Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1816.
Reference Number: 18161204
Reference Number: f18161204-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 4th of DECEMBER, 1816, and following Days; Being the First Session in the Second Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, 74, Basinghall Street,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, FOR H. BUCKLER, BY T. BOOTH, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons.

1816.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bailey , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Richard Richards , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Eamer , Knt. Sir William Leighton , Knt. Joshua Jonathan Smith . Esq. Samuel Birch , Esq. Samuel Goodbehere , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart. Recorder of the said City, and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Starke ,

Thomas Davey ,

Henry Stewart Cundy ,

Evan Lloyd ,

Martin Skilts ,

James Harrison ,

Robert Wood ,

William Burton ,

John Dolphin ,

William Hickson ,

William Puckeridge ,

Thomas Syms .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Dodson ,

Henry Seabourn ,

Roger Percell ,

Robert Kennedy Dikman ,

Chace Craddock ,

Joseph Styles ,

Thomas King ,

Thomas Sherratt ,

John Williams ,

William Orton Coleman ,

John Hart ,

John Man .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Watson ,

Thomas Brown ,

Robert Brown ,

James Frazer ,

James Lawrence ,

Andrew Bethune ,

George Fairbank ,

Edward Harsant ,

Joseph Franks ,

William Whitbread ,

James Bentley ,

Joseph Kinder .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 4, 1816.

WOOD, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION IN THE SECOND MAYORALTY.

Reference Number: t18161204-1

1. JOHN ETHERINGTON was indicted, for that he on the 25th of August last, at the parish of St. Pancras , upon Robert Teasdale , a subject of our Sovereign Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously, &c. did strike, stab, and cut the said Robert Teasdale , in and upon his left thigh, with intent in so doing feloniously, wilfully and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder the said Robert Teasdale , against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, The same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to disable the said Robert Teasdale .

THIRD COUNT, The same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be, to do the said Robert Teasdale some grievous bodily harm.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I was a collector of rates on the 2nd of August last, in Skinner-street, I had a demand upon the prisoner, amounting £4 10s. for rates; he had full time to appeal against the demand if he thought it an imposition. On the 22nd of August I went to levy a distress on the premises of the prisoner. Mr. Fotherby, and his man, went with me, between ten and eleven in the morning; when we got there the prisoner was not at home, his son went and brought him, and we told him that we had got a warrant of distress for £2 5s. for that house. Mr. Fotherby tried to persuade him to settle it; he swore he would not, and seizing a sword which hung-up in the shop, declared he would kill the first man that came in or seized any thing. Mr. Fotherby told the prisoner if he would say "he would pay him again," he would pay the rate for him, and not make any charge for the expences, and he was sure that I did not want any recompence for my trouble, but he would not let Mr. Fotherby pay the rate for him. We staid a long time, and at last was obliged to take an inventory of the goods. I gave him a copy of the inventory. While we were taking the inventory he sent out for some gin, he put the sword down and went into his parlour, as I suppose, to take the gin; when he came out he was very abusive to me. Mr. Fotherby said, we must take the goods away, for it will not be safe to leave them. Mr. Fotherby told me to stop with his man while he went to get an officer and a cart, I remained until he came back-the officer came in with him. The prisoner was there at the time with the sword in his hand. The officer asked me what I did there, I produced my warrant, and the officer endeavoured to persuade him to settle it, and read the warrant to the prisoner; the prisoner swore he would not, for he had appealed and could get no redress, and would defend his property to the last drop of his blood. After waiting sometime, I desired Mr. Fotherby's man to take the goods away, he endeavoured to move them and the prisoner pushed him away. I told the prisoner that it was of no use, for if he would not let the man take them that I must. I went to move some chairs when the prisoner made a thrust at me with this sword(producing it), it was directed to my body.

Q. What part of your body - A. To my belly, I parried it off with my left hand, and it cut me in the thigh. He stabbed me in the thigh.

Q. Did it penetrate your thigh - A. It did.

Q. To any depth - A. No; it just rose the skin. It went through my pantaloons and drawers, penetrated the skin and drew blood; in the scuffle he twisted my finger back, I thought it was broke. The officer took him in charge.

Q. Had he before that day a sufficient opportunity of knowing that you was a collector - A. He had. I had been several times before for the money; he knows me well; I have seen him several times, and knew him as a neighbour; he is very passionate. This was in the year 1815.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not on the 25th that you brought the warrant - A. It was the 24th to the best of my knowledge.

JOHN FOTHERBY. I am a broker, and live in Gray's Inn lane. On the 25th of August, 1815, I went, in company with the last witness, to make a distress in the prisoner's house; I proceeded in the regular way with the distress. The goods were not more than sufficient to pay the amount, with the expences. They were the shop goods that were seized, we did not take any thing that was used by his family. I knew the prisoner before. I offered to pay the money for him if he would say he would pay me again, and charge nothing for my expences, and Teasdale said he would take nothing for his trouble. I told him I must impound the goods, and left him a notice of the place to which I was going to take them. My man laid hold of a chair, and the prisoner thrust him aside. - My man was afraid and would not touch the goods again. I

told Teasdale to take them, and the prisoner made a thrust at Teasdale, and he was wounded. I have known the prisoner seven years; he is rather passionate.

JOHN MOORE . I was servant to Mr. Fotherby. I went to levy a distress at the prisoner's house with him; the account he has given is correct.

JAMES PAYNE . I was the constable that year. The account given respecting the wounding by Mr. Fotherby is correct, I was present. The prisoner had a sword in his hand; when I went in I saw the scuffle. I saw the sword in Mr. Teasdale's thigh, and the prisoner had hold of it.

JOHN CRANCH. I live nearly opposite to the prisoner. As I was passing I saw the prisoner with a sword, scuffling with Mr. Teasdale; I rushed forward and seized the sword from the prisoner, and locked it up in my house. I have known the prisoner sometime; I believe he has not been altogether right in his mind since the execution of Holloway and Haggerty, his son was killed in the crowd, and he himself was taken up for dead; since that time I have known him doseveral things which a man would not do if he was in his right mind. I have seen him beat out the brains of a dog as it casually passed along the street. I have also seen him beat his son, who is blind, most cruelly with an iron rod. I also understood that he had a straight waistcoat prepared for him, and that he was deranged. At the time that this offence was committed I saw no difference in him from his usual appearance. I never knew him to be confined as a madman.

Court. Q. At the time this offence was committed what do you suppose to be his state of mind - A. I think if had been in his right mind he would not have committed such an act.

Prisoner's Defence. The present prosecution against me is by Mr. Teasdale. For many years past I have had several persons conspire to cause my ruin, and they have brought several actions against me. Mr. Teasdale said, that if these did not do, he would spend a hundred pounds a year to be my ruin. I had not, before the transaction, seen Mr. Teasdale for a month. When I came in and saw him, I asked him his business, he told me; and I replied, that I had appealed once, and had been rated by spite, and not by the commissioners. The magistrate said, it was not with his consent that I was over rated. I had tendered the money and it was refused. Fotherby asked me the price of the sword, which was the cause of my taking it down; I stuck it in the boards and there I left it. I requested them to leave a man in possession, but they refused. Teasdale was taking the goods away, I said, I would not suffer them to be taken. Mr. Fotherby refused either to take the goods away or to let his man do it. He sent for a constable, but I neither molested one or the other; about an hour after the constable came Teasdale requested him to keep the peace. Teasdale took hold of the chair on which I was leaning with one hand, the other hand being on the sword, which was stuck in the ground; he struck me once or twice, and I caught hold of his finger in my hand: he called to the constable to interfere; the constable requested me to let go the sword, and I let go of the sword and his finger. Teasdale called out he has stabbed me, and requested the constable to take me to Hatton Garden. I went before the magistrate and he bound me over.

MARTHA BAKER . I lodged with the prisoner, and was present when the scuffle ensued; the prisoner offered to pay what he had been rated at before, in consequence of which Teasdale told Fotherby to seize. The prisoner requested that a man might be left in possession, which was refused. The prisoner was leaning with one hand on the sword and the other on the chair; Teasdale said, let go the chair-the prisoner refused; upon which Teasdale struck him on the ear, and then on his shoulder, in consequence of which the prisoner fell. The prisoner went into the kitchen, and Teasdale pulled the sword out of the ground, immediately fell, and cried out, I am stabbed. I am sure the prisoner was in the kitchen at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I lodged with the prisoner at that time, but now live in Pellican-court, Drury-lane; I am sure I was present all the time, and saw all that happened.

Q. How came the sword into the shop - A. It was hanging up, and the prisoner, seeing Teasdale resolute, took it down, saying, he would defend his property.

Q. You say the prisoner offered to pay what he had been rated at before: will you swear that he tendered any money-A. I will swear I saw him take out bank-notes.

Q. Did not Fotherby offer to pay it-A. He did, at first; but the prisoner said, no, Fotherby, I have money, and will pay what is just and right, but nothing else.

Q. Then at the time the man was wounded it was quite impossible for the prisoner to do it - A. I saw no wound; he might or he might not be wounded; I am sure the prisoner was in the kitchen.

Court. How long have you known the prisoner - A. About three years.

ANN MEREDITH . About a year and a half ago I lodged with the prisoner, and was present when Teasdale came into the shop; the prisoner was out, and I sent for him. When he came in he produced the money, saying, he would pay a just and true debt. He said he would immediately pay the rate of 9s. 4 1/2d. in the pound. Teasdale said he was authorized to seize; the prisoner wanted him to leave a man in possession, but he said he would seize immediately. The prisoner took down the sword, saying he would defend his property; Teasdale struck him twice, and was going to strike him again, when the prisoner caught hold of his little finger, and he cried out, I am murdered. The sword was sticking in the ground at the time. The prisoner was very much abused.

Cross-examined by the Court. How long had you lodged there - A. Not two months. I did not see so much as Mrs. Baker; she might see things which I did not. I saw Teasdale give the prisoner three blows.

Q: When was the prisoner knocked down-A. It was the second blow that knocked him down.

Q. How came the sword there - A. It was hanging-up, and prisoner took it down. I did not hear him say he would defend his property while he had a drop of blood.

Q. Did you hear Teasdale say he was wounded-A. I did.

Q. Was you present all the time - A. I was not.

Q. Did the prisoner stick the sword in the ground - A. He did; and he offered to pay the money three times.

TEASDALE Re-examined. On the oath you have taken,

did you strike the prisoner at all - A. I did not; neither did I offer to do it. The prisoner did not tender any money whatever.

Q. Did he put down any note, or say he would pay-it A. He did not; on the contrary, he said he would not pay it, but defend his property to the last. He flourished the sword over my head several times. I am perfectly sure that his hand held the sword at the time I was wounded.

FOTHERBY Re-examined. You stated that you had been friendly disposed towards the prisoner, is it true that he tendered any money - A. He did not; there was no money whatever tendered. He said he would not pay it.

Q. Did he offer to pay any part - A. No; he said he would not pay it. I did not see Teasdale strike him; I must have seen it if he did.

Prisoner. Was there not two chairs standing between us - A. There might be.

Q. Did he not lay hold of the sword while it stuck in the ground - A. I do not recollect it.

Q. Did I not say I had been imposed upon - A. You did.

Q. Did I not offer to pay 9s. 4 1/2d. in the pound. - A. You said you had been used very ill.

Q. Did I not pull my notes out of my pocket and tender them to Teasdale - A. Not while I was present.

Court. Did he offer to pay the money which he considered to be due - A. I do not recollect any such transaction. He said he should pay what was just, but I saw no cash whatever tendered.

Prisoner. Had I not plenty of time while you was in the shop to stab Teasdale, if I had been inclined - A. Certainly you had.

Q. Did I not tender £6 15 - A. I never saw it.

Court. Did you see him flourish the sword at all - A. He did; and said he would defend his property.

Court to JOHN MOORE . Did you see any money tendered - A. I did not; I was there the whole time; I heard my master offer to pay the money, I am sure none was tendered. I did not see the prisoner knocked down; if he had been struck I must have seen it.

PRIME. I came in as constable; the prisoner desired me to keep the peace. The prisoner was not knocked down while I was there, nor any blows struck. The sword was in the hand of the prisoner.

Prisoner. On Teasdale saying he was stabbed, did you not request me to let loose - A. I did, and you let loose.

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-2

2. DAVID MICHAEL was indicted for stealing on the 1st of June , one bank-note for payment of and value £50. the property of John Moir , against the statute.

No prosecutor appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18161204-3

3. JOSIAH FISHPOOL was indicted that at the Kings gaol delivery of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, on the 4th of December, in the fifty-second year of his Majesty's reign, he was convicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November, in the fifty-second year aforesaid, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster, goods to the value of 39s. of William James Hill, and was ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years; and that afterwards, to wit, on the 26th of November last, he, without lawful excuse, was at large within this kingdom, to wit, at the parish of St. Martin in the Fields , before the expiration of the said term for which he was ordered to be transported, against the statute .

JOSEPH COOPER . I am a constable. I produce the certificate of the prisoner's conviction; I was present at his trial, and I am sure he is the same person. I met him at large on the 26th of November last in Spring-gardens.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLOND. At the time he was tried he gave his age in at fifteen; I believe he was going to work at the time I met him.

(Certificate read, stating the prisoner to have been convicted of a burglary in the house of William James Hill, and that he was ordered to be transported for the term of seven years).

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his good character .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18161204-4

4. GEORGE WARWICK and JOHN WARWICK were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edmund Jordan , about twelve in the night of the 19th of November , at Harmondsworth , with intent to steal, and stealing therein two sheets, value 6s. four pounds weight of pork, value 2s. two loaves of bread, value 2s. one gallon of elder wine, value 5s. one bottle, value 1s. and four pounds weight of cheese , the property of the said Edmund Jordan .

EDMUND JORDAN. I live at Harmondsworth. On the 20th of last month, in consequence of information I had received, I went down stairs about four o'clock in the morning, and observed my pantry window (which was a lattice, and not made to open), broken open; it was safe at eleven o'clock the preceding night; a small man could get through the hole which was broken-the pantry is part of my house. I searched and found I had lost the articles enumerated in the indictment; they were taken from different rooms in my house, I am sure all the articles were safe the night before. I also lost two loaves out of my bakehouse, which was locked the night before, and is part of the house.

STEPHEN LEE . I belong to the horse-patrole. In consequence of information which I received, I went to the Sun public-house at Harmondsworth, and secured the two prisoners; on searching them, I found these two sheets on them. I did not find any thing else on them.

(Produced and sworn to).

Both the prisoners pleaded distress.

G. WARWICK, GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 20.

J. WARWICK, GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-5

5. ANN MILLER was indicted for that she, about the hour of three in the morning, being in the dwelling-house-house of James Byrne , the elder , in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stepney , feloniously did steal one shawl, value

10s. one shift, value 2s. one cloak, value 5s. of the said James Byrne ; one coat, value 5s. one waistcoat, value 2s. one pair of trowsers, value 2s. one shirt, value 1s. one handkerchief, value 1s. one pair of braces, value 6d. and one prayer-book, value 1s. of James Byrne , the younger ; and having committed the said felony about the said hour of three, in the night of the 6th of October , in the parish aforesaid, the said dwelling-house feloniously and burglariously did break and get out of the same, against the statute .

ELEANOR BYRNE. I am the wife of James Byrne , a bricklayer's labourer , I live in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney; the prisoner lived with me as servant about three weeks, she was to have one shilling per week. On the 6th of Octobet last, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner, myself, and my husband, went to bed; my son came in about a quarter past eight, I heard him come in, we were then in bed; we got up at about five o'clock the next morning and the prisoner was gone; we did not expect her to go as she had given us no notice; we searched, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment were missing. The shawl, cloak, and shift were mine, the rest of the things were my sons. We found the coat, trowsers, shirt, and waistcoat at the pawnbroker's, about a week after. I had had my cloak on the same day, and the prisoner borrowed it of me; I never found the rest of the things.

JOSEPH TEMPLE. The things were pawned on the 7th of October, in the name of Ellen Shaw ; I do not know the person who pledged them.

JAMES BYRNE . My son was up last at night, and I got up first in the morning, I found the street door open, it was day-break; when I got up there was not sufficient light to see anything. It was dark when my son came home.

JAMES BYRNE, jun. I was up last and locked the door, it was upon the latch when I came home; there is a spring which keeps the lock back, when I came home I let it go, I tried it to see if it was fast, and it was, I left my cloaths by the side of my bed, I awoke about half past five o'clock, the prisoner was gone then; I heard the door swinging about by the wind in the night, I suppose she was gone when I heard that noise, it was about four o'clock.

HOPE. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 2nd of November, at her father's house, in Cow-lane. Shadwell, she voluntarily told me that she had pawned the suit of cloaths in Bermondsey-street. On her second examination I took her to Mr. Temple's, 243, Bermondsy-street.

JOSEPH TEMPLE. I live at 243, Bermondsy-street.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I had a friend at Portsmouth whom I wished to see, my mistress would not let me go, so I went without leave.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18161204-6

6. JOHN MILLER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Hanks , about two in the night of the 17th of November , at St. Giles's in the Fields , with intent to steal, and stealing therein three bonnets, value 24s. the property of the said Robert Hanks .

ROBERT HANKS. I live at 247, High Holborn . On Saturday, the 16th of November, I gave orders for my shop to be shut-up, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I got the prisoner at the bar to assist in shutting it up, I waited till it was secured, and was the last person on the premises, and locked the door, there was an iron bar over the shutters, which was secured inside, the shop is part of the dwelling-house, I then left; I am sure the part which was broke open was safe when I left. The prisoner was a watchman , and his box is in the same passage that my shop runs down, he had assisted several nights before in shutting-up. When I locked the door I told the prisoner that nobody slept on the premises, and desired him to keep an eye over them, which he promised to do, I then left him. On the Sunday morning I was informed that my premises had been broke open, I went to the premises and found two shutters broken down, but they had been put up again in a temporary way; I found I had lost two bonnets, I saw them afterwards at the constables.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I slept in Blackfriars-road that night. I have another house there; I have only had those premises a fortnight, I have slept there several times, and my son has too.

JOHN THOMAS GEARING. I am constable of the night; about half past one o'clock on Sunday morning, the 17th of November, the prisoner brought two men into the watch-house, charging them with taking down two shutters, with intent to rob, but he could not tell the number of the house; the two men, named Riley and Saunders, were locked up. Shortly afterwards I went to look at the premises, before I could get up to the prisoner, whose box is just by the premise, he put his hand into the box and presented two bonnets, saving, he had found them in his box. I found a square of glass broken in the window. I told the prisoner to look about, and perhaps he would find something more. I afterwards came back again, and he produced another bonnet. I asked him where he found it, he said down behind his box, I borrowed his lanthorn of him, and going behind his box, I said, is it down here that you found it. He hesitated, and then said, up there; I said where, he replied, tied to a bar. I asked him whether that was the place, because it was very wet, and expected if he found it there it would have been wet. I asked him if he sprung his rattle for assistance, he said no. I asked him where he left his lanthorn when he first discovered this, he replied, that he had left it with the watchman at the bottom of the court. This was about half past two o'clock.

Cross-examined. I was on duty, the first alarm was the prisoner bringing in the two men, accompanied by the patrole. Riley was brought in first, by M'Carthy, and two minutes after the prisoner brought in Saunders.

Q. How long might the prisoner be in the watch-house making the charge - A. Not more than five minutes; during which time there was nobody taking care of his box; it is not usual to have any body in the box while he is away.

Q. Then a person might easily come in and place any thing rhere - A. Yes; I don't know where the prisoner lives, nor how long he has been a watchman; the bonnets were all that was missed.

ROBERT HANKS . The bonnets were two or three inches from the glass, so that they might have been taken through the window.

SAMUEL ROBERTS. I am the watch-house keeper; I was called up about a quarter before three in the morning by Furzeman; I went down to Mr. Hanks's premises and examined the glass, I found the pin of the shutter had been taken out. The prisoner was in his box, which is close to the window, he has a good distance to go when he calls the hour; he has to turn down several courts. There were no marks of violence on the shutters.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The prisoner has been a watchman two or three years; he lives near Red Lion-square.

Q. If he had stolen the bonnets might he not have conveyed them home if he chose - A. I cannot say.

JAMES MULLINS. I was going down Holborn about a quarter past one o'clock on Sunday morning, I saw the shutters down, I asked the prisoner about it, and he produced two bonnets; the constable of the night asked him about his lanthorn, and he said he had given it to the watchman; the prisoner was standing outside his box at the time, he had been in his box before. The bonnets were brought out after I had left him. We looked behind the box.

Q. Was it after or before the second hat was produced that you looked behind his box - A. We had looked before, there was no bonnet there then, and when he was told it was a watering-place, he said it was tied to the iron bar.

CHARLES RILEY . I am a journeyman baker. I was going down Holborn on the morning of the 17th of November, about twenty minutes past one o'clock the prisoner called to me, saying, baker, here. I want to speak to you, I went back to him, and he said you are one of the bakers, I said, what of that? he said he should take me into custody; I went with him, and he gave me to another man; I was kept in the watch-house; the prisoner came in with another man in about seven or eight minutes.

Court. How near to the house did you pass - A. I was two or three yards past when he called me.

NICHOLAS COWELL . I am a watchman; my beat is near Lincoln's-Inn-fields; as the prisoner was calling half past one, he called to me, saying, Cowell I want to speak to you. I said, what, have you got a prize? he answered, come along, and I will show you. He took me up the court and showed me the shutters. I asked him how it was done; he said, I do not know; I said, it looks very bad; he replied, I have got a man to take to the watchhouse, and I will leave you in charge the while. He left me and walked quite slow towards the watch-house; he had no man with him. I thought it very strange; I looked behind his box, and every thing appeared right. I did not look in his box; there was nothing behind it but an iron bar, which belonged to the box; there was nothing in it. He came back at about ten minutes past two o'clock; he said, he had taken up two; I said, you told me you had only got one; he replied, that he had caught another, and one of them was a baker. I then left him. About a quarter of an hour afterwards he called to me again, and said, he had got two hats; I asked him if they belonged to the two men; he said, they are ladies hats. He shewed them to me in his box; they were put very carefully in one another. I left him again, and he called me a third time, saying, he had got three hats; I told him he had but two before; he said he had found the other in the box; I told him it was not there when I left him; he made no reply, and I left him again. About six o'clock he asked me to go to the watch-house with him; I refused, saying, it looked very black. He said he had left a lanthorn in my care; I told him, that he was a false man to say so.

Cross-examined. He walked away quite easy; he was gone about forty minutes; I had my own lanthorn, not his.

Q. When he was gone did you observe whether the glass was broken - A. I cannot say; one of the shutters was down, and the other was leaning against the glass; he shewed me the hats in his box of his own accord; he did not shew me the third hat, he only told me of it after the constable of the night had been; when I told him it looked black, he could not answer me a word.

Court. Q. Where was your box - A. Down Lincoln's-Inn-fields; there was no box at the bottom of the court; I did not look at the windows; there was nobody passed by, all was quiet.

SAMUEL SHREVE . I am a watchman; the prisoner was coming from his beat with Riley; he told me to pass him on; I asked what he had been doing; he said he had been taking down shutters, with another baker; I took him and passed him.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am keeper of the watch-house; the prisoner sent Riley in by M'Carthy, and shortly afterwards came in himself with Saunders, and gave them both in charge for pulling down shutters with intent to steal. Mr. Geary asked him which of the men took the shutters down; he hesitated, and then said he could not say; afterwards he said Saunders.

WILLIAM HARRIS HANKS. On the 16th of November I helped to shut up the shop; it was quite secure; the bar was undone by means of taking out the pin, which was rather difficult; the prisoner was acquainted with the nature of the fastenings.

JAMES M'CARTHY. I am a watchman; Shreve passed Riley to me, and I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's defence. I had called the hour of one, and found every thing in order until I came to Turnstile, when I heard a crash; I had got as far as my box; I looked up and found the two shutters down; I sprung my rattle, and saw two men, one of which was Riley; I asked him if he knew any thing about this; he said about what? I took him into custody, and gave him to Shreve; as soon as I came back Cowell was there; he asked me what was the time, and I told him; that is all I know of it.

WILLIAM HANKS , Jun. Four or five nights before the prisoner asked me if either I or the shopman slept in the house. I told him that the shopman did; although he did not, as I thought it strange he should ask me.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 46.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-7

7. LUCAS CLIFFORD , was indicted for stealing on the 29th November , at St. Mary's, Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel , twenty-three yards of Linen, value twentythree shillings, of Edward Colls , privately in his shop .

EDWARD COLLS . I keep a shop in Mason's-alley, Whitechapel ; I had some linen standing at my shop door on Friday, November 29, which I lost; it was twenty-three yards, and worth twenty-three shillings; it was within the shop, but so near the door that any body might take it without going into the shop; I was informed of it; Mr. Kays had taken the prisoner; I had seen the cloth about an hour before; it was taken between seven and eight in the evening; we have gass lights.

JAMES STIRLING . I received this cloth from Mr. Colls; I have had it ever since.

(Produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM KAYS. I live at 115, Mason's-alley, which is next door to the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner and two others coming by; the prisoner took the cloth off the pile at the door, and put it under his coat; he passed and looked at me and laughed; I pursued him with Mr. Colls's servant, and said when I came up to him, this is the man; he let the cloth drop, and was taken into custody; we gave him the cloth and told him to put it where he found it, he put it on the pile at Mr. Colls door.

The prisoner put in a written defence as follows:-My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, being a Sicilian by birth, I humbly beg leave to state that I have served seven years at sea; the last two in a merchant ship; I was returning from the Sicilian Consul's when I was taken into custody. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

WILLIAM KAYS . I saw the prisoner take it and drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Whipped in Gaol .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18161204-8

8. ROBERT WARD , was indicted for stealing on the 23d of November , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone , one coat the property of John Longman , privately, in the stables of William Clarke and David Willock .

JOHN LONGMAN . I am coachman to George Brown , who lives in Sackville-street, Piccadilly; the stables are in Mary-le-bone, and belong to Messrs. Willock and Clarke; on the 23d of November, I lost my box-coat, it was worth one pound; I lost it out of the stables; I left it there about twelve o'clock, and when I returned it was gone; I did not see it again until it was at the police office.

JAMES GORE. I am hostler at those stables. On the 23d of November I had occasion to go up into the loft, and hearing the dog bark, I looked out of the window and saw the prisoner with the coat under his arm. I ran after him, calling out stop thief; he dropped it, and I picked it up, and a young man stopped him at the corner of Wellbeck-street. I lost sight of him for about half a minute; I am sure he is the man; I gave the coat to the constable.

MICHAEL WRIGHT . I am a constable; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. This coat was given to me by the last witness.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's defence. I met a man who gave me the coat to take to Mary-le-bone-street, and a man ran after me and said I had stolen it.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 62.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18161204-9

9. JOHN MAHONEY , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Goodman Solomon , about the hour of three in the night of the 11th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein seventy-two coats, value 79l.; twelve pair of breeches, value 10l.; twenty-eight pair of trowsers, value 14l.; one pair of pantaloons, value 3s.; twenty-three waistcoats, value 6l.; four jackets, value 2s.; three gowns, value 10l.; one spencer, value 15s.; two shirts, value 15s.; and other articles , the goods of the said Goodman Soloman, against the statute.

GOODMAN SOLOMAN. I live in Field-lane , and keep a sale shop . On the night of the 11th of January, or the morning of the 12th, my house was broken open; it is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . The door appeared to be wrenched open with a crow-bar. I went and informed Hancock of it between three and four in the morning; we went in search of the person or persons who had done it; we went to a house in Saffron-hill; a man of the name of Butler said the prisoner was the man who had broken it open. That is all I know. Butler is not here; I understand he is gone to sea.

JAMES HANCOCK . I was an officer at the time, belonging to Hatton Garden; I went with the prosecutor to No. 13, Great Saffron-hill, and met Butler coming out at the door.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-10

10. JOHN HYAMS , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Benjamin , widow , about nine o'clock, on the night of the 12th of November , and stealing therein three coats, value 1l. 4s.; one pelisse, value 1l.; one pair of breeches, value 8s.; three shirts, value 7s.; one pair of pantaloons, value 10s.; three waistcoats, value 8s.; one hat, value 2s.; and one pair of gloves, value 6d. the property of the said Elizebeth Benjamin.

ELIZABETH BENJAMIN. I live in Love-lane, Houndsditch ; my house was broken open on the 12th of November; I was not at home at the time; I came home soon after eight o'clock; I found my drawers open, and the articles gone.

BENJAMIN BENJAMIN. My mother came to me and told me she had been robbed; we went and informed Mr. Kinnersley. The prisoner had lodged at our house, and thinking he might be the thief, I went and apprehended him, and gave him into Kinnersley's custody; I afterwards took his partner, whose name is Noah; he said he knew nothing of it. I promised him if he would tell me where the property was I would admit him as an evidence; in consequence of which he told me.

SAMUEL NOAH . I sell cocoa nuts about the streets; I have been in partnership with the prisoner about eight months; before that I lived with Mr. Wing, in Houndsditch, and the prisoner enticed me away; between seven and eight o'clock we went into Gun-yard; the prisoner told me to watch until he came out; he was in Mrs. Benjamin's about ten minutes; he brought a bag of clothes out, and took them to his lodgings, where we both lived; the next morning I put some into my bag, and he put the rest in his; if we were asked what we had got we was to

call clothes. I sold Mr. Levy one lot for 36s.; another for 8s.; a pelisse, for 11s.; two sheets, for 5s.; and a waistcoat for 18d.

DAVID DAVIS . Noah came to my shop and offered a pelisse for sale; I offered 11s. for it; he went out; afterwards Noah and the prisoner came back, and Noah sold it to me; the prisoner was present.

MOSES LEVY . I keep a sale-shop in Holywell-street. Noah came to my shop, and I brought several things of him, for 1l. 16s. I produce them.

REUBEN LEVY . I bought this coat of Hyams for 11s.; producing it.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . On the 12th of November, Benjamin came and informed me he had been robbed. I went and examined the premises, and found the back-door had been broken open, as well as the front-room door; he said he suspected the prisoner. I went in pursuit of him, but could not find him. On the 15th of November, Benjamin came to me to say, he had taken one of the prisoners. I went to the house and found him in the custody of Forester, the officer; as we were going to examine his lodgings we met Noah, and took him with us; he wanted to persuade a young woman in the house that he had not been at home; but she persisted that he had just gone out. We went into his room and found a crow-bar and a pair of gloves in the fire-place, covered over with ashes. I took him into custody. He said he knew nothing about it. The next morning I went to him with his father, who persuaded him to tell where the things were. He took me to several places, and at last to Mr. Davis; he said he had sold some things there; Mr. Davis gave them up to me; he then took me to Mr. Levy's, in Hollywell-street, where he had sold goods to the amount of of 1l. 16s. I then took him before the Lord Mayor. I found this shirt on the prisoner's back.

JOHN FORRESTER. I apprehended the prisoner, and took him to Giltspur-street Counter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the robbery; I lodged with Noah; he came home with a bundle, and took it away the next morning, and sold the things at different places.

GUILTY Aged 21.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-11

11. ELIZABETH STYRING , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one pair of shoe-buckles, value 4s., and one pair of shoes, value 2s. , the property of James M'Guire .

JAMES M'GUIRE. I am a buckle-maker ; live in Whitecourt, White-street, Little Moorfields . I lost my shoes on the 5th of November, and my buckles on the 3d; I left my shoes under the bed.

HOWELL GODDARD . I am a constable. The prosecutor told me that he suspected his lodger's daughter had robbed him of his shoes and buckles. I went to the house; Mrs. M'Guire promised her, that if she would say what she had done with them she would not punish her. She said she knew nothing about it.

MATHEW HEATH ROSS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Goddard, a pawnbroker; the buckles were pawned by the prisoner, on the 5th of November; we knew her before, and her relations; she said she was thirteen years of age next Christmas-day; she wanted 1s. 6d. on the buckles; we offered to lend her the amount without the buckles.

(Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-12

12. JOHN PEDDINGTON , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Stedman , about the hour of six, on the night of the 27th of November , and stealing therein one handkerchief, value 5s. his property.

JOHN STEDMAN, Jun. I am a haberdasher , I live at 36, Beech-street, Barbican; have also a house in Aldersgate-street , where my servants live. On Wednesday last, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was brought into my shop by Mr. Arnold. I was there at the time. The handkerchief was about half out of the window; it laid close to the window.

RICHARD ARNOLD. I am an engine-maker; on Wednesday evening last, about six o'clock, I was coming down Aldersgate-street, and saw the prisoner, and another with him, at Mr. Stedman's window. I watched them, and in about a minute I saw the prisoner taking the handkerchief out of the window. I laid hold of him, he had part of the handkerchief in his hand, the other part was inside.

JAMES HEWKLEY . I am a constable; I was going by, and observing a crowd, I went into the shop, and the prisoner was given into my charge, with the handkerchief.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been to carry a parcel, and as I was returning the gentleman laid hold of me and said I took the handkerchief.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for the term of Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-13

13. WILLIAM ATKINSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November last , one carcass of a pig, value 1l. 15s. , the property of Joseph Pocklington and George Frackleton .

JOSEPH POCKLINGTON . I am a salesman in Newgate-market , on the 2d of November, between six and seven o'clock in the morning. I had a quantity of pigs hanging up for sale; I had been informed that there was a bad character about the market, and I set a watch to look after them. The pig belonged to me.

JAMES BOOTH. I was set to watch; and I observed the prisoner walking backwards and forwards, with a skewer in his hand; the moment Mr. Pocklington's back was turned the prisoner stuck the skewer in the belly of the pig and walked away with it. I told Mr. Pocklington and he went after him, and took him.

Prisoner. I am a porter in the market; a man asked me to carry it, and I did.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-14

14. EDGAR CHURCH , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one trunk, value 16s. , the property of Henry Bott and Wm. Payne .

HENRY BOTT. I am a trunk-maker ; I live in Leadenhall-street ; I have a partner whose name is William Payne . I lost the trunk about two o'clock, on the 9th of November; it was taken from the door.

THOMAS TERRY . I am an officer; on the 9th of November, about twelve o'clock, I heard a cry of stop thief; the man turned into Leadenhall-market; I followed, and met a young man with the prisoner and trunk in his custody,

JOHN BRODERICK . A person came into the shop and and gave the alarm, that a trunk was stolen; I traced the prisoner by a man on the top of a coach pointing towards Leadenhall-market; as soon as I got into the market the prisoner and trunk was brought up to me by a strange man; I gave both to the officer.

JOHN WARD . I saw the prisoner take the trunk from the door; I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's defence. I saw the trunk lying on the pavement, and asked who it belonged to; nobody answered, and I took it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-15

15. HENRY MAY , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one watch, value 3l.; one key, value 6d.; and one watchribbon, value 1d., the property of William Lillycrop , from his person .

WILLIAM LILLYCROP. I am a baker ; I live in Goswell-street. I was in Wood-street, on the 26th of November, about half-past seven in the evening; I had been drinking a little gin; I went into the Shears public house, in Wood-street ; when I came out-side the door I fell down, and two men picked me up; I did not see who they were; just as I was going into the house the prisoner drew my watch from me; it was found soon after he took it; I collared him, and said you have taken my watch. He took and pushed the watch into the waistband of my small-clothes. The officer came up, and I gave him in charge.

JOHN WAUGH . I was coming up Wood-street about half past seven; I heard the baker say, d-n you, you have taken my watch. I went up, and said, who has got the watch; he said the prisoner had taken it; but he has shoved it in my breeches. He was in liquor a little. The prisoner denied the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Peckham, and as I was coming down Wood-street I saw the baker fall, I helped him up, and he said "d-n you, you have got my watch;" the officer came and took me into custody; I am a carpenter by trade, and perfectly innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-16

16. GEORGE PRICE was indicted for stealing on the 1st of November , one watch, value £35, one watch-chain, value £1, and one seal, value £1, the property of Gideon Yates , from his person .

GIDEON YATES. I am an agent and accountant ; my office is in Newgate-street, I have a house in Nelson-square. On the 1st of this month I was coming from Hatton-garden, I met seven or eight men together, they followed me down Holborn into Fleet-market , it was about eleven o'clock at night, they got before me, the prisoner was among them. I particularly observed him, he came by me with the others and hustled me, which made me suspect them, I stopped and told them to pass on, and I would wait, I immediately put my hand to my fob and missed my watch, I called the watch and gave the prisoner in charge; I will not swear that he took the watch, he was in company with those who took it. He dared me to give him in charge, and said he was an apprentice to a gentleman on Snowhill.

Prisoner. Did I pass you several times - A. You did.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am the watch-house-keeper; about half past eleven o'clock the prosecuter and the prisoner came up, both together, and the prisoner said, here is the watchman; the prosecutor said, take this man in charge, for he is one of the party who have been hustling me; he took hold of him and brought him into the watchhouse.

ROBERT WALPOLE . I am an officer; I was at the watch-house between eleven and twelve at night, the prosecutor and watchman brought the prisoner in, charging him with hustling the prosecutor, and stated, that he had lost his watch; I searched him but found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on my way home; I saw three gentlemen, they addressed themselves to the prosecutor, and said, go; and who are you talking to, do you think you are in Field-lane? The prosecutor came to me, and asked me if I knew where to find a constable, I told him I would shew him the watch-house, which I did.

GIDEON YATES Re-examined. I said, he would oblige me by telling me who the party were that he was with, and asked him to give me my watch again; the prisoner ran off, and got into the recess of a door, which is No. 7 or 8, Fleet-market; I saw him come out of that place, and he walked up to me very leisurely.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-17

17. THOMAS PATER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one pocket-book, value 3s. of Edward Burmester , from his person .

EDWARD BURMESTER. I am a merchant ; as I was going through Lime street - square , about ten o'clock in the morning, a person called to me saying, Sir, you have lost your pocket-book; I turned round and the prisoner threw it at me; he was near enough to hear what I said; he ran away, I followed him, crying, stop thief; he ran into the India House, and was stopped at the front door; he said, it was not me, Sir, I was running for you. We got a constable, he was taken to Giltsper-street Counter; he said, he hoped I should not prosecute him; I told him I should. The officer has the pocket-book.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. You did not see him take it-A. No; I was told of it, and the prisoner threw it at me.

CHARLES HUGHES . I was coming along Lime-street - square, I saw the last witness coming towards me, as I passed him I observed the prisoner move forward very

quick, which drew my attention, I turned round and saw the prisoner with the book in his hand, I told Mr. Burmester, he turned round, and the prisoner threw the book at his feet.

Cross-examined. Did you see him take the book - A. I saw it in his hand, I did not see him take it.

Q. When you said, you have lost your pocket-book, the prisoner said, here it is-A. No; he turned round, threw it down, and ran away. I do not think there was any body in the square but ourselves; it is quite a bye-place.

THOMAS WALTER. I was at the Counter when Mr. Burmester brought the prisoner in, and gave me the book; when the prisoner was going to the Counter from the Mansion-House, he said he was in company with the man who took it and dropped it, and he (the prisoner) picked it up.

Prisoner. I did not say I was in the company of the man who took it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-18

18. THOMAS HODGES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , at St. Mathew, Friday-street , one pair of pantaloons, value 1l. 1s. the goods of Robert Romanis .

ISAAC GRAY. I am shopman to Mr. Romanis; I missed the pantaloons, and ran down Friday-street, and caught the prisoner with the pantaloons under his arm.

(Produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Friday-street, a man came by and threw the pantaloons down and I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-19

19. WILLIAM EARLE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one pocket-handkerchief, value 6s. the property of William Deykes , from his person .

WILLIAM DEYKES. I am an attorney ; on the 20th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in St. Martin's-le-grand , I felt a jerk at my pocket, and I found I had lost my handkerchief, I turned round and caught hold of the prisoner, and took him over the way; he refused to go into a shop, but I held him tight; a young man called out here is the handkerchief, he has dropped it; I observed him shuffle very much, as if he wanted to get rid of it.

JOHN GRAY. I am a jeweller; I was passing through St. Martin's-le-grand, I was about three yards from Mr. Deykes; I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief and helped to secure him till the patrole arrived.

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I am an officer; this is the handkerchief. (Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along and the gentleman collared me, and said I had picked his pocket; he took me to a shop and searched me, I had nothing about me, somebody brought the handkerchief to him.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-20

20. WILLIAM DENNISON was indicted for stealing on the 5th of November , one box-coat, value £4 , the property of Thomas Chambers , Esq.

THOMAS LOWE . I am gardener to Thomas Chambers, Esq. who lives at Hampton , the coat was taken out of the coach-house, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I met the prisoner coming up the yard with it under his arm; I asked him what he had got, he said he did not know. He had no business on the premises.

Prisoner. Did you not kick me and let me go-A. I took the coat from him and pushed him out of the gate, but I was persuaded to take him again, and I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I do not wish to add falsehood to fraud, I own I took the coat, but it was from mere distress.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to mercy. Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-21

21. WILLIAM THOMAS SHELLITOE was indicted for stealing on the 29th of November , two coach glasses, value 10s. two rugs, value 2s. and one lock, value 6d. the property of Richard Parkes , Esq.

JOSEPH ANDERSON . I am coachman to Richard Parkes, Esq. he lives in Broad-street, Bloomsbury; I missed the things on the 30th of November, at about eight o'clock in the morning, I had seen them at four o'clock on the afternoon of the 29th, in the coach-house, which was locked. I saw the glasses again at Bow-street the next day.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; on the 29th of November, about half past eight in the evening, I observed the prisoner come out of Great Russel-street and turn down George-street, with something under his arm, I told my brother officer to head him and stop him, which he did at the corner of Buckeridge-street, and took the glasses from under his arm, he got loose from us, and at that time he drew a large stable lock from under his arm, threw it down, and ran away; we followed him into a house, and up-stairs, under his bed, we found an iron crow.

THOMAS AMSDEN . On the 29th of November, about half past eight o'clock, the last witness desired me to follow the prisoner; he got away from us, and we followed him into a house in Buckeridge-street, and found him under the bed; he cried out, for God's sake do not hurt me. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence as follows:-My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, on the 29th of November, as I was returning home I saw something white laying on on the ground; I picked it up; a cry of stop thief was raised, and knowing the thing did not belong to me I threw it down. I was overtaken and secured. I have a large family, and implore the mercy of the court.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-22

22. JAMES MITCHELL , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Wasey Sterry , on the 22d November , on the King's highway, at St. Mary-le-Strand , putting him

watch, value 10l., one chain, value 2l., three seals, value 3l., and one key, value 1s. , the property of the said Benjamin Wasey Sterry.

in fear and taking from his person and against his will one

BENJAMIN WASEY STERRY . On the 22d of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was turning the corner of Catherine-street, coming out of the Strand , the prisoner came against me with great violence, more than an accidental meeting would occasion. He had an opportunity of seeing that I was coming that way, I nearly fell forwards; a person pretended to assist me; he came up to me, and then moved behind, and took hold of both my arms, and kept them confined. I had no means of assisting myself. I saw the prisoner take out my watch. I could not prevent him, as my arms were confined.

Q. Did you see the prisoner run away - A. My face was towards Exeter 'Change, I turned round and called out stop thief. The person, who held my arms, went away very leisurely across the street. The prisoner ran towards New castle-street; I pursued him immediately, and saw the watch-chain hanging out of his hand; I did not loose sight of him till he was taken, opposite Somerset-house. He had the watch in his hand, with the chain hanging out. He was apprehended, and I assisted in taking the watch from him. I produce it. I have had it ever since. I am sure the prisoner in the man.

Prisoner. If your face was towards Exeter'Change how could you see me - A. My face was towards Exeter'Change at the time my arms were confined.

LIEUT. JOHN MORGAN . On the evening of the 22d of November, as I was walking up the Strand, I heard a cry of, stop thief, he has my watch; and immediately the prisoner rushed by me; I pursued him; the constable caught him; Sterry came up immediately; I assisted in securing him; the constable said, what has he between his legs; I put my hand down, he had his hands between his legs, and I took the watch out of them. Mr. Sterry claimed it, and I gave it to him.

WILLIAM DAVIS. I am a watchman of St. Dunstan, in the West. I was going along the Strand, about seven o'clock in the evening, to my beat, I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner run across the street; he was making for the gate-way of Somerset-house; I collared him; he had something between his legs, for he kept his hands down there; I told the last witness of it; he took the watch from him; two patroles came up, and I gave him in charge. Several persons wanted to take him from me before, but I resisted.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18161204-23

23. THOMAS PETER MANSFIELD , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Swan , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 25th of October , Elizabeth, the wife of the said Thomas Swan , being therein, and stealing four silver table-spoons, value 1l. 5s.; one silver jug, value 10s.: one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; and one sugar-dish, value 3s. , the property of the said Thomas Swan.

ELIZABETH OLDFIELD SWAN. I am the daughter of Mr. Thomas Swan ; on the 25th of October I was at my father's house, at Islington, I saw the prisoner at the bar there; he sold me some apples, for which I paid him a three-shilling piece; another person, who was with him, gave me 2s. in change. About ten minutes after I saw the prisoner getting out of the parlour window; I did not see him get in; I suppose he must have got in at the window; I saw the window about an hour before, it was shut, but not fastened; I had been in the kitchen all the time, and I believe my mother and the servant had been there all the time too. I think nobody in the house could go into the parlour without my knowing it. I saw the prisoner getting out of the parlour window, his hands were on the window, and his feet had not touched the ground. He asked me to buy some apples; I told him, no. What do you do there? He made no answer, but went towards the garden gate. I followed him, and caught him. The servant asked me where my geranium was; I asked the prisoner, and he said, there it is, hastening to the garden gate. It had been thrown down from the ledge of the parlour window. He got from me, and went out at the garden gate. I saw no more of him. As I turned round I saw a silver milk-ewer on the window-ledge. I ran into the parlour, and missed one pair of spoons off the sideboard; another pair had been removed to the table between the two windows, and a pair left on the sideboard; there ought to have been three pair of table spoons on the sideboard; a silver milk-pot and sugar-tongs; nothing was taken away but a pair of spoons, all the rest were only removed from the sideboard to the table under the window. I had seen them in their proper place about an hour before. I did not see the prisoner with any property in his hands.

Mr. SWAN. The articles are well worth 30l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARTHA ROBERTS . I am servant to Mr. Swan; I was present when Miss Swan bought the apples, after which the prisoner went out and shut the gate; I afterwards saw him in the garden again, he was going towards the gate, he appeared to come from the parlour window, which was shut before, but when I saw him it was open; I had been in the parlour about an hour before. I did not see the prisoner have any thing, nor did I see him come out of the parlour. I am sure of his person.

Q. Did you go into the parlour after you saw him the last time - A. I did; I missed two silver spoons, and the other things were moved on to the table, there were feet marks on the window ledge, and in the chair which was under the window; the carpet was also muddy, apparently with feet marks.

Prisoner. What can you swear to me by - A. I am sure you are the person.

BARNARD GLEED. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; since this robbery I have frequently tried to find the prisoner, I found him on the 11th of November last; I found him at a public-house in Whitechapel; he was sitting in the box behind a man, when he saw me he stooped down to hide himself; he said he knew nothing of the robbery.

JOSEPH GOSS . I am an officer; I was seat for to Mr.

Swan's, I saw the foot-marks in the room. I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM JACKSON. On the day mentioned in the indictment, I was in my room, I heard a noise at Mr. Swan's, I went over and saw the things laid on the table ready to be removed.

Prisoner. When I was taken to Worship-street, Miss Swan said I was not the man. I heard the officer tell her to swear to me.

Jury to MISS SWAN. Did you see the prisoner in any manner inside the window - A. I saw him leaning on the window; his hands were on the ledge and his feet were not to the ground. The garden gate is about three yards from the window.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-24

24. THOMAS ING , and ANN ING , his wife , were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , in the dwellinghouse of Christopher Bailey , one bank-note, value £10 , the property of Joseph Eaton , against the statute.

JOSEPH EATON. I am a porter at Newgate Market ; I lodge at Christopher Bailey 's house; the note was taken out of my box on the 14th of November. It was a £10 Bank of England note. My box was unlocked, it had been unlocked about an hour; I had seen the note on the 9th, I have seen it since in possession of the Bank. I received the note from John Ellingford , I am quite sure that the note I received from him is the note that I lost; I had no other note of that amount. The prisoner, Ann Ing , was my servant, she has frequently seen me go to the box, and she has heard me ask my wife for money, and seen her go to the box to get it. She went away about an hour after the robbery and never came back; my wife had missed the note before she went away; she was not searched, she knew that the note was missing; she left the house two hours before her usual time; she was to have left on the Saturday, this was on the Thursday.

Q. Did the prisoner Thomas Ing, come to your house on that day - A. I did not see him; my wife kept the key of the box. I gave notice to the Bank to stop the note myself.

MARY EATON. I am the wife of the last witness; I keep the key of the box. I saw the note about twelve o'clock, and missed it between five and six; I left the box unlocked about four o'clock, it had been locked befor that time; it was in the bed-room.

Q. During the time the box was unlocked was you out of the room - A. I was, but not out of the house; when I was out of the room I was in the parlour, which is on the same floor; the prisoner, Ann Ing , was with me the whole of the day-she was with me in the parlour, she went out at times; she was, in general, in the room where I was sitting.

Q. During the time that the box was unlocked could, she have gone into the room-A. Yes, she might; she knew the money was kept there; I told her my money was gone, and asked her if she took it, she said, no. She had lived with me about fourteen weeks, she nursed me in my lying-in; she went away between six and seven o'clock; she used to go home at night, but not till eight o'clock, I did not desire her to stay, but I expected her to return the next morning, but she did not.

Prisoner Ann Ing . Was I not discharged - A. She was discharged, but she said she would come in the morning to see if I had found the note.

Court. Did you know before that day that she had any intention of leaving - A. No; if she had not desired to be discharged I should have kept her.

JOHN ELLINGFORD. I paid Joseph Eaton a £10 Bank of England note on the 29th of October, I do not know the number, I received it from Eliza Lancaster, my wife was present when I received it.

MARY ELLINGFORD. I was present when Eliza Lancaster paid my husband the note, I did not mark it. Eliza Lancaster is gone into the country, before she went she gave me this receipt to take care of (producing it), on the Friday preceding.

Court. Did you look to see if the number on that receipt corresponded with the note - A. No; I was present when James Holt paid two notes to Eliza Lancaster, and she delivered one of them to my husband in my presence; she received it from Holt about one o'clock, and paid it to my husband the same day.

Q. Are you sure that she gave your husband the same note that she received from Holt - A. I am.

JAMES HOLT. I am clerk to Sir Richard Carr Glynn and Co. on the 29th of October I paid a £10 Bank of England note, No. 16,856, dated 12th of September, 1816, about one o'clock; I believe I paid it to Eliza Lancaster .

JOSEPH BROOK. I am shopman to Mr. Fisher, Holborn-bridge; I received a £10 note on the 14th of November, from the prisoner, Ann Ing, about nine o'clock in the evening-on a Thurday evening; I had seen her once before, I am sure she is the person; she bought one wedding-ring, two pair of ear-rings, and a gold keeper, they came to £1 10s. 6d., I gave her the change; I did not mark the note, for I had no change myself, I got change from Mr. Bailey. The prisoner said the ring was for herself, for she had worn her own out. I put one pair of ear-rings into her ears, the other pair she said was for a child, her husband came in with her; I mean the other prisoner.

Ann Ing . My husband did not come in with me - A. He came in afterwards, and took part of the change; he asked for the keeper himself.

WILLIAM JAGO. I am a contable. I went between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, on the 15th of November, to the prisoner's lodgings, in Plumb-tree-court, Shoe-lane, and found this 5l. note in the prisoner's, Thomas Ings , fob. I produce it.

JOHN BAILEY . I remember the last witness coming to change a £10 note; I marked it; I do not recollect when it was.

(Produced).

COURT. Look at that note, and see if it has your mark upon it. - A. It has Mr. Fisher's name upon it, and the name of the prisoner Ing, also. I am sure it is the same note. It is No. 16,856, dated 12th of September, 1816.

WILLIAM HOOLE. I am clerk to the Bank; it is a genuine note; there are no two notes bearing the same number and date.

JOHN BAILEY . The 5l. note produced is the one which I gave Brook in change.

Q. To BROOK. Did you give the prisoner the same notes that Bailing gave you-A. I did.

JOSEPH MIATT . I am an officer, and accompanied Jago; he has spoken correct.

JANE SHEARMAN . The prisoner, Ann Ing , offered me a 10l. note to change on the 14th of November, a little before eight o'clock in the evening. I keep a public house at the corner of the court where she lives. I know her well. I could not change it.

Court. To JOSEPH EATON. Have you heard the prisoner, Ann Ing , at any time say that she had any money - A. I do not think at the time she had a penny of her own.

MARY EATON . She told me she had no money; she said she was very much distressed when she went away. I paid her sixpence, and she said that was all she had.

THOMAS ING . NOT GUILTY .

ANN ING . GUILTY. Aged 54.

Of Stealing only .

Confined Two Years , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-25

25. JOSEPH PRESCOT , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , one mare, value 3l.; one saddle, value 5s.; and one bridle, value 1s. , the property of James Farndell .

JAMES FARNDELL . On the 25th of October, I was going to Town with a load of goods in my waggon; I had my servant with me, and my saddle-horse, which I occasionally rode; being unwell I went into the waggon, and remained there until about three o'clock in the morning, when my man told me he missed the horse. I got out and sent him back to see for the man who had taken it. I saw the horse six days after I had lost it. I saw it pass the Coach and Horses Inn, Holloway. I saw the bridle and saddle the day before. It was in possession of a milkman, who lives in the City-road; I have sold the horse to him since. When I saw the horse, I stopped it. I am sure it was my horse. It had a complaint, which made it constantly shake its head, by which I knew it to be mine.

THOMAS PINCHARD . I am servant to the last witness, and was with him that night. He told me to drive the waggon, and to ride the pony. I did not ride it. The prisoner was coming towards London, and so when I knew him, I told him he might ride the horse behind the waggon. I had no authority to lend it to him. He mounted the horse, and took my lanthorn. I told him to call me if any thing fell out of the waggon. He followed me till we came through Kennington; the things appeared safe, and I took the lanthorn from him before we came to Kennington; he asked me for his stick, which had been put in the hinder part of the waggon; I gave it to him; we had then passed through Kennington; when we had got about a mile further I looked back, and missed the prisoner and the horse; it had a saddle and bridle on it. I did not see the prisoner again until the 23d of November; I saw him then at Chichester. I have not seen the horse, nor the saddle or bridle, since. I believe he must have passed me when he went away. When I took the lanthorn from him I told him not to leave the waggon.

JOHN ERKSTEIN . I live at Holloway. I know the prisoner. I saw him on the 25th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning; he had a brown mare with him; she was saddled and bridled; he stopped at my house and offered the mare for sale to several people. I purchased it of him; I gave him 2l. for it. It was not cheap at that; it was not worth more. I did not buy the saddle; the bridle was given in with the horse; my hostler bought the saddle. I do not remember seeing Mr. Farndell till after the horse was stolen. Mr. Farndell showed me the horse, and I said it was the one which I purchased; she appeared very heavy about the head; I can swear that the mare he showed me is the one that I purchased of the prisoner. Holloway is in the county of Middlesex.

WILLIAM AVERY . I am hostler at the Coach and Horses. The prisoner was at our house on the 25th of October; he had a mare, saddle, and bridle. I bought the saddle of him for 3s. 6d.

JOHN ERKSTEIN . I sold the mare to a man who constantly stopped at our house. It has been sold several times since it was stolen.

WILLIAN AVERY. I was present when Farndell and my Master looked at the mare.

Prisoner. You only gave me 3s. for the saddle - A. I gave you 3s. 6d.

BARNARD GLEED. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street. When the prisoner was brought to the office by the prosecutor, he said he did not steal the horse, that he rode it away, and sold it to a publican at Holloway. No inducement was offered to him to say so.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal the horse, they gave me liberty to ride it on the main turnpike-road.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18161204-26

26. WILLIAM BROWN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Parker , about two o'clock, on the night of the 11th of November , with intent to steal, and stealing therein two birdcages, value 2s.; one pelisse, value 5s.; one gown, value 3s.; one bag, value 1s.; two pair of stockings, value 1s.; one pair of shoes, value 2s; one tea-caddy, value 2s.; one shirt, value 1s.; and two waiters, value 2s. , the property of the said William Parker .

ANN PARKER . I am the wife of William Parker ; we live in Batty-place, Batty-street, Commercial-road, in the parish of St. George . On the 12th of November, I went to bed about eleven o'clock; I was the last person that was up, the doors were locked, and the windows were fastened. I left the key of the outer door on the ledge of the window, under the shutters, in order that my son (who was out), might let himself in; I had left it there before, but not often. The prisoner knew that I sometimes left it there for my son, for he has sometimes come home and slept with him. My husband got up at a little before seven o'clock the next morning; I got up soon after him; when I got up I missed the articles which are mentioned in the indictment. I have seen them all since; they ar in possession of the officer.

WILLIAM SUMMERS. I produce the property.

ANN PARKER . They are all mine.

THOMAS PARKER. I am the son of the last witness. On the night of the 11th of November, I was in company with the prisoner, at a public house in the Minories, till about twelve o'clock; I then left him and went towards home; on my way home, I went to a ball at the Auction Mart. I remained there till about four o'clock. When I got home I found the key in the door. I used to find it in the window. The prisoner has slept with me twice, when I have found the key in the window. I went in and went to bed directly; I took the key in with me, I locked the door; I got up after my father and mother in the morning. Several things were gone; none of the windows were unfastened, so that the person must have entered at the door, and with a key. When I went in, I took the key inside, and found it inside the next morning.

WILLIAM SUMMERS. I am headborough of St. George's; I found the pelisse, work-bag, and tea-caddy upon the prisoner, about three o'clock in the morning, he was in Ratcliff-highway, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's house, I was waiting there for him, as I had information that a man had engaged a bed at the Bunch of Grapes public-house; I went there, and asked him what he had done with the bundle, as I understood he had one. He brought down the pelisse, tea-caddy, sheet, gown, two waiters, and a work-bag, they have been in my possession ever since - He said they were his property. I was taking him to the watch-house, when we had got a little way in he wished me good morning, and set off with the bundle, I pursued him, took him, and locked him up.

LAMMAS CAREY. I am a patrole in the Commercial-road; on the morning of the 12th, the prisoner passed me with a bundle, I called to him to know what he had got - He ran off; I called out stop thief; it was about twenty minutes before three o'clock; he had a box tied up in a white cloth, he flung it down, and said you may take it, I do not know what is in it; he got away, I did not see him again until he was taken. It was moon-light. I only saw one side of his face, he had a blue coat on; I had never seen him before.

Court. How then can you swear to his being the same man - A. I charged him with it the next morning, and he never said a word, either one way or the other; I opened the box, and found a parrot in it, alive, and a bason of soup, which appeard to be victuals for the bird. He was coming from Batty-place way.

MRS. PARKER. The things were safe the night before.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with Thomas Parker; I was looking about for a night's lodging, and as I was going in I found the things by the step of the door.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-27

27. THOMAS PRICKET was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Kingston , Esq , about seven in the night of the 9th of November , with intent to steal, and stealing therein four gallons of wine, value £4, twenty-two bottles, value 6s. one pint of oil, value 6d. and one basket, value 1s. the property of the said John Kingston .

THOMAS SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Kingston; he lives in Gloucester-place . My master sent me out on the 9th of November; I called at Somerset-street, where my master lived until the day before; he had left the house without any person in it; the things had not all been removed. As soon as I had put the key in the door I heard something drop inside, I went in and shut the door, but I did not fasten it, I felt about to see if I could find any thing, and I found a skeleton key, I then came out and procured a light; at that time Mr. Bamfield's coachman came up to the door, and accompanied me in; we went into the back-parlour, and found the shutters open. We thought we smelt tobacco, and went down stairs, when we had got about half-way down we heard a noise, sounding like bottles rattling; we turned back, meaning to lock them in, some person pursued us up-stairs immediately, before we could get to the door. Mr. Bamfield's butler was outside the door, and said we were thieves, and shut us in; I got out, and told the coachman to come out also, and not to let any body else out as he came, but the prisoner got his head out, which we pushed in again. I am sure it was the prisoner, I saw his face distinctly, I had a candle in my hand at the time. The coachman had hold of the door, the prisoner made the coachman let go his his hold, and he got out; we laid hold of him, he knocked the coachman down, and I tumbled over him and let go of the prisoner; He crossed the street, we ran after him, crying stop thief, and he was taken at the corner of Bride-street, in Henrietta-street; I returned to the house, and found a dark-lanthorn laying on the kitchen-stairs, four baskets about three bottles of wine, and a bottle of furniture oil. The cupboard under the kitchen stairs was broken open; the wine-cellar was also broken open; on one of the binns there was a lighted candle, and several of the corks were out of the bottles, and seven bottles of wine had been taken from the back-cellar. I found two pair of my boots had been removed from the pantry into the kitchen.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Mr. Kingston now lives in Gloucester-place; he formerly lived at this house, and had not removed all his furniture; his family had all left.

Q. When the prisoner ran away, did you keep sight of him-A. No; I lost sight of him for about a minute. I had a candle in my hand when I saw his face.

Q. Will you swear to him-A. I will.

Q. When had you seen the wine that was taken - A. The day before, as late as four o'clock.

SAMUEL BENNET . I am Mr. Bamfield's coachman; I went with the last witness to Mr. Kingston's house: I saw the wine in the state he has described it; we were going to get assistance, and I heard some person run up-stairs-Smith ran out and closed the door, and I was left in the house with the prisoner - He tried to get away; I was let out, I shoved the prisoner back and held the door; the prisoner put his foot between the door and the frame, I could not shut it - He struck me with an iron crow-bar, I was obliged to let him out, I followed him; I had no candle, but I could see his face by the light of the lamp. He struck me with the iron crow and I fell down; I am sure the prisoner is the man, I saw him plain enough to swear to him. I ran after him, and cried stop thief, the watchman stopped him; I saw him all the time. He was taken to the watch-house and searched, there was a to

bacco-box, one long piece of whalebone, and two small pieces, found on him, and a knife; the two small pieces of bone were cut.

JOHN STEEL . I heard a cry of stop thief; I live at the corner of James-street, Henrietta-street, St. James's; was in my shop, I ran out, and saw the prisoner being pursued, I stopped him. I am sure the prisoner is the man that I stopped.

JOHN STANLEY. I am a painter; I was sitting at No. 17, Henrietta-street, in the kitchen; I heard a cry of stop thief, and at the same time I heard something fall down the area, I ran out and in a few minutes the prisoner was taken. I am sure he is the man. I went into the area and found a crow-bar, which I gave to Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH . The last witness gave me this crowbar (Producing it).

ROBBERT JARMAIN. I am a watchman; about ten minutes before seven o'clock I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw several people pursuing the prisoner, I went up and took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am a constable; I produce a dark-lanthorn, a crow-bar, a number of corks, whalebone, knife, tobacco-box, two flag baskets, two pair of boots, fourteen bottles of wine, and one bottle of furniture oil. When the prisoner was brought to the watch-house I searched him, the long piece of whalebone fell from him, which, I understand, is very much used by thieves; being placed in the crevice of a door, the night before the intended robbery, to see if any person has been in in the course of the day. The other things were given to me by Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH. They are the things which I spoke of in my evidence.

GEORGE CULL . I belong to the watch-house; I went to search the house; the whalebone was found on the prisoner.

GUILTY, Aged 32.

Of Stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18161204-28

28. PETER FLANNAGAN and JAMES M'CAWLEY were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Skillern , on the 31st of October , at the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one snuff-box, value 3s.; one hat, value 8s.; one handkerchief, value 1s. and 5s. 6d. in monies numbered , the goods and monies of the said John Skillern.

JOHN SKILLERN, I am clerk to Messrs. Forster and Co. on the 31st of October last I was going from the Borough to my house, which is in Drake-street, Bloomsbury; I was in Drury-lane , very near Long-acre, I was on the south of Long-acre , it was about twelve o'clock; I had been drinking that night, but not to excess, I only had a glass of rum and water, it had an effect upon me, but not so as to hinder me from going home safe. Two men came up to me, saying, young man you seem intoxicated, we will see you home; I very gladly accepted the offer; I had not got above a hundred yards before I was knocked down, and completely stunned. I do not know by whom.

Court. Could it be by either of the men who offered to see you home - A. Certainly it might.

Prosecutor. I came to myself about half past six o'clock the next morning, and found I was in St. Giles's watch-house, and that I had lost one 3s. piece, one 1s. 6d. token, and one shilling; a large French snuff-box, a silk handkerchief, and I had almost a new hat changed for an old one; my own hat was found upon one of the prisoners, I saw it at Marlborough-street. I will not swear positively that the prisoners are the men who first came up to me.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I produce the hat.

JOHN SKILLERN . I know it to be mine, there are two or three stiches dropped in the lining, and it has black velvet at the back.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I am a watchman at St. Giles's; on the night of the 31st of October, when I had called the hour of twelve, I saw the two prisoners standing on the pavement with Mr. Skillern, I knew the prisoner M'Cawley before; I asked what business they had with the man. He said, we are going to see him home. I asked them where he lived, but they did not know. I took up my lanthorn, and saw that his pockets were turned inside-out, and he was bleeding at the mouth; I took M'Cawley to the watch-house, and my brother-watchman took the other. We searched them, and found a 3s. piece on Flannagan, but nothing on M'Cawley. The prosecutor being ill, could not appear against them until a week afterwards; M'Cawley, when at the office, had the hat on his head which I have produced. We took Mr. Skillern to the watch-house also.

Q. In what state was he - A. He was very bad, his lip was swelled, he seemed sensible, but did not say what had happened to him. When he got to the watch-house, he said, that he had not got his own hat on. He was stupid, but I think it proceeded from the blows he had received - He bled very much. Neither of the prisoners attempted to run away, we secured them directly - They had no opportunity of escaping.

GEORGE BASEY . I came up to them with Crawley; he has spoken correct. There was a third person with them, who ran away as soon as we questioned them.

MARY ANN EDWIN . I live at No. 18, Wild-street; on the night of the 31st of October, I was returning from Drury-lane Theatre, as I was coming through Broadcourt, Long-acre, I saw Mr. Skillern lying on the iron bars of an area, the two prisoners, and a tall thin young man, were standing by him; two men came by, and asked what was the matter with him; they said, they supposed he was drunk. The two men said they would contrive to get him home; they stooped to raise him, but he seemed quite lifeless. M'Cawley struck one of them, and he asked who it was, M'Cawley laughed, and said, it was only fun; the men then left, and one of them said, he was afraid they were after no good with him; I followed the men a little way. When I returned, the two prisoners had got Mr. Skillern up against a door-way; they searched all his pockets, I saw them do it, but what they took I cannot say; they held out their hands once or twice to the tall man, I saw them give him a handkerchief; I do not know what else they gave him. The watchman came up

immediately, and the tall man ran away; the watchman asked them what they were doing.

Cross-examined by the Court. How long have you lived in Wild-street - A. I lodge there, I am a servant out of place, I had lived there five days then. I have been out of place ever since the 20th of October.

Q. How many different places have you lived at within the last two years - A. I had lived with my aunt antil I went to Mr. Selby's.

Q. When you left him, why did you not go back to your aunt - A. I left my aunt in July, in consequence of a quarrel.

Q. What time was this-A. About twelve o'clock; the Play was over about twelve.

Q. Did you go straight home - A. I stood talking with some young women who had been to the Play with me; I had not been to the Play for four years before. I went before the magistrate about this, and was told they were all gone. I heard no more of the business until the watchman came to me.

Flannagan's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury - I had been at Drury-lane Playhouse on that evening, and coming up Drury-lane, I met the gentleman, there were a crowd of people round him. The watchman came up, and he was told to take him to the watch-house; he refused. They then told us to take him along Drury-lane; immediately two watchman came up and took us; they asked him what he had lost; he first said £40. then 40s. and then 8s.

M'Cawley's Defence. I gave 8s. for that hat, at the corner of Drury-lane. The hat-maker says, he knows he sold it to me; but as there is no stamp in it, he cannot swear to it.

Jury to Skillern. Did you see the last witness - A. I remember seeing a woman standing by, but I do not know whether it was her or not.

Q. Was you at the Play with her-A. No; I never saw her.

Court to M. A. EDWIN. How came you to go to lodge in Wild-street - A. Because I knew the people who lived there. I gave my master warning myself.

MARY M'CAWLEY. I am sister to the prisoner; I bought that hat at the corner of Prince's-street, about a month ago, and paid for it by a shilling at a time.

JUDY M'CAWLEY. I saw the hat on my son's head the day before he was taken up; I knew he had a new hat on, but whether that is it I cannot say; I asked the man of whom the hat was bought, to come, but he would not.

MARY ANN SKILLERN . I bought the hat for my husband on a Monday - He had not had it long; I bought it of a Mr. Dolley, Beech-street, Soho.

Court. What do you know it by - A. By the stitches which are dropped in the lining, and by the pink lining and black velvet.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-29

29. JAMES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , £30, in monies numbered, one bank-note for the payment of and value £15, four other bank-notes for the payment of £2 each, value £8, and seven other bank-notes for the payment of £1, value £7 , the monies and property of Mathias Prime , Lucas, and others.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-30

30. JAMES JOHNSTON was indicted for stealing on the 19th of November , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Hewitt, one banknote, value 50l., one bank-note, value 30l., one bank-note, vlaue 20l., one bank-note, value 10l., one bank-note, value 5l., and two bank-notes for the payment of 1l. each, and value 2l. , the property of James Bourdillion and Thomas Hewitt , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating the house to be the dwelling-house of James Bourdillion and Thomas Hewitt .

JAMES BOURDILLION . My partner resides in the house in which the business is carried on, I occasionally live there. Our private cash is kept in a box, a key of which Mr. Hewitt, and myself, only have. The box was deposited in an iron-safe, and the key kept in a drower in the office, which was not locked; I know the prisoner, he had lived servant to Mr. Hewitt, who keeps the house; he was also employed as porter to the office. He was acquainted with the office, and knew of the safe as well as I did myself. The box contained one 50l. note and one 20l. note(which he had received from Mr. Stone, whose name he wrote on the side), a 30l., a 10l., a 5l., and two 2l. notes, and some silver; there were also one bill for 50l. and another for 27l. with a variety of other things. I am the cashier, I put them in the box about twelve o'clock; I was out from twelve until near four; I shortly after left the office for the day.

THOMAS HEWITT . I am the partner of the last witness. The prisoner lived with me about three or four years, as a house-servant and porter. I saw the cash-box on the 19th of November, in the morning. I locked the safe about four o'clock-the box was there then. The prisoner left me the beginning of July last; he had been at the office several times between that time and the 19th of November. I had paid Mr. Bourdillion two notes, on the same morning which I received them from Mr. Stone. The prisoner had been to my office sometime before, to consult about some property which he thought was coming to him from his family.

JOHN BROOKBANK . I live with Messrs. Bourdillion and Hewitt; I know the prisoner, he left their service about June; since that time he has been to the office two or three times.

Q. Did you learn from him what he was doing after he had left - A. He did not state to me what he was doing. In consequence of what I had heard. I applied to him for two orders for the boxes, as I heard he belonged to the Play.

Q. Do you remember his coming to the office on the 19th of November-A. Yes; at a quarter before nine in the evening. The office in which I write leads into Mr. Bourdillion's room.

Q. Upon his coming in, what did he say - A. One of the clerks asked him if he wanted to see Mr. Hewitt? He said, is he at home? I said, John, do you remember you promised me some tickets; he went backwards into the

yard; I was standing in the passage, and he said, go into the office, and I will bring them to you. He then came in, pulled out his pocket-book, and said, he would write me one. I said, I thought that would not do; he said, he had got a friend just by, and he would go and get me two. He said, he had got a pain in his stomach, and went into the yard again, he did not take a light at that time. He returned again through Mr. Bourdillion's office, asked for a light, and said, he must go again. He went again, through Mr. Bourdillion's room, and returned, pretending to be buttoning-up his cloaths, said, he must go again; he went again, banging Mr. Bourdillion's door after him. This rather excited my suspicion. I rested a little while, then went to the clerk's desk and listened, but heard nothing. Presently I heard the glass-door bang and some person go out. The prisoner did not return through the office as usual. He went out to the privy four times in all. He returned about ten minutes after nine; he put his head in at the door, and said, I have not got the tickets, I am coming here to-morrow morning to Mr. Hewitt. After he had quite gone away, I took my light, thinking that he might have taken some papers. I went to look into Mr. Bourdillion's closet, and I saw the iron-safe half open, and the cash-box gone. I had not been into the room before to see if the safe was open or not. The prisoner did not come the next morning.

ANN IRELAND. I first became acquainted with the prisoner about six months ago; I then resided with my father at Case-Orton, I afterwards came to London with the prisoner, on a Monday, it was near a fortnight before this circumstance took place; we first lodged with Mrs. Baines, in Shepherd's-market; the prisoner said, he was a player at Drury-lane. While we were with Mrs. Baines we wanted money, we had only a few shillings. Mrs. Baines applied to the prisoner to pay his rent; she kept a public-house; we had no money to pay her.

Q. Do you recollect Tuesday, the 19th of November-A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you about going out with him-A. Yes: after tea, it was after seven o'clock. I went out with him, he said, he was going to see two or three friends, mentioning Mr. Hewitt's name; he left me at a public-house. I do not know what direction we took when we came out of Shepherd's-market; I have no acquaintance with town. When we were in the public-house he called for a pint of ale, and left me there; he came back again in about half an hour.

Q. When he came back did he bring any thing with him - A. Yes; he brought something tied in a handkerchief; we left the public-house shortly afterwards; as we were going home, I asked him what he had got; he said, a box. When we got home he undid the handkerchief, and I saw a tin box (a box produced); it was not so big as that (another produced), it was about the size of that; he opened it with a knife; he opened the lid of it at the hinges. I saw him take bank notes out of it; as well as I can tell there was a 50l., a 30l., a 20l., a 10l., a 5l., a 1l, and some silver; there were other papers; he made me get a candle and they were burned. I asked him where he got them; he said at Mr. Hewitt's. After he had opened the box he took me out; he left me at Mrs. Barne's; he returned and told me that he had thrown the box into some water; he paid Mrs. Barnes her bill with a 5l. note; this was on Tuesday; he remained at home the next morning; he was in the public house all the afternoon, and in the evening he went out of town, to my father's; he said he would go and fetch my clothes; he returned on the Thursday morning, my father and my uncle came with him; he came to my room door when I was getting up.

Q. Did he tell you what he had done with the notes-A. He told me he had hid the notes, in my father's privy, between some boards.

JAMES IRELAND , Jun. I am the son of James Ireland, Sen. and brother to the last witness. I know the prisoner; I remember his coming down to my father's on the wednesday evening. He spoke to my mother and she went out. He then went down to the privy, which is in the back-yard; it is no great distancefrom the house; he stopped there about ten minutes; he took a light with him; he returned in about ten minutes for another candle, as his own was burnt out. He got another, and went to the privy again, and remained there about ten minutes longer. His stopping there so long excited my attention; I was playing with a dog at the pig-sty, which is about ten yards from the privy. He had got his back turned towards the door, standing up-right in the privy; I could not see what he was doing.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Harmer coming down - A. Yes; they searched the same privy, in which I saw the prisoner.

DANIEL BISHOP. I am an officer of Bow-street. I went with Mr. Harmer, on the 23rd of November, to search the privy; we found the following notes:-one 50l.; one 30l.; one 20l.; and one 10l.; they were between the boards of the seat.

(Produced.)

MR. BOURDILLION. This 50l. and 10l. notes were paid me by Mr. Hewitt the same morning: they have the name of Stone written upon them by Mr. Hewitt.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his age and previous good character .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-31

31. WILLIAM SANDERS , was indicted for stealing' on the 23rd of November , two pieces of printed cotton, containing fifty-six yards, value 50s. , the property of Thomas Bell .

JOHN LLOYD. I am shopman to Mr. T. Bell, in the Minories ; he is a linen-draper . I lost the cotton on Saturday, the 23rd of November, about two o'clock in the afternoon; they were taken from within the shop; they were lying on the shutters. I was watching the prisoner about an hour before; he took the two pieces on his arm and was in the act of giving them to another person, who was with him; he reached over into the shop, he did not step in; the other man ran off, and I sent for an officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the Minories, and seeing some handkerchiefs hanging by the door; I stopped to look at them; the gown-pieces were hanging by them; I lifted them up to look at them; the shopman ran out, and I knocked them down just as I was going to

ask the price; he laid hold of me, and gave me in charge. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Calendar Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-32

32. MARY SMITH , was indicted for stealing sixty-two yards of satin, value 15l. 10s., the goods of Wynn Ellis , and William Brown , privately in their shop .

WYNN ELLIS . I am a haberdasher ; I live at No. 16, Ludgate-street , Mr. Brown is my partner . On Wednesday the 27th of November, about half past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming from our clerk's desk, which is in the middle of the shop, I observed the prisoner walking out, and leaving a woman behind, who came in with her. I though her left arm, which was under her shawl, seemed encumbered, I followed her; she was walking very fast down Creed-lane; I came up to her, and looked her in the face; she endeavoured to walk slow and get behind me; I kept close to her side; when we came to Water-lane, opposite the shop of Mr. Carrick, I wanted her to go back with me; she refused, and endeavoured to get away; I put one arm round her, and with the other I endeavoured to take hold of her shawl to see if she had any thing there; she took the satin from under her shawl and endeavoured to hold it from me; I took it from her; and at that moment Mr. Carrick opened his door and pulled her into his shop. I delivered her into the custody of the officer, with the satin.

JANE BENNETT . I am shopwoman to Messrs. Ellis and Brown. The prisoner came into the shop with another woman, and asked for some cottage lustres, and some poplins; I showed them to her; they purchased a dress; while I was measuring it the prisoner walked out; the other remained; she said she had lost, or left her purse; she gave me a guinea, saying she would fetch the remainder; they came to 1l. 3s. 4d.; I gave her the guinea back, and told her we would send her the poplin; she then took the guinea, was going out, and said she would fetch her purse. I followed her to the door to persuade her to let me send the poplin. She gave me the guinea back, and told me to keep it if I was afraid; she has never returned for the poplin since; the shop was crowded from top to bottom at the time; there are 18 or 20 shop-people. I served both the women. I did not see the satin. I have heard that a young man was next to me showing satin to some ladies. I am sure he did not serve the prisoner. I am sure the prisoner is the person who came in with the other woman.

ROBERT CARRICK. I am a baker. I live in Water-lane. I saw Mr. Ellis and the prisoner strnggling together at my door. I helped him to secure her. I took her into my shop, and sent for the constable.

MRS. CARRICK. I saw Mr. Ellis take the goods from the prisoner.

RICHARD TIPPITS . I am shopman to Messrs. Ellis and Brown. I was showing satin to two ladies, and the piece found on the prisoner was on the top of the parcel which I was showing them. I do not recollect seeing the prisoner there; the satin was marked S.G.R.

THOMAS WINCOTT. I am shopman to Messrs. Ellis and Brown. I saw the satin the night before the robbery.

CHARLES JONES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody, on the 27th of November, between three and four o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am a distressed widow, with six children. I beg the mercy of the Court and Jury.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 60.

Recommended to mercy on account of her age and family .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-33

33. SAMUEL FORSTER , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , seven shirts value 2l.; six gowns, value 2l. 10s.; one pelisse, value 1l. 10s.; two sleeping-jackets, value 6s.; two petticoats, value 5s.; three books, value 1l. 2s.; seven aprons, value 8s.; three handkerchiefs, value 10s.; one pair of boots, value 5s.; one watch-seal, value 2l.; one teacaddy, value 1l.; and one sheet, value 3s., the property of Sarah Noone , in the dwelling-house of Mary Daniels .

SARAH NOONE . I lived at No. 10, in the Cresent, in the Minories, with Mr. Young, who is a merchant. I was a servant there; I had left my situation and lived with my brother, whose name is Barker; he lives in Lizard-street, City-road; I left my two boxes in the care of Mrs. Daniels, on the 20th May; she sent her son to tell me that my two boxes had been broken open, and all my clothes stolen out. I went down to her directly and saw her. The prisoner is her son.

ROBERT REEVE . I am a pawnbroker; I live in White-cross-street. I produce one gown; two shifts; and one pelisse, which were pledged, by the prisoner for 1l., on the 20th of May.

Prisoner. Are you sure I am the man - A. I have no doubt of it.

JAMES ATKING . I am a carman. I saw the prisoner get into his mother's window on the 20th of May. I had known him some time. It was about four o'clock in the afternoon. In a few minutes he threw a sack out of the window. The room is over a coach-house; he got in by climbing up the doors; he jumped out after it, and carried it away. I believe he was not upon good terms with his mother. The mews forms a square; his mother kept two rooms over the stable; the door is at the side of the coach-house; it is called America-mews. There is a staircase up to the rooms.

Prisoner. If you thought I was doing wrong, why did you not stop me - A. I thought you was not doing wrong, as it was your mother's house.

WILLIAM BELCHER. I live with Mr. Prince, in Whitechapel; I have one petticoat and two shifts pledged for 10s. on the 20th of May, about six o'clock in the evening. I have every reason to believe they were pawned by the prisoner. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN FORRESTER. I am an officer. The prisoner was advertised, and I apprehended him; he denied his name. I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was on board a 74 gun ship since the 25th of April.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-34

34. GEORGE TATE , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , two glass bottles, value 6d., and three pints of wine, value 4s. 6d. , the property of Thomas Abbotts and Richard Abbotts .

RICHARD ABBOTTS . I am a partner in the firm of Thomas and Richard Abbotts; we live in Skinner-street ; there is no other person in the firm; we are wine-merchants . On the 29th of November, the prisoner bought two gross of bottles at our house. I went to the cellar, where the wine is kept, about half past four in the afternoon; as I was going down the stairs I met the prisoner; he was coming up; I asked him what he wanted there; he replied, he was looking out bottles with Charlton, who is one of our servants. I told him to return with me to Charlton, who was in the cellar, which he did. I called for a light, and asked him what he had taken; he said, nothing, and that I might search him. On looking round, I saw two bottles, on his right-hand, on the dark side(from the candle). The bottles were full, and as much concealed as they could be. I sent for an officer, in the presence of Charlton and several others. He said he knocked them down from the binn; that they were breaking, and he caught these two to save them.

Q. How near was he to the binn then - A. About five yards from it. There was no appearance of the bottles being knocked about. There was no bottles broke in the cellar.

Q. From the situation in which the prisoner was found did it appear that he was going to return the bottles - A. Certainly not; he was more than half way up the stairs; he had no business either in the cellar or in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Had he not dealt with you for empty bottles - A. He had.

Q. He has dealt with you to the amount of 40l. in a year - A. I do not know. Charlton was in the cellar with him. I do not think there was any empty bottles in that cellar. We call ourselves the Commercial Hall Wine Company. I met him on the cellar stairs.

Q. When he was going with you, might he not have put the bottles down if he choose-A. He might, perhaps.

Q. Did he not say, you have kicked against some bottles; and you said, come along with them-bring them along - A. I heard some bottles rattling, and I told him to take care or he would break them. There were binns on the side of the cellar. Other persons might have put bottles outside the binns if they choose. Several persons had been in the cellar. When I asked him what he had got, he said, nothing.

Court. Could you see if he had got anything when he was on the stairs - A. No; I could not keep up to him. He had no business on the premises. He afterwards said, that he had picked the bottles up.

EDWARD CHARLTON . I am servant to the prosecutor; I heard some person call for a light; I went with one, and found the prisoner and Mr. Abbotts together; there were two bottles found on the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Do you mean to say they were under his coat - A. Yes; he had his hands under his coat; that part of the cellar is not payed. I believe he has dealt with us for empty bottles. The cellar is quite separate from the house.

Q. Is it an extraordinary thing for persons to come into the cellar - A. There has been such a thing. We did not keep empty bottles there.

JAMES ALSON . I am a servant to Messrs. Abbotts. I found a bottle of wine on the side of the steps.

RICHARD HARLAND. I was near Mr. Abbotts when he called for a light. Mr. Abbotts asked the prisoner, what business he had there; he said he had come down for bottles. Mr. Abbotts asked him, what he had got; he said, nothing, you may search me. He searched him, and found two bottles on him.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went and bought some bottles of them on that day. When I had looked them over, I went back, and asked if there were any more; I was told there was in the cellar, in the binn, No.10. I went to look for them; as I was coming out of the cellar, I met Mr. Abbotts; he asked, who is there? I said it was me. He called for a light, and we went down together. I knocked against some bottles; he told me to take care; he then turned round and asked what brought me there; I said business; he said nothing, but sent for an officer, and gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-35

35. MARGARET SPEAR , was indicted for having in her custody and possession a forged Bank of England Note, knowing the same to be forged .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

36. SARAH GARDENER , and MARY HOPKINS , were indicted for the like offence.

The prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-36

37. SARAH GARDENER , and MARGARET SPEAR , was indicted for forgery .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex, Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

38. SARAH GARDENER , and MARY HOPKINS , were indicted for the like offence.

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

39. MARGARET SPEAR , was again indicted for the like offence,

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-37

40. JOHN KEYS , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Murrell , on the 25th of November , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his

person, and against his will, three seals, value 3l., and one key, value 10s. , the property of the said Henry Murrell .

HENRY MURRELL . I am a costermonger . On the 25th of November, I had been to a public-house, in Westminster, with a friend. We stopped there until about half past ten o'clock at night; we had very little to drink; on my way home I went to another public-house, and had some gin and water; I then left to go home; it was about eleven o'clock. When I had got about one hundred yards I came to a dark place. The prisoner and three more were standing there, with their hands over their faces. The prisoner struck me several times, trying to knock me down. I fought with him as well as I could. He made three or four attempts at my seals; he got them at last. He ran up New Pye-street, and I followed him, crying stop thief! I never lost sight of him. I saw him taken by the watchman; nothing was found upon him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. He was searched by the watchman. I do not know the other men. I was quite sober. I am sure he is the man. Some of the other men struck me behind; I should not know them.

Q. Did you not tell the magistrate, that you did not know which of the men it was - A. No. I have no expectation of a reward; I did not know there was one. He said he would cut my seals; but I do not know whether he did; the ribbon appears as if they had been forced off. I did not tell the magistrate that he cut them. The seals and key were gold; they hung out quite easy to be seen.

JAMES M'CULLEN. I am a watchman; I heard the cry of stop thief! I came out of my box, which is at the corner of Pye-street; I stopped the prisoner; he was walking; I did not see him above six yards from my box. There were other people in the street. Murrell came up in about five minutes. I called four or five times for him before he came; he appeared to be in liquor; he was sensible enough to know what he was about. The prisoner made no attempt to get away. Murrell said, he was the very man that knocked him down; he did not say what he had lost; he told the constable of the night, that he had lost his seals and key.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I cannot say whether any body had gone by my box before I came out. There might be. There were people going backwards and forwards. The prisoner was walking. It was a very dark night. The place where Murrell was robbed is very dark indeed.

WILLIAM TRIPP. I am constable of the night; I searched the prisoner, but found nothing on him. Murrell appeared as if he had been drinking; he was very dirty.

Jury to M'CULLEN. Did the prisoner appear flurried when you stopped him - A. No.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-38

41. JOHN JEFKIN , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Stephen Knight , the younger , on the 11th of November , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, six pair of stockings, value 12s.; six pair of socks, value 5s.; and three yards and a half of woollen cloth, value 3l. , the goods of Stephen Knight , the elder .

STEPHEN KNIGHT , JUN. About eight o'clock in the evening I was in St. Pancras-road . I was going from Holborn to Kentish Town. I was just by Frances's-barn , when two sailors collared me, and demanded my bundle. I had three bundles with me, one of them was the cloth, the other the stockings, and the third the socks; I refused to give them up. They threw me down on a bank by the side of a ditch; one of them covered my eyes, and the other told me to deliver the bundle; I gave them the socks; the stockings were taken out of my great-coat pocket, and the third bundle was in the ditch. I called out murder! A watchman came up to my assistance, when they had left me. I could not see them run away, it was so dark; I do not know which way they went. I could see that they were sailors, by the reflection of the lamp. I did not see their faces. The watchman sprung his rattlc. It was about half past eight o'clock. I only know that they were sailors. They were coming from Kentish-town. The watchman ran towards London. I called out stop thief! I ran after him; when I came up the watchman had the prisoner in custody. He asked me if the prisoner was the man; I told him he was. The persons who robbed me ran towards London. The prisoner had a sailor's jacket on. He was searched, but no part of my property was found on him. The prisoner was going towards London, when we overtook him.

Q. Do you mean to say that the prisoner is the man who robbed you - A. Yes; because I met nobody else; and he said that he had come from Barnet.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a patrol belonging to Highgate-hill. Two men in sailors dresses passed me about two hundred yards from Frances's-baru; they were going towards London. A few minutes afterwards I heard a groaning; I went and found the gentleman laying on the ground; he said he had been robbed; I sprung my rattle. I could hear footsteps before me, but could not see, it was so dark. Blundell's box was between Frances's-barn and London; he had stopped the prisoner. Mr. Knight came up without his hat; he said he was sure that he was the man, and that he could swear to his being the man who held his hands over his eyes. The prisoner said, that he had come from Barnet, and was going to Greenwich to receive prize-money; he said he had no papers to show; he said that he had slept the night before under the shambles in Fleet-market.

Prisoner. Was I unwilling to go with you-A. No.

JOHN BLUNDELL . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm. I ran about fifteen yards, and stopped the prisoner. He asked me to let him pass. He was walking gradually on towards London. He did not attempt to get away.

GEORGE WHITEHAIR. I am a patrol of Sommers' Town; on the 11th of November, at about a quarter to nine o'clock, the prisoner was brought into the watch-house; I searched him; I only found a knife on him; he said he had slept in Fleet-market the night before.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been eighteen years in his Majesty's service. I have been in great distress. I was looking for work. I know nothing of the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-39

42. ELIZABETH CARR , was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , two sets of bed-furniture, value 3l. 10s.; two quilts, value 2l. 5s.; seven blankets, value 2l. 3s.; one pair of sheets, value 10s.; three pillows, value 9s.; four pillowcases, value 4s.; two towels, value 1s.; seventy-six yards of linen cloth, value 5l. 10s.; four table-cloths, value 15s.; one table-cover, value 3s.; six shirts, value 1l. 10s.; ten yards of cotton, value 14s.; two waistcoats, value 8s.; one pair of breeches, value 8s.; one kettle, value 8s.; and one pair of candlesticks, value 7s., the property of John Westgate , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN WESTGATE. I live at Hoxton . The prisoner lived servant with me for about three months. She left me on the morning of the 10th of October. I did not know that she was going. I found some duplicates in the kitchen drawer. I found I had lost several things. From the dates of the duplicates I suppose they have been pledged at different times. I found fifty-eight duplicates. I have examined the property at the pawn-brokers, and they are mine. The cloth is in different remnants. There is no one article which is worth 40s. by itself.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a constable. The prisoner was in my custody; she told me that she had left the duplicates in the drawer. I made her no promises.

JAMES MARLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Cotton, who lives in Shoreditch. The prisoner had pledged articles at our shop, five times in the whole. I gave her duplicates.

GEORGE VINCENT. I live with Mr. Le Blane, pawnbroker, Shoreditch. The prisoner came to our shop six times in the months of August and September. I produce the articles which she pledged with me. I am sure she is the person.

MR. WESTGATE re-examined. Among the fifty-eight duplicates there were five relating to the goods pledged with Martin, and the six pledged with Viucent.

(Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-40

43. LOUISA ELLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , twenty-one yards of woollen-cloth, value 18l. the goods of William Prosser , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM PROSSER . I live in Goswell-street ; the prisoner was my servant , and had been with me for two years. On the 2d of November, as I was cutting a piece of cloth, I found that I had lost five yards and a quarter; I examined farther, and found I had lost twelve yards more from other pieces, and afterwards I missed three yards of cassimere; I lost a great deal more. I knew it must either be the prisoner or my lad. I spoke to her on the Saturday about it; I gave her no reason to think that she would not be prosecuted. When she was charged with it, she said, she had stolen it; this was on a Sunday night. When the officer came, she said, that she had taken the blue and green cloths; she had taken them to a Mrs. M'Ginnis, who lived in Cloth-fair; the officer was present when she made this confession. We took her to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. She had been sometime in my service; I had a good opinion of her. I had missed goods several times.

BENJAMIN HAYDON . I am an appreutice to Mr. Prosser. I remember seeing the prisoner go out of the house between seven and eight o'clock on the morning, before this robbery was found out; she carried something with her; I asked her what it was, she said, they were things she had to take out.

WILLIAM MONK. I took the prisoner into custody, and was present when she confessed the robbery; she said, she had taken the goods to Mrs. M'Ginnis, in Cloth-fair. She said, that M'Ginnis sold them for 2l. 10s. to a Jew, and give her the money.

Prisoner's Defence. Friday night was the first time that I was asked about this. They kept me confined in the house, and I never went out until I went with the officer; and then Mr. Prosser said, would it not be better for me to be in my own bed, and that if I would confess it I should be let loose, and I did confess it.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-41

44. FRANCES NOWLAND and ANN M'DOUGAL were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , twenty-three yards of printed cotton, value 1l. 10s. and twenty-four yards of linen cloth, value 18s., the property of William Spooner , privately in his shop .

JOHN SPOONER. My brother is a linen-draper in Chiswell-street ; I was officiating in his shop for him, on the 6th of November, between three or four o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners came in together; they did not ask for any thing. I suspected them, and I asked the prisoner Nowland what I could serve her with; she said she would wait until I had served the people whom I was attending to. They were in the shop about twenty minutes before they were served. When the people went out, Nowland asked for some muslin, I server her with it, and some course cloth and cambric, they came to 3s. 1d. altogether. They left the shop in company - I did not perceive them take any thing. I followed them, and came up with M'Dougal, she had got my umbrella; I told her she had stolen it, and asked her to let me look in her apron, which she had up. I looked in, and there were some Irish and print, and a shawl, which I saw on Mrs. Nowland's arm when she came into the shop; I brought M'Dougal back to the shop; she said, Nowland had given her the things. I did not see Nowland afterwards. I had seen both the articles, I am sure, about an hour before in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. There were people in the shop when they came in.

Q. How was Nowland dressed - A. Not as she is now; she was dressed much better than the other prisoner. M'Dougal said, that the muslin was for her. Nowland had the shawl when they came in; I afterwards saw M'Dougal with it, and my umbrella.

Q. When you charged M'Dougal with the robbery, did she not say, if there is any thing wrong, Mrs. Nowland lives at such a place, she gave me the articles to carry-A. No; she said, God bless you, do not hurt me! the woman gave me one shilling to carry it for her. When she got to the shop she gave me Nowland's direction, which I afterwards found to be true.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I did not know where Nowland lived. She dealt with me for the articles, M'Dougal was standing by, and said, that the muslin was for her. When I went out M'Dougal was standing up for the rain; she had no umbrella of her own with her. I officiate sometimes for my brother. I do not know whether Nowland was a frequent customer or not.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I keep the shop; this Irish and print have my private mark on them.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Nowland has dealt four or five times at my shop; she once paid me a note and gave me the name of Martin, Barbican; she never gave me the name of Nowland. It was about a fortnight before this transaction. M'Dougal gave me Nowland's direction, and she was found there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. When she gave me the 1l. note, I offered to send the things home; M'Dougal was there, but she would not let me. I am sure that when she gave me the name of Martin, that it was not the name of the person from whom she received it.

Court. Was M'Dougal in hearing when she gave you the name of Martin - A. She was; they would not let me put the goods in paper, which made me suspicious. The linen is worth a 1l.

THOMAS VAN. I am an officer; I received the linen from Mr. Spooner; M'Dougal told me that Nowland lived in Gould-court, Stepney-green - I went and found her there; she said, if M'Dougal had property it was nothing to her. M'Dougal told Nowland that she gave her the property; Nowland denied it.

Nowland's Defence. When I paid him the 1l. note he did not ask for the name; and when I bought the things the gentleman asked if I was in a hurry. I know nothing about the goods.

M'Dougal's Defence. I certainly had the property, and received it from Nowland; she gave me them to carry, and said she would be after me directly, when the gentleman came and took me. I am sure she gave them to me; I went into the shop with her, I wanted nothing myself.

Court to JOHN SPOONER. How far had M'Dougal got when you overtook her-A. About three hundred yards, she might have got farther if she had not stopped for the rain; I found her standing up, under cover; I am sure that Nowland had the shawl which I saw in M'Dougal's possession afterwards.

WILLIAM SPOONER Re -examined. I am sure she did not give me the name of Nowland.

F. NOWLAND. GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

A. M'DOUGAL. GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 48.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-42

45. GEORGE WELLS , WILLIAM QUINLAND , and WILLIAM SMITH , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Cholmondeley , Esq. about five in the night of 21st of November, with intent to steal, and stealing therein one table, value 10s.; six chairs, value 40s.; five hats, value 5s.; a set of bed-furniture, value 5s.; and three yards of silk, value 1s. the property of the said Charles Cholmondeley , Esq.

CHARLES CHOLMONDELEY , Esq. I live at No. 4, Cleveland-square, St. James's ; I left my house about June last, and went into the country, the key of the street-door was left with Mrs. French, who had the care of my house. I returned to town about a fortnight ago, in consequence of information which I received from Mr. French; I intended to return to reside in that house again. I have been robbed to the amount of two or three hundred pounds.

ALICE FRENCH . I am the wife of George French. In the month of June I had the keys of Mr. Cholmondeley's house; I went from time to time to look at the house; I went on Thursday, the 21st of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I had been about five weeks before, and my husband has been since; I did not see any thing amiss on the outside, the windows were all shut and the shutters to; when I got in I found some fire-irons in the hall, and that the house had been robbed of a great deal of property. I went and got my husband and one of the lodgers to accompany me; I was there with Nichols. The table was in the drawing-room and the chairs in the dining-parlour in the morning; the bed-furniture and some hats were on the great landing, and there was some silk on the ground-floor belonging to the book-case. I went with Mr. Wellet, a little after five o'clock, and walked about the door; I observed the prisoner, Smith, standing close to the Duke of Cumberland's wall, and passed him. In the course of a little time I saw him near Mr. Cholmondely's door, he then went away, and I saw him come round the corner of Cleveland-court, and go up to the door, as if he was going into it. I observed a man with a porter's knot, very near the house, go round by the Marquis of Stafford's stables, he had the knot under his arm, a light coat on, and a green baize apron; I saw him walk round by the Marquis of Stafford's stables, which comes round by Mr. Cholmondeley's door - I did not see him afterwards there was no thoroughfare. I did not see the other man until he was taken; I went away, and when I returned I saw the door broken open - I then went in. The table and chairs which I had seen in the morning were removed into the hall, with the hats and bed-furniture, they were packed up in a green baize, and a porter's knot was in the hall, on the table, the prisoners were in custody, I saw all three of them at the suttling-house; I knew Smith, and the other was dressed exactly the same as the man I saw in the street with the knot. I have every reason to believe that he is the same person. It was very dark.

Q. Did you find any thing in the house which had not been there in the morning - A. A dark-lanthorn was found there, which was not there in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. You had not been to the house for sometime-A. About five weeks before; no person lived in the house - I kept the key. It was a few minutes after five o'clock when I first went to watch. I did not see Smith directly, he was standing still when I

passed him, with his face towards the railing; I had no opportunity of seeing his face at that time; I saw him twice. I am certain, by his dress, that he is the same person.

Q. Then it is by his dress that you speak to him - A. From his dress and height, more than from his face.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. How far were you from Wells - A. A very little way. If I had stopped I could not have seen his face by the light of the day. I could see the colour of his dress as I passed him.

Q. Without the light of the lamp you could see colours, why could you not see features as well - A. Features are more difficult to see than colours; the lamps were alight.

GEORGE FRENCH . The keys of Mr. Cholmondeley's house were sent to my house. On the 21st of November my wife went there, and I followed her; I saw that the things were taken away which I had left safe ten days before; I went to Bow-street, Nichols came to me, and we went and looked over the house together. I was there in the evening.

Q. What time did you leave in the morning-A. About three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Were the chairs and tables in the hall then - A. No; I returned in the evening. We had left the shutters in the same manner as we found them. One of them had been forced, and a bar was found under the windows; all the other shutters were fastened. There was a patent lock of Bramali's taken off the door, and another lock on the door which we left locked; I returned in the evening and came down to a post to meet Nichols; I gave him the keys, and he desired me to wait there while he went for assistance. I do not know whether he saw any person go in; Wilders came back with him; he put the key into the door; I was close to the door - He found it fast on the inside; Nichols and Wilders forced it and went in. They had lights. The men had made their escape out at the top of the house. I did not see the prisoners until they were at the suttling-house.

Q. Did you see any difference in the hall when you were there - A. The chairs and table were tied up, and the bed-curtains and hats were in the green cloth, and the porter's knot by the side of them. I saw the prisoner, Quinland, examined; a piece of silk was found on him, which I had seen in the house in the morning.

WILLIM NICHOLS. I am an officer of Bow-street; in consequence of information which I received, I went to Mr. Cholmondeley's house, about half past two o'clock. I gave directions to watch.

Q. What time did you go in the evening - A. About five o'clock. I observed the prisoner, Smith, standing at the corner of the Lord Chamberlains Office, which is nearly opposite the door. I went further on, and passed Wells and Quinland; Wells had a porter's knot, and an apron on. I was in disguise. I got behind the pillar of the Lord Chamberlains office, and I saw Smith go to the door; he was close against it, with his face towards it. I was not near enough to observe him do any thing. He went away, and in a few minutes returned again, went up to the door, with his face towards it; he then walked away, and the other two prisoners crossed over to the door. I lost sight of them. Smith went away, and I was obliged to go, for fear of being seen. I ran through Palace-yard, and went round into Cleveland-square. I then told French and Wilders to go away. Smith returned; went to the door, watched a few minutes, and then walked towards St. James's-street. I followed him, laid hold of him, and said where are you going. He said that he was going home; that he had just come from Westminster, and had been drinking with some Molls, and told me not to tell his wife.

Court. You knew him then - A. Perfectly well. I told him that he was my prisoner, and must go back with me; he said that he had got nothing about him. I took him to the Suttling-house, and returned to the house. I got some assistance; I listened at the door, and heard a noise, as if things were being removed down stairs. I told my assistants to remain at the door, for their coming out. During this time the door was opened a little way from within, but immediately shut to. I took the key from French; I tried it, and the bolt was immediately closed. I heard a noise like running up stairs. There was a cry in the street, that they were escaping out at the garret window. I desired the Marquis of Stafford's porter to tell the neighbours to watch them. I forced the door, and followed them up stairs. I was followed by some soldiers, we went from roof to roof. The garret windows, were open and broken. After passing over several roofs, the prisoner, Quinland, rose up close to me. I took him into custody, and Ashworth took Wells by my direction. I asked Quinland where he was; he said he must not tell. Quinland said, I know Nichols, and will go with him any where; I must answer for what I have done. I secured him, and found a piece of silk in his hat. I found the articles mentioned in the indictment in the ball: a porter's knot lay by the things; they were packed ready to be carried away. I am sure that the men who were taken on the roof, are the same that I saw walking about.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. There were a great many people collected.

Q. When you opened the door some persons might get in, whom you did not see - A. They might; I did not see them go in.

Q. Among the persons who went in, might not the prisoners be two-A. No; I am sure they were not. I gave directions to the porter, and looked into the parlour, before I went up stairs.

Court. How long did you see the men before the door was opened - A. It might he half an hour.

THOMAS WILDERS. I was upon the watch that night.

PETER ASHWORTH. I am in the guards, on the 21st of November, I went to the top of the house and took Wells into custody, he was laid down in a gutter.

(Lanthorn and silk produced.)

MRS. FRENCH. This is the lanthorn which I found in the house; and this is the silk. I have looked at the hats, and other things; they are Mr. Cholmondeley's.

Smith's Defence. I know nothing about it; I was taken about one hundred yards from the house; Nichols took me into custody; I had been to drink a pot of beer with a friend.

Wells's Defence. I had been to Pimlico. I ran to the top of the house; was walking about, I saw a man, he said, I was the thief, and brought me down.

Quniland's Defence. I was coming along with the

other prisoner; I went in and met Nichols at the top of the house. He said that I was one, and took me into custody.

G. WELLS. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 38.

W. SMITH. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

W. QUINLAND. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-43

46. THOMAS GIBBONS was indicted for, that he about five o'clock, on the night of the 14th of November , being in the dwelling-house of Ann Whales , feloniously did steal therein, two sheets, value 12s.; two blankets, value 14s.; one counterpane, value 7s.; one looking-glass, value 4s.; and one napkin, value 6d. the property of the said Ann Whales, the same goods, being in a lodging-room in the said house, let by contract by the said Ann Whales to the prisoner, to be used with the lodging; and having committed the said robbery about the hour of five o'clock, in the night burglariously did break, and get out of the said house, against the statute .

ANN WHALES. I live in White's-alley, Chancery-lane . I am a single woman , and let lodgings. The prisoner took a furnished lodging of me on the 14th of November, at 7s. per week. He came between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and slept there. I got up between six and seven o'clock the next morning; he was then gone; it was hardly day-light; the articles mentioned in the indictment were gone; they were let to him with the lodging (produced and sworn to); the sheets were not quite finished. I was the last person up at night, and fastened the door. The windows were safe in the morning. I am sure the prisoner is the man; he called four or five times before he took the room. He said he had just come from the country, and referred me to a public-house. They could not say much about him; I took him more from his saying that he was a printer at the Star-office. I have since learned that it is false.

Prisoner. Can you swear to the blankets-A. I can; the sheets have my own mark in them. When I awoke it was dark; if he had gone down after I awoke I must have heard him.

JANE SHIELDS. I lodge at the last witness's house, in the next room to that where the prisoner lodged. I heard him moving about, as though he was getting up, about five o'clock in the morning. I did not go to sleep again; I did not hear him go down stairs. As I was going out of my own room I observed his door open, I looked in and found the things gone, and I told Miss Whales of it. The street door was wide open. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I put the things on the bed the night before. There were two other lodgers in the house.

PATRICK CROWLEY. I am a watchman; I stopped the prisoner at a little after six o'clock in the morning, at the corner of Drake-street, Drury-lane; he was running from High Holborn; he had a bundle under his arm; he got off the pavement to pass me; I asked him what he had got; he said clothes, and that he brought them from Whitechapel Church; he said they belonged to his father. I took him into custody; he offered me half of them to let him go; we searched him at the watch-house, and found the sheets round his body.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am the watch-house-keeper; I have had the things in my possession ever since.

Prisoner to SHIELDS. What time did I take the lodgings - A. On Wednesday night, and you was taken on Thursday morning.

CROWLEY. It was not quite light; it might be twenty minutes past six o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave 30s. for the things; I was just by Drury-lane and Crowley stopped me, and asked what I had got. He took me down a bye place, and asked for something to drink. I said I had no money, and he took me into custody.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-44

47. SAMUEL HALE was indicted for having a forged Bank of England note in his possession, knowing it to be forged . The prisoner pleaded guilty .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-45

48. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one hat, value 1s. and a box, value 6d. the property of Edward Pennycott .

EDWARD PENNYCOTT . I am an errand carrier ; I left my cart, in Lime-street , for about twenty minutes; I came back and went on with it; about twenty minutes after Prichard's servant came to me, and asked what I had done with the hat-box. I went to look for it, and it was gone; it was put at the tail of the cart, and covered over with a cloth.

JOHN GENT . I saw the prisoner running down Rood-lane with the box in his hand; he held it under his apron; I asked him where he was going with it; he said he was employed to carry it to Newington. I said it was directed to Mr. Fielding, Haslemere. He then said he found it in Fenchurch-street; I took him to Dollman and Co., the place where it was bought, and he was taken into custody.

RICHARD KNAPP. I gave the hat to the carrier that morning.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in Fenchurch-street.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-46

49. WILLIAM HILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , from the person of Thomas Paddon , one pocket-book, value 1d., and three bank-notes, for the payment of 1l. each, value 3l. the goods and property of the said Thomas Paddon .

THOMAS PADDON. I am clerk to a solicitor in Gray's-Inn. On the morning of the 7th of November I was at the Britannia Coffee-house, Newgate-market ; I had been out to supper; I met the prisoner at the coffee-house. He pleaded great distress, and asked me for drink, which I gave him, and some meat also. I was preparing myself to go to the office; I had set up all night; I had pulled off my coat in order to clean myself; the prisoner asked me if he should assist me on with it. The moment I had

got it half on he ran out of the house, and my friend followed him and brought him back. My pocket-book was gone from my side pocket; I gave him in charge; I was not very sober; I went to the coffee-house about three or four o'clock in the morning.

JOHN MASTERS . I am a solicitor's clerk. I and Mr. Paddon had been spending the evening with some friends until three o'clock in the morning; in our way home we went to the Britannia Coffee-house. The prisoner entered into conversation with us, and asked the prosecutor for drink, which he gave; it was about six o'clock. The prosecutor took out his pocket-book to pay the reckoning; the prisoner was sitting by, and could plainly see him do it. His pocket-book fell down, he picked it up, and put it in his pocket. We went into another room to have some meat, and the prisoner followed. I was laying my head on the table, I looked up and saw the prosecutor with his coat off. The prisoner took the coat up to help him on with it, and as soon as he had got his arms partly into it, I saw the prisoner take a pocket-book out of the side pocket and run away. I pursued him, and took him between the stalls in the market; he offered me the book and money if I would let him go; he gave it to me, and tried to get away; I told him to beg the prosecutor's pardon, and he should be forgiven. I only told him so to get him secured.

Prisoner. Did he not pull off his coat to fight, and challenge you to fight-A. No.

GEORGE READ . I am a constable. About ten minutes after six o'clock the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge, for stealing his pocket-book. I took him into custody; the prosecutor gave me this pocket-book.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the coffee-house when the two men came in; the prosecutor was drunk, and offered to play any body for 5l. He sent me out of the room, and called his friend a d-d thief. He came to me with the pocket-book, and said I was a thief. He went to the house, and sent his friend out, saying, I had stolen his pocket-book.

Jury to MASTERS. You was very sleepy, and you saw him take the pocket-book-A. I did; I was sober, but the prosecutor was in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-47

50. MARY BRIDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , two pillow-cases, value 4s.; two sheets, value 6s.; one tent-bed furniture, value 20s.; one quilt, value 2s.; one looking-glass, value 2s.; one blanket, value 6s.; and one candlestick, value 1s. the property of Joseph Myatt , in a lodging room let to the said Mary Bridges, to be used with the lodging room aforesaid .

JOSEPH MYATT. I live at No. 11, Plough-Court, Fetter-lane . My wife let the prisoner a lodging in October, in the name of Grimaldi.

MARY MYATT . I am the wife of the last witness. I let the prisoner a furnished room on the 30th of October, at 7s. 6d. per week; the articles mentioned in the indictment were let with the lodging. She paid me the rent regularly. I went into the room to borrow something of her; I missed the furniture off the bed, and the other things. The prisoner was out. I sent for an officer. When she returned I asked her what she had done with the property; she said she should return them again. I saw the officer find most of the duplicates on her, and the others were found in her room.

EDWARD BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Fetter-lane, very near Plough-court. I have a blanket and pillow-case, which were pledged at my shop, by the prisoner, for 4s. 6d.

JOHN WEBB. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Fleet-market. I have a sheet which was pledged on the 14th of November, and some bed-furniture, on the 17th, by the prisoner.

GEORGE CORBY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and found the duplicates on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. To deny this charge would only be aggravating the offence; I had no criminal intention in taking the property; I had been pressed for a small debt. I pledged the property, meaning to take it out when I had more money, which I very soon expected. The money was offered to the prosecutor to take the things out of pledge, but he would not accept it. The magistrate wanted them to refrain from prosecuting me, and take the money. I earnestly implore the court to have mercy upon me; I hope I shall never transgress again.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-48

51. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing a pewter quart pot , the property of Samuel Nice .

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I am street-keeper of Aldersgate Ward. I saw the prisoner with the pot under his arm; I asked him what he had got; he made no reply; I laid hold of him; he said he was going to take it to the public-house; he had passed the house. I told him he had stolen it; he begged for mercy. I took him to the landlord, and he was taken into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was going to Little Britain, and I meant to take it home as I returned.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-49

52. JAMES MADDON was indicted for stealing one muff, value 10s. the property of Samuel Smith .

REBECCA PARSONAGE . On Thursday the prisoner came into Mr. Smith's, St. Martin's le-Grand, to beg, and I gave him a penny. On the Friday morning he came in again, and asked if I knew a person of the name of Thomas. I said, no, and was going into the counting-house; I saw him take up the muff and run away. I ran after him, and overtook him with the muff. I took it from him.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the 2nd of December.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the top of St. Martin's-le-Grand; I saw a man with it, and he gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-50

53. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one coat, value 4l.; one waiscoat, value 18s.; one pair of trowsers, value 24s.; and one pair of drawers, value 5s. the property of John Garnett Flowers .

JOHN GARNETT FLOWERS . I am a tailor , residing in Leadenhall-street. On the 30th of October the prisoner applied to me for a suit of clothes, and agreed that they should come to 7l. He put down his address,

"Mr. Price, at the Falcon, Pemberton-row, Gough-square." He said, if I would send them at seven o'clock on Friday, he would return the money. I told him that the things would not be delivered without the money. He said he could not expect it. I took the clothes myself; I asked for Mr. Price, and was sent into a room to him. He asked me to take something, and began talking about several things. I asked him to settle with me. He told me to fold the things up, and he would pay me. He asked me if I had a bill of them. I said I would write him a receipt, which I did. He said he would take them up to his room, and bring down the money. He took them to the bar, and asked the landlady for a light. I heard him go up stairs; after waiting some time, I went to the bar, and was informed he was gone out with a parcel.

Q. Did you consider that you was dealing for ready money-A. I did. I told him I could not give him credit, and he said he could not expect it. It was not my intention to part with the things without the money. This was on the Friday. I found him on the Monday at the White Hart, Brook-street; he was going to run out at the back door, but I collared him. I am sure he told me to write a receipt, and he would bring me down the money. back door, but I collared him. I am sure he told me to write a receipt, and he would bring me down the money. I heard a man say to him at the White Hart, Dick, here has been two or three men after you.

ANN TEMPRO . I keep the Falcon public-house; the prisoner took a lodging at my house two nights previous to his taking the clothes. He took it by the week, and gave me no notice.

GEORGE SPENCE . I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to get the money; when I returned the house was shut. The next morning I heard the officers were after me, and I was afraid to return.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-51

54. JAMES REMNANT , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , one gown, value 4s.; one tablecloth, value 1s.; and two counterpanes, value 8s., the property of Hugh Flynn ; also four gowns, value 8s.; one sheet, value 10s.; and one umbrella, value 5s. , the property of Daniel Delany .

MARY FLYNN. I am the wife of Hugh Flynn; he is in Greenwich College; the things were taken out of a chest in the room adjoining where the prisoner slept; but there was no lock on the door. I lodge at No. 20, Maidenhead-court, Moor-lane. The prisoner came to my place on a Monday evening, after I had lost the things; I charged him with taking them, and he denied it; but at last he owned it, and gave me two duplicates; one was for my own gown, the other belonged to a person whose things are in my care. I gave the officer the duplicates.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. What is your name - A. Mary Flynn.

Q. The other day it was Mary Winter. Was not he committed for robbing Mary Winter -A. I gave the name of Winter when he was examined; I go by that name as well as Flynn. My first husband is dead. I saw my last husband about six weeks ago. I told the prisoner he had better confess that he had taken the things.

ANN NICHOLAS . I live in Fore-street, Cripplegate; the prisoner brought a counterpane to me, on the afternoon of the 20th of November, to sell; I gave 6s. for it. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN TURNER . I am a pawnbroker; I have three gowns pledged, on the 23d of November, for 4s.; I took them from an elderly woman.

JOHN ARNETT . I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 130, Whitecross-street; I have a gown pledged by a woman, on the 23d of November, for 6s. The officer has the duplicate.

JAMES PEACHY . I live at No.38, Goswell-street. I have one gown, one sheet, and one umbrella; they were pledged by the prisoner in the name of John Turner .

JOSEPH PAGE. I am an officer; the prosecutrix sent for me on the 27th of November; the prisoner was in the room, crying; the prosecutrix gave me two duplicates; one of a gown, for 4s., the other a gown, for 6s.; going to the Counter, the prisoner gave me two more; one was for an umbrella, pledged for 5s., the other for a gown and sheet, for 8s.; in searching his box I found a table cloth, an apron, and one yard of print, which the procecutor claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Calendar Months , and Fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-52

55. MARY MASON , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one bank note, for payment of, and value 10l., and two bank notes, for payment of 5l. each, value 10l. , the property of John Podd .

MARY ANN PODD . I am the wife of John Podd, who lives in the Curtain-road. I missed the notes on the 27th of October. I lodged with the prisoner. The notes were in a small box, which was in a chest in my room; I had seen them on the 19th. I had a lodging in the prisoner's house.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. There were other lodgers. I never left any body in my room. I saw them seven days before I missed them. The 10l. note was No.577.

Q. Do you know that of yourself - A. No; I got it from the banker's, after I had lost the notes; but before I found them. When I lost the notes. I went to Masterman's, to inquire their numbers. I received the notes of William Rae , at Masterman's.

ANN ROBERTS . The last witness is my daughter. I

know she had the money. I went to trace the notes with her; the young man at Mr. Munro's shop told the prisoner that he could swear that she gave him a 5l. note, and tendered it in the name of Mary Brown , No. 53, Wellclose-square. The magistrate gave up the 10l. note, because a baker, who had taken it of her, would not swear to her. She agreed to pay him 2s. a week; he said he would sooner lose the note than swear to her.

WILLIAM BOWEN. I am shopman to Mr. Munro, who lives at No. 143, Ratcliff-highway. I produce the 5l. note, which the prisoner paid me, about the latter end of October. I am sure it was the prisoner; it is marked Mary Brown , No. 53, Wellclose-square. I wrote it while she was in the shop.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. I am a police officer. I apprehended the prisoner; I told her what my business was, and brought her away; she lives below stairs; her key opens the prosecutor's door; I tried it; I was present when the settlement was made about the 10l. note.

MRS. PODD. The 5l. note produced is mine.

Cross-examined. What do you know it by - A. By the number.

Q. How do you know the number-A. By the paper which the banker's clerk gave me in Masterman's house, where I took it. I went there and they gave me the numbers of all I had received.

Q. If it were not for the banker, you would not have known it-A. No.

Q. Is there any person here from the banker's - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never knew any thing about the note. I was never inside the shop. The prosecutrix came to me and said, she had found the note at a linen-draper's shop, and that the man would know the person again. I asked her to go with me, but she would not; I got a neighbour to go with me; I asked the man if he knew me? - he said, no; the prosecutrix came in; she was looking at some gingham, and she said, that I had got a piece of it; the shopman then said, I must be the person.

WILLIAM BOWEN . I am sure she is the person. There was nothing passed about the gingham. I sent to Wellclose-square; no such person lived there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-53

56. JOSEPH WILLIAMS , was indicted for stealing ten pounds of mutton, value 6s., the property of Samuel Dickins , privately, in his shop .

SARAH DICKINS . I am the wife of Samuel Dickins ; he is a butcher and green-grocer , and lives at No. 45, Gray's-Inn-lane . I was in the shop on the 9th of November; there were two loins of mutton there; I missed one; I saw it the next morning at Mr. Johnston's; I knew it to be the same, because I fitted it with the other joint; it was ten pounds and a half; I weighed it myself.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON. I am a butcher. On the 9th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in New-street; I saw the prisoner and another boy with him; the prisoner had a bundle under his arm, in his blue apron; I looked at him, and the other boy ran away. I followed the prisoner, he ran up a court, and I secured him; he said it was meat that he had got, and that he bought it for 6s., at the White Horse. It weighed ten pounds and a half; I took him to Hatton-garden; I afterwards found that it belonged to the prosecutor. It could not be bought for less than 6d. per pound.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I saw the other boy run away. I did not go to the White Horse.

Q. Did you compare the meat - A. I did; and it exactly fitted.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of Stealing to the value of 4s. 10d.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18161204-54

57. JOHN SMITH , was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , fifty-three yards of carpet, value 35s., the good of James Wilson , privately, in his shop .

JOHN BLISS. I am shopman to Mr. Wilson, who lives at No. 53, St. John's street . The carpet was placed about a yard within the shop, on the 8th of November; in consequence of information which I received, I ran up the road after the prisoner; I saw him with the carpet; I lost sight of him; I did not come up to him until he was taken; I saw the carpet on his back. I took him myself, afterwards; I brought him back to the shop; he said he was not the man. I am sure I saw him with the carpet. I have seen him lurking about the shop several times before.

ROBERT WALI . I am also shopman to Mr. Wilson. A woman came in and asked me if I had lost a carpet; I looked, and found it was gone; I ran up the road; I saw the prisoner at the top of the road; I laid hold of him; he dropped the carpet, and his hat also; he was running across the road with the carpet on his back. I stooped for the carpet, and he got away. I called out stop thief! and he was taken by the last witness; when he got from me he ran down a street and I lost sight of him. I am sure he is the man that I stopped with the carpet; the carpet laid on another, and might be taken away without a noise. I did not see him take it; it was worth 35s.

(Produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MAYHEW. I am an officer. Hearing a noise, I ran into the shop, and found the prisoner there, with the carpet and hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to my sister's, and coming home, I was shoved off the pavement; a gentleman stopped me, and brought me back to the shop; I had lost my hat, as I was in a hurry.

Jury to WALL. Was it inside the door-A. It was; it could not be taken without his putting one foot within the door.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-55

58. PATRICK KEAN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Cornish , about seven, on the night of the 12th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therefrom six biscuits, value 6d. , the property of the said George Cornish.

CHARLES CORNISH. I am the son of George Cornish ; I was at home last Monday, between seven and eight in the evening; the shop door was partly shut; I saw the

prisoner break two windows, and take out some biscuits. There was a crowd round the door; he broke the windows with his elbows. I saw him do it; and he was stopped directly with the biscuits in his hand. Mr. Winder stopped him, the biscuits were picked up; there was no name on them.

MICHAEL WINDER. I am a watch-maker. I was coming down Holborn, and saw a mob coming down towards the procecutor's house, with the prisoner at the head of them. He came up to Mr. Cornish's, and said, here is a baker's-shop, come along; he immediately folded his arms together and broke two pains of glass with his elbows; he took out a quantity of biscuits from the window; I laid hold of him; he said, I am grabbed, rescue me; the mob came round, and I, with my son's assistance. took him into the shop.

WILLIAM WINDER . I am the son of the last witness. I saw the prisoner come up with the mob; he took his elbows and broke the window, and took out the biscuits. We took hold of him, and he said I am grabbed, rescue me; we got him into the shop. The mob consisted chiefly of boys; they went away directly. It was between seven and eight o'clock.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am a watch-maker. I was in Holborn, and saw a mob, of about two hundred boys, come up to the shop, with the prisoner at their head; he said, here is a baker's-shop, and put his arms through, and took out some biscuits; Mr. Winder took him; and he said, I am grabbed, rescue me; he was taken into the shop. There was a basket of ginger-bread lost.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his Age .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-56

59. JAMES BRIDGES , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Read , one bank dollar, value 5s. 6d., the goods and monies of the said Joseph Read , and three bank notes, for payment of and value of 1l. each; the said notes being the property of the said Joseph Read , and the sums of money payable and secured thereon being then due and unsatisfied to the said Joseph Read , the proprietor thereof .

JOSEPH READ. I live at No.5, Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square . I am a blue merchant . On a Friday night the prisoner came to my shop with another man; it was Friday fortnight. The man who was with him asked me for an article which I had not got. I went and put three one pound notes and a dollar into my till; I went into the parlour, and the other man came in to speak to me, leaving the prisoner in the shop; the parlour faces the till, where I was drinking my tea. I saw the prisoner put his hands over the counter into the till. I went to my till, and the money was gone. I seized him, saying, you have robbed me; he pulled a one pound note out of his pocket. I took him into the parlour, and asked him for the rest; he then gave me another one pound note; he said he had thrown the remainder of the money about the shop; he then ran away. The other man told me where he lived; and I informed the constable. The other man's name is Butler. I never found the other note or the dollar.

HENRY CROKER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; he said he had only taken two notes.

Prisoner. I did not have the other money; there were other men in the shop.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-57

60. JOHN SEVERN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Morrison , at about seven o'clock, in the night of the 15th of November , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one loaf of bread, value 15d. the property of the said John Morrison.

JOHN MORRISON. I am a baker , residing at the corner of Castle-street, Leicester-square . On the 15th of November, about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening, a crowd, principally of boys, assembled round my windows, calling out, a loaf! A man called to me to hand him out a loaf and they would be gone; I gave them three; my windows were broken, and some bread was taken. I saw the prisoner in custody about two hours afterwards. I did not see him with the crowd; the mob had sticks with them; I saw one small black-looking stick.

ROBERT FREEMAN. I am servant to the last witness. I saw some 3d. and 6d. loaves taken away.

MARK RANKIN . I am servant to Mr. Shephard, who is a baker. I saw the mob breaking the windows of Mr. Morrison's shop and take some bread.

JAMES BARCLAY . I am servant to Mr. Morrison. I was at home at the time; I picked up a piece of hard mortar in the shop.

JOHN ESTHELBY . I am an officer of Bow-street; I was out, on the 15th of November, with Maidmant, Wilson, and Townsend; we were at Mr. Morrison's at the time the mob were crying out bread or blood! I heard the windows break, and rushed forward among the mob; I saw the prisoner, with a small stick, with a hook to it, breaking the windows; he put his hand through one of the panes, which he broke himself, and was in the act of taking a loaf from the end of the counter; I seized him by the collar; Maidmant came to my assistance; the mob cried, rescue! He did not make a violent resistance; we took him to St. Martin's watch-house. Maidmant searched him; I saw him find some pieces of cemented mortar in his pocket; they corresponded with the piece found in Mr. Morrison's shop.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. There were about three hundred persons. I was close to the shop; he was surrounded by a crowd.

Q. Is the stick here - A. No; I did not take it; I suppose he dropped it. I am sure he held the stick; he did not resist; when I went up, he was in the act of breakiing the glass; I saw him in the act of drawing a loaf from the counter with the stick; he had nearly removed it from the place on which it stood. I should not think that any part of it stood on the place that it did before.

JEREMIAL MAIDMANT. I am an officer. I saw the prisoner close to the window; when I seized him he said nothing; but the mob cried out, rescue! I did not see what he was doing, because Esthelby was before me; I searched him, and found upon him two bits of mortar and

a hymn-book (producing them); the mortar was in his coat-pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. There was many persons surrounding the shop - A. There was; my attention was directed to the whole group, not to one in particular.

JOHN WILSON . I am an officer; I was out with Esthelby and Maidmant; Esthelby seized the prisoner; I had not observed him before that I found this piece of mortar in the shop (producing it); it appears to be the same kind as that found on the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. Is it not a finer grain than the other - A. I do not see it.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I beg to state that I am perfectly innocent of the charge; I trust, when my witnesses are heard, that you will think so. It is very unlikely that a person in my situation of life should be guilty of stealing a loaf: my situation in life has ever been respectable. Esthelby is the only witness I have to complain of, he has not said what it true. I have been a Yeoman in the Guards, and have been always ready to exert myself for the public good.

Court to WILSON. Where was the prisoner when you seized him-A. About four yards past the window; Maidmant and I saw him close to the window.

Court. Had he got away from the window-A. I seized him directly.

WILLIAM HINDE. I am a biscuit-maker. I live in the Haymarket. On the 15th of November I was in Castle-street, and hearing a noise I run down to Mr. Morrison's shop. I saw John Fisher , and laid hold of his arm to guard against the crowd; we were driven against a post, and could not move either one way or the other. I observed a man in a brown coat go and speak to Morrison. I then saw a boy in the shop gather the bread together from the window; the people as they passed knocked their elbows through the window. Several stones were thrown from the opposite side of the way. I did not see the prisoner there.

JOHN FISHER . I am a cordwainer. I was present at Mr. Morrison's shop; there were several windows broke on both sides of the shop. I saw the prisoner previous to my arrival at the house; he had no stick in his hand. I know the prisoner slightly before this evening; I had seen him in the company of his brother, who live with Messrs. White and Co. in the Haymarket. I was on the steps of St. Martin's Church; I followed the crowd; I met the prisoner at the corner of Hemmings-row; he was going with them towards the Haymarket. He told me that he was going to see his brother. I went part of the way along the street with him. The pressure of the crowd was so great, that we parted. If he had a stick with him I must have seen it. I went on with the crowd to Mr. Morrison's, which is a very short way from Leicester-square. The windows were broken. White and Co. live next door to the Theatre. William Hinde met me, and took my arm. I saw the man with the brown coat as he has described.

WILLIAM BRITTON. I am a shoe-maker; live in Well-street, St. James's. I was coming through St. Martin's-court, which leads to Bear-street, hearing a noise I went to Morrison's shop; the principal part of the mob had got into Leicester-square; the last of them were round Morrison's shop; I saw the prisoner come up to the door of the shop; I am sure it was him; he had no stick.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. In what state were the windows when he come up - A. They were broken before he arrived. There was nothing remaining in the window; I did not see him throw any thing. The mob was pushing about. I was there where he was taken into custody.

Court. Where was he when he was taken into custody - A. Very near the door. The mob cried out-rescue. I did not know the prisoner before.

MAIDMANT. When I found the mortar, he did not account for it.

Eight respectable persons gave the prisoner a most excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-58

61. JOHN PAXTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Edwards , about six o'clock, on the night of the 13th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one pocket-book, value 2d.; two handkerchiefs, value 10s.; and l8. 16. 6. in money numbered , the goods and monies of the said Thomas Edwards .

THOMAS EDWARDS, Sen. I live at No. 2, Cooper's-court, Old-street, St. Luke's, on the 13th of October I was at the house about a quarter before six, it was not quite dark; all was then safe.

THOMAS EDWARDS , Jun. On the 13th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, I was in Whitecross-street, with my father; he sent me home to put my brother to bed. I went home; the door was open; the latch I lifted up, and saw a light up stairs. I went up, as I thought it was my brother; a man came out of the room, and put the light out, and came down stairs. He rushed past me, and told me to go down to my father. I did not see his face. I don't know who it was. My brother was out of doors.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. You saw the man on the stairs; it was not the prisoner - A. No. I gave evidence here last session against two men.

Court. How do you know that it was not the prisoner - A. The man was rather taller.

THOMAS EDWARDS , Sen. re-examined. My little child was not in the house. My son came back and told me what he had seen. I went home; my chests were both broken open. I had lost a little bag of silver, to the amount of about 7l., and a pocket-book; some duplicates and other things. I had left my brother in charge of the house. I apprehended him and another, and they were tried here last sessions and acquitted, because I could not trace the property. I had not seen any part of it until the 13th of October, when Mr. Sowerby, who is a pawnbroker, sent for me down to his shop; when I got there the prisoner was in the shop. He had produced two duplicates to redeem two articles; the pawnbroker shewed them to me in his presence. The prisoner asked me if I had lost them. I told him I had lost them and a great deal of property in a red pocket-book, and with some money. He said that he found them in a red pocket-book, which he had at home; but that he lived at Chatham.

He said had several more which he picked up with them. He produced them. They were the very tickets which I had lost. We went to Worship-street to know how he came by them, and he was committed.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. My keeping my money in a chest was no secret. The prisoner said he found them at Chatham, and he said that he had more. I have heard that the man who was tried with my brother had been at Chatham.

Q. Do you believe that the prisoner committed the robbery - A. No; from what I have heard since I don't think he did. I should know the pocket-book again (produced by the prisoner). It is mine.

MATTHEW MOSS . I live with Mr. Sowerby, who is a pawnbroker. The prisoner came into our shop to redeem some pledges. I found that I had notice from the prosecutor to stop any body who offered to redeem them. I asked him how he got them. He said that he had bought them of Mrs. Edwards. I sent for her. We were not particular in detaining him; he might have got away if he liked; he did not seem at all agitated. The conversation took place that Mr. Edwards has related. I was at the office, and Mrs. Edwards was there.

Q. What did she say-A. She said that she had not sold the duplicates, and the prisoner confessed that was the only part in which he was criminal. He said, he intended to redeem the property, that the perosn who had lost them might have it.

Cross-examined. The property was pledged in the name of Edwards.

Q. If he should tell you that he had found the tickets, you would take them away - A. No; we should stop the property. The prisoner staid very quietly in the shop.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner to the office. He took out six duplicates, and said he had found them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-59

62. PATRICK SULLIVAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Womack , about six o'clock in the night of the 2d of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, eighty-seven quartern loaves of wheaten bread, value 1s. 6d. each , the property of the said William Wornack .

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am servant to Mr. Wornack. Last Monday, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, there was a great crowd round the house. I had been out. When I came in, I found them there. There was three men with bludgeons in their hands. The shop was full of people, taking the bread. I was alone in the shop. It was shut up before I went out. I left the door upon the latch; they asked for bread. As they were going out I saw the prisoner with some loaves; I laid hold of him, and he dropped them. He had two loaves under his arm.

JOHN WILSON. I took the prisoner off the shop counter; I pulled him through one of the broken windows. Goodwin was in the shop.

THOMAS PRICE . I took the boy to Bow-street, and he was committed.

Prisoner. It was hunger drove me to it.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Of Stealing only. - Recommended to mercy.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18161204-60

63. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, in the 43d year of his Majesty's reign , - one frock, value 2s.; two petticoats, value 1s. 6d.; one shirt, value 6d.; and one pair of shoes, value 1s. the property of Hannah Waters , widow , now Hannah Verlin, widow.

HANNAH VERLIN . About thirteen or fourteen years ago the prisoner lodged with me. I then lived in Green-yard, East Smithfield . I sent her away. My name was then Waters. On the 18th of July I gave her a night's lodging. She slept with my child Mary, and the witness Ford. I went out early the next morning; the prisoner and my child was in bed when I went out. When I returned, which was about nine o'clock, she was gone, and so was my child, with its clothes. I have not seen her since, till about three weeks ago; I then met her in Shadwell; she had two children with her; she looked as if she was in the habit of begging. I asked her where my child was; she changed colour, and looked very much confused; and said, I have not seen little Mary Waters since I left your house. I told her if she would say what she had done with her, I would forgive her. I said nothing to her about the clothes.

Prisoner. Have you never seen me within the last fourteen years in the Borough-A. No; I never did.

Q. Could nobody have taken the child but me-A. I never saw the child or the clothes after.

CATHERINE FORD. I remember the prisoner being at the last witness's house about fourteen years ago. I lodged there. I slept with the prisoner and the child. When I got up I dressed the child, all but its shoes, before the prisoner came down. When the prisoner came down the child was out; it was taken out by an old lady, who was in the habit of taking it out. She has been dead about six weeks; her name was Bennett. When the prisoner came down she asked for the child. I told her Mrs. Bennett had taken her out. The prisoner asked me why I let her go, as she wanted to take her a walk. The prisoner took hold of the child's shoes, and went out, saying, she would go and seek her. I told her where she was gone. The old lady came back in about an hour without the child. The prisoner did not return nor the child, or the clothes. She had a black frock, two petticoats, and a shift on; the shoes were never brought back again.

Prisoner. Have you not seen me for these thirteen years-A. Never; until I saw you at Shadwell Office.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal the clothes or the child.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-61

64. JOEL FARR SAUNDERS and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , at St. Mary-le-bone , two shillings and ten-pence, in monies numbered , the property of John Thomas Bryant .

THOMAS BRYANT. I live at No. 24, Barnard-street, Edgware-road . On the 18th of November I left my till with 2s. 6d. in silver, and 4d. in copper, in it. I was alarmed by my apprentice. I found the money gone. I pursued the two prisoners with him, and overtook them in South Molton-street. They were walking. They were searched in my presence. Two shillings and sixpence in silver, and two pence in copper was found on Saunders, but no money was found on Williams.

JOHN WHITEHEAD . I am the apprentice. I was coming into the shop about nine o'clock; I saw Saunders in the shop, standing by the door. I asked him what he wanted. He asked me if I knew of a situation. I told him no. He went out and shut the door. I pursued him with my master. I did not see Williams when I saw Saunders.

THOMAS MORRIS . I saw the prisoner go into the shop on the 8th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning. I saw Saunders go in; Williams stood outside. I saw Saunders leaning over the counter. I stepped over the way, and saw the till half open. I went into the shop, and as I came in Saunders shut the till. I asked him what he wanted; he said he was waiting for somebody. I told him it did not look well his having the till open; he said he had not got it open; he was leaning over the counter, and walked out. John Whitehead came up, and I told him, and they were pursued.

Saunders Defence. I went into the house to ask for a situation; the last witness came in and said, I had got the till open. He told me to go about my business, and I went out.

Williams Defence. I was walking along Oxford-road, and the other prisoner asked me what was o'clock, and the gentleman took me.

SAUNDERS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAMS- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-62

65. THOMAS BROWN and JOSEPH BRADSHAW were indicted for stealing-one pig, value 40s. the property of John Ward .

JOHN WARD . I live at Turnham-green . I saw my pig on the 12th of November last. The watchman had taken the prisoners and the pig, and called me up and asked me what he should do with them; and I gave them in charge. My pigs were both together when I went to bed.

Q. Did you fasten your pigs up that night - A. I did; the door was close. I am sure the pig was mine.

JOSEPH HALES . I am the watchman. I saw the two prisoners driving the pig out of Mr. Ward's premises; they had got about fifty yards, and I laid hold of one, and the other watchman the other.

Q. Had they the pig tied with any thing - A. No; they were driving it along the road; they had passed me about a quarter of an hour before.

FRANCIS VAIN . I am a watchman. I was told by Hales to lay hold of the prisoner, and I did.

JOHN MITCHBNER . I am a smith. I saw the prisoner at the Barley Mow about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Brown's Defence. I and the young man was coming to twon, and the pig ran against his leg. I ran after it, and the watchman laid hold of me, saying, I had robbed him of his pig. He then said it was not his, but he would find out who it belonged to.

Bradshan's Defence. I was standing in the path; the watchman said, if it is not my pig, I will find out whose it is. He locked us up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-63

66. MATHEW SHEATH , was indicted for stealing, from the person of William Spencer , one pocket-book, value 1s., and two bank notes, for the payment of 1l. each, value 2l. , the property of the said William Spencer .

WILLIAM SPENCER. I am a surgeon , and live in William-street, Middlesex Hospital. I was going through Broad-street, St. Giles's , when I felt my pocket-book taken from my pocket; the prisoner passed me at that moment; I did not lose sight of him. I gave an alarm, and he was stopped by the constable; the prisoner threw my book away, and the constable picked it up.

JOHN GRANGER. I heard the alarm; I stopped to prisoner, and he threw the book down; I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-64

67. WILLIAM SLOPER , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one coat, value 2l. , the property of Thomas Blacket .

WILLIAM TRAPP . I am an apprentice to Mr. Blackett, who lives in Newgate-street . The coat hung by the door, part inside and part out. I saw it about half and hour before it was taken.

JOHN RUGBY. I am a porter at Christ's Hospital; I saw the prisoner take the coat from the door; there was another boy with him. I laid hold of the prisoner; the other boy ran away. I took him back to Mr. Blackett's; he said that he had picked it up. I am sure I saw him take it.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER. I am a constable; the prisoner was given into my charge with the coat.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I saw a man drop the coat, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-65

68. ANN SMITH , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , twenty-six yards of calico, value 25s. , the property of George Wright .

GEORGE WRIGHT. I am a linen-draper , and live in Aldgate ; I lost my cloth on the 27th of November; it was near the door, inside the shop. It was twenty-six yards; I had seen it about an hour before it was taken.

GEORGE LATREILLE. I was going to Houndsditch; I saw the prisoner, in the company of another girl, looking at some prints, at the prosecutor's door. I watched them, and saw the prisoner disengage the print from the rail and put it in her apron; they went away; I stopped the prisoner, and brought her back.

JOHN CROME . I took her in charge.

(Produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was going past the door, and saw the print; a little girl came up and asked me, if she gave it me, would I have it; and she gave it to me.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Two Months , and fined One Shillings .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-66

69. JAMES PUCKERIDGE , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief, value 6d., the property of Henry Green , from his person .

HENRY GREEN. I am an engraver , and live in Goswell-street; on the 9th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking at the procession of the Lord Mayor, on Ludgate-hill ; an officer came up to me, and informed me, that I had been robbed; I found I had lost my handkerchief. The officer showed it to me at a public-house in the Old Bailey; I am sure the handkerchief is mine. The officer had the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am a constable; I was on Ludgate-hill when the procession was going by; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Mr. Green's pocket. I laid hold of him, and told him he had robbed the gentleman; he said nothing. I showed Mr. Green the handkerchief, and he claimed it.

STEPHEN CADMAN . I am an officer; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Mr. Green's pocket. Marchant seized him directly.

(Produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief laying on the ground, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-67

70. JOHN STEPHENS , was indicted for embezzlement .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

71. JOHN TATE , was indicted for the like offence.

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-68

72. WILLIAM WARD , was indicted for stealing one shawl, value 4s. , the property of Charles Brooks .

CHARLES BROOKS. I live in Duke-street, Manchester-square ; I lost a shawl I on the 15th of November; it was hanging up within the door-way; I had seen it safe about an hour before.

ROBERT JAMES . I saw the prisoner take the shawl from Mr. Brook's door, and run off with it; he had another man with him; he ran towards me; I saw him with the shawl in his hand; he got from me; his companion knocked me down; I pursued him, and took him again; I am sure he is the man; I gave him in charge to the watchman; he had made away with the shawl before I took him the second time.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a ery of stop thief! I saw the thief knock the man down; he got up, and said I was the thief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-69

73. JOHN WALDON , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one stool, value 14s. , the property of John Gillock .

JOHN GILLOCK . I am a cabinet-maker , and live at No.36, Holywell-lane, Shoreditch; I gave the stool to the prisoner, to take to Whitecross-street, on the 22d of November, he was in my employ; this was on a Friday; he was to come to work on the Monday, but he did not; this made me suspect him. The prisoner told me that he sold the stool in Moorfields , and I found it there, on the 28th of November; he was not fully employed by me; he said he was sorry for what he had done.

ABRAHAM SKIPPER . I am a broker in Moorfield; on Thursday, the 28th of November, I bought the stool of the prisoner, and gave him 14s. for it; he was coming down Broker-row, and I asked him if it was to sell; Mr. Gillock claimed it as his property.

WILLIAM TURNER. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The distress of my family caused me to act as I did. I was going along with the stool as my master had desired me, and the gentleman asked me if I would sell it, and I did; I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY. Aged 58.

Recommended to mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-70

74. WILLIAM JONES , was indicted for stealing one handkerchief, value 5s., the property of Joseph Cox , from his person .

JOSEPH COX . I live in John-street, Adelphi. On the 20th of November, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was in Red-Lion-street, Holborn , when a person came up to me, and informed me that the prisoner had taken my handkerchief; I felt, and found it was gone; I ran after him, calling out, and a person stopped him. He said he had not got it, and wanted me to go into a house to search him. I gave him in charge; it was worth more than 5s.

HENRY PITT . I am a cheesemonger; I live in Red-Lion-street; I was in my shop and saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Cox, and take the handkerchief out of his pocket, and another boy came up to him, and went away down Beckford-street; the prisoner ran down Eagle-street. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

WILLIAM REED, Sen. I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I received the prisoner in charge, searched him, and found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Tottenham-court-road, and the gentleman came up to me and accused me of the theft; I was never in Red-Lion-street.

Court to MR. PITT. Was the prisoner running when

he was taken - A. He was, and in the direction from Red-Lion-street.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-71

75. NEHEMIAH WASHINGTON , and BRYON BARON , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , at St. Margaret's, Westminster , twenty pounds weight of lead, value 3s., belonging to, and being the property of our Sovereign Lord the King , fixed to a certain stable, part and parcel of certain dwelling-houses, and the buildings used and occupied as barracks by the soldiers and land forces of our Sovereign Lord the King, and thereunto belonging, against the statute .

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS. The same, only varying the manner of laying the charge.

JAMES GREENAWAY . I am a private in the first regiment of Foot Guards. On the 12th of November last, I was in the stables, which belong to Hyde-park barracks, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard somebody at the top of the barracks; I went out to see who it was; I climbed up, and saw the two prisoners cutting the lead off the gutter. I did not think that they were doing wrong. The prisoner. Washington, came down with me; I pointed out a pipe in the roof of the stables where the rain came through; I went up again with another man; I then observed that the lead was fresh cut, and sent for the clerk. I went down a second time, and returned again; the lead was then cut off and gone.

ROBERT WHITFIELD . I am also a private in the same regiment. I went up to the top of the barracks, and saw that the lead had been cut away; I saw the prisoner, Baron, coming down, with a basket, from the top of the building; I did not suspect him; I afterwards saw him standing by the dung-hill; I went there, and found the lead hid in a basket, covered over with dung; there was also a knife in the basket.

(Property produced.)

JOHN BRAGG. I am clerk of the works at the barracks. The prisoners were employed at the barrachs; one as a bricklayer, and the other as his labourer; they had no authority to move the lead; it is not their place to do any thing with the lead; Baron is the last person that I should suspect.

Washington's Defence. The man spoke to me about a pipe being stopped I went up to look at it, and saw the lead cut; I told the other man of it, and he took it to the barrack servant.

Baron's Defence. We went to the top of the house; the other prisoner told me the lead was cut; I was going to take it to the servant, but not directly; I put it on the dung-hill, and it must have sunk down; I did not cover it.

JAMES GREENAWAY re-examined. I did not give him any directions to unstop the pipe.

N WASHINGSON. - GUILTY . Aged 45.

B. BARON. - GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-72

76. WILLIAM JACKSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , two shirts, value 5s.; two jackets, value 10s.; two pair of stockings, value 10s.; one towel, value 6d.; one handkerchief, value 6d.; one frock, value 3s.; one waistcoat, value 2s.; and one bag, value 6d. , the property of John Taylor .

JOHN TAVLOR. I am a fisherman , and live at Colchester; my vessel was laying alongside Billingsgate ; my wearing apparel was laying in the cabin; they were safe on the evening of the 5th of November, as late as ten or eleven o'clock; I went on shore, when I returned my things were gone; I saw them the next morning; the prisoner was then in custody.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer; about one o'clock in the morning, of the 5th of November, the prosecutor came to the watch-house, saying he had been robbed. I apprehended the prisoner about two hours after; he was concealed in a coal-shed, in Denmark-street; I took him to the watch-house; he had the prosecutor's jacket on his back. We went to the coal-shed, and the man who keeps it produced a bag, which the prosecutor claimed, with its contents; next morning the prosecutor brought a coat, which he said he had found in his cabin, and the prisoner claimed it as his, and he put it on to go before the magistrate.

JEREMIAH SAVAGE. I am a watchman; the prisoner passed my box, which is near the coal-shed, with a bag; I asked him what he had got; he said it was his clothes; that he had been discharged from an Indiaman; he said, he wanted a lodging, and I recommended him to Elias, who keeps the shed; soon after the prosecutor came by, and asked me if I had seen any body with a bag, I sent him to the coal-shed. The prisoner hearing him come in, jumped out of the back-window; he was afterwards found in the coal-shed.

SAMUEL ELIAS . I keep a lodging-house; the prisoner took a lodging at my house; he was brought by Savage; he had a bag with him; he left the bag with me; I delivered it to Summers, in the same state that I received it from the prisoner; he was alarmed, and made his escape out of the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-73

77. RICHARD MITCHEL , was indicted for stealing one saw, value 4s. the property of James Clarke and John Clarke .

JOHN DANIEL CLARKE . I live with Messrs. Clarke and Son, who live in Holywell-street, Shoreditch . On the 25th of November I saw the prisoner come into the warehouse; the door was open; he then went into the back-warehouse, and in about two minutes I saw him return with the saw in his hand; he went out of the shop with it; two of the men went after him, but could not find him; he was taken the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Mr. John Clarke has been in partnership with his father since the 23d of November.

JOHN HALTON. I am servant to the prosecutors; I had the saw not five minutes before it was taken; I went out

to look for the prisoner, but could not find him. I saw him in the warehouse; I knew him; he had worked in the warehouse some time before; I know the saw to be my masters.

Cross-examined. Had you seen the saw before the prisoner worked for your master - A. Yes; I bought it myself.

Q. Was not the saw taken before the partnership commenced - A. No; the bills were made out in their names on the 21st.

WILLIAM COX. I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner, on the 26th of November, at Hoxton; I asked him what he had done with Mr. Clarke's saw; he said he had pawned it, and gave me the duplicate; it was pledged in the name of Richards, at Flemming's, in Newgate-street. He said Richards had pledged it for him.

ALEXANDER MILL . I took the saw in on the 25th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening; I advanced 1s. 6d. on it.

(Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-74

78. SAMUEL MUNDAY , was indicted for stealing, on the the 14th of November , one handkerchief, value 5s., the property of the Revered Thomas Silver , from his person .

REV. THOMAS SILVER . On the 14th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going along Coventry-street , accompanied by Mr. Andrews; as we were walking along, Mr. Andrews told me there was a man picking my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner and another man close to him. My friend told me that it was the other man who had picked my pocket. I followed him, and could have seized him, but the prisoner stood in a menacing attitude, and prevented me. I saw the prisoner by a shop, where there was a very strong gas-light, so that I cannot he mistaken in his person; they got off. I had occasion to go by the same place for two or three nights following, and was hustled every time; in consequence of which I gave information at Bow-street, and the prisoner was taken about a week afterwards. I am sure he is the man.

MR. GEORGE ANDREWS. On the 14th of November, I was walking along Coventry-street, with the last witness, I saw a man close behind us, and the prisoner and another man behind him; the first man was in the act of picking Mr. Silver's pocket; I am sure the prisoner saw the man take the handkerchief out; he appearcd to put his hands behind for the purpose of giving it to the other men; of whom the prisoner was one. Seeing that we observed them, they did not receive it, and it fell on the ground, at the prisoner's feet. The men ran off, and the prisoner passed us, and stood at the corner of a dark place, called George-yard; The man who took the handkerchief ran up the yard; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

CHARLES HUMPHRRIES . I am an officer; I took the prisoner into custody by the description which the prosecutor gave me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was behind the prosecutor on the 14th of November; I was going to the George public-house, a young man ran past me, and the gentlemen were following him; that is all I know of the matter.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-75

79. STEPHEN BROOK , and JAMES FRANKS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eliza Robertson , about twelve o'clock, on the night of the 4th of November , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, eight tea-spoons, value 18s.; two salt-spoons, value 4s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 6s.; two pair of stockings, value 4s.; one pair of boots, value 1s.; one pelisse, value 1l.; one pillow-case, value 1s.; one pint of brandy; value 3s.; one quart of gin, value 2s.; one quart of peppermint, value 2s.; three decanters, value 6s.; one quart of rum, value 3s.; three bottles, value 6d.; and fifteen shillings in copper , goods and monies of the said Eliza Robertson .

ELIZA ROBERTSON. I am a widow . I live in Whitechapel-road ; I keep the Duke of Cumberland public-house . My house was broken open on the 5th of November; a hole was made through a nine-inch wall into the bar. I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment. I have seen some of them since; the pelisse is well worth 1l.

HENRY JACOBS . I produce a pair of sugar tongs, one pair of salt-spoons, and two odd spoons.

EBENEZER DALTON . I produce a pair of child's boots.

ELIZA ROBERTSON . They are all mine.

HENRY JACOBS . I am a clothes-salesman, and live in Rosemary-lane. The two prisoners came to my shop between one and two o'clock in the day, on the 5th of November, and offered the silver articles for sale. Brook was the man that offered them. I asked him where he got them; he said he had brought them from abroad. I told him I did not think that they were his. He said they are mine, if you will not buy them, give them back to me. I refused, and he told me to send for an officer. He could not have gone away without jumping over the door; I do not think he attempted it. I went for the officer, and left them in charge of my wife and man. The articles are worth thirty shillings.

ELIZA ROBERTSON re-examined. When did you perceive the hole in the wall - A. After six in the morning of the 5th; it was neither dark nor light. Lucy Cason was up before me. When I went to bed the wainscoat was quite secure. The next morning it was broken down with the wall. I had seen the things after twelve o'clock at night.

LUCY CASON . I live with Mrs. Robertson. I got up after six o'clock in the morning; it was not light; the day had began to break. I was going to open the street door, and saw the hole in the wall.

EBENEZE DALTON. I am a police officer. I searched the prisoners, and found the boots, one shilling and two-pence three-farthings, in farthings, and ten-pence halfpenny, in penny-pieces and halfpence, and two children's thimbles on Brooks; and on Franks I found one shilling and sixpence, in halfpence, and four-pence halfpenny, in farthings and penny-pieces. Brooks said, that he bought the boots in Petticoat-lane, for his little brother, and gave sixpence for them. Franks said, he found his things at the back

of the hospital in Whitechapel-road. I found a chisel in the bar of the house.

Court to MRS. ROBERTSON. Did you lose any thimbles - A. I cannot say; my children have thimbles.

Q. Had you as much as two shillings in farthings - A. I had.

Brooks Defence. On the 5th of November I was coming from Stepney, and fell in with this boy. We were talking together, and he blacked my face in the fields. I had a stick in my hand, and I pushed it into the ground to get up a turf to heave at him, and I rose the spoons up. They were buried in the ground. I went to Petticoat-lane, and bought the boots; they gave me the farthings in change. As I was going down Rosemary-lane I saw a boy, who asked me if I had any thing to sell; I gave him the spoons, and they sent for an officer.

BROOKS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

FRANKS - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-76

80. RICHARD HARRIS was indicted for stealing one bank note, value 25l. the property of Thomas Leighton .

THOMAS LEIGHTON. I live with my father, at Feltham ; the prisoner was in our service. I had a 25l. note in my jacket-pocket, which hung up in the stable; I received the note on the 8th, and missed it on the 21st. Suspicion fell upon the prisoner, and he was taken into custody. I was with the officer when he was taken. I never desired him to change the note for me; he was searched, and 21s. 6d., in silver, was found on him.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG . I am a baker, residing at Feltham; the prisoner brought a 25l. note to me to change on the 20th, about six o'clock in the evening. He asked me to change the note for Thomas Leighton . I don't think that he knew the value of it. My wife changed it for him. She gave him 2l. in silver, and 23l. in notes; they were mostly one pound notes, consisting of Country and Bank of England notes. My wife paid the note away. I live about fifty yards from Mr. Leighton.

WILLIAM BETTS. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of November, in the evening, Thomas Leighton was with me. He did not say any thing about the note. We took him before the magistrate; he said something before the magistrate, which was taken down in writing. In consequence of what he said, we went with him to his lodgings. He put his hands into his bed and pulled out these eighteen one pound notes.(Producing them) He did not say any thing about them. They are Country and Bank of England notes. I asked him what became of the other money; he said he had lost them.

PETER HENDERSON , Esq. I am a magistrate of Middlesex. The prisoner was brought before me on the 21st of November, charged with stealing a 25l. note, the property of Leighton. I took down the evidence of the witnesses. I called upon him for his defence. What he said was taken down in writing (I produce it). They brought these eighteen 1l. notes to me when they took him into custody.

WILLIAM BETTS re-examined. When did the prisoner tell you where the notes were - A. When we were at the magistrate's; they were produced at his second examination. He voluntarily told me that he would go and look for the notes. He took me to his bed, and produced them.

PETER HENDERSON, Esq. re-examined. I asked the prisoner for his defence. He said that he had taken the note from his master, and changed it.

WILLIAM BETTS re-examined. While I was taking the prisoner to Newgate, he said he could find a little more. He gave me 50s. He said he would give it to me, and take the other to make him comfortable in prison.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-77

81. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Rorke , on the 2d of December , at St. Pancras , on the King's highway, and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3l.; one gold chain, value 1l.; one seal, value 10s.; and one key, value 1s. , the property of the said Charles Rorke .

CHARLES RORKE . I am a builder , and live in St. Martin's-street, Leicester-fields. On the 2d of December last, I was going to Somers Town, between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I was in Western-street ; I came up to a friend's door; I was going to knock; three men came up to me, and the prisoner pulled my watch out; part of the chain was hanging out; I turned round and laid hold of his coat; he got off and ran away. I pursued him, and never lost sight of him; he was secured. I did not get my watch again; it was not found on him; I am sure he is the man who took it.

Prisoner. Did you not take another man, and let him go - A. No; the two other men held my arms while he got the watch, and then let go.

JOHN MORRIS . I was in Western-street on that night; I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutor following him. I attempted to stop him, and he made a blow at me. He ran a few yards farther, and stopped another man of the name of Bess, who keeps a shoe-shop in that place. He laid hold of him, and said,"Here he is; here he is. I told you I would have him(looking at the prosecutor)." I am sure the prisoner is the man who I tried to stop. Mr. Bess was running the other way; I am sure he was not the man who the prosecutor was pursuing.

Prisoner. Why did you not say I struck you at the office - A. I was not examined.

JOHN WYLLIE. I am bailiff to the County Court of Middlesex. I was standing at the corner of Western-street, and heard a cry of stop thief! I saw some persons running, and I followed them, and got up to the prisoner at the same time Mr. Rorke did. The prisoner was laying hold of another man, saying, "Here he is; I have got him." I searched the prisoner, and found a watch and a bad three shilling piece on him. I saw him running, and take hold of another man who was not running.

JAMES HOLT . I am a locksmith. I was in my house, and heard the alarm. I ran out, and as I was going to my door, two or three men were running; the prisoner had turned the corner of the street. Mr. Bess was coming the other way, and the prisoner laid hold of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Somers Town. I

heard a cry of stop thief! and I took one man, when the prosecutor came up, and swore to me, and let the man go.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-78

82. JOHN MILLER , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eliza Bromett , on the 26th of November , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, taking from her person, and against her will, one apron, value 6d., and four jackets, value 40s. , the property of the said Eliza Bromett .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating the jackets to be the property of William West .

ELIZA BROMETT. I live in Bernard-street, with my mother, who takes in slop-work. On the 26th of November I was coming from Mr. West's with four jackets for my mother. I went home, and my mother not being at home, I went out again. As I was going over London Bridge, I met the prisoner; it was about twelve o'clock in the day. He asked me where I was going, and if I would have something to drink. He was going to East Smithfield, and I was going to Cornwall-street the same way. I went with him; I had never seen him before. He took me to the sign of the Crown, in East Smithfield; he gave me a quartern of gin. I drank the whole of it, as I was very wet, and had had no victuals for two days. I do not think that he drank any of it. We came out together. He then wanted to carry the bundle; I would not let him. He did not want to carry it before. He struck me in the stomach; I fell down, and as I fell he drew the bundle from under my arm, and ran away. I got up to look for the bundle, and it was gone. I cried out stop thief! I could not see any body. A gentleman went after him. About a quarter of an hour after, I saw the gentleman come back with the bundle; I stopped in the same place all the time. Mr. Moses shewed me the bundle; it was covered with my apron. I can swear to the apron. It was in the apron when Mr. Moses brought it to me; he gave it to the officer.

Prisoner. Did you not ask me to go with you - A. No. He said he was going into East Smithfield, and I said I was going to Cornwall-street. He said, that was the same way; and if I would go with him, he would give me something to drink; and he asked me if he should carry the bundle.

Court. You said just now, that he did not ask you if he should carry the bundle till he came out of the public-house - A. He asked me if he should carry it.

Prisoner. Did you not ask me to carry it - A. No; you asked me.

MOSES MOSES . I live in Parsons-street, East Smithfield. I am a slop-seller. I was standing at my brother's door, which is opposite the Rose and Crown public-house, on the 26th of November, I observed the prosecutrix come out of the public-house with the prisoner, at about a quarter before one o'clock. At the instant they came off the steps, I saw her fall into the Kennel, and the prisoner take a bundle from her, and run away. I did not see him do any thing else to her. We pursued him, and overtook him. I saw him run all the way till I took him. I asked him what it was; he said, it was a bundle that he was going to carry home to the person whom it belonged to, as the woman he had taken it from had stolen it. I took him back to the public-house, and sent for an officer, and gave him in charge. The bundle was given to the officer also. We took him to the magistrate; the girl swore to the bundle. the bundle which I took from him is the same that I saw him take from the girl; it contained four unmade sailors jackets, wrapped up in a check apron.

WILLIAM NATHAN . I am headborough of St. John's, Wapping. I was sent for to the public-house; the bundle was on the table; Moses said it was the bundle which was taken from the girl; it contained four unmade blue jackets, with trimmings (produces them).

ELIZA BROMETT. I can swear to the apron. I never opened the bundle.

SARAH WEST . I gave Eliza Bromett the materials for making four jackets, on the 6th of November; those produced are the same. I saw them the next day at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming over London Bridge; she asked me where I was going. I told her, and she said she was going the same way. She said, she had something to sell. I asked her what it was, and she said, four jackets. I asked her where she got them; she said, that was nothing to me. She went to several shops, and offered them for sale. They said, she had stolen them, and threatened to take us, up. She asked me for some gin. She said I had robbed her.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-79

83. ANN STODHART , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one sheet, value 2s.; one shift, value 12s.; one napkin, value 6d.; two handkerchiefs, value 5s.; one frock, value 4s.; seven yards of calico, value 10s. 6d.; six yards of woollen cloth, value 5l. 18s.; and two yards of linen cloth, value 3s., the property of John Seabrook , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN SEABROOK. I live in King-street, Tower-hill ; I am a publican and a tailor ; the prisoner had lived servant with me about five months; I had lost several things.

JOSEPH MESSENGER. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Ratcliff-highway; the prisoner pledged this remnant of cloth with me, on the 20th of November; (producing it), in her own name, I knew her before.

THOMAS PARSONS . I am a pawnbroker; several parcels of things were pledged with me, in the name of Sarah Cooley ; I issued duplicates of them; there are six parcels in the whole, four of which I took-in myself.

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer; I searched the prisoner, and found these duplicates on her (producing them). I found a key in her pocket, which opened the door where Mr. Seabrook kept his cloth. Mr. Seabrook was with me when I tried the key; I asked her, how she came to take the cloth; she said, she had only taken two pieces.

(This confession, which was taken down by the direction of Sir Daniel Williams , was read).

"The black cloth and linen pledged with Mr. Messenger, I took from my master; the other things, which were

pledged by Sarah Cooley , were pledged by my direction."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-80

84. HENRY BAINES and WILLIAM CLARKE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Blenkinsop , about twelve in the night of the 13th of November, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one pair of pistols, value 20s.; one German flute, value 3s.; three umbrellas, value 20s.; one time-piece, value 3s.; two tea-spoons, value 5s.; two jackets, value 20s.; two pair of trowsers, value 19s.; and twenty-four handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the property of the said Thomas Blenkinsop.

THOMAS BLENKINSOP . I live at Wapping-wall ; on the night of the 14th of November, at a little after five o'clock, I was alarmed by my daughter-it was before day-light; I got up, looked out of the window, and saw nothing, I then went to bed again; I heard the watchman call five o'clock about five minutes before I got out of bed. In about a quarter of an hour my daughter called me again(this was before six o'clock); I got up and opened the the window, the watchman was calling half-past five o'clock - I called him; I looked into the street, and saw a man standing about eight yards from my house-it was not quite day-light. I called out, "Who is there?" the watchman was still advancing towards the house; the man came forward, and stood under the window out of which I was looking, and looked me full in the face; I called the watchman again, the man then walked down the street, and I saw no more of him; I should not know him again. I returned to bed, and got up in about twenty minutes, being alarmed by my servant, this was after six o'clock; I went into the parlour, and found the furniture in great disorder. I missed a table-clock, a pair of pistols, two flutes, an old time-piece, and three umbrellas; the door between the parlour and the shop was forced open. I conceived that they must have got in at the parlour window, as it was open. I also found the cellar window forced open; the cellar doors lead into the street - they are folding-doors which fasten by bolts, that go into the flap, the place was large enough to admit a person through, there were no marks of violence on them, so that it must have been opened from the inside. There was no other place open but the parlour window and the cellar doors. The cellar is part of the house. I have seen some of the things since.

ELIZA BLENKINSOP . I am the daughter of the last witness; I heard a noise between half-past four and five o'clock, and called to my father, what he has said is correct. When I went down stairs in the morning, the parlour shutter and window were open; my observation was the same as my father's; the cellar windows were shut about half-past ten o'clock the night before; I held the light for the servant to fasten them; they shut with two folding-doors and fastens with a bolt; they were quite safe. My father missed the articles before me.

HANNAH SHEPHARD. I am servant to Mr. Blenkinsop; I rose first in the morning; the cellar windows were quite safe the night before; when I came down stairs they were shut close, but the bolts were broken. I saw them before my master, they were broken open after I had seen them the night before, so that a person must have been into the house. I missed the clock and the umbrellas; there was a time-piece besides the clock, which was also gone. I did not miss the other articles. I know nothing of them.

MR. BLENKINSOP Re-examined. I only missed the articles which I have enumerated, at the time-they were in the house the over-night. I afterwards missed the other articles out of the shop. I cannot say what they were; the spoons were missing that morning, they are worth 5s.; the pistols are worth 10s.; the flutes 5s., and the three umbrellas 20s.;

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am the beadle of St. George's Parish. On the 30th of November I met the prisoner in Old Gravel-lane, knowing them before, I looked after them. They were carrying something in their hands; they looked round at me, and I at them. The prisoner Clarke altered the position of his bundle, and put it in front, which made me suspect him. I went to them, and asked Clarke what he had got; he said, it was his own property. I felt it, and found it to be pistols; they were tied up in a handkerchief. I asked him where he was going with them; he said he was going on board the Eliza, which lay on the other side of the river. I told him I must take him where he must give a better account of them. I took them to Shadwell-Office; while they were there I searched them. Baines wished me to let him go, as he said he was no acquaintance of the other prisoner. I found a German-flute, a watch and appendages, and a steel purse, and some orders for the free and easy clubs on Baines. I then searched Clarke; I found on him a tobacco-box, a bad three shilling token, and the pistols. I found out who the property belonged to, and they were committed. I afterwards searched Baines's house, and found a bunch of keys in his room; one of them fitted Mr. Blenkinsop's portable desk, another his till, and another fitted a door in his shop (I took the lock off the desk, and produce it).

(Property produced).

MR. BLENKINSOP. The watch is not mine; the other property is.

Baines' Defence. I was going along Ratcliff-highway, and met the prisoner, who asked me to go to Execution-dock, Jackson came to stop him, and he took me too. I bought the flute about seven months ago.

Clarke's Defence. Jackson asked me where I got the pistols from, and I told him that I bought them for 10s.

BAINES - GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 18.

CLARKE - GUILTY . DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-81

85. SARAH BOND and SUSAN SMITH , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Marie Antonie , on the 15th of November , on the King's highway, and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 8s., and 1s. 5d. in monies numbered , the goods and monies of the said Marie Antonie.

MARIE ANTONIE . I am in the service of Colonel M'Clough , who lives in Piccadilly. On the 15th of November, about ten o'clock, I was going to Reeves's Mews, where I live; as I was going through Grosvenor-square , Sarah Bond spoke to me, and laid hold of my coat. I was on the pavement.

Q. Which way were you going-A. I had got half-way down the street. I was coming form Piccadilly into Swallow-street, then across Hanover-square, Bond-street, into Grosvenor-square. When I was in the square, S. Bond came up to me, and asked if I had got any money? I said, No; she then took my neck-handkerchief. The prisoner Smith took hold of my hands, and told Bond to look for my money. I called out to the watchman, and he came up; Bond ran away, but I took hold of Smith, and gave her in charge; I had lost my handkerchief, and 1s. 5d. in money, which was in my pocket.

Prisoner Bond. Did you not give me the handkerchief - A. No.

Prisoner Smith. Did you not give me the 1s. 5d. - A. I did not; I was quite sober at the time.

GEORGE GAFFER. I am a watchman; I heard a cry of watch, about a quarter past eleven o'clock; I saw the prisoner, Bond, run round the corner of Grosvenor-street, into Bond-street, shortly afterwards I saw the prosecutor come out of the Half-Moon Coffee-house, which is three doors from Bond-street, he had hold of the prisoner Smith; he told me that she had taken 1s. 5d. from him, and that another girl had taken his handkerchief. I told Smith to give him the money, she said she had not got it; I took her to the watch-house; she did not say he had given it to her. It was after eleven o'clock. Smith was not searched; she said that Bond had got the handkerchief and money. I found Bond, in Bond-street.

ROBERT JARRAD . I belong to the watch-house; Smith was brought in by the watchman; when the prosecutor came in, he said, that she was not the girl who took the money, but he charged her with assisting the other girl. I could not understand him. Bond was brought in afterwards. They were put into the lock-up-house, in which there is a water-closet; it was a cold night, and I ordered them up to warm themselves, when I found this handkerchief in the water-closet. I do not know which of them put it there.

(Produced and sworn to.)

MARIE ANTONIE Re-examined. I left my master's house at ten o'clock. I am sure it was ten o'clock.

Q. Then you must have been an hour going from your master's to Grosvenor-square-A. I know it was ten o'clock. I had to call first by St. George's Church, Hanover-square - I did not stop there.

Bond's Defence. He gave me the handkerchief.

Smith's Defence. I asked him to go to a house with me, and he gave me 1s. 5d.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-82

86. EDWARD HALL , was indicted for feloniously assaulting M. A. Settle, on the King's highway, and taking from her person, against her will, one shawl, value 3s. , the property of the said M. A. Settle.

It being proved that Mary Ann Settle was married to-Brown, previous to the robbery, the indictment was not correct in stating the shawl to be the property of Mary Ann Settle , the prisoner was

ACQUTTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18161204-83

87. ANN JEFFRIES and CATHERINE BURNS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Blackiston , on the 6th of November , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 40s.; two gold seals, value 27s.; one chain, value 6d., and two keys, value 2d. , the property of the said John Blackiston.

JOHN BLACKISTON. I am a shipping agent , and live at Wapping-wall. On the 14th of November, I was at Mr. Dishbourn's, in Old Gravel-lane; it is a private house, I might be a little in liquor, but not much. I had only drank two glasses of rum and water. Mr. Dishbourn's is not more than one hundred yards from my own house. I left his house, and had not got more than thirty yards before I was molested by two or three men, who demanded some drink-money, which I refused, when they immediately pushed me up against a wall; I fell down, and they went away; when I got up two women came and spoke to me, left me, and went up a lane; I then went home, when I was at my own door I missed my watch-my seals had been hanging out. I had seen my watch at Mr. Dishbourn's; I saw it the next morning at the Police-Office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCIS JACKSON. I took the watch from the prisoner Jeffries, at about a quarter past two in the morning, on the 5th of November; I heard the two prisoners wrangling about dividing some property; I also heard them disputing concerning a seal, upon which Proctor had lent them one shilling. I asked them what they were disputing about, they said, it was nothing but a joke. I asked about the seal, they told me, that it was Jeffries's husband's seal upon which Proctor had lent them one shilling. I took them to the watch-house, I then went to Proctor's and got the seal from him.

JOSEPH PROCTOR . The two prisoners came to me about one o'clock in the morning of the 5th of November, Burns had got a bottle with her, and asked me to lend her a shilling, as her father was gone to bed; I refused; when Jeffries offered me the seal, which, she said, was her husband's, and she would return the shilling again in the morning. I gave Burns a shilling, and received the seal from Jeffries.

JOSEPH SCARLETT . I gave the watch to Jackson, which I found on the prisoner, Jeffries, when she was in custody.

JOHN BLACKISTON . The seal which is produced is mine. The two women came close to me; I might have dropped the watch when I was pushed by the two men.

Jeffries's Defence. The watch was given to me by a gentleman in the Commercial-road.

Burns's Defence. I met the other young woman in Ratcliff-highway.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18161204-84

88. MARY HARRIS , was indicted for stealing in the dwelling-house of James Lyons , one shawl, value 3s.; one pair of boots, value 1s.; one petticoat, value 1s.; two aprons, value 1s.; one bank-note, for payment of, and value 2l.; and three bank-notes, for payment of 1l. each, and value 3l. , of the goods and property of the said James Lyons , against the statute.

JAMES LYONS . I live at Little Chelsea . I know the prisoner; she worked for us some times. I and my wife left the house at four o'clock on the morning of the 5th of October; the prisoner was not in the house then; we returned about four o'clock in the afternoon. My money was kept in a little box, which was in another box; I missed three one pound notes, and one two pound note; one of the notes had a mark in the middle, by which I knew it. I did not know the other notes; I saw the notes again on the 8th of October, at Mr. Adams's at Little Chelsea.

MR. ADAMS. I produce the note.

JAMES LYONS. I know it to be mine by the stroke in the middle.

ELIZA LYONS. I went out with my husband on the 5th of October; the prisoner was not in the house at that time. We returned about four o'clock in the afternoon; I went up stairs, and missed a silk shawl, a white petticoat, two aprons, and a pair of women's boots, out of my drawer. I saw them afterwards (about the 8th of October), with the constable of Putney. The prisoner used to work for us some times.

EDWARD PODDER . I am a constable. In October last I was desired to apprehend the prisoner; I found her in the street at Putney; I took her to the watch-house; I found a shawl and a pair of boots on her. The shawl was on her back, and the boots on her feet. She told me, of her own accord, that they were her mistress's. She gave them to me, and said, she was sorry for what she had done. I put her in the cage; I went the next morning, and the door was broken open, and she was gone. I had locked her in with four locks; the padlock was gone, and the other locks broken.

RICHARD SMITHERS . I am an officer. On the 27th of November I met the prisoner in the Strand; I asked her who let her out of the watch-house, and she told me; she cried, and said, she was very sorry for what she had done. I asked her what she had done with the notes; she said she had changed the one pound note with Mr. Adams, in Little Chelsea; and the two pound note at the Goose and Gridiron; the other two she could not recollect where she had paid them; she said it was all gone.

WILLIAM ADAMS . The prisoner gave me the one pound note on the 5th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning. I am sure it is the note that she gave me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of her Youth, by the Prosecutor and Jury .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-85

89. THOMAS SMITH , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one coat, value 5s. , the property of Samuel Winbush .

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am the constable of Mary-le-bone. The prisoner, Smith, was brought into the watch-house by Samuel Cobham. I took charge of him, and asked him where he came from, he said Smithfield; and that he had taken the coat from distress. I found 5s. on him.

SAMUEL COBHAM . I observed the prisoner and another man lurking about Mr. Winbush's shop, about eight o'clock in the morning. The prisoner went up the yard, and the other man stood at the corner; he turned from the door in about ten minutes after, and went up a yard, and I saw him come out with the coat; I stopped him; the other man made his escape.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am the father of four small children, and hope you will have mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Calendar Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-86

90. EDWARD GLEESON , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , one coal-scuttle, value 10s. , the property of Richard Hopkins , Esq.

SAMUEL WELLBELOVED . I am servant to General Hopkins , who lives in Glocester-place, Portman-square . I missed the scuttle.

ANTHONY GARDNER . On the morning of the 28th of October, between eleven and twelve, I was in Wigmore-street, and saw the prisoner and another boy selling the scuttle; the other boy had the scuttle; I asked him where he got it, and he said it was not his; the prisoner claimed it; I asked him where he got it; he said he bought it of a servant for 3s. 6d.; he offered to sell it for 4s., and I took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS GELL . I am a broker; I was standing in my shop, when the prisoner and another boy came by; the other boy had the scuttle, swinging it about; they were laughing. I asked him if it was his; he said, yes; he said it was for sale for four shillings; he said he would take three shillings and sixpence. Gardner came up and took him.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am a constable; I have the scuttle, which was brought in with the prisoner; I asked him where he got it; he first said he got it of a sailor, and then of a gentleman's servant; he said, he gave 3s. 6d. for it. I asked him why he sold it so soon; he said, he wanted the money.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going to Montague-square, I met a person who offered me the scutle for 3s. 6d. and I bought it. A man at a shop door asked me if I was going to sell it; I asked him 4s. 6d. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Calendar Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-87

91. ISAAC SAUNDERS , was indicted for stealing one hat, value 6s. the property of Alexander Johnston .

ALEXANDER JOHNSTON . I live in New Inn-yard, Shoreditch . I keep a public-house . I lost my hat on the 2d of November , between eleven and twelve o'clock at night.

THOMAS BLACKFIELD . I was at the sign of the Jacob's Well, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I saw the pri

soner take the hat off the bench (I believe he was sober), and go out; I went after him, and took him; I asked him what business he had with the hat; he said, what hat? I asked where it was; he made an attempt to knock me down, and ran away. Mr. Johnston overtook him. I gave him in charge to the officer.

JOHNSTON. I stopped the prisoner.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Calendar Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-88

92. JOHN WALKER , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 3l. 12s., in monies numbered, and one bank-note, value 1l. the monies and property of John Mathews .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-89

93. ANN RANKLER , was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , two shutters, value 15s. , the property of John Elves ; and MICHAEL DOWDING , for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, well-knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute.

JOHN ELVES . I keep a chandler's shop in Well-street, Mile-end ; I lost my shutters on the 12th of November, they were taken out of the passage; I missed them when I went to shut up.

CHATHERINE SMITH. I saw the prisoner, Rankler, pass my house with the shutters, about eight o'clock; I live in High-street, Mile-end.

JOHN ELVES. Being told, by the last witness, that Rankler had taken my shutters, I went the next day, and found them at an old iron-shop, which is kept by the prisoner, Dowding, about ten o'clock the next morning. I went in and said, they were my property, and the officer came in directly. I asked him how he came by them; he said he gave 1s. 6d. each for them, to a girl.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. On your going into the shop, I believe he told you that he bought them of a girl - A. He keeps a house in High-street, and a stall in Whitechapel.

Q. You went first to his stall - A. I did; I saw him there, and asked him if he had seen two shutters go by his house; and he said, no; he did not tell me afterwards that he had them at home. I told him I should take out a search-warrant. I afterwards went to his house and found them, and he told me he bought them of a girl.

ISAAC DAVIES . I am a constable. I was sent for, and went to the prisoner's, Dowding, house. I asked him what he had done with the man's shutters; he was confused, and gave me no answer. He was standing by his door, in the act of moving the shutters, having both in his hands. Elves was with me, and claimed them. I asked the prisoner, Dowding, who he bought them of, and he said, of a girl, and gave 1s. 6d. for them. I asked him if he should know her; he said, he had bought a number of things of her. I asked him to show me where she lived. He went to the house where he said her father and mother lived. I could not find her out. We took them to Lambeth Police Office.

Cross-examined. The prisoner told me that he had bought them of the girl, and that he knew where she lived, and accompanied me to her father's house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CATHERINE SMITH. They appear to be the shutters which I saw her take.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. It was a light night, and she was close to me.

Ann Rankler 's Defence. They were standing in the street; I was in distress, and I took them. I took them to the man; he asked me where I got them, and I told him that they were my father's.

Michael Dowding's Defence. All I know is, that Elves came to me about the shutters. I asked him to call on me in an hour, as I thought the girl would call, and he should have his shutters. He has known me this three years.

ANN RANKLER- GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Calendar Months , and Fined One Shilling .

MICHAEL DOWDING - GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Two Years , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-90

94. THOMAS MOOR , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , two table-cloths, value 1l.; two tea-spoons, value 4s.; six knives, value 6d.; and two forks, value 2d. , the property of John Knott ; and MATILDA WELLS , for feloniously receiving the same, on the same day, she knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZA KNOTT. My husband keeps the Barley Mow , in Salisbury-court, Fleet-street , during the last four months I have lost several articles. The prisoner Moor is brother to my man-cook; he returned from sea about four months since, and has been in the habit of coming to my house to see his brother. He had heard me say, that I had lost some spoons. I had information that some of my things were found in a room occupied by the prisoner Wells, in Harford-place, Drury-lane. I got a search-warrant, and was accompanied by Hutt, the officer, to the room; we found six knives and two forks, and several duplicates, some of which belonged to my property. I asked the prisonor Wells, if she had received my table-cloths from the prisoner Moore; she acknowledged that she had, and said, she had pledged one of them in Holborn, and the other in Drury-lane. I went to a pawnbroker, and saw one of my table-cloths. Hutt took the prisoner Moor into custody, searched him and found a duplicate of a silver tea-spoon in his possession.

JOHN WHEELDON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Russell-street, Covent-garden. I have a tea-spoon pledged for one shilling; to the best of my belief it was pledged by the prisoner Moore. The duplicate found on him is the same that I gave the person who pledged it.

THOMAS HEDGES. I am a pawnbroker; I live in Drury-lane. I have a tea-spoon pledged for one shilling, in the name of Thomas Moore. I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not.

JOHN BROWN. I keep the sign of the Red Lion, in Drury-lane. I produce the duplicate of a table-cloth, which I bought of the prisoner Moore. He represented himself as having come from sea.

GEORGE BENTON . I am a pawnbroker; I live in High

Holborn. The prisoner, Wells, pledged a table-cloth, on the 20th of October, for four shillings, with me, in the name of Mary Mathews ; she has pledged several articles at my shop.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I accompanied Mrs. Knott to the apartment of the prisoner Wells. I told her I had a search-warrant; she said, she had no objection to it. I found six knives and two forks, which she said, were her property, and that they were brought by a person of the name of Moore, who made her a present of them. I asked her if she had bought any table-cloths of him; she said he had brought two for her to pawn for him, which she had done, and had given him the money. She went very willingly to shew where she had pawned them. One of the pawnbrokers had not got any; the next had one. I secured her, and went down to the prosecutor's, and took the other prisoner. As I was taking him along, he made an attempt to take something out of his pocket; I found he had got a duplicate of a spoon. I asked him how he came by it; he said it was thrown out in the street. He afterwards confessed that he had taken the things, and had taken them to the prisoner Wells.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Moore's Defence. I had lately come from sea; I got into the company of Wells's husband, and he persuaded me to do it. It was distress that drove me to it.

Well's Defence. I did not know that he had stolen the property when he gave it to me to pledge.

THOMAS MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and fined One Shilling .

MATILDA WELLS- NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-91

95. THOMAS MERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , twenty pounds weight of leather, value 30s.; and one sack, value 2s. , the property of Edward Hadley and Charles Simkin .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating the sack to be the property of John Watkinson .

EDWARD HADLEY . I am an engine-maker . Charles Simkin is my partner ; I lost the leather on the 1st of November.

OWEN NEVILL . I am the patrol to the parish of St. Brides; I was on duty on the 1st of November, in Fleet-street. I saw the prisoner and another man with a bag containing something; they stopped at the corner of Salisbury-court, and the prisoner put it on the other man, who was William Turner . I heard the prisoner say,"d-n it; we will have some beer as soon as we get there." My partner, James Collingridge, was on the other side of the way; I beckoned to him to stop them. We stopped them at Bridge-street; I asked Turner what he had got; he said he did not know. I put my hand in the bag, and found it was leather. The prisoner said it was leather which was left at his house, by a person, to take over the water. I asked him where; he said into the Borough. He would not tell me the person's name whom he was going to take it to. We took them to the watch-house; I then opened the bag, and found it was a bullock's hide. He then said he was going to take it to Mr. Scott's, River-street, Gravel-lane; we took them to the Counter. I then went to Mr. Scott's; he said he had not bought any leather, nor did he expect any. I at last found that the leather belonged to Mr. Hadley. Turner was discharged by the magistrate, and the prisoner committed.

ROBERT BUTLER . I am a constable, at St. Brides; the prisoner was brought into the watch-house with the leather and bag (I produce it).

EDWARD HADLEY . The leather is mine; I have a piece which I cut from it before it was stolen, and it exactly fits. The prisoner was in my employ for about two years.

JOHN WATKINSON . I am a corn-dealer. The sack is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the sack up in the Strand. There was no mark on the leather; he might cut a mark, and fit it in. I bought it of a man who came from Lancashire.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-92

95. ROBERT SIMPSON and SAMUEL DE WIT , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one till, value 1s.; half a pound weight of tobacco, value 2s.; and eight shillings and ten-pence farthing, in copper money , the goods and monies of Henry Frost .

HENRY FROST . I am a publican ; I live at the Rose, in Rose-street, Long-acre . When I was going into my tap-room, I saw a man going out, who I suppose to be Simpson; I called to him, but he made no answer. I went to get some money, and found my till gone. I went over the way into a house, and went up stairs and heard the prisoners parting out the money. I suspected that it was the prisoner Simpson; he lived in that house; (produced) I can swear to five of the farthings.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALENOR. I only saw the back of the man who left the house.

Q. How can you swear to the farthings - A. I had been disputing with a person about one of them. Any thing goes for a farthing. I heard Simpson say, he had thrown the till away, in Long-acre.

De Wit's Defence. I never was in Simpson's house.

Simpson's Defence. I was not in the house that evening. I had been to market; I pulled out my money, shewed it to him, and he swore to some of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-93

96. WILLIAM ANDERSON was indicted for the wilful murder of John Levy , on the 9th of November .

RICHARD HOLLIER . I am a goldsmith and jeweller; I live in Charter-house-lane, Smithfield. On the 9th of November I was in company with John Levy , at the Cart and Horse public-house, Goswell-street , I saw the prisoner there; he came in between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. I was in company with the deceased and several others; I had been there from seven o'clock until that time; I had been drinking very little; I had had a pipe, and some beer; I was playing at cards with an elderly man, whose name I do not know.

Q. When the prisoner came in, who did he speak to - A. He said he would challenge any man to play for 5l. I had ceased to play then; the cards were on the table;

I was picked out by a man of the name of Ingram to play with him. I said I did not want to play with him, as I did not know him. The prisoner appeared to be very little in liquor. When I said that I would not play him, he said I had got no money. I then said I would play him for 5l. He said he would play for 1s., and something to drink. I laughed at him, and said, then you have got no money in your pocket. He made no reply, and I said, I would play him. He borrowed 1s. of Mr. Knight, and put it down, and I gave my money into the custody of Rawley. The landlady then came in, and said, she would have no playing so late at night. I gave her my cards up, but the prisoner was not willing to give her his. The prisoner said, I think you will get drawn as you go home. I said, I do not think that you will draw me. In the course of the evening the prisoner addressed himself to the deceased. The deceased sat by the prisoner while I was beginning to play with him. The prisoner Anderson offered to play him for 5l. The prisoner spoke first to the deceased. The deceased was laughing at what we were saying; when I told the prisoner I was not afraid of his drawing of me. The prisoner offered to play the deceased, and the deceased said, what is the use of playing you, you have no money in your pocket. The prisoner then said, you bl-dy snot, I will produce 5l. within an hour. The deceased said, I will not play you for any thing; I see what sort of a chap you are. The prisoner said, d-n your eyes, I will bl-dy well lick you, if you talk in that way! The deceased said, it would take a better man than him to do it. The prisoner challenged him to fight; he said, will you go out to fight? The deceased said, no, I will not. Then he asked him to play at cards, the deceased said, no, I will not; and called him a foul-mouth-fellow, and said, he would call the landlady to bring a mop and pail to mop his foul-mouth out. The landlady came in by chance, and the prisoner got up, and said, d-n your eyes, I will cut your bl-dy head in two! They were both sitting down before this. The prisoner then made a blow with the pint-pot in his hand, towards the deceased's face, but he checked it; so that it did not hit him. The landlady then attempted to turn the prisoner out; he caught hold of the door, and would not let her. He came back and challenged the deceased to go out and fight; the deceased said, he did not want to have any thing to do with him. The prisoner repeatedly challenged him again, and the deceased said, I suppose I must have a turn-out; I must tight seemingly. They then both agreed to go out and fight. They both went out; the deceased went out first, and the prisoner followed, but not immediately. Nothing more passed after they agreed to fight. I know that the deceased went out first; I went out with some more, and left the prisoner coming out, as it were behind me. But when I got out, he did not follow directly; there might not be a minute between his coming out and mine. I saw the deceased out at the door. When the prisoner came out, he had his hands behind his coat; they were under his coat, behind him. The deceased said, I do not wish to fight here, it being muddy; I will fight you on the turf if you like. There was a field about two hundred yards farther on. The prisoner said, d-n your eyes, you b-r, you shall have it here, and ran at him! The deceased hit out immediately, and they closed; both fell; the deceased was uppermost. They got up by themselves; no sooner had they got up, than they closed again; they both fell again, after a little fighting, during which they were closed all the time.

Q. How long did that round continue - A. It might last better than a minute; the deceased was uppermost again. The deceased got up, and the prisoner laid on the ground. I saw the deceased get up, and stagger towards a shop, which might be about two yards from where they fell. He fell into the hands of Hutton; I did not hear what he said. Hutton called out that he was cut. I went up to him; the prisoner was laying on the ground all that time. I looked at the deceased, he made a noise as if he was fainting; I saw the blood running from him very fast indeed. He seemed to me to be fainting. He was then carried off to Mr. Taylor's, the doctor; I helped to carry him there; it is about one hundred and eighty yards. I did not hear him speak again; he died in Mr. Taylor's shop; I do not suppose that he lived above two minutes after he got in; it might be about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes from the beginning of the fight to his death. I then went to look for the prisoner, and found him standing near the place where they fought; he was all over blood, and the watchman was standing with him. I told the watchman to take him into custody for murdering the man. The prisoner made no reply. The watchman took him; others told him to take him as well as me. I did not hear the prisoner say any thing. We then went to the watch-house; the prisoner said, who is the man that will give charge of me? Mr. Knight came in, and said, I give charge of him. Mr. Knight had been with us at the public-house; the prisoner was left in custody. The deceased was a silversmith. I observed the prisoner with his hands behind him as soon as he got out of the door. The deceased then said he did not wish to fight; neither of them stripped.

Q. At the time the prisoner had his hands behind his coat, could you form any opinion what he was doing - A. Not the least.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. You had been playing at cards from seven till eleven o'clock, and had been drinking - A. I had; our spirits might be a little elevated; the company were my friends; the prisoner was known to some of them; he wanted to play for 5l.; I smiled, and said, he had no money.

Q. You meant this as a taunting expression, or as a retort-A. I did. I was not warm in the least when I said, I was not afraid of his drawing me. I meant that as a taunting expression.

Q. Did you think that he meant to steal your watch-A. I did; and meant to convey that opinion to him. He asked me where I lived; I thought it strange. I meant to convey to him that I thought him a pick-pocket.

Q. The deceased called for a mop and pail to mop his foul-mouth out - A. He did.

Q. They fought - A. Yes; they fought two rounds; there was no seconds, all were standing round, about a yard and a half or two yards from them. After the first round the prisoner fell undermost.

Q. Upon the deceased getting up did he say he had been cut-A. I did not hear him. They closed again in

stantly. If he had made such a complaint, I should suppose, we should have heard him.

Q. You could have seen it-A. No; it was dark. I observed the prisoner's head was cut when he was at the watch-house.

Q. The blood which covered him might be his own blood - A. No; because his clothes were all bloody in the front.

Q. Was the wound in the head given in the first or second round - A. I should think the second; for he fell tremendously heavy; he was undermost both times.

Court. During the time they were fighting was any person near, so that they might have given the deceased a blow-A. No; I did not see them. There was no ring formed.

Q. What length of time might the first round occupy-A. Near a minute; the second round was more than a minute, it lasted about two minutes.

Q. How long might the prisoner be on the ground the first time he fell - A. About a quarter of a minute; as soon as they separated they got up.

Q. Had you your eye upon the prisoner when he was on the ground, after the first round - A. I observed them both.

Q. Could you see the prisoner, after he was down the first time, take anything out of his pocket-A. I did not.

Q. Might he, without you seeing it - A. I do not think he could; if he had I must have seen it.

WILLIAM HUTTON . I was at the Cart and Horse public-house on that day; I went there about eight o'clock. I was in company with Levy, the deceased - He was a silversmith; I had known him for two years. The prisoner came in between eleven and twelve o'clock. As soon as he came in, he said, I'll play any body at cards, for 5l.; several persons said, there is a young man who will play you, pointing out the last witness. I observed that the prisoner was a little intoxicated. Hollier said, that he would play him for 5l.; and the prisoner said, he would play him for a shilling, a glass of liquor, or a pint, I do not know which. They sat down together to play, and the prisoner borrowed a shilling of Mr. Knight; the money was deposited in Rawley's hands. The prisoner then said, Knight, lend me another shilling. Knight said, lose that first. The landlady came in, and said, that there should be no more playing that night; the cards were put up, and the prisoner turned to the deceased, I do not think they had spoken to each other before; the prisoner said, I will play you for 5l., speaking to the deceased, and I will make it good in an hour. The deceased said, how can you do that, you have no money, what do you talk in that way for? The prisoner felt himself agrieved, and made use of very bad language; he took up a pint pot, and said, d-n your eyes, you b-gg-r, I will split your bl-dy head open. The deceased said, do not do that, it will be a pity. The prisoner then said, he would bl-dy well lick him. The deceased told him it would take a better man than him to do it; and said he would call the landlady in to get a pail and a mop to wash his foul mouth out. He put the mug on the table again; the landlady came in at the time, and caught hold of the prisoner, and tried to turn him out; he put his hands on the door, and prevented her. The prisoner then said, several times, that he would fight the deceased. Levy agreed to go out and fight him. The landlady tried to persuade them not to go, but they would. Levy went out first, and the prisoner followed him. Several people went out with them; I was with Levy, before the prisoner. When they came out they walked a little way. Levy said, he would not fight there, it being muddy, but he would on the turf. The prisoner said, no, you b-gg-r, you shall have it here. They went at it directly, no ring was made at that time. The prisoner rushed at him, and they closed directly and fell, the prisoner being under the deceased; they both got up immediately, closed, and fell again, and the prisoner was then under the deceased. The deceased got up, between a stagger and a walk, and went to the other side of the way, against a green-grocer's shop; I caught hold of him, he said, my face is bloody; I took out his handkerchief, and while I was wiping his face, he said, he has cut me. The prisoner was on the ground, I do not know whether he heard him. I immediately helped to take him to Mr. Taylor's.

Q. When they were on the ground the first time, did you observe any thing particular in the prisoner's con duct - A. No; nor the second time either.

Q. If he had put his hands in either of his pockets, were you in a situation to see him - A. I was.

Q. If any instrument had been drawn from his pocket, could you have seen it - A. I think I should.

Q. What distance were the bye-standers from them - A. About two yards; they were quite separate from them.

Q. How many were there round them while they were fighting - A. Nine or ten. The deceased did not live a minute after he was carried into Mr. Taylor's. He did not speak after he spoke to me at the green-grocer's door. I went back to the place the next morning, there was a great quantity of blood on the ground.

Cross-examined. How long had you known the deceased - A. One or two years; I did not know the prisoner more, than from seeing him once or twice. I went to the house about eight o'clock, and was there when the prisoner came in, which was about half-past eleven; he might be in liquor; a man was picked-out to play with him, whom the company thought was the best player.

Q. He had several against him-A. No; the landlady endeavoured to persuade him not to fight. I went out with Levy, he went out before the prisoner.

Q. Did all the company come out of the room - A. No.

Q. Did any come out with the prisoner - A. They followed after him.

Q. Was not the prisoner out, and the landlady trying to keep Levy in-A. No; the deceased was capable of thrashing the prisoner.

Q. Did the prisoner strike with both hands - A. He rushed at him directly, they closed, and the prisoner was underneath both times; his head was in the mud, I saw it afterwards, it was very bloody. I was about two yards off from them; when they fell their feet were towards me. I cannot say what the prisoner was doing with his hands; I saw nothing in them at any time.

MR. ANDREWS. Did you hear any person persuade the prisoner not to go out to fight-A. That was Mr. Warder.

Q. Was it before he left the house - A. It was at the door.

Q. Did Mr. Rawley persuade him not to fight also - A. He did; he had been playing with him, he sat at the same table.

Court. Did Rawley and Warder persuade him not to fight before Levy left the room - A. It was before I went out; there was no person near them while they were fighting. I am sure nobody could have cut the deceased, but the prisoner; if they had, I must have seen them. I am sure no person was near enough.

Q. Had you your eye upon the prisoner. from the time that they began until Levy staggered; and did you notice, so as to be able to see if he did take any thing out of his pocket - A. It was impossible, the time was so short.

Q. Was it impossible to take it from his pocket after they first began - A. Impossible; when he was down he got up directly, so that there was no time then.

Q. Then, in your judgment, if the prisoner cut the deceased with any thing, it must have been in his hand, at the time he began fighting-A. It must, I have not the least doubt of it.

DANIEL PARSNIDGE . I am a jeweller; I was acquainted with the deceased; I was in his company at the Cart and Horse, on the 9th of November last. I was there about eight o'clock. The prisoner came in about a quarter before twelve o'clock, to the best of my recollection. I had been drinking. We were all sober; we had drank about six pots of porter among seven or eight persons; we had been playing at cards. When the prisoner came in, I thought he was rather intoxicated. When he had been in about six minutes, he began talking to us. He challenged to play any one at cards for 5l. Some person told Hollier to play him; and Hollier said, he would play him. They sat down, and agreed to play for a shilling, and something to drink. The prisoner asked Knight to lend him a shilling; when the landlady came in, and said, that there should be no more playing. Hollier put the cards down. The prisoner rose from his chair, with the cards in his hand, and said, I will play any body for 5l. I thought he addressed himself to the deceased. Levy said, if I play you for 5l. you have no money. The prisoner then said, d-n your eyes. The deceased said, bring in a mop and a pail, that I may wash his foul-mouth out, for it is very foul. The prisoner then took up a pint pot, and said, I will cut your bl-dy eyes out; addressing himself to the deceased. The deceased seeing him coming, rose up, and said, do not do that, for it will be a pity; and put himself in a posture for defence. The prisoner said, I see you are fightable, are you? The deceased said, no, I am not; nor do I wish to fight. The landlady took hold of the prisoner's shoulders to turn him out, saying, you shall not stop; he came back to the place where she had drove him from, and insisted on fighting with the deceased. Levy sat down afterwards; he was in his seat when the landlady was turning the prisoner out. When the prisoner returned, he said, will you fight? The deceased said, he would not. At last the deceased said, I see nothing else will do, I will go out and fight him. He got off his seat to go out; he went out before the prisoner, I, and some others, went out with him. I saw the prisoner by the door, he stood with one hand behind him, under his coat, in this way (Here the witness put his right-hand under his coat-flap, near the waist); there were several standing by the side of him. I told the deceased he had better not fight on the stones. He said, I do not want to fight at all, but if I do, it shall be on the turf; the prisoner then said, you shall fight, and rushed at him; some blows were struck on both sides, and they got nearly into the middle of the road - They both fell; Levy was at the top; they both jumped up, they were not down a second; they rose directly; I did not observe whether the prisoner had any thing in his hand at the time; there was nobody near enough to strike them all the time-no person interfered to pick them up. They began fighting again; they closed as soon as they got up; I saw the prisoner had his left arm round Levy's neck, and his other hand as if striking him, when they fell again; Levy was uppermost; he rose of his own accord, and staggered about three yards-he said nothing in my hearing; they might be about a minute on the ground the second time.

Q. Was there then time enough for the prisoner to take any thing out of his pocket-A. No; I do not think he could, I was near enough to see him; I do not think at that time he could; I went to assit Levy, and heard some person say that he was dying. I found him lying on the ground, bleeding very fast. The prisoner lay in the middle of the road; Mr. Knight ran and picked him up. I attended on Levy, and went to Mr. Taylor's with him - He died there very soon. I returned with Mr. Knight, to look for the prisoner, and found him standing near the place where we left him. Somebody said, "Why Bill, you have killed him." I did not hear him make any answer. The prisoner was then very bloody. I observed the blood run from the back part of his head; there was also blood on the front of the prisoner's clothes. He was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. You knew the prisoner; there was no pretence for any body to say, that he was a thief-A. Nobody said he was. I saw them the whole time that they were fighting.

Q. If, at the commencement of the battle, he had a knife in his hand, you would have noticed it-A. No; I should not have noticed, whether he was striking or cutting.

Q. After the first round Levy sprang up-A. Yes; and as soon as both were up they began fighting; there was no time for any complaint; if he had been cut, I suppose, he would have desisted. They were down, the second time, about half a minute.

Q. Half a minute was a sufficient time for a man to draw a knife from his pocket - A. I should suppose so; I did not see him do it.

Q. I take it for granted, then, that the thing was impossible to be done-A. No; I do not mean to say so.

Court. You did not see, that the prisoner took any thing from his pocket, from first to last-A. I am certain I did not.

Q. Do you think it was possible for him to do it when he was fighting - A. I do not think it was.

Q. Was it possible for him to have done it when he was on the ground the first time-A. I do not think it was possible.

Q. The second time - A. It was not impossible, but I did not see it.

Q. Was it possible for the prisoner, during the time they were on the ground the second time, to have cut the

deceased in more places than one - A. He might have done it, and I not see it.

Q. There was time enough while he was on the ground to have got the knife out of his pocket, and cut him - A. There was time; but I should think he could not have got it out of his pocket.

Q. This might depend on the pocket it was in - A. It might, my lord.

Q. You think it improbable, but not impossible - A. Not impossible.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I was at the Cart and Horse public-house on the 9th of November; I have known the prisoner five or six years He came in about a quarter before twelve o'clock; I did not know that he was coming; he appeared intoxicated. I was of the same party as Levy. When the prisoner came in, he joined the party at our table, and said, who will play for 5l. A person of the name of Ingram pointed Hollier out; they agreed to play, and I lent the prisoner a shilling; he was, at that time, perfectly in good humour. The cards were produced, but the landlady insisted that there should be no playing at so late an hour. The prisoner would still keep challenging the company to play for 5l.; he addressed no one in particular, that I saw; there was a wrangle between the prisoner and the deceased, I was at the same table with them. I heard the deceased say, what is the use of playing you for 5l. you have not got a shilling about you. There were some expressions used by the prisoner, but I cannot say what they were; after that, the deceasad said, ring the bell for the landlady to bring a pail and mop, to mop his foul-mouth out. Then the prisoner said, I will cut your bl-dy head in two, taking up the pint pot at the same time. The landlady came in, or was in, and she took the pot out of his hand, and insisted on their not fighting there, and did all she could to turn the prisoner out, but she could not. The prisoner returned to Levy; I do not know what he said. It was the wish of the prisoner to fight - They agreed to go out and fight; the deceased went out first; I detained the prisoner at the parlour-door, and said, "Bill do not fight, for you are in the wrong, he gave you no particular offence, why should you fight?" He said, d-n me, I will fight. I then let him go; I went first, and he followed behind me. I stood to see what followed. When I got out the prisoner got before me, and stood before me. I heard the deceased say, I will not fight here - I will go upon the turf. The prisoner answered, d-n you, you shall have it here; and immediately set to. They fought, and the prisoner closed with the deceased in the first round. I saw the deceased fall, but did not see the prisoner fall. They had a second round, and were closed all the time. The whole of the rounds did not exceed two minutes and a half. They fell the second time-the prisoner was undermost. I assisted the prisoner in getting up, and placed him against a wall, my attention was chiefly directed towards him; I do not know whether he was bleeding at the time. Levy was against the door of a green-grocer; the witnesses were attending him - I assisted in carrying him to Mr. Taylor's, I observed him blecding very much, and there he died; I had left the prisoner at the corner of Sutton-street, I went back, and found him in the same place; his clothes were covered with blood. All the front of him, from his head to his boots, were all bloody. He was given in charge. Several persons examined the spot where they had been fighting, but found nothing.

Cross-examined. Was the prisoner searched in your presence-A. He was; there was no instrument found on him.

Q. When you were in the passage dissuading him from fighting, were you alone-A. No; there was somebody else, but I do not know who it was.

Q. When you went out of the passage before him, did he follow directly - A. I stood on the step, and he got before me; it was all but going out together. I did not observe any thing in his hands at any time, nor did I see him take any thing out of his pocket. He had the appearance of being drunk; we persuaded him not to fight. I heard no complaint made by either after the first round; nobody went within a yard and a half of them. The deceased was shorter and stouter than the prisoner. When they fell I was on the prisoner's left side; his right-hand was out of my observation; I saw him at the watchhouse; he had a cut on his head, and his hair was discoloured with blood.

Court. You was with him in the passage; can you tell whether he had, or had not, a knife in his hand - A. For any thing I know he might have had it. He had not got a great coat on.

Q. Do you know whether the cuff of his coat came over his hands - A. I cannot say.

Q. During the fight was there any body sufficiently near Levy to cut him - A. I believe not; I cannot answer that positively. I saw them all the time, and I do not recollect seeing any body sufficiently near.

Q. From first to last, did you see the prisoner take any thing out of his pocket - A. I did not; I should think he could not do it without my seeing him.

Q. Do you mean to say, that it was impossible he should - A. I do; for it must have taken up some time; I am possitively sure, that when they fell, the last time, there was nothing taken out.

Q. What makes you so positive - A. The time was so short.

GEORGE PAYNE. I am a jeweller; I was at the Cart and Horse, on the night of the 9th of November; the prisoner came there, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock. I was not with Levy's party; I was in the same room; when the prisoner came in, he was rather abusive, and appeared to be in liquor. I did not particularly notice his conduct; a quarrel arose between the deceased and the prisoner; I think it was about cards; somebody advised them to go out and fight; they went out; I followed them; I believe I went out with them; when I got out I was on the side of the deceased; he said, he would fight on the turf; I did not observe the prisoner in particular; I am not certain, but I think the prisoner was out first; I believe I went out after him. When I first saw the prisoner, after I had got out, I believe he was standing; when the deceased said, he would fight on the turf, the prisoner said, he would fight there, and commenced fighting; I do not know how they began to fight; I did not see the prisoner take any thing from his pocket.

Q. Was there time enough for him to do it - A. There was, while they were fighting.

Q. Could it be done, while they were fighting, without your observing it-A. I think it could; I do not think they were together two minutes; they closed and fell, and got up, and fell again; the deceased got up and staggered towards the shop; he was all over blood; I did not observe the prisoner, my attention was directed to Levy; he articulated something, I do not know what; I went to Mr. Taylor's with him. I saw the prisoner at the watchhouse, his clothes were very bloody in front; I did not see them behind; his clothes were very much stained with blood, rather upwards; I did not observe any blood on his legs. He did not complain; I was a stranger to both of them.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Did you see the whole of the fight - A. I did; they both fell, and got up at the same time; they closed, and made no complaint; if he had been cut, he had an opportunity of saying so. I did not observe the blows; when the deceased got up, the second time, I saw blood upon him. I did not observe any blow after the first round; I had no opportunity of seeing.

Q. Though the prisoner had not time to take a knife out of his pocket, had he not time to take it up in his hand, if it laid on the ground near him - A. I think it might be so.

Court. You saw no knife in his hand, before they began fighting - A. I did not.

Q. In what part of the contest do you think the prisoner might take up a knife-A. While they were on their legs.

Q. Was it possible for the prisoner to take a knife out of his pocket whilst they were down, the second time - A. If it were a shut knife, he could not; but if it was an open one he could.

WILLIAM KNOWLES . I am the landlord of the Sun-dial public-house, which is opposite the Cart and Horse. There was a person came into my house, on the 9th of November, about a quarter past twelve o'clock at night; he was all over blood; he said something to me; all his face was bloody; he went out, and I saw him no more.

JAMES HOSIER . I am a watchman, in Goswell-street, close to Sutton-street; I knew the prisoner; on the night of the 9th of November, I found the prisoner, leaning against a post, at the corner of Sutton-street; I said, hallo! what do you do here? - he said, I have been used exceedingly ill; there were nobody by at the time. I said, who has used you ill; he said, nobody, but a set of rascals have cut and beat me. I asked him who they were; he said, he did not know. I lifted my lanthorn up to see if there was any body near. I saw he was bloody; I said, you are covered with blood and mud, and have no bat on; he said, I am cut all to pieces; I said, where; he said, I am cut over my head, and bruised all over; a man came up and said, here is your hat; the prisoner took it, and said, it is not my hat, take it again; I asked the man, whether he knew him; he said, no; another man came up with another hat; I took the hat from the man, and put it on the prisoner's head; the prisoner was given in charge; I took him to the watch-house; there was a great quantity of blood on the pavement, where he was standing; this was about twelve yards from the Cart and Horse.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The blood was on the pavement and the road.

Court. Did you observe what part of his clothes were bloody-A. All over his face was bloody; he had boots on; his waistcoat, handkerchief, and boots were bloody.

THOMAS HORNE . I am keeper of Goswell-street, watchhouse. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, on the 9th of November; his clothes were covered with blood in the front; when he came in, he said, he had been very ill-used. I asked him where; he said, at the Cart and Horse, in Goswell-street. I delivered him the next morning to Hutt, in the same clothes that he came to the watchhouse in, the night before.

Court. Were his boots bloody - A. They seemed to be speckled a little,

FRANCIS ROWLAND. I keep the Cart and Horse public-house. The prisoner came in, on the 9th of November, there was a few words occured, and the prisoner and the deceased went out to fight.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I endeavoured to dissuade the deceased from going out to fight; he said he would settle him, and just give him a taste.

Q. What had passed before the expression was used - A. There were a few words occurred, which made Levy angry.

JOHN HUNT . The watch-house-keeper delivered the prisoner on the morning of the 10th of November; his clothes were very much smeared with blood; his breeches and waistcoat muddy. I have Levy's clothes also; his shirt is very bloody; the stockings, in particular, are bloody; the pantaloons, down to the shoes, are very bloody. There are about nineteen cuts or stabs in the coat, in different places; in the collar, back, and side; they appear to be done by some instrument; all the cuts appear to be done in the same way. (I produce both Levy's clothes and the prisoner's.) Levy's clothes have nineteen cuts in the coat; five in the waistcoat, and three in the pantaloons; there is also a cut in his neck-handkerchief; the cuts in the waistcoat and coat correspond. I had the prisoner in custody; I said, it was a bad job; he said it was.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. I have only been in possession of the handkerchief since last Friday. I do not know whether it is the deceased's or not.

Q. Was there any blood on the prisoner's boots - A. there was.

Court. Was there any other wound on the prisoner, except the back of his head - A. No.

JOHN REDGRAVE . I was at the Hand and Apple public-house, which is about thirty or forty Yards from the Cart and Horse, on the 9th of November. I saw the prisoner there between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening; the prisoner was sitting down; he had a knife, which he took out of his pocket; when he had used it he shut it up, and put it into his right-hand breeches pocket. I cannot say what sort of a knife it was; I only saw the blade, it appeared to be about two inches and a half long, like mine (producing one). I went away and left him there; the prisoner is a watch-finisher.

Cross-examined. The blade resembled mine.

JANE ESSOM . I gave Hutt the handkerchief; I took it of the neck of the deceased; I was in Mr. Taylor's shop,

and seeing the handkerchief, I thought it might be tied too tight, and took it off. I went to the Cart and Horse, and said, that I had the handkerchief; it is the same handkerchief which I gave to Hutt, and in the same state as when I took it off the neck of the deceased.

JAMES BOW . I live in Clarke-street, Sutton-street. I remember going to the Cart and Horse public-house, to look for my father; I went into the passage, and beard two men talking about fighting. I did not know them. I saw two men come out afterwards. I do not know what day of the week it was; it is a long while ago.

JAMES BOW, Sen. I came home about a quarter before one o'clock, on the morning of the 10th of November; I do not know that my son had been out on that night; I left the key in the door, and found it in the same state.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a surgeon, and live in Goswell-street. On Saturday night, the 9th of November, the deceased Levy was brought to my house; he was in a dying state when he was brought in. About a quarter of an hour after his death, I examined his body; I first examined his head, and found a transverse cut, of about three inches in length, which must have been done by a sharp instrument; a knife would have done it. Between the mouth and the ear, on the left cheek, there was a crucial incision, which, I consider, had been done by an instrument. There were several more wounds on the chest and other parts of the body, in the bowels and on the hip;(I did not observe any on the neck) and on the upper part of his right thigh there was a wound of about three quarters of an inch in length, and about one inch, or one inch and a half, in width; on the other thigh there was another wound of about half an inch in depth, but merely muscular. I have no doubt but that the wound on the right thigh was the cause of his death; the main artery of the thigh, which we call the farmicular artery, was cut through, which, if not immediately stopped, death is certain. A man would bleed to death in a quarter of an hour from such a wound. His dress was so muddy that I did not take any notice of it. His right-hand was wounded between the thumb and fore-finger; they were cut through, and separated. It appeared to be done by a sharp instrument being drawn through the hand; all these wounds appeared to be fresh, and all to be given by the same instrument.

Q. Would such a knife as that produced have made these wounds-A. I should have thought it was rather narrower than that blade.

Q. Suppose a man to be fighting, might he have gone on another round without knowing that he was wounded-A. I should think he might, providing the wound in the thigh was not given, or the other wounds, altogether eight of them, might have been given without a man's knowing it. If he was fighting, he might have gone on, they would not be felt at the time. It very often happens when a mortal wound is given that it is not felt at the time.

Q. Would any of the wounds prevent articulation - A. The wound on the face would. I did not probe the head, as I thought it unnecessary.

Court. The deceased could not have died from the breaking of a blood-vessel, or from apoplexy - A. He could not. The greatest depth of the wounds was an inch.

Prisoner. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. My feelings are so much hurt at this most dreadful calamity that has happened, that I cannot say any thing; I therefore leave it to the court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18161204-94

97. WILLIAM SIMCOE , was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one watch, value 3l., and one seal, value 18s., the property of Richard Boxhall , from his person .

RICHARD BOXHALL. I am a marine . On the 25th of November I was at Execution Dock , between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came up to me; I thought I felt my watch moving; the officer took my watch out of the prisoner's pocket.

WILLIAM MOODY. I am an officer. I saw the prisoner put the watch into his pocket, and I took it out.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the watch laying on the ground, I picked it up, and asked if any body had lost one. I was answered, "No." I put it into my pocket, and the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-95

98. MARGARET MEAD , was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one gown, value 5s.; one pair of shoes, value 2s.; and one pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Dynan .

ELIZA DYNAN. I am the wife of Joseph Dynan. The prisoner came into my service on the 17th of November, on the 18th, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I set her to wash some things. I fell asleep, and was awoke at five o'clock by my mother. The prisoner was gone, and the articles mentioned in the indictment. She was apprehended the next day; she took the things away wet. I am sure the prisoner is the girl.

JOSEPH DYNAN . I went and approhended the prisoner in a bad house, and found all the things on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix lent me the things to pawn for her.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-96

99. SAMUEL LINGHAM , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one portmanteau, value 18s. , the property of Allen Billing and Thomas Lane .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18161204-97

100. THOMAS BIGGS , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , at St. George's, Bloomsbury , eighteen plates, value 12s.; four hinges, value 4s.; and four bits, value 2s., the property of John Wilson -two saws, value 12s., and one apron, value 2d., the property of John Tooley -one saw, value 9s., the property of George Walter -one saw, value 7s., the property of John Whittington -two saws, value 12s., and two aprons, value 6d., the

property of Richard Crossfield -two saws, value 12s., the property of Thomas Forster -two saws, value 12s., the property of Henry Feakins -two saws, value 12s., and one apron, value 3d., the property of James Dowling -one saw, value 6d.; two bits, value 6d.; and one > rule, value 6d., the property of William Mortimer -and two saws, value 12s.; three bits, value 9d.; and one bevil, value 2d. , the property of Thomas Tweedale .

JOHN WILSON. I am a coach-maker , and live in Thorney-street, Bloomsbury, in the parish of St. George's . I lost eighteen plates, four hinges, and four bits, out of my work-shop. I fastened my premises on Saturday, the 30th of November, and returning on Monday, about seven o'clock, I found both the back and the inside door had been opened. I missed several of my men's tools, and some of my own; I am sure they were safe on the Saturday; I saw them afterwards with Wiltshire, the officer; my things are worth 18s.

Prisoner. Did you not say, at Bow-street, you was sure it was not me-A. I said I was certain it must have been done by more than one person, as you did not know my premises.

JOHN TOOLEY. I am a workman, at Mr. Wilson's . When I left work, on the Saturday night, I left two saws and an apron on my bench; they were gone on the Monday morning. I have seen them since, in the custody of Wiltshire; I know them to be mine; they are worth 12s. 2d. together.

Prisoner. Do you recollect saying, when I described the person who had got the things, that you suspected him-A. I do.

RICHARD CROSSFIELD . I work at Mr. Wilson's. I left two saws and two aprons there; they are worth 12s. 6d. together. I saw them with Wiltshire; they are mine.

THOMAS FORSTER. I left two saws at Mr. Wilson's, on the Saturday; I missed them on the Monday morning; I have seen them at Wiltshire's; he had several more tools; they were not more than one person could carry.

HENRY FEAKINS . I work at Mr. Wilson's. I left two saws there on the Saturday; they were gone on Monday morning; I saw them afterwards in Wiltshire's custody; they are worth 12s.

JAMES DOWLING. I work at Mr. Wilson's. I left two saws and one apron in the shop, on the Saturday; they were gone on Monday morning; they are worth 12s. 3d. I saw them in Wiltshire's custody afterwards.

WILLIAM MORTIMER. I left two bits, one rule, and one saw, at Mr. Wilson's, on Saturday; I missed them on the Monday morning; they are worth 7s. together. I saw them in Wiltshire's custody afterwards.

THOMAS TWEEDALE. I left two saws, three bits, and one bevil, in Mr. Wilson's shop, on the Saturday, and missed them on the Monday morning; they are worth 12s. 11d. I saw them in Wiltshire's custody afterwards.

JOHN WILSHIRE . I am a constable. I was in Crown-court, Cheapside, on Sunday night, the Ist of December, about half past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner tying the things up in two or three aprons. I asked him what trade he was; he said, he was in the coach line, and that they were his own. I suffered him to bring them out of the court, and when he came to the corner of Queen-street I saw the watchman, and then took hold of the prisoner. He threw down the bundle, and made a blow at me, and got out of my grasp. The watchman, whose name is Taylor, ran after him, and secured him. I secured the bundle, and picked up some more tools which he left behind in his hurry to tie them up. When he was taken to the watch-house, he had some more tools in his pocket, and three old keys; the keys will not fit any part of the premises. I learned, the next day, that the tools belonged to Mr. Wilson. The prisoner said afterwards, that he was hired to carry them, by a person in St. Paul's Church Yard, for one shilling, to East Smithfield. They were claimed by the several persons who have seen them to day.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am watchman of Cheap Ward. I was at the corner of Queen-street when Wilshire laid hold of the prisoner; I saw him get from him; I pursued him, and took him. I saw him throw down the bundle of tools; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been acquainted with a man of the name of MKenzie. Last Sunday week, as I was returning from Drury-lane, I met him with three packages under his arm; he asked me to carry them, saying, he was going the same way as me. I took one of them; he walked faster than me. As I was coming down Cheapside the watchman stopped me, and said, he suspected me. I threw them down, and endeavoured to escape.

JOHN WILSON. It would not require a great deal of force to break into the premises; but it appeared to me to be the work of more than one person.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-98

101. THOMAS M'KENZIE , was indicted for stealing' on the 1st of December , eighteen brass-plates, value 12s.; four hinges, value 4s.; and four steel bits, value 2s., the property of John Wilson -two saws, value 12s., and two aprons, value 6d., the property of John Tooley -one saw, value 9s., the property of George Walter -one saw, value 7s., the property of John Whittington two saws, value 12s., and two aprons, value 6d., the property of Richard Crossfield -two saws, value 12s., the property of Thomas Forster -two saws, value 12s., the property of Henry Feakins -two saws, value 12s., and one apron, value 3d., the property of James Dowling two saws, value 12s.; two steel bits, value 6d.; and one rule, value 6d., the property of William Mortimer -two saws, value 12s.; three steel bits, value 9d.; one bevil, value 2d.; and one stock, value 1d. , the property of Thomas Tweedale .

JOHN WILSON . My shop was broken open, and the tools, which I mentioned under the last indictment, were taken away; they are of the same value as I gave them then. I know the prisoner; he was once employed by me; he left me about eight weeks ago; he knew the situation of my premises.

THOMAS TWEEDALE . Beside the tools which I had enumerated in the last trial, I lost a stock, which I afterwards saw in the officer's, Harrison, possession.

WILLIAM MORTIMER . I also lost a stock, two bits, and a saw, beside the tools which the meet prisoner has been

convicted of taking. I have seen them since in possession of Harrison.

JOHN TOOLEY . I also lost a stock beside the articles which I mentioned on the last trial. I have seen it since in Harrison's possession.

CHARLOTTE CUMMINS . The prisoner slept four nights at my house; he came in on Sunday night, and brought a bundle with him, about half-past nine o'clock. He slept at my house, with the other prisoner, who has been convicted.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 4th of December last, Mrs. Cummins gave me information that there was some things at her house, at Dock-street, East Smithfield. I went and found three stocks, one saw, ten pieces of brass-edging, some plates, and centre bits, and one apron. I went and apprehended the prisoner, and found him at a public-house, in Rosemary-lane. I charged him with the robbery; he said, that the last prisoner had got over the place. I found six duplicates on him, of things belonging to the workmen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I lodge with the young man. We were both out of bread; he asked me to shew him where I worked, and I did; he went in, and opened the door, and let me in; he gave me the bundle; I have not seen him since.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-99

102. ANN BARRATT , was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , two blankets, value 6s.; one quilt, value 1s.; one looking-glass, value 12s.; and two flat irons, value 1s., the property of James Bellamy , in a lodging-room, in his dwelling-house, let by contract to the prisoner , to be used with the lodging aforesaid.

JAMES BELLAMY . I live in Allen-street, Clerkenwell . I rent the house. I let the prisoner a furnished room on the 6th of November. The articles mentioned in the indictment were to be used by her with the room. She left me on the 22d of November; she was to pay me 5s. per week; she paid me only 4s.; she gave me no intimation of her going; she went, and not returning, I opened her door, and found the things gone. I have seen them at the pawnbroker's since. I found out where she lived, from a man with whom she cohabited, and I took her up.

SARAH BELLAMY. My husband has spoken correct. I gave the prisoner no authority to take the things.

JAMES FRANKLIN . I live with Mr. Brown, Fetter-lane; he is a pawnbroker. I have a blanket and two irons, which were pawned at our shop by the prisoner. I am sure it was the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CHESTERMAN . I took the prisoner into custody on the 26th of November; I searched her and found duplicates of the things, which have been produced, on her.

Prisoner. I pledged them from distress. I offered to take them out on Saturday.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Fourteen Days , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-100

103. SUSANNAH VILLERS , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one seal, value 2s. , the property of John Harding .

JOHN HARDING, Sen. I live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields . I am a glassman ; the prisoner was brought into my shop by Hatfield; he asked me if I had lost a glass seal. He shewed me one, when I knew it to be mine; I did not miss it.

JOHN HARDING , Jun. The prisoner came into the shop to inquire the price of a seal, about four o'clock. I told her 1s. 6d.; she said it was too much, and went away. She was brought into the shop, about eight o'clock, by Hatfield. I cannot say whether I sold the seal or not.

JAMES BOSWELL. I am a weaver. I was going along Shoreditch with a boy of the name of Black; the prisoner stopped us, and shewed us the seal, and the officer came up and asked the prisoner, how she came by it; she said she gave 1s. 6d. for it; he took her into custody.

WILLIAM HATFIELD . I am an officer. I was going along Shoreditch, and saw the prisoner and several others looking at the seal; the prisoner said, she bought it at a shop in Brick-lane. I took her there; she went very willingly. The prosecutor said it was his property, and that he had not sold it. The prisoner then said, she had picked it up. She afterwards said, she had taken it, and was sorry for it.

JOHN HARDING , Sen. I can swear the seal was mine, but I might have sold it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-101

104. WILLIAM POWERS , was indicted for stealing a quadrant, value 10s. , the property of Samuel Davies .

SAMUEL DAVIES. I live in Convent-street . The prisoner came to my house on the 26th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; he said he had come from sea; he had slept at my house the night before. I am in the habit of letting lodgings; he wanted to buy my quadrant. On the 26th, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, he sent me out to get him some beer; when I returned, he was gone, and the quadrant also. I saw the prisoner again on the 27th; I charged him with robbing me; he ran away; he was stopped. I found my quadrant at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES ROBERT ELLIS . I am a pawnbroker; live with Mr. Dickins, at Limehouse. The prisoner pledged the quadrant at our shop, on the evening of the 26tk of November, about five o'clock. I am sure that he is the man. It was afterwards claimed by Davies. He has pawned two quadrants with us.

GEORGE BROWN. I met the prisoner about three o'clock in the afternoon on the dock bridge. He gave me the quadrant, and told me to carry it. I carried it down to a public-house, and he then took it from me. I am sure it was Mr. Davies's quadrant; I had seen it before.

MICHAEL MORRIS. I am an officer. I saw the prisoner taken, and he was given up to me; he said he knew nothing of the quadrant.

(Produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. That quadrant is my own.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-102

105. JOHN LARGE , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one umbrella, value 2s., the property of John Stamford Girdler , Esq. , from his person .

JOHN STAMFORD GIRDLER, Esq. I am a magistrate for the county of Middlesex . I reside at Brook-green; myself and wife had spent the evening with a friend; as we were returning home, I observed several persons at the top of Mutton-hill ; I heard footsteps, and observed two men behind me; I turned round, and a man made a snatch at my umbrella, which was under my arm; but did not take it; he made a second attempt, and got it; I cried out, stop thief! he ran down Cross-street; I can not say, that the prisoner is the man; he was immediately stopped; I seized the other man; my umbrella was shown to me; it was not found on the man whom I stopped.

JOSEPH TWIGG . I was in Cross-street, and heard the alarm; I was in company with another gentleman; the prisoner ran between us, and we collared him; a person passed me at the time; when I collared the prisoner his hands were behind him; in about half a minute I heard something drop from him, into an area; an officer came up and took him; I said, what was dropped was in the area; a lamplighter came up and got the umbrella out of the area.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer; about ten o'clock, on the night of the 5th of November last, I was in Hatton-garden, and heard the alarm; I ran up; the prisoner had been taken; I took him into custody; and a lamplighter produced the umbrella from an area.

(Produced and sworn to).

Prisoner. I am innocent.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-103

106. JOHN WARREN , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November, twenty-two pounds of beef, value 10s. , the property of Charles Osborne .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Two Years , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-104

107. MARY HARRIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , forty-eight yards of fringe, value 2s., the property of Eliza Kemp , widow, from the person of Caroline Kemp .

CAROLINE KEMP. My mother is a weaver ; she lives in Holywell-lane; she sent me out with forty-eight yards of fringe; I was to take it to No. 98, Cheapside; the prisoner met me close to Lackington's, in Finsbury-square ; she asked me my name, and I told her; she said, she must have my bundle, for she had a letter at home for my mother, with some money in it. I had never seen her before, and refused to give her the bundle; she took it from me; I ran after her, and cried out, stop thief! but she got away. About a fortnight afterwards I saw her in Moorgate; I gave the alarm, and she was stopped; she had some of the fringe on her bonnet; I am sure she is the person. She took it from me against my will. I should have known her if she had not got the fringe on her bonnet.

ELIZA KEMP . I sent my daughter with the fringe, and she returned in about an hour, and told me the same as she has now sworn; I know nothing of the prisoner; the fringe was forty-eight yards, and worth two pounds. The prisoner had about a yard and a half round her bonnet.

Prisoner. Did you not say, that you could not swear to the fringe - A. No; I am certain it is mine.

CHARLES BROWN. I am an officer of Hatton-garden; Caroline Kemp, and the prisoner, were brought into our office, and Kemp gave the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner. I bought the bonnet ready trimmed.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-105

108. PHILIP GRANT , was indicted for stealing on the 30th of November , one warming-pan, value 6s.; one skellet, value 1s.; one pot, value 8s.; one tea-chest, value 1s.; one tea-board, value 1s.; one basket, value 6d.; two tea-spoons, value 2s.; and one knife, value 2d. , the property of Sarah Cokeham , widow .

SARAH COKEHAM . I live at Shadwell ; the prisoner lodged with me; the things were for the use of my lodgers; they were safe when I went to bed, on Saturday, the 30th of November; I missed them the next morning; the prisoner had left the lodgings a few days before.

MICHAEL LUTTRELL . I am a watchman; on Saturday morning, about half past five, I met the prisoner, with the things; he said, he had bought them at Chelmsford; it was dark; I took him into custody.

CHARLES JACQUES. I am the watch-house-keeper; the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, and I found the tea-spoons in his pocket.

(Property produced.)

Prisoner. I bought the things.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-106

109. MICHAEL SHEEN , & JAMES THOMPSON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Nichols , about six o'clock, on the night of the 10th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therein four China plates, value 40s.; one China jug, value 40s.; one tea-pot, value 2s.; one wash-hand bason, value 2s.; and one jug, value 2s. ; the goods of the said James Nichols; and ELIZA CARNEY , for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, she well-knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES NICHOLS. I live in Grosvenor-lane, Chelsea ; I keep the house; I lost my things on Wednesday, the 4th of December; I keep a shop ; it was dark; there was a light in the shop; it was about half past six o'clock; I closed the door of the shop; I am sure that I latched it. Nobody could come in, but by turning the latch. I found the door half open, a few minutes after, and the things gone. I went out and made an alarm. I saw the things, the same evening, at the prisoner's (Carney) house, in Strutton-ground, Westminster, who keeps a tripe-shop. I

saw the prisoner, Sheen, before I went to Carney's. The articles were worth 24l.

Cross-examined. The articles are worth more than I have stated.

Q. They have no intrinsic value; they sometimes sell for very little - A. Certainly, so.

WILLIAM MOUNTJOY. I live at Chelsea. I know the prisoners, Sheen and Thompson, by sight. I saw them, on Wednesday last, by Mr. Nichols's door; they were in company with another boy; I saw them first, about two hundred yards from Mr. Nichols's; the other boy joined them, and they went over to Mr. Nichols's; it was a little after six o'clock; it was dark; I saw no more of them.

Prisoner, THOMPSON. Q. Are you sure that you saw me there - A. I am not; but I am certain of Sheen.

ROBERT WILKIE . I am a gardner; I live in Field-row, Chelsea; I was at the King's Head, Field-row, which is about two hundred yards from Mr. Nichols's; the two prisoners, Sheen and Thompson, came by about a quarter before seven o'clock; I am sure it was them; they had something bulky in their aprons; there was another boy with them; they all had aprons. I could not see what they had got. I went round to another street, and heard that Mr. Nichols had lost his China. I told him what I had seen. I am sure the two male prisoners are the same that I saw. I know Sheen well. I am sure Thompson was one of them.

WILLIAM DAVIS. I live in Prince's-row, Chelsea. I know the prisoner, Sheen. I do not know Thompson. I saw David Davis , the prisoner, Sheen, and another boy, go by the King's Head; I was with Wilkie; Sheen and Davis had aprons on; they had something in them, but I do not know what.

JOHN ROPER . I was a sailor; I am now out of employ; I live with my father, in Queen-street, Chelsea. My father had sent me out, and I went past Mr. Nichols's house; I saw the prisoner, Sheen, and two others, Davis was one, standing opposite the door; I cannot speak as to the prisoner, Thompson. When I came back I saw them in the same place. I went home, and was sent out again; as I went past Nichols's, they were near the door; one was rather away from the other two; this was nearly ten minutes afterwards. I saw them again, rather further up the road. I went home, and had my tea, and went out again, and heard Mr. Nichols's house had been robbed. I told what I had seen. I saw the prisoner, Sheen, in custody, the same evening, and said, he was one; I also saw Davis, and said, he was one.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer of Queen-square Police-office; I took the prisoner Sheen, in New Pye-street, Westminster, between eight and nine o'clock on the Wednesday evening, Green was with me; I charged him with stealing the china; I had been informed of it by Nichols. Nichols had some boys with him to look for the prisoners, two of the witnesses were with him; soon afterwards I apprehended Davis. The prosecutor promised to forgive him, if he would say where the China was. I went, by his direction, to the house of Michael Carney, and found the prisoner, Eliza Carney , there, Nichols was with me; it was a dog's-meat shop. I told her I came for the China which the boys had brought there that evening, and for which she had paid 3s.6d., the said, she had none. I said, I would see; she then said, some boys had left some there, but she had not bought it; and that they were to call again in the morning for it. I went into a back-room, with Mr. Nichols, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment there. Mr. Nichols claimed them. I gave them to him; and we took them, with the prisoner, Carney, to a public-house, where we had left David Davis, and some other boys. I took her into the room to see if she saw any of the boys, who had brought the China; she came out, and said, she did not. I took her to Bridewell, and sent for the prisoner, Sheen; she charged him with being the boy; she said, she could swear to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. You asked her for the China, which she had bought - A. No; I said, I had come for the China, which she had given 3s.6d. for; she said, she had none. The things were on her table. She said, that they wanted 10s. 6d. for them, and were to call again, in the morning, and bring the top of the jar.

Q. When she saw the prisoner, Sheen, she knew him - A. She did. I did not suspect her before.

EDWARD GREEN. I am an officer. I was with Bly; we were on different sides of the way, in Pye-street; Sheen, Thompson, and Davis had got to the top of Pye-street. I caught hold of Thompson and Davis. Sheen was behind us; one of the boys said it was Sheen. I let go Thompson, and caught hold of Sheen. He said, he knew nothing about it, and that he had got them from Paddington. I did not say any thing to him about the robbery. I searched him, and found a 1s.6d. token. and 6d. on him. When the prisoner, Carney, came, she said, it was some of the money she had given him.

Prisoner, THOMPSON. Will you swear, that you laid hold of me-A. I will; I left him with one of the boys, and he ran away. He was taken the next morning. I am sure it was him, that I laid hold of.

JAMES BLY. I took the prisoner, Thompson, the next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Sheen's Defence. I met a man, and he gave me a shilling to carry the things to Strutton-ground. He took them into the shop himself, and then came out and told me to come in, and say, that I belonged to him. I did; and the woman gave him 3s. 6d., and I was to eail for the 6d. in the morning, in part of my shilling. I was coming down Pye-street, and Green laid hold of me.

Thompson. I was in bed by six o'clock that night.

Carney's Defence. I had no intention of buying them. I told the boy to call when my husband was at home.

MICHAEL SHEEN . GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of Stealing to the value of 39s. only; but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

JAMES THOMPSON . NOT GUILTY .

ELIZA CARNEY. GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-107

110. MARIA THATCHER , was indicted for stealing on the 1st of December , two back-tokens, value 6s.; and one other bank-token, value 1s.6d; and 1s , the monies of George Sparrow ,

GEORGE SPARROW . I keep a chop-house , in the Strand . The prisoner was in my service. I put 1l.6s. of marked money into my till; there were 3s. and 1s. 6d. tokens amongst it. The prisoner was employed in the chophouse . I put the money into the till about eight o'clock. She went to wash the floor, behind the till; when she was gone, I went to the till, and it was a little open. I missed 8s. 6d. of the marked money; it consisted of two 3s. and one 1s.6d. tokens, and 1s. I sent for a constable. Nobody but the prisoner had been behind the till. She said, she had no money but what was her own. The constable told her, to pull it out, and she produced 13s.,8s. of which were mine; there were two 3s. and one 1s. 6d. token, and 1s., all marked; she begged forgiveness.

EDWARD LANGLEY. I am a constable. I was sent for. The prisoner produced 13s.; 8s. of which Mr. Sparrow claimed. I compared the money, which he claimed, with that in the till, and it corresponded.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Calendar Months , and Fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-108

111. SARAH SINCLAIR , and SAMUEL, BLUES , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one watch, value 2l. 15s.; one key, value 6d.; one handherchief, value 2s.; one pair of scissars, value 6d.; two bank-tokens, value 6s.; and 1s., the property of Samuel Green , from his person .

SAMUEL GREEN. I live in Church-lane, Wellclose-square. On the 30th of October, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I was going home; I had been drinking, but I had my senses; I met the prisoner, Sinclair, in White-chapel. I went to a house with her, which was in Rose and Crown-court . I went into her room with her; there was nobody but us two in the room. I had my watch in the room with me;it is worth 2l.15s. I had the other things mentioned in the indictment, in my pocket; my watch was in my fob, in my small-clothes, which I put under the pillow. I went to sleep, and was awoke by the noise of a person coming into the room. I heard him walk up to the bed, and draw my small-clothes from under the pillow. I heard the voice of a man say, if he stirs, I will do for him. I was alarmed. The prisoner, Sinclair, was awake; she turned round. I waited until I heard persons about in the streets; I then asked her, for a light; she got up, and said, she had no matches; and then she said, she could not strike a light. She said, somebody must have been in the room. In about half an hour she got me a light. My watch and the other things were gone. I gave her in charge of the officer. The prisoner, Blues, was taken afterwards.

CHRISTIAN MATHEWS. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner, Blues, pledged this watch with me, on the 30th of October, for 25s., in his own name. I am sure he is the man.

(Produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL WILSON. I am a constable. The prosecutor gave the prisoner, Sinclair, into my custody. The door appeared to be broken open.

Sinclair. I am innocent.

Blues-Pleaded distress.

SINCLAIR. NOT GUILTY .

SAMUEL BLUES. GUILTY . Aged38.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-109

112. MARY SULLIVAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , four baskets, value 8s. , the property of John Bingham and Joseph Bernard .

JOHN BINGHAM . I am the partner of Joseph Bernard ; we lost the baskets on the 23d of November; they are worth 7s.

THOMAS STANFIELD. I saw the prisoner take the baskets, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I stopped her.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman told me to take them.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-110

113. TIMOTHY SULLIVAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , one box, value 2s.; four gowns, value 6s.; two sheets, value 2s.; one table-cloth, value 2s.; four napkins, value 2s.; one yard of cloth, value 1s.; one pair of gloves, value 1s.; one petticoat, value 1s.; and a miniature painting, value 15s. , the property of James Sullivan .

MARY SULLIVAN. I am the wife of James Sullivan; the articles mentioned in the indictment were in the box, except the four gowns, which hung on a line, to the same room with the box. The prisoner is quite a stranger to me. The prisoner and another man opened my door, while I was in the back-room, and took the things away. The other manh ran away, and I shut the door, and shut the prisoner in. The box, which contained the things, was under his arm. He was secured.

(Property produce and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-111

114. FRANCES ROBINSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one bank-dollar, value 5s. 6d., the property of George Creasy , from his person .

GEORGE CREASY. I am a smith . I was at the Black Swan , and called for some beer; as I was coming out of the door, about half a dozen women came round me. I am sure the prisoner was one. I got from them. I went into the landlord, and showed him my money; the prisoner snatched the dollar out of my hands, and ran away with it.

HENRY MILLER. I am the landlord of the public-house. Creasy showed me his money; and the prisoner said, it was her dollar, and took it from him.

THOMAS HART. I took the prisoner in charge, and found two dollars on her, neither of them were marked. The prosecutor first said, she had taken it, and then, that he had given change to a woman, and that the dollar fell down.

RICHARD WALLEY . As I was taking the prisoner to the watch-house, she said, she had taken it, and it was her own.

Prisoner's Defence. I dropped the dollar; the prosecutor was looking at it at the bar, and I took it from him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-112

115. JAMES GATES and JAMES BAKER , were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Millard , on the night of the 16th of July , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 40s.; two 30l. bank notes; one 20l. bank note; seven 10l. bank notes; and three 1l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN MILLARD. I am a lime-burner , and live at Lime-house ; my work keeps me up all night. On the 16th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I laid down upon some sacks in the lime-yard; I heard some persons in the yard. I had 153l. in my possession-there were one 30l. and seven 10l. notes, in my right-hand pocket, and in my left, there were one 30l., one 20l., and one 1l. notes, which were in my tobacco-box; and I had two 1l. notes in my waistcoat pocket, I went to look, and saw five men, I asked what business they had there; one of them said, he would soon let me know. They came over the wall, which is seven feet high. William Dee said, to John Warren , is it he? I do not know him. I knew them all before. There was a great light. Warren told two of them to seize me, and they immediately seized me by the throat. They thrust me back into the shed; they took hold of my legs, and threw me into the lime. Two of them held me, and another cut off my breeches pockets, which had my money in them. They then went away; Curtis said, let us go back and kill him. I did not know him till he was apprehended. I then knew him to be the man who seized me. He told them to take out a knife, and take my head clean off. Another said, we will do it another way. They held me, and he beat and kicked me. I think they had been joined by some others while they were in the yard. I thought there were seven of them. I lost a great deal of blood; they tied my head with a handkerchief, and then left me. I begged of them to save my life. Mr. Cranch hallowed out of a window. Curtis said, I wish we had killed him; and Warren said, it did not signify if we had, for what he did to me. They then left me. I had also a protection box, and two tobacco boxes. I have seen the watch since at the Thames Police-office, about a fortnight ago, when Curtis was apprehended.

Q. You have spoken of Curtis, Warren, and Dee, did any body else hurt you - A. Yes; the prisoner Gates was one of them. I am sure he is one of the men who robbed me; and the prisoner Baker was one also. I heard him say, when they were going away, "he does not know me, for I got in the dark; I do not think I saw him." I heard Warren say, he only knows two of us; they got over the wall, and went away.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. You kept a great deal of money about you-A. I did. They went over the wall; I am sure there was six men; I did not lose my senses. I only knew Curtis by sight; he was dressed in a blue coat, light waistcoat, light breeches, and white handkerchief.

Q. When you were examined here, on Warren's trial, did you not say that you only knew him - A. I said, I should know two more. Curtis is the man who wanted to kill me.

Q. Recollect yourself; did you not say, that if Warren(who has suffered) had not said, that Baker was there, you should not have known it-A. I worked with him for two years.

Q. You could have found him at the time of the robbery if you chose - A. I could. I am sure it was Baker, by his voice.

Q. Then it is by the voice that you attempt to swear to Baker - A. No. I knew where to find him, but did not take him up.

Q. Did you not say that they were all tall men - A. I did not say any such thing. I did not know Gates before.

Q. What reason have you for swearing to him - A. He is one.

Q. Did you not say, when you first saw Gates, that you could not swear to him - A. No. Mr. Goff asked me, and I said, he was not the man that tied me, as I thought it was another. Gates was taken up on the 20th of last month; I knew him as well as I knew Curtis; I am sure he is the man.

Q. Did you not see Curtis before Gates was taken-A. No. I saw him the next day.

Q. Did you swear to Gates before Curtis had said any thing to you - A. I did. I had talked with Curtis at the Police-Office.

Court. Before you swore to Gates, did Curtis tell you he was one of them - A. I believe I did not hear him say so till afterwards. I saw Curtis at Union Hall.

THOMAS CURTIS . I was concerned in this robbery, and have been suffered to give evidence. I was in company with the prisoners Gates and Baker, and two others, who I do not know. There were only five of us. We met at the Spread Eagle, and then went into the lime-yard, and saw Millard. Baker and myself got him down, and the others took his money. I did not see him struck more than twice. I do not know how much money there was; I was to have 16l. 8s. for my share, but I did not get it. It was left in the prisoner Gates hands, in order to employ a solicitor, if any of us were taken up. I got between 11l. and 12l. One of the men said let us kill him; it was not me; I only held him down. I did not know Warren; I have heard that he was executed.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. You go to commit a robbery with four men, two of whom you do not know - A. Yes. Mr. Holmes keeps the house; the two men met us afterwards; they were not at the Spread Eagle. I was not here when Warren was tried; I was in custody when he was executed.

Q. What were you in custody for - A. For taking some tea on the river. I saw Millard at the Thames Police-Office. I was afterwards admitted an evidence. I told the magistrate that I knew of the robbery. After we had committed it; I think we got over the gate.

Q. How were you dressed-A. In a blue coat, pea-

green breeches, and silk handkerchief. I do not know whether my waistcoat was white or red.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I keep the sign of the Spread Eagle. I have seen the last witness at my house. I also know the prisoner Gates, but do not remember their being at my house on the night of the robbery.

JAMES BOLT . I live at Limehouse. John Warren , who has been executed, and William Dee , applied to me, about a fortnight before the robbery, to join them in committing it. I refused.

Cross-examined. You have seen Millard, and talked with him about the robbery-A. I have.

Q. You have heard him say that he did not know the prisoners - A. He said, he could not swear to Baker, but by his voice.

JOHN ASHTON . I am a pawnbroker. I received this watch in pledge on the 17th July; it was pledged in the name of John Turner. I do not know who brought it.

(Produced and sworn to.)

JOHN GOFF . I am an officer. On the 21st of November I went with my brother, George Goff , and took the prisoner Baker. Millard was with us. I told Millard to appear at the office. On the Friday after I took Gates. Millard saw them at the office.

GEORGE GOFF. I was with the last witness; he has spoken correctly.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD . I am clerk to Mr. Harwood, who is a conveyancer, in Bolton-square. I have an entry of five one pound notes, in my own writing, on the 17th of July last, paid to me by Curtis, Gates was with him. They came to pay me 5l. for rent. I did not see Gates again until he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Gates had no business with me; he appeared intoxicated, which made me notice him. I never saw him before.

Q. Did you not tell the magistrate, that it was a taller man than either of the prisoners - A. No. I said I thought Gates was the man, but he was rather taller. The magistrate told him to take off his coat, which he did, and I then had no doubt of him.

Gates Defence. It is so long since the robbery, and I have been committed so short a time, that I have not been able to try my friends. I know nothing about it.

Bakers Defence. I am innocent.

Jury to CURTIS. Was Gates with you at Mr. Harwood's A. He was.

GATES - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 39.

BAKER - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 46.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-113

116. JOHN JONES , THOMAS ASHTON , and THOMAS SMITH , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , six pounds weight of pork, value 4s. , the property of John Granhill .

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. On the night of the 27th of November, I saw the three prisoners about Granhill's window. I saw Smith go into the shop, and Jones went to the door and took the pork from him. I secured him, and he threw it away,

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I followed the prisoner into Goswell-street. Smith went into the shop; Jones went to the door; Ashton went to the corner of the window; I saw Jones take the pork, and throw down. I took Smith into custody.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am an officer. Ashton went to the window, and I took him.

JOHN GRANHILL . The prisoner, Smith, came in for some cheese; he was taken.

Smith's Defence. I went in for the cheese.

Jones's Defence. I was coming home, and he took me.

SMITH- GUILTY . Aged 15.

ASHTON- GUILTY . Aged 16.

JONES- GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-114

117. GEORGE HENRY , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , twenty-five pounds weight of butter, value 25s. the property of Robert Bays .

BENJAMIN HARRIS . I am a watchman; I stopped the prisoner in Paternoster-row, with the butter; he said, he brought it from Loadenhall-market, and that it was sent to him from the country. It was directed to Mr. Bays.

THOMAS HART . I took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-115

118. WILLIAM HOLMES , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , fourteen pounds weight of cheese, value 10s. the property of Ann Byers . widow .

ANN BYERS . My mother keeps a chandler's-shop, in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch; I saw somebody come into the shop, I got up to serve them, but they went away. I do not know who it was.

WILLIAM HATFIELD . I stopped the prisoner in Shoreditch, with the cheese, he was running. He said, a boy had given it to him to carry. I took him into custody.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-116

119. WILLIAM DAWSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Joseph Paine , from his person .

JOSEPH PAINE. I was going through Newport-market , about four o'clock, on the 14th of November, the prisoner and two men, followed me; I felt a hand in my pocket, I turned round, and saw the prisoner take my handkerchief out, and hand it to another man. I charged the prisoner with taking it, and he told me to search him. I followed him till he came to Little Earl-street, and seeing some people about, I gave the alarm, and he ran away; he was secured. I never lost sight of him, I am sure he is the man. I saw my handkerchief in his hand.

ROBERT MAYNARD. The prisoner ran past me, and I secured him.

JOHN EARL . The prisoner was given into my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The young gentleman said, I had got his handkerchief. He would not search me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-117

120. ELIZA DENNETT , was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one bed, value 5s. , the property of Thomas Fitzgerald .

THOMAS FITZGERALD . On the 8th of November the prisoner came to my house, in Carney-street, St. Giles's , and took a night's lodging; I lost a bed.

HANNAH METCALF. I am servant to Fitzgerald; he keeps a lodging-house ; he sent me to see for the bed, and it was gone.

DAVID WILSON. I am a rag-dealer; the bed was brought to me, and I bought it. I do not know the person who brought it.

FRANCIS TRUSTER . I am servant to Mr. Wilson; I was in the shop when the prisoner brought the bed in, it was on the 8th of November, we gave five-pence for it.

(Produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-118

121. DAVID CONWAY , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , thirty pounds weight of Iron, value 5s. , the property of Henry Cutler , John Cutler , and Egerton Cutler .

RICHARD OSTLER . I am clerk to Messrs. Cutlers. On the 18th of November, I saw the prisoner going out of the door, with the iron. His brother is our porter.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see my brother, I saw the iron lying down, and I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-119

122. DANIEL BENNETT , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one pelisse, value 30s. the property of Joseph Rumbell .

JOHN ADAMS. I am shopman to Mr. Rumbell, who lives in Cranbourn-street ; in the afternoon of the 28th of November, I saw the prisoner take the pelisse from the door, and run away; I pursued him, and took him.

(Produced and sworn to).

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Calendar Months , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-120

123. CATHERINE PIPPET and CATHERINE BOURN , were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , one sheet, value 4s. and one key, value 2d. the property of George Rome .

GEORGE ROME. I keep an eating-house ; the two prisoners were in my service, on the 2nd of November; the beadle came to me know if I had lost any thing; he had a sheet, which was mine.

JOHN BOULE. About half-past ten o'clock, on the night of the 2nd of November, the two prisoners were brought to the watch-house; the prisoner Bourn, charged Pippet with robbing her of some clothes; I searched Bourn, and found a sheet on her - She said, it was her own. I found a key on Pippet, she said, she had found it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PIPPET - GUILTY . Aged 31.

BOURN - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-121

124. RICHARD PINK , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one coat, value 10s.; one pair of breeches, 5s., and one waistcoat, value 8s. , the property of John Callis .

JOHN CALLIS . I live in Mitcham-street, Mary-le-bone ; I am a coach-maker , the prisoner lodged with me; the breeches were in his room - He left the lodgings, without giving notice. I went into his room, and missed them; the coat was taken out of my room. He was taken up on the 19th of November; and he had my small clothes on.

Prisoner. Did you not lend them to me - A. I had lent him the breeches to go after a situation. I did not lend him the coat.

PYEALL. I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of November, he was in bed; he got up, and put the breeches on him. Mr. Callis claimed them.

Prisoner's Defence. He lent me the breeches.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-122

125. JAMES FLEMMING , was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 1s. 6d. in monies numbered, the property of Thomas Gearing , from his person .

JOHN THOMAS GEARING. I am a constable of St. Giles's . On the 2nd of November, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I was in Dyot-street ; there was a great crowd, and I went to see what was the matter; the prisoner put his hand into my pocket, he drew my money out, and threw it away; I took him, and gave him in charge.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . The prisoner was given into my charge at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the crowd, and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-123

126. PETER CAYGILL LEE , was indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT WEBB . I am shopman to Mr. Brooks Hinton; he is a linen-draper, the prisoner was his servant , and received monies for him, he had lived three years with Mr. Hinton. I have lived there six months. I marked a 1s. 6d. piece, with my initials, and gave it to the officer to buy a yard of Irish; it was my master's money.

Cross-examined. You and the prisoner had not been on good terms - A. Very good until this happened; it was on the 18th of November.

Q. Had you not quarreled with him before this - A. I never had any words with him, so as to bear malice. I was more friendly with him, than I was with the other shopman; he had reported me to my employer, but he was robbing him at the same time.

Court. How could you say, that you had no words with him - A. We had had words. I have seen him take money from the customers, and put it into his pocket, and I informed my master.

Q. After he had reported you - A. Yes; when the 1s. 6d. was paid me, we were very busy; he was taken into custody a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Q. He was on the other side of the counter when it was given him, and there was no till there - A. There was no till there; we used to put the money on the shelf.

GEORGE RUTHVEN . I am an officer; Mr. Hinton proposed marking the money, and laying it out in the shop. I was directed by him to buy his own goods, with his own money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-124

127. THOMAS KELLAWAY , was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , one peck and a half of pears, value 5s. , the property of James Collins ; and GEORGE LOWTHER , for feloniously receiving, on the said 18th of November, the same goods, he well-knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen .

JOHN HINDE. I am patrol of Hackney parish. On the 18th of November, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner, Lowther, he had a green bag on his shoulders; I asked him what he had got, and he said, some pears, that he had brought from the country. I took him to the watch-house, he then said, they were given to him, and then that they came from Walthamstow; after he was locked-up, he said, he had them from Mr. Collins's gardener; he said, that he had met the gardener at the Queen's Head. I took him to Worship-street Police-Office, before Mr. Giffard.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. I did not know him before.

THOMAS BOLD. Corroberated the testimony of the last witness.

JAMES COLLINS . I have a house at Stamford-hill; the prisoner, Kellaway, was my gardener - He had the care of my tool-house; on the morning of the 19th of October, he asked leave to go out for an hour, which I gave him; I then came to town, and about twelve o'clock the same morning, he came to my office, in Spital-square, and told me, that a countryman of his had called, and he had given him a few pears, and that the patrol had stopped him; he wished me to write to the magistrate, to say, that I did not object to it; he said, he might have given him half a peck. I was sent for to the Police-Office directly after, the prisoner, Lowther, was at the bar, and Kellaway standing by him, the peas were produced, and I knew them to be mine. Kellaway said, he took them from the tool-house. The magistrate committed them both.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. The prisoner, Kellaway, had lived with me two years and a half.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

KELLAWAY-GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to mercy .

Imprisoned One Year , and Whipped .

LOWTHER- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-125

128. JOSEPH NORROD , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one portmanteau, value 2s.; one pair of scales, value 1s. 6d., and one picture-frame and glass, value 1s. , the property of James Cooper .

JAMES COOPER . I live at No. 7, St. John-street ; the prisoner was my servant ; he left my service in October; he often came to my house; I lost the things on the 30th of October, the next morning I went to him, and on searching his lodgings, I found the articles mentioned in the inment. He was taken into custody.

WILLIAM REED. I am an officer; I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year . and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-126

129. JOHN MARTIN , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one piece of timber, value 4s. , the property of John London .

JOHN LONDON . On the 20th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I lost a piece of timber. I went out and met the prisoner coming out of a court, just by my house. There was no thoroughfare in the court; I found the timber in the court; I did not see the prisoner with it.

RICHARD LEWIS. I saw the prisoner coming down Bell-yard with the timber on his shoulder. I told Mr. London of it, and he took him. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM CLOWE. The prisoner came to me about three o'clock in the afternoon, to sell some timber. I said I would not buy any; he wanted 3s. for it, and said he would bring it at night. About six o'clock he brought it. Mr. London came to enquire about it afterwards.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been doing a job for a person, and they gave me the timber. I sold it to Clowe for 14d., and they took me into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 26

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-127

130. JOHN MARTIN , was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one saw value 2s. , the property of William Clowe .

WILLIAM CLOWE . When the prisoner was taken with the timber, he dropped a saw, which was mine.

JAMES LONDON . I saw the prisoner with the saw under his arm. When he came to Mr. Clowe's door, he dropped it, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year , and Fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18161204-128

131. MARY KELLY , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , one goose, value 7s. , the property of William Taylor .

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I am a poulterer , and live in Great Newport-street . On the 5th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another woman came into my shop, and bought some rabbits; the prisoner turned round and took the goose from off my

counter. I ran after and took her, with the goose upon her.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Calendar Months , and Fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-129

132. HENRY HISCOCK , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one rammer, value 5s. , the property of Morris Dundan .

MORRIS DUNDAN . I am a labourer . I left my rammer in a court near Oxford-street , as I was at work there.

THOMAS WHITAKER . I am a watchman. Last Sunday morning, I saw the prisoner coming out of the yard with the rammer, and I took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. The workmen's tools are kept in the yard; it was a quarter past one on Sunday morning.

SAMUEL PYEALL . I am constable of the night. The rammer was brought into the watch-house with the prisoner; it had the parish mark on it. If the prosecutor had lost it, he must have paid for it. The prisoner said, he had laid a wager that he would carry it some distance.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home with my truck, and a man made me carry it for a glass of gin.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Recommended to mercy .

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-130

133. JOHN GOWER , was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , six pounds weight of salt fish, value 1s. 3d. , the property of Brian Murray .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I saw the prisoner and another boy with him. The other boy ran over, and took the fish from Mr. Murray's, and gave it to the prisoner.

Prisoner. A man dropped the fish, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-131

134. MARIA GREEN , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , two shirts, value 14s. , the property of Robert Bignell .

MARY BIGNELL. On the 30th of October last, the prisoner came into my room, and asked me to recommend her to a lodging. She asked leave to sit in my room a few minutes; I went out of my room; when I returned I found she was gone, and had taken two sheets off my bed.

JOHN BEAN . I met the prisoner in Holborn, about a fortnight after the robbery; I took her into custody, and she told me where she had pledged the sheets.

JAMES JONES . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged two sheets with me on the 30th of October.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-132

135. HENRY CHARTER , was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one watch, value 1l., and one key, value 1d. , the property of Joseph Wiltshire .

JOSEPH WILTSHIRE . I am an iron-founder , and live in Pear-tree-street, Clerkenwell . The prisoner slept with me on the 6th of November; I got up about six o'clock in the morning, and left my watch on my chest; when I returned at eight o'clock the prisoner and my watch were gone.

JAMES LIMBRICK . I took the prisoner into custody, and found the watch upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only took it as a jest; I did not intend to steal it. I thought it was my friend's.

-PATTER. I lodge in the same room with the prisoner and prosecutor; we were all on intimate terms. I believe the prisoner thought it was my watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-133

136. RICHARD BRIGGS , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , two glass rummers, value 3s. , the property of Evan Griffiths .

EVAN GRIFFITHS . I keep an eating-house , in Chandos-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner came into my house on the 25th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening; I served him with some soup; he paid me for it, and as he was going out he dropped one of the glasses in the passage. I took him back, and sent for a constable. The prisoner took off his coat, and gave me one of the glasses out of his pocket. I found another under his chair.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. He was rather intoxicated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-134

137. JOHN HANCHETT , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , ten sheets, value 2l.; one coat, value 10s.; one pair of stockings, value 6d.; and one cap, value 2d. , the property of Rachael Horne , widow .

THREE OTHER COUNTS. The same, only stating the goods to be the property of different persons.

RACHAEL HALL. I am matron of St. Dunstan's, in the West, workhouse . The prisoner was a pauper there. When we got up in the morning, the door was open, and the prisoner gone. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment.

THOMAS BURKE. I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner with the shirts; I took him into custody.

JOSEPH BARNLEY . The prisoner told me that he got them from St. Dunstan's workhouse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-135

138. CORNELIUS MURPHY , was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one saw, value 5s., the property of Adam Amos ; and one saw, value 3s. , the property of Thomas Porter .

ADAM AMOS . I am a carpenter . On the 6th of December, I was at work, at No.5, Bedford-place . I went to dinner, and left my tools there, and when I returned I missed my saw.

THOMAS PORTER . I was at work at the same place, and missed my saw.

SAMUEL GRANT. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a saw with me, on the 6th of December.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. I am sure it was the prisoner.

WILLIAM ELLIS . I am a smith. I was at work at the same house. I saw the prisoner in the coal-cellar. I am sure it was him.

THOMAS PORTER , re-examined. About a quarter past one o'clock, I heard the saws were lost, and went to the pawnbroker's in Charlotte-street; and found my saw.

Cross-examined. The prisoner was at work at the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to dinner with Amos; it was impossible that I could go to the pawnbroker's, and get back at the time I did.

ADAM AMOS . The prisoner dined with me, and left the public-house about twenty minutes before one o'clock. The pawnbroker's was not above three minutes walk from the public-house. NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-136

139. JAMES SMITH , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , one coat, value 5s., and one pair of trowers, value 6s. , the property of John Scriven .

JOHN SCRIVEN . I am a porter . I put my things into my box, on the 24th of November, and found them gone on the 1st of December. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-137

140. THOMAS HODGES , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October ,one surcingle, value 1s. 6d. , the property of Francis Todd , Esq.

FRANCIS TODD , Esq. I live at No.18, Euston-street. I lost my surcingle, and got a search-warrant, and found it in the prisoner's house.

WILLIAM REED. I had a warrant, and went to the prisoner's house, and found the surcingle there.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. It was on the floor, in his room.

WILLIAM BOLTON. I am groom to Mr. Todd. The prisoner asked me for the surcingle, and I told him, he might have it.

Cross-examined. I gave it to him in the coach-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-138

141. ELIZA ASHLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , two live tame rabbits, value 4s. , the property of William Lee .

HANNAH LEE . The prisoner lived opposite me. I went out, and when I returned, I found my door open, and two rabbits gone.

FRANCIS HEATH . I am a poulterer, at Islington. The prisoner sold me the rabbits, for 3s.

(Produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-139

142. ELIZABETH BRADLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , three handkerchiefs, value 6s.; one gown, value 6s.; one shift, value 4s.; three aprons, value 3s.; one pin-cloth, value 6d.; one pair of stays, value 6s.; one pair of boots, value 3s.; three frocks, value 6s.; one pair of stockings, value 1s.; one bonnet, value 2s.; one cap, value 6d.; two shirts, value 6s.; one gold ring, value 15s.; and one silver watch, value 40s. , the property of John Marriott .

JOHN MARRIOTT. The prisoner was my servant . I live at Stratford. On the 21st of November she left me, without any notice. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment.

THOMAS PETO. I am a pawnbroker. I live in Brick-lane. I have a shirt, which was pledged, on the 22d of November, by the prisoner, and a gold ring, which was pledged by a man.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Wentworth-street. I have a silver watch, which was pledged by a man, in the name of John Rose; he said, in the prisoner's presence, before the magistrate, that he pledged it by her desire, and she did not deny it.

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. She acknowledged, to the magistrate, that she had taken the things, and had given the man directions to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-140

143. JOSE BELE , was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , one watch, value 3l.; one seal, value 1s. 6d.; one watch-key, value 4d., the property of Andrew Scott , from his person .

ANDREW SCOTT. I am a sailor . I live at Shadwell. On the 4th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was rather intoxicated, and a woman enticed me home with her. I fell asleep. I do not know who took it.

NATHANIEL NATHAN. I am a slop-seller. I live in East Smithfield. The prisoner came to my shop, on the 5th of November, and offered the watch for sale. I asked him, if it was his own; he said, it was given to him by a man on Tower-hill, and he had come to sell it for him. I detained him, and sent to Tower-hill; he then said, if you must know whose it is, it is mine. I searched him, and found the chain and seal on him. I had asked him before, if he would sell the chain; and he said, he had not got it.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I took the prisoner in charge. I took him to the King's Arms; and he pointed out a black man, and said, he gave it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on Tower-hill, and a black man and a woman told me, to go and sell the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Calendar Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-141

144. LOUISA TURNER , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one gown, value 1s., and one shawl, value 1s. , the property of Mary Turner .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-142

145. CHRISTOPHER O'HARA , was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , seven pounds of cheese, value 5s. , the property of John Shaw .

JOHN SHAW . I keep a cheesemonger's-shop , in Butcher-row. About half past seven o'clock, in the morning, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the cheese. I taid hold of him; and he asked me to forgive him. I took him to the watch-house.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Judgement Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-143

146. MARY GRAYSON , and LETITIA JONES , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , five pounds of bacon, value 1s. 8d. , the property of Richard Mullins .

RICHARD MULLINS. I keep a chandler's-shop . The prisoner, Grayson, came into my shop for some beer; when she went out, I missed the bacon. I went after her, and took the bacon from her; he asked me to forgive her. The prisoner, Jones, was in company.

WILLIAM THISSELTON. I took both the prisoners into custody. GRAYSON. GUILTY. Aged 16.

JONES. GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18161204-144

147. CHARLES GRANT , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one handkerchief, value 5s., the property of a person unknown, from his person .

GEORGE RUTHVEN. I am an officer; on Monday, the 25th of November, I was under the Piazza, Cnvent-garden, I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the pocket of a gentleman. I secured him.

Cross-examined. I am sure I saw him take it.

Judgment respited . GUILTY. Aged 13.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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