went out in the evening within two or three minutes after my husband and the prisoner. The coat was safe in the front room up stairs when I went out; when I returned at eight o'clock, it was gone. I locked the room-door before I went out.

MARIA ALLEN . I am the daughter of Joshua Allen, who keeps the house. About twenty minutes past seven o'clock, the prisoner came to the house, alone; I let him in, and told him, that Mrs. Holland was not at home; he said, he knew that, but she was only next door, and that he would go up stairs and wait until she came in; he waited about ten minutes, and then went out, before Mrs. Holland came in. He shut the door after him. Nobody but the prisoner went up stairs during the time that Mrs. Holland was out; she returned about eight o'clock; I told her Jones had been; she went up, and missed the coat directly.

Prisoner. Have you not often heard your mother find fault with the prosecutor, for going out and leaving the door open? - A. Sometimes.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am servant to Mr. Fothergill, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Aldersgate-street. On the 4th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged the coat at out house, for 1l. 10s.; I am sure he is the man. Mr. Holland claimed it. I have done business with the prisoner before.

HENRY HARRIS. I apprehended the prisoner; he said he knew nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Holland's house the whole of that day before tea. I wanted some paper to write a letter - He had no paper. I was there till after tea. I went out with Holland after tea. I was going to Mile-end. I went back to write the letter; when I got to the side-door, there was a man pushed by me. I found the room-door locked, and came out, and found the coat lying in the court, and I pledged it.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of Stealing only, to the value of 39s.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-84

231. ROBERT SMITH , was indicted for stealing, on the 21th of December , one box, value 1s.; three shirts, value 1l.; five handkerchiefs, value 6s. 6d.; three pair of stockings, value 5s.; and one waistcoat, value 5s. , the property of Cornelius Jackson ,

To which indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-85

232. FRANCIS MURRAY , was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , one coat, value 1l.; one pair of trwosers, value 10s.; and one handkerchief, value 1s. , the property of Thomas Wardel .

THOMAS WARDEL . I am servant to Mr. Palmer, who is a publican, and lives in Broadway, Westminster, at the sign of the Star and Crown . On the 14th of November, the prisoner came to lodge at the house, and slept in the same room with me. On the morning of the 16th, the clothes were safe in my box. The prisoner asked what was in my box, and I told him it was my best clothes; he said he was going to lodge with us for eighteen days; he left the house on Friday, the 17th of November. I went up stairs to put my clothes on, but they were gone; the prisoner did not return; he was taken on the 17th of January, and the duplicate of my things found on him. I did not see him go out of the house.

Prisoner. Did I not speak to you after I came down on the Sunday morning-A. No.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am a constable; I was requested to look for the prisoner. I found him on the 7th of January; I told him of the charge, and took him to the prosecutor, he recognized him, and charged him with the robbery. I found a duplicate of the trowsers on him,

they were pledged on the 16th of December, for five shillings at Mr. Roberts's; while I was searching him, he endeavoured to secret something in his trowsers; and the duplicate fell out of them. They were pledged in the name of Prenn.

WILLIAM BEZAN. I am servant to Mr. Roberts, who is a pawnbroker. The trowsers and handkerchief were pledged with me, on the 16th of November: I do not know who pledged them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to lodge there; I took the lodgings for a night or two, at 6d. per night. On the Sunday morning, I got up and asked the prosecutor what the box was, he said, it was his clothes box. I talked some time with the landlord; if I had got any thing when I went out he must have seen it; I could not leave the house without going through the bar. I bought the two duplicates of a man at the public-house opposite the prosecutor's. Prosecutor first said at the office, that he saw the things on the Sunday Morning, and the pawnbroker said they were pledged on the Saturday, he then said it was that day.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-86

234. JAMES FREEMAN , was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Judd , on the King's highway, on the 5th of November , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one hundred shillings, in monies numbered; twenty half-crowns, value 50s.; twenty silver three-shilling tokens, value 60s.; and eight 1l. bank-notes the monies and property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of James Judd.

JAMES JUDD. I am a two-penny post letter-carrier , between five and six o'clock, on the 5th of November, I was in Bell-lane, Spitalfields , which is my district. I had delivered my letters, and had received 10l. for them, consisting of eight of 1l. bank-notes and the rest in silver and copper, there were shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns among it. I was stopped by three men, one of them held my right arm down, while the prisoner robbed me of the money stated in the indictment. The notes were in my right hand breeches pocket, the silver in the left, and the copper in my left hand waistcoat pocket, which he tore in taking the copper out. The third man stood by; they were with me about five minutes; they then ran away. I gave information at the police office, and described the men. I saw the prisoner in custody at Lambeth-street, on the 21st, I knew him directly. I am sure the prisoner is the man, I picked him out immediately from several others. There was a good light at the place, from a factory lamp; it was by the lamp that I was robbed.

Prisoner. Was you intoxicated at the time? - A. No.

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer of Lambeth-street office. I took the prisoner into custody, on the 28th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, from the description that I received from Judd. I found him walking along Whitechapel. I told him that I wanted him for a robbery, and the next morning I took Judd to look at him, and then told him, that I wanted him for the robbery of the postman in Bell-lane, with two others; I did not tell him what day it was, he said, he knew nothing about it. Judd saw him when he was before the magistrate. This (producing a paper) is the examination before the magistrate I heard him state what has been taken down.(read.)

"Middlesex, Rex v. John Freeman . - Public Office,

Whitechapel, 19th of December, 1816.

The prisoner says, I have nothing to say. I was at home the whole of that day on which I am charged with the robbery. I did not go out from three to eight o'clock on the 8th of November.

Taken before me.

(Signed) DANIEL WILLIAMS .

Prisoner's Defence. The man came and looked at me, and said he did not know me. I have witnesses to prove that I was at home on that day.

JUDD. I never said, I did not know him; I knew him the moment I saw him.

MILLER. The prosecutor never said, he did not know him.

HANNAH CARR . I am in the silk line. I called upon Mrs. Elliot on the 5th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and waited there till eight o'clock in the evening. The prisoner lodges with her. I left him there when I left, he was not out of the house all the time that I was there. Mrs. Elliot lives at Dog-row, Whitechapel-road.

Cross-examined by MR. GURNEY. I live in Dukesbery-court, Whitechapel. The prisoner lives more than half a mile from Bell-lane. I did not go to inform the magistrate that he was at home on that day. I knew he was taken up, but it was three weeks after he was taken up, that I knew he was charged with doing any thing on the 5th of November. I do not know what day of the week the 5th of November was on. I had been to buy some linen and called on Mrs. Elliot, she was sitting by the fire reading, when I went in; the prisoner was nailing his shoes; the prisoner drank tea with us; I staid till eight o'clock Mrs. Elliot went to her needle-work after tea, another woman came in while I was there, and staid till four o'clock. She was Mrs. Elliot's acquaintance - I do not know her name. It was eight o'clock when I went away.

DIANNA ELLIOT. I live in the Dog-row; the prisoner has lodged six months with me; he is a rope-maker. He came in about half-past one o'clock, and nailed his shoes; it was a wet day; he was nearly all the afternoon nailing them. He drank tea with us. Mrs. Carr also drank tea with us; she came to my house about three o'clock. I see her almost every evening.

Q. What did you do while she was there - A. I was chiefly talking to her. and looking at her things: she went away about eight o'clock; the prisoner did not go out at all. I heard that he was taken up on the 29th. I do not know what day the 5th of November was, I only noticed it by its being wet.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. The prisoner lives at my house; I was cleaning my room when Mrs. Carr came up.

Q. Did any body come in while Carr was in the room - A. Mrs. Clayton came in with her; I knwo her by sight. The reason of her coming was because she was with Carr; we all three came home on Saturday together. Mrs. Clayton stopped at my house, drank tea with us, and went away with Carr. I had not been reading the whole of that day.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-87

235. PATRICK DOWNS and THOMAS WALTON were indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Stanton , on the 28th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one bank dollar, value 5s. 6d., and 10s. in monies numbered , the monies of the said Edward Stanton.

The same witnesses were called as on the former indictment (See No. 183), against the prisoners, and giving similar testimony, it being the same jury, they returned a verdict of

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18170115-88

236. JOHN IRVINE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Stubbs , on the King's highway, on the 29th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 6l.; one chain, value 2s.; one seal, value 1s.; and one key, value 6d. , his property.

THOMAS STUBBS . I live in Provost-street, City-road, and am a book-keeper ; on the 29th of December last, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was in Cross-street, Finsbury-square ; I and my wife were coming along, when the prisoner and another man came upon us forcibly. One of them seized my wife, the other came to me, put his body close to mine, and secnred both my arms, and very forcibly took out my watch. I have a stave in my fob to prevent my watch being taken out, but the violence of the jerk broke it; they both quitted us, and ran a few yards down the street, and returned again, both running past me. A cry of stop thief! was given, and they ran up Finsbury-place into the square; two young men pursued them, with the watchman, the prisoner was stopped on the south side of the square. They said nothing when they pinioned me; one laid hold of my wife while the other robbed me. He was taken to the watch-house. I had lost sight of him myself; but I am certain the prisoner is the man, I had an opportunity of seeing him: there are two gass lamps, one on each side of the street, I saw him plainly, and will swear to him; the whole transaction did not last ten minutes; he at first ran from me, and then passed me again. I am sure that the same persons who robbed me came back again. My watch, except the case, was found in the square.

Prisoner. Was you not in liquor - A. I had been drinking a little, but was not intoxicated.

Q. Did you see me before you saw me at the watchhouse - A. I believe he followed us from Broad-street, he spoke to us there; I lost him in Moorefields, and did not see him again until he came up to me.

ANN STUBBS . I am the wife of the last witness; we were coming home together on the 29th of December; just before we turned the corner of Crown-street, we were stopped by two men-the tallest took hold of me; I begged of them to go about their business, and not interrupt us. As soon as the tall man let go of me, I saw the watch go out of my husband's fob, and called out, they have got your watch; I turned towards them, they were making towards South-street, I cried out, thieves, you have got his watch! They turned round, came back again, and passed us at the corner of Cross-street, Finsbury-place: when they had got past Lackington's shop-door I heard the glass of the watch break, and called out, you are breaking his watch, thieves. I turned round, and saw the prisoner hold up his hands, and he said, I have got it (speaking to his companions). I pursued them, crying, stop thief! several people were gathered in the square, and I stood with my husband till they brought the prisoner up. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I am sure that the same men that ran down South-street came back again; I did not lose sight of them till they got into the crowd; my husband was not in liquor. When I saw the prisoner at the watch-house, I knew him to be the same man, he came up to us, and followed us, in Broad-street, about a quarter of an hour before; he said something to us, I do not know what, and Mr. Stubbs said, what does that fellow want? It was on the dark side of Broad-street, we crossed over to the other side, the lamps gave a good light at the time, quite sufficient for me to see him, so as to know him; I looked at him several times. I lost sight of him in Moorfields, but I am sure he is the man.

JOHN GARLAND . I am porter to a master-tailor. On the 29th of December, I was coming along Finsbury-place at the time, the prisoner was with another man, taller than himself; I saw them running from the prosecutor. I pursued the prisoner, with the watchman, till he was taken. I ran from Finsbury-square to the corner of Wilson-street, and from Wilson-street to Lackington's, where he was taken.

Q. Before they took that direction did you see them take any thing - A. No; I saw them run from the prosecutor to the place where the prisoner was taken; I did not see them come back again; I did not see them go towards South-street. I am sure that the prisoner is one of the men that I saw run from the prosecutor, he was not out of my sight of the whole of the time. I saw them run straight, from the prosecutor, down Wilson-street.

Prisoner. Where did you first see me - A. In Finsbury-place.

Q. Which way did I run - A. From Lackington's, round the corner into Wilson-street, which is the next street to Lackington's, and leads into Moorfields. When the prisoner was taken, he said he was not the thief, but that he was running after the thief. I am certain that he is one of the men that ran from the prosecutor; I did not lose sight of him the whole time till he was stopped. He had a silk handkerchief tied round his neck, which covered the lower part of his face. When the watchman said that he would take him to the lady and gentleman, to see if he was the man, he pulled off his black silk handkerchief, and put it into his hat; he had a white one on underneath, which made him appear quite different. He was taken to them, and the lady said he was the man.

JACOB PYE . I am a tailor; I saw the prisoner, with another man, taller than himself, run from Mr. and Mrs. Stubbs - I was passing by the corner of Finsbury-square. One of them said, "Let us take it and be off;" they then both ran across the square, as far as Wilson-street; the prisoner was then taken by the watchman. I did not lose sight of him until he was taken. I am sure that he is the man that I saw run from them.

WILLIAM FIELD . I am a watchman of Chiswell-street, Finsbury-square. On Sunday night, the 29th of December, at half-past ten o'clock, I was crying the hour; I had got to the end of the street which looks into the square, I heard a woman say, "You villian, you have got my husband's watch: I know you have, I heard you break the glass." She cried out "thieves! these two men have robbed my husband of his watch." I being on the opposite of the street, facing them, I saw a bustle by the gaslights; I ran across the road to the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner, in company with another man, run from Mr. Stubbs to the other side of the square, towards Sun-street. I sprung my rattle, and called out stop thief! I ran as fast as I could, and some persons passing at the time, held out their arms, and prevented the prisoner from getting any further; I came up and collared him. I said you are my prisoner, of whom the alarm was given; I will take you to the prosecutor to see if they will know you again. As soon as Mrs. Stubbs saw him, she said he was the man. When I told him I would take him to them, he took off his silk handkerchief, put it in his hat, and said,"Take me to them, they will not know me, I am not the man." I took him to the watch-house, and searched him, but found nothing on him. We found the watch on the pavement, the glass was broken, and the case gone, opposite Lackington's, in Finsbury-place.

Q. How was the handkerchief tied round his neck - A. It was round his neck quite up to his nose.

JOSEPH SHREWSBERY. I am a head boorough; I was on duty in Chiswell-street, about half-past twelve o'clock, on the 29th of December, I heard the cry of stop thief! I went to the place where the cry came from; when I came up the prisoner had been taken into custody by the watchman: I went to the watch-house with him, and searched the prisoner. I found a red handkerchief in his pocket, and some copper - He had nothing in his hat. Mrs. Stubbs knew him directly. I found the watch on the pavement, where he had been taken; I did not find the case.

Prisoner. When Stubbs came into the watch-house, did he not charge two or three persons with it - A.He said two men did it. I told him to look round to see if the other man was there, he said, no.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent; I had been spending the evening at my cousin's; I heard the alarm, and went to the lady to see what was the matter, she ran from me towards Cross-street - I followed her, a young man stopped me, and attempted to stop two or three more, Mr. Stubbs was intoxicated, and charged several men with the robbery; his wife said, she could not say I was the man.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-89

237. GEORGE YATES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Wilkins , on the King's highway, on the 8th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch-chain, value 1l.; two gold seals, value 2l. 15s., and one key, value 1s. , his property.

THOMAS WILKINS . I am a farmer , and live at Cambridge. On the 8th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was going up Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury , with my wife, the prisoner came up to us as thought he would walk over us; he struck me a violent blow on the breast with one hand, and with the other took my chain and seals; the violence of the blow broke the chain and saved my watch. It deprived me of my senses. As soon as I came to myself I gave information at Bow-street.

MARY WILKINS. I am the wife of the last witness; we were walking up Great Russell-street, about eight o'clock at night, I did not see the man till he came against us; I pushed him with my hand, thinking he was drunk; and my husband said, he has got my watch; I cried out stop thief! and ran after him down a dark street, I think, it was Holborn, I did not pursue him farther - I will not swear that the prisoner is the man; but I have no doubt of his being the man. When he was at Bow-street I picked him out from among several more.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN. I told the magistrate I could not swear to him. It was five days after when I went to Bow-street. He was not pointed out to me, but I went there under the idea of seeing the man who had robbed my husband.

Court. How many were by when you picked him out-A. I should suppose a dozen; my husband pointed out another, but I said the prisoner was the man.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer; about a quarter past eight o'clcok, on the 8th of January, I was crossing Long-acre, opposite Bow-street, I saw the prisoner, with four others, they were coming from Hanover-street, and passed me quickly, towards Drury-lane, and at half-past eight o'clcok Wilkins gave information at the office, describing the prisoner, and said there were three or four other with him at the time, I apprehended the prisoner the next day; he was committed till the Monday following; I told Wilkins to stand in the room, and that the prisoner should be in the office - I took him there with five or six more, when Mrs. Wilkins picked the prisoner out. He was not pointed out by any person.

Cross-examined. It was past eight o'clock. I should suppose that Russel-sreet is a quarter of a mile from Long-acre. The prisoner was taken the next day.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I went with Jefferson to apprehend the prisoner; we took him at the Horse and Groom, in Long-acre.

THOMAS WILKINS re-examined. When I came to my senses, there were four or five persons round me. I gave information at Bow-street, within ten minutes after the robbery; I pointed out a man, but found out my error.

MRS. WILKINS. They came upon us unobserved, after the watch was gone; I saw some men running; I thought they were pursuing the thief, they run towards St. Giles's.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-90

238. CHARLES PRESCOT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , two sheets, value 10s.; one gown, value 10s.; one coat, value 30s.; one waistcoat, value 10s.; and one pair of pantaloons, value 12s. the property of John Fitch , in the dwelling-house, of William Fitch .

JOHN FITCH. I live in Edgeware-road , William Fitch rents the house. The things were taken from my room, about five o'clock in the afternoon, of the 7th of December; the sheets, coat, waistcoat, and pantaloons, are mine; the gown is my mother's; they were taken from the second pair of stairs room.

GEORGE FLINT. I am a pawn-broker, and live in Edgeware-road, about two o'clcok in the afternoon, of the 7th of December; I saw the prisoner walking with two others, and watched them; I lost them, and when I got to Fitch's house; I saw the prisoner with one of the others, come down Mr. Fitch's steps with a bundle; I stopped the prisoner, and asked him, what he was going to do with it - He said, do you suppose I am a thief. I told him, I did - He said, he was going to take it to his uncle's. My nephew was with me, I gave the prisoner into his charge, while I went to the house to give information; the prisoner threw down the bundle, and resisted a great deal, and got away; I secured him again before he got out of my sight.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the bundle to carry.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of Stealing, to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-91

239. WILLIAM SMITH and GEORGE MASON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , four pair of shoes, value 28s., the goods of Edmund Sinclair , privately in his shop .

EDMUND SINCLAIR . I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Whitecross-street , about eight o'clock in the evening. On the 20th of December, the prisoner, Smith, came into my shop, and looked at several pair of shoes, none would suit him, he said, he would be measured for a pair; I measured him, he said, he had a brother outside the door, and that I should measure him, and he would fetch him in; we did not agree for any price. When the other prisoner came in, he said, perhaps I had got a pair that would fit him; he tried two or three pair on; then Mason said, he would be measured also; my back was turned from them to look for the shoes; the prisoner walked about the shop. When I had measured them, Smith said, I will be a pot of beer, and put his hands to his pocket for some money; I would not be treated by them; they left the shop, and I began to think all was not right; they were to call for the shoes, and both gave me the name of Smith to put on the measure; there was nobody else in the shop, while they were there. Mason had got an apron on, and by his manner of going out, and shutting the door after him; I suspected them, and followed them, and laid hold of Mason, about one hundred yards from the shop; they were talking together, and had another boy with them. Smith and the other boy ran off. Mason had got one pair of shoes in his apron. I lost four pair of shoes; I am sure the prisoners are the persons.

ABRAHAM HEMMINGWAY. I am an officer. I took charge of Mason; I asked him where the other lad was - He told me, that Smith lodged at his father's, at Shoreditch; I went there, and took him that evening; he was outside the door; he had a bundle with him, I asked him what it was - He said, it was shoes that he had been mending, and he was going to take them to a shop; I took him to the next door, I found in the bundle, three pair of new shoes, and one pair which had been mended; while I was examining the bundle, he made his escape down stairs, and ran away; I found him the next morning, at the prisoner, Mason's house. Mr. Sinclair claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. The property was picked up by Sinclair's door, and given to me. by Mason.

MASON'S Defence. I did not give them to him.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 18.

MASON - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-92

240. WILLIAM BOYS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , three pair of shoes, value 1l., the goods of John Johnston , privately in his shop .

JOHN JOHNSTON . I live at No. 10, Lower West-street ; I am a shoe-maker . About six o'clock in the evening, of the 3d of January, the prisoner was brought into my shop by the constable; who produced one pair of shoes, I had not seen him in the shop. I had missed three pair just before.

GEORGE CAINES. I live opposite the prosecutor; as I was coming out of my door, I saw the prisoner in the prosecutor's shop, taking the shoes out of his window, another person was on the outside; the prisoner came out, and went down the street; I followed him, and secured him; he threw a pair of shoes down; I gave him and the shoes to Barnett.

HYAM BARNETT. I am a constable. The prisoner and the shoes were delivered to me by Caines. Johnson denied taking them before I took him to prison, he said, he would make the prosecutor any recompence to forgive him.

(Property Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoners Defence. The man came up to me, and said, I had got the shoes, another man brought a pair of shoes; I am innocent. GUILTY-Aged. 20.

Of Stealing to the amount of 4s. 6d. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-93

241. MICHAEL LYONS was indicted for feloniously assaulting, Thomas Harlow , on the Kings highway, on the 14th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one umbrella, value 7s. , his property.

THOMAS HARLOW . I am a broker . and live at George-street, Shoreditch. On the 14th of August, I was going towards Bethnal-green; I first saw the prisoner at the

end of Hare-street; I saw the prisoner there, following me. When I came to the workhouse, in Hare-street - fields , a man, with a wooden leg accosted me; the prisoner was then behind me; I was near a public-house, the man came to me, and asked me, what I was looking at that man for (meaning the prisoner), he struck me, and I struck him with my umbrella; I called out, and about a dozen persons came from the public-house, and dragged me across the field, one of them struck me a violent blow, which stunned me, and made me bleed very much; my umbrella was gone. When I recovered, I found myself at the workhouse; the prisoner assisted them in taking my umbrella; I had not been looking at the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I had know the prisoner for five or six years. I struck him with the umbrella; my umbrella was found in the field.

WILLIAM FLINT. I am a headborough. I met the prisoner in the beginning of November; I was with Harlow, he said, the prisoner was the man who had robbed him.

MARIA GARDNER. I was at the poor-house at the time, it is in Hare-street - fields; I saw Mr. Harlow passing the poor house; I saw the prisoner with several more, striking him on his face - He was quite senseless; he was led into the poor-house, I led him in. I saw the prisoner take the umbrella from him, and throw it across the field; I picked it up, and brought it into the workhouse; they then went away, there was no cry of stop thief, or any alarm given; nor did any body pursue them, before they threw it away.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. There was nobody to hinder them from taking the umbrella away.

HARLOW re-examined. There was no attempt to rifle my pockets. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-94

242. BRIGHTON COTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one pocket-book, value 3s, the property of John Whale , from his person .

JOHN WHALE . I live in Harper-street, May-fair. I was in the Strand about ten o'clock, on the 28th of December; I felt my coat lifted up, I turned round, and missed my book; I laid hold of the prisoner; there were two men near him, I told him he had got it, the prisoner threw the book down, and my papers flew out; I saw no more of his companions. I let go of him topick my book up, and he ran away, but was stopped immediately; I am sure that he is the man.

JOHN COVERDALE. I am a solicitor's clerk. I was in the Strand, and saw the prisoner run across the street, and the pocket-book drop between the prisoner and prosecutor; I heard the cry of stop thief! he is the man that I saw run across the street; he was secured.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry and ran across.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-95

243. JOSEPH GUTTERIDGE , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Parker , about six o'clock on the night of the 4th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d.; three pound of sugar, value 2s.; one pound of tea, value 8s.; six pounds of beef, value 3s.; one pound of butter, value 1s. 6d.; and one pound of cheese, value 1s. , her property.

SARAH PARKER . I live in Brick-lane, St. Lukes . I keep a Chandler's shop . My street door was left open at six o'clock, on the morning of the 4th of December. I heard a noise in my shop about half past six o'clock, it was not day-light, it was rather light. I sleep in a room even with my shop. There is a gass-light facing the window. I saw the prisoner in the shop putting the tea in his bag. I went back for my key; when I returned he was gone. I found him on the step of the street-door with the bag in his hand. My lodgers left the door open; but I found the staple of my cellar door drawn, and the floor of my shop broken away; he must have broken through the floor to get in; it was forced up. I could not follow him, as I was not dressed. I called out stop thief. The prisoner had lodged at my house about seven months before. I saw him by the gass-light, which reflects into my shop. I described him to the officer, and told the officer his name. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were in my shop the evening before.

JOHN HUTT. I am an officer. Mrs. Parker described his person to me. I apprehended him on the 5th of December.

Of Stealing only . GUILTY. Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-96

244. JOHN LOFINGHAM , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 40 pounds of butter, value 1l. 10s.; the property of Thomas Rowe , privately in his shop .

HARRIET ROWE. I am the wife of Thomas Rowe , who keeps a Cheesemonger 's shop, in Lemon-street, Whitechapel . On the 2d of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in a room at the back of the shop-the door was open. I heard a noise in the shop; I went into the shop, and missed the butter. I did not see any body in the shop. I went to the door, and called out stop thief. The butter was in a lump near the window. Davis brought the prisoner and butter into the shop, about five minutes after.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in the shop taking the butter. Miller the officer, was coming by at the time, the prisoner dropped the butter.

Prisoner. Why did you not stop me when you saw me come out? - A. Because there was three more with you.

SAMUEL MILLER . I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the butter fall from the prisoner. The prisoner's jacket had some butter on it. GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of Stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-97

245. THOMAS BEARDON , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , one piece of printed cotton, value 1l. 5s.; the property of Thomas Craig , privately in his shop .

RICHARD HODGES. I am servant to Thomas Craig , who is a linen-draper , in Oxford-street . On the 10th of December, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner walking about the door with another man, I noticed him; they were looking at some goods inside the door, and talking to one another; there were several persons serving in the shop; I was the nearest to the door. I saw he was gone from the door, and a girl came in and gave the information. I did not see him take the cotton. I pursued him, his companion had left him. I saw him throw the cotton out of his apron into an area; as soon as I came out of the door. I followed him into Soho-square, and took him. I did not lose sight of him.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am a constable. The prisoner, and the cotton, were delivered to me by Hodges. The cotton was dirty.

JULIA JELKS . I live in Adam and Eve court. I was sitting at my mother's stall, which is opposite the shop, and saw the prisoner and another man standing under the door. The prisoner took the cotton up and put it in his apron, and went away. I went in and told the men. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Stealing only . Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-98

246. WILLIAM COOKE , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , one mare, value 50l. the property of William Dester .

WILLIAM DESTER . I am a farmer , and live in Leicester . On the 12th of October, my mare was taken out of my stable. I saw her again the 22d of November, in London. My stable door was broke open.

JOHN EVANS. I am a stable-keeper and let out horses. On the 15th of October, the prisoner brought the mare to my stable to sell. The prisoner said, that he had known the mare ever since it was two years old. I knew Palmer very well; he brought him with him. I gave him 34l. for it. I sold it again for 35 guinease. I shewed Mr. Dester the same mare that I bought of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Cooke is my nephew. Palmer was a stranger to me, he cannot be found. A man will not buy a horse of a stranger, without somebody warranting it. The prisoner is a stay-maker.

WILLIAM CLAY. I am an officer. I went with the prisoner to apprehend Palmer; he took me to several places, we could not hear any thing of him.

Cross-examined. He did not take me to any place where I could even hear of Palmer.

Prisoner's Defence. Palmer called on me with the mare, and said he wanted to sell her, he said it was his own colt. I knew him, and went with him. About a fortnight after, I found it had been stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-99

247. JAMES HARRIS , junior, EDWARD JAMES WILLIS , JOHN PETTIT , and HARRIET ANN LUP-TON , were indicted for buglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wilkinson , the elder, about twelve on the night of the 13th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three 10l. bank-notes; one 40l. bank-note; and twenty 1l. bank-notes, the property of Thomas Wilkinson, the elder, Thomas Wilkinson , the younger, John White , and Richard Perry ; and thirty-eight 1l. bank-notes, the property of John Perry ; and JAMES HARRIS , the elder, was indicted as an accessary, before and after the fact.

SECOND COUNT against the principals, for stealing the said bank-notes, the property of the said Thomas Wilkinson, the elder, Thomas Wilkinson , the younger, John White , and Richard Perry , and like bank-notes the property of the said John Perry.

TWO OTHER COUNTS against James Harris , the elder, as accessary before and after the said last mentioned felony.

JOHN PERRY. I am clerk to Messrs. Wilkinson and Co. Mr. Wilkinson's house is in Moorfields ; the dwelling-house of Mr. Wilkinson, senior, is part of the premises and under the same roof. The prisoner, Harris, senior, is a sofa-frame maker , and lives in Sash-court, Wilson-street. The back of his house comes against our warehouse; his windows look into a yard at the back of his house, and our store-room window looks into that yard; it is only a glass casement. On the morning of the 14th of December, about half-past seven o'clock, I came to Mr. Wilknson's house, it was just getting day-light. I got in through Mr. Wilkinson's dwelling-house. I was the last in the place the day before; I locked all up at eight o'clock. When I got in, I observed a quantity of papers about, which was not there the night before. I found the papers had been taken from my pocket-book, which I had locked up in the desk the night before, and took the key with me. I missed six 10l. notes, four of which were endorsed; one 40l. note; one 30l. note; and six 1l. notes; the 30l. and 40l. note was my property, the rest belonged to the firm. The whole of the desks, six in all, were broken open. The counting-house was only fastened with a latch. I examined the premises, and found a door that comes out of the lumber-room, which I had bolted the night before, open; the lumber-room is under the same roof as Mr. Wilkinson's dwelling-house. There was nothing to impede the progress of the men from the store-room to the door; after getting through that door, they might go to the counting-house without interruption; they would have to pass a door with a spring or pully before they got to the counting-house. If a person had entered the store-room window and took the direction I have described, he could not pass through any premises, but Mr. Wilkinson's; they are not under the same roof all the way along. The store-room is under Mr. Wilkinson's roof; the manufactory is on the same floor; there is nothing over them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Is the counting-house part of the dwelling-house, or not? - A. It is distinct, it is no part of the dwelling-house. We lost about 150l. It is impossible to say. which way the persons came. I do not know whether Mr. Wilkinson's rent is paid out of the partnership account or not.

Court. If a person wanted to go to the counting-house after you left it, they must go through the door which you locked? - A. They must.

THOMAS WILKINSON, junior. My father lives in the dwelling-house, in Moorfields. The store-room window looks into Harris's, senior, yard, it is on the first-floor; the store-room leads into the workshop, they are both under the same roof. The store-room and workshop are not under the dwelling-house; the lumber-room is part of the dwelling-house, there is a door out of the lumber-room into a passage and into the warehouse, you can go into the counting-house through that door; the lumber-room is under the dwelling-house, but detached from it by a partition and door, which is nailed up; there was no communication through that door.

Q. Can you go from the lumber-room to the dwelling-house, without going from under the roof? - A. No, you must go under another roof, and come again under the dwelling-house.

Q. Do you consider the whole continuation of the dwelling to be more than one roof - A. Yes; two roofs; the firm pay for the whole of the premises, and charge my father with the rent of his dwelling-house.

WILLIAM WARD . I am servant to Messrs. Wilkinson. Mr. Thomas Wilkinson 's dwelling-house is by itself, it joins the manufactory; there is a window in the back-room, it was fastened by small bars, which held the leadlight in. The window was quite safe the night before; it was broken the next morning, part was inside and part out. I could not see how they could get in but by the window, I got through it myself, any body could get through it-the bar was bent round; a person could stand on the privy, and get in at this window from the prisoner's, Harris, yard. I found a candle, which had been lit, and a mallet, in the room near the window.

THOMAS GRAVES. I am a watchman, my beat is near Moorfields. On the night that Messrs. Wilkinson and Co. were robbed, I saw the prisoner, Harris, jun., at the Punch Bowl public-house, which is about two hundred yards from Messrs. Wilkinson and Co's. house. harris, sen. lives in Sash-court. The four prisoners, after that came out of the public-house into Broker-row, and went up Wilson-street; Sash-court is in Wilson-street. They then went round and came up the street again, and stood a little while at the end of Sash-court, and went down the court. I followed them, they went into Harris, sen.'s house; this was about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock. I first saw them at eleven o'clock-Mitchel was with them.

SARAH BLACK. On the 12th of December I lived in Sash-court, in Harris, sen.'s house, the other prisoners used to be backward and forward at his house-Lupton is his daughter. I was at work on the 13th of December, I did not see them on that day. I went to bed at a little after nine o'clock. Harris keeps the two pair of stairs front room, my room is on the ground floor; at a little after twelve o'clock I was awoke by a rustling noise, it proceeded from the passage, close to my door. I heard a voice say, "d-n you, Jem, do not run, were are all safe." It was a voice which I knew, but I do not know whether it was a female voice or not; they went by twice, talking to one another, they shut the yard-door, and soon after I heard the rattling of some glass, as if it was breaking; I did not get up, as I had been used to hear noises. A person could get to Wilkinson's window by getting on the top of the privy. Sash-court is no thoroughfare.

Court. How do you know the particular night - A. I heard the words, which made me notice it.

SARAH COLLIS . My husband keeps the Punch Bowl public-house. On the night of the 13th of December, the prisoners, Harris, jun., Willis, Lupton and Pettit, were at my house, and left it just before eleven o'clock.

THOMAS COLLIS . I am the landlord of the Punch Bowl public-house. On the 13th of December, the prisoners Willis, Lupton, Pettit and Harris, jun., were at my house. Between ten and eleven o'clock a woman came to the door, and asked for Willis-it was Mary Mitchel .

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I will not swear it was her.

MARY MITCHEL . In December last I lived with Harriet Lupton , the prisoner, Willis, also lived with her; I used to chair for her, I know Pettit, and both the Harris's. On the night of the 13th of December, I was at my father's, I went to the Punch Bowl at half-past eleven o'clock, I went to see Edward Willis, Collis opened the door to me; the prisoners Harris, juu., Lupton, Pettit, and Willis, came out together, I asked Willis if he was going home, he said that he was not, and that I should not go home with him; I walked along Broker-row with them into Wilson-street - they were all together; I then asked Willis for two pair of shoes which he had got of mine, he said I might take them in the morning; I had left them in Mrs. Aliff's room, who lodges in Harris's house. He had never refused my going to Harris's house before. The other prisoners were at home at the time. Lupton said that I should go home with her that night. I went and slept at my father's. I left the prisoner at the corner of Horseshoe-alley, Wilson-street, it is the next court to Sashcourt, not twenty yards from it. As we were standing at the corner of Horse-shoe-alley the watchman came up to us; I went away, and saw no more of them that night. I saw them on the Saturday morning at Harris's house, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went to Aliff's room to get my shoes; I saw Lupton the same afternoon in Chiswell-street, she was alone, I met her as I was going to my father's; I told her that I had been to her father's and got my shoes from Aliff's room; I asked her if she was going home, and she said she was going to look for somebody. The prisoner, Willis, came to my father's house on Sunday morning, he told me that Lupton wanted to speak to me; I went with him to Red Lion-market, and found Lupton there, she asked me to go and buy her a second-hand gown-Lupton and Willis went with me, we had some breakfast at a coffee-shop in Barbican; she bought a second-hand gown in Field-lane, and paid for it with two three-shilling pieces, I saw she had got a great deal of money; I then came back to Barbican with her, Willis left us at the coffee-shop, I went home - She said Willis had got the money. On the Sunday afternoon she sent to my father's for me again, and I found her waiting at the top of my father's court for me; she asked me if she might stop at my father's house till nine o'clock, when Willis and Harris would call for her, she waited there, and they called for her at nine o'clock, they had supper-my father was in the room while we were at supper; when he was gone I heard Willis and Harris talking about Wilkinson's robbery, they said they had got 140l. from Mr. Wilkinson's, and if they had had a drag (meaning a cart),

which they had got now, they would have taken the iron chest; they said, they had given 15 guineas for the horse, and 5l. for the cart; I heard them say, that they got into Mr. Wilkinson's house, by the back part of Mr. Harris's house; they said, that they had lost 40l. in changing the notes; they only received 100l. for the 140l., and that they told Pettit, that they got 20l. less than they did, and that they had shared 120l. among Willis and Harris, jun.; I was in the room at supper; they went away together, about eleven o'clock; I saw Lupton one day afterwards at Mrs. Collis's, it was either Monday or Tuesday; I know that Willis and Lupton were very short of money before the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I was Lupton's chairwoman. I never lived with either of the men; she and Willis cohabited together; they had no money to pay me my wages; on my oath I never cohabited with either of the men; I never quarrelled with Lupton about Harris.

Q. Did you not quarrel with Lupton for taking Willis away with you A. I never did.

Q. How came you to ask the man to let you go home with him, when you was living with your father - A. They had said, that I was to go home with them. I never said that I would be revenged on Lupton, for taking my sweet-heart. I heard them talking of the robbery; I did not come here for the reward; I have not seen Johnston, since Lupton lived at New-terrace; I never said that I would be revenged on Harris, if I swore away his life.

Re-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I have not seen Johnston since the prisoners have been taken up; I have no malice, towards either Lupton or Willis; I do live with a young man; I asked Harris, if I should go home with him, because Lupton had said that I should live with her, and should never leave her. Johnston is a prostitute; I have never been on the town.

Examined by the Court. I told Mr. Wilkinson what I had heard about a week after, I did not like to tell him before.

Q. Why did you not tell of the robbery, when you first heard of it - A. Nobody heard of it but me, Mr. Wilkinson was the first person that I told about it.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a hackney-coach keeper. I sold a horse and cart for 15l., to Willis, I believe he is the man; It was the Friday before Christmas-day, there was a young man with him; I saw Willis riding it afterwards, and a young woman with him.

WILLIAM GOUGH. I am a broker, and live in Golden-lane, the prisoner, Willis, took a lodging of me a few days before Christmas-day; Lupton came with him, and remained there; they stopped till Christmas-eve; the prisoner, Harris, used to come and see them. When Willis took the lodging, he said, he had just come from the country, and they were to pay 6s., per week; they staid five days with me; after they left the lodging, I examined my bed, I found it very much broken, and terribly torn, so that any thing might be put into it. When he first came, he had a whip with him, and seemed quite a dasher; I took them without a character.

JOSEPH ARMSTRONG. I am a police officer. I went with Gleed and Turner, to look for the prisoners; I knew them all by sight, and by name, but Pettit. I went to the Punch Bowl, Queen-square, Moorfields, and found the prisoner, Lupton there, we staid a few minutes, and Willis, and Harris, jun., came up; Willis had a whip in his hand; Gleed said, here is Willis, and he, and Turner laid hold of him, and I said, here is Harris; he ran away, I run after him, and told him, that he had better stop, and he did; as soon as I took him, I told him, I took him for Wilkinsons' robbery; I took him to the Punch Bowl; Gleed and Turner had got Willis in the tap-room; in entering to the bar, six or seven men came by me, who I knew to be reputed thieves; the prisoner, Harris said, d-n your eyes, Joseph, I am no thief, leave go, or I will hit away. We found a knife on both of them; I told them, I took them for Wilkinsons' robbery, they immediately said, I am d-d if there is a man in the room; I went out to look for the horse and cart, which was in Moorfields, about one hundred yards off, when I got there, it was gone; I took them to the office; a few days ago, I apprehended Pettit, I had been to his house for him, but he did not come home all night; he came to me, and said, I understand you want me, and I am come to deliver myself up to you, if you have got any thing against me; I told him, that he was concerned in Wilkinsons' robbery, with Harris and Lupton-he said, he knew nothing about it; I told him, that he was at the Punch Bowl with them - He said, he had left them at ten o'clock, and never saw them any more that night.

BARNARD GLEED. I apprehended Willis; the last witness has spoken correctly.

HARRIS, JUNIOR'S Defence. I was at the Punch Bowl that night; I left it about ten o'clock, and went to bed.

WILLIS'S Defence. I am innocent. Mitchel has said, she would be revenged on me, I have witnesses to prove it.

PETTIT'S Defence. I went to bed at ten o'clock that night.

SUSAN THOMPSON . I am a mantua-maker. I know Mitchel; she has cohabited with Harris, and vows vengeance against him for leaving her. (This witness also gave testimony, to prove her a prostitute.)

SARAH JOHNSTON. Was also called for the same purpose, and Thomas Van , the officer, gave similar testimony against both Thompson and Johnson.

Jury to COLLIS. Did you see Pettit with them - A. I saw them all three go down into the house.

HARRIS, jun. - GUILTY. Aged 20.

WILLIS - GUILTY. Aged 22.

PETTIT - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

LUPTON- NOT GUILTY .

HARRIS, sen. - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-100

248. WILLIAM TYSON and JOHN WHITE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one piece of floor-cloth, value 3l. the property of John Hare , in the dwelling-house of George Sargon .

JOHN TITTERSON. I am a clerk to Messrs. Hares, who keep a shop in Little Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn , Mr. Sargon lives in the house. On the 21st of December, about half past one o'clock in the afternoon, I observed the two prisoners, looking very earnestly in the shop;

I watched them; they passed the shop two or three times singly, soon after they both came together, and stood in front of the shop; the prisoner, White, said to Tyson, he is there, he is there; Tyson untied the piece of cloth, and dragged it over the front of the shop, which is about three feet high; he put it on his shoulder; it was within the shop, I ran out, and overtook Tyson with it, about six yards from the shop; he threw it down, and ran away; the prisoner, White, was standing by at the time; I told a person to secure him, while I ran after Tyson; I pursued, and overtook him; I never lost sight of him.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am a constable. On the 21st of December, I heard the cry of stop thief, the prisoner, White, was given into my charge by Titterton.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TYSON'S Defence. If he had seen us, would he not have taken us before we took the property. White came to me, and said, he would have the cloth, and I told him not to take it - He said, he would, and took it, and ran away.

WHITE'S Defence. I never saw Tyson.

EDWARDS. When I took White, he would not own Tyson; but soon afterwards, he called him by his name.

TYSON - GUILTY. Aged 18.

WHITE - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-101

249. JAMES HATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , two hundred and seventeen pieces of silk-handkerchiefs, value 200l., the property of John Howard , in a certain ship in the Port of London, being a port of entry and discharge ; and MICHAEL MURRAY , for that he, before the felony aforesaid was committed, on the same day, did feloniously and maliciously incite, move, procure, aid, and abet the said James Hatton, to commit the felony aforesaid .

CAPTAIN JOHN HOWARD . I was commander of the Duke of Wellington, East Indiaman, we arrived in the Docks about the middle of July last. On the 20th of July, we began to discharge our cargo, part of which consisted of bandana silk-handkerchiefs; on the second day, we found a chest of bandanas had been broken open. The 21st was Sunday, and on the 22nd we did not work. There were three or four pieces of bandanas remaining in the chest, which were rather damaged by the sea water.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I received information, which made me examine to see if I lost any thing. I had seen the things safe on the night of the 20th; I cannot say, that I had seen the chest before; I cannot swear that it contained bandanas, it was marked bandanas, and had three or four pieces remaining; I have not the least doubt, but that it contained bandanas.

EZEKIEL BARTLET. I am an officer of the customs; the Duke of Wellington got into Dock, in the month of July, and commenced her delivery on Saturday the 20th, she did not work on the 21st or 22nd. On Tuesday, the 23rd, I was called into the hold by Mr. Warry, who is foreman to the company; he gave me a piece of bandanas which he had found. Soon after the broken chest of bandanas, was brought on dock; there was one side of it raised sufficient to put your fingers in, it appeared to have been plundered; I immediately sent for the superior officer, who examined it. We found it had been robbed, and had only two pieces of bandanas in it, they were damaged; I found some bags of ginger, and temaric in the chest; these things are not usual to be packed in chests.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The cargo consisted of indigo and other things; the chest was not marked bandanas; they were reported to be bandanas; I do not know what it contained, but from the Company's books, nobody could tell by looking at the outside there were bandanas in it.

CAPTAIN JOHN HOWARD re-examined. I have been in the East India Trade ten years, and have never known temaric, or ginger, to be packed with bandanas.

JOHN WARRY. I am superintendant to the East India Dock Company. On the 23rd of July, I was in the main hatchway of the Duke of Wellington, about eight o'clock in the morning, I found one piece of bandanas loose, it excited my suspicion; I soon after found another piece between decks, I looked further, and found the chest; I had it hoisted upon deck, there was a corner of it loose; I thought it might have been done by accident; I found eight or nine small bags of ginger and termaric in it, and two pieces of damaged bandanas; these things are never packed with bandanas; I believe the chest had been broken open; the cargo consisted of ginger and other things, some of the ginger was loose, and some in bags.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I cannot say, whether the chest was broken in her voyage, or at home; the bulk is not broken, till the ship comes into Dock; at sea, the hatchways are barred down, and the crew are turned out of the ship before they are broken.

THOMAS CURTIS. I have known the prisoner, Hatton, twelve years. I have not much knowledge of Murray. On Sunday morning, the 21st of July, Giddons and Hatton came to me; they told me, that they had seen the man belonging to the Docks, who had told them, that there was some bandanas on board the Wellington, which they might easily get at. Hatton then lived at Rotherithe; they saw me at my house, No. 1. Marine Crescent, Bermondsey; I agreed to go with them, on the Sunday evening, to get the handkerchiefs from the Wellington; they told me, that they had got a ladder, which was hid in a potatoe-field, near Bromley Hall-field, which was in the way from the Commercial-road, to Bromley; there is a way from the field, to the East India Docks, by going across the marshes. We went to the field, and took the ladder; Giddons and Hatton were both with me, we got over the wall with the ladder, and then drew it over into the docks, got down the wall on the other side, with the ladder; we then went round to the south-side, where the Wellington lay; we all went into her, and rose the hatchway-bars by a rivet of wood; we went down below, and struck a light; we had a tinderbox and matches with us; we found the wooden case of handkerchiefs, we took them out, and put them in our bags; we cut the cords of the case, and opened it; it was only tied with cords; we easily lifted the head up took out the handkerchiefs, and put them in three bags;

we put some gummy bags, and some ginger bags into the case, which were laying in the hold near the case; we brought the handkerchiefs upon deck, replaced the hatch bars, and came to the ladder; Hatton got over first, and carried the bags up, and Giddons lowered them down to him on the other side; we pulled the ladder up, and got down on the other side; we could get across the marshes with the ladder, by laying it across the ditches; we returned the ladder to the potatoe-field; Giddons's wife was at the bottom of Cut-throat-lane, with a cart and horse; we expected to meet her there, it was about a quarter of mile from the Docks. John Gardner, her son, was with her, we put the three bags into the cart; she and her son went across the water, to wait till the cart came round; we three came over London Bridge with the cart, to my house; we found them there; we then lotted the bandanas out into three parcels, they were damaged with, I think, sea-water, there were two hundred and seven pieces in all; we each had sixty-nine pieces; I sold my parcel to a man of the name of Gates. On the Thursday or Friday following, I met Murray at the half-way-house, at the George, Hatton and Giddons were with me at the time; I had never seen Murray before. Hatton gave him 3l., Giddons 3l., and I gave him 4l.; I gave Murray the money myself, nothing was said about what it was for. In the month of September, I saw Murray, at the Green Dragon, at Stepney; I went there, expecting to see him. Giddons and Hatton were both there at the time; there was some conversation about the Wellington-he, Murray, told us, there was a watchman in the Docks now, and that there had been a piece of work, about the robbery of the Duke of Wellington, and that he would let us know, when the watchman was taken off; I gave him 1l. more than the rest, because they had bought the ladder.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I am in custody now in the House of Correction. I have been a thief for five years. Murray was a stranger to me, before this. Giddons and Hatton, both said, the ladder had been hid in the field. I struck the light and helped to take the things out. Hatton held the bag; it was a coarse wrapper bag that I had; each carried his own bag. I do not think the chest was nailed down. I have been admitted as evidence against Giddons and others.

JOHN GIDDONS. I have known the prisoner, Murray, six years, he was working in the East India Docks in July last. I have known Hatton ten years, he resided at Black-wall. We met about going to see if there was any watch in the docks. We bought a ladder in Mile-end-road together, it was in July - I do not know the day of the month, it was on a Saturday; we gave 1l. for it; we were to give 1l. 1s., but they trusted us a shilling. I do not know the name of the man whom we bought the ladder of; when we got the ladder at night, we went directly to the docks. Hatton and I went by ourselves, it was on a Saturday night, we did nothing there that night; when we came out we put the ladder in the potatoe-field just by Bromley-hall-field. The next morning I and Hatton went to Curtis's house, and told him, we had been to the East India Docks, and that if he would go, there was two bales of bandanas down the hatchway; Murray had told us that the Wellington was in the Docks, and that it had two bales of bandanas in the main-hatchway; he was a labourer in the Docks. We agreed to go in the evening. We went and got the ladder out of the field about ten o'clock at night. We went through the marshes to the Dock-wall. We got over the ditches by the ladder. When we got to the wall, we laid along the bank till all was quiet. We then got over, pulled the ladder over, and got down on the other side; we went round to the ship,(Murray had told me where she lay). We got some hand-spikes and glutted the hatchway and went down. We found the case of bandanas; took them out and put them into three bags. We filled the case full of ginger bags, put the hatchway back again, and got out of the ship, and over the wall; we put the ladder in the field again, and took the things to Cut-throat-lane, and put them into the cart. My wife and son were waiting there with the cart; I told them to come there. I sent them across the river and drove the cart round. I overtook Hatton in the Commercial-road; we went home together. We took the bandanas to Curtis' house. We had about seventy pieces for each ones's share, they were very much damaged with sea water, some were quite rotten. My wife sold some of them to Walker of Deptford - I took them to him myself. I met Murray again, at the latter end of the month, at the half-way-house, in the Commercial-road-Curtis and Hatton were there; Murray came to be paid for the handkerchiefs we got out of the Dock. Hatton and I gave him 3l. each-Curtis gave him 4l., making 10l. in all; Curtis gave him 4l. because we had bought the ladder. After we had robbed the ship, when we were laying the ladder in the field, the man who belonged to the field, asked us what we were doing to his crop; Curtis was with us at the time. We had put the ladder down and were looking for it, to see if it was safe.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. When we met on on the Sunday morning, nothing was said about the cart. It was dark when we got into the ship, we had a tinderbox and dark lanthorn. Curtis was my partner in thieving. My wife went with me to sell Walker the handkerchiefs - I did not sell them all to him; my wife received the money.

Court. When you was before the magistrate, did you have one of those handkerchiefs round your neck - A. I did, it was one that was taken from the ship.

JOHN GARDNER . I am Sarah Giddons's son, and John Giddons's son-in-law. In July last, about one or two o'clock in the morning, I and my mother went with the cart to Cut-throat-lane; we met Giddons, Curtis, and Hatton there. I am sure Hatton was with them; they came to us in the cart. They brought something in bags with them, what they contained I do not know; they put them into the cart, and my mother and I came home across the river.

SARAH GIDDONS . I am the wife of John Giddons. I went with the cart; the cart got home before us. I carried the handkerchiefs to Walker, it might be fifty pieces; I went to him by myself, and he paid me for them; the rest were sold. My husband did not sell any of them, nor did he go with me to Walker's; they were some other handkerchiefs that he took to Walker.

JOSEPH BOWERS. I am a ladder-maker, and live in Mile-end-road, about the first mile stone; it is measured

from the church. In the month of July last, I sold a ladder to a man, who said his name was Hatton - I think the prisoner, Hatton, is the man. He said, he bought it for Thomas Brookes , and that a team would call for it in the afternoon; the team did not call, he came for it himself, with another man.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I took particular notice of him.

Q. If you had been asked to describe him, should you have been able - A. I should have said, he was a stout comely man, if I had seen him among fifty. I think I should know his face. I should not know the other man. I have had no conversation with Curtis, nor have I heard a word that has been said. I saw the prisoner arraigned, I knew him before that; the other man came at night.

Court. What did they give you for the ladder - A. The agreement was for 1l. 1s. but when they came for it, they gave me 1l. and I took it.

THOMAS ASHBY . I am a labourer. I worked for Mr. Mann, who is a farmer. Last summer I was mowing the weeds out of the potatoe-field and found a ladder; it did not belong to my master. I took it away, and sold it afterwards.

Cross-examined. Was it July, as near as you can tell - A. The weeds want cutting down about that time; the road parts our field from Bromley-hall-field.

MR. MANN. I am a farmer at Bromley. I have a field near Bromley-hall field, the road parts it. In July last, I remember two men coming across my field - I asked them what business they had there. I rather think, that the prisoner, Hatton, was one of them - I think I should know the other if I saw him. I think that is the man,(pointing out Giddons from amongst several more) I think it is his voice.

Cross-examined. Can you swear to either of them - A. By no means. I only say, that I think they were the men. I rode a great way with them. Giddons spoke very sharply to me, his saying so much, makes me think I should know him better than the other; it was day-light. Giddons has remarkable features.

CAPTAIN JOHN HOWARD re-examined. The property was under my care as owner of the ship.

Cross-examined. The moment the ship enters the Dock, she is reported, and considered under the care of the Dock Company. The officer comes on board before we break bulk; she is considered in the hands of the Dock Company. I am still commander of the ship, but I consider the cargo under the direction of the Company, and myself not responsible.

JOHN PURTON. I was foreman to the Dock Company. Murray was employed under me the whole of July.

GILMORE. I am an officer. I produce a handkerchief which I took off Giddons's neck, when he was under examination; it is sea damaged. I went to Walker's and found some handkerchiefs which correspond with the one on Giddons's neck. (I produce them.)

Cross-examined. If the damage had been done by aqua-fortis, they would be yellow.

JOSEPH HARDING. I am an officer. I apprehended Murray, at the Docks. I went to his house and found some silk handkerchiefs there - They were not damaged.

Hatton's Defence. They have committed depredations themselves which I know nothing about.

Court to GARDNER. How do you get your bread. - A. I sell wood to the shops.

CAPTAIN HOWARD. The things are worth 200l.

HATTON- GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 45.

MURRAY- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-102

250. WILLIAM DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one peck and a half of wheat, value 3s. , the property of William Cooke .

JOHN HOLDING. I am bailiff to Mr. Cooke, of Enfield . On the 17th of December last, the prisoner was employed to thresh wheat in the barn. I went into the barn-yard about two o'clock, he wanted me to go and fetch a broom, I went, and left him with another man, when I came back the prisoner came into the barn with a basket in his hand; I suspected he had got some wheat in it, he began to clean out the barn, I stood in the barn for an hour and a half, and then told him it was time to leave; he wanted me to take some wheat out of the barn, to get me away; he then took hold of his basket to carry it away - I saw it was full; he had got outside the barn, I stopped him; he said that he had got nothing in it - I took the basket from him, and he went away, I found a peck and a half of wheat in it. He lived at Enfield, he left his home for a fortnight; I was present when he was taken; as he was going before the magistrate, he said that he was very sorry that he had taken it.

ROBERT SMITH . I apprehended the prisoner, he said he was sorry for what he had done.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-103

251. MARY WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two coats, value 1l.; one suit of boys clothes, value 16s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 2s.; one pair of breeches, value 2s.; one waistcoat, value 1s. 6d.; three gowns, value 2l.; one night-cap, value 6d.; one bed-gown, value 6d.; two sheets, value 4s.; and one petticoat, value 2s. 6d., the property of Arthur Essen , in his dwelling-house .

ARTHUR ESSEN. I am a watchman ; I live in Miles's-court, Type-street , and keep the house. On the 17th of January, as I and my wife were at dinner, between one and two o'clock, we heard somebody coming down stairs; we had no lodgers. I sent my daughter to see who it was, and heard her speak to the prisoner. I went out and saw the prisoner just inside the door with a bundle packed up in her own gown, I examined it, and it contained the articles enumerated in the indictment - They were all taken out of the two pair of stairs room; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me. The street - door is always open.

FRANCES ESSEN. I am the daughter of the last witness.

I saw the prisoner go out of our door, and I stopped her; my father came and took the bundle from her.

STEPHEN DACE. I am a constable; the prisoner and bundle were given into my charge; when I searched her she had not got a farthing about her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of Stealing only, to the value of 39s.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Six Months , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-104

252. PETER DENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one coat, value 7s.; two pair of breeches, value 7s.; one waistcoat, value 2s.; four shirts, value 2l.; three pair of stockings, value 1s.; one quilt, value 5s.; and one handkerchief, value 6d., the property of Thomas Jones , in the dwelling-house of Archibald Ellis .

The prosecutor's name being Janes, and the indictment stating it to be Jones,

The prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-105

253. ELIZABETH LEONARD and MARY LEO-NARD were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , one bed, value 3l.; one sheet, value 3s.; one blanket, value 4s.; one counterpane, value 5s.; three pillows, value 10s.; one carpet, value 1l.; two bed-gowns, value 2s.; and two bonnets, value 3s., the property of Charles Warlters , in the dwelling-house of George Bromage ; and HENRY ABRAHAMS , for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

CHARLES WARLTERS. I lodge in John-street, New-road , in George Bromage 's house, in the front room on the first floor; I left my room safe on the 5th of January, I returned on the 10th, and found the articles stated in the indictment gone. The prisoner Elizabeth Leonard's father brought the bonnets to me - I have not seen any more of my property. Mary Leonard lodged in the same house, in the next room to me.

CHARLOTTE WARLTERS. I am the wife of the last witness. I saw my bonnets in Mary Leonard 's possession, I knew them to be mine.

GEORGE BROMAGE . I am the landlord of the house; on the 9th of January, the day before Warlters came home, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner Leonard's mother came down to me; I went up and found Warlters's apartment broken open, the lock had been picked, and the bed and other things gone. I told Barrett of it. The next day I saw Warlters, he took Mary Leonard. On Saturday evening the prisoner, Elizabeth Leonard came to my house, and I apprehended her; I let her go, on condition of her coming to me early on Monday morning, and she came with her father, who brought the bonnets.

WILLIAM BARRETT. I lodge with Mr. Bromage; the day before Warlters came home I saw the prisoner, Elizabeth Leonard, and a man named Cromby, at the street - door, about five o'clock, they went in, and I saw no more of them.

JOHN CROMBY. I went with Elizabeth Leonard to her apartments between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, Mary Leonard was at home, she opened Warlters's door with the key of her own door, Elizabeth Leonard was in her mother's room, and could see what was going on; I knew what we were going to do. Mary Leonard packed up the things, and I tied the sheet round the bed and pillows, and she told me to carry them to the prisoner Abraham's house. I saw two bonnets in Warlters's room. Abrahams bought the things, I did not tell him how I came by them, he gave me 10s. for the whole - We spent the money. I saw Elizabeth Leonard with the bonnets on the Friday after.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner, Mary Leonard, at her mother's, the key of her door opened the prosecutor's apartment; there was a hole bored through the wainscot in the room, which looked into his room. I found the things at Abrahams's house, he keeps an old iron shop.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-106

254. JOHN MOORE was indicted, for that he about seven in the night of the 17th of January , being in the dwelling-house of Ann Graham and Mark Graham , did steal therein one gown, value 30s.; two cloaks, value 7s.; two handkerchiefs, value 4s.; one set of bed furniture, value 15s.; one counterpane, value 2s.; and one pair of stockings, value 1s., the property of the said Ann Graham ; and one coat, value 20s.; two pair of pantaloons, value 2s.; and one pair of trowsers, value 3s., the property of Mark Graham ; and having committed the said felony, about seven in the night of the same day, burglariously did break and get out of the said dwelling-house .

ANN GRAHAM. I live at No. 24, Fort-street, Old Artillery-ground , Mark Graham has part of my business - He is not my husband's executor. I have had no fresh agreement with my landlord since my husband's death, it is only an agreement among ourselves. I am a weaver, the prisoner worked for me, and on the 17th of January I lost the articles stated in the indictment out of my bed-room - He worked just by the bed-room, they were safe an hour before; the prisoner left my house a little before seven o'clock in the evening, he had only been at work one hour; there was work for him all day if he had come to do it.

MARK GRAHAM. I am in business with my mother; my things were taken from the room above where the prisoner worked. I have seen them since at Mr. Sowerby's

WILLIAM SOWERBY. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. On the 17th of January a coat was pledged at my shop, and on the 18th I took in a counterpane, it was pawned by a woman in the name of Davis; Graham claimed them.

JAMES GRAHAM. I am the son of Mrs. Graham. On the 17th of January, while my mother was at tea, I let the prisoner in, he went up stairs into the workshop.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On Friday, the 20th of January, I stopped the prisoner, at eleven o'clock in the morning, in White Horse-lane, Mile-end, he had a bag with him; I told him that I was an officer, and asked him what was in the bag; he said, he was my prisoner, and surrendered. The bag contained the skirt of a gown,

one cloak, one sheet, and two pair of pantaloons, Mr. and Mrs. Graham afterwards claimed them. He said that he had stolen them, and begged me to let him go. I found the duplicate of a coat, pledged on the 17th of January at Sowerby's, on him, I went there and found the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the bag up two or three doors from my master's house, and got a young woman to pledge them. GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of Stealing only .

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-107

255. WILLIAM TODD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Gillham , abour four in the night of the 20th of January , with intent to steal .

GEORGE GILLHAM . I keep a chandler's-shop in White-horse-lane, Stepney , it is a dwelling-house, I keep it myself, and have lived there about half a year. On the 20th of January I fastened the house myself, my family consists of my wife, two children, and a maid servant; I went to bed at eleven o'clock, the house was broken open between four and five o'clock in the morning, the cellar shutter was forced and broken in two pieces-it is a flap outside the door. The watchman alarmed us between four and five o'clock, I got up, came down, and found the shutters broken, and the prisoner in the cellar, laying on the coals, I told the watchman that he was there, and he took him into custody; I asked him how he came there, he said that he was a poor man out of work, a cabinet-maker by trade, and that he only came down into the cellar for a night's lodging. I asked him how he came to break the door? he said that he did not know that he had done any harm. I took him to the watchhouse, and gave him in charge to the constable. On our return we searched the cellar, and found a chisel, nothing else; we found a brad-all on him at the watch-house.

WILLIAM HARROW. I am a watchman of Stepney parish; I was passing the house about three o'clock, on morning of the 20th of January, and observed a little piece of the door broken, but it was fast then; I came round again at four o'clock, and found it broken open - I alarmed Mr. Gillham; he came down into the cellar. I had called out to him at the window, that his flap was broken open, and asked him if he knew it. He told me to wait till he came down. I never saw the prisoner about; I only call the hours, we do not call the half-hours, but we keep walking round-mine is a long beat. I did not see any body break it open, I found the man in the cellar; the chisel was found underneath the prisoner, where he was laying. The door was split open, The door which leads from the cellar had a mark in it which fitted the chisel.

Prisoner. Did you not say at the office, that you found the door partly broken - A. I found a little nob off - I say so now.

GEORGE GILLHAM. The door which leads from the cellar was locked. I compared the chisel with the mark, it appeared as if an attempt had been made to break it open.

JOHN SURIER. I am the constable of the night. Gillham brought the prisoner into the watch-house at a little before five o'clock. I took him in charge, searched him, and found a brad-all on him and a key.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the key of my lodgings. I was shut out of my lodgings. The flap appeared to be loose and I opened it, and went to sleep there for the night. GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy on account of Distress .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-108

256. WILLIAM KNIGHT , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Wontner on the King's highway, on the 11th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, three gowns, value 15s.; two table cloths, value 16s.; and four pinafores, value 4s. , the property of John Glazier .

JAMES WONTNER. I am a harness-maker , and live in Cumberland-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the 11th of January, I was taking a bundle to John-street , I put it under my son's arm and left him, I had not got above thirty yards before he called out, that a man had pushed him down and taken his bundle; it was Mr. Glazier's property.

CHARLES WONTNER . My father and I went out at eight o'clock, my father left me at half-past eight, I had the bundle, and knocked at Mr. Glazier's door, where I was to leave it. A man knocked me down and took the bundle away from me. The prisoner is the man, I am sure of it, he threw the bundle away in the court; and ran down John-street into Goodge-street. The watchman took him.

JOHN GLAZIER. There was a knock at my door, I went up, the boy had fell down, and I saw a man run off with the bundle.

ELIZA PARKER. I saw a man take the bundle from under the boy's arm, and run down John-street; I think the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM HIGGINS. I heard the alarm and saw the prisoner running, and tried to stop him, but he over-powered me and got past; I am sure the prisoner is the man-it is a bye street.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON. I am a watchman. I heard the alarm and saw a man run by me, he ran up Goodge-street, I pursued him, he dodged me through the coach-stand; I took him at the bottom of Cumberland-street, he was in a crowd, I knew him by his dress.

ELIZA BESSITER. I keep a coal-shed in Colwell-court. I picked the bundle up in the court, at a little after eight o'clock in the evening.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running to keep myself warm. I saw a man running who was dressed like me. The watchman did not know me at first.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-109

257. MORDICA SOLOMONS , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , in the dwelling-house of Evan Jones , one till, value 3s.; twelve pence, in monies numbered; and two 1l. bank-notes , his property.

EVAN JONES . I am a grocer . I live in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields . I lost my till and money, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening of the 23d of December.

RICHARD WARD . I live next door to Mr. Jones; my father keeps a coal-shed. I saw the prisoner run down Corbett's-court, with something under his arm. I did not see where he brought it from, nor do I know what it was. I am not sure the prisoner is the person.

FREDERICK TRUEWILLIAM . I am a cabinet-maker. I found the till (producing it,) at the back of the chapel. I kicked against it as I was going down Corbett's-court. I asked the last witness whose it was, and he gave me a description of the prisoner, and told me his name and his dress, and said that he had been lurking about the door for some time. When I took the prisoner his companion ran away. I found them at the sign of the City of Canterbury, in Mile-end. Ward swore to his being the person he had seen go into the court.

WARD re-examined. I believe he is the man - I did not tell his name.

TRUEWILLIAM re-examined. He told me that he was the man, and that he went by the name of Smouchey, and I found him by that name. He said that he had seen him skulking about the door, about a quarter of an hour before he brought the till up the court. He said, that he knew the prisoner, that he ran down the court with the till under his arm. He said, that he had blue pantaloons and a blue coat on, and ragged shoes; and that his name was Smouchey. I took Ward to the watch-house the next morning, and shewed the prisoner to him, and he said he was the same person, and began crying.

WARD re-examined. Did you see the prisoner that night, or not - A. I did, between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Did you say you had seen him walking backwards and forwards several times - A. Yes, I said that I saw him go down the court; I said he had something under his arm, either a box or a till, and that he had blue pantaloons on.

Q. How came you to say, you did not know what was under his arm - A. I told his name.

Q. How came you to say you did not know his name - A. I think he is the same person.

EVAN JONES. He told me that the prisoner was a playfellow of his, and that he was afraid of the rest of the gang. He ran away one day, and would not come to Hicks's Hall.

Q. to WARD. Are you afraid of the gang, that you do not give evidence? - A. I am.

THOMAS MAHON . I met the patrol, who said he had picked up the till. Ward described the prisoner in a very accurate manner; and the patrol said, that he knew the man by the description he had received. I went with him and took the prisoner; and Ward said he was afraid of the gang; Mr. Jones said, that he would protect him, and he then said, the prisoner was the person.

JONES, the patrol, brought the till to my house. Ward said he knew the prisoner. There was 2l. and some silver and copper in the till, my door was not shut.

Q. to WARD. Is the prisoner the person, or not - A. He is the person. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-110

258. CATHARINE MANNING , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , one ring, value 4s., the property of Robert Duncan , from his person .

ROBERT DUNCAN. I live in King-street, Golden-square. On the 5th of January, I was walking along Oxford-road , about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was standing at the corner of Bond-street, with several other girls, she caught hold of my arm as I passed, and said, young man where are you going? if you do not take care you will lose your ring, and pulled it off my fingers; I took hold of her and gave her to the watchman. She struck me very violently several times. I did not find my ring again. I am sure she is the girl that took it.

THOMAS MURRAY . I am a watchman. At half-past nine o'clock, the last witness called watch, I went to him, and found him struggling with the prisoner, and said, give me my ring; he gave her in charge She abused him very much. It snowed very fast; if the ring had dropped it would have been covered.

Prisoner's Defence. He laid hold of me, and said he wanted to speak to me, I would not have any thing to say to him; he then said, I had taken his ring.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-111

259. SAMUEL BOWEN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Hall , about three in the night of the 24th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twentyfive watches, value 90l.; thirty-three seals, value 32l.; six chains, value 6l.; two broaches, value 2l.; one suit of ornaments, value 20l.; four hundred and sixty-one spoons, value 60l.; three ladles, value 1l.; four pair of sugar-tongs, value 1l.; one butter knife, value 1l.; one pair of asparagus tongs, value 1l.; forty-six forks, value 20l.; six skewers, value 1l.; one cork-screw, value 1s.; six silver boxes, value 1l. , the property of the said James Hall.

JAMES HALL. I am a pawnbroker , and reside in High-street, Marylebone-street . I carry on my business in the same house. On the night of the 24th of December, I was out till rather more than half-past two o'clock in the morning. On my return home my servant let me in, I fastened the door myself, I fastened the private door, the shop street - door was fastened before I went out, but the door which leads out of the passage into the shop was not fast. My apprentice sleeps in the shop, I sleep in the two pair of stairs front room. On going up stairs. I found the windows shut and the shutters fastened, the one pair of stairs back window was shut down when I went out at half-past eleven o'clock, but I do not know whether the shutters were shut or not. I went to bed and was called up about eight o'clock the next morning, and told that I had been robbed. I went into the shop and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, some of them were from my pledge stock and some from my sale stock. I published a bill from Bow-street and sent it round to the trades-people. I saw my property in the custody of Foy and Jeffries at Malborough-street, on Monday last, I knew it to be mine, it was in my possession the night I left the shop. On looking at my house the next morning, I found an entry had been made through the one pair of stairs back window, there was a pane of glass broke in the window - I believe it was shut down when I first saw it; a pane of glass was also broken in my back parlour, and an attempt made to force the shutters. The sash fastening had been pressed against the shutters, which made an impression

that had not been there before; the outside of the window appeared as if a lighted candle had been put on the frame which had burnt it, there was also a match on the window frame. I have seen the prisoner frequently before, I believe he has been to my shop. North-street is within one hundred yards of my house.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. All your property has been found - A. The greatest part of it.

JOHN BEARDS . I am Mr. Hall's apprentice, and live in his house, I slept in the shop. On the 24th of December, I went to bed at a little before two o'clock; I awoke about a quarter before six o'clock, and seeing a light, I rose up in my bed and looked forward, but saw nothing at first, I looked in the front and saw a candle and the crown of a hat on a level with the counter, there was a quantity of jewelery and watches near the counter, it was the sale stock; the pledges were neariy level with the side of my bed, in some drawers, there was two doors before them, the drawers contained jewelery, &c., there was spoons in both stocks. I turned a little more round and stretched a little more out of bed, and saw a man, who I at first thought was Mr. Hall, I said to him, 'Ah, who is that?' the man made no answer but turned round, and I thought put the candle out, I could not see it any more, I heard no more at that moment, but in a minute or two, I heard one step and the sash-window slide along, it is made to slide along, and the jewelery is behind it, it is the glass-window or case which incloses the things, I heard it slide back; soon after I heard the things tingle and something drop, which proved afterwards to be a miniature, I heard paper rustle at different parts of the shop, some of the pledged stock was inclosed in papers, I said nothing more, I did not cry out; I heard a man's shoes creak as if he was going out of the shop into the parlour, just as it was getting light I heard the private street door go, it leads into Paradise-street, all this from first to last might be about one hour and a quarter, it was just beginning to get light when I heard the door swing. In the morning I found some papers about the shop. My master got up about an hour afterwards. Soon after they went I rose up and thought I heard a noise among the boxes, I was alarmed and remained in bed for some time, I suspected it was thieves; I only saw one man. I found a miniature and a snuff-box on the floor, and some other things on the counter, there was also some duplicates which had been pinned on pledges, they were thrown about the shop.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. Last Monday morning, I had occasion to go to the prisoner's lodging - I saw him there. He lives at No. 21, North-street, Marylebone, it is near Paradise-street. I found some property there which was claimed by Mr. Hall. I found it in a trunk of the prisoner's which is here. I had taken him into custody before I found them, I found a watch in the prisoner's pocket, which Mr. Hall claimed as his property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a watch-maker by trade and was in business for myself. I have dealt wtth Mr. Hall. I bought the things in question.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-112

260. JOHN MACMAHON and THOMAS CHADA-WAY were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , one great coat, value 30s. , the property of William Cooke , Esq.

ROBERT ASHDOWN . I am Mr. Cooke's footman, he lived in Nottingham place, Marylebone . I lost my great coat between ten and two o'clock in the day, of the 13th of January.

ROBERT FREEMAN . I live in Welbeck-street. On the 13th of December, at twelve o'clock, I was passing up Nottingham-street. I saw the prisoner, Macmahon, go down the area steps of Mr. Cooke's house, and returned in about three minutes, with a bundle before him; he came up, and gave it to Chadaway; I pursued them into the New-road, and from thence into Northumberland-street, calling stop thief. Chadaway threw the coat down, and I took him, and afterwards took Macmahon.

ROBERT FLOWERDEW . I am beadle of Marylebone. I was standing at the workhouse door, and saw the two prisoners come along the street, the last witness called out stop thief, and Chadaway threw the bundle down, and I picked it up.

(Property Produced and sworn to.)

MACMAHON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CHADAWAY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-113

261. PATRICK DUNFRECE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house, of Richard Barton , about seven o'clock, in the night of the 6th of December , with intent to steal .

RICHARD BARTON . I live at Stroud-green, near Wilsdon, Middlesex . I farm a little. On the 16th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I sent my son into the garden to get some water, it was dark; he called out shut the door, for here is a man; my wife bolted the door; I heard my son outside, begging for his life; I went to the back-door; I heard a man halloo to open the door; he fired a gun, which made a hole through the door; I heard somebody say, go it while your blood is warm; I told my wife, that we should all be murdered; I heard two or three voices outside. My wife then cried out murder; our house stands by itself, there is not another within half a mile of it; they fired a blunderbuss at the window, which knocked the casement right out; I saw one man at the window, he fired a pistol at me, the ball grazed my arm; I ran into the bed-room, which is on the ground floor, and pushed against the door to prevent them firing in, it was wrenched off its hinges with an iron crow, the bed-room door is inside, they must have been in the house to do it; there was one man with a blunderbuss, and another with an iron crow in the front room; I had the poker in my hand; they told me, if I did not give it up, they would blow my brains out; my wife had put our child out of the window, to run for assistance; they were going to tie my hands, but there was an alarm out of doors; I sprung out, the man called out shoot, but they did not fire; I saw my daughter at the top of the field, by the light of the moon; the men had gone out; they did not take any thing with them; the prisoner is the man that shot at me

with the pistol; I saw his features as plain as could be, I am positive of it; I never saw him before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I work for Mr. Franklin. I was afraid to live in the neighbourhood after this occurred, I have lived at Wilsdon; I saw three men, I struck the prisoner with a poker, when he put the pistol in at the window; I did not complain to the magistrate, at Wilsdon; two persons came to my assistance.

Q. When you went to the magistrate, did you not complain of an assault - A. I was not used to the business. I told the magistrate how I was served, and he issued out a warrant; the shots made a hole in the door, Foy saw it; when I saw my son, his hands were tied, the prisoner was taken up two days after; we found two balls had lodged in a basket of clothes; I saw the prisoner in Queen-square, he was paving. I pointed him out myself.

WILLIAM BARTON. I am the son. On the night of the 16th of December, between seven and eight o'clock, my father sent me out for some water, the pond is about twenty yards from the house; my mother takes in washing. When I got out, the prisoner rushed up to me with a blunderbuss, and said, if you do not open the door, I will shoot you, he presented the blunderbuss at me; I am sure he is the man; it was quite moon-light; he was the only man that I saw then. I called out for my mother to fasten the door; two more men then came up, and spoke in Irish; the prisoner said to them, if they do not open the door, let us shoot him; the prisoner told me to open the door, or he would blow my brains out; I told him it was fast; the prisoner snapped the blunderbuss at me twice, but it did not go off; he then hit me with the but end of it, over my head, I was insensible for some time, when I recovered, I found my hands and legs were tied, and 1s. 41/2d. had been taken out of my pocket. I am positive that the prisoner is one of the men. When they went into the house, they untied my legs and brought me in, but kept my hands bound; they forced the bed room door open with a crow, my mother and father were there; somebody whistled, and they left the house, the neighbours then came to our assistance; I went to the justice the next morning, with my father. I was with my father, when the prisoner was taken in Queen-square, we were both sure of his being the man, and knew him the instant we saw him, it was a very light night.

Cross-examined. I saw the prisoner in Queen-square first, the officer was with us. I did not see my sister come in; I do not know who tied my hands; they began to tie my father's hands; the prisoner struck me with the blunderbuss, and he knocked my eye (here the witness shewed to the Jury a scar over his eye), which still remains. We went to Queen-square, to look for the prisoner, we did not see him the first time. Howard went with us before, he said, that he knew another man who he suspected; I knew nothing about any reward.

THOMAS HOWARD . At the time that this happened, I lived at Wilsdon. I never was with Barton at Hampstead when I heard of the attack, on the next day, I went with Barton to look after a man, whom he suspected, he was not the prisoner.

Cross-examined. I went to look for another man, whom he suspected. I had seen that man in Queen-square; I left Wilsdon to lodge with Barton. I know nothing about a reward.

Court. Did you see Barton's house - A. Yes, the bedroom door was broken down, and the wash-house doorappeared to me to have been shot through; I saw Barton's arm, it had bled.

THOMAS MACINTOSH. I am an officer, of Marlborough-street. I went to Queen-square with an assault warrant, to apprehend the prisoner; I do not know, what name was in the warrant; I come here at the desire of the prisoner's solicitor.

Q. Was the prisoner's name in the warrant or not - A. It was, he answered to the name that was in it; I found him in Queen-square, Barton and his son was with me at the time, and pointed him out to me; he surrendered himself quietly; the magistrate admitted him to bail.

FOY. Barton, and his Son, came to Mr. Baker's office; he said, that six or eight persons had surrounded his house, and had endeavoured to assassinate them; he said, one of them had tied his son's hands and legs, and at last the person went away. I was sent to examine the house, and found it had been injured in several parts, the windows broken in, and one of the doors were forced off the hinges, another door had a hole in it, but it did not appear to have been done with a shot. Barton did not appear to be hurt.

Jury. What was your opinion of the house - A. I reported it to Mr. Baker, the magistrate, that I thought it was a fabrication, I did not find the bullet - They gave me some bullets.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, which I will prove. I shall prove that I was not there, I was at a public-house in Berwick-street, Soho, on the night until eleven o'clock. I was apprehended for an assault, and the magistrate admitted me to bail; I attended at Hicks's-hall, and to my surprise, I found an indictment against me for a capital charge; I have now surrendered to take my trial.

JAMES HOWARD . I live in Salisbury-place, New-road; I am a pavior. On the 6th of December, the prisoner was at work for me, until five o'clock in the afternoon, which was the time to leave, the days were short; he was bailed for a common assault.

THOMAS BARACLOUGH . I keep the Black Lion public-house, in Berwick-street, Soho. On the night of the 6th of December last, the prisoner was at my house from six to eleven o'clock in the evening, another man was with him; he was not out of the house five minutes all the time.

Court. What makes you remember the particular night - A. It was four nights from the 2d of December, when the riots were, he was at my house five nights running from that day.

Q. How came you to remember six nights from that time - A. I thought it strange he should be so constant, he was not in the habit of doing so; he has used my house for one year. I am sure he was there on that day; I told the magistrate so within eight days after, the reason that I remember his being at my house on that night, was, he ran 2s. 6d. in credit, and has not yet paid me, the other man had used my house for six months; I have known

prisoner fifteen months, his 2s. 6d. is still on my slate.

WILLIAM NUGENT. I am in Mr. Howard's employ. I was with the prisoner on the 6th of December, at Baraclough's, from a little after five to eleven o'clock at night.

Q. How do you know that it was on the 6th of December - A. It was the day of the riots at Spa-fields, that is the day I mean to speak of, it was the very same day, I mean to speak of no other day, than the day of the riots; we do not owe the landlord any thing, we paid for what we had.

ANN COCHRANE. I am servant to Mr. Baraclough; he has kept the Black Lion for eight or nine weeks. I lived there before he came, the prisoner frequented the house; I saw him there on the night of the riots, that is the day that I come to speak about, Nugent was with him, they staid till eleven o'clock, they paid for every thing they had.

Q. When was you desired to come here - A. Yesterday; I was told the riots were on the 6th of December, I heard Nugent say so. I am sure that the day I am come to speak of, was the day of the riots, for I went to the door and saw the people shutting up, and they said it was because of the riots. I have not seen the prisoner at our house since the riots; the prisoner was not a customer at our house before Baraclough came, which is eight or nine weeks ago.

Jury to BARTON, jun. What kind of buttons were on the man's coat - A. I did not notice.

BARTON, sen. I did not notice.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-114

262. PATRICK DUNFRECE was again indicted for feloniously assaulting, William Barton on the King's highway, on the 6th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will 1s. 41/2d., his property .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-115

263. LEWIS LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , four veils, value 1l., the goods of Richard Yates , from the person of Celia Brown .

ELIZA YATES. I am the wife of Richard Yates , we live in Lincoln's-inn-fields. On the 7th of January, towards the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked for some veils, for his mother to shew to a lady; I knew his mother, but not knowing him, I refused to give them to him, and told him, that I would send Celia Brown with them; I packed up four lace veils, they were worth 4l. cost price; I delivered them to the prisoner, and he gave them back to Brown, desiring her to carry them, they both left the house; Brown went to bring back the money or the veils.

CELIA BROWN . I am in Mrs. Yates's employ. On the 7th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, she sent me with the prisoner, and some veils, I had them in my hands, when we went out of the shop; he first took me to Wild-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields, and said that his sisters lived there, and I was to set there while he shewed the lady the veils, he went up and said, he would fetch a candle to light me up stairs, he returned and said they were not at home, and asked me to accompany him to the place where he was to sell them. I said I would, he took me to the corner of Long-Acre, and said he was going to take them into a house; I saw the house would not be a proper place for me to go into, and said I would wait outside, and he promised to return in a few minutes, I gave him the veils in Wild-street, I waited near an hour without seeing him, I went to the house in Wild-street, and found his sisters there, who told me where I was likely to find him, a person took me to Phoenix-alley, I waited there for him, but he did not come, and I went home. He had come out of that house and went in again, but I did not know him as he had changed his dress. I saw him at Bow-street the same evening, in the dress which he put on after he took the veils; I knew him again.

WILLIAM BAKER . I found the prisoner at a Public-house in Bow-street. I asked him what he had done with the veils, and sent for an officer; he said, he knew nothing about the veils. The officer secured him.

THOMAS JONES . I am an officer. I secured the prisoner, and found a duplicate of four veils, pledged in the name of Joseph Lawrence , at Macbeth's, I got it from him with difficulty.

ALEXANDER MACBETH . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged the veils with me between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a bill to make up, and pledged the veils, and intended to take them out the next day.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-116

264. JOHN BRIDGEN , CHARLES ROSS , and HENRY GIBBONS , were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , six live tame rabbits, value 1l. , the property of John Bloom .

JOHN BLOOM. I live at Purim-place, Bethnall-green . On the 7th of January, my rabbits were in my shed behind my house, the gates were shut, they are six feet high, there was a silver-grey doe among them, which I had bought of Baxter. About half-past ten o'clock in the evening, Baxter came to my house and shewed me all my rabbits.

MARY BAXTER . I am the wife of Richard Baxter , we live in Brick-lane, and deal in rabbits. On the evening of the 7th of January, about eight o'clock, the prisoner, Bridgen, brought six rabbits to our house to sell, my husband was not at home, he left them, and said he would call again.

RICHARD BAXTER , senior. I am the husband of the last witness. The rabbits were left at my house on the 7th of January. The prisoner, Bridgen, came and another with him, and wanted 12s. for them. I found a silver-grey doe among them, which I knew had been mine. I told them that I had sold it, but they said they had bred it

themselves; they said that they lived at Purim-place, Dog-row, and that the rabbits were there own, and that I might go home with them to see the hutches, if I would buy them. I gave them 8s. and told them I would pay them the rest when they brought the hutches. I sent my son to look at the hutches, when he came back I looked more distinctly at the rabbits in consequence of what he said, and remembered selling the silver doe to Mr. Bloom. I shewed them all to him and he claimed them.

RICHARD BAXTER, jun. My father sent me with Bridgen, and another boy, to look at the hutches, when we got to Church-street, they said they would not sell them, as they were going to keep more rabbits; and they sent me back again.

WILLIAM FISHWICK . I set up at Mr. Bloom's to watch the premises; I saw Bridgen come from the premises with another boy, they had forced the back gate open; it was about half-past one o'clock in the morning. I apprehended him, and found a chisel, a phosphorus-box, and matches on him, while I was taking him before the magistrate, he said that there were six of the party, and gave me their names, he said that two were on the look out and four went in, and that he had taken the rabbits. I afterwards took Ross, Gibbons.

JAMES ARGENT . On the evening of the 1st of January, about six o'clock, I saw the three prisoners and some others in the Dog-row, they were standing opposite Mr. Bloom's gate talking about getting the rabbits, it was two others who were talking about it, the three prisoners were at the gate, it was fast; Bridgen got over, and the two other prisoners waited outside, Bridgen opened the gate and let them in, I waited on the outside, and looked in at the gate; Bridgen said, if I did not get away he would knock me down, they brought a bag out with something in it; Bridgen and Leonard went across the fields to Brick-lane, they came back in about an hour and brought 6s. with them.

BRIDGEN. Did you not go and take the rabbits - A. I did not.

BRIDGEN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROSS- NOT GUILTY .

GIBBONS- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-117

265. WILLIAM MARTIN , was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one watch, value 5l.; one chain, value 2l.; two seals, value 1l.; and one watch-key, value 5s., the property of James Whiffing Paulin , from his person .

JAMES WHIFFING PAULIN . I am an auctioneer , and live at Ratcliff. On the 16th of December, about twelve o'clock at night, I was called out to protect the property at a fire in Wapping, I had my watch, chain, and seals about me, they are worth 9l., I looked at my watch once or twice, I was there about two hours, I was standing at the corner of the street, and felt my watch drawn from my fob, I made a snatch at the hand that was taking it, and caught the prisoner by the sleeve, I did not see the watch in his hand, I accused him of it, and he made no reply, I heard it rattle on the ground, it fell at his feet, I picked it up, I laid hold of him by the collar, he resisted, I struck him on the head and he called out to his companions, saying,

"Will you let me be taken in this way?" one of them said to me, let him go, it was not him; I knew that man to be a bad character. I took the prisoner with much difficulty and gave him to the watchman.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. My attention was directed to the fire, I had about twenty-five round me, my back was against the wall; I did not observe the prisoner till I took hold of his hand, the watch fell immediately I took hold of his arms, it fell at his feet; he stood next to me.

Court. From the position in which the arm was when you seized it, could there be any other arm to convey away the property, but the one you seized - A. I have not the least doubt of it, the hand was directly before my fob.

GEORGE OLNEY. I am a patrol. I took the prisoner in charge; he denied the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman took hold of a sailor, and he got away; the gentleman then took hold of my arm and gave me into custody.

PAULIN. I did not take any body but the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-118

266. MICHAEL SPREWEN , was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one coat, value 5s.; one waistcoat, value 3s.; one hat, value 10s.; and one shirt, value 2s. , the property of Patrick Bird .

It being proved that the property did not belong to Patrick Bird , but to his lodgers, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-119

267. THOMAS JOHNSTON , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , six pound of pork, value 4s. , the property of Edmund Rouch .

WILLIAM ROUCH. I am the son of Edmund Rouch , who is a Cheesemonger in Tottenham-court-road . On the 7th of December, about half-past nine in the evening, I was in the shop, and heard somebody say, "Rouch," I looked at the door, and saw a man strike another who had got hold of the prisoner. Holmes brought the prisoner to the shop, he had the pork in his hand.

JOSEPH HOLMES . I live in Oxford-street. I saw the prisoner drawing the pork out of the shop, a man stood by looking at him; I took hold of him, the man said, let him go, let him have it, he struck me and knocked me down, I kept hold of the prisoner, the man ran away; the prisoner dropped the pork.

JAMES MAHONY. I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-120

268. ROBERT HUNT , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , one pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of William Clapp .

WILLIAM CLAPP. I am a shoemaker , and live at Huntington-street, Hoxton . On the morning of the 11th of December, I was down stairs at breakfast, I heard my door-latch open, I ran up and a neighbour pointed to a

boy, and said he had run off with a pair of shoes, I run out, the people said he had run up Red Lion-street; I saw the prisoner running, I got over a wall into a yard, I found him there and took him, the shoes were in the next yard to where I found him; as I was bringing him back I met Collins, who said in the prisone's presence, that he saw him open the door, and go into the shop.

JOHM COLLINS. I live opposite to Clapp. I was at my window, I saw the prisoner go into the shop, and come out again with something under his arm; I told Clapp and he went after him. I am sure the prisoner is the boy, that I saw go into the shop, he waited at the door before he went in talking to some boys, one of the boys went and pointed his finger at the shop window when the prisoner was in.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-121

269. WILLIAM DAVIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one silver tea-spoon, value 2s. , the property of George Button .

MARY HANNON . I am shopwoman to Mr. Button, who lives in Middle-row, Holborn , he is a pastry-cook . The prisoner came to our shop on Saturday evening about six o'clock, I served him with some jelly and gave him a silver spoon to eat it with, when he had done eating it, he sat the glass down with a pewter spoon in it, the silver spoon was gone, we have no pewter spoons in the house, he put sixpence on the counter for the jelly, I run round the counter, I had observed the spoon was changed, I took him by the collar and would not let him go out; I held him till the constable, who was passing, came in, I saw him drop the silver spoon in the window at the time the constable took him.

Q. by Prisoner. Did I attempt to go out-A. You had turned yourself round and was going out, you dropped the spoon among the mince-pies,

ROBERT CLARKE . I am a constable. I was coming by at the time, I heard a noise and saw Hannon collar the prisoner, he was just under the door, I went in and said that I was an officer, she took the spoon out of the pastry, it might easily be dropped there, and said he had stolen it, I took him into the back room, and saw him move his left hand, and I picked this pewter spoon(producing it), off the fire; I found 5s. 6d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not attempt to leave the shop with any property, nor was any found on me.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-122

270. GEORGE WESTLEY and JAMES FRY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one hair-broom, value 3s. , the property of George Rathbone .

GEORGE RATHBONE. I am a turner , and live in Witch-street, Drury-lane . I was at ten in my parlour, which looks into my shop, I saw a broom move that stood inside the door, I went into the shop and found it was gone; I went to the door, and saw two persons walking on my right hand - I followed them, Westley was one of them - He was about twenty yards from the door; I heard the broom fall, and a man said, Westley, what have you done with the broom? I laid hold of Westley, and picked the broom up by the Olympic Theatre: I did not see them with it. The man went away, and Westley denied taking it; I told him I should take him to Bow-street, but he wanted me to take him to his father's. Fry was taken up afterwards. The prisoner, Fry, came to my shop that evening, and said that Westley was his brother; I thought he was the person whom I had seen with the boy, when he said he was not, but he had heard the boy was taken. Westley said that he had stolen the broom by the direction of a man, I believe Fry to be the man, he was dressed like him.

ROBERT CLARKE. On the 7th of December, I went out to look for Westley by his father's desire, he was brought to the watch-house for stealing the broom. I went to look after the man, I found him and took him before the magistrate; I told him that I took him for stealing the broom, and he said it was a very pretty business.

FRY'S Defence. I never knew the boy. Rathbone said he knew the boy when he came to me.

GEORGE WESTLEY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

JAMES FRY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-123

271. DANIEL RODGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , ten pieces of printed cotton, value 10l., and four pieces of gingham, value 1l. 10s. , the property of Robert Pool and William Pool .

WILLIAM POOL. I am a linen-draper , and live in Great Marylebone-street ; on the 14th of December, about one o'clock in the day, I was up stairs, my brother called me down, and told me some property had been taken, the property had been chained to a chair, the chair and all was taken. I went out and found the chair lying in the street, broke, and the goods gone.

WILLIAM FROUD. I am a shoemaker; I was standing in my shop, in Chesterfield-street, and saw the prisoner go by my window, he had the prints under his arm; he went about two steps and turned back, my passage door was open, he went into the passage, and was there about ten minutes. I did not go to look for him, as I thought he was going to take the things up stairs to a woman who lives in my house. One of my lodgers asked if the prints were for sale; I got up and saw the prisoner tying the prints up in bundles in my passage; he offered one of my lodgers one piece of print if she would give him a handkerchief to tie them up in, she said she had not got one; he pushed the door to, the constable came to the door, and asked for the prisoner. He told one of my lodgers that he had had a dreadful fall, and that they must not be alarmed at his coming in - I heard him. The constable took him.

WILLIAM STORR . I am a constable; I was informed of the robbery, I went to the house of the last witness and found the prisoner there, behind the door, with the prints

packed up in three separate parcels; the last witness said that the prisoner brought them in. I took him to the watch-house. We found the label of the prints in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prints were above two yards from the door, and not appearing to belong to any person, I took them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-124

272. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , two cushions, value 20s. , the property of William Macneil .

WILLIAM LEWIS. I am foreman to Mr. Macneil, who lives in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital; I was in the counting-house, on the afternoon of the 19th of December, about three o'clock, and saw something go between the carriages, in the front of the shop; I went to the front of the shop, and saw the prisoner with the two cushions under his arm - They were taken out of a landau; he threw them at me, and I secured him. He said he was only looking to see the inside of the carriage, and that I had better let him go, as I was only giving myself trouble, for I could not do any thing with him, as he had not got into the street. I had him secured.

THOMAS MACINTOSH . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to look for work; I took the cushions out to look how the carriage was finished.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-125

273. MARY FINCHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 22d December , one watch, value 1l., the property of Charles Cane , from his person .

CHARLES CANE . I am a mariner . On the 22d December, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was in Gray's-inn-lane , coming towards Holborn, I was in liquor, and the prisoner came up to me, took my watch from my pocket, and ran away. I ran after her, calling out, watch! and followed her till she was taken. I am sure she is the woman.

GEORGE PERRY. I am a watchman; I heard the alarm; I went to Charlotte's-buildings, the prisoner passed, and the man was following her. I saw her throw the watch away, I picked it up and stopped her.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY . - Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-126

274. ALEXANDER DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one handkerchief, value 5s., the property of John Phillips Bevan , from his person .

JOHN PHILLIPS BEVAN . I am clerk to Mr. Croft, in Chancery-lane. On the 7th of January, I was walking in the Strand , near the Adelphi, and felt something pull my pocket, I turned round, and the prisoner, in company with another boy, passed me; the prisoner was pointed out to me, and I took him.

AUGUSTUS WILLIAM FABER. I was going up the Strand on the 7th of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prosecutor was just before me, and the prisoner, in company with another man, passed between me and the prosecutor, I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket, and give it to his companion, who was a little boy. The prosecutor turned round, and I pointed the prisoner out to him. He was secured. I am sure the prisoner is the man, I did not lose sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. They searched me, and could not find any thing about me. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-127

275. CHARLES BRADSHAW TOMPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , three sows, value 8l., and nine store pigs, value 20l. , the property of John Bailey .

EDWARD NEAVE . I am a watchman at Stamford-hill; I had called the hour of one, and the prisoner ran passed my box after two pigs; I called to him, saying, you have got some wild pigs there - He said he was almost dead; I said, you seem to run well after the pigs. He drove them back again, and they ran to Mr. Bailey's house; I assisted him with them. He ran down after the pigs, and I stopped at the end to prevent them going the wrong way; he said, that he wanted to take them to town; he was gone a long time, I went down the lane to meet him, and saw him come out of Mr. Bailey's yard with them; we came up the lane, and I asked him if he had got his complement - He said, yes. I said, how many is there? he said, thirteen, and thanked me for my trouble in assisting him. I walked a little way with him. I returned to my box, and found two pigs left behind; I called after him to tell him, and he said he did not mind two pigs, that there were two more men coming behind with another drove, and they would pick them up, that made me think he had stolen them. I went to the lane where the pigs came from, and found Mr. Bailey's gate open, I went into the yard, his pigs were gone, I then alarmed Mr. Bailey. and he sent me after him; when I got to Kingsland turnpike gate, which is two miles and a half from Mr. Bailey's, he had a stick in his hand, I got the other watchman to assist, and we secured him. I am sure the prisoner is the man; he had got twelve pigs when we secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I did not see any other person driving pigs but him.

RICHARD EMERTON . I am a watchman of Kingsland-road; about a quarter after two o'clock in the morning of the 30th of December, Neave came and asked me if I had seen any pigs go by; I went with him to look after the man, as I had seen some go by, we took the prisoner just by Shoreditch church; he asked me the way to the City-road, and I told him he must go with me on suspicion of stealing the pigs-he had three sows and nine store pigs with him; he said, he had not stolen them. I took him to the watch-house, and left the pigs at the White Hart.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. He went willingly with me.

HENRY CALLER . I work for Mr. Bailey, he lives at Stamford-hill; he lost three sows and nine store pigs on the 30th of December, I saw them at the White Hart, in Kingsland-road, the next day. I am sure they were his.

WILLIAM TALLET . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 30th of December; he told me that a man had given him the pigs.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Edmonton, and I met a man, who gave me 3s. to drive the pigs.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-128

276. WILLIAM BRENNAN was indicted for stealing on the 10th of January , nineteen pounds of lead, belonging to Andrew Northcroft , and then fixed to his dwelling-house .

ANDREW NORTHCROFT . I am a law-stationer , and live in Chancery-lane . On the 10th of January the lead was fixed to the roof of my house, I found some of it gone; I had lost some before that. Mr. Fowle, who lives next door but one to me, and I, went to the to of the house, and traced footsteps to the trap-door of the house where the prisoner lodged. I got a search-warrant, and my friend watched his house; he called me out, the prisoner came out of his house with the lead, and we followed him to a shop in Dean-street, Fetter-lane, where he was selling it. We went into the shop and took him; he said he had done it through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES PLUSH . I examined the lead which was taken from the prisoner, and have no doubt that it was taken from the house.

HENRY BROWN . I am a carpenter; I went to the top of the house, and traced the footsteps into the prisoner's lodging. I saw him come out of his house with the lead under his arm.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-129

277. ROBERT COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one looking-glass, value 7s.; two sheets, value 7s.; and one counterpane, value 1s. 6d., the property of Thomas Daws , in a lodging room in his dwelling house, let by him to the prisoner to be used with the lodging .

JOHN DAWS . I am the son of Thomas Daws , who lives in Bartholomew-square, Old-street . I let the prisoner a furnished lodging about ten months ago, the articles mentioned in the indictment were let with the lodging; he left the lodging on the 4th of January; his wife lived with him; he owed us about 30s. for rent, his wife gave notice that they were going to leave. On Sunday morning I went up to the lodging, the prisoner was packing up his things, preparing to leave, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, he said, he would replace them in about a month or six weeks; I took him up two hours afterwards.

JOHN TURNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tabernacle-walk; I took in a glass of the prisoner on the 23d of March, Daws's son claimed it afterwards.

Q. by Prisoner. Are you sure I am the man - A. He is the man.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he gave me the duplicate; he said, it was distress, and he would make it up in a month.

Prisoner's Defence. The articles were not pledged by me, but by my wife, and without my knowledge, I found it out after they were pledged, and I sent her to the prosecutor to acknowledge what she had done, and to give notice that I should replace them on the Monday, and leave the lodgings; I went out, and on my return, I found my room had been entered by Daws, I told him, I would settle with his mother, he would send for the officer. I had no intention of going without redeeming them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-130

278. MICHAEL CHRISTIAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , two pint pots, value 2s. 6d. , the property of William Calvert .

WILLIAM CALVERT . I am a publican , and live in Marylebone-street. The constable brought the prisoner to me on the 1st of January, he had a pot which I knew to be mine, we went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found another pot which was also mine.

JOSEPH HUNTLEY . I am a shoemaker. My brother and I were going up Newman-street, and saw the prisoner take up two pint pots from the step of a door, I followed him to No.5 Conway-court, I asked him to give me the pint pots, and he gave me one from under his apron, he had another pot in his pocket. The constable took him.

MATHEW HUNTLEY . The last witness has spoken correctly.

MICHAEL WRIGHT. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody, and found four pots in his lodgings, beside Mr. Calvert's two.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-131

279. THOMAS EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one hat, value 3s., the property of George Williams , from his person .

GEORGE WILLIAMS. I live in Banner-street. On the 10th of January, I was at the vestry of the Tabernacle Chapel , in the evening, at a prayer meeting, the prisoner followed me in; he stood there about ten minutes, and then snatched my hat out of my hand, and ran into the chapel and hid himself, a gentleman laid hold of him, and took the hat out of his hand,

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge, he said, he done it from distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-132

280. EDWARD MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , one pair of pistols, value 20s. , the property of William Crowther .

WILLIAM CROWTHER . I am a watch-maker , and live in Jenny-street, St. Luke's . The prisoner was in my employ, the pistols were in the shop where the prisoner slept, for him to guard the house; I had been ill for some months, and the first time that I came into the shop I missed them, and asked him for them - He said, he could not find them, and wondered where they were gone to, he said, he had not seen them for some months, I asked him if he suspected any man of taking them, and he said, he suspected a man, named Payne. I saw the pistols at Hatton Garden, on the 9th of December; I had an officer on the 9th of December at my house, and he found the duplicate of the pistols on the prisoner, and he said, they were the pistols that he had stolen from me.

CHARLES CROWTHER . I am brother to the last witness. I was present when the prisoner was searched, and the duplicate was found on him, he said, they were the pistols which were stolen, and that he was a wretch, and was done for.

WILLIAM REID. Jun. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner on the 9th of December, in his master's house, I found a duplicate of the pistols on him, he was asked if they were the pistols which had been stolen, he said, that they were.

WILLIAM TILLER . I am a pawnbroker. The pistols were pawned with me, I do not know who pawned them, the duplicate found on the prisoner is mine, they were pledged in the name of Marshall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-133

281. CHARLES VARNEY and HENRY LEES were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January . one handkerchief, value 3s., the property of Robert Butler , from his person .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-134

282. MARY PHEAPS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , one pair of boots, value 5s. , the property of George Nash .

SARAH NASH . I am the wife of George Nash, who is a shoe maker , in Monmouth-street ; the boots were on our kitchen stairs for sale, the prisoner came down the stairs; I was sitting opposite; she brought an old coat to sell, we did not buy it; I saw her take the boots, and give them to a person behind her. I sent for a constable.

SARAH NIGHTINGALE . I live next door to Nash. I was in her kitchen, and saw the prisoner and another woman come down into the kitchen to sell a coat; they both ran away, I ran after them, but could not secure them.

Prisoner's Defence. I stood at the door half an hour for them to search me.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined three Months and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-135

283. JOHN STRAGNELL and JOHN CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , two shillings in monies numbered , the property of Mary Roberts .

The prosecutor not appearing, prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-136

254. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , two shifts, value 6s.; one gown, value 6s.; one petticoat, value, 2s.; one pelisse, value 3s.; one pair of boots, value 2s.; and one gown-skirt, value 3s. , the property of Ann Taylor .

AHN TAYLOR. I live in Long-alley, Moorfields , with my mother, the prisoner is my brother, and lived with us; the things were taken out of my box, which was locked, on the 6th of November, I had seen them safe on the 4th. I saw them at the police-office, at out a fortnight afterwards, when he was taken into custody.

WILLIAM HENRY RODGERS. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gown which was pledged with me on the 6th of November; when I was at the police-office, I asked the prisoner who pledged it, and he said, that he did; it is pledged in his name.

JOHN GOODBURN. I am a pawnbroker. I produce two shifts, which I received from the prisoner in the name of Smith. I am sure he is the person, Ann Taylor claimed them.

JOSEPH WARTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Moorfields. I told him what it was for, he said, he could not help it; when he was examined, he told where he had pledged the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-137

285. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , nine pounds of beef, value 5s. 6d. , the property of Henry Wincott .

HENRY WINCOTT . I am a butcher , and live in Banner-street . On the 10th of December, about half past four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take my beef off the hook and run away, I followed him, and when I came up to him, he threw it away; it is worth 5s. 6d.

RICHARD LOWLESS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. and found 1s. 7d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-138

286. JOSEPH LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , from the person of Henry

Murphy, ten 2l. bank notes, and sixteen 1l. bank notes, his property .

HENRY MURPHY . I am a soldier in the 83rd regiment of foot. On the 31st of December, about half-past nine o'clock at night; I was at the King's Arms, at Fulham , the prisoner is in the 63rd regiment, and was quartered there with me; I had received that day, from Drummonds, the bankers, one 50l. bank note, and thirtysix pounds in 1l. and 2l. Bank of England notes, in all 86l. I went to bed about half past eight o'clock; I looked over my notes, and they were all safe then; I rolled three 1l. notes upon the outside of the rest to buy some cloaths with, and put them all into my wife's pocket, which I put under my head in the bed where we both slept, the prisoner slept in the same room; he went to bed about a quarter of an hour after, and, by my desire, put out the candle. About two o'clock in the morning my wife awoke me, and asked for her pockets, to get some snuff, I told her they were under my head - We could not find them; I went down and got a light, and as soon as I came up, I found them laying by the prisoner's bed side; he was not in bed, I asked the man who slept with him, where he was, and he asked, what I wanted of him; I blamed him for robbing me of 36l. and 60l.; I awoke three more men (there were nine men quartered in the room), and looked about; I told the Colonel of it the next morning, and went to Queen-square; the prisoner was absent. I got a constable to accompany me to Isleworth, to look for the prisoner; I met a man who had been with him, and he went with me, and we found him in prison at Hammersmith, he had been taken before we arrived, nothing was found on him. His brother brought 13l. 18s. 6d. which the prisoner owned to be mine; the three 1l. notes were among it, and my name was on them; he had laid out 8l. in clothes, and bought a watch for 4l. 10s. and had been to several public-houses, and changed notes at them. I found my 50l. note torn in several pieces, and thrown about the room.

Q. by Prisoner. When did you make a memorandum of the notes - A.On the 31st of December, at night.

WILLIAM ELLIOT . I am a labourer. On the 31st of December, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the Greyhound public-house; he had no shoes on; he called for some beer and gin; he had some notes in his shirt bosom; he had no waistcoat on; I asked him, how he came by them, he said, he had received them from Cox and Greenwood, for back-pay and clothing-money, I said, he had better sleep there that night as he was in liquor, the landlord said, he must sleep with the soldiers if he did, to which he agreed; he counted his money, it was 35l. 18s. 61/2d., there were 1l. and 2l. notes among it, and gave it to the landlord to keep for him, and went to bed; I went home, and the next morning I went to the Greyhound again, it is about a mile from the King's Arms; the prisoner was up and waiting for his money, which the landlord gave him; he called for some gin, and a gallon of beer, to treat the soldiers, which he paid for, and said that he wanted to go to Hammersmith; I told him, I was going to work there; he said, he wanted to go to the Goat to send his money to his mother at Isleworth, as he was going on guard, I told him, he had better send his money to her, and that, there was a post-office near the Goat, at Hammersmith; he went into the Goat, and had a pot of purl, and gave the landlord a 1l. note to pay for it, and took, 18s. in change. I told him, he had better buy himself some clothes, and he went with me and bought two coats, two shirts, two waistcoats, one pair of pantaloons, one pair of overalls, three pair of stockings, two pair of shoes, three handkerchiefs, and a hat, which came to 8l. 14s.; he gave me 3s. to go with him to take his money to his mother at Isleworth; he got into the Reading coach, and rode to Isleworth. When I gave him up to his sister, he counted his money there, and said he had got 17l. in 1l. and 2l. notes, and part of the change of four 1l. notes; as I was going home I met Shorter, and told him where to find the prisoner. I afterwards heard of the robbery, and went back to look for the prisoner.

THOMAS SHORTER . I am the landlord of the Goat public-house at Hammersmith; the prisoner came to my house on the 1st of January, in the morning, and called for some purl, and gave me a 1l. note to change; he talked about buying some clothes, he had some money, and I advised him to send it, by post, to his mother. I afterwards went to Isleworth and took him, and told him what I wanted him for; he said his brother had got the money and clothes; his brother brought them.

EDWARD EDGSON. I am constable of Hammersmith. I have 13l. 18s. 6d, some clothes, and a watch, which I took from the prisoner's brother, in his presence (I produce them).

MURPHY. I can swear to two notes.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-139

287. ELIZABTH KIRBY , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one set of bed furniture, value 2l. 10s.; one counterpane, value 10s.; two pair of breeches, value 4s.; one yard of cotton, value 2s. 6d.; one scarf, value 10s.; three sheets, value 10s.; one gown, value 3s.; one clock, value 4s.; one shift, value 4s.; two pair of shoes, value 8s.; one pair of trowsers, value 2s.; six caps, value 4s.; seven shirts, value 9s.; eight bedgowns, value 10s.; three frooks, value 4s.; four petticoats, value 5s. 6d.; two coats and stays, value 2s.; two blankets, value 1s. 6d.; and thirty napkins, value 12s. , the property of William Newsom .

REBECCA NEWSOM. I am the wife of William Newsom, we live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square . The prisoner had chaired for me about three months, she used to come in the day-time. About the 29th November, I went up to my bed-room and found my box empty, and missed several things from my drawers, the next day the prisoner came as usual, and I asked her if she knew of my loss, she said she knew nothing of it, about half an hour after she said she had robbed me, I said I thought it was her, she said if I would go to her lodgings she would tell me all about it. I went up with my husband, and she gave us the duplicates and said she would tell me the rest on Monday. She said the duplicates were for the only things that she had taken, she went away. Her husband gave me the duplicate of a pair of trowsers.

WILLIAM NEWSOM . I learned from my wife, that I had been robbed, I asked the prisoner about it on the 30th of November, she denied it for some time; I told her I would have her lodgings searched, and desired my wife to detain her. As I was going out of my door she said, do not go, if you and mistress will come to my room, I will tell you where the things are. She said she had robbed us, and gave me nine duplicates, saying, she hoped I would be merciful and let her come and finish her work that day, and she would let me know where the remainder of the things were; my wife gave her leave, and in the afternoon she said, there was a place in Bishopsgate-street, where she had pledged several things without tickets, she said she had been to the place and that they were so busy they could not attend to her, and that she was to go again on the Monday and she would get them. I expected to see her on the Monday morning, but we found she had ran away. We went round to the pawnbrokers, and found the things to be our property, and told the officer to look for her.

CHARLES JERRAND . I am shopman to Mr. Sadler, who is a pawnbroker in Bishopsgate-street. On the 29th of October, the prisoner pledged a curtain with me for 6d.; and on the 30th of November, a pair of trowsers for 1s.; I am sure the prisoner is the person.

SAMUEL HAYWOOD . I am a pawnbroker in Bishopsgate-street. I have two sheets which were pledged on the 21st of October, and one gown on the 16th of November, by the prisoner.

THOMAS JONES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Houndsditch. I produce one sheet, pledged on the 19th of November, in the name of Ann Davis . I do not know whether it was the prisoner; the duplicate found on her is mine.

FRANCIS SCOTT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Houndsditch. I produce a sheet and shift pledged on the 22d of November, in the name of Louis Jones, the duplicate found on the prisoner is mine.

JOHN HALL. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. I produce a curtain, pledged for 2s. 6d., on the 2d of November, and two curtains, on the 9th of November, and one shift, on the 23d of November. The duplicate found on the prisoner is mine.

JOHN WALTON. I am a headborough of Shoreditch. I took the prisoner into custody, and asked her why she did not bring the things to Newsom, she said she could not.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get my money, and was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-140

288. JOHN PICKMAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , one trunk, value 3s.; five pair of sheets, value 2l. 10s.; four table cloths, value 1l.; four shifts, value 10s.; five napkins, value 2s.; two shawls, value 10s.; four aprons, value 6s.; one tea-chest, value 5s.; one bible, value 7s.; one shirt, value 7s.; one gown, value 5s.; four towels, value 4s.; and one quilt, 2s. 6d. , the property of Thomas Oldham .

THOMAS OLDHAM. I am a clerk . On the 26th of December, I was at Little Gadsden and sent six packages to London by the carrier, I delivered them to Francis London. The carrier was directed to my house, No.2, Penford-street, Red Lion-square, Holborn. Five of them were delivered safe, the other contained the articles mentioned in the indictment.

ROBERT APPLETON. I am a watchman of Red Lion-square. On the 27th of December, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner by the near side of the waggon, and another man with him, the waggoner took a load out of it and went to Mr. Oldham's house; while he was in the house, the prisoner and the other man crossed over to the waggon, they each took hold of the handles of the package and walked down Penford-street, Red Lion-square, I went across to them, and said, what have you got there, it does not belong to you. They dropped the trunk, and ran away. I sprung my rattle and called stop thief! they ran down the street; Dewxell and Welch stopped them. I went up and said, the prisoner was the man, the other got away.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The waggon stopped two doors from Red Lion-square. It was not quite dark. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM WELCH. I am a watchman. I heard the alarm and stopped the prisoner, he was running.

JOHN DEWXELL . I am a patrol. I was on my beat, in Holborn, and heard the alarm, and took the prisoner into custody.

FRANCIS LONDON . I am a carrier. I had the box in my cart, I set it on the pavement, while I was in the passage it was taken.

REID. I am an officer. I took the prisoner and trunk.

(Property Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-141

289. JAMES MURRAY , was indicted for embezzling the sum 3s. 6d. , the monies Richard Dixon .

RICHARD DIXON . I am a trunk-maker , and live at No. 49, High-Holborn. The prisoner was my shopman , and entrusted to receive money for me.

THOMAS BURWASH. I am silversmith, and live in Bartholomew-close. On Saturday the 21st of December, I purchased a leather portmantua, for which I paid 1l. 8s., and a red trunk, for which I paid 2s. 6d. at Mr. Dixon's, of the prisoner; I called in the evening, and asked him to change it, he said, he would; I called on the Monday, and he looked me out one of the size that I wanted, it came to 34s., I gave 6s. more, which was the difference between the two trunks, I said, I had paid 28s. for the trunk, and produced the bill, which the prisoner gave me, amounting to 1l. 10s. 6d., when I bought the two trunks, it is in the prisoner's hand writing.

Q. by Prisoner. Was you sent by Mr. Dixon to buy the trunk - A. No.

RICHARD DIXON . The prisoner only accounted to me for 1l. 7s.; I produce his book, which contains an account of the money that he receives, it is in his hand writing (reads) "on the 28th of December, twenty-one inch portmantua, 1l. 7s.," the red trunk is not put down. He only gave me 1l. 7s.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman looked at a 27s. trunk, and I thought that was what he bought, I put it down in a hurry; I forgot to set down the little trunk, but thought of it after, and meant to put it down.

DIXON. When he was before the magistrate, he said, he done it from distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-142

290. GEORGE TURNPENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , two pint pots, value 2s. 4d. , the property of Thomas Crisp .

THOMAS CRISP . I am a publican , and live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square ; I missed two pots, and the next morning they were brought to me by the watchman.

JAMES TOOK . I am a watchman in Gray's-inn-lane. On the 3d of February I heard a rattle sprung, I run and took hold of the prisoner, a man named Moses said that the prisoner had been ringing his bell; I found a pint pot in his bosom, and asked him where he got it; he said,"do not hurt me, I have got another on the other side." I took them out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the street,

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-143

291. JAMES TAYLOR and JOHN BLAKE were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one pair of boots, value 1l. the property of John Burton .

JOHN BURTON. I live at Hackney . On the 17th of December, between two and four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost the boots from my tool-house, adjoining my dwelling-house; my yard door was on the latch, and so was the tool-house door; I missed the boots after four o'clock. I went next day to inquire if any jack-ass boys had been seen about, and found that the prisoners had been our way, selling catsup. I went to town, and found the two prisoners at the Bull's Head, Kingsland's-road; they were taken into custody.

JAMES INGRAM . I am a smith; I was at the Bull's Head, in Kingsland-road; about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, Taylor, came into the house with a pair of boots, he asked me if I knew any body that would buy them; I told him I would go and see; I took them out of his hand, and went to Saunders's-gardens, which is close to the house, and offered them to Gadsden for 12s., he offered me 10s. for them; I went to Taylor, and he said I might let him have them - I did, and gave the money to Taylor, and he gave me a shilling for my trouble; he told me if Blake should come in, and ask what I sold them for, to say six shillings. In about a quarter of an hour Blake came in, and said, if he had been there at the time they should not have been sold for that money. I was quartered at the Bull's Head.

WILLIAM GADSDEN . I gave ten shillings for the boots. I gave them up to Armstrong.

WILLIAM LINTON . I am a labourer; I was passing Mr. Burton's house, about two o'clock, on the 17th of December, the prisoner, Blake, asked me if I would by any catsup; the two prisoners were together, and had bottles in their hands, they were about one hundred yards from Burton's; I saw no more of them. I am sure it was them.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On the 17th of December, Mr. Burton applied to me, I and my son, accompanied him to the Bull's Head, in Kingsland-road, and found Ingram and Baker sitting there together, we took them. I left Ingram in Burton's care, and took Taylor, who was there. I took Ingram to Gadsden's house, and he gave me the boots; we took the three to the office, and I heard both Taylor and Baker say, it was the first thing they had ever done, and that it was through distress.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I was with my father, and took the prisoners; they said it was the first robbery they had ever committed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BLAKE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-144

292. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , one watch, value 30s.; one chain, value 2s., and one key, value 2d. , the property of George Newton .

MARY NEWTON. I am the wife of George Newton ; we lodge with my mother, in the first floor; the prisoner also lodged, down stairs, with her. On the 21st of December, I went down stairs to tea with my mother; I shut my door after me, but did not lock if; when I went into my mother's room the prisoner was there and my mother too, before we began tea, the prisoner made an excuse to go out to fasten my mother's shutters - He came in again in about a quarter of an hour. He was not out after My mother's clock stopped, and I said I would go up and look at my watch; as soon as the prisoner heard that, he went out, and did not return until the officer brought him the same evening, very late. I missed my watch out of my room, it hung up over my bureau. I went round to stop the pawnbrokers from taking it in, if it should be brought, and Mr. Matthews stopped it.

ROBERT HORNE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Minories. On the 21st of December the prisoner brought me a watch to pledge; Newton had left a description of it at my house - I detained him; he said it was his property, and that he had it sometime, and would sell it, as he was going a long voyage.

Q. by Prisoner. Did you receive it out of my hand-

A. I saw you deliver it to my man.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY. I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody; he refused to tell where he lived, or where he got the watch; when I was taking him to the Counter, he said it was given to him by a girl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me the watch to pledge.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-145

293. JOHN JAMES , GEORGE EDWARDS , JOHN HAYDEN , JOHN MATTWOOD , and JAMES BROWN ,

were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , seventyeight pounds of beef, value 36s. , the property of Joseph Terry and Harry Terry .

JOSEPH TERRY . I am a salesman in Leadenhall-market, in partnership with Harry Terry . On the 3d of January John Pells sent me some beef to sell-there were two lots of beef; I sold one lot, and had another left, which I put out for sale on Saturday morning, the pigs laid over it. A person came to me, and asked if I had sold the beef; he had made me an offer for it the day before. When I went to look for it I found it was gone, there was only one piece left; the rump, loin, veiny-piece and flank were gone; between one and two o'clock the officer came, and told me he had taken the five prisoners, with the beef, I went to the office to see it-it was mine, and would complete the lot.

JOHN PELIS. I am a butcher, and live at East Smithfield; I sent Messrs. Terry two lots of beef to sell for me; the next morning I heard that three pieces out of the lot were stolen; I went before the magistrate, and saw the three pieces of beef; I am sure they were mine, I cut them myself.

JOHN GRIFFITH. I am an officer. On Saturday morning, the 4th of January, about ten o'clock, I received information that there was a quantity of beef taken into a chandler's-shop, No. 91, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; I went there, with Freeman, we went up to the two pair of stairs front room, and found the five prisoners in the room, before the fire; Freeman kept the door while I searched. I found the beef covered over, between the prisoners, James and Edwards's bedsteads - They said they were their beds, there were a great many beds in the room; it was a dirty wet morning; the two prisoners, James and Edwards, were very dirty, the other prisoners did not appear to have been out; we took them to the office, and when we got there, James said, that he and Edwards had stolen it.

FRANCIS FREEMAN, I confirm the statement of the last witness, the beef weighed seventy-eight pounds.

JAMES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

HAYDON- NOT GUILTY .

MATTWOOD- NOT GUILTY .

BROWN- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-146

294. WILLIAM SCOGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , four pounds weight of starch, value 3s., and one bag, value 6d. , the property of Edward Palmer .

EDWARD PALMER. I am a grocer , and live in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel; the prisoner was my carman , and had been in my service upwards of two years. I went to his lodgings, in Goodman's-fields, the officer found a parcel of starch in a paper, there was no mark on it.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I am an officer; I went to the prisoner's lodgings on the 23d of December, and found a paper of starch in a tea-chest-Palmer claimed it; we also found a bag; the prisoner said he bought the starch of Mr. Fenton.

JOLLY. I am an assistant to Mr. Fenton; the prisoner did not buy any starch of me.

EDWARD PALMER . The bag is mine, I cannot swear to the starch.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the bag one wet day, to throw over me. I bought the starch of Mr. Fenton.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-147

295. LUCY SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one shift, value 3s.; one shirt, value 2s.; two petticoats, value 3s; one coat, value 1s.; two pair of gloves, value 1s.; two black feathers, value 1s.; one cap, value 3s.; four pair of stockings, value 3s.; two napkins, value 6d.; four gowns, value 15s.; one gown-skirt, value 2s.; one pair of stays, value 1s.; one tippet, value 1s.; one spencer, value 1s.; four handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; and one basket, value 6d. , the property of William James Allsop .

WILLIAM JAMES ALLSOP . I am a labourer , and live at Hampstead; the prisoner lived servant with me for about three months, she absented herself on the 7th of December, when we missed the property. I made application to Reid, the officer. I apprehended her myself, at Hampstead, on the 1st of January; she gave me no warning before she left.

SARAH ALLSOP . I am the wife of the last witness, the prisoner was my servant; when I laid-in she went away for a fortnight, while I had another nurse; she was backwards and forwards during the time, and afterwards came to live with me again; the night before she went away, she said she should get up early to clean the kitchen, she did not say she was going. She got up early, and left us - She did not clean the kitchen. I saw no more of her till she was at the office. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment. When she was at Hatton-Garden, I asked her what she had done with them; she said she had sold them, and that I should never receive any of them again.

WILLIAM REID . I went to look for the prisoner. The prosecutor gave her into my charge. I asked her where she had pawned the things, she said she had been into the country, and sold them at different places.

The prisoner put in written defence, charging the prosecutor with having an illicit connexion with her, and stated, that she had taken the things to support herself.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-148

296. WILLIAM BROWN and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , one wooden till, value 1s., and 4s. in copper monies numbered , the property of Thomas Gillingham .

THOMAS GILLINGHAM . I keep a shop at Hampstead ; I lost my till on the 7th of January, it was brought to me the next morning.

JOHN MORGAN. I live at Hampstead; I went to look after my donkey about eleven o'clock in the morning. I went to the pond to slide, it broke in with me, and I found the till, full of stones, sunk in the pond; I took it to Gillingham, as he told me he had lost one.

JOHN PRIOR. The prisoner, Brown, asked me to go with him to do the robbery - I have known him for two years. He asked me to get a stick to poke through the window to get the halfpence out of Gillingham's house - I refused. Jones was not with him.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am headborough of Hampstead; I took Brown, he denied it; I afterwards took Jones. Jones said, that Brown took it, and that he stood on the outside and received it, and that they had filled it full of stones and then threw it into the pond; Brown then confessed, and said that he had spent the money in twelfthe-cake.

JONES'S Defence. I said so because he told me, if I would confess, he would not take me to the watch-house.

PHILLIPS. I held out no inducement to him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-149

297. WILLIAM BRYAN and MARTIN HENEY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , one hundred pounds weight of lead, belonging to Joseph Smithies , and fixed to a certain building, against the statute .

JOSEPH SMITHIES . I live in Spencer-street, Goswell-street; I am the properietor of the brewhouse in the City-road, I had seen the lead safe about a week before.

JOHN SMITHIES. I am the son of the last witness. On the 20th of December I missed the lead off the roof of my father's engine-house, I saw the two prisoners cutting it away, and told Mr. Simmonds; I returned to the premises, and found the mill-house door broken open, and a rope tied to a beam, which would enable them to get to the roof of the engine-house. Simmonds went into Bunhillfields burial-ground to prevent them escaping; I got on the roof, and secured Heney, on the first floor of the mill-house, I asked him where the other man was, he said there was nobody with him; I gave him to a man and went to look for the other; I saw him jump out of a window, twenty-five feet high, into the burial-ground-Simmonds secured him. The lead was on the roof but removed from its proper place, and had been recently cut. Bryan said, he had not been on the premises. I found an axe and a sack on the roof, on the 17th.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. It was not quite dark. I am sure the prisoners are the men, I saw them cutting the lead, I was on the watch.

VALENTINE SIMMONDS. I am a plasterer; I went into the burial-ground, on the 20th of December, I heard the window thrown up, and a man dropped into the ground and ran off, I secured him.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a constable; the prisoners were brought to Worship-Street on the 20th of December; I tried the lead to the roof, and it fitted exactly.

THOMAS GARTON . I went with the last witness, the lead exactly fitted. I found a knife on each of the prisoners, they appeared to have recently cut lead.

HENEY'S Defence. I went there for a night's lodging.

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

HENEY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Years , and publicly Whipped near the burial-ground .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-150

298. JOSEPH BAKER BETTERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , twenty-four silk Mantlets, value 5l.; one hundred silk handkerchiefs, value 15l.; one silk scarf, value 30s.; seven silk shawls, value 6l.; two yards of silk mode, value 4s. , the property of Stephen Wilson , Charles Pritchet Bousfield , and Samuel Wilson : and ROBERT FROST for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

CHARLES PRITCHET BOUSFIELD. I am in partnership with Stephen Wilson and Samuel Wilson , the prisoner, Betterton, was in our employ, at a salary of 90l. per annum, and had lived seven years with us, we live in the Old Jewry. On the 17th of January I took out a search-warrant, he lived in the City-gardens, City-road. Armstrong and Gleed went to his house with me, to execute it. Armstrong went in first, and laid hold of the prisoner, Frost, he ran away directly he saw us; Armstrong brought him back into the kitchen - He had a parcel in his hand, which he put on the table; Armstrong asked what it was, he said it was his own clothes. Armstrong produced his warrant for silk goods, and asked if it contained any thing of that sort; after some hesitation, he acknowledged that it contained some of the articles which had been read to him; it was opened, and contained the articles enumerated in the indictment - I knew them to be mine; we had not sold him any of them, they are worth 40l. Frost said that he bought them of his brother Betterton, and produced a paper in Betterton's hand-writing, which, he said, was a bill; some of the articles are much lower, and others rather higher, than they would be sold for. We went up and found Betterton in his bed-room, I told him what I came for, and that Frost said he had the goods of him - He did not deny it. He afterwards requested to speak to me, and said, he hoped we should be lenient with him. I told him it depended on my partners.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On the 18th of January, I went to execute the warrant, and found the two prisoners at Betterton's house; when I was let in, I saw two men were standing in the room, they saw me, and one of them ran away, I run after him, and found Frost in the washhouse, with a bundle under his left hand, I brought him into the room, another man was there at the time; I asked Frost, what was in the parcel, he said, it was is own things; I produced my warrant for silk goods, and he said, there were some in the parcel; I opened it, and found it contained the articles specified in the indictment, Bousfield claimed them-Frost said, he bought them of his brother, and produced a bill of them, made out with the letters R.F. December, 1816, and enumerating the several articles, amounting to 28l. 18s. 6d. (I produce it), it it a bill of the several articles mentioned in the indictment; Betterton was brought down by Gleed; I read the warrant to him, and told him what Frost had said; he said, the goods had come from Mr. Wilson's, and he went apart to speak to Mr. Bousfield.

BARNARD GLEED . Corroborated the statement of the last witness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BETTERTON. Put in a long written Defence, confessing his guilt, and his contrition for it; begged for mercy, and wishing to exculpate Frost from the knowledge of the goods being stolen.

FROST'S Defence. I was told, that the things were my brother's, and had them to sell for him.

BETTERTON - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

FROST - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-151

299. ANN DANSER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , ten yards of lace, value 10s. , the property of Children Shoebridge .

CHILDREN SHOEBRIDGE. I am a haberdasher , and live at Kensington . On the 13th of December last, between twelve and one o'clock in the day; the prisoner came into my shop; I knew her before; she asked for some lace, I put some on the counter; from her manner, I suspected and watched her; I saw her take a remnant of lace, and put it into her pocket. She offered to pay for a piece of lace which she was looking at, which came to 2s. 6d. I told her, I did not like to be paid for part, and part to be pocketed. She turned her pockets inside out, and the lace hung to her pocket; I took it from her, and sent for an officer.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. She had been drinking; from the open manner in which she did it, and her not being accustomed to taking spirits, I think she might have done it innocently.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE HULL . I took the prisoner into custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-152

300. JOHN HILL was indicted, that he, on the 23d of November, in the 29th year of his Majesty's Reign, at St. Mary, Lambeth, was married to Sarah Catharine Law son, and that he afterwards, during the life-time of the said Sarah Catharine Lawson , on the 28th of February, in the 48th year of his Majesty's Reign , at St. George's, Bloomsbury , feloniously did marry Ann Walker , against the statute .

THOMAS CLEMENTSON. I am a coal-meter. I know the prisoner, and was present at Lambeth Church, when he was married to Catharine Lawson , about twenty-eight years ago; they lived together as man and wife, and had a family; he has left her about ten years; she is now living in service, in St. Helen's-place, Bishopsgate.

Cross-examined. I never saw her in Brownlow-street Hospital, the prisoner was a sea-faring man .

SARAH MONDAY . I live at Battle-bridge, my husband is a butcher. I know the prisoner, and Ann Walker , she lodged in my house for two years; she was married to the prisoner, I was present at their marriage, at Bloomsbury Church, about eight years ago, and saw the ceremony performed, and they lived together as man and wife for two or three months.

Cross-examined. I believe his son is the prosecutor in this case.

The prisoner being deaf and dumb, put in a written defence, as follows-In 1788, I married Catharine Lawson ; I went to sea in 1794, and stopped till 1796. John Hill went with me. I went out again, and returned in 1799, and found my wife lying-in, at Brownlow-street Hospital; she ran away afterwards, and I could not find her; I went to sea again, and afterwards, in 1809, married Walker.

JOHN HILL . I am the son of the prisoner, he went to sea with me in 1796, my mother was in Brownlow-street Hospital, in 1799, when we returned; I have not seen her since. When my father left his children in the care of my uncle, he sent him money at different times to pay for them.

MATHEW HILL. I live in New-yard, Shoe-lane, the prisoner is my brother. When he went to sea, I took care of his children; I have seen his first wife with a child, which could not be his.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-153

301. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , one saw, value 4s. , the property of Walter Trevana .

WALTER TREVANA . I am a carpenter . I was at work at the Tunn's public-house, Penton-street , on the 16th of December, the prisoner was a stranger to me; I was cutting some boards in the passage, and the prisoner came out, and I missed my saw about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw it again the same night, at the police-office, when the prisoner was in custody; he lived opposite the house where I was at work; he is a smith.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I heard the man had lost his saw; I went over the way, down stairs where the prisoner was, and found the saw, concealed behind his bench; I told him to come with me, and he refused, and went very unwillingly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN HURDS. I am a beadle. I met the prisoner about ten minutes after three o'clock; I afterwards heard that the prosecutor had lost a saw, I told him, that I had seen the prisoner with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I borrowed it of the prosecutor.

WALTER TREVANA . I did not lend it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-154

302. THOMAS HOLMES , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , nine ounces of tea, value 1s. 4d. , the property of the United Company of Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first, only stating the goods to be the property of certain persons unknown.

THOMAS THORNTON . I am a servant to the Company; the prisoner was also, in their service. On the 17th of January, I suspected him, and desired Bennett to watch; I afterwards took the prisoner down stairs to be searched by an officer, he found nine ounces of black tea in his waistcoat pockets. The chest of tea, at which he was em

ployed, had nine ounces of tea missing from it, and it was the same sort of tea that he had in his pockets; the chest had the print of a hand on it.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a commodore in the Company's service. I was desired to watch the prisoner. He came to the tea-room - He had no business there, he went to the chest, took the tea out, and filled bothe his waistcoat pockets; I acquninted the elder of it. The prisoner could not see me. He was searched and nine ounces of tea found on him, it was the same tea which he took out of the chest; there were marks of a hand in the chest.

WILLIAM CAVIN . I am an officer of the Customs. I searched the prisoner. I found nine ounces of tea in his waistcoat pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to purchase some tea, I took it as a sample. GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Six Months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-155

303. SARAH DAVIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one great coat, value 2l. , the property of Henry Robert Digby .

HENRY ROBERTY DIGBY. I lodge in Duke-street, Manchester-square . On the 4th of December, I lost my coat, and found it again on the 12th, it had just come home from the tailor, who had altered it. I cannot swear to it, as I did not see it after it was altered.

CHARLES THOMPSON . I work for Mr. Perry, who is a tailor. I delivered Mr. Digby's coat to Ann Simmonds , at his house, on the 3d of December, about eight o'clock in the evening.

ANN SIMMONDS . I am servant in the house where Mr. Digby lodges. Thompson delivered the coat to me, and I put it in the one pair of stairs room, it is a private house, and we have no other lodgers. The area gate is left open in the day-time. The coat was missed on the 5th of December, I saw it again at the office on the 12th. I am sure that it is the coat that Thompson gave me.

GEORGE AMES. I am Mr. Perry's errand-boy. I brushed the coat and tied it up in the handkerchief. I saw it again at the Police-office, and I am sure it is the coat I gave Thompson for Mr. Digby, it is worth 2l.

HYAM HYAMS. I live in Dean-street, Westminster, and am a dealer in old clothes. The prisoner brought the coat to me on the 4th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, she wanted 1l. 10s. for it, thinking it worth much more, I asked her how she came by it; she gave me two or three different accounts, and I told her I suspected it was not her own, she said if I went home with her, she would convince me of it; she took me to Duck-lane. I offered her 1l. for it, and she said she would take it, I told her to send to my house for the money. I went for Pace, the officer, and told him, and he took her into custody as she was coming to my house.

THOMAS PACE. Hyams came to me, and I apprehended the prisoner at the corner of Dean-street, she was standing at the corner of the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I deal in clothes, and bought it of a man at the corner of Burton-street, for 1l. 5s.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined One Year , and fined One Shillings .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-156

304. HANNAH WOOD , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , one coat, value 3l.; one pair of shoes, value 7s.; and one thimble, value 6d., the property of Henry Smith , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY SMITH . I am a cabinet-maker , and lodge with Mr. Parkinson, who keeps the White Horse public-house, in St. John-street ; there are no other lodgers. My room does not communicate with the stairs. I had seen the things safe, about an hour before I missed them. The prisoner lodged with us.

JAMES SMITH . I am the son of the last witness. I first missed the coat, the prisoner, and her husband, were in the room at the time.

JOHN COBBS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner up on suspicion of stealing the things, on the 10th of December; I could not find her husband. She said the prosecutor had lent her the thimble.

Prisoner's Defence. The thimble was lent to me, I know nothing of the other things.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-157

305. JOHN GILBERT , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one miniature picture, value 1l. 9s. , the property of John Noyes .

SARAH NOYES. I am the wife of John Noyes , we live at Weymouth-terrace, Hackney-road . The prisoner came to look at some apartments which I had to let, on the 7th of December, it was dusk, my sister let him in, he said that he was recommended by some person who had my bill up; I shewed him the rooms, and told him if he would come down stairs, I would speak to him about them, he appeared to be a working man; he came down, and my sister brought a light into the parlour, he said he was a varnisher - I am sure he is the man; he left me and said, he would bring his wife to look at them the next day. I missed my husband's miniature the next morning, it hung over the fire-place; nobody else had been in the room.

WILLIAM LEVETT . I am an officer. Mr. Noyes sent for me to the Roebuck public-house, he had the prisoner in custody, I took him, and he told me that he had sold the miniature to Mr. Nightingale, he went there with me, and asked Mr. Nightingale for the miniature which he had sold him; Mr. Nightingale produced it, and Mr. Noyes claimed it.

GEORGE NIGHTINGALE . I am a carver and gilder, and live in Leadenhall-street. I bought the miniature of the prisoner on the 7th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN NOYES . On the 16th of December, I went with my sister to the place where she said she had seen the prisoner, I told him that I wanted him, he said what for? I said, you have been to look at some apartments at my house; he said, he had not been to look at any; my sister said, he was the man; he wanted me to go back, and said he would follow me; I got him to go with me, and when he had got about twelve yards he ran away, I followed him and took him; and said, if he would tell me where the

miniature was, I would set him at liberty - He would not. I sent for a constable.

ELIZA NOYES . I am sister to Mr. Noyes. The prisoner is the man who came to look at the lodgings.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-158

306. MARY DAVIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , three cakes of soap, value 1s.; one bottle of oil of roses, value 1s.; two bottles of lavender water, value 1s.; one pocket-book, value 2s.; two rows of beads, value 1s.; one box of tooth powder, value 9d.; one seal and drops, value 9d.; three pincushions, value 1s.; two cotton boxes, value 6d.; two bank tokens, value 3s.; and 2s. 51/2d. in monies numbered , the property of Augustus Kraus .

AUGUSTUS KRAUS . I am a perfumer , and live in Portman-street . The prisoner was my servant , and had lived six months with me. I put my money in the till on the 10th of January. I suspected her and sent for an officer, and had her searched, he found the keys of my till and shop door, and my money, and the articles stated in the indictment, they were all in her box, except the money, which was in her pocket, they were marked. She used to clean the shop out, but did not serve.

GEORGE PITTMAN . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found some money and the key of the shop in her pocket, the money was marked; there were two eighteen-penny pieces, and two shillings, and some copper. The key of the till and the otehr things were in her box, which was locked. The prisoner opened it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-159

307. ELIZABETH KING , ELIZABETH MURRELL , and JOSEPH RUDD , were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , two pillows, value 6s.; two blankets, value 9s.; one counterpane, value 15s.; one rug, value 4s.; two sheets, value 8s.; one tea-board, value 3s.; one looking-glass, value 3s.; two pillow-cases, value 2s.; one iron spoon, value 2d.; one knife and fork, value 6d.; and five images, value 6d., the property of Robert Cooper ; the same being in a certain lodging-room in his dwelling-house, let by contract by him to the prisoners, to be used with the lodging-room, against the statute .

ELIZA COOPER . I live at Pitfield-street, Old-street . On the 13th of December Elizabeth King came to my house and took a second floor, she was to pay 3s. per week, she said they were for herself and sister, who was coming from Norwich. Rudd came to the house, she said he was her brother-in-law; I supposed him and Murrell to be man and wife. They all came to the lodgings on the 30th of December, in the evening, I objected to taking three of them, King was to go away and Murrell and Rudd to live there, and King was to come in the day-time to assist her sister, they left on the 14th, at seven o'clock in the evening. King passed my door with a bundle, I followed her, and said, I suspected it was some of my property; she said, it was nothing but her own dirty linen; she said she had not robbed me, and objected to go back to my house; while I was talking to her, Rudd and Murrell passed us; she said, she wanted to go to speak to them, and I said, I would go with her; she took me to the back of the house, just by St. Agnes-le-Clare; she then got out of my hands, and dropped the bundle and a small basket, which Murrell had given her, and ran away; I picked them up, but could not overtake her. I found the bundle contained two feather pillows, which were mine; I went into their room and found the bed stripped, and the things stated in the indictment gone; I have seen all of them since, except the looking glass.

JOHN MATHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. I have two pillow cases and one sheet, which were pledged on the 14th of December, by the prisoner King.

WILLIAM BARR. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Rose and Crown-court, Moorfields. I have a counterpane and blanket, which were pledged in the evening, on the 14th of December, for 7s. 6d., by the prisoners King and Murrell.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners, Rudd and Murrell, at Norwich; I told them what I took them for, Rudd said he was very sorry, it was the first they had ever done. The tea-board and rug were stopped, by out direction, at the Norwich waggon. Murrell said she was very sorry.

MATHEW GILDERSLEEVE. I am a constable. On the evening of the 14th of December, Mrs. Cooper brought King to me, and charged her with robbing her lodgings. I found two images in her pocket and 1l. 4s. 6d., we took her to the Compter; as we were going to the office, She confessed she had stolen the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KING - GUILTY . Aged 28.

MURRELL - GUILTY . Aged 27.

RUDD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-160

308. ELEANOR WALLIS , was indicted for stealing on the 20th of December , sixteen plates, value 1s. 4d.; eighteen basons, value 1s. 6d.; and one handkerchief, value 3d. , the property of Susanna Price .

SUSANNA PRICE. I sell earthen-ware , and live in Newgate-market . On the 10th of December, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment. The prisoner lodged with me. Her husband is a brewer. I suspected her. There was nobody else in the house; and on the Saturday night I sent for a constable. I found some of my plates between her bed and mattress.

MARY PRICE . I am the daughter of the last witness. I always locked the door where the things were, and always found it open afterwards.

ABRAHAM HEMMINGWAY. I am a beadle. I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody; I found her husband in the room, and asked him if he knew any thing about the things, he said he did not. I found eighteen

asons; when I took the prisoner, she said that her husband was innocent, and that she took them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-161

309. ANN WESTLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , one watch, value 10l.; one chain, value 1l.; and 3l. 10s. in monies numbered, the property of William Andrews , from his person .

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am a surveyor , and live in Herefordshire. I came to London on the 11th of December. I was going to Guildford. I spent my evening in Fleet-market, and parted with my friend a little after nine o'clock, I met the prisoner in Holbron, my watch was safe when I met her, it was near ten o'clock; I went home with her to Charles-street, Drury-lane . I had a three shilling piece in my pocket when I met her, and two guineas, and a half-guinea, and a seven shilling piece in my purse. I gave her the three shilling piece, and she went out to fetch some refreshment. I fell asleep while she was gone, and when she came back I awoke, I fell asleep again almost immediately. I had put my watch under my pillow. I awoke in the middle of the night, and found myself alone, and my watch gone, and my pocket-book right; I felt my purse and found something in it, which I thought was my gold. When day-light came, I searched again for my watch, but could not find it. I went next door to the master of the house, who said, she had not lodged there before that night. She had left one shilling in the room, which he took for the rent - I went away; and when I got to the top of the court, I found two or three Roman coins in my purse instead of my guiueas. I described the prisoner to the constable and he took her. I found the watch in pawn in the name of Corn; I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

JOHN SAUL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Toftenham-court-road. I took the watch in pledge from William Corn , on the 14th of December, for 1l. 10s.

WILLIAM CORN. I live at Cambden Town. I am a gardener. I received the watch from the prisoner, she gave it to me on a Saturday night. I afterwards went out and saw the prisoner very much intoxicated; I took her to my house; she shewed me two guineas and a half-guinea; she would not leave my house in the morning; she asked me to go and change one of the guineas; she said, they were her own; she was in liquor. She slept at our house the next night; she gave me the watch to pledge, and said it was her husband's.

WILLIAM FRY . I received information of the robbery, on the 15th of December, I traced the prisoner at Corn's-house, they said she was gone; I went up stairs and found her there, and took her into custody. I asked her, what she had done with the watch, she said, she had not seen it. I apprehended Corns, and he was admitted as an evidence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the guinea; I never had the watch. GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-162

310. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , five pounds of mutton, value 2s. 6d. , the property of Edward Richards .

JAMES BOND. I am servant to Mr. Richards, who lives in Union-street, Spitalfields. I saw the prisoner take the leg of mutton out of the shop about nine o'clock at night; I saw him lurking about the shop several times. I apprehended him, and took him into custody. I am sure he is the man. GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-163

311. THOMAS ABREY and THOMAS MAYO were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , two blankets, value 30s.; and one looking-glass, value 20s. , the property of John Sykes .

JOHN SYKES . I keep the Catharine-wheel, public-house, in Bishopsgate-street , in December last, I was furnishing a house at Newington. On the 20th of October, I had information of the robbery, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, and found several more things tied up ready to be taken away.

WILLIAM WARE . I am a headborough of Shorediteh. On the 20th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was going up the City-road; I met the two prisoners, each of them had a bundle under his arm, they saw me, and threw the bundle down and run away; I called for assistance, and pursued them until they were taken; one of them threw a dark lanthorn out of his pocket, and there was a bundle of matches picked up; I took Mayo to the watch-house, and took a turn-screw from his pocket, his other pocket was turned inside out, as if he had shook the lanthorn out of it; I found the bundles to be two blankets and a looking-glass. Abery broke out of the watch-house the same day; I took him again on the 24th. I am sure they are the men that I saw with the bundles.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Mayo was let at large becaute the other could not be found.

JAMES CORCORAN. I am a headborough. On the 20th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, my brother officer gave me the signal, I saw the prisoner running; I picked up the property, and found an iron crowbar near to where the property laid, I am sure they are the men.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ABERY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

MAYO - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-164

312. THOMAS SKILLERN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , one tea-tray, value 5s. , the property of Thomas Vincent .

JOHN WATKINS . I am a salesman. I saw a man put his hand into Mr. Vincent's shop in High Holborn , and take out the tray, Robert Gregory pointed to the prisoner, I pursued him and took the tray out of his hand; he ran away, I followed him, and he was taken. I am sure he is the man.

ROBERT GREGORY . I was coming down Holborn, and saw the prisoner take the tray from under the knocker;

I pointed him out to Watkins, he was taken. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-165

313. THOMAS ROBINSON and JAMES PRETTIE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 750lbs. weight of Cork, value 30l. , the property of Thomas Hankinson .

THOMAS HANKINSON . I am a cork-cutter , and live in London-wall. On the 7th of January, I bought thirteen bundles of cork of Mr. Hicks, who gave me leave to put them in his warehouse; I went with the carman to deliver it, and put it in his warehouse and locked the door about noon, with a padlock; I heard it was taken afterwards, I went and missed seven bundles, which was worth 30l.

THOMAS EATON . I saw both the prisoners on the 9th of January, in Wood's-buildings, Whitechapel, which is about half a mile from Mr. Hicks's; the prisoner, Robinson, told me, he had gone to the Docks at seven o'clock in the morning, when he thought it was eight.

HENRY BUCKHAM . I saw the prisoner, Prettie, that morning, in Wood's-buildings, Whitechapel, where he lived; he was removing cork from his own place to a shed some distance from the court, between ten and eleven o'clock, I told Mr. Hicks of it; about five minutes afterwards, I returned with Mr. Hicks; I then saw Prettie carrying a large bag of cork under his arm.

CHARLES HICKS . I am a cork merchant. On the 17th of January, I sold the prosecutor thirteen bundles of cork, it was put in my warehouse, some of it being stolen, I sent for the prisoner, Robinson, I afterwards saw him burning cork behind the London Hospital, another man was with him; I told him, it was the cork that I had lost, and asked him where he got it, and who he bought it from; he said he bought it of me; and after some hesitation, he said, it was the cork of the Francis ship; I said, it was the Eliza cork, it was a different sort from the Francis, and that he only bought two bundles of the Francis; he said, he had three bundles of the Francis, and this was the best of it; I told him, I could not believe but it was my cork, and I found a piece, and told him, it could not be the Francis's cork; they still persisted in burning it, and the other man said, it was a piece which he had cut a fortnight ago; I said, it was the Eliza cork, and that it was fresh cut. Robinson advised me to let the matter rest for a few days, and I should be more likely to find it out. I described the cork to my son, and told him to go and search all round to the cork-cutters; they were burning it near Prettie's house. I went to Prettie's house with the last witness about half an hour afterwards, and we found about four hundred weight of cork, laying in a shed there. I saw Pettie coming from his own house with a bag full of the cork, which he put into the shed; I asked him where he got it, and told him that it was taken out of my warehouse; he said, if I would come down into the kitchen, he would shew me the remainder, and tell me all about it; I went with him, he shewed me the cork, and told me, that Robinson had brought it to him about seven o'clock in the morning; he said, he brought seven bundles in a cart, about seven o'clock in the morning; he said, he did not know that it was stolen, I asked him, why he was getting it out of his house; he said, because Robinson had been back within the last half hour, and told him it was stolen, and to get it away; he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Cork is a difficult article to indentify in general. I bought the whole cargo of the Eliza; I have sold cork to Robinson; I did not sell him any of the Eliza cork.

Cross-examined by MR. WALPOLE. Prettie said, he had it from Robinson; the shed was a great way from his house.

HENRY HICKS . I am the son of the last witness. When the prisoner, Robinson, bought the Francis cork, I delivered it to him; he told me afterwards, that he had cut it all up, it was not the same cork as the Eliza. I saw Robinson about eight o'clock in the morning, walking towards the field where the cork was burning; I told my father of it; I found the warehouse door lock broken between seven and eight o'clock, it was a pandlock. I had put it on the door about ten o'clock the night before, because the other had been broken, and in the morning I found that broken, and the property gone.

THOMAS MOORHOUSE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners, I asked Robinson, how he came to break the warehouse open; he said, he was very sorry for Prettie, as he had nothing to do with it; I found some cork at Robinson's, and some at Prettie's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

PRETTIE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-166

314. JOHN SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , one shirt, value 4s. , the property of John Marton .

HARRIET MARTON. My husband is a groom , we live at Hendon . The shirt was put on the hedge to dry, on the 9th of January, I saw the prisoner take it and he was secured.

ROBERT DREWETT . I am a labourer. Harriet Marton called to me to stop the prisoner, and I did, and found the shirt under his great coat.

(Property Produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SMITH . I took the prisoner into custody; he would not tell me his name, and wanted me to let him go; I found several shirts, stocking, and other clothes upon him.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-167

315. MARIA RABEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , thirty yards of canvas, value 12s. ; the property of John Hughes .

DAVID EVANS . I am shopman to Mr. Hughes, linen-draper , St. John-street . On the 24th of December, about

ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was lurking about the shop-window, soon after somebody gave me the alarm, and I ran after her, and took her about a hundred yards from the door, with my master's canvas on her shoulder.

Prisoner. I picked it up. GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment respited . Sent to the Refuge .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-168

316. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , six guinea-pigs, value 4s. 6d. , the property of Richard Baxter .

RICHARD BAXTER . I am a dealer in pigs , and live in Brick-lane, Bethnall-green . On the 7th of December, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in bed, I heard a noise in my yard, I got out of bed, and saw the prisoner taking my pigs out of my hutches; I ran into the yard, and he ran away, I took hold of him as he was getting out of my shed - He said his name was Johes. I asked him where he lived, he said, at Bethnall-green. I was taking him there, and he sat down in the street, and said he would not tell me where his father lived. I gave him to the constable. I lost two of my pigs.

WILLIAM BAXTER. I am the son of Richard Baxter. I went to the back of the house, and saw a man come out of the premises, and four pigs running out of the court.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-169

317. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one shawl, value 10s. , the property of Ann Dixon .

ANN DIXON . I keep a chandler's-shop , in Wheeler-street, Spital-fields . On the 5th of November, my shawl was in a chair behind the counter - I lost it.

MARY LINDSEY . The prisoner came into the shop for some cheese, I saw him take the shawl off the chair, and run out. I could not overtake him. I am sure he is the man.

ALEXANDER BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker; I have a shawl pledged on the 6th of November, in the name of Mary Thompson . On the 13th of January the prisoner applied to me for an affidavit, saying, he had lost the duplicate; he said his wife pledged it, but she was confined.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DEVILLE . I am an officer. On the 1st of January I took the prisoner into custody; he said he took the shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-170

318. MICHAEL LYNCH and SARAH LYNCH were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , two Bank dollars, value 11s., and 3s., in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Golliker .

MARY GOLLIKER . I am the wife of Thomas Golliker , who is a stoker in the gas-house , the two prisoners lodged with me. On the 11th of January, Sarah Lynch saw me put my money in a box, I put the key at the head of the bed; I desired her to iron some linen, and went out, when I returned she had not done it. She went out and came back. I missed the key, she told me not to make a noise, I should find it to-morrow. She went up stairs, and said she had found the key, and gave it to me the next morning; I missed my money, and gave her in charge. Her husband was at home at the time.

JOSEPH PRINCE. I am an officer; I took the prisoners into custody. Sarah Lynch said, she would make it right the next morning, if they would let her alone.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-171

319. JOSEPH MOULDER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , one waistcoat, value 7s.; two pair of stockings, value 4s. 6d.; two pair of drawers, value 3s.; one pair of sleeves, value 3s.; and one handkerchief, value 6d. , the property of William Sandison .

WILLIAM SANDISON . I am an umbrella-maker , and live in Playhouse-yard, Golden-lane . On the 31st of December. I missed my things, the prisoner lived in the same room with me; he told me he had taken the things, before I missed them.

JOSEPH PRINCE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the 4th of January, he gave Sanderson the duplicates, and said he was in distress.

GEORGE GILLETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street; the prisoner pledged two pair of stockings with me on the 31st of December.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-172

320. JOHN KNIGHT and WILLIAM PRICE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one hat, value 5s., the property of William Godson , from his person .

WILLIAM GODSON. I live with my uncle. On the 6th of December, about half-past five in the evening, I was in Holborn , near Southampton-buildings, on my return home to Grosvenor-square, somebody behind struck me a violent blow on my head; I turned round, and the prisoner, Prise, pointed to a boy, named Barker, and said it was him. I went on and took no notice, when Barker came up and offered to fight me, I had said nothing to them, I refused; Price jumped up and took off my hat, I took it from him, and went into Holborn-court; when I was in the middle of the court the same boys came up to me again, and took off my hat, they ran by and threw a hat away; I picked it up, thinking it was mine, but it was not. I pursued them and called out, stop thief! the two prisoners ran towards Bellingham-buildings. I followed them, they parted, and I collared Knight, he said he had not got the hat, but the other boy had, pointing to Price. Barker came up, and said he could show me where the hat was, and took me to Holborn-court; as I was going along Knight attempted to put his hand into my pocket, I turned round, and he ran away. Barker looked down Holborn-court, and said the hat was not there. I afterwards went with Barker to Air-street-hill; he said Knight lived there-he was not at home, Barker then ran off. I gave information at the Police-Office, and the two prisoners were taken into custody the next night. I am sure

the two prisoners were with the other boys when I lost my hat.

THOMAS RICE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, Knight, and afterwards took Price, at his father's house; he had a hat on which the prosecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KNIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 13.

PRICE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-173

321. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , one pair of bellows, value 1s. 6d. , the property of Thomas Deakin and John Richard Haynes .

JOHN RICHARD HAYNES . I am Thomas Deakin 's partner; we are ironmongers in St. John-street . On the 12th of December, the bellows were at our door, about dusk the officer brought the prisoner into the shop, with the bellows.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 10th of December, I observed the prisoner lurking about the shop, and saw him take the bellows from within the door; I took him with the bellows in his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-174

322. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , from the person of William Warre Simpson , one pocket-book, value 6d., and two bank notes for the payment of and value 1l. each, his property .

WILLIAM WARRE SIMPSON. I live in Fore-street, with Mr. Wilson, who is a broker. On the 3d of January, I was in High Holborn , going towards St. Giles's, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was stopped by the constable, who had the prisoner in custody; he asked me if I had lost any thing; I found I had lost my pocket-book, which contained the property stated in the indictment. I did not see the prisoner near me. I knew the book to be mine. It was in the kennell at Southampton-buildings.

THOMAS THOHPSON. I am a constable. On the 3d of January, I was in Holborn, just by Middle-row, I saw the prosecutor walking along, and the prisoner, with two others, behind him, the prisoner attempted his pocket twice, without success; he put his finger into his pocket; the two other men were close behind, apparently covering him from view. I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take something out - He put it under his great coat. I told the prosecutor, and took hold of the prisoner and another of the men; I was the pocket-book fall from the prisoner into the kennell. The other man made his escape, and left his hat in my hand. Mr. Simpson claimed the book; it contained two 1l. notes and some papers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Q.by Prisoner. Did you not lay hold of another man before me - A. I took both together.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-175

323. CATHERINE ROOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , three pounds of pork, value 1s. 8d. , the property of William Ralph .

GEORGE HOLT . I am servant to Mr. Ralph, cheesemonger , South-street, Spitalfields ; I saw the prisoner, and another woman, come to the shop, the woman asked for some ham, after they were gone I missed the pork; I went after them, and found the prisoner just by the door, I charged her with taking it, and took her to the watchhouse. She had the pork. I knew it to be my master's property.

JOHN BARRS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house, and the pork was taken out of her apron; she said she had bought it in the Borough. Hold claimed it. She said it weighed two pounds; it weighed three pounds and ten ounces.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Month , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-176

324. JOHN KEYS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , four shirts, value 20s. , the property of Paul Buckley .

The indictment being laid in the county of Middlesex, and it being proved that the house was in the city of London , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-177

325. JOHN GOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , four screw-drivers, value 1s. 4d.; 622 locks, value 30l.; 636 keys, value 11l. 2s.; 35 pair of brass hinges, value 1l. 14s. 6d.; 12 brass handles, value 7s.; 28 plated handles, value 1l. 10s. 4d.; 7 table-catches, value 5s. 3d.; 30 brass buttons, value 6s. 3d.; 624 brass hooks and eyes, value 1l. 1.8d.; 18 brass knobs, value 2s. 3d.; 72 brass eyes, value 4s.; 13 castors, value 5s. 6d.; 6 pair of iron hinges, value 4s. 6d.; 58 blanks, value 1l. 18s. 8d.; 24 rings and roses, value 4s.; 648 screws. value 13s. 6d.; and 10,000 small nails, value 4s. 6d. , the property of William Sturch , William Jesse Sturch , and James Boobyer .

JOHN ROSSET . I am shopman to Messrs. Sturch and Co., they in Stanhope-street. Clare-market ; the prisoner was in the habit of coming to our shop, he came on the 20th of December, Walker shewed him a box of screw-drivers; previous to that I saw him put his hand over the counter, which made me suspect him; he bought a turn-screw, and paid four-pence for it; he was going out, I detained him, and sent for Clark, the officer, who searched him and found ten locks and five screw-drivers upon him, besides the one that he bought, they came out of the same drawer that he was served from - He was opposit the place where the locks were kept. I accompanied the officer to his lodgings, and there we found the articles stated in the indictment. He was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The prisoner has often dealt with us, he was near the locks, he must reach over the counter to get them. The locks were never sold out of our shop; he was about twenty minutes in the the shop; there was a card on some of them, with our

private mark on them, we never send them out so. The prisoner had been in the shop that morning before.

WILLIAM WALKER . I was in the shop when the prisoner came in, it was about two o'clock; I was engaged with another customer. The prisoner asked for a turn-screw, he was in the shop about ten minutes, before I served him. I went to the drawer, and shewed him the turn-screws, he made choice of one, and shewed it to me; he paid four-pence for it. I am sure he only bought one. We never sell goods with the private marks on them; they are always put into fresh paper.

Cross-examined. He might have been in the shop twenty minutes.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I searched the prisoner, and found some locks and a turn-screw on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the screws and locks. Rosset tied them up for me, and I paid him.

JOHN ROSSET. I did not sell him any turn-screws. I am sure he never bought any locks of me.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-178

326. SARAH BENJAMIN , was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one box, value 6d.; and seventy wine glasses, value 25s. , the property of James Robins .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-179

327. GEORGE COX , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , thirty-three pounds of beef, value 8s. , the property of Thomas Saunders .

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am a butcher , and live at Islington . On the 24th of December, my beef hung up in my shop, about half-past four o'clock, I missed it, and found it laying on the ground, about twenty yards from my house.

THOMAS COLE . I live next door to Mr. Saunders. On the 24th of December, I was at my door, and saw the prisoner near his shop with the beef in his apron, he was going from the shop, I called, stop thief! and he threw the beef away; I took hold of him. I am sure that he is the man.

DIANA HEATH . I saw the prisoner take the beef off the hook; I told Mr. Cole.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-180

328. MARY WILLIAMS , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , one pocket-book, value 6d.; and 20s. in monies numbered , the property of John Miller .

JOHN MILLER . I am a gardener , and live in Castle-street, Borough. On the 28th of December about six o'clock in the evening, my pocket-book was in my breeches pocket. I met the prisoner in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields , I asked her the way to Spitalfields, being a stranger; she was standing at her door, and three other women came, and they forced me into the house; I had my bundle on my shoulder, they got me into the passage, and the three women stood at the door while the prisoner took my pocket-book from my breeches pocket, it had 20s. in it. I put up my hand to take care of my bundle, which was on my shoulder; the other women swore they would murder me - I was alarmed; the prisoner went away and I got out, and told the patrol, and described the prisoner to him. I saw her again in about five minutes. I am sure she is the person. She was searched, and a 6d. found on her, which I described to the patrol before I saw it; it has a figure of 3 marked on it.

ABRAHAM COATLEY. The prosecutor came to me about half-past six o'clock, and described the prisoner to me, he pointed out the place. I apprehended the prisoner about ten minutes after, at a public-house just by. The prosecutor laid hold of her, and said, she was the woman; he said he had lost 20s., and a 6d. marked with a figure of 3, which he could swear to. I searched her, and found a 6d. on her, and 7s.; he knew the sixpence when he saw it. He was quite sober, (I produce it).

JOHN MILLER . I can swear to the 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-181

329. JOHN SMITH , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , nine shirts, value 5l.; four waistcoats, value 5s.; one pair of trowsers, value 10s.; four handkerchiefs, value 12s.; two pair of stockings, value 6s. , the property of Ann Walker .

ANN WALKER , I live in Surat-street, St. George's . I take in washing . The prisoner took a lodging at my house, on the 10th of September, he came about half-past nine o'clock at night. The next morning he got up at five o'clock and went out, he did not return; I heard him about the room, and locked the door; I let him out myself, he had nothing in his hands, but he appeared very bulky about his person; I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of the room which he slept in. I met him on the 16th of January, and gave the alarm, and he was taken. I am sure he is the man.

ANN BORLEY . I live in the Commercial-road. The prisoner came to my house about the 10th of September, for a lodging; I recommended him to Mrs. Walker. I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Two Years , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-182

330. JOHN SHIELDS , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one watch, value 1l.; one chain, value 6d.; one seal, value 6d.; and one key, value 1d. , the property of Robert Linders .

ROBERT LINDERS . I keep a coal-shed , in Lion-yard, Smithfield. On Sunday, the 15th of December, about seven o'clock in the afternoon, my watch hung against my

kitchen-wall; the prisoner, and another young man, came to enquire for a person whom I did not know. The prisoner was just by the watch, I missed it directly he went. I sent my son after him; he was taken in about a quarter of an hour. I saw my watch taken from him - He said, he had not got it.

CATHARINE WAINER . I am an unfortunate girl. The prisoner met me, and asked me to have something to drink - We went to the Dundee Arms, just by Linders's house. As we came out, Linders's son stopped him, and accused him of stealing the watch. I took the watch from him, and gave it to the constable.

THOMAS HARRISON . Wainer gave me the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-183

331. REBECCA ROBERTS and MARY CREW , were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one bank token, value 3s.; and 16s. in monies numbered, the property of Abel Burchall , from his person .

ABEL BURCHALL. I live with Messrs. Trueman and Co., brewers. On the 7th of December, about nine o'clock at night, I saw the two prisoners at a public-house, in Brick-lane . Roberts came and sat down by me, on my left side. I told her I did not want to say any thing to her. She drank my beer without my leave. The other prisoner was in the room. My money was in my left hand breeches pocket. I had sixteen shillings and a three shilling bank token. I saw her hand come from my pocket, and she ran out of the box; I ran out and took hold of her. Crew came up, and took the money out of her hand, before I could lay hold of it, she ran into the tap-room, and gave it to somebody else. I brought the prisoner, Roberts, into the house, and gave her into custody. Crew was also searched, but nothing found on her. The prisoners appeared to be acquainted with several in the room. My pocket was drawn out.

JOHN BARRS . I am a constable. I took charge of the two prisoners. I found Roberts concealed in the privy.

ROBERTS. - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

CREW- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-184

332. BRIDGET RILEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , from the person of James Cottle , one gold ring, value 3s.; 8s. in monies numbered; and three 1l. bank-notes , his property.

JAMES COTTLE . I live in Ogle-street, Marylebone. I am a mason . On the 26th of December, I went into a public-house, in Church-street, St. Giles's, at ten o'clock at night, to enquire for a person; the prisoner took me to another public house to find him. I treated her with some gin. I went home with her about half-past ten o'clock. I had my things about me then. I staid there till the morning. I heard a noise in the night, and missed my things about five o'clock in the morning. I charged her with robbing me, and she gave me 2s. 6d. which I can swear to. I gave her no money.

WILLIAM NOBLE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; she had 14s. 6d. upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me six shillings, and wanted his money back again.

ANN ROSE . I live with the prisoner. I heard the prosecutor and her go up stairs, and soon after, I heard money jingling. I heard them quarreling in the morning, the prisoner said, do you want your money again, and she gave him 2s. 6d.; he did not complain of being robbed.

MARY WHITE . I am an unfortunate girl. I heard the prisoner say, in the public-house the over-night, that he had not got any money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-185

333. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one watch, value 1l. 15s.; one watch chain, value 1l.; and one watch key, value 2s., the property of Robert Moore , from his person .

ROBERT MOORE . I live in Tash-street, Gray's-inn-lane, and am a carpenter . On the 17th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I parted with a friend in Long-lane, my watch was safe then, the chain hung out; I had been drinking, but knew what I was about. I had just come out of a public-house; two persons came up to me, the prisoner was one of them; I enquired the way to Gray's-inn-lane; they said, they were going that way, and walked part of the way with me, I had my son with me; he walked before, when we got to Cow-cross , they tried to push my son down, I spoke to them about it; they said, they did not know that he belonged to me; I then felt one of them pull my watch out, they had hold of my arms, and run away. I called out watch, and the prisoner was taken in half a minute.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I had been drinking. I only fell down once. The two prisoners came up to me.

BENJAMIN MOORE. I was with my father, on the 17th of December; he was not very drunk. When we came out of the public-house in Long-lane, the prisoner offered his assistance; I am sure he is one of them; they laid hold of his arm. I put my father's watch in his fob for him, and put the chain inside. When we came to Cow-cross, the prisoner and another man had hold of his arm, there were two men behind; the prisoner gave me a shove, and told me to go on; he pushed the bundle out my hand, I picked it up, my father said I was his son, and he begged his pardon; I heard my father cry out watch! I turned round, and found they had left him. Thompson took one of them.

Cross-examined. My father had been drinking at two or three different public-houses; he fell down, and the prisoner offered his assistance.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. I saw the prosecutor coming from Smithfield; the prisoner had hold of his arm, the other man following. I was in a dark corner, and watched them, I followed them down Cow-cross, one of the three took hold of the prosecutor's arm; I heard the prosecutor call watch, one of the prisoners run down Bowling-street; the prisoner crossed the street; I took him, and told him, he had robbed the man; he said, he had nothing about him; he said, one of those two

have got his watch, and I should overtake him; the prosecutor had his senses.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. The prisoner denied it; I did not see the watch taken.

Q. When you got to Hatton-Garden, was not the prosecutor so much intoxicated that the examination was put off - A. He was.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner, and another man, take hold of the prosecutor's arm in Cow-cross; soon after, I heard the alarm, and saw Thompson take the prisoner.

Cross-examined. The prosecutor was in liquor.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am the keeper of the watch-house. The prosecutor was the worse for liquor.

Cross-examined. His wife was obliged to come to write his name to the charge; he was too drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-186

334. RICHARD MASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , one 3s. bank token; one 1s. 6d. bank token, and 2s. in money , the property of James White .

JAMES WHITE . I am a tinplate-worker , and live at Somers-town, the prisoner was in my service. I suspected him; I marked the money, and put it in my till; I left the key in the till, by accident; I missed it about eight o'clock in the morning of the 12th of December; the prisoner had been out; I asked him where he had been, he said, to breakfast; he used to bring his breakfast with him; he would not let me search him; I fetched his mother; she searched him, and found the money, stated in the indictment, in his pocket; he refused to account for it; I gave the tokens to the officers. I can swear to them.

PETER WHIPHAM. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-187

335. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , one bed, value 3l.; one bolster, value 1s.; one sheet, value 1s.; one quilt, value 2s.; and three blankets, value 10s., the property of Thomas Mecham , the same goods being in a lodging-room, in the dwelling house of the said, Thomas Mecham , let by contract by him to the prisoner, to be used with the lodging aforesaid .

THOMAS MECHAM. I am a cordwainer , and live in Corbts-court, Spital-fields . On Monday the 3d of January, I let the prisoner a furnished room, at 5s. per week; he went away on the Friday night, and took the bed and bedding with him, the watchman brought him back. The articles stated in the indictment were let with the lodging.

JOHN SALE . I am a watchman, about half past five o'clock in the morning, of the 8th of January; I saw the prisoner go by my box with something on his back; I asked him what it was, he said, it was a bed that he had brought from his lodging, in Brick-lane, and that I might go back with him, if I liked, and that he could tell me what was in it, as a proof that he had not stolen it; he said, he was going to take it to the water-side. as he was going to sea, and must be there by six o'clock; I took him to the watch-house; when he got there, he said, that he was going on board a ship and wanted to go; he said, that his lodgings were in Brick-lane; the officer went to look for them, but could not find them; the prisoner said, he could find them by day-light; we took him to look for them; he would not go up Church-street; nor would he go up Red Lion-street; when we got to the place, he saw his wife and landlady, and went in; his wife was alarmed at his being in custody. When we came to Corbet's-court; he knew it very well; we went into the prosecutor's house, the landlady said, she hoped he had not robbed her; she went up, and missed the things; she came to the watch-house, and claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HOWE. I am headborough. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house, he said, he was going on board an Indiaman; I told him, it was not a right bed to go on board a ship; he asked me to go with him to point out his lodgings, we could not find them; he said, the name of his ship was the Vansittart; in the morning we found where he had stolen the things.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-188

336. JAMES HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , one pair of shoes, value 10s. , the property of Joseph Rivolta .

JOSEPH RIVOLTA . I am a shoe maker , and live in Great Saffron-hill . On the 30th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was cleaning my windows, and saw a hand snatch a pair of water-tight shoes from my door; I went out, and the prisoner was secured.

RICHARD PORRI . I live next door to the prosecutor. On the 30th of December, I was standing at my door, and saw the prisoner before the window; he had nothing in his hand, in a little time I saw him with the shoes; I took him, and he threw them down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HIGHAM BARNETT. I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-189

337. THOMAS GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one cask, value 1s., and 56lbs of damp-blue, value 1l. , the property of Benjamin Brushfield .

ABRAHAM OAKLEY . I am a patrol. On the 10th of January, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I was at the corner of Rose-lane, Spital-fields. I met the prisoner crossing the road, somebody gave an alarm, and I stopped him with the cask of blue on his shoulder; I asked him what it was, he said, it was salt, and that he got it from Mr. Saltes, in Bishopsgate-street. I asked him, where he was going to take it; he said, to the corner of Angel-alley, Whitechapel, to a cheesmonger's. I told him, it was too heavy for salt, and took him to the watch

house. I went to Angel-alley, the man said, he expected no salt, nor did he know Mr. Salter; the cask was examined and found to be blue.

THOMAS HART . I examined the cask at the watchhouse, the prisoner said it was salt; I found it to be blue.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who told me to carry it to Whitechapel, and said it was salt.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-190

338. RICHARD ARNETT was indicted for embezzlement .

No prosecutor appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-191

339. JOHN WALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 5lbs. of bacon, value 3s. , the property of Thomas Gammage .

THOMAS GAMMAGE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in King-street, Seven-dials , On the 13th of December, I saw my bacon safe, about five o'clock in the afternoon.

WILLIAM SYMMONDS . I am a bricklayer. I was coming down King-street, and saw the prisoner go to the window, and take the bacon out of the shop; I laid hold of him, and took him back to the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-192

340. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 16lb of beef, value 4s. , the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a butcher , and live in Clerkenwell . On the 13th of December, in the evening, I was in my cellar; I sent my wife up to look to the door, and she called me; I missed the beef, and went to look for the man; I went to the White Horse, and found several men in the parlour there; I asked the landlord if there was any body in his kitchen, he said, no. I went down to see; they pushed me about as I was going to the door. The prisoner came to the door with the beef in his apron; he said, d-n me, lads, I have been and bought a fine bit of beef for supper. I took hold of him, and said, I have got you beef and all; I took him into custody, and sent for an officer; he shewed a great resistance, and got towards the street - door, there was a large gang of them; he tried to get out of the door; I held him; he got away for a little time; I was surrounded by about twenty men; the prisoner ran away; the officer took him again. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM THISSLETON. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the White Horse, I took him to the office, and shewed him to the prosecutor among ten more men, and he said, the prisoner was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man in Cow-cross. who saw a man drop the beef; I picked it up, and took it into the public-house to have some beer.

RICHARD SAUNDERS . I am a boot-closer, the prisoner is a book-binder, I live at No. 4, Glovers-hall-court, Whitecross-street, the prisoner lives in Golden-lane; I was going to Clerkenwell, and met the prisoner, he went with me; as we were going along Tash-street, a man was going along and dropped a piece of beef; the prisoner called after the man, but he would not come back, and the prisoner picked it up; he was a tall man with a blue coat on; the prisoner went with me to the public-house; the man seized him with the beef, nobody else was near. I was never in the public-house before. I do not know the landlord; there were several there; I stopped at the bar while the prisoner went in; the man brought him back by the collar, several gathered round; nobody was with me; this is the truth. We called for some beer; the man laid hold of him; I do not know what he said; I was paying for the beer; he went into the tap-room, and I called for the beer.

Q.Why did you not say you saw him pick it up then - A. There were so many round.

Q. Why did you not go to the justice - A. I went to Hatton-garden, but the justice would not hear me; it was some days after he was taken; it was not the next morning after he found the beef.

WILLIAM SMITH . I never saw any body but the prisoner.

WILLIAM THISSLETON . The robbery was committed on the 13th of December, I did not take the prisoner till 21st. I charged him on my own suspicion. He was not brought up to the office till the 23d. The prisoner was not taken that night.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-193

341. JOHN WILSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th. of January , one chest, value 2s., and eighty-four pounds of tea, value 23l. , the property of John Jones .

WILLIAM HERMITAGE . I am carman to Mr. Jones, who is a grocer , and lives in Oxford-street . On the 9th of January, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, I was unloading before my master's door, I had unloaded three chests, and a hogshead of sugar, and was making room in the shop, when I was asked by a young man, if I had lost a chest of tea. I run out, and missed one chest. The man said, he had seen three men take it from the cart and cross over, and turn down James-street. I run down James-street, and saw two men standing, and asked one of them, if they had seen any body with the chest, they said no, we have just come up. I thought they might be two of the men. I turned round and saw the chest, and the prisoner standing before it to hide it, he turned away, and I took him, and told him he had taken the chest of tea. I took him to the shop. He refused to go, but I got assistance. Three men carried the chest for me, (it weighed 1cwt.) while I secured the prisoner; he said, he would not go to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. I did not see him carry it, he was standing in a dark corner before the chest. It was not a minute before I lost it.

HENRY JOHNSTON. On the 9th of January, I was standing against Mr. Taylor's door, and saw three men stand

ing at the corner of James-street; one of them went up to the cart and took the chest out of the cart, and crossed the road. I told my shopmate, and he told the carman. The last witness came up to me, and I told him which way they were gone, he went down James-street after them.

Cross-examined. I will not swear that the prisoner was one of them.

SAMUEL PYALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-194

342. HENRY HALLETT and THOMAS STEVENS , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , one bullock's heart, value 3s.; and one sheep's pluck, value 9d. , the property of John Watkins , the elder, and John Watkins , the younger.

It being proved, that John Watkins , junior, was not in partnership with John Watkins, senior, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-195

343. SAMUEL JAMES PILKINGTON and JAMES GRAY , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , four pair of boots, value 30s.; two pair of shoes, value 5s.; two hammers, value 6d.; two pair of pinchers, value 2s.; and one apron, value 6d. ; the property of John Coke .

JOHN COKE. I am a boot-maker , and live in Bowling-street, Clerkenwell. On the 29th of December, in the morning, when I came to my stall in Back-hill , I found the door open, the bolt of the lock broken, it was shut to, and the window broken. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment. The next day, a man took me to a woman, who told me where my things were; the officer shewed me my property.

RICHARD EYRES . I am the watchman of Saffron-hill. About a quarter before five o'clock in the morning, I was going down Blackboy-alley, and saw the prisoner, Pilkington, in the alley, putting on a pair of half-boots, he was knocking them against the wall, he could hardly get them on; he saw me looking at him, and said, watchman shew me a light; I went up to him, a pair of old shoes were laying just by him, which he had pulled off. The prisoner, Gray, was looking round the corner and saw me, he pretended to be calling somebody to get up to go to work, but nobody answered. I heard the other watchman coming along, I called him, and we took the prisoners into custody, we took them to the watch-house and searched them, and found some small keys and a small lock on them; I found the prosecutor's property in the cellar of an uninhabited house, close to where they were putting on the boots.

HENRY BAYS. I am keeper of the watch-house. I searched the two prisoners, and found a picklock-key and three other keys on Pilkington, and a small bolt, and a brass lock; I delivered them to the officer.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. I took a pair of boots off Pilkington. The picklock-key fits Coke's door, very well.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PILKINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

GRAY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-196

344. JOHN MACDONALD and JOHN GOFF , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one cloak, value 1l. , the property of Matthew Richardson .

ELIZA RICHARDSON . My husband is a well-digger , and lives in Swallow-street. On the 12th of January, the prisoner, Macdonald, brought me a letter, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I found it was for my sister. While I was going up stairs to take it to her, he took my cloak, when I came down, Goff was at the door with him. I am sure the cloak was in the room when he came to the door, and it was gone when I came down.

THOMAS PARKHOUSE. I am a constable. I found the cloak at a house in Drury-lane, on the 12th of January. I went with Richardson's husband, who told me, that Macdonald lived there, I saw him, and asked him, what he had done with the cloak; he said, he had not got it. I found it in his front garrett gutter. I took him into custody; he said, if I would let him go, he would never do so again. Both the prisoners were in the room - I took them.

MACDONALD - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months , and Fined One Shilling

GOFF- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-197

345. HENRY WHEELER and WILLIAM MURRAY , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , one set of chaise harness, value 1l. , the property of Serach Atkinson .

SEARCH ATKINSON. I am a plaisterer , and live in New court, Chapel-street, Westminster . On the 13th of January, between six and seven o'clock, I missed my harness from my passage, where it usually hung. My brother had it out that day. That is all I know.

JAMES GILLMORE. On Monday evening, the 13th of January, the prosecutor came to me, stating that he had lost his harness, and who he suspected to have stolen it. About twenty minutes afterwards the prosecutor came to me with part of the harness, (the collar and traces), after that he sent for me to take Murray into custody-which I did. I went with Murray to Wheeler's house, and took him into custody. Wheeler's friends threatened to prosecute Murray, for inducing Wheeler to commit the robbery. The next morning the prosecutor brought me the other part of the harness, which he said, in the prisoner's presence, was delivered to him by Wheeler's friends.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ATKINSON re-examined by the Court. I got the harness from Murray. I had seen him that night. I do not know where the harness hung up that night. I do not know where it was.

Q. Did you never say, it hung behind the street door in the passage - A. I might. I do not know that it did

Q. Will you swear that it was not hanging there - A. I do not know. I did not see it there at all. I did not see it there that day; my brother had it out.

Q. Did you not tell the magistrate, that it hung up in the passage leading to the street - door, and that the prisoner must go through that passage to go out - A. I do not know. I suspected Murray, by his calling on me; I missed it about half an hour afterwards. I had not seen it that evening.

Q.After you had seen Gillmore, where did you go to - A.Into Tothill-street, to Murray's, he is a harness-maker, Wheeler was selling the harness there.

Q. How came you to tell me that you knew no more about it - A. It did not strike me then; I met him at this end of Tothill-street, the sadler's is in the middle.

Q. Will you swear he was at the end of the street - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to swear that Murray was waiting at the other side of the street - A. Wheeler gave me part of the harness, and brought the other part home.

Q. Why did you not tell me this story before - A. I do not know.

Q. Is what you swore before the magistrate true or not? which story do you stick by, what you swore before the magistrate, or what you say here - A. I stick by what I say here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-198

346. JOHN KEYS and TIMOTHY DWYER , were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one coat, value 10s. , the property of Charles Dent .

CHARLES DENT. I am servant to Mr. Dent, who lives in Baker-street ; on the 10th of January the coat was down stairs.

GEORGE PITMAN. I am an officer. I met the two prisoners coming down Gloucester-place, about half-past two o'clock, Keys had got the coat in his apron - He threw it down, and attempted to run away. I called out, stop thief! and he stopped. Dwyer had ran away. I took Keys to the office, and Dwyer was brought in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KEYS'S Defence. A man gave it to me to carry.

KEYS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

DWYER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-199

347. SARAH HALEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 26s., in monies numbered, the property of Thomas Evans , from his person .

THOMAS EVANS . I am a painter , and live in Collingwood-street. I met the prisoner in Whitechapel-road, with five more women, they asked me for some drink; I took them into the Yorkshire Gray, in Whitechapel, I left them there and went on towards home, when I got a little way the prisoner overtook me, and asked me if I was going home, and where I lived? I told her; she said she lived in Collingwood-street, and kept a school opposite my house. When I came to the corner of Collingwood-street , she called me on one side, and told me not to tell the neighbours that she was out so late, as she was not going home then. It was twelve o'clock. While she was talking to me I felt something go out of my pocket, and missed my money; I laid hold of her hand, and took my money out of it, and she cried out watch! the watchman came up, and she said she would give me in charge, as I was going to rob her of her ring. I told the watchman she had robbed me of my money. Being close to my house my wife heard the noise, and came out. We went to the watch-house together; when we got there, she said she had only got 17s. in her pocket, which, she said, was her own, and she had no more about her. I said I had lost more; the constable told my wife to search her, which she did, and found 8s. 6d. and a duplicate on her; the duplicate was taken out of my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I did not know that the prisoner lived opposite me, I afterwards found she did not. I never saw her before. I knew what I was about, but I was not sober. I did not give her the money.

SARAH EVANS . I am the wife of the last witness. I heard my husband call watch, as I was in my room. I went out to him, he said the prisoner had robbed him. I asked her to give me his money if she had got it; she said she had got none belonging to him. When the watchman came up, she charged him with attempting to rob her of her ring; we went to the watch-house; I went into a room and searched her - She undressed herself, I found 8s. 6d. and a duplicate of a shirt, between her stays, and a piece of money which my husband had taken for a shilling, which I had for sometime. When I found them she said if I would give her 3s. she would give me the money back again; I told her I would not. I did not know her, I never saw her before.

Cross-examined. I said nothing about Parker. My husband was in liquor, but he was sensible.

MARTIN REMMINGTON . I am a watchman. On the 19th of December, about twelve o'clock, I was called by the prisoner and prosecutor, the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge for taking his money out of his pocket; She said that the prosecutor wanted to take her ring off. She did not give charge of him; she had a ring on. I left them at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. The man's wife went with us. I did not hear her say any thing about a Mr. Parker.

MARTIN FRAMINGHAM. I am the watch-house-keeper; the prosecutor came to the watch-house on the 19th of December, about twelve o'clock at night, and charged the prisoner with picking his pocket of 20s.; she pulled 17s. out of her pocket, which she said was her own, and that she had taken it where she worked. I asked her if she had any more, she said, no. She said she was willing to be searched. The prosecutor's wife searched her, and found 8s. 6d. upon her, and a bad shilling among it; I did not see the duplicate till the next morning, when Mrs. Evans gave it to me. The prisoner said, if I would give her some of the money, and let her go, she would. She did not make any charge against the man, either at the watch-house, or before the magistrate. She said, the 8s. 6d. was her own, and the rest was the prosecutor's,

and that he had given it to her; before that, she claimed the whole. Evans had been drinking, but knew what he was about (I produce the duplicate and money).

EVANS. I bought the duplicate of a man, and the bad shilling is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me all the money he had; he pulled me about, and I called watch, he then gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18170115-200

348. EMMA GROOM and ANN SMITH , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , three bank tokens, value 9s.; and one other bank token, value 1s. 6d., the property of George Hawkins , from his person .

GEORGE HAWKINS . I live in Foley-place. On the 29th of December, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I was at the corner of Margaret-street , the two prisoners stopped me; I staid with them about a quarter of an hour; I had 17s. 6d. in my pocket, and when I left them I had lost 10s. 6d., the prisoner, Groom, put her hand into my breeches pocket, and took it out. I gave them in charge.

WILLIAM HEWITT. I am a constable; the prisoners were brought to the watch-house, about two o'clock in the morning; I found 1s. on Groom, and 10s. on Smith.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman; I saw the prosecutor and the two prisoners together, in Marylebone-street, he was talking to them; I went over to them, and told them to go away, when he gave them in charge; he said he would let me know what he had been robbed of, when he got to the watch-house, he said he had lost 3s.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-201

349. HENRY CRESWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one watch, value 30s.; one piece of ribbon, value 1d.; and one key, value 1d., the property of John Higgins , from his person .

JOHN HIGGINS . I live in West Smithfield, and am a silversmith . On the 7th of December, about half-past two in the morning, I was at a fire on Saffron-hill ; my watch was not hanging out, I was just by one of the engines, the prisoner pulled my watch out, I laid hold of him, and my friend said, he saw him throw the watch away, my friend picked it up. I am sure I saw the prisoner take it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. He was facing me. I am sure of his person.

CHRISTOPHER JOHN . I am a jeweller, and lodge with the last witness, we went together to see the fire; the prisoner and another man, were right before us; I saw the prisoner throw the watch down into the kennell - I picked it up. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was a great distance from them.

JOHN LLOYD . I heard the alarm and came up, and took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-202

350. JOHN DUGGAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , nine loaves of bread, value 10s. , the property of William Stevens .

HENRY GARDNER . I am a printer, and live in Union-street. I went past Mr. Stevens's shop, and saw five or six boys running by the shop, the prisoner went in, and the others took the bread of him as he handed it out to them. The prisoner had no shoes on. I took hold of him, and the others came to rescue him; one of them threw me down; I would not let go of him.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-203

351. THOMAS CASSELL , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one handkerchief, value 5s., the property of John Robinson . from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-204

352. MARY SMITH , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , from the person of Augustus Daubiguis, one pocket-book, value 1s.; and one 30l. bank-note , the property of the said Augustus Daubiguis , against the statute.

AUGUSTUS DAUBIGNIS . I am a French teacher . On the 14th of January, about twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in St. Giles's. I was rather intoxicated. I went home with her, and staid there about five minutes, it was in Lazaruscourt ; nobody else was in the room. I had my pocket-book safe then, it had a 30l. bank-note in it. I do not know whether I gave her any thing or not. There was no light in the room. I did not like the house, and she suffered me to go away. When I got out I missed my pocket-book. I had got to the top of Queen-street, Bloomsbury, where I lived. The next day, I gave information at Bow-street, and stopped the note at the bank, it was No. 7,899, and had my hand-writing on it. I saw it at Bow-street, about three days afterwards. I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

WILLIAM CRICKET. I am a salesman, and live in the Minories. On the 15th of December, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner and another woman, came to my house, and bought two pelises and three silk handkerchiefs, which came to 4l. together; they appeared to be meanly dressed. The prisoner gave me a 30l. note, I gave her 26l. in change. I asked her where she got the note; she said, she lodged with a man who had received it as prize-money, and had given them leave to spend 4l.; she said, he would want some things himself, and I gave her a card of my shop. She gave me the name of Smith, Newman-street, Deptford, to put on the note. I gave her one 10l. note and one 5l. note in change, and the

rest in 1l. notes. Salmon, the officer, came to me the next morning, and produced my card; and asked me, if I had taken a 30l. note - I told him I had; he produced some notes, I knew the 10l. note and the 5l., and will swear, that I gave the 10l. note to the prisoner. (I produce the 30l. note, which I took of the prisoner.)

AUGUSTUS DOUBIGNIS. It has my hand-writing on it. I took it of Mr. Dick.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Rose-court, St. Giles's. I told her what I apprehended her for, and asked her, if she had got any money about her, she said, she had not; I found a 1l. and a 5l. note, in her bosom, I apprehended another woman with her, and found Cricket's card on her, which led me to go to him; he produced the note which agreed with the description which the prosecutor gave him; the prosecutor swore to the prisoner directly he saw her, I produce the notes found on her.

CRICKIT. I know the 5l. note, by the letters R. C. over the 5. I took it of Robert Coleman , I am sure it is the note.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the note on the bed.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-205

353. WILLIAM ANSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , four shirts, value 12s., and one shift, value 3s. , the property of John Stevens .

DEBORA STEPHENS. I am the wife of John Stevens, we live at Mile-end , the things were drying in the yard, a person must get over the wall to get into it; I missed them on the 11th of December, about half past six o'clock at night; I had seen them ten minutes before; I saw them again in a quarter of an hour, the prisoner was then taken.

JOSEPH LEE . I am a drover, and live next door to Stephens. I heard a noise, and went out into the yard, and found some of the clothes drying there; I saw the prisoner at the top of the wash-house; I laid hold of him, and asked him how he came there; he said, he did not know; the lines were cut, and rolled up with the clothes. Mrs. Stephens claimed them; I found the cloaths stated in the indictment under the prisoner, at the top of the wash-house.

CHALES JAQUES. I am a constable. The clothes and prisoner were delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-206

354. CHARLES ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , one watch, value 15s. , the property of James Napier .

No prosecutor appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-207

355. WILLIAM MARRITT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2lbs of butter, value 2s , the property of Thomas Cooper .

THOMAS COOPER . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Wood-street, Spital-fields . On the 16th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked for a halfpenny worth of cheese, my wife told him we had not got any; he was going out, a gentleman said, he had got some butter under his apron, and took it from him; he said, he hoped I would forgive him.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-208

356. GEORGE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , one pair of skaites, value 2s. 6d. , the property of Thomas Daycock .

THOMAS DAYCOCK . I am a broker , and live in Wheeler-street, Spital-fields . On the 11th of January, the skaites were laying on my window board; I saw the prisoner take them up and run off; there was another boy with him; I followed him, he threw them down, and I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Judgement Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-209

357. THOMAS REARDON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , two pair of shoes, value 12s. , the, property of James Thompson .

JAMES THOMPSON . I am a shoemaker , and live in Oxford-street . On the 21st of January, the shoes hung up by the side of my door, West told me, that they were taken; I run out, turned up Queen-street, and found the prisoner in a slaughter-house. Limbric came up, and found the shoes on him.

THOMAS WEST . I live next door to Thompson. I saw the prisoner cut the shoes down, and told him of it; I picked one shoe up in the street.

LIMBRIC. I am an officer. I found three shoes on the prisoner. GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-210

358. ANN JEFFERIES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , two sheets, value 7s.; one pelisse, value 30s.; and two other sheets, value 7s., the property of James Geeves , being in a lodging room in his dwelling-house . NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-211

359. JAMES WILLIAM WOOD , was indicted for embezzlement .

ELIZA NORBURY . I am a laundress, and live in Kentish-town, the prisoner used to carry home my clothes, and receive my money. I told him to receive 6l. 14s. 8d. of Lady Cunningham; he promised to return by eight o'clock in the evening; he did not come back; he was taken up the next morning.

JANE CONGREVE . I am servant to Sir Joseph Cunningham, who lives in Berkeley-square, I paid the prisoner 6l. 18s. 4d., about seven o'clock in the evening.

JOHN SMITH. I am an officer. I took the prisoner

into custody; he gave me 6l., he said he had got tipsy and spent the 18s. 4d.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the money, and got drunk, and lost myself in going home; I slept at a public-house, and left the 6l. with the landlord, and told him it was not mine; the next morning as I was going to take it to the prosecutrix, I was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-212

360. ISAAC FRATE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one gown, value 2s.; one apron, value 6d.; one pair of stays, value 1s.; and one petticoat, value 1s. , the property of Mary Pearson .

The prosecutrix not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-213

361. SAMUEL SANYEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 28lb of Soap, value 18s. , the property of Thomas Cowderoy .

THOMAS COWDEROY. I am a grocer , and live at Broadway, Westminster . On the 18th of January, Mr. Piplin came to me for some change, a woman gave the alarm that a soldier had taken my soap, the prisoner was stopped and brought back with it.

WILLIAM PIPLIN , I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner, just by the door, with the soap under his arm. I followed him into a house up a court, and took him; he dropped the soap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18170115-214

362. EDWARD MACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one pair of stays, value 3s.; three skeins of silk, value 6d., the property of William Hoare , and one handkerchief, value 1s., the property of Abraham Hart , from the person of Sarah Hart .

SARAH HART . I am the wife of Abraham Hart, who is a glass-cutter . On the 20th of January, about six o'clock in the evening; I was going to Spital-fields, the prisoner spoke to me several times; and when I came to Sun-street , he took my bundle from me, and ran away; I followed him, and called stop thief! he was stopped before I lost sight of him, he dropped the bundle. I am sure he is the man.

ABRAHAM OAKLEY. I am a plasterer. I heard the alarm; I saw the prisoner drop the bundle. I took it up, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.


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