Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th May 1816.
Reference Number: 18160529
Reference Number: f18160529-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 29th of MAY, 1816; and following days; BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) BY R. BUTTERS, NO. 22, FETTER-LANE, FLEET-STREET

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench. Sir James Allan Park , one of Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas. Sir Charles Abbott , one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas. Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City. Samuel Birch , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart, William Heygate , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Sir William Leighton , knt. Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Sir Watkin Lewis , knt. Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City. His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Richardson ,

John Lewis ,

Stanley Goddard ,

Isaac Picket ,

John Viaey ,

Charles Smith .

Edward Gardener ,

John Meadows ,

John Lllewellyn ,

John Seabrook ,

Angus Cameron ,

Edward James Bond .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Windsor ,

James Walford ,

Samuel Ochterlony ,

William Lumley ,

John Hindle ,

John Newton ,

Andrew Northcroft ,

Joseph How ,

William Mollineaux ,

Daniel Collins ,

Richard Stevens ,

John Tillot .

Second Middleselex Jury.

James Mellish ,

George Fowler ,

William Green ,

James Abraham Heraud ,

William Mackenzie ,

William Wyatt White ,

John Stevens ,

John Chapman Smith,

Charles Robertson ,

Joseph Craddock ,

James Richardson ,

Henry Milton .

Reference Number: t18160529-1

476. GEORGE NANKEVILLE was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Toden Holt , in the King's highway, on the 13th of May , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 8l. a gold chain, value 3l. three seals, value 3l. and a watch-key, value 10s. his property .

WILLIAM TODEN HOLT . I live in Baches-row, Hoxton. On the 13th of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking very deliberately through Brook-street , returning to Baches-row, within four yards of the turning of the street into the Market-place of Hoxton; I was surprised by a fellow running with the greatest force and violence against me; I saw him th[Text unreadable in original.]n put his hand down towards my fob; he did not knock me down; I immediately put my hand down, and a voice cried out, sir, you have lost your watch; I cried stop thief. Upon his withdrawing his hand, he came to the right about, and ran across the Market-place, with a full cry of stop thief; I mean a number of persons after him. I believe I should have told you, that the man who spoke from the window was the first. I should have fallen from the violence of the push, only persons were behind me; if there were any persons belonging to the prisoner, they were behind me; but I don't know that they belonged to him, of my own knowledge. He was pursued closely by the man who saw him commit the act; that man picked up the case of the watch, which had fallen, and gave it to me, and said, I will pursue him, which he did, crying stop thief. I did not see him taken. I perfectly well observed the man, and I am as positive it was the prisoner, as I am of my own existence. I afterwards saw him in custody; I then declared myself positive that he was the man; I knew him to be the man, and said so among fifty or sixty people; he was close to me when I declared so; when I said so, he did not say any thing, but muttered something, which I could not understand. I have not seen my watch since; I saw the prisoner searched; but he had not got it. When he ran away, I saw nobody else running, but the persons who ran after him to take him. At the time he put his hand down, I cringed inwards, and he gave me a chuck under the chin with his other elbow. The box, or inner part of the watch, was silver-gilt; the outer case was metal; the chain was gold, and there were three valuable gold seals.

EDWARD HARDY . On the 13th of May, I was looking out of my window, and saw three young men stop Mr. Holt, two pushed behind, and one before; I saw them take his watch; the one that was in the front took his watch; I saw the persons of the men; the prisoner was behind; he was not the man who took the watch. Directly I saw the watch drawed, the prisoner ran round the prosecutor, he ran round his right arm, and ran in front of him; the other two men ran the other way. I ran down stairs, and I followed the prisoner; the other two ran first, while the prisoner at the bar held Mr. Holt; he was longest there. Before I pursued the prisoner, I saw the case fall close to Mr. Holt's heels, behind him. I ran to the King's Arms public-house, and found the prisoner in the privy. The man who took the watch, put his elbow in Mr. Holt's throat, and knocked his head up; that was not the prisoner. I can't exactly say what the man did with the watch. I pursued the prisoner to the public-house; he went round, and in backwards, and the mob went in forwards; I saw him in the privy; the landlord opened the door, and I said that was the man; his clothes were not unbuttoned then. Mr. Ho't came in, and said, that is the man that robbed me of my watch.

Prisoner. I was sitting in the privy at the time he came in.

Witness. He was standing up, and not sitting at all, when I saw him.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a headborough, and was sent for to take this man. I produce the watchcase which was also delivered to me by the prosecutor.

ALEXANDER CONNIGAN . I was in the Market-place, Hoxton. I saw three men come up to the prosecutor; one struck him under the chin, and two men behind him; I did not see who robbed him of his watch; I did not positively see whether a watch was taken or not; but I saw the case of a watch drop; a man picked it up; it was on the ground, near to where the prosecutor was standing. The prisoner ran up Charles-square; I saw the other two no more; they ran another way; I ran after this man; he ran round Charles-square, and round the public-house, and hid himself in the privy; when the door was first opened, the prisoner was sitting, his breeches were then unbuttoned.

Prisoner's Defence. After I had done my work, I was returning home, when I met two men, and the gentleman; they stopped up the way, and I could not get one way nor yet the other, and they got shoving against me, and when I went by them, I walked on, and I immediately saw two men ran across the Market-place, and heard the words stop thief, and I ran after those two men, and lost sight of them, and not being over and above well in my inside, I was taken short, and went into the public-house, and went into the privy immediately, and that young man came in, and said, I was one of them, and I know no more about it than the child unborn.

Alexander Connigan . The prisoner was behind the prosecutor; he went away in front of him, and ran a different way from the other two.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-2

477. ESTHER SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two pelisses, value 6l. one gown, value 5l. one necklace, value 15l. 15s. one

watch, value 30s. two curtains, value 40s. one ring, value 1l. and six caps, value 3l. the property of Richard Pollen , esq . in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD POLLEN , ESQ. I know the prisoner at the bar; she was in my service from the middle of February, 1815, to the middle of February, in the present year. I left town to go the Circuit, on the 3rd of July, in the last year; I left nobody else at my house but her; I left property to a very considerable amount in my house; I left a great deal in my bed room on the second floor; I was occasionally at my house in the course of the autumn; but did not return until the 19th of January; I had an express came down to the country, to inform me that there had been a fire, and when I came up to town the chest of drawers in my bed room was consumed; the whole of it had been apparently burnt; I afterwards discovered a vast quantity of things pledged; the whole of those mentioned in the indictment; I found them about March last. I first of all sent for the prisoner, and enquired of her particularly about the fire, in consequence of missing a quantity of table linen, which was kept in a different part of the house from where the fire was; and the prisoner said, she hoped I would take pains to find it out; she supposed they had been stolen in the fire, and it was very prejudicial to her character; and I then said, that I was going to Bow-street, or that I had been to Bow-street, and I never saw her after that; in a few hours she absconded. In the evening of that day, in consequence of the foreman of a Mr. Tate, a pawnbroker, living at No. 1, Cambridge-street, Golden-square, calling on me, I went to his master's house. and saw there a quantity of caps; I think six or eight. I also went to the house of a Mr. Daubrise, another pawnbroker, in Oxford-street, and found the curtains of the bed in my room, which was consumed; also a necklace, a watch, and a ring. These had been all in the chest of drawers which was burnt; the curtains were on the bed, (which was also consumed,) when I left town.

WILLIAM KING . I am foreman to Mr. Tate, who lives at No. 1, Cambridge-street. I know the prisoner at the bar; I saw her on the 17th of January, she pledged two pelisses, a gown, seven caps, and several other things, in the name of Mary Williams ; I think I had seen her before.

WILLIAM GOFTEN . I am journeyman to Mr. Daubrise. I know the prisoner. I saw her frequently from the month of July, 1815, to January, 1816; she came to pledge several articles in that interval, a necklace, a ring, and a brooch, all in one duplicate, for thirty shillings, for Mrs. Pollen, by Esther Sampson ; the necklace for us to purchase is about one pound, it is garnet, and if any one wanted to purchase such an article; it would come high; but they are out of fashion now; the ring is a pearl ring, and is also worth about a pound; there is also a watch worth three pounds, pawned on the 14th of October, and the bed curtains were pawned on the 5th, for three pounds.

(Property produced.)

Richard Pollen , esq. I look at the property produced. The white satin pelisse is worth ten guineas, it cost considerably more, and has only been worn once; the gown is worth seven guineas; the other pelisse is worth three or four guineas; I was present at the purchasing of both the pelisses. I never authorized or ordered the prisoner to get any locks opened.

WILLIAM BURNS . I am a locksmith. I know the prisoner at the bar. I opened the locks of a chest of drawers in the two pair of stairs bed room; she sent for some things out of the country, which were in these drawers, but she had not got the keys.

Prisoner. Was not the lady's maid with me when I had the drawers opened?

Witness. Yes, once; but I have opened several locks since that. I know Mr. Pollen's lady's maid; I remember opening a door once when she was present.

COURT. Was the lady's maid with the prisoner ever when you opened the chest of drawers in the back room on the second floor?

Witness. Yes, once she was.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to clear myself concerning the fire. I had to air all the mattrasses before the family came to town; the straw mattrass and the hair mattrass I aired, and put by; but I had to leave the white mattrass all night. I went up about five o'clock in the evening, but for fear of greasing the house, I did not take up any candle; I left a little fire in, and the white mattrass at the fire, and there was only breadth enough for a chair to stand between the fire and the bed, and the curtains were hanging over the mattrass. I then shut the drawing room window shutters, and all the shutters, and then went down stairs into the kitchen, and I never went up stairs from that time until a gentleman knocked at the door, and gave me the alarm of fire; he said, my good woman, your house is all on fire; I immediately ran up stairs, and the gentleman followed me, and I opened the room door, and was just going to rush in, when the gentleman pulled me back, and some more people came up, and soon after a fireman came, and we got water, and I assisted in getting water as quick as possible, and after the fire was extinguished, I came down stairs again, and when I came down the fireman said, what have you been doing with the mattrasses, and I said, I had aired them; and he said that it was from that mattrass which was near the fire that the fire began, and the furniture. The hair mattrass and the straw mattrass were burnt completely, and there was not so much of them left as could be worked up with new stuff again. I pledged these things, I own it, and it was my intention to redeem them again.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-3

478. JOHN PRIMROSE and WILLIAM GOW were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the Right Honourable William Hurry, Earl of Darlington , about nine o'clock in the night of the 17th of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one table, value 5s. one waistcoat, value 4s. his property; one

pair of breeches, value 8s. the property of Samuel Mitchell ; and one pair of gaiters, value 3s. the property of Richard Whittington .

JESSE WHITTINGTON . I live with Lord Darlington; he lives in King-street, St. James's-square . In the evening of the 17th of May last, I was in the stable at about eight o'clock, I was there before that time for two or three hours, I had been in the room over the stables at about eight o'clock in the evening; I locked the door; I remained in the neighbourhood of the stables for about half an hour. I put the key in my pocket. It was quite dark when I went away; I had not the stable door in my view all the time; I had not seen it between eight and half past eight; if any one had entered the stable door between eight and half past eight o'clock, I was not in such a situation as I must have seen them. I returned to the stables at about a quarter after nine o'clock; I saw a light in the room up over the stables; my father was with me. We found the door open. My father went in, and stood at the door; I heard my father call out Bob, two or three times; he meant the postillion; I heard an answer made in a strange voice. My father then came out, and locked the door; we have two keys to the stable door; I had one, and my father the other. My father told me to go for assistance; I went to the ale-house, and brought assistance; Mr. Wright and Mr. Mackenzie came with me. When I got back to the stable, my father told Wright to take care of the stable, and he would go for more persons; he did so. On his return, they opened the door, and went in; he went up stairs, Mr. Wright, Mr. Mackenzie, and my father went up. Two or three days afterwards, I found a crow and two skeleton-keys in the litter of the horses in one of the stals; we clean out the litter once a week; we put fresh straw over the old, and so go on for about a week. It was light when I locked the door.

RICHARD WHITTINGTON . I am the father of the last witness; I am coachman to the Earl of Darlington. I remember the evening of the 17th of May, I was ordered to bring the carriage at a quarter after ten. My master's christian names are William Harry. I was in the stables on the afternoon of the 17th of May, and left them between seven and eight o'clock; I was not farther than the public-house from the stable all the evening; the public-house is about a hundred yards from the stable. I returned to the stable at about a quarter past nine; there was a light in the room over the stable then; the stable door was then shut, but unlocked; I went in under the ladder, and called out Bob, several times, and then I heard a strange voice; then I went outside, and locked the door, and put my shoulder against it, and sent my son to the ale-house for assistance. When they came, we went up stairs; Wright went first with a pitchfork, I followed next, and Mackenzie came next with a lanthorn; we found the two prisoners in the hay-loft, at the top of the ladder, with a bundle tied up behind them. Wright and Mackinzie seized them first, and I said is there any more of you; they said no. I said, I won't believe you; then I looked all round, and there was no more. After we got them down stairs, we took them to the watchhouse, and had them searched; we lodged the bundle in the watchhouse also. I know the handkerchief in which the bundle was tied up; it belonged to a brother of mine; a tablecloth was in the bundle, that was his Lordship's; also a pair of breeches, they belonged to Samuel Mitchell , he is a postillion; also a stable livery waistcoat, the property of his Lordship; and a pair of gaiters, which were my own property. This stable adjoins Lord Darlington's house; it is all in one building.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Lord Darlington's servants sleeps there; there is a strong party wall between the stable and the dwelling-house, and a person can go from the stable to the dwelling-house by a passage underneath, a covered passage.

SAMUEL ROPER . I live with Mr. Palmer, 199, Oxford-street, he is a coach-harness plater. I remember the evening of the 17th of May; I was sent by my master to Lord Darlington's stables, to take two territs; it was about nine o'clock when I got there, it was pitch dark; not knowing the stable, I hallooed out at the end of the mews, and was answered by a woman; I asked which was Lord Darlington's stables, and she told me they were the last on the left hand. In consequence of her information, I found out the stable; I tried the stable door to go up stairs, and found it fastened; I stopped there about four or five minutes; at last I could not make any one hear, and I hallooed out very loud boy, and a postillion answered me from the window, and I perceived by the light of a lamp opposite, that he was in his shirt sleeves, and he said, he was getting into bed, and could not come down, but told me where the coachman was. He sent me to the coachman at the public-house; instead of going to the Golden Lion, I went to the Red Lion, and left the territs there for the coachman.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was quite pitch dark. I never returned to the stable after having gone to the public-house; all was quiet when I was at the stable; it had gone nine I rather think when I got there; it was four or five minutes after, and I returned straight home from the public-house, it was not a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after nine. Who had been at the stable between seven and eight o'clock, I don't know. All I know is that the door was locked at the time I was there; there was no lock outside; I know that, because I felt; I could not see. I felt the door, and felt a little staple, and put my finger through it, and shook the door, and found it was locked inside. The postillion was on the inside of the room.

Examined by the COURT. I found this staple by feeling; for I could not see. I left the two territs for the coachman at the public house; there was two coachmen, only I took the territs to the wrong public-house.

ROBERT BOWMAN . I remember the afternoon of the 17th of May; I was at the stables that afternoon, from five until eight o'clock; I was with Jesse Whittington there; I had been occasionally up stairs in the course of that afternoon; I am the postillion, called Bob. I left the stable at eight o'clock; I stood thereabouts for half an hour afterwards; I mean I

was in sight of the stable door, when I say thereabouts. If any one had entered the stable door while I was there, I must have seen them; it was quite dark when we went away; it was only half past eight; it was light enough to see a person's face eight or nine yards off.

COURT. Would you not have known Jesse Whittington 's face at ten yards distance - A. Yes. I did not return any more to the stable that night, until after the prisoners were taken. I was in the stable the next morning, and found six skeleton keys, on the cupboard up stairs, I gave them to the coachman; I found a tin phosphorous box, another day, on Tuesday I found it, containing matches and a bottle; I found that also in the horse litter, and took it to the coachman.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. I was not examined before the magistrate.

Examined by the COURT. My Lord has two postillions; there was another postillion at the stable that night besides me; I did not leave him in the stable when I went away. Samuel Mitchell and I want into Lord Dadington's house the front way.

SAMUEL MITCHELL . I am in the service of Lord Darlington; I am the second coachman . I was in the stable about five o'clock in the evening; I can't state how long I staid. When we had done the horses up, I left the stable about eight; I did not leave the stable before it was dark; I staid besides the stable; if any one had gone into the stable while I was there I would have seen them. Afterwards I saw the articles in the bundle; there was a pair of breeches in it which were mine; I had worn them that day; I hung them up in the room on a pin that day, when I took them off. I saw all the articles; they had been all hanging on the pins. I went into the house with Bowman; he and I went into the house together; I did not go into the house until nine o'clock; I staid near the stable until I went into the house; it was impossible for any one to go into the yard without my seeing them; nobody went into the stable before nine o'clock.

Examined by the COURT. I staid quite in front of the stable door; nearer to the stable door than I am to your Lordship; I did not see a little boy come and rattle the stable door; if he had been there while I remained, I should have seen him. There is a postillion sleeps over the stable; he was left there; he sleeps over the coach-house; he was not locked in the stables. I came out with Robert Bowman .

Richard Whittington , Re-examined. We all sleep over the coach-house adjoining to the stables; we are obliged to go through the house into this bed-room; the other ways are walled up. At a little after nine o'clock, Robert Bowman answered the boy from over the coach-house, out of the window of that room.

Re-cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. Can a person now, or could he at the time of this burglary, have gone by any internal communication, from the place where the prisoners are supposed to have been found, into the house - A. The communication which originally existed, was walled up then, and is now. A person could not have entered the room over the stables where we found the prisoners, from the house.

Q. Could the prisoners have gone from the place where they are supposed to have been found, to where your people slept over the coach-house - A. No. The reason the communication was nailed up, was because his Lordship let part of the stables.

COURT. Although there is no internal communication, yet the place where the prisoners were found, is under one roof with the place where you and some other of your master's servants sleep - A. Yes; it is all the same building.

Robert Bowman , Re-examined. I went to bed at nine o'clock; I heard a boy at the door after I was undressed; our bed-room looks into the mews; I was not in bed; I spoke to the boy; I did not come down to let him in; I could not, without coming through the house; I told him to leave the territs at the public-house; it was then dark, and I had a candle.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I went to the assistance of Lord Darligton's servants; I went through the stable and up stairs; I saw the prisoners there, and collared them both; I afterwards went to the watch-house.

Examined by the COURT. When I went up the ladder, the lesser man, Gow, said, coachman, you have got us; we will give ourselves up to you; I am in distress. I told them I could not help that, and collared them both. I am a coachman, and he addressed the term coachman to me. Mackenzie followed me up.

ELLIS WILLIAMS . I am a constable of the parish of St. James's. Lord Darlington's stables are in that parish. I produce the articles given to me by Richard Whittington .

(Skeleton-keys, crow-bar, wax-taper, and phosphorous produced.)

MR. REYNOLDS, for the prisoners, objected, that the part into which the prisoners had broken, was not part of the dwelling-house, because whatever communication there might have been originally, it was clear that there was none now, either with the place where the servants slept, or with the dwelling-house.

MR. MARSHAM, contra contended, that it was under the protection of the dwelling-house, and in support of his argument, cited the case of the "King against Brown, in the 1st East. p. 493; in that case the premises of the prosecution consisted of a stable, cow-house, cottage, and barn, which were not enclosed, nor had any internal communication with each other; the barn was the part broken and entered, in the night time, and the prisoner was found guilty, subject to the opinion of the Twelve Judges, who after a consideration of the case, declared the conviction to be right.

THE COURT, ruled with Mr. Marsham.

PRIMROSE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

GOW, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-4

479. JOHN HARVEY and PETER HERBERT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Davis , spinster ,

about the hour of ten in the night of 11th of April , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one waistcoat, value 1s. one jacket, value 4s. six sheets, value 20s. two pillow-cases, value 2s. one set of bed curtains, value 5s. one counterpane, value 1s. two window curtains, value 1s. one gown, value 5s. two aprons, value 1s. 6d. and three handkerchiefs, value 2d. her property .

MARY DAVIS . I am a single woman; I have a house at No. 34, Sun-yard ; I rent the whole house; I let lodgings there; I lived there about eleven or twelve years. On the 11th of April last, I went out at about ten o'clock in the evening; I had been washing, and after that went out; I staid away about ten minutes; I locked the door after me; I am sure I locked it. When I came back again, I found it locked; I unlocked it with the key, and had hardly time to put the key in my pocket, when two men rushed out; I hallooed out stop thief; they did not touch me as they went out. After I hallooed out stop thief, they dropped a waistcoat and jacket; they were about two yards from me then? it was one of the two dropped them, but which, I don't know. I picked them up, and delivered them at the watch-house to Mr. Moore. They went a little farther, and dropped something else; the watchman took them, and I went to see what it was. The watchman and two other gentlemen secured them. I never lost sight of them from the time they went out of my house until the time they were secured. When they were secured, I went back to see what they had dropped, and found it was a whole quantity of keys, in a ridicule; one of the prisoners stooped a little when he dropped that, which I afterwards discovered to be a bag of keys. I gave those keys to the watchman to be taken to the watchhouse. I afterwards saw one of those keys tried on my lock, and it opened it. When I got back again to my own house, I found a bundle of wet clothes tied up in a strange handkerchief; that bundle was on a chair. I had left those in a clothes-basket on the table; there was another bundle of dry clothes tied up in another strange handkerchief, that was on another table.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I am a singie woman, and have never been married; I have kept this house for twelve years, for the occasional accommodation of sailors.

Q. And their ladies - A. I don't know; any one who will pay me my rent. The jacket belonged to a lodger of mine, who is dead. When I say rushed out, I mean they came out with speed, and I ran after them, and hallooed out stop thief; they had not got past my window before I hallooed out; the keys were dropped about three doors off; the watchman took the men about four doors off. This was the night before Good Friday. These men ran pretty fast; they did not resist; they begged of the watchman to let them go. Nobody was present when I picked up the jacket or the keys.

WILLIAM BRIGHT . I am a watchman. On the night before Good Friday, I was in my rounds in Sun-yard, at about ten minutes after ten, as near as I can tell, I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the two prisoners running, and I took them into custody. Nobody was with me when I stopped them, but myself. I know where Mrs. Davis lives; it was about thirty yards from her house as near as I can guess; I took the prisoners to the watchhouse, with some assistance; the prisoners were not searched in my presence. Before I stopped them, I did not see either of them stoop down, or drop any thing. Near my box, when we came back, some keys were picked up by one of the witnesses; that was where I stopped the prisoners; my box is in Sun-yard. There were a good many keys; but I don't know how many. I delivered the prisoner to the care of the watch-house-keeper.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. When I heard the cry of stop thief, I did not know whose voice it was; it appeared to be a woman's; the person who was crying it was about thirty yards off; I don't know whether it might be twenty, twenty-five, or thirty. I did not know where the prosecutrix's house was. Both the men were running, and when I laid hold of one, the other stooped first behind. I knew them, because I had seen them lurking about the night before; they did not resist. I saw the keys found; Newman found them; Mrs. Davis might be there to the best of my belief. I saw some keys produced the same night.

JOHN NEWMAN . I am a licensed victualler. I was in Sun-yard on the night of Thursday before Good Friday; I was standing in my bar, and heard the cry of stop thief; my public-house is in Sunyard. On hearing that cry, I ran outside the door, and saw the watchman have hold of the two men; I took hold of one of the men, and went with them to the watchhouse. When I came back from the watch-house, I found some duplicates; he tore one duplicate in half, and I took the other half of it in his hand. When I came back, I picked up the duplicates, a screw-driver, and pen-knive; I picked one key up; it seemed to be a key of a little box; I did not pick up any other keys; there were skeleton keys produced while I was there by a person of the name of Wapshere.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Mrs. Davis had been out of our house from two to five minutes before this. To the best of my knowledge, she might have been in my house a quarter of an hour, or half an hour; but I can't say positively; I did not see her come in, I don't know whether she was in company with any one or not; she was standing at the bar; I don't know whether she was with a sailor and some young ladies. As soon as ever I came out, the watchman had stopped these men; the watch-box is only about four doors from Mrs. Davis's She came to my bar and had a glass; I did not serve her myself.

JOHN WAPSHERE . I am a shoe-maker; I live next door to Mrs. Davis. On the night of Tursday before Good Friday, I had been out, and on my return, I saw the prisoner Harvey standing between the prosecutrix's door and mine; I never saw him before; he was standing nearer to my door than her's. I never took any more notice then; but went in doors. I had not been in more than nine or ten minutes, before I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran out, and they passed my door, and this jacket and waistcoat were dropped; I did not know who dropped

them; they were on the ground; I pursued the prisoners, and the watchman stopped them both; the keys were dropped, and no one else was returned at that time, but the two prisoners; I did not see either of them stoop; Mrs. Davis was following, and she stopped to pick up the waistcoat and jacket; she picked up the keys, and gave them to me; one key dropped out of the ridicule, and somebody else picked another up; but I don't know who. After I found the two prisoners were safe in the watchhouse, I went back and then these skeleton keys were found. I went with the prisoners to the watchhouse; Harvey as he was going along, tried to get his hands into his breeches pocket, and dropped something out just by the watchhouse, it was duplicates; he had torn one in half, and thrown half away, and the other half was taken out of his hand; I left the keys in custody of the officers; Thomas Moore was there; I did not see the keys tried to the lock then; but afterwards Mr. Moore came back with me, and examined the premises, and the keys were then tried, and one of them opened the door.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I was not present when Mrs. Davis picked up these keys; she picked them up in a ridicule; they dropped ridicule and all.

THOMAS MOORE . I am a constable, and there were some keys delivered to me, fourteen; I believe Wapshere brought them; there are nine of them skeletons; I tried some of them on Mrs. Davis's door, and one of the skeleton ones opened it; I tried it at about eight o'clock the next morning; I took charge of these two bundles, which I have had ever since.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am the watchhouse-keeper, and recollect the two prisoners being brought. These keys were produced; the constable took part of them away, and I have two in my possession; Moore was the constable. The two I have are common keys.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Harvey's Defence. My Lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, I had been drinking on the evening, in question, and I was returning home soon after ten, and was nearly at the bottom of Sun-yard, when I heard a cry of stop thief, and saw some woman coming towards me, and I was seized by the watchman, and when this woman came to the watchhouse she charged me, and I am very innocent of it.

Herbert's Defence. I was along with this young man drinking on the said evening, and what he has said is the fact, and I can declare that I am innocent as possible.

HARVEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

HERBERT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-5

480. WILLIAM GOLDSMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Somberg , in the King's highway, on the 18th of June, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 23l. in bank notes, his property.

WILLIAM SOMBERG . I am a Swede. I was robbed of twenty-three pounds nearly two years ago, in the Summer; I was in Stepney fields at the time; I lived at No. 2, in the Back-road; I am a sailor , and I had been on shore two or three days when this happened; our Captain ordered us to go to his house to be paid in Stepney; a great many of our ship mates went with me. I was paid the last, and was playing at shittels in the skittle-ground; until I was paid; I was about two hours in the skittle-ground; the prisoner was there. When I had got my money, I was going home to my lodging; as I was going through a bank in Stepney-fields, where there was an opening, the prisoner and another man were lying down on the other side, and the other man gave me a smack, and knocked me down, and this prisoner took my money; there were two ten-pound note, and three single notes. I never saw the prisoner from the time I was robbed, until about six weeks ago, nor did I ever see him before I saw him in the skittle-ground. After the robbery, I met a man, who advised me to go to Shadwell office, and tell what had happened; I did so, and an officer went with me, and looked every where after the man who had robbed me. I gave the officers a description of the man. I went to sea soon after I was robbed, and was gone for eight months. When I came back, I did not stay here long, but went to Russia almost directly; nobody was with me when I was robbed.

Cross-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. He is older now; he has different clothes on; but his face is not materially altered; he had larger whiskers then than he has now; I described him to the officers has having long whiskers when he robbed me. I can't say I was sober at the time, nor was I drunk; I could stand, or go, or do any thing. I will swear I was not sick in the public-house. This was a very public field. The officers have been supporting me since the last session; I have heard that there is a forty pound reward if the man is cast.

JOHN BUTLER . I am an officer belonging to Shadwell police office. I first saw the last witness in the Summer of 1814; but on what day I can't remember; it was about eight o'clock at night, when I was shutting up the office; he said he had been robbed about half an hour before; he did not give me a description at that time; he gave me a description on the 30th of March, after he had been a voyage. We made every search for the man without effect. In consequence of the description he gave me, the prisoner was apprehended. I was ordered by the magistrate to support the prosecutor, because he was a foreigner, and had no friends.

ROBERT WILLAN . I am an officer, and was with Butler when he apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was born in Stepney, and apprenticed in Shadwell, and have never been out of the way, nor ever had any intimation that I was wanted, until about two months ago, when I was apprehended.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

MRS. STRINGOLD. I am the landlady of the public-house at which the prosecutor and his ship mates were paid on the 28th of June, 1814; he was in my house from nine in the morning until five in the

evening, and I did not consider him sober when he first came; he drank a great deal of porter in the course of the day, and when he went away, I considered him drunk; he abused his captain very much indeed, and accused him of cheating him, and spit about the carpet. I never saw the prisoner before in my life; if he had been in the skittle ground that afternoon, I must have seen him; he was not there.

JAMES COOMEES . My father is a cooper , and lives in Lower Shadwell. The prisoner at the bar was apprenticed to his own father, who worked in our manufactory for fourteen or fifteen years; he is twenty-one now.

MR. REYNOLDS. I will ask you then, had he large whiskers in July, 1814 - A. No; he had not any.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I have known the prisoner from seven to eight years; he lived about a quarter of an hours walk from the field where this robbery is supposed to have been committed.

MR. REYNOLDS. Then as he lived so near the place, I would ask you if ever he has absconded, or been out of the way - A. Never, to my knowledge.

Q. Had he large long whiskers in July 1814 - A. No; he had not any.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-6

481. THOMAS CAREY , MICHAEL SLOANE , JOHN WILSON , and JAMES HILL , were indicted for coining .

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am a patrole of Bow-street. On the 30th of April , I was introduced to Carey at the Red Lion, East Smithfield ; I was disguised like a porter; Vaughan and Dickins were with me; they were in the next room whilst I was with the prisoner Carey. The person who introduced me said to Carey, that was the person of whom he had been speaking. I asked the prisoner when I could have some bobs, meaning bad shillings; he said, he could let me have half a dozen then. I asked him what the price would be, and he said, the old price, half and half. I told him I had no objection, provided they were good ones, meaning good bad ones, and he handed me over half a dozen; I gave him a three-shilling piece, and told him that so small a quantity was no use to me, I wanted a couple of dozen more; he said, he could let me have them by eight o'clock the same evening; this was about three o'clock. I told him I could not wait so long, and asked him if he could not get them quicker; after some consideration, he said he could, and would go home, and set them to work, and would return in half an hour. He went away in about five minutes, and I went into the room where Vaughan and Dickins were, and pulled off my disguise, and followed him; I followed him to Angel-court; I saw him go into a house, which turned out to be No. 2; I waited at the door a few minutes, and when he did not come out, I returned to the public-house, which was about two hundred yards off; I found my brother officers there, and they came back with me; I went up stairs first; the upper room door was fastened; I peeped through the key-hole, and saw Carey rubbing something in his hand. Vaughan and Dickins had followed me; it was in the two pair of stairs. Near Carey was a chair, on which I could distinctly see three pieces, resembling shillings. We bursted the door open afterwards, and then Sloane had a pair of pinchers in his hand, and a file; he was filing something. The other two were sitting on another chair, with a basin between them, rubbing something with their fingers. I did not wait at the door above a minute; the other officers looked after me. We then burst the door open, and I seized the prisoner Carey, who immediately dropped what he had in his hands, into that basin, (points to another basin produced.) I secured him and Sloane, and the other officers secured the other two. Sloane immediately dropped the pinchers, and they fell at my feet, together with a round bit of brass. On searching Carey, this shilling dropped from him; these three were on the chair were he was sitting; this basin was also on the chair were he was sitting, and it had this wash in it, which I put into this bottle. Near Sloane were these five blanks. We secured the prisoners, and brought them away; their hands were all over a white stuff, which Dickins will produce; their hands looked as if they had been handling the peels of wallnuts; there was an empty bottle which was corked, and when the cork was drawn, it made a report; the cork also seemed very much burnt. I asked Carey where the good money was which I had given to him, and he said, he did not know.

GEORGE VAUGHAN , and SAMUEL DICKINS , two other officers, corroborated the latter part of the last witness' testimony, and produced several other implements of coning.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I am assistant to the Solicitor for the Mint. I am of opinion that the implements and materials produced, are such as would be appropriated to the coining of money of the description produced by the officers, and are sufficient for that purpose.

MR. JOHN NICOLL, one of the moneyers of the Mint, proved the baseness of the coin produced.

The prisoners in their defence stated that they had been employed by the person who had introduced Jefferson to Carey.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-7

482. SARAH GILBENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , twenty-four silver forks, value 12l. twelve silver table-spoons, value 6l. twelve silver desert spoons, value 3l. four silver sauce ladles, value 4l. two gravy-spoons, value 2l. eighteen silver tea-spoons, value 4l. seven silver salt-spoons, value 1l. one silver cheese-knife, value 7s. one pair of silver sugar tongs, value 10s. one silver punch ladle, value 10s. two silver cup-covers, value 4l. one silver snuffer-stand, value 1l. one silver tea-pot stand, value 1l. 1s. one silver butter knife, value 5s. four silver salts, value 4l. four silver wine labels, value 4s. four decanter stands, value 1l. two extinguishers, value 5s. one tablecloth, value 5s. and one man's jacket, value 10s. the property of Sir George Thomas Smart , knt. in his dwelling-house .

LOUISA HALL . I am servant to Sir George Thomas Smart . On Friday the 16th of May, there had been a party at my master's house; and the next morning I washed up the plate and put it in a table cloth in the back kithen, at about half past twelve o'clock. It consisted of all the articles enumerated in the indictment. The back kitchen where I put them, is at the back of the house; they could not be seen from the street.

WILLIAM HALL . I am Sir George's servant. There had been an entertainment at his house the night before this robbery. There had been near an hundred and twenty persons. There was no more plate than Sir George's; there were some persons coming from the Argyle Rooms to take the seats away, which Sir George had hired. Persons going by, might observe that there was a stir and bustle going on in the house.

DENNIS KEEF . I am a porter, and was sent from the Argyle Rooms to Sir George Smart 's house, to remove some of the things which he had hired. I was taking away cane seats, tables, and tressels. There was another porter named Roach. It was necessary that the door should be left open. In the course of the work, between half past one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the bar. To the best of my belief I saw her on the two pair of stairs landing place. I don't know whether she had any thing; she had a pair of pattens in her hand. I was coming down; thinking she was one of the servants of the house, I remarked to her, that it was a nice day, to what the day before was, when we brought the things, for it had been a rainy day; and she said, yes it was. From that moment's conversation I had sight and view enough of her to know it was she, when I saw her again; in the course of about three hours, or something less, I was as sure of her then, as I am now. I think she had something in her apron before her, but I can't swear.

JOHN ROACH . I am also a porter. I was assisting Keef that morning. I saw the prisoner in Sir George's house, at the bottom of the stairs in the hall. I spoke to her, and said, good day ma'am; we are all in a bustle here. She made a very low answer which I could not hear; I am sure she is the person.

DAVID THOMAS . I am a linen draper, at No. 119, Oxford-street. On the day in question, I took notice of the prisoner by her being in my house. It is two turnings from John-street, which leads to Great Portland-street. It was about twelve o'clock. I had the Rev. Mr. Helm in my house, who on going out to his silversmith's left the street - door open, and I found the prisoner in my house. I knew her person; I saw her in about an hour and a half afterwards in Edward-street, Cavendish-square. She had then a large bundle of things in a table-cloth. From that to Sir George's house, which is about four or five hundred yards, or rather less than a quarter of a mile. I took particular notice of her and walked past her. When I turned round, she was out of my sight; she had gone down a gateway, where there was no thoroughfare. I went down also and heard a noise behind a stable gate, and I looked, behind, and immediately she ran off from behind it and up some steps, and said, I am undone, take the property? the property is yours, or something to that purpose. She was greatly confused. I called several persons but not one of them would secure her. I took her; I afterwards took the bundle from behind the gate, where she had left it. I afterwards examined it. There were one hundred and one pieces of silver plate. All these I gave to the officer. They were never out of my hands until I gave them to the officer. I delivered the prisoner to him also.

CHARLES JEFFERSON . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I was sent for, and these things were delivered to me in the street, and have been in my custody ever since. The prisoner was present when they were delivered to me, there was a coat also.

(Property produced and sworn to, according to the value set forth in the indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have no earthly friend to make intercession for me. My husband is in the King's Bench, and my two children are with my parents.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-8

483. WILLIAM IMBER was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Morgan , in the King's highway, on the 7th of April , and for putting him in fear, and for taking from his person, and against his will, five shillings and six-pence in monies numbered, the property of the said John Morgan .

JOHN MORGAN . I am cook at the Globe Tavern. On the 7th of April last, I was going through Hornsey Wood , between five and six o'clock in the morning. I was with another young man; as we were coming along we saw a gang, apparently a great number together, fifty or sixty, as near as I can tell. They were coming through the wood, and we were going through; when about twenty of them had passed us, then they attacked both of us at once. I was struck over the head with a stick, and knocked down in the pathway. The other person who was along with me was thrown into the ditch, at the same time. I got up, and was immediately knocked down again. Then as many of them as could well get at me with their hands turned my pockets inside out. I had five shillings and sixpence in silver, and a metal watch about me. The five shillings and sixpence was taken from me, and they took my watch out of my fob; and as they were taking it, I caught hold of it, and they pulled and the chain broke. I then got up, and when they found I would not give up my watch, they knocked me down again. Then I was knocked down the third time; they kicked me on my sides and neck; when I got up, they cried ditch the b-gg-r, ditch him, and I was immediately thrown into the ditch. I got up again, and threw myself among them in the wood. When they found I fought so very hard, a very big one of them called out for a knife, and said, stand aside, and I will do for the b-gg-r. Immediately about half a dozen of them threw themselves upon me, and I caught hold of the prisoner Imber, who was one of them, and struggled with him, and he got away from me and ran into the fields, and I got away from the

others had got the watch, but I had it, in my hand. I had not observed the prisoner until I had got hold of him; he was one of the five or six who were upon me at last. I saw Vaughan and Jefferson when it was all over; I saw them coming down through the wood; Vaughan, Jefferson, Dickinson, and Rice; we told them what had been done to us. We afterwards went to the Sluice House; when we went there I went up stairs, and the officers went with me; I should think there were near an hundred or two hundred persons in the room up stairs; I picked the prisoner Imber out from amongst the persons in that room; I knew him; he was taken into custody by one of the officers.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. This was on a Sunday. I did not see them fighting; I had no scuffle nor fight with any body there, nor went there to see any fighting. I carried away the watch from the place; I deceived them, because I had it in my hand, and they thought some of the others had it. They called it a tickler, and said if I did not give it to them they would do for me.

Examined by the COURT. The persons we met, were men and boys; I do not know how far the Sluice House is from the place where I was robbed.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer belonging to the public office Bow-street. I happened to be in Hornsey Wood, and saw Dickins, Maidment, and Rice there; we were going through the Wood about six o'clock in the morning, and met a great many men, the greater part of whom I knew myself, and amongst the rest was the prisoner Imber; they seemed as if they were hastening from a field at the farther end of the Wood. I knew Imber by sight before. In consequence of some conversation that took place between me and the other officers, we went towards this field at the farther end of the Wood. We saw two men, the prosecutor, and another, just recovering themselves, and they got up, and ran away; I hallooed out to them that we were officers, and produced my staff. and then they came up to us. In consequence of what they communicated to us, I took them to Sluice House, which is about a quarter of a mile from the place where I met them. In consequence of information which I received from Jefferson, who was below stairs, I found that the gang had gone up stairs; I went up stairs with Morgan and his companion, and the whole of the officers; when we were in the room, the prosecutor pointed out Imber, and I immediately took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to go a palming that morning, and I met some men who had been palming too; there was a great many people behind us, and they all turned back into this mob of people, and as I came amongst them, they pushed me down; I hallooed out murder, and they pushed me down again, and took two shillings and five-pence from me, and I thought my life would be taken away from me every minute.

John Morgan , Re-examined. The prisoner did not halloo out murder; I did not see him ill-used by any of the people; I did not take notice of the prisoner until after I had been knocked down four times; after I had been knocked down the fourth time, five or six still remained upon me; I am sure the prisoner was one of those who remained upon me at the time; he did not say a word.

JURY. Q. When you had hold of the prisoner, which of you was uppermost - A. He had hold of me, he was on top.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-9

484. CHARLES BUTLER and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Whiting, about the hour of two in the night of the 8th of May , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one pair of sheets, value 8s. three shirts, value 14s. six shirts, value 14s. one waistcoat, value 2s. one gown, value 12s. two petticoats, value 3s. three frocks, value 17s. 6d. three pair of trowsers, value 15s. one pair of stays, value 1s. nine pinnafores, value 13s. three pillow-cases, value 5s. 6d. two tablecloths, value 42s. one trank, value 1s. 6d. one cap, value 1s. 6d. five cravats, value 10s. two remanants of calico, value 1s. two remnants of cotton, value 2s. two remnants of linen, value 2s. one pair of silver table spoons, value 1l. 12s. one pair of silver salt spoons, value 6s. one toast-back, value 1s. one pair of candlesticks, value 2s. 6d. one mug, value 2s. five pair of boots, value 2l. 12s. two pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. one jacket, value 12s. 6d. two hats, value 1l. 10s. one coat, value 10s. one pair of gaiters, value 5s. one pair of knee-caps, value 4s. one silk handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. two pair of gloves, value 1s. and one boy's shirt, value 4s. the property of the said Henry Whiting .

HENRY WHITING . I live in Bellevue-terrace, Ball's-pond . In the morning of the 9th of May, at about five o'clock, I discovered my house to have been broken open; I was called up by some man passing by; I discovered my kitchen shutters to have been opened; it is not a sunk kitchen; they were inside shutters; the glass of the sash was broken, or cut; the sash fastening was forced; it had been fastened by an extra screw. Two holes were bored through the shutters, one with a gimlet, and the other with a centre-bit; they had first made a hole on that side of the shutter which would not enable them to get down the bar; then they made another hole on the other side large enough for them to get their hands through. I then discovered that the things mentioned in the indictment were gone; I discovered a basket was missing, which had been ready placed with the things to go to the mangle. At the lowest rate, the things I lost came to sixteen pounds, eighteen pounds, or twenty pounds; they were all my property; I was the sole occupier of the house, with my family. I can't say I was the last up the night previous; of my own knowledge, I know that the sash of the kitchen was fastened down; I went to bed at about eleven o'clock; I had seen the greater part of the things the night previous, before I went to bed; some I had worn, and some my children had worn. I was not disturbed at all until five o'clock. When I came down stairs in the morning, I found a gimlet in the kitchen, immediately under the shelf; in the

front court I found a large oak stick, and the kitchen bar, the bar which fastens the shutters; I found a candle also turned with the wick downwards in a salt-seller in the roasting-jack; there was salt in the salt-seller. I never used a candle in that way. All my properly has not been found.

THOMAS HOWARD . I am headborough of the parish of St. Mary Islington. On the morning of the 9th of May, in consequence of some information, I followed the two prisoners, I took one, and gave the other in charge to a man of the name of Banks; I followed them in Bridle-lane; it was about twenty minutes before six o'clock; it was broad day light then; they were carrying two large bundles. I took Butler myself, and gave charge of Smith to Banks.

CHARLES BANKS . I was present at the taking of these two men.

THOMAS BONE . I was going to work; when I saw them it was half past five. I saw them coming along the fields into the road; that was about a mile from Mr. Whiting's house; they had two bundles; I am sure those are the bundles. I followed them; I took hold of one of them; they were two mighty for me. I was along side of them before the constable came up. Butler dropped his bundle, and I took him immediately. Smith ran away, but was over taken.

WILLIAM BAGNELL . I was about two hundred yards from the prisoners when they were taken; I had seen them with two bundles.

GEORGE NOBLE . I was going to work at about a quarter before six, and I saw these two men with the bundles, and I followed them, and never lost sight of them until they were taken.

Butler's Defence. I was going to Town at about five o'clock in the morning to see for some work; and as I was going along a brick-field, I saw these two bundles among the straw, and I saw this man Smith coming along up the road, and I called him over to ask him what was best to do with them, and he said, the best way was to take them to Town, and see if any body owned them, and advertise them in the papers, and as we were going along, that man, (Bone,) caught hold of me.

Smith's Defence. I can say so far as this here, that I was going over to Kingsland to my sister-in-law who lives there, to get her to stand Godmother to my child, and I saw this man, Butler, in a brick-field, and he called me over, and shewed me these bundles in the straw, and we agreed to take them to the next public-house, and as we were going along, these people stopped us, and as for running away, I never ran away at all.

Evidence for the Prisoners.

CHARLES DALTON . I saw Bone, Noble, and Banks; they were in the yard of this court; they were talking close to me about the prisoners, saying, they must say, they found some bits of muslin on them or it would not do. They said, they did not care if they stretched them, so as they got the money. A few pounds would be of use to them. Noble said, the few pounds would be of use, and the others conversed about the muslin.

(This witness was here ordered out of Court.)

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I was standing in the same way as the last witness decribed, and heard towards the latter part of this coversation. I heard them say that they would not mind stretching the b-gg-s if so be as they could get a few pounds, for it would be of use to them.

Examined by the COURT. I immediately knew Charles Dalton. We did not have any conversation about this. I mentioned it to him, and he said he heard the same words; it might be about four o'clock, or after.

Q. You know there are three gates in the yard, one for carriages, and two for foot passengers, now whereabouts were you standing when you overheard all this - A. Between the middle gate, and the farthest.

Charles Dalton , Re-examined. I know Smith, by his making shoes for me; I live at 34, Gee-street, and am a watch-case finisher. When I over-heard this conversation between these witnesses, there were a great many people about; but I did not take notice who they were. I am sure I did not take notice whether there were so many as twenty or thirty; I heard this conversation near the outer-door.

Q. Was it near any gate - A. Yes; it was near about the first gate; it was between the bottom of the steps and the first gate.

Q. Did you stand next the prison, or next these windows - A. I stood in different parts; not exactly in one place; I stood nearer the Court than the Gaol. I can't tell which stood nearest to the witness.

Evidence for the Prosecution, in Reply.

Thomas Howard , Re-examined. Butler told me he found these things in a field; a man asked them about the dog, but it was not I.

Thomas Bone , Re-examined. I have heard what these persons have said. I never said to any persons that a little money would do me good, nor did any of the other witnesses for the prosecution say so in my hearing.

George Noble , Re-examined. I never said that we must swear to finding some muslin, or else this case would not do. I never said that I did not care, so long as I stretched them, for a little money would do me good; I never uttered such a thing.

Charles Banks , Re-examined. I never heard either of the two last witnesses say what has been stated. About four o'clock, we were in the public-house over the way. Nothing of the kind was mentioned there.

BUTLER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-10

485. WILLIAM COLVILLE and WILLIAM CHAPMAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Erasmus Payne , in the King's Highway, on the 12th of May , and for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two three-shilling bank tokens, value 6s. his property .

ERASMUS PAYNE. I am a taylor . I never saw the prisoners before Sunday morning, the 12th of May, that I know of; I was then coming home at about half past twelve, or a quarter to one; a young man named John Pindon was with me. Coming

through Temple Bar, I said, we will call at the Star and Horse Shoe and have a parting glass, and I did so. We went in, and I saw the two prisoners together at the Star and Horse Shoe. I was rather intoxicated, but not drunk, nor yet sober; I knew very well what I was doing. As we were going in, another young man was coming in; and he and my friend had rum and gin; he did not know my friend; he said, I will drink with you, for you are two taylors; from that he gave the glass to me, and after that to the prisoner; then the strange young man, tossed for half a pint of rum. The prisoners offered to toss to make it up a pint. There was not any particular conversation passed, any other wise then their drinking with us. I believe we all tossed. I tossed and we had the rum between us; five drunk out of a pint and a half; I had only one glass myself. The two prisoners at the bar walked away with me after that; they walked on each side of me. They said we could get some coffee, and we went to a coffee shop in Wych-street ; It was then very near three o'clock in the morning. I went in, but immediately said to the prisoners I don't like the look of this place. I turned out directly, and got about six or seven yards from the door, when the prisoner Colville came up by the side of me, and presently the other prisoner came up. Before I got very little further, I found the prisoner Colville after putting his hand into my pocket. I believe he did not put his hand in, for I think I catched it. I said, you are after robbing me. By holding of him by the hand, I was knocked down, but I don't know by whom. The prisoners had no weapons with them that I perceived. I don't know whether it was with a stick that I was knocked down or how. My head was cut with the fall. It did not make me insensible. I saw nothing of the prisoners after that. As soon as I got up again, I missed my money. I discovered that I had lost between fifteen and sixteen shillings. I saw the prisoners no more, until they were taken to the watch-house. My friend was some distance off. at the farther end of the street, when I was knocked down. I saw the prisoners taken to the watch house in a very little time after. I am sure they were the same men I had been drinking with.

Colville. Q. Did you ever catch my hand in your pocket?

Witness. No; but I caught you putting your hand to it.

Chapman. Were you not so drunk that you did not know what you were about?

- A. I was sufficiently sober to know what I was about.

JOSEPH BERRY . I am a constable. On the Sunday morning, at about half past three o'clock, I saw the two prisoners at the bar, in company with the prosecutor, in Picket-street; there were two more behind, which I did not know at that time. Knowing Chapman, I followed them into Wych-street; they then went into the coffee-shop with the two others; they then came out of the coffee-shop, and I followed them until they came to the corner of Newcastle-street, in Wych-street; they stopped there about ten minutes; they then moved down Wych-street, towards the dark part, which is about the middle; I then crossed over the way. They then stayed there about ten minutes, and I heard some one say, you are robbing me; one of the men fell. I then went down towards them, and the two prisoners ran from the spot by me; I followed them until they got to a coffee-shop in Blackmore-street, Drury-lane. When I saw the prisoners go in there, I told the patrole, who was with me, to go back, and fetch the prosecutor. When he came, we went into the coffee-shop; I went up stairs, and I laid hold of Chapman by the collar, in consequence of what the prosecutor told me. I brought him down; I told him I wanted him; Colville followed down; I told Colville I wanted him also. The moment they came down, the prosecutor laid hold of Colville, and said, that is the man that had his hand in my pocket. I then took them and the prosecutor to St. Clement's watchhouse. I asked Colville what money he had about him, and after some hesitation, he said, fourteen or fifteen shillings; I searched him, and found sixteen shillings and four-pence, with two three-shilling pieces among it. He said, he had changed a one-pound note, when I asked him where he got it. I asked him where he changed it; but he did not know. I searched the other prisoner; but he had nothing at all. When I saw them in the first coffee-shop, I spoke to Chapman; he knew I was an officer; he did not see me in the street after that, because I evaded his sight. I am sure the prosecutor did not join two other men than the prisoners, after he came out of the first coffee-shop in Wych-street. Chapman said to me in the first coffee-shop, how are you Mr. Berry, I hope you will not take any notice of my being here.

RICHARD SHAW . The patrole, corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

JOHN FAIRBAIRN . I am a patrole. I was with Shaw. The story he has told is the truth. Colville wanted to make his escape from me at the coffee-shop in Blackmore-street.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I was constable of the night. I asked the prisoner Colville, how he got the money, and he said, he had been in Shoe-lane to receive some money for his work. I asked him how much, and he said, he believed a one-pound note. I then asked him where he had changed it, but he could not tell where he got change. I then locked them up, and on the Sunday morning, Colville's mother came, and I asked her in his presence, if she knew any thing of his getting a one-pound note for work; and she said, she did not. Then he said, he received one pound one shilling all in silver. When the prosecutor came to the watchhouse, he was violently bruised, and all over mud.

THOMAS HILL . I was in company with the prosecutor. I was going down Wych-street at the time he was knocked down by Chapman. I saw the prisoner Colville before; I never knew him before; I knew it was him, because I went to the watchhouse; I was about twelve yards from him when he knocked him down, and after he got up, he knocked him down again.

Chapman. Q. Did you come out of the coffee-shop when the prosecutor came out?

Witness. I came out about half a minutes after him.

Colville's Defence. When first I went into the

Star and Horse Shoe, I called for a pint of beer, and presently the prosecutor came in, and said he would toss any one in the room for half a pint of rum, and I tossed the other to make it a pint, and we had three or four pints of rum, and we were all so intoxicated that we could not walk.

Chapman's Defence. When the prosecutor first came in, he said all the money he had was two three-shilling pieces, and he lent his friend a three shilling piece, and spent two shillings and eightpence himself, and then the landlord would not draw any more liquor, and we all came out together, and then the prosecutor said, he had lost his two three-shilling pieces, and he accused us of robbing him, and I shoved him down.

COLVILLE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

CHAPMAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-11

486. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , two bonnets, value 2l. eight gowns, value 6l. five silk handkerchiefs, value 1l. one pelisse, value 50s. three shawls, value 2l. two shifts, value 10s. two half handkerchiefs, value 2s. one napkin, value 2s. three tea-spoons, value 6s. two combs, value 2s. one ring, value 10s. one veil, value 10s. two yards of calico, value 3s. one bed-gown, value 1s. three caps, value 5s. and four lace collars, value 10s. the property of Joseph Jesson , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH JESSON . I keep a public-house in the Broad-way Westminster . The prisoner was my servant on the 26th of April, and had lived with me about eight days. On the evening of the day in the indictment, when my daughter went up stairs, she missed a great many things, and hallooed out at the top of the stairs, that the house was robbed; I immediately ran up stairs, and found the prisoner there; I accused her of having stolen the things, and she made no answer at all. I then called an officer out of my parlour, and then she said, the things were not out of the house. By her direction, the officer went into the back yard, and there he found a bundle of things; he said, he had got them out of the sand-hole in the kitchen. She was taken to Queen-square office.

SARAH JESSON . Proved where the things had been deposited previous to their removal.

ROBERT SMITHERS . I am an officer. The prosecutor called me up stairs, and I asked the prisoner how she could be so foolish, and she said, she was very sorry for it; but the things were not out of the house. I found the things by her direction, in a kind of washhouse.

THOMAS GARNER. I am a police officer. I searched the prisoner at our office, and found this silk shawl and these two spoons on her, which are claimed by the prosecutrix.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-12

487. PETER FLAGAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wood , at about the hour of ten in the forenoon, of the 23rd of May , and stealing therein, a hat, value 10s. a black crape hat band, value 1s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Wood .

JOHN WOOD . I live in Spread Eagle-court, Limehouse . When I went out in the morning of the day in the indictment, I locked my door, and left my house otherwise secure; I put the key in the place where I was accustomed to put it.

JANE KELLY . I went to this young man's house on the morning of the 23rd of May, at about half past nine; I found the key where he used to put it. I had had his hat to do for him, and I took it with me tied up in a handkerchief; it had a hat-band round it; it had been to be cleaned. I came out, and lucked the door after me, and put the key where I found it. There was nobody in the house when I was there.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a constable. At about ten o'clock in the morning of the 23rd of May, I was just going out of my door, and saw the prisoner at the bar running from the corner of Limehouse Causeway; I stood at the corner of the house seeing him run with a hat in a handkerchief in his hand; I was preparing myself to have a run after him. When I heard the cry of stop thief, I immediately pursued him, and when he had got about half way across a field, he threw away the hat, which I picked up in pursuing him. In a moment, I missed him, and found him again up an alley, where there is no thoroughfare. On searching him, I found a socket chisel on him, which has been bent for the purpose of prizing things. I took him to the watchhouse, and gave the hat to the night-beadle. We went afterwards, and found marks where the window had been prized up, which this chissel exactly fitted. The window had one line broke, and would not slide easy.

ELIZABETH BEALE . I live next door to John Wood . At about ten o'clock in the morning of the day in the indictment, I heard John Wood's window go down with a slam; I was sitting against my own window at the time; my dog flew out of the door, and ran round the corner; I went after him, and saw the prisoner running; he might be twenty or thirty yards off; he was running in a direction from Wood's house. He had a hat in a handkerchief; I cried stop thief.

JOHN LINES . I compared the chissel with the marks on the window, and found them to correspond.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down to Blackwall to look for a ship, and picked that chissel up as I went along, and it was never made for any design of mine. I picked up that hat as I was running along with it, and they stopped me.

William Jones . He said, he did it out of poverty when he was taken.

GUILTY, aged 50,

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 11d. only .

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-13

488. THOMAS CAREY , MICHAEL SLOANE ,

JOHN WILSON , and JAMES HILL , were indicted for coining .

MR. GURNEY, counsel for the prosecution, declineing to offer any evidence, the prisoners of this charge were.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-14

489. THOMAS CAREY was again indicted for feloniously disposing of, and putting away, six pieces of counterfeit milled money, made each to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, at a lower rate than by their denomination they did import , against the statute.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I was introduced to the prisoner at a public-house in East Smithfield , and on asking him if he had any bobs, meaning counterfeit shillings, he said, he had half a dozen. I asked him what I was to stand for them, and he said, the old price, half and half. I told him, I had no objection, provided they were good ones. He then produced these half dozen, for which I gave him a three-shilling bank token. I looked at those he gave me, and said, I had seen better ones than those; I told him I wanted a larger quantity, and he said, he would endeavour to alter them.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I look at this money; it is counterfeit. I am conversant with counterfeit money, and perceive these are only washed.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined one year , and fined 1s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-15

490. ELIZABETH SOREL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , one lace shawl, value 4l. one lace cap, value 1l. fifteen yards of sarsnet, value 2l. twenty-one yards of lace, value 1l. 8s. twentyfour yards of ribbon, value 5s. a quarter of a pound of sewing silk, value 5s. ten yards of net, value 2s. four pair of stockings, value 6s. five yards of flannel, value 3s. a yard and a half of trimming, value 1s. four silk tassels, value 6d. twenty yards of tape, value 3d. one fan, value 6d. and six balls of cotton, value 3d. the property of William Samuel Garford , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SAMUEL GARFORD . I am a haberdasher . The prisoner was a servant of mine. On the day in the indictment, in consequence of having missed some money out of the till, I determined to have the boxes of all our young people searched; accordingly I sent for an officer, and the things in the indictment were found in the prisoner's box. The fan has my private mark on it, and am certain that the greater part of the other things are my property.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer, and searched the prisoner's box, and found all these things in it.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-16

491. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , three shirts, value 18s. two shifts, value 6s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. and four waistcoats, value 20s. the property of William Mitchell , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Rolfe .

SARAH ROLFE . I live with my husband at 45, Rathbone-place . On the 24th of May, I missed these things, between three and four in the morning, together with several other things, which I did not mention in the indictment. I missed them out of the passage; they were wet; I had put them there about eleven o'clock on the night previous.

MICHAEL HURLEY . I stopped the prisoner, with this property in Foley-street, about four o'clock in the morning.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-17

492. JANE HOLFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , a pair of shoes, value 6s. the property of Thomas Lock , privately in his shop .

THOMAS LOCK . I am a shoe-maker . The prisoner came into my shop with another woman on the day in the indictment. While they were in the shop, I saw a vacancy over the mantle piece, where a pair of shoes was missing; they went out of the shop before any thing was said about it; I did not see any body take them. I pursued the prisoner, and took her under a gateway; she had the shoes in her apron. I brought her back, and delivered her into the custody of an officer.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I received charge of the prisoner, and the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor old woman, and beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160529-18

493. WILLIAM SEABROOK and RICHARD BRITTEN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Rimmington about the hour of ten in the forenoon of the 23rd of April , and stealing therein, one shirt, value 2s. 6d. the property of the said Richard Rimmington .

JANE ROBERTS . I saw the two prisoners in company together stop at Mrs. Rimmington's window, and Britten opened it, and took out the shirt. I gave an alarm, and they were taken shortly afterwards.

SARAH FARNHAM . I saw Seabrook hide the shirt under some cabbage stalks by the corner of our garden.

JACOB STARKS. I am a constable, and received the shirt into my charge, and apprehended the prisoners.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

SEABROOK, GUILTY , aged 33.

BRITTEN, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-19

494. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a tea-caddy, value 2l. the property of Sophia Damond , in her dwelling-house .

SOPHIA DAMOND . I know nothing of this robbery of my own knowledge. The tea-caddy was replaced before I heard of the circumstance, and I never missed it.

SARAH LOVING . I live directly opposite to the prosecutrix. I saw the prisoner take this caddy from Mrs. Damond's shop, and when he perceived I was going over to tell her, he came back, and replaced it.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing to the value of 39s, only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-20

495. HENRY DYE was indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession a forged promissory note, made to the likeness and similitude of the notes of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, he well knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-21

496. HENRY DYE was again indicted for forging a note of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence on this indictment, on account of the prisoner's plea in the last case.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-22

497. ROBERT HENRY DYE was indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession, a forged promissory note, made to the likeness and similitnde of the notes issued by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-23

498. ROBERT HENRY DYE was again indicted for forging a note of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

MR. REYNOLDS, on the part of the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence on this indictment, on account of the prisoner's plea in the last case.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-24

499. PATRICK FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , a watch, value 3l. and a seal value 2s. the property of John Saunders , in the dwelling-house of John Newman .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I lost my watch at the Sun public-house , about eight weeks ago. The prisoner slept in the same room with me. When I awoke on the morning of the day in the indictment, the prisoner, and my watch were gone.

RICHARD PARRY . I live with Messrs. Temple, pawnbrokers. That is our duplicate, and I produce the watch, which was pawned between the hours of eight and ten in the morning of the 17th; we lent one pound fifteen shillings on it.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, I am a poor friendless young man, only twenty three years of age, seven of which I have spent in his Majesty's service. It was the first offence I was ever guilty of and real distress was the cause of it, as I had no employment whatever since I was discharged. Immediately on my apprehension, I confessed my guilt, as Mr. Newman, the Publican, promised that I should not be prosecuted. I have only one friend in London, who at present lies dangerously ill, and therefore can't attend to give me a character, although he knows me from my infancy. I however, most humbly hope and implore that your lordship, as it is my first offence, will pass on me a favourable sentence, and your lordship's supplicant will ever pray

PATRICK FLYNN

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one year . and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-25

500. WILLIAM PEARSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a spoon, value 10s. the property of James Murdock ; and a coat, value 2l. 5s. two shirts, value 4s. one cravat, value 6d. and a pair of shoes, value 10s. the property of John Robson .

JAMES MURDOCK . I live in the house of John Robson . The prisoner lived on the same floor with us. On our missing these things on the day in the indictment, the prisoner was gone. The great coat, cravat, shoes, and shirt belonged to Mr. Taylor.

HENRY GODFREY . I belong to Bow-street. The prisoner told me he sold a coat to Aaron Aaron . He did not tell me what coat.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-26

591. JOHN WELLING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Hudson , widow , in the King's highway, on the 15th of April , at St. Botolph Aldgate, for putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 3s. and one apron, value 1s. her property .

MARY HUDSON . I am a widow. I know the prisoner at the bar. I never knew him before he took my shawl, on the 15th of April; I was standing at my door in Sun-yard, Nightingale lane ; it was about twelve o'clock at night; as he came past, he snatched my shawl off my neck, and my apron from round my waist. The one broke the strings of the other, as I suppose; the shawl was cotton, I valued it at four shillings. I had never seen the prisoner

before; he ran away as fast as he could, and I ran after him, and sung out stop thief. Immediately after, I ran against him. I saw him again as soon as the watchman attacked him, and took him to the watchhouse.

JAMES SIMMONS . I am a patrole. On the 15th of April, I was standing at the corner of Nightingale-lane, and heard a cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner making towards me; he was running fast; if I had been behind him, I could not have come up to him; it had just gone twelve o'clock. I caught hold of him, and we both fell, and he chucked a shawl and apron on the ground; I have them here; he did not throw them any distance from him.

GEORGE KAINES . The prisoner was brought to my custody.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken into that house by a girl, the door was open, and there was another girl sitting there by the fire-side. The other girl took the rest of my money, and ran out, and the prosecutrix pretended she knew nothing of her, and I took her shawl.

Q. To Prosecutrix. Had you not seen the prisoner in your house - A. No; he was not there at all; I don't know who he was.

Evidence for the Prisoner.

GEORGE TURKAN . I am a Scotchman. I know the prisoner. I recollect the Sunday he was taken into custody; I parted with him at about half past ten; I left him in Sun-yard, Nightingale-lane, with the woman of the house, the prosecutrix; he had money when he went up stairs in that house; I am quite sure it was that house, kept by that woman,(pointing to the prosecutrix,) I knew the other woman who went up stairs with the prisoner. I remained in the house after he went up stairs with the woman, and after he came down again; he was not above a quarter of an hour with the girl, and they came down quarrelling; it was near ten and eleven o'clock when he came down, as near as I can recollect. The other young man and I went out, and left him quarrelling with the old woman, the prosecutrix. I am quite sure I left the prisoner taking about ten minutes with her, before I left the house.

Prosecutrix, Re-examined. It is all false; I never spoke to him in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-27

502. JAMES DONOHUE was indicted for a highway robbery .

BUT as the witnesses could not swear positively to his person, as being a party concerned, he was found

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-28

503. ISAAC JONAS and DAVID SOLOMONS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Shaw , in the King's highway, on the 8th of May , and for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one pocket-book, value 2s. one gold watch, value 20l. one piece of ribbon, value 6d. three seals, value 1l. and nineteen five-pound bank notes, his property .

RICHARD SHAW . I am a merchant . On the 17th of May last, I had been passing the evening with some friends in Hungerford-street, in the Strand; it was nearly eleven o'clock when I left them; I drank nothing but ale all the evening; I came directly down the Strand, and Fleet-street, and up Ludgate hill, in my way home. When I got to the top of Ludgate-hill, I was going to cross to get to the left hand side of St. Paul's Church-yard, when an elderly gentleman, with either grey or powdered hair, ran against me; a few words ensued, and the two prisoners came up to me; I have no doubt of them. They said, the old man was in fault; they said they would stand my friends, and they each took hold of my arms, and took me out of the crowd which had collected. We then proceeded up St. Paul's Churchyard, and got into Friday-street, and met a watchman there, and asked him if any house was open in the neighbourhood where the prisoners and I might have a friendly glass together; it was I that proposed to take a friendly glass. The watchman told us that they were up at the White Horse, in Friday-street; we went there, and got a glass each, I and the two prisoners; I had a glass of brandy and water, and they had each a glass of rum; one of them paid for it. We all went out together; we were not in the house ten minutes; we all left it together. I then asked them the way to the Belle Savage Inn, on Ludgate-hill, as it was so late, and they said, they would tell me. We then turned down to the right into Fish-street; I was a stranger to that neighbourhood, and have learned since that that is the name of the street. We then turned down Lambeth-hill , and going down the hill, one of the men hit me a violent blow over the head; that was given me with his hand; I can't exactly tell which of them did it; I was hit, and tripped up by the heels at the same time. The effect of the blow was that I fell. I was a good deal stunned.

Q. Do you know what happened to you while you were on the ground - A. I was robbed while I was on the ground; my pocket-book and watch were taken from me while I was down; I missed them when I came to myself.

Q. Did you feel any body taking them - A. No; I did not. I was stunned by the blow or fall. I had my pocket-book and watch immediately before.

Q. What was the last time you felt your pocketbook and watch about you - A. In Fish-street; when I had left Mr. Mountain's, then I had them safe. When I got up, Jonas was with me, and he only. The watchman came up just at that moment, and I told him, I was robbed of my pocket-book and watch. Jonas was present when I told the watchman this. He said, you don't think I have robbed you, do you, if you do, I will go with you to the watchhouse. We then proceeded down the hill altogether; when we got near to the bottom, Jonas asked the watchman how far it was to the watchhouse. The watchman told him it was close at hand, when he immediately ran off, and the watchman after him; he

got clear off. I went down to the watchhouse. I saw them again in about a fortnight after; not before; I can't exactly say. I had given a description of them. I knew the notes, and the numbers of them; I went to the Bank of England the next morning; eleven of them came into the Bank of England, but they have all fictitious addresses on them; I had nineteen five-pound bank notes, and eleven of them have been stopped.

WILLIAM MOUNTAIN . I keep the White Horse Inn, in Friday-street. On the night of the 7th of May, the last witness came into my shop, at about a quarter before twelve; the two prisoners came in with him; they had each a glass of rum, and he had a glass of brandy, to which I put some water; they were in company at my house together, and stood together; they stood about ten minutes together; they went out together; I am positive the prisoners are the men.

JOHN OFFORD . I am a waiter at the White Horse. I remember the prosecutor coming into our house on the 12th of May; Mr. Shaw came in, and the two prisoners came in with him; I think the prisoners are the men.

THOMAS BUTLER . I was a watchman on Lambeth-hill. On the 7th of May, I heard a scuffle and noise between twelve and one; I made up to the spot as quick as I could; when I got there, I found a little man, but can't swear to the prisoner Jonas. I found Mr. Shaw and that little man arm in arm; Mr. Shaw stood a little, and then said, he was robbed of his pocket-book; then he said, he was robbed of his watch. The little man said, if he thought he had robbed him, he would go with him to the watch-house, and he searched. I laid hold of the gentleman one side, and he on the other; we were alls going to the watchhouse together, and when we got a little distance from the watchhouse, the little man asked me how far it was off, and I told him not far, and he immediately loosed the gentleman, and ran away from him, and I after him, crying stop thief; but he got clear away, and was not stopped.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I received information of this robbery from Richard Shaw; I think that was about Friday, the 10th; I received a description of the prisoners two or three days after the robbery, from Mr. Mountain; I did not know Mr. Shaw. In consequence of that description, I desired the two prisoners, whom I knew, to meet me at the Mansion House coffee-house; they met me there on the 21st. I did not tell Mr. Shaw that they were in the room; but I immediately went to Mr. Mountain, and requested him and his waiter would step down, and go into the parlour, and see if there was any body there they knew; the waiter came first, and I sent him into the room, and he came out into passage, and said he believed the little one to be one. I then desired him to go back and fetch his master. Mr. Mountain then came, and pointed out the little one. I then went up to the Mansion House; but found the Lord Mayor was gone. I locked them up in the Compter for that night; the next morning I brought them before the Lord Mayor. I suppose there were at least seven or eight persons in the room where the prisoners were, when Mr. Shaw went in; it is a back room; I had seen the two men at the bar the day before.

Jonas's Defence. On Saturday I was told that Simon Solomons and I were to come up to the Mansion House, for there was something against us, and we went twice, and could not see Mr. Brown; Tony Harrison told us he was gone round by St. Martin's le-grand, and we went after him; but could not find him; and on the Monday evening I saw Mr. Brown at the Red Lion, and he said, Jonas, you are wanting, and you must come up to me at the Mansion House public-house, and if the people don't say it is you, you shall go; and I went where he told me, and I was taken into custody, and locked up, and I know nothing at all of the robbery.

Solomons's Defence. I saw Tony Harrison, and he told me we were wanted, and I went with Isaac Jonas in search of Mr. Brown, and could not find him. At last we saw him on the Monday, and he told us to come up the next morning, and on the Tuesday morning we went to the Mansion House public-house, and asked for Mr. Brown; Mr. Matthews here knows that.

JONAS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

SOLOMONS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-29

504. NATHANIEL WALTERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , thirty pounds weight of lead, value 6s. the property of Henry Peto .

JOHN SAMPSON . I am gate-keeper of the New Custom House . In consequence of a suspicion, which I entertained, I stopped the prisoner, who was a labourer on the works, going out at about six o'clock in the evening of the day in the indictment, and on being searched, the lead in question was found in his trowsers.

JAMES OLIVER . I am clerk to Mr. Henry Peto; he is contractor for the erection of the New Custom House ; the prisoner was a plumber's labourer, working at the New Custom House. I cannot swear positively to the lead, but there is no lead on the premises but what belongs to Mr. Peto.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-30

505. WILLIAM GREENWOOD and JOHN MARTIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , two pieces of carpetting, containing forty-nine yards, value 17l. the property of William Newell and Joseph Newell .

WILLIAM NEWELL . I lost this carpetting on the 9th of April, at about twenty minutes before eight o'clock; the door having been left on jar at that time in the morning, somebody got into the parlour where it was then, and stole it. In consequence of information, I saw a roll of carpeting on the seat of the privy in Mrs. Breadcult's yard; she pointed out a man to Harrison, who secured him; that was Greenwood.

ANTHONY HARRISON . On Tuesday morning, the 9th of April, at about eight o'clock, information

was given me that a man had run up Mrs. Breadcutt's yard, with a carpet on his shoulder; I went to Mrs. Breadcutt's street door; it was fastened; I knocked, and it was opened. I saw the carpet lying in the privy, and Mrs. Bradcutt pointed out the man to me who left it there; he was making off, and I secured him, and took him, together with the carpet, into custody.

ELIZABETH BELL . I am servant to Mr. Newell. On the morning in question, when I was in the kitchen, in consequence of hearing a noise in the passage, I opened the door, and saw the prisoner Martin going out of the ware-room, with a roll of carpeting on his shoulder; I asked him what he was going to do with it, and he told me my master had sent him for it. He went out at the door with it, the moment he got out he ran as hard as ever he could, and I went to the counting-house to my master.

WILLIAM HATTON . I ran after Martin; I called out to him, and asked him where he was taking the carpeting, and he dropped it, and ran away.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I was going to work on the morning in question, and met two men, with two pieces of carpet. I believe the prisoner Greenweed to have been one of them.

THOMAS TRIPP . I was coming out of the gates belonging to Mr. Newell's premises on the morning in question, at a little before eight, and saw the prisoner Greenwood looking into the ware-room window. I am not certain that the other man was Martin.

EDWARD GROVE . I can swear that the carpeting in question was sent to Mr. Newell's.

MARTIN, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

GREENWOOD, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-31

506. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , thirty-two pounds weight of beef, value 20s. the property of Benjamin Brooker , privately in his shop .

BENJAMIN BROOKER . I am a butcher , and live in St. Martin's-lane . A person might have taken this beef from the stall board without coming into the shop; I know nothing of the robbery; only that I knew the beef after it had been stolen; I cut it out myself.

JOHN WALLER. I caught the prisoner going off with the beef in the King's-mews.

GUILTY, aged 35,

Of stealing, but not in the shop .

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-32

507. JAMES WINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , two wether sheep, value 6l. the property of James Ebsworth .

JAMES EBSWORTH I live at Maidenhead; I am a salesman of Smithfield Market . On the 17th of April last, I had a number of sheep placed in a field belonging to a Mr. Phelps, at Southall ; I think there were three hundred and thirty three; among them, there was a lot the property of a gentleman named Tuckwell; there were twelve of his. They were marked on the near hip with a wheel pitch mark. I left them in the care of Colman, my drover, and I never saw the lot again until they came to Smithfield. Then two were missing from the lot belonging to Tuckwell. I afterwards found them at Uxbridge, at a butcher's of the name of Maden. They were the same sheep; that was on the 21st.

JAMES COLMAN . I am drover to Mr. Ebsworth. I saw the sheep on the night of the 17th, going down the lane, leading to Mr. Phelps's field; my brother took them out of the field the next morning. I did not miss any until they came here on Thursday night. When I droved them, I found two missing; They were Mr. Tuckwell's; that was Thursday night, the 18th. On friday afternoon, I enquired after them. On Saturday morning, I went to Maden's, and found the two sheep; they were the two I had lost; they were wethers.

JACOB WAKEMAN . I am servant to Mr. Maden, who is a butcher at Uxbridge. I remember Mr. Colman coming to my masters, and seeing two sheep there. Mr. James Winter brought them, I believe on Friday; he came to me about seven o'clock in the morning, and told me that he had put them in two hours before; he had put them into the pig-stye; he told me to tell my master to kill them, the moment he got up, and send them to London. He told me that they were tired sheep; my master did not kill them. They were the sheep Colman saw. Winter told me he should call again by and by. My master went up to town to him. I did not see him after.

THOMAS MADEN . On the Friday morning, my boy told me what had happened. Upon that, I went to the pig-stye, and saw the sheep. They were what were clamed by Mr. Ebsworth. I saw the prisoner the same day. He told me he had put in two tired sheep out of the drove, and wished I would kill them and send them to London. He wanted me to make a dead bill of them, and give him the money. I did not consent to that. That is not the regular course of business. We never give a dead bill before the sheep are dead and sold. He left word for me to kill them, and send them to London. I suspected something, and therefore would not.

JOHN WEBB . That is in the way from Southall to Uxbridge. In the afternoon of Thursday, I saw the prisoner at about two o'clock take two sheep athwait our green. I had seen him before, and knew him. He had only two; he and is dog were after them. He appeared to come from Southall, and went off for Ryslip, instead of going the nighest way to Uxbridge. That is the farthest way; It is going crossways; I think it is seven miles, or more, to go by Ryslip, and by the nearest road, it is only five miles; Ryslip way is a bad road, but is more private.

(Skins produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Maden had said very false. in saying, I asked him to make a dead bill of them. I told him I had found two stray sheep, and told him to kill them, and send them to London, but if any body owned them, I told him to let them have them.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-33

508. CLARA COWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , five yards of cotton print, value 12s. the property of Charles Thomas Brooks , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BARKER . I saw the prisoner, who came into our shop on the day in the indictment, under a pretence of buying something, take something out of the window, and conceal it under her arm. I hesitated a moment, and then asked her what she had concealed. She denied having anything and I then took from her a dress of print; it was cotton, and worth twelve shillings.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was serving in the shop at the time, and did not see the prisoner take any thing.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing but not privatly .

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjant.

Reference Number: t18160529-34

509. MARY COVENTRY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a coat value 9s. the property of Thomas Proctor .

THOMAS PROCTOR . In consequence of an alarm given me by my sevant, ringing the shop bell most violently, and calling out master; I ran down stairs, and found she had stopt the prisoner, from whose person I immediately took the coat mentioned in the indictment; she must have gone up stairs, and taken it off the landing place; she had it on her arm.

LUCY WATERS . I stopped the prisoner, coming down stairs, with this coat, and I called my master.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, and don't remember going into the house at all.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-35

510. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , two boxes value 2s. fourteen caps, value 1l. 8s. one habit shirt, value 2s. three tippets, value 6s. three collars, value 3s. one frock, value 2s. and nine turban fronts of caps, value 4s. 6d. the property of Lawrence Churchill .

ELEANOR CHURCHILL . I left these boxes containing the articles named in the indictment outside a liquor shop, in the Minories , while I went in to get a glass of cloves, and in consequence of some information I ran out, and missed my boxes, and ran all the way down the Minories with the glass in my hand, crying stop thief, and soon after the prisoner was brought back together with the boxes.

SAMUEL ROUSE . I assisted in stopping the prisoner with these boxes. I heard a violent cry of stop thief, and murder, and seeing him running, I stopped him.

ABRAHAM VALENTINE . I assisted in securing the prisoner, and he was delivered to an officer.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor distressed seaman, and was out of employ.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-36

511. WILLIAM CONNELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , one teapot, value 1s. 3d. four plates, value 3s. 3d. and one pound six ounces weight of metal, value 1s. 4d. the property of William Cornelius Swift .

WILLIAM CORNELIUS SWIFT . I am a pewterer , in Shoe-lane . On Friday evening, the 10th of May, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I happened to go to that part of the shop where the prisoner was at work, and found some metal concealed under some iron plates. I asked my apprentice if he had put it there, and he denied it. Accordingly I marked the metal, and left it where it was. I went into the shop between nine and ten at night, and it was there then; but it was gone the next morning between seven and eight; I got an officer, and as the prisoner was going to breakfast, I stopped him, and accused him of robbing me, which he denied. I told him, I would take him up on suspicion, and he went, and looked under the iron plates, and said, there is none there. I told him he knew that as well as I did. Then I ordered the officer to take him into custody, and then he said, I will find you the metal; he then went down stairs, and the officer and I followed him, and in the shop, under the stairs, where there were several casks of sand and rubbish, he brought the metal out from where he had concealed it. I then told him that was not all, and we went to his house, and found the plates mentioned in the indictment on the shelves in the kitchen, and the teapot on his premises.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-37

512. JAMES GREENFIELD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Cooper , in the King's highway, on the 28th of April , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, thirteen shillings in monies numbered, his property .

RICHARD COOPER. On Saturday night, the 28th, I was going along Broad-way, Westminster , in company with one Thomas Cole , and six men followed us, and shoved us off the pavement; I was thrown down in the gutter. I had some money before I was thrown down, thirteen shillings, and some halfpence. Cole helped me up; after I got up, I missed my money. I am not able to say whether the prisoner was one of the party, or not.

THOMAS COLE . I was in company with the last witness. We were both shoved off the path into the kinnel. When I was getting up, the prisoner at the bar had his hand in Cooper's pocket; I observed that; I am quite sure of it. I did not know his name then, but afterwards from the description I gave of him, I learned his name was Greenfield; I gave a description of him to Gillmore, the officer.

JOHN GILLMORE . I apprehended the prisoner,

driving a donkey with some apples, in Westminster, in consequence of receiving a description of him.

Prisoner's Defence. All I have got to say is that I am innocent, and never saw the men before with my eyes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-38

513. WILLIAM GRAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May , two shirts, value 5s. two pairs of shoes, value 4s. the property of James Goldsmith ; two trunks, value 15s. three gowns, value 2l. two petticoats, value 10s. two shifts, value 15s. four aprons, value 8s. one pair of shoes, value 5s. three yards of ribbon, value 2s. two bonnets, value 1l. 8s. three one-pound bank notes, the property of Sarah Herbert .

SARAH HERBERT . Between eight and nine in the evening of the day in the indictment, I lost these things at the end of Chancery-lane . James Goldsmith is a fellow servant of mine; and we took a hackney coach at Billingsgate, and told the prisoner, who was the coachman, to drive to the Golden Cross Charing Cross. We stopped at the bottom of Chancery-lane, to get out to see a friend, and left the boxes in the coach, and while we were away, he drove off. When we missed him, we went back to the friend on whom we had called, and told them what had happened. I recollect the prisoner was the coachman; but I don't recollect the number of the coach.

JAMES GOLDSMITH . I am servant to the Rev. Mr. Santees. The number of the coach was 578. I am a fellow servant of the last witness. The prisoner is the man who drove the coach; we went together to the end of Chancery-lane; there we got out, and in about a quarter of an hour came back, and the coach was gone. We had asked the prisoner to stop until we returned.

WILLIAM WORGAN . I am a ticket-porter at Billingsgate. This young woman and lad were delivered into my charge by the Captain of the Ramsgate Packet, who told me to get them a coach, and put them and these things into it, and direct the coachman to drive to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross. The prisoner was the coachman whose coach I got, and I told him to drive to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross, and to stop at the end of Chancery-lane, as the lad wanted to get out there to see a friend. The young woman then paid me one shilling and sixpence for my porterage, and I took the number of the coach, as I always do; the number was 578.

ELIZABETH LEVI . I deal in wearing apparel, and other things. On Wednesday night last, the prisoner came to me, and said he had a few articles to sell, which would suit me; they were the articles in question. He asked me thirty shillings for them, and I offered him one pound, which he agreed to take.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-39

514. ELIZABETH FOREDICE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May , one coat, value 1l. one tea-caddy, value 5s. one umbrella, value 2s. 6d. the property of John Matteson , and one coat, value 5s. the property of Benjamin Boys .

ANN JACKSON . I am servant to Mr. Matteson. On the day in the indictment, as I was going up stairs, I met the prisoner on the second flight, coming down with the property in question; she enquired for a gentleman of a different name from that of any one living in the house. The coats were on her arms; I called a gentleman whose chambers were on the first floor to assist me. She was secured, and an officer was sent for; one coat belonged to my master, and the other to Mr. Boyes.

Prisoner's Defence. These things were on the stairs, and I was obliged to take them up out of the way, that I might pass, and this woman came out, and said, I stole them.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-40

515. THOMAS MYERS and DAVID BENJAMIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a pocket-handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Robert Adamson , from his person .

ROBERT ADAMSON . I was in Newgate-street , on the 18th of May, at about twelve o'clock in the forenoon; I was coming from the West End of the Town to the City, and felt a crowd pressing on me; I turned round, and saw my handkerchief drop from the prisoner Myers, upon which the little boy picked it up, and concealed it under his coat. I took them both, and gave them in charge to an officer.

HENRY HONEY . I took the prisoners into custody, and produce the handkerchief.

MYERS, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

BENJAMIN, GUILTY , aged 11.

Well whipped, and delivered to his father .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-41

516. DAVID PICKARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , one pocket-handkerchief, value 4s. the property of William Nash , from his person .

WILLIAM NASH . On Good Friday last, at about six o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking up Fleet-street , and a young man came behind me, and told me my pocket was picked, and shewed me the prisoner, who, he said, had got my handkerchief in his pocket. I immediately pursued the prisoner, and took him. While he was running, he pulled my handkerchief from his pocket, and dropped it; I delivered him to a constable.

JEREMIAH HOLLAND . I saw the prisoner pick this gentleman's pocket; he was in company with a wooden-legged man.

THOMAS WHITEHOUSE . I was with the prosecutor when this happened. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket, and dropped it as he was running.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-42

517. WILLIAM BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , one hat, value 10s. the property of James Witchelo .

JOHN WITCHELO . I lost my hat on the 15th of May . The prisoner walked into the Duke of Albermarle public-house, in Dover-street, Piccadilly . This hat hung behind the door in the parlour, and I caught him coming out with it on his head, and I stopped him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-43

518. THOMAS BRUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , four handkerchiefs, value 8s. the property of William Spooner .

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a linen-draper , in Chiswell-street, Finsbury-square . These handkerchiefs were hanging over an iron at the door, outside the shop.

THOMAS BAILEY . I was in Chiswell-street on the day in the indictment, and watched the prisoner, who was at the prosecutor's shop. I saw him attempt several times to get these handkerchiefs, and at last he succeeded, and I immediately took him into custody.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-44

519. JOHN DUNNAGE and WILLIAM FELLOWS were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Burton , in the King's Highway, on the 27th of April , for putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, one pocket-book, value 1s. one knife, value 3d. six fishing lines, value 6s. six fishing hooks, value 3d. five keys. value 1s. and four penny-pieces, value 4d. the property of the said George Burton .

GEORGE BURTON . I am a cooper . I was robbed in Skinner-street, within thirty yards of my own door, on Saturday, the 27th of April, at about twelve o'clock at night; I was on the Sun-street side of Skinner-street . The place where this happened was in the City. I saw the two prisoners at the bar, there was a sailor with them; they were dressed much the same as they are now; I have not seen the sailor since. The two prisoners stopped me at the corner of Skinner-street, at the oil-shop corner. The prisoner Dunnage put his elbow against the wall, and would not let me pass. Then the tall one, the sailor , stooped down, and looked in my face, and made use of some cramp words, which I did not understand. I turned off from them then, and went to the side of the street that my house was on. Then the prisoners crossed down upon me, and came before me within about thirty yards of my own door, and then they said, now b-gg-r your eyes, we have got you; give us up your money, all you have got, or we will have your life. I said, I had got no money, and they said, I was a b-y liar, and they said, they knew better, for I had money, and they would have it, or murder me directly. I turned round then, thinking to turn back, and did not think that the sailor was behind me; I turned round, and the sailor caught me by the throat, and nearly throttled me with his nails, and prevented my going away, and told me to stand still; I had hard to do to breathe. The two prisoners then held my arms, and the sailor felt my pockets, to see if I had a watch, but I had not. I was then endeavouring to get away, and was looking every way to make an alarm, and they said, if I made any alarm, they would murder me outright. The two prisoners took from me a pocketbook; it contained my fishing materials; I am positive there were not less than six fishing lines, and six hooks; they also took from me four penny-pieces; I gave them three, and told them if they would let me go, I would give them a pint of beer. They took a knife also, which was in the pocketbook, it was part of the furniture of the book, and five keys; my keys were in my coat pocket. I was endeavouring to get away several times, and before I could get away, these two prisoners said, if he will be so very obstropolous kill him out of the way, any how you like. Then they beat my hat down over my face, so that I could not see, and struck me at the back of my head into the middle of the road, and then when I pulled my hat off, I found there was nobody near me; they dragged me clean off my feet for two yards. The next time I saw any of them was at Bishopsgate watchhouse, on the Monday night, where I saw the two prisoners; they were taken in consequence of a description of them which I had given to Mr. Sapwell; I described them as soon as possible. When I saw them at the watchhouse, I had a strong idea that they were the men; they were sitting, and I desired them to stand up, and then I was sure of them, and that confirmed my recollection of them, and when they spoke, I had had such an opportunity of observing their voices from the ill language they had given to me, that I was sure and positive of them. I have never seen any of the articles that were taken from me on the Saturday night. I had first described their persons to Mr. Armstrong, and then he sent me to Mr. Sapwell, and I described them to him then, and to Shepherd. At the time I charged them at the watchhouse, they said nothing that is particular.

SAMUEL SHEPHERD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners on Monday the 29th; I took them both at eight o'clock at night; that was on the Monday, after the Saturday that this man says he was robbed. I took them just at the skirts of the City, just at the end of Bishopsgate-street. I have heard the prosecutor describe the place where he was robbed, and that is in the City. I siezed hold of Dunnage first. I had had a description of three, but only took these two, and took them by the descriptions. Fellows wipped past my left hand. I took Dunnage, and gave him to Gildersleve, the patrole, and then persued Fellows, and took him. I had not told them when I took them at first, what I took them for; Fellows asked me what I wanted with him; he said he was not in company with the other, and did not know

him, meaning Dunnage. I had seen them together in the fore part of the day. I saw them together, so as to know they were companions. I had seen him twice the day before in company with the other. I took them both to the watch-house. I knew where to find the prosecutor, and informed him that I had got them. In consequence of that information, he came to the watch-house. I told him to look at them; they were the only persons in custody. I told him to be very circumspect before he said any thing; he looked at them; he sat close to them. There was nothing said then. He came out with me and Sapwell, and then went in again, and desired that they might stand up, and button their coats, and put their hats on. I asked him then if he knew them, and he said he was certain that they were the men. I asked him if he had any doubt, and he said none whatever. He said he recollected their person, and said, I know your voices particularly. Nothing was found on them relating to this charge. I afterwards went with Sapwell, to search Dunnage's lodging, but nothing was found.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. I was on one side of the way, and the prisoners were on the other, when they were taken. I know nothing more than Shepherd has stated. I heard those expressions made use of by the prosecutor he said he was sure of their persons, and their voices, but particularly to that.

Fellow's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the crime of which I am accused, and never saw the prosecutor before in my life.

Dunnage's Defence, written. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury; I most humbly address these few lines to you in this form, hoping that your kindness and great humanity, will extend to a poor friendless boy, and not be led away by the influence of false swearers. Though poor and distressed, I have not been guilty of the crime imputed to me, and should I be so fortunate as to meet your kind humanity, my lords, and gentlemen, be assured nothing shall tempt me to do wrong, or fall into the hands of bad company, which I have at all times avoided before. I have an aged mother in a most distressed state, whose only care is for my liberty, and wellfare, and should I meet your kindness and compassion, be sure I will fly to the arms of a tender mother, and never more disgrace her, or give her pain, but ever make it my study through life to make her comfortable, and happy. Humbly praying your kindness and consideration, and merciful goodness towards me, for which I shall be in duty bound to pray, and humble submission I remain, JOHN DUNNAGE .

George Burton , recalled. There was a great gas light at the corner of the first street, where they stopped me; that gas-light did not throw its light as far as where they interrupted me the second time, but I saw them with the small lights that were in the street.

FELLOWS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

DUNNAGE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-45

520. WILLIAM GREGORY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 6th of April , a certain transfer, for the transfer of 25l. interest, belonging to one Elizabeth Coward , in certain annuities made transferable at the Bank of England, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For uttering a like forged transfer, knowing it to be forged with the like intent.

OTHER COUNTS. Varying the manner of laying the charge.

SARAH VINCENT . I lived at Pitt-street, Tottenham-court-road. I had known the prisoner about two months before this first occured; I washed for him occasionally. On Saturday, the 6th of April last, he came to my lodging in Pitt-street, about eleven o'clock in the morning; he asked me if I could accompany him to the City upon a little business; I hesitated at going at first, because I nursed children; his washerwoman being in my room, she offered to take charge of the children while I went; by which reason, I agreed to go. The prisoner told me he would pay me for my trouble, and loss of time. I then went with him. He told me he was going to the Bank, to receive a little money, it was his sister's. He said, he had received a letter from his sister, who being in the country, in situation, she could not possibly come to Town; and he had received this letter, with instructions to get a woman to go with him to the Bank. Mr. Gregory in his way thither, told me I was not to write in the book. I had asked him a question whether I was to write my name; and he said, I was not; but to make a mark. I then asked him if writing my name, would not answer the same purpose; he told me, no. I don't remember whether he mentioned the young woman's name or not; I don't think he did; but he said, her mark was in the book before, and therefore it must be a mark. We then proceeded onwards towards the Bank. He told me if the broker asked me any questions, to say, my time was very limited, and to beg the favour of the broker to dismiss us as soon as possible. I don't recollect any thing else. I then sat down, and he told me, he would go and speak to the broker. When he returned, I don't recollect any thing particular that he said to me. He gave me his papers; but I don't recollect whether he went to speak to the broker or not. I think he told me one of the papers was the power of attorney, and the other was of no use. I saw Mr. Weeden, the broker, soon after, he came up together. I think Weeden gave me that paper. (Paper put into the hand of the witness.) But Gregory stood by. The broker put a name on it, and then put it by, and I went into the office with him. I then went to a place, and saw a book, and put a mark in it, by the direction of Gregory; Gregory was present at the time, as was Mr. Weeden. (A book produced to witness.) That is the mark I made. That being done, we returned to the broker's desk, and the broker gave Mr. Gregory a check, it was a bit of paper; I did not read it, Then Gregory and I went to Banbury's and Co, the bankers; we went into the bankers. I saw Gregory give the check to the clerk, and the clerk asked him what notes he would have it in, and he said, one-pound notes; and he received twenty-one, and some

silver and halfpence, but I don't know how much; we then returned as far as Bloomsbury-square together; he then left me to go into a watch-maker's; I then went on by myself, and Mr. Gregory overtook me, in Store-street, near Goodge-street. He had left me for about ten minutes, and then came again. On our way home, he told me not to mention this to any one person. When he came to my lodging, he still wanted it to be kept a secret before me and his washerwoman; he might stay about half an hour in Pitt-street; this was on the Saturday. I communicated what passed to Mr. Hutchins, the father of two children that I had the charge of; I communicated it also to my brother, and on the Tuesday morning, I went to Marlborough-street; then I sent to the Bank of England. I went of my own accord to the magistrates.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. I had only known the prisoner two months before. They did not read over what it was to me which I put my mark to.

Examined by the COURT. The broker never read any thing to me. I was able to read, as well as to write. I saw the broker write after I had made the mark; I did not see what name he wrote. I don't recollect that the prisoner gave me any directions when he gave me the papers. The prisoner was a tailor.

HENRY WEEDON . I am a stock broker. On the 24th of March, I first saw the prisoner; he was introduced to me by a gentleman named Pidlake; he stated that he wished for a power of attorney for the transfer of some stock, that he was ignorant of the business, that it was stock standing in the name of Elizabeth Coward ; he said there was only twenty five pounds navy five per cents. I then asked him to let me look at the stock receipt, which he did.(Receipt put into the hand of the witness.) That is the receipt. I stated to him then the impropriety of of having a guinea and sixpence for so small a sum of stock; he said, it was a great deal of money to pay, I told him he had better put it off all together, and he wished me a good morning, and went away. On the next day, he came again, and stated that he had seen the party, or heard from her; he said that she was in the country, and wished for the money, and I was to procure a power of attorney for the money. I then inquired of him for the Bank stock receipt a second time, and then I prepared the necessary instructions for drawing the power of attorney; before I lodged instructions I examined, and found it correct. That is the power of attorney. (paper put into the hand of the witness.) He waited on me at the Bank at twelve o'clock on the next day, and I asked him for a guinea and sixpence, and he said he had not so much, but would thank me to pay the same for him. I paid the guinea and sixpence, and I asked him when it would be likely to be returned; he said in the course of a day or two. He came to me on the following morning, and stated that the family were Miss Coward was in service had arrived unexpectedly in town, from Brighton, and she would attend herself to make the transfer. He did not return me the power of attorney. I saw no more of the prisoner for three, four, or five days. I then met with him on the Rotunda, on the 31th of March; I then asked him were Miss Coward was; he waited there from eleven to twelve o'clock, He told me he had made an appointment with her to meet that day. No one came that day. He stated he was much surprized at her not coming, as he had said she was coming at twelve o'clock. On Saturday, the 16th of April, he came to me in the Rotunda; I had then only left my clerkship three days, he stated that Mrs. Coward would be there, and he would thank me to put the ticket forward, as he hoped she would not be kept long. I then prepared the transfer ticket. I paid a private transfer on the ticket, and sold the stock to Mr. Joseph Partridge ; my brother was with me, and I told him to go and fetch the woman and the prisoner. He brought them. The woman was she who as appeared to day, as the witness Sarah Vincent . Every thing being ready; I desired her to write her name to the stock receipt. The prisoner was present at the time, I said, now, Mr. Gregory, we will walk to the five per cent office, to make the transfer. I then went to the division, and enquired if a ticket was entered in the name of Coward, and found it was. (Turning to the book.) This is the transfer. The prisoner was standing close by at her elbow when she made this mark." Elizabeth Coward , her mark," I wrote that; I wrote that after she had made her mark; that was while we were all three standing there. I attested it, and Mr. Mappel and Mr. Gibbins witnessed it, and I witnessed the identity. We then went back to the desk in the Rotunda. I then enquired of them who was to pay the guinea and sixpence for the power of attorney, and the prisoner told me to pay myself; I made him out an account, and paid him twenty-one pounds and three-pence; I gave a check for that amount. (Check produced.) That is the check.

Cross-examined by MR. LONG. I never asked the woman whether her name was Coward; but I think I said to her at the time I saw her, good morning, Mrs. Coward. My acquaintance with Gregory had been of but twelve days standing. On his representation, I took this woman to be Mrs. Coward. From the power of attorney, and from my examining the account, and finding it correspond, I thought it was all correct. I asker her to sign her name, and she said, she could not; but she made her mark. I told her it was for twenty-five pounds navy five per cents. I did not read over any part of the transfer to her, except saying it was transfer twenty-five navy from Coward to Partridge; I don't recollect that I read the words Elizabeth Coward , her mark.

Re-examined by MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET. The old stock receipt was produced to me twice over by Gregory.

JOHN GIBBINS . I produced that book. I am witness to the mark purporting to be the mark of" Elizabeth Coward ." There is also the name of Mr. Mappel. I recollect Vincent; I am sure she is the person.

JOHN MAPPEL . I was one of the witnesses to this tranfer; that is my name, and my hand-writ-

WILLIAM GILES. I am chief clerk in the five per cent office. I turn to the ledger, and see that there was twenty-five pounds five per cents standing in the name of Elizabeth Coward , spinster, of Hanover-street, Hanover-square, at the time of this transaction.

JOHN BONUS CHILD . I am one of the brokers of the Bank. There has been a transfer of the stock in question back again to Elizabeth Coward; she has been re-instated in a similar sum.

WILLIAM DOBSON . I am clerk to the bankers, and paid Mr. Weedon's draft upon us for the stated amount.

ELIZABETH COWARD . I lived with a family in Hanover-square. I know the prisoner at the bar; I have known him about two years.

Q. Did he ever make any application to you for money - A. Yes; he was always asking me for money. From time to time, I lent him different sums. I had a sum of twenty-five pounds in the funds. I did not purchase it myself. I received the dividends on that stock.

Q. Did the prisoner ever ask you for your receipt - A. Yes; but not to destroy. I can't recollect what time I lent it to him.

Q. Was it in the course of last year - A. I can't tell what month; it was since Christmas; he had it about a month, before I asked him for it. I don't remember when he was taken up. It was on a Friday he asked me for it again; and as I learn, this transfer was made the next day, Saturday. He asked me for it again on the same evening that he had returned it to me.

Q. Did you ever go to the Bank in the course of this last year to make any transfer of that stock - A. No.

Q. Did you ever make any mark in any book for transfering that stock, or to any receipt - A. No. I once went with the prisoner to the Bank; but did not get it out. I saw the prisoner on the Friday before this happened; he did not say any thing about going to the Bank.

Cross-examined by MR. LONG. Q. How came you to lend him this receipt - A. Only to shew people that he had money. He often asked me to get it out, but I always said, I could not promise him to go. I went with him once for the purpose of getting it out; but could not get it out, for the Bank was shut; I don't know when that was; it was since Christmas; but before I received my January dividend.

Q. Did he propose to you to get it transfered - A. He asked me; but I refused it.

Q. Did he say any thing about its being transfered without your going to the Bank - A No; he did not.

Q. He told you some one else could supply your place in transfering it - A. I believe he did once; but I told him he could not do it.

Q. He requested you to consent to that, and you refused - A. No. He asked me to allow some one else to supply my place, and I said, no one else could.

Q. Did you not say he could not get a person-did you not say he might if he could - A. No. I never authorized him to get it out.

Examined by the COURT. Did you mean to give him permission to get another person, if such person could be found - A. No; never.

Q. Had you ever lent him money by going to the Bank, and transfering money there - A. Yes; I took seven pounds out for him last year.

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET. Did you ever go with him to take out money to lend him - A. Never.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am a clerk in the Bank. On the 9th of April last, I went with Craig, the officer, to apprehend the prisoner, and I apprehended him in a public-house in Pulley-street; I did not tell him what for. Craig searched him, and found four one-pound notes on him. He told me he received them of a young woman, and he said, her name was Elizabeth Coward , that she had been to the Bank to sell out some stock on that day, and from the Bank they went to the bankers together in Lombard-street, and received the money there, and he was to re-pay her when he could. I asked him what he had done with the remainder of the money, and he said, he had paid it away to different persons to whom he was indebted.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I searched the prisoner, and found these two papers in his possession. I also found these four one-pound notes on him.

Prisoner's Defence. Elizabeth Coward I have known two years. On the 5th of April, she called on me; she asked me if I would take a walk with her; I told her I could. Before we went from the door, she asked me if I had got the transfer of the money, and I told her I had, and accordingly gave it to her. She asked me if I could go home with her, and I told her my circumstances, and that I had got some things to do, and if she could lend me some money, I would thank her, and she said, she could, but she had not got it about her, it was in the Bank, and if I could get a person to go with me to get it, I was wellcome. I did not know the danger of these things, and I went to this person, and asked her to come, and we went. When I got to the Bank, I saw Mr. Weedon, and I told him this person was going to receive the money; I told him Elizabeth Coward , and she wrote her name, at least made a mark, I suppose; I stood a distance of, and whether it was a name or mark I don't know; but according to Elizabeth Coward 's information, the person who went, was to make a mark, as she could not write.

Mr. Gibbins. Re-examined. It appears before that Elizabeth Coward was a mark woman.

Elizabeth Coward . Re-examined. I have heard what the prisoner has said. I positively swear that I never allowed him or authorized him to go to the Bank to transfer this stock.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-46

521. WILLIAM MOLDS , and ELIZABETH MOLDS , (his wife ,) were indicted for the wilful murder of John Hewley, alias Hazel , on the 23rd of April , an infant of the age of five years ; the said William

with a certain brush of no value, and the said Mary, with a certain leather strap of no value, having inflicted in, and upon the said John, his head, back, stomack, thighs, and legs, divers blows, by which means they feloniously gave unto him, one mortal bruise and fracture of the leg, of which he died .

ANOTHER COUNT. Varying the maner of laying the charge.

JAMES SMALL . I am a pupil at the London Hospital. I remember the deceased being brought to the Hospital on Saturday, the 22nd of April. On examining him, I discovered a contusion on the forehead, and a mortification of the foot and leg, and a fracture of the larger bone of the leg. It appeared that the fracture had arisen from violence, either a blow or a fall might produce it, and suppose the injury might have been done three or four days; It is impossible to say exactly. The mortification which had succeeded, would certainly occasion death. I don't think the decased could have walked after the fracture. I attribute the mortification to the fracture, and the violence done to the leg. There were a few excoriation or scars about the knee; they were not of a recent nature. The mortification had proceeded to that lenght that amputation was necessaray. The amputation took place, and the deceased survived it but twelve minutes or a quarter of an hour. I attibute his death to the violence done to the leg, and to the mortification.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. The deceased had been seven days in the Hospital before the amputation took place; there was a fever on the deceased, which were symptomatick.

RICHARD CLEMENT HEADINGTON. I am surgeon to the London Hospital. This gentlemen described the state of the decesed on his entering the Hospital, and the amputation, and its consequences.

ELIZABETH WARE . I live at No. 18, Fashion-street . In April last, I was in my own house, and I remember the male prisoner, the deceased, and another boy coming at about ten o'clock in the morning; it was the 2nd of April; they went into a room over my head, which was empty, for the purpose of sweeping the chimney. After they had been there some time, I heard the cries of a child screaming violently, and I heard blows. In consequence of this I called Mrs. Reeves, who went up stairs and I followed her. The first thing I saw when I got into the room was the prisoner, stooping up the chimney shaking back handed at the child up the chimney with such a brush as chimney sweepers usuly have; the child was screaming violently, and had been screaming for half an hour before we went up. I told him the child was not his own, or he would not use it so; he said it was nothing to me, and pulled him down by his legs, and dashed him down on the hearh stone. The child layed on its back, and received a violent blow on the back of its head by this fall. I told him if I was not confined in the manner in which I was, namely child-bed, I would lay an information against him. The child was then put up the chimney; he lifted it up in his arms and put it up the chimney, and put the other boy after it, The other boy was about ten years old.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The other boy went up without force or violence. I went down stairs then, and did not see the little boy afterwards.

SARAH REEVES . On the day the last witness has mentioned, I remember the prisoner and the two boys coming to our house to sweep the chimney. I remember Mrs. Ware calling to me, and my going up stairs with her into the room where the prisoner was. Before she called me, I had not heard any noise. The little boy was then some little distance up the chimney; I could not see any part of him. The prisoner was standing by the chimney, and he was extending his arm up the chimney, and I saw him bring the child down by its little legs. I don't know whether I was in the room before Mrs. Ware or not. Then he put him up the chimney again, and the child cried, and said his knees hurted him. Then the child came down again; he took it by the back part of its little breeches, and dashed it on the hearth. Then he put it on the big boys back, and sent him up the chimney, and when they came down again, the prisoner took the hearth broom, and struck the little boy several blows on the back and loins. He was then standing on the hearth shaking the soot off its cloths, It put its little shoes on, and trembled very much, and the prisoner put a black bag on it, and then they went down. The child walked down stairs with his hand against the wall, and the prisoner turned round to him, and swore he would serve him out. I followed them down towards the door, and saw them walk out.

Evidence was here about to given of some transactions supposed to have taken place relative to the prisoner and the deceased on the 23rd of April, the day stated in the indictment to be the day on which the deceased sustaind the injuries that occasioned his death but

THE COURT, Interposed to prevent such evidence from being given, in as much as the prosecuting party had gone in the first instance to establish the guilt of the prisoners by evidence of a transaction which took place so far back as the 2nd of April; it was by no means from any desire to stifle inquirs or prevent the ends of justice that the court here interposed, because in all cases, but more particularly perhaps where the case of a helpless infant came under consideration injury would always be traced as far as consistence with regularity would permit.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-47

522. THOMAS REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , a sheet, value 5s. the property of John Tovey Joss , in a lodging room .

JOHN TOVEY JOSS . I keep the Bell at Uxbridge . The prisoner was a lodger of mine. In consequence of missing this sheet on the day in the indictment, I went in search of the prisoner. I found him at a public house in Uxbridge, at the sign of the Rose and Crown; I challenged him with the theft, which he acknowledged; he said he was very sorry for what he had done. I immediately had the constable, who went to the pawnbroker's, I had a suspicion it was

pawned; the pawnbroker immediately produced the sheet. The prisoner's wife had left my house the same morning. She used to work for a woman.

RICHARD DAVIES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of May, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner brought that sheet to my house. I am positive he is the man; I paid three shillings and sixpence for it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined three months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-48

523. PETER BROWNE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , eight yards of printed cotton, value 8s. the property of John King .

JOHN KING. I keep a slop shop . I saw the prisoner come into my shop, and take this cotton out of my window; he was going out with, and I stopped him, and took it from him.

(Property produced, and sworn to)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined three months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-49

524. JOSEPH BOYCE was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 17th of February , a certain deed, purporting to be the power of attorney of John Tasker , of Dartford, brewer, authorizing the assignment and transfer of 781l. 3s. 11d. interest or share in the joint stock of five per sent annuities, transferable at the Bank of England, whereof he was joint trustee, with the Rev. Richard Williams , deceased, unto the said John Tasker . and William Smallbone of the Stock Exchange gentleman, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. For uttering and publishing as true, a like forged deed, he well knowing it to be forged.

TWENTY-TWO OTHER COUNTS. Varying the manner of laying the charge.

ROBERT GILL . I am an attorney. In December last, I lived in James-street, Lambeth Marsh. I became acquainted with the prisoner on the 1st of December last; he and Austen called at my residence; the prisoner said he came in consequence of my letter relative to the reversion of five hundred pounds at the death of a lady aged sixty. I asked him what he expected for it, and he said, three hundred and fifty pounds. I then stated to him that it was necessary I should have an extract of the will from the Commons, under which the lady claimed. He said, he should get it, and nothing farther passed at that interview. I think I saw him next on the 8th, he called on me in company with Austen, with the extract, and shewed it to me. On perusing the extract of the will, and observing it to be in the names of the trustees, I said, that the surviving trustee must join in the transfer; the prisoner thought not. I told him, I should apply to some one professionably, and I applied to Messrs. Ballachi and Bridges, they are solicitors in Angel-court, Throgmorton-street; I went to their office shortly after I received the extract; I saw Mr. Ballachi. I afterwards communicated to the prisoner what passed. I told him that two hundred and seventy pounds or two hundred and seventy-five pounds had been offered, and Mr. Ballachi said it depended on the nature of the stock, The prisoner said it was worth three hundred and fifty pounds; but I was to do the best I could. I told him Mr. Ballachi had said that the trustee must join, and I recommended Boyce to go down to Tasker to ask him his conset to the deed of assignment; I understood he lived at Dartford. In five or six days the prisoner proposed to go down. I think he next came on the 20th of December; he came with Austen; they generally came together; he said, he had been down to Mr. Tasker, and had obtained his consent to execute the deed, and requested that the business might be expedited. I mentioned to him that certificates of the deaths of certain parties were necessary to be produced. The prisoner and Austen came together on the 20th; the prisoner said he had been down to Mr. Tasker, at Dartford, and obtained his consent, and Mr. Walker was his attorney. Upon that, I called on Messrs. Ballachi and Co. and told the prisoner afterwards what passed at that interview. I saw the prisoner again at the latter end of December; Austen was with him. I told the prisoner I had been to Ballachi and Bridges's, and two hundred pounds was offered for this; this was at the New York coffee-house, and I said, I thought it was too little, and I recommended him not to take it. However he requested me to try if I could get two hundred and fifty pounds. I went to Messrs. Ballachi and Bridges's; Mr. Ballachi was out of Town, and I informed the prisoner after that, that they would extend it to two hundred and ten pounds, and the expences to be paid out of the two hundred and ten pounds. The prisoner said, they would take it. On that, I went to Mr. Bridges's, and told him to prepare the draft of the deed of assignment, as it would be taken. I received the draft of the assignment, I think on the 8th of January, also a letter accompanying it, directed to Mr. Walker, of Dartford. I handed that note and the draft to Mr. Boyce, on the same day, I think, at the New York coffee-house; it was then perused by Boyce, and he said, he should go as that afternoon to Tasker. That is the draft. He proposed going down with the draft and letter, and to see Mr. Walker besides. In the evening of the following day, Mr. Austen came to me, and gave me that draft; there was something written on it then which had not been written before. I saw Boyce a day or two afterwards, at the New York coffee-house, and he then merely asked if the business was going on. I said, you have been to Dartford, and seen Mr. Tasker and Mr. Walker; and he said, he had, I said, I supposed the attorney had been paid, and mentioned that a guinea was usual to be paid; and he said, he had been paid; nothing more passed. The draft was left with me, and I handed it to Messrs. Ballachi and Bridges for the purpose of being endorsed. I received the deed, accompanied by a letter, on Sunday, the 14th of January. That is it. I look at the power of attorney; I saw that at the same time. Boyce called on me the same after

noon, and I told him I had procured the deed, with the power of attorney and letter, and stated to him the manner in which it ought to be executed, and he appeared to be extremely ill, and I thought he was very ill, and I asked him, and he said, he was; and I told him, I would go down to Mr. Tasker and Mr. Walker, and see the business executed, and he said, there is no occasion for that, I will go. I then delivered the deed and power of attorney to him. I understood he was going down that evening. I was to see him the next day at one o'clock; I did not see him. Austen came to me with the deed and power of attorney, as executed; as they are now; they purported to be executed by John Tasker , and attested by Thomas Walker and Richard Browne . I then immediately went to Ballachi and Bridges, but it was too late to get the stock transfered that day.

JURY. Was Austen alone when you met him at the coffee-house, and he gave you the papers as executed?

Witness. Yes. I saw Boyce the next morning; Austen was with him then; Boyce asked whether the business was done; and I told him I had been to the stock-broker, Mr. Watts, and it appeared on looking at two powers of attorney, one signed John Tasker, 1801, and the other, the present, that they were quite different, and the transfer could not be made until that difference of hand-writing was accounted for. Boyce said, it was very extraordinary. I said, that the gentlemen of the Bank directed me to send a letter to Mr. Tasker, to account for the difference, and it must be put into the post; I did write such a letter, and kept a copy of it; I shewed it to Boyce when I had written it. I proposed to put it into the post; but Boyce said it would go quicker by a returned post chaise, which would go from the Kent-road, and I made an observation that the gentlemen of the Bank expected it to go by the post, as I thought I would take it myself, it did not make any difference; accordingly I folded the letter up in a parcel, and sealed it up, and directed it to Mr. Tasker, Boyce and Austen then accompanied me to the Bull Inn, Kent-road. On going into the parlour, I took up the paper; soon after, Boyce came into me, and said, Mr. Gill, there is a chaise at the door, and the post-boy is in the tap-room. I then went into the tap-room, and gave the parcel to the boy, and asked him if he knew Mr. Tasker, and he said, he did. I asked the boy his name, and he said, Charles Ward . Boyce paid him a shilling, and I strictly enjoyned the boy to deliver the parcel to Mr. Tasker the moment he got down, and he assured me he would. I then adjourned into the private room, and the chaise drove off. Boyce did not go in with me; he came in in ten minutes afterwards. I think I saw him afterwards; but I am not quite certain.

Cross-examined by MR. LONG. In all the subsequent interviews, Austen was present. I am not certain as to the particular days. When the draft was brought, Boyce was not present, nor when the deed and letter of attorney were brought after supposed execution.

JOHN AUSTEN . I am a boat-builder; I came to Town in December last. I had occasion to see the prisoner, to whom I had written about some money from Rye. When I came to Town, I applied to him about some money in the funds, which was coming to me in right of my wife after the death of my mother-in-law. I saw Mr. Gill several times with the prisoner, After I had seen Mr. Gill several times. I received that draft from Boyce, which he had had to take to Dartford. I can't particularly say when I had received it. I took it to Mr. Gill in the same state as when I received it from the prisoner. The prisoner said he could not attend himself, having an appointment to go else where, and I took it then to Mr. Gill. I afterwards received two more from the prisoner at the Griffin, in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square; there was nobody else there but he and I; I believe it is in the County of Middlesex. These are the papers he produced. There was not then my own name, nor that of my wife. The prisoner was very ill through going to Dartford, and he said it had knocked him up; he said, I was to sign my own name and my wife's, which I refused, wishing to stop until I got to Messrs. Bridges's and Ballachi's, and the prisoner was very angry, and called me a fool, and by his persuation, I signed it there, not thinking any harm. I signed my own name, and my wife's. The prisoner said that it was lawful that I might sign it, and I, not knowing the nature of the law, did so accordingly. The prisoner told me to take them to Mr. Gill, and say that he could not attend as he was so ill. Nothing was said about my wife's signing. I took the deed and power and met Mr. Gill, at the New York Coffee-house, I delivered them to Gill in the same state as I received them from Boyce, only with the addition of my own and my wife's names. From the New York Coffee-house, I went with Gill, to Bridges's and Ballachi's; It was two late that day for the stock to be transfered, and we met again, and the next day to the best of knowledge, I went to the Kent-road. The prisoner at the bar was to have thiry pounds, and said he must be well paid, for he had a great deal of trouble with it.

MR. EDWARD BRIDGES . I received directions from Mr. Gill to prepare an assignment of transfer. That is the draft. I think I saw the prisoner twice on this business. He came soon after Mr. Gill, and inquired if Mr. Gill had made application for the preparation of these? I told him he had, and he was perfectly satisfied. And then he came with Austen afterwards. I made this power of attorney. The last time he came was to know how it was getting on; he thought it was not necessary that the surviving trustee should join. Nothing farther passed with the prisoner. I sent a letter with the papers.

Robert Gill . Re-examined. I think there was a letter accompanying the deed and power of attorney. I delivered to the prisoner every thing that I received.

MR. THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD , assistant solicitor to the Bank of England, was now called, to prove his serving a notice upon the prisoner, for the production of the letter just mentioned, and as it was not forth coming in court, a copy of it was read,

which specified that the charges of transfer were to be bound by the device.

John Austen . Re-examined. Did you not go by a wrong name at the Custom House, on purpose that your friends might not know where you were - A. No. I was run to such expences and debt, that I was obliged to do this.

CHARLES WARD . I am a postillion; I live at the Bull Inn, Dartford. I remember coming with my chaise to the Bull Inn, Kent-road. I saw the prisoner at the bar there, and Mr. Gill. I received a parcel from Mr. Gill at the Bull; the prisoner was with him. The prisoner first asked me, was I going to Dartford, and I said, I was. He then asked me if I would take a parcel down for him; I told him, I would. Then he went for Mr. Gill, and Mr. Gill brought the parcel, and gave it to me; Boyce then told me to be sure to give it to Mr. Tasker, and I said, I would as soon as I got home, and I left them standing there, and I put my horses too, and went off. I had nearly got to the World Turned Upside Down, about a quarter of a mile, when I saw Boyce, the prisoner, who came after me; a person hallooed out that somebody was calling after me; I stopped, and looked round, and saw the prisoner, and he said, you have almost put me out of breath; I will thank you for the parcel, I have something to put in it. I said, I will wait a few minutes; I returned the parcel to him; he said he had something more. I said, I would wait a few minutes if he liked, He said, it was no consequence, I might go, and keep the shilling, for he would not detain me. He never returned the parcel; I drove on without it.

John Austen . Re-examined. Q. When the prisoner delivered to you the papers, did he say any thing to you about any thing being done at Dartford about this being executed - A. He said, he gave a guinea to the attorney for it to be executed. I did not give him that guinea back again.

Robert Gill . Re-examined. I produce a copy of the letter I gave to the post-boy.

(The witness here reads the letter.)

"January 17th, 1816.

"29, James-street, Lambeth Marsh.

SIR,

"I beg leave to trouble you with a few lines, and to request you will inform by letter, directed to William Dawes , esq. chief accountant to the Bank of England; whether you signed a power of attorney on the 15th instant, in the presence of Thomas Walker , an attorney, at Dartford, to transfer seven hundred and eighty-one pounds, being a third part of two thousand three hundred and forty-three pounds eleven shillings and ten-pence, navy five per cents annuities, which John Austen , who describes himself of Rye, in the County of Sussex, boat-builder, and who is entitled to this stock in right of his wife, Eliza Joyce , formerly Eliza Joyce Simmons , spinster, and one of the children of Elizabeth Simmons , of East Greenwich, in the County of Kent, butcher, deceased, the said John Austen has contracted with William Small bone, of the Stock Exchange, London, gentleman, for the absolute purchase of his reversionary interest for two hundred and ten pounds, and in consequence, an assignment by deed has been prepared for the signature of the parties interested, namely yourself. John Austen, and his wife, and was, as I am informed by him, and his friend, Mr. Boyce, presented to you at Mr. Walker's, the attorney, on Monday last for your signature, and which appears to be signed by you, (as is said,) Mr. Austen and his wife in the presence of, and attested by Mr. Walker and William Browne , I presume, his clerk. On comparing your hand-writing to a power of attorney signed by you, dated the 22nd of July, 1801, and the one you signed on Monday, the 11th instant, as appears to have been signed, is very different. As in the former you have written your christian name short, Jno. Tasker, and in the latter at length, John Tasker . The Bank being particular, and your handwriting different, it is requested you will be so good by return post, inform Mr. Dawes, whether you signed the last power of attorney on Monday, the 15th instant; and for the purpose mentioned, you will excuse this intrusion, and I am.

"Yours Obediently,

" R. GILL."

"Mr. John Tasker, brewer,

"Dartford, Kent"

MR. THOMAS WALKER . I am a solicitor, at Dartford. I am acquainted with Mr. Tasker. There is no other attorney of my name at Dartford. In the end of December last, I never saw the prisoner respecting any deed of transfer, or letter of attorney whatever. I look at the draft; I never saw that, nor any thing like it. I never saw it until the prisoner was apprehended. That memorandum at the bottom, purporting to be mine, is not written by me; I have no clerk of the name of Browne. I look at the letter of attorney; the attestation is not mine. I am perfectly well acquainted with Mr. Tasker's hand-writing. I look at that signature of his name affixed to this letter of attorney; it is not his handwriting. I look at that letter; it is not Mr. Tasker's hand-writing, nor any thing like it.

JOHN TASKER . I am a brewer, living at Dartford. About the middle of December last, or some where there about, I can't say to a week or ten days; the prisoner called upon me; he said, he waited on me on the part of Austen. He said, Austen wished to dispose of his reversionary interest in the stock belonging to his mother-in-law, and I told him, I had had sufficiently trouble with it already; I was engaged as a trustee, and should fulfill that trust; but I would not involve myself in any trouble, and I told him, I would have nothing farther to do with it; that was my final answer. I saw him again in the middle of January. The first time he mentioned that the deed should be prepared, I told him that I could not binder him from transfering; but I should not become a party to any deed, and if it were made, I should refer it to my attorney. When he came a second time, he said, he came with a copy of a deed; I told him, I was very much surprized at that, because I had told him, I would not become a party; and he said, surely, I would look at it; and I told him I should not. He asked me should he shew it to

my attorney; and I told him, he might exert his own discretion; but if he took up my attorney's time, he must pay him for it, I look at the power of attorney; that signature John Tasker , is not my hand-writing. To the best of my belief the first time I saw it was at the office of Messrs. Kay and Freshfield. I never saw the prisoner at the bar on the subject of that power. I look at that letter directed to Mr. Dawes; it is not my hand-writing, neither the signature nor the body. I look at the deed also; I have not executed that deed; it is not my hand-writing. I had no interview with the prisoner besides those on the 2nd and 9th of January; I had no interview with any other person upon the subject of that deed.

Robert Gill . I wrote no other letter to Mr. Tasker but the one I gave to the post-boy.

(The letter purporting to be the answer of Mr. John Tasker , brewer. Dartford, Kent, to William Dawes , esq. chief accountant to the Bank of England, London, in pursuance of the request of Robert Gill , attorney at law, was read.)

"Dartford, January 18th, 1815.

SIR,

"I received last night a letter from Mr. Robert Gill , desiring me to write to you, saying, if I signed a power of attorney on Monday, the 15th instant, for Mr. Austen, to Mr. Smallbones. I have only to say, that I not only signed a power of attorney, but a deed also at Mr. Walker's, my attorney. Mr. Gill tells me that a power of attorney I signed in 1801, is different from the one I signed on Monday, the 15th; but it should be recollected that I do not write now as I did then; fifteen years you must allow, will alter a man's writing; and also that I write my name some times Jno. and at others John. But the signature of mine on Monday, the 15th, I signed my name as I have to this.

"I am sir your obedient servant,

"JOHN TASKER."

John Tasker . Re-examined. I never had any transactions with Boyce before this time. In the course of my acquaintance with Austen, I know very little of his character; I can't say exactly how long I have known him.

WILLIAM GILES . I am a clerk in the five per cent office. I have the ledger; I turn, and find two thousand three hundred and forty-three pounds, eleven shillings, and ten-pence, standing in the navy five per cents, in the names of the Reverend Richard Williams , deceased, and John Tasker , of Dartford, brewer.

ISAAC DALVALLEY . I am acquainted with the prisoner's hand-writing; I have seen him write; I have seen letters from him directed to me, and I have afterwards learned from, on an interview with him on the subject of the application of those letters that they came from him. Those letters, and the instances in which I have seen him write enables me to form a judgment with respect to the identity of his handwriting.

Q. Do you believe that to be the prisoner's handwriting - A. I have very little belief upon the subject; if I had seen it with his signature; I might think it to be his.

(The power of attorney was here read.)

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am keeper of the Grffin public-house, which is in the County of Midlesex. In the month of December and January last, the prisoner and Austen were at my house five or six times; the last time they were there was a little time before I heard Mr. Boyce was in confinemint.

Prisoner's Defence. In the month of December, I received a letter from Austen, dated Hastings, telling me he had some money in the funds in right of his wife's mother, and he wished to know if he could sell it; I wrote him answer back that if there were no restrictions in the will to prevent it, he could; and I told him to come to Town, and he had better advertise it in the newspapers. He came up two days after; he then called on me, and asked me to draw an advertisement, which I did, and put it in the Morning Chronicle. In the course of the day, a letter come from Mr. Gill; I shewed it to Austen, and we both went over together; that was the first letter that came. Mr. Gill said that he could get it done in a few days, and we went over four, five, or six times to his house, and we met at the New York coffee-house, and Auston seemed very much in a hurry, and said he would blow Gill's brains out for the delay; and I told him the best way was to go to Ballachi's and Bridges's, and see if it was going on, and I found it was. Mr. Gill was the person employed; I was merely a friend of Austen; I was not in the money line; I went merely to see to it, and knew nothing of the man only six or seven times seeing him; it was recommended to go down to Mr. Tasker, and I told him I would go. I went down, and saw Mr. Tasker he said it had been a very troublesome job, and he would have nothing to do with it, because he would not subject himself to a law suit; I told him, to convince him, that every thing was honourable, I would send him down the rough draft of the deed, and he might shew it to his attorney, and it should be altered if one word was wrong. Mr. Tasker said if he did not have any trouble, he would have no objection. The rough draft was then drawn up, and they asked me to go down; they told me I had better go down, and I went down with the rough draft; when I came there, I saw Mr. Tasker, and he said, he had just received a copy of a deed from a man in St. Alban's-street, and this money was so locked up that Austen had not a right to sell it, for that there were four other persons, making five lives, and he could not dispose of it, Mr. Tasker refused to look over the rough draft at all. I asked him to let his attorney look at it; Mr. Tasker said he was never to be biassed by an attorney, and he said he would not pay the annuity, the mother had sold without a warrant so to do. I then told him, that from that moment, I should take no further trouble about it. When I came back, I met Mr. Austen at the Griffin; I told him I should have nothing more to do with it. He said he would not go to Mr. Thorpe, who had also applied in answer to the advertisement, and he said Mr. Gill should do it. He put the rough draft in his pocket, and said he would send a person down to Mr. Tasker, in whom he could put more confidence then in me, and I said, I would have no more to do with it after that. As to any bargain, or any money, he was to give me, it is

false. I told him I wanted no money. I called on him on Sunday morning after that, and he said; I am glad you are come, for I wanted to see you, and he said, I wish you would go to Mr. Gill's, for God's sake go, or my business will not be settled, for I can't go myself for my pantaloons are all to pieces, and my shirt is coming out. I told him it would be evening first, before I could go, and from that I went over. He wanted to go down to Dartford, and he had not a farthing, and I was obliged to lend him some money, as I very often did before. He said he was going in a one horse chaise. and I asked him how he could go in a one horse chaise, when he had no money, and he said, he could borrow one, and I parted with him there. I next went to Mr. Gill's, and got a parcel from him, and I called with it at Austen's lodgings, and asked if he had been there, and they said, he had not; and I told them to tell him that I had been there, and to say that I should be in Eagle-street. I never untied the parcel, nor any thing of the kind. there was the power of attorney, and a letter directed to Mr. Walker, and I went to Mr. Wright's, the Griffin, and Austen was there, and I called him to come into the parlour, and I then said, here are the papers; and I went out, and asked for pen and ink, and took them in, and then I went out again, and when I returned, Austen was writing, and I asked him what he was doing, and he had written something, and he said, he would get them done in a day, or two, and he folded the papers up, and put them in his pocket, and drank his grog, and said he would get them done that evening or the next day. From that moment, I knew nothing more about it.I never had any thing to do with it whatever more, and as for Mr. Gill's saving, that I told him that I had seen Mr. Walker, and paid a guinea, it is as great a falsehood as ever man uttered. This is the truth, as I am before the Almighty, I have no witnesses at all. Now with regard to that letter, Austen came to me, and asked me to go over with him and Mr. Gill to the Bull, and I said I was going to Kensington gravelpits, and it was two far; and he said, never mind, we shan't stop, and I went with him. Then I saw them deliver the parcel to the post boy, and Austen told me to give him a shilling for he had no money, After that, Austen came to me, and said, there was a mistake, and there was to be something more added. and he said, he knew he could not go for the boy, for his leg was bad, and he was ill, and I said I would go for him, and I ran after the boy, and overtook him, and it almost put me out of breath, and I said there is a mistake, they want to add something; and with that, he gave me the parcel back again, and I told him he need not wait; he might keep the shilling, and they would send it off by the post, and on my return to the Bull, I met Austen at the door, and gave the parcel to him; and that is all I have got to say.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 59.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18160529-50

525. SARAH BLAKELY was indicted for stealing, twelve pounds three quarters weight of cheese, value 6s. the property of William Cory and Richard Denman .

WILLIAM CORY . I saw the prisoner come into our shop, upon a pretence of purchasing some bacon, and I afterwards saw our lad bring her back, with the cheese in question, and I saw him take it from her.

JOHN PERFREMENT . The prisoner came into my master's shop on the day in the indictment; she asked for a piece of bacon, and I shewed her a piece; she begged me to weigh it, and while I turned my back for that purpose, I saw her shuffle, and get over a pile of cheeses. I told her the bacon came to eleven-pence; she offered sixpence, which I could not take, and then she went shuffling out of the shop; then I looked over the counter, and missed a cheese. I immediately followed her, and stopped her, and the cheese fell down from between her legs; I stopped her, and brought her back, and sent for a constable.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-51

526. WILLIAM SOAMES , JAMES COOPER , and JOHN COOPER , were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , a pocket-book, value 6d. a piece of paper with a certain stamp thereon, value 4s. another piece of stamped paper, value 6d. and two other pieces of stamped paper, value 6d. the property of John Souter , from his person .

JOHN SOUTER . On the day in the indictment, I had been in Serjeant's Inn, Fleet-street; my pocketbook was safe then; I had a four shilling receipt stamp in it, one sixpenny one, and two three-penny ones, and several small ones, but I could not take upon myself to say what they were. I went from Serjeant's Inn up Ludgate Hill, into St. Paul's Church yard ; I had a young man with me that I was speaking to. When I got to the other end of St. Paul's a person accosted me, and said, you have lost your pocket-book; and I said, I have not. He said, did you not come up Ludgate Hill; and I told him I did. He then saed, I had again; and I felt in my pocket, and found it was gone. I gave him my address. I never saw the prisoners until I saw them at the Mansion House. On the Friday, in the next week, I received a note, and went and fetched my pocketbook.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was in the City on the 20th of April, I met the prisoners, William Soames , and the two Coopers; they were going as if towards Charing Cross, and I was coming into the City, I met them all three in company together. I crossed over the way, and watched them for some time. When they got to the Bar, they made a turn, still keeping on the Temple side of the way, I kept at the other side of the way, and kept them in sight; they attempted a number of persons pockets; Soames attempted, and the others were covering; they came across the prosecutor, and another gentleman. They then turned back, and followed them into the City. I observed James Cooper go up to the pocket of Mr. Souter's friend,

and make an attempt at his pocket, by tuching it, and passed by him at the same time. The gentleman turned round, and seeing no one kept his hand in that pocket afterwards. Then James Cooper joined in company with John Cooper and Soames, then they proceeded in following Mr. Souter and his friend; Soames went up to Mr. Souter's pocket and just as he was going to cross the road to go to Ludgate Hill, the other two were on the right and left of Soames untill they got to Creed-lane, and just as they were crossing the top of the lane, Soames went up to Mr. Souter's pocket, touched it at the bottom with one hand, and drew the pocket-book out with the other; he put it in his left side, inside his coat, and held his coat with his left arm, and then they turned down the lane; they ran down the lane. I persued them. I pretended to be lame all the time, and I don't think they were acquainted with my person; the short one, John Cooper , who had staid at the corner of the lane longer than the others, made a run after them. I then went down Ludgate Hill, and down Broad-way, expecting to double upon them; I ran as far as Blackfriars Bridge, thinking they would go over the water; but I could not catch sight of them. I then ran back as fast as I could up Ludgate Hill, and through St. Paul's Church-yard, in search of the prosecutor, and came in sight of him at the Cheapside end; I went up to him and told him that he had lost his pocket book; and he turned round, and looked at me, and said no, I have not. I then said, I was sure he had, for the noted Bill Soames had taken it out of his pocket. He then felt, and said, I have; and I told him he owed to his country to give me his address, and I would send for him when I apprehended them. The next day I saw Dickins, and we went in search of the prisoners. I laid hold of Soames on the Tuesday, one got away from Dickins. We took them before the Lord Mayor, I forget what day the prosecutor attended. I know them so well as to be enable to be sure of them. Mr. Souter shewed me a letter, and I went with him to the workhouse, where the pocket-b-k was delivered up to me. There was a letter directed to Mr. Souter in the pocket-book.

AUGUSTINE HILL CRADOCK . I live in the poorhouse. On the 20th of April, on going to get some work, namely, shoes to clean, and such like; I was away for about quarter of an hour. When I came back, I went up to my kettle, and found a pocketbook, and a long letter about work done in it; it is six weeks ago; I got a person to write a letter to Mr. Souter. Neither of the Bow street officers wrote that letter for me.

Soames's Defence. I am entirely innocent of this charge against me, and I wish to say Mr. Vaughan has declared he would send me out of the Country for life if he could; and tis a very hard case to be sent for this case, for I know nothing about it.

John Cooper's Defence. I am entirely innocent of it.

James Cooper 's Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge.

SOAMES, GUILTY , aged 48.

JOHN COOPER, GUILTY , aged 38.

JAMES COOPER, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-52

527. PHILIP GLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , nine yards of ribbon, value 4s. 6d. and a handkerchief, value 1s. 2d. the property of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I am a traveller to Fairs . I lost these things at Brook-green Fair , between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, of the 2nd of May; I did not miss them before the officer shewed them to me.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer. I was at Brook-green Fair. I saw the prisoner attempt a number of pockets; but without success; he had a great coat thrown loosely across his right arm; he made a drive in among the stalls, and went up to the prosecutor; he stood there for the space of five minutes, and then took a piece of ribbon with his right hand, and put it into his jacket lining, and went away. He came back again, and took another piece, and the handkerchief, and we followed him until he got through the thickest part of the Fair, and then apprehended him, and found the property on him.

GEORGE WOODROFFE . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-53

528. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a coat, value 4s. the property of John Hill .

JOHN HILL . I lost my coat on Monday, about one o'clock, from my waggon. I had left it hanging on some hogsheads of sugar.

WILLIAM ROWSON . I stopped the prisoner in Little Tower-street, with this coat under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. A man stopped me, and said, I took the coat away; I know nothing of the coat.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-54

529. JOHN MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , four pounds weight of turkey raisins, value 2s. the property of Thomas Conway , and others; and JOHN EVANS , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. In consequence of observations which I had made, on the morning of the 9th of April, I went near Mr. Conway's ware house, a little before eight in the morning, and I saw Mansfield come out from the warehouse; he came up Garlick-hill , into Trinity-lane, and went to the Peacock; I had a person with me, whom I sent into the public-house after him. Some time after that, I went in myself; when I went in, I found Mansfield just coming out of the house; I

found Evans in the house, also I found a bag of turkey raisins close by Evans, on the seat by him. I asked him what he had got in that bag; and he said, it was the man's breakfast. He gave it to me, and it was a breakfast bag. I told him I must take him into custody; I had stopped Mansfield, and brought him in; they were both taken before the Lord Mayor. I told Evans he had been receiving stolen property from Mansfield. Mansfield said, he had taken those few raisins to give to Evans, because he was out of work, and very much distressed. Evans said again, that he thought it was Mansfield breakfast bag.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I followed Mansfield into the the public-house. I saw him take a bag from underneath his smock-frock, and give it to Evans, who was in the passage. I then saw them talking together, and drinking out of the same pot. Then I went, and gave Mr. Matthews a hint, and called him in. Evans as soon as he saw him, went into the tap-room, and put the bag on the seat in the box, and then they were taken into custody.

SAMUEL PETTIFER . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors, who are wholesale grocers. The prisoner Mansfield was their porter. On the morning of the 9th of April, Mansfield went out to the bakers to get the rolls, as was usual. In consequence of his being apprehended, and hearing what Matthews has stated, we examined the warehouse, and found a cask of turkey raisins open. There was only one broken, and I missed some raisins from one side; the raisin taken from the side of a cask will have a different appearance from those taken from the middle; and these raisins produced, appear to have been taken from the side of the cask; they are precisely the same sort of raisins that were in the cask in our warehouse which was broken.

MANSFIELD, GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

EVANS, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-55

530. HYMAN PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Douglas , in the King's highway, on the 7th of May , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, part of a gold watch chain, a gold seal, and key, value 30s. his property .

EDWARD DOUGLAS . I was in Bishopsgate-street, about ten o'clock, on the night of the 7th of May; I was by old Bethlehem; a woman accosted me, and took me up Alderman's Walk , which is not a thoroughfare; I remained there for the space of three or four minutes. She had just left me, when I received a blow, which knocked me down; I don't know who struck me. While I was down, there was a violent pulling at my chain; it was a gold chain; it broke, and was separated from my watch; there was a gold seal and key affixed to it. I then got up, and saw one person; who was about a yard from me; I only saw one person; I am not sure he was the person who had been pulling at my watch chain. I was running after him, and he ran; he took the left hand, and I followed him; I did not overtake him until the watchman got him. I am not positive that he was not out of my sight before he was stopped. The man who ran away from me, was stopped by the watchman; I saw the watchman lay hold of that man; the watchman laid hold of the man who ran from Alderman's-walk. I think the same man who was running from me, was stopped; but I can't swear. The prisoner at the bar was the man whom the watchman took; we went to Bishopsgate watchhouse. I lost my property entirely.

BENJAMIN DOGGET . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of stop thief; I met the prosecutor running with his hat in his hand, calling stop thief; I saw the prisoner come running out of Alderman's-walk just before; he ran until he passed the hatter's shop at the corner, and then walked slowly on, along the pavement. I pursued him until I came up to him, and instantly collared him, and took him to the watchhouse; two other watchmen were with me.

Examined by the COURT. I saw the prisoner ran out of Alderman's-walk; the prosecutor was following him; nobody else was running whatever. I suppose the prosecutor was about five yards behind him. The prisoner was running, and the prosecutor was pursuing him.

SAMUEL SHEPHERD . I am a constable of the Ward of Bishopsgate. When I was in my watch-house on the 7th of May last, I heard a cry of murder and stop thief; I should suppose it is forty yards from Alderman's-walk to the watchhouse; the sound proceeded from Alderman's-walk. I ran towards the sound; when I passed Alderman's-walk, I saw the prisoner was in custody in the hands of the last witness. The prosecutor was bleeding at the nose and mouth; he had not got a hat on; he was crying out at that time. The prisoner was taken to the watch-house. When he got there, he prefered a charge against the prisoner; he said, he had been knocked down, and robbed of his watch chain and seal. I told him to took at the prisoner; but he said, he did not know his face, for he could not see his features. The prisoner gave an account of himself; he said, he did not come through there nor past Alderman's-walk, but he came up Fore-street, and down the Churchyard. I asked the prosecutor if he was sure of the man; and he said, he never lost sight of him; he did not state it, for he was not above three or four yards from him.

MR. FRANCIS HOBLER . I am clerk to the Lord Mayor. The prisoner was brought before his Lordship on Wednesday, the 8th of May. I took the examination; what the prisoner said, was taken down in writing. Neither threat nor promise were made to him. I asked him what he had to say; and what he said, I made a minute of. I am sure I have his words here substantially. (Witness reads.)"Was coming out of Bishopsgate Church-yard, heard a cry of stop thief; had been to Fore-street, come along Moorfields, through Church-yard, and was going home to Catherine Wheel-alley; had been to Mrs. Page, sells fish, keeps a stand, stopped a quarter of an hour, asked her to bring me six pounds of prawns for my mother, to save my going to market. I went from my mother's to go to Mrs. Page,

went about a quarter to ten." That is the account he gave of himself, to shew he had not been there.

ELEANOR PAGE . I live in Fore-street, and keep a stand there; it is a place where the Lord Mayor was good enough to put us. I sell fish, and other things in their seasons. I don't know the prisoner at the bar, any farther than seeing him at market. He had not been to me on the night of the 7th of May; he had not asked me to bring six pounds weight of prawns for his mother; I did not see him that night at all. I moved out of the market at about ten o'clock. There is no other person of the name of Page in the market that I know of; I have been thirty-two years a fishmonger. I knew the prisoner, by seeing him, as another person; I don't know whether I must have remembered it if he had come to me; it is possible that he might have come to my stall and asked me to get six pounds of prawns.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-56

531. WILLIAM HARRISON and JOHN EMERY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a key, value 3s. 6d. the property of James Rees .

JAMES REES . I live at No. 3, Grafton-street, East, Tottenham-court-road . This key was in the key-hole of my door, while I was at work outside; I left it there for the convenience of going in and out without troubling any of my family to let me in. The prisoners were for some time looking at me, while I was at work. I heard them talking to each other, and one said, it is a very complete job, when they got about ten yards from my door. On following the prisoners. and apprehending them after the key was missed, Emery took it out of his breeches pocket and threw it over into a garden. I reached it, and gave them in charge of an officer.

HENRY COOK . I am an officer, and was present when Emery threw something into the garden, which turned out to be the key.

HARRISON, GUILTY , aged 18.

EMERY, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-57

532. GEORGE MAYCOCK was indicted for feloniously forging, and counterfeiting a certain bank note, for payment of 2l. apparently resembling the notes issued by the Bank of England, for the like sum, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the said Bank .

JOSEPH FARTHING . I keep the Quean's Head, in St. John's-street . On the 1st of January, in the present year, the prisoner at the bar, came to my house, in company with another person, with one eye. I believe it was about one or two o'clock. They were in the tap-room for sometime, before they came to the bar for change; when they came to the bar for change, Maycock asked me if I could give that man, meaning the other, change for a five pound note. I mean the man with the one eye, that I described, I told him I did not think I could, for he was a stranger, and I did not like to give change to a stranger; the prisoner then told me he was no stranger, for he was very well known in the neighbourhood, and he generally lodged at the Little Bell in St. John's-street, and went by the name of Nelson, but his real name was Wilcock. He said he would be answerable for it, and I might put his name, on it if I pleased. I had seen the prisoner several times, and knew him about ten months; I knew what his name was. I took the note from the other man, and asked my wife if she had change, and she said she had, and I gave her the note to put Thomas Wilcocks on it, and she did so; that is the note. I gave him the change, I gave him four single notes, and I believe one pound in silver. The prisoner was afterwards taken up. I attended before the magistrate. The other man who went by the name of Thomas Wilcocks ; the one eyed man was with him. The one eyed man was charged by the name of Adams. I saw another person of the name of Young, and another person of the name of Dell, went before the magistrate.

ANN FARTHING . I am the wife of the last witness. I remember the prisoner at the bar, and the one eyed man, coming to our house on the 1st of January. I have heard the account my husband has given, and it is correct. That is the note, and that is my hand-writing on it.

GEORGE YOUNG . I keep the Blue Last, in Compton street, Clerkenwell. I remember the prisoner at the bar coming in company with two other persons to my house, on the 13th of January; one of the other persons was a one eyed man; he was a person whom I afterwards saw at Marlborough street; that was the time Farthing, the last witness but one, attended. They had a pot of ale, and a drop of spirits put in it, at my house. I drank a glass with them, and after it was pretty well drank, the one eyed man tendered me a two pound note. I said, I could not give him change for the note, as I had no silver left. The one eyed man and the prisoner were very pressing for change, for they could not pay the reckoning unless I did. I told them I could not change it by any means; but I offered to give them two one pound notes, and they said, that would do. Maycock said so. I remember they said, they could not pay their reckoning without it I delivered the two one pound notes to the one eyed man. I held the two pound note, and asked the one eyed man his name, and he said, Maycock. I looked at the prisoner, and said, George, that is your name. He said, you may put that on master, it is all right. I wrote on the note directly, before I put it out of my hand. That is the note. The third man, then gave the one eyed man, Adams, one shilling and sixpence with which he paid the reckoning.

GEORGE DELL . I keep the Hat and Feathers, in Wilderness Row, Goswell street. On the 13th of January, the prisoner at the bar, came to my house; a man with one eye, came with him; they came in the evening, at a little before eight o'clock. I afterwards saw that man with one eye at Marlborough street; he went by the name of Thomas, or William Adams ; I am certain he went by the name of Adams; he was charged with the prisoner for this offence, I

saw Mr. Young and Mr. Farthing there. The prisoner and the one eyed man had a shillings worth of wine and water at my house, and after that, two glasses of shrub. The reckoning came to one shilling and sixpence; the one eyed man offered a two pound note to change. I asked him his address, and he said William Smith, Little Bell, St. John street. The prisoner Maycock was standing by at that time; he was near enough to hear this; and I asked the prisoner, does he live at the Little Bell, and he said, no, he only lodges there, and I said, well Maycock, I know you, if I don't know the other, and if there is anything amiss, I shall look to you for it, and he said, ah! master, it is all right. that will do, his name is William Smith . I gave the note to my son, and he wrote the name of William Smith , Little Bell, St. John street, in my presence. That is the note. There is William Smith, Little Bell, St. John street, James Dell , 1816, on. That is all my son's hand writing.

THOMAS DELL . I am a son of the last witness. I look at the note in question, and that is my hand writing on it William Smith , Little Bell, St. John street, James Dell 1816. I wrote that by my father's direction. The prisoner at the bar was by at the time. The man who was with him had only one eye.

JOHN FUTTER . I keep the Little Bell in St. John street. I kept it in January last no person of the name of Adams or Smith, or Wilcock; or Maycock lodged in my house on the 13th of that month.

Q. Was there any one eyed man lodged there at that time - A. No. I don't think I ever saw a one eyed man in my house at all, no man of the name of Nelson with one eye ever lodged in my house.

JOHN LEE . I am inspector of bank notes, to the bank of England. The prisoner was apprehended on the 23rd of January. I saw him; I went to Marlborough-street. He was not charged with the whole of the present charges. He was only charged with uttering to Dell. He gave me an answer to a question which I put to him; which answer I took down in writing at the time; neither promise nor threat, nor any other inducement was held out to him. He said he knew the man who paid the two pound note at Dell's. He was a corn porter, and he was called One Eye, or Nelson. I saw him on the Monday after the Saturday, (that is the 15th). It was in Smithfield, and he told me he had been in the country as a drover. I never knew any house at which he lived. I never had any other money transaction with him before this. nor since. He did not appear to have any more money about him; nor did I ever see him change any other bank notes. I have known him ten years; I met him in Wilderness-row. He asked me to have something to drink; it was about dusk. We went into Dell's; we had a shillingsworth of wine and water. When we left there, he went away and I went home. I saw him on the Monday, I did not drink with him; and never saw him since; he never paid me any notes. He said his name was Nelson, because he had lost one eye. I read this over to him afterwards. It was not before the magistrates. That is forged in every respect, in the plate signature and paper. The signiture is Y. Butten; there is such a clerk, but it is not his hand writing. That is also a forgery, forged in every respect as the last, only with a variation in the number; it is the same date and the signature, and it is from the same plate as the first. That is forged also in every respect, in plate, paper, and signature. The signature is in the same hand writing as the signatures of the other two. The name signed is S. Hulm. We have different signaturs for the different amounts of notes, and Hulm signs the five pound notes. I am sure he is not the signer of this.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave all to my counsel. I know no more of this man, than that he was a horse dealer, and worked up and down the roads.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-58

533. CHARLES GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , forty-one pair of gloves, value 40s. one stocking piece, value 5s. four pair of drawers, value 20s. thirty-one pair of hose, value 5l. four shirts, value 15s. three caps, value 3s. thirteen stiffners, value 13s. one pair of braces, value 3s. half a yard of wool, value 1s. two pair of sleeves, value 1s. and seven purses, value 6s. the property of James Pitt , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES PITT . The prisoner lived with me as an errand boy from about fifteen to eighteen months. Having repeatedly missed goods and money out of the till; I was determined to find out the cause; and I went to Bow-street and got an officer, who examined the prisoner's box by my request, and found goods in it of mine, which formed part of those mentioned in the indictment. The box was locked, and the officer obtained the key from the prisoner. The prisoner slept in an adjoining room behind the shop. There were some of the things in the box, which I had missed six months before.

BENJAMAN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am a Bow-street officer, I went with Mr. Pitt to his dwelling house, on the 5th of April last. I saw the prisoner there, whom I searched; I found a silk purse on him with four pawnbrokers duplicates in it, and a box key, which he said belonged to his box. I brought the box to him, and gave him the key I have mentioned, and he opened the box himself, and part of the property named in the indictment was there. In a paper in his pocket were two other keys. I took one of them to his master's till, and found it opened it. He acknowledged that he had another box at his father's which had property of his master's in it, I took the prisoner with me to his father's, and there we found this box, which he acknowledged was his. The third key opened it. I found a quantity of hosiery of all descriptions in it, and at the bottom I found a piece paper with forty-nine pawnbrokers duplicates, the greater part for articles of hosiery.

THOMAS BLACKBURN . I live at Mr. Hawkins's, No. 166, Drury-lane. I know the prisoner, he pledged two pair of bose at our house on the 6th of April. They are black silk hose, and I advanced ten shillings on the two pairs.

Prisoner's Defence. My master sold me many goods, which I pledged, and also Mr. William Pitt

sold me many; but the goods in the indictment were bought of Mr. William Pitt , though perhaps unknown so Mr. James Pitt .

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-59

534. CHARLES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , three shirts, value 30s. one pair of small clothes, value 20s, one coat, value 3l. two waistcoats, value 1l. one silk handkerchief, value 2s. three whole handkerchiefs, value 5s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. and a shawl handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Samuel Peacock , in the dwelling house of Frederick Kierke .

SAMUEL PEACOCK . The prisoner and I lodged in the same house; the house of Frederick Kierke; we slept in the same room; Frederick Kierke is a German; I keep my clothes in my box in that room; my box was locked; I found it broke open on the 9th of April, at about half past three in the afternoon, and my clothes were gone. I had seen them at about half past ten that morning. They consisted of all the articles named in the indictment. I had not seen the prisoner that day, until we apprehended him. I saw him on Tuesday; he was on guard on Monday night, and we took him on Tuesday the 9th of April, at about half past four, about an hour after I missed the things; we took him into custody in Tothill-street, Westminster; he had my small clothes on under his overalls, and he had some more of the things tied up in the bundle in which they are now. The breeches were the only things be had wearing on his person. I asked him if he could tell me where the rest of the things were, and he said no, that he had sold them to people that he did not know.

THOMAS GOOK , I assisted in taking the prisoner, about half past twelve I had observed him coming out of the house where they lodged, with a box on his shoulder. I stopped him, and put a question to him, where he was going with the box; he said, he had two boxes, and he was going to dispose of the one for which he had no use. I thought that a reasonable excuse. The house is in St. Martin's-court. I afterwards took the prisoner into custody. I found a turnscrew in his pocket, some marks of which were on the box. We asked him where the rest of the things were; and he said, we might have the money, provided the prosecution was stopped; he had twenty-six shillings, which he said, were the produce of the articles, all except six or seven shillings, which he had received as his pay.

(The part of the property found produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is my property; I did not break the box open.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-60

535. WILLIAM REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a watch, value 5l. a gold chain, value 1l. a seal, value 5s. a silver box, value 10s. two breast-pins, value 7s. three rings, value 1l. four pairs of ear-rings, value 10s. one brooch, value 5s. one silver pencil-case, value 2s. three silver clasps, value 3s. two thimbles, value 1s. and one shilling, the property of Samuel Fulmer , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA FULMER . My husband lives in Palmer's-village, Westminster, in the parish of St. Margaret's . He is a house-keeper, and lamplighter to his Majesty . I know the prisoner very well; I knew him first in the Hospital, in Westminster Infirmary; my husband was there as a patient, in the same ward with the prisoner; that brought us to an acquaintance. In January last, I had a little girl strained her ancle, and then the prisoner was surgery boy at the infirmary . I went with my child with the strained ancle, and the prisoner opened the door to let us in. I attended at the Hospital with the child for some time, and the prisoner came to my house on the 25th of February. On the 26th of February, I went to the Hospital with the child. The prisoner came on that morning, and asked me if I was going, I told him, yes, Bill, will you come in, and he said, no, I can't stay; he then went away. He came afterwards; but I did not see him. I went to the Hospital, and when I came back. I picked up the drop of an ear-ring, which the officer has got.

MARY FULMER . I am in my eleventh year. I am the daughter of Mrs. Fulmer. I know the prisoner; I was at home when my mother went to the Hospital in February last, she left my sister at home with me; it was on Monday, the 16th; the sister that was left at home with me was about four years old. The prisoner came to my mother's house, when she was not at home on that day; I knew him very well; he said, your mother is gone to the Hospital, is not she, and I said, yes; I said, will you come in Bill, and I put a chair for him to sit down, and he said, here is sixpence for you to go and get some cakes. I said, I must not leave our place, my sister is ill, and my mother would beat me if I left the place; and he said, it would do the child good to take her out. So he reached my sister's bonnet down, and gave the sixpence to my sister, and told her to go, and said, now you go, meaning me, and he pushed my sister and me out, and shut the door; I was gone about ten minutes. I looked in at the window, and saw him go into the parlour; then I went and got the cakes, and then came back, and knocked at the door ever so long before I could get in, and when he opened the door, he said, he did not hear me.

RICHARD MUNDAY . I am a constable, and went on Monday the 26th of February, to search for the prisoner, but did not find him; but as part of the ear-ring was produced to me, which I have now, and a clasp, and this key. Mrs. Fulmer gave me these things. I endeavoured to find out the property, but could not. I went round to all the pawnbrokers, and described the articles missing, and told them, should any thing be offered, they should detain the persons. I know nothing of the prisoner. The first time I saw him, was when he was in custody at Queen's-square.

SAMUEL FULMER . I am the husband of Mrs. Fulmer. I came home at about three o'clock on the day in question, and looked for a three-shilling token and missed it; I had left it in the bureau or desk,

in the parlour; I left it with my watch and several other articles, and when I went home in the afternoon, I missed a great many of them. I missed my watch at night. I had two gold rings, two gold breast pins, and four silver clasps. The watch had a gold chain, seat and key. They were all in this desk. It was locked, and I kept the key in my pocket. I found the desk locked; I don't think my wife knew what was there. These were her earrings.

Eliza Fulmer . Re-examined. I was at my house the whole of that day, except the time that I was at the hospital. I had not been to that desk. I had not left that piece of an ear ring on the floor when I went out; I am sure it is my ear-ring; I had not seen it for two months before; my husband, when he looked in the drawer said, oh! where is my watch. That drop was broke from the ear-ring these two years; the fellow was whole.

Sarah Fulmer . Re-examined. I had been at home the whole of that day, except when I went out to buy the cakes. I had not discovered any thing on the floor while my mother was out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent to Tothill-fields, and had a week for this.

GUILTY- DEATH , aged 14.

[ Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-61

536. FRANCIS FOX was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Cherry , in the King's highway, on the 7th of April , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3l. and eight shillings in monies numbered, his property .

EDWARD CHERRY . I am a watch-maker ; I live at No. 9, Anderson's-buildings, City-road. I happened to be in the fields in the neighbourhood of the Sluice House, on the morning of the 7th of April; I went from home about eight o'clock, and got there about nine, and I was returning home by Hornsey Wood House , when I overtook the prisoner and several others; that is about half a mile from the Sluice House; there were about ten others then, and they were joined afterwards by the prisoner, and several others. I was alone when I first met them; I was passing by them, and they said, I had shot a dog, and with that they hit me on the face; then they wanted me to go back, and fight, which I declined, and then the prisoner came up, and hit me; then I ran down from the River, and jumped over, into a lane, and he pursued me. I jumped over a hedge and ditch; he pursued me alone; he then overtook me, and threw me into a ditch which runs by the side of the lane. I then got out, and he knocked me down again. He then held me until several others came up, and helped him to hold me; there were ten I dare say. I saw him distinctly put his hand into my pocket, and I missed the watch directly afterwards; it was my right hand breeches pocket; I had eight shillings; then they kicked me. The prisoner continued with them. After they kicked me, I got up, and walked away. In the scuffle, I missed the watch; but can't exactly say who took that; I can't exactly tell the moment when I lost it; it was in the lane; I am certain I had it before I was knocked down in the lane, and I lost it while they were striking and beating me in the lane. Then I got up, and walked straight to the Sluice House back again; they did not pursue me. I saw Jefferson, the officer, about five minutes afterwards; I communicated to him what had passed. Then I went across the fields, towards Hornsey Wood; I afterwards saw the officers Vaughan and Rice; I went with them back towards the Sluice House; I saw the prisoner at the bar again that day; I can't say exactly how soon; but they overtook him just before he came to the Barley Mow, at Islington, about two miles from the Sluice House; he was in company with two or three girls at the time, and several persons together. I knew him again; he was pointed out before I got up. I never saw my watch since. I look at the prisoner, and I have not the least doubt about him.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. There were several persons in the fields, and they accused me of shooting a dog; I had not shot one. I carry a gun about the fields some times, and go fishing some times. Some words ensued, but not on my side. There were many persons round me at the time. I did not fight. I believe I had about nine shillings about me when I went out; I had felt my money in my pocket, and buttoned my pocket. I don't believe the money could have tumbled out of my pocket. I had had this watch some months; I don't know whether my father knew of it.

Re-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. The prisoner pursued me alone, before the rest came up; it was but a short time before they came up.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I belong to Bow-street. I happened to be out on the morning of the 7th of April; Vaughan and Rice were not with me; they were at Hornsey Wood House. I saw forty or fifty persons that morning. I saw the prosecutor, Edward Cherry, going over a hedge and ditch, into a lane; it was between nine and ten; he was running. I saw the prisoner and a woman pass me at the corner; they were running also. I observed the prisoner hit the prosecutor, and knock him down in the lane. The woman said, go it Frank, that is him that killed the dog. The prosecutor got up, and was knocked down again by the same person; then about twenty more surrounded him. I saw something resembling a watch in some person hand; I was about the length of this court from them. It was thrown up in the hand from the person who was down, and it appeared at that distance like a watch. Then they all left him, and went away, and came by me; and the prosecutor came up to me, and said, he had been robbed; I told him I knew that. I told him I could not assist him by myself; but I sent him up to Hornsey Wood House for Vaughan and other officers. I mentioned Vaughan's name; he went as I desired, and he returned in about twenty minutes, with Vaughan and Rice. I then went along with them until they came to Highbury-barn; I went down the terrace, and they went across the fields. I was not present at the apprehension of the prisoner; I am positive of his person.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. This happened on Palm Sunday. There are many innocent individuals go out on that day for their recreation. I suppose there might be two hundred persons out in the fields. I heard the woman urge the prisoner to beat the prosecutor on account of killing a dog. I I saw something in a man's hand, which I thought was a watch, though it might be a snuff-box, or something of that kind.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am a police officer of Bow-street. The prosecutor came up to me at Hornsey House, and I and Rice went with him, first to the Sluice House, and afterwards across the fields, in company with two persons named Smith; Jefferson continued with us for some distance, and the two Smith's continued with us. About fifty yards off, just crossing the Ball's Pond-road, I saw the prisoner in company with three or four more; he was in company with a girl; he was pointed out to me by both the Smith's; Cherry, the prosecutor, was there. The two Smith's got up first, and then the prosecutor came running up, and cried, that is the man, that is the man, the moment he saw him. We took the prisoner and the girl. Cherry charged him with robbing him, and knocking him down, and the prisoner denied it. I searched the prisoner, and found eight shillings and sixpence on him; I can't say exactly how that amount was made up. The money was produced before the magistrate, and the prosecutor could not identify it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. I have got eight shillings and sixpence; but not the identical eight shillings and sixpence that I took from the prisoner; I don't say positively but that the amount might be made up by three shilling pieces, and eighteen-penny pieces and sixpences. I know nothing about shooting a dog.

THOMAS RICE . I know no more than Vaughan has stated, which is correct.

PHILIP SMITH . I am a cabinet maker. I saw this transaction which the prosecutor has stated Five or six of the men charged the prosecutor with shooting a spaniel dog. Then some of them knocked him down; and he then ran away, and jumped over a ditch, into a lane; the prisoner followed him. I saw the prisoner in the lane, with his hand in the right hand pocket of Cherry; I could not see if he took any thing out.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. There was an accusation against the prosecutor that he had shot a dog.

ISAAC SMITH . I am the brother of the last witness. I have heard the account he has given. I saw the prisoner at the bar with his arm round the prosecutor's waist, and his hand in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me.

JOHN CHERRY . Was called on behaf of the prisoner, to prove that he did not know his son had a watch.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-62

537. JAMES HALL , was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , a watch, value 1l. 10s. two coats, value 2l. one pair of trowsers, value 15s. one waint coat, value 3s. one pair of boots, value 5s. and eight shillings in monies numbered, the property of Charles Walls , in the dwelling-house of John Howard .

CHARLES WELLS . I know the prisoner at the bar, he lodged in the same house with me; it was the house of Mr. Howard, of Long Alley, Moor Fields, in he parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch . He lodged in the same room with me, but did not sleep with me. I lived in Dolphin Yard, Long Alley; this was on the 5th of May, in the morning about six o'clock I got up; I believe the prisoner lived there eight or ten weeks; I left my watch; I had hung it up over my head, and it was gone; it was a silver watch, and had a ribbon and key; I missed a great coat also, and an under black coat, and a pair of black trowsers. The great coat I had laid over me on the bed; my full suit of clothes were gone, and my boots likewise; all but my hat; I went to look after the prisoner.

THOMAS HODGES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 7th of May, the prisoner pawned a watch for one pound, in the name of Robinson; this is the watch.

GEORGE RUTHVEN . I am an officer. On the 7th of May last, I apprehended the prisoner, and found on him a duplicate of a watch; I have it here. I found two other duplicates on him, for a coat and the boots, pledged at Benton's, in High Holborn, in the name of James Black. I found the pantaloons, great coat, waistcoat, and a neck handkerchief on him; and he told me where to find the duplicates of the other things.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-63

538. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Stephens , in the King's highway, on the 23d of April , for putting him an fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two seals, value 20s. one watch key, value 1s. and part of two broken keys, value 1s. his property .

WILLIAM STEPHENS . I was going through Church-street, near Shoreditch , on Tuesday the 23d of April, about a quarter after eight o'clock in the evening, and a young woman came up to me and said there are four men behind you that mean to rub you. She passed me; I thanked her and bid her good night. I got to the opposite side of the street where I lost her. The prisoner passed by me about as far as from me to your Lordship; he turned sharp round upon me, and drove his head against my chin, and took the seals from my ribbon. The seals, key, and part of two broken keys. I directly put my hand to my watch, and found my things were gone, and I tried to stop him with my left hand; with that, he ran away, and I ran after him, calling stop thief. He ran I suppose, one hundred yards; but I secured him at last; I never lost sight of him. Three or four more then came up, and asked me if he had robbed me, and I said yes. The prisoner struck at me several times, and I struck him again and cut him. I never found my things since. I never lost sight of him, and I am quite sure he is the man.

JOSEPH WASHINGTON . I was headborough at this time. I was going up Church-street, about one

hundred and twenty yards from where the prosecutor was stopped, and I heard the cry of stop thief, and this young man ran past me; I ran after him and several others, and in Brick-lane some one stopped him; that is at the bottom of Church-street, and he was given to my charge. The prisoner said if I was an officer, I was welcome to search him; and there was a great mob, and there was blows exchanged; but I don't know who struck first.

JOHN CROSSWELL . I know nothing of the robbery, I took the prisoner into custody; he would have been rescued if I had not gone to the prosecutor's assistance.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and I saw a mob running, and I ran to see what it was, and a young man came up to me and said as how I was one; then the people came all about, and the young man put his hand in his pocket and then felt his watch, and said he had lost two seals, and I know nothing of the robbery.

GUILTY- DEATH , aged 17.

[ Recommended to mercy on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-64

539. JOHN STAYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , two watches, value 4l. one pair of pantaloons, value 1l. 18s. one pistol, value 5s. one razor case, value 3s. five razors, value 3s. one trunk, value 3s. two watch ribbons, value 4d. four books, value 2s. 6d. two pair of stockings, value 2s. one pair of overall chains, value 1s. and two watch keys, value 4d. the property of John Cook , in the dwelling-house of Henry Clarke .

JOHN COOKE . I lost these things at the Green Man, in Bedford-street, Covent Garden . I lodged there; the house belongs to a person named Henry Clarke ; I have seen the prisoner in the house drinking several times; he lodged on Saffron-hill. I lost my property on the 26th of April; I missed it about half past nine or ten o'clock at night; I went to Bow-street; part of the things was found, and the remainder was returned to me by the prisoner's wife and brother.

HENRY CLARKE . I am landlord of the Green Man; I saw the prisoner at the bar coming down stairs, with the trunk or box in his hand. This was on the 26th of April, between three and four in the afternoon; he went backwards and forwards to the house for years before I went to it. I was alone, by the bar door. and there is a light that looks from the tap-room to the stair-case, and that was where I saw him. The stair-case fronts the door-way, and he went towards the privy, instead of coming out. There was a man came in just at the time, and called for a pot of beer; I drew it, and when I went back to see for the prisoner in the privy, he was not there. The door was open and I never saw any more of the prisoner, There was no trunk or box there; the prisoner had no box at my house of his own.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I let lodgings. I do not know that the prisoner was a man who goes about the country hawking goods. There was no man there on whom he was in the habit of attending. There were a great many persons it the tap-room at this time. There were no persons up stairs. This was three or four o'clock in the afternoon. The soldier was not in the house at that time, when the serjeant asked for a candle, to go up to bed; he discovered the robbery. My house is in Bedford-street, which is in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields.

WILLIAM BOND . I belong to Bow street. I went and searched the prisoner's appartment, on Saturday, the 27th of April; I found the door was fastened, and I knocked, and they asked who was there, and I said a friend; and when the door was opened, I saw the prisoner at the bar; I knew him; he has been known some time by the name of the Old Duffer. I told him I had an information against him for taking Cooke's, the serjeant's trunk away, and his property in it. He was very much in liquor at the time, and was getting his dinner. I made him get up, and in his waistcoat pocket, I found this watch-key, and overall chain. On the Tuesday following, I called at the Green Man, in Bedford street, and part of the property was returned.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

John Cooke. Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. I left the room door locked. I can't say that no one went in to make my bed, I left the key at the bar; who went into my room after I went away, I can't tell. I was present when the prisoner was apprehended. I am positive that both the overall chains were in my box, they were a pair I purchased myself. Ten pounds were lodged in Henry Clarke 's hands to stop the prosecution.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it all to my counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 54.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-65

540. SAMUEL NASH, alias QUILTER , was indicted for that he, on the 19th of April, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign, was convicted with one Philip Reilly , as a common utterer of counterfeit three shilling tokens; and that he, having been so convicted as a common utterer, on the 3rd of May , uttered to one Lydia Hose , a certain other counterfeit token, well knowing it to be counterfeited .

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD. I produce an office copy of the original record of the conviction of the prisoner, with one Philip Reilly , as a common utterer of counterfeit three shilling tokens. I happened to be present at their trial, and can certify that the prisoner is one of the persons mentioned in that record.

LYDIA HOSE . My husband keeps a public house in the Five Feilds, Chelsea . I remember the prisoner at the bar, coming to my house, about eight o'clock in the evening of the day in the indictment; he asked for a glass of porter; he said would I grant him a favour; I told him I must know what it was before I said I would. He said it was but a small one, he wanted to give a child a three shilling piece, and would I give him one for small silver; I said yes, and he gave me two shillings, and two sixpences, and I lighted a candle, and looked at them, and they were perfectly good. I put them into the till; I gave him a three shilling piece out of the till. I took the candle in one hand, and the money in the other, and told him to look at it, and see that it was good. I know that the three shilling piece I gave him was a

full cheek, and it also had a little half moon on it; I took very particular notice of it, for I would not have given it to him if I had had another. He had another three shilling piece under his fingers, and as I was going to look at it, he put his hand over it. He went away, and he was back in an instant, and said, I don't much like this, mistress, and I will thank you to change it. He held it towards me, and I perceived it was not the one I gave him. I called him a rascal, and told him, I had a great mind to knock him down I snatched both out of his hand, and said, he should not have either until he had been before his betters. I sent for a constable to apprehend him, and as soon as he found the constable was sent for, he left the house, though it rained very hard.

THOMAS HOSE . I followed the prisoner, and took him. He pretended he was going back to the place where he had taken the three shilling piece, and on account of his agitation, I was about to take him into custody, when he ran away. I overtook him, and he put up both his fists, but I told him that if he would strike, I would strike; with that, I knocked him down, and secured him.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I am one of the tellers of the Bank of England. I look at the three shilling piece offered by the prisoner to Mrs. Hose; It is counterfeit. I look at the other which Mrs. Hose first gave the prisoner, and it is a good one.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been employed for Mr. Sotter, and took this of one of the workmen at foundation digging of the name of Washington.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-66

541. JEREMIAH MORGAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edmund Rolf , about the hour of one in the night of the 10th of May, with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, forty two pairs of boots, value 60l. and twelve pairs of shoes, value 7l. the property of Thomas Bamfield .

THOMAS BAMFIELD . I am a boot and shoe maker , and live at No. 13 Picket street, Temple Bar , I don't rent the whole house; It is Mr. Edmund Rolfe 's house. and I occupy the shop only. I quitted my shop about eight o'clock in the evening preceeding the robbery, and returned about nine in the morning; I then found that about eighty pairs of boots, and about twenty pairs of shoes had been taken from my shop. They were worth considerably more than sixty pounds. I perceived no marks of violence whatever on any part of the shop. There were nine odd boots, and eight pairs of shoes not bound, which they did not take. I got an officer from Bow street. who had all the locks taken off, and examined. I have now forty two pairs and an old boot. The 10th of May was a Saturday. I saw twelve pairs of shoes at Bow street, and I was confident that they were part of those that had been stolen.

DAVID BARRAT . I am in the employ of Mr. Bamfield. I fastened up the shop, and left all secure. It was a quarter past nine; it was dark at that time, and perfectly secure. The next morning when I came to the shop at a little before seven, I missed the property which my master has mentioned.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . On the morning of Monday, the 13th, a person gave me information, where the property was. We went to Phoenix-street, Soho, out of Crown street. I got a neighbour to let me stay in their place to watch No. 4, to see if any one would go in there; Richard Limbrick , my brother, was with me the whole of the time. At about four o'clock in the afternoon, there came two men to No. 4, and knocked at the door, which was opened, and they went in. Afterwards my brother and I went in, and searched the house, but could not find either of the two men. We opened the back yard door, and found the prisoner working at a woman's or child's shoe, in a shed, I asked him if he had seen two gentlemen go out that way, and he said, he had not. There was a ladder against the wall, and there is a communication to the next house, No.3, which is a pigeon shop, the parlour of No. 4, was full of women's and ladies' shoes. The prisoner's brother makes up orders of ladies and children's shoes. Then my brother and I went out, and watched again, and we saw the two men come out who had gone in. That was about five or ten minutes after we came out. I immediately ran round by another street thinking to meet them; but missed them. I and my brother then returned to the house again, and asked leave to search for the property. I rather think I did not say what property. The prisoner made no objection to that; he said, he knew nothing of any property; and while I was talking to him I looked through the back kitchen window, and discovered the toes of several pairs of boots, which appeared to be covered over with a bag. I don't know that that kitchen was occupied by the prisoner. I called to my brother, who was searching No. 3, to come to take care of the prisoner, while I broke open the kitchen, when I saw the property. He came, and took charge of him. I went down to the back kitchen, and tried to break the door open; but could not. I then knocked at the front kitchen door, where a man and woman lived, and asked them for the poker; and they seemed rather confused, and denied me it. I immediately went up stairs to the shed, where the prisoner was at work, and asked him to lead me a hammer to break the door open; he said directly, here is the key of the back kitchen, which two men who have taken the place, have left with me, that key opened the back kitchen door, and there we found forty two pairs of boots, and an odd one, and twelve pairs of shoes. They were afterwards claimed at Bow street.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . Corroborated the account of his brother.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

ROBERT CLAYARD . I own No. 3 and 4 in Phoenix street. The prisoner at the bar is my brother in law; he lived in that house No. 4 with me, was born there, and served his apprenticeship there. I remember a man taking the back kitchen of me, on Friday, the 10th of May, in the evening; he was a working looking man; Mrs. Nelson was present at the time, in all the time my brother has lived in that

house, I never knew him in company with the person who took the back kitchen. On Friday he worked all day with me, and we worked all the evening together, and he supped with me, and at about half past eleven, he took a light, and went to bed; and I saw him in his own room, and the head of his bedstead is against the partition against which the head of my bed is; and I never heard any noise in his room, or heard him get up during the night, this man took this place to put goods in, and he said, he should only want it about a week, and as it was empty, and I found it difficult to let. I thought it a good thing to get it occupied. I carry on the business of a ladies' shoemaker, and have opened part of the shop No. 3, as a pigeon shop.

SOPHIA NELSON . I lodge in this house, No. 4, and I was present when the man took the back kitchen of Mr. Clayard. I never saw that man there before, and I have lodged in the house about six months. The prisoner always bore an excellent character as a very honest man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-67

542. FRANCIS BLAKE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Davies , in the King's highway, on the 15th of April , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch chain, value 6d. three watch keys, value 2d. and a seal, value 1d. his property .

BENJAMIN DAVIS . I am a journeyman taylor . I was going home in Brown's Lane, Spitalfields , at about half past twelve on the night of the 15th of April, and the prisoner came up to me, and gave me a shove in the breast with one hand, and with the other took hold of my chain, and broke it. I then catched hold of him by the neck that moment; he threw something out of his hand at the time. I believed that my watch was gone for I heard something fall. I called to the watchman, and they did not come. My wife was sitting up for me, and she heard my voice, and she came, and saw me with a fast hold of this man. There was a man and woman pulled the prisoner, and told me to let him go, but I would not, and took him to the watchhouse, and then I found my watch in my pocket, but my chain and seal gone. I afterwards went back with a candle, and looked, but could not find them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-68

543. ASLIM MACDONALD and JAMES CAREY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , three silver waiters, value 6l. one silver snuffer-stand, value 1l. two pairs of steel snuffers, value 2s. three silver candlesticks, value 5l. two silver extinguishers, value 20s. three plated candlesticks, value 20s. four plated extinguishers, value 10s. one silver soup-ladle, value 40s. three silver sauce-ladles, value 40s. thirteen silver table-spoons, value 7l. two silver gravy-spoons, value 40s. four silver desert-spoons, value 40s. one silver sallad-fork, value 10s. one pair of silver asparagus-tongs, value 20s. twenty-three silver table-forks, value 15l. seven knives, value 5s. seven forks, value 5s. and one japanned knife-tray, value 2s. the property of William Praed , esq . in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM LEEDS . I was servant to Mr. William Praed at that time. On the 7th of May, in the morning, I saw the plate, and put it into the pantry cupboard. I afterwards saw the plate, which was found in the possession of the prisoner; that was the plate I had put into the cupboard; it was about nine o'clock, I had it, and I missed it about four. The pantry door had been locked; but not all the day; some part of the day the key was in the door.

JOSIAH PARKER . I keep a plated warehouse. I know the two men at the bar; I have known them about two months. They were at my house on the 7th of May last, they came about four o'clock; Macdonald came in first; then he had a bundle with him; he asked for weights and scales. I did not produce them. My wife went out at the back door, according to the directions I had given on the previous day. I had dealt with the two prisoners before. I considered them to be both interested on that occasion; they were both present. During the absence of my wife, Carey came in; he placed himself in a chair; he did not say any thing to Macdonald, nor Macdonald to him. My wife returned with some persons, the two Mr. Turner's. She then went out a second time, and brought in a man named Jeffkins; when she returned then, Macdonald and Carey were in my parlour. When the Turner's came, I informed them that I had purchased plate of the prisoners on the 16th of March, and I had reason to believe it was stolen; I said that in the presence of the prisoners. One of them said, he could give a very good account of how he came by it; but if it was stolen, he would recompence me to give him his liberty; it was Carey said this. There was nothing more passed then. The officer was sent for, who, when he came, searched them; it might be a quarter of an hour before Limbrick came. When my wife was returning with Jeffkins, Macdonald slipped out at the door, and Jeffkins laid hold of him, and brought him in. Carey attempted to run out before the officer came in. Young Turner came in I think first. The bundle of plate was secured.

JANE PARKER . I know the two prisoners at the bar. Macdonald came to my house on the 7th of May last; he brought a bundle; it was about four o'clock in the afternoon; he walked right through the shop into the parlour, and asked for Mr. Parker; presently my husband came in, and as he came in, I went out, I went out to bring in Mr. Turner; I had received directions from my husband to do that if either of the prisoners came. I did not hear a word pass between my husband and Macdonald. He did not ask me for any thing before my husband came in. I returned with some of my neighbours in a few minutes; the youngest of the Turners came immediately, and the father followed. When I returned, I was informed Carey was there. When I came back, I did not see either of them until I saw them brought through the shop to be taken to Hatton Garden; Limbrick took them through. I locked up a bundle in the presence of a neighbour of mine;

she kept the key until that bundle was delivered to the officers. I had seen Carey and Macdonald at my husband's house on the 16th of March; I could form an opinion that they were acquainted at the that time; they talked together on that occasion, like persons who were acquainted. My husband bought something of them; as soon as my husband bought that, they went away together, and they had come together.

SARAH WYBERT . I was at Mr. Parker's, when I saw the two prisoners taken out. By Mrs. Parker's desire, I took charge of the key after the property was locked up; I had the care of the key, and young Turner said it was better to be locked up, and Mrs. Parker carried it up stairs, and it was put into an empty room. Mrs. Parker locked it up, and gave the key to me, and I took the key home, and after the officer returned, the door was unlocked in his presence, and I saw the bundle delivered into his hands.

JOHN LIMBRICK . On the 7th of May, I went to Parker's house, about a quarter after four; I got this bundle from Mrs. Parker. I saw Mrs. Wybert there. I saw the two prisoners Carey and Macdonald. The bundle was just as it is now.

Macdonald's Defence. May it please your Lordship and gentlemen of the Jury. I know nothing about this bundle at all. This man, Carey, gave it to me to bring into Mr. Parker's house, and I never saw nor knew what it contained, any mere than your lordship; and as for my running away, it is false.

Carey's Defence. I am a man who gets my bread as a porter in running of errands, waiting at table, brushing coats, and such like, and I circulated cards for that purpose, and a man came into my shop in Somers Town, and asked me if I would go of an errand for him; and he asked me to go to Mr. Parker's, where I had been for him before; he said, he had been speaking to Mr. Parker the day before concerning the bundle, and I was to bring him what Mr. Parker gave me. On my way, I met with Macdonald, and this man was walking after me, and I asked Macdonald if he would take a walk with me, which he agreed to do; I knew him. I came within a short way of Mr. Parker's, and I had occasion to stop against a wall, and I said, I would be in in a few minutes, and asked him to take the parcel in; and I went in, and knocked at the door, and soon after Mr. Parker bid me walk in, and sit down, and I sit down.

John Parker . Re-examined. The bundle was not opened while it was there; Carey asked for weights and scales, but did not say what he wanted with them. Neither of the prisoners said what the bundle contained.

JURY. Q. Did Carey say he came from a person who had been with you the day before?

Witness. No, he did not.

COURT. Q. What was it one of these men or both of them sold to you on the 16th of March?

Witness. A silver tea service, for which I gave them eighteen pounds three shillings.

JANE FOSTER . I am a neice to Mr. Carey; he lives at Ware-passage, Somers Town. I was at his house in May last; he is a gentleman's servant out of place; he waits at table, keeps a shop, and took in coats to brush, and shoes to clean. I was there on the 7th of May; I was out of place also. He went out that day at a little after two; he had been at home the best part of the morning, until twenty minutes after two; I slept there the night before, and breakfasted with him that morning. I first saw him at eight o'clock, at breakfast; I left there about half past ten; I came back at a quarter before eleven; he was then cleaning shoes and brushing coats. I saw him at dinner and saw him until dinner, a little before one. He was in the shop serving clothes with his wife. He went out at about twenty minutes past two; a person came in with a parcel; I was present. He asked my uncle if he would carry a parcel, and my uncle said he would, and he put on his hat, and went out immediately with the person who came in; that was twenty minutes past two.

GEORGE LEEK BOLTON . I am as half-pay lieutenant in the India Company's service; my birth-day is on the 7th of May. On my last birth-day, I was at the prisoner's shop, about two o'clock; I saw the prisoner there; but not at first. I dealt for an article; not agreeing about the price with the first person I spoke to, the prisoner came out, and concluded the article for nine shillings and sixpence, and I gave him six shillings, as I had not so much silver. On the Thursday, I called again, and paid the ballance for the pantaloons, and took them. Mrs. Carey then called me in, and told me something which had happened, and that brought to my mind the exact time I had been there. While I had been there, I recollected a man coming into the shop, who said, Carey, I want you to go on an errand for me, to take a parcel where you have been before; Carey said, he would go with him immediately, and in about three or four minutes went with him. On the next day but one, I heard he was taken up.

JANE FOSTER . I never saw the man before that came in to ask my uncle to carry a parcel; he was a tall thin man, and was dressed in black.

MACDONALD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

CAREY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-69

544. BENJAMIN HARL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 11th of March, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , three asses, value 6l. the property of the Right Honorable Edward Lord Ellenborough ; of which John Purvis was convicted of stealing, at the General Sessions of Oyer and Terminer for the County of Surry, on the 24th of March, in the year aforesaid .

JOSEPH SNOW . I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Purvis, at the Spring Assizes, for the County of Surry.

(The record put in and read.)

JAMES THORNTON . I was Lord Ellenborough's bailiff, at Roehampton, in the year 1814. His Lordship had an old jenny ass, and two jacks, at Roehampton; the youngest of the jacks was about two years old; I found the eldest of the young ones at the house of Hill, who has been convicted here; he

lived in Cow Cross, Smithfield ; I found it on the 17th of April. I went in search of the prisoner; but he had absconded, and I have not been able to find him until lately.

CHARLES OADES . I was concerned with Purviss in stealing some asses off Lord Ellenborough's lands; we stole three. We brought them to Smithfield; when we got there, Purviss sold them; he went with some men to sell them, and left them for a time with me; he left me for about a quarter of an hour. When he came back, we went to Chick-lane, and after that to Hill's house in an alley. When I got there, I saw the prisoner; he bought the asses; I am not positive whether it was twenty-five shillings or twenty-seven shillings for the three; Hill joined in buying them, and they were apparently both concerned. The asses were driven up into the street to Cow Cross; they all stood at the door when Harl paid for them; it was a public-house. I went into the house, and then Harl and Hill proposed drawing up a paper for six pounds, as the price they had given for the asses, supposing any thing should occur that that had been the value of them. A paper was drawn up by the landlord of the house, and some money was paid in the presence of the landlord. I was afterwards apprehended. I went with the officers to Hill's house, where they found one of the asses.

GEORGE TARRANT . I keep a public-house in St. John-street. I remember the morning of Friday, the 10th of March, 1814, I do recollect the selling of some asses at my house; but the prisoner is the only one I can recollect. I was desired by the prisoner to write a paper. That is the paper. I did not see the asses; but I saw two pounds five shillings paid.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-70

545. MICHAEL KELLEY , and GEORGE KAY, alias CARTER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and intering the dwelling house of William Goodwin , at about the hour of one in the night of the 19th of May , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing there in, one kettle, value 6s. one pelisse, value 10s. one shirt, value 6s. one gown, value 1s. two pairs of stockings, value 6d. and one table-cloth, value 3s. his property .

WILLIAM GOODWIN . I and my wife and family went to bed on the night of the day in the indictment between twelve and one, and in the morning discovered the articles in the indictment to have been stolen. The way I suppose the entrance was made was by the flap of the cellar window, which was not fastened. I do not know whether it was shut or not, before I went to bed, and there was nothing to prevent a person from going in if it were open. I was awakened in the morning by the watchman, and it was then light enough for me to see what o'clock it was by my watch.

ANNE GOODWIN . I am the wife of the last witness. We went to bed together. I do not know in what state the cellar window was when we went to bed. When I was alarmed in the morning, the first thing I missed was a tea-kettle, and I next missed the shirt, green cloth pelisse, and a table cloth.

EDWARD DAY . I am shopman to Mr. Soerwby, pawnbroker, at No. 45, Chiswell street. Some things were brought to us to be pledged on the forenoon of the 20th of May; there was a new copper tea-kettle, a woman's palisse, a table cloth. The prisoner, Kelley, brought the pelisse and tablecloth; I am sure of that; he brought them after the kettle had been pledged. I advanced eight shillings on the pelisse and table cloth. He gave me the name of John Mops , I advanced five shilings on the tea-kettle in the name of John Lake .

JOHN LAKE . I am going on in my thirteenth year; I live with my father and mother. I know both the prisoners; I have known them about three or four months. I got up on the Monday morning, and was going out about half past six, when Michael Kelley came and asked me if I would pawn a teakettle for him; Kay was not with him at that time; I told him I would. I went after breakfast, and did so. He had it in a bag. I took it to Mr. Sowerby's, and asked eight shilling, and he gave me five; when I came out, I saw the prisoners, they were both standing together, near the door; I gave my father's name to the pawnbroker; I had been to pawn things for my father before. I gave the five shillings to Michael Kelley , and he gave me two pence, and George Kay gave me three pence.

KELLEY, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

KAY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-71

546. WILLIAM BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a pair of boots, value 1l. the property of Joseph Hale , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH HALE . I was in the parlour adjoining my shop, and saw the prisoner walk out of my shop, with a pair of new jockey boots. I pursued him, and secured him, and brought him back, and delivered him into the custody of an officer.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-72

547. JOHN HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , a chaise harness, value 3l. two bridles, value 1l. and two saddles, value 4l. the property of John Bowling .

CHARLES SMITH . I am a servant to Mr. Bowling. On the evening of the 5th of May, I locked up the chaise house. At about five o'clock the next morning, I found the door open, and missed the chaise harness, saddles, and bridles.

WILLIAM CASER . I am in the fish-line. The prisoner came to me about a quarter before three, on the morning of the day in the indictment, and asked me to lend him a sack; I did not; I told him I should not lend him one at that time in the morning.

THOMAS HILLIARD , On the morning of the 6th of

May, at a little after four o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Brook Green-lane, about two hundred yards from Mr. Bowling's house. I followed him. He threatened, if I followed him, to give me something I did not like. I asked him what he had, and he said a few cabbages. I followed him until I got another person to go with me,

JOHN BOLTON . Between five and six o'clock, I saw the prisoner in my stables, at Waltham Green. He asked me whether I would buy a bridle. He had a sack; I saw him take two saddles out of it, and heave them into a ditch, where we afterwards took them from.

WILLIAM MAYNE . I am a harness-maker, at Knigtsbridge. The prisoner came to me on the day he was taken up, and offered to sell me a saddle, two bridles, and a whole chaise harness, except the collar, for ten shillings. I had him taken into custody, and delivered the saddle and harness to the officer.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-73

548. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , seven pounds weight of leather, value 14s. the property of Thomas Gardiner , privately in his shop .

DAVID HATFIELD . I am a shoe-maker. On the 18th of May, in the afternoon, I went to the shop of Mr. Gardiner, on Clerkenwell Green . I went to purchase some leather. The prisoner was in the shop. In consequence of observing her putting herself in different attitudes, I suspected her, and acquainted Mrs. Gardiner, with my suspicions, in consequence of which she acquainted her husband, and the prisoner was searched, and the leather found between her petticoats.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined three months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-74

549. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Price , in the King's highway, on the 26th of April , for putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a ridicule, value 1s. one six-pence, four halfpence, a silk handkerchief, value 1s. and a pincusion, value 6d. her property .

SARAH PRICE . I was robbed on the 26th of April, in Pentonville . I was walking in company with a lady, at about half past nine o'clock. It was not very dark at that time. Crossing to Penton Place, three men passed us, and the last man, Robert Johnson , laid hold of the ridicule which I had in my hand, and forced it from me. I resisted him; he broke the string, and cut my hand. I struggled with him, and in struggling, he twisted my hand, and broke the string, which was wrapt round my fingers. He had hold or my hand to get the string away. I was struggling with him half a minute. He immediately ran across the road. I was rather frightened at the time, and said, the man has got my ridicule, and the lady who was with me, cried stop thief, and ran from me, and the man was immediately pursued.

I saw him again in about or four five minutes; he was then in custody of Mr. Read. I knew him again; I am sure he is the man. The ridicule was made of black velvet, and was worth a shilling.

JOHN KINDON . I am a watchman. I heard a great screaming as I was crying the hour of half past nine o'clock. I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran through York passage, into Weston-street, Pentonville; the prisoner was running and several persons after him; and there was a cry of stop thief. I ran immediately to meet him, and he got into the middle of the road; I threw my rattle at his head, which I am not possitive hit him; but I rather think it did; for his hat immediately fell, and the ridicule fell out of it. I picked them up, and delivered them afterwards to Mr. Read.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I heard an alarm of stop thief, in Weston-street, and the prisoner ran by the gate where I was standing. He had his hat on then; a great quantity of people was running after him. I came up and took him into custody, when the watchman delivered these things to me at the same time that I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it all to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-75

550. THOMAS WILLIAMS and CHARLES SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , seven yards of gingham, value 10s. the property of John Waller , privately in his shop .

JOHN WALLER . Between eight and nine oclock in the morning, of the 17th of May, my young man was in the shop, and I came down while the prisoners were looking at some silk handkerchiefs. There were a third man with them, who made his escape. He took the attention of the young man, while the others were looking at the handkerchiefs. As they were going out, after they said the handkerchiefs would not suit; I thought Smith had something under his jacket. The man who made his escape went out first, Smith went out next, and I sent my young man after him, who brought him back; the other prisoner had not got out of the shop

MATTHEW HARRISON . Inconsequence of what Mr. Waller told me, I went after the prisoner Smith, and in bringing him back, I took the gingham from under his arm.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 24.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-76

551. THOMAS REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Samuel Burrowes .

No prosecutor appearing , the prisoner was found

NOT GUILTY.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-77

552. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a watch, value

4l. and a watch key, value 5s. the property of Thomas Chadwick , from the person of Margaret his wife .

MARGARET CHADWICK . I lost this watch on the 16th of April, at about half past two o'clock in the day, in Threadneedle-street . The prisoner asked me what o'clock it was; and I pulled the watch out of my pocket to tell him, and he nipped it out of my hand, and ran off; and I saw him no more until he was apprehended. We never found the watch again.

WILLIAM SAUNDERS . I apprehended the prisoner, and there were several charges of defrauding different people against him.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-78

553. GEORGE GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a watch, value 2l. the property of Reuben Gooch , from his person .

REUBEN GOOCH . I was a sailor . I lost my watch on the 18th of May, between eight and nine o'clock at night. I fell in with the prisoner at the Crown and Thistle, by Tower-hill ; we had four or five pots of ale to drink. I was not half drunk; I was a little drunkish. I told him, I wanted a ship; he told me he could get me one, and asked me to take a walk to see the mate. The watch was safe in my pocket then; and we went out, and I felt him draw the watch out, and he ran off as quick as he could, and I ran after him; but he turned out of my sight, and I lost him. I am sure he is the man, I can swear positively.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-79

554. JANE CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , a watch, value 3l. 3s. the property of Philip Pottinger .

PHILIP POTTINGER . I lost my watch between four and five o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of May, at the Grapes, at the corner of Round-court, St. Martin's-le-grand . I called for a glass of liquor, and the prisoner got me round the waist, and would not let me go until she got my watch out of my pocket. I did not feel her take it. I never gave her the watch to go with her because I had no money.

JAMES LOVEL . I wait in the bar at the Grapes. The prisoner came in, and began talking to the prosecutor, and he bid her be off, and keep her own company, for he was very ill, and not in a fit state to talk to her; and she immediately pulled up his frock, and said she would feel for some halfpence.

JOHN BROWNE . I had a description of the prisoner, and apprehended her. I accused her of stealing the watch, and she said, it was underneath the step of the door, where there was a gully hole. I took her there, and she put in her hand, and pulled it out, and gave it to me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-80

555. CATHERINE M'CABE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , a fowl, value 10d. and a piece of green baize, value 6d. the property of Joseph Gillman and others .

ALICE FEATONBY . I live in Newgate-street , at the house of Messrs. Gillman and Co. In the evening of the 11th of May, I caught the prisoner in the house, coming down the stair case with a bundle; I asked who was there; she said, a friend. I asked her what she had got in the bundle; she said, nothing of yours. I requested to see what she had got, and she proceeded a little further down stairs, and then threw the bundle down, and tried to make her escape out at the door. I called for assistance, and she was stopped, and an officer was sent for, and she was taken into custody. There were several things belonging to a young man who travels for the firm; the fowl and green baize belonged to the firm. She said, she had not got any plate; but that was what she wanted; she had got these things from the two pair of stairs.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-81

556. THOMAS WILLIAMS, alias GEORGE ATKINS , was indicted for foloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Butterworth , about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 27th of April , and for stealing therein, four pieces of printed cotton containing ninety yards, value 12l. the goods of the said John Butterworth and David Evans .

DAVID EVANS . I live at 94, Watling-street ; my partner lives there. We carry on the business of linen-drapers .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a police officer. On the morning of the 27th, I hid myself in these gentlemen's warehouse, from some reasons, so as to command a view of the door, and see who came in. Before I went into the warehouse, I saw the prisoner and another looking in at the warehouse window; that was about half past seven, or twenty minutes to eight; they saw me also. I went down Watling-street, and they went down the Old Change. I went into the warehouse, and sent for Mr. Evans; he went away again; and then I fastened the warehouse door; then I stationed myself over a fan-light over the door, and I could then command a view of both the outside doors, and the warehouse door to. Williams, and Morgan, the other, came into the passage; they turned the latch of the warehouse door, which I had fastened, and after they got the latch loose from the hasp, the door would open about three quarters of an inch; at the top of the door there is a catch of a bell, which if the door was opened any further, would ring; and with this stick, which was longer than it is now, (but I will tell you how I broke it,) they shoved the bell back; it hangs on an elastic iron, and this took about ten minutes, with a portion of care and nicety. I am sure the door had been

fast; I had stationed a young man under the dresser in the warehouse close by the door, to see I had fastened it; I told him you see I have fastened the door; and he said, yes, you have; and I said, if it was a jar they would suspect. I made him particularly observe it. When they got it open, the prisoner at the bar went into the warehouse; the other man stood at the warehouse door with this bag, and just before he opened the bag, he looked out at the street door to see if any one was coming. The prisoner at the bar reached some printed cotton, and Morgan held the bag open so, and he chucked it in. Morgan was inside the street door; the prisoner at the bar then went back, as I thought to get some more; but I rushed upon him out of the private door, and Morgan made his escape. The prisoner at the bar was took into the warehouse. The prisoner and I had a little bit of a tustle, and he said, Matthews, don't hurt me, you have got me, and that is all you want.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing at all to say. I am guilty of the crime laid to my charge.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-82

557. THOMAS BROWNE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Hyam Barnett , in the King's highway, on the 27th of April , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, four seals, value 3l. one watch-key, value 4s. and part of a watch chain, value 10s. his property .

HYAM BARNETT . I am a hatter , and live at No. 7, Field-lane, Holborn. On the night of the 27th of April, I and my wife went out at about eleven o'clock to the grocers' to get some tea and sugar; Nixon and Burn's near Union-court were the grocers. I observed the prisoner at the bar and two more men standing near the door at the grocers shop. We went in; but it was so crowded, that we thought it best to go a little further, and return. We then went up Holborn-hill ; in about three or four minutes we met the prisoner at the bar, and two more men, abreast of us; they were arm in arm together on the foot pavement, near Gloucesterplace; my wife received a blow from the prisoner Browne; I knew him perfectly well, having seen him at the grocers, and several other places. Before I could render any assistance, he said loudly, d-n your eyes, who are you shoving at; my hat was knocked off, and I had another blow. I stooped for it, and felt a sudden snatch at my fob, and by the feel, I thought my watch, chain, and seals were gone; the chain was broken, and left the watch behind. The watchman was very near the prisoner, and would not stop him, nor spring his rattle; the prisoner ran towards Gloucester-place, and the watchman would not follow him. I look upon it Browne snatched my chain. I was surrounded by girls and different people; I cried stop thief, and after that, I went to the pawnbroker's, and told him how I had been used, and the officer advised me to go to the watchhouse, and Mr. Brand and some more City officers went round until two in the morning; I afterwards saw Mr. Barnley. The next time I saw the prisoner was about five o'clock in a public-house at Cow Cross, on Sunday, the 5th of May; that was in consequence of what my son told me. The prisoner refused to go with the watchman, and asked what for; he was told for the robbery on Saturday night; he said, Thursday night, Friday night; but he did not like Saturday night at all. I never found my chain or seals again.

Prisoner. The prosecutor stands charged; ask him whether he was not tried before?

Witness. No, never; I am too well known in this court for any body to suppose any thing of that kind.

RACHAEL BARNETT . I am the wife of the last witness. I was with my husband at the grocers; I observed these men near the grocer's shop door; I knew the prisoner well; he has bought hats at our shop. He and two other persons came up to us near Gloucester-place; they came a breast of us, and the prisoner at the bar first struck me a violent blow; I was going to say, Browne are you tipsy, when my husband cried out murder, watch, and I heard his hat fall; I called out also, and the watchman could have stopped him if he chose, but he did not; and we pursued them up the back alleys to Gray's-inn-lane; but lost them; we could not find them. Then we went into the pawnbrokers, and my husband went about with Mr. Brand all night.

Prisoner's Defence. About three months ago, Mr. Barnett bought a ring of me, and he bought it quite on hazzard, and gave me ten shillings for it, which was spent in gin, and I and my wife and child used frequently to call in at his house, and have a drop of gin; and he told me this ring was not gold; and he said, when he got made a petty officer, he would false swear my life away; and he met me after that, and told me he had been robbed; and on the Sunday following he had me apprehended. I had been buying some roses for my wife, and I went up Church-lane to Mr. Poole's, and Mr. Barnley came in, and said, I was his prisoner.

THOMAS REILLY . Was called to prove an alibi for the prisoner; but could neither fix day nor hour to the period about which he spoke of the prisoner being in bed.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-83

558. MARY ANN KING was indicted for that she, on the 3rd of April , did falsely pretend to Richard Jeune , shoe-maker, that she then wanted a pair of walking shoes, and she was to be married to Mr. Thomas, a nephew of Sir John Thomas , of Bath, on the Monday following, and then the said Mr. Thomas would pay for them; by means of which said false pretences, she did unlawfully obtain of and from the said Richard Jeune, one pair of shoes, value 14s. with intent to cheat and defraud him of the same; whereas in truth and in fact, she was not to be married to the said Mr. Thomas, a nephew of Sir John Thomas , of Bath, on the Monday following, and whereas she was not married to Mr. Thomas, a nephew of Sir John Thomas , of Bath, on

the Monday following; and whereas Mr. Thomas, a nephew of Sir John Thomas , did not, nor did any Mr. Thomas, nor any other person, pay the said Richard Jeune for the said pair of shoes on the Monday following, or at any other time , against the statute.

NONE of these false pretences were astablished by the prosecutor; and the prisoner, by direction of the Court was found

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-84

559. HENRY THATCHER , THOMAS BAXTER , THOMAS JONES , THOMAS MAYN , and HENRY PHILLIPS , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Hales , at about the hour of seven in the afternoon of the 23rd of April , his wife and others in the same being, and stealing therein, one silk handkerchief, value 3s. two necklaces, value 1l. one brooch, value 18s. two pair of ear-rings, value 17s. two tablecloths, value 3l. three sheets, value 1l. 10s. five pillow-cases, value 10s. one pelisse, value 7s. two gowns, value 10s. three frocks, value 3s. two shirts, value 5s. four aprons, value 4s. two petticoats, value 2s. six towels, value 6s. and one pair of stockings, value 12s. his property .

RICHARD HALES . On the 23rd of April last, I was landlord of the Bridgewater Arms, in Bridgewater-gardens . All the prisoners were at my house that evening; they came there about two o'clock in the afternoon; that afternoon I was cleaning out the skittle ground, and was coming in and out every moment. When I had done, I heard them talking in a low voice in the back parlour. In consequence of hearing that, I listened, and I heard Morgan, (a man who is not here,) say, we are in a bloody mess now; he was in the back parlour, sitting right facing me. He addressed himself to the whole company, as I supposed. There was a stranger in the back parlour, whom I did not know. I next observed the prisoners, all except Mayn, lay their heads together, and say, let us go and stall him off as he comes down stairs. I believe that means making a bustle about, so that a person might not be seen. With that, I ran through the back parlour, past the stair foot door, and I saw a person coming down stairs. There is a room for the accomodation of company on a Sunday and Saturday night up stairs; but it is not used for that purpose at any other times. This was a Tuesday. When I saw this man on the stairs, he had a silk handkerchief in his hand, which he threw over his shoulder behind him. I collared him immediately; I afterwards picked that silk handkerchief up. I called out to my wife to go up stairs; she at that time in my presence, pulled the key of the room we found was broken open out of her pocket. She immediately went up stairs, and when she had got to the top, she cried out we are ruined, for the door is broken open. She then came down stairs, and I went to search the man's pockets. I had continued hold of him all this time. I was going to search him on the stairs at first. The men in the parlour were in such a situation that they could hear what my wife said to me. They followed me out to the foot of the stairs; it was light enough to distinguish faces at that time. I was going to search the man, when the prisoners at the bar began to bustle about, four of them; I can't say Mayn was in that bustle. They came close to me, and pushed me about; I did not at that time distinguish Mayn. I then dragged the man into the bar, for fear they should rescue him, and pushed him into a chair. There had been two strangers in the house; the one I saw in the parlour, and the other was the one I caught on the stairs. Then Thatcher, Baxter, Jones, and Phillips came round the bar. Thatcher said, let the man go, for he is drunk; I said, I can't think of letting the man go, when I have had my place plundered; I will have justice done. With that, Thatcher said, d-n your eyes, if you are all of my mind, he shan't be taken. Thatcher then addressed himself to the other prisoners. They were all then round the bar, as close as possibly could be. After he had said that, they immediately came round to the other side, where I had taken the man, and Thatcher dragged my wife away, and I immediately closed the doors upon them. She had been by the side of me, telling me to let the man go. There are two glass windows at the top of the bar, which bolts, and the lower part locks. With that, they took the shutters which stand by the side of the door, and they battered the door all to pieces. They dragged the man by the hair of his head and the collar of his coat over the door, and opened the side door going into the passage, and carried him out of the house in triumph; three of them had hold of him; I am certain Thatcher, Phillips, and Baxter. At that time that they were endeavouring to pull him out of the bar, and I was endeavouring to hold him, I received several blows. I had a bit of the door in my right hand to defend myself, and that hand was grazed. There were several blows struck at me; but Field warded them off; Field is a man who lives at the back part of the house. I did not see him when he first came in. After they carried the man off in the manner I have described, I saw nothing more of them for about a quarter or half an hour. I sent for some officers while I had the man in the bar; but none came. About five or ten minutes after the man was carried off, officers came in, and said, they would not go, unless they had seen them in the fact. Other officers came about ten o'clock; Thatcher, Baxter, and Phillips had then returned, and called for a pot of beer; it was half or three quarters of an hour before they returned. I served them the beer, while I sent for the officers. In the mean time Baxter came round to the bar, and was drinking there, and Thatcher and Phillips staid in the tap-room. When the officers came in there were seven or eight, and an extra watchman. Baxter went off quietly; but there was an attempt to rescue Phillips and Thatcher, and the officers were obliged to use cutlasses. Phillips and Thatcher heard the charge I gave the officers. The officers asked me if they were the men that had been robbing me, and I told them they were, and to take charge of them on that account. It was after that, that the attempt to rescue was made. Thatcher and Phillips both got

out at the window; but Thatcher was taken after a long struggle. The officers then asked me to go out into the mob, and see if there were any more, and I went out, and secured Mayn.

VIRTUE HALES . I am the wife of the last witness. I recollect the 23rd of April; I was up stairs in the bed room, about four o'clock in the afternoon of that day; I locked the bed room door with a padlock, and put the key in my pocket; the stair foot door which leads into the passage is locked with an inside lock, and not a padlock. I put the bedroom key in my pocket, and the other on the mantle piece of the bar. When I got down stairs, my husband had the same man in the bar who had been on the stairs. At the time the man was struggling on the stairs, the prisoners were in sight; I am quite sure some of the prisoners were present, when he threw away the handkerchief. I had a full opportunity of seeing that. They were near enough to hear me say I was ruined, I was ruined. When my husband was in the bar, I saw the men by the bar door in the passage, I took hold of my husband's arm, and begged him to let the man go, for we should all be murdered. There was then a number of others rushing in at two other doors beside. I knew them by seeing them before on other days and that day also. Thatcher then rushed into the bar, and siezed hold of me by my handkercheif, and pulled me away from my husband. There was a carving knife that laid on the table close by the bar door, he took it up, and said, she can swear to her property, let us do for her. I said for god's sake, spare my life, for the sake of my baby. Baxter then come on my right hand side, and got his hand into my pocket. I struggled very much with them, and they cried pinion her hands; Jem Welch , Bill Morgan , Thatcher, Baxter, and Harry Phillips , were surrounding me at that time; one took one wrist, and one another. I looked up to Harry Phillips , and said oh, Harry, little did I think to be served so. He immediately swore at me and took the broom which was by the shutters, and gave me a blow at the back of my neck, and my head sunk. The knife had fallen out of their hands, and there was a brick to keep back the kitchen door; Thatcher took it up, and said this will do it, and some persons at a distance said, don't, pray don't; and immediately he threw it from him; I fell at that time from a blow on my head.

WILLIAM FIELD . I live in Bridgewater court. The prosecutor's backside of his house is within four steps of my door. I recollect the 23rd of April last, I was standing at my own door, between seven and eight o'clock, and I heard a great noise in the Bridgewater Arms. I went into the house, I saw Mr. Hales in the bar with a man, as he said, was a prisoner, whom he had found robbing his house. He had hold of that man, he said that aloud. There were a great many person, standing round at that time, and four or five came into the bar, and said, let the prisoner go. I was in the bar at that time. He said, he would do no such thing, as he had been robbing him. The people said, come, go it my boys, we shall have him. They opened the door then, and went round to another door that went into the parlour, and laid hold of two shutters, and broke the upper part of the bar door open; I was outside the bar when they did this. Mr. Hales and the man were in the bar at this time. As soon as they had done this, Mr. Hale cried out and said, neighbours, is there any one that will come forward and save my life, and assist me. I stepped over his counter then, and laid hold of a large pair of tongs, which were by his fireside, and went to the door to defend him, and prevent the people coming in. At the same time, the people behind threw a pint pot, and a half pint pot, and hit me at the back of the head. I turned back to know who threw them at me, and while I turned about, the man got from Mr. Hales, and got half way in the door that was broken, and the people who had broken the door had him by the head, and breast, and collar to pull him out; the people without, were pulling him over so as to get him quite clear. I stopped for about half a minute more; I don't know whether that man whom they got over the bar door was taken out or went out.

JAMES VINT . I am a ward officer of Cripplegate Ward. I recollect on the evening of the 23rd of April last, being sent for to the Bridgewater Arms, about ten o'clock; when I came there, I went in along with some of my brother officers, and I saw Thatcher, Baxter, Jones, and Mayn; I saw Mr. Hales; he said to me, that is one, pointing to Thatcher; he likewise told me, Baxter was another. I went to take hold of Thatcher, and he was rescued from me by Jones, and a chimney sweeper, and others. I went to catch hold of him a second time, and he was torn from my hands again, and he got out of the window. A minute or two afterwards, I heard a cry help, out side, and I went out, and saw Everett struggling with Thatcher. I immediately secured Thatcher, and he went quietly along. I had to take them in charge. We did not know of the robbery at first. I never knew them before, nor did I know whether they knew me. I had my cutlass with me, and was obliged to use it, I considered it necessary.

JOSEPH PAGE . I am a constable. I was there on the night of the 23rd, with Vint. I saw Baxter in the bar when first I went in, and Mr. Hale gave charge of him for a robbery. I left him there with Cousins and Moore. I and Vint went into the taproom with Mr. Hale, and he pointed out Thatcher and Phillips as two of them. I said, you must go with us. Thatcher said, what for, and I told them for a robbery. Harry Phillips then said he should not go, and Thatcher said, he should not go. They then began to fight with us, and we drew our swords. Then the women and people in the place closed our arms, and they got out at the window. I have every reason to believe that the woman closed our arms on purpose for them to escape.

THOMAS MOOLE . I am a ward officer of Cripple-gate. When I got to the Bridgewater Arms on this occasion. I saw Baxter and Jones was apprehended afterwards; Baxter was in the bar, and was very much elevated in liquor. The landlord gave me the eye to him that he was one of them. The landlord at

that time, made a charge of robbery; I am positive it was robbery. Further assistance was sent for, as Everett thought it necessary. When we persevered on apprehending three of them, only three were taken at that time. I saw Mrs. Hales in a little trouble; she did not make any charge at that time, she was very much flurried and in a great deal of agitation.

JOHN EVERETT . I am another officer of Cripple-gate ward. I went into the Bridgewater Arms, and saw Baxter, Thatcher and Phillips; Phillips got through the window, and I took Thatcher coming through it; Phillips got of entirely for that evening. Hales gave me an intimation that Baxter was one; he told me for what to take them into custody for breaking his up stairs room door. We met with a great deal of opposition in apprehending these men. I saw Mrs. Hales, she was very much frightened, and very much alarmed, but by no means in liquor.

Thatcher's Defence. It is true I was in the house, but I am innocent of what is laid against me; if I had been guilty. I certainly should never have returned to the house again.

Baxter's Defence. It is true I was there, but never interfered one way nor the other; I was playing at skittles there in the afternoon, and when I went to the bar after it was all over, some one said go away, and I said why should I go away, I have done nothing, and I never resisted nor said a word.

Mayn. Left his case to his counsel.

Jones put in a written defence, denying his guilt.

Phillips's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge laid against me.

Evidence for the Prisoners.

ANN STEVENS . I live at 34, Bridgewater Gardens. My husband is the proprietor of those gardens. I was going through the court on the evening in question, about eight o'clock. During the time I was there, I heard Mrs. Hales cry out they are robbing the house; she was in the passage; I was in the court adjoining the house; I was looking through a window; I had been there about ten minutes. I saw ten or twelve men rush out of the parlour towards the bottom of the stair case, towards the bar; they rushed from the parlour. Mr. Hales had got a man by the collar, and pushed him into the bar, and Mrs. Hales had a handkerchief in her hand, which she said, she had picked up off the stairs. Mr. Hales called out for somebody to fetch Mr. Stevens; Mrs. Hales begged me to fetch him, and I directly went for him, and returned with him; I was gone about two minutes, not more. When I returned, Mr. Stevens went into the bar, and a person said, they have opened the back door, and I went round directly and went in, and saw Mrs. Hales in the passage. I shut the door directly, and put my back against it, and said, no one shall go out this way. Mrs. Hales then went into the parlour. There is a passage between the bar and the parlour. She was in a very violent passion, and raved very much; when I went into her, she was laying on the bench, and kicking; I thought she would go into fits. There was one woman in the room. From the time she went into the room until I went away, there was not one man in the room. There was no men knocking her down, or putting a knife to her throat, or putting their hands into her pocket; if that had been so. I think I must have seen it. I assisted to recover her. She told me she was in the family way, and I was much afraid of her. I stopped with her until five or six men tried to force the bar door open, and finding they could not, they broke it open with the shutters. As they were forcing the door, one of them said, tip it him, and I was alarmed for my husband, who was in the bar. I directly opened the side door to get out. In the situation in which I was, I could not look into the bar. As I got to the front door, they were bringing the man out, two of them. I left her in the chair, and heard her cry out oh, three times. I don't know who the woman was that was in the room with Mrs. Hales. After the man was taken away, Mr. Hales went for officers. Field shewed me a half pint pot, which he said, they had thrown at him; I took it out of his hand, and told him it was not meant for him, and therefore not to make such a noise about it. During the whole time, there was no man in the back parlour put a knife to Mrs. Hales' throat, or rided her pockets. On my being served with a subpoena, I went to Mrs. Hales, and told her I had been so served. I told her as my husband was out of Town, to ask her solicitor, Mr. Burgess, whether I was bound to attend; she said, that my own sense ought to have told me better, for I had no business to accept the subpoena. I am positive that I never told her that my evidence would hang the men, or any thing to that effect.

HENRY JONAS . I am a watch-maker. I went to the Bridgewater Arms just as the man was dragged into the bar; I was standing in front of the bar. I saw the man rescued, and taken away. I heard Mrs. Hales scream, and they said, she was fainting; and Mr. Hales called for a person of the name of Stevens, and when he came, he said it was a very troublesome piece of business, and I said, it is; he said, I will have nothing to do with it, for it is a troublesome job. Mr. Stevens went out, and fetched one Mr. Wood, and he would have nothing to do with it. Mr. Hales had hold of a man in the cradle; and a man named Stevenson asked for some brandy for Mrs. Hales, and the servant girl gave a glass of rum; I don't know where Mrs. Hales was then; but I believe she was in the parlour. Some man said, it is a shame for a man to be dragged to prison who has been drinking in the house all day, and a voice said, he sha'nt if they are all of a mind like me; and the top door was shoved open, and I dare say there were twenty men pulling at this man, who had got out of the cradle. Before the man had been rescued, Mrs. Hales came into the bar. I asked her what she had lost; and she said, a row of beads and ear-rings, and she set such store by them, that she had been offered three pounds for them, and would not take it. They knew me very well, because they have a public-house in Petticoat-lane. She said, it is very fortunate that the man did not get to my middle drawer

where all my property layed. She said to me, it is immaterial, for she knew two of the men, and they should suffer if ever two men suffered on the new drop, should it cost every bit of property she had left; those were Harry Thatcher and Baxter. She did not make the least complaint of any one knocking her down, or holding a knife to her throat, or picking her pockets. Her clothes had been torn about as if she had been fainting.

SAMUEL HILLIER . I was at this house the best part of the afternoon. I was there when the alarm was given of the man being up stairs robbing the house. I staid there from that time until a quarter after ten. I saw nobody knock Mrs. Hales down, or put a knife to her throat, or rob her.

WIILIAM STEVENSON . I was helping Mr. Hales to clean the skittle-ground. I recollect the circumstances of this disturbance. I saw Mr. Hales draw a man down stairs, and charge him with robbing him. I could command a view of the stairs at that time. I was going in with the skittles; I saw a great many persons round the bar, and they shoved the top of the bar door in, and pulled the man out. I can't tell whether that was done by one or more. I was in view of the bar all the time. Mrs. Hales fainted away, and I took her into the parlour. She fainted away against the bar, and I took her from there to the parlour; she was then in an insensible state for some time. I saw no violence used to her during the whole time. She did not faint in the parlour; she fainted between the bar door and the parlour, and the people were conveying her in. leading her in. I fetched the glass of rum; I asked the maid for a glass of brandy, and she said, she had none. When I took her the rum, she drank it off in a minute, and seemed better. She never mentioned a word about her having her pockets picked. She never said, a word about a knife being held to her throat.

THE JURY retired for about two hours, and found all the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-85

560. ELIZABETH EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Ward , a bag, value 4d. one half-a-crown, and three one-pound bank notes, the property of Robert Izard .

JAMES RISCON . I work for a farmer at Royden Hamlet, in Essex. I came up to Town on the 21st of May, to sell some straw, and I went into a house for a pint of porter, and laid down the money in the bag by the pot on the table; it was Mr. Robert Izard 's money, my master. The prisoner whipped up the bag, and ran away; and I pursued her, and took her in George-yard, and brought her back.

JOHN BOUTLE . I took the prisoner into custody; but could only find two notes on her; there was another girl in company with her, who has absconded ever since.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing only .

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-86

561. MARGARET CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , an umbrella, value 1s. 6d. a key, value 6d. and four one-pound bank notes, the property of Charles Finch , in his dwelling-house .

But the prosecutor not appearing , the Jury found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-87

562. HANNAH POLLEY was indicted for a misdemeanor ; but

MR. GURNEY, for the prosecution, opened an acquittal, as it would appear that the prisoner was the agent of her husband.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-88

563. JOHN HATCH and JEREMIAH ETTERIDGE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , five gallons of raw corn spirits, value 3l. the property of Samuel Davey Liptrap , and Thomas Smith .

JAMES RUSM . On the morning of last Tuesday fortnight, I went into the distillery to gauge the spirit cask, and saw some bladders laying on it; I went out to call the watchman, who was at the top of the yard, and before I came down again, the prisoners came by me, with the bladders in their aprons. I ran after them, and in making their escape, they dropped the bladders. I had known them before; they had been discharged three weeks or a month; I knew them perfectly well; they came out of the distillery stooping their heads down. Afterwards I picked up the bladders; there were eight in the whole; those left on the cask were full; altogether there were eleven gallons and a half.

JAMES GOLDIE . I am brewer to the house. I found a great number of spoil holes made in the receiving cask very recently; that is within ten hours. This kind of spirit is worth fifteen shillings per gallon.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I apprehended the two prisoners.

HATCH, GUILTY , aged 24.

ETTERIDGE, GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-89

564. BRABAZON CHRISTIAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , twenty-four shirts, value 6l. six night shirts, value 12s. nine pair of drawers, value 2l. fifteen pair of stockings, value 1l. 10s. eighteen necklaces, value 18s. eighteen handkerchiefs, value 18s, two coats, value 2l. one great coat, value 1l. four pair of pantaloons, value 1l. one pair of breeches, value 5s. eight waistcoats, value 1l. 15. one set of mathematical instruments, value 1l. two pairs of pistols, value 1l. one portmantue, value 5s. and one trunk, value 5s. the property of James Bodmer , esq .

JAMES BODMER , ESQ. I am a native of Switzerland. At the latter end of last month, I was coming from Ghent to Ostend. I met with the prisoner on

board the barge coming from Ghent. He told us he was a partner in the house of Cothey, Roberts, and Co. in Cannon-street; he shewed us some papers that had a relation to that firm, which induced us to believe that he was in it. We gave him some money to pay for his passage. We first gave him seven Louis d'or; and then he said, those had been stolen from him, and we gave him thirteen more. He came over from Ostend in the same packet to Ramsgate with us, and we came by the same coach to London; we came together to Blackheath ; there my brother and I were obliged to stop, on account of the fatigue of our journey; and as he was going on with the coach, we requested him to take care of our luggage, and take them to Cannon-street, to Cannon-street to his merchantile house. He said, he would be there in the morning. At Ramsgate he gave us a private direction, Mr. Christian, 116, Red Lion-street, London. He invited us to come and see him. We did not give him the keys of our trunks. When we got to Cannon-street the next morning, we found no such house as Cothay and Co; we heard that those gentlemen had removed to somewhere in Little Tower-street. We afterwards went to Red Lion-street, Holborn, but could find no No. 116 there. He explained to me that it was Red Lion-street, Red Lion-square; and therefore we did not go to any other Red Lion-street.

WILLIAM COTHAY , ESQ. I am in the firm of Cothay, Robert's and Co. That firm has existed more than ten years. He never was a partner in that firm; he was a relation to Mrs. Roberts. He was to have been a partner some years ago, but he never was.

JAMES GLANNON . I was directed to make search after the prisoner at the bar. The prosecutor gave me a description of his person, and of the sort of articles he had with him. After a long search, on the 25th of May, I found him at No. 11, Tottenham-court. I took him there at about seven o'clock in the morning. I went up stairs; the woman of the house went up stairs to the bed-room door. She asked to speak to him, and he said he would come directly; I rather suspected that he was preparing to meet me, and I forced the door open, and he snapped a pistol at me. I afterwards found it was loaded. I catched the pistol with one hand and knocked him down with the other. I found two trunks in that room; the locks were forced off; the straps were cut, and the chains broken. They were empty; I searched some drawers there, and found all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-90

465. PIERRE JOSEPH DE COHENRA was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , a box coat, value 20s. the property of William Morgan .

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am coachman to Dr. King. About half past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was leading my horses to the coach makers to get the carriage. This coat was on the horses backs; I was looking forward, when all on a sudden, I missed my coat.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . At about half past eleven o'clock I saw the prisoner throw this coat off his arm at the corner of Princes-street, I followed him and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the coat.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-91

566. JOHN FITZPATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , two brooms, value 6s. the property of George Swan , privately in his shop .

HARRIETT SWAN . I lost two brooms on the 6th of May, near nine o'clock at night. I did not know any thing of the property being gone, until the man was brought into the shop. They were in the shop, and not outside the door.

JOHN ACKERBERRY . I saw the prisoner take the brooms. I stopped him with them and never let him go.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-92

667. ELIAZAR DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Shilson , in the King's highway, on the 14th of April , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3l. and a hat value 5s. his property .

THOMAS SHILSON . On the 13th of April, I was at the Duke's Head, in St. Martin's-street . I was robbed when I came out of the house, at about half past twelve o'clock. I was not quite so sober as I am now. A party gave me a shove on the shoulder when I came out. I am sure I did not stagger against any body. They shoved me right off the foot pavement; then another party came up and hit me right on the side of the head, and down I went into the middle of the road. I got up and had one istrike at the man that knocked me down. I never could find the man that knocked me down. There were three together. I think the prisoner was with the man that knocked me down. After I got up from that, a third party knocked me down; and then my watch and hat was taken. I got hold of the prisoner, and he got from me, by his jacket tearing. He was taken the next night; the others ran away, and the prisoner might have run away if he pleased.

CHARLES BARTWELL . I am a hackney coachman, and drive No. 237. I was out with my coach when this robbery was committed. I took the prosecutor to St. Martin's-lane, and brought him back again.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-93

568. JOHN MALLION was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , six silver tea spoons, value 2l. one pair of silver sugar tongs, value 18s. a three shilling bank token, two eighteen-penney bank tokens, two shillings, and one sixpence, the property of John Taylor , in his dwelling house .

JOHN TAYLOR . The prisoner was a lodger of mine. In consequence of missing the articles in the indictment, I had him apprehended on suspicion, and two duplicates were found on him.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody as he was going to bed. I searched his clothes, and found a pawnbrokers duplicate for three silver tea spoons, pawned for seven shillings, on the 30th of May, and another duplicate for three more tea spoons, and a pair of sugar tongs, pawned for twelve shillings, on the 31st of May.

JOHN NEALE . I am a pawnbroker. These are my duplicates. I took the spoons in to pawn of the prisoner; he has been a ship carpenter, and lately returned from sea.

GUILTY .

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18160529-94

569. ROBERT JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , seventeen shillings, and sixpence, in monies numbered, a two pound note, and a one pound note, the property of John Goodwildes , in his dwelling house .

CELIA GOODWILDES . I was washing out a pair of stockings. The prisoner was in the room. I left the room with the dirty water; when I came back, I missed the prisoner. The money in the indictment was in a pewter box in a silk net hanging at the back of a chair; I missed it immediately, and went after the prisoner; but could not find him.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-95

570. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for felony .

BUT no prosecutor appearing , he was found

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-96

571. ELIZABETH ROW was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , three yards, and three quarters of another yard of calico, value 5s. the property of John Wilder .

CHARLES JAMES . On Saturday, the 27th of April, at about half past eight or nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop; she bought some small quantity of muslin which she wanted, and paid two shillings and sixpence for it. during the time that I was serving her, the calico in question was on the counter, and she took a handkerchief out of her pocket, and placed it on the counter before my face, look the calico in question, doubled it in half, and doubled it across again, put it into her handkerchief, and tied it up in her bundle; she was sober, and she saw I saw her do it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on the ground in the shop, and thought some one had dropped it. as they were going out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-97

572. FRANCIS RILEY , SAMUEL NEALE , and JOHN KING , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a pocket-book, value 14d. the property of Robert Barnett , from his person .

ROBERT BARNETT . I am a merchant . On the 8th of April, I was coming though the Strand , at about four o'clock in the afternoon, in company with two other gentlemen. I felt someone touch my pocket, and turning round, I saw a man in a great coat gently let go my pocket, and pass on. I suspected my pocket had been picked, but found it had not. I turned round shortly afterwards, but the person I had seen was gone. Mr. Vaughan came up, and asked me if I had lost any thing, and I found my pocket book was gone. He requested me to accompany him to Bow street, which not being able to do, I gave him my address, and a description of the things in the pocket-book, and the pocket itself. I went to Bow street the following morning, and learned that three persons had been apprehended; one of whom, had my pocket-book. On seeing those three persons, I recognized Riley as the man who let go my pocket.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I on monday, the 8th of April was in the Stand, at about four o'clock, and saw the three prisoners at the bar in company together. They were coming from Charing Cross, following a gentleman, who was going towards Somerset House; they left him by Akerman's, and followed the prosecutor, Mr. Barnett. Riley went up to Mr. Barnett's pocket, and sounded it with his right hand. He then went and spoke to the two other prisoner; they passed the prosecutor, and joined again behind him; then King, the old man, was on the outside, Riley was next him, and Neale was next the houses. Then Riley went up to Mr. Barnett's pocket, and raised the bottom of it, and had one of his hands partly in; Mr. Barnett turned round, let go of his two friends, and Riley walked on two or three yards, and looked in at a window; then Mr. Barnett walked on towards Charing Cross, and the prisoners joined in company together, in similar situations as before, and walked after the prosecutor. They followed him about thirty or forty yards; when King, the old man, took a silk handkerchief out of his own pocket, and Riley went up to the prosecutor's pocket again, and drew something out, which King immediately caught up in his handkerchief, and then they all three ran towards Covent Garden. I went up to Mr. Barnett, and in consequence of what passed between him and me, I went to Bow-street, and got a brother officer, and we went to a house in Wild-street, where I guessed the prisoners had gone to. We apprehended Riley coming out at the door, and apprehended the other two in the house. On searching Riley, we found a pocket book, which the prosecutor swears to.

Riley's Defence. The pocket book that is there, is mine; I bought it from among a hundred in Exeter Change; I have not got the man here that I bought it from.

Neale's Defence. I might be in the Strand, but I was not in company with these men.

King's Defence. I was going down to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross, to fetch a parcel for my sister.

RILEY, GUILTY , aged 20.

NEALE, GUILTY , aged 36.

KING, GUILTY , aged 67.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-98

573. LEAH LEWIS CLIFFORD was indicted for

stealing, on the 8th of April , three three shilling bank tokens, value 9s. two shillings, and a French sixpence, value 4d. the property of Richard Houghton , from his person .

RICHARD HOUGHTON . I lost this property in Broad-street, St. Giles's , between twelve and one at night. Coming along the street a man ran against me, and I immediately felt a hand in my pocket, and I turned round immediately, and found the prisoner's hand in my pocket. I was as sober as I am this moment; she had the money in her left hand, and dropped it into her right hand. I held her fast until I got some one to assist me; and Smith, the patrole, came.

RICHARD SMITH . Between twelve and one, I heard the cry of watch; and on going up to the prosecutor, found he had hold of the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-99

574. BRIDGET CONWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , a watch, value 2l. and four shilling and sixpence in money, the property of Samuel Hulbert , from his person .

SAMUEL HULBERT . On the 5th of April, I was coming up Drury-lane. I met Elizabeth Shane who is one of my witnesses, I asked her what brought her out so late; and I asked her if I should see her home; she lives with her father and mother. I asked her if she would have any thing to drink; she said, she did not care, and we went into a public-house in Drury-lane; we were drinking a pint of porter, when the prisoner Bridget Conway came in, and asked me if I was going to give her any thing to drink. I went home with Elizabeth Shane ; and the prisoner followed me; and after I had seen Elizabeth Shane home, the prisoner asked me to go home with her, and I went home with her to Dyott-street ; and she asked me for something to drink; and I sent her out for a pot of porter and a quartern of gin; then she had something to eat, and I felt for my watch, went to bed with my clothes on; and fell fast asleep. When I awoke about five o'clock in the morning, I found my watch, my money, and the prisoner gone.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-100

575. GEORGE GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a hat, value 8s. the property of Daniel Gardiner .

RICHARD HOTMAN . This hat was taken from the ail at the door, between six and seven on Wednesday evening.

HENRY WRIGHT . I saw the prisoner take this hat. I gave information to the last witness, who pursued the prisoner, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was quite drunk.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-101

576. HENRY JENKINS was indicted for stealing on the 30th of April , five coats, value 25s. five waistcoats, value 10s. two pair of pantaloons, value 4s. four pair of breeches, value 8s. and one canvass bag, value 6d. the property of Francis Todrig and James Todrig .

FRANCIS TODRIG . These things were taken on of my vessel, which was on the City Canal , on the 30th of April last. All I know is that I lost them.

WILLIAM DOWSBURY . I stopped the prisoner with the property in question.

JOHN LINES . I am a constable. Downbury brought the prisoner to me, and he could not tell what was in the bundle.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the bag.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-102

577. BENJAMIN HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , thirteen pound weight of ham, value 20s. the property of Henry Hewit .

HENRY HEWIT . I am a dealer in ham , and live at No. 9, Oxford street . On the evening of the day in the indictment, I was in my parlour behind my shop, and was alarmed by the sound of one of the tin stands (on which we generally place the hams) falling. I ran out, and the watchman had seized the prisoner with the ham before he had crossed the threshold.

JOHN FENTON . I saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's shop, and take this ham, and he dropped the ham, and the prosecutor, picked it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a cripple, unable to work. I work a little at the tailoring business and have served his Majesty eight years.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-103

578. MARGARET HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , nine shillings and sixpence in money, and eight one-pound bank notes, the property of Joseph Flogdell , from his person .

JOSEPH FLOGDELL . I am a baker . I met the prisoner in Clare-street , between twelve and one on the night of the 8th of May, she asked me to give her some liquor; but I refused. She asked me for liquor again, and I told her I would give her some if there was a house open. While I was standing at the door of the Cock and Magpye, she left me all on a sudden, and I suspected I was robbed, and immediately missed my notes and money. I immediately made my case known at the watchhouse; and the constable of the night and a patrole went in pursuit of her; they found her, with part of the money on her. I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

JOHN BEAN . I am a patrole of St. Mary-le-strand. On the 8th of May, I was going my rounds at about half past twelve, and I saw Mr. Flogdell and the prisoner in company together; I followed them from Feathers-court down to the Cock and Magpye, where Mr. Flogdell was knocking, trying to get in. I left them then, and was going down White Hart-yard,

when I was called by Mr. Flogdell, who said, he had been robbed of eight pounds, and some silver; and I took him into the watchhouse, and after that I apprehended the prisoner going down Covent Garden, and found six one-pound notes and ten-pence in halfpence. The prosecutor was a little elevated in liquor.

JAMES FLETCHER . I was constable of the night. I found six one pound notes in the prisoner's bosom. I asked her how she came by them; and she said, she had them of a man about six o'clock in the evening.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-104

579. THOMAS LINNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a gown, value 2s. the property of Mark Arnold .

ELIZABETH ARNOLD . My husband name is Mark. I lost my gown on the 14th of May, on going up stairs, I saw a man up stairs; I asked him what business he had there, and he said, he wanted a man named Jones, and I said, there was not a person in the house of that name. I told him to come down, and when he came down, he told my husband he wanted a man named Barnet, and my husband stopped him, and my gown was in the crown of his hat; and in his waistcoat pocket, there was a key to open the lock of my bed room door.

(Property produced, and sworn to.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-105

580. MARY MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a petticoat, value 2s. the property of Mary Ann Nuckells .

MARY ANN NUCKELLS . I am a single woman , and lost this petticoat on the day in the indictment.

WILLIAM JOSEPH ALDRIDGE. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Portugal street. The prisoner pawned this petticoat with me on the 10th of May, for a shilling.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in very great distress.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Sent to the Refuge .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-106

581. THOMAS MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a coat, value 18s. the property of Isaac Moses .

ISAAC MOSES . I am a dealer in clothes . In consequence of an alarm, I ran down stairs, and found the prisoner and my shopman tustling together, and my shopman told me this man had stole the coat.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I was standing on the clothes exchange, and I saw the prisoner take this coat, and I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-107

582. ELIZABETH PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , a shawl, value 8s. and a pelisse, value 3s. the property of Charles Hackney .

CHARLES HACKNEY . I am a weaver . Elizabeth Porter was my apprentice , and left my employ on the 11th of December. She went down stairs, and staid about a quarter of an hour. When she came up. I asked her what she had been doing; and she said she was getting some coals, which I expected were for the shop fire. After speaking to her then, I missed her, and the property in the indictment. She was brought back to me by a person, who said, he had taken her up as disorderly.

THOMAS THWAITES . I am a pawnbroker. This shawl was pledged on the 11th of December by the prisoner.

(Shawl produced, and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. My Mistress gave me the shawl.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Sent to the Refuge .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-108

583. MICHAEL TOOKEY and ELIZABETH TOOKEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , a shirt, value 2s. and a waistcoat, value 2s. the property of John Green .

EDWARD CAVE . I am a publican. On the 9th of April, the prisoner at the bar and his wife , came to my house, and asked for a lodging for the night; they sat in the tap-room some time, and had several pots of beer to drink, and they tendered in payment, several pieces of bad money. I let them stop there that night, thinking to take them in the morning, when the house was cleared. I stepped into the bar to settle the days accounts, and one thing or another, and on going down the cellar stairs to shut the door, the light blew out, and I was making the best of my way up to my bed room in the dark, when about half way up I was met by the prisoner and his wife, and they said, it was day, and they would not stop in the house any longer, for there were so many men. I had a great many soldiers in the house. I took the prisoners into the tap-room, and called for lights, and several persons came down stairs, and we found a shirt and flannel waistcoat on the prisoners, which belonged to a dragoon that was quartered at my house. I went out, and got the nearest watchman I could.

MICHAEL TOOKEY , GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

ELIZABETH TOOKEY , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-109

584. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , a handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Joseph Hale , from his person .

JOSEPH HALE . I lost my handkerchief on Easter Monday, as I was passing through Hart-street, Bloomsbury , I thought I felt something at my pocket, on feeling, I missed my handkerchief; I looked round, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand; I seized him, and took him into a public-house.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-110

585. CHARLES PERRYN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , three pounds weight of pepper, value 5s. the property of Patrick Crawford Bruce , and others.

JOHN LEY . On the 2nd of April last, I was an inspector of the River. In consequence of information I received, I caused the prisoner at the bar to be stopped; he was on board the Lord Castlereagh as an exciseman ; I was at the East India Dock -gate. On searching the prisoner, I took the pepper mentioned in the indictment out of his pockets and hat. I asked him how he came by it, and he said, it was done, and could not be helped; he said nothing more then. I happened to be on board the Castlereagh on that day, and I saw the prisoner on board. Her cargo was pepper.

RICHARD OVER . I saw the pepper found on the prisoner.

SAMUEL HIGLEY . I am an excise officer also. I was employed on board that ship. I was with the prisoner when he was stopped; there was pepper on board that ship.

JAMES GATHORNE REMINGTON. I am a member in the house of Bruce and Co. in India. We are the owners of the Lord Castlereagh ; Cap. Michael Bruce Laing was her Captain at the time of this robbery. This pepper is worth eightpence per pound without the duty.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-111

586. ROBERT THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , two pounds weight of pepper, value 2s. the property of Patrick Crawford Bruce , and others .

JOHN FREDERICK FAULL . I was a labourer on board the Castlereagh . The prisoner at the bar was on board that ship as an officer . Pepper was the chief cargo of that vessel. I was under the main hatchway; while I was there, the prisoner lowered a bucket down, and asked me to fill it; I pretended not to hear him, and moved on one side, and made no answer; then he came down, and filled it himself. I suppose it held about two gallons in measure. Having filled it, he hauled it up. He came down, and filled it again in about twenty minutes or half an hour.

JOHN STEGGELL . I am a servant in the service of the prosecutors. I know the prisoner; he was on board our ship at the time Faull was there. I saw the prisoner come down the main hatchway, and put the pepper into the bucket; it was the ship bucket, usually employed to contain water.

JAMES GATHORNE REMINGTON . I am a member of the house of Bruce and Co. in India. The Castlereagh belonged to that firm; the greater part of her cargo was pepper.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-112

587. JOHN BARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , two pounds weight of pepper, value 2s. the property of Patrick Crawford Bruce , and others .

RICHARD OVER . I am a constable belonging to the Thames Police office. On the 2nd of April last, I happened to be stationed at the gate of the East India Docks . I saw the prisoner at the bar coming up to go through the gate at about three o'clock in the afternoon; I desired him to walk into my place, and on searching him, I found two pounds weight of pepper loose in his hat.

DANIEL GORELY . I am an officer of the Customs. The prisoner was on board the Castlereagh as a Custom House officer . The principal part of that ship's cargo was pepper.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-113

588. THOMAS WILLIAMS and WILLIAM CARROLL were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a sack, value 7s. the property of Thomas Crotone and John Barford .

WILLIAM HUMMERSTON . I observed two men following my masters' waggon; my masters are coal-merchants at Millford-wharf. The prisoners were the two men following the waggon, I saw Williams take the sack out of the waggon, and Carroll was by him; when he got four or five years towards me, I catched hold of him. Carroll went round from the waggon whilst I had hold of Williams, and Williams put his hands into my mouth that I should not call out. I secured Williams, and the sack, which was my master's property.

DAVID SIDNEY . I was in the Cheshire Cheese, and hearing a noise, came out, and assisted Hummerston.

JOHN BEAN . I am a patrole, and took Williams into custody. I afterwards took Carroll at the Sols' Arms, in Wych-street.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and whipped .

CARROLL, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-114

589. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , nine drinking-glasses, value 8s. the property of James Henshaw .

JAMES HENSHAW . I am a licensed victualler . The prisoner was going out of my house, and my servant was coming in; he and three others had had three quarts of ale. In consequence of information I received, I pulled him in again, and found nine goblets in his coat pockets; they might be worth eight shillings; they cost me that; some were whole and some were broken.

MARY PALMER . I met the prisoner going out of my master's house, and hearing glass rattle in his pocket, I stopped him; I was struggling with him, as he wanted to get past me, when my master came up, and seized him.

JAMES TAYLOR . I know nothing of this matter, any more than apprehending the prisoner, and on searching him found a large bunch of keys, one of which was a skeleton key.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it all to my counsel.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-115

590. THOMAS WESTBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , a watch, value 30s. the property of Stephen Aldous .

STEPHEN ALDOUS . I left my watch in the hands of the landlord of the Salutation, at Brentford .

MARY CLARKE . I am the widow of the landlord of the Salutation. This watch had been left in our till; I saw it safe on the 10th of May, and on the 11th it was gone. The prisoner lodged in our house.

JOHN BANNISTER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 11th of May, in the afternoon I took in a watch from a labouring man; I advanced sixteen shillings on it. On the Monday following, the prisoner was before the magistrate, dressed as he is now.

WILLIAM GORE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th, and found a duplicate on him of a watch, pawned at the last witness.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-116

591. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , a watch-chain, value 2l. two keys, value 5s. and one seal, value 20s. the pro of William Moore , from his person .

WILLIAM MOORE . On the evening of the 3rd of May, as I was coming up Holborn , at about ten o'clock at night, nearly opposite New Turnstile, the prisoner at the bar crossed upon me, and made a snatch at my chain the chain broke from the watch, and he ran; I hallooed stop thief, and ran after him. A young man of the name of Drew ran also; and we seized him at the top of Gate-street; I never lost sight of him.

WILLIAM BOATRIGHT . I was at the end of Turnstile when this happened, and I joined in the pursuit after the prisoner, and assisted in taking him. I saw him fumble at his pocket, and he threw something away. Mr. Moore's chain has never been found. A metal chain and seal were found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was brought up to the sea, and I could get no work, and I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-117

592. SARAH BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , from the person of John Dean , one watch, value 5l. two gold seals, value 3l. one key, value 10s. one gold ring, value 10s. one coat, value 1l. one great coat, value 30s. one pair of boots, value 1l. 5s. one hat, value 5s. and twenty shillings in money, and three one-pound bank notes, his property .

JOHN DEAN . On the 8th of April, the prisoner at the bar took me to No. 4, Charles-street, Drury-lane , between nine and ten at night; I had the articles in the indictment about my person when I went into the room with her. I agreed to stop the night with her, and went to bed. I awoke about twelve o'clock, and missed my property, and she was gone also. I saw her on the Thursday week afterwards.

THOMAS GOOK . I knew this woman; she did not lodge there. I heard of this man being robbed, and I apprehended the prisoner in consequence.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-118

593. JOHN MACKAREL was indicted for River Piracy .

But the prosecutor not appearing , the Jury found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-119

594. MILES TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , two silver desert spoons, value 1l. and one silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of John Halkett , esq .

DANIEL BANDERER . I am servant to the prosecutor, who lives at No. 22, New Furfolk-street, Park-lane . These things were safe about twelve o'clock on the 16th of May, and about three o'clock the prisoner was charged with stealing them, and he delivered them up.

THOMAS WATKINS . I am an upholsterer. I went to wait upon Lady Catherine Halkett , and as we were ringing the bell, we saw the prisoner coming up the area steps; he came out of the area gate, and was joined by another person, who was waiting; but whom we did not see before. They both walked off very quick to the corner, and then they ran very fast. I ordered my man to ring the bell very hard, and I ran after him. I took the prisoner, who was stopped before he got out of my sight, and I brought him back to Mr. Halkett's, and I felt the spoons in his pocket, and he handed them out.

(Property produced, and sworn to.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-120

595. WILLIAM KENELY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , a leather bag, value 2d. and seven eighteen-penny bank tokens, the property of Domingo Spears , from his person .

DOMINGO SPEARS . I lost these out of my left hand side pocket, on Thursday. the 16th of May, at about two o'clock; I was coming along by St. George's watchhouse , and there was a great mob in the street looking at a man and woman tumbling about. I stopped to look at them; I felt some thing press my pocket, but did not take much notice. I brought my hand down, and immediately missed my leather bag, containing my money. I looked round, and the prisoner had his left hand in his breast, with the bag between his fingers; he could not hide it, and I got hold of him, and said you have been picking my pocket. The people said hold him, for he is a pick-pocket, and then he made a start from me for five or six yards; but I caught him, and gave him into the custody of an officer.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I was in the croud at this time, and the first thing I saw was the prosecutor

contending with a boy, and I immediately took him into custody when I knew the occasion of their dispute.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-121

596. JOSEPH MOULDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of George Dougal , from his person .

GEORGE DOUGAL . On the 16th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Stepney Fields at the Fair; there was a very great crowd of people collected together, and presently I felt a tap on the shoulder, and on looking round saw the prisoner in custody of the officer Lyons, who told me he had picked my pocket, and produced my handkerchief to me.

WILLIAM LYONS . I am an officer. I was at Stepney Fair on the 16th of April; as soon as I entered the Fair, I saw the prisoner and two other well known characters very busy, they made several attempts, but without success, and at last they fixed on the prosecutor; one placed himself on his right hand, another on the left, and the prisoner in the centre behind; as soon as they so placed themselves, they made a terrible push, and I directly saw the prisoner put a handkerchief into his bosom. I instantly seized him, and informed the gentleman he had been robbed.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a Jew, and he shoved the handkerchief into my hand.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-122

597. MATTHEW MERRETT and WILLIAM TRUELOVE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of George Hill , from his person .

GEORGE HILL . I lost my handkerchief on the 2nd of May, at Brook Green Fair . I did not miss my handkerchief until an officer came and laid hold of me, and tapped me on the shoulder, and told me I was robbed.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I was once an officer. I was attending at Brock Green Fair, about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 2nd of May, in company with Wonderoffe and Thompson. I observed the prisoners behind the prosecutor, and Merrett drew a handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it inside his frock; they then left him; one went one way, and the other went another. I ran after Merrett, and apprehended him, and took the handkerchief from his breast. We lost Truelove; but apprehended him afterwards. I saw Truelove attempt several pockets; I can't say I knew Merrett before; but I am certain they were together, and spoke to each other.

GEORGE WOODROFFE , and THOMAS THOMPSON . Corroborated the statement of the last witness.

MERRETT, GUILTY , aged 36.

TRUELOVE, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-123

598. THOMAS MALIN and WILLIAM BASS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Wallis Crow , from his person .

WALLIS CROW . I am in the half-pay office. I was at Brook Green Fair on the 1st of May; between one and two I was standing in the fair; but did not know any thing of the robbery until after it was committed.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I was at Brook Green Fair on the 1st of May, in company with Woodroffe. We saw the prisoners in the Fair, and we followed them, and the little one picked the prosecutor's pocket, and Malin was covering him at the time, and we apprehended them. On searching them, we found nothing but the prosecutor's handkerchief. We did not know Malin before.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GEORGE WOODROFFE . Corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

MALIN, GUILTY, aged 16.

BASS, GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgement respited

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-124

599. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , from the person of William Wagstaff , four one-pound bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM WAGSTAFFE . I am a linen-draper . I met the prisoner between twelve and one at night, on the 23rd of May, in Shoreditch ; she asked me to go into a court with her; she asked me to give her a shilling to have connexions with her; I offered her some money, which she refused, and then she left me. After I got a little way, I missed my money, when I pursued her, and told her she had robbed me, and I called the watchman, who took her to the watchhouse, and the money was found on the very spot where she was taken.

THOMAS WIDDOWS . I am a headborough, and searched the prisoner; but found nothing on her. I afterwards picked up a one-pound note, and the watchman picked up three. She told me she had a sucking child, and I went a mile and a half to fetch it to her.

EDWARD HANSON . I am a watchman, and picked up three one-pound notes.

Prisoner's Defence. He offered me sixpence, which I would not take.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-125

600. MARY WHITBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a pair of ear-rings, value 10s. four gold pins, value 8s. two gold rings, value 10s. one thimble, value 9d. a silver pencil-case, value 2s. and a silver purse clasp, value 2s. the property of Robert Halford . And ANN WILSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, three gold pins, value 6s. and one gold ring, value 5s. part and parcel of the goods above mentioned, she knowing them to be stolen .

ROBERT HALFORD . I am a jeweller , and live in Orchard-street, St. Luke's. I lost these things on

the 13th of April. Mary Whitburn was my servant ; she lived with me a month or five weeks.

THOMAS DANIEL CLEVELAND . I am a jeweller. I called on Mr. Halford on the 17th of April, and I found Whitburn had a paper in her hand, which she was endeavouring to conceal. The officer has that paper.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 11th of April, I took in a ring for four shillings, from the prisoner Ann Wilson .

JOHN BEAL . On the 28th of March, I had three pins pledged with me, by a person named Ann Ferguson.

ANN FERGUSON . The prisoner Ann Wilson asked me to pledge those three pins. She said she had had some money owning her, and took them in part payment. I pledged them for her, and gave her the money and the ticket.

JOHN USTENSON . I am a headbourough. On the 13th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was sent for to Mr. Malford's house, and part of the property was taken from Whitburn's person.

WHITBURN, GUILTY, aged 16.

WILSON, GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-126

601. THOMAS COMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , sixty dozen of bolts, value 5l. sixty dozen of bolt-nutts, value 2l. ten pairs of gibb-straps, value 6s. eleven pole-bolt caps, value 4s. and four dozen of washers, value 4s. the property of James Collingridge , Thomas Rowley , and George Mansel .

SECOND COUNT. Laying the property on other persons.

GEORGE MANSEL . I am a coach-maker ; I am in partnership with James Collingridge and Thomas Rowley . The prisoner was in our service as a labourer .

WILLIAM POYNTER . On the 14th of April, the prisoner at the bar came to me, and told me he had a great quantity of bolts to sell. I am a coach-maker, and I agreed with him to go and look at them the day following. I went and looked at them. I did not know at that time what capacity the prisoner was in; but after I had learned that he was in the employ of Messrs. Collingridge and Co. in Liquorpond street , a suspicion arose in my mind that he had not come honestly by them. I accordingly went to him with a friend, and told him I was not satisfied concerning the bolts I had bought of him. After taking me to a great many places to see the person of whom he said he bought them, without effect, I determined to take them to Messrs. Collingridge, because I knew that if they were got from their premises, they would have the tools with which they were made. I went there, and as I was going along, the prisoner said, you appear dissatisfied, if you like I will give you your money back again; I told him no; that it was my determination to see the matter properly cleared up, and then I should be satisfied. When I took them to Liquorpondstreet, the prosecutors claimed them.

SAMUEL ELLIOTT . I am a foreman in the smithing department to Messrs. Collingridge's. These articles are their property, and I have got the tools in Court with which they were made. The prisoner was in our service three or four months.

WILLIAM READ , SER. I am officer, and took the prisoner into custody. I found a dozen and a half of bolts at the prisoner's house, and four dozen of washers.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them, and paid for them in July last.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-127

602. SARAH HARDY, alias SULLIVAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a ring, value 2s. a lottery ticket, value 6d. a shift, value 5s. a petticoat, value 3s a waistcoat, value 4s. a spoon, value 3s. a pair of gloves, value 1s. and a napkin, value 3d. the property of Samuel Simonds .

SAMUEL SIMONDS . I live in Raven-row, Spitalfields . The prisoner was a servant of mine. On the 11th of April I got up about five o'clock in the morning to make passover cakes; I left a memorandum on the table at home of the different orders I had to execute that day. I went to my manufactory, and returned immediately, and found a strange man in the house; he was in the kitchen. I asked the man what he wanted there; and he said, he wanted a man who portered for me. I told him if he would go with me I would shew him where to find him. I took him near my manufactory, and then he tried to make a run; and I got some of the men out of the factory to assist me in taking him, and I gave him in custody of an officer. On the Saturday morning, I heard that the prisoner had left a bundle at Mrs. Megg's, in Brick-lane, and I went to the officer, and told him about it.

WILLIAM LYON . I am an officer. I went to Mrs. Megg's, and received a bundle, which she said the prisoner had left with her.

SARAH MEGGS . The prisoner at the bar left that bundle with me, on the 11th of April; it was the same bundle that Mr. Lyon had, and contained several duplicates, which led to Mr. Simonds's property.

WILLIAM HART. I produce a petticoat, pawned for a shilling, which the prisoner pledged. I produce a duplicate, and the corresponding one was found in that bundle.

CHARLES POORE . I produce a tea-spoon; I also produce the duplicate of it, the corresponding one of which was found in that bundle.

(Property produced, and sworn to.

GUILTY , aged 35.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

603. SARAH HARDY, alias SULLIVAN , was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a pair of sheets, value 5s. the property of William Bright .

MARGARET BRIGHT . The prisoner was a lodger of mine; and when she left me, I missed my sheets.

WILLIAM LYON. I found a duplicate for a pair of sheets in the bundle of which I spoke in the last case.

JOSEPH HALL . I produce a pair of sheets, pawned by the prisoner.

(Sheet sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-128

604. JOSEPH IRWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of Thomas William Pass .

HANNAH PASS . I live at No. 10, Featherstone-buildings, Holborn . The prisoner lodged in our house. I accused him of stealing these things, because they were in the room while he was at breakfast, and gone after he went away.

GEORGE LEE . I am a pawnbroker, and produce a handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner, on the 6th of April.

JAMES SPURLING . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a shirt and handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner on the 6th of April, for seven shillings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-129

605. JOSEPH KIMBLING was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a veil, value 20s. the property of some person unknown .

THOMAS THOMPSON . On the 19th of April, I was in Bishopsgate-street , about a quarter past seven, and saw the prisoner and another in company together, making several attempts at different shops; being suspicious characters, I watched them; and at last I saw a lady going along towards Shoreditch Church; the other man and the prisoner signalled each other, and followed her, and stopped, and then she passed them, and the person who was in company with the prisoner, ran up to the lady, and snatched the veil off her head; they immediately ran towards Sanderson's Gardens. The lady screamed out stop thief. I made a violent blow at the prisoner with a stick, and brought him down, and I have not been able to find the lady since, nor have I got the veil.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-130

606. WILLIAM LEESON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , a gown, value 4s. a handkerchief, value 1s. and a ring, value 5s. the property of Elizabeth Griffin .

WILLIAM BAKER . The prisoner was a lodger of mine for one night; after he quitted the house the next morning, the gown and things were missing; and when we apprehended him shortly afterwards, we found them on him.

JOHN ESSAM . I apprehended the prisoner at a private house, next door to the White Horse.

(Property produced, and sworn to.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-131

607. FRANCES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , a two pound brass weight, value 3s. the property of Robert Bell .

ROBERT BELL. I saw the prisoner take this two pound weight, and she denied it; and then I took it out of her bosom, and then she said, she was very sorry for what she had done.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-132

608. ELIZABETH RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , a pair of sheets, value 10s. a gown, value 12s. and a jacket, value 8s. the property of James Attfield .

ELIZABETH ATTFIELD . I lost these sheets on the 13th of May. I had been out, and as I was coming in, I met the prisoner going out at the threshold of the door. I asked her where she had been; and she said, to one Mrs. Clarke, to get some washing. I told her no such person took in any washing in the house. By that, I suspected she had been robbing me. She went into the New Inn; I followed her. She ran as hard as she could; and I called stop thief; by that, she was stopped, and I brought her back to my appartment; I missed the things in the indictment then, and I found the things on her. I sent for an officer, and gave her in charge.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-133

609. MARY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , ten-pounds weight of beef, value 3s. the property of Richard Eaton .

RICHARD EATON . I saw the prisoner take a bit of beef out of my tray at the window; it was salt beef. I immediately stopped her, and she dropped the beef. Knowing where she lived, I let her go; but on looking over my try, I missed another piece. I took a constable to her house, and there we found the other bit.

JOHN GADWARD . I am a constable. All I know is that I found a piece of beef at the prisoner's house. I know her husband; he is a very honest man, and he told me it was a thing she had been guilty of for many years, and he always told her she would get taken up at last.

GUILTY , aged 45

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-134

610. WILLIAM TIBBONS, alias TIBBLES , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , seven pieces of printed cotton, value 5l. the property of William Deacon .

WILLIAM DEACON . On the 14th of May, I lost these things at Edgeware ; they were taken out of my waggon.

JOSEPH BEAN . I drive Mr. Deacon's waggon. The prisoner went down to Edgeware with me by the side of my waggon. The prisoner got into the waggon at Edgeware. When we got half way up Edgeware, the prisoner said he would go back to Town, and so we let him go. After we got home we missed the goods.

ABEL DICKENSON . I drove my father's waggon on the 14th of May, and as my horses were going through the Edgeware-gate, the prisoner spoke to them. I afterwards saw him at the Hart, and he said he had got some gown pieces, and I went into the stable with him, and he wanted to give it to me; but I would not have it; he shewed it to me there.

GEORGE GODFREY . I apprehended the prisoner. He said, he would confess the whole of it, and he told me he had torn a hole in one of the packages in the waggon, and got the cotton in question out, and laid it in a hedge, and then went on with the waggon; but turned back soon afterwards, and he said he sold the whole for five shillings.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-135

511. ANTHONY SMEDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a watch, value 1l. a coat, value 10s. and a waistcoat, value 4s. the property of Samuel Mosley .

SAMUEL MOSELEY. I am a lapidary . The prisoner worked for me ten days. On the 29th of January last, I went out, and told him I should return in about five minutes. On my return, I missed the property in the indictment, and the prisoner. I had three duplicates sent to me by some person to me unknown. I never saw the prisoner more until the 26th of April.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I produce a coat and waistcoat, pawned on the 29th of January; but I don't know by whom.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-136

512. JOHN PHILIPS and MARY PHILIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , a sheet, value 4s. two pillow cases, value 1s. one flat iron, value 8d. the property of Thomas Smith , in a lodging-room .

ANN SMITH . I let a lodging on the 20th of December to the prisoners, ready furnished for four shillings a week; I let it to the wife , and the prisoner came to lodge there the same night. He continued there until the 28th of March; there was two pound due; they went away on that day, and did not return. We had a constable to break open the door the next morning, and then these things were missing. Mrs. Philips brought the flat iron home, and the husband brought the tickets of the other things on the morning that we went down to Worship-street, and we had them taken into custody.

WILLIAM JAMES BURROWES. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet, and two pillow-cases, pawned in the name of Philips, in December last.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

John Philips 's Defence. I was out of employ for a very long time, and had no other resource left.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-137

513. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , thirty pounds weight of pot metal .

MR. GURNEY, for the prosecution, decling offering any evidence against the prisoner, he was found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-138

514. JAMES MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , a watch, value 3l. a chain, value 2s. 6d. and a key, value 1s. the property of Samuel Blass .

MR. GURNEY, for the prosecution, declining offering any evidence against the prisoner, he was found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-139

515. ANN MANSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , a knap-sack, value 4s. 6d. two shirts, value 5s. one pair of shoes, value 2s. one pair of stockings, value 1s. another pair of stockings, value 2d. one pair of gaiters, value 9d. a clothes brush, value 2d. a shoe brush, value 6d. a hair brush, value 4d. a buckle brush, value 4d. a button brush, value 4d. and a glazing ball, value 6d. the property of William Scales .

WILLIAM SCALES . I was a soldier belonging to the Tower Hamlets, when this property was stolen from me. I was quartered at the Five Ink Horns on the 28th of April. I was in bed at the time these articles were taken; my knap-sack hung over my head, and about half past four I was awakened by something falling on me; I immediately saw the prisoner going out at the door, with my knap-sack under her arm; I jumped out of bed immediately, I followed her; I caught her, and a constable was sent for, who took her into custody.

JAMES LEWIS . I am a publican, and keep the Five Ink Horns. There are only buttons to my back doors to fasten them. When I got up stairs the soldier had hold of the prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-140

516. JOHN MOONE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a shirt, value 1s. a pair of breeches, value 2s. two neckcloths, value 1s. and a waistcoat, value 5s. the property of William Curtis ; and a pair of shoes, value 5s. the property of Richard Curtis .

WILLIAM CURTIS . The prisoner lodged with my brother and me. We went out, and left him in bed, on the morning of the day in the indictment, and when we returned, he was gone, and we missed the property. On the 17th of May, brother met him accidentally, and had him taken into custody. My

shirt and breeches were found on him then. The other things have been disposed off.

RICHARD CURTIS . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-141

617. WILLIAM INCH and JAMES DANIELS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , four tea-trays, value 1l. the property of Philip Phillips .

But the prosecutor would not swear to the property, and the Jury found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-142

618. THOMAS REED , WILLIAM GRAYNER , and DAVID WILLIAMS , were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , fourteen pounds weight of lead, value 2s. 4d. the property of John Wilson , and fixed to his dwelling-house . AND JANE EDGCUMBE , was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

BUT the evidence proved that the lead in question was not affixed to the dwelling-house, but fixed to a pump in a yard; consequently the prisoners were found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-143

619. FRANCIS BACON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , a piece of timber, value 2s. the property of Richard Hales .

RICHARD HALES . I am a publican , and live in Bridgewater Gardens . The piece of timber in question was a prop to the back part of my house; it was a part of the house, and affixed to it.

THE COURT, informed the Jury, that they must acquit the prisoner, as the property supposed to be stolen, was improperly defined by the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-144

620. FRANCIS BACON was again indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , an iron bar, value 2s. the property of Joseph Cole .

JOSEPH COLE . This iron bar fastened my celler window on the outside.

ROBERT GOULD . I stopped the prisoner in Golden-lane with this bar; he was a watchman as well as me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-145

621. HENRY BARTHOLOMEW was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Thomas Hughes , from his person .

THOMAS HUGHES . I was going from this Court, after having served as a juror at the last Session, when my pocket was picked by the prisoner. I felt something at my pocket; I turned round immediately, and missed my handkerchief; seeing the prisoner going from me, I followed him, and seized him, and took the handkerchief from him.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I was also going from this Court. The prosecutor gave the prisoner and property into my charge.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-146

622. RICHARD DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , two brass locks, value 4s. one mortice lock, value 2s. one padlock, value 6d. and one file, value 6d. the property of William Summers and Samuel Summers . AND SILAS TULK , was indicted for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an ironmonger , in partnership with Samuel Summers . The younger prisoner Donald, was a servant of ours. I had reason to suspect him, and in consequence of information, I took out a search warrant to search Tulk's premises. That was before any accusation was made against Donald. We found the goods mentioned in the indictment, all except the locks; we found a file and mortice lock my property, and a duplicate for the other locks. Tulk came in while we were executing the warrant. I acquainted him with my business. We found part of the property in question at the pawnbroker's, where he had pawned it. Donald acknowledged his guilt, and fell on his knees, and said, he would never do so again. He acknowledged he sold them at Tulk's. I knew them to be my property.

GEORGE PICKET . I am journeyman to Mr. Neat, pawnbroker, in Duke-street, Manchester-square. I know both the prisoners by sight. The two locks which were found at our house, were pledged by a woman, on the 13th of May; that woman I had seen before, and always understood her to be Tulk's wife. I have the counter part of the duplicate said to be found in Tulk's.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

THOMAS FOY , and SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . Corroborated the testimony of the prosecutor.

Donald's Defence. At Marlborough-street they told me it was best to make a confession. This other prisoner told me he would buy any thing in my master's way, any common snuffers, or locks, or any thing of that kind, and I brought these things to his house, and left them when he was not at home.

DONALD, GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

TULK, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-147

623. ANN MARSTON and SARAH KOYLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a gown, value 3s. the property of William Gosling and George Midford Young .

THOMAS THWAITES . I am in the service of the prosecutors, who are pawnbroker s. On the 7th of May, the two prisoners came to our shop for the purpose of redeeming a pledge. Mosten took this gown down, and put it into her apron. The other it was

who redeemed the pledge. I am not sure she saw Marston take it; one of our young men followed her by my desire, and she was brought back, and they were both delivered into the custody of an officer.

JOHN RICHARDS . I received charge of the prisoners.

(Property produced, and swarn to.)

MARSTON, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

KOYLEY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-148

624. AMELIA MARSH was indicted for child stealing .

BUT in the event of the case, it appeared that she took the child in question with no fraudulent or criminal intent whatever.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-149

625. ELIZABETH ANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , a watch, value 2l. a chain, value 3l. a seal, value 1l. and a key, value 1d. the property of Henry Austen White , from his person .

HENRY AUSTEN WHITE . I lost this property on Thursday, the 9th of May, between one and two in the morning. I was accosted by three women in Bishopsgate street; they took me to the prisoner's private house, in Teuscin's court, Petticoat lane . I asked the prisoner whether I could lodge there, and when I took my watch out to see what o'clock it was the prisoner took it out of my hand, and said she would pawn it. I had no idea that they were going to make away with it; and another woman said, I will shew you where you can lodge, and the moment I went out of the door with her, the door was fastened against me, and the person who went out with me ran away. The prisoner remained in the house, and I waited and watched it until six. I never went into the house after; I found her between three and four o'clock in the afternoon in Fashion street, and gave her in charge to an officer. I have never recovered my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate woman; but I never took his watch.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-150

626. SARAH HEAP was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a watch, value 3l. a gold chain, value 2l. a seal, value 2d. and a watch-key, value 5s. the property of William Brown , from his person .

BUT it appeared that the watch in question was never from his person; but was in his coat pocket when he went to the watchhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-151

627. SAMUEL DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , a watch, value 3l. two keys, value 6d. and one seal, value 6d. the property of Robert Rookes , from his person .

ROBERT ROOKES . On the 11th of May, I went to Whitechapel market, at about a quarter after nine in the evening. Coming along Brick-lane , I was met by the prisoner and another man; they ran against me, and snatched my watch at the same instant; I immediately cried stop thief, and pursued them as fast as I could. I came up to the prisoner, and caught him by the skirts of his coat, and said, you have robbed me; he said, he had not got the watch. I took him to the watchhouse, where he was searched, but he had not the watch. I have never recovered it.

JOHN PARKER . I took the prisoner into custody. I found two bad shillings and a bad sixpence on him

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a mob going across the road; they were running, and I ran too, and the gentleman caught hold of me, and said I robbed him, and I told him to search me, and there was no property found on me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-152

628. HARRIET COLLINS, alias HILL , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , a watch, value 5l. one seal, value 1l. one key, value 6d. and one ribbon, value 1d. the property of Thomas Gregory . from his person.

THOMAS GREGORY . I am apprenticed to a surgeon and apothecary . I was going up Drury-lane, between ten and eleven o'clock on the night of the day in the indictment, and I met the prisoner, and went with her into a house of ill-fame, in Russelcourt . After being there about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, she made an excuse for going away. Immediately on her going, I missed my watch, a gold chain, and key. I informed the people of the house, and by advice, made application at Bow-street, and got two officers, who found the prisoner and the watch.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer of Bow-street office. I apprehended the prisoner, attempting to pledge this watch.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-153

629. ANN JOHNSON and ELIZABETH KINSEY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , a shawl, value 1s. and a pocket handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Mary Gilison , from her person .

MARY GILLSON . On the day in the indictment, I was at the Princess of Wales , there was a company of men and women in the house. Johnson took my handkerchief; but who took my shawl I can't say; it was over my shoulders. The landlord told me he had got the shawl in pledge for half a pint of gin; I insisted upon having it, and Johnson struck me in the month, and they charged me with the watch, and I went very willingly to the watchhouse with the landlord; but I was discharged.

THOMAS HART , I am a constable, I know

nothing of this business, except on the 7th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, the watchman brought the prosecutrix to the watch-house, in company with Mr. Clifton, and said he gave charge of her for abusing him; and I told him I could not take such a charge. The woman was perfectly sober. She made a complaint that she had been robbed in Mr. Clifton's house. I told her to go back and bring the persons who had robbed her; and in a little time after, Clark the watchman, brought in Ann Johnson for stealing the handkerchief; he likewise brought the shawl, but we could not find who took that.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHNSON, GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

KINSEY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-154

630. ISAAC COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a hat, value 10s. the property of Samuel Fox , from his person .

SAMUEL FOX . I lost a hat on the 10th of May. I was going along Oxford-street home, and I saw the prisoner standing without a hat, with four or five other persons, at the corner of Bird-street, and a little boy came up and gave me a shove with his elbow. I was speaking to the boy, when the prisoner, who was in a white jacket and trowsers came behind me, snatched my hat; and on turning round, he had it in his left hand. I was about to take him, when the others came up and prevented me from taking him. He then ran away, but I pursued him and took him at last. I lost the key of my watch also.

THOMAS GREEN, I am a watchman; I took charge of the prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-155

631. MARY BURAN, alias FAIRCLOTH , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , from the person of Benjamin Williams , one pocket book, value 1s. and one bank note for the payment of 10l. and thirteen bank-notes for the payment of one pound each, value 13l. his property .

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . I lost this property on the 25th of May. It was in my pocket book in my pocket. I lost it at about half past eleven o'clock at night. I had been spending the evening with some friends, and met the prisoner in Old-street. She accosted me as a woman of the town; she walked some yards with me; but I did not agree to go home with her. I am quite sure I had my pocket book safe before I was met by the prisoner. She detained me with some kind of conversation. I had not left her long before I missed my property; my coat was not buttoned. The prisoner was close up to me.

JOHN THORNLEY . I paid the prosecutor the notes in question; and put my name to every one of them.

(Two one pound notes put into the hand of the witness.) These are two of the notes.

WILLIAM GIBBERT . I am a publican, and keep the Puncheon of Rum. On Saturday morning, the 25th of May, the prisoner and several others came into my house several times, and I took those two notes of her in payment for what she and the other persons drank.

RICHARD LAWLESS . I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-156

632. JANE WELPREY , MARY ANN HUNT , and ELIZABETH SHEFFINGTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , from the person of John Reynolds , one pocket book, value 1s. one pencil case, value 1s. one watch, value 4l. one chain, value 6d. one key, value 2d. one bank-note, value 10l. and two bank-notes, value 10l. his property .

JOHN REYNOLDS . Between ten and eleven o'clock on the night of the 21st of April, I was coming along Whitechapel, and saw Mary Hunt in company with another female. I went home to a house in Wentworth-street with them. I went into the ground floor. I am sure I had the money and my watch when I went into the room with Hunt; the other girl left me. Sheffington came into the room while I was there with Hunt. Soon after Hunt went out, and did not return; she gave me no reason to suppose she was going to leave me. After she was gone, I missed my property. I immediately went after her; I heard a noise in the next house; several people talking. I went into the street, and to the next door; and heard some person say, you have made a fine booty. The persons were on the stairs. I went up stairs; I was accosted by Jane Welprey ; she asked me where I was coming to, and what I wanted. I told her there was a person in her house who had robbed me. She said, no person had come in there, and told me to go about my business. I told her I would not go without my property. I called the watch, and we went up stairs and found the prisoner Hunt under the bed, and a gentleman in the room. I accused her of robbing me, and she denied it, or that she had ever seen me before. I told her, she need not say that; but if she would not give me my property, I would charge her with the watch. She then told me not to make a noise, for my property was on the stairs. I found my pocket book on the stairs, with a five pound note missing from it. I then insisted on leaving the other note; and she said, if I would give her a three shilling piece, she would give it me. I gave her the three shilling piece, and she pulled the note out of her bosom. At first, I forgot my watch; I had left it on the table in the room into which I had been with Hunt at first. I left it there, and when I went back, it was gone.

JOHN OTTEN . I went with a young woman on the night in question, to the house where, Welprey was, While I was in the room with her, Hunt came running, and crept under the bed. I jumped up and went to the door, and heard a noise. I saw what the last witness has related, relative to what Hunt did and said.

HUNT GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for life .

WELPREY, NOT GUILTY .

SHEFFINGTON, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-157

633. MARY RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , a Waterloo medal value 4s. 8d. the property of John Harris , from his person .

JOHN HARRIS . I am a soldier belonging to the Second Battallion of Grenadier Guards . I went to bed at a lodging at No.7, George-street, Bloomsbury , where the prisoner was a servant . In the morning, I missed my Waterloo medal from my clothes.

GEORGE COWIE . I am a refiner in Long Acre. I bought this medal of the prisoner in a very much battered state, and she said, she found it some time previous in the road.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-158

634. JOHN M'CARTHEY and JANE CROSS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , from the person of John Morrison , 25l. in Bank of England notes, his property .

JOHN MORRISON . I am a seaman . I received these notes from Mr. Hacket's, in Birchin lane, on the day in the indictment. The two prisoners got along with me, and staid with me all day. I got rather forward in liquor, and they called a coach for me, and I requested that I might be driven to the Brown Bear, in Bow street, where I had lodged, and where I owed a score; but instead of being driven there, I was driven to the house of the female prisoner, in Gravel-lane; she represented the other prisoner to be a lodger of her's. I was intoxicated; but had my recollections about me. They twice attempted to take my money away from me by force; but they did not succeed. I wanted to go down into the cellar at about eight o'clock in the evening and the female prisoner lighted me down. While I was down, the man cried out put out the light, and take the money from him; but I walked up stairs, keeping my hand on my money. I then said, I would go home; they then collared me, and insisted that I should not go, and they took me into the Red Lion, in Gravel-lane , to have something to eat, and a pot of beer, and they said, they would leave me then. While I was there waiting for something to eat, for which I had sent out one of the party, the female prisoner put her hand into my bosom, and whipped the money out; I immediately caught her hand, and gave her a chuck with my elbow; she dropped the notes, and the other prisoner whipped them up, and went off. He came in again in about half an hour, and on my acousing him, he threw all his clothes off, and insisted on being searched; I never got a note back again.

THOMAS HEMMINGWAY . I was the landlord of the Red Lion at the time of this business. I did not see what passed. I heard the prisoner M'Carthy, say, that this man says he is robbed, if there has been a robbery, I insist on being searched; I would not search him, I refused. Cross asked me to call my wife, and have her searched also. M'Uarthy then came into the middle of the room, and pulled off all his clothes. I told him, if the bird was flown, it was no use to look in the cage for it. They were then taken to the watchhouse.

JOSEPH JEFKINS . I am a ship-mate of the prosecutor. I went with him to receive this pay, and prize money, and I wanted to go with him to take care of him seeing he had got into bad company, but when he got into the coach with the prisoners, he would not let me go any farther; so I left him.

The prisoners each in their defence denied the charge.

M'CARTHY, GUILTY , aged 35.

CROSS, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-159

635. JANE DRUMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a blanket, value 2s. a rug, value 1s. a bed curtain, value 2s. and two flat irons, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Tooley , in a lodging-room .

IN this case, the prisoner, who was a married woman, pleaded her coverture, and was accordingly found

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-160

636. JAMES WILLIAMS and JOHN THOMPSON DUGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , four hundred pounds weight of tallow scrapings, value 10s. the property of Eli Collins , and Joseph Percival .

ON account of the absence of two material witnesses, this case was not satisfactory made out against the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-161

637. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a coat, value 15s. the property of Thomas Windus ; and one pair of gloves, value 6d. the property of George Allright .

RICHARD PHILIP HIGHAM . I am a pawnbroker, at 105, Bishopsgate-street. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening of the day in the indictment, a woman brought a livery coat to my house to pledge; she said, she was sent by a young man. I told her I should detain the coat. Soon after, the prisoner at the bar appeared as the owner of the coat, he said, he bought it of a jew in Rag-fair. I thought I knew something of the livery, as Mr. Windus lived near me. I detained the prisoner, and that coat was afterwards claimed by the prosecutor.

GEORGE ALLRIGHT . I am coachman to Mr. Windus. That coat is his property; it was taken out of our stable.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-162

638. CHARLES FINNIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edwin Nicolls , in the King's highway, on the 28th of September , and putting him in

fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a hat, value 5s. his property .

EDWIN NICOLLS , actually disproved the charge against the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-163

639. WILLIAM GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , twelve wooden printing block, value 15l. one cutting press, value 1l. and one plough, value 5s. the property of John Balland .

JOHN BALLAND . I am a paper stainer . I lost these things on the 23rd or 24th of April; my dwelling house is a considerable distance from the shop whence these things were stolen; it is in Mile End .

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer of Worship-street. In consequence of information, I went to a house in James-street, in Mile End Old Town; there was no number on the house; that house turned out to belong to the prisoner; he was not at home at first; but afterwards when he was, we went again, and he threw up the window, to get out; but seeing Crosswell outside, he made no farther attempt. We found the property in question there.

JOHN CROSSWELL . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

(Property produced, and sworn to )

Prisoner's Difence. I bought these things honestly, and exposed them openly for sale.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-164

640. ELIZABETH FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a stove, value 5s. the property of James Senols .

JAMES SENOLS . I lost this stove from the outside of my door, in Fore-street, Cripplegate .

JOHN ROZEE . I am a watchman, and stopped the prisoner with the stove, and she said, she brought it from Aldersgate-street; she could not have carried it, and she said, she rolled it along.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-165

641. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , a shirt, value 2s. a pair of stockings, value 18d. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of William Day .

BUT the prosecutor not appearing , the Jury found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-166

642. CONSTANT ELIZABETH FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , three pounds weight of beef, value 2s. the property of Thomas Mead .

THOMAS MEAD . I am a butcher , in Clarance-place, Hackney-road . I lost this beef about eleven o'clock in the evening of the day in the indictment. I immediately ran out, in consequence of some information, and found the beef in the prisoner's pocket.

JOHN DAVIS . I saw the prisoner take something from the stall, and I called the butcher.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-167

643. MICHAEL DUFFY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a gown, value 5s. and three silver tea spoons, value 6s. the property of William Bird .

JOHN GROOM . Mr. Bird, the prosecutor, has been accomodated with part of my house while his own has been repairing. I saw the prisoner in his room on the day in the indictment; I asked him what he wanted, and he said Mr. Johnson. I told him he did not live with me; it struck me he had taken something out of the room, and I watched him steadfastly until he got some yards from the door. He then threw his right shoulder forward to conceal a bundle, which I observed he had under his coat. On enquiry, the property in question was missed. I pursued the prisoner to the Swan, at Hammersmith, where I found him, with the gown and spoons.

EDWARD NIXON . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced, and sworn to )

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-168

644. DANIEL COHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , three three-shilling bank tokens, an eighteen-penny token, three shillings; and a sixpence , the property of Evan Evans .

MARY EVANS . The prisoner came into our shop on the day in the indictment, to buy some hemp and wax; he is a shoe-maker . While I turned my back, he reached over the counter, and took this money out of the till; he went out of the shop directly. An officer afterwards took him.

RICHARD GRAINGER . I am a shoe-maker. I sent the prisoner to the prosecutor's shop for these articles. After he had returned, I found fourteen shillings in silver in the privy, wrapped in a piece of paper, and I sent for an officer. The prisoner had a good character.

JOHN CROSSWELL . I apprehended the prisoner. I asked him what he had done with the money, and he said, he had hidden it in the privy.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1s. and delivered to his master.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-169

645. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a pelisse, value 30s. the property of Joseph Rumbell .

JOHN ADAMS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Rumbell. I saw the prisoner take this pelisse; it was handing outside the door. I pursued him crying stop thief, and he was stopped, and threw it down.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-170

646. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a shawl, value 30s. the property of Mary Walker , spinster, from her person .

MARY WALKER could not identify the prisoner as the thief, neither was the property found on him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-171

647. EDWARD JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , five loaves of bread, value 2s. the property of James Rattray .

JAMES RATTRAY . I am a baker . I was in Bond-street on the 20th of May, at about two o'clock; I left my barrow to go and serve a customer, and when I returned, there was an officer standing by the barrow, and he told me, he had a man in custody for stealing bread from my barrow.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I saw the prisoner leaning on a post close by the barrow, and knowing him, I watched him. At last I saw him take a bag from under his coat, and put five half quartern loaves into it. I took him into custody.

GEORGE WOODROFFE . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-172

648. THOMAS ENGLISH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , two saws, value 2s. two planes, value 2s. one hammer, value 1s. one screwdriver, value 6d. one oil-stone, value 1s. one axe, value 1s. one striking knife, value 6d. one punch, value 6d. one square, value 6d. and one rule, value 6d. the property of James Mead .

JAMES MEAD . I am a carpenter . I left these tools safe in an uninhabited house, at Park-place, Chelsea , on the 21st of May, and when I went the next morning, they were gone.

THOMAS WILD . I came past this house at about six o'clock in the evening of the 21st of May, and saw the prisoner get over the fence with a basket of tools; he jumped down so violently, that I thought he had hurt himself, and I went over to him; but he had not.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and he told me where the tools were, and there we found them; some he had sold.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-173

649. SAMUEL EDHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , a hen fowl, value 5s. the property of John Russel .

JOHN RUSSEL . I found this fowl, after we had lost it a considerable time, in the possession of Richard Bingley . The prisoner is a dealer in fowls .

ANN RUSSEL . We lost this fowl six weeks before Michalmas last. I am certain it is the same fowl, because I never had another, and I reared it alone in the house.

RICHARD BINGLEY . I am a licensed victualler. I bought this fowl of the prisoner; he is a dealer in poultry.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLENOR. He might have bought it in the way of his business.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-174

650. JOHN BRACKNELL and SAMUEL WILLMOT were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , four pieces of timber, value 15l. the property of Elizabeth Sharp , James Elthorp , and George Backway .

RICHARD DALBY . On the 2nd of April, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I saw a barge pulling in towards St. Saviour's Dock; I observed she had some timber lashed alongside, both fore and aft. I hailed the barge, and asked them where they were going to take the timber; I was answered by Bracknell, that they were going to take it to Kirkham's, or Kirkman's. I asked them where they got it; and they said, they picked it up; but immediately let it go adrift. I then went on board them, and took them both into custody. Willmott said, he was hired by Bracknell; it is not usual when a piece of timber is picked up, to lash it alongside; it is generally towed astern. I shewed that piece of timber to Mr. George Backway .

JOHN ROSE . I made this timber fast about a fortnight before it was stolen; it was lashed with others on the water. Some times timber gets loose from the rafts. The whole four pieces that were missing, were not found with the prisoners, only one.

Bracknell put in a written Defence, stating that he employed Willmot, and that he picked up the timber floating on the River.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-175

651. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , a pair of trowsers, value 2s. 6d. and four pair of stockings, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Baker .

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a seaman . I lost my trowsers and stockings, on the night of the 15th of May; they were in my chest locked up.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a constable of the London Docks. I apprehended the prisoner coming out of the Docks, and there was information lodged at the watchhouse of several other ships having been robbed, and I found the property on him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-176

652. LEONORA SIMMONS, alias MARTHA MORRIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a watch, value 4l. the property of Patrick Barry .

PATRICK BARRY . I met the prisoner at the corner of Charles-street, Drury-lane , and went home wit her. When I got up in the morning, my watch was gone.

GEORGE FLINT . I am a pawnbroker, in the Edgeware-road. I took a watch from the prisoner; I stopped her when she offered to pledge it.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the watch because he had no money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-177

653. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , four shirts, value 12s. two jackets, value 10s. two pair of trowsers, value 4s. one waistcoat, value 1s. and six books, value 3s. the property of John Hodgson .

JOHN HODSON . I am a sailor ; I belong to the Sunderland packet . I lost all the things I had in my chest; the chest was safely locked on the Saturday night, and I found it broken open when I came on board on Monday morning. The prisoner belonged to our vessel.

JOHN PURVISS . I am a police officer. In the night of the 15th of April, I stopped the prisoner coming ashore in a boat, at Iron Gate wharf. I found he had the property in question in the boat, and I took him back to the Sunderland packet, where I found the chest was broken open. He acknowledged he belonged to her.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-178

654. ANN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , three brass cocks, value 2s. the property of Charles Abbot .

DANIEL ABBOT . I keep a broker's shop in Brillrow, Somers Town . These cocks were on a board outside the door. The prisoner came to my shop on the day in the indictment to purchase a second hand dish. Before I missed the cocks, she came in again, and offered them for sale.

(Property produced, and sworn to.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave a girl at the prosecutor's door what halfpence I had for the cocks, not thinking they were his property.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-179

655. WILLIAM HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a shovell, value 4s. the property of William Myrm .

WILLIAM MYRM . I am a farmer , at Hornsey, and Finchley . I was at breakfast when one of my men brought this man into the house with the shovel.

WILLIAM HIDER . I am in the employ of the last witness. I met the prisoner coming out of my master's yard, with the shovel on his shoulder; and I stopped him; we had a scuffle, but I took the shovel from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man with a pick-axe spade and shovel, which he offered me for sale; I had not money enough to buy them all, and I gave him two shillings and sixpence for this shovel.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-180

656. FREDERICK GASKELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , fifty-three yards of sheeting, value 1l. 6s. the property of Thomas Craig .

JOHN DOYLEY . I was passing through Oxford-street on the day in the indictment, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day time, and I saw the prisoner at the bar take this piece of sheeting from the prosecutor's door.

RICHARD HODGE . In consequence of information given me by the last witness, I pursued the prisoner, and brought him back with the property.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-181

657. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , two boy's shirts, value 3s. one pair of stockings, value 6d. and an apron, value 6d. the property of William Davis .

ANN DAVIS . I live at No. 16, Pleasant-row, Church-lane, Somers Town . On the evening of the 13th of April, I hung these things out to bleach, and the next morning they were gone.

ELIAS BEWSEY . I met the prisoner in Somers Town with a basket, between three and four in the morning of the 14th, and on my going up to him, he threw down the basket, and ran off. We afterwards secured him. There was linen wet and frozen in the basket.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-182

658. ROBERT MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May , two shillings in copper monies , the property of Joseph Gable .

JOSEPH GABLE . I went to see the prisoner and another man fight on the day in the indictment, and all of a sudden, they all fell upon me, and took the money from me; I had about two shillings in halfpence. I am not sure the prisoner fell on me. I can swear I lost my property.

JOHN THOMAS INGRAM . I took the prisoner into custody.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-183

659. ANN WYNNE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , a shawl, value 7s. the property of Leonard M'Nally .

LEONARD M'NALLY. I lent this shawl to a lodger of mine.

JANE BRUMAGE . I had borrowed this shawl of Mr. M'Nally, and left it on the stairs at her door; it was afterwards missed. I saw the prisoner going along the street with something bulky, and on stopping her, took the shawl from her.

THOMAS VANN . I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief laying on the stairs, and picked it up, not thinking it any harm.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-184

660. JOHN BROOKS , THOMAS WILLIAMS , and JOHN BRADLEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , two handkerchiefs, value 20d. the property of certain persons unknown, from their persons .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I first saw the prisoners, on the day of the indictment, fronting Gyngell's show, in Brook Green Fair . All three were in company together. I then saw the biggest. Bradley, catch hold of Brooks's arm, and point to a gentleman's pocket, and push him in, covering him. I saw the lad Brooks, draw the handkerchief out; Williams assisted in covering him. I endeavoured to inform the gentleman of the transaction, but could not get up to him; I did not know his name. We did not attempt to meddle with the prisoners until they got right out of the mob. When they had got from among the booths, they all felt into conversation together, and the little one, Brooks, pulled a handkerchief from under his jacket, and they all three caught hold of the corners, and began examining it. I guesed they were looking if there were any marks; I think it was too dark for them to see any, if they were. When we seized on them, the two smallest dropped the corners, and Bradley threw it away. I seized him, and Woodroffe took the other two. I accused Bradley of picking a gentleman's pocket, but he denied it, and said he had never seen the other two prisoners before. I found another handkerchief between his shirt and skin, and an open pen knife in his pocket, very sharp.

GEORGE WOODROOFFE corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

Bradley's Defence. I was going along, and a man came up and asked me if I would buy a handkerchief of him, and I bought those two, and went towards the fair.

Williams's Defence. What this man says is right.

BROOKS, GUILTY, aged 13.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgement respited .

BRADLEY, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for life

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-185

661. SOPHIA BROWN, alias JANE RUSSEL , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , a watch, value 50s. the property of Thomas Dunn .

The circumstances of this case, are too indecent to be inserted here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-186

662. JOHN NASH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a watch, value 20s. the property of George Hindle , from his person .

GEORGE HINDLE . I am an auctioneer . On the 30th of May, in the evening; I lost my watch. I was going towards Covent Garden , past Drurylane thatre; there was a hackney coach drawn close up to the pavement, and the prisoner and two more hackney coachmen , and seven or eight women were all talking together. As I was passing through them, I was hustled into the midst of them, and I felt my watch taken from my fob, but I can't say by whom. I laid hold of the prisoner, because I saw it in his hand. I took it out of his hand; he wanted to charge me with an assult, The whole proceeding was done in two minutes.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am watch-house keeper, The prisoner was brought into the watch-house a little before twelve o'clock. He was brought in by the watchman. First of all, he wanted to give charge of Mr. Hindle, for an assault. Mr. Hindle had the watch safe before he came to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the watch. The prosecutor very much ill used me. He never made any charge against me, until I charged him with an assault.

THOMAS WESTBROOK . I am a master grocer, in Guildford-street. Happening to read in the paper that the prisoner was brought before a magistrate for this charge, and having seen the transaction, I thought it my duty as a man to come forward. The theatre had broken up, and the prisoner and three or four men were quarreling with some girls. The watchman came up to disperse them, but they did not go on. Upon that he sprang his rattle. Then the prisoner and two or three girls walked on as far as the confectioners opposite the end of Bow-street. I turned my head for a moment, and in half a minute there was a row again; before I got close up, I saw the prisoner falling. Just as he rose the prosecutor knocked him down again; and while he was on the ground, shook him violently, and asked him if he wanted any thing more; because if he did, he would serve it out to him. I saw no watch in the transaction, nor was a word said about it then. Then the watchman came up; I was quite close to them, and the charge the prosecutor made, was, for ill using the girls, If any thing had been said about a watch, I must have heard it; but nothing about it passed,

JOHN SIMONS corroborated the last witness's account.

RICHARD ANDREWS gave a similar evidence to the last two witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-187

663. ROBERT ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , ninety feet of timber. value 5l. the property of Charles Christian .

It appeared in this case, that the timber in question, was erroneously taken in execution, and

The COURT was of opinion that the circumstances of the case, was rather a ground for an action of trover, that for a criminal prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-188

664. RICHARD MASSEY was indicted for steal

ing, on the 28th of April , three tin cans, value 3s. and three gallons of oil, value 19s. the property of John Methley and Thomas Tapster .

JOHN METHLEY . I am an iron-monger . I have another partner beside Thomas Tapster .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-189

665. WILLIAM NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 50s. the property of Griffith Foulkes .

IN this case, the removal of the property in question by the prisoner, was held by the Court to be insufficient to constitute felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-190

666. JAMES KEGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , a gown, value 6s. the property of George Ash .

ANN ASH . My husband lives at 115, Shoreditch ; he keeps a slop-shop . The prisoner and another man came into our shop between eleven and twelve in the forenoon of the day in the indictment, on a pretence of buying something; on their going out again, I saw the prisoner had something, and suspecting him, I followed him, and he dropped the gown. He was secured directly almost.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-191

667. JOHN KINGSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April , a pair of steps, value 3s. the property of James Sander .

THOMAS SMITH . I am apprenticed to Mr. Sander. These steps were put outside our door to prevent people from dirtying their clothes against our shop, which had been newly painted. I saw the prisoner take them, and walk off, and I stopped him with them within ten yards of our door.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was compelled by the paugs of hunger to commit this rash act.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-192

668. RICHARD PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , three pounds weight of bacon, value 2s. 3d. a quarter of a pound of tea, value 2s. 6d. one pound weight of butter, value 18d. one pound two ounces weight of cheese, value 16d. and one pound of sugar, value 13d. the property of John Austen .

ELIZABETH AUSTEN . I keep a chandler's shop, in Eagle-street, Holborn . The prisoner came into our shop on the day in the indictment, and ordered these things to be made up, and then seized them, and ran off with them without paying. I never had trusted him before; I did not intend to trust him then, nor did he ask me. I never saw him again until Thursday, when I had him taken up. The things amounted to seven or eight shillings.

ELIZABETH BACEY . I was in the shop of the last witness, and saw what she has related.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-193

669. FRANCES SHERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , a shirt, value 2s. the property of Wright Frederick Cook .

WRIGHT FREDERICK COOK . I am a stay-maker . The prisoner was a servant of ours; she left our service on the 10th, when she was taken into custody. in consequence of suspecting her, I followed her on the 9th into a pawnbroker's shop, where she pledged this shirt. On the 10th, I had her apprehended.

HUGH GANLY . I have the shirt. I don't know who pawned it; I took it in myself.

ROBERT HOWARD . I found the duplicate for the shirt on the prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-194

670. JOHN WINTERBOURN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , twenty-one boots, value 5l. three pairs of boots, value 2l. one shoe, value 1s. six pairs of half boots, value 6s. and two pairs of shoes, value 2s. the property of James Britten .

JAMES BRITTEN . I am a shoe-maker ; I have a shop at No. 10, Little Turnstile, Holborn . I lost these things on the 8th of May, in the morning, at about three o'clock. The shop was secured the over night; I did not live over it. I was alarmed about three o'clock, and on going to my shop, missed the greater part of my property. The padlock and staple had been forced. After that, I went to St. Ann's watchhouse, where the prisoner was in custody; I saw some boots there, which were my property.

WILLIAM BROWNING . I am a watchman. On the 8th of May, about three o'clock in the morning, I perceived the prisoner coming down Little Compton-street; I was with another watchman. We had a suspicion of the prisoner, and in consequence stopped him; he had a bundle in his right hand, which contained a parcel of boots and shoes, to which the prosecutor swears. He ran away when we took the property from him, but we afterwards secured him.

JAMES STEVENS . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-195

671. HENRY AVERY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a watch, value 1l. two seals, value 2l. a chain, value 5s. and a key, value 5s. the property of John Gill ; a coat, value 5s. a pair of breeches, value 4s. a handkerchief, value 3s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. and a waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas West , in the dwelling-house of John Bedford .

JOHN GILL . I am a sweep . The prisoner at the bar came to my master's house to be a sweep also; my master's name is Bedford. I got up at about four

o'clock on the morning of the day in the indictment, to go to work, leaving the prisoner in bed. Returned at about half past six, and he was still in bed, and pretended to be asleep. Then I went out again until twenty minutes before eight, I then found he was gone, together with the property mentioned in the indictment, and he had left the clothes in which he came to us in the fire-place. I had seen my property safe the over night. We went in search of him; but could not find him. In a few days, a boy came to another sweep's house close by us, and having heard of it, I went into their cellar to see if it was the same boy, and found it was the prisoner; I found him hidden under the bed-clothes. The prisoner had part of my fellow servant 's clothes on when I took him.

JOHN STOCKS . I live in Strutton-ground, Westminster; I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pledged with me on the 13th of April, by a young man.

WILLIAM DANBY . I am almost ten years old. I pawned that watch for the prisoner; he gave me five shillings for myself.

CHARLOTTE HOFFMAN . I keep a pork shop. I changed a one-pound note for the last witness; on the day that the fair began, Tothill-fields Fair.

GUILTY, aged 12,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160529-196

672. RICHARD KING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , two tableclothes, value 8s. a coat, value 5s. a sheet, value 6s. three blankets, value 12s. a quilt, value 3s. a bed, value 3l. 10s. a bolster, value 4s. and two pillows, value 6s. the property of James Thurley , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH THURLEY . The prisoner took a ready furnished lodging in our house; part of the things in the indictment were let to him with the lodging. The prisoner and his wife occupied that lodging for nineteen weeks and two days. They went away on the 10th of December, and did not return; and on the 20th, we got an officer, and broke open the door, when we discovered all the things named in the indictment were gone.

JAMES THURLEY . I missed some tableclothes from some drawers, which were not let to the prisoner.

GEORGE HUGHES . I am a pawnbroker. I have three parcels, which were pledged with me; the bed is one of them, and was pledged by the prisoner. I don't know who pledged the other things, because in the course of business we can't remember every body. They were all pledged at different times; some in the months of September and August in the last year.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 53,

Of stealing to the amount of 5s. only.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-197

673. CHARLES DAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Clow , at about the hour of two in the night of the 3rd of May, with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two blankets, value 6s. one pair of linen sheets, value 6s. one coverlet, value 2s. 6d. and one piece of blanket, value 6d. his property .

THE only evidence against this prisoner, was that the last item in the indictment, viz, the piece of blanket, was found in his possession, after he had quitted the prosecutor's premises, where he had lodged.

Prisoner's Defence. I took that bit of blanket to wrap up my crockery-ware when I went away, and I did not think it of any value.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18160529-198

674. JOHN GRIFFITHS and JOSEPH FOX were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Moore , at about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 22nd of April ,(Maria, his wife, and Jane Edwards , in the same dwelling-house then being,) and stealing therein, two pictures, value 1l. and two silver tea-spoons, value 2s. the property of the said William Moore .

MARIA MOORE . These things were in our front parlour. I had not been in that parlour the whole day. On going in, after I had received some information, I missed the property in question; very shortly afterwards, I saw the property, and the prisoners in custody.

JAMES SAUNDERS . I am a blue-maker. On the 22nd of April, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. I saw the prisoners; they were going in a direction towards the prosecutor's house. When they got up to it, they looked in at the parlour window; the little one shoved the window up, and went in; he did not remain in a minute, before he came out again; he brought nothing out. Then they walked up and down. Then they came back again, and the little one went in again; he brought something to the window, which he gave to Fox, and which he put into his right hand coat, pocket. Then he handed the pictures out. I gave an alarm, and caused them to be stopped; we followed them, and apprehended them in a field, about thirty yards from the prosecutor's house. The pictures were dropped, and the spoons were picked up in a direction in which Fox ran.

JAMES ALLEN . Corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

The Prisoners in Defence. We leave it to the mercy of the Court.

THE COURT, in charging the Jury, told them that if the window was in any degree open, before it was raised by the prisoners, that circumstances would take off the capital part of the charge.

GRIFFITHS, GUILTY, aged 13,

Of stealing, only .

Sent to the Refuge .

FOX, GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing, only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160529-199

675. LEWIS BIRD and JOHN LACEY were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , a watch, value 2l. and a key, value 6s. the property of Thomas Withers , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH WITHERS . All I can prove is the loss of the watch. I saw it advertised on the Saturday after I missed it.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. On apprehending the prisoners in consequence of a suspicion on the day in the indictment, I searched them at the Camden Head, Islington, and on Bird I found a watch; I asked him if he knew the name of the maker, or the number, and he did not. Consequently I detained them both, as they were in company.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

BIRD, GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

LACEY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160529-200

676. CHARLES COLLIER was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Walter , in the Kings highway, on the 23rd of April , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 7l. a seal, value 1l. three keys, value 14s. and a ribbon, value 6d. his property .

JAMES WALTER . I am footman to Lord Dudley and Ward. On the 23rd of April last, I was waiting at the Opera for her Ladyship; I had a flam in my hand, and as I was going up the Haymarket for the carriage, the prisoner hit me across the arm, and knocked the flam out of my hand. At the same time, my watch was drawn from my pocket. I saw my watch in another man's hand, but not the prisoner's; I catched the man who had my watch by the waistcoat, and said, in our vulgar way, d-n your eyes, you have got my watch. The prisoner and another man then dragged me from him, and he ran off; at the same time I hallooed out stop thief; but there was no one came to my assistance, and as I turned myself to the prisoner, he said, d-n your eyes, you ought to lose your watch; I told him he was the man who was the instigation of it. Before Nichols came up, the prisoner offered me the number of his coach, and said he would appear the next day; his coach was third from the curb-stone. When Nicholls came up, I gave charge of him, and told my fellow servant to tell her ladyship that I was gone to the watchhouse, where I made good my charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. This happened a little before twelve. I don't know any persons of the name of Benjamin Hickman , or James Smith . The prisoner offered me the number of his coach.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer of Bow-street. Nicholls and I received information of this disturbance at the corner of Pall Mall. On going to the spot, I heard the prisoner say, d-n his old eyes, he is an old son of a bitch, and ought to lose his watch, or something to that effect. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with assisting to rob him, and we took him to the watchhouse. The prosecutor gave us the same account that he has now.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I know no more than the last witness has stated.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing talking to Smith, another coachman, when Mr. Walter came up to me; I was a great way off from where the robbery was done, and he said, he had been robbed of his watch, and I said, in a joking kind of away he deserved to lose his watch, if he could not take care of it.

JAMES SMITH . I am a coachman, and drive for Mr. Duffy, hackneyman, in Black Horse Yard, Tottenham-Court-Road. On the night of the 23rd of May, I was with my coach near the Opera House; I was in conversation with the prisoner at the time the prosecutor charged him with robbing him. We were near our coaches; I believe we had been talking together ten minutes or quarter of an hour; we had been talking concerning the fight that was to take place the next day. At the time the prisoner was conversing with me, he did not strike any man, nor pull any one from another man; nor could he have done so without my seeing him. Lady Dudley's footman came up, and made a piece of work, and the prisoner said what a foolish man he was, not to take care of his watch when he had one, or something to that purpose. The prosecutor then said, you are the fellow, that knocked the flam out of my hand; upon which the prisoner said, you are a liar, and said he was talking to this young man; meaning me. The prisoner then very much abused the prosecutor, and he asked him where his coach was, and he told him it was 226, which it was; he drives for Mr. Miller, in Hanway street, Tottenham-Court-Road. The prosecutor said, you are not the man who robbed me; I had the man by the celler who robbed me, and he was a short man with a brown coat; and I being a short man, and having a brown coat, did not go to the Watch House, for fear of getting into trouble myself.

Examined by the COURT. He described the man who robbed him, as short, and wearing a brow coat. I answered that description, and kept away.

BENJAMIN HICKMAN . Coroborated the statement of the last witness.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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