Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th September 1816.
Reference Number: 18160918
Reference Number: f18160918-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-hall, in the Old Bailey, ON WEDNESDAY the 18th of SEPTEMBER 1816, and following days, BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J.A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) BY R. BUTTERRS, NO. 22, FETTER-LANE, FLEET-STREET.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING'S Commission of the PEACE, OVER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD ,Esq. Lord Mayor of the City of London: Sir John Graham , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer. Sir George Holroyd , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench. Sir James Burrough , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench. Joshua Jonathan Smith esq; Christopher Smith esq. Sir Charles Price bart; John Ansley esq. Sir John Eamer , knt. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City. His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Perkins ,

Richard Hall ,

James Darling ,

James Latham ,

Richard Hodgson ,

Peter Desforges ,

John Trigg ,

Thomas Eglinton ,

Thomas Emerson ,

Robert Lloyd ,

James Bowyer ,

William Stevens .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Coventry ,

George Leder ,

George Martin ,

James Day ,

William Taylor ,

James Brown ,

Thomas Walker ,

Thomas Thomas ,

William Pearce ,

William Holmes ,

John Jones ,

William Green ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Saunderson ,

Alexander Strachan ,

Robert Spane ,

Edward Freeman ,

James Gibson ,

Jacob Wilson ,

William Bailey ,

James Martin ,

Thomas Harris ,

Allan North ,

William Freeman ,

Charles Knight .

Reference Number: t18160918-1

819. WILLIAM PLAYER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Tindal Thompson Walmsley , in the king's highway, on the 20th of July , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3l. one chain, value 1l. one seal, value 1l. and one key, value 1d. the property of the said Tindal Thompson Walmaley .

TINDAL THOMPSON WALMSLEY . On Saturday, the 20th of July, I was in Crown-street, near Finsbury-square ; I think it was about ten o'clock at night; a person ran against me; it immediately occured to me that my watch was gone, and on feeling for it, I missed it. From the height and substance of That person's person, I believe the prisoner to be he. He ran from me, and I called stop thief. In about ten minutes, I saw my watch, at the watchhouse.

Cross-examined by MR. MARSHAM. Crown-street is a very public street; I was not in the least fear; It was an instantaneous business.

JAMES KERSLEY. I was at my shop-door, in Long-alley, on the night of the day in the indictment, at about ten o'clock. I found a watch in the alley, and the case had flown off a short way from it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GEORGE LYSLE . I saw Mr. Walmsley put his hand to his fob, and he immediately cried stop thief. I saw a person run from him, and I pursued that person; I lost sight of him going round a corner; but I found him in custody when I got round. I had not seen his face. It was the prisoner that was in custody.

THOMAS FITZGERALD. I was in Long-alley, standing at my door. I saw the prisoner come running through a small alley opposite my house, and I stopped him.

WILLIAM REVETT . I was at my own door, in Crown-street, on the Saturday night. I saw Mr. Walmsley put his hand to his pocket, and cried stop thief. I saw a person ran from him, and the prisoner was stopped.

Prisoner's Defence. My father sent me out of an errand to ask a friend to come to dinner on Sunday. I was running along, and heard a cry of stop thief, and a gentleman caught hold of me, and said, I was the robber.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18160918-2

820. JOHN WARREN was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Millard , in the King's highway, on the 16th of July , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2l. two thirty-pound bank notes, one twenty-pound bank note, seven ten-pound bank notes, and three one-pound bank notes, his property .

JOHN MILLARD . I lived at Limehouse , on the 16th of July; that is in Middlesex. I remember the night of the 16th, it was Tuesday; between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; my work keeps me up all night. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, hearing some men walking in my master's lime-yard; I went out; it was near the public street; it is now a private yard; it used to be a public road. I had been lying down on a sack, and I went into the yard, and saw five men there standing up. I asked them what they were doing there, and what was their business. I told them, there was no road there; and one of them said, d-n your eyes, where is your money; then he looked over his shoulder, and said to the others, I am not sure it is he. Then John Warren , the prisoner, and John Dee , another man, who were about a rod from me, said, it is he. I knew Warren and Dee; I had worked with them before, better than two years. It was not dark at this time; it was very light. I knew them both very well, both by tongue and person. Dee said, it is he, is it not; and Warren said he was certain sure of it. Warren told the man next to me to sieze me, and they would be after as soon as possible, and so they were. Then the fourth man said, I will soon let you know something about it, and then they seized hold of me; he took hold of my throat, and the others took me by the arms, and they shoved me in at the door; there were two fires; it was quite as light there as it is here; you might see to pick a pin up; it was fight from the fires that came from the kiln; the kiln door was open. They catched me up by the legs, and threw me down on the lime, and two of them were on my throat, and three across my legs and thighs. Then they cut my trowsers all off my back, and cut my pockets off where the money was in; they were nankeen breeches. They cut off the watch-pocket, where the watch was, and the breeches pockets. I saw them take a thirty-pound note, a twenty-pound note, and a one-pound note out of my tobacco box. They opened the notes and looked at them. These notes were in my tobacco box in my left hand breeches pocket. They cut off my right hand breeches pocket also; there were seven ten-pound notes, and a thirty-pound note there, in a protection box, which I bought five years ago at Greenwich, and gave three-pence for it, in my right hand breeches pocket. In my left hand waitcoat pocket there were two one-pound notes; the money was in three boxes in all.

Q. How came you to carry so much money about you - A. I was never in constant work. I had been engaged for three months, and only worked one, and I thought I might as well go home. After that, I always kept it in my pocket, as I thought it safer than any where else.

Q. How did you come by all this money - A. I had worked nearly seventeen years day and night to get it up. They took my watch also; it was a silver watch; there was one seal with a dog on it; they continued on me about twenty minutes altogether. They beat my head into the lime before they started

to go off, and when they were going out of the door they turned back to kill me, and one of them said d-n his bloody eyes, let us kill him; pull out your knife, and cut his head clean off, and we will throw it away, and I looked every moment for it to have come off too.

Q. Was any knife taken out - A. No; I did not see any knife; but one held my head, and another my legs, while the others beat me, and kicked me; four of them came back, and the other staid at the door; Dee and Warren came back; Warren was for killing of me at the last moment. Warren said it would serve him right if we were to kill him, for what he did to me, and I never did any thing to him, any more than working with him; I am certain he said that. Then they tied me cross-legged tight over the tendon, with a handkerchief not my own, one of theirs; then they were standing altogether at the door, and Mr. William Cranch hallooed out what is the matter, Coker, and I could not hardly speak; I was scarcely able to speak; I told him I was robbed, as well as I could; but he could scarcely understand me. Then William Dee said to the others come let us go, and then they went off, and they answered to Mr. Cranch there is not much the matter, it is all right enough, and then I saw no more of them that night after that; it was the man that caught hold of me first that said that; and away they went over the wall. Wheh they had cut my pockets off, Warren, the prisoner, said, I told you where the money was, I had such a sight of the prisoner as to be sure he was one of the persons; I knew four of them by sight, and Dee and Warren by name; Dee and Warren had been in the yard that day. I had thirty shillings a week; I used to have more than that at Mill-wall; I had two guineas and three pounds a week when I was there.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I had been at work all day; I was burning coke; that kept me at wok night and day.

Q. How soon after did you go in search of the men - A. I could not go; the runners went within an hour afterwards. The watchman came, and I informed him what had happened; there were two watchmen came; but I don't know that they are here.

Q. Is there any one here to whom you told what had happened to you - A. Yes; there is Mr. Cranch, I told him what was the matter; I was at the lime kiln door. This yard stand upon three quarters of an acre; there was a wall and pales all round; there is valuable property there. There are two gates; those gates open close upon the door. There is a little street which covers about two rods of ground, and which comes down by the gates.

Q. How far is this yard from the public-street - A.About an hundred yards from the common road, perhaps not so much; there is a kind of road which goes down to the yard, where the carts go round to carry potetoes. At the time I speak of, I don't know whether the gates were opened or locked. When the men had left me, Mr. Cranch let me out; I was nearly blind, and nearly dead. I believe Mr. Cranch unlocked the gate; I think it was unlocked, but I am not sure it was he unlocked it. I told Mr. Cranch I knew one of the man was John Warren , I am certain sure of that; that is the man, (pointing to the prisoner.) I have known him upwards of two years and a quarter; I mean to say I am quite sure of his person. When I found these men in the lime kiln yard, I was rather frightened. It was a stout young man that first seized me; he seized me by the throat; I was frightened.

Q. Do you mean that you were so much in your right senses as to be sure of the prisoner - A. I can safely say he was one of those men; he had a blue jacket and trowsers on.

Q. Did you not tell Mr. Cranch that Warren did not commit any violence towards you - A. Yes; he did not beat me. When I was speaking to Mr. Cranch, I told him I knew Warren was laying across my legs. I have never got a farthing back. I have seen some of it at Shadwell; I don't know the numbers; I had no memorandum of the amount I had. I don't know when Warren was taken up; I was as blind as a bat. I did not see Warren for a week after he was taken. When I did see him, I saw him at the Justice's at Shadwell; there I recognized him. I did not say at Shadwell office, I could not swear to him, but I said I could, for I would a thousand times; I mean to say that is the man, and it is impossible I can be mistaken; I am sure of the man.

Re-examined by the COURT. I had changed a great many notes in the yard, five-pound notes and others, and the prisoner know I was possessed of a good deal of money. He came one night before, but I was prepared for him, and had a broom stick; I should have knocked him down. He got a ladder; he came about one o'clock in the morning; I should have given it to him too, if he had come on, about a foot farther, for I was guarded for him at that time. He crawled away through the kiln hole.

WILLIAM CRANCH . The prisoner was in my employment in July last, at Mr. Mason's, at Bow; I reside at New Cut Lane, on the same premises where this lime yard 1s.

Q. Did you hear any noise in the course of that night that disturbed you - A. Yes, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was disturbed by a noise, and I threw up the windows, and asked who was there, and what was the matter? and I received no answer, and I returned to my bed again. I was disturbed in about ten minutes after that, by the cry of murder. Upon being so disturbed, I got up, and I challenged three times who was there, and I received no answer, and I then said I would fire, if I did not receive an answer; I abstained from firing, and in the course of a few minutes the prosecutor answered it was me; I have been robbed. I then asked the prosecutor if they had abused him; I found him a good deal beat and cut about the head. I got the assistance of two watchmen prior to my going out into the yard; then, having the assistance of those two watchmen; I went down, and found the prosecutor in the yard; he had then untied his legs. He said the prisoner was one of the persons; and in consequence of that I got up early the next morning, and went in search of him; he said he thought the prisoner was one; he said there was

a person by the name of Dee, whom he knew to be one of the gang. I knew of the prosecutor having a considerable sum of money. I have frequently a changeed ten-pound twenty-pound and thirty-pound notes for him; both he and the prosecutor had worked for me.

Q. Do you happen to know whether the prisoner has ever been present at the time he has got change - A. It was chiefly of a Saturday night when the other men were collected to receive their money, in their presence I have done it. The prisoner was one of those men. Both prisoner and prosecutor worked for me. There are two notes that are traced after the prisoner; but there are no marks of mine on them that enable me to say I have seen them before. I apprehended the prisoner at Bow, on Wednesday morning, about eleven o'clock, the day after. The prisoner lived at Bow Common. It was just by Bow Fair Field where I found him. He had a bundle when I appreheaded him. I took him from Bow to Limehouse, and there. I delivered him into the hands of the night beadle and constable; Lisles, and a person named Jones. I gave the bundle to the officers, as well as the prisoner; I gave them the bundle. I delivered it on the premises where the robbery was committed; I was not present at the search.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. This yard is about a hundred or a hundred and fifty yards from the highway; the back of the yard is near to the River, and the front is towards the highway. I do sometimes mark notes, but not constantly, I am not enabled to identify any note that I have seen that I passed to the prosecutors. It was between eleven and twelve when I heard this noise; the prosecutor was in the kiln-yard; he told me he had been robbed; he described to me who he thought it was; he was not so ill but he was well enough to describe the particulars of what had happened.

Q. Did he not tell you he did not know any of the persons by name - A. No; I am sure of that.

Q. Did you ask him to describe the persons of any of them - A. I did. I was not present when the bundle was opened.

JOHN LISLES . I am night beadle of the parish of St. Ann Middlesex; that is where this lime-yard is In consequence of some information I received I saw the prosecutor Millard on the night of the 16th of July last, between twelve and one; he was in a room at Mr. Cranch's house; Mr. Cranch came into the room during the time. The prosecutor was lying with his face on the carpet, and there was some blood dropping from it; he seemed dreadfully hurt; he had several bruises about his face, one in particular under one of his ears, from which blood was coming. He said that Warren was one of the persons who robbed him; and in consequence of his telling me that, at four o'clock that morning I went to his house at Bow Common; he was not at home, and I searched the house for him deligently; not finding him, I gave up the search then. He was delivered to me afterwards by Mr. Cranch; Mr. Cranch pointed him out to me in the yard, and I took the prisoner; and Mr. Cranch gave me the bundle, and the prisoner said it was his own. I am sure that is the bundle, and it has been looked on up at the watchhouse ever since; I have kept the key of that place ever since; there is a pair of white silk stockings as one article, a black silk handkerchief, a sailor's relveteen jacket, a pair of velveteen small clothes, a red waistcoat, and a yellow handkerchief. I was present when the prisoner was searched. I have a memorandum mode at the time of the search; he had twentyone pounds five shillings and sixpence on him; a ten-pound note, one pound five shillings and sixpence in silver, ten one-pound notes, and seven-pence three farthings in copper. I also found on him a small bag, that the note was in. and a case knife; there was also a bill of parcels which Mr. Jones took; I saw these things taken.

-JONES. I am a constable of Limehouse. I was called out of my bed on the 17th; at about twelve or one in the night, between the 16th and 17th; I was called. I got up, and went to the watchhouse, and when I came there I saw Millard in a terrible state with a bruised head; a medical man was sent for belonging to the parish, and he dressed the wounds, and after that, we took him to the workhouse, and after that, I thought it prisoner was one by what Millard told me; when we had done what we could for the safety of the man, we went immediately to a house in Ann-street; we knew where the prisoner lived, and we went to his house; that must be about three and four o'clock in the same morning. He was not there; we did not like to enter the house forcible, so I left some of the persons to take care of it, and then I and Brown the police officer went to Old Ford, and fetched the prisoner's son; and he shewed us the house, and the prisoner was not there. We found nothing in the house only about five or six club sticks under Warren's bed. I was one of the persons to whom the bundle was delivered. After that I came into the lime-house; we went to Cranch's yard, and the prisoner was delivered to us, and the bundle. On searching the prisoner, in his watch-fob I found twenty-one pounds in bank notes, and one pound five shillings and sixpence; the different sums mentioned by the last witness; here is a bill of parcels also that I found on the prisoner along with the notes; these were all the things beside a case knife and a bag. We went to Mr. Swift's, in Houndsditch, and got some information; I have kept the notes locked up ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Before the 17th of July, I did not know where the prisoner lived. I went to a house which somebody told me belonged to him. His son told me he slept there.

(A bill of parcels was here put in, and read, and was for articles of wearing apparel bought of Mr. Swift, a slop-seller, on the 17th of July, amount three pounds four shillings.

GEORGE MOORE . On the 17th of July last, I was in the employment of Mr. Smith; he is a woolen draper and clothier. I know the prisoner at the bar; I saw him on that day. I think nearer seven than eight in the mornings, it was at my master's shop I saw him; there was another young man with him, whom I should know if I were to see; they came there both together; I never saw them before.

I was in the shop when the bill of parcels was made out. I did not hear the prisoner mention his name. I saw a note produced; I received a thirty pound note from Dalton; the first note I saw was a thirty-pound note that Dalton gave me; he is one of Mr. Swift's men; I don't know how Dalton came to have it; I did not see any one give that note to Dalton. I got change for it; I believe there were a ten-pound note, two five-pound notes, and the rest in one-pound notes; I brought the change back, and delivered it to Mr. Dalton; I did not see what he did with it; I was called into the wareroom sometime after, and there received a twenty-pound note from the other man that was with the prisoner; that was given me to get change of. I went to get change for that; I brought it back, and put it on the table, and the man took it himself; the man that gave it to me took it up; the change I got was all in Bank of England notes; I did not see Mr. Dalton pay the prisoner nor the other the change I got for the thirty-pound note, nor do I know what became of the change of the twenty-pound note after it was taken by the other man.

PATRICK DALTON . I am shopman to Mr. Swift, and I was so on the 17th of July last. I saw the prisoner at the bar on that day, at my master's shop; I am sure he was one of the persons that came.

Q. Look at these things and tell us whether you or your master sold those to the prisoner, or the other person that came with you - A. They are, to the best of my knowledge the things I sold to the prisoner; he gave me a thirty-pound-note, to take the amount of them out; I am sure it was the prisoner; It was a Bank of England note. I gave it to the last witness to get it changed; I gave all the change to the prisoner, and he gave me the amount of my bill one of it. There is the name of John Warner on the bill. Mr. Swift's son made out the bill in my presence; and the prisoner gave the name of John Warren ; I think the other man's name was mentioned, but I can't recollect it. The other man bought another sum of clothes too; I did not make any mark on the note; I did not take much notice of the twenty-pound-note; I can't speak much to it.

CHARLES THOMAS . I know George Moore . I remember his bringing a thirty-pound-note to me to get changed, on the 17th of July last; at about half past seven in the morning; I put Mr. Swift's name upon it. I sent that note to the Bank; the banker's clerk has got it in court. I am positive sure that that is the note; it has Mr. Swift's name on it, I wrote Swift on it becaue Moore was in his employ. I never cashed any other note of thirty-pound for him but th1s.

THOMAS WHITETHORN. I live at the Angel, in Fenchurch-street. I gave change to Moore for a twenty-pound-note on the 17th of July last; I made a mark on it; I marked it "T. W. of Mr. Swift's man, Hounsditch, 17th of July." This is the note, I am positive sure of it from what I myself put on it; I wrote this on the same day I gave him change. I kept it in my possession, and the next day afterwards, Mr. Jones came with another officer. I am positive that is the note; then I took it to the police-office. I gave a ten-pound-note in-change. (The ten-pound-note found on the prisoner produced.) I look at that note; that is the note, I know it because there is the words "of Mr. Jones' man" on it, and I know it by that, because I gave change for it to one of Mr. Jones' men, of Aldgate.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-3

821. DANIEL SEARS , and DANIEL MARTIN , were indicated for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a weather sheep, value 3l. the property of George Keiley .

GEORGE KEILEY . I am a butcher at Harrow . I had twenty-five sheep on the 25th of August; I saw them on Saturday morning, the 24th of August, they were in my field, at the bottom of Harrow Town. On the Sunday morning one was gone; it was a fat sheep; I had paid three pounds for it. From ten until one o'clock, I looked all about the fields, and at last I went into a little field adjoining that of mine, there I saw a hole in the hedge, where one had been driven there, and I saw the blood where one had been killed, and I traced the dropping of the blood across another field about and hundred yards; there I traced it up a lane about a quarter of a mile, by the blood into a field where it was stripped; then I traced it by the blood from stile to stile, where it had been rested, to within a hundred yards of the prisoner Martin's house. I went to his house, he was up stairs, I said, Martin come down, I went to speak to you; he did come down, and I asked him if he had any mutton in the house, and he said, no master, I have not, and then I told the beadle to come forward with his warrant, and search, and he looked into a cupboard, and brought out a pan of fat, Martin was then going to go away; but I told him to stay where he was. Then the constable proceeded with a search, and found the heart, the liver, and the lights, and then he went up stairs and brought down a hinder quarter of mutton, a shoulder, and a whole neck, and part of a breast. Then I said to Martin, well Daniel, have you not been robbing me now? he said, master, I did not know it was your sheep, if I did, I would not have touched it on any account; and I said, Daniel, you must have had some confederate with you beside yourself, or else you never could have done it? he said, he had none. The wife said, Daniel, if you won't split, I will; the wife said, Sears was his partner. Then she said, Daniel, when you come home with the mutton, I told you you would be found out, and she fell in a fit. Then Martin said, if you go to Sears's, you will find the remainder of your sheep there. Then James Martin , the beadle, went to Sears's. We met Sears going into his door, and the beadle told him, we came to search his house, and we suspected he had got some mutton; and Daniel Sears saw me; and I said, Sears, I expect you have been robbing me? and he said, he had not; and I said, it was no use for him deny it, as Daniel Martin had confessed every thing. Then he said, d-n Daniel Martin . Then we went into his house with a warrant, and the constable searched, and he found a little pan of fat, mutton fat, and part of a sheep's tongue, and

a little trifling bit of mutton; he stopped willingly. Then he said, master, this is a bad job, but I must go through it, now I am in it; and then he said, come along with me, and then I will give you the mutton; he took us up stairs, and took us into the bed-room; he unlocked a door on the left hand side of his bed-room, and Martin, the beadle, went into the room, and took out a leg, loin, breast, and shoulder of mutton; that is just half the sheep. I said, Daniel, how came you to do so. I then took that mutton to Martin's, the prisoner, and then I compared that found at Sears's to that at Martin's, and I found that they both belonged to the same carcase; it was slaughtered pretly fair. I examined the fat; the trotters were not left on the carcase. One man could not have caught that sheep, and so slanghtered, and carried it that distance; it was impossible, for I am sure it weighed better than twelve stone. These men lived within two hundred yards of each other.

JAMES MARTIN . I am headborough. I accompanied the last witness. I found Martin at home. I have heard the account of what passed at Martin's; he has represented fairly and truly; and also all that happened at Sears's, every thing.

Martin's Defence. We found it.

Sears's Defence. We found it on the Sunday morning, as we were going to gether a few mushrooms.

SEARS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

MARTIN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-4

822. JAMES TUCK was indicted for the wilful murder of John Draper , at Endfield , on the 8th of August .

RICHARD THOMAS . I am a schoolmaster. I knew the deceased, John Draper ; he was an officer in the Court of Request, at Endfield ; it was a part of his duty as such officer always to put executions in force. I constantly accompanied him. On the 8th of August last, I set out with him to put the executions in force, at about twelve o'clock; the first person we went to was Daniel Chapel , against him there was an execution for three pounds, all but one shilling and three-pence. Chapel was arrested; he was taken to the Robin Hood and Little John, at Potter's Bar. Reynolds, an attorney, paid the money for him, at his request; he paid it in three one-pound notes, and received one shilling and three-pence in change from Draper. Draper put the notes into his pocket-book, it was a small red pocketbook; when he opened the pocket-book. I saw a large roll of notes, two or three fingers thick. He doubled these three up with the rest, and put them into his pocket-book, which he put into his breeches pocket, this was about four o'clock in the afternoon. We then came close to the White Bear at Barnet; I was with him until seven o'clock in the evening; between his receiving these and the White Bear, he paid away no money. I have seen a person named James Smith . The deceased then was neither drunk nor sober; he had not drank any great deal, about two shillings-worth.

JAMES SMITH . I am a hair-dresser. I was in Barnet on the 8th of August, I was in the White Bear; I had been in that house about a quarter of an house before Draper came; Draper was totally a stranger to me; I never saw him before. We drank together; I joined his company. I saw him take out a pocket-book; but I could not tell whether he had any money or not; I did not see him pay any thing. From that we went along together, and stopped at another public-house at the end of the Town; we had a pint of beer there. The deceased did not produce any money there; I paid for the beer. We then went towards Endfield, and stopped at the Bald Face Stag.

Q. Did you walk or how - A. He had a cart and horse, and we rode. The prisoner kept that house. We arrived there about eight o'clock, as near as I can appoint the time; I saw Mr. Tuck there when we arrived; Draper and I went into the parlour, and had two or three glasses of gin and water together while we were there; there were several other persons in the house; I don't know the exact number; but I suppose eight or ten in the same room; I did not know any of them before. The prisoner Tuck came in and out on business, I mean serving his customers.

Q. Who paid for the liquor that he and you had - A. I paid for two glasses I know; but I did not see him pay for any.

Q.Did he hold any conversation with any one in that room - A. No one in particular. I did not see any thing in his conduct until he had drank, and it was about ten o'clock; he was then rather insulting to Robinson, the black, and wanted to be ten pounds or twenty pounds; he did not pull out any notes; but he presented his pocket-book; it was a small red pocket-book, wrapt round with a piece of string; it appeared nearly full. The black told him he should not strike him; but if he struck him, he should take the law of him. I saw the deceased put the pocketbook back into his breeches pocket, and that was the last I saw of it. I left the room a little after ten; I saw nothing more while I was there. I proceeded on my road towards. Hoddesdon. The horse and cart belonging to Tuck overtook me; there was nobody in it; I returned to Tuck's with the horse and cart. Draper lived in Enfield Town, and the cart was going towards Draper's proper home. When I came back to Tuck's, I saw Draper there; he was in the parlour, where I left him. When I returned it was in about half an hour; Robinson, the black, and two or three others were there that I did not know. I had no conversation with Draper in particular. I tried to persuade him to go home. I saw Mr. Tuck, the prisoner, also that second time; he was at his busines. Droper sat down, and said, he would go after another glass or two. He and I went out to look for his horse and cart; he was then quite drunk; he was stupidly drunk. When we went out together, he coliared the hostler, and asked him where his horse and cart were; the hostler said be did not know; they had a scuffle together, and he threw the hostler down once. Draper appeared to me to be a very powerful man; he was about fifty years of age. The hostler wrestled with him, but was in perfect good humour. Then a hay maker came

up to the door, and the deceased insisted on wrestling with the haymaker; the haymaker said he did not want to have any thing to do with him. Then he collared the haymaker, and the haymaker threw him twice by tripping him up; no blows passed. Then he wanted to fight with the haymaker; but the haymaker pushed him off with his fist, merely, in his own defence. Mr. Tuck then came out,and took the deceased from the haymaker. Then I went on, on foot, and about a mile before I got to Enfield Town, I overtook the horse and cart; I got into it, and gave the horse his head, and he stopped at a house which I afterwards found out to be Draper's. I told the people of the house where I left him. The next day I saw him dead, about three o'clock; If examined his person; I looked at the body; Tuck was in the house when I saw the body.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. When he produced his pocket-book there were ten or twelve persons in the room.

Q. What distance is the well from the place where the deceased was wrestling - A. About twenty or thirty yards.

Q. Then it was no distance for a drunken man to waddle - A. No.

Q.Are there not six or seven feet of the circumference of the well without any fence - A. When I saw it the fence was broken down. The prosecutor was a stout man, and able to make a good deal of resistance. So much of the fence as remained was a filmsey thing, and good for nothing.

Q. And Draper would take a good deal of beating before he could be forced into a well - A. He was very powerful indeed.

Q. And I believe he had a good stout bull dog, which I believe if he had been attacked could have afforded a good deal of resistance - A. I understand that dog was found on the premises the next morning.

Re-examined by MR. ANDERWS. Draper had lost his dog. I was never at Tuck's house before.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am hostler at the Bald Face Stag. I remember John Draper coming there the night before he was found drowned in the well; he came there a good bit before dark; he was in company with some delicate mechanical sort of man, like the witness James Smith; it was a beautiful night as ever I saw. Draper took me by the collar; in that scuffle he fell down poor man; I gave him no blow. I then went into the tap-room, and had my pint of beer. Afterwards my master said, go and look for that old man; he has lost his horse and cart, go and look in the field; I went and looked over all the field, and found nobody there only. the bitch in the yard; it was in the same close where the well was. I then went and laid on some straw over the barn. I can't tell what o'clock it was, as there was no clock.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Did he not seem anxious about the poor man, and did he not tell you to go in search of him - A. Yes. This well is a wonderful size it is about eight feet over; there was about three feet from pole to pole where there was no fence. The next morning the fence was in the same state that it was in before; it was not broken down until the people came pressing on it. I saw the dog afterwards; it was a little brindle crop, a little on the cross, not through bred; I should not think the dog could defend Mr. Draper; there were bushes over part of the well, and there were about four feet without any bushes.

WILLIAM WEEB. I was at work for Mr. Paris, in August last, at making hay. I remember the night this misfortune befel. Draper; I was at the Bald Face Stag as near ten as I can say; I saw Draper there, and felt him; he was outside in the road in front of the house; I never saw him before. He caught me very fast by the collar, and said he would wrestle with me; I said, my friend, I am no wrestler. He then wrestled with me, and kicked me twice on the legs; I was hurt by him; I took it in good part; I did not strike him; I tried to keep myself on my feet. He could not have sustained any injury from what happened between me and him; he fell twice, and I with him; he fastened upon me, and would not release me, and so we fell together; the second time in our getting up he slipped his hold of my collar, and I got away from him. I saw him coming at me again; then I stept up to him, and pushed him down on his backside; I pushed him with my open hand.

Q.Did any thing more pass between you and him - A. No. I saw him then get up, and go into the house. I did not see any more of him. I did not see the prisoner Tuck.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I took him to be an elderly man.

Q. But a good heavy man, so that if he fell he might get a bruise on his head - A. I can't tell.

Q. You were hurt by the fall - A. I was.

Q. And he being more heavy than you, was more likely to be hurt.

JOHN WALPOLE . I am a butcher, at Endfield. On the evening of the 8th of August, I was at the prisoner's house. I remember the deceased John Draper was there; he was in the front parlour; there were other persons in that room. The deceased had a young dog there; I dare say it might be seven or eight months old, it was a little small bull dog, and he had it in a chain. I stand in that company, until I persuaded Draper to go home, that is until I persuaded him to go out for that purpose; he was a neighbour of mine, and lived close to me.

Q. Was he well acquainted with Tuck's premises - A. He knew the house very well; it is about three miles and a half, or three miles and a quarter from his own house. I left off telling him to go home at about half past nine or ten; I had tried to persuade him to go; at last he went away, leaving me in the room. The prisoner Tuck was in and out constantly in the course of his business. But I am going to tell you that the deceased got talking about fighting with the black; I believs the black was a fighting man; he began to play his tricks with the black, and the black said, friend I shan't hit you but if you strike me, I shall take the law of you.

Q. While the deceased was in the room, did you see him pull out any pocket-book - A. Yes, a

middling sized red pocket-book; I did not see it opened; it was in his hand; he talked about laying a wager; I don't know whether it was full or empty; I did not see him pay for any liquor; I don't think he did. I don't know this well; I believe it was a sess-pool formerly. I had seen it, but not to take notice of it before this happened; it is upon a little descent. I don't recollect it before this happened. There seemed an old rotten rail round it; it was a little out of the foot-patch going to the brew-house, about forty yards one way, and six the other.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q.Was there any thing to prevent a man from stumbling into the well - A. I don't think there was a railing all the way round; I think there was a dippling place; it was not a very large hole; but I should think a man might fall into it. After Draper was gone out of the room, some of the company remained behind entertaining themselves, singing. I thought he had gone home. Robinson was there a good bit after Draper was gone.

Re-examined by MR. WALFORD. I think it was half an hour after the deceased was gone, that Robinson and they quitted the room.

JOHN HOLMES . I live in Tottenham. I went to the Bald Face Stag on the 8th of August, I got there about eight o'clock in the evening; I saw Tuck there; he was in the bar. I remained there until nearly twelve at night; I knew Draper perfectly well; he was summonsing officer in the County Court; he was in the habit of collecting money, and of carrying a good deal about him at times. I have assisted him at times in executions. I saw him at Tuck's at a little after eight in the evening of the 8th of August; he was rather in liquor; a young man (who has been examined here to day,) was with him; he had a dog with him in a chain or string in the room; it was a small whitish dog; there were several persons in the room, and Draper was talking very loud to some of them. Tuck was in the room occasionally; but I did not hear any conversation from him to Draper, nor from Draper to him. I went into the bar to Mrs. Tuck to settle some business. Draper went out for some purpose or another. I can't tell in particular what passed on his returning. I did not see him produce any money or notes. He was very noisy and blunt, but I did not see him quarrel with any one. I was called out a second time by Mrs. Tuck, and the plaintiff and the defendant agreed to settle the warrant in the business I went there on.

Q. Did you observe where Tuck was - A. I believe he went into the bar as I came out of it, and went into the room; he was about his business, serving his customers. I returned into the room where Draper was; he was drinking with his friend. I remained some time, and at last I told him I would ride home with him in his cart; it was agreed that I should go with him; he was very forward in liquor. I missed him out of the room a little before eleven, or about that time.

Q. Did you observe whether he went alone - A. No; about the same time I missed Crouch, Saunders, and Robinson, the pugilists, who were lodging at Tuck's house; they were in what is called training.

Q. Did you miss any one else at that time - A. I missed Mr. Tuck; I did not miss him at that time. When I missed Draper, I went outside the door to try if I could see him and his cart; I think at that time it was about eleven o'clock. The horse and cart were gone. I then came into the room again, and said to a man named Flowers, I believed that Draper had given me the double, for I meant to have gone home with him. I sat down, and had a glass of gin and water, and quitted the house about twelve.

Q. After missing these three persons and Mr. Tuck, did you see them any more - A. I did not see either Crouch, Saunders, or Robinson; but I saw Tuck; I saw him in the parlour; it was getting about twelve when I saw him in his parlour; he was gone out of the parlour before I left the room; I believe he went about his business; the door is open to the bar. I could not see from the room where I was into the parlour behind the bar where he was.

COURT. Then where Tuck or the other three persons were, you cannot say - A. No.

Q. I understand he came into the room where you were, about half an hour before you went away - A. Yes, my lord.

Q. Did you perceive any thing in his appearance at that time - A. No, not in the least; he did not appear to be alarmed. My house is at Tottenham, and I went there that night. I knew Tuck's premises; but I have not seen the well above twice; I saw it when the Coroner was viewing it; I stood by his side; that was about three days after the man was found dead in the well.

Q. How did you get from the house to the well - A. I went through the field gate myself; I believe there is a door from the back of the house also into the skittle-ground; there is a small well just by that; but the other lies more on the left; there is a fence which separates the four corner ground from the field, or close where the well is; there are some boards to stop the ball in playing, over which a person might get. The top of the well was nearly covered over when I saw it; there was a dipping place left open about three feet over; there was a gradual ascent to the top of the well; it might be eight or nine inches rise, or probably a foot; the posts were broke off close to the ground, and the rail and all was down. Before the railing was down, I don't think any one could fall into the well.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. From post to post, was it not at least six feet - A. Yes, it might be that. The well was covered with furzes, and such like; if a man walked upon that covering it would yield.

Q. When you say Tuck was absent, you don't mean to say he was out of the house - A. No.

JAMES PEAT . I am a blacksmith; I live at Cockforsters, near Endfield; that is a village about three miles from Endfield. On the evening of the 8th of August, I was at the prisoner. Tuck's house, and I saw the deceased John Draper there; he was in the front parlour; I was in his company about an

hour. The prisoner at the bar was going in and out about his business while I was there. The last I saw of the deceased was that he was going out of parlour to go home as I thought; he went out alone. The young man Smith who has been examined went out a few minutes before; there were other persons left the room about the same time; there were seven or eight, whose names I could mention. It was about ten I saw him go out; I did not see him pull any money out. I continued there about an hour after he was gone; I was not in the same room; but I was in the parlour behind the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. I had business by the house; Mrs. Tuck applied to me to borrow some money; she said, she wanted to make up a certain sum for her brewer; I supplied her with six pounds. I saw a packet of bank notes in her possession at that time.

Q. When you gave her that money, did she signify that that would be sufficient to answer her purpose - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the deceased after that - A. Yes, for this took place about nine o'clock in the evening. Draper was there when I went; I saw Tuck about eleven; he asked his wife for the key of his bedroom, and he went off, as I supposed to bed.

Re-examined by MR. WALFORD. I had received five of those six notes from Mr. Paris's housekeeper; there were five of them old notes; I can't tell where I got the other; I had had it some days.

SAMUEL ROBINSON . On the 8th of August, I was at the house of Mr. Tuck the prisoner. I saw the deceased there. The last time I saw him was between ten and eleven in the parlour, with other persons. I went out alone about that time, and went up to bed. The deceased was drinking some gin and water. I did not go out to do any mischief; I went out to go to bed. He got tarkign with me, and I fold him I would take the law of him if he struck me. I remained in bed all night.

RICHARD CROUCH . On the 8th of August last, I was in the house of the prisoner Mr. Tuck. I saw the deceased John Draper in the house; I saw him somewhere about half past ten; I am not positive for a few minutes; there was a person there named Church; he is not here; he has been arrested, and is in the King's Bench.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I was there a number of times; I was there on the morning of the 8th, I saw the deceased come up to the house that morning, he had a horse and cart, and said he was going to Barnet, The prisoner spoke to him kindly; he spoke of him before he came up to the house; we were at breakfast, and the window was open, and we saw the deceased coming up with the horse and cart; and the prisoner said, here is Mr. Draper coming, as good an old man as ever lived; he said he understood he had been a man of considerable property, but through some misconduct of his own or law affairs, his relations got it. They shook hands together through the window, when Draper came up; there seemed to be a condiality and friendship between them. I was there in the evening, Draper was there very drunk, and very much disposed to quarrel; he was forward in liqoor when he came. He wanted the dog to fight; he went out, and brought his dog in in his arms; there was a dog of Tuck's in the room; the deceased took the chain and collar off his dog, and threw it down, and wanted it to fight; Tuck would not permit them to fight, and secured his dog. Several persons strave to persuade the prisoner to go, as he was so drunk; Tuck repeatedly told him to go. When I went to bed I heard a man's foot on the stairs coming up. Tuck was the only man in the house that was going to sleep there, that was not in bed. Before we came up, he declared it his intention of going to lied. He went by our door. Draper had left the room in which we were all sitting, at about half past ten; I can't tell exactly to a moment as there was no clock.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am a servant to Squire Paris, he lives at Beech Hill, that is about a quarter of a mile from the Bald Face Stag. I went by the Bald Face Stag, about twelve o'clock on the night of the 8th of August; I merely passed by it. Wil liam Austin , and Samuel Bricket had gone into the house before I came up; they were ahead of me, and went into the house. When I came up to the house I saw four men run out of it quite hasty out of the front door; I knew none of them but the landlord of the house, I mean the prisoner at the bar; he was the first, I knew him by his voice, and it being a moonlight night, I could see him. The landlord said, d-n his old eyes he is gone this way, I know he has gone round here.

Q. Did any of the others say any thing - A. Yes, another of them said we will give him a good hiding and we will kick his-. They went in a direction towards the well. I then went on about my business.

Q. What became of Bricket and Austin - A.They were in the house before these men came out. I knew one of them to be Tuck the prisoner; I knew neither of the others. I had come near half a mile, and I heard Mr. Corvyn's clock strike twelve. It was after I heard this that it struck; I counted it. I worked late that night. I had been to town with a load of hay, and stood in the market until it was sold, I brought back a lord of ashes; and got to Mr. Tuck's at ten o'clock at night and left the load before his door; I left it opposite his house in the road. I took the horses out and left the waggon in the road. From that time until I returned past Tuck's house, I was employed in doing my horses. I put them up at Beech-Hill, where my master lives about a quarter of a mile from Tuck's house. I had three horses to do, and nobody to help me. Returning from Beech Hill, to my own lodgings, I pass Tuck's house. The next morning I mentioned some part of what I had seen, but not all. I mentioned it to Joseph Harvey , and Jem Seymour, and nobody else. I had not heard anything at that time, I told them there was a row at Tuck's house, I did not tell them that I heard the men swear; I said there was a row and they ran into the Field. I heard that morning that Master Draper had met his death.

Q.After, the conversation with Harvey - A. No, before. The hostler came to Beech Hill to fetch some water, and told us there was an old man drown

ed in the well; and I told him that I heard a row there that night as I was coming by; that was all that passed between me and Harvey about it. I did not go to see the man after that. It had been a moonlight night, but not quite so clear as it sometimes is I was acquainted with the well, and saw it a good many times.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I am a carter. I took up the load of ashes at six o'clock in the evening in London; It is about twelve miles from town, to Tuck's house. I mean positively to say it was ten o'clock. I know a Mr. Langdale, he is here.

Q. Now you have heard Mr. Langdale's name, I will ask you on your oath, was it ten o'clock when you placed your load of ashes opposite Tuck's house - A. Yes, I am sure it was as late. It would take me two hours nearly to take the horses from the cart to the stable, and to clean them.

Q. Now upon the oath you have taken, was it nine or ten o'clock, when you first arived at Tuck's with your cart - A. Ten. I had something to drink in the Haymarket, before I quitted town. I had nothing more to drink until I came to Bowes Farm; I had nothing to drink from Mr. Laugdale.

Q. I suppose you told all this story to the Justice - A. I told it to the Jury.

Q. I asked you the Justice - A. Yes, on the Monday week.

Q. Did you mention the names of Bricket and Austin - A. No, all but that.

Q. Did you tell that anybody was with you at the time you heard this at the door - A. No; because there was nobody with me when I saw these man come out of the house. They were forward, and gone into the house. I did not know the bruisers; I knew the boxing men were there.

Q. Did you not tell the Justice, that the men were going out to have a fight - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the Justice asking you, why you did not stay to see the fight as it was light enough - A. Yes, and I told him, because I had been up two nights. I have always been very good friends with Tuck; I never took out a warrant against him, Groom did. One of the boxers gave me a blow once; that was on the Monday night, previous to the night in question; I went to the door, to ask for a pot of beer, the door was shut, but there were lights in the house; I believe it might be near twelve o'clock; I made a noise at the door, and Mrs. Tuck said, who is there, and I told my name, and said what I wanted, and she said, Johnson, you will get no beer here to night. I then said, bring me a pot of ale, and a prize fighter; and then one of them came out, and knocked me right off the three steps. When I got up, I made a start, and he came and kueched me down again. It was Groom that took the warrant out. When I passed Tuck's on the night in question, I went to Cock Forsters, I went by myself. These four men that came out of the house went to the left, and I went to the right; in point of fact, we went two different ways.

Re-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I have never had any ill-will in the least towards the prisoner; I was a little sancy, and it was Church that came out, and beat me.

-LONGDALE. I am Squire Paris's buileft. I know Johnson, the last witness; he is my carter; I have also two carters named Bricket and Austin; Austin is a boy.

Q.On the 8th of August, what time did Johnson come home from Town - A.About a quarter before nine, as near as I can tell. When he came home he had to do up his horses, and feed then; what would take him perhaps two hours; but he might have been an hour and a half that night.

Q. Did you give any beer to Johnson that night - A. Yes, and there were several more of the men present; I think I gave about seven quarts strong and small that night, among them in Mr. Paris's stables. I am not positive that Johnson drank any of the beer; but he was in the stables at the time it was there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. This beer was given for all the persons in the stables; some of the hay-carters who had come up with the last load of hay were there. Johnson did not tell me the next morning that he had seen four persons rush out of Tuck's house. The last time I saw him that night was between ten and eleven.

SAMUEL BRICKET. I am a carter in the employ of Mr. Paris. On the 8th of August, I was employed at hay-cart very late. Johnson went to London with the team; he had not come in with his horses when I came to the stables; he does not put his horses in the same stable where I put mine. I saw the beer served out; Johnson was not there then that I saw.

Q.How soon did you see Johnson that night - A. About an hour before I came down to the Stag; he was in the stable then walking up and down; he had not done his horses. About twelve, Johnson, Austin, and I went from the stables; Johnson asked the watchman the time, and he said, he was going to cry twelve; this was a watchman of Mr. Paris's, his name is Thomas Hillyard. Austin and I were going to the Stag, and Johnson was going on to his lodgings at Cock Fosters. We all went on together to the stag; I was first; we were in discourse together with one another all the way. When we got to the Stag, Austin and I went into it; Johnson went on, and we saw no more of him that night. As I was going to London the next morning, I intended to have some beer and bread and cheese, at the Bald Face Stag; I asked Mrs. Tuck, who was in the bar for it. I did not see any one else, but what were in the tap-room; there was the servant boy and girl there, the old ostler, and three Irishmen who worked for my master. We did not get the bread and cheese at first; Mrs. Tuck said it was past hours. Then she hallooed out to the boy to go and ask his master, if she might let me have some bread and cheese; the boy went out, and coming in immediately said, she might do as she pleased. The boy had gone out at the back door; he returned in a very short time. The boy then brought the bread and cheesc into the tap-room; after I got the refreshment, we continued there twenty minutes at the farthest.

Q. Did you at any time while you were in the house that night see Tuck - A.No. After that I

went to my home at Mr. Paris's, The back door goes into the Four corner ground, and to the stables.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I can be positive the watchman said twelve, and not eleven; it was in answer to a question of Johnsons that he said so. To the best of my knowledge Johnson had no share of the beer that was for the carters in the stables. I did not see Mr. Langdale come into the stables while we were having the beer. After the beer was drank, we waited nearly half an hour for Johnson. We went along talking together all the way, When we came to the corner, we bid Johnson good night; I did not look after him. When we crossed the bridge, we went to the left, into the public-house, and Johnson went to the right. We crossed the bridge together, Johnson was in discourse with me when we crossed the bridge. We went about a pole, before the road leans to go to Cock Fosters. I did not see four men rush out of the Stag. I did not hear any one make any exclamation or cry out. When we were going into the public-house, Johnson was walking steadily on towards Cock Fosters. If any men had rushed out as he passed I must have seen them, and if they said any thing I must have heard them.

COURT. Is the road going to Cock Fosters, a straight road - A. Yes, and from it you can see the front of the Bald Faced Stag.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.But a man going towards Cock Fosters, would have his back towards the Bald Facedstag - A. Yes.

Q. And how long after Johnson parted from you, was it before you went to the public-house - A.about two minutes. We went in at the front door, and neither saw nor heard any thing. I was at the stag on the Monday night previous, when Johnson got the licking, that was between eleven and twelve o'clock; the door was shut and fastened. On the night in question the boy was not gone long to ask his master; he was gone a very short time. I saw Johnson on Friday. He did not ask me any question about any one rushing out of the Bald Faced Stag. A young woman told me of the death of this poor man.

Re-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Johnson had not got such a way from the Bald Face Stag; when we went in; but he might have heard the voice of a person coming out.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I work for Mr. Paris. I remember going along with the last witness to the Bald Face Stag, on the night of the 8th of August; Johnson set off with us from Mr. Paris's; the watchman at that time said, he was going to cry the hour of twelve. We all came down the hill together. We did not part at all until we came to the Inn. We went into the house, and Johnson went to Cock Forsters; we all kept close together until we came to the Inn. We had some beer and bread and cheese. When I came away, we left a girl, a boy, three Irishmen, and the hostler there. We had some difficulty at first in getting the refreshment we called for, but the mistress sent the boy out backward to his master, to ask him if she might serve it; when he returned which was in a very short time, he said that she might do as she pleased. The reason she refused it at first, was because it was after hours.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. I think it was darkish that night; but it was not moon-light. I had part of the beer that was given to the men in the stable; I can't say rightly whether Johnson was there, and had any of it or not. I saw Johnson's back turned towards us as I went into the stag. I did not see anybody come out as I went in.

JOSEPH HARVEY. I am a carpenter, living at Cock Forsters. I was at the Bald Face Stag on the night of the 8th of August, between nine and ten o'clock; I saw a man there of the name of Draper, I saw him wresting with a haymaker; he did not receive any injury then that I know of. I saw Johnson there; I saw him leave a load of dung or ashes or something opposite the door of the Bald Face Stag. John on told me that he heard a noise the night before, when I saw him the next morning, he told me he heard there was a man drowned; these were the words he told me. I did not ask him who the men were that he said he saw come out, nor did he mention any particular expression they used. He said he heard a noise, and scuffle in the Bald Face Stag, and one of the men said he is gone round this way, we will follow him. Nothing passed more between us two.

-HILLYARD. I was watchman to Squire Paris, in August last. I remember Bricks, Austin, and Johnson going away from Mr. Paris's the night before the man was drowned; it was between eleven and twelve o'clock; I had called eleven about half past eleven.

Cross examined by MR. DOWLING. I told them it was near twelve; I will swear positively it was half past eleven. Johnson lodged at my house at Cock Forsters; he did not say a word to me the next day about any thing he had heard or seen as he passed the Bald Face Stag; I went home between five and six the next morning to go to bed.

Re-examined by MR. WALFORD. I can't say I saw him the next day.

MARY HOLBORN . I have been servant to Mr. Tuck between three and four months; I knew Mr. Draper; I remember seeing him at the Bald Faced Stag on the 8th of August, he had a glass of gin and water; I did not see my master wait upon him. I think I went to bed about half past ten or eleven, I am not sure, as there was no watch. I lit a candle for Mr. Church to go to bed, I think my master was in the room where the company sits when I went to bed. Draper was there; I did not hear him wrangling with any one. Sometimes we shut up at ten, and sometimes eleven. I think my master called me about a quarter before five; he called me twice, the second time was soon after the first. It was his custom to knock at the wall, or my door always. About seven o'clock, I went to the well to draw water; the well was in the same state as usual, only there was a piece of wood that went across, was broken in two or three pieces.

Q. Did that appear to have been broken since you had been at the well before - A. That which was broken was a fence that ran round the top of the well the dipping place where I dipped for water, was large enough for a man to tumble in. When I dipped

for water was large enough for a man to tumble in. When I dipped the pail, I saw the deceased's hat and face. I went to get assistance directly; I said, good gracions master, there is a man in the well; my masters was letting the fowls out of the fowl-house at that time. He went and looked, and said, good gracious, I suppose it is the poor old hostler. He appeared very much frightened. The body was in an erect posture, just against the pipe of the well; the water was rather thick. My master came to Robinson, the black, who was cleaning his shoes, and he said, good gracious Robinson, there is the poor old hostler in the well. I saw the body after it was taken out of the well; it was in the brewhouse. I heard my master say that he, Robinson, Crouch, and Saunders had taken the deceased out of the well. Draper's brother came about breakfast time. My master could not eat any breakfast, it shocked him so. Mr. Draper's brother was sent for by my master. I am still in the service of the prisoner's family.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Then your poor master was feeding the fowls when you gave him the alarm, and he was so shocked that he could eat no breakfast - A. Yes.

Q. A drunken man going out into the yard, might easy find his way up to the well, and without much difficulty might tumble in - A. Yes.

Q. The railing was very rotten - A. Yes, I should think so. I think the railing would have broken if any one pushed against it.

Q. Is it not a place of all others where the body of a murdered person would be sure to be found - A. Yes. My mistress chiefly manages the business; she pays and receives the money. I remember Bricket and Austin coming for the bread and cheese. I gave it them, and went to bed. I went to bed before my master.

BENJAMIN PETTS . I was servant to the prisoner in August last. I remember the morning that the man was found in the well. On that morning my master gave me a parcel; he told me I was to go with it, before the body was found; but he gave me the parcel to take after it was found. He told me the over night that I should have to go to Enfield; he told me so at seven o'clock the night previous. It was a very little time after the man was found in the morning that he gave me the parcel. He did not any particular what the parcel was, but he told me to take it to the brewer's, Mr. Etteridge; I gave that parcel to a little boy at the brewer's, in the same state as I received it.

CHARLES SMITH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Brailsford, the brewer, at Enfield. Tuck was a customer at our house. I remember the last witness coming to our house about half past seven in the morning of the 9th of August; he gave me a parcel; that parcel contained twenty pounds; eighteen one-pound notes, and two pounds in silver; I kept them about ten minutes, and then gave them to Etteridge, the clerk. I put Tuck's name on each of the notes before I handed them over to Etteridge; I also wrote on them the day of the month and the year, and C. Smith. I don't know that I ever before received any notes from Tuck myself. I should know any of those notes again.

PHILIP ETTERIDGE. I am clerk to Mr. Brailsford, the brewer, at Enfield. On the morning of the 9th of August, I received eighteen one-pound notes and two pounds in silver from the last witness Smith. One of that parcel of notes was afterwards shewn to Mr. Reynolds. I delivered all them to Draper. I had calied on the morning previous at Tuck's for money; I called again at about four o'clock the same afternoon, I saw Mrs. Tuck; I told her I had a bill to make up, and she said, I should have the money the next morning at half past seven. They were pretty regular in their payments generally; we had no fault to find with them on that account.

-DEAPER. I am the brother of the deceased. I did not see my brother when he went out in the morning. The deceased's son came to me about eight in the morning of the 9th; and about nine I went to Tuck's, and saw the body; it was in the brewhouse, with its clothes on; I saw Tuck there; he was the first person I saw; I believe I spoke to him first; I asked him if he had taken care of my brother's property, and he said what property he had about him, he had then, and he did not know he had any property. He said, I should see him, and what property he had about him, I might search him. I then proceeded to search the deceased, with the assistance of his son, and he took from him these two books; they had nothing but Court matters in them; also a small purse, with nine shillings in silver and a halfpenny; they were very wet when I got them, the water had penetrated through them. Tuck saw the body; he turned very sick, and was very much agitated, and turned away, and went out to the end of the brewhouse. He reached very much. I left his house almost immediately. He had told me how they found him. I was very frequently with my brother, he was in the habit of having money. I supposed he had some money on that day; but I did not know what he had. Mr. Tuck knew how he got his living. I should suppose he must have done business for him. I received eighteen one-pound notes from Mr. Etteridge on the 13th; I have sixteen of them in my pocket, and Read has the other two.

WILLIAM READ , SENIOR. I am a police officer of Hatton Garden police office. I produce the papers which the last witness gave me, and two one-pound notes.

-Draper. Those are two of the notes I received from Etteridge.

William Read. Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I apprehended the prisoner; he behaved himself very well. He said, if you want me. I will go with you. During this investigation, he lent me his cart to go down and fetch the watchman; he told me his poney would take me in four hours.

-Draper. Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you not take up these two pocketbooks, and say it was all right - A. No, I did not examine them, nor look into them there. I did not examine them until I got two or three hundred yards from the prisoner's house. I opened them to the

beadle of the parish; I met him going to view the body before he went to the Coroner, and these papers were all entirely wet,

PHILIP ETTERIDGE . I look at the two notes produced, and say, that they are two paid to me by the boy Charles Smith .

Charles Smith . These are two of the notes brought to me by Tuck's boy.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS. I am an attorney, living at Cheshunt. On the 8th of August at about four o'clock, I went to Potters Bar; I saw the deceased John Drapper there, I made a payment to him on the account of a client of mine named Chapel, I paid him three pounds. I look at one of the two one-pound notes produced, and know it to be one of these I paid to Draper on the 8th of August; I know it by"19l" put upon it, I put it on myself.

Q. Why did you put that on it - A. Because on the 17th, I had taken a large sum of money in notes, and in counting them over, I put the ones altogether, and when they amounted to nineteen pounds, I put"19l" on the outside note. Draper was the only person I paid out of that money.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I was examimined at Hatton Garden. I paid Draper from the outside of the roll of notes.

Q. Did you not at Hattop Garden, say that you could not say whether you took them from the outside or the inside - A. I did not call it to mind at the moment. I don't recollect that I did say so.

Q. You were asked to write the figures "19" - A. Yes.

Q.Are these the figures you made, in compliance to that request; (putting a piece of paper with the figures "19" on it, into the hands of the witness.) - A. I really don't know; that is not the way I usually make "19"; I can't say whether it 1s.

Q. You have been wagering on this subject; have you not been wagering that that man will be convicted to day - A.No.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, have you not bet ten pounds, that that man will be convicted to day - A. No.

Q.Do you know a person of the name of Dray - A. Yes. The fact was, I saw Mr. Dray at the office, and the wager was ten to one, that he would be committed.

Q. Is that the only wager you have laid on this subject - A. Yes it 1s. I have offered no other. I don't know a Mr. Davison of Charing Cross. I don't know that I ever saw him to my knowledge. (Another paper put into the hands of witness, with the figures"19"on it.)

Q. Now we come back to the "19" again; did you or did you not write that "19" A.- I cannot tell.

Q. Then how can you swear to the "19" on the note - A. I can swear to it. I said when I wrote the nineteens at Hatton Garden, that I did not think they would be like that on the note, because I wrote them on the back of a book; and I wrote that on the note at my own office, and at my case on my desk.

Re-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I had no knowledge of Mr. Tuck, until I was called on upon this transaction. I look at this note again; I believe I might swear to it, by the name of the Bank clerk,"Barkwaite," as there was a person at Cheshunt of the same name. I had seen that note on the evening before.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS , JUNIOR. I live at Cheshunt. I remember my father having a quantity of notes, to the amount of five hundred pounds on the evening of the 17th of August. He marked the roll of ones"19l," because there were nineteen notes. He marked them, that he might not have to count them over again. I look at this note; I know it; the "19l" is my father's hand writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How came you to open that note, and look at the front of it before you answered - A. I think it is proper to look at a thing before I swear to it. I saw my father write the "19". I was at Hatton Garden office. I did not say then, that I saw my father write it. I told Mr. Harmer at the time, that I could swear to it; Mr. Harmer said, that he thought my father's evidence was not true, and then I said, I could prove it as well as he could.

KESIAH STREITS. I knew Mr. Draper, the officer of the County Court. In July last, I had to pay him some money. I saw him on Wednesday, the 10th; I paid him one pound four and four pence; I paid him a one pound note, and four shillings in silver. I should know the note again if I saw it; it had two names on it and J M; they were on it when I gave it him. I had received it about a quarter of an hour before from a person of the name of Mrs. Naylor. I had no more notes in my possession when I paid that away. Draper wrote on it when I paid it to him; he wrote my name Strits, which was an improper way of spelling it; he put J B at the bottom for John Brown, at whose suit the debt was incurred. (Note put into the hand of the witness.) That is the note; I can positively swear to it; there is the mark J M on it, and Callaway, and Mr. Morevin, then Streits; he said, if this note should be lost, or if there should be a dispute about it, I should know it again.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was about a week after Draper's death that I saw this note again.

Q. Now look at the front of that note, and you will see J. Rose 267, that is the 26th of the 7th month; was that on it when you parted with it to Draper - A. Yes, that I am sure of.

Q. You are as sure of that as every thing else - A.Certainly.

Q.Were these words Pocock 1st of the 8th - A. I don't know.

Q.There is Neat 3rd of the 8th month; was that on it when you gave it to Draper - A. Yes.

Q.And that you are sure is as true as all the rest you have said - A. Yes. Mr. Draper pointed out the name of Rose to me. Mr. Draper's brother brought the note to me after the death of the deceased. I told him about the name of Callaway. I did not tell him about the name of Rose; I told him Neat was on it.

MR. CLARKE. I am a surgeon, residing at Enfield. I was called to examine the body of the deceased on

Saturday, the 10th of August. I examined the head, and observed marks of bruises about the head, face, and side of the neck, both cheeks, and under the left ear; on the face were marks of violent bruises as if from a fist. At that time I did not make any particular examination. Tuck said he had been fighting with one of the persons. At that time, his being found in the well, I thought a sufficient cause for his death. By the desire of the Coroner on the 13th and 14th I made a more particular examination; Mr. Holt was then with me. The body was then brought to Enfield at the second examination. I think, from the result of that examination, that the blow on the neck, might have been sufficient to stun him, or render him insensible. I could not then discover any blow that could have occasioned his death. But if I had found the deceased on the ground dead, I should have attributed his death to that blow.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. At first I thought that his being in the well was quite a sufficient cause for his death. When I saw it the second time, the blow by the neck had become much more visible; the weather had been hot, and the body had been kept nearly a week.

MR. WILLIAM HENRY HOLT. Corroborated the opinion of the last witness with respect to the death of the deceased.

Prisoner's Defence. I can put my hand on my heart, and say I am perfectly sure I am innocent of this hienous crime, and as such leave myself to the mercy of the Court and Jury.

MR. WILLIAM GRAY . I am an attorney. I know Mr. Reynolds of Cheshunt. I was at Hatton Garden at the examination of the prisoner Tuck. I saw Mr. Reynolds there, and had a conversation with him about the event of the examination; the conversation was concerning the innocence or guilt of the prisoner. I knew Mr. Reynolds by doing agency for him as a Country attorney. I stated to him that it was my opinion that at that period there was no case against the prisoner to convict him, not commit; he differed from me in opinion by stating that he was sure to be hanged. I said it could not be. I said, I would lay him ten pounds to one that the evidence that had been adduced against the prisoner up to that period could not convict the prisoner. I shook him by the hand as a token that the bet was made. In about a minute he turned round, and said it was a mistake, and that he ment a commitment, and not a conviction. I turned upon my heel, and went off.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Curiosity took me to Hatton Garden. I don't know that I have ceased to be Mr. Reynold's agent. I have never seen Mr. Tuck twice in my life, until he was apprehended on this, once at his house, and once in Smithfield market. I was subpoened here today.

MR. DOWLING now called a very considerable number of witnesses, who gave the prisoner an excellent character for humanity, honesty, and integrity.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-5

823. HENRY PAYNE , and JOHN JOHNSON , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Lucas , in the King's Highway, on the 15th of July , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 6l. a chain, value 2l. and a seal, value 2l. his property .

SAMUEL LUCAS. I live in Duck-lane, Mile End, New Town, I am a weaver . I recollect going home on Monday the 15th of July; I was going home in the middle of the day, at about a quarter before one; at the time this transaction happened, I was in Great Garden-street . As I was going along there, I was suddenly stopped by some men, and the two prisoners at the bar held me fast; they held my arms; I cannot tell whether each of them held an arm, as it was done instantaneously; I am sure they were about my person. There was nothing more particular happened to me, only I saw a lad run away, and I suppose he had got the watch; I know I had my watch when I first came into the street, about two minutes before. That lad ran away, I did not feel the watch go; I believe I had it in my possession immediately before the two men laid hold of me. As soon as I was liberated, I discovered that my watch was gone, and then I called stop thief. There was a gold chain and a gold seal to my watch; it was a watch that went upon a diamond, and it was silver; I have never seen it since. The two prisoners were stopt directly afterwards; they did not run, but they walked away very fast. They had not got an hundred yards, before they were stopped. I am quite sure they both assisted in holding of me.

Cross-examined. That was within a few minutes of one, in a street which is rather short, and rather narrow. Mr. Elwes is the man sent for to take them into custody. They were walking away, they had no hand in robbing me, but they held me fast. I did not say to Mr. Elwes that I could not swear they held me. Mr. Elwes keeps an oil shop in White-chapel; he was sent for. His house and shop are not in a situation as to enable him to see what passed from them. I was alone in this street; there might be people in the street in which I was walking along. I first got Mr. Westcoat to assist me, and afterwards Elwes.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with Elwes or Westcoat about a reward - A. No.

SAMUEL WESTCOAT . I was in this street on the 15th of July, I live there. I remember hearing stop thief cried; it was eight minutes before one at that time by my watch. I observed the old man shaking, and quaking, and I asked him what was the matter, and he said, those two men have robbed me of my watch; they had got better than an hundred yards off, and I went forward and seized them. I took them to a public-house, and Elwes searched them.

THOMAS ELWES . I am a constable. I was called in on this occasion. These young men were in custody at the last witnesses when I went in. The prosecutor expressed himself, that John Johnson rushed behind him with a stick, and the other had hustled him. He desired me to search them, and I did, but found nothing about them, and then they told me, it was no use keeping them, as they had not got the watch.

PAYNE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

JOHNSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18160918-6

824. JOHN DONNELLY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Poole , at about the hour of six in the night, of the 15th of December , in the 55th year of Geo.III. with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, thirty yards of woolen cloth, value 5l. the property of the said James Poole ; and GEORGE VAUGHAN was indicted for an accessary before, and after the said burglary .

JAMES POOLE. I am a tailor .

Q. On the 15th of December, in the last year, did either of the prisoners come to your house - A. Yes, Mr. Vaughan, in company with Barrett; as near as I can recollect, it was about twenty minutes before five; it was darkish. I had left my work of cutting out, as I could not see to cut out, and I was drinking my tea, when they came in.

Q.How long had you ceased to cut out, because it was not light enough - A. About ten minutes. Vaughan spoke to me before the other man, and said my name is Vaughan, and I am a Bow-street officer; and he gave me his card. He said, I know that your house is marked up to be robbed, and I am come to warn you, and if you will let me, we will take the men; this is Barrett my brother officer. Now they are very bad characters, and noted house-breakers, and if you do not let us take them, they will no doubt come when you are in bed and asleep, and most likely you or some of your family will get murdered. By these persuasions, I consented to Vaughan to protect my place, and then they both spoke to me. I consented to do as they should advise me.

Q. Did they then give you any advice - A. Yes, they told me to mark my cloth.

Q. In what manner - A. The cloth in the long rolls, is all marked in a regular system, with a shop mark.

Q. Did Vaughan propose any additional marks - A. Yes, he told me to mark some pieces that were on the counter and told me to lay them on the counter. I asked him how I should mark that which I was to lay on the counter, it being short cuts or lengths, and not marked as usual; they were cuts that lay about for present use. He took up my shears, and cut some bits of calico, little bits off; and then he nicked them, and they were pinned to the bits of cloth that lay on the counter; I don't know whether he pinned them, or shewed me how he pinned them on, but they were pinned on. There were cards on the regular rolls on the shelves; they did not want marking. I should think this was twenty-five minutes or half an hour before the thieves came. It was hardly a quarter of an hour before I went out with them. Just before we came away, the buy brought up a light and lit the lamp, and Vaughan ordered it to be put out, I can't say he gave any reason for desiring it to be put out. I don't know whether Vaughan or I put it out. He desired me to faston the door, not to lock it, but to latch it, but to be very particular about it, to take particular care that the latch caught, and was fastened, He, Barrett, and I quitted the shop together. Vaughan shewed, me how to fasten the latch, and said, now you do so; and be sure it is on the latch. Then we quitted the shop, and went over the way to Mr. Anderson's shop in front of mine, for the purpose of catching the thieves coming to plant them there. Vaughan asked me to get him into some neighbours house to watch. We went over to Mr. Andersons, and his eldest son gave leave for them to be there; that was Mr. Robert Embledon Anderson.

Q. After you had stationed them there what did you do with yourself - A. Will you allow me to tell you, that young Anderson knew Vaughan, and he said, ah Vaughan, how are you. He more readily consented as he knew Vaughan.

Q. Did you tell Vaughan and Barrett, what you had to do - A. Yes, I told them I had to go out and wait upon a gentleman, precisely at five o'clock. Before I left them, Vaughan and Barrett both spoke to me, telling me to mark any of the large rolls of cloth, beside what they had marked, and put them in the way. They told me I should loose nothing. I went across home, and told my wife I was satisfied that it was Vaughan the officer. I then took my candle and looked all round the shelves in my shop, and missed nothing. The lamps were not lighted, and I took the candle back into the parlour, leaving no light in the shop. I then told my wife to sit near the light if she thought proper. I then placed a boy on the stairs facing the passage door, I placed him to sit on the stairs; it was dark there, and if any thieves were to enter they could not see him there. They could well see my wife through the window, because my parlour has folding doors. Having made this preparation, I quitted the house to go to my customer.

Q. When you quitted the house, how did you manage about the door - A. I latched it inside white I was inside, and went out by another door round by the passage. I ascertained that I had latched it, and that it was fast; I ascertained it both inside and out. I pursued Vaughan's directions and made every thing secure.

Q. How long after Vaughan had quitted your house, was it before you quitted your house finally - A. About ten minutes or hardly so much; I know I was some few minutes beyond my time with the gentleman I was to have been with at five; he was Mr. Eldred Addison , No. 8, Mecklenburgh Square. I think I might be about ten minutes running there, and back. It was about six or seven minutes after the time of my appointment that I set out to go. I had been detained about this business, and was gone I thought ten minutes; I don't think I could be more. This was the shortest day, and when I was setting out it was rather dark; the lamps were lighted.

Q. Was it light enough to see the face of a man - A. I have been reminded by Vaughan, that it must be the light of the oil shop.

Q. Don't tell me of any light that you had from oil shops; from the light of Heaven, independent of of any artificial light, could you distinguish the features of a mans countenance - A. Yes, there was when I left my shop. I went to Mecklenburgh Square and was gone about ten minutes, As I was going

out of my shop, I met two men between me and the railings; they afterwards turned out to be Batts and Rawley, and were afterwards convicted here; they were about thirty yards from my shop; the street is but short.

Q. Now as you were returning, did you see any one - A. Yes, I saw Rawley with a roll of cloth under his arm, and another person; it was superfine broad cloth; I let him pass me about ten or fifteen yards, and saw no one coming. Then I turned round to go after him; I did not cry stop thief for some time. He threw the cloth down under my feet; it stopped me, and I jumped over it, and followed him, and cried stop thief. I still pursued him; I caught him nearly opposite the Foundling Hospital, in Great Guildford-street.

Q. Had you ever lost sight of him - A. No. After I seized him, the officers came up immediately; I don't know where they came from.

Q. Did they take the other person - A. They did; it turned out to be Farthing afterwards.

Q. Were Farthing and Rawley taken to the watchhouse - A. I left them in custody, and returned home.

Q. When you got home, how much of your property did you find missing - A.Three pieces of superfine broad cloth. Vaughan told me he picked up the piece that Rawley threw down. Vaughan and Barrett came to my house again that night at eleven o'clock.

Q. What passed between you - A.Vaughan was telling us a great deal about different robberies. I told him I had lost three rolls of cloth.

Q. What was the value of these - A. I believe I lost about thirty yards, worth about twenty-five shillings a yard. I told him I had lost three pieces, and he said he knew where to find them, and he knew where to find the other thieves; but I had, spiked the job by calling out stop thief; for he knew where to have gone and caught them together dividing the cloth.

Q. Did you ever get the other pieces again - A. I never did. Vaughan afterwards returned to me the piece he picked up; but not as it was before; it wanted about two yards and a quarter; the length of the piece had been seven yards and a quarter, and when he returned it to me it was about five yards. I appeared the next day at Bow-street against Rawley, and Farthing; and Batts had been taken then. Vaughan made application to me about the conducting the procecution. He asked me if I would employ a Counsel, and I told him I did not want to go to any expence, what I knew of myself was plain facts.

Q. Did Vaughan and you give evidence against Rawley, Batts, and Farthing on their trial here - A. Yes; but I did not swear to one because I did not know him; they were convicted.

Q. After that verdict was found did Vaughan make any observation to you about your evidence - A. He did when we went out of the Court; he said I had leaned two much to the prisoners, by saying it was so light, he said by which you have deprived me of the three forty pounds, which you would have had part of for taking the one man.

JOHN EMBLEDON ANDERSON. I live at No. 3, Everett-street; that is almost opposite Mr. Poole's house. On the 15th of December, in the last year, Mr. Poole came to my house, accompained at the time by Vaughan and Barrett; at the time they first came over it might be a quarter after four o'clock in the afternoon; as near as I can recollect at the present moment.

Q. Did they state for what purpose they came - A. Mr. Poole in the first instance stated for what they had come and I immediately recognized Vaughan as a police officer; I had seen him at the police office, and in other places. Vaughan then stated that Mr. Poole's house was that evening to be robbed by certain individuals, and requested that I would allow him to place himself in our house to watch the depredators; which I consented to; it was mentioned that there were to be four robbers; Vaughan mentioned that. The candles were not then lighted; but our lad was bringing them up stairs, when Vaughan requested that they might not be taken into the front shop; the reason he ascribed was that the robbers might not seen him, and his co-adjutor; that was Barrett. Barrett and he were in the private passage of the house. This application was made by Vaughan in Burretts hearing. I contiuned in the front shop from curiosity. I saw two three or four men; I can't say the number. I saw two individuals go into the shop of Mr. Poole; they went in at the front door; that was open; they went in at the passage door; in that passage there is a door that goes into the shop. I saw them go into the shop. One individual was a tall thin man, leaning over the rails as if in the act of watching any person who might come from the parlour into the shop. That man had on a dark brown great coat; he had on a pair of high shoes, what are generally termed high-low-shoes, which came up to his ancle; they were such as are laced up a short way in front.

Q. Did you see the men come out of the shop-Yes.

Q. Had either of them any thing - A. Yes, one of them who was dressed like a sailor had a bundle of cloth under his arm.

Q. What became of them after that - A. The alarm was given, and the officers left the passage of the house, and as they left the street door open, I followed round to shut it after them.

Q. Did you observe what became of the tall man who was looking over the railings - A. He went down the street the same way as the officers went, and at the crossing of the street the tall man ran immediatelybetwen the two officers, or nearly; he had crossed over to my side of the way, and in crossing to the other side he got between the two officers; there is a blank side of a house and a garden wall at the end of the street where they might have certainly taken him into custody; they were near enough to converse together.

Q. Did you see them converse together - A. I saw them stop a few seconds. Barrett then went one way and Vaughan another; and a hackney coach coming through the street, I lost sight of them, and saw no more of them for a considerable length of time; I lost sight of the two officers; but I saw the tall

man; he took across from Everett-street towards Brunswick-square; I followed him.

Q. Did you come up with him - A.Yes, at the corner of a street paratlel with Everett-street; that was the corner of Barrard-street and Willnot-street; Everett-street is the street that is parallel. Then he stopped for a moment to pull up his stocking.

Q. Had you at that time an opportunity of observing him - A. During that time, I just walked round him, and as Vaughan had stated to me that he knew where to find the men; I did not stop him. I should be both to swear to him.

Q. When you saw Donnelly again, did his figure and gait correspond with the figure and gait of the man you had so seen - A. At the time the individual had a long dark brown grent coat. When I next saw Donnelly, his dress was different entirely, except that he had high shoes on similar to those the person were.

Q.Am I right in understanding you that his figure and gait corresponded with those of the man whom you saw looking over the rails in Everett-street - A. Yes; but there are many circumstances that I would not speak so positively; because the hat he then wore was much shabbier and slouched, wore over his face and ears.

JOSEPH SAUNDERS . I knew both the prisoners; I have known Donnelly about two years, and Vaughan about a twelve month.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Batts who was convicted in January Sessions - A. Yes.

Q. And Rawley - A. Yes.

Q.Did you know a man of the name of Farthing who was convicted also - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect over seeing them or either of them with either of the prisoners - A. On the 15th of December John Donnelly was at the Falcon public-house; that is in Portpool-lane, nearly opposite the place where I lived; he was in company with Batts, Rawley, and Farthing; I can't say whether they were drinking together; it was between three and five; I did not see them after five I am pretty sure; they left the house altogether. About nine o'clock the same evening, Donnelly came to the window of the same house; I went out to the door immediately; he had not made any signal. He asked me if Tuniker was there; Vaughan was Tuniker as I understood.

Q. Had you ever heard him called so among them - A. Yes, always almost; very seldom any thing else. I told him no. I asked him to come into the house, he said, he could not, for he was concerned in a robbery with Farthing and Rawley, and he mentioned that Farthing and Rawley were in custody.

Q. Did he say any thing more - A. No.

Q.Have you ever seen Donnelly and Vaughan in company together - A. Yes, at the Falson drinking together.

Q. Was that a house that Donnelly used - A. Not often; I have not seen him often there.

WILLIAM BARRETT. I was a constable in December last. I have been acquainted with the prisoner Vaughan I suppose these three years; he was a patrole belonging to Bow street; I am also acquainted with the other prisoner.

Q. What name did you know him by - A. Donnelly alias Jack-a-dandy. I know a house occupied by a person named Poole perfectly well. About the latter end of November last, I saw Donnelly in Holborn, in company with two other thieves; I only knew Donnelly before. Knowing him I watched them, they committed an offence there, and were apprehended, but no prosecutor appearing they were discharged. That adventure led to an intercourse between Donnelly, Vaughan, and me; I saw Vaughan, and he and I had some conversation concerning Donnelly giving information; he said he should I not wonder but what Jack would come it.

Q. What is the meaning of that - A. Giving information. It was agreed to ask him when we saw him.

Q. How soon after did you see him - A. In the course of a day or two afterwards; I was in company with Vaughan, and saw him in Gray's-inn-lane; we invited him to Mr. Perth's public-house in Holborn, fronting the end of Gray's-inn-lane. We asked him if he could give us any information; he said if he did, the thieves would kill him or murder him, or something to that effect; Vaughan replied, he would make that all right. He left us after having had some porter; we might have been together then about half or quarter of an hour. Being told that that would be made all right, he agreed to give information, We saw him again in a day or two afterwards. Vaughan told me that he had met Jack, and had made an appointment with him to meet him at the same place at two o'clock; that was the house in Holborn. We went, and met him. Donnelly stated that he was going out that night; that was in December; it might be ten days or a fortnight before the 15th. He told us he was going out that night with Batts and Rawley; they were going upon the sneak.

Q. What is that, among thieves - A. It means going into a house slyly; and that is distingnished from breaking forcibly. If any thing was done, he expected to share part of the reward; that was so agreed on. I was to go along with Vaughan to assist in taking them into custody; and if that was accomplished, he was to have his share of the reward. This agreement being made, we seperated; and we were to meet in the evening part, early, between four and five. The party that were going upon the sneak were to go between four and five from the Falcon in Portpool-lane; that is in the neighbourhood of Gray's-inn-lane; and we were to go and watch them out. We went to a public-house fronting the Falcon that same evening, between four and five. This was not the transaction of the 15th.

Q. Now then come to the 15th - A. On the 15th we met at Perth's, Donnelly, Vaughan, and I; it was in the forenoon. Donnelly, said d-n me! how did you lose us last night? Vaughan replied, we lost you in a minute; which way did you go? Donnelly, described the way, and Vaughan knew it better than I did. They were alluding to a transaction

the night of the 14th. Donnelly said, they went to the Draper's and went in on the screw and sneaker out a piece of broady.

Q.What does the scraw mean - A.Turning round the latch of a door; broady, means broad cloth. I asked Donnelly what had become of it, and he stated that Long Tom's wife had pledged it. I asked him where, and whether he could get the duplicate; Vaughan was present all this time. Donnelly said he could not, nor did he know where it was pawned. Long Tom was a man who was convicted here, named Batts. I know a woman named Embling perfectly well; she lived with Thomas Batts . I asked Donnelly where the cloth was, and told him that if that cloth could be procured, and the prosecutor could swear to it, that would be sufficient in convict them; if he could get either the duplicate or the cloth.

Q. Who had the mentioned as being concerned in that - A. Robert Rawley and Thomas Batis .

Q. Had you and Vanghan, in point of fact, watched them, and lost them - A. We had.

Q. How near had you seen them to Mr. Poole's house - A. About half a mile from it. I then saw Batts, Rawley, and Donnelly together, and missed them suddenly.

Q. Now go on with the conversation you were relating - A. He said he could not get the duplicate, but they were going again to the same house that night, and they were to start from the same public-house about the same time; and he proposed that I and Vanghan should watch them from the house. Vaughan objected to that, he did not like following them from the house, and said that he would go to the prosecutor, and give him information of his house being about to be robbed. Vanghan stated that two heads were better than one, and he would have his own way in planning it; I had also suggested a doubt of the propriety of following them from the house. We then left the public-house in Holborn, and I think it was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. Donnelly said, mind and be there in time; mind how you act so as you don't throw any suspicion on me; because if you do, they will chiv me; that means stabbing him; putting a knife into him. Vanghan said; no, no, we will take care and make all that right. Soon after we seperated, and went to the Falcon, in Portpool-lane, and had some beef-steaks in the parlour. At the Falcon I saw, Donnelly, Rawley, Batts, and several other thieves; I think I saw Farthing, but I won't be certain as they were not in the room we had the steaks in. They were in the tap-room, and we were in the parlour. At the time that Vanghan and I were eating the steakes, Donnelly came into the parlour, and said mind be in time, don't be too late; we said we will take care and be in time. After we had eaten the steakes it got near the time, and Vanghan and I went to Vanghan's mother-in-law, and there we got two aprons, they were to be put on to disguise us. That was that we night pass for tradesman. Then we proceeded to Mr. Poole's house, and I saw Mr. Poole, Mrs. Poole, and a boy servant. There Vanghan related the circumstances to Mr. Poole of a plan laid to rob his house; he told Mr. Poole that his house was to be robbed and he was to mark some cloths Poole and Vanghan marked them; Mr. Poole seemed rather frightened. Vaughan marked one or two; I think two; I observed they were marked by pieces of calico pinned to them, and they were placed on the counter. Vaughan then told him to put his lamps out which was lit, to the best of my recollection that was done.

Q. Did he give any reason - A. Yes. That the thieves should not see any person who was in the house. Then Vaughan asked Mr. Poole if he could go over the way; that we might conceal ourselves there; Vaughan shewed him how to fasten the door so as to be sure it was latched. Then we went over to Mr. Andersons, and he gave us leave to be there. After having been there some time, about five or ten minutes; Mr. Anderson gave us leave to go into his passage. We had been in his passage about a quarter of an hour when Mr. Anderson brought a chair, and Vaughan sat down; we had the passage door open, and presently we saw Batts, Rawley, and Donnelly pass Poole's door once or twice. Then there was a man looking over the rails; I don't believe it was any of the three that I have named, but I am not certain. Donnelly then passed again; then he stopped at the window. The first time of passing, a man at present unknown, was looking over the rails; whoever it was the first time, I am not enabled positively to say, but the second time, I saw him distinctly look over the rails into Mr. Poole's shop. Batts then went into the passage of Mr. Poole's house, and came out again. I believe he went in again. Then Rawley went in, and when he came out, he had a piece of cloth with him under his arm. I told Vaughan they had got it and said come along; Vaughan said they had not; I said they had, and said let us come along; I ran out. When I got to the end of the street, I saw Rawley give the cloth to Batts. I ran after them; they had got some distance. Vanghan objected to my going When I got to the bottom end of the street, Rawley gave the cloth to Batts. He went towards Bruntwick-square with it. Rawley and Donnelly returned to go to Poole's house again. Vaughan then came up to me, and they passed me on the way. I had left Vaughan in the passage, and in the moment that Rawley and Donnelly turned to come back, Vaughan came up to me; he came on the other side of the way. Whilst we had been watching them from the passage, Mr. Poole was obliged to leave his house, and when Rawley was running away, he was met by Mr. Poole, who was coming back. Then I and Vaughan joined each other and followed them. Rawley had gone into Mr. Poole's shop a second time, and whilst he went in Donnelly crossed over toward Andersons. Rawley brought out a piece of cloth again; Rawley made off with the second piece of cloth, and it was then that Mr. Poole met him. Vaughan and I pursued after him, and as we were crossing after the prisoner Rawley, Donnelly also crossed, and ran nearly against us, and said George, Bob is gone that way, and Tom is gone that way. Then Donnelly made off, I did not see any more of him. We precerded after Rawley, and when we were following Rawley, we heard a cry of stop thief. We then hastened our pace, and ran after Rawley as hard

as we could, and when he had crossed the road, we saw him stop by a gentleman; but we did not know who it was until we got up, and found it was Mr. Poole, Farthing ran across the road, as if he was coming to Rawley, and was stopt. Vaughan picked up the cloth that was thrown away; that was the second piece. We took Farthing and Rawley into custody and took them to St. Giles's watchhouse. Then Vaughan and I took the cloth to his house. We then went to Batts's house, but seeing no light we came away. Vaughan and I met very early the next morning, and went to Batts's house, as early as four o'clock, and apprehended him. Donnelly was not taken, he was to escape. If it had not been settled, there was no difficulty in taking him. These persons were tired here, and capitally convicted.

Q. How soon did you see any of the prisoners again - A. In a day or two after, the commitment I saw Donnelly. In a day or two after, I don't know where, but I think in Cloth Fair, I and Vaughan were together, Donnelly said, you have get Jack, meaning Farthing. Farthing had at that time been committed for trial. Donnelly said that Jack was not there just at that time, meaning at Mr. Pooles. He went out with them, Donnelly said to go, but he stopped somewhere on the road, close by Mr. Pooles, but he was not there, at the time the robbery was committed. Vaughan said he had sworn to Farthing, and he was an old thief, and went out for the purpose of committing the robbery, and it could not be helped, and he should let it remain where it was. We agreed to meet at the Cloth Fair public-house, and we did according to the appointment. The chief of the conversation was about the three persons then in custody. I asked Donnelly what had become of the first piece of cloth that was taken on the 15th, that I had seen Rawley,give to Batts. He said, that when Rawley and Farthing were taken, Long Tom, meaning Thomas Batts , threw the cloth over Brunswick-square, ran back into Holborn to the watering house there, and fetched a rattler, meaning a hackney coach, whipped back to Brunswick-square, took the piece of cloth, and fenced it at old mother Jenning's, in Redlion Market. Before we left the Gost in Cloth Fair, Donnelly said he should go and live over the water, until it was all settled; for he was suspected of giving information against the persons, and he had heard it from several he knew. Before he left the house, he asked Vaughan for some money. Vaughan gave him ten shillings, and we then agreed to meet again in the course of a week which we did, according to appointment at the same place. This was not the only money that passed, Vaughan gave him shillings, or something on former occasions, at Perth's in Holborn, before the robbery was committed. Before we separated at the Goat, an appointment was made for us to meet again; that was for him to give Vaughan and me fresh information. We did meet again, and we used frequently to see Donnelly, but I don't remember anything that passed upon the particular occasions. I believe Vaughan altogether let him have between fifty and sixty shillings, and he had eight shillings of me.

Q.Do you remember any occasion in which Vaughan and Donnelly had any conversation in Portpool-lane - A. Yes, that was after I had apprehended Donnelly for stealing the gloves, and after he was discharged. After that I saw them again in company conversing together in the lane, and I could hear Donnelly mention his brother's name whom Vaughan had in custody for picking pockets. We frequently met afterwards. I heard that the officers were after me, and I suriendered myself to Mr. Harmer, and told him all I knew upon this subject, and another I was concerned in.

Q. We have found that these persons were not convicted of the burglary, but merely of thes tealing. Had you any conversation with either of the prisoners on the aubject of that verdict - A. On the day, or the day after the coviction, I saw Donnelly in Cloth Fair, and he said that the persons were convicted, but nothing allowed. That Vaughan had spoiled it, and he would be damned if he would give any more information. After the conviction some time, I had some conversation with Vaughan, and he several times asked me over the water, and at last I did go, and we went to where Donnelly lodged. I knew the woman that kept the house, and Vaughan staid along with Donnelly and his woman. I stepped down below with the woman of the house. After tea we came out of the house all three together. They two came down from above, and joined me. I had told Vaughan of the expression that Donnelly had made use of to me, saying that Vaughan had spoiled it, and he would be damed if he would give any more information. Vaughan asked Donnelly if he would give any more information, he promised he would, but he never did.

MARY EMBLING. I formerly lived with Thomas Batts . I lived with him at the time he was taken up; he was taken up at the same lodging with me.

Q. That was on the morning of the 16th - A. It was.

Q. Do you remember the night of the 14th - A. Yes.

Q. Who came home with Thoams Batts that night - A. John Donnelly, and Robert Rawley . They brought a piece of cloth with them, and desired me to pledge it, I did so, for one pound, and I gave the money to Thomas Batts , and it was shared among the three. On the night of the 15th, Donnelly came to my lodging again between the hours of seven and eight; Thomas Batts was not at home. He told me if Batts came home, to tell him to keep out of the way, or else he would be taken. He said Robert Rawley , and John Farthing were taken up for a robbery. Batts came home in the course of an hour or two afterwards, and the next morning between six and seven, he was taken by Barrect and Vaughan.

-PERTH. I keep the George public-house and liquor shop, in Middle-row, Holborn, facing the end of Gray's-inn-lane. I know Vaughan and Barrett, they have been in the habits of frequently frequenting my house in the months of November, and December last; I can't say that I ever saw them together; I have seen Donnelly there also. I don't know that I have ever seen him in company with Vaughan and Barrett.

CHARLES BALDING. I am a plumber, and live

in Portpool-lane. I recollect the time when Rawley and Farthing were apprehended. I heard of it the morning after the robbery; I was a watchman at the time. I look at the prisoners; I know them both; I have known Vaughan five or six years. I have not known Donnelly above a twelvemonth. About a week or ten days before the robbery, I saw Mr. Vanghan and John Donnelly at the corner of Wyatt's brewhouse-yard, in Portpool-lane.

Q.Were they conversing together - A.They were talking in the street; Donnelly stood off the pavement, and Vaughan stood on; Vaughan nodded his head to me as I passed. They talked about half an hour together, and I saw them go away together to the Marquis of Granby, in Gray's-inn-lane.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I apprehended the prisoners Vaughan and Donnelly, with the assistance of others. I apprehended Vaughan first; I had been searching for him very near a week before I found him; at last I found him at No. 3, New-street, Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel. I knew where he used to reside, it was in Gray's-inn-lane; I found him at his aunt's; I told him I wanted him, and that I had a warrant against him; he asked me to let him look at it, and I shewed it him. Read came in, and we searched him; we took this pistol from him, and some papers, He declared himself innocent I apprehended Donnelly on the 29th of July, in Beech-street, Barbican; he had on a kind of short coat, as he has now, and shoes up to the ancle, laced in front.

Q.Had you any conversation with him at the time you apprehended him-A. Coming along in the coach, he made use of an expression, d-n his eyes, he never knew a bigger rogue in his life than Vaughan was; he did not say any thing about himself.

Donnelly's Defence. I have nothing to say, only that Mr. Barrett is the first that induced me into it, and swore my life away.

Vaughan's Defence. I am innocent, and leave the whole case to my counsel.

DONNELLY, GUILTY , aged 22.

VAUGHAN, GUILTY , aged 24.

Judgement Respited.

[Their Case subject to the Opinion of the Twelve Judges.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-7

825. HANNAH MAHONEY and ANN KILLIVAR were indicted for the wilful murder of Maurice Walsh , on the 5th of August .

WILLIAM COWLEY . I am one of the patroles of the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields. Maurice Walsh was a watchman under me; he lived in Phoenix-yard, George-street. I remember the morning he was found dead. I had seen him alive at six o'clock in the afternoon of Monday, the 5th of August; he was at the bottom of George-street; I did not notice any cuts, scratches, or bruises on his face; I should have spoken to him, only seeing him in earnest discourse with another person, I did not; he appeared then in perfect health.

MARY ATKINS. I keep a public-house in St. Giles's. I know the prisoner at the bar, Killivar; I also know the other woman; they lived next door to me; I believe it is called No. 5. I saw Killivar on Monday, the 5th of August; I saw her three or four times between two and five o'clock; she came to my house for spirits; she did not say any thing to me about Walsh until night. I knew Walsh, the deceased; I had seen him on that day, and saw him on the Sunday. I saw Ann Killivar between ten and eleven at night; she came in very much frightened. I asked her what was the matter, and she said that Maurice Walsh was dead. I then said, is it the man that there is a piece of work about so often; she said, yes. I said it can't be; for I saw him but a while back, which I did. I asked her when he died? and she said, at three o'clock. I asked how? and she said when they came to move him for dinner they found him dead. I told her I was certain he did not die at that time, for I saw him at six o'clock. I asked her if she was sure he was dead, for very likely he was only in a fit; I then asked her who was with him when he did die, and she said, nobody but Hannah; Hannah meant Mrs. Mahoney. I told her to send for a doctor, and by no means to let the body be touched, for there must be an inquest held upon it. She went with her hands together, and begged for God's sake that I would not say the man was dead. She then asked me to let my servant fetch her some wood, as she was so frightened she could not fetch it herself. I then served her with half a pint of gin that she wanted.

Q.Do you recollect how much she had in the whole day-A. About a pint and half a quarter. I did not see her again in the course of that night. I had not seen Mahoney that afternoon. My house is so situated, that I can hear every noise in the house in which Mahoney lives. After this conversation I shut up my house immediately and went to bed. I had been to bed some time, and I believe it was between eleven and twelve when I was awakened by a tremendous crush, and in fact I thought it was my own street door that was broken open. I got up, and threw up the sash, as I slept in the front room, and I saw a short woman rush out of Mrs. Mahoney's house, and run into the street, saying, Mary, you have murdered him.

Q.Was that said to any one - A. I don't know. She turned round as she was coming out, and she came out as if she was pushed out. She said that, I thought to someone in the house. I knew that woman; I knew her very well; her name is Doe. I watched her into the next turning, and watched a considerable time to see if she would return; but: she did not return; I did not see or hear any thing more that night. I could not tell what part of their house that tremendous crash came from; but I know by the sound that it came from No.3.

JOHN SMITH . I am a beadle of St. Giles's and St. George's Bloomsbury. In consequence of information I received, I went to George-street about nine> o'clock on the morning of the 6th; I saw the dead body there when I first went into the room; by looking, I found it was Walsh; he was laying on a kind of table, and the body as high as the breast was covered with a white sheet; he had a clean frilled shirt on, and a white handkerchief tied in a large bow

tight round his neck. The window shutters were shut; the curtains were down, and Mahoney was there when I came in; I spoke to her.

Q. Now tell us, as near as you can recollect, every thing that was said - A.When I went into the room and found the corpse in the situation I have described, I asked Mrs. Mahoney how she came to remove the body? I said, I supposed she was aware that if that man died suddenly, there must be a Coroner's Inquest held on the body? she said, she was aware of that. I told her it ought to have remained in the clothes the man had on when he died? she said, as to that, it was her country fashion to lay them out as soon as they were dead. As I said before, I told her it was extremely wrong? and she said, she knew nothing about that. She said, that she hoped, or wished, or words to that effect, that the Coroner's Inquest might be delayed as long as possible. I told her that rested with the Coroner, and not with me. After that, I looked at the body; I saw some marks on the face; and seeing them, it struck me very forcibly, that the man had not died a natural death. I thought there appeared to be a blow on the left jaw, two scratches on the right jaw, and a scratch on the nose. I left the room immediately, and went to the Coroner for his warrant. That was all that passed on the Tuesday. Afterwards I saw the body more particularly; I saw it with Mr. Burges; about one o'clock. I went to Mr. Burgess after I had obtained the warrant from the Coroner. Mrs. Mahoney and three or four more were present when Mr. Burgess was there; I firmly believe that Mrs. Killivar and Mrs. Doe were there. The second time there were five or six candles. I assisted in examining the body more minutely the second time. I then saw the marks I had observed the first time, and also observed a mark round the neck, as if a small cord had been tied round very tight, and under the jaw on the right side there was a black mark as if the skin had been drawn up, or twisted up.

Q.Did Mahoney say anything - A. I forget. She said the first time, that he had died with the cramp in his stomack. I don't recollect that she said anything the second time. She attended before the Coroner's Jury, and so did Killivar. I had no conversation with Kilivar until I took her on Friday night; she told me she knew nothing about it; she stated to me as I was taking her in a coach to Marlborough-street, I am very sorry, but I did not speak the truth before the Coroner and the Jury. The answer I made was, you acknowledge not to have spoken the truth before the Coroner; she replied, that every word she spoke before the Coroner and Jury was false; she told me so herself, without asking any questions. She said, she was under great obligations to a certain person, who induced her to swear by the Holy Cross of Christ not tell the secret. She then informed me that after she was so sworn, she was shewn the dead body of Walsh; she said the body was lying on the bed, and the bed was very wet, as if water had been poured over it, and the body was nearly cold. She said, when the oath was sworn, a certain person said, she would shew her something, and then that certain person said, Maurice Walsh is dead, and then shewed the body; Killivar expressed something, that it was a shocking thing; and I told her it is not too late to tell the truth now, if you spoke falsely before; speaking of the nature of the crime she had committed. I told her, I was sorry at a married woman's swearing falsely; and she said, oh! we don't care for your oath. She did not speak to me any farther on the subject. Then we got up to the office. The day that the Coroner's Jury sat was the 7th of August. Mrs . Mahoney produced a handkerchief before the Coroner's Jury; this is the handkerchief, with this piece off.

JAMES DRISCALL . I live at 31, Little Portland, street, in the parish of St. James's. I remember Mrs. Mohoney calling me up on Tuesday morning, the 6th of August; it was the mother of the prisoner Mahoney; her mother said, she wished me and my wife to go to Mrs. Mahoney; accordingly I went; I got to her place between three and four o'clock; I saw a man laying dead on a bed there in the back parlour; he had part of his clothes on. I saw the prisoner Mrs. Mahoney there, her mother, and my wife, and several more who came backwards and forwards during the time; I knew Johannah Doe was one. The prisoner Killivar came in a short time afterwards; Mother Mahoney, the mother, asked me to lend a hand to undress the man, and I did; I took off a blue jacket, and stripped the body. The prisoner Mahoney assisted me; we striped the body entirely. I observed no marks of violence whatever. All the mark I could see was a small speck on the point of his nose; there was on neckcloth about his neck; I did not observe any mark on the neck I asked Mrs. Mahoney how he died? and she said, she did not know. Killivar did not say any thing that I know of. I was in the room nearly the whole day; I put the neckcloth on the dead man; it is customary. I don't know whose neckcloth it was; Mrs. Mahoney, the mother of the prisoner, gave it me. I held the candle when Mr. Burgess examined the body.

Q. Did you observe any marks that you had not seen before - A. Mr. Burgess pointed out a small crease, he thought about the neck.

Q. Did you observe it was so - A. I could not discern any more than the regular and natural wrinkle round his neck.

Q. When did you leave the appartment of the prisoner Mahoney - A. I was there backwards and forwards until the man was buried. I knew that Killivar lived in the same house. I asked Mahoney how the man came by his death? and she said, she did not know. I did not ask Killivar that question. The body was not shaved when I first saw it; I shaved it; Mrs. Mahoney requested me; she borrowed a razor for me to do it; I had never shaved a dead man before; I did it as a good natured act for a man whom I knew. I did not go to bed after three o'clock that morning.

ELIZABETH DAY . I lived at this house, No. 5, I know the prisoners at the bar; I knew the deceased also; the deceased had lodged in the second floor, but he had removed. He was at that house on the Monday, in Mrs. Mahoney's room; I did not see them together there, I only heard them. I had such

a knowledge of their voices that I was enabled to say with certainty that it was they.

Q. At what hour in the evening was your attention drawn towards them - A. I believe at six or seven o'clock, but I can't say exactly to half an hour. I heard a fighting and quarrelling for an hour or two, and I heard the deceased call out, Oh my God! my God! my Christ! my Christ! That was between six and seven o'clock. or it might be later; the fighting and quarrelling was before this; the quarrelling was all in two voices, which I could distinguish; I could hear Mahoney's voice, she was calling him a bitch's son, and all such low language as that. Their room window was open, for I heard it shut; it was shut immediately after the cries I have described. I went out at half past nine o'clock; up to that time I observed nothing farther than what I have observed already. At the time I was going, which was at about half after nine, I saw persons in the passage, and heard them talking in the back parlour, and I saw the woman from the Black Horse with a can of beer; they were talking in the back parlour as I went by; the door was shut. I returned at half past twelve; there was a woman sitting on the stairs I took no notice of that. At eleven o'clock the next morning I heard of this business.

ANN MITCHELL. On the 5th of August, I lived in Mrs. Mahoney's house. I went out on the night of that day, about half past nine; I came home about half past twelve. Mrs. Killivar let me in; the house was all quiet when I came home. About five o'clock in the morning Mrs. Maboney came up to my room, to fetch my table. She knocked at the door, I said who is there, she said Mahoney; and I asked her what she wanted, and she said she wanted to borrow my table; she asked me if I did not think it strange she should fetch the table, and I said yes, meaning so early in the morning; I asked her what she was going to do with it, and she said she was going to lay out a man on it; I asked her what man, and she said Walsh; I asked her how he came to die? and she said ask me no questions. With that she takes the table down stairs; I asked her if I should assist her, and she said no, she could carry it herself. At nine o'clock in the morning I went down and found Walsh laid out. This was a long deal table with four legs. When I was going down in the morning for wood to light my fire, I saw the body laid out, and Smith the beadle was coming in at the door. I heard no noise. I saw the body of Walsh, but did not go close enough to it to see any marks.

JOHANNA DOE . On the 5th of August, I lived in Buckeridge street, St Giles's. Mrs. Killivar came to me on the Monday about ten or eleven o'clock at night; it rained very hard; she asked me to come to Mrs. Mahoney's; I said I would not go, because I was very ill, and was almost blind. She then said Morriss Walsh was dead; I went along with her, and saw the man lying in the bed room with his clothes on; that was in the back parlour. I began to cry, I found him dead and cold. I went into the next room and was crying there until I was very ill indeed and I fell asleep in that place, and never left it until Dr. Burgess came that morning. I saw Mrs. Mahoney, she was crying, I did not ask her how he come by his death, nor did she tell me, not a word. I never said anything about how he died, so help me God, not a word.

CATHERINE AIRS . I live at No. 4, George-street St. Giles's, next door but one to where Mrs. Mahoney lived. I saw a woman come out of her house between eleven and twelve on the night in question; she came out and slammed the door after her, and said, the man is murdered, he is murdered. I heard nothing more that night.

ROBERT M'CLELLAN. I am an upholsterer, I live in Russell-street. I was passing through George-street on the night of the 5th of August at about a quarter before ten. At the house where the body was afterwards found dead. I heard a noise in the back parlour, like some people fighting; I heard them wrestling and fighting, and I heard them come against the wainstcoat and door three or four times. I did not hear any voices at that time. Immediately after that I heard something heavy fall on the ground as if one or two people had fallen down together. I then walked away, and had not gone above four or five paces, when I heard a person make a loud scream; it was very piercing, and seemed to come from a person convulsed, and in great agitation of mind. I then returned to the door, and heard a noise in the farther end of the passage, of people coming out. Instantly two men and a woman came out. There are two steps at the door, and they did not come down step by step, but they came all out in a lump down both, and ran down the street as fast as possible; they came out as if there had been a person behind them with a drawn sword; if there had been, they could not have come out with more hury. When they were gone, I looked in at the door to try if I could see any person, or if I could hear any noise; but I could neither.

MARY KILLIVAR. I am the child of one of the prisoners at the bar. On the 5th of August last, when Walsh died, my mother lived down in the cellar at Mrs. Mahoney's house. About six o'clock in the evening I came home, I did not hear any noise then. It was Sunday Mrs. Mahoney, and Mr. Walsh made the noise; they were fighting; it was about my father. Mrs. Mahoney and my father had a dispute, and Mr. Walsh interfered; one struck the other and so it began; they were fighting all night; she called him a b-y bitches son; and a b-y whore's son, and he called her a whore. I was on my mothers back stairs whilst this was going on. When I came home on the Monday evening, all was quiet, only Mrs. Mahoney cried on the bed. She was in the back room at the time, sitting on the bed crying. I went into the room, Mrs. Mahoney asked me to light the fire, and to get her a drop of water to get a cup of tea for us.

Q. Did you do as she desired you - A. Yes; I struck a light with a tinder box in Mrs. Mahoney's room; there was a little water in the kettle; my mother was in the same room with Mrs. Mahoney talking. Walsh was on the bed, where Mrs. Mahoney was sitting; she had been crying for a long time. Mrs. Doe was not in the room at that time. Mrs. Mahoney sent for her about three o'clock in the morning? She told my mother to go for a quartern

of gin and bitters; she went, and came back; my mother had one glass, and Mrs. Mahoney had another. I don't know what they talked about. The tears were coming out of my mothers eyes; my mother asked Mrs. Mahoney what was the matter with her; and Mrs. Mahoney would not tell her.

Q.What made your mother cry then - A. Mrs. Mahoney would not tell her what was the matter. I saw the old man in bed, he was stretched out, and his hands were laying down. Only part of the clothes was over him, I think a blanket, a sheet, and a quilt; he was dead.

Q. How did you know that - A.Because when I was putting the tea-things on the table, Mrs. Mahoney said she would not have any tea; at this time my mother was gone down to wash her hands and face. There were no clothes on Mr. Walshs's face, so I went over to the side of the bed, and saw he was dead; I was not alarmed, but when I found it, I set the tea-things on the table, and went down to my mother; my mother knew he was dead.

Q. How-A. Because Mrs. Mahoney told her, and made her swear by the ten crosses of Christ, not to tell any one that Mr. Walsh was dead.

Q. How is that done - A. She told my mother to put two fingers of one hand, across the fingers of the other; my mother was not to tell that old Mr. Walsh was dead. Mrs. Mahoney said no more at that time. My mother asked Mrs. Mahoney to lend her a bonet, and then she went to Marlborough-street, because there was a man had stuck my uncle. Mrs. Mahoney did not say anything to me after my mother was gone away. When I saw Mr. Walsh in the bed, he had no clothes on; he had his neck-cloth about his neck, and he had a shirt on, but no waistcoat; it was a white handkerchief. I looked at his face, it was all black and blue. I did not observe anything else. My mother came back from Marlborough-street about half past nine; she went into Mrs. Maboney's room. I went to bed, and told my father Mr. Walsh was dead. I heard Johanna Doe crying up stairs at the door, and I went up to her; she was in the parlour, in which the man was lying, she was at the bed along with Mrs. Mahoney, crying. I was going into bed, but I heard such a noise up stairs that I would go up. I went up to the door of Mrs. Mahoney's room, and my mother opened it for me; then I went down stairs again, and went to bed. There is a hole in Mrs. Mahoney's door for the key; a person can see through that hole; if you look through, you can see the bed.

Q. Did you see anything through that hole after the door was shut - A.That night.

Q. Yes - A. No I did not look through the hole that night.

Q. Had you ever seen anything through the keyhole before - A. Yes, I could see Mrs. Mahoney go into bed with Mr. Walsh. In the day time of that day I saw Mrs. Maboney at the bed through the key hole, that was when it was day light. My mother was not in the room at that time; I found the door locked, and I looked through the key hole, and saw her on the bed; he was inside the bed, and she was laying outside, I could see his hands; his hands were outside the bed clothes; one of Mrs. Mahoney's hands were under her own head, and the other was on her body; she appeared to me to be asleep. I heard the people say the next morning, that the work-house doctor was there. My mother did not come in the morning until three o'clock. I do not remember carrying any water to Mrs. Mahoneys, nor seeing any water made use of until I was there. I did not see any scattered about the room or bed. I did not, while I was looking through the key-hole see anything done to the body. My uncle's name is Desmond. I have been staying with him since my mother has been in prison. When my mother came down at three o'clock in the morning, she spoke to my father but it was in Irish, and I do not understand that. My father asked her what made her so late, and she said she had been up with Mrs. Mahoney. On the Sunday when Mrs. Mahoney, and Mr. Walsh were fighting, Mrs. Mahoney beat him with the poker and shovel about the head and shoulders. Walsh knocked her down with his hands. When she beat him, he had been at the step of the door speaking to my father.

Q. The next morning had he any marks - A. Yes, he had a bite on his nose. Walsh aad Mahoney had dined together.

MARY MAHONEY . I am the mother of the prisoner Mahoney. She sent for me on the Monday night, between twelve and one; Old Walsh was as dead then, as he is now; he looked as though he was asleep. My daughter told me that Maurice was dead. I went over to the bed, and I said La! so he is sure enough.

Q. Were there any marks on his face - A. No, not that I saw a hap-worth. He look as though he was asleep in his clothes.

Q. Did you hear your daughter say how he died - A. I did not ask; I did not want to hear anything more about it again. Mrs. Killivar did not tell me. I did not see any knives or forks or plates in the room, and there were no clothes on the man but his own. I did not see anything about his neck.

JOSEPH BURGESS . I am apothecary to the parish. On the morning of the 6th of August, I was sent for to this house, in George street. I found a dead body there; I was shewn into the back parlour, by Smith, the beadle. I saw Mrs. Mahoney there, Smith, and others, whose names I don't know. The body was laid out in the usual manner for an Irish Wake; it was stript of its clothes, but had a sheet about it; it had a neck cloth about its neck. Mrs. Mahoney knew me perfectly well. I examined the body externally; I observed no kind of mark about it; whatever, by which I could account for its death; my attention was then directed to the head and neck, and I took the neck cloth off; I observed a very extensive bruize on the left jaw under the ear, and several scratches on the face; this was in the presence of several persons. I think I observed it in the hearing of those who were present; I am not positive, I also found a very plain and decided mark extending all round the neck. I concluded in my own mind that the mark about his neck was the cause of his death. I asked Mrs. Mahoney wether she had sent for any medical man, and why not for me, as she knew me? her reply was, that she was so

agitated that she did not know what she did; she did not say any thing more to me. I did not examine his hands the first day. I concluded that the mark round the neck must have been produced by a rope or some such thing tight about the neck. I concluded it must have been produced by a rope; but I can't take upon myself to say it was; it night have been produced by a tight-bandage, a silk handkerchief twisted tight would have produced it; it was such a mark as satisfied me that it must be produced by something small, it was regular all round. On the day the Coroner's Inquest took place, I examined it in the presence of the Coroner and of the Jurors I pointed out the same marks upon the neck as I had observed before, although they were not quite so very evident. I then examined the arms; I found them very much discoloured the lower arms; they looked as if some ligature had contained then so as to impede circulation. I think the mark round the neck would produce stragulation and death. I should think the bruize on the lower jaw would not produce death it was not in a part where a bruize would be fatal

Johanna Doe . Re-called. Mr. Walch had been very bad, complaining of pain in his stomach: he used to drink I told him if he did not take better care of himself, he would soon finish himself, for he drank very hard.

The prisoners made a very long defence, denying their guilt.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd

Reference Number: t18160918-8

826. FRANCES SIBLEY and ANN TILLING were indicted for feloniously assaulting Timothy Root , in the King's highway on the 31st of July , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person. and against his will, a purse: value 1s, a key, value 2d. ten shillings and sixpence in monies numbered, and two one pound bank notes, his property .

TIMOTHY ROOT. I am a gardner ; I live at Eltham, in Kent. On the night of the 31st of July last, I was in Whitechapel , going along the footpath in the Hight street; it was about half past eleven as I was told, I heard the watchman say so. I saw both the prisoners that evening; the first thing was, I was walking along, and they asked me to go with them both; I told them I had a home of my own, and I asked them where did they think their home was; and they followed nine up to the entrance an Alley which is called Castle Alley; then they give me a sudden snatch, about two yards up the Alleys, I am sure I was forced up the Alley by intervals they had both a hold of me then he then seized hold of my left hand, and the either my light, and pinned both my arms down. Then a man came up, and clapped his hand upon my mouth, and stopped me from taking my breath. Then they held me in that way; I could not call out; the holding my mouth stopped my breath entirely. I was then held so until they drew the purse out of my pocket. The biggest of the prisoners, Sibley, drew the purse out of my pocket, with two one pound Bank of England notes in it, a duplicate of a watch, and about ten or eleven shillings in silver; there was a key also, in the breeches pocket were the purse was. It was very dark where they stood I know they and the same women by their talking to me and my answering them in the Highway. There was a lamp at the end of the passage, and in the Highstreet also. They then ran away, and when I recovered myself, I called stop thief, The man that had held my mouth bolted out of the passage. When I called out stop thief the watchman sprang his rattle, and the man and one of the prisoners were apprehended before I got out of the passage; that prisoner was Sibley. The other women was just by me when I went out, and I gave charge of them all; they were close together and was in the watchhouse when they were searched but I did not see my property.

JOHN ALBERT . I am a watchman at Whitechapel, my stand is opposite Castle Alley. On the 31st of July at about half past eleven, I was at the corner of Reddich street, standing with my back against a door with my coat over my light, and I saw two women and a man ran over from the opposite side from Castle Alley; they ran accross the way in a very great hury; I heard the cry of stop thief, and I followed this party about twenty yards. The whole three name close out together, and the man attempted to cross the road again; with that I sprang my rattle; the man crossed the road, and the woman going straight on. By the assistance of an extra watchman that was going along, we took the whole three into custody. When I came close to them, the man attempted to cross the road, but we secured them. I pursued the man; the other watchman stopped the women. It was not three, minutes from the time step thief was called until they were all taken into custody; they were never out of my sight I had sight of the whole three until they were apprehended; I was present when they were searched and none of these things were found on them.

JOHN BOUTLE. I am headborough of the parish of Whitechapel. I remember when the two prisoners were brought with the man to the watchhouse. The prosecutor charged them with this robbery. I snached them all three; I found nothing at all on these women nor did I find any thing on the man that relates so this charge, I found on him a watch-chain, a guinea in gold a three-shilling bank token one shilling and two sixpences.

(It came out in the course of the trial that the bill of indictement; against the man spoken of as an accomplice with the prisoners, was thrown out by Grand Jury.)

Timothy Root. Re-called. Did you tell, the Grand Jury that you believed that the man who was apprehended at the same time with the prisoners was the man who gagged you - A. I did tell them I believed so.

Q. And do you now believe so - A. Yes, I know so.

SIBLEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

TILLING, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-9

827. CATHERINE WINTER was indicted for

breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sampson Battomley about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 10th of August , in St.Matthew Bethnal Green , Sarah Battomley and others being therein,) and stealing therein, two shifts, value 1s. four handkerchief value 2s. one pillow-case, value 1s. three neck-cloths value 2s. two night-caps value 6d one night-gown value 6d. one table cloth, value 2s one frock value 6d. and one window-curtain, value 6d. the property of the said Sampson Battomley .

SARAH BATTOMLEY. On the 16th of August I was in the front parlour, from one to two o'clock. Then I tied my weeks linen up, belonging to the whole family in a bundle, I placed that bundle in an arm chair, at the further end of the room from the door. I went away exactly as the clock struck two. I shut the front parlour door. I have the whole house; the outer door of the parlour in which these things where was shut; then I went to attend my school room, which is close to my parlour; there is not a great distance from the two doors. At half past four I had occasion to go into the room, and I missed my things. I made an alarm, and a neighbour of mine gave me some information; her name is Hannah Strover . There were in the bundle, the things mentioned in the indictment, and other things. The most valuable of them have not been found. All the things might be worth thirty shillings; I saw part of them at Lambeth-street, and knew them again.

SAMPSON BATTOMLEY. At the time I found the prisoner in the act of pledging part of the property a shirt, and a waistcoat, in one of my own pocket-handkerchiefs. The shirt and waistcoat were not my property. The bundle was in her right hand, And the instant I went into the shop, I said that was my handkerchief, and the pawnbroker told me to be very circumspect, as there were many handkerchiefs alike, it was my handkerchief. She said she had bought it fifteen months before in Bethnal Green Road. She was going with me to shew me where she bought it, and about for or five steps from the door, two of Mr. Richardson's young man came after me with the bundle, and asked me if it was mine; and I made answer that the hankerchief was, as well as the property that was inside of it. I had not the bundle there. I observed that the handkerchief was mine. When I took the prisoner back to the pawnbrokers, I specified what things were my property. I opened the bundle, there I discovered the childrens frocks in the bundle, and I knew the things all to be mine except a waistcoat and shirt; that was the same bundle I had seen in the pawnbrokers shop with the prisoner, The prisoner then said that it was her sister at Bethnal Green sent her to pawn them and it was a cruel thing. Then I took her down to Lambeth-street office immediately; going along, a great many people tried to rescue her. When I delivered her in charge to the officer, he searched her, and she made an answer and said, that all the things in the bundle were not mine; she said just the same before the Magistrate.

JOHN CROSS . I live with Richardson the pawnbroker. I remember the prisoner coming to Mr. Richardson's shop on the 16th of August; he brought with her a shirt, waistcoat and an old handkerchief; I did not see anything else with her then. She proposed to pawn them. I afterwards saw a bundle in the shop which she had dropped. The prisoner, when she dropped the bundle, pulled the woman that was next her over it; that was to hide the bundle from Mr. Battomley's seeing it, and when they were gone, the woman pulled it out; I know that woman did not bring that bundle in. Mr. Richardson and I then went, and that handkerchief matched the other which Mr. Bottomley had.

HANNAH STROVER . I live right facing of Mrs. Battomley's house. On the 16th of August, I saw some one go into Mr. Battomley's house, I don't know the time, as I have no clock. I saw the prisoner go into Mrs. Battomley's house; I am positive of it; she went in at the street door, I saw her come out again; she remained in a very few minutes; she had nothing with her when she went in, but when she came out, she had a bundle with a silk handkerchief carefully thrown over it; she turned to the left, I can't tell rightly what the hour was: it was after my dinner. I work at a mangle, I was terribly busy, This was on a Friday, which is a very busy day with me.

ROBERT COMBES . The prisoner and all the things were delivered into my custody; she said all these things were not the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The good lady swore at the office to my person only by a black gown with a stripe. I know nothing of the charge alledged against me, I am very innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18160918-10

828. ROBERT YANDELL was indicted for sodomy .

GUILTY - DEATH aged 44.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-11

829. ROBERT TOWNSEND was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain promissory note for payment of money , which is as follows, that is to say;

"I promised to pay to Mr. Robert Townsend, for order, six month after date, the sum of seven hundred and twenty-five pounds for value received.

Witness my hand, FORTUNATUS Crisp.

"Dated Yarmouth, Norfolk , January 5th , 1816". With intention to defraud the said Fortunatus Crisp , against the statute.

AND OTHER COUNTS. Only varying the manner of laying the charge.

FORTUNATUS CRISP. I live at Yarmouth. I know the prisoner at the bar. I was an executer under his father's will with himself and another one Joseph Haines . In the easily part of sheet year 181 is be gave me a receipt; he delivered this to me with his own hands.

(The receipt was here put in and read, and, was on receipt for one shilling, bearing date February 5th, 1814 in full satisfaction of all demands from the prisoner to the prosecutor.)

RICHARD SMITH . I am in attendence upon my Lord Ellenborough , the Chief Justice of the Court

of King's Bench. I produce a promissory note, given in evidence in the Court on the 14th of June last, in an action of Townsend against Crisp, it was ordered to be impounded by the Court, upon the motion of the Attorney General.

JAMES NICHOLLS . I live at No. 16, Frederick place, Hampstead Road. I know the prosecutor, who has been examined here. I know his handwriting and I have seen him write. I look at the signature to this promissory note, and say I believe it not to be his hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDEREWS. I am a cabinet-maker; I have been living two years opposite to St. James's Chapel; I don't keep a shop there; I am a journeyman, living in a private house; not a house of my own; I am a lodger; I work for Mr. Osborne, in Tottenham-court-road; he does not keep a broker's shop; he keeps an upholsterer's; there are very few old goods; he sometimes has old goods; he does not often buy goods at sales. I have worked for him a year and a quarter; I will not swear that he does not sometimes deal both in new and old goods; I work as a cabinet-maker for my bread; that is all. I have known Mr. Crisp fifteen or sixteen years; he has generally resided at Yarmouth. I once lived at Yarmouth, I corresponded with him; I can't tell how often; oftener perhaps than once a year; perhaps oftener than twice a year, I can't speak exactly. I have not got all the letters, nor any of them. I kept them a certain time; I did not look to see if I had any of them before I came out. I lived at Yarmouth until the last two years.

Q. How often within these fifteen years have you corresponded with him - A. By letter, note, and doing business with him always.

Q. How many times may he have written to you A. I can't say how often; more than three or four times; I have bad at least as many letters of his as that; perhaps not more. I can't say exactly within what time last past, but within the last two years, I may have received three; one of which have I preserved. I can't say exactly where Crisp first told make should want me as a witness to disprove this hand-writing. Upon my word, I don't know when he first came to me. That is the best account I can give of it.

Q. Within how many months or weeks last past did he come to you to tell you he should want you as a witness - A. I think it was about last Christmas time; it is so long back.

Q. Did he take you any where along with him - A.Not the first time.

Q. Did he not tell you what he wanted with you - A. Yes.

Q. And upon your oath, did you not tell him, it is no use calling upon me Mr. Crisp, I do not know your hand-writing - A. I never told him such a thing in my life.

Q.When did you meet him - A. I met him at the Prince of Wales.

Q.By accident - A. Yes, by accident.

Q. How near is that to your house - A. I lodge at the Prince of Wales.

Q.Did you not tell us that you lodged at a private house - A. Why, it is not a shop.

Q.But in as much as you said it was a private house, and you now say it is a public-house; reconcile those two accounts if you can? -

Q.Then you cannot give us any other account of it - A. No; it is a public-house, the landlord's name is Bees; I believe he is a married man; I am not sure of that; there is a person there who officiates as his wife. This application was made about Christmas. The next time when I saw Crisp again, was when he came up to Town about this business again; I don't know when it was.

Q. Did he not bring papers and specimens of writing to you - A. Yes, he brought banker's checks.

Q. Did he not produce specimens of his handwriting at your request, because you could not undertake to prove his hand-writing - A. No; he did not. These checks were signed by the name of Crisp: I believe this was better than six months ago; he did not produce them upon my expressing a desire for his doing so; nor upon my telling him that I could not swear to his hand-writing.

Q. Then why did he produce them, for what reason - A. I don't know; he gave no particular reason.

Re-examined by MR. ALLEY. I do not derive my information of this being or not being his hand-writing from those checks.

Q. Are you enabled to say it is not his, handwriting from any other circumstance - A. Oh dear yes; I had a sufficient knowledge of his hand-writing.

Examined by the COURT. If you knew his hand-writing, for what possible use could he have produced those checks to you - A.He did not produce them to me in particular; but to several other persons.

Q. But what did he say - A.He shewed them I believe to shew that the writing corresponded, and I was to see it amongst the rest. I don't know that he put it down by me in particular; I can't recollect at the present time what was said.

Q. Did he not tell you he should want you as a witness - A. He asked me if I was sufficiently acquainted with his hand-writing to swear to it; and I told him, I was, and he afterwards shewed me these checks. I can't recollect the names of all the persons who were present when these checks were produced, but I believe Mr. Smallman and Mr. Loddy; I don't recollect any body else.

ANTHONY BLACKHURNE. I live at Yarmouth. I am acquainted with the prosecutor, Mr. Crisp; I have known him seven years; I have had frequent opportunities of becoming acquainted with his hand writing.

Q. Look at that bill, and tell me if you believe it to be his hand writing - A. On my oath I believe it is not; I think there is no similarity; I have seen him write repeatedly.

ROBERT FLEMING . I live at No. 46, Wardour-street; I know Mr. Crisp about seven years; I have frequently seen him write, and have had opportunities

of knowing his hand writing. I look at this bill, it has not the slightest likeness to his hand writing.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. I was never at the Prince of Wales public-house. He first came to tell me I would be of use in January; he did not show me anything; I am positive of that; I think Capt. Shepperd was present. He came to my house, and he asked me if I should know his hand writing, I said I should; he asked me if I had any bills of his, and I replied I believed I had. I had seen some of them frequently, and I have looked at them and my receipts since that.

Q.Then you would not swear that you believed this was not his hand writing, unless you looked at the bills and receipts by yours - A. Yes I would.

Q.Then how came you to look at them - A.Merely for the satisfaction of the thing, knowing I had them by me.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am a police officer. In July last, I apprehended the prisoner in Guildhall; Read my brother officer searched him after he was in, custody; in my presence this pocket-book was found on him; there is a copy of a letter there and a slip of paper; the signature is torn off the bottom of the letter, and it is on the slip of paper; there is also the copy of the bill in question.

(The documents were put in and read; the letter purported to be a copy of a letter sent by Mr. Crisp to the prisoner, relative to family affairs; and the slip of paper fitted the copy, and contained the signature.)

MR. RICHARD BREWER . I was the attorney for the prisoner at the bar. In the action which he brought against Mr. Crisp, he delivered to me the bill upon which I brought that action; he delivered to me that bill at Chancery Chambers; they are in the County of Middlesex. (The forged bill put into the hands of the witness) I cannot say anything to this bill. The action I brought was upon a bill for a similar amount; this looks like it but I will not swear positively to it. I don't know it because there is same writing on it since I had it. I will not positively swear at this is the bill.

Q. Are you still upon the rolls - A. I believe so.

Q. Do you doubt that too - A. No, but the bill upon which I brought the action had no such writing as there appears upon th1s.

Q.It does not purport to have had that writing on before the action was brought but that hand writing appears to be the writing of Mr. Smith the officer of my Lord Ellenborough - A. And that makes the doubt.

Q.That writing must have been put on subsequent to the bringing of the action. Suppose it was not on, is that the bill you brought the action on; and if it be, when and from whom did you receive it - A. I believe it to be the bill, and I received it in November last from Townsend or another person who came with him; George Warburton came with him at the time; and I cannot positively say which of them it was gave me the bill, but I believe it was the prisoner. While the bill was in my possession, I did not suspect anything, and therefore did not examine it very particular, or perhaps so strictly as I cught to have done. I suppose it is the same bill but I would not wear positively. It appear to be payable to Robert Townsend it was on the 20th, or 21st of November 1815 nearly a year ago when it came into my hands.

Q.And Mr. Warburton name at the time-A. Yes.

Q.And whether Warburton or Townshend gave you the bill, you don't know - A. No.

Q.And whether this is the bill or not you will not swear - A. No.

Q. Is there anything on the face of the bill which could enable you to swear to it positively - A. It resembles it, but I cannot swear positively to it.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my fathers's property I want; I leave my case to my counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

Of uttering only.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18160918-12

830. THOMAS BOOTH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Marshall , about the hour of three in the night of the 8th of August , with intent to steal and for burglariously stealing therein, ten razors value 10s. one necklace, value 18s. and one pair of snuffers, value 7s. the goods of the said Henry Marshall .

HENRY MARSHALL . I remember being called up on the night of the 8th of August; it was about three o'clock in the morning; it is my dwelling-house, I am a jeweller . When I was called, I looked out of the window, and was informed by people who stood under the window that the place had been broken open; It was quite dark, and the watchman had a light in the lanthorn. I dressed myself, and I went down stairs, and found that the shop shutters had been forced one over the other they were perfectly secured up the night before. The fastenings were then the same as they had been the night before, only the bar was sprung and one of the shutters was forced over the other. The glass was broken, and ten razors taken out, and a pair of snuffers, and a coral necklace. These things had been within reach of the broken pane. I saw some of the things, the same morning; in the course of an hour I saw the coral necklace, and one of the razors.

THOMAS PETERKIN ; I am headbarough of Limehouse . I know the prisoner at the bar. I remember seeing him on the night between the 8th and 9th; I saw him at Mr. Marshall's window, it was about three in the morning, at his shop window; he was standing at the window doing something with his hands; as soon as I saw him, a man who stood by held up his hand, and whistled; them the prisoner jumped backwards off the payment into the middle of the road, and came towards me, and they turned up a turning called Thomas's-rents before they came to me; I did not lose sight of the prisoner, but followed him; the other man ran with him. I proceeded after them, and when I came to Ropemakes's Fields, I called out stop thief, as loud, as I could call twice. The patrole went to stop them, and the prisoner then turned down the same street where he had been committing the robbery. I ran through an Alley, and caught the prisoner just close

to the watchhouse door; I lost sight of him while I turned one corner, but not for a minute. The patrole was close to him when I caught him. I went round another way, I gave the prisoner into the custody of Mr. Lines. I searched the prisoner; but found nothing on him. I then called Mr. Marshall up. I found the necklace and a razor under the window, and have them here now; I have had them locked up ever since. The necklace was under the shutter that was forced open; it was a very large pane of glass that was broken, and a man might have got his head in.

JOHN PETERS . I remember the last witness calling to me to stop two men; I saw two men running; I crossed the way as they were coming in; one man shot against me, and I got the prisoner against the wall, and he turned up Force-street, and then I afterwards was close to him when we stopped him in Thomas's-rents. I found nine razors, a pair of snuffers, and a crow bar.

-LINES. I am a constable of the night. I compared the crow with the marks on the shutters, and the marks corresponded.

Prisoner's Defence, In the evening before this happened, I was coming along Whitechapel, and I met a man named Jones, and I had been out of employ a fortnight, and he said to me, Booth, are you out of employ; and be said, why don't you go into the fields early of a morning, and get a few mushrooms. I got up early in the morning, and as I was going past this shop window, I saw the shutter had been removed, and I stopped a little, about half a minute, and on turning my head, I saw a man with a white apron, and I said, I should alarm the watchman, and he made answer follow me, and I thought he was going to alarm the watchman, and I followed him, and presently I heard a voice say stop, and I turned up the street where this depredation had been committed, which I should not have done if I had been concerned in it; I know I am very innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-13

831. EDWARD SHORTLAND and MARTHA HILL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Stennet , about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 22nd of July , (no person in the same dwelling-house then being,) and stealing therein, two sets of bed-furniture, value 3l. 8s. two sheets, value 5s. two gowns, value 20s. one frock, value 10s. one petticoat, value value 6d. one handkerchief, value 1s. four shirts, value 10s. one pair of stockings, value 1s. one cap, value 6d. one watch, value 5s. and one necklace, value 20s. the property of the said William Stennet .

WILLIAM STENNET . On the day stated in the indictment, I had been out, and on my return was informed my house had been broken open.

SARAH STENNET . I am the daughter of the last witness. On the 22nd of July last, I quitted my father's house; my mother was gone out before me. I was the only person left at home. A little boy brought a message to me that I was to go and meet my mother at Shoreditch Church at three o'clock; I did not know the boy.

Q. Before you went did you fasten the doors and windows - A. Yes; I locked the door, and I am sure that the doors and windows were fast when I went out.

Q. On looking about you before you went out, was all your father's furniture and all your mother's wearing apparel safe in the house - A. Yes. I met my mother in the Kingsland-road; she had been to Town; she came by Shoreditch; she came home with me; she is very ill. I returned with her about seven o'clock. I went out before three; I left nobody in the house. On my return, I found one of the panes of glass cut out; that was where the latch opens. Any person who put his hand in through that part might open the hasp.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say that the window was entire as to all its parts before you went away - A. There was one of the bottoms out before I went away; but nobody however, by putting their hands through that, could open the window; I am sure none was out near the hasp. I took notice of the things before I went out, and when I returned. I missed two bed-furnitures, three gowns, four shirts, two frocks, a coral necklace, and other things mentioned in the indictment, together with a purse and three half-crowns, and a few two-penny and three-penny silver pieces; no other money that I am aware of. I saw some of these things on the following Saturday week; I saw them at the magistrates. That is all I know about it.

EBENEZER DALTON. I am a police officer of Whitechapel. I know Shorthand; I never knew him until I apprehended him; I went to a place that I understood was his lodging, on the 23rd of July last; it was at 28, Harbour-street; Griffths and Cpombs were with me, they are two officers. When we went to the house Griffths and I went up; I had received information about half an hour before that, that such things were deposited in the prisoners apartment, and supposed to be stolen. I went into that apartment; I did not see the prisoners at first. While we were searching the room, the female prisoner came home; as soon as she saw us, she ran down stairs directly; I hallooed out to Coombs to stop her, and I ran down, and brought her up again where Griffiths was. I searched her, and down her bosom I found these beads. I got some information from her. In consequence of that, I went into the Minories, and there I found Shortland smoaking a pipe. I asked him what his name was; and he said, Smith. I asked him where he lived; he said, he lived in Fashion-street, Spittalfields. I told him he must go along with me, and he came with me, and when I got him to No. 28, in this street, I said. I think you live here instead of Fashion-street; I took him in to the lower room. I searched him, and look the watch out of his pocket; I have had that watch over since.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I was in this lodging. I know no more than receiving the information from the woman. I don't remember the man saying that he had only lodged there one night; Hill said that she had lodged there more nights than one. As soon as

we went up stairs, I found this property tied up under the bedstead. While I was there looking round the room, the female prisoner came on the stairs, but not quite into the room. When she saw me, she ran down immediately; we called out to stop her below, she was stopt by Coombs; she was searched by Dalton, and that necklace was taken from her bossom. While I was searching her box, she flew down stairs the second time; Dalton went down stairs after her, and brought her back up stairs, and I searched her box, and in different parts of the room I found all the property which is here.

SARAH SPARKS . I keep the house in which this property was found; I look at the prisoner Hill; she took the room on the Thursday; she said, she should not sleep there that night and on the Friday Shortland and she came together, and they brought a box; they did not sleep there that night, nor on the Saturday night. The young woman slept there on the Saturday night, and on the Sunday night; Shortland came about eleven. Shortland went out about five o'clock in the morning, and came home to breakfast, and after that they both went out together within a minute or two. In the evening Hill brought in the two bundles just in the dark, and she said, she was tired, and I helped her up.

Shortland's Defence. I was at work with a gentleman at the time of the robbery, and went for a pair of lasts.

Hill's Defence. These things were given to me in a bundle in Brick-lane by a girl of the name of Ann Smith, and she asked me to take them into my room.

SHORTLAND, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

HILL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18160918-14

832. JAMES THOMAS SPENCER was indicted for that he, about the hour of eleven o' clock, in the night of the 13th of August , at St. Dunstan's Stepney, being the dwelling-house of John Bluck , did steal therein, one hundred and twenty books, value 6l. twenty-five knives, value 25s. twenty-three forks, value 23s. one set of casters, value 3s. one pair of candlesticks, value 3s. three pair of salts, value 5s. one pair of decanters, value 8s. one pair of bottle stands, value 2s. one pair of bell-pulls, value 2s. two juggs, value 2s. two baskets, value 2s. and one print, value 5s. the property of the said John Bluck; and that he, having so committed the said felony in manner aforesaid, afterward, to wit, about the said hour of eleven o'clock in the night of the same day, and at the said parish, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house to get out of the same, against the statute .

JOHN BLUCK . On the 13th of August last, I lived at Stepney . I had a variety of articles in my house; they were chiefly books and articles of furniture that I lost. All these articles were safe on the 13th of August; I saw nothing missing the evening before the robbery; I did not sleep in the house that night; only servants and a sister of mine slept in the house that night; Miss Sarah Bluck is a sister of mine. All I can tell is that the next day I discovered I had lost a great many articles of household furniture and wearing apparel. The prisoner was a servant of mine.

SARAH BLUCK . When I went to bed the over night all the property seemed in its usual safe condition. In the morning the female servant come up to me; on her giving me some information, I went down. The night before I left a pair of bellows, some books, some decanters, some knives and forks, some china, and there were numerons other things that I can't recollect. I never saw any of these things again. When I went down stairs, I did not perceive any thing, because I knew that all the doors and windows of the house were left safe; but they were only so secured that any one inside might have let himself out. I had been in the apartments where these several things were; I saw these things in their proper situations. In the course of the next day I saw the prisoner in the kitchen. When I came down in the morning I did not look for him, I had not any occasion to want him.

MARIA ROSE . I was servant to Mr. Bluck. On the 15th of August last, I went to bed that night about ten; I locked the door and fastenings; I also looked at the articles the over night, and did not miss any thing. I gave orders to the prisoner to go to bed; that was before I went to bed myself, and then he appeared to be going towards the stairs, as if he were going to bed himself. We three were the only persons in the house. There had been a sale by auction the day before in the house. The several articles were in different sets in the sale-room. I went into the sale-room before I went into bed; I observed none of the articles missing. In the morning it was Mr. Sitgraves pointed out the loss to us; we did not perceive any thing missing until he pointed them out to us. I got up in the morning about eight o'clock. I believe the prisoner was up stairs about half an hour after I got up; I had not any conversation with him in particular.

WILLIAM STTGRAVES . I am an auctioneer's porter. I attended the sale on the 12th, 13th, and 14th. I have a catalogue of the goods; they were chiefly household goods. The things that were sold on the 13th remained on the premises; I saw them as late as seven o'clock, and I left the premises as late as half past seven, first looking round the house, as I generally do, to see that no person was secreted. I attended the next morning at half past nine; then I missed the things in the indictment, which had been safe the over night. I missed them by looking over my catalogue. I was the first person that discovered they were missing. Neither Miss Bluck nor the maid bad taken any alarm, that I had heard of, the next morning.

(Witness here recites from his catalogue the several articles that were missing, which are the same as mentioned in the indictment.) I saw almost the whole of the things again about three weeks after they were stolen. I had a suspicion who stole them; I took steps for the detection of the thief. I went immediately to my master's son, who is an attorney in the neighhourhood; I told him we had been robbed; I communicated my suspicion to my master's son soon after ten that morning. I taxed the prisoner myself; I

did not tell him it would be better for him to acknowledge it; I did not threaten him. I taxed him strongly; he said he was in bed soon after eight at night, and slept until half past eight the next morning soundly, and he heard nothing in the house to disturb him whatever. I told him he must sleep very soundly indeed. He said what was it to him if they were lost; he had no charge of them whatever. Going round the place to see if I could make any discovery, he pointed out a ladder to me against a pent-house, and said here is where they got in I suppose. This ladder had been taken from an out-house in the garden; and I said that was rather impossible, for there were four feet from the ladder to the top; and then there was a thin leaden flushing which I said if a child had stepped on it, it would have left a mark. He said he did not know any thing about it, and he got out of my sight as fast as he could always. I observed that he had hurt his leg, which was one occasion for my suspicion; it was his foot; he had his shoe cut considerably, and there had been no appearance of lanen as about him the day before; he appeared very different from what he did the day before; he looked jaded. and as if he had been drinking. The moment he let me in. in the morning, I asked him what he had been doing with himself all night, (that was before I knew any thing was lost;) for his appearance was so changed? he said he was lame of a rorn, and he went away immediately out of my sight.

RALPH HOPE I am a police officer. On the morning of the 14th of August, I took the prisoner into custody, in company with William Hewitt . We taxed the prisoner with the robbery; he utterly denied it. I asked him what time he went to bed on the preceeding night. I did not hold out any expection of mercy to him. He said it was half past eight when he went to bed, and he never came down stairs till half past eight the next morning. We proceeded to search him; in his pocket was found a written paper, being a list of all the articles that were missing; I did not know whose hand-writing it was, and I found the ticket of a turnpike gate No. 70, on him; it was Cannon-street - road gate. I was present when all the papers were taken from him, also three pieces of matches such as you light the candles with, together with a key which opens the gate into Mr. Bluck's Yard; it goes from there into the school-room, and so into the house; it is a gate which fronts into the street, it is a side door that goes into a little yard, and thence into the house. I asked him how he came possessed of those matches, he said that Maria, the servant maid, had said that she had got no matches in the house, and that she would thank him to go out and get some. I then asked him when that was, and he said between six and seven 0'clock the evening before. That was all that passed.

Maria Rose. The boy did not get any matches for me; I am sure of that.

Ralph Hope . He was then apprehended and committed for examination. In about a fortnight after, I saw an advertisement in the Morning Advertiser. (Witness here produces that newspaper, and reads the advertisement of which he speaks.) In consequence of that, I went to No. 10, Gulfsone-street, Whitechapel; Mrs. Thompson keeps that house. We told her we had seen an advertisement about some things, in the paper, and she said that was the house. I saw the two pictures; she took us to a room up stairs, to a room where a girl named Ann Baker lodged; I got the two pictures from Mrs. Thompson, one is here; the other was delivered to a Mr. Power, who had put it into the sale, and it was not sold. We got the whole of the property there; we have had it in our custody the whole time. I also found three pawnbroker's duplicates, which were delivered to me by Ann Baker ; they are the duplicates of Baker, 52, Bishopsgate-street, and Robert Peart , Whitechapel.

ANN BAKER . On the 13th and 14th of August last, I lodged with Mrs. Thompson. I look at the prisoner at the bar; I can't swear that he is the young man who brought the things.

COURT. There must be no favour, nor significant looks at the prisoner; did you know him before this time - A. I never saw him but twice before he left the things. He brought them on the Wednesday morning about half past seven; he left them at my lodging; I do not happen to know the day of the month; it was in August; he brought two pictures and some books; he brought the pairs of plated candlesticks, in short he brought all the things which Mr. Thompson gave up to the officers; there was no one with him. Mr. Thompson met the young man on the stairs; I mean by the young man the prisoner. Mr. Thompson asked him what he had brought up stairs, and he said a picture and some books; then Mr. Thompson asked him whether I was any relation to him, and he said I was his cousin; I was not so; nothing else passed. The things were taken into my lodging-room; they remained there about a fortnight. I had an advertisement put into the paper; In consequence of that, the officers came; I was not at home, but I was sent for; I was only present when part of the things were delivered to the officers. I am in an unfortunate situation of life.

Q.Now after he had delivered these things to you, did he continue to visit you - A. He told me he should call the next day, but I saw no more of him, until I saw him in custody; I believe Mr. and Mrs. Thompson delivered up three duplicates; I was not present when they were delivered; Mrs. Thompson went into my apartment, and delivered them up. I had one of those tickets from Mr. Peart, one from Mr. Perkins, and one from Mr. Flemming; I had them for things which I pawned, which things were part of the things which I received from the prisoner, he told me I might pawn some of them, and in consequence of that I did.

CHARLES PONE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Peart. I don't know the person of Ann Baker ; it was a servant of hers that pawned the property. I took in the candlesticks, and gave nine shillings for them and the seven castors.

RICHARD THORNTON PERKIN. I am a pawnbroker, I remember taking in three pairs of plated salts on the 23rd of August; I don't know from whom; I gave five shillings on them, and this is my ticket.

MARGARET OSEORNE . On Wednesday morning the 14th of August, I saw the prisoner, at about half past six; he was in a cart; there was one horse to the cart; I don't know whether there was a man or a boy with him, but there was another person with him I know; he was driving towards his master's house; I spoke to him, I asked him if I should call at their house with milk that morning, because they were leaving the premises; he said he did not know; that was all that passed between us.

ROBERT JONATHAN HORNE . I am a pawnbroker, I am shopman to Messrs. Mathews, 128 in the Minories, On the 15th of August, I took in a pledge of Ann Baker , who has used the shop before. I took in a pair of decanters from her. I advanced eight shillings on them, and gave the ticket to Ann Baker; and these are they.

JAMES JACKSON , I keep the Blue Anchor, Brook-street, Ratcliffe. The prisoner came to me about ten o'clock at night on the night of the 13th, or rather after ten, and asked me for a halfpennyworth of matches, and I said never mind about the halfpenny my boy, here is a few for you, and I reached him down a little bundle, and he said one would be sufficient for him. That is a'l I know. I had seen him before, because I served Mr. Bluck with beer.

ANN COWDERY . I live at No. 105, Brook-street, Ratcliffe. I know the prisoner at the bar perfectly well. I remember seeing him on the morning of the 14th of August last, between six and seven o'clock, he was going in a cart drawn by a small black horse; he was going in a direction from his master's house. I observed the frame of a picture or looking-glass in the cart, I said, you are moving your glasses and pictures very early this morning; he did not speak, but rather smiled.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Sitgraves said I had a bad foot, and it was a bad toe; and a medical gentleman saw it; I was going out in the morning to have it dressed, and I met this person in the cart, whom I knew, and I asked him to let me ride as I was lame, and he did, and coming back again I overtook him again returning, and I asked him to let me ride again.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-15

833. WILLIAM MORGAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Butterworth , at about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 27th of April , Elizabeth the wife of the said John Butterworth and others being therein, and stealing therein, four pieces of printed cotton, containing ninety yards, value 12l. the property of David Evans , and the said John Butterworth .

DAVID EVANS. We carried on the business of Manchester warehousemen ; I know the goods were taken away by some persons; I recovered some back from Matthews; I received them after the sessions following the robbery; they were afterwards disposed of for the benefit of the firm.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . On the 27th of April last, I was at the warehouse of the prosecutors. I saw a man of the name of George Atkins , who was convicted. The prisoner was looking through the warehouse window. I then went into Watling-street , and got an apron and broom, and swept before a door. I knew the prisoner's person for a little time; I turned up the Old Change, and then turned towards Friday-street. I then went into Mr. Butterworth's warehouse, and sent for Mr. Evans, in Cheapside; he came. Then he went out again. I stationed myself over the private door. When you get into the house, there is the street door on the left hand, and a warehouse door in front. I stationed myself at the fanlight over the private door; I looked through the fanlight; I saw Atkins come in first; that was the man I saw in company with the prisoner, and who was convicted, and then Morgan came in; I am quite sure he is the person. This was about twenty minutes past eight when they came in, in the morning. Atkins undid the latch of the warehouse door; he turned it round; there is a bell to the warehouse door, and they got the door open, about an inch, or three quarters of an inch, before it rang the bell. Then Atkins put this stick in to shove the bell back; this stick was longer, but I will tell you how I broke it; Atkins shoved the bell back, so as to prevent its ringing upon his opening the door. The reason this stick was broke, Atkins, when I seized him, flung scotch snuff in my eyes, and I broke it across his legs. Morgan brought this bag in with him; it was empty when he brought it. This bag he held open in this manner, just by the warehouse door; then Atkins chucked in four pieces of cotton, and then I had to pull the door towards me, and I had then to open the door and directly that the prisoner at the bar found that, he rushed out, and dropped the bag. Then I catched Atkins in the warehouse. I produced those pieces in evidence on the former trial. Mr. Evans saw those pieces in Court here. I look at the prisoner again, and have no doubt at all that he is the young man; I had not seen him from the time of the robbery, untill I saw him at Clerkenwell prison; I never had any doubt about him. I indicted him by the name of William Morgan; he was known by the name of Long Bill, and I afterwards knew him by another name. It was last Saturday I saw him.

THOMAS SMITH. I am a porter, and live in this street. I am the man whom the last witness helped to sweep the door; I worked then at No.11, Walling-street. I saw the two men walking to and fro before the prosecutor's door. I believe the prisoner to be one of the two men.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am a police officer of Hatton Garden. I and Read apprehended the prisoner, and when we produced him to Atkins, he knew him directly. We found nothing that relates to this charge on him.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I delivered the goods to Messrs. Evans and Butterworth; they were the same goods that were dropt by the prisoner, and I produced them on the prosecution of Atkins.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, I am very innocent. The officer and the other gentleman have sworn very false, and I am not the person they represent.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-16

834. EDMUND MURPHY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Teary , in the King's highway, on the 31st of July , and putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a shawl, value 3s. 6d. a handkerchief, value 1s. and one sixpence, the property of the said Mary Teary .

MARY TEARY. I remember going through Montague-square one evening in July last, it was on a Wednesday evening, it was on the 31st of July, I think; I was going through Montague-square; that is by Gloucester-place; I went out of Gloucester-place, that is on one side of Portman-square, it was nearly twelve o'clock; a man came up, and snatched at my shawl, and I asked him what he meant by it; he immediately struck me, and I called out watch; and he struck me again; I called out watch again; and he repeated the blow. Then he struck me violently on the stomach, which took away my breath, and broke the busk of my stays and he took from me my shawl and handkerchief; he struck me very hard; he struck me twice on my side, once in my stomach, and several times over my head, when I fell to the ground. I can't say how many blows. I had received when I fell; the blow that broke my busk knocked me down, and I could not speak any more; I fell to the ground before he got the shawl; he had not got it, before I got the blow that knocked me down. I am sure he continued striking me after I was down; and as I rose up and ran after him, I saw him throw something away: I had not lost sight of him; I was more enraged with the bows to be after him: and I am sure I did not lose sight of him; and I am sure the person whom I saw run away, was the person who knocked me down, and took my shawl away; I heard a rustling before, as if somebody was going to stop him. I hallooed out stop thief, stop thief, and the watchman replied, I have stopt him.

Q. Had you lost sight of him then - A. No. I saw he was stopped when I came up, and I am sure the prisoner is the same man; I never lost sight of him.

ROBERT COPLAND . I am a watchman of the parish of Mary-le-bone.

Q. Do you remember any thing happening on Wednesday the 31st of July last - A. Yes; at about half past twelve I was on my watch; I was about to leave my box when I heard the cries of this girl; I immediately repaired to the spot that the sound came from, and I had got one third of the distance up one side of Montague-square, when I met the prisoner running at full speed towards me; I bid him stand, or I would knock him down; he did so, and I collared him immediately; I immediately sprang my rattle for assistance; I gave him in charge of a watchman until I returned from fastening my box, which I had left open. The woman came up immediately after I had taken him; she said, have you got him, or you have got him, and I said, yes, is this the man? and she said, he was. Then I went down to the watchhouse with the prisoner; I did not see any shawl or handkerchief produced; I don't recollect a shawl being brought back. There was nothing found on the prisoner when I took him.

Q. Do you remember or not any young woman bringing any shawl to the watchhouse - A. Yes.

Q. How long was that after you had brought the prisoner - A.It was in the course of the time that the charge was taken; it was while I was given the charge to the watchhouse-keeper; I forget to whom it was given when it was brought; I did not take the custody of it.

Prisoner. Did you not say, she would be well paid for her shawl and her trouble at the Old Bailey - A. I never uttered a word of the sort.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-17

835. MARY STANHOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Hewes , one guinea, one half-guinea, three seven-shilling pieces, two five-pound bank notes; one one-pound bank note; and one promissory note for the payment of seven pounds, the property of the said Samuel Hewes .

SAMUEL HEWES . I am a salesman , in Spittalfields-market. On the 22nd of September, I was up into my bed-room by my wife; my house is at No.1, West-street, Spittalfields-market , She asked me if I had been to her drewer; I told her no; and asked her how I could go to her drawer. I told her I had not been to it. The prisoner was our servant . My wife said she had lost a pocket-book out of her drawer, since she had been in the Country. The prisoner was in the room at the time. I told her it was impossible for her to lose it, and she had better look again. She said I am confident I have lost it. Then I challenged the prisoner with it, and she denied it for five or ten minutes. Then I came down stairs, and told my son not to let her go out until I fetched an officer, I fetched an officer, and gave charge of her. In bringing her down stairs, she informed the officer that the pocket-book was in the house. I asked her where it was, and she said, down in the cellar, where the five chaldrons of coals were shot, on the cill of the window. The officer looked for it, and could not find it. I said to the prisoner, shew the officer where it is; she put her hand up over the cill of the window, and bringing out the pocket-book delivered it to the officer. I asked her whether there was any property in it, and she said, yes, that there was part of it. The officer examined the pocket-book, and found a five shilling and sixpenny dollar, a three shilling piece, a duplicate for two gold coins, a bill of exchange, and a promissory note; the bill of exchange was for ten pounds fifteen shillings and sixpence; the promissory note was for seven pounds. I asked her how she had got to the property, and she said she had got a key to the drawer, and I asked her what she had done with it, and she said, she had thrown it down the privy.

JOHN PARKER. I am an officer. Mr. Hewes came to me on Sunday, the 22nd of September, and said he suspected that the servant had robbed him of these things. I went with him, and took charge of her; she then began to be rather alarmed. I asked her where was the money, and she said, it

was in the cellar. I went into the cellar, and could not find it, and she came down, and took it off a beam in the cieling off of the little I opened the pocket-book, and found in it a five shilling and sixpenny dollar, a three shilling piece, a duplicate for two gold coins, ten shillings and sixpence, and a seven shilling piece. I then asked her what she had done with the other money; she said, she had laid it out, and had pawned the guinea at Mr. Pearl's for eighteen shillings, and she said she had found the key in the garret. Mr. Hewes suspected that she had taken notes out of another drawer; but she said, she-had not, for the key was too large, and she could not unlock it.

GEORGE FISHER. I live with Robert Peart , the pawbroker. I produce two gold coins, a guinea and a half-guinea; I took them in pledge from the prisoner; there is nothing extraordinary in it; if people have them as keep-sakes, they frequently don't like to part with them entirely.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-18

836. WILLIAM RIORDAM was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , five hundred and fifty pieces of Foreign silver coin, called dollars, value 110l. the property of Col. William Jervois , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Hedges .

COL. WILLIAM JERVOIS . On the 8th of July, I lodged at No.35, Duke-street, St. James's-square . The prisoner was my servant ; at the same time he lived with me, I was in possession of a quantity of foreign dollars, there were eighteen hundred; they were kept in a box in my bed-room; that box was locked. I met the prisoner in Sr. James's-street, a short time after I had returned from Canada, where I had been on service; he was looking in at a shop window, and seemed, as I thought, in very great distress; he addressed me, and told me that he was in very great distress, and had been out of employ for six months, and had been obliged to pawn all his clothes from poverty; from a feeling of charity, I took him into my service.

Q.How long after this was it that you missed any dollars - A. I don't know exactly how many days it was; but it was between the 5th and the 8th that I missed them, I only missed a portion, about five hundred and fifty-five, within one or two. After the prisoner came to live with me, I believe the next morning, or the day after, he appeared in a new coat, in an extremely nice new coat, and his appearance was changed very much indeed for the better. I had left my lodging for one night to go to Richmend, and foolishly left my keys behind me; one of those keys would open the box in which the dollars were deposited. The prisoner was my only servant. In consiquence of my suspicion, I went to Bow-street. I was present when the Bow-street officer apprehended the prisoner; he was not living in the same home with me; he slept in one of those old houses in Bolsever-street. At the time he was apprehended I told him what I apprehended him for; I told him I missed a quantity of dollars, and I conceived it impossible for any one else to rob me. He then became rather abusive, and he said, he was extremely sorry that he ever came into my service, on account of his character, and he never had taken any money of mine. On taxing him with the alteration for the better in his appearance; he said, he bought the new coat from a jew in the street. I went with the Bow-street officers to his lodging in Bolsover-street I took the prisoner with me. I saw the officers examine his lodging, and we found a parcel of women's new shoes, a quantity of trinkets, and silk handkerchiefs quite new. We did not find any dollars.

JOHN HARRIS. I am shopman to Messrs. Rochforts, in Jermyin-street, they are pawnbrokers. I know the prisoner at the bar; he purchased a watch at our shop, I think on the 9th or 10th of July; a silver watch; he paid me in Spanish dollars, fifteen in number; the amount was three pounds two shillings and sixpence. The next day be bought a gold seal, I think for twenty seven or twenty eight shillings; he paid me with nine Spanish dollars, and I gave him the difference of a few shillings; he did not make any other purchases of me; those he made he paid for allia Spanish dollars.

HENRY MYERS. I keep a sale-shop, in Swallow street. The prisoner bought something of me, about two or three days before he was taken up; he bought a coat; I asked him two guiness for it, and he gave seven Spanish dollars; I allowed him four shillings and four pence a piece for the dollars; so then he paid me in all dollars. I am sure he is the man; he used to pass my door almost every day.

DANIEL REECE . I am a sales-man, in Swallow street. I know the prisoner; but no father than by sight; I now recollect his person; he purchased a pair of pantaloons of me about two or three days before he was taken into custody; he was to give me fifteen shilling for them, he paid me in four Spanish dollars, and I gave him two shilling in change.

JOHN CAESHAW . I am shopman to Mr. Wilkinson, the jeweller, in Piccadilly. I know the person of the prisoner at the bar; he came one morning; I think Thursday the 11th of July; we asked him four pounds for a gold seal; be bought it. I agreed for three pounds ten shillings at last. He paid me eighteen dollars, and I gave him two shillings change out; they were old Spanish dollars; at that time he had a number of dollars in his possession. He asked if we could not give more than four shillings a piece for them; and we told him no. He brought sixty four other dollars in his possession; he said he could get four shillings and sixpence and five shillings a piece for them in Swallow street; but the person to whom he applied had gone out for change of a fifty pound note, to make a purchase of them. We purchased the sixty four dollars. I saw him in custody with in three or four days after this, I knew his person.

PETER PERRY. I am a conductor of the patrole of Bow street. Col. Jervoise applied to me to take this man into custody; I don't know any more than Col. Jervoise has told you. I went to three several places, and collected these witnesses. I found these things in his lodging; I found all these things the Col. Jervoise has told you of; I know no more, I found no dollars on the prisoner's person, and he had but one shilling on him when I searched him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in my working clothes when the Colonel spoke to me; I lived six years at Carlton House , and then General Bloomfield got me a place as an officer of the Woods, and then that office ceased, and I was out of employ; and Col. Jervoise spoke to me, and asked me if I was out of employment, and I told him I was, and I shewed him my papers that he might see the respectable situations. I had been in, and he gave me a direction to call at his hotel in Bond-street, and I went to his service as clean as any servant ever went to any place, and as for their saying I was shabby it is no such thing. There is the Colonel, and I will leave it to him to say whether I was or not. I had been paid for my work in Spanish dollars, and went to lay them out where I was well known; and as for this old man, Myers, I did not lay a halfpenny out with him. I purchased the things of his son.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-19

837. THOMAS BURNFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , one coat, value 20s the property of Daniel Beale esq; one coat value 18s. the property of Gayton Mansfield ; and one coat, value 7s. the property of James Sudbury , in the dwelling-house of the said Daniel Beale, esq .

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first. only stating the goods to have been stolen in a certain outhouse, belonging to the dwelling-house of the said Daniel Beale , esq.

THIRD COUNT. Stating the goods to be stolen privately in a stable, of the said Daniel Beale Esq.

GAYTON MANSFIELD. On the 6th of August last I was coachman to Mr. Beale, esq. I look at the prisoner, and know him.

Q. What do you know of him - A. About six o'clock in the evening of the 6th of August, I went out to exercise one of my horses, and when I came back, my young mistress was waiting to go out riding with the poney. I went into the stable and took off my coat, and took it into the harness room; the harness room is part of the stable, and the stable joins the rest of the house; kitchen, stable, and all join together. I went into the harness room, and brought out a coat like this. As I was coming out of the harness room, there was a man behind the door; he came from behind the door, and said I thought it was your master, and I said my man what do you do here; it was the prisoner. I asked him his business, and he said he had no business; and I said why do you come here? this was about six o'clock in the evening; and I turned him out; then he said that the footman wanted to buy a ferret, and I said I was sure the footman wanted no ferret. At last I turned him out; I left my great coat in the harness room, and locked the harness room door, and put the key in my pocket; the stable door was left open the first time he came. I went out the last time, I shut the stable door, but did not lock it. Then I went out with my young mistress as far as Tottenham High Cross; my master's house is at Edmonton; I was out about half an hour altogether. When I was coming back with my young mistress, I saw the prisoner at the bar about a quarter of a mile from my master's house; I saw him with a long coat on, drawing on the ground; I thought it was mine. When he saw me he turned up a lane, and when I got up opposite the lane, I got off my horse, and went an I examined the coat. I laid hold of him, and the great coat, and knew it to be mine; it was the same I hung up in the harness room. I said my man, you have got my coat, he said he had not; I examined him and said, you have not got mine only, but you have got two of my fellow servants also. He had got three coats over his own. I asked him how he came by them, and he said the footman gave them to him. I took him by the collar, and led him to my master's house; there was one coat a livery, it was a coat belonging to a former footman: I called the great coat mine; my master gave it me two years ago, so it was my property. We took the prisoner to Mr. Roberts the justice at Tottenham; there the coats were delivered to the constable, his name is Grinley.

JAMES SUDBURY . I was in the service of Mr. Beale; I hung my coat up in the harness room; It was my coat; I had it in another service.

Prisoner's Defence. I was discharged from his Majesty's 73rd regiment of foot, in which I served, and was at Waterloo, where I was wounded; I could get no employment whatever.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26,

Upon the third Count.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18160918-20

838. JAMES FLYNN was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Minster in the King's Highway, on the 18th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 10s. and one walking cane, value 1s. 6d. his property .

JOHN MINSTER . I live at Stepney. I am a warehouse keeper in the service of the West India Dock company. On the 18th of July this happened, at about a quarter before twelve at night; I had been to Perceval-street, Clerkewell; I had been with friends, but had not been drinking, I was perfectly sober. By Spitalfields church , quite close this happened; as I came here the prisoner in company with two others ran violently against me, and I received a blow on the breast, which nearly knocked me down; I dont know which of the three gave me that blow. I recovered myself, and caught the cuff of one, which came off in my hand. The two ran away, and I immediately seized this man, and called watch; the other two did not run until I called the watchmen. When I called the watchmen, I gave this man in charge; my hat and cane were taken from me. At the time I received the blow, they took my hat off my head; one of the three, I dont know which. My cane was taken from my hand, but it was so suddenly done, that I hardly knew myself. The prisoner did not get out of my sight before I took him close by me. The blow was given, and the property was gone just at one, and the same time. The cane was brought back to the watchhouse, but the hat was completely gone.

JAMES BILLET, I am a watchman. When I came up, I asked what was the matter. and this

gentleman said that some one or two more had robbed him of his hat and cane, and had nearly knocked him down. The prisoner said he was going home to Whitecross-street, and he said he was out of place, that is all. After I got the charge of the prisoner, Mr. Minster looked about, and found an old hat, but he said that was not his; the cane was brought back to the watchhouse.

Prisoner's. Defence. I had been at my uncles, at Mile-end, and coming home by the church, I heard a cry of watch; the gentleman seized me, and said. I was one of the three that robbed him, and he called the watchman, and I was taken into custody, which I am very innocent of the crime.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-21

839. RICHARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , one watch, value 3l. one seal, value 1l. and one key, value 5s. the property of William Collet , since deceased, in the dwelling-house of John Collett .

MARY COLLETT . On the 9th of July, the prisoner called to see my son; my son was then living, and had been to sea . The prisoner had been five years in the same ship with him; my son was sick in bed. The prisoner was several hours with my son, and took tea and supper. My son appeared to be friendly towards him. I was out when first the prisoner came. Ill as my son was, he sat up; the prisoner stopped until I came in between eight and nine o'clock in the evening the prisoner went away. He came the next day between eleven and twelve to enquire how my son was; my son was then up stairs in bed; he went up to him and spoke to him. When the prisoner came down again he told me he had told my son, he would send a pigeon pie for his dinner; I asked him if he lived near at hand, or should I send for it, and he said a little brother of his should bring it. The watch was hanging in the kitchen below where I was; it was a silver hunting watch, jewelled, and gilt inside; the name was John Simpson , Holborn, No.4224, with a gold seal and key; the watch cost me six pounds, and I had it valued by a watchmaker, at three pounds as under value; the seal was worth one pound. I left the prisoner in the kitchen; I was washing, and in a hurry, and he talked with me some time, and then he went for his hat and let himself out; it was a little after twelve that he left that house; I missed the watch two or three hours after. My son has been dead about a month.

RICHARD PHILIP HICHAM . I am a pawnbroker, I know the prisoner at the bar; my shop is at 105, Bishopsgate Without. The prisoner pawned a watch with me on the 10th of July, between the hours of twelve and one o'clock; I advanced two pounds upon the whole; it had a seal, I gave two pounds upon the whole; it is a silver watch, gilt inside, and the name of the maker is John Simp son. On the 11th of July, a young man called about it, and on the 15th it was taken to the megistrates. The prosecutor was then alive.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-22

840. THOMAS HEDGES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jonathan Hardcastle , on the 24th of September , for putting him, in fear and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 2l. one ring, value 14s. one seal, value 7s. two watch-keys, value 2d. and one chain, value 1s. his property .

WILLIAM HARDCASTLE . I was going up the King's-road , on the Tuesday, the 24th of September, towards Theobald's-row. When I was going to step across John street, the prisoner Hedges drove against me with his shoulder, and drove me back, and immediately snatched my watch, and took it out, and I felt it. I felt it moving out of my pocket. I immediately when it was gone, I turned myself round, an the turned towards Gray's inn-lane, and I called out stop thief; it was about four or five minutes between my being robbed and his being taking.

RICHARD BREWER . I was going down the King's road, and heard the cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running, and stopped him; when he saw me coming towards him, he slipped down, and when he got up he put his hands between his legs, and another man came up, and took something out of his hand; which I presume was the watch, and the other man went off.

EMANUEL OAKLEY . I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw two men in the kennel; one was the prisoner, and the other was the last evidence, and I helped to secure the prisoner.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-23

841. ROBERT JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Griffin , about the hour of four in the forenoon, on the 26th of July , (William Griffin, and other persons in the same dwelling house then being,) and stealing therein, eight sheets, value 38s. five waistcoats, value 1l. three pairs of drawers, 12s. four pillow-cases, value 10s. three petticoats, value 8s. two frocks, value 5s. twelve shifts, value 2l. seven night gowns, value 1l. twelve night caps, value 1l. twelve handkerchiefs, value 2l. and four pairs of stockings, value 10s. his property .

WILLIAM GRIFFIN. I remember being called up a few minutes before four o'clock on the morning of the 26th of July, by John Smith, he is a next door neighbour of mine; I am a labourer in the East India House; this here was my property that was stolen.

Q.What did you discover when he called you up - A. I heard the alarm by a knocking at the door, and I went backwards, and saw John Smith outside of the garden pales. When I opened the window, he told me something; I observed from the window, some linen lying in the garden; it was on the ground in the garden. I found a window open, the kitchen window where the basket of clothes had stood facing; that kitchen looks into the garden; the basket of linen was in that kitchen the night before, and that linen which I found in the garden, had been with the rest. The basket was half out of the window, and part of the linen was in the garden

Some of the linen was in the garden, and the remainder was in the basket. I went to bed the night before at half past ten; I left that window fastened with a screw then. The window was open, and the screw appeared to have been broken; the window was thrown up, and it appeared to me to have been broken by violence; it had been wrenched with something; the basket stood near to the window the night before, on a dresser facing the window; it could be reached by an arm. Nobody could get to that window without getting over the garden pales. The whole basket was removed from the spot where it was the night before; that was my dwelling-house, and the linen was my property. I did not see the prisoner in my garden; I saw him when he was taken. I did not see him until I took him; we took him in the next garden to my own; I found him in the privy, and we took him to Worship-street. I asked him what business he had there, and he said, he got over to ease himself. I told him there was no necessity for that as there was a large field at the back of the garden. I did not find any linen no any thing about him.

JOHN SMITH. I am a neighbour of Mr. Griffin's. I very well remember looking out of my window on the morning in question, it was the 26th of July, the morning that the last witness has been speaking of, it was about a quarter before four, or somewhere there about; I had occasion to get up, and I was standing against my window, and I saw the prisoner plainly; I saw him jump over Mr. Griffin's pales. When I saw him first, he jumped into Mr. Griffin's garden; then I ran down stairs as quick as I could. He had then got the window open. All I can say is it was open when I got there; my house does not adjoin Griffin's; there is a little road between; this was my back window that I was looking out of; my back window looks into his garden; I ran down by his garden pales; the prisoner was in Griffin garden when I got down. He was standing by the window getting the basket out; he was standing still when I came, and was looking about him; he had got the basket half way out of the window; I saw him at the window with the basket half way out; that was after I returned from calling Griffin; I am sure he had hold of the basket; he got out of that garden and went into the next garden; I saw him go over the paces; those were the pales of the garden in which the privy was that he was taken in. I assisted in taking him; Griffin and I were together when he was taken. The basket was left there.

William Griffin . Re-examined. I have a few of the things here that were found in the garden; some of them are marked. The whole of the things were of the respective values stated in the indictment; the sheets were very good; they might be worth one pound a pair.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up early in the morning of the 26th of July, and I was going along the fields, and had occasion for a private conveniency, and I perceived that there was a milk-woman in the field, and I did not like to expose myself, and I went into that privy, where the gentleman came and found me, and they charged me with this business, and I am very innocent of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-24

841. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , twenty-eight yards of oil-cloth, value 5l. the property of Thomas Irons , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS IRONS. On the 28th of August last, between eight and nine o'clock in the forenoon, I was taking my breakfast in the kitchen; I keep a floorcloth-manufactory .

Q. Did you see or hear any thing that drew your attention - A. I saw the prisoner step from the pavement on to the shop-board; I had left nobody in the shop; we have no window to our shop; but there is a board fenced in by an iron-railing raised three feet eleven inches. He had one of his legs extended, and was laying over the rail, assisting as I supposed, in taking this out of the shop. I immediately proceeded up stairs, and saw him and another take the piece of oil-cloth which is now in Court; they had got it outside the shop, and it was upon the shoulder of one of them; it was on the shoulder of the prisoner's companion. I immediately called stop thief, and they dropped it. I pursued after the prisoner, and lost sight of him myself. Then I pursued the other, and left the people to pursue the prisoner. I lost the other; but the prisoner was apprehended by the people; it was not five minutes before he was brought back to my shop. I am positive the prisoner is one of the persons, for I had an opportunity of observing him for two or three minutes; I am certain of his person. The oil-cloth was recovered; I under value it at five-pound; it is here; it cost me five pounds to manufacture it.

JOHN BURN. I was going down Frith-street on the morning in question, and heard the cry of stop thief. I then saw the prisoner running away, and ten or a dozen people running after him; he turned off into Church-street; I followed him, and laid hold of him. At that time I did not know what was the charge against him. The prosecutor came up soon after, and said, he had been robbed of a piece of floor-cloth, and the prisoner said he was going by, and helped a man up with it on his shoulder; it was at the watchhouse he said that.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up this street, and there was a young man standing by the prosecutor's door, and he asked me to be so good as to lift this up upon his shoulder, and I did so. I ran on about my business directly, and I was stopped, and brought back to the house.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-25

842. JOHN PAUL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Catherine Lucas , in the King's highway, on the 27th of June , for putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d. six pair of stockings, value 12s. three frocks, value 5s. one petticoat, value 1s. 6d. one shift, value 1s. one night-gown, value 1s. 6d. one night-cap, value 1s. two handkerchiefs,

value 1s. two spencers, value 2s. four pin-cloths, value 6s. two printed books, value 3s. 6d. two brushes, value 1s. one comb, value 1d. and one phial, value 1d. the property of the Rev. William Parker .

CATHERINE LUCAS. On the 27th of June last, I was going to Newington , at about twenty minutes before twelve; I had a young lady with me, my master's daughter; I had a band-box, an umbrella, and a bundle. I met three men; I don't know whether the prisoner was one of them; one took the bundle from my arm; he went a few steps, and it fell; I went and tried to pick it up, and got my hand upon it, and one of them gave me a push, and I fell down. He got it up again, and ran away. I ran after him a little way; I did-not overtake him. One of the others asked me what I wanted, and I told him I wanted my bundle, and be made no answer. He did not binder me from running. Then the two other men ran after Copsey. I then went on towards Newington; they went Islington way. I next saw two of the men at about twenty minutes before two; they were then taken into custody; the prisoner was not either of those, they were tried and convicted here. When I got across the fields almost to Newington, I met a young man; he asked me if I was frightened at the cows, and I told him I was not; I told him I had been pushed down by three men, and he went after them. The things mentioned in the indictment were in the bundle; they belonged to Miss Parker; I was to take them to Dr. Gascoigne's; Miss Parker was going there on a visit; she is eight years old.

BENJAMIN CLARK. I am a cow-keeper. I saw the prosecutrix in our field on the day in the indictment; I was milking a cow at the time. She looked frightened, and I asked her if she was frightened at the cows, and she said she was not; but had been knocked down, and robbed of her bundle. I saw the prisoner pass me along with two more before; he was a stranger; I did not know his name; but I had seen his person before; I can speak with certainty as to him; I had seen him about ten minutes before; in that very field where the girl said she had been knocked down; I had seen him numbers of times before about London streets when I go with my milk. I am certain of his person. When she complained to me, this man and the other two were out of my sight. Shortly before she complained, they passed me, going in a direction, in which she soon afterwards came. I saw no other party of three go that way, about that time. I raised an alarm, after the men. There were other persons milking in our field. I, at last, got sight of them; when I saw the prisoner again, the two others were in company with him. I had got about a mile and a half from this field; I got sight of them up in lslington fields; I saw them under a tree, and they were tying the bundle up in an apron; they were standing; then they went on again, and we ran after them; I had got another young man with me; they walked on; they did not see us. When we came up near them, we hallooed out stop thief; they looked round then, and ran a little way, and then threw the bundle down; all three looked round; I stooped to pick the bundle up; but the other young man picked it up first. I pursued after the men; I then missed the prisoner; he got away for the time, and I did not see him again that day. I next saw him in two or three days after about Shoreditch; I did not cause him to be apprehended; I saw him several times after; I took no steps to cause him to be apprehended. I saw him in custody about eight weeks after. I gave information to Mr. Yardley, that I knew the man; he belongs to Worship-street, and I saw the prisoner in custody in about two months. I knew him then to be one of the men that I saw in the field where this girl was robbed. When the bundle was picked up, it had an apron round it then. I did not particularly notice that the prisoner or his companions had an apron with them when they first passed me. The person who picked up the bundle is not here.

JAMES KENNEDY . I apprehended the prisoner.

Benjamin Clarke. Re-examined. I had seen the prisoner several times, and had observed he had only one hand.

JOHN CROSSWELL . After Kennedy told the prisoner what he took him for, I searched him; but found nothing on him. He asked me what they would do with him since the other two had been tried; I told him I knew nothing about the other two, nor him neither; and I said, you must know best yourself whether you were amongst them; he said, he never should deny but what he was there, but he never touched the girl, nor never laid a hand upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going along, I met these two lads, but I never intended to have committed a robbery nor any thing of that kind.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-26

843. THOMAS RAWLINSON and HENRY PEG were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , thirty-nine pieces of silk romalls pullicat, value 78l. and thirty-nine pieces of handkerchiefs, containing in each piece fifteen handkerchiefs, value 78l. the property of Robert Oliver , in a certain lighter upon the Navigable River Thames .

CHARLES NORTON . I am clerk to Messrs. Brown and Rogens. On the 27th of June last, I gave some orders respecting some india silk romals; I ordered fifty pieces to be packed in a trunk; they were to go to Gibraltar; the trunk was to be marked Q with an X through it, and the number 301, was to be put on the trunk.

JOHN PRYOR . I am a commodore of the merchant's births at the India House. In June last, Messrs. Brown and Rogers, had a great quantity of romalls in my room that they had purchased at our sale; they are prohibited to be used in this country; they are pieces of handkerchiefs. In the latter end of June, I received a packing order from Messrs. Browns and Rogers, ordering fifty pieces to be packed out of two seperate lots, respectively numbered, 1366, and 1397; they were to be put in a trunk, on which were to be put the marks and figures spoken of by the last witness; they were accordingly packed in a two feet six inch trunk on the

28th of June, fifty pieces; the trunk was numbered and marked as directed. As soon as I put the goods in, I locked it down, which was with a good deal of exertion as it was quite full, and took three or four to held it, while I locked it; I put the key in my pocket, and the trunk maker was in waiting, and he immediately put the mat on and nailed it, and corded it, and the trunk remained in my possession until the 19th of July, on which day it was called for, and I myself dragged it to the loop-hole of my room, to put it into the cart; this is the top of all the warehouse, and I lowered it down to what we call the lobby, where they are delivered, they are then weighed; an officer weighs them. This was on the 19th of July. During the time it was packed up, it was as far from the loop hole, as I am from you; in a public room where there are servants of the company and merchants continually backwards and forwards. At the time I so lowered it to where it was weighed, it was in the same state to all appearance, as when the packer left it. I look at that trunk, and swear it is the trunk; I swear to the mark and number, because I marked it myself, a thing I don't often do; but I did this. I have since seen the goods that were found, they are similar romalls.

JOSEPH HIGHBY. I am a looker to the Customs, on duty at the East India Company's warehouses. I saw the packing in a trunk of some India silk romalls on the 28th of June last; I counted out fifty pieces of romalls pullicatis; they were to be packed in a trunk, marked O with an X run through it, and numbered 301; it was packed for Messrs. Brown, Rogers and Brown. I saw Mr. Pryor the last witness pack these pieces; there were five other trunks of nearly the same size. The trunk produced has every appearance of being the trunk alluded to; I believe it to be the same, and have no doubt about it. After it was packed, on the 19th of July I received my orders for the delivery of it, from the customers, and I delivered it into a cart from the loop hole of the West area, on a lower tier than that on whcih it had been packed; I saw it put into the cart myself.

HENRY GOBLE . I accompained that cart to the Custom House; they put four heavy bales in the cart over the trunks; I then delivered them safe and free from injury to the Custom House quay ; they were never out of my sight, That trunk appears to have been one of them; I know it to be one of the trunks, by the document that Higby gave me. By seeing that trunk, the number and mark tally with the quantity of goods, That document I delivered to the searcher; it is merely a bill of the things delivered, and I delivered them to the servants of the Quay. I saw the trunks in the cart on the Quay, at about ten o'clock.

THOMAS GARRAND . On the 19th of July, I received from Mr. Goble six trunks; this paper, is a cart note, called a shipping note, without which I could not receive them; I received it from Messrs Brown and Co; I saw these things in the cart and took them out of the cart; I did not tick them off. I remember that there were six trunks, I know that particularly, because it was a wet day, and we were obliged to cover them occasionally with a tarpaulin. These were three bales besides the trunks; they were all for Brown and Co; they were all for the same proprietor, and were to be shipped on board the same lighter, and were so. I will not swear whether I saw any of the prisoners in the lighter; Peg I might have seen, but the other was not there. When I saw them in the craft, I did not make any particular remark; but they were stowing them away. The lighter lay at the further end of the Custom House Quay, right under the crane, No. 4; all the cranes are numbered.

JAMES WALLER. I am a servant to Mr. Oliver the lighterman . On the 19th of July, I put some goods, on board a lighter of ours, she was lying under No.4 crane; the goods consisted of trunks and bales, I think there were six trunks. I look at the trunk produced, it has the same mark and number. Rawlinson, Bonner, and Leanord were stowing away. I gave directions how they were to pack the trunks, I told them not to put the bales at the bottom, and Leonard said what odds, and the other men could hear him. They were not stowed, as I ordered them to be, they put the trunks on the bales instead of the bales on them. After all the things were on board, I took up the tarpaulin, let down the hatches, and put over the hatch bars; I did not lock them; the trunks were below. This was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th.

BENJAMIN WALLER . I look at that trunk, I saw that and five more on board a lighter of Mr. Olivers, lying near the crane, No. 4, Custom House Quay; they were stowed, I did not see them stow them on board; I did not observe the stowage at that time; I had given orders for the trunks to be put below the bales. On the next morning I found that they were not so, but that they were at top, contrary to the orders I had given; I saw them on board the lighter between twelve and one on the 19th. I had one key of the batch bars; they were not locked, until they were locked in my presence, about seven, or between six and seven; there are two keys, and I had both after they were locked down; and I made the man that locked them, shake the locks to see if they were safe. The lighter was then put out of the birth where she lay, and another lighter estern of her, was put into her place, and this was put more forward in the river, a lighter's length further out. Thomas Rawlinson was employed in that, the other prisoner was not in that lighter at all. About nine, I gave orders that he and Rawlinson should be out for the night, to take charge of that lighter; I told them that I should be over in the morning between four and five, and that I should appoint another man, so that we might put her down against tide, in the tier below the Tender; I mean by against tide, in expectation of tide. The ship Scicily, lay just below the Tender. I gave the prisoners no more orders about what they were to do than I have described. I appointed the two of them to be with it, knowing it to be of great value. Peg was to be a watchman, and was to be with it all night. I had not mentioned that they were of great value to either of the prisoners; not having the keys, they could not get below, as I imagined I had the key of the scuttle, and the keys of the bars, and I thought they could not get

down below. I saw the lighter again at eleven at night. Having loaded a craft, I went down to see if all was safe at eleven o'clock at night again. When I got-down by the water side, I heard two men, Rawlinson and Peg, talking to a man named Bonner; on hearing their voices, I told them that was not their charge, and told them to go to their charge. Bonaer was on board a barge alongside, and these two men were talking with him; I don't know whether they were with Bonner in his barge, but I know they were off their own lighter that they had charge of; they were either in Bonner's barge, or in a lighter lying by. I told them that was not their place, and they ought to go on board their own lighter. They went on board in consequence of what I said to them. Consistently with their duty, they could not be away from their charge. I next went to the lighter at about a quarter before five in the morning; the prisoners were neither of them there. I unlocked the stern scuttle, and went down below; I saw the six trunks all lying at the top of the bales; that was the first time I knew that my orders had not been attended to in that respect, I saw every thing right as I thought. I made some inquiries. I saw the prisoners at a quarter after five or half after; I was in the lighter when they came; I sent after them, they were both together, I believe I accused them of being absent from their charge. I then gave Rawlinson the keys of the lighter and the shipping note to deliver the goods. I employed Peg in other business; he went down with the lighter with Rawlinson and two more men. The lighter had got to go the distance from about this to St. Sephulchre's church to the Scicily. I went to the searchers office about twelve; I met Mr. Oliver, and Mr. Wolfe coming down the gateway; Mr. Wolfe is the searcher of the Custom House. I then received some information; I then learned that the property had been taken from the lighter. Maize the watchman was there. He stated some circumstances that occured to his observation; he spoke of some persons that he had seen, and his description of those persons corresponded with the two prisoners at the bar, Neither of them was present, or in sight.

SIMON MAIZE. I am a watchman of Portsoken Ward; my station is at the corner of Swan-street, facing John-street in the Minories. On the morning of the 20th of July, I observed three men coming towards me at aboat a quarter before four, they came up John-street towards the Minories; at that time in the morning, it was broad daylight; John-street is the direct road from the Custom House Quay, and a person coming from the Custom House would and must come up that way. Two out of these three men had bundles, the third had nothing that I could perceive in his hand; he was in company with them. They came to the corner of America-square; and then the third man came into the Minories, towards Tower Hill; then they made for Redlion Court that is rather higher up in the Minories; the other without the bundle, came up the Minories towards my box; he passed me, and addressed me; he said it is almost four o'clock watchman is it not; I said yes, it is very near. He then went down the Minories as if he was going towards Tower Hill; the course that the took was apparently towards Redlion Court. I know the man by his features, and I know that he was very much dishaped by his walk, very lame, and very much knock kneed; Peg is that man I have no doubt at all that he is the man. After he passed me, I went down Goodman's yard; thinking I should see those two with the bundles go by again. When I got down to the bottom of the yard I did not see anything of them not just then; I then went into Redlion Court and there was Rawlinson with one of the bundles; there were Rawlinson, Peg and another man with the bundles; the other man had the other bundle. With that I went up to Rawlinson with the bundle, as he stood right facing me; he had the bundle in his hand, I asked him what he had there, and he said nothing of any consequence; with that he threw the bundle down, and made his escape; the others threw their bundle down, and all three made their escape just at that time. They ran away as fast as they could; the court is not very long. I took up the two bundles, and threw them into my box. Just as I got to my box, one of the patroles came up, his name is Hargraves; he asked me what I had got, I told him I did not know, but I gave them to Hargraves, and after that returned to my daty. In consequence of information, which I had, I went to the Custom House and described to Waller the men whom I had seen. in consequence of further information, I went down to the London Docks, and in the London Dock No.2, I found one of the prisoner's lying on his back; he did not appear to me to be asleep; it was peg. The officer roused him; I told him he was one; I saw as soon as he got up on his backside, that he was one of the men. He had the same features to me, and stood on the same legs. I afterwards saw him on his legs, and was then more sure of him. When all three had thrown down the bundles, and ran away; they all ran the same way. We took Peg into custody, and went to his lodging; we afterwards took a boat at St. Catherine's stairs, and went to the Scicily; she was lying just below the tier. When I got to the Scicily, I was told to look round, and I saw Robinson in the craft eating a bit of biscuit. I pointed him out to Forrester, and he was secured. I am sure he is one of the men; I saw him in America-square. I described them before I saw them.

EDWARD HARGREAVES . I belong to the Ward of Portsoken. I received the property from the last witness; and in consequence of information, I went to the house of Mrs. Jacobs; I obtained admittance. We found nothing there relating to this charge. When I returned to the watchhouse, the two bundles were there. I examined them, and discovered their contents; Maize described the persons of the prisoners at the bar, which description they answered when they were taken. In the bundles I found twenty-two pieces of silk handkerchiefs. I was in company with Maize when the prisoner Peg was in his sight afterwards, and at the time he saw Rawlinson I was ordered to have a strict guard over him, that he might not make a bolt; I had not laid hands on him nor taken him into custody; Maize said that he was confident they were the men that he

had seen in the early part of the morning. When first Maize came on board, Flam on was eating a bit of biscuit with a piece of boiled meat, beef, I believe; and was sitting down, and he knew him almost immediately.

ROBERT OLIVER. I am a lighter-man. On hearing what had happened, I went on board the Scicily; I saw Rawlinson there; I asked him if he was not a pretty rascal, to rob his own charge; he said, that the goods were all right, and that he had never left her; I believe this was about twelve o'clock, or a little after; it was before he was apprehended. I went on conversing about the circumstances of the transaction; while I was so conversing, the trunks were brought in for examination. Rawlinson then said that he had left the craft for a little while, and had been on shore; I think he said, to Dark-house-lane; that is near Billingsgate. I did not pay much attention to him. After that, I saw the trunks examined; the one in question appeared to have been opened; by looking at it, I could tell that; the matting seemed all torn, and the nails were only here and there placed in the iron hoops. I have no doubt of its having been opened; I was perfectly satisfied of that. When we took the matting off. we observed that the lock was broken off; I looked into this trunk, and there were only eleven pieces; there ought to have been fifty; thirty-nine were missing; their place was supplied with old rope and old tarpaulin.

Robinson's Defence. I am intirely innocent.

ROBINSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

PEG, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-27

844. CHARLES DEROCHE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August . a bill of exchange for payment of 500l. a bill of exchange for payment of 320l. and a bill of exchange for payment of 100l. the property of Francis Thaddens Reyer and Joseph Schlik , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Edlmann .

MR. JOSEPH EDLMANN. I am agent of the house of Reyer and Schlik. I know the gentleman at the bar. I first became acquainted with him on the 1st or 2nd of July; he came to me, and represented himself to be a countryman of mine, and to have served in the Army, and to have got into some embarrassment on the Continent, and for that reason quitted the Continent; he came to England to look for employment, and was actually in great distress; I relieved him. He was in the habit of coming to my house every day twice or three times. I found him serviceable in his own language. On the 18th of August, which was Sunday, he came to breakfast. After breakfast, he went away; he had not taken leave of me to go any where in particular at that time. He went out. In about half an hour after, I went into the Country. I returned about ten or eleven in the evening. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I missed the bills in question; they had been in an iron safe in the counting-house; the key of that safe was generally in a wooden case by the side of it. The prisoner at the bar knew where the key was kept; he was frequently in the counting-house, and I have used the key while he has been there sometimes. I had seen the bills on the Saturday during the day; the three amounted altogether to nine hundred and twenty pounds. In consequence of missing them, I called my servant maid; I made some enquiries in my house, which led me to go to Bow-street; ultimately I and Bishop went in a post chaise to Caterbury; we got to Canterbury between two and four in the morning. I first saw him in the room in the Inn at Caterbury, when he was brought in by Bishop. I first identified him, and then Bishop seized him; the bills were found on him; I saw Bishop find them in one of his pockets; those bills Mr. Bishop has.

DANIEL BISHOP . I went with Mr. Edlmann to Canterbury. I overtook the coach at Canterbury; I found the prisoner just going from the Dover coach into the Guildhall tavern; he was alighting from it where they change horses. I secured him from behind for fear of accidents; he had this loaded pistol in one hand, and a dagger in the other. I found another loaded pistol in the pocket of the stage coach. On searching him, I found the three bills in question on him, and a quantity of powder and twelve bal1s.

Mr. Edlmann. Those are my bills.

CATHERINE TROTTER . I live servant with Mr. Edlmann. On Saturday, the 18th of August, I remember the prisoner at the bar breakfasting with my master; he went away about half an hour before my master in the morning. After my master had gone out about an hour or better, the prisoner returned, and said, he wanted a book out of the counting-house; he went into the counting-house, and I went about my domestic concerns; he was in the counting-house in which my master's iron safe was. He was about twenty or twenty-five minutes there. I was up stairs on the first floor, and I heard the door open, and I looked out of the window, and saw him go out with a book in his hand. He was gone about an hour; when he came back, he said, he wished to write a note to Mr. Edlmann, to say, he should not breakfast with him the next morning; but he should see him the next day. When he got a bit of paper and began to write, I of course left the counting-house, and when I came to the door in four or five minutes, he came out, and said, I have finished the note Mrs. Totter, give it to your master with my compliments; then he went away.

RICHARD PARRY . I live at No. 22, St. Martin's-le-grand, and am a corn-dealer. The prisoner lodged in my house. On Sunday, the 18th of August, he said he should go and fetch a book, and I believe he brought one in; it was similar to that. He said, he had lost the key of it some days, and I was laying on the sofa, and I got up to see if I had a key that would open it, I had not. He said, he should get the key of it the next day. He got up about nine o'clock the next morning, and I believe he was gone before ten; I believe he owed nearly a pound for lodging; he had his trunk away, and he asked my man to get a porter to carry his trunk; he took no final leave.

MR. CHARLES CHRISTIAN BAKER , a merchant and agent of considerable eminence in the City, translated to the Court a written Defence of the Prisoners,

from the German; wherein were recited all the actions of his life, and which finally accounted for the transaction thus, that the bills were no use to him, that he certainly took them, but with an intention of writing to the prosecutor when he arrived at Brussels, informing him he had them, and he should restore them upon a remittance of one hundred pounds.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-28

845. RICHARD HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , two coppers, value 30s. the property of John Cooper , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN COOPER . I live in Pump-row. Old-street -road . On the 18th of March last, I had taken the premises in question, on which were the two coppers. I had taken all the fixtures, and had paid for them on that day. On the 20th, in consequence of information, I went to the premises, and missed the property in question.

BROWN EDWARDS . On the 20th of March, about half past nine, I and Mr. Mayhew were coming up Old-street-road, and we saw three persons in the road, two with each a copper on their shoulders; we crossed the road, and laid hold of Hooper, the prisoner, and he threw down his copper. He then got away from me; I pursued him, apprehended him, and took him to the watchhouse. I secured the coppers also; they fitted the place in the prosecutor's kitchen. The prisoner made a desperate resistance.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-29

846. GEORGE BLAKER was indicted for having in his custody and possession a forged Bank of England note, knowing it to be forged .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-30

847. JANE BROWN was indicted for the like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-31

848. ELIZABETH STUBBS was indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-32

849. WILLIAM CHAMBERLAINE was indicted for the like offence .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-33

850. JOHN BROOKS and ISAAC GREENSLADE were indicted for the like offence .

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-34

850. JOHN JAMES SHORT was indicted for that he, being the clerk and servant of John Stanley and others, the directors of the Cornwall Copper Mine Company , by virtue of such employment, took into his custody and possession, a sum of twenty pounds, and afterwards feloniously secreted, embezzled, and stole the same .

It was proved that the prisoner was a share holder in the Company of whom the twenty pounds in question was the joint property.

THE COURT. Ruled that the prisoner could not feloniously steal that of which he was apart owner.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-35

852. JAMES HARRIS and WILLIAM GRANT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Gwillim , about the hour of two in the night, of the 9th of July , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, four copper lids, value 10s. one copper tea-kettle, value 7s. five window curtains, value 5s. 6d. one silver tea-spoon, value 2s. 6d. one plated caddy-spoon, value 6d. one themometer, value 1l. two table-cloths, value 3s. one cotton umbrella, value 2s. 6d. one gown, value 1s. five bottles, value 10d. one brass balance, value 1s. half a pound of tea, value 3s. three pounds weight of sugar, value 3s. twelve pounds weight of tobacco, value 2s. 6d. and eighty farthings, value 1s. 8d. the property of the said Ann Gwillim ; and a cotton shawl, value 1s. the property of Lydia Mellish .

ANN GWILLIM . I keep the Weavers Arms, in Grubb-street . On the night of the 9th of July, my house was broken open, and the things in question stolen from it. Harris was in the habit of using my house; I know nothing of the other.

LYDIA MELLISH. I lost my shawl out of the tap-room, the night the house was robbed.

ANN MITCHELL GWILLIM . I assisted my mother in seeing the house safe the over night.

WILLIAM SHIERS . I belong to Bow-street. On the morning of the 9th of July, about half past six in the morning, I was coming down the City Road, in company with another officer of the name of Woodcock, and we heard a cry of stop thief, and I saw three men running up Old-street Road; we stopped one of them, of the name of Locke, upon whom was part of the property in question, and the others dropped apart. I don't know that the prisoners are the two other men.

ROBERT WOODCOCK . I don't know that the prisoners were the two other men.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-36

853. GEORGE JENKS was indicted for stealing,

on the 8th of August , two pounds thirteen ounces of tea, value 5s. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

JAMES HEPWORTH . I am an assistant elder, at the East India House, the prisoner was also in the service of the Company . On rubbing the prisoner down when he was going out on the day in the indictment, I discovered a bulk in the waistband of his breeches; he said he had nothing that he knew of; and on searching him, I found the tea in question had been pushed into the waistband of his breeches under the lining, which had been afterwards sewed over.

JOHN LINES. Corroborated the account of the last witness.

SHEM NOAH . I produced the tea.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined three months , and whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-37

853. ROBERT PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , ten quires of paper value 10s. five quires of other paper value 5s. five quires of other paper, value 4s. and six quires of other paper, value 6s. the property of John Cotton .

HENRY TURNPENNY . On the 8th of August, about five minutes past eight in the morning, I saw a man of the name of John Wooten come out of Mr. Cotton's warehouse with this parcel; I then let him go about a hundred yards; then I turned myself round, and saw the prisoner at the bar looking after me; I then seized Wooten with this parcel; he said he did not know what was in it; he said he was going down to Blackfriars Bridge with it to a person who was to take it from him there. I then put the parcel into the bar of a public-house, and took Wooten back to the prosecutor's ware-house. I then told the prisoner I should take him into custody also, and he downed of his knees, and begged for mercy, and hoped I would forgive him; I told him that was not in my power for I must send for his master; and I did so.

JOHN WOOTEN . I received that parcel from the prisoner, I was sent to Mr. Cotton's ware-house by a strange person who was to meet me when I got the parcel on Blackfriars Bridge. I told the prisoner I came for a parcel, and he gave me this.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny falling down upon my knees and asking for mercy; I asked to see the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-38

854. JOHN ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a pair of bellows, value 5s. 6d. and six cups, and one saucer. value 2s. the property of John Dowler .

JOHN DOWLER . I lost these things on the 4th of August out of a garden house I had at Hoxton ; they were safe the evening proceeding the day in the indictment.

THOMAS -. I saw the prisoner at the bar about twenty minutes before five, on the day in the indictment; I saw him take a bundle out of a ditch, and throw the weed and leaves off it with his left hand; then he walked along the road towards the Prince Regent; I was with my fellow servant, and I said to the prisoner, halloo my friend you have got a job early this morning; and he said no I han't, what have you got to do with it; I told him he had got more than was his own there; and I and my fellow servant went up to him, and then he struck my fellow servant with both his hands with this stick over the leg. Then he ran off, I pursued him and he turned round and made a blow at me to cut me down, but I was too nimble for him and avoided it then he ran on, and I called stop thief, and he was stopped.

GUILTY , aged 74.

Confined one Year , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-39

855. JOHN LEVI was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Mills , in the King's Highway, on the 16th of August , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 40s. a seal value 2d. and a key, value 1d. his property .

ROBERT MIL1S. I am a shoe maker . On the 15th of August, between twelve and one in the morning in Burleigh-street, in the Strand , I was met by two men, one was a very tall man, and struck me on the breast; I called watch three times. It drove me a little back, and at the same time I felt my watch was gone directly as the blow was given; I felt it go from my breeches; I turned up the street directly, caught hold of the prisoner, and found the property in his hand; he was running away from me, and I took him at the top of Burleigh-street, and Exeter-street; I called the watch, and I gave the property to the constable of the night.

JOHN PARKER . I took the prisoner and the property into custody.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined two years , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-40

856. THOMAS HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 35s. the property of Robert Peele , Barnet and others.

JOHN WILMOTT . I am agent to Sir. Robert Peele and Co.; these things were taken on the 7th of the present month. from No. 8, Milk-street ; I should think it was from five to six in the evening.

WILLIAM HOW . I am a painter , who was employed at Sir Robert Peeles in Milk-street; the prisoner was employed there likewise. He came to me on the 7th of the present month, at about half past one; I set him to work down in the lower warehouse; he was very much intoxicated. About four o'clock, the porter came and gave me some information, and when I went down, I found the prisoner had painted the glass instead of the window frames. On examining him, I found the piece of printed cotton in question concealed in his waistcoat and he was afterwards given in charge to the officer.

JAMES BEDFORD. I am a porter to Sir Robert Peele. On Saturday the 7th instant, I went into the

cellar where the prisoner was at work to see how he got on, and observed a large bulk round his body and I soon after missed the piece of print in question; and not being able to find it I suspected the prisoner had it, and on examining him we found it on him, under his waistcoat.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one year , and fined 1s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-41

857. WILLIAM KEMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , twenty four calves' skins, value 10l. the property of Joseph Howlett Fenner .

SAMUEL YOUNG . I am a warehouse-man, in Leaden-hall-market . The business of the Market having been over; I had gone into the Lamb tavern. I received some information from one of Mr. Fenner's servants, I went out, and at about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner drive a cart up into the market, load the two dozen skins in question, and drive out again. I followed him into Leaden-hall-street, and laid hold of the horse's head; I asked him what he had in the cart; he said, two dozen skins. I asked him who they were for, and he said for Mr. Wood, of Fishmonger alley, in the Borough. I told him Mr. Wood had not made any purchase that day. Then he said he had made a mistake, and I might take the skins back again; upon which, he jumped off the shafis of the curt, and ran away; I and Mr. Fenner's man ran after him, and caught him.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-42

858. MARY M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , four shifts, value 10s. a frock, value 2s. an apron, value 1s. two pockets, value 6d. a pipe, value 5d. and three bowls for pipes, value 3d. the property of Michael Lyons .

MICHAEL LYONS. I keep a public-house . The prisoner was my servant . About twelve o'clock on the night of Saturday, the 20th of July, the prisoner was very much intoxicated, and we put her to bed. She had lived with me since April. In the morning I got up about eight o'clock, with intent to send her away, and when I came down, she was in liquor again. I suspected all was not right, and I set my daughter to watch her, and she called me down, and I sent for a constable, and we found a key on her which opened the wine-cellar door. In her pocket we found several duplicates, one leading to a shift of my wife's, and between the bed and the mattrass I found the other things named in the indictment.

ROSA LYON. On the 21st of July, I watched the prisoner into the privy, and I saw her take a bottle of wine out of her pocket, and drink out of it; then she went to the coal-place, and I called my father.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-43

859. THOMAS BONSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , fifteen dozens of swivels, value 3l. two fishing reels, value 1l. three dozens of fishing-hooks, value 12s. and one box, value 6d. the property of Maria Ustenson , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARIA USTONSON. The prisoner came into my shop to purchase some articles of fishing tackle, on the 6th of September; I had seen the things in question in the glass case on the counter about an hour before; I went into the kitchen as was customary at that hour of the day, and left a boy in the shop; he came down to me to ask me the price of a powder flask; I told him the price, and almost immediately afterwards, I heard him call out, halloo, young man, what are you doing there. I then ran upstairs immediately, and saw the prisoner run out of the shop.

ELIZABETH BOLTON. I am servant to Mrs. Ustonson. I was going up stairs with a pail of water to clean the stairs, and saw the prisoner and another young man in the shop; they asked the price of something, and the boy went down to his mistress; and as I was looking through the window, I saw them lift up the lid of the glass case, and take something out; I said halloo young young man, what are you doing there, and they immediately dropped the lid of the case and ran out of the shop; the errand boy ran out, and they were soon after brought back.

EDWARD SEVENCEY . I am in the service of Mrs. Ustonson. The prisoner and another man came into our shop on the 16th of September, and the prisoner asked the price of a powder flask. I heard the account of the last witness, it is true. The prisoner and the other man ran down Temple-lane , and the prisoner was stopped.

JOHN MAJOR . I am a City waterman. I was coming up Temple-lane, and heard the cry of stop thief, and the prisoner was running down the lane towards me; but he turned into Pump Court. I picked up the property, which he threw away; and I delivered them up at Mrs. Ustonson's shop.

GUILTY aged 17.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-44

860. JAMES TUCK was indicted for stealing, two one-pound notes , the property of John Draper .

MR. ANDREWS. On the part of the prosecution, declined to offer any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-45

861. BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isaac Snowsill , at about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 31st of July, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , ( Mary Holt , widow, in the same. dwelling-house there being;) and stealing therein, six half guineas, value 3l. 3s. one seven-shilling piece, value 7s. sixteen pounds in monies numbered, three pocket-books, value 2s. one pair of money weights and scales, value 2s. one promisory note, for the payment, and of the value of 10l. 2s. the property of the said Isaac Snowsill , and one bill of exchange, for the payment and of the value of 7l. 19s. 3d. the property of Thomas Snowsill , against the statute .

SARAH SNOWSILL . I am the wife of Isaac Snowsill.

In the month of July, 1814. my husband lived in Gray's-inn-lane . On the 31st of July, I went out at about half past three, and left Mrs. Mary Holt in the upper part of the house; she is a widow. When I and my daughter went out, we left my husband behind. We went up to Marybone; we were fetched away from Marybone at half past five by Bray, who informed me that my house was robbed; it had been robbed of the things in the indictment, they were in a drawer, part of a chest of drawers which was in the one pair of stairs front room; they had been locked, and had been opened by a chissel, or something of that kind; the room door had been locked, that was opened too; I did not find that it had been opened by violence. When I came home, I saw Mr. Johnson; the moment I saw him, I was so aggravated, that I said something to Mr. Johnson, I very much offendad him; somebody had told me something. I said Mr. Johnson, how could you be so bad a man, as to let the poor young fellow go up again; then he said that he came down empty, and his coming down empty was to no purpose to me, and he said when he came down with a load, I soon took him. I said no more to Johnson. The young man was taken to the office, and committed, and tried here; this property was afterwards produced by Johnson, as taken from Baxter.

ISAAC SNOWSILL . I went out of my house on Sunday the 14th of July, 1814 at about twenty minutes after three. I fastened the first floor door, and pulled the street door to; it had a spring bolt, and I put the key in my pocket. I left Mary Holt in the house; I found her in the passage when I came home; it was nearly five o'clock when I came home. When I came in, Mrs. Holt told me not to be alarmed that the house had been broken open and robbed.

SARAH SNOWSILL. I am a daughter of the last witness. On the 31st of July, in the year 1814, I remember being out at my brothers; it was a Sunday. I was there about half an hour, and a man of the name of Bray came for us in a coach; and in consequence of what he told us, we went home, and I saw Johnson in my mothers presence. She spoke to him; she asked him how he came not to take the prisoner, William Baxter when he came down the first time; my mother said she thought he was a very bad man, that he did not take William Baxter when he came down the first time; Johnson said it did not answer his purpose unless the prisoner had taken the property.

Q. Did Johnson say anything to you about going up the first time - A. He said he told him to go up the second time.

Q.Are you sure of that - A. I am; I heard him say nothing more; I learned from him, that he had seen our family go out; he said he saw me and my mother go out before my father, and he said he afterwards saw my father go out.

THOMAS BINGLEY . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Golden-lion-court. Aldersgate-street. I remember the circumstance of Mr. Snowsill's house being robbed on a Sunday in 1814; I know Johnson the prisoner; I saw him in the course of that day, it was the afternoon of the 31st of July, 1814; I saw him in Gray's-inn-lane, opposite to the house that was being robbed. I have known him this twenty years. I did not know him to be an officer of the City at that time. As I was passing along, he called to me, I was walking on Snowsill's side, and he called to me before I observed him; he said Tom, stop here, they are cracking a crib on the opposite side; I did not at that time understand what that was, but I now understand it to be breaking a house open. I asked him his meaning; he said the curtain is down, pointing to the curtain of the house; go and take your station at the end of the lane, and if I give you a signal, you come up to me; he did not add anything more. I went down, and stood at the end of the lane, that gave me a command of that side of the lane where he was standing; I could see Snowsill's door, and Johnson who stood opposite to it. In a few minutes, about five or six, a man came out of Snowsill's house; he crossed over towards Johnson, and spoke to him; they conversed together and walked down Gray's-inn-lane; they were the space of five or six minutes talking at the end of Charlotte Buildings; then they parted, and the man went back again into Mr. Snowsill's house, and Johnson took his station as before; I still remained in my station for seven or eight minutes after that. After he had gone in the second time, I saw the man come out of the house, I did not observe any difference in his appearance as to bulk; I was not near enough for that, and I had no idea that he was the person whom Johnson was watching. Johnson made me a signal, a beckon, and then I got up to them both, close to a public-house, called the Guy Earl of Warrick; that was about seven or eight houses from Where I had stood. They walked together in conversation; if I had met them myself, not knowing either of them. I should have considered them in perfect intimacy. I came up to them at the door of the Guy Earl of Warwick, by then I got up, Johnson asked him if he would have anything to drink; the man said yes, but we will go farther down; Johnson sain no, come in here. We went in, and Johnson asked him what he would have to drink, and he said a pint of porter; Johnson said, sit down, sit down; the man sit down and Johnson put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and said, now I am an officer, and if you make any resistance, I will blow your brains out; he took the handcuffs out of his pocket, when he put his hand in, and handcuffed the man. He then proceeded to search him. He asked me to go to Snowsill's, to see that nobody went in, I did so. I was absent about seven or eight minutes; then Johnson came and beckoned me back again; I went back and helped Johnson to count out the money that was taken from the man, and it amounted to sixteen pounds, sixteen shillings in silver, and some trifle in gold; I took an invertory of the silver myself, in Johnson's pocket-book; there was a bill of exchange and a promisory note. Johnson asked me to sit down by the prisoner while he went over to inform them that they were robbed; he went out accordingly to do so; he was gone for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then returned with a man of the name of Bray; it turned out to be another officer, as I understood since. Both Johnson and Bray took the man to Eagle-street watchhouse. I since know

that it was William Baxter who was then taken into custody, and to him all my evidence relates when I have been speaking of this man. I was not present when he was tried. Johnson, Bray and I went over to Mr. Snowsill's and he had not come from chapel. When he had come home Johnson told him the house had been broken open, and it was agreed that Bray should go to the other end of the town to fetch Mrs. Snowsill.

RICHARD HATTON. I am a watchhouse-keeper in St. Andrew's parish, and was so in July, 1814; that watchhouse is in Eagle-street. I remember on Sunday, the 31st of July, 1814, the prisoner Johnson and another man brought Baxter to the watchhouse, near about three o'clock in the afternoon; Johnson desired me to take care of the prisoner he brought. I asked him for what? he told me for house-breaking in our parish. I asked him where? and he told me at the patten-maker's, in Gray's-inn-lane. I asked him if he had known any thing of the prisoner? he told me when I put him back in the lock-up room, that he would tell me all about it. Accordingly he went with me and this other man that was with him to see the prisoner locked up. That being done, he came back to the watchhouse alongwith me. I asked him what officers they were? and he said, they belonged to the City Police. I asked him if he knew any thing of the prisoner before? his answer was that he was introduced to him as a cracksman, and he had been with him all that morning. He himself had been introduced, and he, Baxter, did not know but he, Johnson, was one of the same sort. That he was in some where about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and Baxter was coming out at the door to come for the street again, and Johnson said he saw he had got nothing about him then. Johnson asked Baxter if all was right? and he said, no. Johnson said, damme, go back again, and do it, for all is right here. He went back again, and was in about ten minutes; Baxter then came out again; Johnson said he saw all was right then by the bulk of his pocket. He asked him if he would have any thing to drink; and he said yes, and he took him over the way.

JOHN BAXTER. I live at No. 10, Russel-place, Little Coram-street. I am the father of the young man who was convicted of a robbery in Gray's-inn-lane. When my son was apprehended. I went to see him; I went on the morning following, between five and six o'clock; on my going to the watchhouse, I saw the present prisoner Johnson soon after; he asked me my name; I told him. To that he said, are you the father of the prisoner, and I said, I was. I told him I could see very plainly that it was a planned thing to trap him.

Q. What did Johnson say to that - A. He said if he were to give a pistol into his hand to shoot another, is that enough that he should do the action. I asked him what office he meant to take him to, and he said to Marlborough-street. I said the proper office was Hatton Garden. I said he had no right to take him there; he said he should take him to no place but Marlborough-street. Johnson was then securing my son, and band-cuffing him; my son said Johnson, what you are now doing to me, will be done to you very soon.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. On the Friday before the Sunday, two years ago last July, a man of the name of Golding, who is in the Calendar, came to me at the Mansion House, and gave me information. Accordingly I went to see this man of the name of Golding. According to appointment, I met him at the top of Brooks-street, Holborn, and went into a public-house, and had a pint of half and half. Then it was about the time that I was to be at the top of Gray's-inn-lane; but when the man that is convicted,(Golding) was paying for the half and half we met with this Baxter, and then Golding spoke to him, and I supposed by the description that he was the man who was to commit the burglary; they said, they would go back, and have half a quartern of gin; whilst the two were drinking, Baxter then pulled out a key, signifying that all was right; according to my information it then was done, and my plan was totally defeated; and on coming to the door, Baxter saw what he had done, and what he was going to do. Under these circumstances, being in company with him, I found I could not being him to a Public Court of Justice, and I found it was then two late, and he was then to meet Golding again in the afternoon; but I was not to be there, because the person suspected I was not one; little did he think I was an officer. In the afternoon, they met again in Gray's-inn-lane, and Baxter touched me on the shoulder; he said, Golding was drunk. I did not know what to do; when I met with a man of the name of Bray; I acquainted him with it, and the young man Bingley; I never knew a more false evidence; he stated, that I kept him. He saw every transaction; so did Bray. But the young man says, he saw the young man let down the curtain, and that is a total falsehood.

THE COURT, here interrupted the prisoner, to correct this misunderstanding of h1s.

Prisoner, in Continuance. - He came out, and was not in one minute; I was then momentarily going to take him, and he said, d-n my eyes, my hand itches for it, here goes, and he went in, and I do not know what he did. But when he came out the second time, I acquainted Bray with it. I was then going to take him into custody; on account of his being such a notorious character, and his having committed such a number of robberies. I let him go in again, and he had said, the first officer that offered to take him, he would put a knife into his liver, and no doubt if I am found guilty I shall suffer. Moreover after that, I took him to the watchhouse, and took him in company with Bray; Bray was present, and that young man. Bingley has sworn entirely false, Directly as I got him into the house, and as he began to count the money. I took Baxter off to the watchhouse. There was a man at the watchhouse, and he said, that the watchhouse-keeper was up stairs a-bed, and he called him down, and when he came, I told him I had a man for burglary; I told him where it was. I left him there, and that is all I spoke to him, so help me God. At

the time that man, Hatton, was an evidence on the trial of Baxter, he was going to be indicted for perjury, and he was ordered out of Court by the counsel; there was not a word mentioned of what has been said to day; it is made up altogether; if it was not made up, why did they not come forward to save the young man's life on the trial, and why did not Mrs. Snowsill state what she said to day as she should do. I am here to be tried for my life, and I must leave it totally to your Lordship and the Jury. It is hard that all these things should be brought up against me now, and I hope God will save her soul, if he don't save mine. As for the father he is as bad as Baxter was; he was turned away from Messrs. Cannon and Cole's, in Thames-street, for a robbery.

-BRAY. I was a City officer; I am not so now. I went to fetch the mother and daughter; I did fetch them. Johnson did not say any thing to them to my knowledge about his sending the young man into the house the second time. If he had said it in the coach coming, I should have heard it. I only came home with Mrs. and Miss Snowsill in a hackney coach, and there I left them. Whether Johnson was with them or not, I don't know. I went into the one pair of stairs, and I believe Mrs. Snowsill sent something up there to drink. Neither in the coach nor in the house, did I hear Johnson say any thing to her about sending the man in a second time. She was looking over the things in the house, and I naturally looked with her to see if they were safe. I was at the watchhouse; I did not hear Johnson say that he had been with Baxter, Mr. Hatton when he came down opened a door, and went in with Johnson. I staid outside, and Johnson gave his own charge. I had not the least to do with the charge. The only communication I heard was that Mr. Hatton asked me to go backwards to assist in locking the prisoner up, and Johnson said, let him have some beer and bread and cheese to the amount of two or three shillings, That was going up to the lock up place.

Cross-examined by THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. I do not mean it to be understood that no other conversation could have taken place. There might be a great deal that I did not hear, because I did not go into the little place. I naturally staid out because I had nothing to do with the charge. I was here on the trial of Baxter; I can't recollect whether I was or was not examined; it is two years ago; I don't think I was.

Q. Were you not examined after Mr. Hatton was examined, as to the fact of whether Johnson said to him what he had said, he did say on his examination - A. I heard after the trial was over.

Q. But before the Judge summed up, were you or were you not examined as to the fact of the conversation I have spoken of - A. That question was put to me by Mr. Adolphus whether those things were said by Johnson in the watchhouse.

Q. Had you not been examined, and told your whole story - A. I never was examined at all about it.

Q. Were you not examined as a witness to confirm the testimony of Johnson - A.Certainly I was.

Q. Now the question was put to you by these things, now what things - A. It was about some things that Johnson was named to have said at the watchhouse. I say now that certainly much might pass which I did not her. On the Sunday in question I might be in company with Johnson three or four hours; it might be about twenty minutes before three when I first came into his company; we did not then keep together. Johnson desired me to go into a public-house, and wait there until he beckoned to me; that was a little before three; I was not in company with him alone. That was a little before three, he met with Lee, the street-keeper of Holborn; we were going to the park-fair. The public-house commanded a view of Mr. Snowsill's house. I saw the man that Johnson shewed me, go in; he shewed me him through the window; that man at that time was on the opposite side of the way. He came out, and Johnson ran out of the wine-vaults, and ran down Gray's-inn-lane, and he was gone for about five minutes, and just as he got in, he shewed me a bit of a a sign that the man was coming up; he said, that is the thief, and he went on, and was in about ten minutes. Johnson was in and out with me four or five times. The man was in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and when he came out Johnson directly caught hold of him, and he waved his finger for me to get up; I had not lost sight of him at all until he had laid hold of the man; I ran very quickly. Johnson did not say any thing to me. We went into the public-house with the man. I recollect being examined on the 21st of July, 1814.

Q. What did you say had passed between Johnson and the prisoner Baxter on his apprehending him - A.I can hardly answer that question; it is such a question as I am sure I do not understand.

Q. My question is whether Johnson said any thing to you as to what passed in his attempt to secure the prisoner Baxter - A. I could not answer the question.

Q. Do you understand it - A. I don't.

Q. Then I will make you. Did Mr. Johnson tell you that any thing had passed between him and the prisoner Baxter when he attempted to secure him?

Q.When you came up to Baxter, did Johnson tell you of any thing that had happened in taking him into custody, any thing that he had done to Baxter - A. I don't recollect any thing that he did to him.

Q. That is not my question; this is what I want to come at; have you not represented that Johnson said he had a struggle with Baxter, and was obliged to knock him down - A. The question I said was, that Johnson said that Baxter was a resolute fellow, and that he was obligated to knock him down.

Q. Did Johnson tell you so - A. I believe he did. I stated it to Mr. Nares there might have been a strong tustle in the passage; Johnson told me so in the public-house.

Q. Now I will ask you sir, one question, and then I have done with you; what share of the reward did you receive for the conviction of Baxter-A. The Recorder gave me ten pounds; I have received it, and part of my ten pounds was given to Johnson to pay for the counsel and lawyer, for carrying on the

prosecution. After all the expences were paid, I believe I had no more than four or five shillings in my pocket.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 39.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-46

862. BARNET LEVI was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , a watch, value 20s. the property of Stephen Monk , from his person .

STEPHEN MONK . I am a waterman . On the 25th of August last, between the hours of four and five in the afternoon, I went into Newgate ; I am sure my watch was safe when I went in. When I got about a yard from the gate going in, the prisoner at the bar came up to me, and took my watch out of my pocket; he gave it a snatch; it had a black ribbon to it; he handed it to someone else. I immediately collard him, and gave an alarm. The watch was recovered in about half an hour.

NATHANIEL LAURENCE . I saw what the last witness has stated; I went in with the last witness.

MR. JOHN ADDISON NEWMAN. I am the keeper of Newgate. The prisoner at the bar was confined in Newgate on the 25th of August. I did not see Monk come into the gaol; the first I heard of it was that a visitor had been robbed, and in consequence of that, I came to the gates, and Monk seized the prisoner, and one of the principal turnkeys assisted in bringing him out. The watch was afterwards handed through the rai1s.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am one of the turnkeys of Newgate. Monk come in to see a friend that was in confinement, as soon as I let him in, he had a bason with some meat in it. I examined it and let him go through; as soon as he got in, he was immediately shoved against, by this Levi, and Monk directly put up his hand, and caught hold of him. I directly said to the gatesman, bring him through, what is the matter. Monk instantly complained of having lost his watch, and the gatesman brought the prisoner between gates to me. I had observed the ribbon hanging out of the prosecutor's pocket when I was examining the meat. In about twenty minutes or half an hour, the watch was found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing in the yard close by this young man when he missed his watch, and he caught hold of me, and said I had stolen it; Mr. Davis immediately searched me, and there was nothing found on me.

(The prisoner called two prisoners from the Goal, to prove he had not stolen the watch, and they declared they knew nothing at all about it.)

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-47

863. JOHN WILLIAMS, alias KITCHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a pocket-handkerchief, value 6s. the property of William Waithman , from his person .

MR. WILLIAM WAITHMAN . I am a linen draper , and live in Fleet-street. I lost a handkerchief, on the 20th of last month, at about nine, or half past nine in the evening; I was walking along Fleet-street near Temple-bar , and a person came up to me, and said that person who was walking before me had taken my handkerchief; I am sure it was in my pocket when I left my house. On feeling in my pocket I immediately missed it; I went forward and stopped the prisoner, who was a few yards before me, I charged him with stealing my handkerchief, and he denied it; I laid hold of him by the collar, and on my shewing symptoms of an intention to search him, he put his hand under his coat, which was buttoned, and drew the handkerchief out, and dropped it; it was worth about six shillings. I had a constable, and took him into custody.

WILLIAM SANDFORD . I saw the prisoner behind Mr. Waithman, and saw him take the handkerchief out of Mr. Waithman's pocket. I gave Mr. Waithman information, and saw the handkerchief dropt by the prisoner, as Mr. Waithnran has stated.

JOHN WILL1S. I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner, and the property.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-48

861. ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a shawl, value 10s. the property of Abraham Holford .

JAMES ARCHER. I am an assistant to Mr. Holford, linen draper at No. 6, Bishopsgate-street, without . On the 20th of August last, at a little after seven in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop; she wished to look at some shawls; she was a long time looking at them, and inquiring the prices of them. She took her own shawl off, and placed it on the counter, to see the sise of one of my master's, and I observed her moving one of the under shawls, and I then suspected her; she then proceeded towards the door, and I followed her, and found the shawl in question under her own shawl; I took it from her, brought her back, and sent for an officer.

JOHN STARKEY . I received charge of the prisoner and the property.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months and fined 1s .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-49

865. WILLIAM TIFFIN was indicted for the wilful murder of William Reed .

WILLIAM FRANKLIN. I am in partnership with Mr. Tiffin the prisoner; we are potters, and manufacturers of crucibles. On the night of the 27th of July , I was in my own house, in Spitalfields , where we carry on our business, and heard the report of a pistol; soon after there was a ringing at the bell; that turned out to be the prisoner's servant. Mr. Tiffin had gone round the premises as usual with his lanthorn and a pistol, to see that nobody was lurking about the premises. When I saw Mr. Tiffin immediately afterwards, he told me he had gone down to his cart shed as usual, and as he was going down, his little dog began to bark, upon which he looked over the light of his lanthorn, and saw a man on the premises near the wall; when he saw the man, he told him he should go out, or if he did not, he would shoot him; instead of going out when he told the man, the man ran upon him, and as he was coming

up, he told him to keep off; but the man kept running on. Then he retreated a few paces back, and the man followed him up within a few paces. He then fired, and the man fell. He said, he did not know whether he was dead or wounded; by his desire I went for a watchman, and we found the man lying on his back quite dead.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. These premises were completely enclosed; our manufactory had been robbed a very short time previous, and the counting-house had been broken open. The prisoner said, he fired in his own defence, and if he could have avoided it he would not have done it.

JOHN BENSON, and SAMUEL DOBSON, described the premises.

THOMAS INGRAM . I am a watchman. I went to the house of the prisoner on the night this happened. I saw the body. The prisoner told me the circumstances as Mr. Franklow has stated.

SARAH HARRIS . The deceased cohabited with me. I was getting supper ready, and he said, he would go out and get a pint of beer, and the next I heard of him was that he was shot.

NOT GUILTY .

[It is but proper to state that the Learned Judge observed, that the prisoner quitted that bar without any imputation whatever upon his character.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-50

866. ADAM WRIGHT was indicted for the manslaughter of George Kirby and Mary Kirby .

THOMAS HENRY . I live in King's-road, Fulham. I remember on Sunday, the 25th of August , I was at the top of the Chelsea stage coach, which the prisoner drove. I remember passing through the turnpike at Hyde Park corner at about ten minutes or a quarter past nine in the evening; we passed through the left hand gaite; I observed a carriage pass through before us, which had lights; we might then be ten or a dozen yards from it; we were going quicker than in general; it was a very dark night. We gained upon the coach that was before up, and got nearly opposite to it, bearing away on the right. In a moment I heard the coach run against something; I can't say whether it was on the left or right side of our coach, because I was in conversation with my wife; but the shock seemed to be on the left of our coach; the shock was very great; the other coach appeared to go straight forward. The prisoner appeared to me to be perfectly sober. I did not hear any one call out to make way. The prisoner did not stop at all after this to make any enquiry what had happened.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. The coach in front of us had lights, I could not see any thing before us for the glare of those lamps.

WILLIAM TYLER . I remember being at Kingsland-bridge on the 25th of August last, at a little after nine; I was by the second lamp post from the Weigh-gate; I was precisely opposite to where the accident happened. It was rather a dark night; I was standing on the Hospital side, that is the left side going from Town; I could see the carriages that passed and repassed most distinctly; I was looking in the road for a dog I had lost. I could see by the glare of these coach lamps; I think there was an advantage for a foot-passenger's seeing. I heard a voice proceeding from the opposite side of the road, and my attention was then directed that way. I observed the carriages two or three seconds before I heard the voice; what the voice uttered, I don't know. In about the space after that a horse could strike three or four strokes with his feet, I heard a crash; then I heard screaming; I principally heard a man's voice. I went across to the assistance of the people; but I found I could afford them no assistance. At the time I heard the voice, I saw the carriages going. The one that appeared to have done the mischief, appeared to be going fast. There is a little difficulty coming through the gate. The carriage with lights was on its proper side of the road; it a little preceded the coach the prisoner drove; but I think they were running in almost parallel lines; I think the prisoner's coach was more on the right than was necessary, supposing he was endeavouring to pass the other. I found the gig thrown over, and one shaft broken; I found the woman and the child thrown out by the shock; they were immediately taken to the Hospital.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I believe there was room for the gig to have passed between the two carriages.

GEORGE KIRBY. I was driving this gig on the 25th of August, in which were my wife, and child. About a hundred yards from the gate, I was on the left hand side of the road, and saw this coach a few yards before me, coming directly on me; I called out for God's sake stop, and drew up the horse; my wife screamed out; but it was so momentary a thing that he was upon us. With the force of his near horse coming against my near sharft, broke it; and my wife and the baby fell out on the near side of the chaise, and I and a son of mine about ten years old fell behind the horses hee1s. Then when the shafts were broken, the horse turned a little to the left, and the coach passed us on the left. My little boy and I got up from behind the horses heels, and my wife and the baby were taken to the Hospital. The coach that did the mischief was coming with a fast trot down a descent; I could not get out of the way, it was so momentary a thing. My wife and the baby were killed. I was driving very slow.

THOMAS CAMBLER . I bring forward the prosecution on the part of the parish.

JOSEPH TIPPIN. I was coming home by the Chelsea coach. I know no more than has been described by the first witness.

JOSEPH TIPPIN , JUN. I am the son of the last witness, and saw what he described.

MR. KERMION. I am house-sergeon at St. George's Hospital. I remember the unfortunate persons being brought into the Hospital; the child had a fracture on the left thigh, and I observed something farther wrong about the child, and I did not ascertain what that was until he was dead; he lived until five o'clock the next morning, and then died. I afterwards opened it, and found that two of the bones of the back were separated from each other, and the liver was ruptered, from which profuse bleeding had taken place.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a coach before me with lights, and it was my intention to pass that coach, and I did not see any thing before me, and at the same time the gig came, and ran the shaft into my horses chest.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined nine months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-51

867. WILLIAM TODD HUNTER was indicted for embezzlement .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-52

868. GRACE BLAKER was indicted for forgery .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-53

869. THOMAS JOHN PARKER was indicted for felony .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-54

870. ELIZABETH GREATHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , a tea-spoon, value 3s. a salt-spoon, value 3s. two shirts, value 5s. and a coat, value 4s. the property of Frederick Samuel Hopkins .

FREDERICK SAMUEL HOPKINS . I am a stationer , and live at 42, Bishopsgate Within . The prisoner at the bar was a servant of mine. She came on the 31st of July, and she was frequently intoxicated, and on one or two occasions she was so much so, as not to be able to do her work. After this, I was about to discharge her, and a variety of things was missing. She denied all knowledge of them. I was at length obliged to send for an officer, and when we were searching her some duplicates dropped from her person. At last she produced a small box, which the officer opened. We then went and searched her lodging in Peter's-lane, St. John-street. There we found forty-one duplicates, seven of which related to the property in question.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined one year , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-55

871. SUSANNAH PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , from the person of John Rutherford , one one-pound bank note, his property .

JOHN RUTHERFORD. I work at the Opera House . On the day in the indictment, I left the Opera House at nine o'clock; every season after the Opera House closes, the workmen have a supper; we had so on the night in question, and I had a one-pound note, a three-shilling piece, and an eighteen-penny piece. After supper was over, I got a little way on my road home, when I met the prisoner by New-square, Westminster . I felt the prisoner's hand go from my pocket, and on feeling, I told her she had picked my pocket of a one-pound note, and she denied it. I had been with her about twenty minutes. I called watch; the watchman came up; he searched her, and the one pound note was found down behind her on the stones. When I charged the watch with her, she said she had dropped it. I told her if she would give up the note, I would let her go, and she said, she had dropped it.

Q.Then you did not keep your word with her - A. No.

JOHN SMITH . I am the watchman. I was crying two o'clock when the last witness called me. I went up to them; she said she had dropped it, and the prosecutor told me to shew a light, and picked it up from behind her.

THOMAS WATSON. I am the constable of the night, and received this charge.

Prisoner's Defence. He tore me about in a most shafeful manner, and was in my room more than two hours, and sent out for some beer, and I had pulled my gown off, and went down for the beer without it, and he came after me, and wanted the note back again, which he had given me as a compliment, and he tore me about in a most shameful manner.

Thomas Watson . Re-called. He acknowledged he had been in a room with her, and certainly her clothes were very much torn about.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-56

872. RICHARD THORN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , a watch, value 4l. and two seals, value 1l. 10s. the property of Richard Edwards , from his person .

RICHARD EDWARDS . I was coming through Hyde Park at nearly four o'clock in the afternoon of the day in the indictment. I had been out that morning, and was returning home. I was very bad in my bowels, and went out of the path, and dropped to sleep. I am sure my watch was safe in my fob when I sat down. When I awakened, I missed it. I never saw it again until the evening, when I saw it at Marlborough-street. The prisoner was then in custody.

CHARLES JAMES JOYCE . I am apprentice to Mr. Mulcaster, pawnbroker, in Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square. I look at the prisoner at the bar, and know his person. He offered to pawn a silver watch with me between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the day in the indictment. I had information from Mr. Edwards, and I asked him where he had got it, and he said, he had stolen it. He appeared perfectly sober to me. I left him in the shop, and took the watch to Mr. Edwards' house; Mr. Edwards was not at home; but his wife thought it was his watch. I returned back, and got a constable, and had the prisoner taken into custody.

Prisoner. I asked that witness if he thought I stole it. I did not say I had stolen it.

Witness. I am sure he said he stole it.

PETER GRIST. I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody.

JOHN BURRIN. I was going across the Park with a friend, and saw a person laying asleep, and the prisoner who was outting across the Park went up to him I saw the prisoner stoop, and pull out something, and I could see a blue ribbon, The prisoner

overtook us, and told us he had enough to take him to Horncastle Fair; I knew him. He wanted to borrow eighteen pence of me. We went to a public-house together, and there I saw him with the watch. I saw him before the Justice the next day, or the day after.

EDWARD BOND. Corroborated the account of the last witness.

Prisoner's Defence. We were altogether going along, and I asked Mr. Burrin to lend me eighteen pence, and he gave me this watch to go and pawn, and he said he would lend it me out of the money.

Richard Edwards . My watch had a blue ribbon to it.

WILLIAM BAKER . I can positively inform the Court that Mr. Edwards had the watch eight minutes before three that afternoon.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-57

873. JOHN BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , eight canvas blinds, value 12s. 6d. the property of Mary Illingsworth .

THOMAS ROWLEY . I am a bricklayer by trade. I had the care of Mrs. Illingsworth's house, and locked it up safe on the night of Saturday the 20th of July; I saw it again on the Monday morning the 22nd; my son was to repair it, and I was to help him. When we went to the door at about a quarter past five, my son had got a load on his shoulders, and he said there is somebody in the house. As we opened the door, the prisoner came out, and my son told him to stop, but he an off, and immediately another man ran out. I thought it was better to secure one, than lose them both; I caught him, and as I was taking him down Frith-street, I said, where are your implements that you got in with; he said what is that to you, your master must ask that; and he said you have let the best man go; I said never mind I have got you. When I go him down to the watchhouse, Mr. Craig asked him where the jemmy was, and he pulled it out, and put it down on the table; it was about twenty inches long, and it was done up quite snug in a little green baize bag. These blinds were all cut down; and then we found some skeleton keys also on him; we found eight blinds had been taken down, and five had been left in the house; three had been taken away, as I expect by the man who ran away; they had been fixed to the front windows of the house; they were bundled up in the passage, the value might be eighteen shillings.

GEORGE THOMAS ROWLEY . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

WILLIAM CRAIG. I received charge of the prisoner and property.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-58

874. WILLIAM BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , a ham, value 14s. the property of Richard Brown .

ROBERT FRAZER . I saw the prisoner coming out of Mr. Browne's shop in Wardour-street with this ham; I gave Mr. Brown information and he pursued him, and took him.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a cheesemonger at 28, Wardour-street Soho . In consequence of information I received from the last witness, I pursued the prisoner and brought him back with the ham on him; it was my ham.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-59

875. ISAAC CROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a watch, value 1l. 5s. a chain, value 6d. a seal, value 6d. and two keys, value 4d. the property of Robert Strickland .

ROBERT STRICKLAND. I am a cooper , and live at 51, Noble-street ; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me. On my getting up on the morning of the day in the indictment and going out, I left my watch behind me; I returned a little after six to get it, but it was then gone, and the prisoner was gone; he did not return to the lodging that night, but he came in the next morning; he said he knew nothing of the watch; he afterwards produced the duplicate to the constable, and I went with that duplicate and found the watch; it might be worth twenty-five shillings.

HENRY PEACHEY . I am a pawnbroker, I know the prisoner at the bar; he pawned a watch with me on the 10th of September, I advanced him eight shillings on it. One or two days afterwards the constable and Strickland called at our house, and Strickland claimed that watch.

GEORGE STEADMAN. I took charge of the prisoner. In conveying him to the office, he wished to take some refreshments, and the prosecutor and he I, went into the Baker and Basket, and he wished to withdraw backwards, and he there confessed that he threw the duplicate out of the back parlour window, into the garden; we returned with him, and he shewed us where it was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The greatest distress.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-60

876. WILLIAM COLBIN , SARAH COLLINS , JOHN BOWL , and ANN WOOD , were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , two saucepans, value 3s. the property of Samuel Griffiths .

SAMUEL GRIFFITHS . On the 14th of September, at about ten o'clock at night the two female prisoners came to my shop, and asked for a save-all, they stood in a direction between me and the door so that I could not see the door. While they were in the shop, the prisoner Colbin was laid hold of and brought into the shop with the saucepans in question.

DAVID WILLIAMSON. I was going by Mr. Griffith's shop, and I saw the prisoner Colbin lying on the steps of the door with a saucepan in his right hand and another in his left; I did not at that time see the two women, but when I did see them they were in the shop, and by the direction in which they

stood, it was impossible for a person in the shop to see what was doing at the door. Colbin handed one of the saucepans to the other man prisoner, and dropped the other. I secured Colbin and both the saucepans were secured; Bowl walked away I believe. I am sure he is the man to whom Colbin was handing one of the saucepans; Colbin said he was shewing the saucepan to Bowl, and he said he was wagering five shillings, that one was a three pint saucepan; Bowl however did not stay to see that wager decided; Colbin too wished to walk off with himself, and as I was stopping him, he made a blow at me; I immediately collared him, and seized him by the throat; then the two females were stopped.

JOHN CHESTERMAN. Colbin was brought to the watchhouse first; Wood followed him, and when she came to the watchhouse, she was taken into custody.

WILLIAM MANNING . I am a watchman, I took Colbin into the shop, I afterwards took Colbin and Bowl.

WILLIAM JORDAN. I am the constable of the night; I received charge of the prisoners, and the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoners, each in a vary long defence, denied their guilt.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-61

877. JOHN DAVIS and GEORGE BLOXAM were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , two silver spoons, value 10s. the property of John Willing Warten Esq.; and one spoon, value 1d. the property of Elizabeth Fennel , spinster .

ELIZABETH FENNEL . I lived in the house of the prosecutor. In the day in the indictment I saw these spoons safe in the kitchen on that morning about nine o'clock; one laid on the dresser, and the others were in the corner cupboard. I went out of the kitchen for a minute between ten and eleven, and on my return I saw the boy whose name I believe to be Bloxam stepping out of the kitchen; I missed the spoons after that.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I was in Southampton Row, between eleven and twelve on the morning of the day in the indictment; I saw Bloxam shewing a spoon to a person who is not here; that other person might be about twenty one, a great deal taller than either of the prisoners. That circumstance induced me to watch them; Davis was not by at this time. I laid hold of him, and asked him where he had got that spoon from; he pretended to be perfectly ignorant of what I was asking him about, and contrived to hide it the moment I laid hold of him. I searched him, and found the property in question on him; also a latch key. I saw Davis about Southampton Row, and endeavoured to secure him. Upon my saying I had seen him with Bloxam, he ran away; he was stopped by a man.

WILLIAM BOND. I found a silver spoon on the boy, not the prosecutors. I found it on the inside of his trowsers, between the lining and the cloth.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Bloxam's Defence. Fagan came and gave me the spoon.

DAVIS, NOT GUILTY .

BLOXAM GUILTY , aged 14.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-62

878. THOMAS BROCK , JOHN PELHAM , and MICHAEL POWER were indicted for coining .

DANIEL BARRY , SENIOR. I have known Michael Power about eighteen years, and I have known Pelham about four or five months or so; I first knew him about the latter end of April or May; I met him in the company of Michael Power , in Finsburysquare. We had some conversation together. After that I did not meet them again until they came to my own house; it might be a fortnight before both came together. Power asked me if I would go and have a walk with him; I told them I could not go that afternoon, and the next day, being Sunday, Pelham came, without Power; he knocked at my door, and my wife opened it; on seeing me, he asked me if Power had been then, and I told him he had not. He asked me to come, and have some beer; I told him I had no money, and he told me not to mind that. Then we went to the top of Bunhill-row, and he gave me three pots of beer, and a quartern of gin; we both drank. He asked me if I knew any houses where thieves resorted. He told me he could put me into a good thing, as well as he did Michael Power, and he had put Michael Power into a good way of living without work. He then asked me if I could get a man or two who could break a pane of glass or two in a shop-keeper's window; if I could, he would have two police officers standing on the other side of the way, who should run over and take him directly, and I need fear nothing; and if I could not get any one to do it, to do it myself, and never fear, but I might walk on, and he would take the first man that came up, and that there would be a good reward for that, and that I would have my part; that I refused. Then he asked me if I could get a man or two, who could pass bad three-shilling pieces; that he would fix a day, and he would give me three bad three-shilling pieces, and one good one; that I should walk with him, and should pick up a man, and get into conversation with him. He then asked me if I could get a man or two who would go and make shillings; he told me he had put Michael Power into a good way of living without work, and that Michael Power could make stuff that would colour a quart pot if that was all; I told him if he wanted a man, he should go to market for him; that is at Cheapside where the Irish labourers resort to early in the morning to get work; it is at the corner of King-street; the usual time is between five and six. After that we separated; a few days afterwards I met him and Power in Barbican; Pelham asked me in Power's hearing if I had made up my mind in respect to what he had been talking to me about; Michael Power said did you tell Barry anything; I did said Pelham; did you swear him first said Power; he would not swear for me said Pelham. He had asked me to swear on a newspaper, at the first public-house, at the time he first proposed about breaking the panes of glass, and I refused to swear; it was that I should keep secret whatever he told me, for Michael Power had

given a good character of me. I was to swear to keep secrect every thing he told me. Then Power said to Pelham, you did ill; well says Pelham he does not believe what I say to be true; if you told him any thing said Power, I dare say it is all right enough. Well said Pelham, if you don't believe me, come with me to the Solicitor for the Bank, and I will make you know, that I am well known there. I went with him to the Solicitor for the Bank; we went up through Colman-street; Pelham told me it was the Solicitor to the Bank; I saw Mr. Westwood. About four or five days after that, Pelham came up to my house, and told me he wanted me to go along with Michael Power to market to get two men; I said, I would, and we agreed to go the next morning, and we were to meet at the post of Cripplegate-buildings, at seven o'clock. The next morning Pelham came and called me; when I went down stairs, Brock and Power were waiting, and we went and had some gin together, all four. Then I wanted to go home for something I forgot, and I told them I would be back at the post, and so I was. Then it was agreed for Pelham, Power, and me to go to market; then we went to the corner of King-street, Cheapside; we were to go for two men. Then we went to King-street; Brock did not go. As we were going along, Pelham said, now Mike it won't do for me to be seen by these men at market, for I must assist the officers in taking them up. Upon that, I and Power went to market, leaving Pelham behind. Then Power said, now Barry, you speak to the men; that was when I went up to the men. When I got to the market, I saw Quin and Rourden; I fell into talk with them; it was about a quarter past seven. I asked them how work went on, and how work was; and they said, that no men had been taken off the market that day. Quin put his hod on his shoulder, and the other took up his shovel, and they said they would go home. Power desired me to walk on with the men; which I did, and he remained a little behind. I went on talking with the men, in Irish; when we got to the end of the street, Power called out Barry, I dare say these two men want a job; I dare say they do, said I; and yes, said Quin, we do indeed, we want a job very bad. We said, we should see our master, and ask him if he wanted any one; they asked us where our master lived; and I told them at the Cat at the corner of Whitecross-street; and I asked them if they knew it, and they did. We told them to come at nine o'clock. Power called after me to tell them to leave their hods behind, as they would not be wanted; and I did so, Then when the men were gone, Pelham came running up, and said, well, is all right; he was following us all the time Power said, all was right enough, and the men were to meet him at nine o'clock. Then I must go back to Brock and get some money, said Pelham, and let you go and have something to drink; where shall we go and have drink without money; said Michael Power but I know a public-house where we can have a pot of beer, and shall not be asked for the money until we have drank it, and we will sit over it. Then we went to the Cat, and met the men, and took them to the French Horn when I got there, there were Michael Power , I, Quin, and Rourden; a pot of beer was called for, and had not been on the table ten minutes when Pelham came in, and looked at the men, and then went out, and was followed by Power; we were to take no notice of Pelham. Power came in again with his pipe alight. He said now, Barry, you know our master won't take any man into his employ unless they take an oath that they won't tell any body what they do. Then Quin turned about, and he began to tell it in Irish to Rourden; I knew Irish very well. I told Quin if that young man could not speak English, to tell him it in Irish. It appeared to me that Quin communicated it to Rourden. Upon this, they swore. Power took a bit of paper off the floor, and he crossed himself, and kissed it, and said he would tell it to no one but them who would be at work along with him; then he pushed the paper to me; I am not a Papist; Quin and Rourden I believe were; that is a kind of solemnity, the crossing, that is used as a species of oath. Power crossed himself and then laid the paper on the table, and so desired me to do the same, which I did, and pushed it to Quin and Rourden, who did the same as Power, only Rourden took it in Irish. After this, we drank the pot of beer, and agreed to meet again at one o'clock, at the bottom of whitecross-street, near Cripplegate church. We did meet there; I, Power, Quin, and Rourden. Power said, we must have some beer, and I have got a shilling, or else he said, there was a shilling coming; we will go into the Mariners, and have a pot of beer; we four went into the Mariners, and called for a pot of beer, and we were drinking it when my son came in; he had not been in either of the parties before. Pelham came in, and gave a look at the men, and beckoned my son, who followed him into the parlour. There was nobody in the tap-room but ourselves. My son, I, and Brock had been in company together before, about the setting of a copper; Brock, Pelham, and Power were together when we saw them; this was before this business of Rourden's, and before we went to Cheapside some days. Now I come back to this public-house again; my son came out of the parlour soon after, and two more pots of beer came. Some one said, nobody had got any money to pay for this beer; and the landlord said that the gentlemen in the parlour had paid for it. I had seen Brock and Pelham in the parlour, and they went out, and Power went after them. When he returned, he told my son that his master wanted him; my son went out and I asked Power what they wanted with him; he said, they only wanted him to take a room for them. After some time, my son came back and brought word that a room was taken in Cow Cross; that he told me and Power, and the two men were present. We then made an appointment with the en for them to meet us the next morning at the Red Cow in Louglane, at six o'clock. Power and the two men were to come to that appointment, and from the Red Cow we were to go to the room in Cow Cross; they said the room had been hired in Jacob's-court, Cow Cross. The next morning we met, Power, I, Quin, and Rourden were together. My son passed us as we were standing in Cloth Fair. We did not thenexactly know whether we were to go to the house. In a little time Pelham came down from towards Barbican, and beckoned Power to him; he went over, and beckoned me, and we left the men just in the street. Pelham told us that he had done a very bad thing on the evening before; he said, I took a room in Jacob's-court, Cow Cross, and it is the worst thing I could do, for I must be with the officers when they take the men, and the landlord will see me, and know me that I took the room; so he said he must he at the less of the earnest, and he said he must be at the loss of what I spent, for it does not please Brock, because it is not in the City; Brock had said that he was a City officer. While we were talking together, Brock came up from towards Smithfield with a switch in his hand; I met him in Aldersgate-street, and I asked him for something to drink, and he said he had left a shilling with the men, and he told me to go and get my part, and to tell Power to be sure to get a room in the City. Then I went back to Quin and Rourden, and we made an appointment to meet them in Moorefields at one o'clock. We met at one o'clock. Pelham, I, my son, and Power went to Augel-alley to take a room; I don't know how much was to be paid a week, but my son can tell you. We then came on with the men; we met them, and took them on to the room which had been taken; I, Power, Quin, and Rourden went into the room. We did not do any business that day; we had no files. Power went out, and left me and the men in the room, and a little while after my son came in with a white basin and brown paper; then in the course of two or three hours after, he brought in two or three pots of beer, and we sat down on the boards, and drank them. Then we went to a public-house, the George, in Beech-lane, and had two more pots of beer. The Irishmen then just drank a little of it, and then went out. Then Pelham came in, and Power asked him for a pot of beer, and he said no, I can't give you one, for I have got to go for the tools; but if you will meet me to-morrow morning at nine o'clock at the Cooper's Arms, I will. We met at nine o'clock the next morning. When Pelham came in at nine o'clock at the Cooper's Arms, he brought in a hammer and two files, and laid them on the table. Power took hold of one of the files, and said, that is a bad tool to work with; Pelham said it would do well enough. He called for a pot of beer, and we drank it, and then we agreed to meet at the corner of Golden-lene the next morning at seven o'clock. Pelham took the tools, and we met the next morning; I met Brock; Brock, Power, and Pelham were coming towards us. Pelham then called Power over to him, and took from out of his bosom the hammer and the files, and gave them to Power, and here is a pair of scissors said he, I have borrowed them from my landlady, and I suppose she will never see them again. Power and I then went off, and met the two Irishmen, and took them to the room in Angel-alley; we found them in Moorfields quarters. I don't know where Brock, Pelham, and my son went. When Power, Quin, Rourden, and I first went into the room we had nothing to do. Then Power went out, and in some time, he and my son came in, and brought a bottle with some stuff in it, a paper with like flower in it, another paper with a lump of hard stuff in it, some salt, a ball of whiting, some matches, and a candle. Then Power asked my son where was the brass; my son went and gave it him out of the cupboard, or out of his pocket, I don't know from which. Power then took the brass, and laid the broad file to it, and laid a shilling upon it, and marked it; then he cut it in straight strips, he cut out some pieces, and the Irishmen and I cut out some as well as him; then he cut them into shillings afterwards; he cut them into round things in the shape of shillings; they were square at first, and he rounded them afterwards. Power rounded them with the scissors, and then gave them to us to file, to me, Quin, and Rourden. After they were filed, then the scouring paper was used. We all of us worked with them. Then when they were all done, he looked at them all one by one, and there was some finer scouring paper; we rubbed them all over with it. I believe there was about thirty of them. After that was done, he went down to get a light for his pipe. He came up in about twenty minutes with his pipe alight in his mouth, and then he took a match, and lit the candle, and stuck it in the ashes, and then took the basin, and spilled what was in the bottle into the basin, and took a silver shilling out of his pocket, and put it into that; then he took a handkerchief and spread it over the top of the basin, and held the basin over the candle; so close as to heat the bason; the flame touched the bottom of the bason, and he held it until such time as a blue flame and smoke came up through the handkerchief; then he took the handkerchief off, and took the basin down, and stirred it up then with a bit of stick; then he put in the whole of that like flower out of the paper, and he put in some of the hard lump, which he scraped very small with a knife; then he put in some salt; then he put in some w g, and put the basin into the cupboard; while he was doing all these things, he was looking at a written direction now and then, which he had pulled out of his pocket. Then he looked at the shillings again, and sat down, and told me I don't think these will do, for they are not round enough, and it is not long since there was a good job lost by their not being even like.

Q. Not being made well enough, in short - A. Yes. He said the Solicitor was very particular, and hard to please. Then my son came in, with some bread and cheese and beer for breakfast. While we were having it, he went away. Power desired us all to wash our hands, and we did. He took one of the shillings, and began to rub it with the stuff in the basin, and he told us to rub them well, and mind and rub the edges well, and we all began to do so; and then he directed us to wash them in the water that was is the brown pan; then he got a towel, and dried them; then there were two sheets of fine brown paper, and he rolled every shilling up separately by itself in the paper. Then the basin was put into the cupboard again, and we were to pass our time there until six o'clock, and not to go out. Then my son brought in word that we might go out to the George in Beech-lane, and have a pot or two of beer, and his master had told him to tell us so; and Power said he would take the shillings out in his pocket, and ask

Brock and Pelham their opinion whether they would do. When we had the beer, we parted, and we were to meet the next morning at seven o'clock. I overslept myself, and Power came and called me, and when I came to the room about eight o'clock, I found Rourden and Quin there. Power told me that the shillings would not do at all, and they did not approve of them, and that they were to have some other brass from Bruck to make some good ones that would pass. Rourden said that there was another man at their lodgings, and wanted to bring him; I said we must ask the master first; but however Power said, he might bring him, but be sure to swear him, said Power, before you bring him here. First he hesitated at having the other man brought; but at last he agreed to it. Rourden went away, and was not gone long before he brought in Connell; when he came in, Power said, ask Rourden if the man was sworn; Rourden said, yes, that he 1s. Then he was desired to come and sit down among us; but there was nothing to do then. My son came in, and brought a shilling, and gave it to Power, and told him to make every thing according to that, and to be sure and not make an East Smithfield job of it; East Smithfield was the place where the good job was lost as they said. He said, you are to return that shilling again, for my master wants it for something else. Then Power and I desired the boy to go out, and get some breakfast, and he went away, and staid away a very long time; so Mike Power went out, and come in again with a pickling jar full of coffee. After breakfast the brass was cut out, but he was more particular; it was done in the same way; he did it with his own hands. I think my son brought the brass, or Mike Power , I don't know which, Whoever brought it, Power ruled it, and cut it out. We then went and filed as we did before, and gave him the shillings to finish, and he laid them by that shilling that my son had brought to see if they were alike. Then all the process was gone through that was gone through the day before, only that the shillings were brought to the similitude of that which was brought by my son. Then in the evening Power went out.

Q.Do you remember Connell saying any thing while you were at work - A.While we were about it, Connell said, now Barry. we are at a job which will hang us all, and I said are we, and he said yes; and I said if so, I won't do another days work at it; the men had been promised some bacon and cabbage for dinner. At this time I said I would go and see about it, and I took up one of the shillings, and said I would go and get some beer. That was only an excuse to get out.

Q. You yourself knew you were perfectly safe - A. Yes; Brook and Pelham told me I should be. I made an excuse, and when I got out, I went into Fore-street, Cripplegate, and I met Brock, Pelham, Power, and my son; I went to Brock, and said Mr. Brock, what a pretty predicament you left me in, leaving me by myself, if any strange officers had come they would have taken me. Brock said, oh Barry, go back to the men, Taylor has gone to get the warrant signed; go back you Power and Barry, and stay with the men, and all shall be ready in an hour: by that he meant, that an officer should come and take the men, as soon as Mr. Taylor had got the warrant signed. I and Power then went back to the men; he went one way, and I another, and then we set the men about colouring the old ones again, to keep them employed. Then Power laid the shillings that he made last and finished, and scattered all the bits of brass, and put the parings of brass he had cut off, and some of the brass that was left, near them. All things at hand for the officers to find, some finished, and some unfinished. Rourden was there, and saw all this; but did not know what it was for. After the preparation was done, my son came in, called me out, and said my master wants you and Power to bring some dinner on table, he did not mention any name, when he said my master. Brock and Pelham having given a caution, not to name a name, but only to say master, and then we went down as for dinner, leaving Quin, Rourden, and Connell in the room colouring. When we went out of Angel-alley, I saw Brock and Taylor, facing Moor-lane on the other side, I was going to speak, but Brock lifted up his foot, as a signal for me to pass by, and I did so, and looked round and saw them go up Moor-lane. They went to take up the Irishmen; I went towards Whitecross-street. At night I met my own son and Michael Power ; we had some victuals, and heard that the men were apprehended and the whole discovered; I believe at this time the sessions were sitting; the men were not brought to trial before another sessions. When they were tried, I came down with Power, I saw Brock and Pelham in the Old Bailey yard; Power took me and my son, and gave us a room and victuals that same evening that the men were taken up, and then we went to the George in Beech-lane as usual. We sent for Brock, and after some time, he, Pelham and another man came to us; I believe Brock's landlord; I have heard so since; the other man was Collins. Brock came over and asked Power how much beer he had, and he told him; and he put a three-shilling piece into his hand, and ordered two more pots. Then Power asked what did Taylor say to the job; and he said Taylor said it was a very good job indeed, and then Brock desired us to be seen as little together as possible, least any one should take notice, and not to go near his place. I attended at the time these men were tried. I saw all the prisoners in the yard; that was before the trial came on.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I went before the Grand Jury within a week past.

DANIEL BARRY, JUNIOR. I know Michael Power; I recollect seeing him in May last; he came up to my father's one morning, when I was there, and asked my father if he had anything to do, and my father said no; he turned round to me, and asked me if I had anything to do; I told him if I had, I should not be sitting there, and he said if we came along with him towards Cheapside, he thought he could get us some work. We went with him; my father, he and I, walked until we came to the corner of Fell-street, in Wood-street; he told us to stop, for he was going up to a friends and would not be above ten minutes. In the course of ten minutes, Brock and Pelham came down, and Michael Power

stood up; it was in Brock's room; I saw Power up at the window of Brock's apartment. They bid us good morning, and said they wanted my father about setting a copper and white-washing a room or two, and that he must go the market and get a man or two. We came on until we came to the corner of Addle-street; that was near Silver-street, and Brock said, let us have a drop of gin, and he went into a shop in Silver-street, and as we came out we met Michael Power , and he said, am I not to have any, and Brock gave him two-pence to go in, and get a glass. We then went towards the market, Brock, Pelham, I and my father went to the market; we came to the corner of King-street; this was about half past six in the morning, or a quarter before seven; Brock and my father went up to the market to see if there were any men there, and returned in a short time saying they were all gone away; and then Brock pointed out a door, and we all went together to the Mariners in Colman-street. We all agreed to meet again at the corner of Beech-lane, and he said, he would bring a man of the name of Jefferson, who had the job to do; the copper to set, and the rooms to white-wash; at that time that was the only job mentioned to me, but the prisoner Power and my father continued to talk in Irish which I did not understand. They said they must meet on the following morning. We then went into another public-house; all five agreed to meet at Cripplegate the next morning. We went to my father's house the next morning about six; we met Brock and Pelham standing in the court waiting for him as I suppose I did not lodge with my father. Then we all came together, and Brock said, let us have a drop of gin; Brock said take care and pick out a strong one, and Power answered leave me alone for that. I then went away about my business, but the shop not being open to which I was going in Black friars road, I came back. I met Quin, my father and Power together; Pelham and Brock were behind, and beckoned me in this manner to come to them; I went up to them, and Pelham said are they going to fetch another man; at this time I did not see Rourden; Brock said to me, here is a shilling, take it to the Mariners.

Q. Were you told at any time by Brock to get a lodging-A. Yes; he told me to look out for a light room for him, and to have it in the City; that was the day the men were hired. I told him I could not tell what sort of room he wanted, and why could not his wife go; and he said she was at her sisters and Pelham said d-n me I will go with him, what harm is there in taking a room; Brock said very well, but let it be in the City; and Pelham went to look for a room, but could not find one in any part of the City that he took me round, and then we went along until we came to Jacob's-court, Cow Cross, and there I saw a bill up, and we went in. We saw the woman, and Pelham took the lodging; he said he was a coach painter, and lived in Holborn, and paid one shilling and sixpence earnest; in fact he lived at Mrs. Fields, in Golden-lane, he did not live in Holborn. Brock afterwards asked me if I understood making of clasps, I thought he meant lady's clasps; I told him I did not He said he would be obliged to me to go to Barratt's the brass founders, and get seven penny worth of hand sheet brass, and to mind it was nice and clear. I went and brought it to him, he looked at it and said it was too thick, and he wanted me to change it, and I told him I did not like; why did he not go himself, and then Pelham said he thought it would do, and then Power took a pair of scisors, and went into the closet of Bruck's and cut it a little way, and came out and said it would do nicely. I told Brock of having taking the room, and he said he did not think it would do as it was not in the City. I gave him the key of the lodging that was taken last; the last was in the City; I never went to the room in Cow Cross afterwards. He told me to meet him at the end of Cloth Fair about six o'clock that night or a little after; and Brock said, here is a shilling, go and you will find your father with Michael Power and two men underneath a gateway, just by the Red Cow, in Cow Lane, and give them some gin; I went there and found all except my father, and we went then to the corner of Charter House Lane, and had some gin. I saw Brock that morning, and Pelham was there, I saw them very often together; Pelham was always eating and drinking with Brock. At last a room in Angel-alley was taken; Brock gave me three-pence to give the woman; I, Power, and my father took it, and gave it to her; I took possession. In the afternoon they sent me with a brown pan, a basin, and a bunch of matches; then I saw Quin, Rourden, my father, and Michael there; they were all up in the corner just by the fire place; I gave the things I took, to Michael Power ; nothing particular passed then; Power said go back to Brock, and ask him if I am to have any tobacco, and I went back and Brock gave me a shilling, and I took some, and some beer. I then saw the men, they were up in the corner. The next day Brock gave me a shilling, and told me to take it to the men and get some victuals for them, and I did so. The next day I saw Quin, Rourden, Michael and my father at the room; I did not see Counell till the last day; Brock sent me to buy a quartern loaf and take it there, and then I saw Counell in the room; that was the first time I saw him; and then I saw them all making the shillings, and saw my father, Quin, Rourden, and Connell all colouring of them; and Michael Power was cutting them out and filing them; and I said, if I had known this game what you had been up to, I would not have had anything to do with you; and Quin said what matter if we could get a little victuals, and something to drink. I went to Brock, and I told him, if I had known that, I would not have had anything to do with it, for they were making shillings; Pelham was with him at the time, and Brock was at home at his own place. Brock said hold your tongue you fool, there is plenty of money to be made at it, and I said what do you want with them, and he said if I had a hundred dozen of them finished, I could find a customer ready to take them from me directly; this was in Pelham's hearing. I forgot to tell your Lordship about the aqua-fortis, and that I was sent for some. After I got the beer, Brock took a little bottle out of his closet, and it had some stale aqua-fortis in it; as he shewed it to Pelham and said he did not think it was strong enough. Then Brock poured it into the fire place and washed the bottle out,

and he said he wanted me to go of an errand or two. Then we went out, and came nearly facing of Grubb-street, in Fore-street, and Brock said, go in here and get three penny-worth of aquafortis; I did so, and he put it into a side pocket of his; He kept it, and then said, I want you to go over the way and get two penny-worth of salammoriac; that is hard white stuff; I went and brought it back to him; and then we went into the Mariners again, and had some beer. Now said Brock, go up to the place where you got me the aquafortis, and get me three penny-worth of cream of tarter; I did so. I afterwards took these things to the room. I don't know whether they were in brown paper. I saw things of that description in the room. The cream of tarter is just like flower. While this was going on between Brock and me, Pelham was writing a note, and he had a shilling just by, and he wrapped the shilling up in the note, and Brock told me to take it to Power, and he told me to say that they were not to make an East Smithfield job of it. but to make them like that. He did not say what this East Smithfield job was. He told me to take it; I did object. He said poh nonsense, there is no harm in that. I did not know that they were going to take the men, or I would not have had any thing to do with it at all. I afterwards found the men were taken up. In a day or two afterwards, when I heard the men were taken up, I went to Brock's; Pelham was there reading a book. I told them both if I had known what it was going to be, I would have had nothing to do with it. Pelham got into a wrangle about it, and he said, by the Cross of Christ if you say one word more about it; I will have you and your father hanged as high as ever Hammond was hanged. Brock said; he wished he could get Connell, the man that Rourden brought to turn King's Evidence, and then the others would be sure to swing, or else go fishing for life.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable of the Ward of Aldersgate. I know the two prisoners Brock and Pelham. On the 30th of May last, Brock came to me, he said Mr. Taylor, I want you, and he said, I want you to go along with me. I said for what; and he said, I have got an information of some coiners at work; and I said where, and he said in Angel-alley, Moore-lane. I said how do you know it, and he said, I have it from very good authority. Then said I, as an officer, I am in duty bound to go with you. Then I said, stop Brock, before we go, we will have a search warrant from the Alderman. With that we went to the Alderman's, who was not within. Then Brock said, it is all in good time, what time do you dine; I said about one. Going down the Brittain. Pelham was leaning on a post. That was the first time I ever saw him to my knowledge. Brock was with me, and he said, well Pelham; how are they getting on; and he said, I believe it is all right. I told Brock what time I dined, and we agreed to meet in half an hour. After dinner, I was in the Britain, and saw the Alderman, and got the warrant. Brock went and made an affidavit.

"The affidavit was here put in and read, and was a common information lodged with the magistrate, complaining that certain persons were coining at such a place and so forth."

Witness, in Continuence. - The search warrant was signed in Brock's presence, upon his making that affidavit. We then proceeded down the Britain, down by Cripplegate Church and saw Pelham leaning on the post there. I was going along with Brock. Brock asked him how they were getting on, and he said, that there was one out. Upon his saying that, Brock said Pelham, then Taylor and I will go to the Crow, and when you see all is right. give a signal. The Crow in Moor-lane would command a view of Pelham where he then stood. With that we were passing the end of Angel-alley, and Pelham said, here is one now going in; and then we followed, and went into the house, and into the first pair room, and it happened not to be the room; there was a woman tying up radishes there. With that, a little aftercation aruse, and I told them they had better not talk there, and we went out below, and presently Pelham beckoned again, and we went into the same house again, and went up two pairs of stairs. With that we made a pause at the door, and Brock tried to look in through the key-hole, and said, he believed there was something hung over it, for he could not see through. Then we immediately entered, all three of us together, and we found Rourden, Quin, and Connell, the men that were conviced sitting on the floor; they were rubbing with white stuff, what I call colouring, pieces of metal resembling shillings; there was no furniture in the room, neither chair, nor table, nor any thing else; on seeing them, I hand-cuffed the two tall ones myself, and Brock and Pelham hand-cuffed Quin, who jumped about the room a good deal. In Connell's pocket I found a three-shilling piece, which appeared good, and I returned it. I then searched Rourden, and on him I found eight shillings lapped up, with the paper doubled over each, so that they could not rub together; they were in a waistcoat pocket which was open, and the waistcoat had not above one or two buttons, just about the centre of his body. I looked at the others that were found; they were blanks without colouring. They seemed very much alarmed, and very much agitated, and one or two spoke in English, if we could wait there was a man gone out for their dinners who had set them to work; and I said very well, and we waited a little time, and I thought it was not right to wait long, as it was a low neighbourhood where the house was. The woman of the house we saw, and she said to the men if I had known you were characters of this kind you should not have had my room. I found in the room also, a hammer, two files, a pair of scissors, a basin, Brock produced a phial of aquafortis as if he found it, and I found two bottles, in one of which there had been some I am sure. Brock had the scissors and files, and I had the basin and the hammer, and I produced them in Court before. I also produced the white stuff which was in the basin, and by the order of Mr. Powell, I destroyed it in the presence of White, the officer. The other things were kept, and Harrison has them. There are twenty seven piece of counterfeit money.

(Articles produced.)

ANTHONY HARRISON. I produce these things. Mr. Brock gave them to me on the 20th of July, just after the trial of the men. There are two files, a pair of scissors, a board, some emery paper, five bad shillings, and a sixpence. I received these at Mr. Brock's lodging, in Fell-street, Cripplegate.

William Taylor. Re-called. I look at those things, I believe them to be found in the room either by myself or Brock. This board is for rubbing up the edges of bad money. I can speak to having seen them in the room.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor for the Mint. I have here the bad money produced on the trial of the three men alluded to. I produce five, which I believe to be five of the eight taken from Connell's pocket. During the course of the former trial, I selected three upon which I supported the indictment. I know these five because I have marked them with a cross, I marked them on the day I took them, in the prosence of Brock and Pelham.

William Taylor , Re-called. I can swear to these five.

Mr. Powell, Re-called. They are counterfeit. At the time of the conviction of the other men, they had resembled the current coin of the Realm, as it is in its present state.

JAMES COONEN . I look at the pair of scissors which are laying there; I know them. There was a pair of scissors similar to those of mine, which my landlady Mrs. Field, borrowed for Pelham. Michael Power lodged in the same house; Pelham and Power lodged in the same room, and slept in the same bed. I had had a pair like these for two years; they are now missing; these so much resemble those that I miss, as to induce me to say. I believe them to be the same, to the best of my knowledge.

SUSAN FIELD . Coonen and his wife lodged at my house; so did Power and Pelham. I remember Pelham asking me to lend him a pair of scissors, and I borrowed a pair from Coonen's wife, and lent him. The points of them were broken, and I believe these to be the same I borrowed. Pelham was only present when he asked me to lend him a pair. I have no doubt that these are the same.

ANN PURKISS . I live at 66, Golden Lane, in the parish of St. Lukes. I look at this hammer and these files that are produced, I have a perfect knowledge of them. I sold them all in one bargain to two persons, to Brock and Pelham. I sold the two files, first, and the hammer to the same person in about five minutes afterwards.

Q. Are you able to tell when it was you sold them - A. I think it was about two months before the time I was first called upon; I was first called before the Lord Mayor on the 5th of August; I did not know these two persons before; but I can swear to them.

-BRADFIELD. I am landlord of the Three Mariners, in Fore-street, Cripplegate. I remember the three Irishmen being tried here for colouring money.

Q.Look at the bar, and tell me if ever you have seen either of the persons there, at your house - A. I have seen those two on the left, (Brock and Pelham,) and the tallest, (Rourden,) and shortest, (Quin,) of the Irishmen were at my house. I don't exactly remember the day of the month; it was about four or five o'clock in the afternoon; there had been four or five pots of beer, and Mr. Brock came forward out of the parlour at different times. He asked for an inkstand in the bar, and did not make any use or it. He paid for two pots of beer that the Irishmen had, and then he went into the back kitchen, and had a pint of beer there; I did not like his conduct about my wife, and I wanted to get rid of him, and I told him we charged three pence a pint for beer in there; but he paid it. Then he stepped through, and had some conversation with young Barry, who I am sure was there, and after he drank the beer, he went away, and five or ten minutes after, the Irishmen went. From these circumstances, and from his conduct, I have no doubt of his person. Pelham was backwards and forwards in the parlour, and I have no doubt of his person, though I would not swear positively.

-MACDONALD. I am an Irish labourer, and I go to what we call the market to be hired of a morning; I know Rourden and Quin; Rourden came with me from Ireland, but I did not know Quin until I came to this place. I remember I used to come to the market every morning at six o'clock to look for work, and I used to meet Rourden there every morning; and I saw two men coming up to them one morning and they spoke to Rourden and Quin, and asked them if they wanted a job; they said they did, and they went away with them. Then when I heard they were in prison, I went to the house where they lodged; I did not hear they were in prison until on the morning that I missed them. When I heard they were in goal; I came here when they were to be tried, with one Griffiths with whom they had lodged, and I went into the public-house over the way with Mr. Burgess the counsellor. I afterwards saw Brock and Pelham talking with therw men that took them away from the market, at our talking together. Then I went into the public-house, and I told the counseller and Griffiths, I told him I had seen those persons talking together. Then I went out again with Griffiths to look among the people, but they could not be seen. (The witness here points out the prisoners, Power and the elier Barry, as the persons to whom be aliuded.) I then went and told Mr. Burgess that they were not there, and he told us to go and look again, and if I knew them that they would be in it. I went out about twelve o'clock, and went up the stairs of the Court house, and looking down into the yard, I saw the two men that took them away from the market talking to the other two, Brock and Pelham; they were at that time conversing together. Then I called Griffiths, in order that he might see them, and I might shew them to him, but he could not see them. I then went down, and I got very near them, and when I got within one or two yards of them, I was talking to Griffiths, and I think they heard me, for they ran out of the gate. I saw Barry and Power go one way, and I followed them as far as the end of Newgate street; I stopped there, and in a minute or two I saw Griffiths; they appear-to be watching us. Then I went after them again, and met them again in Newgate-street, and I took one this way, and the other that way; (Here the

witness uses a getare, conveying an idea, that he seized one with one hand, and the other with the other.) I said now I have you, you are the two fellows that took the two Irishmen from Cheapside market; then they said they were not, and I said they were. Then that man, Power, gave me a blow, and knocked me down, and they ran away, and I cried stop coiners; and I followed them again. The people did not know what I meant, or what I was saying. I followed, and a man that was crossing over the other side of the street stopped Barry. Then when I took him, another man came up to me and asked what call I had to that man; then I said he was one of the men that took the two Irishmen from Cheapside market, and that were tried that day at the Old Bailey, and Barry said he was not. I asked the stranger to take care of Barry, while I went to get an officer, and he said he would not, and he let him go out. Well, I took him again, and some other man came up to me, and a man asked me in Irish what was the matter; then he said tell me in Irish, and I will tell the people in English; and I told him how it was, and he told it to the man that came up, (the first stranger.) Then he took hold of him; I told them to bring him to the place where the three Irishmen were, which were here, and I said it they would not know him, then I would take his place. He was brought here into a matter room that is outside there, and the moment they saw him they said he was the man, and they thought he was come to swear against them and they would be hanged. and they began to cry.

JOHN LANGEN . I live in Jacob's-court, Cow Cross. I look at the prisoner Pelham, I remember seeing him in the month of May last; him and young Barry. I keep a house there. They came and asked me if I had a room to let, I told him I had, and they asked me at how much a week, and I asked them two shillings and six pence a week, and Pelham said he would only give two shillings, and he took it and gave me sixpence earnest; then I went and drank with him. Nobody afterwards came to take possession of the room. I ssa him no more, until I saw him at the Lord Mayor's.

Mr. Caleb Edward Powell , Re-called. These are counterfeited to resemble the current coin of this realm called shillings, in their present state. These are implements and materials such as would be used by coiners. I look at the five pieces; they have become tarnished, so as to be less fit for circulation then when produced on the former trial. I have been long used to business of this kind.

ANN PURKESS . I live in Angel-alley, Moor-lane. I remember a man coming and taking a room of me about five months back, I know since that that person's name is Barry; it is young Barry; I know the two Barry's now; he was to pay one shilling and tenpence a week.

-COLLENS. The prisoner Brock lodged with me for these two years. I remember the day these Irishmen were taken up for coining; I saw Brock on that day; I did not go any where with him until the evening. When I came home from my work, he said Collens will you go along with me and take part of a pot of beer; I said I had rather not; he persuaded me, and said it should not cost me anything, and I went with him to the George, in Beech-street; he then joined company with four others that were in the room; they were Barry the younger, Power, Pelham, and Barry senior; I knew them before by sight, but did not know their names, without it was Pelham. Brock drank at this house, and they had been drinking when I went into the room. I had seen all those persons come after Brock to his lodging; Pelham and Power principally came backwards and forwards; I saw the two Barrys come only one day.

MR. FRANCIS HOBLER , Clerk to the Lord Mayor, was called to read the first examination taken before his Lordship on this charge, and the dates thereof, in order to prove that this prosecution was commenced within six calender months after the commission of the offence, as required by Act. 15, Gen. II; Chap-28. Sec. 5, which contains this provison; viz. Provided that there shall be no prosecutions for any of the offences made Treason or felony by this Act, unless such prosecution be commenced within six calender months, next after such offence shall be committed.

(The pardon of Dennis Rourden , James Quin , and Thomas Connell , under the Great Seal, was here produced

JAMES QUIN . I am an Irish labourer; and came from Ireland; I believe I have been here about fourteen months. I used like other Irishmen, to go to Cheapside market to be hired of a morning. I was coming home one morning, and I met with a man in my way; he asked me, did I want a job; I and Rourden were together; we told him we did; it was Barry the elder; he said to me alluding to Rourden, this young man is not long from Ireland, I said no; he said my master wants one or two men, I said very well; and he told us to go home, and leave our hods and shovels, and to meet at the Cat; we went there; we were afterwards brought in the evening to see the room where we were to work the next day. I remember Taylor coming into the room when we were taken; we were rubbing the pieces with rough paper. I look at the prisoners at the bar; I know Power; he was along with me in that room, he and two more, Barry and his son; Power was colouring those pieces and rubbing them. Barry's son brought up the copper, and Power pulled out the scissors.

HENRY BALDWIN RAVEN. I have taken the copy of the record of the conviction of James Quin , Dennis Rourden , and Thomas Connell , in this Court. I have examined that copy with the original record in the possession of Mr. Shelton.

THOMAS WHITE. I know Angel-court, it is in the City of London.

Brock's Defence. I have this to state to his Lordship; I will state how I was led into it. This man John Pelham , told me he had seen those bad characters, and had watched them into a house in Forestreet, and that first morning he asked me if I could lend him a few shillings, I told him I had not got any, and I then went and borrowed the money and gave it to him, and he went away; then he came again and said he had seen the parties in Moor Fields; I told him to watch them; he said he had watched them into a house in Fore-street, and after that into

a house in Angel-alley, and he said that they had been in all that day; and the next morning, about nine or ten o'clock he came and told me he had watched them again; I told him to go back and pay strict attention to the house. Then he wanted me to apprehend the men about one o'clock; I told him I could not, and I went to Mr. Taylor, and we went to Alderman Cox, and he came in and took the evidence, and asked me if I thought it was a just thing, and I told him it was, and he gave us a warrant, and we went down, and when we went into Fore-street, we met with Pelham; he took us into the house up one pair of stairs; he said he thought that was the room, and on going into it, we found a woman tying radishes; then we went down again, and presently he came and beckoned us, and we went up into the two pair of stairs front room, and we opened the door, and there they were sitting; and we apprehended them. This is all I have to say, to assett my innocance; a great part of the evidence is perjored.

Pelham's Defence. I have something of the same sort of defence to make. I watched them at different places, and Brock told me to watch them; and I saw them and watched them down in Moor Fields, and from that into Angel-alley. I wanted them to take them into custody, and he said they must get farther asistance to take them into custody. We went, and I did not know rightly where the room was; and we opened the door of the room on the first floor; at last we found the room. The evidence has proved false, that swears about the files; and the Barry's are perjured As for the publican, I never saw him; that is the time fact before God and man. I really believe Brock had some information about these people and sent me to look after them.

Power's Defence. That Quin never saw my face, until he saw me in King-street; and I was employed in the same business that he was.

BROCK, GUILTY - DEATH .

PELHAM, GUILTY - DEATH .

POWER, GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18160918-63

879. THOMAS DICKSON was indicted for stealing on the 8th of September , a coat, value 4s. the property of John Hamilton .

JOHN HAMILTON . I was a passenger in the Brig from Belfast to London, she lay in the Dublin chain near the Tower where she arived in the river. I left this coat in the Forecastle of the Vessel on Saturday, the 7th of last month, and I missed it on the 8th; it was a great coat. As soon as I came on board it was gone, and the prisoner was in custody then.

JOHN RODNEY . I belonged to this brig. I saw the prisoner go on shore on the Monday morning with this coat; it was not raining.

JAMES GRAIO. I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police. I apprehended this man on the 8th of last month, at about five o'clock in the morning off Hermitage-stairs; he was in the brig's boat, and suspecting him, stopped him; I found a bundle in the boat, and these shoes and the great coat.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the greatest distress, and put the coat on, on account of nakedness.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-64

880. ANN GROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , one pair of shoes, value 5s. the property of Martin Farmingham .

EDWARD TENCH. About half past seven in the morning of the day in the indictment, I was working for the prosecutor in his shop, and the prisoner came in; she asked for some shoes, and I went out of the shop for a moment while they were fitting on. On my returning, I saw her take the shoes in question, and immediately called my master.

MARTIN FARNINGHAM . I was called down by the last witness, and took the prisoner into custody for taking these shoes.

MARY LANE . I produce the shoes; they were given to me to take care of. They are my master's property.

The prisoner received a very good character from several witnesses.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-65

881. ABRAHAM HART was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , four decanters, value 36s. the property of Moses Jacobs .

MOSES JACOBS . In consequence of information I received, I marked my decanters so that I might know them again; I afterwards missed some of them.

JAMES TURBEVILLE . Here are four decanters; the prisoner offered them for sale to me, and I bought them in February last.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-66

882. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , two sheets, value 4s. and one bed-curtain, value 1s. the property of Peter Sontag , in a lodging-room .

PETER SONTAG. I let out my house in lodgings, and the prisoner was a lodger of mine; he had a whole bed for one night for sixpence; there were three beds in the room; there was only one man sleeping in the same room. The prisoner went away about half past six; and after he was gone, the two sheets and the bed-curtain were missing.

JOHN NEALE . A woman and the prisoner pledged these things together, for six shillings; they were afterwards claimed by Mr. Sontag.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-67

883. GEORGE INGREY , HENRY LUFF , JOHN GOWER , and JOHN WARD , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , one hundred and twenty pieces of brass, value 3s. one tin pan, value 2d. and one steel, value 2d. the property of John Scott .

JOHN SCOTT . I am a locksmith , and sell ironmongery, and tin goods , at No. 17, in the Islington-road . The prisoners are strangers to me, and I know nothing of this business, except being able to swear to the property.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the day stated in the indiciment, I was in St. John-street. I saw the four prisoners; I followed them up and down until they came to Mr. Scott's, in Islington-road, where I saw Ward and Ingrey pass the window; when Gower and Luff went up to the door, and then returned to the other two; they immediately turned back again to the door, and took up a tin pan, and chucked it into Gower's apron, and they all ran away; two towards the main road, and two towards Sadler's Wel1s. I pursued, and took Gower, with this brass in his apron; by Sader's Wel1s. The next morning I saw Ingrey.

DANIEL ELLINCHAM : I knew no more than the last witness has related. I assisted in the apprehension.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I was with Thompson. I lost them all, Thompson and them too. I took Ward on the Monday following.

Gower's Defence. These three Young chaps are quite innocent of it. I saw something lying down by the door, and I picked it up, and put it into my apron.

The other prisoners denied their guilt.

INGREY GUILTY , aged 21.

WARD. GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months , and whipped .

LUFF, GUILTY , aged 17.

GOWER. GUILTY , aged 16.

Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-68

884. MARY LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , a washing-tub, value 3s. 6d. the property of Mary Weed .

MARY WEED . I lost my washing-tub on the 11th of August. I did not see the prisoner take it. All I can say is that I lost it.

MARIA BOWDEN . I live in the same house with Mrs. Weed. I saw the prisoner coming out of the cellar with this tub; I said, where are you going with that tub, and she immediately put it down, and said pray ma'am let me go. An officer was sent for, and she was taken.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-69

885. JOHN MOATE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , three printed books, value 4s. the property of Richard Corral .

RICHARD CORRAL . In consequence of information I went out, and took the prisoner, with the books, on him.

MATTHEW TONGE . I saw the prisoner take the books, and informed Mr. Corral.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

Reference Number: t18160918-279

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

886. JOHN SMITH was indicated for stealing, on the 30th of August , a jacket, value 3s. a pair of trowsers, value 2s. a waistcoat, value 1s. and two handkerchiefs, value 9d. the property of Robert Blacket .

ROBERT BLACKET. I am a sailor . I list these things our of my chest on board the Zodiac; she was at the time in the Export West India Dock . I had seen them an hour before I missed them. My chest was not locked. I saw the prisoner coming from on board my ship, and I stopped him; he had my property with him.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-70

887. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , three hanks of worsted, value 1s. five caps, value 3s. one frock, value 5s. one pair of stockings, value 1s. one doll, value 6d, three yards of fringe, value 3s. five books, value 4s. two yards of green ribbon, value 6d. one half of an ounce weight of cotton, value 2d. twelve pins, value 3d. and twenty sheets of paper, value 6d. the property of Robert Jones .

EDWARD JONES . I am the son of Robert Jones , he is the Holloway carrier . I was with my father's cart in St. John street , and the prisoner came to the end of the cart and took the things out. The tail board was down, and he could reach them. I hallooed out stop thief. The prisoner told me to go and call my father, and as I was going, I looked round, and saw him take these things.

THOMAS JONES . I am a son of Robert Jones . I used to drive the errand cart. I went to help my father with a large box, and I left my little brother with the cart in John street.

WILLIAM HARR1S. I heard this city, and pursued him, and stopped him with the property in his possession.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-71

888. SARAH WOOD was indicated for stealing, on the 28 of July , a handkerchief, value 9s.6d. the property of Richard Taylor .

RICHARD TAYLOR. The prisoner came into my place in Frying-pan-alley , on the day in the indictment I missed the handkerchief about twenty minutes after she was gone. She brought me my child. I did see her take the handkerchief. I have never seen it since. There are three lodgers in this house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-72

889 ANN YATES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , one purse, value 6d. one cornelian stone, value 2d and one bank note , the property of Eliza Rider .

ELIZA RIDER. On the day in the indictment, between twelve and one at noon, I went to Mr. Bellshaw's at the corner of James's-street, Covent Garden , to pay him a bill; he is a publican, and the

prisoner was then with another woman. I gave Mr. Bellshaw a two-pound note, and he put down a one-pound note in change, and the rest in silver. The prisoner was quite close to me, and all on a sudden I missed my purse and the note; and the prisoner had then gone into the market: I went and asked her if she had seen it, and she denied it. I went for an officer, and he searched her; he found it for me, but I do not know whether he took it from her person.

JAMES BETHEL . I searched the prisoner. She told me she had not the note, but a woman in the market had it. She described the woman, and I went to her, and she denied it. The woman abused the prisoner for saying she gave it to her, and the prisoner said, you know you have it. I then searched this woman, and found the note concealed in the top of one of her stockings. Afterwards I heard that Mary Stack had been in the yard, and had thrown something down the privy. I went to the privy, and found the purse and the cornelian stone.

MARY STACK . I have a stand in Covent Garden. The prisoner brought me this note for change. I would not give it up to them until I knew who was the right owner. Afterwards I delivered it myself, and the officer did not take it out of my stocking.

JOSEPH BELLSHAW . I am the publiean. I remember giving Mrs. Ryder change for the two-pound note. The one-pound note that was taken from Mrs. Stack was the one I gave Mrs. Rider in change.

Prisoner's Defence, Mrs. Stack took purse note and all out of my hand.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-73

890. JOHN ELDER and ELEANOR HILL were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , a rug, value 12s. a blanket, value 12s. and a candlestick, value 1s. the property of Michael Johnson , in a lodging-room, and a bed-tick, value 2s. his property .

WINIFRED JOHNSON. I let out a lodging to the two prisoners at four shillings a week. They paid no rent, but gave six pounds. The bed-tick they took out of another room. The other things were part of the furniture of the lodging. They stopped nine days, and went away without notice.

JOHN CREED DIXTER . On the 24th of July. I took in a rug from a person who gave the name of Sarah Bell ; neither of the prisoner. That rug was afterwards claimed by Mrs. Johnson.

ELIZABETH CLARK . The female prisoner asked me to purchase a duplicate; she said she was very much distressed, and had only had a two-penny loaf; which hurt my feelings, and I bought the duplicate of this rug from her for nine-pence. I released it for three shillings, and pledged it again at Mr. Dixter's for two shillings.

ROBERT UPSALL . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket, pledged by the female prisoner.

JOHN CROSS . I produce the candlestick; it was pawned by the man.

ELIZABETH WALLIS . I bought the bed-tick of the woman prisoner, on a Saturday; but I don't know how long ago. I bought it of her at my own house in the Curtain-road, Shoreditch. I gave her sixpence for it.

ELDER, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined three months , and whipped .

HILL, GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-74

891. MARY EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , two spoons, value 12s. and four table-cloths, value 24s. the property of Peter Williams .

MARTHA WILLIAMS . The prisoner was a servant of mine. I missed some of these things whilst she was with me: but I did not miss the tablecloths until the 23rd of August, after she ran away; she went away on the 21st of August. She sent to my daughter to go and meet her, and my daughter brought her back to me. I asked her how she could think of serving me so, as there was a bill of her accumulating presented from the public-house; she said, she hoped she could make amends if I would take, her into my service again.

WILLIAM SAMPSON . I produce a tablecloth, pawned by the prisoner.

JAMES BEARDWELL . I produce a tea-spoon, pawned by the prisoner.

JOSEPH FOLLOWS . I produce a tea-spoon also, pawned by the prisoner at the bar.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-75

892. WILLIAM HATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , five planes, value 10s. one oil-stone, value 5s. one saw, value 2s. one square, value 1s. 8d. five chissels, value 2s. five gimlets, value 1s. 6d. and one draw-board, value 3s. the property of William Williams ; four planes, value 8s. one saw, value 3s. one oil-stone, value 8s. three chissels, value 2s. one axe, value 2s, and one square, value 2s. the property of John Forster .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I left my tools at the Hamlet of Mile end Old Town , where I had been to work, on the evening of the 23rd; and when I came to work on the 24th, they were gone.

JOHN FORSTER . I left my tools in the same place.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a superintendant of the watch at Mile-end, Old Town. I was going my rounds on the morning of the 24th of August, at about half past one, and heard a rattling behind the buildings, where these tools were deposited. I met the prisoner coming out with the two baskets of tools, which he immediately dropped. I told him he had been robbing the buildings; and he said, he had not, that he had only been doing his occasion; and as soon as he had buttoned his flap, he up with his fist and shoved me down almost. As soon as I had recovered myself, I fetched him one, and knocked him down. I called the watchman to my assistance, and we took him and the tools to the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-76

893. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , one hundred and forty yards of printed cotton, value 7l. the property of William Rickarby .

THOMAS GARNER . On the day in the indictment, in consequence of information, I missed the property in question from the door, and I pursued after the person I understood had taken it; I pursued up Well-street. where I got farther information, and went up Berner-street; I saw a man running, and I hallooed stop thief, and he dropped, the property in question. That man when stopped, was the prisoner at the bar; it was he who dropped the bundle. He gave the young man that stopped him a most dreadful kick in the bowels. We took him to Marlborough-street, where, after I had gave my depositions against him, he gave me a terrible thump on the face.

JULIA JELKS . I saw the prisoner take this property from Mr. Rickarby's door, and I went in and informed him.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-77

894. JOSEPH JOSEPHS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , a pair of pantaloons, value 4s. the property of Benjamin Lyons .

BENJAMIN LYONS , I was sitting at my supper, at about a quarter before nine on the night of the say in the indictment, and I heard a kind of crack at the shop window, and both my wife and my servant ran out to the door; in a few minutes, I was called into the shop, and my servant pointed out the prisoner as one of the men who took the pantaloons; and who had hit her a punch in the stomach; I went after him and brought him back again.

ELIZABETH HARRIS . This man at the bar was one with two others, who took the pantaloons, and ran away; he knocked me down. I am sure the prisoner was one.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-78

895. SAMUEL LANYON was indicted for stealing on the 11th of July , a coat, value 20s. three yards and a half of cloth, value 4s. and one gown, value 3s. the property of John Scott .

JOHN SCOTT . I lost this property out of my room on the day in the indictment; I live at No.15 in the New Road, Westminster ; I was not at home when it was taken.

WILLIAM WEBBERLY . I am a file cutter, I live at the same house. The prisoner came and asked me if a certain person lived up stairs; I told him I did not know; but he might go up stairs and see; he went up stairs. The prisoner is the man I am sure: he was up stairs about ten minutes.

MARY ANN RAMSEY . I saw the prisoner in this house at about half past seven o'clock; I heard him ask my mother's landlady if there was a person named Bell lived up stairs; he went up stairs; he was up about ten minutes; when he came out he had a bundle under his left arm tied up in a yellow handkerchief.

JAMES BLY. I found the property in question, in a room, where the prisoner and a woman of the town lodged together, and I apprehended the prisoner at about eleven at night. at a cook's shop.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Judgement respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-79

896. JOHN MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , a sow pig, value 10s. the property of Thomas Clark .

THOMAS CLARK . I live in Robert-street, Hackney Road Bethnal Green . I lost a pig on the morning of the 30th of June early; I had fastened it up in my yard, and locked the gate on the Saturday night, and on the Sunday morning it was gone.

WILLIAM BROWN . I live in Cross-street, Bethnal Green. I bought this pig of John Moss ; on the 2nd of July; I bought it on condition that he was to have it again when he brought the money and paid for the feed; I bought it about the middle of the day. The last witness has seen it, and claimed it.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-80

897. JAMES BARKER and THOMAS GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , twelve live tame ducks, value 12s. the property of Lewis Duval , Esq.

ROBERT COPELAND . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoners at six o'clock in the morning of the 6th of August, in Oxford street, and they had these ducks in their possession.

JOSEPH TURNER . I saw the ducks found in the possession of the prisoners by the last witness. They were the property of Mr. Duval, my master. I saw them safe at eleven o'clock in the night of the 5th, and at four o'clock in the morning of the 6th they were missing.

BAKER, GUILTY . aged 20.

GREEN, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-81

898. MICHAEL HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , from the person of John Stephenson , a bank note, value 10l. and a bank note, value 5l. his property .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-82

899. MARY ANN CAFFRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , from the person of Roger Kayne , a bank note, value 20l. and a bank note, value 5l. his property .

ROGER KAYNE . I have been a sailor on board

the Northumberland. On the 16th of August, at night, I fell in with the prisoner; I went with her to her lodgings; I agreed to pay her three shillings for the bed and herself; I went to bed; she sat up for three or four minutes; I told her to put out the candle, and lock the door, and come to bed, and she did so. I had a twenty pound note and a five pound note in the pocket of my trowsers; I put my trowsers underneath my head, and about two o'clock in the morning; I missed her, and the note. Two men came up to the room to send me out, and told me I should not sleep there.

GEORGE BASEY . Hearing of this, I apprehended the prisoner at the bar, according to the description I received; she is called Dublin Poll. She was committed for re-examination, understanding the prosecutor had received the note at Sheerness; I wrote down a letter, and a letter was sent up. In consequence of information, we stopped the notes at the Bank, and they are in Court.

-HOALE. I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I produce the notes, and the twenty-pound note was paid in by Mr. Jones of Smithfield.

-JONES. I took that note of a man who cohabits with the prisoner at the bar.

Roger Kayne . I cannot swear to that note.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-83

900. MARY BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a watch, value 5l. the property of John Frazer , from his person .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-84

901. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , three bank tokens, value 9s. the property of Joseph Lowden .

JOSEPH LOWDEN . I am a master mariner . The prisoner shipped himself with me in Jamaica to come home in capacity of steward . On our arrival in England, I appointed the 7th of August to pay the men. A friend of mine had lodged a complaint to me against the prisoner, he came to be paid, but hearing the voice of this friend of mine he ran out of the house; his wages amounted to fifteen pounds. He ran through the room where all the money for the payment of the men, was lying on the table to the amount of about three hundred pounds, and my wife said the money is all on the table; we immediately returned, and missed three three-shilling pieces of the change. We stopped the prisoner, and he said he had no money but two-pence, which he then threw upon the table; yet in his shoe he had three three-shilling back tokens, and two shillings.

GUILTY , aged, 34.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-85

902. FRANCIS MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , a hat, value 5s. the property of Henry Richards ; and five shillings in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Dawes .

HENRY RICHARDS. I am porter to Mr. Ing, he keeps an oyster shop in Fleet-street. I slept on the night of the 28th of June at the Weatsheaf , and the prisoner lodged in the same room. In the morning about six o'clock, I missed him and my hat; and on the Saturday following, I saw my hat on his hand in Tothillfields Bridewell.

THOMAS DAWES . On the 29th of June I received some information from Mr. Brooks; in consequence of which I examined my till, and missed five shillings in halfpence. I keep the Wheatsheaf .

ISAAC BROOKS . I was at Mr. Dawes's house on the morning of the day in the indictment; I saw the prisoner come out of his bar, and I informed him; and the prisoner was then gone.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-86

903. JOHN RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , seven shillings and six-pence of the monies of Charles Turmeau , and a handkerchief, value 7s. the property of Henry Turmeau .

CHARLES TURMEAU . I deal in lamps and oil , and live at 152, Drury lane . John Riley was engaged in my service, and in consequence of suspecting him, I desired my brother to mark some money, and give it to a neighbour to make a purchase.

HENRY TURMEAU . I did as my brother directed me, and gave the money to John Lucas .

JOHN LUCAS . On the morning of the day in the indictment, I purchased four lamp glasses at the prosecutor's house, paid the prisoner for them a three shilling piece and shilling.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-87

900. GEORGE LOCKE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a saw, value 2s. 6d. the property of Edward Mass .

EDWARD MASS , THE YOUNGER. My father keeps a butcher's shop , in Whitechapel-market , and this saw was stolen from our shop. I never saw the prisoner.

THOMAS THWAITES . I am a pawnbroker. This saw was pledged with me on the 10th of July, about the middle of the day, by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it with others of a man for four shillings and sixpence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-88

905. MARY FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , one half seive, value 10d. and eleven quarts of currants value 2s. 6d. the property of William Johnson .

WILLIAM JOHNSON . On the day in the indictment, about the middle of the day, the half seive in question was standing on a board on my ground in the market; I saw them safe about twelve o'clock, and missed them about ten minutes after; I did not see them again until I saw the prisoner in custody, which was about ten minutes after they were taken away. I saw the seive and the currants when the prisoner was taken; I knew the seive again, and she owned she had taken them.

JOHN BROWN. I had a stand in Covent Garden . I had seen the prisoner frequently in the market. Mr. Johnson said that he had lost half a sieve of currants, and I followed the prisoner, and stopped her; she had the currants with her, and readily surrendered them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-89

906. ELIZABETH BREWER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a watch, value 30s. the property of Michael M'Canny .

MICHAEL M' CANNY. I lost my watch on the 13th of July last; it was a silver watch. It was taken from my house in Bath-place, New-road .

MRS. M'CANNY. I had seen the watch before I went out with the prisoner, on the 13th. I was in care of the house. It was on the dresser shelf. I saw it about eight in the evening of the 13th of July. The prisoner was in the house during the greater part of the day; she called on a visit, and I gave her leave to do her work in the house. She came about ten or eleven in the morning, and she nursed my child during that day. She left the house with me about eight in the evening. As she went out with me, I saw the watch. I went into Brook-street, which is in the New-road; I was gone about twenty minutes. I pa ted with the prisoner soon after I went out, and after my return, I missed my watch about ten o'clock

THOMAS DOBBINS. I am a labouring-man; I lodged in this house. I know the prisoner. I recollect Mrs. M'Canny going out to get change for a note; I saw both her and the prisoner go out together. In about ten minutes the prisoner came back, and knocked at the door, and said she had forgotten a key, and wanted to go down stairs; she went down, but was not down above a minute or two. When she came up, I did not perceive that she had any thing about her. I stopped until she came back again, and then she went away. That is all I know. She bid me good night at the door, and went away. Nobody else came into the house after the prosecutrix went out but the prisoner.

DAVID CAMERON . I took in a watch on the 13th of July; I think from the prisoner; but I am not sure; I think it was she; I advanced fifteen shillings on it.

BENJAMIN HOPE . I-had known the prisoner about a fortnight when she called at my lodgings, and gave me the duplicate of a watch; it was about the middle of July, and it was a watch pawned at Cameron's. She stated to me that she had bought it of a woman, and had given ten shillings for it; I redeemed the watch, and paid fifteen shillings for it. I pawned it at Mr. Dry's, in Blandford-street, and I lost the duplicate, and when we went to his house for it, it had been redeemed.

DAVID Cameron. I wrote upon the duplicate; I recollect the name of the maker of the watch; it was Parkinson

Michael M'Canny. On my watch the maker's name was Parkinson.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-90

907. PATRICK KENNEDY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , forty pounds weight of lead, value 3s. of and belonging to our Soverign Lord the King ; and then being fixed to a certain building .

WILLIAM HUNT . I am a carpenter. I was employed in repairing the green-house belonging to the Pallace . This lead was laid there before it was stolen; it was on the flat at the back; I don't know whether it was fixed. The prisoner had got better than a quarter of a mile with it before I stopped him; when I stopped him, it was on his head.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-91

908. PETER BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a pair of iron springs, value 5l. the property of John Stretton .

JOHN STRETTON I lost a pair of iron springs; they belonged to the cart. The stable was in New-street ; about a hundred yards from us.

ROBERT SHUTTLEWORTH . On the Sunday morning, I saw the prisoner about a quarter or twenty minutes past six; I saw him come out of the house that is being repaired at the top of Sydmouth-place. I saw a sack at the top of the area, where they were getting it up. I saw the prisoner lift that sack on the other man's back; they looked back several times, and in cousequence of that, I thought it was lead that came off the house. I went through a different way through Sidmouth-mews, and I saw the prisoner following a cart, in which was the other young man and a woman. The moment I stopped the cart, the two men took to their heels, and ran as fast as they could. I pursued after them; I followed the prisoner close into a field, and he was stopped before I lost sight of him. The springs were afterwards taken out of the cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I went behind some bricks, and saw the man with this sack, and I helped him up with it on his shoulder by his request, and then I ran down the field, and the witness laid hold of me, and said what, have you been robbing my master's house, and I said, no, I was not, and I said I was very willing to go with him whereever he liked.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one year , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-92

909. MARY HART was indicted for that she, being servant to Thomas Coomber and William Goddard , and being employed and entrusted by them to receive money for and on their account, by virtue of that employment, took into her custody and possession sixteen shillings and tenpence on the account of her said masters, and afterwards did feloniously secrete, embezzle, and steal the same .

THE COURT. Ruled that a female servant was not within the letter of the Statute, "39, Geo. III. Cap. 85, Commonly called the Embezzlement Act." under which this indictment was framed.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-93

910. WILLIAM TUFFNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , thirteen live tame rabbits, value 3s. the property of William Froutt .

WILLIAM FROUTT . On the evening of the 15th of August, the stable was broken open, and my rabbits stolen.

MATTHEW COOPER . I know the prisoner at the bar; I knew him about half a year before he was taken up; I knew no more of him than seeing him sitting with fish fronting the court where I live. About half past eight in the evening of the 15th of August, I was at the top of our court, I heard William Tuffnell and Thomas Read talking about taking of rabbits. I went with them and Read got in at the stable window, and handed the rabbits out to Tuffnell, and he took them home; they were put down Tuffnell's cellar, The officer caught hold of me the next day, and asked me about it. I had joined in this theft, and they promised me one of the rabbits. I told the officer where to find them, and he found them by my direction.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON. I heard of the loss of these rabbits. I found them by the direction of Cooper, at No.9, in this Court; I found eleven of them in the back cellar. I found Tuffnell in the passage of that house to which the cellar belonged; I told him I had come to search for the rabbits; he said he would shew us all he had; he took me down into the cellar along with the prosecutor. He shewed me several rabbits in the front cellar; but none of them belonged to Mr. Froutt; and I looked through into the back cellar, and he said it was dangerous to go in; and I saw the soil had broke through. I then fetched Cooper; he said he would shew me where the rabbits were, and I found the rabbits in the back cellar.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-94

911. ELEANOR FOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September fifteen pairs of stockings, value 8s. and one piece of patchwork, value 1s. the property of William Looseley .

HANNAH ROWE . I bought some stockings of the prisoner; she produced eight pairs to me; she asked me two-shillings for them, and I told her I would give her eighteen-pence. They were claimed about two hours after I bought them. Mrs. Looseley saw them, and claimed them. She at first offered to buy them; I asked three shillings and three-pence, and she offered two shillings and sixpence; I thought I should not get so good a customer again, and I offered to take the half-crown,and then she claimed them. I told her I believed I knew the woman by sight of whom I bought them, and as I was going up the street, I met the prisoner, and she was taken into custody.

JOHN AARON . I remember the prisoner pawning a pair of stockings, on the 20th of September, with me.

THOMAS SALT . I produce the patchwork, pledged by the prisoner for ninepence.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-95

912. ROBERT JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , five yard measures, value 3s. three tea-totums, value 1s. 6d. one thimble, value 6d. two pin-cushions, value 1s. the property of Moses Harris .

GEORGE STRANGE. In consequence of information, I seized the prisoner, who is in my master's employ, and brought him into the parlour, and found the articles named in the indictment on him; they were such articles as are exposed in our shop for sale. The value altogether was about six shillings; the prisoner was an errand boy .

GEORGE PAUL . I was talking with Mr. Strange on Saffron-hill . I saw the prisoner in his master's shop in a suspicious manner putting something into his pocket, and I gave information to the last witness, to whom I was talking.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Fined 1s. and delivered to his master .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-96

913. SARAH PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , a pair of breeches, value 5s. an apron, value 6d. a petticoat, value 1s. and a pair of stays; value 1s. the property of Jesse Payne .

No prosecutor appeared.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-97

914. THOMAS SCOTLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a pint pot, value 2s. and a book, value 1s. the property of Robert Moore .

ROBERT MOORE . I had information that the prisoner was a common pot stealer, and on Saturday, the 3rd, we lost seven bar pints. The prisoner was in my house on the 3rd, as late as we kept the house open, as late as eleven. He came again on Sunday the 4th, and called for a pint of porter in a spouted pot; after he was gone, the pot was missing. He returned again in about three quarters of an hour, and I then watched him. I told my people to go, and have an officer at hand. I suspected he had something about him, and I collared him, and took him and found this property on him.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-98

915. JOSEPH GRAY and THOMAS WIGGINS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , from the person of Thomas Overall , a watch, value 4l. a pocket-book, value 2d. two ten-pound bank-notes one five-pound bank-note, and seven one-pound bank-notes, the property of the said Thomas Overall .

THOMAS OVERALL . On the 5th of August, I left the Bull in Bishopsgate-street at about seven o'clock in the evening of the day in the indictment, I had been drinking there but had my property safe when

I quitted it; I was intoxicated. When I came from the Bull in Bishopsgate-street, I found I ought to have gone to the Bull in Aldgate; and I went on for that purpose. I missed my way, and fell asleep, and when I was awakened, I was told I was in the Islington Road , and I had been asleep there; I expect it was in the open road. I know I had my notes in my pocket book when I left the Bull; there were the notes stated in the indictment in it, and several papers and memorandums; I am quite sure they were safe. When I was awakened I missed my property. When I arrived at the Bull in Aldgate I had a two-penny flash note, which I had had for five or six years.

JAMES DOUGLAS . I am a silk weaver, I am the master of the prisoner Gray, About the 6th of August, he had a quantity of notes; it was on the morning of the 9th of August. In consequence of information I received, I wished to know how he came possessed of the property; he said his brother had given them to him, and his brother had found them. We insisted on knowing how he came possessed of the property, to discover if we had been robbed of goods or anything of that kind; then he acknowledged that he had met with a sailor at the Ball in Bishopsgate-street, and led him as far as Crown-street, Finsbury Square, and had taken his pocketbook, containing about thirty pounds; he afterwards met with Wiggins and divided the property. According to his account, Wiggins was not present at the robbery; I know nothing of Wiggins. The prisoner Gray had none of the property about him.

WILLIAM HEWIT . I am in the employ of the last witness. On the 6th of August about ten in the morning, I understood that the prisoner Gray had found seventeen pounds; I saw the book and the notes; there was a ten-pound note, a five-pound note and two ones, I asked him where he found them, and he said opposite Shoreditch church. There was no leaf, memorandum, nor anything of that kind in the book; every thing was torn clean away. I informed the last witness. The constable took three pounds and a silver watch out of Wiggins's pocket; he said that watch he had bought.

HENRY MACKRILL. I am a constable. Wiggins admitted that Gray gave him the property that was found on him, but he said he did not know Gray had stole them. I found a ten-pound note in the Kingsland Road, and the two-penny flash note, I got from Gray's mother.

WILLIAM COOPER. I am a weaver. I live at the prisoner Gray's masters; Gray came to me on the 8th of August, and told me he had found some money, and he gave me a ten-pound note, to ask me to take care of it for him; and I put it into my aunts lean is for safety; that was afterwards given up to the last witness.

Gray's Defence. I took the money from Mr. Overall, and I told Wiggins I had stolen it.

WIGGINS, NOT GUILTY .

GRAY, GUILTY , aged 13.

Judgement respected.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-99

916. HUGH FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , a silver butter-boat, value 1l. and a silver spoon, value 5s. the property of Phineas Murphy .

PHINEAS MURPHY. In consequence of information, about four o'clock in the afternoon of the day in the indictment, I went out and saw the prisoner in my area; he appeared to me to be endeavouring to hide the butter-boat which was within two or three inches of his hand, among some broken bricks which were in the area; he must have got over the area rails, for the gate was locked; I had the key of the area, and on going into it, I found the spoon among the bricks. I took the prisoner, and went down to Bow-street, and brought the officers up.

JOSEPH AUSTEN. I saw the prisoner get over Mr. Murphy's rails and go down to his area; on my passing by, I looked down the area and saw some plate at the window. On coming back in about ten minutes, I perceived some of the plate gone out of the window; presently I saw the prisoner trying to get up the wall; I asked him what he wanted down the area, and he said he had dropt his handkerchief. He then stepped down again, and took the plate from under his coat, while I was knocking at the door, and concealed it among some bricks; and three persons who were standing by, and whom I suspected to be his confederates ran away.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-100

917. THOMAS EBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , one-pound, ten shillings, and sixpence in monies numbered , the property of Samuel William Pyall .

MARY PYALL . I lost this money on the 13th of August about four o'clock in the afternoon; I saw the prisoner going round from behind my counter; on my speaking to him, he asked me if I wanted to buy any wood; I told him he had no business there; and I went round the counter and directly missed my money. The prisoner was stopped by Eleanor Werndly; he had only two bundles of wood under his arm.

ELEANOR WERNDLY . I saw the prisoner going round from behind the counter; I saw two bundles of wood under his arm, and I thought he might have been putting wood under the counter. I then heard him ask Mrs. Pyall if she wanted any wood, and she made answer that he had no business there. Upon that I went into the shop, and Mrs. Pyall told me to stop him, which I did; then Mr. Sellers was sent for, and he asked Mrs. Pyall if she could swear to the money; Mrs. Pyall made answer and said, if it was her money that was found upon the prisoner, she could swear to some of it. He then took it out of his pocket, and threw it on the counter, and Mrs. Pyall spoke to several shillings which she knew to be hers; and among the rest, there was a six pence which I knew to be one that I had paid to Mrs. Pyall a fortnight before. When the prisoner found that, he burst out crying, and hoped that she would forgive him.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-101

918. ANN COPUS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , two shirts, value 20s. the property of Thomas M'Clean .

GEORGE GILES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 8th of August, I took in two shirts from the prisoner; I lent her twenty shillings on them.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I took the prisoner in custody at Wimbledon, and found the ticket of these two shirts in her possession.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined three months and fined 1s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-102

919. ELIZHBETH COLLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , three table-cloths, value 1l. 7s. five handkerchiefs, value 1l. one pillowcase, value 2s. three pairs of cotton hose, value 7s. one napkin, value 2s. and one apron, value 2s. the property of Mary Cooper , widow .

MARY COOPER . I lost these things at several different times, and in nearly three years. I know the prisoner.

WILLIAM BROCK . I have got three table-cloths, some handkerchiefs, and some stockings; I took them in pledge from the prisoner at the bar, at several different times.

JOSEPH GASS . I apprehended the prisoner, and found on her the duplicates relating to this property; I found four duplicates on her which led to th1s.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-103

920. DAVID BRYAN and WILLIAM HORNSBY were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a watch, value 25s. a chain, value 1s. and two keys, value 6d. the property of Joseph Vetreen

WILLIAM SMITH . In the morning of the 11th of July, a woman named Deborah Barnet, brought a watch to pledge, and I lent her ten shillings on it.

SARAH SMITH. I live at Mrs. Barnet's. The prisoner knocked at the door on the 9th of July, at three o'clock; they asked for beds to sleep in; I told them I did not know whether we had any, but I would call the landlady, I called the landlady, and she said she had two beds; they said they had no money, and they would leave the watch until the following evening at six o'clock. I look at the watch produced by the last witness; that is the same watch; the prisoner David Bryan gave it, and I took it into my hand to look at it.

ELIZABETH SCRIVEN . I live at No.4, Denmark-street ; I am a house-keeper. I remember these young men coming to my house on the evening of the 9th, for a bed; they had slept there on the preceeding evening, and they came on the following evening again, and asked me for a bed; it was between ten and eleven when they came to the best of my knowledge; they sat on the chest for the value of an hour and a half, or two hours; sometime after I had gone up stairs, I heard the cry of stop thief; on my coming down, I missed the watch, it was Joseph Vetreen's watch.

OWEN REECE . I was in this room, and saw the prisoner Bryan take the watch, and go out; Hornsby was not there. He blew the candie out, then snatched up the watch and went out, and I cried stop thief.

HORNSBY, NOT GUILTY .

BRYAN, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-104

921. JOHN CHRISTY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , two live geese, value 5s. a spade, value 1s. and a bag, value 2d. the property of Thomas Osborn .

PRISCILLA OSBORN. I live at 14, John-street, Limehouse Fields . I lost these geese, on the 21st of July, I don't know what time; they were safe at eleven o'clock, and I missed them next morning at eight; the bag and spade were taken at the same time.

AMELIA LAMBORN. About ten minutes before seven in the morning, the prisoner and a man named Bellamy, who is not in custody passed my door; somebody pursued them, and the prisoner exclaimed d-n your eyes and limbs drop it, upon which John Bellamy dropped a bag he had in his hand, which contained a live goose; they both went off. We took the goose and the bag in, and in about ten minutes afterwards, the prisoner returned knocked at the door, and demanded the goose as his property; I told him he should have it by and by. He went away swearing that he would storm the house and have my life.

WILLIAM GRIX. I assisted in this; I refused to give the goose up. An officer was sent for who took away the goose, and afterwards took the prisoner up.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-105

922. EBENEZER BUCKINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a shawl, value 6s. the property of William Holbrook .

REBECCA HOLBROOK. I went out to get a bit of meat, and in returning, I met the prisoner coming out of the Court; I knew him. When I got home, I missed my shawl. I immediately went after the prisoner, and found him in the White Lion, I accused him of stealing my shawl, and he denied it. While I was gone for an officer, he owned to it to the people; he told me he had sold it to Mrs. Levi I have known him from a child, and I really think he took it out of distress.

HANNAH LEVI . I live in Rosemary-lane. I bought this shawl of the prisoner at the bar.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through the greatest distress.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-106

923. THOMAS BRIGHT was indicted for stealing on the 14th of July , ten live tame fowls, value 10s.

two live tame rabbits, value 2s. and one bag, value 6d. the property of William Smith .

THOMAS FLOBBS . On the 14th of July, I was taking a walk between two and three o'clock. I saw the prisoner in the City-road, and he had a bag with something in it. I was making towards him when he threw the bag away, and ran off; he jumped over Mr. Poppen's grounds, and I got over after him, and pursued him into a wash-house, and secured him.

RICHARD LAWLESS . I searched the prisoner. I found on him this bit, an iron chisel, ten fowls, and two dead rabbits in the bag.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-107

924. SUSANNAH TOZER and ANN MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , a watch, value 5l. three seals, value 2l. and one key, value 3s. the property of Hugh Bunbary , from his person .

HUGH BUNBARY . I lost my watch on the 7th of September, at half past twelve; I met four girls in the Commercial-road; they laid hold of me, and would insist that I should go home with them; I told them I would not, as I was going to my own home. Susannah Tozer took hold of my arm, and said I must go, merely to see her apartment. I went with her, and I took out my watch to see what o'clock it was; she suatched the watch out of my hand, and said, she would put it into the cupboard: instead of that, she ran down stairs with it, and the prisoner Ann Moore kept me in conversation all the time. Soon after Ann Moore started away from me, and I ran down stairs after them with a knife; but they had got off. I met one of the other girls that I met along with the prisoners, and I gave her in charge to the watch.

TOZER, GUILTY , aged 18.

MOORE, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-108

925. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , a pair of shoes, value 1s. a shawl, 6d. a knife, value 2d. and three farthings, the property of Joseph James Evans , from his person .

JOSEPH JAMES EVANS . On Saturday morning, the 10th of August, between twelve and one, I was down by Wapping Dock ; I sat myself down, and went to sleep, and when I awoke, I found this property taken from me.

CHARLES COX . I am a watchman. I met the prisoner with a pair of shoes in his hand. I asked him where he got them; and he said, he had pulled them off his feet to ease his feet; but I found he had shoes on besides.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-109

926. THOMAS BALLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a watch, value 2l. a seal, value 10s. and a chain, value 1s. the property of Robert Reeve , from his person .

ROBERT REEVE . About one o'clock in the morning of the day in the indictment, as I was returning home, I fell down crossing Ratcliffe Highway . At the moment, the prisoner and another man came over, and were in the act of helping me up. The prisoner put his hand to my breeches, and I thought there was something wrong; I told him not to rob me; and he laid hold of the chain and seal, and made a catch, and drew the watch out of my pocket; he broke the bow of the watch with the snatch, and ran down the hill with the watch.

JOHN KALE . I am a watchman. I was coming along, and heard a man halloo out stop thief, and I saw the prisoner coming towards me, and I caught him. When I was bringing him along, he put his hand towards the wall, and I found the watch on the ledge of the wall where I stopped him.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-110

927. CHRISTIANA ABRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , two three-shilling bank tokens, one shilling, and a sixpence, the property of John Thorn , from his person .

JOHN THORN. On the 16th of August, about half past eleven at night, I was coming home from St. John's-square, and a woman come rushing up against me, and I said, you have drank enough, mistress, hold up. I observed her person and her fare well; it was the prisoner. I was close by my own door, and in going up stairs, I put my hand in my pocket, as is a custom of mine; and I missed my money; it immediately occured to me that the prisoner must have robbed me. I went out, and called the watchman, and had the prisoner apprehended; and on her we found the money, and I could swear to one of the three-shilling pieces by two small TT on the neck of the head side.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-111

928. THOMAS FURNEAUX was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM MENCKE. I am clerk to Mr. Henry William Winton . I paid the prisoner one pound eleven shillings, on the 24th of August , on his master's account.

HENRY SMITHER . I am a carman . The prisoner was my foreman , and used to collect money for me. He never accounted to me for this money.

GUILTY .

Judgment respited.

(On a question whether the property was properly sat out in the indictment.)

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-112

929. HENRY CORBLEY and MARY WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , a handkerchief, value 5s. a pen-knife, value 1s. seven

pieces of Foreign coin, value 1s. 6d. three guineas, three 2l. bank notes, and three 1l. bank-notes the property of Thomas Lloyd , from his person .

THOMAS LLOYD. On the 3rd of August, I met with a friend or two, and got a little intoxicated; I met with Mary Williams , she took me to a private house, No. 1, Cable-court ; we had something to eat and drink, and presently I fell asleep, and when I awoke, I found my pocket stripped, and the prisoner gone. I found a man of the name of Smith very drunk in the street, and I had him secured; and I had other people secured, and afterwards the prisoners were secured, but my money was never recovered.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-113

930. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , a watch, value 4l. the property of John Richardson , from his person .

JOHN RICHARDSON. About eleven o'clock at night I went into the Mackworth's Arms in the Commercial Road ; I had the watch in my hands, and called for a pint of porter. The prisoner and another young man were sitting opposite to me; I had the watch in my hand. The young man who was with the prisoner said young man, that looks a good thing, let me look at it; upon which I put the watch into his hand; he immediately got up, and went towards the bar. A young man who was a stranger said to me immediately, young man you are done; surely said I, the man will never act that way, and I sat about half an hour. I got up, and left the prisoner George Taylor sitting where he was. The man returned me the watch, and I went out. I had not been just got out, when the prisoner Taylor followed me; and a little distance from the Mackworth's Arms, he snatched the watch from me; I pursued him closely, calling stop thief, and the watchman Mr. Morgan, took him into custody.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I took the prisoner, and there was an attempt to rescue him.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-114

931. JOSEPH SARBEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , two pounds two ounces weight of pepper, value 3s. the property of Edward Holmes and others.

JOHN COOPER . On the day in the indictment, I saw the prisoner in Botolph wharf close by a bale of pepper with a knife in his hand, and presently I saw pepper issuing from the bag; he held his hat, and the pepper went into it; I immediately seized him, with the pepper on him.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Whipped one hundred yards on Botolph wharf , and imprisoned two months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-115

932. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Thomas Arden , from his person .

HENRY WHITMORE . In the evening of the 19th of July, between eight and nine o'clock, I was passing from Fenchurch-street , to Gracechurch-street , and I saw a gentleman who afterwards called himself Arden; I saw the prisoner's left hand in his right hand pocket, and he took his handkerchief out. The prisoner immediately turned round, and before I had spoken to him at all, he put himself in a menacing attitude, and said, what did you say sir! what did you say? and I said, you villian you have robbed that gentleman. We secured the prisoner, and I went after the gentleman, who said is name was Arden, and he swore to the handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-116

933. LEVI SIMMONS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-117

934. ELEANOR REGAN and THOMAS SULLIVAN were indicted for uttering a counterfeit sixpence, and on the same day uttering another counterfeit sixpence .

LLEWELLIN HUGHES. On the day in the indictment, the male prisoner came to my house, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; he had something to drink and paid sixpence for it; I immediately put it into the till, but did not observe it at the time; and as soon as the prisoner turned his back the officer came in. I then took particular notice of the stamp on the sixpence; I put it in a piece of paper and have kept it ever since; I had no other sixpence.

ROBERT DENNIS . I look at the male prisoner; he came into my house on the day in the indictment and had a pint of porter; he gave me a sixpence, and I gave him the change; I did not part with the sixpence until the officer came in. The officer brought the woman in; she had some colouring in her hand, which she squeezed all to pieces in opening her hand.

JAMES BAKER . I was in Chancery-lane with Wainright on the day in the indictment a little after two; I saw the two prisoners coming from the corner of Cursitor-street; I then saw the man prisoner go into the Five Bells, the woman went about fifteen yards from it and stopped. He came out again, and when he came out, they spoke together. They went together lower down, to the chandler's shop, and several other places; they had half an ounce of tobacco there. I used to see some halfpence pass from him to her, when ever he came out. I saw the sixpences produced by the two last witnesses as uttered to them by the male prisoner, and they are both bad. When I apprehended the female prisoner I saw her grapple her hand together and I was obliged to use force to take her into Mr. Dennis's house; Wainright and Sullivan was then together. I forced the female prisoner's hand open, and found a bit of paper containing some colouring, and a bad sixpence in it; she tore the paper all to pieces, and it fell, but I picked up a little or the colouring, and it produced the colour of silver on base metal; I tried that,

I then searched her, and found on her these boxes, one contains twenty-eight sixpences, and the other four, shey are all bad ones; she had likewise four shillings in copper, and a large pair of clippers, which I think had the appearance of having been used. On the male prisoner I found threepence three farthings, which would be the change out of sixpence, after paying for the pint of beer; the pint of beer being two pence farthing.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I am clerck to the solicitor of the Mint; I look at these sixpences, they are all counterfeits.

REGAN, GUILTY .

SULLIVAN, GUILTY .

Confined one year , and bound over to find sureties for their good behaviour for two years more .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-118

935. WILLIAM ASHLIN was indicted for obtaining money on false pretences .

REBECCA MOORE. On the day in the indictment the prisoner came to the shop. I had known that he was the servant of Mr. Backler, the celebrated glass stainer, of Newman-street. He asked me if Mrs. Taylor was within. I told him she was, and he asked me to lend him eleven shillings for Mr. Backler, to pay the carriage of goods, lying at Wood-street, which had come from the Duke of Norfolk's. I lent him eleven shillings upon that. Mrs. Backler was a customer of ours, and we knew her. He came again on Thursday the 25th of July, bringing with him a paper, apparently a bill for the carriage of goods. The amount was one pound nine shillings and a penny, and underneath was written in pencil, "received one pound," and he asked me to lend him nine shillings and a penny, to pay for the carriage of goods lying at Wood-street, and I did so; fearing that it might not have been right, I wrote to Mrs. Backler, and she sent a verbal message. On Monday the 29th, the prisoner came to the house again, and asked for a one pound note for Mr. Backler, who, he said, was waiting in Gracechurch-street for it. I did not let him have it, but I gave an alarm, and he was laid hold of immediately.

JOSEPH BACKLER. The prisoner was formerly in my employment. I had no goods come to London from the Duke of Norfolk. I expected no such goods. I never authorised the prisoner to get this money.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-119

936. CHARLES BEISE was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-120

937. CHARLOTTE ANTHONY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October, 1815 , two spoons, value 5s. the property of George Sunshine ; and HARRIET, the wife of Samuel Garva , was indicted for receiving the same, on the same day, knowing them to be stolen .

Charlotte Anthony pleaded GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and discharged .

ELIZABETH SHUNSHINE . In October, in the last year, I lived in Creswell-street , with my father, Mr. George Shunshine . I missed a table spoon, a tea spoon, and four desert spoons that were my father's, that was in the beginning of October, in the last year. I questioned Charlotte Anthony about them, and she told me she had taken them to Harriet Garva , the fortune teller . I learned something which led me to the prisoner at the bar. She lived in Fryingpan-alley, Petticoat-lane. She has a private room there, and makes bonnets and tell fortunes. I told her I wanted my fortune told. She told me of my fortune, and she told me of my loss; she told me I had lost something of value, and that it was plate. I told her that she had told me pretty true, and she described the person who had stolen it, which description answered Charlotte Anthony. I told her that she Garva had received it. Upon which, she swore bitterly that she knew nothing of the property. I told her I was certain she had it, and had disposed of it in some sort of a way; and all I wanted was the duplicate, or a direction to the place where she had sold it. She then declared that she had not a duplicate in the house but what belonged to herself. She then went out of the room, and locked me in for a few minutes. I then told her all I wanted was the duplicates. I then told her that if I did not obtain them, I should take other means; and she let me out of the room, and I left her. In about half an hour afterwards, she came to my house with the duplicates. I don't know how she came to know where to find me. I perceived that they were dated on the day she brought them, quite fresh; it was the 17th of October. When she produced them, she said, there are the duplicates, and she said that Charlotte had brought them to her, meaning my niece. She said that Charlotte brought her the spoons. I did not go to the pawnbroker's until I had taken her into custody. I have seen that table-spoon and the desert-spoon again; I saw them at the pawnbroker's, and afterwards at Worship-street.

JOHN GOODBURN . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these spoons from Harriet Garva , the prisoner at the bar, on the 4th of October, in the last year; I knew her before. On the 17th she came and paid the interest for them, and took out a fresh duplicate, in another name; she at first pawned them in her own name; the second time she gave the name of Ann Anderson , which she said, was the name of the person that the property belonged to.

CHARLOTTE ANTHONY. I am the niece of Elizabeth Sunshine; latterly I have been at the Refuge for the Destitute; I know the prisoner at the bar. I bought a bonnet of her during the last very hard frost. In October in the last year, I called at her house about a bonnet; she then asked me to have my fortune told; she took me into a dark room. I was at that time keeping company with a young man, and she said if he was not married, she should bring him to me in the dark room. I remained about twenty minutes; whilst I was in the dark she brought something to me of the appearance of a man;

I immediately fainted away, and I was taken to a surgeon's and bled. After this passed, she said something to me; she said she knew where I lived for she had followed me home; she asked me sixpence for telling my fortune, and asked if I could afford any more; I said no, and she then asked me if I could get any thing to make money of; I told her no; and she followed me home. When I got towards home, she followed me to the door, and said she would part. She asked me to bring something to make money of, and said it would never be found out. After I had my fortune told, she wanted me to take on oath that I would never discover it; I would not take any oath; she repeated words for me to say; but I would not say them. She wanted me to say, so help me God, I won't disclose it; but I did not; and she wanted me to come and live with her. In consequence of her telling me to get something to make money of, I took a desert-spoon and a table-spoon, and gave them to her right opposite the place, she stood opposite the house for them. After I got her the spoons, I went home with her, she took me to the Royalty Theatre. I afterwards went away from her; I saw I had done wrong.

Q. After you had been taken to the Royalty Theatre, did she propose any thing else - A. Yes, she wanted me to go in the streets. In consequence of that proposal, I went to a friend of my grandfather's and communicated what I have stated to day, and that friend went to my grandfather, and afterwards got me home. Then I went to the Assylum for the Destitute, and continued there until last June; I had then an ill state of health, and was obliged to come out for my health sake; I soon after met her on London Bridge, and she asked me if I had been at home all that time; and I said, yes. Then she said she had a little house in Cooper's-gardens, and wanted me to go with her but I would not. I told what had happened to the people of the Assylum, and she was taken up.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Searjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-121

938. CHARLOTTE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , from the person of William Newbolt , a watch, value 4l. and a bank-note for the payment of thirty-pounds, his property . And DAVID MYERS was indicted for receiving the goods aforesaid, he knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM NEWBOLT . I met the prisoner in Hampstead Road; I went to her lodgings in Eden-street , and staid there about half an hour, and fell asleep. A young woman of the name of Jones, who had been with the female prisoner, left the room first, and left me and the female prisoner in the room together. When I awoke, I missed the woman and the property. I had a number of papers in my pocket-book, beside the note. I had given three pounds ten-shillings for the watch; I had also some silver about me, but that was not gone. I have seen the note since; I had taken it at Hoares, in Fleet-street.

ELEANOR JONES . I remember the night of the 10th of August last; I lived at No.8, Eden-street, Hampstead Road in the parlour; Charlotte Green lived with me. I was walking with her when this gentleman came up. We went home, and I left Charlotte Green in the room with Mr. Newbolt. She came to me in about ten minutes, and then she and I ran down Tottenham Court Road; she never stopped until she came to Frances-street. When she stopped there, she shewed me a pocket-book, and a watch; the watch had no chain or seal; she also shewed me something like a bank-note, but I can't read. She emptied all the papers out of the pocket-book into her lap, and chucked the pocket-book away. Then we went on to St. Giles's church; there she met with a man, and had some conversation with him. Then she said come along, now I know where to take it. We then went to Mr. Myers's; it was almost twelve; we found him up one pair of stairs in Compton-street, near St. Giles's church; she shewed him the note; he said it was a twenty-pound note, and then she shewed him the watch, and he said do you know what I will give you for this, meaning the note; she wanted eighteen pounds for it, but he would only give her seventeen. Then he gave her fourteen shillings in silver besides, that was for the watch. He then asked her whether she would have anything to drink, she said yes, and then his wife went out for something to drink. After that he desired us to lay hold of his arms, saying, that would prevent all suspicion. As we went along he said, will you give me something to drink, and then we went into a public-house, kept by Mr. Holmes, and Mr. Myers asked for a glass of wine. The publican said he did not sell wine, and then he and a man who had come in with us, had a glass of shrub each. The female prisoner told him she had taken it from a man, and said we shall be all taken up; it was after she told him that, that he told us to lay hold of his arms, saying that would avoid all suspicions.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I remember the night of the 10th of August, when the last witness, the female prisoner, Myers, and another man came into my house; I took particular notice of them, because by Myers asking for a glass of wine, I thought he was an informer, as I had no licence to sell wine.

HENRY COLLIER . I apprehended the prisoners, and the girl Jones. I took the girl Charlotte Green to Myers's house first; Jones said to Myers, I am come here for those papers that Charlotte Green and myself left here last week; he asked what papers; she said you know what papers I mean, why the papers we left. He then said, so help his God, he never saw the girls before, and did not know what they meant; Mrs. Myers then flew in a passion at the girls, and wanted to turn them out. I told her however to stop, for he was a prisoner, and I was an officer, and I said I wanted the papers, for the gentleman only wanted to have his papers. I then apprehended Myers; he went very quietly with me, and was admitted to bail.

SAMUEL LACK . Green told me the same story she told the last witness.

WILLIAM HOULE . I am clerk belonging to the Bank of England. I produce a thirty-pound note paid into the bank on the 20th of August, the date

of which is 17093; it was paid in by Jones Lloyd and Co. bankers.

CHARLES PLUMLEY. I am a goldsmith, living on Ludgate-hill. I look at the note produced by the last witness; there is a mark on it due thirty-one pounds eighteen shillings and nine-pence. The male prisoner bought gold of me to that amount, and paid me in a thirty-pound note, and I firmly believe this to be the note he so paid me.

GREEN, GUILTY , aged 17.

Judgment respited.

MYERS, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-122

939. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 2s. 1d.1/2. in copper monies numbered , the property of George Seaborne .

ELIZABETH SEABORNE. This money was taken off the desk in my father's shop. I was scowering in the back part of the premises, and hearing somebody come into the shop, I went to see who it was; it was the prisoner, and he asked me if I wanted any hearth-stones; I told him no; and he went out. As soon as he heard me begin scowering again, I saw him come in, and take this money off the desk.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-123

940. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a watch, value 20l. a chain, value 2l. and three seals, value 3l. the property of John Bates , from his person .

WALTER BURKE . On the 12th of August, I came into Mr. Bates's house, the Cock and Lion, in Wigmore-street , about twenty minutes after eleven, while I was having my supper, the prisoner at the bar came down stairs, and the landlord along with him. The prisoner at the bar came and sat down along side of me, and the landlord went into the bar. The prisoner said, d-n me if I han't got a one pound note of Bates. I said how did you come by it Thomas; he said, never you mind, you eat your supper, and don't say a word about it. I asked him to give me something to drink; he said, it won't do to night, stop until Sunday, and then I will give you a prime dinner, and plenty to drink. free of expense. The landlord went up stairs, and he followed him up directly. He returned in about eight or ten minutes, and sat himself down along side of me, and said, I have got that in my possession which will fetch us nine or ten pounds, and if you like to go in partnership or be in co, you shall have half. I made answer that I did not understand what he meant. He said never mind, only keep secret and never divulge a word. Then the bell rang up stairs, and the landlady went up stairs. Now, he says, is your time or never, go into the bar he says, and have something out of the bar, the landlord is tipsey and the landlady is gone up stairs, and I shall watch for you; then I left the house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-124

941. MARY WOODFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , five shirts, value 12s. one pair of half-boots, value 2s. one gown, value 5s. one napkin, value 6s. one coat, value 5s. one pair of pantaloons, value 2s. and one pair of spectacles, value 1s. the property of Amey Andrews .

AMEY ANDREWS. The prisoner lived servant with my mother in March last. We did not miss these things until two or three months after the prisoner left.

WILLIAM GOODENHAM. I produce a shirt, which was pledged by a female, who gave her name as Ann Woodfield. I don't remember her person.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I apprehended the prisoner.

(Shirt sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-125

942. RICHARD THORN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , a coat, value 2l. the property of Richard Davey .

RICHARD DAVEY . I lost my coat the 12th of September twelve months. The prisoner came to fetch his bundle, and after he was gone, the coat was missing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-126

943. WILLIAM SMITH and ROBERT SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , three live tame ducks, value 4s. 6d. the property of Thomas Turner .

DAVID MYLAN . These two men were coming down Bedford-square about a quarter past four; the black man had a bundle, which he was endeavouring to conceal; the other prisoner was with him. I stopped them to see what they had. I called my partner, and we found two dead fowls in the black man's apron. Those fowls were claimed by the last witness.

SAMUEL STODDART . I am a watchman, and assisted the last witness.

WILLIAM SMITH , GUILTY , aged 30.

ROBERT SMITH , GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined three months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-127

944. HENRY BATES and JOHN CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a lace veil, value 10s. the property of Bernard Borstman , from the person of Jane, his wife .

JANE BORSTMAN . On the 12th of August last, about twenty minutes past nine in the evening, I was in Russel-street . There were three men before me; I passed them. After I passed them, they made a Bolt at the end of the street; they wrestled, and immediately ran up towards me, and then made a snatch at my veil, and snatched it off my head, and the one in the light jacket came up to me. The moment I missed my veil, they spoke something, which I can't repeat; one of them was taken immediately.

BATES, GUILTY , aged 19.

CONNOR, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-128

945. GEORGE SIMMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , a pair of sheets, value 20s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 9d. the property of John Wheeler .

JOHN WHEELER . I am a publican . I lost these things on the 30th of July; I saw the prisoner open my drawer, and take out these pantaloons, and I sent for an officer, and had him apprehended.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-129

946. JAMES STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , two bank tokens, value 6s. the property of John Harvey .

JOHN HARVEY . The prisoner was in my service. I suspected him for a considerable time, and had my money stamped, which was in the till, on the day in the indictment, and afterwards missed the two three-shilling pieces in question.

WILLIAM SELLERS . The prisoner was brought to me; on searching him, I took from him two three shilling bank tokens, which were claimed by the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-130

947. MARGARET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , one bolster, value 8s. a pillow, value 4s. a sheet, value 3s. and a counterpane, value 4s. the property of Joseph Newton .

SOPHIA NEWTON. On the day in the indictment, I sent my boy up stairs to fetch some things; he called out to me, and I ran up stairs, and found the things in the indictment had been removed, and the prisoner was hiding herself in the next room.

CHARLES NEWTON . My mother sent me up stairs to fetch my brother's clothes, and I saw these things taken off the bed, and the prisoner was behind the door.

BENJAMIN MURCOTT . I went up stairs by the request of the prosecutrix, and took the prisoner; she had hidden herself behind the door. I sent for an officer, who took her into custody.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-131

948. JAMES NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , a brush-case, value 20s. the property of Thomas Lane and Allen Billing .

JOHN MOLYNEUX . I saw the prisoner take this brush-case; he ran off, and I ran after him.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I picked the brush-case up in a cellar, at the back part of the Strand.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-132

949. JAMES EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , two pewter pots, value 2s. the property of James Purle .

JAMES PURLE . The prisoner lives in a little yard behind my house, and on the day in the indictment, I found him melting these two pots.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Confined one year , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-133

950. ROBERT COLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , a hat, value 3s. a looking-glass, value 2s. a pair of breeches, value 4s. a waistcoat, value 3s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a coat, value 8s. a pair of gloves, value 6d. a sword, value 7s. and a basket, value 6d. the property of Benjamin Butcher .

BENJAMIN BUTCHER . The prisoner had lately been to sea , and by his mother's request, I let him come to my room to have his meals, until he could get another ship. Between six and eight on the day in the indictment, he took these things away; he left his hat in the room, and took mine. I went in pursuit of him, but could not find him, and I did not hear of him any more not until the Thursday. On the Sunday before this happened, he had walked with me out to my brother's at Child's Hill, and after he had robbed me, I sent word to my brother, that if such a person should come there, he was to stop him. On the Thursday, I went up to my brother, in consequence of information, and there I found the prisoner, with my hat on his head.

SAMUEL PRICE. The prisoner came to me to sell a clock and a small market basket. I have the clock here.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I bought this looking-glass of the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-134

951. WILLIAM FOY and FRANCIS PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , a handkerchief, value 1d. the property of William Hutton , from his person .

WILLIAM HUTTON . I lost my handkerchief in Bartholomew Fair . I felt something at my pocket; I missed my handkerchief, and on turning round, found the shorter prisoner in custody of the officer, who also had my handkerchief.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I saw Mr. Hutton in front of Richardson's show; the prisoner Foy was behind him, and moved with him, as far as Saunders's; he kept looking down, and several times attempted his pocket. He pulled the handkerchief a little way out, and then when he turned, the other prisoner immediately took it completely out; I took Foy.

FOY, GUILTY , aged 27.

PHILLIPS, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-135

952. SARAH ELLEN GOODRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , two pounds thirteen

ounces weight of sugar, value 2s. 4d. two pounds weight of butter, value 2s. nine ounces weight of tea, value 3s. 6d. one towel, value 6d. and one cup, value 2d. the property of Samuel Deacon and Thomas Deacon .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-136

953. JOHN PARKER was indicted for stealing' on the 5th of August , one pound two ounces weight of solder, value 1s. the property of Henry Peto .

JAMES OLIVER . I am clerk to Mr. Peto, the contractor for the construction of the New Custom House . The prisoner was a plumber on the works, and would have the possession and use of Mr. Peto's solder for doing his work.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am gate-keeper at the New Custom House. On the day in the indictment, I stopped the prisoner going out at the gate in the evening, and he had this solder concealed in his boot.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined two months , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-137

954. GEORGE COWEN was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN ASHTON . I am a wine and brandy merchant . The prisoner has been living with me as my clerk and servant ever since June 1814; he was to receive one hundred and twenty six pounds per annum, and his expences for going among publicans, which expence amounted generally to two, three, or four guineas a month. In the month of February last, I had a customer named Taylor, who kept the Rose and Crown public-house, in the Commercial Road, Blackfriars, whom I then considered to be indebted to me in the sum of seven pounds, eleven shillings and sixpence; the prisoner never accounted to me for that sum as if he had received it.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . My husband is a publican, and keeps the Rose and Crown. On the 12th of February, I paid the prisoner seven pounds twelve shillings and sixpence on account of the prosecutor; I received this receipt from him; (receipt produced, and read.)

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I believe I paid the prisoner in seven bank-notes, and the rest in silver; but I am not positively certain that I might not have given the prisoner eight pounds, and he had given me the change.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-138

955. JOSEPH DEARS was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-139

956. MARY GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a quilt, value 3s. a blanket, value 6s. a sheet, value 2s. 6d. and a flat iron, value 6d. the property of John Nash , in a lodging-room .

SARAH NASH . I let lodgings. About eight o'clock on the morning of the 26th of August, the prisoner applied to me for a lodging; afterwards a man came to the lodging, representing himself to be her husband; he is indicted but is not in custody; I soon heard that man's name was William Young ; he went by the name of Griffiths. They entered on the lodging on the 26th of August, and were to pay five shillings a week; they continued in the lodging until the 12th of September, and paid no rent. In consequence of hearing that the prisoner had borrowed a flat iron, I suspected that all was not right, because she had a flat iron as part of the furniture, When they came home, we got an officer, and went up stairs, and missed the things in the indictment. The prisoner gave up three duplicates to the officer; they were duplicates of our things.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a sheet and flat iron pawned by the prisoner.

THOMAS KIRK . I a pawnbroker, and produce a blanket, but I don't know who pawned it; it was pawned in the name of Griffiths.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-140

957. JAMES POWELL and WILLIAM RICHER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , two yards of linen cloth, value 2s. the property of John Finlayson ; and forty six pounds weight of lead, value 10s. belonging to the said John Finlayson, and affixed to a dwelling-house; one copper, value 1l. and two brass cocks, value 6s. belonging to the said John Finlayson and affixed to his said dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, Stating the property to be in John William 's.

JOHN FINLAYSON . I lost these different things on the 28th of August last; I did not miss them until the evening; I had seen them there one or two days before I missed them. I went and spoke to the watchman, and found some men had been stopped with some things the evening before; I only know that the property is mine.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I stopped the two prisoners with this property; I asked them where they got it from, and they told me that was my business to find out. I searched them, and on Power I found some skeleton keys, and one of them filed small to fit a drawer. Sellers searched Richer, and I saw him find a small saw on him. The next morning I discovered where the depredation was committed.

WILLIAM SELLERS . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

POWELL, GUILTY , aged 25.

RICHER, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-141

958. JEREMIAH MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , a watch, value 1l. a seal, value 10s. and a chain, value 1s. the property of Richard Jenkins , from his person .

RICHARD JENKINS. I lost the watch on the 3rd

of August, in Rosemary-lane , between eight and nine o'clock in the day. The prisoner spoke to me and asked me if I was a seafaring man . I told him I was, and we had a good deal of conversation about ships, and I found he did not know any thing. I went into a house with him, and we had some more beer, and I threw down five shillings for some beef steaks. I fell asleep, and he took the watch out of my pocket, I felt him, and rose up immediately. I asked him what he was about, and he said he was only taking the watch out of my pocket to give it to the landlord for security; I told him he had broken the chain. He said he would mend that easily. I however caught hold of him, and had an officer sent for. He knocked me down; but I caught hold of him until the officer came. I gave charge of him; I never saw the watch from that time to this. When I first awoke, the watch and chain were both in his hand.

ELIZABETH SHIRLEY . I saw this transaction; a man of the name of Jack Dirscall was concerned in it, and he threatened my life if I came here, and my husband's too.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-142

959. WILLIAM WILLOUGHBY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , a pocket book, value 2s. a bank dollar, and a shilling , the property of William Robertson .

WILLIAM ROBERTSON. Coming out of Uxbridge towards London, I fell in with the prisoner on the 3rd of August; he was with another, and they asked if I was going to London; I told them yes, and we all walked together. We had some rum and beer on the road, and came on; the other went a head of us, and Willoughby and I walked together; and it being very warm, we went into a green field and sat down. Being tired with walking. I fell fast asleep. When I wakened, I found he had robbed my bundle of the property named in the indictment, of my discharge and my pension ticket, and all my certificates of prize-money. I went in pursuit of him, and found him in a cross country road, about three miles off. I got a constable and took him into custody, and found the pocket book with the prisoner.

THOMAS HARRIS. I am a constable of Greenfield parish, near Harrow. The prisoner had sold the prosecutor's shirt, a jacket, and a pair of trowsers to the mowers.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months , and find 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-143

960. JAMES CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , a single horse chaise, value 10l. the property of William Leader .

WILLIAM LEADER . In July last, I lost a one horse chaise, between the hours of one and three, from the door in Castle-street . I next saw it in the possession of a Major Nalleker , just by Castle-street. Major Nalleker sent a Mr. Evans to me, and then the prisoner was apprehended. The prisoner has worked for me as a labourer.

JOHN EVANS . I have known the prisoner eight or nine years. I bought the chaise in question of him, and that was the chaise I lent to Major Nalleker . The prisoner told me he had bought it to break up. When I saw it, I found it very much broken, and in a very dirty state, and a great hole in the hind pannel. I gave him three pounds ten shillings for it, which I considered to be the utmost value.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-280

961. SUSAN MURCH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , a pair of drawers, value 2s. four half handkerchiefs, value 3s. and one shirt, value 5s. the property of Theodoret Samuel Clarke ; one pair of pockets, value 1s. two pieces of linen, value 1s. one bolster case, value 1s. and one towel, value 6d. the property of Eliza Frances Clarke ; two two shirts, value 6s. and two pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of Thrasycles Clarke .

THEODORET SAMUEL CLARKE. The prisoner came to my service on the 22nd of February last, and left me on the 29th of August. I turned her away in consequence of very abusive language, and she left her box behind her. Having reason to suspect I had been robbed, I examined her box, and found some of these things, and the duplicates for the remainder.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-144

962. RICHARD WEBBE and THOMAS WILLET were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , five live tame ducks, value 5s. the property of John King .

JOHN KING . I lost my fowls on the 28th of July. In consequence of information I went up to Spitalfields watch-house, and there I found the ducks, and knew them to be mine.

JOHN BARRS. I am inspector of the watch, and stopped the prisoners about ten minutes after twelve at night, in company together. Webbe had the property.

WILLET, NOT GUILTY .

WEBBE, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-145

963. MICHAEL WAYLAND and CATHERINE SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , two pair of pantaloons, value 4s. a jacket, value 1s. the property of James Michaels .

JAMES MICHAELS . The prisoner, Catherine Sullivan, asked me to buy a shirt I took her to the bar of a public house, and we had a pot of beer, and I drank part and went out. On my coming in again, I met her in the doorway with a bundle. I took her back to the bar again and took the bundle from her. I opened it and missed my frilled shirt; that was one I had bought of her. I asked her what she had done with the shirt; She said she had done nothing with it. I told her she must come into the bar and settle this difference; and as I was going into the bar, the

ran through the second side door; I ran fast after her; I fell down; and she dropped the bundle. The other prisoner was with her, and he picked the bundle up.

WAYLAND, NOT GUILTY .

SULLIVAN, GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-146

964. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , four pieces of ivory, value 3s. sixty-nine table-knives, value 2l. 2s. twenty-four table-forks, value 17s. twelve desert-knives, value 7s. and twelve desert-forks, value 6s. the property of James Prest .

JOHN PAYNE . On the 3rd of August last, a woman came to my shop, and affored some pieces of ivory for sale; I bought them of her for three shillings. Before she went away, I asked her for her name and address, which she gave me, and I afterwards found she was the prisoner's wife. I went afterwards to the Swan public-house in the Strand, where she really did live. We took the prisoner into custody. Some duplicates were found on her.

GEORGE GLOVER . I produce twelve knives and twelve forks, pledged by the prisoner.

JOHN HUGHES . I produce three parcels of knives, pledged at different times; there are forty-five altogether, and twenty-four forks.

JAMES PRIEST. The property produced by the two pawnbrokers is mine.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined two years , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-147

965. MARY ANN STENT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , a silk handkerchief, value 5s the property of Michael Bryan .

MICHAEL BRYAN I lost my handkerchief on the 22nd of August. The prisoner followed me out of the place where I slept, and asked me to give her my bundle to carry, and I said I could carry it myself. She followed me into a public-house, and I gave her some beer, and she asked to carry my bundle again; I let her; and when I got my bundle to my lodging, I missed the handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-148

966. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a pair of trowsers, value 7s. the property of Andrew Campbell .

JOSEPH CAMPBELL. In consequence of information, I went out, and missed a pair of trowsers from the door; I immediately pursued the prisoner, to whom my attention was directed, and I overtook him with the trowsers in his possession. I gave him into the custody of Brown, the police officer.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined one year , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-149

967. JOHN ROBINSON and JOHN ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , a pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d. the property of Robert Brand .

ANN BRAND . The two prisoners came into the shop both together, on the 12th of September, at eleven o'clock; Robinson asked for a pair of shoes; he was very troublesome in fitting, and I saw Allen cramming something into his bosom. I looked in his bosom, and saw a pair of shoes with the heels upwards. I took them from him, and called my husband, as I thought he had more in his bosom. Before my husband could come, he ran away; Robinson sat quietly in the chair.

ABRAMAM JOEL. I went after him, and brought him back; and he threw the shoes away; I am sure he is the man.

ROBINSON. GUILTY , aged 44.

ALLEN, GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-150

968. WILLIAM PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , five pounds weight of bacon, value 3s. the property of Thomas Gammage .

THOMAS GAMMAGE. About half past seven in the evening of the 7th of August, I saw the prisoner come to my shop window, and make three attempts at the piece of bacon. I saw him take this piece of bacon, and I immediately came up to him, and took him.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-151

969. BENJAMIN MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , a live tame fowl, value 2s. the property of William Jordan .

WILLIAM JORDAN . I saw the prisoner take this fowl; he put his hand in his pocket, and then put it down towards the fowl, and coaxed it towards him, and then caught hold of it. He had a partner who ran away, and I ran after the prisoner, and found the fowl on him.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-152

970 WILLIAM MUNROE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , a hat, value 12s. a pelisse, value 2s. a petticoat, value 1s. a handkerchief, value 6d. and a coat, value 2s. 6d. the property of Michael Connelly .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-153

971. JOHN M'DERMOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August a pair of iron springs, value 20s. the property of Samuel Stanton .

SAMUEL STANTON . I saw the prisoner going down the hill with these springs on his shoulder.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-154

972. JAMES LYONS and EDWARD DIXON

were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , a silver tea-spoon, value 3s. the property of John Kingston esq .

CHARLES MIDDLETON . On the 10th of August, I came into the servant's-hall, and saw two boys run up the area steps; I saw that the window had been lifted up, and that a tea-spoon had been taken from the window. I suspected the two boys, and I went to the end of the street, and saw them in Hanover-square . I went up to them, and challenged them with having been in the area. While I was talking to them, a boy came up with the tea-spoon, and asked if it belonged to me; he said, that the prisoner Lyons had deposited it under a stone.

ROBERT CLARKE . I live with my uncle, a bricklayer. On the day in the indictment, between ten and eleven, I was coming through Hanover-square, and saw the prisoner Lyons, stoop down, and put something into a hole under a stone. I went over, and stooped down, and took it up; it was the spoon, and seeing this gentleman go up to the boys, I went up to him, and gave him the spoon.

LYONS, GUILTY , aged 13.

DIXON, GUILTY , aged 12.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-155

973. GEORGE COWEN was indicted for embezzlement .

THE same witnesses were called as on the former indictment against this prisoner, and gave similar testimony; it being the same Jury, they found him

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-156

974. WILLIAM SLADE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , a carpet; value 10s. the property of Charles Augustus Tulk .

SAMUEL HUGHES . I keep the One Tun, Old Brentford. On the 28th of June last, a person named John Short brought a carpet to my house, at about half past six in the morning, carried it by my tap-room door, and pitched it in my back premises. When I went backwards, I discovered this carpet just as it is now.

JOHN SHORT. I am a shoemaker, and live at Brentford. I look at that carpet; I carried it to the house of the last witness. Slade the prisoner gave it to me, and asked me to be so good as to sell it for him; he and I had been soldiers together in the same regiment; he told me it was his property. After that the landlord sent for a constable, and I was detained; and as soon as I was detained, I said where I had got it, and the prisoner was apprehended, and acknowledged that what I said was true.

JAMES GOOD. I am a gardener to the prosecutor. I learned that this carpet was found; it was taken from my master's house at Marble Hall, Twickenham . The prisoner had been employed about the premises, white washing . We did not miss this carpet for a long time after it turned out to have been stolen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined two months and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-157

975 JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , two pounds weight of butter, value 18d. and a plate, value 1d. the property of Frances Charge , widow .

FRANCES CHARGE . I went into my yard on the day in the indictment, to put my tubs away; and the officer came into the shop, and when I went to him, he asked me if I had lost anything; and I immediately missed this plate of butter.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am a patrole. On the 25th of July, I saw the prisoner in company with two other boys in St. John-street; they walked up and down before Mr. Charge's shop several times, and at last the prisoner went in, and brought something out in his apron, and I immediately went over the way, and took him; it was a lump of butter in a plate; I asked him where he got it, and he said he had it given to him.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-158

976. ANN JUSTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , a chain, value 1s. 6d. the property of Cornelius Norris .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-159

977. CHARLES HARWOOD and WILLIAM TWEEDLE were indicted for stealing, a pair of shoes, value 1s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a pair of gaiters, value 1s. a handkerchief, value 6d. a waistcoat, value 1s. a jacket, value 2s. a hat, value 1s. and four shillings and sixpence in monies numbered, the property of William Ackers , from his person .

WILLIAM ACKERS. I had been out to drink on Friday night of the 2nd of August, and I went to sleep in the street. and when I awoke I found myself stripped of these things, and my money taken from me; I afterwards saw my jacket exposed to sale. Harwood on being apprehended had my hat, and Tweedle my shoes and gaiters.

HOWARD LEWIS . The prisoners came into my shop on Saturday morning the 3rd of August; the prisoner Tweedle had the jacket on, and he said he wanted to exchange it for another, and to have something to boot; and I gave him an old jacket, worth one and sixpence, and one and sixpence to boot. To a wearer the jacket might be worth four shillings and sixpence.

HARWOOD, NOT GUILTY .

TWEEDLE, GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-160

978. LAWRENCE HEPWORTH and JAMES LAWES were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , forty eight pounds weight of cotton, value 8l. the property of Collin Douglas , and George Haynes .

CHARLES EDWARDS . I am a servant to the prosecutors,

who are candlewick cotton manufacturer s. In consequence of some information, I received directions to watch if Hepworth came to the manufactory. On the morning of the day in the indictment, I saw him come about seven o'clock; Lawes was a warehouseman in our manufactory. Hepworth had a bag with him when he went into the warehouse, and when he came out, that bag had something in it; it was quite bulky; I don't know where Lawes was that morning, but it was his duty to be in the warehouse at that time. I communicated this circumstance to the foreman, Cowley, and we followed Hepworth to Battle Bridge, We then went up to him, the bundle was on his shoulder; it did not appear to be very weighty. I asked him what he had got there, and he said cotton, from Mr. Duck, in Golden-lane; he said that there was some more ordered, but he had not the bill with him. We then told him we would go to Mr. Ducks with him, but he refused to carry the bundle, and he threw it off his shoulder. We then went to Mr. Ducks, and he said he knew nothing of the cotton nor the prisoner. The prisoner then said we might have the cotton.

WILLIAM COWLEY . I have heard the account of the last witness; as far as I am concerned it is a true account.

WILLIAM DUCKS. I am a tallow chandler in Golden-lane. I know the prisoner Hepworth; I never desired him to bring me any cotton.

HEPWORTH, GUILTY , aged 41.

LAWES, GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-161

979. RICHARD BREWER was indicted for that he, on the 28th of March , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain bill of exchange , of which is as follows, (that is to say,)

"London, March 20th, 1813.

"12l. 9s. 3d.

"Two months after date, pay to me, or my order, twelve pounds nine shillings and three pence, for value received of,

"Signed FRANCES FRANKLIN .

"To MR. WILLIAM HALLSTON ,

"Blackheath."

FIFTH COUNT. Charged the prisoner with forging an acceptance to the like bill of exchange, which acceptance is as follows,

"Accepted WILLIAM HALLSTON ,

"Payable at Peele's Coffee House,

"Fleet-street, London."

With intention to defraud Charles Cokill , against the statute.

IN this Case, the prosecutor so often contradicted himself in his testimony, that the prosecution was discontinued.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-162

980. DANIEL GARCIA was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , a snuff-box, value 50l. the property of John Sauvayre , from his person .

JOHN SAUVAYRE. I was handing a lady to her carriage from the Opera House , on the night in question. I felt something at my pocket, and on feeling, I immediately missed my snuff-box; it was a tortoiseshell one gold mounted, for which I paid sixty-five guineas. As soon as I perceived it was gone, I turned round immediately, and saw the prisoner trying to get off, just by the horses; he was making from me, and before I laid hold of him, there was another put before, who asked me what I wanted; he pushed himself before me, and said, what do you want, what do you want; I said you are not the man; I want that rascal just before you. I then sprang forward and collared the prisoner. I told him you have my snuff box; he denied it, and tried to get away; but I would not let him go; I held him fast. I brought him to an ale house just opposite, and delivered him to a watchman. As soon as ever I collared him, the other man set off running. There was no person near me when I turned round and missed my box but the prisoner. My snuff box has been recovered.

THOMAS GRIFFITH. I am a watchman. About half past four, before daybreak, on Sunday morning, my partner and I saw the snuff box in the kennel, opposite the Opera-house. That box was claimed by Mr.Sauvayre. We advertised it.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night, I was going to Hyde Park Corner to wait for the strawberries coming in from Isleworth for my brother, who keeps a fruit shop in Great Turnstile Holborn; and very near the top of the Haymarket , this gentleman stopped me and accused me of taking his snuff box, and I am as innocent as the child unborn; and unfortunately this happens to be our whitefast, and our people cannot come forward to give me a character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-163

981. JOHN BISHOP was indicted for stealing, a hat, value 25s. the property of William Levett , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM LEVETT. I left my shop about three minutes, and returning, I met the prisoner with this hat; I had left my shop open, and it was about a quarter after seven in the morning. I missed two hats when I returned to my shop, and an accomplice of the prisoner got off with the other. I gave the prisoner in charge of an officer.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-164

982. CHARLES PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , two hundred and sixty pounds weight of lead, value 30l. the property of William Harland .

In this case it appeared, that the prisoner was lessee of the premises, and he urged in his defence, that he was repairing the premises.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-165

983. JOHN FREEMAN , WILLIAM WELLS , and GEORGE WELLS , were indicted for stealing, two live tame ducks, value 4s. and six live tame ducks, value 12s. the property of John Power .

ROBERT SHEARMAN . On Sunday morning about six o'clock, I was called up and informed, that there were three or four men with a bag of fowls; I went after them, and saw the prisoners on Bow Common; I apprehended Freeman; he had the bag; he said it contained fowls; I found it had six fowls, and two ducks dead, and two live geese in it; the ducks and fowls were just warm. He said he did not steal the geese, but the two Wells's gave them to him. When I apprehended him, the two Wells ran away. I shewed the property to the prosecutor, and he owned the fowls and the ducks.

FREEMAN, GUILTY , aged 18.

WILLIAM WELLS , GUILTY , aged 21.

GEORGE WELLS, GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-166

984. MARY SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a cap, value 3d. a hat, value 4s. and a gown, value 4s. 6d. the property of Mary Gummings , spinster .

MARY CUMMINGS . These things were taken from my lodgings; the prisoner lodged in the same room. I got up as usual at four o'clock in the morning of the 7th of March, and I know I left my things safely locked up. When I returned that morning about eight o'clock, I found the prisoner gone. I found my box broken open, and all my property was taken.

JOHN COOPER . I am a constable. I found the property in the prosoner's room.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18160918-167

985. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on on the 14th of August , twenty-two yards of printed cotton, value 1l. 5s. the property of Richard Powel .

SIDNEY STRONG . I am apprentice to the prosecutor; on the 14th of August, this cotton was outside the door, and I received some information from a young woman, in consequence of which I went out and missed the cotton, and saw the prisoner running with something in his apron; I pursued him, and he was stopped.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Judgment respited.

Reference Number: t18160918-168

986. THOMAS GAMBLE was indicted for steal- on the 8th of July , eighteen live tame fowls, value 30s. and two pewter measures, value 1s. the property of John Matthews .

THOMAS GRENVILLE . I am a watchman; I stopped the prisoner in Bunhill Row, on the morning of the 11th of July, about four o'clock with this property on him.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-169

987. JOHN HOFFSEMMER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , a violin, value 20s. and a violin bow, value 1s. the property of Thomas Taylor .

THOMAS TAYLOR . I have the misfortune to have lost my sight, and I play on the violin for a livelihood . On the 25th of July, I had been playing at the King's Arms, in Old Gravel-lane , and I left my violin in the bar, under the care of the landlord. I left the house between seven and eight, and when I returned on the morrow morning, my violin was missing.

GEORGE BREADEN . I am landlord of the King's Arms. This boy left the violin in the bar; I saw it in the prisoner's hands as he was coming out of the bar with it. He said he was going to take it into the room, instead of which he went off with it, as we afterwards found out.

JAMES LOVE . On the 25th of July, the prisoner brought a fiddle to me to pledge. I asked him to sell it; but he said he would not part with it for any money, and he should take it out the next morning.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-170

988. JOHN CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , one pound five ouces of tobacco, value 7s. 6d , the property of Alexander Gordon .

ALEXANDER GORDON. In consequence of suspicion, I placed myself in a dark cellar adjoining the warehouse, and after about twenty minutes the prisoner came down. Then he went and tied the tobacco in question up, and let down his breeches and put the tobacco in; then he went on working until I came out of the place where I was concealed; and whon he was going away, I stopped him, and charged him with having stolen this tobacco, but he denied it. I told him it was no use to deny it, for I had been in such a place and had watched him, and then he took it out and acknowledged it.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined two months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-171

989. JOHN COLVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , a sheet, value 4s. the property of Ocavius Augustus Sawyer .

JOHN LEE. I am servant to Mr. Sawyer; the prisoner was a lodger in his house, and this sheet was on a bed in the room where the prisoner lay; but not on the bed he slept in. I missed the sheet on the 7th in the morning. An officer came in and asked if we had lost a sheet; we told him we had. It was marked all over, "Sawyer, Wingfield-street , stop the bearer."

THOMAS JONES . The prisoner wanted to sell this sheet to me; but I knew it must have been stolen by the stamp, and I gave him in charge of an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. In distress

GUILTY , aged 49.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-172

990. RICHARD BOLD was indicted for stealing,

on the 10th of August , a gold brooch, value 5s. and a shirt pin, value 5s , the property of George Ward .

GEORGE WARD , On the night of the 10th of August, before I went to bed. I put my brooch and breast pin in a cushion on my dressing table. They were both gold. About ten o'clock, Mr. Armstrong told me a person wanted to see me on very particular business. In consequence of that, I ordered that the person might he shewn up stairs, It was the prisoner. He begged my pardon for disturbing me; but said he was going out of town, and had not sufcient money to pay for his stage. He said he had not any one to resort to but me, and in consequence of that, I lent him one pound. He then went away. When I got up the next morning I missed the property in question. It was then about eight o'clock, and there had been nobody in the room all night but the prisoner. I communicated what bad happened to Mr. Tuck, and about a week after I had the prisoner apprehended.

JOHN TUCK . I keep the cock in the Haymarket, In consequence of something Mr. Ward communicated to me, I apprehended the prisoner at the Feathers public-house; I thought the prisoner was charged with a capital felony, for obtaining money under a threat of an unnatural offence. The prisoner said I was no officer, and I said, I was not; but I considered that I had a right to take him on such a charge. I understood that charge to be from Mr. Ward, that the prisoner had insinuated to him a charge of a certain nature, and thereby induced him to give him money. We sent for an officer. The prosecuter never mentioned any thing about the pin or brooch then. He afterwards did in the afternoon. The prisoner struggled to get away. I said he should not go; and I said I would put him into a hackney coach, and take him to Bow-street. While the coach was gone for, he broadly charged Mr. Ward with the grossest of offences, and said that this money was the wages of it. Mr. Ward did not then say any thing about the pin or brooch. Afterwards when the coach came, the prisoner begged Mr. Ward's pardon, and stated that all he had urged was false; there were a number of persons of the Prince's household in my house at the time and they all concided in my idea that the prisoner ought to go to Bow-street. The charge was positively that of extorting money, and that was the only charge which was then made against the prisoner. We then took him to Bow-street, and there the brooch came out. On relating the time to the magistrate about the money being procured, he considered from what the prosecutor said, that it was lent, and the magistrate considered that the capital charge would fail.

JOSEPH ARMSTRONG. I am landlord of the house in which the prosecutor lodged. I recollect the prisoner coming to my house on the night of the day in the indictment, at about ten o'clock; he said he wanted to see the prosecutor on very urgent business, and wished to see him; I told him the prosecutor was in bed. He then said, be must see him if possible. I went up, and told Mr. Ward that Mr. Bold wanted him; at first Mr. Ward did not seem to know him; but at last he said, if he wanted any thing in particular, he must come up he supposed. I shewed him up accordingly; I went away immediately, leaving him in Ward's bed-room; it might be three quarters of an hour that he was there. He did not go until I called out that I wanted to go to bed, and I wished the gentleman to go. Mr. Ward then answered and said he is going immediately; and immediately after that he did go. Mr. Ward went out of Town the next morning after breakfast. The prisoner called twice after that; he called on the Tuesday; and on the Sunday; when he called on the Sunday he was extremely insolent, and insisted upon seeing Mr. Ward, through I told him he was not at home; he insisted that he was at home; in point of fact he was not. At last, I sent for a constable, and then the prisoner left. Before Mr. Ward went out of Town in the morning, he did not say any thing about having lost a brooch or a pin. I told him on his return, how insolently the prisoner had behaved on the Sunday. Mr. Ward did not then say that he had lost any brooch or pin. He seemed very much agitated, and said he would have him taken up.

MARY BYRNE. The prisoner lodged in my house for three weeks. He brought me a pin and a ring and said they had been made a present to him by a gentleman; he said he did not want such things, and I might have them for a pound; I told him I had a friend who might like to buy them; I would shew them to her, and if she did not like them, I would return them to him. I afterwards delivered the property to Mr. Smith, at the police office.

Mr. Ward. Re-examined. Q. Upon your oath, did the prisoner take it without your knowledge - A.Upon my oath he did.

Q. Then how came you not to mention it - A. I did not mention it.

Q. And how came you to tell us that which is totally inconsistent that you lent this man twenty shillings - A. I did lend him twenty shillings, with a promise that he would pay me again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-173

991. GEORGE NEWPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , a gown, value 5s. the property of Matthew Smith , from the person of Christiana Smith .

CHRISTIANA SMITH. I was coming up Redcross-street, and the prisoner asked me if I would go of an errand for him, and I said I would; and he said it was to take his compliments to his brother, and bring a bottle of blacking and his box, and he told me to mind and not spill the blacking over the clothes; he directed me to a public-house where to go to; he took the gown out of my lap, and when I went into the public-house the people all laughed at me, and when I came out again to the top of Wood-street , the prisoner was gone.

JANE SMITH . I sent this little girl with this gown. On the 18th I saw it exposed for sale in Grubb-street; I asked the price of it, and they asked eight shillings. While we were talking about it, the prisoner went past, and he was pointed out as the person who sold it.

ROBERT COLES . On the 10th of August, the prisoner brought this gown to me to sell; he wanted

seven shillings and sixpence for it, and I gave him five shillings.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-174

992. JOSEPH BROCKBANK and WILLIAM BRADSHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , three handkerchiefs, value. 1s. 6d. the property of persons unknown.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-175

993. THOMAS COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , twenty-seven pounds weight of beef, value 10s. the property of William Stubbings and Benjamin Stubbings .

JOHN ALBERT . I am a watchman. On the 27th of July, in the morning, I was on duty in White-chapel . After the clock struck four, I went down the court where the prosecutor's premises were; the prisoner was talking to one of the prosecutors men. There was only one door in the court, and that was the prosecutors'. I watched, and in the course of about two minutes, the prisoner came up the court again with a bundle under his arm. Upon that he crossed the road instantly, and looked round to see if I was watching him; that gave me a suspicion that all was not quite right; accordingly I apprehended him, and found the beef in question on him.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS. When I saw the beef, I knew it to be mine.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18160918-176

994. JOHN BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , a carpet, value 12s. the property of Edward Williams .

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I lost a carpet on the 9th of August; it stood on a table on the outside of my shop. I saw the prisoner in the act of pulling it away with his apron. I immediately went up stairs, and the prisoner had then got about fifty yards from the shop with the carpet. I pursued him, crying stop thief, and he dropped the carpet.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-177

995. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , a pepper-box, value 10s. the property of Thomas Fossey .

ESTHER FOSSEY . I lost a pepper-box in the latter end of May last, out of our house; it had been in the parlour at the back of the shop. The prisoner had come for a hat, and had been asked into the parlour. After he was gone, it was missed.

JOHN MACHIN. I am a silversmith and jeweller. The prisoner brought this to me for sale; it was very much bruized, and I gave him ten shillings for it.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-178

996. STEPHEN VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , three three-shilling pieces, one dollar, and one shilling and sixpence, the property of William Savage , from his person .

WILLIAM SAVAGE. I got up early in the morning of the 2nd of August, and left the prisoner in bed; he had been a lodger of mine for a week. I left him in bed while I was at work. I had left my breeches under my pillow with this money in my pocket. I was up at work, and the prisoner was still in bed. He got up about a quarter past six, and left the house; and after he was gone, I felt in my pockets, and my money was gone, I went after the prisoner, and I found him about two hundred yards from my house; I charged him with having taken my money, and he denied it. I said I would send for an officer, and while the officer was gone for, he delivered the money up.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-179

998. MARIA MONTAGUE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a shawl, value 15s. the property of Richard Taylor .

ROBERT HAWKES . The prisoner came into our shop on the day in the indictment and wished to see some shawls; she pointed out one which lay behind me; I turned round, but I saw her twisting the shawl in question; she said she had come to buy a shawl for a young woman. The prisoner had bought one, and had paid a pound for it. At last she said never mind, she would not take the shawl she had been looking at, but said the young woman should come herself. She was going, but as I had seen her take the shawl in question, I told her to come back, for she had stolen a shawl; and she then denied it. I told her it was useless for her to deny it, for I had actually seen her take it. I brought her back, and look it from her, and gave her in charge to an officer.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one year , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-180

999. WILLIAM BARLOW , DANIEL HURLEY ,

JOHN SHAW , and JAMES MAHONEY , were indicted

for stealing, on the 26th of August , fifteen fathoms of cable, value 40s. the property of John Till .

WILLIAM JOHNWIN. I am a mariner. I saw the four prisoners at two o'clock on the day in the indictment taking part of the cable from the Dover Castle. A boy waited on the bank on the South side of the City Canal, and assisted the four prisoners; I followed them into the rope ground near Mr. Pritchard's yard at Blackwall, and when I got in I found part of the cable was on the scale being weighed. This cable had been between decks in the Dover Castle. I sent for an officer, and had the prisoner Barlow taken into custody; I asked him how he came to take the cable away, and he said he had deposited some money in a gentleman's hands, and that gentleman had absconded with his money, and he took the cable to make amends. I saw Hurley, cut it up into lengths of five fathems each. The prisoner Barlow was the ship keeper on board the Dover Castle. I don't know what the other three men were; they had no business in the ship at all; they all carried it into the rope round.

JOSEPH MURDOCH . I am clerk in the East India Docks . The prisoner Barlow was on board the Dover Cattle, as ship-keeper , and I considered him as a responsible man. This cable had originally belonged to the Eliza, and was on board the Dover Castle under the care of Barlow, for safely.

HURLEY, NOT GUILTY .

SHAW, NOT GUILTY .

MAHONEY, NOT GUILTY .

BARLOW, GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-181

1000. ELIZABETH BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , nine shillings and sixpence, the property of William Smallwood , from his person .

WILLIAM SMALLWOOD. I was coming along Broad-street, St. Giles's , about twelve o'clock at night, and was stopped by the prisoner; she caught hold of me, and I extricated myself from her. The moument she went from me, I missed my money. I pursned her to the corner of George-street, where she made a stop; I don't think that she suspected I was following her; but she turned her head, and saw me close behind her; and speaking rather sharp, said, are you going home; I told her I was, but that she was not. I immediatley called a watchman, and the prisoner was taken to the watchhouse; they there asked me what I had lost, and I told them, a half crown, and six or seven shillings besides. She was searched, and that money was found rolled up in the corner of her shawl, which she held in her hand.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-182

1001. THOMAS COPE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , five yards of lace, value 2s. the property of John Pearl .

JOHN PEARL. In the morning of the day in the indictment, about half past seven, I heard a cry of stop thief; I immediately went into the shop, and found the shop window broken, and the lace in question gone.

WILLIAM WORTHINGTON. I saw the prisoner in this street; there were two other men with him, they ran off, and the young man came out of the shop, and cried stop thief, and ran after them. This prisoner ran up Castle-Street, and he was caught in Wells-street; I am certain that the prisoner was one of them.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-183

1002. MARY CONNOR and ANN RYMER was indicted for steeling, on the 20th of August , a watch, value 5l. a key, value 6d. and a piece of ribbon, value 1d. the property of William Church , from his person .

WILLIAM CHURCH . I lost my watch on the 13th of August, between one and two o'clock at night, in Piccadilly . I was going along talking to a woman named Caroline Marshall , and Connor came up and said she would go with me for six-pence. I went with her up the court, and was talking to her for about a minute, and she drew the watch but of my pocket. I said, damn you, madam, you have got my watch. She went away; I went after her, and she shifted it from her right hand to her left, and then gave it to Rymer. That is all I know of it; I never found the watch again.

CAROLINE MARSHALL . I was walking with this young man, and he told me he would give me a sixpence, and I told him I would not do any thing of the kind. He went with Mary Connor; she handed his watch to Rymer, and she gave it to some of the other girls.

CONNOR, GUILTY , aged 30.

RYMER, GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-184

1003, JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , a jacket, value 20s. a pair of trowsers, value 20s. a jacket, value 20s, a watch, value 5l. three seals, value 5l. a key, value 5s. three knives, value 1s. 6d. a hat, value 5s. a comb, value 6d. and nineteen shillings in monies numbered , the property of James Field .

JAMES FIELD. I am mate to the ship Jane ; these things were stolen out of my chest by my bed side, in the course of the night of the 18th of July. I cannot say at what time. I missed them in the morning when I got up.

FRANCIS JACKSON. I apprehended the prisoner; he was discharged by mistake, after the last sessions. I apprehended him. I found the property on him.

(property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-185

1004. JAMES GILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 20s. the property of Joseph Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH. This cotton was taken away out of my shop, on the 8th of August, between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I was in the parlour when it was taken. I heard the cry of stop thief, and when I got to the door, some man flung a piece of print into my arms. I recollect that that piece of print had been upon the counter at six o'clock.

ROBERT SHEARMAN. I am an officer. I keep a green grocers shop opposite Mr. Smith's, about a quarter past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner walk into the prosecutor's shop about three or four feet, and take the piece of print in question, and put it under his coat. I immediately ran towards him, and he dropped it. Some person picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Smith. I pursued the prisoner, and took him.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18160918-186

1006. ANDREW HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , a jacket, value 1s. 6d. the property of Joseph Felix ; and a saucepan, value 1s. the property of Robert Brown .

JOSEPH FELIX. I belong to the Malabar East India-man , and my jacket and this saucepan were taken from the ship, This saucepan was the property of Mr. Brown, the owner of the ship.

JOHN HEBBERT. I am a watchman of the City Canal , about half past eight in the evening of the 27th of August; I met the prisoner. on the Canal Bank, with this jacket and the saucepan in his possession; I asked him where he was going, and he said he was going to the tinman to get a saucepan new tinned; I asked him the name of his ship, and he gave me the name of a ship that I am sure there was no such in the Canel. I told him he must come back, and shew me the ship; he took me from ship to ship for about half a mile, and then I found he was wrong; then I told him to deliver himself to me as a prisoner; when I said that word, he made a blow at my head with the saucepan, and hit me in the mouth with my carbine, and then he ran away. I pursued, and overtook him, and when I got up to him, he began to ill use me again, and in about ten minutes I got some assistance, and secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. They said as there was a very fierce dog on board this ship, and that I could not fetch anything out of the Galley: and I said come, I will lay you a wager of a gallon of beer, that I go and fetch something if the dog he ever so fierce, because I knew how to manage any dog whatever; and I went and fetdhed this jacket and sancepan, and this man stopped me. I had very good clothes on me, I wanted no old jacket like this, and is it likely I should thieve such a thing as a saucepan; no to be sure not, for it was no use to me; besides, I am a very good character, and have always bore a good reputation, never was accused of being a thief before in my life.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined three months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-187

1007. JOHN MOONEY and THOMAS KENT were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , eight pounds weight of mutton, value 4s. one fowl, value 4s, and half a pound weight of butter, value 6d. the property of Ann Dashwood , spinster .

MARY HOWE . These things were taken on the 25th of August, a Sunday morning; out of a safe in the front area.

JOHN BROOKS, About five in the morning, of the 25th of August, I was called by a private watchman, named George Hughes; he told me that he saw a leg of mutton handed up out of the prosecutrix's area, and he was sure there was a man in the area; upon that I sprang my rattle, on which more watchmen came up to my assistence; upon which the lady put her head out of the window, and asked what was the matter, and on being told, she came down and opened the door herself. We went down into the area, and found the prisoner Mooney in the vault in the area. The other went off with the mutton.

ALEXANDER GALDWELL. I am a watchman. When the rattle spring. I saw the prisoner Kent run away; and we went down to search the vaults, and brought the other prisoner up.

GEORGE DUKE . I saw the prisoner Kent take a leg of muttion from some person down the area, in consequence of which, I informed the second witness, and he made an alarm.

MOONEY, GUILTY , aged 21.

KENT, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-188

1008. MARY REARDON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , three glass-cloths, value 1s. a yard of flannel, value 9d. the property of Sir James Graham , bart .

ALICE FORCE. I am house-keeper to Sir James Graham. The prisoner slipped down our kitchen stairs, and complained that she had hurt her back; she had come to bring some work home. I left her to go into my room for a milk-pot, and when I came back, I found her with the glass-clothes in her hand.

I immediately suspected she had been to my drawers, and accused her of it. I detained her while I sent for her master, and then we sent for a constable, and found this property on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-189

1009. ANN SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , a shift, value 2s. a bed-gown, value 1s. a cap, value 6d. gown, value 2s. and a towel, value 6d. the property of James Dunn .

SUSANNAH DUNN . My husband is a mariner . I lost this property while I was confined. The prisoner came after a lodging in my house; she lodged with me four weeks all but a day. After she was gone, I found the duplicates of some of these things in a box under her bed.

GEORGE GILLET. I took in a gown, a towel, and a child's shirt from the prisoner, on the 16th, 18th, and 19th of July.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them with the consent of the prosecutrix, when I was in the greatest distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-190

1010. ANN SIMMONS was again indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , a shirt, value 6s. the property of Edward Flower .

EDWARD FLOWER. My wife took the prisoner into my house for charity, and persuaded me to let her be until she could get a place. I consented, and on the day, in the day in the indictment, I asked the prisoner to look for a particular duplicate in one of the drawers, as I could not read myself. That duplicate was not forth coming. The next thing I missed was my shirt, that I wanted to put on, on the Sunday; the prisoner told me she had put it out to wash, as she could not do it. At last I found that she had pawned it at Mr. Gillet's.

GEORGE GILLET . I took this shirt in pawn from the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-191

1011. JOHN TILL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a tea-caddy, value 4s. a pair of pantaloons, value 7s. and a suit of child's clothes, value 10s. the property of John Richards .

ELIZA SAVALL . I came down stairs and let the prisoner in; he brought another man with him, and I would not let him in. The prisoner said he would not go up stairs, but he would lie down there for the night. He asked me to get him a drink of water, and when I opened the door to chuck some dirty water out, I saw the other man still at the door. I shut the door, and went into the kitchen, and then went up stairs to bed again. Every thing was fastened when I went to bed, and it was impossible the door could be opened from the outside. In the morning the doors were unbolted, and this property was gone. Nobody could have opened the door but the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-192

1012. ELIZABETH BUTT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , a pair of gown-sleeves, value 2s. five remnants of lace, value 6s. a towel, value 6d. a brooch, value 2s. five caps, value 10s. and two pair of ear-rings, value 7s. the property of Samuel Backler .

FRANCES COLLIER , When I left school, I was put under the care of Mrs. Backler. Mrs. Backler accused me of taking this lace, and I was advised to make every inquiry possible about it. The prisoner's sister lived servant with Mrs. Backler, and the prisoner used to chair for Mrs. Backler. We had a search warrant, and I went with a Bow-street officer to apprehend the prisoner. We found part of the property in her drawer, and duplicates for the rest.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-193

1013. CATHERINE STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , a napkin, value 1s. a piece of ribbon, value 6d. the property of John O'Donnell ; and a pint pot, value 1d. the property of John Chivers .

WILLIAM WEBBE . I found this pint pot in the prisoner's room, and I found the duplicate of the napkin. I also found these two keys, which unlock all Mrs. O'Donnell's drawers.

GEORGE LAWRENCE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a napkin, which I took in pawn from Mrs. Stewart.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-194

1014. SOLOMON LYON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a handkerchief, value 3s. the property of a person unknown.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-195

1015. JOHN THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

CHARLES LEWIS . I have known the prisoner for some time; he was a school-fellow of mine. I met him in September, in the last year. I asked him a question about his having left his employment so early; and he said, he was in the employ of the Excise, in Fenchurch-street, and that his business was done for the day. I expressed myself that it would be a good thing for a young man to get into such an employment. He asked me if I knew any person who was acquainted with the Commissioners of Excise; I told him no. He said he knew a person of the name of Longmore who had a considerable interest with the commissioners of Excise, but he was a very mercenary man. I inquired what that person would require as a renumeration for exerting

his interest to obtain a similar situation; he said he did not know; but he would make inquiries, and we pacted for that time. Next time I saw him he shewed me a note; I think that note was signed "B.R.L." and the substance of that note was "he would get the situation for two guineas. I expressed my surprize, that only so small a sum should be required, and Thompson explained it that he was personally intimate with this "B.R.L." and that be had induced him to take that small sum, as a favour to him, the prisoner. I wrote to the Commissioners, and this business was discovered.

JOHN RAWLINSON PAYNE. I belong to the Board of Excise. The prisoner was an extra-warehouseman , and clerk in the employment of the Excise. I have a letter from Mr. Cobbe, and I believe it to be his hand-writing.

JAMES COBBE . I am Secretary to the Board of Excise. The prisoner could not procure any one a situation under the Excise; nor do I know any one of the name of Longmore, who had any interest that could procure such a situation.

GUILTY .

Confined six months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-196

1016. ELIZA DILLON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , from the person of Robert Snellin , a handkerchief, value 4s. and a one-pound bank note, his property .

ROBERT SNELLIN. On the evening in question, I had been to the Elephant and Castle, and I saw a crowd in Holborn, and followed it to the watchhouse. Then the prisoner came out of the watchhouse, and asked me to come and have something to drink. I went to Cribb's wine-vaults . We had a glass of liquor a piece to drink. I took out my handkerchief, and put it on my knee, and she put it into her pocket, before my face; I asked her for it immediately, and she told me to hold my tongue; and after that, we came out; we then walked down Southampton-buildings; there I insisted upon having my handkerchief; she said she had not got it, and she supposed it was at Cribb's wine-vaults. I went back to see if it was, and it was not. I returned, and told her so; she had then got as far as Chancery-lane, where she turned down. I kept talking to her, and asking her for my handkerchief, and at last she put her hand into my left hand breeches pocket, and took out a one-pound note and several shillings. I called the watch, who took her into custody.

WILLIAM GALLAND . I took the prisoner; she denied having the man's property. I asked her to open her hand, that we might see what was in it; she would not allow me; she forced her hand from me, and pushed it under; I pulled her arm back, and found the one-pound note; she dropped it. The handkerchief we could not find.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined one year , and fined ls .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-197

1017. WILLIAM STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , a silk handkerchief, value 4s. the property of Christian Bohn , from his person .

CHRISTIAN BOHN. On the 22nd of July last, I was in Rosemary-lane on my way home, when a person told me my pocket was picked; I felt my pocket, and my handkerchief was missing. The prisoner was pointed out to me, as he was running, and I immediately pursued after him, crying stop thief.

MARY ANN HAWKINS. I saw the prisoner do this, and informed the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined two Years , and whipped

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-198

1018. SARAH REESON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , a purse, value 6d. two dollars, and a eighteen penny-piece, the property William Hodges , from his person .

WILLIAM HODGES. I felt something at my pocket, and I clapped my hand down, and said, bless me, why you have robbed me; and immediately she ran from me about a hundred yards before I overlook her, and then I gave her in charge to the watchman; she denied having the money, but the watchman got it back.

WILLIAM KAY. I am the watchman. I told the prisoner it was best to give the money up; and she said she had not got it, though she owned she knew where it was; she took me back to find it, and after taking me about a quarter of a mile, she stooped down and picked up something, and put it into my hand; it was the leather purse which the prosecutor claimed with the money in it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-199

1019. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a dollar, a three shilling-piece, three eighteen penny-pieces, and two shillings, the property of Thomas Tapling , from his person .

THOMAS TAPLING. The prisoner came up to me, and laid hold of me; she said she wanted some gin. I felt something come from my pocket, which was the prisoners hand. I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my money; I immediately caught hold of the prisoner, and said, you have robbed me; I immediately took hold of her hand, and some of the money was in it, and the rest she let fall. I immediately called out for the assistance of an officer.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-200

1020. WILLIAM HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , a shawl, value 2s. 6d. a counterpane, value 4s. 6d. a hat, value 7s. and a frock, value 1s. the property of James Stevens .

CHARLOTTE STEVENS . I lost these things between five and six weeks ago. I quitted my house for about a quarter of an hour on the day in the indictment, and on my return, my son told me a man had been in and had opened the drawer, I missed

the property in the indictment. I accused the prisoner in consequence of information which I received.

DINAH MOSES . I keep a slop shop. about half past nine in the evening of the day in the indictment, the prisoner came into my shop, and offered me the property in question for sale; I suspected he had not come honestly by it, and I sent for an officer.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-201

1021. JAMES DEVYER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of a person unknown.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . Oa the 17th of August I was coming along the Strand about twelve o'clock, and opposite Northumberland House, I passed three gentlemen, and I saw the prisoner following them; I saw him put his hand into the pocket of one of the gentleman and take out his handkerchief. He was in the act of putting it into his bosom when I seized him. I called the gentleman; he returned back, and wanted me to give him his handkerchief; I told him I could not do that, but if he was a gentleman, he would come back with me to the office, and prosecute the prisoner; he said that was impossible, as he was going to Scotland.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-202

1022. MARY ADAMS and ELIZABETH GOODMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , a watch, value 4l. a chain, value 1l. a seal, value 10s, and a key, value 2s. the property of George Blatherman , from his person .

GEORGE BLATHERMAN. I lost my watch on the 12th of August; I was coming home, when I was stopped by those two girls between eleven and twelve at night; they stopped me, and induced me to go home with them, with which I complied. I went with them to a house in George Row ; Miss Goodman I gave five shillings to instead of going with her; and she seemed to regret the pleasure. more than wishing for the money; and wanted me to engage to stop with her; but I told her I could not. With that Miss Goodman ran away with my watch; I could not follow them quite so quick as they went, but I gave an alarm in the house, and the landlord came up and abused me, saying it was impossible such a thing could have taken place in his house, and I was obliged to retire. I gave information to the officer, and he apprehended the girls in about two days.

ADAMS, NOT GUILTY .

GOODMAN, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-203

1023. SAMUEL TART was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , two saws, value 6s. one square, value 2s. four gimblets, value 2d. one plain, value 2s. one turnscsrew, value 6d. four chissels, value 2s. one hammer, value 1s. one pair of pincers, value 1s. and one basket, value 2s. the property of William Bird .

WILLIAM BIRD . I am a carpenter . I was at work at the Star and Crown in Broad way Westminster . I left my tools in the kitchen, while I went to take up some carpets at a gentleman's house. When I came back, about three o'clock, I missed my tools; I immediately went round to all the pawnbroker's shops, and while I was in one in York-street, the prisoner brought in the tools, and I of course immediately claimed them as my property; and the prisoner was taken into custody.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in York-street. The prisoner came into my shop in the day in the indictment to pledge these tools, just as the prosecutor was describing them.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18160918-204

1021. MARY RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , three handkerchiefs, value 5s. one shirt, value 2s. one waistcoat, value 1s. and one pair of stockings, value 6d. the property of John Statham .

JOHN STATHAM. I lost this property, on the 22nd of July.

PHILLIS STATHAM. I saw a woman coming down our stairs; and I went to look after my property; the prisoner was the woman I saw coming down stairs. I immediately went after her, and found she had sold the shirt for one shillling and sixpence; she had the rest of the property with her; I gave her in charge to an officer.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-205

1025. JOHN KINGSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September, a pair of wooden steps, value 4s. the property of Richard Rosser .

JOSHUA HOBBS . I am a cabinet maker. On the 10th of last month, the prisoner brought them to my work shop, and he said he had bought them in a lot of sundries at a sale as fire wood. He asked me three shillings for them. Mr. Rosser and his foreman came in about half an hour and claimed them. I gave the prisoner half a crown for them. The next day the prisoner passed my shop, and I apprehended him and delivered him into custody.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined six months and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-206

1026. CALLANRON was indicted for stealing, a vellice, value 2s. a brush, value 2d. a feather, value 6d. and a sash value 9d. the property of William Lawler .

WILLIAM LAWLER . I belong to the thirteenth Light Dragoons . These things were stolen on the day in the indictment, from the General Howard, in Chelsea , where I was quartered.

ANN DAY . I saw the prisoner put this property into a bag. I gave information, in consequence of which he was stopped.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-207

1027. JOHN CROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 30s. the property of Simeon Browne .

SAMUEL FRY. On the 9th of August, about five and six in the afternoon, in consequence of an alarm, I ran out to the door, and saw the prisoner making off with this print. It had been cut down from outside the door. I saw the prisoner running with it. I immediately cried stop thief, and he dropped it. He was stopped by Mr. Read, the officer, and I am sure he is the man who dropt the print.

WILLIAM READ . I was in a public house close by, and heard this alarm of stop thief. I immediately ran out, and seeing the prisoner running, I stopped him.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-208

1028. WILLIAM BROWNE was indicted for a larceny .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-209

1029. GRACE MORGAN and MARY ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , a watch, value 2l. a chain, value 1l. a seal, value 10s. and a watch key, value 5s. the property of John Connor , from his person .

JOHN CONNOR . About one o'clock in the morning, of the 22nd of August, I was going down Hackney Road , and met the prisoner Morgan there with a man. I fell into discourse with them. I went into the house with the prisoner Morgan, and the man brought the other prisoner in with him. I fell into a doze; I was very drunk; and when I avoke, I found the prisoner Morgan with her hand under my hat. I had put my watch there. Recollecting it in a minute, I lifted the hat up, and it was gone. I then accused them of taking it, and the man went away. I called the watchman, and gave the prisoners in charge; my watch has never been recovered.

THOMAS EAGLES. On the morning in question, I was on duty at the watch-house, and heard the prosecutor cry to the watchman for assistance, and I went up at the same time. We took the prisoners to the watch-house, and afterwards I went with the prisoner Morgan back by her request, and she put her hand upon the wall up five or six feet high, and took the watch down and gave it to me.

ROSS, NOT GUILTY .

MORGAN GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-210

1030, FRANCIS M'DONALD , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , a handkerchief, value 2d. and seventeen pence farthing in copper monies, the property of Thomas Eagles , from his person .

THOMAS EAGLES. On the 14th of September, I felt something at my pocket, and missed the property in question. In consequence of information, I followed the prisoner and laid hold of him, and found the property on him.

THOMAS IZZARD . I saw the prisoner's companion take this property from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to the prisoner; I immediately informed the prosecutor, and seized the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-211

1031. THOMAS BOUCHER was indicted for assaulting John Perry , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, twenty-five shillings, his property .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-212

1032. RICHARD ATKINS was indicted for stabbing .

No prosecutor appeared.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-213

1033. JOSEPH BENNET was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a counterpane, value 3s. a shawl, value 1l. eight knives, value 2s. eight forks, value 2s. the property of James Butterworth .

JAMES BUTTERWORTH. I missed these things on the day in the indictment. I was going to have a sale of the things. I asked him if he had seen the property, and he denied all knowledge of it. I heard him mention before his wife, being in Skinner-street. At last I found the room where his wife lived, and there I found the shawl. When we were coming back, in Leadenhall-street, a girl put the counterpane into my hand.

WILLIAM STEWART . I am a headborongh; I went with the prosecutor to No. 28, Skinner-street, where we found a shawl. When we told the prisoner we found the shawl there. He said it must be his wife's or daughter's bringing there; that he knew nothing of it.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD. I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-214

1034. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , a mahogany plank, value 30s. the property of Samuel Paynter and John Paynter .

ELIZABETH JAMES . On the day in the indictment, I saw a man come into Mr, Paynter's yard, and take a plank. Soon after I saw the man brought in with the plank, it was the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined three months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-215

1035. JOHN WILLIAM JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , from the person of William Appleby , a ten-pound bank-note, his property .

WILLIAM APPLEBY . I lost this money on board a barge, with the prisoner. I went on board the barge, about two o'clock, and I said I was rather fatigued; and I lay down to go asleep. I had then in my possession two ten-pound notes. I awoke at about twenty minutes after four, and the prisoner then was on board the barge. I missed one of the notes; the prisoner was then with me; I told him I had missed it, and he said, that be damned, for there was nobody there but himself and me, and it could not be done. The Lord Mayor Shewed me the note again, and I knew it by its being the following number to the one I had in my possession.

LEWIS LIVICK. I took a ten-pound note from the prisoner, on the 18th of July; be bought two pairs of speckled cotton stockings from me; he paid me with a ten-pound note.

HENRY TURNPENNY. I apprehended the prisoner. I found on him eight one-pound notes, two pair of stockings in his coat pocket, and one pound eighteen shillings in his watch fob.

William Appleby. I believe that to be my note.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one year , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-216

1036. WILLIAM, alias WILLIAM JAMES BEECHEY , was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE FISHER. I am a butcher, in Newgate-market. On the 19th of July last, I was debtor to Messrs. Hanson and Davis in the sum of eleven pounds odd. I know that check; I paid it to Beechey, the prisoner at the bar, when he came for the money; he demanded the money for Davis and Co. I had known him as their servant for many years.

JOHN MUNDAY . I am cashier clerk to Messrs. Hanson and Dev1s. The prisoner was employed as a clerk to them.

Q. Was it part of his duty to receive money - A. I believe he was merely as a salesman.

Q. Does it appear by your books that he has ever received money while he was there - A. I have known him to call for bills, and I believe I recollect one solitary instance of Mr. Beechey collecting money. It appears by my books that Mr. Fisher was indebte to our house on the day in the indictment in the sum of eleven pounds eight shillings and sevenpence. The prisoner never accounted to me for that sum of money.

BENJAMIN HANSON . I belong to this firm. It was never my intention that the prisoner should collect money for the firm since Mr. Munday has been there; Mr. Munday is our present cashier; he came into our service about February. I did not then notify to the prisoner that he was not to collect any more. It was his business to account of an evening for the sum of money he had received in the course of that day.

ANTHONY WALEON . I am clerk to Robarts and Co. bankers. I look at that check; I paid it; but I don't know to whom; I paid it with a ten-pound note a one-pound note, and the rest in silver and copper.

GUILTY .

Judgement respited.

For the Opinion of the Judges.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-217

1037. SARAH NETTLEFORD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Hodges , about the hour of ten in the night of the 29th of July , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therin, three sheets, value 3s. and a blanket, value 1s. the property of the said Thomas Hodges .

ELIZABETH HODGES. On the 29th of July, we lived in Worship-street . I recollect going out on the evening in question, about half past seven or eight. I did not leave any body in the house; I pulled the street door to with my hand, it is a spring lock, but it did not eatch; the up-stairs door was locked, and I had the key in my pocket. When I came home the up-stairs door was broken open, and the door that was by the fire-place was broken off the hinges. I missed three sheets and a blanket, which were safe when I went out.

RICHARD EVESON. I stopped the prisoner with the property, on the 29th of July, in Worship-street; it was night, and it was about a hundred yards from the prosecutrix's premises.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18160918-218

1038. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting, William Edward Williams , in the King's highway, on the 17th of August , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 2l. a seal, value 10s. and a key, value 6d. his property .

WILLIAM EDWARD WILLIAMS . In the evening of the 17th of August last, I happened to be walking with a young lady in Finsbury-square ; and the prisoner ran up against me with such violence as separated me from the young lady; he seemed staggering as if he were drunk before he came up to me. I immediately missed my watch from my fob, and I directly pursued the prisoner. I called watch, and collared him just as be turned the corner; and never lost sight of him. A struggle took place, and I pulled him to the ground. Then he threw the watch away, and a young man brought the watch; and two or three gentlemen came to my assistance, and the prisoner was secured.

HENRY THORNGATE. The prosecntor said to the prisoner, you have got my watch; I saw them fall together, and I saw the prisoner try to stop the prosecutor calling, by putting his hand upon his mouth; and I saw the prisoner throw the watch away with his right hand.

GUILTY , aged 19,

Of stealing from the person only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham

Reference Number: t18160918-219

1039. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edmund Rolfe , about the hour of two in the night, of the 11th of May , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, forty pairs of boots,

value 20l. and twelve pairs of shoes, value 5l. the property of Thomas Banfield .

THOMAS BANFIELD. On te night in question, my shop was broken open, and the property mentioned in the indictment taken from it.

DAVID BARRATT. I was servant to the prosecutor. I fastened up his shop at a quarter after nine on the 10th of May.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18160918-220

1040. CHARLES LINGUIST , alias ABRAHAM GOODSOME was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , two shirts, value 3l. the property of William Hull , in his dwelling-house .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18160918-221

1041. MICHAEL FORD was indicted for stealing on the 20th of August , one pair of pantaloons, value 10s, one handkerchief, value 8d. and one shirt, value 2s. the property of Oliver Columbia ; one pair of shoes, value 2s. the property of David Stephenson ; and a hat, value 2s. the property of William Couts .

DAVID STEPHENSON. I was coming home at night, about one o'clock, and the prisoner came after me, and asked me if I would let him sleep in the house for the night; I let him come in, but told him we had no bed to spare; he asked me to let him sleep with me, but I said no; then he said never mind that, for he could sleep in the kitchen until morning. I left my shoes underneath the kitchen table and went to bed, leaving him in the kitchen. We did not hear any alarm until between four and five o'clock in the morning; when I got up, I missed my shoes.

PETER COLUMBIA. I looged in this house, an sat up for Stephenson; I saw the prisoner come id with him. I fastened the door, and went to bed; and in the morning I missed my property. On the Saturday following I saw the shirt on the prisoner's back at the police office.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined two years , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18160918-222

1042. JOHN GILL , JOHN BRIAS , and GEORGE MORRIS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Michael Flanery , in the King's Highway on the 21st of August , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a hat, value 3s. and a one-pound bank-note, his property .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-223

1043. JANE HARDING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bowyer , about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 16th of August , no person in the same dwelling-house then and there being, and stealing therein two gowns, the property of the said John Bowyer .

SARAH BOWYER. I locked the door of our room before I went out in the day in the indictment, and on my return, I found it open, and this property gone. I saw the gowns again that night; at Marlborough-street office.

MARY FREEGROVES. I saw the prisoner on the evening of the day in the indictment about five o'clock on the ground floor in this house; I lodge there. She had no business there. I saw the prisoner apprehended in consequence of the information which I gave.

GUILTY , aged 30,

Of Larceny only.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-224

1044. HENRY LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a tea chest, value 3l. the property of Benjamin Palmer , and Thomas Blades , privately in their shop .

BENJAMIN PALMER . On the 16th of July, between twelve and one; I went out, leaving a person in the care of my shop. On my return, I immediately missed the chest. I then wrote my address on several slips of paper, and went round to several pawnbrokers; and in about an hour afterwards, I was sent for to Marlborough-street, where I found my tea chest and the prisoner.

HENRY THOMSON. On the 16th of July, the prisoner came and offered the tea chest in question to me to pawn; I told him it would not suit me to give him above one pound ten shillings for it; upon which the prisoner went away. He had not been gone long, before a person came in with the prosecutor's address. I communicated what had passed. In a short time the prisoner came back again. I sent for an officer and took him into custody.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-225

1045. JAMES GUNNE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , a coat, value 7s. the property of John Nicholl .

AGNES NICHOLL . The prisoner came into our shop with a man, to sell a watch. We did not deal in watches, and I refused to buy it. As the prisoner went out, I recollected seeing something under his coat; but did not see him put it there. I immediately missed the coat, and went after the prisoner, and took it from him.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-226

1046. FRANCIS ROSS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Stephen Bishop , in the King's Highway, on the 26th of August , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2l. a chain, value 1s. a seal, value 1s. and a key, value 3d. the property of Stephen Bishop .

STEPHEN BISHOP . On the 20th of August, about twenty minutes after eleven o'clock at night, I was coming along Holloway-lane, Shoreditch . The prisoner came up to me, and gently put his hand here, and took my watch. It was out of my pocket in an instant. It was a silver watch, and worth about two

pounds, He ran away directly; I turned upon him and called watch; he ran about an hundred yards, when he was stopped by a person who could not hold him; at last he was stopped by a watchman.

EDWARD ANSON. I stopped the prisoner. I took him to the watchhouse; the prosecutor charged him with robbing him of his watch. At last we searched the prisoner, but could not find the watch. I then went back to search the place where I had stopped him. I found the watch put on some tiling over a privy, close against where the prisoner stood when I seized him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 22.

Of Larcey only.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-227

1047. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Scott , about the hour of twelve in the forenoon of the 2nd of August , no person in the same dwelling house then being, and stealing therein, a gown, value 10s. three pair of stockings, value 6s. and a shawl, value 10s. the property of the said Thomas Scott .

SOPHIA SCOTT. At this time we lived in Castle-lane, Westminster ; the landlord lived in the house, and we lodge there. We had these things stolen from us; I missed them on my return after having been out.

BOBERT LEW1S. I am a pawnbroker. This gown which I produce was pledged by the prisoner at the bar, on the 2d of August for three shillings. I am quite certain as to his person. I am quite sure he is the man.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-228

1048. WILLIAM BELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Walker , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, of the 27th of August ; and stealing a pair of snuffers, value 15s. and a snuffer stand, value 10s. the property of Thomas Walker .

ELIZABETH WALKER . My father's name is Thomas. I was at home when this happened. These snuffers were taken from the parlour. About an hour before they were missing, I saw them on the side board. My father keeps a shop ; the shop door is sometimes open; but not always. I saw the prisoner brought back to the gate of our house, and I saw him throw the snuffers down. I picked them up and knew them to be my father's property.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Of larceny only.

Confined one month, and whipped.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-229

1049. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a pair of boots, value 14s. the property of James Powis .

JAMES POWIS . Between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, of the day in the indictment; I stepped out of my shop, next door, to speak to my son; and when I was coming back, I met the prisoner coming out of my shop; I called to him two or three times; but he walked on and made no answer, I then called stop him; he was stopped, and brought back, and the boots were under his coat.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I stopped him and brought him back. The boots were under his coat.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-230

1050. PRISCILLA KIRK was indicted for burglariously breaking the dwelling house of John Cavanaugh , about the hour of eight in the night of the 19th of September , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two sheets, value 20s. the property of the said John Cavanaugh .

JOHN CAVANAUGH . I went out and found the prisoner in custody of a female lodger of mine, and I took her to the watchhouse.

MARY M'GOWAN. I was coming down stairs; I heard some one on the stairs between the club room and the sleeping room; I asked several times who was there, but could receive no answer. I then went down stairs to call Mr. Cavanaugh, and a woman ran down after me, and wanted to pass me at the back door; she had a bundle in her apron, and I stopped her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-231

1051. JOHN EMERY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Magill , about the hour of one in the night of the 9th of August , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, six yards of woolen cloth, value 1l, and one hundred and seventy yards of trimming, value 10s. the property of the said Thomas Magill .

THOMAS MAGILL. These things were drawed throught the area rails out of a window down stairs.

WILLIAM HOPKINS. At about a quarter past twelve at night of the 9th of August, I saw two men in Windmill-street; I watched them up John-street, and along Colville-street, and I lost them. When I came back, I saw a third person at the area; when he saw me coming along on the other side of the way, he walked off from there and went into Tottenham Court Road. When I came back again to the corner of John-street; the prisoner and another one came by again along Windmill-street . Soon after the prisoner came to the prosecutor's area, and put his hand through the grating, pushed the upper sash of the window down; and in a few minutes with this stick he began to pull some of the things out. In five of six minutes, I saw that I could catch him, and I was within five or six feet of him but my foot slipped, and he turned round and looked at the full in-the fae, and then ran; but I pursued him, and caught him. The rattle sprund, and I secured him in Suffolk Mews. I can swear to the man, for I have known him these two years.

GUILTY , aged 21,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-232

1052. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , a pail, value 3s. two plates, value 2d. a dish, value 6d. a saucer, value 1d. and a knife, value 2d. the property of Thomas Barker ; and a pail, value 10d. the property of John Lester .

JOHN LESTER. On the day in the indictment. I saw the prisoner going along with two pails upon his arms, one of which I thought was my property; I immediately stopped him, and found the rest of the property.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-233

1053. RICHARD JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , twenty two dozen of silk trimming, value 4l. the property of Thomas Taylot , in his dwelling-house .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-234

1054. ANN WILSON and MARIA KNOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , one five-pound bank note, and three one-pound bank notes, the property of William Bush , from his person .

WILLIAM BUSH . On the day in the indictment, I sold some lambs in Smithfield; I had nine pounds two shillings and three pence for them; I received the money in a five-pound note, and four one-pound notes, I put them into my pocket. I saw these women between eleven and twelve in Whitechapel , in the day time; they caught hold of me, and took the money out of my pocket; they asked me to go with them, and I did, and Knott held me on the bed while the other prisoner took the money out of my pocket. Then Wilson ran out into the street.

WILSON, GUILTY , aged 21.

KNOTT, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined three months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-235

1055. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , in the dwelling-house of Sampson Coysgan , seven one-pound bank notes, his property .

ANN COYSGAN. The prisoner was a servant in our house. I missed the notes in question while she was in our service, from my drawer, which was locked. Her box was searched, and a one-pound note and twenty one shillings in silver were discovered. At first she said she got this money in her wages from her last place; she said some hand writing on the note was her mistress hand writing. There was also some new linen drapery discovered in her box.

MARGARET DOHAN. The prisoner lived with me. I look at this note, there is no hand-writing of mine on it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-236

1056. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eliza Russel , in the King's Highway, on the 8th of August , for putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a pocket, value 6d. and 2s. 6d. in monies numbered, her property .

ELIZA RUSSEL . About half past two in the morning of the day in the indictment, as I was going home by Charing Cross , this young man took my pocket off, he did not hit me, nor any thing, he and I were talking together, it contained two shillings and sixpence in halfpence. I told the watchman of it, and he ran after him, and he was apprehended.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-237

1057. HENRY WILLOUGHBY and GEORGE MITCHELL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Rolfe , about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 14th of September , and stealing therein, a tea-caddy value 2l. 2s. his property .

JAMES ROLFE. About eight o'clock in the morning of the 14th of September, the street door was shut fast, and was opened by someone; and this caddy stolen off a table in the parlour.

WILLIAM CLARK. I saw Willoughby at about ten in the morning of the 14th of September, with a tea-caddy; they went into a fishmongers, at the corner of Holles-street; I went in; they were opening the eaddy with a key, and they emptied the tea out of the boxes. I then put my head over the settle, and said, as you have emptied the the tea out of the caddy, will you sell the caddy; and one of them said, no not to you. I then went and got some assistance, and took them both; I searched them both, and on Willoughby I found these latch keys, and a small skeleton key, for opening desks; and another small key and a knife.

WILLOUGHBY, GUILTY , aged 33.

MITCHELL, GUILTY , aged 45,

Of larceny only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-238

1058. JOHN ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John O'Donnell , at about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 12th of September , and stealing, therein, three waistcoats, value 10s. a shirt, value 10s. a shawl, value 7s. and a knife, value 1s. the property of the said John O'Donnell .

JOHN O'DONNELL . I was sitting in my room with my wife and nephew, and this man went up stairs and broke open the door and took the things in the indictment out of the drawers. I had discharged this man, and whilst we were sitting he went up stairs, and did th1s. My wife saw him going out with a bundle under his arm, and suspected something.

SARAH O'DONNELL . My husband dismissed this man, and I saw him go by the room door with a bundle under his arm. I told my nephew that he

had got more than belonged to him; he had no property in our place before; my nephew went after him.

MARTIN O'NEILL. I went after the prisoner. and I brought him back with this property.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Of Larceny only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-239

1059. ANN TIMMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , a cap, value 2s. a quilt, value 1l. two table-cloths, value 1l. 2s. six yards of cotton, value 12s. two gowns, value 1l. 10s. three petticoats, value 17s. one watch, value 1l. 10s. two shirts, value 10s. five pairs of stockings, value 14s. five handkerchiefs, value 1l. 5s. two frocks, value 1l. one shawl, value 15s. one pair of boots, value 5s. a tinder-box, value 1s. and a iron, value 4d. the property of Thomas Spencer , in his dwelling-house .

REBECCA SPENCER . The prisoner was a lodger in our house. She absconded from my house in the latter end of August; I then missed my things; I had been ill, and confined to my bed. I sent for an officer; and at last I had a hint where she was, and the constable found her in the Greenwich Road; she had a cap on of my property.

ROBERT LOCK. I apprehended the prisoner, and found this cap on her.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of stealing to the amount of 2s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-240

1060. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , seventy two wine glasses. value 3l. two decanters, value 8s. five cups, value 2s.6d. three liquor bottles, value 9s. two jelly glasses, value 2s. and one set of cruets, value 3s. the property of George Loddy , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE LODDY . The prisoner went into the parlour on the day in the indictment, and called for a pint of beer; this glass was all in the parlour. In consequence of some information which my servant gave me, I determined to give an eye to the prisoner and the other person who was with him, when they went out. I immediately went into the parlour, and missed he glass in question. I then went out, and overtook the prisoner and brought him back; and he pulled the cruets out of his small clothes, and I took a coffee cup from his coat pocket. I never recovered more of my property. He offered to pay for the glass, but I told him I was determined to check depredations of this kind, and I should pursue the law accordingly.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-241

1061. HENRY POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , a gold snuff box, value 10l. the property of Colonel John Hanbury .

It appeared that the snuff box was tortoiseshell, and gold mounted.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-242

1062. HENRY POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , a ten-pound bank-note , the property of Nathaniel Pruden .

NATHANIEL PRUDEN. I am a cork cutter . I was robbed of this note and two two-pound notes, on the day in the indictment, in a field at Barking in Essex , seeing the fight. I was surrounded by several and robbed; I know the prisoner to have been one in the crowd.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-243

1063. ABRAHAM WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , a crupper, value 4s. a collar, value 6s. a pair of hames, value 4s. and a pair of traces, value 6s. the property of John Copland .

JOHN COPLAND. The prisoner had been haymaking for me for about three or four weeks. After these things were missed, the prisoner was brought back with them, by my bailiff.

WILLIAM SEARCH. I manage the farming business of this geutleman. In consequence of information which the other men gave me, I went after the prisoner on missing these things, and found him with them.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-244

1064. THOMAS CLAPP was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , ten yards and a half of cotton value 15s. the property of George Abell .

HENRY ABELL . I was in my brother's shop, and saw the prisoner come and take this cotton from the door; it was within two feet of the door. I pursued him; he dropped it; I never lost sight of him until he was stopped.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-245

1065. ROBERT ANDERSON , JUNIOR , was indicted for stealing, on the 30th December , two pairs of snuffers, value 3s. 6d. the property of George Dudley ; and ROBERT ANDERSON , SENIOR , was indicted for receiving then knowing them to be stolen .

GEORGE DUDLEY. I am a hardwareman , in Bride-court, near Bridge-street . I did not miss any snuffers until April. The younger prisoner was employed by me. I know nothing of the elder prisoner, only seeing him in my warehouse.

WILLIAM DENNY . I bought a pair of snuffers on the 21st of February, of the elder prisoner.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. I apprehended both prisoners. I made a charge against the boy of stealing snuffers.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-246

1066. ROBERT ANDERSON , SENIOR , and ROBERT

ANDERSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a pair of snuffers, value 2s. and a pair of nut crackers, value 4s. 6d. the property of George Dudley .

JAMES NEIGHBOUR. I am a pawnbroker. I know the old prisoner; I took in this pair of nut crackers from him in September in the last year; I advanced four shillings on them.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. The old man said he would take me round to all the places where he had pawned these things, and among the rest he took me to Mr. Barrows.

ROBERT ANDERSON JUNIOR, NOT GUILTY .

ROBERT ANDERSON SENIOR, GUILTY , aged 75.

Confined two years , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-247

1067. JAMES DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , forty nine pounds weight of lead, value 8s. the property of Henry Peto .

JAMES OLIVER . I am clerk to Mr. Peto; I only speak to the property.

JOHN NEWBY . I am a watchman to Mr. Peto; I stopped the prisoner and searched him and found this lead concealed on him; he dropped on his knees, and prayed forgiveness of Mr. Peto.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-248

1368. MARIA GREEN was indicted for stealing' on the 11th of September , two three-shilling tokens, and twelve shillings in monies numbered , the property of William Dawson .

WILLIAM DAWSON. I went home, and found the prisoner in company with my wife. I had given my wife eighteen shillings in the prisoner's presence, and had desired her to put it by for paying the quarters rent. There was no other person present then but the prisoner and my wife. The next night she was taken.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined 1s. and discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-249

1069. JOHN BROWN and WILLIAM JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , a snuff-box, value 6d. and a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of William Culband , from his person .

WILLIAM CULBAND . I was in Bartholomew Fair on the day in the indictment. I know my snuff box and handkerchief were safe when I went into the Fair.

THOMAS WHITE . I saw Mr. Culband in the Fair, and both prisoners also. Brown came very close up to the prosecutor; I perceived that he drew something from the prosecutor's pocket; Brown immediately threw something from him, which I could not perceive what it was.

JOHN HERDSFIELD . I took the snuff-box from Brown's pocket, but he snatched it from my hand, and threw it about ten yards.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 18.

JACKSON, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-250

1070. WILLIAM COLLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Cotterell , in the King's highway, on the 18th of September , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3l. and a part of a watch-chain, value 3l. his property .

JOSEPH COTTERELL. At about eleven o'clock at night I was in Long-lane ; I was alone, and a man came out of the horseway, and ran up against me, and made a pull at my watch; I laid hold of the seals and held it fast, to prevent its going, the chain broke, and he got the watch and part of the chain from me. Another man at the same time came behind, and I was shoved down in the horseway; then the prisoner was pretending to help me up, and he held me until the watch was gone. As soon as I got up, I charged him with being one, and he immediately set off; I pursued him, and found him in the custody of a watchman.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-251

1071. JOHN TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , a trunk, value 5s. four gowns, value 6l. three shawls, value 4l. three scarfs, value 3l, one pelisse. value 2l. nine guineas, and two half guineas , the property of William Roberts .

AMY ROBERTS. I took a coach to go to Islington. All of a sudden the springs of the coach were cut, and some one opened the door and removed the trunk, and when I enquired for my trunk, it was gone. The coachman said he knew nothing of it.

SAMUEL SHEPFARD. On Thursday the 29th of August. I was on duty in Bishopsgate-street. I saw the prisoner come out of Old Bedlam, with that trunk on his shoulder. He made across towards Houndsditch, and I ran after him; I stopped him; he then threw the trunk on me; I caught the trunk on my right arm, and caught him with my left. He struggled with me, and his clothes gave way, and he got from me and ran. I pursued him and took him to the compter.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-252

1072. MARY MORTIMER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , six pairs of stockings, value 6s. one pair of drawers, value 6d. one shift, value 2s. and a pinafore, value 1s. the property of Mary Thomas .

ELIZABETH LEISTER. I saw the prisoner go into the privy with a large bundle tied up in a handkerchief.

JOHN CREWS. I saw the privy searched; I went into the room where the prisoner was, and saw her trying to conceal some duplicates, and I took from her sixteen, which are duplicates of other things lost, and pledged at different pawnbrokers.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-253

1073. SARAH DICKENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a shawl, value 2s. the property of Ann Ivimey .

ANN IVIMEV. The prisoner took my shawl off my shoulders, and ran away with it.

WILLIAM GOUGH . I dragged the shawl out of the prisoner's pocket, and she immediately grabbed at it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-254

1074. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , a jacket, value 2s. and a pocket handkerchief, value 3s. the property of William Cooper .

WILLIAM COOPER . I am a mariner ; I lost these things from the forecastle of the William and George . John Dane caught the prisoner.

JOHN DANE . I caught the prisoner on board, with the jacket under his arm, and I gave him in charge of White the officer.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one months , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-255

1075. THOMAS ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , ten quires of paper, value 5s. the property of William Sewell .

WILLIAM SEWELL . I saw the paper in question taken from him; he had it; he was standing in the shop with it.

JANE SMITH . I am in the employment of the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner at the bar come from behind the counter; I gave an alarm, and he was secured. The prosecutor was sent for, and this paper was taken from the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-256

1076. CEORGE ARMFIELD and WILLIAM SNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a watch, value 20l. the property of John Lumsden , esq. a gold chain, value 4l. three seals, value 4l. and a watch key, value 5s. the property of William Reed , in the dwelling house of the said John Lumsden , esq .

THOMAS COOMES . I am a sweep. I recollect the morning of the day in the indictment; I saw Snell coming up Crawford-street with a load of dust. I waited until be got up to me, and walked along with him. Then I saw Armfield come running up Crawford-street as hard as he could run, till he got up to Snell; then he pulled a watch out of his pocket and shewed it to Snell. I afterwards discovered that a robbery had been committed. I happened to mention it to a person, and I was called upon to give my evidence.

Examined by the COURT. I knew Snell before. I have been tried here before.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-257

1077. ANN BAINBRIDGE was indicted for steaing, on the 24th of August , three gowns, value 9l. one shawl, value 5s. one cloth Pelisse, value 6s.the property of Ann Graham . One pair of sheets, value 2s. one pillow case, value 1s. and two pairs of stockings, value 10d. the property of Henry Haldane , esq .

JAMES PALMER. I am servant to Colonel Haldane . I saw the prisoner in his area, between one and two o'clock; I did not speak to her, but went in doors. I came out presently and she was gone. I told my fellow servant to look if there was any thing missing, and the cook missed these things. I was then sent for a constable, and the prisoner was apprehended.

ANN GRAHAM . I am the Cook . In consequence of the information given me by the last witness, I missed the things stated in the indictment.

ESTHER PALMER. I am the nursery maid. I missed part of these things. A person brought all of these things soon after, to see if they were ours.

MARY FOLKAND. I live in William-street, Manchester-square. On the day in the indictment, the prisoner brought these things and left them with me, requesting me to take care of them while she went to fetch her bonnet. she did not return, We took the things to the Colonel's, having heard of the robbery.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-258

1078. THOMAS HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , one hundred pounds weight of lead, value 1l. the property of our Lord the King .

JOHN JAMES . I am a carpenter, employed about the building of Sommerset House . This lead was lost on the night of the 7th of September. In consequence of information, I found a quantity of it to the amount of sixty-nine pounds weight in the prisoner's boat, and I found chips of lead also. We apprehended the prisoner about two o'clock on Wednesday morning going into his own house in Eaglecourt.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160918-259

1079. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , a tea-caddy, value 1s. a tea-caddy ladle, value 1s. 6d. and two tea-spoons, value 2s , the property of Jame Brown.

JAMES BROWN . I live in Bell Yard In consequence of information I received on be day in the indictment, I ran up to the prisoner and found my caddy tucked under his coat.

THOMAS EDMUND NELSON. On the 10th of last month, I followed the prisoner as I had a suspicion of him; and I saw him come out of Mr. Brown's shop with his coat swelled out. I gave Mr. Brown some information, and he was stopped, and the property in question taken from him; he was given in charge to an officer.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-260

1080. THOMAS MACARTEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , forty pounds weight of cheese, value 1l. 5s. the property of John Rodband .

THOMAS JONES. I was by the Turnpike, and saw the prisoner come across with this cheese under his arm.

HENRY BARTON. This cheese was standing outside the door.

JACOB BATES . I took the cheese in the prisoner's possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-261

1081. JAMES RYDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , two coats, value 4l. one pair of pantaloons, value 1l. 5s. the property of John Baillie ; two shirts, value 1l. three pairs of stockings, value 12s. and two sheets, value 10s. the property of another person named John Baillie , in the dwelling-house of the said last mentioned John Baillie .

JOHN BAILLIE . I lost these things on the 5th of July, I charged the prisoner with taking them, because he went away that morning, and took the sheets off his own bed; he had lodged in the house where I lodged for three nights.

JOHN BAILLIE . I am the uncle of the last witness. The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 1st of July; it was a ready furnished lodging; he left me on the 5th of July in the morning without paying, and took my sheets and some other things.

WILLIAM ROBERTS. I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of July the prisoner pledged two coats with me, and a pair of pantaloons.

WILLIAM ATFIELD . I am an officer belonging to Worship-street. On the 2nd of last month, the prisoner sent for me, and he told me he had something to communicate to me; he told me he had pawned these things, and I went to the pawnbroker, and took him to Newgate, and there he said it was the same man who pawned the things.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Of stealing, to the value of 39s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-262

1082. HENRY MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a tilt-cloth, value 5l. the property of Thomas Edgington , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES BARNE. I saw the prisoner coming out of the prosecutor's premises with the package on his shoulders; he walked away with it, and at last pitched it; I apprehended him.

ROBERT CHAPLIN . missed this property at about half past twelve on the day in the indictment; I came up just as the last witness had stopped the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-263

1083. THOMAS FULLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , a pair of shoes, value 4s. the property of Alexander Wilson .

THOMAS VINCENT. I am servant to Mr. Wilson. The prisoner came and took these shoes in Holborn-hill , and I took him with the shoes under his jacket.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-264

1084. ARTHUR DABBS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , a boot, value 5s. the property of William Heath .

ROBERT HALES. I am a shoe-maker. This boot was taken from the shop window on the day in the indictment, by the prisoner. I went after him, and brought him back into the shop with the boot, and called Mr. Hales.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-265

1485. CHARLES LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , a pocket-book, value 1s. one fifty-pound bank note, one thirty-pound bank note, one fifteen-pound bank note, one ten-pound bank note, one two-pound bank note, and five one-pound bank notes, the property of John Malins , from his person .

JOHN MALINS . On the 2nd of August last, about one o'clock, I was in Fleet-street . The officer will prove the circumstances; all I know is I lost my pocket-book containing bank notes to the amount of one hundred and twelve pounds.

FRANCIS FAGAN. I was with Thompson on the day in the Indictment, between one and two o'clock. I saw the prisoner with two others following this gentleman. By the direction of Thompson, I watched them up Fleet-street. The prisoner was placed next the gentleman whilst the other two strove to hide him from the passingers. I observed the prisoner turn round with a pocket-book in his hand, which he immediately put in his bosom; he then walked a few paces towards Temple Bar, and I apprehended him.

MICHAEL CAIN. I went into this place, and took the pocket-book out.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-266

1086. JOHN SMITH , and EDWARD SMITH were indicted for stealing, four pictures, value 7l. the property of Samuel Knight .

JOHN KNIGHT . On the night of the 14th of July , my shop was broken open and these pictures were merely removed from the wainscott, which was out through to a silversmith's shop on the other side; the prisoners were taken in my shop.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160918-267

1087. GEORGE WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted under the Post Office Act, for that he being employed by the Post Office of Great Britain, on the 2nd of May feloniously secreted and stole a certain letter, containing a one pound note , the property of Henry Gladman Flack .

HENRY GLADMAN FLACK. I am a schoolmaster . I am acquainted with a person named Winifred Hunibon , She lives at Colney Hatch, and I was in the habit of sending her weekly, a one pound note. On the 2nd of May, I enclosed a one pound note in a letter, which I directed to her, and gave to my son to put into the post. The number of that note was"32965," and the date was the 25th of "March, 1816." The next time I saw that note, was in the hands of Mr. Parkin, the solicitor of the post office.

CHARLES JAMES FLACK . I am son of the last witness; I have always put the letters my father gave me to put into the post, into the post; at the general twopenny post in Gerrard-street Soho.

GEORGE MOSS . I am what they call window man at the General Twopenny Post Office, in Gerrard-street; that is, I take the unpaid letters from the box. When I have taken them out of the box. I sort and tax them I heard of a letter directed to Mrs. Honeybun miscarrying. I had seen a letter so direct pass a week previous to that information. On the Thursday previous, I had seen the letter so directed. A letter need to go through every week so directed. I knew the hand writing of Mr. Flack; I carried that letter with about twenty or thirty more to the sorting office.

JOHN M'ANDREW. I am a stamper at the Gerrard-street general post office. All the letters I received on the morning of the 2nd of May, I duty stamped according to my duty.

JOHN THOMAS. I am sub-sorter to the Gerrard-street post office. I received from the last witness all the letters for the daily delivery. on the morning of the 2nd of May. A letter to go to Colney Hatch, would go first to Finchley, and in the course of delivery at Finchley, would be the same morning. After having sorted them that morning, I took them to the Lombard-street district.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am the re-sorter at Gerrard-street. A letter directed to Colney Hatch, would come through my hands. On the 2nd of May last, I subdivided all the letters I received from the last witness, and delivered them to the porter made up in separate bundles.

ARTHUR BOWDEN . I am the porter at the Gerrard-street office. I received the letters for the early delivery from the last witness; I put them in the bag that goes across the horse, in seven distinct bundles. A letter for Finchley would go to the north division.

JOHN OAKLEY . I am clerk of the northern division of the post office in Lombard-street. On the 2nd of May, I received the letter from Gerrand-street in the usual way. I then took them to the place where the letters for the northern division are sorted. I sorted them into the different packages, of which Finchley is on. I then took the amount of them, and put those for Finchley, into the Finchley bag, which I then delivered to the sealer, to be sealed.

JOSEPH BAKER . It was my duty to seal that bag, and I believe I did, on the 2nd of May.

GEORGE BRADFORD . I am employed in the post office at Finchley, as charge sorter, and letter carrier. There are four employed in the district at Finchley; There are myself, Thomas Smart , Robert Godfrey Hattersley , and the prisoner. The prisoner was a sorter and carrier . The letters are brought from Lombard-street on horseback, and the bag has on it the office seal. The other three sorters assist me in taking the letters out. On the 2nd of May last. I received the bag, sealed in the usual manner. We all set about sorting them; Smart was to deliver the Colney Hatch district. I did not see any letter directed to Mrs. Hunibun that day. The prisoner's walk was Nether-street, part of the Common, and Wheatstone.

ROBERT GODFREY HATTELEY . I am one of the Finchley sorting and carriers. The letter in question never came into my hands. My walk was Totteridge.

THOMAS SMART . I am one of the Finchley sorters and carriers. My wal