Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd April 1816.
Reference Number: 18160403
Reference Number: f18160403-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 3rd of APRIL, 1816; and following days; BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) BY R. BUTTERS, No. 22, FETTER-LANE, FLEET-STREET

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. Lord Mayor of the City of London; The Right Hon. Edward Lord Ellenborough , Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench: Sir George Wood , knt, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Justice Abbot, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes, knt. Sir Richard Carr Glynn, bart; Sir William Leighton , knt. Sir Charles Flower , bart; Sir Claudious Stephen Hunter , bart; Aldermen of the said City. Sir John Sylvester , bart, Recorder of the said City; John Alkins, esq. Samuel Goodbohere , esq. William Heyghae , esq. Robert Albion Cox, esq. Alderman of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City. His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and county of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Benjamin Fleuret ,

Robert Peter Guiard ,

Richard Malm ,

Joseph Blackburne ,

William Dunbar ,

John Payne ,

William Newell ,

William Sells ,

William Gardiner ,

James Scrutton,

William While ,

Joseph Todd .

First Middlesex Jury.

Peter Nicholson ,

Samuel Sandell ,

Joseph Hunt,

John Thompson,

Joseph Baylis ,

James Barker ,

John Wright,

John Knight ,

James Davis ,

James Bryant ,

Samuel Plat ,

Henry Andrews .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Wright ,

William Hope ,

William Fountain,

George Croft ,

Justus Bartholomew Coostree ,

Thomas Dickins ,

Richard Satchwell ,

William Smyth ,

William Hunt,

Thomas Hughes ,

Ralph Shepherd,

John Freeman .

Reference Number: t18160403-1

288. EDWARD BRIANT , WILLIAM FORE-MAN , and LEVI ABRAHAMS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Fillison , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 10th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one chest, value 12s. one tankard, value 15s. one mug, value 5s. two pins, value 5s. one brooch, value 15s. one opera-glass, value 15s. one snuff-box, value 5s. two dozen handkerchiefs, value 1l. 14s. two shirts, value 1l. eight pairs of stockings, value 26s. six waistcoats, value 2l. five pairs of trowsers, value 2l. one coat, value 15s. three pairs of gloves, value 4s. two pairs of shoes, value 12s. one pair of breeches, value 1l. and two razors, value 6d. the property of Robert Edward Holme, and one chest, value 6s. the property of Sarah Colby . And ESTHER JONAS and SARAH LEVI were indicted for feloniously receiving on the 11th of March , the same goods, they well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen , against the statute.

JOSEPH FILLISON. I am the landlord of the house, which is in Stepney parish; I live in the house myself; I let part of it out to lodgers; Sarah Colbey is a lodger of mine, and Mr. Robert Edward Holme; I have no other lodgers; I recollect Sunday, the 10th of March; I went out at about a quarter before three; I left Mrs. Colbey, at home. I locked the door when I went out, leaving her in the house; I returned at about a quarter before eight; when I returned, my street door was locked, to all appearance as I left it. I went in myself, and some of my neighbours were in the house when I went in. I lost nothing; I know nothing of the circumstances of the robbery; I keep one key of the door, and Mrs. Colbey keeps the other; I left Mrs. Colbey at home; I had bolted the back door.

SARAH COLBEY . I lodged with Mr. Fillison. On Sunday, the 10th of March last; I know the last witness went out in the afternoon, and I heard the door shut about three o'clock; a little while after, I went out; when I went out, I pulled the door to, which has a spring lock, and I pushed it to see that it was safe. When I heard the door shut at about three o'clock, I did not go down to see who it was that went out. I did not unbolt the back door; When I went out, I fastened the front door, and pushed it, and it was fast. Mr. Fillison returned just before me; it was about eight o'clock; when I went into the house on my return, I missed a chest, I don't know what it was worth; I don't think a shilling; I had not seen it just before I went out; I don't know that I had seen it that morning; it was in my bed-room; I can't say whether I had seen it or not that morning.

RHODA BROWN. I am a servant next door but one to Mr. Fillison's. I was at home on the 10th of March last, at about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw two men go out of Mr. Fillison's house, with a chest on their shoulders; I saw them go in, and I saw them go up the steps, and saw them go in, and bring out a chest.

Q.How did they get in - A. They were not on the steps a minute; they did not remain in a moment; they were out again directly; one had a chest on his shoulder; I can't say which; I believe it, was the tallest, Briant; he had a soldier's coat on; Foreman was with him; I think the tall man carried the chest. I had seen them in the afternoon in the street; there were three in the street, walking up and down all the afternoon, opposite our house, and opposite Mr. Fillison's; that bad attracted my attention; I had particularly observed them; I am for certain enabled to say, that the two men at the bar are the men; I can't say I should know the other man; if I had seen him go in, I should have known him too; I did not see the third man when they went in. I noticed the one with the curls on his face; that is the tallest one; I saw no mark on the face of the other. Afterwards I saw them at the police office; I knew them then; they were then in a different dress; they had other clothes on than what they had on the Sunday; one had a soldier's great coat on; but it was neither of these. When I saw them enter the house, it was moon-light. I told the neighbours directly almost.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. The persons who entered the house were only two; no third man was within sight, that I perceived; this was on the 10th of March, it was about seven o'clock. I neither knew Briant nor Foreman before; I did not take such notice of them as to know how they were dressed; I know one man was dressed in black, and the other man, who went into the house, had a soldier's coat on; but I don't say whether this is the man; I can't say whether they both went into the house; one is the man who went to the house.

Q. Which - A. I think Foreman, the little one; I think Foreman went into the house; I believe the small one carried the box. I did not see the faces of both that went into the house; I saw the short one go into the house.

COURT. Who is the man you saw with the chest - A. The tall man, with a soldiers coat.

WILLIAM JAGGERS . I live in the neighbourhood of Mr. Fillison's house; I am a cork-cutter. I was passing Mr. Fillison's house, and saw one of the prisoners, Levi Abrahams , I think is his name; I saw him with a bag on his shoulder; it was about one hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Fillison's door. I did not see any body else then. I followed Levi, and lost him. Coming back again, through the same street, I saw the two prisoners Briant and Foreman with a box; I am quite certain to these two prisoners; Briant had the box on his shoulder, and the other had a hold of the rope behind. Upon that, I took no more notice. Foreman was dressed in

black, and had a patch on his chin; a large black patch. This was about half past seven; it was a moon-light night. I think I could speak to the box they had; I can swear to it. Mr. Fillison's house is in Turner-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. It was about half past seven when I saw them. They were then a hundred and fifty yards from Fillison's house, and it was full a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes before that I had seen Levi; I did not know Briant before. I saw them at the police office next, I went immediately and gave information at this office. I went into the house and looked over it, and gave information at the police office; I saw the girl Brown standing at the door; she had just then given information.

Rhodn Brown re-examined. I saw that gentleman,(the last witness) at about half an hour after I saw these men; I was then alarming the neighbourhood, I alarmed it immediately.

William Jagger 's re-examined. I found a robbery had been committed. I said I could swear to the persons if I saw them again. In consequence of finding that a robbery had been committed, I went down to the police office, and described the men I had seen with the chest; and in consequence of that description; they were both taken. I look at the prisoners, Foreman and Bryant, and I have no doubt of their persons.

JOHN TINNEY . I am a watchman of Whitechapel parish, in Chicksand-street, about half a mile from the house that was robbed. At nine o'clock in the evening of the 10th of March; I was crying my first hour, and found a chest at the corner of Halifax-street. I have taken care of it, and it is here. I afterwards found another, at about fifteen yards from that, in a piece of waste ground where a builder keeps his things.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a police officer; the persons of two men were described to me, and in consequence of that description. I took Briant and Foreman. Foreman was described particularly, with a black patch on his chin. I found them both in company the next morning, and Foreman had a black patch upon his chin. They were in Flem-delis-court, turning out of Brick-lane, Whitechapel. When we took them to the lock-up-room; Foreman had a patch on his chin, but before the witness saw him, he had torn it off. In consequence of some information, I went after Levi Abrahams the same morning, the Sunday, at a little after eight, or between eight and nine. We went first to Abraham'e house; he was at home; it is in Chicksand-street. We found him there, but not any property. We did not take him into custody then; in about an hour, or an hour and a half, we went into a house in Little Middlesex-street, Whitechapel, we there found Abraham's and the two women employed in picking the marks out of this property. (producing it) I asked them whose it was, and from whom it came. They all three said they did not know whose it was, nor from whom it came. In the pocket of Sarah Levi I found two pair of gloves and a neckerchief. I took all three of them up; I believe the husband of Esther Jonas, keeps the house. They were actually picking the marks out of the things. They immediately dropped them when I opened the door suddenly.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I saw Levi in the morning at his own house; I believe his name is Abraham Levi , and not Levi Abraham; the girl Sarah Levi is his daughter. I searched at his house and discovered nothing there. I know Jonas, the husband of Esther Jonas , if I should see him. I came into the room where they all were; Abraham Levi had a pin or a needle, which he dropped in a moment; I will swear he dropped a pin or a needle the moment we opened the door; we did not look for the needle; I saw a pin, or a needle, or something of that description; I went in first, and the others followed me closely.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I accompanied the last witness in taking up the prisoners Foreman and Briant. The account he has given is correct.

EBENEZAR DALTON. I went to the house, and found Levi and the two women there; they were employed in picking the marks out of the linen which is now produced; they dropped the things directly from their hands as soon as ever the door was open. I caught hold of the things as soon as ever they dropped them. They said, they knew nothing of them, nor did they know to whom they belonged. Miller and myself went there; we saw them picking something out.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I don't pretend to say that I saw any needle, but some of the things had the marks only partly picked out.

ROBERT EDWARD HOLME . I was a lodger on the 10th of March last. I left home at about half past two in the afternoon; I returned soon after ten at night; I found that I had in the course of that day been robbed. That chest contained this wearing apparel, which is now produced.

(Witness now swears to the wearing apparel.)

SARAH COLBEY. I lost such a box as one of these; but could not swear to it; I lost such a one; I think this is it; it is something like it. I lost a box like that other box.

William Jaggers . That is the box, (pointing to the one which Mrs. Colbey cannot swear is her's,) Briant had on his shoulder. This box has rope handles; Foreman had hold of the rope behind.

John Tinney . The boxes were about fifteen yards from one another. I found Mr. Holme's chest first, it was at the corner of Little Halifax-street, in Whitechapel, and the other was in a bit of waste ground, inclosed by a bricklayer to keep his tools.

Mrs. Colbey. I can't tell whether my box had a rope handle or not; I cannot even swear to its handle.

Rhoda Brown . I can't say what box it was I saw them with; it was a large box I believe.

Levi Abrahams Defence . In the morning I went out to buy some fish, and coming home, I went into my sister-in-law's, Esther Jonas , and she asked me to look at these things which she had there; I was not in five minutes, and was just looking over them when the officers came in, and took me,

and they know that the fish was on the table.

Jonas's Defence. I got up on the Monday morning, and went out to market, and I was out about half an hour, and when I came in, I found these things all about my place; I asked my neighbours if they knew any thing about it, and they said, a man had been in, and I was very inquisitive to know what these things were, and just then by brother-in-law came in, and I asked him to look at them, and we had not been looking at them five minutes when the officers came in.

BRIANT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

FOREMAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

ABRAHAMS, NOT GUILTY .

JONAS, GUILTY , aged 23.

LEVI. GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-2

289. LEVI ABRAHAMS , ESTHER JONAS , and SARAH LEVI , were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , one bed, value 3l. one bolster, value 10s. and two pillows, value 10s. the property of Thomas Bennet , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BENNET. I live at No. 9, George-street, Stepney ; I have a dwelling-house there; I left it about six o'clock in the morning of Saturday, the 9th of March; I left my wife at home; nobody else lives in the house. When I returned between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I found that I had been robbed of my bed, my bolster, two pillows, a blanket, a counterpane, and a trunk, containing various articles of mine, and my wife's wearing apparel. I had seen them in the house before I went out; I slept in the bed; it is now in court. The value of the bed is three pounds; the bolster is worth ten shillings. I understood that the door of my house had been double locked. When I came home, I found a number of my neighbours in the house, and my wife.

JANE BENNET . I am the wife of the last witness. I left my house about seven o'clock in the morning; I left nobody in the house. I returned a little after eight in the evening; I returned before my husband. I had double locked the street door when I went out. When I returned, I found it on the single lock. The moment I came home I went up stairs, seeing the doors open; I found the bed missing, the first thing of the bedstead, also a quilt, a counterpane, a blanket, a trunk, a bolster, and two pillows. I can't say how any one got in. The bed was worth three pounds; the bolster ten shillings; the two pillows ten shillings. I have seen my property since; the officer has got it.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a police officer. I went in company with Dalton, on the morning of Monday, the 11th; I went to a house in Little Middlesex-street, Whitechapel; I found the three prisoners were there, the bed, two pillows, and a bolster. I believe Mr. Jonas keeps the house; the girl, Sarah Levi, is the daughter of Levi Abrahams, I believe. They were all sitting in the lower room, and the bed was in the middle of the room; the bolster and pillows were with the bed. No other persons were in the room but the prisoners. I asked them whose bed that was, and they all three denied all knowledge of it, and did not know whose it was; they knew nothing at all about it. I went between ten and eleven o'clock on the Monday morning; they were picking the marks out of the other property. I took them into custody. I did not search any other part of the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. This was the third day after the robbery; the robbery was on the Saturday. I know Jonas has a husband living, that I believe. I know Levi lives some where else. In these three days, I don't know who might have brought these things there.

EBENEZAR DALTON. I am a police officer, and went also to this house. I can only speak to the same facts to which the last witness has spoken; his account is correct.

(Property produced.)

Jane Bennet . I know these pillows, and the bolster; I can also swear to the bed, it is sewed up the middle, where I put some feathers in.

Levi Abraham 's Defence. I had been out that morning to buy some fish, and on my way home, I was passing by my sister-in-laws door, and looked in, and she said, these things had been put into her place, and asked me to look at them, and I was just looking over them when the officers came in, and took us.

Jonas's Defence. I had been out to buy some fruit that morning, and when I came in these things were in my place. My brother-in-law came in, and we were just looking over them when the officers came in, and took us.

ABRAHAMS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

JONAS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

LEVI, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-3

290. THOMAS DALEY , and JAMES MAN-NING were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , three pieces of calico containing seventy yards, value 4l. the property of George Anstey , William Pearce , and Thomas Anstey , in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be the dwelling-house of William Pearce only.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I carry on the business of a furniture printer ; George Anstey and Thomas Anstey are my partners; I reside in the house, it is in Bond-street . Neither of my other partners live in the house. On the 11th of March last, I lost some property from my shop. I know Mr. Samuel Brindle ; I had employed him to sit in an opposite shop of mine, and in consequence of some information he gave me by a note sent, telling me to come over directly; I went. I then went with brindle; he came out to me; I accompanied Brindle to a public-house; he and I followed Manning; we took him into custody. He had three pieces of calico in a bag. I told him that was our property; he made no reply, except some body gave it to him. It was a quarter of an hour after before Daley was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ARABIN, I reside

in the house, and the taxes are paid by the firm.

SAMUEL BRINDLE. I was employed to watch the shop of the prosecutors; I stationed myself on the opposite side of the way in a shop, a paper hangers just opposite; I sat in the shop; I had an opportunity of seeing all persons who went into or out of the prosecutors shop; about half past eight, I saw Manning go into the premises, he had nothing with him when he went in; he did not stay two minutes, when he came out with this bag; I did not see him speak to anybody in the shop; I did not see any body in the shop; I could not. In consequence of this, I gave information to the prosecutor, and went with him to the public-house. As soon as Manning came out of the prosecutor's shop, I followed him to the White Swan, in Wardour-street; I went in myself, and called for a glass of liquor. I am quite sure that Manning was the man who went into the shop, and came out with a bundle.

Cross-examined by MR. ARAPIN. I speak to the time he was in the prosecutor's shop, because I looked at my watch; he did not stay two minutes in. I don't know what direction he might have received in the shop.

JOHN WHARTON LOPPET. I am warehouse-man to the prosecutors. I recollect the morning on which this was detected. I left the shop between eight and nine; I left the prisoner Thomas Daley in the shop, to take care of it; he was the only one that was in the shop; he remained behind me in the shop I suppose a quarter of an hour. I don't know whether any one came into the shop while I was absent. I look at the property; I know it, it is my masters property; I believe three pieces cost us thirty shillings a piece; I believe that to be the cost price, but I am not certain.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. There are four persons employed in this concern. When I went to breakfast, the prisoner Daley was left in the shop; there was no one in the shop but Daley; the other porter was below stairs; he was not in the shop; but he could have come into the shop in a moment.

THOMAS ANSTEY. The prisoner made a disclosure to me; I had not held out any inducement to him; it was at the police office in Marlborough-street, but not before the magistrate; he said he had been robbing us for six wix weeks. I asked him how many pieces of calico he had taken, and he said, about forty or fifty.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he mention these particular pieces - A. There was an allusion to these; I asked him how he had disposed of them, and asked him if it was to the man who had the three that morning, and he said, yes, to the same man.

Daley's Defence. When I was committed, they promised me every thing, and Mr. Thomas Anstey brought me to a public-house, and kept me for an hour, and put me in a flurry, and I don't know what I said.

The prisoners called several witnesses who gave them a agood character.

MANNING, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

DALEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-4

291. JOHN SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edmund Simkins , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 17th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one lookingglass, value 4l. the property of the aforesaid Edmund Simkins .

EDMUND SIMKINS. On the 17th of February last, in the evening, at about a quarter past seven o'clock, I was sitting in my kitchen with my family, at my house, No. 24, Greenfield-street, Commercial-road, at the parish of St. Dunsten Stebonheath , and I was alarmed by something over me, as if something had dropped; some one of the family exclaimed, there is some one in the parlour; that was the room above. I immediately ran up stairs, and discovered the prisoner with a glass, resting on the ledge of the window; it was a looking-glass; the window was open; the shutters had been put to; the sash was thrown completely up. I was in the room not ten minutes before; it was then down. I have not a doubt but that the prisoner at the bar, who was in the room, had opened the window; the sash is fastened down by a catch, or a window drop. I found this catch forced from the window, and lying on the floor. This is part of the catch; that had been entire, and fastened to the window, and I found this knife also in the room; it was not there ten minutes before. I found the prisoner at the bar getting out at the window, with the looking-glass resting on the ledge; the glass was removed from its place. There is a little wooden railing outside, that he might have rested his foot on in getting out; he might have got out without breaking the glass or damaging himself. When I saw him getting out, I gave the alarm of stop thief; he had got one foot on the chair, and the other on the table. The watch was not set. I gave the alarm of stop thief, and a young man was passing, and saw him coming from the window, and threw him down into the kinnel, and I found him in his custody, when I secured him; this was about a quarter after seven o'clock, it was dark. When I went up, I had not a candle with me, but I knew the prisoner was the same man when I went round, because I have a lamp just opposite to me, and another by me. The prisoner is the same man whom I saw in the room. He begged very hard for mercy, and hoped I would let him go. I am sure the window was down when I went up about ten minutes before. No person could get in at the window, or force it up, without forceing this catch off.

WILLIAM ALTHORNS. I was passing by before the alarm was given, and seeing the prisoner coming out of the window, I thought proper to seize him; I threw him off the rail into the kinnel; the rail is under the window. I held him down a minute or two, when there was a cry of stop thief, and the last witness, Simkins, came out; I did not let go of him until I put him into the hands of Simkins. The prisoner said he had done nothing, he had done nothing, let him go, let him go.

Simkins, Re-examined. I took the prisoner to Lambeth-street office, and delivered him into the custody of Ebenezar Dalton. The glass was not taken out of the house, because I had put it back again; he had moved it from its place.

EBENEZAR DALTON. On the 17th, I was standing in the office, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and I heard a bustie in the street, and went out; I saw Mr. Simkins and two or three more bringing this man to the office, and it was with great difficulty we got him in; I took him in, and searched him; but there was nothing on him. The next morning I went to the house that had been broken open, and there I received this knife and catch. The knife agreed with the mark on the window; there was an appearance of force on the window, where it had been broken open.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day in the indictment, I was very much intoxicated, and was returning home through Greenfield-street; I had come from Ratcliffe Highway; a person stopped me, and charged me with a robbery, and I knew myself to be innocent, and I made no resistance. It is impossible to break open a house without any instrument; and it is well known that that knife, (even if it was proved to be mine,) could not break open this window; they searched me, and found nothing on me.

Simkins. Re-examined. The looking-glass had been fixed to the wall. I have not the least doubt that that is the man,(pointing to the prisoner,) who was getting out of the window when I went up stairs; he was dressed nearly as he is now.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see my face - A. I did.

JURY. We should suppose that the power of that brass would cesist the power of that knife.

Simkins, Re-examined. Q. Your window is in a frame - A. Yes, it slides up.

Q. Do you see that knife, it does not seem very strong; how do you suppose it could break that brass - A. I don't know how it could be broken off, but I found it broken off, and the window open. He could not open the window without breaking the catch; the glass of the window was not broken at all.

Ebenezar Dalton, Re-examined. I saw where the knife had made an impression; there was the mark of the knife on the sash.

THE COURT, in summing up the evidence for the consideration of the Jury, told them that if the prisoner lifted the sash after it was dark, without forcing the catch, that would constitute the crime with which he was charged.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenburough.

Reference Number: t18160403-5

292. JOHN MORRIS , SAMUEL COKER , ELI-ZABETH HENLEY , and ANN MOORE were indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Emannel Moses , about the hour of three in the night, of the 11th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, five handkerchiefs, value 28s. four shawls, value 4l. nine yards of silk, value 2l. and eleven yards of sarcenet, value 30s. the property of the said Emanuel Moses.

EMANUEL MOSES. I live at No. 6 and 7, Bunhillrow, in the parish of St. Luke's . On Tuesday morning, the 11th of March; I was called up, I got up; I found my shop had been broken into. I got up and I found the window broken, and one of the panes of glass was broken, and a square piece cut out of one of the shutters. It was between three and four in the morning when I got up. I examined to see if any thing was gone out of the shop, and I missed two pieces of sarcenet, five silk handkerchiefs, four silk shawls of various patterns. We found some more articles in the area which had been taken out. I shut up the shop myself on the night of the 11th; I shut it up about eight in the evening; nothing was broken; I went to bed about eleven o'clock. The value of the things was ten pounds, or there abouts; I I have seen some of them again at the office. I had seen the prisoner Coker before; he was in my shop on the Thursday before; he came in and asked me to sell him a waistcoat and a coat; I sold him a waistcoat for ten shillings; he bid me pat it by, and he would call again, but he never called again after that. I had seen these things in my shop on the day before; I then put my shop to rights and set these things all smooth.

DANIEL MOSES merely proved Coker's coming to the shop.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I am a constable; I saw some of the prisoners on Tuesday the 12th of March, about twelve o'clock. As I was coming down Houndsditch, I met the four prisoners in company together; the two men were walking first, and the two women were close behind them. Knowing them, I turned round to look at them. I saw Elizabeth Henley nudge Ann Moore ; she then turned round to look at me, and then began to shove her patterns on. They then went up Aldgate, High-sreet; they then went across the High-street, and into the Minories. I then followed them down the Minories into the New Square, to a pawnbrober's shop, and Coker went on the opposite side of the way. Elizabeth Henley and John Morris went to the corner of America-square. There I passed them, and went into America-square, I went back again and went into the pawnbroker's shop; I asked the pawnbroker what that young woman had brought; it was Ann Moore who had gone in; I told the pawnbroker to detain her for five or six minutes, and I would be back again. I then went to America-square, and there I apprehended John Morris and Elizabeth Henley. I asked her what she had got under her shawl; and she said she had got a shawl which she was going to pawn, it was her own. There was a gentleman coming by of the name of Davis, and I asked him to be so good as to take them to the watch-house for me. He was Davis, the ward beadle. I told him I had another person run down Honndsditch whom I wanted to follow. That was Coker; I followed him and apprehended him in Swan-street, pretty near the bottom. I brought him back again into the Minories, and there I met Ann Moore running down the Minories as fast as she could. She did not see me, and ran

into my arms; I told her she must go along with me, and she exclaimed, for God's sake, let me go. I took her then to the pawnbroker's shop with Coker. I asked the pawnbroker if he had given her any money, and he said no. I saw a shawl lying on the counter, and asked for it. The pawnbroker said that that was the shawl that she came to pledge. I told him, I knew it was; she heard that, and did not deny it. I then took and tied Coker and her together, and took them to the watch-house where the other two were, and after I had been there about a minute, I opened the door and saw my partner, John Ray, and called him in. He came in, and I asked him to search the two women, and I searched the two men. I asked them a great many questions, where they lodged; and both of them said they lodged where they could; one night with one girl, and another night with another, and so on. In searching Coker, I found the key of his apartment, as it afterwards turned out to be, in his pocket. In searching the other man, I found a key in his possession, which unlocks his sister's door, but not his own. I should state to you that I found this silk handkerchief, (producing it) not hemed, round Coker's neck, which is the property of the prosecutor, I likewise found another silk handkerchief in his hat. I am not sure whether there was one or more in his hat. I found on Elizabeth Henley this little shawl, (producing it) with the private mark on it. I also took the shawl that Ann Moore was pawning. I handcuffed them all then, and took them all to Giltspur-street Compter. Elizabeth Henley had a dog with her; just before they went to the Compter, in Newgate-street, she said she would not know what to do with the dog, without the turnkey would let her take it into the prison. The turnkey refused; then I said I would take the dog to White-chapel, or that way, and lose it. We then took it to Whitechapel, and in Wingfield-street he stopped at some old bones; we waited there a little time, and then we ordered him to go home, and he did so, and we followed him. He went into a little court off Wentworth-street, he went up one pair of stairs, and into the first room, and when we went into the room, there was Henley's sister. Her name is Mary, she seemed very much frightened. I searched the premises and found two silk handkerchiefs, and one silk shawl. In a box just by, I found two pieces of silk. (producing them) There are three pieces now, because they had cut a piece off from one of them. I then asked the girl if she knew where Coker lived, and she went and shewed us Coker's lodging. She took us up one pair of stairs in a house, a little way up Wingfield-street. I put my hand in my pocket and pulled out the key I got from Coker and unlocked the door. There I found between the bed and the sacking, two silk handkerchiefs, and one silk shawl, and this tea-pot; but there is no owner for the tea-pot. I found nothing else. Morris and Henley live together; and Coker and Moore lived together.

JONATHAN RAY. I am a constable. I accompanied the last witness Kinnersley; I searched the lodgings of the prisoners; in a closet in Morris's room, I found a parcel of pick-lock-keys; he lodged in George-yard, Wentworth-street. We know it was his lodging, because he owned something which Kinnersley took out of that room. The keys were all I found there. Kinnersley found the other things.

Kinnersly, Re-examined. Morris and Elizabeth Henley lived together, and Moore and Coker lived together. I found in the room in which Morris lived three pieces of silk, one silk shawl, and two silk handkerchiefs.

Jonathan Ray , Re-examined. It was there I found the pick-lock keys. Then I went to Coker's with Kinnersley, and there I found a large crow, a centrebit, and a number of other pick-lock keys; there were matches in each of the lodgings; a carpenter had been at work at the shutters of the prosecutor house, and there was a bit of theshutter that matched to this centre-bit; the iron crow exactly fitted with the marks on the shutter, where they had tried to take the shutter down; I also found with the bit and brace in Coker's lodging, this piece of wood, on which they had been trying the bit and brace.

Emanuel Moses, Re-examined. The shutter had not been taken down; the hole in it measured about six by seven inches; it had been cut away. Nobody had been in the shop. I suppose the things were drawn out of through this hole.

(Property sworn to.)

JURY. To Moses. Have you had those things in your possession since they have been stolen?

(Kinnersley, Re-examined.) No. I have kept them in my possession ever since we took them.

MARY HENLEY . (Sister to the prisoner of that name.) I lodge at the Baker and Basket, in Middlesex-street; Elizabeth Henley lodged in a court in George-yard; John Morris lodged there. I went to my sisters on the 12th of March, I went on the Tuesday to see her; the prisoner Morris was there; he was lying down on the bed; he had his clothes on; it was between ten and eleven in the morning; Coker came there with Ann Moore; they had came together to my sister's room. I saw them go out all together; they took something with them; they took a shawl with them, I believe; I believe they also took some handkerchiefs; but I am not sure. I remember the officers coming and searching the room; that was my sister's room they searched; they found part of the things which they have produced. I was in my sister's room when they came.

Morris's Defence. I am guilty of having these things; but know nothing of their being stolen. I worked in the West India Docks, and I was going down George-street, and I saw a bag which contained those articles, and I took them up into Coker's room, and the pick-lock key and the iron crow were in it.

Coker's Defence. About half past six, as near as I can guess, this man came up with a bag, and said he had just picked it up, and it had these things in it, with the crow bar and pick-lock keys, and being short of money, I asked Ann Moore to pledge the shawl; but the women are innocent.

Henley's Defence. There was nothing covered up

at all in my room, because I did not know they were stolen.

Moore's Defence. This young man, Coker, asked to pledge this shawl, and I thought it no harm, and I went. I did not know but they were honestly come by.

MORRIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

COKER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

HENLEY, NOT GUILTY .

MOORE, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-6

293. GEORGE BARNET was indicted for that he, on the 17th of February , with a certain pistol loaded with powder and leaden shot, which he in his right hand had and held, feloniously did shoot at Frances Maria Kelly , spinster, a subject of our Lord the King, with intent to kill and murder her .

SECOND COUNT. Stating his intent to be to disable her.

THIRD COUNT. To do her some grevious bodily harm.

FOURTH COUNT. Simply charges him with shooting at her; but states no intent.

FIFTH COUNT. Charges him with shooting at Edward Knight, a subject our Lord the King, with intent to kill and murder him.

SIXTH COUNT. Stating his intent to be to disable the said Edward Knight.

SEVENTH COUNT. Stating his intent to be to do the said Edward Knight some greviously bodily harm.

AND EIGHTH COUNT. Charges him with shooting at Edward Knight ; but states no intent.

NATHAN HARRIS. I am a dealer in jewellery, and live at 176, Drury-lane. I was in the eighth row from the orchestre of the Pit of Drury-lane Theatre, on the evening of Saturday, the 17th of February; the prisoner sat two rows in front of me, on my right; I sat on the left of him. I did not see him until the after-piece; his standing up then when every other person near him was sitting down, made me observe him. This was at the first commencement of the Farce; Miss Kelly and Mr. Knight were on the stage; they were embracing each other in the characters of Nan and Joey, two servants in the Modern Antiquities, or Merry Mourners. When this took place, they had parted from each other, and Mr. Knight had retired to the right of the stage, as looking from the audience, and Miss Kelly to the left. When she had got nearly to the stage-door, retreating, with her face towards the audience, I happened to turn round, and saw the prisoner stand up above all the rest, with his right hand pointed on a level with his shoulders, towards the left stagedoor, where Miss Kelly was standing; he was on the right hand side of the Pit, and she was on the left hand side of the stage, as you look from the audience; she was therefore on his left. I did not see what he had in his hand; but I saw a flash, and heard a report immediately after. I did not hesitate a moment, but made towards where he was, and leaned over, and pitched right upon him, and seized him instantly, before he had time to sit down. Upon my seizing him, he said he was not the person that fired the pistol. I saw nothing about him. At that time, I had not seen the pistol. I told him I was sure he was the man, as I saw him. He only said, he was not the man that fired, don't take hold of me. I saw the flash in his right hand; I saw the wadding momentarily drop out of the muzzle, straight from where it was fired; the pistol was no longer than his fingers; I saw the wadding alight. He dropped his right hand momentarily, as if towards his great coat pocket. I took him across the seats until I got further assistance; then he was taken into the avenue, or the lobbey of the pit; there he was searched, and a small black paper pencase was taken from his pocket, which contained gunpowder; there was something else taken from him; but I did not see it, because there was so much confusion and such a crowd.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. I never saw the pistol at the office at Bow-street. The prisoner was about six feet from the orchestra; he fired in a slanting direction; I observed he was extremely agitated after the handenffs were put on; he went very peaceably to Bow-street, and never made any resistance. I did not tax him with shooting at Miss Kelly; but I told him, I should not let him go.

GEORGE RORAUER . I was in the pit of Drury-lane Theatre at the time this happened. I was stand-at the corner of the orchestre, on the King's side, the left as you face the stage. I was looking at the performance, and I observed a flash, it proceeded from the right hand side of the pit; I merely saw the flash, it was about twenty-five feet from me. I heard something like shot rattle against the lamps, I mean the line of lamps called the float, between the orchestre and the stage. I saw a man taken across the pit, whom I afterwards discovered to be the prisoner. I immediately made my way out of the pit, and ordered the doors to be closed. Then I assisted in searching the prisoner; I saw a pen-case containing gunpowder taken from him, also a quantity of small shot; the shot was also in his pocket; I also saw the key of a pocket pistol taken from him. I went with the prisoner to Bow-street office, and while he was there, a pocket pistol was produced, by a gentleman of the name of Taylor; Mr. Taylor stated in the presence of the prisoner, that he found it where the prisoner had stood in the pit; the prisoner made neither observation nor answer. I then examined the pistol; it appeared to have been recently discharged. The depositions were then taken against the prisoner by the magistrate.

RICHARD BIRNIE, ESQ. I am the magistrate before whom the prisoner was brought. I took the examination of several witnesses, they were reduced to writing. I asked the prisoner what he had to say; I think he did not answer at first, and I told him he had heard what had been said against him, and asked him what made him fire the pistol, and he said to make an alarm. I then asked him how he came to point it so, as the witnesses had described, and his answer was, she can explain. He did not mention Miss Kelly's name; I think it had been mentioned;

no other lady's name had been mentioned.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. He could not avoid hearing what was said.

Q. I believe you had an opportunity of observing his conduct while he was before you - A. I had.

Q. Were you enabled to form any judgment with respect to the state of his mind at that time - A. Never having seen him before, I cannot positively say whether there was any thing unusual in him; but there was a sort of gloomness over his eyes.

Mr. Roraner, Re-examined. After the performance was over, I examined the direction which the shot had taken; I found marks of shot in front of the orchestre, in the direction from where the prisoner stood to the stage door; I found some marks on the stage door itself. I picked up some shot in the orchestre, very small shot indeed; they had struck against the board in front of the orchestre, and had dropped down; those which had struck the stage door, might be about two feet nine inches from the floor. The shot I found in the orchestre were the same size as those found in the prisoner's pocket.

EDWARD KNIGHT . I was performing the character of Joey in the Modern Antiquities, or Merry Mourners. I remember the circumstance of a pistol being fired; I was near the centre of the stage at the time; Miss Kelly was on my right hand as I face the audience, if they call that the King's side; but I don't know that it is so. I saw the flash in the pit; it was on my left hand. I did not see the person who fired, nor did I see the pistol. I think I heard the rattling of shot against the tins in the orchestre.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. I am not positive that it was shot that I heard; but I now think it was something that made such a noise as I think shot would have made. Neither I nor Miss Kelly have been informed that it reached the stage door.

MISS FRANCES MARIA KELLY . On the night of Saturday, the 17th of February; I was performing at Drury-lane Theatre. In the commencement of the after-piece, when I was on the stage, I indistinctly saw a flash in the pit; but don't know what it was; at the same time I heard what I conceived to be a detonating ball which we have frequently heard, and on former accasions I have been very much alarmed by them. I have no acquaintance with the prisoner in the least. I never saw him in my life until to day, to my knowledge. I did not see him when he was taken up.

JOHN BAKER . I am a constable belonging to Bow-street. I was in attendance at Drury-lane Theatre on the evening of the 17th of February last, I was in the back part of the pit, and heard the pistol; I immediately made my way to that part whence the report proceeded, when I saw Mr. Harris with the prisoner by the collar; he called for a officer, and I told him, I was one. I took him into custody, and took him to the back part of the lobby, and by order of the public, I searched him; I took from him powder and shot, which I have produced here to day. I immediately took him to the office at Bow-street, and while I was in the office, a Mr. Taylor came there, who produced a pistol in the presence of the prisoner. This is the pistol; it appeared to have been recently discharged; it has been in my possession ever since; nobody has ever seen it until Friday morning last. I afterwards went with the prisoner to Tothill-fields, in company with a man named Dickins. I either asked him was it his intention to kill, or was it his intention to shoot Miss Kelly, I am not positive which; his answer was I will tell you the pistol was not loaded with ball or slug. Dickins asked him if he ment to shoot Miss Kelly, and he said yes. No more passed until we got to Tothill-fields; no more conversation passed that night. The prisoner said, he lodged in Princes-street, Drury-lane; I can't call to mind the number; we went there, and there I found a pistol, the fellow to the one which is produced; I found some papers and shot, which was in that box.

Q. Do those shot correspond with those you found in his pocket - A.Apparently they do.

SAMUEL DICKINS. I am a constable of Bow-street. I accompanied the prisoner and Baker in the coach to Tothill-fields; as we were going along Baker put the question. what was his reason for firing the pistol; he gave no answer immediately. Then Baker said to him, did you mean to shoot Miss Kelly; I did, says he. What! with intent to kill her? says Baker. He did not give any answer then for a minute or two, and then he said, I did. What was your reason, says Baker, for doing it; the answer he gave Baker was, she knows perfectly well, herself, what it is for. That was all that I heard. Baker told me to be sure to take notice of what he said, and I did.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Then as Baker told you to take particular notice of what he said, I presume you have given us the correct account, and you mean to adhere to it - A. To the best of my knowledge, I have stated correctly what passed.

Q. Was it you or Baker that used the word kill - A. I did not.

Q. That you are sure of - A. That I am sure of.

Q. Are you sure the first question was did you mean to shoot Miss Kelly - A. Yes; and then Baker stopped, and than added, what! with intent to kill her.

Q. That account you mean to adhere to - A. Yes. I did not hear the subsequent conversation in Tothillfield Bridwell with the prisoner.

MR. DOWLING. Here requested that the letters which Miss Kelly had spoken of as having received, might be produced.

MR. GURNEY. Conceived that they were not legal evidence, nor did it appear that they were the hand-writing of the prisoner. He would however, waive any objection that might arise as to their admissibility in evidence, and would appose no difficulty in the prisoner's way.

MR. DOWLING. Stated that he had it in his power to prove the hand-writing.

The letters were now put in and read.

First letter, "addressed to Miss Kelly, Drury-lane Theatre, February, 12th. 1816."

Did love ever prompt you to rehearse, The part of honour unessayed in verse; Or passion strive to guard it from decay, Applause to gain, or applause to pay. The works of genius would its charms resign; And your honours praise echo every line. Mistaken girl! ambition would you sway. I assume a part in each concerted play? Your sex's softness endeavour to abuse, And for offence-not even one poor excuse.'

'I have here madam, defined your character and disposition in a few words; and shall go so far as to say, that you are not a stranger to my name.'

'Years ago I was your admirer; but always met with disappointment. Coquetry indulged you; although always obtained at the expense of others; without vanity to myself, I think my good intentions towards you have been more trifled than any of my cotemporaries. My claim to your person is therefore greater which determines me to demand your hand, or in other words to make you my wife.

'You will either consent to this, or accept my challenge. I will attend you at any hour you please, on Wednesday, or before. I have witnessed your dexterity of firing a gun; but suppose a pistol will better suit you, as being much lighter.

'Had you not infringed the rights of your sex, I should not have thus addressed you; but as it is, no other person can better answer this letter than yourself; it shall not break contempt on trifling excuses.'

(Signed) 'GEORGE BARNET.'

No. 22, Princes-street, D-ry-lane.

Second letter,"addressed to Miss Kelly, performer at Drury-lane Theathre, 14th of February, 1816."

'Madam, I received a letter yesterday evening, which from its apparent rusticity, I believe it to be yours. You would act wiser if you was to add your name, as I am not sufficiently acquainted with your hand writing, and as I hinted in my last letter, not to subject others to be answerable for your forwardness. If the terms specified in my letter, were not to my satisfaction, why not express yourself as one becoming your profession. Why suffer your temper to over rule your reason? I love the sex, and once esteemed you as an ornament to it, until you would my indignation by your impertinence and scandalous abuses.

'You are very partial to a diaguised male dress; but let me not experience any more of your folly; for if you do, I will secure you as an impostor, and punish you for your temerity.'

'I am Madam, your well wisher,

' GEORGE BARNET .'

MR. DOWLING declared his intention to call witnesses to establish the insanity of the prisoner.

JOHN CROCKET . I am the prisoner's father-in-law; I am a porter to an orange merchant in Covent Garden. I married the prisoner's mother; the prisoner's own father died before he was born. As he grew up from a boy, he appeared always as a reserved child, and not fond of playing, At times lately, he was very queer. While he was at his meals, he would burst out a laughing, and when we would ask what he laughed at, he would not give any answer. He was brought up as a law stationer. He was first bound to Mr. Edmatis, in Chancery-lane, from whom he was turned over to Mr. Riorder. After he was out of his time, he went to one Mr. Norcroft; after that he went to live at Sevenoaks, with Mr. Clarridge an attorney there, and remained there about nine months. I was sent for by Mr. Clarridge to fetch him home; I went down to Sevenoaks that day; it was on a Saturday. When I got down. the prisoner was opposite a gentleman's house, taking off his hat and bowing to the house, with a mob round him. This was in July, 1813; I had some difficulty in bringing him home from there. He said he would not come away, and I forced him away on the Monday morning. He stopped about a quarter of an hour before the gentleman's house, in my presence. I am certain he is not in his right mind. I don't think he was in London a fortnight or three weeks after his return from Sevenoaks, be-before he went by sea to Yarmoath, with an acquaiance. We thought the sea air would do him good; he staid five weeks to the best of my recollection. After he had returned about a fortnight, he went to write for Mr. Norcrutt. He lodged and boarded with me while he was at Mr. Norcroft's. He remained with me then about three or four months; he was always very low spirited, and kept no company at all. He then went down to Abergaveny, in Monmonthshire, where he remained with one Mr. Jones, a law stationer, about nine months. He returned again, and was very ill, very dull, and melancholy; he was that way about five weeks. He then went to writing for Mr. Norcroft; he boarded with us.

Q. What was his conduct, for a few days previous to this unfortunate affair - A.He could not eat any thing, and was very unsettled in his mind.

ELIZABETH CROCKET. I am the mother of the unfortunste young man at the bar. He is the son of a Mr. Barnet, formerly a waiter at the Plazza Coffee-house. He was of a very melancholy habit, and very low spirited. Before this unfortunate job, he fell off in his victuals very much indeed On Saturday the 17th, he seemed to go in and out a great deal, and did not stay a minute within doors. In the course of the evening he was in the yard, and while he was there I heard a report, like that of a pistol; but did not see the pistol. I had not time to speak to him after that, for he ran out immediately. That same evening he drank his tea very quick, and ran out immediately after it. He seemed very much agitated. I thought he was going to the play, for he was very fond of going.

ANDREW NORCROFT . I live in Chancery-lane. I know the prisoner at the bar; he sat in my office about two years ago. He did not live in the house with me; he was extremely industrious, and attentive to his business, though very dull. I have no doubt, but that this very close application affected his health. He wished me to look out for a country situation for him; and I accordingly recommended him to Mr. Clarridge, of Sevenoaks. Mr. Clarridge wrote to me upon the subject of the state of his mind, and I in consequence, sent his father down.

He did business for me a few days previous to this unfortunate affair. He then did that business in a very slovenly manner, totally unusual with him, and spoiled the engrossment, by leaving out the greater part. He seemed in a very disturbed state of mind. I expected he would have come on the Saturday that this happened, but he did not.

MORTY RIOHDEN. The prisoner at the bar served six years of his apprenticeship to me; he always conducted himself to my satisfaction; he was always very reserved, After he had been with me, he went to Mr. Norcroft's. I advised him to go into the country for his health sake. While in my service, he has frequently gone out for an hour or two, and on his return told me he did not know he had any thing to do, when he had left a great deal of work undone. He would frequently laugh over his business without any apparent cause. From the observations I have frequently made in his conduct, I think he was perfectly out of his mind.

JOHN THOMAS CLARRIDGE . I am the son of Mr. Clarridge, attorney, of Sevenoaks. I was at Sevencaks during the time that the prisoner was in my father's service. In consequence of what I had been told, I went out one day in company with my father, and saw the prisoner standing with a crowd round him, opposite to a gentleman's house. He was gazing very attentively at the house, for a considerable time. I took hold of one of his arms, and my father took hold of the other, and we led him away to his lodgings; from what I saw at that time, I thought him out of his senses.

CHARLES HURLEY. I am a law stationer. I have had an opportunity of observing the conduct of the prisoner, during the latter end of January and February last; I had frequent occasion to be at Mr. Riorden's office, where he was. I have repeatedly observed him laugh when nobody was in conversation with him at all. I particularly observed him one day, burst into an immoderate fit of laughing; I asked him what he laughed at. I knew nothing had occursed to excite his laughter; but he made me no reply whatever. I have frequently seen him very melancholy; in a kind of reverie of thought.

MARY CHARD. I live at Sevenoaks. The prisoner lodged with me during the nine months that he was with Mr. Clarridge. During that time, I have had frequent opportunities of observing his conduct. He left me in July or August, 1813. He seemed particular in always keeping by himself. He was in the frequent habit of standing on a heap of stones, opposite to a gentleman's house. He would stand there all weathers; frequently with a great mob round him, chucking him under the chin, and making game of him. I remember his sitting in church once with his hat on, and the clergyman was obliged to send to him to take his hat off. I have seen him also, making lidicolous gestures frequently in the church. I was not in the church when he addressed the congregation. I remember his running behind a gentleman's carriage for five miles; at least I saw him set out with it, and he came running behind it up to my door, in a very great heat. I certainly thought him out of his senses.

MARY HAGARTY. I live in Castle-street, Holborn. The prisoner lodged in my house from the 3rd of October, in the last year, to the middle of January; he was during that time very much dejected, and that dejection would frequently give way to the most immoderate fits of laughter, and violent mirth. I observed his conduct during the illness of my own children. At the latter end of October, he expressed a strong desire to see the child that was ill; he came to the sofa, where she was laying in a dying state; we expected her hourly to die. On my asking him his opinion of her, he made no reply, but burt out in an immoderate fit of laughter to my face. I certainly thought he did not possess a sound mind, and it is my belief that he is insane.

JOHN WANT. I am a surgeon, and live in North Crescent, Bedford-square. I have had some experience in the diseases of the mind. I have seen and conversed with the prisoner since his confinement. I have an opinion with respect to his sanity, formed on his conduct and conversation on that occasion, and I have not the slightest hesitation in pronouncing him of unsound mind.

Cross-examined by MR. GURNEY. I was with him three quarters of an hour, and have not the least doubt that the appearances I observed, were genuine, and not assumed or counterfeited.

This being the evidence of one side, and on the other, -

THE COURT, Summed it up to the Jury, and told them, that unless they conceived that the prisoner at the time he fired, was so far a master of his senses, as to be enabled to distinguish between right and wrong, they ought to acquit him, on the ground of insauity, and specify that reason in their verdict.

NOT GUILTY,

On the ground of Insanity .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-7

284. MICHAEL MOVEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Ward , in the King's highway, on the 8th of January , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, nineteen 10l. bank notes, one 5l. bank notes, two 2l. bank notes, and five 1l. bank notes , his property.

JAMES WARD. I am a seafaring-man . On the 8th of January, in the evening, I went into the Duke of Rutland public-house, in Old Gravel-lane; I was alone, and called for a pint of beer. There was a number of people in the house playing at cards; I was in the tap-room. I sat down, and played with them. The prisoner was there. I went out at about eleven o'clock to go to my lodgings; I went out in company with a man named Wilson; I was followed by four men; the prisoner at the bar was among the four that robbed me. I was knocked down in Keppel-street , about a quarter of a mile from the Duke of Rutland. I walked part of the way with Wilson that came out with me; I believe Wilson was the man who knocked me down. I had changed a one-pound note; I had been playing at cards, and had lost the whole of my silver, and I pulled out a bundle of notes to get a one-pound note to change it;

I had two hundred and four pounds in bank notes; there were nineteen ten-pound notes; one five-pound note; two-pound notes; and five one-pound notes. I had received one hundred and ten pounds from the Bank, and the rest in wages and prize money. I had them rolled up, and tied with a piece of red tape. I took them from my jacket pocket; I was obliged to do so, to get the one-pound note, I had my reckoning to pay, which was four shillings, besides part of my losing out of this one-pound note. I could see the prisoner at the bar among those that knocked me down; the prisoner at the bar took my money; the three who did not take it remained a little longer than the prisoner; he took it out and ran a short distance; I saw him clearly at the time he was robbing me; then the other three got together, and ran towards him. I know the prisoner at the bar took the money out of my pocket; I ran after him, and was within three yards of him, I made for the man who I knew had robbed me. They all ran under the dark of the wall, which was shaded by a small light of the moon, and I could see no more of them. When the prisoner made a stop, he said, I have got it, come along; that was just after he had robbed me. They then ran towards him. I informed Mr. Hewitt I had been robbed.

WILLIAM HEWITT . Upon hearing of the robbery, which was on the 9th of January, the morning after it, I went to the lodging of the prosecutor, and took possession of the clothes that he was knocked down in.

DAVID BRIANT. (Accomplice.) Moven was the first man that knocked him down, and Wilson followed after; there were four of us; we had been at the Duke of Rutland. I mean by Wilson following after, that he struck him next. Moven took the money from him, I was present; Moven ran away, and said, I have got the swagg, come along; he then joined the rest. We all went down to Deptford the same night.

Q. What did you do with the money - A. It was all divided. I made a communication to Mr. Brown two days after the robbery was done. I was not suspected at all; but I thought it a pity that the man should be a loser of his money; it was Brown I told, he is a constable. There was Moven, Wilson, Fryers, and myself; they were all that were concerned. Edwards was not with us at that time. I had been playing at cards, and saw Ward playing; Wilson is a coal-heaver. When we came out of the Duke of Rutland, I was going home to my supper, when Wilson called me back, and told me that Ward had such a quantity of money, he did not mention how much he had. It was in Keppel-street, Old Gravel-lane, that we came up with the prosecutor; the prisoner knocked him down; Wilson followed him; Fryers put his knee on his throat, and I held one of his legs. When Moven ran off, he said, he had got the swagg, and then we all got up, and ran away; we crossed the River at Shadwell Dock-tiers; we got a boat there; we landed at the strairs opposite, in Rotherhithe; then we went to Deptford, and shared the money that night; we went to the Unicorn, the first house; Moven took out the money and divided it among us in a house next to the Unicorn, where we slept. We first went under a lamp, and he took out a ten-pound note, as he said, he could not stay. I got fifty-five pounds they told me; but I am not a scholar, and did not know what notes they were. I returned to London the night following; I stayed at Deptford the whole of the next day. The prisoner kept the same as I had, as they told me. I told Mr. Brown two days after. I had not been apprehended, I was cleared from it, and when Moven was taken, I came forward again. I had been taken before the magistrate.

JOHN BROWN. I belong to Shadwell police office. On the 10th of January last, Bryant sent for me down to the Duke of Rutland, saying, he was sorry for the men who were taken into custody; there were two young men taken on suspicion, though not concerned. He then said, he was one of them; he said this of his own accord. He said, that he, together with the prisoner at the bar, Wilson, and one Fryers, were the four who robbed the lagger, that means a sailor. I had not at that time seen the prosecutor, Ward. I went, and Bryant with me, to try to apprehend Wilson and Fryers; I did not apprehend them.

MICHAEL MORRIS. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of February; I and Hewitt had been looking after him for five weeks. When I took him, I told him I wanted him for a robbery; I knew his person. He said, he knew I did not want him for that, only for leaving his master's employ. I asked him where he had been, and I understood him to have been at Liverpool.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery; that is all I know; I have got no witnesses, my lord.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-8

295. SUSANNAH NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , one watch, value 3l. one watch-case, value 4l. 4s. one brooch, value 10s. 6d. one pair of ear-rings, value 1s. one chain, value 1s. one necklace, value 9d. one seal, value 6d. one finger-ring, value 1s. 6d. one scarf, value 1l. two gowns, value 12s. 6d. one shift, value 6d. two handkerchiefs, value 7d. one pair of stockings, value 1s. two neck-handkerchiefs, value 10s. one muff, value 1s. 3d. one shawl, value 6d. one apron, value 6d. one bonnet, value 2s. 6d. and three feathers, value 1s. the property of John Ladd , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LADD . I live at No. 24, Charlotte-street St. Luke's ; my wife has been liying-in; she lyed-in on the 19th of February last. The prisoner at the bar was her nurse in her lying in. On the 19th of February, she came into my service, and staid until the evening of the 9th of March following. I was absent in the morning of that day, and when I came home in the evening, I found my house open, with all my doors open. After I got in, I awakened my wife, she was asleep in the bed-room. I asked her if she had sent Susan out. I had a female lodger in the house, but not any other attendant. My wife

said, she had not sent her out; and asked me if she was not in the parlour; I told her she was not, and she asked me to look on the table, and see if her gowns were there; I looked, and answered no. I then found the watch was gone from over the parlour mantle-piece. I looked in a drawer, in which I usually kept my business, and missed a gold watch-case; I looked farther, and missed several articles, such as trinkets. I then fastened up my house, and went to bed; it might be about twelve o'clock. When I came into the house, there was a pillow-case hanging over the fender alight; I put it out. The next morning being Sunday, I got up about five; I made further search of what I had lost, and immediately went to Lambeth-street police office. I gave information to Freeman, the officer; he and I went in search of the prisoner; she had lodged with her father and mother, but was not there. She was found in Whitechapel, near Essex-street, in the street-walking. I left the officer then, before she was taken, and when I went again to him, he told me he had got the prisoner, she was then locked up in the watch-house; part of the goods were found on her person, for she was dressed in them; they were found by the officer; his name is Freeman; he said he had found them on her person, and he shewed them to me; there was part of a gold watch-case, a tin box with trinkets, a silk scarf, a brown stuff gown, a black hat and feathers, what they call a chip hat, a white swan down ruff, those were the articles produced by the officer, when I called on him at his own house; the part of the watch-case that was found was worth four guineas; the tin box contained a neck-chain, a gold brooch, and a necklace, and I believe that was all the box contained at that time; the gold brooch, is worth ten shillings and sixpence; the neck-chain, is worth a shilling; the necklace is worth ninepence. These the officer shewed me as what he found upon her.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I belong to the police office Whitechapel. I searched the prisoner's person; I apprehended her about twelve o'clock, on the 10th of March; I searched her, and found on her head this hat and feathers; here is a scarf, a gown, which the prisoner was wearing; on searching her pockets I found this part of the gold case. I then asked her where she slept on the night of the 9th, and she told me she had slept in a house in Wingfield-street, Spitalfields, and that she had left her bundle there. I asked her how she came by these things; I charged her with having stolen them, and she did not deny it. When I went to her lodging where she said she had slept; I found a bundle, containing this tin box, containing a ring, a brooch, a chain, and a duplicate for a silver watch, pawned for one pound one shilling, at Mr. Richards's, in Brick-lane; here is also a stone apparently of a seal.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner at the bar came to our house on the 9th of March, in the evening; she purchased a pair of earrings. She pledged the watch for one pound one shilling, and paid five shillings for the ear-rings out of it. She gave me her name as Ann Brown, Brick-lane. I had not known her; I rather think, I had reen she before; but I am not certain; she did not pawn any thing else.

(Watch produced.)

Prosecutor. These things are all my property; the part of the gold watch-case is worth four guineas; there is a cornetian stone, with my initials on it it; it belonged to a seal, and the gold of it is gone.

Prisoner's Defence, I throw myself entirely on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

[Recommended to mercy on account of her youth.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-9

296. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Brydges , about the hour of ten in the night of the 17th of March , with intent to steal .

WILLIAM BRYDGES . I am a stay-maker ; I keep a shop in South Moulton-street ; but my lodging are in Charles-street. When this was committed, the house belonged to Robert Gould; but I had the shop. I had no other apartment; the shop was connected with the body of the dwelling-house; it is part of it; my son slept in the shop. On the evening of the 17th, St. Patrick's Day, about half past nine, the prisoner at the bar, and another man, broke open this shop of mine. There were two locks to the door, a padlock, and another lock, which was locked double. This night, about that time, I saw my son to his bed; I generally send one of my sisters with him; but this night, I went myself. When I came in the shop door, I found the padlock was gone; it had been on the outside of the door, and the staple screw was forced out. I kept articles of trade in the shop. I tried the door with my hand, and found it open; the trial I made was to ascertain whether it was open; I then pushed it wide open, and found it hit against some person; I said to my son, there are thieves here. The moment I spoke the words, the prisoner at the bar made an attempt to rush but; he rushed from behind the door; I laid hold of him immediately by the collar; another followed immediately, another man; a vielent scuffing then took place on the pavement. My shop was on the ground floor. The consequence of that was, that there being two to one, I was thrown down in the horse road, with great violence, by the two; but the fall did not break the hold I had of the prisoner. The accomplice, who afterwards made his escape, fell upon me, and struck me, and dragged me, and tore me, and this is the coat I wore; it had been a wet afternoon; those were the small clothes I had on. The accomplice, finding that I kept my hold, had a cudgel, and as I was laying down with the prisoner, straight as a person would lay in his bed, he made a violent blow at me; but fortunately he missed me; still I kept my hold. My son was there, and did what he could. Then the accomplice, when he made the blow, ran away. I then got up, keeping hold of the prisoner, and I never left hold of him until I gave him into the custody of the officer; he is here; the officer is also here who

picked up the padlock. I lost nothing out of the house. I saw the padlock after it was picked up; it was considered a safe one, and no picklock could enter it; but they forced the staple out.

Prisoner. Did you catch hold of me inside the door or on the step?

Witness. Inside the shop; for the door was pushed to, and to a person passing by, it would have appeared fast.

BENJAMIN BRYDGES. I am the son of the last witness. I went to sleep in this shop; my father went with me; it was on a Sunday night. My father pushed the door; the padlock was off; I had put it on at ten o'clock on the Sunday morning. When my father pushed the door, it bounced to again, and seemed to hit against some one. My father said, there were thieves in the place, and my father apprehended the prisoner directly; there was no light by which I could see his face; it turned out afterwards that he was the man. After my father had collared the prisoner, another man appeared; the other man rushed on my father, and the prisoner, and all three fell down, my father having hold of the prisoner; I fell down with them. Then I gave the alarm, and a few people came; and then the other man ran away. I immediately went for a constable to Marybone-watchhouse, and he came with me. My father was holding the prisoner all the time; he never let go of him once; he delivered the prisoner to the custody of the constable, and then he was taken to the watchhouse. We did not find the padlock that night. The prisoner never said a word; he gave no account of his being there, or how he came there.

Prisoner. The witness says, his father had hold of me all the time, and never let go of me once. How can he swear that, when he went away for the constable?

Witness. I mean he had a hold of you when I went away, and he had a hold of you when I returned.

Prisoner. Did I not say, I was standing up from the rain on the step of the door?

Witness. Yes; but it did not rain when we were there; the padlock was found the next morning, and it was file same padlock that I had locked on the Sunday morning.

HALL REED. I am a constable of Marybone parish. I was fetched on the Sunday evening, at nearly about half past nine, by young Mr. Brydges; I went with him to the house of Mr. Brydges; I round the prisoner there; Mr. Brydges had hold of him; they were in the shop then; he gave me charge of the prisoner. He asked me if I was an officer, and I told him I was. I found nothing on the prisoner. His coat was all over mud and dirt, as well as Mr. Brydges's, very wet indeed. Mr. Brydges's coat was torn as it is now; it was a very dark night. I saw the padlock was forced off; but could not find it; it was found the next morning by the watchhouse-keeper. Mr. Brydges gave charge of the prisoner, and the next morning he was examined at Marlborough-street.

-NEWITT. I found the padlock the next morning, as soon as it was light; I went to examine the premises, and when I went into the middle of the road, I found the padlock; there was a hole of the size of this screw in the door frame. Mr. Brydges recognized the padlock, and claimed it as his own, and produced a key which looked and unlocked it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing up at the door out of the rain, and Mr. Brydges came up to me, and exclaimed, he was robbed; in the mean time, Mr. Brydges laid hold of me, and we all fell together.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-10

397. HENRY MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a gelding , the property of Sir Abraham Hume , Bart.

WILLIAM NIGHTINGALE. I am servant to Sir Abraham Hume ; he lives at Wormley Bury, Hertfordshire . In the night of the 14th of March, we lost the horse, or early on Friday morning. He was done up about eight o'clock in the evening, and put in the stable then; it was a dark brown gelding. I fastened the stable door with a hasp and wooden pin. I went about five o'clock next morning to the stable; the horse was gone when I came there. That horse belonged to Sir Abraham Hume , Bart. I saw him this morning down at the New Inn, in Barrow's possession; his christian name is William. The prisoner once lived with Sir Abraham Hume, about two years before. He left Sir Abraham Hume 's service about two years ago.

WILLIAM BARROW. I live in Tothill Fields, Westminster. I keep a place for slaughtering horses. I know no more of the prisoner than when he came to my place, which was on the 15th of March, he brought a brown gelding; he said he brought it from a gentleman of the name of Mardimore, a bookseller, in Bond-street, to be killed. He told me, that his master thought the horse was glandered. I examined it, and found the horse was a sound horse. I told him I should not kill it, unless I had better authority; and he told me then, that he must take it back to his master; I told him I could afford to give his master more money, than the killing would bring. He said he would not leave the horse, unless he saw it dead. I told him he should ride one of my horses up to his master's, and one of my boys should go with him, to know if his master would sell the horse. Accordingly while we were putting a bridle on another horse, the prisoner rode out of the yard with his horse. My lad went with him, but he ran off. The horse was brought back by my son to my yard, in a quarter of an hour afterwards. The prisoner did not come back with him; it is the same gelding; Nightingale has seen him this morning again, over the way. I saw the prisoner at Dyson's the next time, in Park-lane. It was on the next day after the horse was brought back by my son. He con-confessed about it in Mr. Dyson's stable; he confessed he stole it from his old master, Sir Abraham Hume .

RICHARD BARROW . I am the son of the last witness; I remember the prisoner coming to our place with the horse; it was a brown gelding. I heard

him say he brought it to be killed, from a bookseller in Bond-street; he said it belonged to a gentleman of the name of Mardimore; my father would not slaughter it for him. When I overtook him, it was in the Broad-way, Westminster; he wanted me to ride on first, or his master would be gone to the city, and my horse could go the fastest. I did not ride on, but staid with him. I rode with him until we came to Dartmouth-street, Westminster. He then jumpped off his horse, and told me to take it back to our yard, and tie it up. He said he would walk up himself; for if he took the horse up, he should get into s piece of work. I took the horse back to our yard and tied him up, and left him there. After that I rode to Bond-street, and could find no such person as he stated was there. I enquired for the name of Mardimore, but could no where hear any thing of any person of that name. The prisoner had said it was No. 35. I don't exactly knew when he was taken up; he is the same man I am sure.

JOHN HARMITAGE . I have seen the golding in the possession of Barrow; it is the property of Sir Abraham Hume.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his youth.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-11

298. HENRY FULDER, alias FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , three books, value 15s. the property of John Frederick Setchell , privately in his shop .

JOHN FREDERICK SETCHELL. I live in King-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner at the bar came to my shop on the 7th of March last, about half past seven in the morning. I was down stairs; my lad came down with the list of books that he brought. I went to the shop and found the prisoner there, and the apprentice only. My lad's name is Thomas. I told the prisoner I had two books which were mentioned in his list; and he told me to put the names of them, and their lowest price on a bit of paper. I did so, and he went away, saying he would call again about one. While he was in the shop; I observed a vacancy on a shelf, on the left hand side coming from up stairs. I did not take any notice of it while the prisoner was in the shop, but suffered him to depart. I did not perceive that he took any thing with him. After he was gone, I spoke to my apprentice, and shewed him the vacancy, and sent him after the prisoner. The vacancy excited a suspicion in my mind. My boy went out and returned immediately, and then I went out myself; I saw the prisoner in St. Martin's-lane, and saw a boy with him; I suppose about fourteen years of age. The boy had a bag of books with him over his shoulder. I did not know either the boy or the prisoner before; I gently took the prisoner by the lappel of his coat, and desired him to come back with me. There was nobody with me; he hesitated at first, and then returned immediately. In returning, at the corner of New-street, I saw the prisoner drop on his left knee and stoop; and on turning round, I saw he had placed three books on the sill of the door of Mr. Grane; he stooped sideways on his left knee. I immediately took the books and seiz ed the prisoner, and he walked quietly with me to my shop. The boy followed him. When I got to the shop, I examined the three books. They were volumes of Sir John Froittart's Chronicles of France and Spain, There was not room for them in the book-case, where the remainder of the set was, and they had been placed on the shelf close by. The set of twelve volumes, and one volume of plates, sell for seven guineas. Perhaps, if they were offered to me separately. I would not give three shillings for them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SIMMONDS. (A little boy.) The prisoner lodged at my mother's. I went out with him on the morning when he was taken into custody. He asked me to go with him; I took a pillow-case, and went with him; he brought two books out of Mr. Setchell's and put them into the pillow-case. Before Mr. Setchell came up to us, he took them out, and put them into his handkerchief, and when Mr. Setchell came. I saw him drop them on the step of a door; that was when he was going back with Mr. Setchell. I saw Mr. Setchell pick them up, and carry them to his shop.

Five respectable witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

THE COURT, in summing up the evidence for the consideration of the Jury, told them, that the value stolen privately in a shop must be five shillings, to constitute a capital offence; but with respect to value in the present case, though Mr. Setchell or any one else, would not perhaps give three shillings for the three odd volumes; yet the intrinsic value was what they were worth to Mr. Setchell, at the time they were stolen; and certainly Mr. Setchell's loss would be considerably above five shillings.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-12

209. HENRY FULDER , alias FULLER , was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , nine books, value 4l. the property of Samuel Hayes , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL HAYES, JUNIOR. My father lives in King-street, Covent Garden , and is a bookseller there. The prisoner at the bar was taken into custody on the 7th of March last; I was in the upper part of my father's house at about a quarter past seven in the morning of that day; the maid servant, who is not here, called me; I went into the shop; it was open; our shopman, named Back, had opened it. On my going into the shop, I saw the prisoner; the shopman was there also; no other person was there. The prisoner presented to me a list of books, which he said, he wanted. I examined the list, and wrote on a piece of paper the prices of such as we had; it was a very long list of books. I went to the back part of the shop to shew him one of the books; I went, and he stood where he was; he desired me to fetch it. I shewed him some books from the back part of the shop; I did not shew

him any from any other place. He staid in all, about five minutes after I came. He did not buy any: he said the books were for the Earl of Kingston, land said, he would call again, and give me an order. After he came, I missed one volume of twenty of a set of books of Cicero; the first volume was separated from the rest. I did not miss any thing else then. I went out, and saw the prisoner in custody of Mr. Setchell, and also a little boy. The one volume I had missed, was found in his bag, and the others which I had not missed also; they were Homer, three volumes, a complete set Juvenal, one volume, complete; Herodotus, complete. Fide took charge of these books, and I knew them to be my father's.

THOMAS BACK . I am shopman to Mr. Hayes. I don't sell in the shop; I go out with books occasionally. I remember the prisoner coming to my master's shop; I let him in myself; I went down for some water; I had opened the shop, and shut the door, and when I came up with the water, I opened the door, and let the prisoner in; he shewed me a list with the prices of books, and enquired if we had them, and I said, I would send the servant to call my master. I just went to the back door of the shop for that purpose; I left nobody in the shop besides the prisoner, at that time. When I returned, he was still in the shop, and no other person there; no one else came into the shop before my young master came; when my young master came, I believe I went out to sweep the passage. I returned again into the shop before the prisoner went away. I can't say whether I was there when he went away; I was in and out while he was there. I did not see him take any thing.

JOHN SIMMONDS . (A little boy.) The prisoner lodged at my mother's; I don't know how many weeks or days he lodged there; it was for some weeks. I went out with him the morning Mr. Setchell took him into custody; I took a pillow-case with me; I took it out empty; the prisoner bid me take it, and go with him. I don't know Mr. Hayes's shop; I know King-street, Covent Garden. The prisoner and I went to Covent Garden together. The prisoner left me a little way off from the shop where he went in, I saw him go into Mr. Setchell's; he left me a little way off from the shop where he went in. The books that were in the bag, he brought me at twice; he went away twice at one shop; that was before he went to Mr. Setchell's. I don't know the books he brought me the first time, nor how many there were; he brought some books the first time, and some more the second; he put them all in the pillow-case, and left me a little while, and went to Mr. Setchell's, and brought three more back, and he put those in the pillow case at first, and afterwards put them into a handkerchief; the pillow case was full. He kept the others i the pillow case, until Mr. Setchell came and took me back into his shop.

JOHN FREDERICK SETCHELL . In consequence of something that had taken place, I fetched back the little boy and the pillow case to my shop. I took the books out of the pillow case; I was taking them out when Mr. Hayes came and claimed part of them. The books remained in my possession until Fido came, and then I delivered them to him.

THOMAS FIDO . I am an officer. I produce the books I received at Mr. Setchell's, from Mr. Setchell himself; Mr. Hayes was there, and claimed them at the time.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

The same witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character, as in the last case.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

[Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-13

300. JOHN DYER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Miguel Caetano de Castro , about the hour of seven in the night of the 4th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, nine spoons, value 3l. and one candlestick, value 5s. the property of the said Miguel Caetano de Castro.

BUT, as no person could prove that the house broken, belonged to a person of the precise name stated in the indictment , the Jury found the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-14

301. WILLIAM FLOWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , four pieces of cotton and linen checks. value 12l. four pieces of cotton checks, value 12l. four pieces of linen checks, value 12l. sixteen pieces of Romalls handkerchiefs, value 12l. sixteen pieces of cotton handkerchiefs, value 12l. sixteen pieces of linen handkerchief, value 12l. ninety pieces of linen tape, value 20s. ninety pieces of cotton tape, value 20s. twenty ounces weight of thread, value 8s. sixty pieces of bobbin, value 8s. four ounces weight of nutmegs, value 5s. two ounces weight of cloves, value 1s. and two ounces weight of mace, value 2s. the property of John Higgin , George Whiteby , and Isaac Higgin , in a certain ship called the Posthumous, upon the Navigable River Thames.

SECOND COUNT. Stating the goods to be the property of Thomas William Horlock .

THIRD & FOURTH COUNTS. Stating the goods to be stolen in a certain ship called the Posthumous, in a Port of Discharge, within the Kingdom of Great Britain, (that is to say,) in the Port of London, in a certain place within the said Port, commonly called by the name of the West India Docks , adjoining and belonging to the said Navigable River.

JOHN STEVENS . I am a police officer. On the evening of Sunday, the 18th of February, about seven o'clock as near as can be, I was in the West India Docks, and saw the prisoner coming up the Export Dock, coming up towards the entrance that leads to go out; on his coming up, he said, was he too late or was the door shut; I said the door is not shut, but it is gone seven o'clock; as he came near, he seemed to be very bulky, and I crossed over, and stopped him; I asked him what he had concealed

round him, and he said, nothing, at first. Then I got hold of him by the collar, and said, you must have something here, and then he said, he had got some shirts. I asked him to let me see them, and on unbuttoning his jacket, he burst a string, which confined something round him; I heard the string burst, and he pulled a piece of cotton and linen check from under his jacket, I asked him what ship he had come from with it, and he said, he had come from the Gartland; she was then lying in the Export Dock. I asked him if the mate of the Gartland knew that he had taken that out of the ship; he said, no, he did not; but there was a man in the Gartland that knew it. I asked him if he belonged to the Gartland, and he said, he did not. What ship do you belong to then, said I? he said, no ship at present in the Dock; but he belonged to the Porthumous, and that he had left her, and took this piece of check out of her on Saturday morning, and put it on board the Gartland, along with a friend of his, if he could get an opportunity of getting it away. I then took him over to our night box; then there were three officers more sitting down in the box, and I called them out, and put him in, and searched him, and found nothing more. An officer of the name of Winnel, asked him what ship he had taken it from, and he said, the Posthumous. We then took him to the watchhouse, and then Winnel and I went to the Gartland, and there saw Larkin, the ship's steward. I received from him three more parcels.

DANIEL LUCAS LARKIN . I am steward of the Gartland. On the evening of Sunday, the 18th, the last witness came on board our vessel, and received from me three of the pieces of check now produced. I had received them from the prisoner Flowers; I received four at first; the fourth the prisoner had taken away that evening; the piece the officers stopped him with I believe was the fourth; he brought the four to me on Saturday, the 17th, in the morning at about six or seven o'clock; the time he brought then the Porthumous was lying in the West India Docks; I knew he belonged to her. She left the Docks in the course of that day. I don't know whether the prisoner went with her or not; he told me he left her at Gravesend.

CATHERINE KELLY . I keep a lodging-house, in Blackwall. The prisoner at the bat lodged with me one week. On Monday, the 19th, Mr. Gotty came and found some things at my house; those things were partly brought up in the room where I lie myself; the prisoner Flowers had brought them there; he had no chest at my house, so he delivered them into my care; he brought them in two parcels, tied up in his own handkerchief, and having no chest at my house, gave them me to take care of. When he brought them, he turned them out of his own handkerchief on the table where I was working; he told me to put them by; that they belonged to a man who gave them to him to dispose of them for him when he got clear of the ship. I knew to what ship he belonged. I knew when that ship went down the River; he belonged to the Portbumous, and he told me he went down the River with her on the Saturday; he came back from the ship on Sunday, and was taken into custody that same evening I believe; he told me he belonged to the Porthumous; but said he was not going out in h he had got his things on shore! He did not name the person to whom he had disposed of any of these things. He said his friend was on board the Gartland, and he said he was to see him for something very particular that evening, Sunday. He brought these things, one parcel on the Wednesday night, and another parcel on another night; but he brought the two parcels running on the Saturday. He came from the Porthumous on the Saturday; she was in the Basin; he brought two pieces of na een on the Saturday; he brought both when the Porthumous was lying in the Docks.

JOHN GOTTY . I am principal surveyor of the Thomas Police . On Monday, the 19th of February, I went to the last witness's house; I found sixteen pieces of handkerchiefs; they are all here; I found four pieces of cape, eight papers of thread, two bundles of bobbin, and three papers, containing small quantities of cloves, mace, and nutmegs. Two pieces of the handkerchiefs have each one cut off, and one has two cut off; the rest are perfect. (Produces the articles.)

GEORGE FROUD . I am clerk to Darby and Davis, in King-street, Cheapside; they are warehouse men. In the month of January last, we furnished the house of Higgin and Whiteby with a quantity of goods, of which these are parts. I have examined them at the Thames Police office; the name of Darby and Davis on them are my own hand-writing. Those three pieces in brown paper are nearly in the same state as when I packed them. I look at those handkerchiefs, which are romotl's handkerchiefs, it is a term given to them; there is something very particular in some of the patterns, it is a red mark.

JURY. Was any more of that pattern ever made for any other house - A. That I don't know. We had five dozen made for us; one piece of these four is not in papers; that is the one found on the prisoner; it corresponds with the other three.

MR. GURNEY. Have you any doubt that those are part of the goods sold to Higgin and Whiteby - A. No doubt whatever.

JURY. What is the quantity in each of those pieces - A. Forty-nine yards.

JOHN M'ARNESS. I am clerk to the prosecutors, Messrs. Higgin, Whiteby and Higgin; their names are John Higgin , George Whiteby , and Isaac Higgin . In the month of January last, our house purchased the goods of Messrs. Darby and Davis; the goods mentioned for exportation, I over looked the packing of them, and assisted in it; they were packed in a leather trunk; I will swear that is the trunk in which they were packed; there is my mark on it they were packed on the 5th of February; I put in these four pieces of linen and cotton check; I put in a number of pieces, the same that I received I put in; I also put in some tapes, thread, bobbins, and needles, as well as some nutmegs, cloves, and mace. The four pieces of check were worth about thirteen pounds.

MR. GURNEY. What are the sixteen pieces of handkerchiefs worth - A. I don't exactly know; Mr. Froud will speak to them.

George Froud . They were worth about twentyfive pounds.

John M'Arness. Re-examined. We locked the trunk, and tied the key to the handle, and a trunk maker in my presence matted it, and corded it; we then sent it down to the West India Docks, to be put on board the Posthumous; she was bound to Maderia and Jamaica; they were sent on the 10th of February, by Finch's cart; I know the prisoner; he was a seaman on board the Porthumous.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. To whom were these goods consigned - A. To T. W. Horlock, esq.

Q. What are his christian names - A. Thomas William, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. He signs T. W. and that is all the knowledge you have, I presume - A. I have seen it signed Thomas W. Q. house has a partner in Jamaica; his name is Isaac Higgin .

JAMES EDMUNDS I am a carman in the service of Mr. Finch On the 10th of February, I took some goods from the house of Whiteby, and Co. to the West India Docks; I took several small parcels, and that Trunk; it was then put in a mat case. I had a receipt from the whatfinger for the goods I took.

John M'Arness. That receipt includs the trunk; it is marked R. H. 7.

THOMAS TUTTLEBY . I am wharfinger at the West India Docks. On the 10th of February I received the goods specified in that receipt; the package was put on board, the Porthumous on the 13th; I I kept them in the warehouse under lock and key until they were put on board.

JOHN WALTER. In February, I was mate to the Porthumous. On the 13th of February; I received a trunk on board; it was matted and regulary packed; it was deposited in the gun-room. The prisoner was a seaman on board that ship; the ship left the Dock at three o'clock in the afternoon, and she arrived at Gravesend on the Sunday morning. The prisoner went down in the ship as one of the seamen, and he left her in Gravesend; he was to have gone the voyage with us. He told me he was going up for his things, for he had not got them on board. On Monday, the 19th, Mr Butler came on board, he was one of our owners; by his desire, we fetched up this trunk, and examined it; it appeared not to be in the same state as when it came on board the ship; it appeared to have been opened, that was very easy to be seen. We then opened it; we found some swabbs and books in it; books belonging to it; the swabbs were swabbs belonging to the ship.

MR. BUTLER. I know nothing more than the examination of the trunk, and finding it in the state the last witness has described.

MR. ADOLPHUS. On the part of the prisoner, took an objection, as to whether a vessel in the West India Docks was entitled to that protection which would be offered to a vessel in the River Thames, by its being a capital offence to steal to the amount of forty shillings on board her; and, whether the West India Docks could be considered belonging to the said Navigable River, any more than any other pond or place watered by the Thames.

THE COURT. However over-ruled the objection, on the ground that the West India Docks were apart of the Port of London.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18160403-15

302. ROBERT MALE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Smith , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon of the 26th of March , no person in the same dwelling house then being, and for stealing therein one purse, value 1s. one tooth-pick, value 1s. three bank tokens, value 9s. and three bank notes, for payment of one pound each, value 3l. the goods chattles, and monies of the said James Smith , against the statute .

ELIZAAETH SMITH. I reside at Kentish-town, in the parish of St. Pancras . My husband's name is Janies Smith. On the 26th of March last, I went out at six o'clock in the morning to washing; I left my three children at home; I left them in bed. I locked the door, and threw in the key through a hole in the window. I returned again at half past twelve o'clock. I then went to the school for the key of the house, and the school-mistrees delivered it up to me. Then I went home and found that the door was entirely forced open. I saw my cupboard was open as soon as I entered; it was broken; I missed my purse, containing three one pound bank of England notes, three three shilling pieces, a silver tooth-pick, and a duplicate of a ring. It was a green silk purse. I had seen the property the over night. I locked the cupboard, and put the key over the top of it.

SUSANNAH SMITH. I am nine years old, pretty nigh. I know my catechism, I know that it is a bad thing to tell a lie. I left my mother's house between nine and ten in the morning of the 26th of March last. I locked the door, and lifted up the latch, and pushed it, and found it was fast. I then took the key to school, and gave the key to my school-mistress, and she laid it on the mantle-piece. I have two little brothers, and they went to school with me. When I and my brothers went to school, nobody was in the house. After school I returned with my mother, and found the door broke open; and that door I am sure I had locked in the morning, and given the key of it to my school mistress.

JOHN HENSON . I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday the 26th of March, about one o'clock; I apprehended him at the Nag's Head public-house, in Kentish Town. I searched him, and he had got the purse clinched in his left hand; I then asked him where he got it? he did not make any resistance then. He said he got it at Finchley for work. I then emptied the money out on the table; there were two one pound notes, six three shilling pieces, a tooth-pick, and a duplicate; they were all in the purse. I then proceeded to bring him out of the public house, and the moment he got to the door he ran off. I pursued him and overtook him. He hit me very hard, and I knocked him down. I then se

cured him and marched him nearly halfway up Kentish Town. There we had another bustle, and then I managed him again; then we went a little higher up, and he got away again; and there we had several rounds of blows, and at last I knocked him down and hit him twice across the leg with my staff, and then he could not run any more. I at length secured him, and I had a horse and cart and put him in it, to take him to Hatton Garden. As we were going along, Mrs. Smith followed the cart, and he saw her, and he said, Mrs. Smith need not have done this to me, for I would have paid her every farthing. I had told him what I had taken him for. Mrs. Smith came into the Nag's Head and owned the property before him. He had not another farthing about him, beside this money.

Prisoner. To witness. You called me a bloody thief and knocked me down several times, did you not - A. Yes, I knocked you down, but not till you knocked me down first.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not a person who would do such a thing.

In addition to this, the prisoner put in another defence to the effect following.

My Lords and gentlemen of the jury, on the 26th of March, as I was going home, after I had been with some food for my child at school, I picked up a green purse, which contained the top part of a silver pencil-case, a duplicate, and three bank notes. I got one of the notes changed at the Nag's Head, and when Mrs. Smith came home, she went to the constable and charged him to take me into custody. He took me and called me a bloody thief, and said I wanted to get away from him, and I was very innocent, and did not try to get away at all. Mrs. Smith has since told a person in Kentish Town, that she lost the purse out of her pocket, and she offered to make it up if she got the money back; but the officer told her there was a reward of forty pounds, and she would have ten pounds of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-16

303. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , six sheets, value 2l. sixteen towels, value 8s. eight shifts, value 1l. four petticoats, value 10s. eight pairs of stockings, value 8s. eight handkerchief, value 4s. one tablecloth, value 4s. one waistcoat, value 5s. three pairs of drawers, value 3s. one shawl, value 2s. three pillowcases, value 1s. two spencers, value 1s. one cap, value 6d. one gown, value 6d. and one basket, value 2s. the property of John Morris , in his dwelling-house .

SUSANNAH MORRIS . I am the wife of John Mor ris, and live in Hoxton-market-place, Queen-street, in the parish of St. Leonard's Shoreditch . I lost the linen in question on Saturday, the 2nd of March; I had put it on the foot of the stairs in a basket, with a large basket over it; it was linen which I had taken in to wash. I always leave the street door open in the day-time. I was folding shirts not a yard and a half from where the basket was, but in a room, and the door prevented me from seeing any one take the clothes. In about half an hour after I put the basket there, while I was folding the shirts, I heard a small creak of a basket; I opened the door, and saw the empty basket laying on the ground, and the full one was gone. I looked out at the street door, towards Hoxton-square; there were three persons and myself. I went a little further, and saw the prisoner against a chandler's shop, on the other side of the road, in the maket place; he had the basket with him; it was about five or ten minutes before twelve; I hallooed out; but I can't say whether stop thief or not, and he locked over his right shoulder, and seeing me, he went three or four steps further, and dropped the basket. I pursued him, and called out stop thief. I saw somebody lay hold of him, a young man named Edward Hardy ; he got from me ever so far; but I saw him taken, and went on until he was. I am sure the prisoner is the man who had the basket, and who was secured. He was brought to my house, and the linen was brought back also; it was the linen stated in the indictment; part of it is here; I examined it at Worship-street, and it was the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I knew nothing of the prisoner before, nor did I see him go out of my house; I never lost sight of the prisoner at all. Four sheets are the only part of the linen that is here; my husband pays the rent and taxes of the house in which the linen was stolen.

EDWARD HARDY. I live about four yards from the prosecutor's house. I was at my own door, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner with a basket before him, coming towards me. Directly he saw me, he threw down the basket, and shewed fight, and knocked me down. I got hold of the tail of his coat as I lay, and he ran away, dragging me after him; I never left go of his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it; I heard a cry of stop thief, and the lad stopped me, and I know nothing of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-17

304. JOSEPH BLUNDER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Nichols Arther Haydon, in the Kings's highway, on the 6th of February , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one pair of spectacles, value 5s. one hat, value 2s. one pocket-book, value 1s. one pound six shillings in silver monies, and seventeen, pounds in banknotes , the property of the said Nicholas Arthur Haydon .

NICHOLAS ARTHUR HAYDON . I am a victualler , and live in Pearl-street, Spitalfields. On the 6th of February last, I went to my landlord house, Mr. Butler, at No. 8, Hackney-road-terrace, to pay my rent, at about half past two in the afternoon; he not being at home, I went thence to the Dover coffee-house, in Bond-street, where I staid three hours, or more, with a person; it was nearly ten o'clock when I left that; it was a little after eleven when I got into Shoreditch, almost facing where I live; just as I was turning into Fleur-de-lis-court , I saw four men and three women coming right facing me, and they were singing; seeing them coming along abrest, I crossed to the other corner of Fleur-de-lis-court, to go down

the other side to shun them; two of the men followed me, and pulled me under a scaffold, which was erected for the purpose of pointing some houses; the rest of the party were under the scaffold then. They struck me with their fists, and cut me in several places with a knife, or some other sharp instrument; they cut me here, and here, (on the right thumb, and over the left eye,) they called me had names; they tore my left hand side pocket away; they took a pocket-book, which contained seventeen one-pound bank of England notes; also a pair of silver mounted spectacles, which were in my left hand side pocket, where the pocket-book was; they took one pound six shillings and sixpence from my breeches pocket, and a new hat from my head; I called out as well as I could murder, several times; I was lying in the kennel. I had an umbrella in my hand, and one man wanted to wrench it out of my hand. The watchman and my daughter came in a moment, and he threw it away. All the men appeared to be about the age of the prisoner; but two taller, and one a little bulkier; I can't swear to the prisoner; nor to the persons of any of them; I could not observe their dress, except that they had long coats.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. My daughter and the watchman are here. It was rather a light-some night; I did not look at the state of the moon; there was plenty of light from the lamps for me to see the party coming against me. I totally deny ever having said that I could swear to the prisoner; I always gave the same account of this transaction. I know nothing about a reward; I do not come here for any such purpose.

SUSANNAH HAYDON . I am the daughter of the last witness; I shall be thirteen the 16th of this month. I heard the cry of murder when I was outside with our servant, putting up the shutters; I knew it was my father's voice; I went to the place whence the voice proceeded, and found my father laying under the scaffold in Fleur-de-lis-court; there was a man on the top of him trying to take the umbrella from him. When I hallooed out father, the man ran away, and threw the umbrella away; three men and three women also ran away. The prisoner was the person who was on the top of my father, and who took the umbrella away; I had an opportunity of seeing his person, and knowing him again; he had a brown coat on; I had seen him before in Wheeler-street; Wheeler-street is near Fleur-de-lis-court; I had seen him on the day before; Fleur-de-lis-court leads into Wheeler-street. My father appeared to be much hurt, and bled a great deal. I got up before the watchman; he had just passed our door, which is in Pearl-street; he ran after the prisoner. I saw another watchman, that my mother called, as she stood at the door; but he did not come up. There was only one watchman named Patrick Duff, who came up, and he ran after the people.

PATRICK DUFF . I am a watchman. I was on duty on the night of the 6th of February; I saw the prisoner that night at about eleven o'clock; he was in company with three young men and three young women; they were all at the corner of Fleurde-lis-court, making a noise, and singing; their making a noise and singing, attracted my notice; I had seen the prisoner before that time, and knew his person. I told them to move on, and they answered me in different words, such as damning my eyes, and the like, and they went down Shoreditch, and up Fleur-de-lis-court, In five or six minutes after they went up the court, I heard some noise, murder, murder, murder, was the noise I heard. Upon that, I ran towards were the noise of murder was cried; I saw the prisoner just drawing from the prosecutor. just about half a yard from him; there were three men stood three or four yards off, and three women to the left of me; as I went to lay hold of the prisoner, one of the young women laid hold of my coat, and I turned round, and struck her over the hand with a stick, to get loose. The prisoner ran, and I ran after him, leaving the others in the court; he ran away from them; he ran up the court towards Shoreditch; I ran after him, and left the others in the court. I followed the prisoner up Fleur-de-lis-court, across White Lion-street, into Spital-square, where he turned up a passage, and I lost him. I had a fair sight of him; all the way as I ran there was a light from the gas-lamps. When I saw him first, I could see him by the lamp at the corner of Fleur-de-lis-court, and by the light of my lanthorn. I had him in my sight about three or four minutes; I had known him before, and had seen him frequently; but did not know where he lived.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this charge that is laid before me.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[Recommended to mercy on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18160403-18

305. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , twenty seven yards of linen, value 6l. seven yards of diaper, value 17s. two table cloths, value 11s. and two shawls, value 5l. the property of Robert Man , George Man , and John William Philpot , in their dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT. Stating the house in which the property was stolen, to be the property of Robert Man only.

JANE PARRY , In the course of September last, I was in the service of Mr. Soppet, of Thames-street, I there became acquainted with the prisoner; he courted me, and it was settled between us to be married after Christmas. He brought some articles of linen drapery to us at different times. It was about Michaelmas; he told me he had bought them of Mr. Man. He brought me two pair of sheets the first time; he next brought me some table cloths, also a pair of sheets again, and some small jack towels? that is, he brought me the linen, and I made it into towels. He brought me a shawl, which he told me he gave Mr. Man three pounds for. There was a scarf of which he made a present to my sister, but he did not say where he bought that. We were

to be married after Christmas. He told me about two months after Christmas, that his father was very ill in the country; and he said he should lose two or three hundred pounds if he did not go into the country to see his father. He told me he would rather give my company up, and go into the country up for good; and if I would give him eight pounds for the linen I should have it.

Q.What reason did he assign for asking you only eight pounds - A. He said he would let me have them for that, as I had the trouble of making them. He told me they stood him in about twelve pounds. Upon this, I went and told my aunt, Mrs. Rogers, what had passed; and in consequence of something that had passed between me and her, I took all these things to Mr. Man's.

ANNE ROGERS. I am the aunt of the last witness. She came and disclosed to me something which she said had passed between her and the prisoner, and gave me the things, and I called on Mr. Man after I disclosed to him what had passed between me and her, he received the things from me.

ROBERT MAN. I am a linen draper in Parliament-street. The names of my partners are George Man , and John William Philpot . My house is in the parish of St. Margaret, within the Liberty of Westminster. The prisoner had been porter to us for a year and half past. I think it was the 23d of February, or a day or two before that, the last witness came to me, and I received from her the articles stated in the indictment. I went to her house and saw them there, and there received them. The greater part is made up into sheeting and towelling,&c. but on the fags belonging to them, there is my mark. I think I may say one or two; but on one, I am certain. I never sold these things to the prisoner. I wondered he never bought any thing for his own use; but he never did. If our men have any thing, we indulge them by letting them have it at prime cost. I never sold these shawls to him, (property produced), that shawl (pointing to one produced.) did not cost me less than five pounds.

ANNE PARRY . That is the shawl the prisoner said he bought of Mr. Man for three pounds.

Mr. Man, I lost exactly such a shawl as that. The same pattern; and I believe that to be the shawl.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-19

306. JOSE VERBOSE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Lovett , about four o'clock in the night of the 12th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, three spoons, value 6s. two shawls, value 4s. one petticoat, value 2s. two table cloths, value 2s. three caps, value 3s. two aprons, value 2s. one handkerchief, value 6d. one pair of gloves, value 6d. and one pair of stockings, value 1s. the goods of the said Richard Lovett .

RICHARD LOVETT. I am an ironmonger , and live at No. 19, Broad-street, Ratcliff . I rent the whole house there. It is in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stebonheath. My house was broke open, I think it was on the 13th of March. I went to bed at about eleven o'clock at night before; my servant and myself went to bed at the same time; no one was up after we went to bed. I did not examine the window before I went to bed; but my servant will be better able to speak to that, than I am. I am sure the sashes were not up. I rose about five in the morning; I had a house repairing within a few houses, and I went to see the workmen. It was day-light then, I think. I took no sort of notice of the state of my premises; for I went strait to the house I have mentioned. In about half an hour after, my servant, Elizabeth Henderson gave me some information, in consequence of which I returned to my house, and looked at my property, to see if any thing was missing; and I missed three silver tea spoons; I saw them at the watch-house about nine in the morning. I went to the watch-house; the prisoner was then in custody; I also saw two table cloths and three aprons, and also many other things that are not in the indictment, but which were found, The prisoner is well known in our neighborhood. I know his person well; he has occasionally come into the shop to ask questions.

ELIZABETH HENDERSON . I went to bed at about eleven o'clock on the night of the 12th of March. I am servant to Mr. Lovett; when I went to bed, the doors, the windows, and the house were all s-cure. I got up at about half past five in the morning; my master had got up before me. I went down into the kitchen and found my things were all thrown about. It was day-light when I got up. I had left the things in their proper places when I went to bed. There was no other person inhabiting the house, but myself and my master. I missed three silver teaspoons, three table cloths, two shawls, two aprons, three caps, one pocket handkerchief, a pair of gloves, and one pair of worsted stockings. The teaspoons had been on the dresser, the over night. Immediately after I went and informed my master. The next time I saw the things was on the 13th, at Shadwell office, between six and seven in the evening; the prisoner was then in custody. I could not see how the person who had broken into the house had got in. But, I think, by raising the sash of the kitchen window next the back yard, which back yard is fenced by a high brick wail; none of these things were locked up. The moment a person got into the kitchen, he might sweep those things off the dresser, and out of the drawers in a very short time.

Richard Lovett. A person must have got over three walls to got into my yard; the window was secured by a sash screw generally, and something must have been put in between the two sashes, and the screw forced back; one of the walls which a person must have got over is about twelve feet high, and the other two are each between seven and eight feet.

THOMAS ANSELL . I am a baker; at the time this happened, I lived at No. 88, Broad-street, Ratciiffe. On the morning of the 13th, about four o'clock, day had not broken, it was moon light; coming down stairs, I heard the dog barking very much in the yard; I opened the door to see what was the matter, and the dog ran up to me, and then ran

back to the prisoner; the prisoner was then in my yard; I collared him; it was dark where he was standing, owing to the shade of the house. I asked him what he wanted there. He must have got into our yard first, and then into my next door neighbour's and then into Mr. Lovett's; he could get into my yard from the side alley which runs down. He said he had been to sleep, when I asked him what he did there. One wall is twelve feet high, and the other two are seven or eight at the lowest. I did not search the prisoner until after I had done my business; I kept him about an hour in the bake-house; I then opened the door, and called the watch, and delivered him over to Mr. Taylor, the watchman. I took the things from his pocket myself, all the articles named in the indictment; they were all about his person; some in his jacket pocket, and some in his waistcoat, and hat. Mr. Taylor took him to the watchhouse.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am the watchman who took the prisoner to the watchhouse. I tied the things up in a bundle, and delivered them to the watchhousekeeper.

JOHN KINDON . I am the watchhouse-keeper. The prisoner was delivered into my custody upon the above charge. I produce the property. I searched the prisoner, and found on him a waistcoat, which is not in this indictment; but Mr. Lovett claims it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave the things to me; he called me in the yard, and gave me these things; I have nobody here who saw it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-20

307. THOMAS BURGESS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Alexander Copland , esq . about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 16th of March , no person in the same dwelling-house then being, and for stealing therein, four coats, value 2l. two pairs of pantaloons, value 30s. four frocks, value 5s. two petticoats, value 2s. two waistcoats, value 2s. two shirts, value 5s. two caps, value 6d. one nutmeggrater, value 5s. and one choral, value 20s. the property of William Johnson .

MARY JOHNSON. I live in the Porter's Lodge belonging to Mr. Copland, in the parish of Acton ; I and my husband sleep in this lodge, as servants of Mr. Copland; it is some distance from his house. In the afternoon of the 16th of March, it was broken open. I went out about four o'clock, leaving nobody at the Lodge. I returned a little before five, and found the door quite safe as I had left it; but the glass of the bed-room window was broken, to turn round the handle, and was open; I had left it shut and whole; that window was in the back part of the house; the person passing the lodge would not pass that window; the lodge is placed to open a gate; a person might have gone through the gate without seeing the window. I walked round to the front of the Lodge, and saw the prisoner there; I saw him in the room through the window plundering my drawers, before I had opened the door. The prisoner is the man; I stood looking at his face for full three minutes; after that, he turned himself round, and stood and looked me in the face; he then turned found again, and bent himself down, and went across the room; he then went towards that window I had seen open; there is only one in that room; he went out of the room in which I had seen him; I then saw him in my yard; he had gone through the window as I supposed. He did not come out at the door. I gave an alarm; a person of the name of Towers was the first that came to my assistance, and he pursued the prisoner. I entered my house, and found the things in a very bad state, some in one place and some in another, and very much disordered; the coats were near the window which was open, four of them, and two pair of pantaloons, they were not tied up in any thing; nothing else was near the window; they were in the drawers when I left the house; they are here; they belonged to my husband. In the front room. upon my drawers, and on the chair, I found some of the children's clothes, four frocks, two petticoats, shirts, and waistcoats, all of which I had left in the drawers; they are all my children's clothes; there were only two or three things missed, namely, a coral, a silver nutmeg-grater, and a shirt of my husband's.

Prisoner. I should wish to know if she saw me near the house? whether she saw me near it, or whether I was not an hundred yards up the lane before she saw me at all?

Witness. No; I saw him in the house, and afterwards in the yard, and pointed him out to Towers.

WILLIAM TOWERS . I was at work for Mr. Copland, close by, and on hearing the last witness scream, I ran to her, and she pointed out the man to me; he was just running up a field when she pointed the man out to me; he was running in a direction from the lodge very fast indeed; I pursued him, and saw him jump over a hedge, and then I got a fresh runner; I never lost sight of him, except for about a minute going round the corner, where he threw the things away. Burrowes caught him; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM BURROWES. I seized the prisoner. I saw him running away, and Towers followed him. I did not see him drop any thing, nor throw any thing away.

WILLIAM TOWERS . I have a shirt here which was picked up by one of Mr. Winter's men in a ditch in my presence. The prisoner had passed that ditch in his flight.

WILLIAM LIPSCOME . I found a silver nutmeg-grater and a coral in my master's garden, on the Sunday morning after the robbery; I saw the prisoner on the Saturday, running down the lane which would lead him to my master's garden; that was at the time a woman was hallooing stop thief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I must leave it to your mercy, for I have not a friend in court to speak for me; as for this man, Burrowes, he did not know whether I was the man or not when he came up.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-21

308. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a mare, value 30s. the property of John Green .

JOHN GREEN . I am a day-labouring man ; I live in Hackney, in Cold-bath-lane. On the 4th of last March, I had a bay-mare turned out upon a place called Hackney Downs , which is common land; I turned her out on that morning at about seven o'clock. I did not see her again until the time I found her. I went to look for her about dusk, but could not find her any where. I made enquiries the next morning, thinking she might have strayed, being blind; I went to a boiler's, named Special, in Ducking-pond-lane, Whitechapel, where I found my mare.

RICHARD BOTLER . I manage the business for Mr. Special, the horse-boiler. On the 4th or 5th of March, the prisoner, in company with one Crowling, or Cowling, came to me in the boiling-place, at my master's; the mare was then tied I think to the wheel of one of our carts; but I don't know by whom she was tied there. Baker, the prisoner, asked me if I would buy her, and I asked him what he wanted for her; he said, thirty shillings, and I agreed to give him one pound seven shillings and sixpence, as her hide would not fetch much, because she had a bad back. I gave the money to Baker; each held out their hands, and I put into Baker's. The prisoner told me his name was William Jackson when I asked him, and he lived on the green at Tottenham, with one Mr. Hudson. Then Mr. Green came and owned his property at our place the next day. On his coming, I went towards Tottenham, and described the two men, and they were both found at the Bull, at Newington. I saw a drunken man at the door of the Bull, and told him what business we were upon, and asked him if they were there, and he said if we would give him a pint of beer, he would fetch them out, and he brought them both out; they went home to their own place, up a court just by where we took them. The other man said he would not run away, he said, he had nothing to wear but a pair of slippers, and he wanted to get a pair of shoes; the other man ran away. The prisoner said he would not run away, and he did not.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

[Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his good character, and youth.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-22

309. JOHN TRUDGETT and JOHN DEARE were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , two geldings, value 30l. the property of George Steel .

GEORGE STEEL . I live at the bottom of Bedfordrow. I know the two prisoners; they were both my servants in November last, and I discharged Deare in February. In November, I directed Trudgett to send a bay horse, which he had let to a gentleman, who broke his knees, and another horse that was down to Thorn's at Ealing; he said he knew a better place; he said it was the Duke of Clarence's Farm, a better place to be turned out at. Dear was not present; that was in the counting-house; then the horses were taken away, and booked out to straw yard. Trudgett brought in his account to me, and I copied that account into my book. In the month of February. I discharged Deare; and on the 2nd of March, I wrote upon a peice of paper, Trudgett, let me know where those two horses are; I want them up from straw yard, and he wrote under it, sir, at Bushey, just other side Teddington. One of these horses is a brown horse and was spavined; the other is a bay horse, that was broken kneed; on the same 2nd of March, when I wanted them up, he wrote let them stop a little longer, for they are doing very well, and I said; be it so. I had occasion to reprimand him two or three weeks before the 2nd of March, about his staying out late, he said he had been to look at the horses, and they were doing very well, and they were up to their collars in straw. In the afternoon of the 2nd of March, I was passing along Piccadilly, and at the end of Bond-street. I saw the bay horse which I called Butcher, because I had bought him of a butcher, in a hackney chariot; I took particular notice of him, and knew him to be my horse, the way he cocked his ear; the man was driving off, and I took the number of the coach, and found that it belonged to a Mr. Joseph Mascall , in Borough-mews; the number was 910. I went there and found the chariot at the public-house-door; I then knew that horse to be mine; I traced it to Mr. Harris's, stable-keeper, Kennington Cross; he relered me to Garland, and Garland to Bishop, and Bishop to Dixon's repository. Both the horses are here, below, and they are both my property. I traced the brown horse down to Huntingdon, and there I found that it also, had been sold at Dixon's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. These horses were not lumber in my yard; they were unable to work when they were with me; but they are now valuable horses; they were by no means useless, or I would not have turned them out. I had told Trudgett to sell the bay horse for twenty eight guineas, but that was before he was fired; I thought I had one of the greatest treasures in the world, in Trudgett, as a servant.

Q. Had he not a general authority to sell your horses, when to your advantage - A. I have sent him with horses to Tattersall's to sell; but he never had any authority to sell them of his own accord; I put a price on whatever he was to sell.

Q.Upon the oath you have taken had he not a general license to sell your horses if for your advantage - A. I don't deal in horses; but when accidents have happened, I have told him if he could sell such and such a horse to advantage, to sell him; but I never told him to sell these horses. He never went out to market to buy my bay or straw; I never yet trusted a man to buy any thing of the kind; I did not allow him to take and receive monies to keep, until I called on him to settle; we settled every Sunday morning. I never gave him credit, except for money I had lent him to get his things out of pawn.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Trudgett was no more my confidential servant than being my head hostler. It was not Deare business to know that Trudgett might have taken them without my consent.

Q. If Trudgett directed him then, to sell the horses, it would be his business to believe Trudgett, and take them as he directed - A.I should think he would consult me upon it.

JOHN GRESCESY . I am foreman to Mr. Dixon, at the Repository, in Barbican. At the time I was with him, I remember two horses coming from Steel's livery-stables; a hay horse, and a brown horse; they were brought to the Repository for sale, and the clerk not being there, I took the instructions. John Deare brought the two horses; he said he brought them from Mr. Steel's liverystables, by order of Trudgett; one was to be booked in the name of Dean, not Deare, and the other in the name of Clarke; but I am not sure. He wished them to be sold for what they would fetch. At the beginning of the sale, he came back, and told me that they were not to be sold under eighteen guineas the two. I asked him how he laid them about the equal price, and he said that either of them might be sold for nine guineas, but not otherwise, or eighteen guiness the pair; they went to the hammer, and neither of them would fetch nine guineas; in consequence of that, they were sold by private sale, for pounds instead of guineas; one was sold to a Mr. Bishop for nine pounds. On the Saturday Deare asked me when pay day was, and I told him on Monday.

JOHN HOVEL . I am clerk to Mr. Dixon.

Q. Do you recollect either of the prisoners, and which, coming to Mr. Dixon's in the month of November - A. I did not see either of the men when the horses were brought; but I remember they were sold by private contract, when they would not fetch the price at the hammer, and I paid the money for them to Deare, on the 30th of November; I paid him sixteen pounds fifteen shillings and sixpence, being the remainder after deducting the commission; I paid that to John Deare; I recollect his person very well; he had once been a servant at Mr. Dixon's. One of the horses was sold to Mr. Bishop, the bay horse, I think, and the other to a man of the name of Searborough. Deare gave me an order from Trudgett for the payment of the money they had produced.

(Produces the paper.)

George Steel . I look at the paper produced by the last witness; it is the prisoner Trudgett's handwriting.

(Paper put in, and read.)

"To Mr. Dixon, Monday, November 13th 1815."

"MR. DIXON, Please to pay the bearer for the two little horses sold on Friday last.

"Signed JOHN TRUDGETT."

JOHN BISHOP . I have seen a bay horse down below, which I bought in November, at Dixon's.

George Steel. That is the horse I saw in the hackney chariot. I have shewn it to Bishop.

WILLIAM READ. I am an officer. I found Deare at Kennington Cross. I told him what I took him for; he said he thought something of this would happen. I went to Kennington Cross by the direction of Trudgett; I traced the horses through the various hands. I apprehended Trudgett; he did not deny it; he wrote it down; he never furnished me with a list; he wrote down this paper. (Producing a paper.) I did not write down to him any hope of mercy. He knew me.

(The part of the writing produced by the last witness, and supposed to be immediately connected with the present transaction was here put in, and read.)

"But the horses was sold at Dixon's.

"Signed J. TRUDGETT."

Five witnesses gave Trudgett an excellent character for fifteen years last past.

TRUDGETT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

DEARE, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-23

310. JOHN TRUDGETT and JOHN DEARE were again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a curricle, value 30l. the property of George Steel .

GEORGE STEEL . The prisoners as I have stated before, were both my servants . On the 20th of October, I ordered Trudgett, my head hostler, to take the curricle and three horses to Tattersall's, at the top of Bond-street, to be sold; there was a harness and all complete. The horses would not fetch the price, and they were bought in; the curricle was not sold, and it was left at Tattersall's; the horses were brought away; one shilling and sixpence a week was to be paid for the curricle remaining there, as is customary. I saw the curricle when I took stock at Christmas time, two months after it went to Tattersall's. When the prisoners were taken into custody upon another charge, Deare told the officers he sold the curricle to a foreigner; I found no curricle at Tattersall's. I found the harness, the cushions, and the driving seat; they had been left there as security for the standing of the curricle. I had information from the officers where it was sold, and I went to Messrs. Page and Company, coach-makers, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square; I went over their premises, and found the curricle body there, hung upon a one horse chaise carriage; the wheels and axle-tree were my own; but new hung. I found the carriage taken to pieces, as if to be shortened, or as I suppose to be made more fashionable, for I had it many years. I claimed it as my property; I saw both the proprietors; it was then put out of the way. Mr. Page said he would send it; he did not send it; and the magistrate ordered him two or three times to send it, as did the grand jury; it is now down at the door, in its altered state; it is mine. I never authorised the prisoners to sell it; I had fixed a price upon it when I first sent it to Tattersall's, namely, fifty guineas.

JAMES TADLOW. I am clerk to Mr. Tattersall. I remember this curricle standing in our yard for a long time. Trudgett brought it in the first instance, there was a man with him, and three horses at the same time; the curricle and horses were put up in October, and the horses were bought in, and re

moved; but the curricle was left. After that, Deare brought an order from Trudgett, to deliver the curle to him; he left some part of the harness, the cushions, and the driving-seat, as security for the payment of the money due for its standing in our yard.

RICHARD PAGE . I am a coach-maker, in Margaret-street, Cavendish square. My partner's name is Messer. Deare came to us about December. and asked us if we wanted to buy a curricle. I went to Tattersall's, and saw it; it was booked there in the name of Trudgett; I asked Mr. Tattersall what it was booked at, and he told me ten pounds. Deare came in a day or two after, and asked me if I had looked at it, and I said, I had. He told me the barness, the cushions, the driving box, and the pole pieces, were not to be sold; with that, we told him we would give him four pounds for it; he said, we should have it, provided we paid the money for its having stood at Tattersall's; we told him we did not know how long it had stood there, and therefore we could not think of doing any thing of the kind. He then brought an order for us to fetch it from Tattersall's. We did not fetch it from Tattersall's, because we had not a horse. Deare brought it to us, and I paid him four pounds one shilling. We broke it up, and put the carriage on shafts, and on another carriage; it is down stairs.

George Steel . I have seen it down stairs, and it is the same body.

Deare's Defence. Read has got the order; I took it from Trudgett to Tattersall's, and brought him the money.

TRUGETT, GUILTY .

DEARE, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-24

311. ELIZA MACKAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , five shifts, value 23s. two petticoats, value 4s. four pairs of stockings, value 8s. fourteen caps, value 14s. five aprons, value 5s. eight habit shirts, value 8s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 2s. two cloaks, value 2s. one body of a frock, value 2s. six frills, value 3s. 6d. six gowns, value 2l. 10s. seven yards of poplin, value 2l. six shawls, value 6l. one hood and scarf, value 10s. four neck-handkerchiefs, value 4s. four cap bands, value 1s. nine laces, value 6d. one veil, value 5s. two boxes, value 1s. 6d. five ear-rings, value 2s. one ring, value 6d. and two pieces of woolen cloth, value 10s. the property of Isaac Ball ; two shirts, value 10s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of James Henderson , in the dwelling-house of the said Isaac Ball and Samuel Taylor .

ISAAC BALL. I am an ironmonger, and live at 42, in the Poultry ; I have a partner named Samuel Taylor ; I only live in the house; he pays part of the expences; the house expences are paid out of the trade. Mr. Henderson is our apprentice . The prisoner came to live as a servant of all work in my family; she came on the 12th of March, in the evening, and on the 13th, the day following, she robbed me, and was doing so the whole of the day. We first suspected her by her locking herself up in the bed room, where he had no business to be with the door locked. Mrs. Ball went and knocked at the bed room door, and the prisoner made no reply. There are two doors to the bed room, and she went round to the other door, and there knocked, that was locked too; in about the pace of half a minute the prisoner answered yes, malam; that gave me a suspicion, and I sent for an officer in the evening.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER . I was sent for about nine o'clock in the evening, to Mr. Ball's house; there were two bundles produced to me, that they said, had been taken from under the sink in the kitchen. The prisoner was present when they said so. I came close to her person, and felt something, which I thought was under her top petticoat; it turned out to be two shirts, which I took from under her petticoat; I then searched her pocket, and found four handkerchiefs, three caps, four muslin ribbons, but they call them o -hands, a silk ribbon a black lace veil, nine or ten cotton stay laces, and a small tunbridge box, containing two pairs of earrings, a guard ring, and a morrocco box, with a re nt of nett lace in it. I took the two bundles, and going to the Compter, she said her friend lived at Worcester. She had been in the Guard Society, and had come from there to Mr. Ball's place. The bundles coutained the other articles named in the indictment.

JAMES HENDERSON . I am apprentice to these gentlemen. On Thursday, the 11th of March, I found two shirts and two handkerchiefs had been taken from my trunk in my bed room. Those two shirts found on the prisoner's person, are my property.

Leadbetter. I produce the two bundles, and the other articles; they have been in my custody ever since, and in the same state as when they were given to me.

Isaac Ball. I saw the things which were taken from the prisoner's person; they are my property; I also saw those two bundles taken from under the sink, by my porter; they contain the rest of the articles mentioned in the indictment, and are my property.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-25

312. SAMUEL SPENLOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , two hundred and sixty-seven shawls, value 75l. twenty-one pieces of muslin, containing one hundred and seventy-five yards, value 25l. six pieces of scots cambrick, containing forty-five yards, value 5l. and twenty pieces of handkerchiefs, containing two hundred and sixty-eight handkerchiefs, value 31l. the property of Oliver Willcock and George Carr Clark , in a certain boat called a lug-boat, on the Navigable River Thames .

THREE OTHER COUNTS. Varying the manner of laying the charge.

OLIVER WILLCOCK. My partner's name is George Carr Clark; we have a warehouse in Watling-street. A correspondent of ours, named Henry Hall, in Surinam, sent us an order to make up parcels of

the goods in question among others. I witnessed the packing of them in two trunks, on the 7th, and the third on the 9th; the trunks 1 and 2 were nearly of a size, but No. 3, was much larger than either. The cambricks were in the trunk No. 3. Thomas Macleish , a porter, took these trunks to Galley Quay, on the 30th of October. In consequence of information, I went down to Galley Quay, on the 31st, where I saw the trunks, which from the slovenleness of the package, appeared to have been opened; when they went from us, each was locked, and the key fastened to the end of the trunk, and a cord outside the mat. On un-packing the trunk, we missed the property named in the indictment.

THOMAS MACLEISH . I am a porter, in the employ of the last witness, and took three trunks to Galley Quay. on the 30th of October; I delivered them in the same state as I received them to Joseph Payne .

JOSEPH PAYNE . I am foreman to Messrs Smith, wharfingers at Galley Quay, and the last witness delivered the three trunks to me, on the 30th of October; they were fit for Exportation, and I delivered them into a lug-boat, in the charge of Flygar, at Galley Quay; he is in the employ of Jacklyn, Williams, and Co. I saw them the next day, and they appeared very different in their package then; the mats were not done up as they were before, and the appearance was such as to make me believe that they had been opened, and when they were opened in my presence, the good appeared to be opened out in order that they might not shake about in the trunks.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Flygar was the only person to whom I delivered them. I could not suspect any one else but Flygar.

EDWARD BURTON. I am a lighterman; I employed Flygar, when he took these trunks, I told him if he could not make his tide down to the ship, to come home. I saw the boat the next morning, the 31st of October, and when I saw the trunks they seemed as if they had been plundered.

MICHAEL CONNELL . I am a watchman, in the employ of Mr. Oliver, of Black Raven-court, on the Thames; he is a master lighterman; I know Spendlove, I remember his being out of the way, a little white just before that, I saw him on the Thames, and went down with him with a thousand hides, in a barge; it was during the afternoon, ebb tide; a young man came along side in a lug-boat; I don't know the day of the month. That young man in the boat was Flygar.

JOHN FLYGAR . In the month of October last, I was servant to Messrs Jacklyn, Williams, and Co. lightermen. On the 30th of October, I was ordered by Mr. Burton, to take three trunks down to Blackwall, to a ship which was lying off there. I returned at about half past eleven o'clock at night. I left Galley Quay at about half past three o'clock in the afternoon. When I was going down the river, I met Spendlove, the prisoner, and Connell the watchman, with him. I stopped along-side Spendlove's barge. I asked him whether he was going to Limehouse. He asked me where I was going, and I told him to Limehouse and Blackwall. He then said, so am I too. He asked me if I had a tool with me.

COURT. Did he ask you if you had a tool, without any previous reference to any thing that could require a tool. - A. Yes. I told him I had not; and he said he would meet me at the Lower Ship, Limehouse Reach. That was the Lower Ship that I had to go to; nothing more passed at that time. We understood one another without any more. Afterwards he met me at the Lower Ship. It was about a quarter or twenty minutes after four o'clock, just getting dusk. He came on board my vessel first, as I was going to shove her off from the ship. He said he must put the benches up. They are put on each side of the thwarts; that was in order that he might have a covering over, so that the people could not see. I was rowing the boat; he told me to look out to see that nobody was coming nigh. He took the cording off the trunk, and then the matting. He ripped the nails out with a chissel. He then got the key from the handle and opened the trunk, and there was some very dark brown paper that the parcels were wrapt in. He then took the things he thought necessary; they were muslins and shawls. Twentynine shawls, and about nine pieces of muslin. Some of the shawls dark, and some light. He then said he would go to Gates's house, and bring a dark lantern, Gates lived at Limehouse, and a man who was tried at the last sessions. He went down to Blackwall, and said he would take the things to Rammage's, who is a publican there. I afterwards went to Rammage's, aad met Spendlove there. Spendlove took muslins and a lot of shawls, some in his bosom and some in his great coat pocket and his hat. When we were at Rammage's, we went up two pair of stairs. A person of the name of Brown came there. He and Rammage looked over the things, and Rammage said they were rubbishing things, going out to the negroes in the West Indies. Brown asked Spendlove if he wanted any money, and he said he had only a five pound note in his pocket, which he gave Spendlove. The things were left at Rammage's, and Brown with them. After that, I and the prisoner went to the boat.

ANN SMITH . I keep a linen draper's shop in Poplar. I know Mrs. Brown; her husband is a waterman. I remember Mrs. Brown coming to me on the 31st of October, to sell some muslin, five pieces. She brought one first and four more afterwards. I never measured them, she brought seven in the whole; but I bought them for five. She was paid four pounds ten shillings for them by Mr. Smith. I only bought them for five; but they were all left at our house, under a mistake. The seven pieces were all plain; she brought also a striped piece, but that I would not buy, because I thought it would not sell. Mrs. Brown took that away with her. I don't know whether I could recollect that again. It was stri ed and figured. I had the pieces I bought until they were delivered up to the officers.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am the husband of the last witness. I recollect Mrs. Brown bringing some muslin in the afternoon of the 31st of October. She brought

one piece of figured muslin; I did not buy that, Mrs. Brown took it back.

BENJAMIN BLABY . I am a police officer; I searched Brown's house on the 31st of October, in company with Edwards and Woolard, two other officers. Mr. Burton was with us; neither Brown nor his wife were at home at first; it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening. While we were there, Mrs. Brown came in, and as she came through the passage she dropped a handkerchief, a piece of striped muslin, a gown piece of blue cotton print, with four pound notes, some silver and some half-pence, (produces the muslin.)

Mrs. Smith. I look at that piece of muslin. It is like the piece which Mrs. Brown offered me for sale. It is something like it. She bought some blue print when she was there.

JOHN WOOLARD . I am a Thames Police officer. I produce seven pieces of muslin, which I received from Smith, on the 13th of November, (producing them.)

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Smith was summoned to the office before he would give them up. He twice denied having them; at last he gave them up.

Joseph Smith . The muslin I gave to the last witness were what I had received from Mrs. Brown, and those only. I look at the figured muslin. Mrs. Brown offered a piece like that to us.

Oliver Willcock . I look at this piece of striped muslin; it has our mark upon it. It is numbered with my own hand writing, for the purpose of answering with the invoice. I now look at the other pieces. There were seven pieces of the same kind in one of the trunks; but I can't identify these. The fag ends being off. The striped piece was in one of the trunks.

WILLIAM HEWITT. I am a police officer. I apprehended the prisonor on Saturday the 2d of March, at the sign of the Ship, Blackwall. I had been looking for him before that, for a month or six weeks. He wears a piece of false hair on his head generally, and his whiskers were larger than usual when I apprehended him.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. I did not search for him at his own house; but I searched for him at Stone Stairs, where he used to ply as a waterman.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I had been looking for the prisoner since October, in the places. where he used, and I was not able to discover him, until he was apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. Flygar is a very false man, and a man of very bad character. I am as innocent as there is a God. As to my being out of the way, I never was.

WILLIAM STOUT , of the Trinity Yacht, was now called by MR. WALFOD, to contradict an assertion which the witness Flygar made in the trial of other persons, supposed to be connected with the present transaction, though a distinct felony. (Vide, the case of Rammage and others, in a former number of this publication.)

Several witnesses were called to the prisoner's character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-26

313. RICHARD BIBBY and WILLIAM RAY-MEN , alias KEY , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Evans , spinster , in the King's highway, on the 22d of January , and for putting her in fear and taking from her person and against her will, one half shawl, value 5s. the property of John Evans .

MARY EVANS . I live with my father, in Elder Walk, Lower Islington. My father's name is John Evans . On the 22d of January last, I was coming up Green Man-Lane , between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and a mob passed me; a few minutes after that, two men came up to me, and snatched my shawl off, suddenly; the prisoners at the bar were the men; and Bibby is the man who snatched the shawl.

GEORGE WILKINS . I am classical assistant to a school at Shacklewell. On the 22d of January last, I was walking from Kingsland to Islington, at about half past four in the afternoon; I first came up with a woman named York; she was in a very distressed state; and in consequence of something she complained off; I immediately went after the prisoner, who were in sight. I jumped upon a hackney coach, and got before them, unobserved. They went into a publick-house, and I followed them in; when I went to apprehend them, Bibby swore he would blow my bloody brains out. I did not see what he produced at that time. I afterwards saw a pistol lying under the seat where he had sat, which was loaded with powder and ball. The prisoners were searched in my presence, and a shawl was found in Key's hat

THOMAS HEBARD . I am headborough of Islington I produce the shawl which was delivered into my charge, and which I have had ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BIBBY, GUILTY, aged 29,

RAYMAN, GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing, but not of the assault .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-27

314. NICHOLAS WELCH was indicted for a highway robbery .

BUT no prosecutor appearing, the Jury found him

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-28

315. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peggy Mills widow , about seven o'clock on the night of the 26th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty sheets, value 6l. twentytwo pillow-cases, value 1l. two table-cloths, value 5s. two caps, value 4s. one pair of stockings, value 2s. and twenty one shillings in monies numbered , the property of the said Peggy Mills .

PEGGY-MILLS. On the 26th of December last, at about six o'clock in the evening, my daughter and I went to the play, leaving the house fastened up, and on our return, after eleven, we found the house broken open, and the things stated in the indictment stolen.

HARRIETT COOKSLEY. I am the daughter of the last witness, and went with her to the play, and her account is true.

SAMUEL DICKINS . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. I found some of these things, namely sheets, pillow-cases, and table-clothes, which are here, and which the prosecutrix swears to; I found them at Mr. Robert's, No. 1, Stone-cutter-street, Fleet-market.

GEORGE ROBERTS . I live at No. 1, Stone-cutter-street. On the 26th of December, the prisoner brought part of the property to my house; the part which Dickins found. I sent to Bow-street for Dickins, Two other men came with the prisoner; it was about half past eight o'clock when they came, and Scott requested me to leave them until the following morning. He did not come the next morning; and upon that, I gave information to Dickins.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in the habit of going to Roberts's house as an acquaintance, and unfortunately he has conceived a jealousy against me about his wife. I have been in a respectable situation in life, and am sorry to be placed in this situation. Mr. Dickins has told Roberts there is a reward, and that is what I am prosecuted for. I can prove I never brought any bundle on the 26th of December.

SAMUEL HOWSHAM . I was in the employment of Mr. Roberts, about Christmas; I have seen the prisoner at the bar at his house three or four times. I was there on the day after Christmas Day, and the prisoner never brought a bundle there. Mr. Roberts bid me, whenever I went to shave any where, if I could see any thing, to take it, and he would buy it.

George Roberts. That boy was not of a good character; he is a notorious thief; he was convicted a short time ago, and if he is now asked how he gets his living, if he tells the truth, he must say by thieving. I never sent him out to shave any one but once.

COURT. To Samuel Howsham. Were you convicted before - A. Yes, my lord.

George Roberts. Yes, and he was flogged every morning in Bridewell.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-29

316. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a shawl, value 5s. the property of Thomas Wallis , from the person of Hannah, his wife .

HANNAH WALLIS . I am the wife of Thomas Wallis , who is a Custom House officer ; we live at No. 3, Danley-street, Rosemary-lane. On the 5th of March, at about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Tower-street , and my shawl was suddenly snatched of my neck from behind. I cried stop thief, and in the course of two minutes, the prisoner was stopped. I turned quick about, and saw the shawl in the prisoner's possession; it was scarcely two minutes before he was stopped, and the shawl with him.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a carpenter; I was going down Harp-lane when this happened, and in consequence of hearing a dry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner run, I stopped him; he had the shawl with him.

WILLIAM POPE . I am a constable. I was standing at my own house, in Harp-lane, and saw the prisoner at the bar coming running down the lane; Bailey tripped him up, and he said with a bad oath, I have not taken it from the woman, and after recovering from his fall, he had the shawl in his hand.

(Property produced, and sworn.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person threw the shawl into my arms. I was going over to the Philanthropic Society, where I have been brought up for eleven years, to get work.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-30

317. JAMES PANKURST was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , thirty-one three shilling bank tokens, value 4l. 13s. thirty-five eighteen-penny bank tokens; value 2l. 12s. 6d. one hundred and forty-eight shillings, value 7l. 8s. twenty-two sixpences, value 11s. and a half-crown, value 2s. 6d. the monies of Thomas Jolley .

JAMES KING . I am a porter to Mr. Jolley, fruiterer , Fleet-market . The prisoner was also in his service, and had been so two months, or rather better; he was shopman . In consequence of something, I watched him a few days before this happened, and on the 15th of March, at a little after twelve, a customer came into the shop, and I served her, and gave her change, and saw that there were two dollars, two three-shilling pieces, and some smaller silver in the till. In a short time after, a gentleman came in, and bought half a chest of oranges; he paid the prisoner for them with a one-pound note, and a three-shilling piece. The prisoner took the note to the desk, and wrote on it, and put his hand into the till, and pulled it out again shut, and went up to the desk. About a quarter of an hour after that, there was a customer came in, and wanted three pennyworth of oranges, and I went to give her change. Nobody came in during the intermediate time. I then went to the till, and observed there was only one three-shilling piece. I said to the prisoner, Joseph, did not that gentleman give you a three-shillings piece; and he said, yes, and I put it into the till. I said, he could not have done so, for there were two in before; that he still stated he had put it in. Mr. Jolley came in, in a quarter of an hour afterwards. I asked him. (so that the prisoner might hear me,) if he had taken any money out of the till, although I knew he could not, as he was not there; he said, he had not, and the prisoner rushed out of the shop directly. I then told Mr. Joiley what I had observed.

THOMAS JOLLEY . On the 15th of March, King began to speak to me in the prisoner's presence about something; the prisoner immediately went out, I had told him to go to Mr. Clarke's, and he staid ten minutes longer than the porter King, whom I sent after him to Mr. Clarke's. On the prisoner's return, I told him if he had been an honest man, he would not have left the shop when King began to speak to me. I asked him what made him stay so long, and he said, he had been for a walk round the market. I then charged him with having stolen two three-shilling pieces out of the till, and he denied it. On his being searched by an officer, he had nothing about him, but seven pence. In consequence of what I had heard, I told him he had another lodging, and that it was very strange, a young man who boarded and lodged with me, should have one. After he was gone to the Compter, he said that he had some keys up stairs which he wanted. I took possession of those keys. After a great deal to do, he told me his lodgings was at No. 3, Liquor-pond-street, he said, at a Mrs. West's. I went to Liquor-pond-street to search for his lodgings. He had described Mrs. West as washing for him; and on my going to No. 3, Liquor-pond-street; there was no such person lived there. I enquired at all the public-houses, chandler's shops, and grocer's shops, with as little effect. As I was returning home, I saw a board hanging out, with a mangle painted upon it, and on enquiring there. I was informed, a person of the name of West lived at No. 3, Bedford-street, which is near Liquor-pond-street. When the prisoner gave me the direction, he told me it was No. 3, Liquor-pond-street, and not in any of the streets or courts leading into it. In consequence of directions Mrs. West gave me, I went to a room in her house, and found a box with the prisoner's name written on a card that was nailed on it, and I think the hand-writing was his. One of the keys I had taken possession of, opened this box. I found in it, a large quantity of silver, silk stockings, and a receipt for gloves he had purchased after having been in my service; the silver amounted to fifteen pounds twelve shillings and sixpence; looking over that silver, I saw two shillings, which I am positive I had put into my till myself, which were missed on the same evening they were put in. The money has been in the custody of a police officer eve since. The prisoner came to my service from that of a person named Kipling, a hosier, in the Po ltry.

CHARLES MATHEWS . I produce the box, and silver.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-31

318. JAMES PANKHURST was again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , thirteen pairs of silk stocking, value 6l. 9s. the property of William Kepling .

THOMAS JOLLEY . In the course of the inquiry which I stated in the last case, I went to a place, and opened that trunk; the key of which, I procured by the prisoner's direction, and I found in it several pairs of silk and cotton stockings.

CHARLES MATHEWS . I produce the box and the stockings.

WILLIAM KIPLING . The prisoner was in my service for one month, and left me some time in November. In consequence of some message, I went to Mr. Jolley, and saw this box, and its contents; there are two pair of gentlemen's robbed china nots; I had never sold them to the prisoner. I missed them while he was in my service. The prisoner did not know I missed them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-32

310. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a pair of shoes, value 4s. 6d. the property of Alexander Wilson .

THOMAS VINCENT. About nine o'clock in the morning of the 28th of February. I saw the prisoner take a pair of shoes from our door. I followed him up Union-court, and took him into custody. He had put the shoes into a basket on his head.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-33

320. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a hamper, value 1s. twenty-eight pounds weight of Spanish juice, value 2l. and five pounds weight of capers, value 18s. the property of Benjamin Batley and William Batley .

CHARLES GOUCH . On the morning of the day in the indictment, I packed up the articles in question with several others, and gave them to the carter with directions to deliver them; he went, and delivered part of them, and about two o'clock returned to the warehouse; he stopped with the cart there, and while I happened to be looking out at the window, the prisoner came up, and seized this hamper, which had not been delivered, and put it on his shoulder, and walked off with it very quick. I pursued him, seized him, and brought him back, with the hamper in his possession.

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing at all about it; a gentleman asked me to carry it to the Ram Inn Smithfield.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-34

321. DIEDERICK BERGHOLME , alias GOT-LIEB BARGHOLME , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , ten pounds weight of sugar, value 12s. 6d. one pound and a half of candies, value 1s. the property of John Craven and Frederick Bowman .

JOHN DREYER . (By interpretation.) I am warehouseman to the prosecutors, who are sugarbakers . The prisoner was also in their employment. On the 1st of March, I placed myself to watch the prisoner in my house, which is by a gate on my masters' premises. I saw the prisoner come out of my master's premises at half past four in the afternoon; Miller, the officer, was with me. We immediately

stopped him, and found on him four pounds of sugar, which corresponded with sugar in our warehouse, and it was double refined sugar; we found six pounds more and the candles, where he lived.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-35

322. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a handkerchief, value 4s. the property of William Wyatt ; one hundred and twenty-three promissory notes for the payment of 5l. each; one hundred and sixty-one other promissory notes for the payment of 2l. each; and nine hundred and sixty-three other promissory notes for the payment of 1l. each ; the property of Robert Williams , William Williams , William Moffat , the younger, and William Hugh Burgess , against the statute.

NOT GUILTY .

To be detained for a Conspiracy.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-36

323. JOHN MERRYMAN, alias MARRYAN , was indicted for a burglary .

BUT all the witness not appearing, he was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-37

324. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Turner , about the hour of seven in the night of the 18th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, three pair of half boots, value 12s. two pair of shoes, value 4s. two blankets value 7s. and one rug, value 3s. the property of the said Henry Turner .

HENRY TURNER . I am a shoe-maker ; I went out on the evening of the day of the indictment, and returned at about half past seven o'clock. I had gone out only half an hour before. The place which was broke open, was a work-shop of mine, a little way from my house, where the lads sleep; two apprentices and my own son. As I was returning home I put my hand against the door as I usually did; I found the top part open, and on putting my knee against the bottom part; it also gave way. The lower part of the door, (it being a hatch) could only open half way, for the bedstead. I asked who is there, and no one answered. I thought I heard something move very slow in the shop, and I requested a man who was going past at the other side of the way, to knock at the next door, which was mine. My wife hearing my voice, came to the door of my house with a light, and then the prisoner made an attempt to come out of the shop. I caught hold of him half in and half out. I took him by the collar, and took him to my own house; some neighbours came in and I left him with them. I then went back to our shop to examine if I had lost any thing. I found nothing missing; but two blankets and a rug were rolled up together at the foot of the bed. I found three pair of half boots, and a pair of man's shoes removed from the place where I had left them.

THOMAS BATES . I left the shop at half past six o'clock, and it was just upon dark then. I fastened up the shop by nailing the upper part of the door with a nail, and a piece of leather; then we come underneath and fasten the lower part, by locking it. I then took the key into the house after I had done, to hang it on the nail. The other apprentice had gone out a quarter of an hour before me. There were only these doors and a window to the shop, and I had fastened the window also. The blankets and rug had been laid smooth on the bed, ready to come to bed. When I went out, there were three pair of half boots lying by master's seat, and also a pair of shoes.

ROBERT SCOTT . I am a headborough belonging to the parish. I was sent for between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of the day in question, to take charge of the prisoner; and after I had lodged him in the watch-house, I went to this shop the next morning to examine it, I did not find any violence on the door at all. I could not discover how it had been opened. The nail I understood, it had been fastened with, was put into my hands by the last witness. I saw the hole in the door-post where the nail had been driven. I look upon it that the upper part of the door had been pushed open, and then the hand was put in and opened the lock, which was a spring one.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming home from my work on the same evening, I was coming down Birdcage-walk, I heard a parcel of men coming along, and I expected they were intoxicated; they were hallooing out, there was a mad bullock; and seeing this place open, I ran in until it was come by, as I thought; and as I was coming out, the prosecutor stopt me, and accused me of robbing his place; that is all I know.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18160403-38

325. MICHAEL WOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Stewart , at about the hour of nine o'clock in night, of the 13th of March , and stealing therein, a drawer, value 3s. a shilling, fourteen penny pieces, and one halfpenny .

JOHN STEWART . On the evening of the 13th of March, I was sitting in my parlour behind my shop and I heard something, as if the door opened for somebody to come in. The door had been on the latch to the best of my knowledge. I immediately went into the shop, and immediately I saw a person handing the till over the counter. He ran off, and I ran after him. I cried out after him. I pursued him near twenty yards; in consequence of which he dropped the till, and I picked it up and carried it home. I heard the constable, whose voice I knew, say, Mr. Stewart I have got him. He was then taken to the watch-house together with the till. I saw him throw the money and the till into the street, at the same time. The door opens with a spring latch, and it was fast, or I should not have left it.

JOHN READ. I am a constable. At about nine o'clock in the evening of the 13th of March, I saw

the prisoner with something under his arm running, aad Mr. Stewart after him. At that time I thought it was a box; I saw him drop it, and I immediately laid hold of him; I took him to Mr. Stewart's shop, and afterwards to the watch-house. Mr. Stewart picked up the till, and I picked up some of the money.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-39

326. GEORGE NANKEVILLE and JOHN NANKEVILLE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Goodfellow , about the hour of three o'clock in the afternoon, of the 22d of February , no person in the same dwelling-house then being, and stealing therein, a cushion, value 3s. and a cushion case, value 6d. the property of Mary Hurley ; a counterpane, value 3s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. two petticoats, value 2s. one bed-gown; value 1s. one pair of pockets, value 1s. two night caps, value 6d. one yard of flannel, value 6d. and six pieces of printed cotton, value 6d. the property of Ann Bates .

ANN GOODFELLOW . In the afternoon of the 22d of February, at a little before two o'clock, I went out to a friend next door but one, and returned again at about half past three o'clock. I had left the sash of my window bolted at the bottom; the door was also fastened. There was a bundle on a box, belonging to Ann Bates , which contained the articles stated to belong to her in the indictment. The cushion and case belonged to Mary Hurley . When I returned, after having been gone about an hour and a half; I found my sash thrown up to the top, two panes of glass taken out of the window, and these things gone.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. In consequence of information, I went in company with two officers to the Weaver's Arms, between the hours of three and four in the afternoon of the 22d of February, I found the prisoners at the back of the skittle ground, and the prisoner George had a bag in his hand. I asked him whose it was; and he said, it was his. I searched him partly, and Mr. Sapwell searched him more particularly. Sapwell has the bag.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I went with the last witness to the Weaver's Arms, and saw the prisoners in the washhouse, at the back of the skittle ground; they were both in, and the door shut. I took this bag out of the washhouse; there was also a bag of patches shoved under the fire-grate. I asked the prisoners how they came by the goods; and they said, they knew nothing about them.

John Nankeville 's Defence. After I had done my work, I went home, and not finding my mother at home, I went to the Jolley Weavers to get a pint of beer. Sitting in the tap-room my cousin came in, and told me there was a bag in the washhouse; I told him I did not know who it belonged to, without it belonged to the landlord. I went with him to look at it, and I said, it did not belong to me.

George Nankeville 's Defence. I have got no more to say than what my cousin has said.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-40

327. JOHN MARSHALL was indicted for that he, on the 7th of March , upon William Vernon George , with an offensive weapon, namely, a pistol, did make an assault with a felonious intent, the goods and monies of the said William Vernon George violently and forcibly from his person, and against his person to take .

WILLIAM VERNON GEORGE . I am a glove-manufacturer , and live near Worcester. This happened to me on the 7th of March, at about a quarter past one in the morning, I was in Fore-street, where I met the prisoner, and asked him to tell me the turning into Angel-street; he said, he was going into Cheapside, and as it would not be much out of his way, he would conduct me there. We went on until we came to the end of Lawrence-lane , when the prisoner turned about, and presented a pistol to me, and demanded my money or my life. I sprang at him, and seized him by the collar; a scuffle ensued, and we both fell together; we had a scuffle on the ground, and then I cried out watch in the space of a minute, the watchman came up, and he said, I wanted to rob and murder him. I told the watchman he had presented a pistol to me, and wanted to rob me. An altercation took place, and a gentleman threw up a sash, and said, take them both into custody. I was then seized by two watchmen, and taken to the watchhouse, and the prisoner the same. The prisoner was searched, and I was searched likewise. While I was being searched, a watchman brought a pistol in, and another brought a paper of powder, which he said the prisoner threw out of his pocket. I said to the constable of the night, that I wished to send for a friend, with whom I had been spending the evening; he came, and I was liberated to appear the next morning, which I did.

Prisoner. Does the evidence you give now, correspond with that you gave at Guildhall?

Witness. I think I gave the same at Guildhall.

PETER MORRIS . I am a watchman of Cheapside. I heard a noise, and shortly after a cry of watch! murder! When I came up to the place, I found the prosecutor and the prisoner upon the ground, and when they got up, each charged the other. Mr. George charged the prisoner with wanting to rob him; and the prisoner charged the gentleman with wanting to rob and murder him. A gentleman opened a window, and said, take them both to the watchhouse. Three other watchmen had come to my assistance. We took them to the watchhouse; in going along, the prisoner dropped the bowl of a pewter spoon from his pocket; I also saw him drop a piece of paper, which was afterwards discovered to contain gunpowder; I did not pick it up, because I had hold of the prisoner. When they got to the watchhouse, they were both searched, but nothing found. I then went back to the place where they had been lying, and found a pistol, which I brought to the watchhouse, and gave to the constable of the night; it was loaded.

Prisoner. Were you the first that came up?

Witness. Yes.

Prisoner. What was cried first?

Witness. To the best of my recollection watch! was cried first.

Prisoner. When you came up, what hold had the gentleman of me?

Witness. He held you fast by the collar.

Prisoner. What did I say to you when you first came?

Witness. You said, the gentleman wanted to murder you or rob you.

COURT. Which gave the first charge?

Witness. The prisoner; he had hold of the prosecutor also.

Prisoner. Did you see me drop any thing; did you see the bowl of the spoon fall?

Witness. Yes.

Prisoner. Had you hold of me?

Witness. Yes; I on one side, and another watchman on another.

Prisoner. And how was there a possibility of my having the use of my hands, in the custody of two watchman?

Witness. We had only a hold of your collar.

GEORGE TAYLOR. Another watchman, corroborated the account of the last witness, and picked up the powder.

Prisoner. What did the gentleman say when he came to the watchhouse?

Witness. He said that if you would acknowledge your fault, as there was a God above, he would say no more about it; but if not, he would persist in the Law. The prisoner then wanted the gentleman to go side with him; but the gentleman said he would not, and whatever he had to say, he must say before faces, or he would not hear it.

Prisoner. Did not the gentleman say, that he could not say whether it was a pistol or not?

Witness. No; he distinctly said it was a pistol. When the prisoner was searched, a thimble was found upon him, and he exclaimed, a very pretty pistol indeed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through Fore-street, in the morning, about one o'clock, to go to Old-street to sleep, and this gentleman came up, and asked me the way to Angel-street; I told him it was to the right of Wood-street, and I would conduct him to it. Just as I got into the dark place, the gentleman demanded my money or my life, and came close to me; I struck his hand, from which the pistol immediately fell, and he caught hold of my collar; I called out murder, and the watchman came up, and I gave charge of him. A gentleman from a sash said, take them both, and three watchman came up, and we were both taken to the watchhouse, and searched, and I had neither pistol or powder, nor had the gentleman who is my prosecutor; he sent for his friend, and was liberated, and they took charge of me; I was sent to Giltspur-street Compter, and afterwards sent here for trial.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-41

328. WILLIAM MOORE , alias JACKSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , eighteen ounces weight of cloves, value 9s. and three pounds two ounces weight of Spanish juice, value 5s. the property of John Lewis .

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am a City officer of Tower wharf. I know James Watson 's house, which is No. 11. Hart-lane, Thames-street. On the 28th of February, in the afternoon; I went there about five o'clock, and was stationed there to watch on the 29th, about six or seven in the evening, I was in the kitchen, and heard the street door go; I then got up, and went into the passage, and met the prisoner, with the middle door open, coming in; I told him to walk in, and not stand there, and when he came in, he took a chair, and sat down by the fire. I then asked him who he wanted, and he said, Watson, either Mr. or Mrs. I then asked him what he had got; he then looked at me with a little surprize, and said nothing. I told him that would not do for me, for I knew he had something concealed about him. I told him he had better pull it out; but he did not chuse, and I searched him, and pulled out from under his jacket, fifteen cakes of Spanish juice. I then took his apron off, and found a small bag, concealed in his breeches, which he said, was coffee; but on examining it, I found it to be cloves. I asked him where he got it; and he said, he found it. I asked him where he worked; I could get no answer; at last he said, for no one in particular, but for any one that would give him a job; I told him as that was the best account he could give, I should be under the necessity of taking him into custody; and when I questioned him more closely, after I got him to the Compter, he told me where he had been at work, and that he had taken the juice out of a chest. Nothing farther passed then. I went to where his master lived, and examined his warehouse, and I saw a chest of juice, which corresponded exactly with this; on looking farther, Mr. Lewis shewed me the cloves, and I could see that some had been taken out, for there was the mark of a hand like.

JOHN LEWIS. I reside in Botolph-lane, Thames-street. The prisoner had been in my employment, as a carman, about nine months. I recollect the last witness coming to my house either on the day or the day after the prisoner was taken into custody. On examination when we looked at a cask of cloves, we found that it had been opened, for part of the head was loose, and some cloves were gone; it had been opened in the usual course of trade; I can't say whether I could have discovered that any were missing. The prisoner had an opportunity of taking cloves and Spanish juice, if he chose; there were two pounds and a half deficient in the cask of cloves, and one pound and two ounces were found on him. I believe the cloves found and the liquorice to have come from my premises, as far as my judgment goes.

GEORGE BARLLY. I am a warehouse-man, and

conversant with these articles. We took stock, and found two pounds and a half of cloves deficient. The bag in which the cloves were found, is the bag in which the prisoner usually brought his victuals. The cloves found on him exactly correspond with those on our premises.

The prisoner received a good character from several witnesses.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-42

229. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a pair of gaiters, value 3s. 6d. the property of Robert Ireland .

ROBERT IRELAND . About half past seven o'clock, on the evening of the day in the indictment, I heard my name called three or four times, and on going to the door, I found the prisoner in custody of a neighbour who had seized him five or ten yards from my door.

GEORGE BUTTON. I watched the prisoner and another man, and saw them take the gaiters from Mr. Ireland's door, and took the prisoner into custody; the other man made his escape.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-43

230. JOHN BURGESS ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , three three shilling bank tokens, value 9s. four eighteen-penny bank tokens, value 6s. a shilling, and two sixpences , the monies of Nathaniel Thorold Darwin and William Banks .

WILLIAM BANKS. The prisoner was a porter to us. In consequence of having frequently missed money from our till; on Friday night the 29th of March, three pounds four shillings and sixpence in silver, were marked in my presence, and put into the till. On the Saturday morning when I came to look in the till, I missed three three shillings pieces, four eightteen-penny pieces, a shilling, and three sixpences; but only two of the sixpences were found. I immediately took the prisoner up into the dining room, and charged him with it. After a little hesitation he acknowledged it; I told him it would save a great deal of trouble if he would acknowledge it. He was searched by an officer, and the money found in his pocket.

FRANCIS EASTERLEY BARLOW. I marked the silver, and put it into the till.

WILLIAM SMITH . I searched the prisoner and found the money on him.

GUILTY , aged 19.

[Recommended to mercy on account of his youth.]

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-44

231. HENRY MEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , two saucepans, value 5s. the property of John Izon , Thomas Whitehurst , and William Izon .

BENJAMIN CRAPPER . The prisoner has been occasionally in their employ twelve years. We lost two saucepans, and the prisoner was detected on the 29th of February.

JOSEPH PHILIP KING . On the 29th of February, I was at Watson's house, which was a receiving house, we got possession of in Harp-lane, and the prisoner came there with two pots, and I took him into custody.

Benjamin Crapper . Those are my employer's property; their marks are on them; the prisoner always bore a good character in our service.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Commercial Road, and as I was coming back, I saw the two saucepans to be disposed of, and I bought them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-45

232. JOSEPH FRANCISCO was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , fourteen pounds weight of beef, value 6s. the property of David Barkley .

DAVID BARKLEY . This beef was lying on my stall-board. The prisoner was about my shop two or three hours, and was at last seen to take it.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrole. I was in St. John-street on the 16th of March, and saw the prisoner take this piece of beef from the prosecutor's stall-board. I stopped him, and took it from under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor helpless old man, I have been to the consul without getting any relief, and for three days before that, I had not a bit to eat.

GUILTY , aged 60.

[Recommended to mercy.]

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-46

233. EDWARD POSTEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , twenty pounds weight of leather, value 10s. the property of Thomas Windus .

THOMAS WINDUS . I can only prove the property. The prisoner was in my employ.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer belonging to Worship-street. On the 2nd of March I was on duty, and saw the prisoner with a bag between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. I stopped him, and asked him what he had there, and he said leather; he had brought it out of Bishopsgate-street, and it was for making patten ties. I went with him to a Mrs. Davis, from whom he said he bought it, and she denied all all knowledge of him, and the leathes.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-47

234. JOHN PAINTER was indicted for killing and slaying Benjamin Plainter , on the 17th of February , against the King's peace .

MARY PAINTER . I am the mother of the child that was killed. My father asked my brother to go for some meat, to carry for one of his master's. My father was at that time eating his dinner. My brother made use of very bad language to my father, and in the heat of his passion, he threw the knife down on

the table, and it rebounded off, and hit the child on the head; the child was in my lap by the fire side. I am not a married woman; it was my child. My father used to kill cattle with the same knife also. The child bled very much, and I went to Dr. Senior, and told him. The child lived until the Monday, from the Saturday, and then died.

EDWARD PAINTER . I am the brother of the last witness. I refused to go to market for my father, to carry some meat for one of his master's he is a butcher. In the heat of him, and in the heat of his passion, I flew out of doors. I did not see the knife in his hand.

Mr. HENRY CHRISTOPHER SENIOR. I am a surgeon. The child was brought to me on the Saturday, and on removing the cap which it had on, I found a wound on its head of about an inch in length; it had been inflicted by a sharp instrument; I prebed the wound and found neither fracture nor depression, and I conceived the death of the child to be occasioned by the loss of blood prior to my seeing it; it was a merescalp wound.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-48

335. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , three pieces of florentine, containing twenty-six yards, value 10l. the property of Henry Liscomb , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY LISCOME . I lost my florentine on the 24th of February, at about a quarter before six, from my shop. I was down stairs in the kitchen, at about a quarter before six, and somebody came into the shop; I went up stairs, and the prisoner at the bar was in the shop; I asked him what he wanted, and he said some florentine for a waistcoat. I shewed him a piece, and he took it up, and looked at it; he took it to the door, and brought it back, and laid it down, and looked at another piece; he took that to the door also, and brought it back, and said those two pieces were rather thin. I then shewed him another, and he took them all three up together, and took them to the door, as I thought to compare them; but he turned his head round to see if I was looking, and stepped of the step, and away he ran, and I being lame, could not well follow him; but I came out, and called stop thief; the servant girl came, hearing me call, and being very active, followed him, and then he was taken, and brought back, and the silks were given to me. He was then taken to the watchhouse, and thence to Bow-street. He turned his head round to look at me, and then stepped of the step in a moment. As near as I can tell, he dropped the silks. He asked me to let him look at them, and I did. I had my eye upon him all the time he was in the shop.

SARAH HARVEY. I am servant to Mr. Liscomb. The prisoner came into the shop, and I went up first, and asked him what he wanted, and he asked if Mr. Liscomb was at home, and I told him, yes, and my master came up to him, and presently I heard a cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner just in the court when I went out, and I ran as hard as I could, and just as he got to the narrow court, he dropped the silks. I am sure that is the man; I never saw him before.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I was going home at a little before six, on the day in the indictment, and there was a man ran very fast past me, and another man ran after him, who, as he passed me, said, why did you not stop him; and he ran down Rose-street, and I ran down Argel-court; there I clearly saw something fall from him; he ran about three steps, and then stood upright against the wall, and the other person went up to him, and I joined them. I picked up the silk, and we brought the prisoner to the corner of Rose-street. King-street, and Godfrey came forward, and took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Wardour-street, and I was coming up Long Acre, and I went into a little court for a convenient place, and I was just coming away, and before I had time to button up my breeches, a man rushed by me, and a gentleman came up, and seized hold of me; I told him, I was not the man, that the man had gone up the court, and it is well known that I am not able to run at all.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-49

336. ROBERT VALE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Rice , about the hour of two in the afternoon of the 28th of March , no person in the same dwelling-house then being, and stealing therein, one coat, value 1l. two waistcoats, value 10s. one pair of breeches, value 15s. one handkerchief, value 2s. two shirts, value 10s. one brooch, value 5s. one neck-kerchief, value 1s. three pairs of stockings, value 1s. forty shillings in monies numbered, and one 1l. bank note , the property of said John Rice.

JOHN RICE . This happened on the 28th of March. I went out at about nine o'clock in the morning, and came home between ten and eleven at night; I have no family; nobody but myself; I live over the stables; I have a servant, who does my work over the stables; but she does not live there; I am quite a single man . I left every thing secure. When I came home, the first thing I discovered was the door open; I went up stairs, and discovered the door of the hay loft open, which goes into the mews; they had come in through the cieling When I opened the dwelling room door, the cieling there, was broken. I discovered some clothes were gone, a coat, two waistcoats, a pair of small clothes, a handkerchief, and two shirts, a gold brooch, upwards of two pounds in silver, and a one-pound bank note; there is a door which opens from that room to another room, which door had been locked; but it was broken open with a poker and tongs. I learned from my man who helps me to clean my horses, that a man had slept in a coach house in the mews all night, and I asked him if he would come with me, and he did. We went to the man who owned the coach-house, and I told him what had

happened, and he said, we were extremely welcome to search his place. I asked my man if he had seen the prisoner at the bar that day; I had seen him several times before; he had been a regular servant with a man in the mews for about a month. In consequence of questions I asked, I found the prisoner had absconded. We did not see nor hear any thing of him for about a week; at last, I gained information of him, and we went down very early last Sunday morning, and found him at his father's house; his father lives at the other side of Hockland, by a place called Birchinghall. When I got there, we found my coats in his father's house; two waistcoats on his person, a pair of small clothes on his person, a shirt, a handkerchief, and a pair of boots, all on him. Mr. Lee found the brooch in his pocket; but no note, no money, nor silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been left with the key of his stable several times.

Rice. He could go out of the hay loft over my room.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

[Recommended to mercy on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-50

237. THOMAS BOSTON and HENRY THOMP-SON were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Leppingwell in the King's highway, on the 27th of February , for putting him fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch chain, value 3l. three seals, value 3l. and one key, value 10s. the property of the said John Leppingwell .

JOHN LEPPINGWELL. On Tuesday, the 27th of February last, I was in Shoreditch, at about a quarter past seven in the evening. Thompson passed by me opposite Shoreditch church; I looked at him, because I thought I had a knowledge of him; afterwards I came to an entry which leads down to Cooper's-gardens, and he was then accompanied by Boston; the two prisoners stood before me across the path, and would not allow me to pass; they did not say any thing to me, I put my right hand up to part them to get between them. When the prisoner Boston saw my hand was engaged, he snatched at my seals that hung to my watch, which was in my fob; I felt him get hold of them, and I put my hand down to save my watch, and the chain gave way. We pulled, and then the chain gave way; he took both chain, seals, and key. Boston then ran down Cooper's-gardens; Thompson went back again, towards Shoreditch Church. I have never got my properety again. There must be considerable force used to get the chain away.

JOHN ARMSTRONG. On Wednesday, the 28th, I was going down Worship-street and saw both the prisoner; I let them walk on until they got very near our office, I on one side, and they on the other; when I got close to the office, I called out to them halloe, I want to speak to you; one came just halfway across; and said he. and I said and you and all; meaning the other man. They then both came across, and I said, here is a man in our office, I want you to look at, and see if you know him; they both came; and I put them into the office; and I then sent for the prosecutor, and from his descriprion, I found them out.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18160403-51

338. JOHN NIGHTINGALE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a great coat, value 5s. the property of John Batchelor .

JOHN BATCHELOR . On the morning of the day in the indictment, I went out, and left the door open. When I returned from my errand, I saw the prisoner coming out at the door, with the coat under his arm; he went up the alley, and I got to him in Benson-alley, and there he had put the coat in a passage.

JONATHAN DOWSETT . I was standing some where about the centre of William-street, and seeing the prisoner running, I let him past me; he had passed me about a hundred yards, when I heard the last witness cry stop thief; I had seen the coat on his arm, and thought he was running to save time for a coach.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one year and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-52

339. SOPHIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a watch, value 2l. a watch-ribbon, value 1d. and two watch-keys, value 1d. the property of George Brown , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA BROWN . The prisoner came into my house, on the 24th of February, to borrow an iron. The watch was hanging over the chimney-piece; she staid full four or five minutes, after she was gone; I did not immediately miss the watch; but did afterwards. I went after her, and asked her if she had been playing me any tricks with the watch. At last we found it at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN MORRISON. I am shopman to Jonathan Murray . I know the prisoner, she came to our shop on the 24th of February; it was about half-past one; she pawned a watch with me in the name of Ann Harris for one pound eight shillings; I gave it to the constable at the office.

JONATHAN MURRAY . I was in my shop when the prisoner pledged the watch; I am sure of her person.

RALPH HOPE. I am a police constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th, in Ratctiffe Highway.

The prisoner received an excellent character from several witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-53

340. ELEANOR FRADGLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Punch , at about the hour of eight

in the night of the 26th of December , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two sheets, value 5s. two quilts, value 7s. one blanket, value 5s. and one pair of shoes, value 10d. the property of the said Philip Punch.

PHILIP PUNCH . I rent a room in the house belonging to Mr. Butcher, and he does not live in the house where it is; he lets lodgings, and I am the only lodger. I left my room between ten and eleven in the morning; my wife went out after me; I don't know whether she fastened up the place. On my return to my house, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I found it had been broken open; my room door had been bursted in, and the things stated in the indictment were gone.

ELEANOR PUNCH . I left the place between ten and eleven in the morning; I fastened the door of my lodging-room. I returned with my husband at night, and found the pannel of the door barsted in, so that any body might get through; and the things stated in the indictment were gone.

MARTHA HAWKINGS . I saw the prisoner at the bar in the court between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, she was hiding herself in a passage next door to the lodging of Philip Punch.

WILLIAM WADEN . The prisoner brought this sheet, on the 27th of December; she pawned it with me for two shillings; she pawned it in the name of Ann Connelly ; she had been at our house before.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18160403-54

311. ANN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , a tea-kettle, value 5s. the property of Henry Jennings , privately in his shop .

HENRY JENNINGS . I keep a broker's shop ; I had the tea-kettle in question in my hand five minutes before I missed it; I had removed it farther into the shop than it had been before. The prisoner was stopped with it upon her four or five yards from my door; the value of it is seven shillings.

RICHARD LADD . I saw the prisoner at the bar about Jennings's from eleven until twelve; I saw her go into his shop, and come out again in a moment; I had a suspicion, and asked her what she had got; she uttered something in answer; but I don't know what it was Mr. Jennings then came up, and she pulled the kettle from underneath her cloak.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18160403-55

342. JAMES SMITH and ROBERT WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , twenty-two yards of printed cotton, value 2l. 10s. the property of Thomas Houlbrooke , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HOULBROOKE . I lost this cotton between four and five in the afternoon of the 9th of February; I have frequently seen the prisoner about the shop. This cotton was hung on an iron bar just within side the door. A man of the name of Wilson was tried here for this offence, and sentenced to be Transported for Seven Years.

THOMAS THOMPSON. I am a patrole of the parish of St. Sepulchre. About half past three in the afternoon of the 9th of February, I was in St. John-street; I saw the two prisoners in company with one Wilson, who has been convicted at the last Sessions. Knowing them, I followed them into Holborn; all the way they were loitering about different shops. When they came to the prosecutor's shop, Smith crossed over the way opposite; Walker and Wilson went to the shop, and in a moment Wilson came running away with a piece of printed cotten in his apron; he crossed over to the end of Brownlow-street, and there I caught hold of him; I took him back to Mr. Houlbrooke, who indentified the property. They were all three in company together.

BOTH GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18160403-56

343. RICHARD SHOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a pocket-book, value 2s. the property of William King , from his person .

WILLIAM KING . On the 5th of March last, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, between London-bridge and Billingsgate , I felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket; I immediately turned round, and he had a hold of my pocket-book; when I took hold of him, he threw the pocket-book into the kennel.

JOHN SALMON . I am an officer, the prosecutor brought the prisoner and the pocket-book, and gave them into my charge.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-57

344. MARY PLUMMER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , five fowls, value 10s. the property of Moses Lyon .

MOSES LYON . On the 15th of February, I was called up at about half past six in the morning, I came down, and the watchman and patrole told me my yard had been broken open, and my fowls had been taken out of the hen-coop. I then went with the watchman and the patrole to the watchhouse, where I saw my five fowls; an old cock and hen, and three chickens.

MARK PARKS . I lived at that time, next door to Mr. Lyon, at No. 7. I happened to be in my own yard, between three and four o'clock on the morning of the 15th of February; I heard some persons whispering, and what I conceived to be a man and woman's voices; I had a candle with me, and I held it up, thinking they were getting over my yard; when I held up the candle, all was quiet; I put the candle into the privy, and shut the door to, and listened, and then they began again; I heard them then talking and walking, for the snow was on the ground, and cracked. I then went to the front door of my house, and kept it a jar, as I knew they must pass me to come out of the yard where they were. I then armed myself with a stick, and

went through the arch, down the yard, and found the female prisoner there; I asked her what business brought her there, and she said, she was doing nothing. I looked round; but could see no man. I told her she had better go away, for there was a man there I was certain. In endeavouring to get away, I though; she had some bundle under her. I then went back into my own house, and kept the door a jar, and then she came out of the back square, and passed my door into the front square, and so into the street; after she was gone about half a minute, a man came out of the back square, and called after her Poll three times; the man gave the woman a bundle, which she put under her petticoats. I called the watchman, and told him to secure the man, and I would secure the woman; she made up to the wall and dropped a bundle from under her petticoats. The man got away. I picked it up, and found it was two fowls in a piece of old linen or cloth. The watchman and the man were struggling on the ground about five or six yards from me. I took the woman and the fowls to the watchhouse; but could not get any account from her where she lodged.

BENJAMIN SUGGATE. I was going the hour of four o'clock when Mr. Marks asked me if I saw a man and a woman in Ebenezar-square; I told him I had; upon which, he bid me lay bild of them. I went back, and Mr. Marks came after me; I said to him, you lay hold of the woman, and I will take the man; we came up to them, and the man knocked me down with an iron crow. and cut my head in three places very bad. He got away, and left three fowls and his hat behind.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-58

345. MARTHA BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , seven cotton handkerchiefs, value 8s. the property of Abraham Holford .

DANIEL NOTTAGE. In consequence of some information which a lady gave me, about six o'clock in the evening of the 4th of March, I went out, and she pointed out the prisoner to me, who had these handkerchiefs in her possession when she was searched by the officer for whom we sent. The handkerchiefs had been hanging by the door.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. On being sent for, I found the prisoner laying on the floor of Mr. Holford's shop, and on searching her, I found the handkerchiefs concealed between her thighs.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along very much in liquor, and I stopped and picked the handkerchiefs up; they were lying on the stones.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-59

346. JAMES PRESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , two yards and a half of kerseymere, value 15s. the property of William Cook .

BUT no prosecutor appearing, the Jury found him

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-60

347. JOHN RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a jacket, value 20s. the property of Richard Mount and Septimus Sadler .

GEORGE SOWARD . I am shopman to the prosecutors, who are pawnbrokers , and live at 134, Bishopsgate Without . I heard something at the door; I immediately ran to it, and saw the prisoner a few doors off, with this jacket under his arm; I immediately siezed him, and brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up off the flags.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined two months , and find 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-61

348. MARK GIBBS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ROBERT KENYON . The prisoner was my shop-man ; he was to receive money from the customers. On Saturday evening last, I was in the back part of the shop, and the prisoner came to a sister-in-law of mine, to ask for a sixpence; she gave him one, and he returned back into the shop, and gave it to the customer that he was serving. I did not see him put any money into the till; but on the contrary, I observed him putting something in his left hand waistcoat pocket; he gave my sister-in-law nothing in return for the sixpence. As soon as the customers were a little clear, I called him to the back shop, and asked him what money he had about him; he said, he had none of his own, and what he had belonged to a cousin of his, who was a performer at the Sans Pareil Theatre, in the Strand, and for whom he had sold some tickets. I asked him to produce what money he had, and he produced four three-shilling pieces, and two shillings. On his producing that, I asked him if he had any more money about him; he said he had not. I asked him how many tickets he had from his cousin, and what they were; he told me he had had twenty pit tickets and fourteen box tickets. I asked him how many he had so; he said, he had sold three pit tickets to a Mr. Hoare, an uncle of his, a box ticket to his father, and another to his mother, and he gave a servant of mine and a young man one each. Out of the whole of the sales, it appeared by his own accout, that he had only received four shillings, I then sent for an officer, who searched him up stairs in my presence, and he put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and on its being examined, he had a three shilling piece in it just at the corner of his silk handkerchief.

COURT. Now the way I should have acted, instead of going this circuitous road to work about the tickets, would have been to ask him to account for the money he had taken from the customer.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-62

349. MARY SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , four three-shilling bank

tokens, value 12s. and thirteen shillings , the property of Henry Barwick .

MARY BARWICK . These tokens were lost on the 20th of March; they were taken out of the till at about eight o'clock in the evening; I had occasion to leave the bar, and the prisoner went into it; she kept a haberdsher's stall close by; she came about seven o'clock, and had been full three quarters of an hour in our house, standing against the till.

EDWARD MASON. I went into the prosecutor's house, on the 20th of March, in the evening, to get a glass of porter; I saw the prisoner in the bar, leaning with her left arm on the counter, and she was taking the money out of the till with her right hand, and putting it into her pocket, under her apron. I asked repeatedly for the beer, thinking she was the landlady; she kept her eyes frequently looking round, and said, yes, sir, yes, sir, several times. Immediately after the landlady came in, and asked me what I wanted; I told her what I had seen, and she went and pulled the drawer out, and discovered the deficiency, for there was only one sixpence left. The prisoner denied it, and said she had no money at all about her, and it appeared when she was searched, that she had seven or eight and thirty shillings in silver and copper.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-63

349. CHARLES CATLING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , a tea-chest, value 1l. the property of Benjamin Reeves .

BENJAMIN REEVES . I lost my tea-chest in the middle of December last, from a yard in the front of my house.

WILLIAM SITGRAVE. On the 10th of February, the prisoner and another man with him, who stood a little distance off, came into my shop with a tea-chest, in a blue apron, for sale, He took it out and gave it to me to look at. I suspected him very much, by the concealed manner in which he had it at first, and on examing it, I found it had no sugar glass; and he told me he had broken that just before he came from home; he asked me would I not give him any thing for it; I told him no, I would have nothing to do with it. I saw him go across to the next witness's shop over the way, and the other man with him; they immediately came out of Berry's, and I went over, and told him I considered the caddy as stolen. We went after them to the end of Charlotte-street; I there passed them, and they did not appear to know me again. I then lost them, and after that, going up towards the turnpike, at the top of Old-street, I saw the man who had accompanied the prisoner standing at a shop. I went into the shop, which is a broker's, and there the prisoner was offering it for sale; I told the woman that I thought it was stolen, and advised her not to buy it. I then looked for the person who accompanied the prisoner, and he was gone. The prisoner said the caddy was his; and when I got him to my house, he said it was his mother's; when I asked him who his mother was, he said she was a woman who carried the swagg, which I understood to be a basket of earthen ware.

GEORGE BERRY . I live at No. 6. Susannah-row. The prisoner came to offer this tea-caddy to me, and I accompanied the last witness in pursuit of him. I had suspicion in consequence of his appearance, and refused to purchase it. We delivered the tea-caddy to an officer, together with the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-64

350. THOMAS PAGE was indicted for stealing on the 12th of March , a handkerchief, value, 1s. a night-gown, value 1s. and three aprons, value 2s. the property of Sarah Ford .

SARAH FORD . It is possible for a person about nine or ten o'clock in the evening, who knows our premises, to go up stairs without our knowledge. On the night of the 12th of March, I went up stairs about half past ten; and as I went past the door of one of the chambers, I perceived the bed was disordered; a bed which had been before made; a pair of sheets, a blanket, and a great coat were missing; that was from one room, Shortly after, I examined my own chamber, and missed a pair of stays, two sheets, two bed-gowns, two pair of stockings, two pocket handkerchiefs, four cotton aprons, and one linen one. These things had been washed and taken up stairs. I then gave an alarm, that I thought the house must have been broken open.

MARY KIMPTON. I know the prisoner, and have known him about two months. I remember Vickery coming to my house and finding some things. The things which Vickery found, and which he took away, were brought by the prisoner, Thomas Page .

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer of Bow-street. I went to the house of the last witness, in company with Joshua Armstrong . I found there two pieces of paper, on one of which was written, Thomas Page , at Mr. Lucas's, Hornsey-road, Holloway, and the other is a part of a note to Mrs. Thorp, in answer to an invitation to dinner. I found the prisoner at Mr. Lucas's, to whose house that direction led me. I only found the property stated in the indictment, at the house of the last witness.

JOSEPH THORP , ESQ. I am the son of the prosecutor, one of the sheriffs of this county. The prisoner lived at house while our groom was ill; he had left us nearly three quarters of a year when this happened. He was with us for six weeks, and he knew the house perfectly. He slept in that part of the house which adjoins the room from which this properly was taken. It was perfectly easy for a person to get into our house between eight and ten in the evening.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-65

351. JOSEPH EMANUEL , JOSEPH MYERS , and EMANUEL AARON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Davis , about the hour of nine in the night,

of the 26th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, six sheets, value 3l. eleven pillow cases, value 1l. two table cloths, value 1l. three waistcoats, value 6s. a coat, value 25s. one pair of breeches, value 10s. four shirts, value 3l. six shifts, value 2l. 10s. fourteen caps, value 2l. 18s. 6d. one skirt, value 5s. five towels, value 4s. four pillows, value 16s. one bolster, value 1l. a carpet, value 3l. a shawl, value 1l. a set of fire irons, value 1l. 1s. a pelisse, value 2l. 10s. a shawl, value 1l. a counpane, value 2l. 2s. a quilt, value 12s. a piece of patchwork, value 7s. six spoons, value 16s. a skirt of a gown, value 7s. and a bank note for the payment of 2l. the property of the said David Davis.

MARY DAVIS . In the evening of the 26th of March last, I went out between the hours of seven and eight o'clock, leaving nobody at home. I locked the door; the back door was fast, and bolted with two bolts; the windows were also all fast when I left the house; I left no one at home. I returned again between nine and ten o'clock, I can't speak exactly to the hour. My husband returned first. When we examined the house, we found the drawers were open and things gone.

MARY HART. On the 26th of March in the evening, I passed the prosecutor's house, near the hour of ten, and saw the front door in the court open. Mrs. Homan gave me a light, and I went into the house; the back door was wide open also; I did not examine the locks; the back door was wide open. I went up one pair of stairs, and saw the the door of a press bedstead open; I dont know whether there was any thing taken from that; I shut the bedstead door; the up stairs drawers were wide open. There is only one room on a floor. The drawers were wide open, and completely empty. The bed was tumbled, and the bolster, and pillows, were gone; the sheets were gone, and the blankets laid on the floor at the foot of bed, as if they had been thrown off. I fetched Mr Fgg, the publican, who also saw the state of the house. I then went and told Mr. and Mrs. Davis what had happened; she was at her mother's close by.

DAVID DAVIS . I heard that my house had been opened at about half past nine, a young woman of the name of Hart informed me; she found me in a public-house. When I went, I found that my house had been opened, and the drawers were empty, and all the things gone; there was a mark by the lock of the door, as if a chissel had been used to force the lock back. The next time I heard of any of my property was when a man had them on his arm; that was in the afternoon; but I can't tell what time, because I was in a hurry to run to see my property; he had two pair of sheets, three napkins, and a waistcoat of mine; it was Joseph Emanuel; Mr. Gleed, the constable, was with me. Emanuel was in Mr. Cutler's house in Rag-fair.

ABRAHAM GOLDSMIDT . I saw the prisoner, Joseph Emanuel , on the 29th of March, which would fall on a Friday, I saw him in Cutler's-street, Houndsditch; he was disposing of some different kinds of light wearing apparel, and other things, offering them for public sale; he told me he knew nothing of the robbery, when I told him I should seize the property, as it was my brother's, and he told me to come with him into the public-house, and he would tell me whom he bought them of; he said he bought them of a person named Joseph Myers. I immediately sent home to my brother-in-law, to acquaint him that I had detained some of his property. Joseph Emanuel said, don't be afraid that I want to run away, leave me in the care of your friends, and go and get a constable, and go round into Petticoat-lane, and there you find Joseph Myers. I left him with my friends, and the property likewise, and he made no attempt whatever to get away.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a police officer of Worship-street. I went with David Davis , and took the prisoner, Joseph Emanuel into custody; I found with him four sheets, three napkins, a waistcoat, and other things, but those I have enumerated, were all that were claimed by the prosecutor. The waistcoat was with some other old clothes. I did not apprehend Myers; but I found this handkerchief on him at the office, which is spotted with white, on the day he was apprehended.

Myers, That is my handkerchief.

David Davis. I went with Kinnersley to Aaron's house; he was not at home, and I found a bundle of things on the step of his door, and among them were two articles of mine; the rest of the things were not mine; those two are merely a shift, and part of a gown.

MORRIS DAVIS . About one o'clock on the Friday, I saw the prisoner Myers, pass by me with two bundles, one was a yellow bundle, and the other was a blue handkerchief, with white spots; very like the one found on Myers.

RICHARD THORNTON PERKIN. I am a pawnbroker. I have some things that I took into pledge on the 27th of March; but not from either of the prisoners; here is a silk gown, a veil, a silk handkerchief, a pelisse, a coat, and a pair of breeches.

LEAH MICHAEL. I live at 31, Cutler's-street. I saw the prisoner, Joseph Myers , on Friday, the 29th of March; I think it was about twelve o'clock in the day time; he had two pair of sheets, and three napkins, and other things, which he was offering for sale openly in the fair; I might have them about three minutes in my hands; he asked me a very fair price for them. I don't know whether those found on Joseph Emanuel are the same.

Emanuel's Defence. I bought the sheets from Mr. Myers, and the napkins.

Myers's Defence. I can take my oath I never sold them to Joseph Emanuel .

Aaron's Defence. Somebody put these things into my premises, and I threw them out as soon as ever I found them there.

The prisoner Emanuel, called the following witness.

DAVID SOLOMONS . I know Emanuel, who is a dealer in clothes, and so forth. I remember between one and two he was exposing articles for sale publickly. I saw these things in his possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-66

352. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 1l. the property of Joseph Johnson and Josiah Smith , privately in their shop .

JOSIAH SMITH. The prisoner came to our shop on the 4th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and bought a yard of calico, for which she paid ten-pence, and a handkerchief, for which she paid two shillings. She went away immediately after paying for these things. In about a quarter of an hour after, an officer of the name of Maidment brought her back to my shop; when she was brought back, she had two quantities of printed cotton; one was about nine yards; the other about four yards and three quarters; the cost price of the two was about thirty shillings, and I have no doubt but that they were my property; the nine yards, which cost about twenty shillings, I can swear to; to the other, I cannot so positively. These things had been near where the prisoner stood. I and a neighbour of mine were the only persons in the shop when she came in. My neighbour is not here.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am a police officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Winfield's, the pawnbroker's at the corner of Compton-street, High-street, St. Giles's; I was in the pawnbroker's shop when she came; she offered to pawn the smallest piece of cotton, and asked eight shillings on it. I asked her whether she had been to treat herself to a new gown? and she said, yes. I asked her how much it took to make a gown? and she said, six yards. I asked her had she six yards? she said, she had, and when the pawnbroker measured it, there were but four and three quarters. That excited a suspicion in me, and I asked her if she had not something else in her apron? she said, she had, and what she had got there, she had brought from her mother's. I asked her if she would let me see it? and she said, no. I thought she had not come honestly by it, and I was determined to see what she had got in her apron, and I found the other piece of print, together with the calico and handkerchief. I asked her if she would take me where she bought them? and she said, she would; and she took me to Mr. Smith's. I asked him whether she brought the calico and handkerchief there? and he said, she had. I asked him whether she had bought the cotton there? and he said, she had not; and it was his property.

Prisoner's Defence. As soon as I turned out of the prosecutor's shop, a strange woman followed me, and asked me if I wanted to buy a cheap gown? and I told her, no; I had bought all I wanted. She asked me fourteen shillings for this cotton, and I was going away twice, and she offered it for twelve shillings; when I unfortunately gave her my market money, and was about to pledge the cotton again, as I could not do without it; and when I was pledging it, the officer stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood

Reference Number: t18160403-67

353. THOMAS PLOWS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , a coat, value 2l. and a hat, value 10s. the property of John Evans , in the dwelling-house of Benjamin Hall, esq .

JOHN EVANS. On Wednesday morning last, I went up stairs, between ten and eleven o clock, and on coming down again, I went to my own room, I pushed my door open, and it recoiled against me, as if somebody was behind it; immediately the prisoner was just coming out; and I asked him what business he had there? he seemed very much confused, and made a great many stammers, and said he wanted to find the kitchen; I shewed him along the passage towards the kitchen, and pointed it out to him; he had a ice-pail and a apron, like a confectioner's man. I just put my head into my own room to see if all was right, and perceived that my coat, which had been hanging up on the other side of the room, and my hat, which had been in a box, had been removed as far as from your lordship to me, to the plate chest, close by which the prisoner was standing when I first pushed the door open; I waited until he returned, and laid hold of him, and then he denied taking the coat and hat. I asked him where he came from? and he said, from Mr. Gunter's, the confectioner, in Berkley-square, for orders. I took him into custody, and took him to Bow-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Brook-street, about ten o'clock on Wednesday morning, and a young man, like a confectioner's man, gave me that ice-pail, and asked me to go down, and ask if there were any orders from Mr. Gunter. I went down, and went into this room by mistake, and was just coming out when the gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18160403-68

354. WILLIAM TURTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , one pound weight of tea, value 6s. the property of William Barnsley; and two pounds weight of coffee, value 6s. two coach-glasses, value 4l. and one rugg, value 2s. the property of Joseph James .

WILLIAM BARNSHY. I am coachman to Mr. Joseph James. On the 22nd of February, I drove the family to Town, and we arrived in the afternoon about one o'clock; I put the carriage in the coach-house, at the Black Lion that night, and about half past seven in the morning, when I went to the coach-house, I found the doors open, and the tea, which was my own, and my master's coffee, both of which had been on the seat, were gone; also the coach-glasses and the rugg from the boot. On the Tuesday following, I saw some of these things at Guildhall.

ROBERT CROFT. I know the prisoner at the bar. At about half past twelve o'clock on Thursday, the 22nd of February, at night, he was going past me at my beat, and he asked me for a lodging; and he had a white paper parcel in his hand. I directed him to a lodging in Field-lane; but he halted at Falcon-court; that gave me a suspicion, and I thought he did not really want a lodging. I went up to him, and found him in company with two other men; they made their escape, and ran down George-alley; I pursued the prisoner; I took the parcel out of his hand; the prisoner told me it was coffee. I then led him down to the watchho use in going along, the tea dropped from him

also. I afterwards found part of the glasses, and the frames, which the two men had thrown away, in George-alley.

SAMUEL EYRE . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Elliott and Robertson, Finsbary-place. Those parcels of tea and coffee were made up at our house and sold to Mr. Joseph James .

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-69

355. HENRY PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , one piece of satin, called leghorn satin, containing thirty-three yards, value 7l. one other piece of satin, called leghorn satin, containing forty yards, value 6l. one piece of violet coloured satin, containing thirty-six yards and a quarter, value 9l. a piece of white coloured satin, shot with yellow, containing forty-eight yards and three quarters, value 6l. one piece of puce coloured satin, containing twenty-three yards, value 4l. a piece of charet coloured satin, containing forty-five yards, value 10l. a piece of black mode silk, containing forty-one yards and a half, value 6l. one other piece of black mode silk, containing forty-eight yards, value 4l. the property of James Stranger , Henry Topham , Thomas James , and William Tate , in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BECKWITH . I am in the employ of the prosecuters, In the morning of Tuesday, the 22nd of March, I discovered that the premises had been robbed; a quantity of satins, modes, and lustrings; the premises had been entered that morning from the back door in the Old Change; I believe they were stolen between eight and nine that morning, for I did not discover any vacancy on the frames at half past seven, and I had observed the things were all safe the evening previous, between five and six.

WILLIAM MOSS . I keep the George, at Stratford. On the morning of Tuesday, the 12th of March, I saw the prisoner at my house; he came about half after ten, alone; in about half an hour, he was joined by another person; that other person brought a bundle; they breakfasted, and staid at my house two or three hours. I did not see them leave my house. When they went; they left the bundle to be taken care of; I did not see them go, but I missed them. They came again in the evening; the bundle was left in the room where we have each parcels; they asked me in the evening if there was any conveyance to town, and they went to London at about nine o'clock, by a return post chaise belonging to the Three Nunns at Aldgate. The prisoner at the bar had been to my house at different times before; I have seen him dealing at my house several times.

RICHARD MULLEY . I rent the tap at the Three Nunns. On the night of the 12th of March, the prisoner and another man came there in a return post chaise belonging to our house; it was about ten o'clock when they came. The prisoner at the bar delivered a parcel into my care, and asked me to take care of it for him; he did not say until when. After that, they both went away in company together. In consequence of a suspicion I entertained, I sent for a constable. The prisoner returned in about half an hour, and I had got the constable in the house. I asked the prisoner whether he was going to take the parcel away? he said, yes, he was, and he made towards the door of the room where the parcel was, and seeing the constable there, he immediately turned back, and went out of the house, and the constable followed him, and took him in the yard, and brought him back into the house.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Aldgate, and I was sent for by the last witness, between ten and eleven on the night of the 12th of March; I was in the house when the prisoner came in the second time, and the moment he clapped his eye on me, he turned about, and went off; I knew he knew my person very well. I asked him if the property was his? he said, it was not; that he had accompanied a man from Startford, and that the man had begged him to have the parcel taken care of for him; he mentioned the name of Lynch. I took him into custody; and the next day, I found out that the prosecutors had lost such articles as the parcel contained.

William Beckwith . I look at this property; it consists of all the things that we missed; it is the properly of my employers.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday morning, about half past nine, I got my goods, consisting of jewellery articles, ready, and went out as far as Whitechapel, to look out for the Coggeshall and Chelorsford coach, to go down the road as far as Stratford. I walked from the turnpike to Mr. Moss's house, and then I called for a glass of rum and water. I took out my goods, and there was a man came in with a bag, and sat himself down by me; he asked me where my goods were made? I told him they were made in London, and I told him I was going to London in the course of the evening, and he said, he would go with me. I went out about my business after that, and returned again in the evening; this man was there then. I stopped a return post chaise, and he and I got into it together, and went to the Three Nunns at Aldgate; I went in there, with a man, and called for a glass of rum and water. This man asked me if I would have the goodness to ask the landlord to take care of the bag for him, and the landlord said he would. I told the man he would find it as safe as in his own house the next morning. After I had returned back, and drank my rum and water, I was going back from the tap-room to the coffee-room, when Mr. Ray came and caught hold of me, and asked me was that parcel mine? I said no, it was not; it belonged to a man who had come to Town with me in a returned post chaise. He asked me if I knew what were the contents of the bag? and I told him, I knew no more than the child unborn.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

HANNAH COHEN . I live in Golden-lane, near Barbican, No. 135. I have kept a house there for twenty-one years. I know the prisoner at the bar; he had lodged in my first floor three or four months, and lived there on the 11th and 12th of March, I always examined the house before I went to bed at night, and none of my lodgers are suffered to keep late hours. I am confident that the prisoner was at home before ten and eleven o'clock that night, of the 11th of March. Mr. Griffiths was with him. The latest hour I saw him at home was before ele

ven o'clock, and I am sure he was not out after that; because I always fasten my door at eleven o'clock, and don't suffer any one to go out; if he went out after that, I must have heard him. I let Mr. Griffiths out myself; he is a jeweller, in Blacklow-street, and makes the seals for the watches.

MARY SAMUEL . I know the prisoner at the bar, and slept in his house, on the night of the 11th of March. I had lately come to town, and my mother had no room for me. I was there the whole of the afternoon. I don't know whether I drank tea there or not. I saw Mr. Griffiths there, and he went away about eleven o'clock. I did not sleep in the same appartment with Mr. Phillips and his wife. Mr. Phillips and his wife went to bed a few minutes after eleven o'clock. I got up about seven o'clock in the morning; and went into their room for my bonnet; and awoke Mr. Phillips, who was then in bed. I went to my mother's, and returned about half palf eight o'clock, and saw Mr. Griffiths at Mr. Phillip's then cleaning some seals and a chain. I can't say what Phillips was doing; but I think he was near the fire side; I think he had dressed himself to go out, but I am not possitive. Griffiths went away rather after nine. After Griffiths went away, Phillips got his goods ready, and put them into his pocket and went out.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS. I am a jeweller I saw the prisoner at his lodgings, on the night of the 11th of March; I went there in consequence of his being in debt with me three shilling and six-pence. I believe it had turned ten in the evening when I went. I staid there nearly an hour; I did not return until the following morning. The prisoner came to me at my residence about half past seven o'clock, and staid with me some minutes; he begged of me to clean up some metallic chains and seals for him, and I told him I could not as I had not the materials, namely, rouge and leather. He then said, if you will come home to my place, I will furnish you with the materials. He then went away and I followed him; it was past eight o'clock when I got to his place; that I am certain of. I cleaned the articles, and as I was going back home, it was five minutes after nine by the brewhouse clock, and that is all I know.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-70

356. JOSEPH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , a cruet-stand, value 5s. nine glass-cruets, value 5s. and four silver labels, value 5s. the property of the Hon. George Annesley , Esq. commonly called Lord Viscount Vatentia ; Sir Thomas Bernard , Bart. and the Rev. William Belve , clerk .

JOHN BROOKS. I am steward of the Alfred Club-house, Albemarle-street . These things were lost on Thursday last, about half past three in the afternoon, one of the servants informed me that he had detected a man taking some of the plate off the side-board. I went in and saw this stand removed from the place where it stood, and a brown silk handkerchief which I had never seen before, spread upon a plate-warmer, at the end of the side-board, one corner of the handkerchief was turned up over the casters, and the three were spread out. The prisoner insisted that this handkerchief was not his property; and said he came to enquire for a gentleman; but I don't recollect the name that was on a letter which he produced, directed to Pope's Alley, Threadneedle-street.

THOMAS HUGHES. I am footman to the Alfred Club -house, Albemarle-street. In the servants room about my business, I heard a bustling of the glasses on the side-board in the dining room, and saw the prisoner in the act of putting a handkerchief over a set of cruets, which usually stood on the side board, but which were removed to the plate warmer. He immediately went out of the room, and I followed him. He left the handkerchief; I can't tell whether he saw or heard me; I raught him just at the green swing doors, which open into the street; there are three pair of doors, and I caught him at the second. I took him into the committee room, and my fellow servant went for Mr. Brooks.

SANUEL PLANK. He said be slept at the Dover Castle, it St. James's-street the night before; but I found there was no such house as the Dover Castle in St. James's-street.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-71

457. HENRY WILLIAMS , WILLIAM BUTTS , and WILLIAM GOUGH , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , three gallons of Rum, value 20s. the property of John Gray and Walter Gray .

Two other COUNTS. Stating the property to belong to other persons.

NOAH MEADOWS . I am an excise import officer, and was so on the 17th of February. I delivered thirty puncheons of rum on that day, from the West India Docks. There was one numbered 105, another 109, and another 120. I delivered them full, with the exception of samples, which were under a pint and a half out of each puncheon. I left 105, containing one hundred and twenty gallons, 109 containing one hundred and fifteen gallons, and 120 containing one hundred and fifteen gallous. I delivered them to Richard Brewer, an excise watchman, at the import dock.

RICHARD BREWER . I am an extra excise watchman, at the West India import docks. On the 27th of February, I received thirty puncheons of rum into my charge from the last witness; there were tins over the bungs, and they were put into a craft belonging to Messrs. Faweelt, called the Shannon. I then went away to the officer of the gate, to take the samples there. I left no person with the samples in the intermediate time while I was gone to the gate. When I came back, the lighter was moved into the basin, on her way to the river. I went on board then; the rums were then all safe as I believe; there was no smell of any rum, having got out then. I walked on the quay, where I commanded a view of the vessel until about seven o'clock in the evening, and I was then relieved by the prisoner, William Gough . The Shannon was to go up the river next day. The next morning I went on her, at about half past eight o'clock; she was then lying in the Custom

house Roads, off the custom-house quay, but on the London side of the river; Gough was there, and a police officer. I asked Gough what was the matter; I had heard that something was the matter; he said, he did not know rightly; but he believed the charge had been plandered, for he had heard a noise in the night. What we term the charge, is that which we have to take care of. That was on the morning of the 28th. In the course of the day before, I had seen the prisoner Williams; he had come to me on the rum. quay, at the West India import Dock, while I was attending Mr. Meadows and Mr. Brain; Williams asked me for my relief, which is very often the case among us. That is, that I should take my charge by night, I gave him the charge of the rum that night. In point of fact, he did not relieve me, but Gough did. I gave Williams my note, to signify that he was to have my night watch, which is a rule of the docks; but instead of his coming, Gough came.

JOHN ASHLEY. I am assistant inspector of the watch. I know Gough and Williams. In February last, they were watchmen, extra watchmen to the Excise. I had appointed William Gough to relieve Richard Brewer , at a charge of thirty puncheons of rum; he was to go at six o'clock; they were in a lighter belonging to Messrs. Fosset. Nothing passed about coffee. I cleared him of his former charge. I discharged him from the charge of some coffee, I appointed Williams on the 26th to twelve puncheons of rum. He was to relieve Thomas Maddox ; it would have been his duty to relieve him at six o'clock, and on the same hour on the 27th; his charge was in a hoy at Summer's Quay, London.

THOMAS MADDOX . I am an extra excise watchman. On the 27th, I had charge of twelve puncheons of rum. I was relieved at Summer's Quay by Henry Williams; it was his duty to remain with the charge until six o'clock the next morning; it was a Deck Hoy. I saw it locked up before I left it, and therefore there could be no plunder there.

THOMAS PIERCY. I am a surveyor of the Thames Police. I was on duty on the morning of the 28th of February, in company with Thomas Hamilton and Robert Nichols. My attention was called on the River to a strange smell of rum opposite the old Custom House; it appeared on board a lighter there; I ordered our boat to go along side of it; that lighter turned out to be the Shannen. I then stood, and opened my lanthorn, which was a dark one, and looked, and saw the prisoner Williams, get up from the after tier, in the body of the lighter, from among the casks; he ran forward in the lighter, and into a deck barge; I pursued him immediately, and he went over the deck barge, and into a lug-boat, and I jumped into it after him; he went forward, and endeavoured to conceal himself between the main thwart and the other; but I secured him. I asked him what made him run away? and he said what run away, I have not run away. I told him that I saw him run out of the lighter, and he denied it. His breath smelled intolerably strong of rum, I searched him, and found in his pocket eight spoils. I then put him on board my boat. On returning to the lighter, I found a spoil struck into a one hundred and ninety puncheon slightly, like a pen into an ink-stand; it appeared as if it had been put into the cask with the hand, and not hatcnered in; as near as I can possibly say, Williams ran from the spot, On getting back into the Shannon, I saw Butts and Gough standing in the head sheets of the lighter; they were enquiring what was the matter. I asked them were they watchmen of the lighter, and they replied, yes. I understood that one was the lighterman's watchman, and the other the excise watchman. I told them they knew better than I did, what was the matter. I suspected that the rums had been plundered, and I proceeded to search them; I found nothing on Gough; on Butts I found two sail needles, and some twine. I gave a look round the lighter; but saw nothing farther at that time. I then searched the different crfts along side the lighter; but found nothing. I was not satisfied, and returned to the Shannon again. On searching her further, I found two bladders of rum in her stern sheets, between her timbers. I examined puncheon one hundred and nine, and found it wet, and the two casks one hundred and five, and one hundred and twenty were also wet; they were wet from having been spoiled. Near the full bladders, I found two empty ones also, and with them a gimlet and crane; it is such as would be used for such a purpose. The bladders were tied with string, similar to what I found in Butts's pocket. I took Butts and Williams to the office. I left Gough to remain until I returned. Upon him, I found nothing, and he remained there until I returned. I told him I had left a person on the wharf, who would watch him if he did any thing. I had not done so, but I told him so to avoid his going away. The vessel was laying about one ships length from the shore; not so far off as the midstream.

THOMAS HAMILTON, and ROBERT NICHOLS. Corroborated the account of last witness.

WILLIAM HURST. I am inspector of the Excise watch. On the morning of the 28th of February, in consequence of what had passed, I went on board the lighter, and found Gough and Brewer there. I went up to Gough, and asked him what he had been doing to let his charge be robbed, and he said, he knew nothing of it. I then said, were you asleep, and he said, no. I said were you in that place, and pointed to a kind of a cabin; he said, no. I then said, where were you then, and he said, there, pointing to some timbers on the fore part of the barge. I asked him if he was asleep there, and he said, he was not. I said if you were there, and not asleep, you must have been a party to the robbery, for in that place, he could have seen all over the barge, and all the casks. He then denied all knowledge of the transaction. I asked if he knew the men who were in custody, and he said, he knew nothing at all of them.

JOHN FIELD . I am an excise surveyor of imports. About ten o'clock on the morning of the 28th of February, I went on board the Shannon, and found it in the care of Richard Brewer, she had thirty, puncheons of rum aboard; I examined the puncheons, and found from one hundred and five there was about

two gallons deficient, and one hundred and nine was about a gallon deficient, and one hundred and twenty was nearly a gallon and six eights deficient; that includes samples and all; if you deduct the samples from the gross deficiency, that will leave an improper deficiency of about four gallons and a half. I see the spoils that were taken from Williams; they are the same sized spoils as those in the casks.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 35.

BUTTS, GUILTY , aged 60.

GOUGH, GUILTY , aged 69.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-72

358. THOMAS SIZELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , one 3s. bank token , the property of Charles Woodward .

CHARLES WOODWARD. Having suspected the prisoner, who was in my service, I was determined to try his honesty, and accordingly I got a friend whom he did not know, to go to my shop in Piccadilly, on the 7th of March, and purchase two locks, with two three-shilling pieces, which were marked, desiring him to get a bill and receipt. My friend gave me the bill and receipt into my hands. I immediately went into the shop, to see if the amount of the bill was entered in the cash book, and I found only two shillings entered for the six. I then desired him suspecting that there was something wrong, to shew me the money in the till, and there was only one of the three-shilling pieces that were marked, in the till. Being certain that he had taken the other three-shilling piece, I asked him to lend me five shillings; upon which he lent me the other three shilling piece, taken from his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-73

359. THOMAS WASHINGTON was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 19th of February , eight pounds weight of silk, value 27l. part and parcel of certain goods the property of Mary Meadows and Thomas Castle Meadows ; of which, John Pax man was at the Delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on Wednesday, the 14th of February last, convicted of feloniously stealing; he (the present prisoner,) well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen .

CHARLES CARRON. I produce the certificate of the conviction of Thomas Paxton, at the last sessions for this County.

THOMAS CASTLE MEADOWS. I am a silk dyer, When this silk is sent to be dyed, it undergoes what we call the first process, which is its being steeped in ho soap-suds, so as to take the greater part of the yellow gum with which it is charged out. Then it undergoes a second process, in which it is boiled in frest soap-suds, and is thereby completely cleared of the gum; it is perfectly easy to distinguish between silk which has undergone the first process only, and that which has been completely cleared of the gum; it is not by any means a practice in the trade to sell silk after its having undergone that first process; it is impossible to be dyed in that second state. I should think that silk in that second state could not be in the hands of any one but a dyer. The processes are performed by dyers alone, and not by dealers in silk; it is impossible for a honest dyer to sell it al all. the silk is delivered to us by the manufacturers. In the course of the night of the 27th of January, our premises were robbed of silks, Orgazine,Italian, and China, to the amount of eighty pounds weight; the value of what we lost would be about two hundred pounds. Part of the Orgazine and Italian silk had only undergone the first process; some part of that silk Paxman was convicted of stealing. On Monday, the 29th, I saw a small parcel which Paxman had dropped. Paxman was taken up on Tuesday, the 30th. Mr. Deboos waited on me on the 21st of February, and shewed me one pound two ounces weight of Ogazine silk, which had undergone the first process only. I went to his house the next morning, and there he shewed me a small quantity of Italian silk, which had also undergone only the first process. In consequence of further information which I received from Mr. Deboos, I obtained a search warrant against the prisoner, and Armstrong and Gleed went with me to execute it. On searching his house, we found on the counter in the warehouse another parcel of silk, which had only undergone the first process; it was a much larger parcel than either of those Mr. Deboos had shewn me. There was a prodigious quantity of other silks there; but this third parcel was the first I took particular notice of. All the other silks were either entirely in the gum, or completely boiled. Upon this, the prisoner was taken before the magistrate. The tying of the silks in banks, enables a person to know them again, there is a thread round each knot.

JOHN STEPHEN MARIGNAN. I am a servant to Mr. Deboos, who was a silk dyer, in Spitalfields. I received the two parcels of silk which Mr. Deboos shewed to Mr. Meadows, from the prisoner to be dyed in February last; one of the parcels the prisoner delivered with his own hands; in fact, I had them both from him personally; it was to be dyed drab. I informed Mr. Deboos of it. I did not see it again until I saw it at the police office.

JOHN DEBOOS . I have been a silk dyer in Spitalfields for some years. I remember the silk in question coming into our dye house, brought by the prisoner; one parcel came on the 19th of February; the other on the 22nd. The bills would denote that the silks had never been boiled, and that they were to be of the same colour. The second bill denoted that the second parcel was to be boiled; and there was a third parcel of four pounds, which came by itself, and which has been sent home. The two parcels which I shewed to Mr. Meadows have undergone the first process, and had so before they came to me; that is, the gum was taken off, but they were not boiled; that would at once be obvious to a person who knew his business well; they could not be dyed in the state they were sent to me; silk is never sold by silk dealers in the state in which this is, I have observed the manner in which these banks are tied, and they are not tied in the manner in which

a dyer would tie them; a dyer would never have sent them home in the way they are now. Knowing Mr. Meadows's loss, it struck me that this was the same sort of silk that he had lost; I had no other reason than that for shewing it to him.

JAMES HENRY GRIEVE , a silk dyer preved it was not the custom of the trade to sell silk in this state.

JOHN HONEYMAN , a silk weaver, corroborated the evidence of the last witness.

JOHN ARMSTRONG, and BARNARD GLEED . Proved the execution of the search warrant on the prisoner's premises, his apprehension, and the finding of one of the parcels of silk.

WILLIAM HERITAGE . I am second clerk to the Magistrates at Worship-street. I was present when the prisoner Washington was examined; neither promise nor threat was made use of to him, and I took down in writing what he said.

(The prisoner's examination before the magistrate, as taken in writing by the witness, was then read.)

"The first parcel of silk which I delivered to Mr. Deboos, I found at the bottom of my bisson; I had it either from Mr. Lane, or from Mr. -. The second parcel I had from Mr. Kibler, in Wood-street, and Mr. Perry took the gum out for me. The silk which was found on my counter I had either from Mr. Kibler or Mr. Barber, and Mr. Perry took the gum out of it."

William Heritage . Time was given to the prisoner to produce witnesses, but none were produced, except one Daniel Perry, on the second examination.

The prisoner put in a written defence of considerable length, arguing upon the improbability of a man of his respectability and long standing in the trade, which subsequently appeared to be the fact, selling his reputation, his honour, and his liberty for such a paulty and inconsiderable profit, as such a fraudulent dealing would afford. He declared most solemnly his inocence, and stated that when he had small orders to complete in haste, he and his wife were some times under the necessity of washing silk themselves, because it was not worth the while of a dyer to light his copper fires, unless he could till Irts coppers.

Several witnesses of respectability proved their selling silks of various kinds to the prisoner, and also gave him a most unblemished character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-74

360. JAMES LEWIS , alias DAVIS , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Wilford Bulkeley , esq. about the hour of twelve in the night of the 24th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two hundred bottles of port wine, value 40l. his property.

MR. GEORGE BULKELEY. The house which was broked open, was No. 10, Great Tichfield-street , from which my father had removed, without any intention of returning; every thing was removed except the wine, part of which was sold.

SARAH GRINAWAY . I am a servant belonging to Mr. Bulkeley. I went to the empty house in Titchfield-street about half past five in the evening of the 24th of February, I secured the house, and it was all safe; this was on Saturday. On my going to the house on the Sunday evening following, and putting the key to the key hole, two pieces of whalebone flew out of the key hole; I found, on unlocking the door. that it was only on the spring, and not double locked as I had left it; I found the latch held up by a piece of white paper doubled up under it; I went and told my master; and on further examination, we found some papers removed in the hall; the cellar door broken open, and a great deal of wine gone.

RICHARD MICHAEL CONNELL. I am a watchman, On the night of Saturday, the 24th of February, going my rounds in Castle-street, I fell in with my partner, and we met the prisoner in Castle-street, near Oxford-road, not a quarter of a mile from Titchfield-street, and coming in a direction from Mr. Bulkeley's when we met him, he crossed the road, and we followed him; we found seven bottles of wine on him, four in a pair of canvass braces and bags, and the other three in his smock frock, which was turned up at the bottom, and tied round him. We asked him what he had there several times, and he would not answer; and I put my hand into his breast, and pulled out a bottle of wine. We took him to the watchhouse.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL. I was constable of the night, and took the wine from the prisoner; I found these braces and bags clung across his shoulders.

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-75

361. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a tea-caddy, value 1l. 12s. the property of Richard Gould .

RICHARD GOULD . I keep a hardware shop , No,

35, South Moulton-street , and lost a tea-caddy on the 5th of March.

SAMUEL CROUCH. I was coming up South Moulton-street, towards Oxford-street, about half past Seven in the evening of the 5th of March, and I heard a cry of stop thief, and saw the prisoner running down South Moulton-street, and I stopped him, and took him to Mary-bone watchhouse. The tea-caddy was found in the middle of the street.

ANN WILKIE . I live with the prosecutor. About half past seven in the evening of the 5th of March, the prisoner knocked at the shop door, and on opening it, I asked him what he wanted, and he said, he wanted the tea-caddy, and I told him if he would be pleased to go round the corner to my uncle, and I would go with him to know the price. The prisoner took up the tea-caddy, and ran off, and I cried out murder! stop thief.

Prosecutor. I can't swear to it.

GUILTY, aged 51.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-76

362. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , a watch, value 4l. and a seal, value 6d. the property of Richard Trappitt , AND ELIZABETH MORLEY , was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to have been feloniously stolen .

THE circumstances of this case, clearly brought home the guilt against Mary Smith ; but are too indelicate a nature to be inserted here.

THE evidence against Morley was not equally conclusive of her guilt.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

MORLEY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-77

363. PETER BUCKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , thirty-two yards of cotton gingham, value 30s , the property of James Fean .

JAMES FEAN. I am a linen draper at the corner of Parliament street .

JAMES PERCIVAL . I am shopman to Mr. Fean. On the 26th of March, at a quarter before eight in the morning, I observed the prisoner at the bar take this gingham from the outside of the shop; it was about four yards. I gave him into the custody of an officer.

GUILTY.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-78

364. ABRAHAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , one handkerchief, value 4s. the property of William Forbes , from his person .

WILLIAM FORBES . On the 3rd. of March, I was at the chapel in Tottenham-court-road . I was standing to hear the minister, and heard a person say behind me, is this your handkerchief; I immediately turned round, and saw the next witness in the act of taking my handkerchief out of the prisoner's hat. I put my hand to my pocket, and found my handkerchief was gone.

WILLIAM DE LABERTANC HE. I was at the tabernacle, and saw the prisoner standing behind the prosecutor; and after making several attempts at his pocket, he at last succeeded in taking his handkerchief from it, and was in the set of putting it into his hat; when I seized him and alarmed the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-79

365. JAMES SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 30s. the property of John Seacombe .

ANN SEACOMBE. On the 18th of March, the prisoner opened the door and took the cotton in question off the shelf close by the door. I was in an adjoining room and ran out. I seized the prisoner, and he hurt my arm considerable in trying to get out; I told the girl to call somebody; and she called two men in out of the street, while I was struggling with the prisoner. He would not put the print down, and one of the witnesses took it from under his coat.

WILLIAM BULMER. On the 18th of March, the prosecutor's servant said to me, pray sir come to my mistress's assistance. She said a man was ill-using her mistress. I went into the shop and the prisoner had his back towards the door. I seized him, and took the print from under his coat.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-80

366. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a hat, value 7s. the property of Richard Gunning .

RICHARD GUNNING . About five o'clock in the afternoon, of the day of the indictment, I saw the prisoner come up to the door, and take this hat from the door-post, and put it into his apron and cover it over, and run away. I immediately hallooed out stop thief, and he ran about two yards from the house, and threw the hat from his apron into the street, and the prisoner was stopped by my young man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along to see my sister and cousin, and as I was running along, my elbow caught the hat and knocked it down. I did not think anything of it, and ran on, being in a hurry, and after I had got a great way off the shop, a man came and knocked me down. For my part, I made no resistance, because I knew myself innocent; and I leave it all to the merciful judge and compassionate jury.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined two months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-81

367. ANN WRIGHT , JANE WILLFEW , and MARY TAYLOR , were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , two spoons, value 4s. one sheet, value 8s. one quilt, value 10s. one counterpane, value 14s. two gowns, value 13s. and one towel, value 2s. the property of John Gregory , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH GREGORY . I let apartments, and the prisoners Ann Wright , Mary Taylor , and Mary Ann Sands, who is not apprehended, lodged with me. They told me they were performers at Drury-lane theatre, and that it being lent time, they had come to our end of the town to perform. I asked them for a character, and they referred me to Jane Willfew , who gave me a character for them all. She lives in Brook-street, Ratcliffe. they came and lodged with me on the 8th of March, and had a furnished lodgings that day. They were to pay thirteen shillings a week. On the 12th of March, Sauds and Taylor went out, and never more returned. When I went up stairs, I found Ann Wright in the room; and on examination, these things were missing. She said Mary Ann Sauds had let her sleep there.

JOHN CAMPBELL. I produce two tea-spoons pawned in the name of Ann Wisham , and a counterpane and patch work pawned on the same day, in the name of Ann Wright ; but don't know the persons of those who pawned them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-82

368. JOHN HOUSE and CHARLOTTE WHITE-MAN were indicted, for feloniously assaulting James Bellamy , in the King's highway, on the 10th of March , and for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, four waistcoats, value 15s. a pair of pantaloons, value 3s. a handerchief, value 3s. and a five pound bank not e.

JAMES BELLAMY. On my return home between twelve and one o'clock on saturday evening, the day in the indictment, near the Bunch of Grapes, at Brompton . I met the prisoner Whiteman; she rushed up against me, and thrust her hand into my left hand breeches pocket. and took out a purse, containing a five pound bank of England note. I had not been walking with her at all. I told her she had robbed me, and immediately the other prisoner came up behind me and knocked me down. Getting up again he knocked me down, and did so two or three times. I had a bundle with me when she first came up to me in a silk handkerchief; it contained the articles in the indictment. When he knocked me down, the bundle fell and she threw it away. I then called the watchman, who took them both, and sent for another watchman, and then took them to the watch-house. I saw my bundle again in about five minutes after that. I never saw my note again.

ELIZABETH LINTON . I was at the Bunch of Grapes, at Brompton. The two prisoners had been drinking there that night, in company with each other; they went away at about half past eleven, together. After they went out, I heard a noise opposite our house; I looked out of the window, and saw the gentleman who was robbed, and the two prisoners. I heard the female prisoner talking to another woman whom she wanted to hide the bundle, and by what she said, I conceived she had the bundle in her possession; and she said, she had got the note. She wanted the other girl to run away with the bundle.

HOUSE, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

WHITEMAN, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-83

369. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Symons in the King's highway, on the 13th of March , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3l. a seal, value 2l. and three keys, value 5s. his property.

GEORGE SYMONS . As I was going homeward down Gray's-innlane , between twelve and one o'clock at night, on the 13th of March, in company with a cousin of my wife's, named Thomas Stevens,(not the prisoner.) A man ran by the side of me, and pulled the watch out of my pocket; he laid hold of my seals, keys and ribbon, and snatched the watch out of my fob with force. Such was the force that the case dropped off to the ground; I followed the man, and saw the watch hanging from his hand as he ran. My cousin stopped to pick up the case. I went up as far as the next or second court in Gray's-inn-lane, where the man had run down, and sung, out stop thief all the time. With that, I was within four or five yards of the man who had the watch, and I made a snatch at him, when I was knocked down, and fell in the mud. The prisoner was not taken into custody until the next day.

JOHN SYDNEY . I was returning home on the night of the 13th of March, between twelve and one, and when I got very near Tash-street, in Grays-inn-lane, I heard the cry of stop thief; there was a young man of the name of John Norman with me. There was a Jew and two women on before us; we all of us immediately turned back; I saw a person run down a place called Charlotte Buildings; I and John Norman stood at the bottom of Bell-court, in Gray's-inn-lane; that was about fifty yards from Charlotte Building. I then saw the same person come running down Bell-court; I then went up to him, and laid hold of his coller; Norman came up at the other side of him; the person whom we seized said, for God's sake young men recollect the consequences to be great against me. The prisoner is not the person we stopped. The person said, you shall have share; I said no, no, come along, and we pulled him out of the court. Coming down towards Holborn again, we called watch, watch; there was no watchman answered. When we came opposite Charlotte Buildings with him, he called out Jack, Jack, and immediately the prisoner came directly, and I perceived the man we had hold of, had the watch on his left side; he gave it to the prisoner, and I said, that man has got the watch, meaning the prisoner. The prisoner said, I got the watch, I will break your bloody neck; with that, he up with his fist, and hit me on the left side of my face; I tumbled against the shutter, and fell down on the rails; then they both got away from us.

JOHN NORMAN . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

FRANCIS FEGAN. I accompained Symons and Sidney the next day, the 14th of March, to the Falcon in Portpool-lane, where I desired Symons to stand at the door while Sydney and I went in Sydney said that one of the persons who were playing at cards, was the person who robbed my friend. We then came out again immediately, and I desired Sydney to go for a police officer. I and the prosecutor staid outside the door. We had not been there long before the prisoner came out of the house, and crossed the street, down a place called Sparrow-rents; imagining that he was the person that Sydney had pointed out to me, I followed him, and secured him, with the assistance of the prosecutor, and we conducted him as far as Hatton Garden, where we met Mr. Hutt, and delivered the prisoner to him.

JOHN HUTT. I know no more than the prisoner was delivered into my custody by the last witness.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed at the time.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

SARAH NUMTING . I live at No. 5, Portpool-lane. The prisoner lodged at my house on the 13th of March; he lodged with his mother at my house; his mother has the front room on the first floor. I saw him at home on the night of the 13th; he and his mother came in at eleven o'clock; I bolted and locked my doors after they came in; I slept in a room adjoining my shop; it is a green-grocer's shop; there is only a very thin partition between the passage and my room. When I had locked the door, I left the key in it. I then knew that the prisoner was up stairs; it was a considerable time after twelve before I went to bed. From the time I locked the door, to the time I went to bed, nobody went out, I am positive. It was impossible for any body to go up or down stairs without my hearing them. In the morning, I found the key just as I had left it.

Examined by the COURT. He went to bed much about the same time on the 10th; I don't know at what time rightly on the 8th; I don't recollect any other particular circumstances on the 13th of March; only that was the usual time he went to bed.

ELIZABETH STEVENS . The prisoner is my brother. I remember the night before he was taken up; he came home that night with his mother; he went to bed a little before twelve; I saw him in bed; we have only one room; it was impossible for my brother to go out after that, without my hearing him, for I sleep with my mother, who is subject to much illness, and is very wakeful. The prisoner was in bed when I get up at half past six in the morning; I went out then, and locked him in.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-84

370. GEORGE NURSEY was indicted for several misdemeanors, in neglecting to account for money received by him in payment of the postage of certain letters delivered to him as a person appointed for collecting them by the Post Office; and was also indicted for fraudulently and wilfully making and impressing a false, forged, and fictious stamp on each and every one of certain letters, which he had received in virtue of his office aforesaid, and the postage of which had been paid to him in virtue of his office aforesaid, which false and forged mark signified that the postage of the said letters had been paid, and he did unlawfully neglect and omit to place the said letters so collected in a certain division of a bag appointed for the purpose, and he did unlawfully neglect to place the said bag containing the said letters .

MR. GURNEY, on the part of the Post Office, declined offering any evidence on the capital indictments; and

To the misdemeanors, the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined three months and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-85

371. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for feloniously transposing and removing on the 23rd of February , the mark of the Goldsmiths Company, from one piece of wrought gold plate, called a watch-case, of the standard of eighteen carats of fine gold in every pound troy, to another piece of wrought gold plate, called a watch-case .

WILLIAM EMERY NADAULD . The prisoner is a watch-case maker . On the 17th of February last, I sent the dial and the frame of a watch to the prisoner's to have a gold case made to it. I received it back on the 23rd of February; this is the case and the dial; I have no doubt it is Jackson's work; I have frequently seen his work before, and this has his mark. When I received it back, I sent it to the motion maker, Mr. Warren, Susannah-row, Curtain-road. I received it back in about three days; I found it was not deep enough for the works, and I sent it to Mr. Hayford, the springer, ordering him to get it raised at Jackson's, it was to have been raised before Hayford could have put the springs in. I should think Hayford kept it three or four days; I then put the works in it. A gentleman came after that from Goldsmith's Hall, and wished to look at it, and ordered me to come to Goldsmith's Hall the next day at eleven o'clock; I did so, and left it with Mr. Ayres and Mr. Lane. When I received it home from Jackson's at first, I received a bill of parcels with it for the watch.

JOHN WARREN . I am a motion maker. I remember receiving a watch dial like this; I am not sure this is the one; it is a remarkable dial; the letters of the name of Isabella White are substituted by dropping one of the letters for the figures; I have seen one like it, one which was made in lieu of this; excepting the one made in lieu of this, and the one I have got in my hand, I never saw one like it.

William Emery Nadauld . I made one similar to this in lieu of it.

John Warren . I received it for the purpose of making the motions. I put in the motions, and returned it to Mr. Nadauld; I returned the same.

WILLIAM HAYFORD . I am a spring-maker. Mr. Nadauld brought that watch-case to me to be secret springed and polished, and to get the bow exchanged, and the bottom raised at Jackson; I can't say whether he ordered me to get that done; but when I looked at the plate, I found it wanted it. I sent it to Hemmet to get the bow exchanged; I am not certain whether I sent it to Jackson's or Hemmet's first. When I had it back, I did what was necessary for it then, and then sent it to Mr. Greenwell's; Mr. Greenwell said it was not one of his joints, and the man then took it to Jackson's to have it raised. Greenwell did not work upon it at all; it was brought back to me by the man I sent it out with; his name is Bacon. I then sent it to Ellsworth's to be printed up, and on receiving it back from him, I finished my work; I had only the case as far as I was concerned; I sent it home as it was sent to me; but not as it is now, because it is much altered; I know Jackson's work by the marks. I have remarked one thing; his work used to be shut wires, but this is flat edges. When I looked at the marks, one of the customary ones was not in it, because it was a customary thing to put the first letter of his name in it; but this had not; that made me look at it, and that made me think he had got a new workman. That mark is mostly put into the middle of the

bottom; and in the trade every man can tell his own mark, if they put their mark and letter; but it might be possible for another person to do it.

HENRY AUSTIN . I am apprentice to Mr. Hayford. He delivered to me a watch-case belonging to Mr. Nadauld to get raised, and also to get the bow exchanged at Mr. Hammet's. I went to Hammet's first, and waited while he exchanged the bow; I was about ten minutes there; no alteration was made in it. I then took it to Jackson's, and I saw a man in the shop, and he looked at it, and then called Dalton up, and told him it was a watch-case of his making, which was to be raised. I waited while it was doing, and no other alteration was made in it besides raising, that I know of. After it was raised, I took it back to my master.

CHARLES DALTON . I am a watch-case maker. In the month of January last, I engaged in the service of Messrs. Jackson; the prisoner superintended the manufactory, and his brother attended to the books. About the 21st or 22nd of February, I received directions from the prisoner about a watch-case; he put into my hand a dial and a frame. That is the same. He gave me directions to make a case for it, and he told me the case was for Mr. Nadauld; I was then in the counting-house, and he told me when he came into the shop, he would give me a Hall marked bottom; accordingly I took the frame into the shop, and he called me again, and gave me the gold for the wires, and mentioned that it was No. 1 gold; the edges are what are termed wires; these wires all together would be the greater part of the watch-case, and consequently would be heavier than the bottom. He said, he was going to give me a Hall marked bottom, and I might use No. 1 gold for the wires, as they were not going to the Hall. I always considered No. 1 gold, by the working, to be rather inferior, from the stubbornness of the metal; the more alloy, the more stubborn the metal. While I was working these edges, they appeared to me to be No. 1 gold, 16 carat gold; while I was working the edges, Mr. Jackson came into the shop to me, and brought me a Hall marked bottom, with all the wires to it, except the wires which shut down; a watch-case opens in the middle, consequently there would be wires both above and below. The case he brought me had been to the Hall, and was stamped, it was one of three which I myself had made shortly before; he told me to cut out the bottom, and put it into the wires which I was then making of No. 1 gold. When I had formed the wire for it, he came to me, and told me that it was a pity to use that case, as it was a large thick bottom-was too thick, and would do for a heavier case, if he should have occassion to make one; he brought me another Hall marked case of lighter and thinner gold; he brought that with the wires also to it; that was another of the three which I had made a short time previous. I cut the bottom out of it, and placed it in the wires which I had formed out of No. 1 gold he had given me. While I was at work upon it, Mr. Jackson came in again, after I had cut the bottom out of its own wires, and put it into the other; it was lying on the work-board, and he took it up, and looked at it. I gave the wires of the Hall marked bottom to Mr. Henry Jackson , to be returned when the prisoner gave the dial to me, he stated that the case was to be made that day; but I did not finish it until the next day at noon. The case I have in my hand is the case I so made; I could swear to it from a thousand. When I had finished it, I gave it to Mr. William Jackson , the prisoner; I saw him weighing it, and he stated, it was lighter than the order stated, and than the orders he had given me. In about a week afterwards, or rather better, I saw it again, a young man brought it from the springer's, and said the case was too low for the frame, and consequently wanted raising, and I raised it while he was waiting for it; the one he produced to be raised, was the one of which I have been speaking. I disclosed this transaction about a fortnight after it had been done, hardly as long as that after it came from the springer to be raised; I first directed a letter to the Goldsmith's hall, and after that went and saw Mr. Lane.

Cross-examined by MR. POOLEY. I served my time with a Mr. Mansell, of Goswell-street; I had been about a twelve month out of my time, when Mr. Jackson proposed this to me, I did not consider it right, but I did not know it was a felony. I never proposed the same thing to any master I ever lived with. I never said to any master that I was surprized he did not do such a thing, because a great many persons in the trade had done so, and made money by it; that I am sure of, and that I can swear. I never told any master that a former master with whom I had lived had used a stamp, and that I could make one like it; that I am sure of, and am positive of. I had never any quarrel or misunderstanding at all with the prisoner. He used to give me quantities of gold to work up into wires, and watch-cases. Upon those accasions he delivered tickets of the quantity of metal to be worked up; he never had occasion but once to suppose that I had not returned the proper quantity of metal, and the reason of that was, that he could not find some gold which his brother had taken down in a bowl, and after a search, we found that this bowl had been thrown under the table in the countinghouse, with some empty ones; I mean to state that that is the only occasion that he had ever found fault with me on that head; his brother stated that he had placed the bowl under the table in the counting-house among some empty ones, thinking that they were all empty. I had lived with him about five or six weeks when he put the dial I have in my hands to make a case to it; he had about a dozen servants besides myself; about nine worked in the shop in which I worked; there was not any particular time for us to come to work, that depended on the urgency of the business we were doing; some times all the men were working in the shop, and at times there as been only one. There were seven or eight besides myself in the shop, which is capable of holding fourteen men; at the time the prisoner gave me this dial, the nearest man to me was about as far as from me to you, and the shop in length is about as far as from that pillar to this, (alluding to the brass pillars at the respective Sheriff's box in court.) It was from twelve to one in the day when the prisoner brought it to me; other persons in the shop saw it; a young man of the name of Atkins took it up in his hand, and observed the dial when the prisoner gave me the instructions, which

he gave me in the shop. he spoke in his ordinary tone of voice. I don't know whether it must have been heard by other persons in the shop, because ours is very noisy business, in which there is a great deal of hammering; and unless a person a tends particularly to what is said to him, he will not hear it. I cannot say that the hammering was so loud at the time the prisoner was speaking to me as to preclude the possibility of any one else hearing it. I sat as far from the man next to me, as I am from you sir. I never counted the benches; we sit opposite the light, all of a row.

Q. Then if there were eight or nine persons besides you in the shop, and the shop is no longer than from one of those brass pillars to the other, how is it possible that they can all sit as far asunder as from me to you - A. I did not say they all sit as far as from me to you; but if they men whose places would be in that distance in the shop as long as from me to you, were not in their places, nobody else would take them, and therefore that space would be empty; each man sits at his regular place. I said, I should know this case from a thousand. I mean to say that because there is a particular mark, which I accidently made with the cutting tool when I was working this case. In about fourteen days I gave information of this; I left the prisoner's service about a week after I gave information. I never understood I was to have any reward for my information; it was never proposed nor told me that for the information I gave, I should be paid; I was never told that if this prisoner was convicted, I should be rewarded; I always gave the same account of this transaction. I said, I received the case and the wires seperately; I did not say on a former occasion, that I had received them both together; I stated that Mr. Jackson followed me up, and gave me the bottom. I might have said directly, but I cannot say it was exactly at the same time; I have worked for Mr. George Glanny five or six weeks previous to the making of this case. I served my time with Mr. Mansell; I went from him to Mr. Glanny.

Re-examined by MR. GURNEY. From Glanny I went to Mr. Jackson, the prisoner; Mr. Jackson went for my character to Glanny, before he took me into his service. Mr. Jackson continued me in his service after this mistake about the gold, daily entrusting me with gold, and seemed perfectly satisfied with me.

JOHN BARROW . I am senior assayer to the Goldsmith's Company. I take the watch-case in question into my hand; the marks I find in it are the leopard's head; the letter for the year, the eighteen for the standard, and the crown denoting that it is eighteen carat gold; the eighteen and the crown are in lieu of the lion, pasant, which denoted twenty-two carat gold; there is another mark W. J. which is the mark of William Jackson , the prisoner at the bar; it is the province of every goldsmith to leave his mark at the Hall; this is the prisoner's mark. The parts the company would put their marks on are the bottom, the cover, and the exterior cover, if it have one. This case has no stamp in the cover; the Hall mark in the upper part may be sometimes worked out. I have assayed this case in its present state; an officer named William City scraped it for me; the assay of the wires in their present state is two carats and one grain worse than the standard of eighteen. The bottom produces half a grain better than the standard of eighteen. On account of the inferiority of these wires, they could not have passed the Hall; the Hall mark would not be fixed to any thing less than the standard of eighteen.

WILLIAM CITY . I am drawer of the plate to the Goldsmith's Company; I draw all the watch-cases that come to be assayed. I have lately scraped this watchcase for the purpose of Barrow making his assay; in the whole we scrape five parts of a watch-case which is to be assayed; four from the wires and one from the bottom. After it is assayed, the Hall mark is put on it.

THOMAS AYRES , ESQ. I am Prime Warder of the Goldsmith's Company. I in company with Mr. Lane, received that watch-case from the hands of Mr. Nadauld.

MR. ALLEY. On the part of the prisoner, objected, that the prosecutors had mistaken their road with respect to the first three Counts of the Indictment, because the prisoner was charged with "transposing and removing," and not with "cauing to be transposed and removed," which allegation was not borne out by the evidence.

COURT. But I am of opinion that what a man orders his workman to do, he does himself.

Prisoner's Defence. If the case was in the state that it now is when it left our house, it has been done for the purpose of bringing the present prosecution. With regard to that part of the evidence which fixes the certainty of its not having passed the Hall, it is the presumption of my mind, that it was done by the witness Dalton, for the purpose of bringing the present charge; we had a quarrel some time previous, and that was the occasion of this; I know nothing of this case whatever.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

GEORGE GLANNY . I am a watch-case maker, in Sinnot-street, Clerkenwell. The witness Dalton offered to come into my service some months ago; he refered me to Mr. Mansell for his character; I did not go to Mr. Mansell for his character; I was induced to take him without that. After he came into my service, he frequently addressed his conversation to me, with respect to the marks on watch-cases; the conversations on that subject always originated with him; he said Mr. Mansell had realized a great deal of money by using a forged or false mark; that was the Mr. Mansell to whom he had refered me for his character. He recommended me to do the same; and said, he could make a mark. I in part laughed at it, and in part treated it with contempt, and denied the possibility of his making a mark. With respect to wires, he advised me to send a rough case to the Hall to be marked, and then to return the Hall mark, and put inferior wires to it. He made this proposition more than once, seven or eight times, a continual conversation upon the subject whenever he had an opportunity of bringing it up; he seemed anxious to induce me to do it. During the time he was with me, I thought I had an opportunity of forming an opinion of his varacity, and

he is not a person whom I would by any means believe on his oath.

WILLIAM MANSELL. I am a gold watch-case maker. Charles Dalton served his apprenticeship to me; he was with me about twelve months before this happened. From all I have known of him, I certanly would not credit him on his oath.

Cross-examined by MR. GURNEY. Because he was so notorious a liar at the time he was a boy, that I could never put any confidence in what he said; a systematic liar; he was with me fifteen months as an errand boy, before I took him as an apprentice; he staid with me three months or rather more, after his apprenticeship had expired. He continued for that time working with me as a journeyman.

Q. From his commencement as a boy you could not depend on a word he said - A. I did not discover it until he had been with me two or three years. I was continually detecting him in little tritling lies. In hopes of reproving him, and out of respect to his father, I kept him. I did not turn him off as soon as his time was up; I took him as a journeyman. As a journeyman, it is not material, so long as he does his work well, if he be a liar.

COURT. It is quite immaterial to you then whether your journyman is a liar or not - A. Yes; my lord.

ROBERT DALTON . I work for Mr. Mansell. I have worked for him nine or ten years. I have a son named Charles. He was first errand boy, and then apprentice, to Mr. Mansell; he worked in the shop with me, and served his time with Mr. Mansell I might be inclined to believe him on oath. Perhaps the feelings of a parent are different from other people's.

Q. Is he a person whom you would recommend me to believe on his oath - A. Certainly I should feel some doubt.

JOHN SHALES. I am a watch-case maker. I have worked for Mr. Mansell about nine years and a half. I knew Charles Dalton ; he worked close by my elbow. I should receive his oath with some doubt.

The prisoner received an excellent character from several witnesses.

MR. GURNEY. With your Lordship's permission, I will offer some evidence in Reply.

MR. THOMAS LANE . I am clerk to the Goldsmith's Company. In the course of the last month the witness Glanny was examined before the Wardens of the Hall, in my presence. He stated something respecting an application on the part of the prisoner's friends to him. He stated it to the Wardens in my hearing, and made use of these words after different panses; they have come to me to invalidate the testimony; he was speaking of Henry Jackson and Mr. Gibbins, and perhaps of others; and he said they came to me to invalidate the testimony of Dalton; they said, we must not stand upon niceties, you must invalidate the evidence of this man.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. This was not one declaration, but a series of answers to many questions.

The Jury after retiring, found the prisoner NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-86

372. CHARLES RICHARD HURD and RICH-ARD KILMINSTER were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one hundred pounds weight of parchment, value 5l. the property of our Lord the King .

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS. Stating the property to belong to other persons.

WILLIAM ROBERTS. I am agent to the Six Clerks' in Chancery. Their names are William Luther Sewell, John Kipling , Henry Walden Hanmer , Francis Vesey, Alexander Johnson , and Edward Vernon Ulterson . I have the care of the bills and answers at their office. In the month of November last, I missed four bundles of bills and answers, and twenty three bundles of replications. I suppose I missed from one to two hundred weight. I know the two prisoners by their being writers in the office. They are father and son-in-law. In consequence of some information, I went to Mrs. Bridges, Drum-maker, at Hoxton, on the last day of February. I found there a great quantity of the parchment which I had lost, made up into drums and tambarines. I should suppose altogether I found about a hundred weight of it there. It all consisted of bills, answers, and replications. I am certain they had been taken from the office of the Six Clerks. I have examined it; part relates to personal property. After I had been to Bridges, I went to Kilminster's lodging; there I found one skin only; it is an answer in an entire state. It had also been taken from the office at some time or other.

JOHN LIMBRICK. I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I went with a search warrant, in company with Mr. Roberts to Hoxton, and searched Bridges's place. I found a great quantity of drums which Mr. Roberts claimed. I also brought away all the rest he claimed. I apprehended Kilminster, and found one skin in his box, at his lodging.

(Parchment produced.)

JAMES GARRETT . I am foreman to Mrs. Bridges, the drum-maker. The parchment which was found on our premises by the officers, and which Mr. Roberts claimed, I bought from the prisoners, Hurd and Kilminster, at various times. They stated, that they weve perquisites; they said, that they were clerks in the office of the Court of Chancery. They came to me in August or September first; they generally brought five or six pounds at a time. I bought the small at thirteen-pence a pound at first, and nine-pence afterwards. The large I gave two shillings a pound for. I believe Kilminster came only twice; I believe he never offered any parchment to sell, but he was with the other.

(The parchment sworn to.)

MR. ALLEY took an objection upon the question, whether the property stolen, being documents of the High Court of Chancery, were properly defined, by being called in the indictment, parchment simply, and conceived that it could not be felony to steal them.

THE COURT reserved the point for the consideration of the twelve judges, and the jury found.

KILMINSTER, GUILTY, aged 63.

HURD, GUILTY, aged 31.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-87

373. THOMAS WELLS was indicted for that he, on the 9th of December , being a clerk and servant employed by Abraham Purshouse Driver , William Driver , and Edward Driver , entrusted by them to receive monies and valuable securities on their account, did by virtue of such employment receive and take into his custody and possession, a certain bankers draft for the payment of 18l. 14s. and afterwards to wit, on the same day, feloniously embezzled the same .

JOHN PETER RASCH. I am an under-writer at Lloyd's. In the month of December last, I owed some little balance to Messrs. Driver. The prisoner called on the 7th or 8th; the prisoner called, asking for money for Messrs. Driver; the sum due was twenty-three pounds, nineteen shilling; but I stated to him that a deduction ought to have been made, and that if he would represent it to Messrs. Driver's and Co. I had no doubt but that they would take something off. On the 9th, he came again, and said that the gentlemen would take off five guineas, though it was not customary. He then deducted the five guineas, and I immediately paid him the balance, by a check on Smith, Payne, and Smith, which check was sent to me in my banker's book. The prisoner wrote a receipt in my presence, which I have.

(Recept and check produced and read.)

EDWARD DRIVER . I am a land surveyer, in partnership with Abraham Porshouse Driver, and William Driver. The prisoner was our clerk, and employed to receive monies and valuable securities on our account. We never authorized him to make any deduction in the account of Mr. Rasch, or even knew that he applied to him for payment. He never rendered any account whatever of this money to us. I have examined the book, in which such money ought to have been entered, and no entry is made of it whatever.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-88

374. THOMAS LOVELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a pocket handkerchief, value 4s. the property of a person unknown, from his person .

JOHN PARCELL . I am a stationer; I live in Token-house-yard, Lothbury. On the 27th of February, at about half after four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the end of Buckler's Bury , in company with several others. I observed the prisoner attempt to pick a gentleman's pocket. I crossed to the other side to watch the prisoner. He tried several others but did not succeed. I then observed a gentleman go along with his handkerchief just peeping out. They immediately surrounded him, and the prisoner drew the handkerchief out of his pocket, clapped it to his breast and ran away. I caught the prisoner as he was going down Wood-street. He threw the pocket handkerchief away directly. An officer named John Brown came up soon after. The gentleman has never appeared.

PETER JOSEPH DOWNS corroborated the account of the last witness.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. The prisoner and handkerchief were delivered to me.

(Handkerchief produced.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Cheapside, and I took my handkerchief out of my bosom to wipe my nose, and the young man came up and said I stole it, which was very false; and they went after a gentleman and asked him, had he not lost his handkerchief, and he said no, don't bother me; I never stole it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-89

375. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , forty-nine pounds weight of lead, value 8s. the property of Henry Peto .

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am gate-keeper at the New Custom House . The prisoner was a plumber's labourer there; he came to the gate at dinner time, on the day in question, and he appeared to have something concealed in the front of his trowsers. I put my hand upon it, and finding it hard, I stopped him, examined him, and took the lead from him.

JAMES OLIVER . My office is at the New Custom House. I am clerk of the works to Mr. Peto. I came down to the gate, and saw this piece of lead; all the lead on these premises is Mr. Peto's; it is new lead.

WILLIAM BOOTH . I know nothing more than taking the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined two months , and whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-90

376. RICHARD WILTSHIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , a copper, value 25s. the property of Humphrey Fyfield .

HUMPHRY FYFIELD. I am a plate-worker , and live in Paradise-row, Chelsea . On the 27th of February, I lost a copper from my door. I put it out in the morning; it was gone at dusk.

ISAAC FIELD. I am in the service of Mr. Pontifex, a copper manufacturer, No. 22, Lisle-street, Leicesterfields. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 27th of February, the prisoner came into our shop, in company with a man, who had a copper to sell. On examining it, I discovered it was one we had sold to Mr. Fyfield. I called Mr. Pontifex down, and he said it was his copper. As soon as the man who had it, found this, he said to the prisoner, you are the master of the copper, and then ran off; the prisoner stood still.

(Copper produced.)

Humphry Fyfield. That is my copper, I had bought it of Mr. Pontifex.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, and I met a young man with a copper, and he asked me if I could tell him where to sell it, and I went with him to Mr. Pontifex's, and they found out it had been stolen, and then the young man ran away. I never stirred, because I knew myself innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-91

377. WILLIAM MORTIMER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a bridle, value 12s. the property of John Pywell .

WILLIAM HANOVER . I am hostler at the King's Arms, in Oxford-street . I saw the prisoner come up the yard, and go into the stable, on the day in question, and stopped him coming out, with the bridle in his possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry for what I did.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-92

378. MARY ANN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one spoon, value 12s. the property of William Porden .

WILLIAM PORDEN . The prisoner was my servant , was dismissed for not being sober, on the 10th of March. The next day a table spoon was missing.

MARY PRESTON . I was also in the service of Mr. Porden. I missed the spoon on the 11th of March. I had also missed a desert spoon a fortnight before. I went to the prisoner's lodgings on the 18th of March, but did not see her.

THOMAS SMITH . I am apprentice to Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker; the prisoner brought it to pawn, and I detained it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-93

379. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March . twenty yards of printed cotton, value 3l. the property of William Rickarby , privately in his shop .

THOMAS GARNER . I am shopman to William Rickarby, in Oxford-street , linen-draper . The prisoner came to our shop about six o'clock in the evening, on the 29th of March last, to match some French cambrick; in consequence of its being rather dark, she said she would call to-morrow, and she left the pattern with me; she came about the same time on the Saturday, and I had then matched the cambrick for her; she then said she had lost the piece of thing which was to guide her in the length she was to purchase; she then wished to look at some prints; none of them would suit her, as she said, she wanted a pattern the same as one which a friend of her's had, who lived at the Marqurs of Hertford's, where she lived also, and she said, she would send on the Monday for the gown and the cambrick. She then went away, and from the manner in which she quitted the shop, I had an idea that she had got something which was not her own; I thought she had something under her shawl; a young man at the door followed her, and I followed her also; in going back I took from under her shawl a piece of cotton, which was Mr. Rickarby's property; it had been laying on the counter against a desk, near where she stood.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up on the pavement outside the door.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18160403-94

380. JOHN DAWSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Owen , in the King's highway, on the 27th of March , and for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a handkerchief, value 6d. his property.

JOHN OWEN . On the 27th of March, in the morning, or rather midnight, I was in Princes-street, Drury-lane , alone; a person passed me, and shoved against me; I made way immediately, the pavement being particularly narrow; as soon as he had passed me, and I had regained the pavement, he turned round immediately, and asked me why I thrust him off the pavement; I told him, I really did not. He insisted that I did, and immediately commenced an attack upon me. I told him I should be obliged to call the watch; I saw the watchman at the other side of the way, and called him over; there were some more men coming along, and they came up. The prisoner had his fist in my face, and immediately gave me a shove with his elbow against the wall, and at the same moment I felt my handkerchief go from my right hand great coat pocket. I then exclaimed, I have lost my handkerchief, and the watchman seized the prisoner, as the man who took it.

JOHN RYAN . I am a watchman. The prosecutor called me over, and I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the proaecutor's pocket; I immediseized him, and took him to the watchhouse, and the others went off.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very innocent of what I am charged with. Unfortunately, I have not any witness to prove to the contrary; but I know I am innocent in my own mind.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-95

381. WILLIAM NEWTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwellinghouse of Hannah Griffiths , widow , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 12th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, forty-six penny-pieces, one hundred and fifty-seven halfpence, and two farthings , her property.

WILLIAM GOSNELL . I live with my mother, Hannah Griffiths, who is a widow a second time; she has two dwelling-houses, one is a public-house, which she inhabits herself; and she lets out the whole of the other in tenements, except the shop, which she occupies as a cook's shop; that shop I shut up at eight o'clock on the night of the 12th of March. I went there again between eleven and twelve, to see if all was safe and right. I was not in the habit of doing so; but I received information that that shop was to be robbed that night. When I went to the shop, I found it had been broken open; I found the cellar flap had the iron forced from it, and the shop door which leads into the passage was unbolted. I found the prisoner at the bar in the shop; I secured

him, and called the watchman. I found the till forced open, and I found ten shillings and five-pence in copper gone; that was the money of my mother; it was taken out of the till, and the prisoner had got it in the side pockets of his jacket I believe.

GEORGE HUGHES . The prisoner was brought to me, and the money.

GUILTY, aged 15,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160403-96

382. JOHN BOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a great coat, value 2l. 10s. the property of Edward Whybro .

EDWARD WHYBRO . I am a farmer , and came to Town on the 16th of February, I put my horse up at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate-street, and carried my great coat on my arm to No. 50, Lombard-street ; I hung it up two pair of stairs behind the kitchen door.

ALEXANDER MILLS. I am shopman to Mr. Flemming. I took this great coat in on the 16th of February, to pawn from the prisoner.

(Coat produced, and sworn to.)

JOHN LIMBRICK . I took the prisoner into custody on the 17th, and I went to his lodgings, and found the duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-97

383. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a shirt, value 2s. 6d. the property of James Busby .

MARY ANN BIRD . The prisoner came in, and asked if my father was at home; I told him no; and he asked me if my mother was at home; I told him she was not. Then he went and sit down on a chair; then he got up, and went and looked in the cupboard; then he went and looked on the mantle-piece. This shirt was lying on the table, under the looking-glass, facing the window. He told my little brother not to stare at him, but look out of the window, and see if my mother was coming. Then he said, he would go and have a pint of beer, and come back again. I did not see him take the shirt; but I am sure it was there when he came in; and we missed it after he was gone.

ANN BIRD . I was sent for; I am the mother of the last witness. I had this shirt to wash.

WILLIAM TILLIER . I took this shirt in pledge from the prisoner, on the 27th of February.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about the shirt.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-98

384. JAMES LEWIS PINK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , fifty pounds weight of cheese, value 37s. and two baskets, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Stickland , the elder, and John Stickland , the younger.

JOHN STICKLAND , THE ELDER. I live in Newgate-market, and am a wholesale cheesemonger . The prisoner at the bar was a porter to Mrs. Stickland, who keeps a shop in the market; he opens the shop for her; he deposits goods in the cellar for her every afternoon, and takes them out in the morning. On Thursday morning last, the prisoner fetched a basket of pigeons from the cellar, and put them outside the dwelling-house door; he then returned, and brought another basket up, and carried it across the market; they are covered baskets, so that I could not see what was in them. I saw him put the basket down near Mr. Cope's, the fruiterer; he then returned, and took the pigeons straight over to the shop; then he went to look for the basket he had deposited by Mr. Cope's, and it was gone; he seemed very much confused, and inquired about where the basket was. When he went with the pigeons, I sent one of our porters to bring the basket away to see what was in it, and found it contained two cheests. I immediately sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody; one of cheeses was Gloucester, and the other Cheshire.

WILLIAM PALMER . Corroborated the account of the last witness, and brought the basket and cheese back from where the prisoner had put it.

HENRY HONEY . I searched the prisoner's premises, and found nothing but two flats.

HENRY HARRIS . I took charge of the prisoner, and he seemed very much confused; but said nothing.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-99

385. ELIZABETH CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , from the person of Henry Jones , three one-pound bank notes , his property.

HENRY JONES . I am a brazier , and live in Golden-lane. I lost my notes by Smithfield-bars , on the 23rd of February last, at about eleven o'clock at night. The prisoner at the bar appeared to be very much intoxicated, and hung by me; she took me into a place close by, not a house, but a court; I was not drunk. About half an hour after I had left her, I missed the notes, and in consequence of information, I went to a house in Church-lane, and knocked at the door, and inquired for Wetch Bet; the patrole was with me, and we took two notes from her hand, which was clenched. I received my notes from Edward Owens.

EDWARD LYNDON . I am a patrole of St. Sepulchre's. I was going my rounds on the night of the 23rd of February, and I went with the prosecutor to apprehend the prisoner; we found two notes clenched in her hand.

EDWARD OWENS . I gave three notes which I received from my mother to the prosecutor, on the 23rd of February.

ELIZABETH OWENS . I don't know these notes; but I gave three notes to my son, one of which I had received from Thomas Claxton .

THOMAS CLAXTON . I gave this note to Mrs. Owens.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the notes up.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-100

386. THOMAS SMITH and JOHN HAWKINS were indicted as common utterers of counterfeit three-shilling pieces .

JOHN MOORE . I keep a chandler's shop, in Clement's-lane. I remember the two prisoners coming into my shop on the 11th of March; they came for a two-penny loaf, with which I served them; they gave me a three-shilling token, which I put into the till, and gave them the change; there was only another three-shilling-token in the till at the time.

SARAH MOORE . I am the wife of the last witness. I remember shewing the three-shilling piece to Mackay, and afterwards putting it on the mantlepiece.

ROBERT KING. I am a publican, and keep the White Swan in Drury-lane. I remember the two prisoners at the bar coming to my house at about seven o'clock in the evening of the 11th of March; they came for a pot of porter; I served them myself, and two officers, Mackay, and another came in, and gave me some information. Then I went to the prisoners for payment; they were both drinking together; Smith gave me a three-shilling piece; I shewed it to Mackay, and he desired me to mark it, and I did mark it. (Three-shilling token produced to witness.) That is the one.

ROBERT MACKAY . I watched the prisoners at the bar, in company with another man, from the Wheatsheaf, in Drury-lane, to Clement's-lane; they went into Moore's, and on coming out Smith said come along, it is all right; then they made the best of their way into Lincoln's-inn-fields, they ran across the fields, and when they got into Holborn, they walked quietly. I then followed them to the White Swan, and Johnson and I remained outside; then one came out, and Johnson followed him, and I went into the house; it was the third man that came out. I took the prisoner's into custody; I searched them, and on Smith I found a good one shilling and sixpenny piece; then I searched Hawkins, and found three tokens counterfeit, with paper between them. I asked Hawkins where he got them, and he said he took them in change.

(Counterfeit tokens produced.)

Mr. JAMES THURGOOD . I am one of the tellers to the Bank. I have examined these tokens, and they are all counterfeit.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 18.

HAWKINS, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined one year , and bound over to find sureties for their good behaviour for two years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-101

387. MARY SMITH, alias QUIN , was indicted as a common utterer of three-shilling pieces .

JOHN WILSON . I live with my uncle. an oil and colourman. 119, Bishopsgate Without. I remember the prisoner at the bar coming to my uncle's on Saturday, the 24th of February; I served her with a three-halfpenny candle; she tendered me a counterfeit token; I told her it was a bad one; and took it to my uncle; he sent for Hodson.

JOHN STOLT . I keep this oil-shop in Bishopsgate-street. The token which my nephew gave to me, I kept, and gave to the officer.

JOHN HODSON . I received a three-shilling token from Mr. Stolt, which I marked. (Produces it.) I then proceeded to search the prisoner, and after a great deal of difficulty I got her hand open, and there I found another. (Produces it.)

MR. JAMES THURGOOD. I look at these two tokens, they are both counterfeit.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one year , and bound over to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years after .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-102

388. MAXWELL HUME was indicted for that he, at the time of commiting the offence hereunder mentioned, had served in the capacity of carpenter on board a Ship of War, called the Phaeton, and had by means of such service become entitled to a certain share of prize money, arising from the capture of the Island of Java, and its Dependencies, and on the 3rd of February, 1813, for a valuable consideration received by him from Allan Mathews and John Ackworth , fully sold, bargained, aliened, and assigned, unto them, all his share and proportion in the said prize money, arising as aforesaid; and that he, on the 20th of February, 1815 , falsely and fraudulently did pretend to one Isaac Levy, that he had not made any assignment thereof, and by such false pretence, did obtain of and from him a certain large sum of money,(to wit,) the sum of 100l. the monies of the said Isaac Levy , as the consideration of a certain feigned and false assigment of his share in the prize money, arising as aforesaid, with intent to defraud the said Isaac Levy .

AFTER the case was gone through on the part of the prosecution, it appeared that the sum paid to the prisoner by Mr. Levi, was paid in bank notes, and

MR. WALFORD. After commenting to the Jury with a considerable degree of vivacity and warmth of expression on the part of the prisoner, insisted on the acquittal of his client, because bank notes were not money, and the indictment stated that the consideration was paid in money.

THE COURT. Co-incided with the learned Counsel's objection, and the Jury found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-103

389. RICHARD HEWES was indicted for stealing on the 3rd of April , a watch, value 30s. the property of John White .

JOHN WHITE . I am an officer belonging to the 3rd Ceylouese regiment. I lost my watch from my lodging, No. 24, Litchfield-street, Soho .

JOHANNAH WHITE. I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner came to me at our lodging, between twelve and one o'clock, on the day in the indictment, and said he had met Mr. White in the Stand walking with another gentleman, and therefore he did not like to speak to him. The prisoner

sat down. The watch was hanging over the mantlepiece. The prisoner wrote a note for Mr. White, and laid it on the table, and said he would call on the next day but one. He went out, and I immediately missed the watch. I saw no more of the prisoner until he was apprehended. I knew him coming home from the East Indies.

GEORGE MORLEY. I am a pawnbroker, and received this watch in pledge from the prisoner at the bar, on the 3rd of April, in the middle of the day.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the whole Court.

(It appeared by the testimony of Mr. Newman, the governor of Newgate, and Mr. Hardy. his assistant, that the unfortunate prisoner, who while he remained at the bar was suffused in tears, had been a surgeon of some eminence, and had gone out with the convicts to Botany Bay, in his professional capacity, and had made several Voyages to India, the last of which had been so unsuccessful as to reduce the unfortunate man to the greatest distress, and compel him to the unfortunate act which brought him before the Court.)

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-104

390. PHILIP STREET was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sampson Eardly Eardly esq about the hour of ten on the night of the 18th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein. four saddle-cloths, value 6s. two rubbers, value 2s, and one sheet, value 5s. his property; and seven pairs of stockings, value 9s. three handkerchiefs, value 4s. three shirts, value 12s, and two pairs of drawers, value 5s. the property of Edward Parsons .

EDWARD PARSONS . I am groom to Mr. Eardly, who lives at No.27, Baker-street . I sleep over the stables, and there is an internal communation from the dwelling-house to the stables. On the 18th of February, I secured the stables at about five o'clock in the evening, it was not dark then. On my returning about half past eight, I saw the stable door about half open; on my going in, I missed the property in the indictment.

EDWARD HUTCHINS. I know no more than the prisoner lodged in my house, and I shewed the officer to his room.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I am a constable of Mary-bone parish. I went to the prisoner's apartment, and found a sheet marked E.E. 12 three white handkerchiefs, marked E.P. 10 three shirts, all marked E.P. and two pairs of drawers, with no mark; I also found two pick-lock keys, and two crow bars.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only, but not of the burglary .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-105

391. PHILIP STREET was again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Archibald John Primrose , esq. commonly called the Earl of Roseberry ; about nine o'clock in the night of the 5th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two coats, value 4l. and one saddle cloth, value 3s. his property; and one box, value 5s. one shirt, value 3s. one waistcoat, value 5s. five pair of stockings, value 9s. a handkerchief, value 1s, and a pair of spurs, value 1s. 6d. the property of Charles House .

CHARLES HOUSE . I am postillion to Lord Roseherry, whose stables is in South Portland Mews; there is a thoroughfare from the stables into the house; his Lordship can go from the house into the stables without going into the street. I went out at about half past nine o'clock, and left the stables fast. I returned at about half past ten o'clock, and found the door open. I found a tobacco-pipe and two matches behind the door. When I went up stairs, I missed the property in question; part belonged to my master and the remainder to myself.

JAMES MARSH . I am coachman to Lord Roseberry. I left the stables about nine o'clock; the box coat and surtout coat were mine.

EDWARD HUTCHINS proved the prisoner lodged in his house.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I went to the prisoner's lodgings on the 15th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. I found a great number of things, and among them I found the things which were owned by Charles House , together with the pick-lock keys and crow bar, which I produced in the last case.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

MR. ADOLPHUS. On the part of the prisoner, objected. that Lord Roseberry was improperly defined as an Esquire, and commonly called a Lord, because in reality he was a Peer of the Realm, and therefore non constat that he an Esquire; and thefore the prisoner could not be convicted on such an indictment.

THE COURT. Considered that it was a point which had not as yet been determinated and therefore would reserve it for the consideration of the Twelve Judges, in the event that the Jury should think the evidence sufficiently strong to pronounce the prisoner guilty.

The Jury found the prisoner

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-106

392. PHILIP STREET was again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Barton , esq. about the hour of eight in the night of the 27th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, a pistol, value 15s. the property of the said Charles Barton ; and a pillow-case, value 2s. an apron, value 2s. a napkin, value 1s. two handkerchiefs, value 2s. one valance, value 2s. one bed-gown, value 2s. and three feathers, value 1s. the property of Issac Morgan .

ISSAC MORGAN. I am a private in the 2nd regiment of Life Guards , and am servant to Lieutenant General Charles Barton ; I live with the General, at No. 1, Montague-place . About half past seven in the evening of the 27th of January, I went with a basket of clothes into Bond-street; I locked the stable door fast, and lifted the iatch, and thrust my

knee against the door, to try if it was fast; I am certain it was fast. I returned at about twenty-five minutes to nine, and then found my door open; it had been opened by a skeleton key, for the lock was not injured in the least. The stable communicates with the house. I then went up stairs, and missed the property in question.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL. I found all these things in the prisoner's lodgings, on the 15th of March; I found one picklock key, several skeleton keys, the crow bars, some phosphorous and matches.

SAMUEL MORTON . I am a gun-maker, and armourer to the 2nd regiment of Life Guards, and I can swear to the General's pistol.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-107

393. WILLIAM JONES , alias ONSLOW , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Dewdney , in the King's highway, on the 8th of February , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 1l. a chain, value 6d. two rings, value 6d. a key, value 1s. and two seals, value 1s. his property .

HENRY DEWDNEY . About eleven o'clock on the night of the 8th of February, I was coming home up Bow-street, Bloomsbury , and two men followed me from the corner of Holborn; immediately the prisoner with three or more behind him, met me in front, and prevented my proceeding; I immediately stepped on the outside of the curh-stone; but the prisoner stepped in front of me again, and the others pressed on behind me, and immediately I felt my watch go; the prisoner got clear off, and I was pushed down; the others then took from me a one-pound note and a sixpence. The watchman made his appearance shortly after, but could give me no assistance, and therefore I went home. I went the next day to Bow-street. and stated the circumstances. I am certain of the prisoner's person.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th, at his lodgings; I searched him and the lodgings, but found nothing.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not of the assault .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-108

394. HANNAH COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a shawl, value 2l. three pairs of breeches, value 30s. one coat, value 7s. one jacket, value 7s. four waistcoats, value 15s. a tablecloth, value 10s. three flower-pots, value 40s. the property of John Orange , in his dwelling-house .

LYDIA OSRANGE. I live in Bedford-court, Catherine-street, in the Strand; my husband is a dealer in glass ; I don't know I lost this property; but the officers came and told me it was at the watchhouse.

(It appeared after a long and disgusting of this witness, that she kept a house of ill-fame in Bedford-court, and that the probability was that the prisoner who was her servant had been sent out by some of the unfortunate female inmates in her house, and had sent out those articles to be pawned by the prisoner, with which she was stopped, and taken to the watchhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-109

395. MARY ANN CAFFRAY was indicted for stealing, a watch, value 3l. the property of Hugh Nouris , in the dwelling-house of James Barrett .

BUT the prosecutor not appearing, the Jury found her

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-110

396. JOHN HOPCROFT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Shearsmith , about the hour of ten in the forenoon of the 28th of February , no person being therein, and stealing therin, a gown, value 5s. a shawl, value 1s. 6d. and a shirt, value 3s. his property .

JOHN SHEARSMITH . I live at 11, Quaker-street, Spitalfields , in a house which is let out in tene the landlord does not reside in the house. I lost this property on the 28th of February, about half past ten o'clock in the morning; I was asleep, and was awakened by some persons in the room opening the drawers; I put my head up, and made use of these words, d-n your eyes, what do you want there; and the prisoner bid me ask his backside; I and the other man went out of the room directly.

MARY SHEARSMITH. When I went out in the morning, I left my son in bed, and locked the door. When I returned, I found these things missing.

WILLIAM BIBBY . As I was going along Quaker-street, a little after ten in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another man going along, and the other man had a bundle; I went with the prosecutor and secured the men at I ambcth-street office. I am sure the prisoner was one, for I had seen him for some months before.

SARAH RICKABY . I saw the prisoner and another man come out of the house in which Mr. Shearsmith lives.

MOSES FORTUNF . I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street office, and apprehended the prisoner.

THE COURT. In charging the Jury, told them that this indictment stated that there was nobody in the dwelling-house, whereas it appeared that the prosecutor himself was in bed, and therefore the capital part of the charge must fall to the ground.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-111

397. JAMES EVANS was indicted for stealing, a coach and horses , the property of Charles Cliff .

BUT the prisoner's manifest intention appeared to

be merely to have driven them to the Green-yard, for the purpose of obtaining a reward, for having found them without a coachman; the Court directed the Jury as there was no criminal quo unimo to find the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-112

398. GEORGE WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February . a watch, value 2l. a chain, value 1l. two gold seals, value 1l. one watch-key, value 5s. one coat, value 1l. and one tea-spoon, value 2s. the property of John Cole , in has dwelling-house .

MARY COLE . The prisoner lodged with my husband and me. We missed the watch by its not ticking between one and two in the morning of the 24th of February, and I had seen it safe at past five o'clock on the evening previous; I also missed the other things.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am one of the patroles of Bow-street. Cole and his wife came and gave information to me concerning this ribbery. On meeting the prisoner by chance, on the same day, I asked him what money he had, and he said none; but I found seventeen shillings and sixpence in silver in a small purse in his pocket; I found the ticket of a silver spoon in the lining of his hat.

Thomas Cox . That duplicate is ours, and I produce the spoon.

(spoon sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-113

399. JOHN BOYD was indicted for forging, on the 15th of July , an order for the delivery of goods , as follows,

"Mr. Hawkins, go to my chambers, and give the man my great coat and umbrella; I shall not sleep at my chambers to night.

"Yours H. WILLIAMS."

with intent to defraud Henry Williams .

SECOND COUNT. Charging him with uttering the same with the like intent.

WILLIAM HARWOOD. I clean shoes, and run of messages, from No. 6, Cock-pit-alley, Drury-lane. While I was cleaning shoes on the 15th of July, the prisoner came to me, and asked me if I knew any person who went of messages, I told him I did; and he told me to go to Iurnival's-inn with a note, and inquire for one Mrs. Hawkins, at No. 15, 1.c told me she lived up three pair of stairs. I went up two pair of stairs, and there saw Mr. Williams, and afterwards he took me to Hatton Garden before the justice; then we went back to Mr. Williams's chambers, and they gave me a great coat and an umbrella, and Mr. Read and Mr. Williams went with me to a liquor shop in Drury-lane, where the prisoner told me he would wait until I came back; but he was not there.

WILLIAM READ . Corroborated the latter part of account given by the last witness.

(The order for the delivery of the goods produced.)

ANTHONY CALVET JAMES ECCLESTON. I know Mr. Williams's hand-writing. I look at this order, and know that it is not his hand-writing.

THE COURT. In charging the Jury, told them that the order in question appeared to be addressed to a Mrs. Hankins; when in fact it had not appeared that such a person was in existence.

The Jury therefore found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-114

400. JOHN BOYD was again indicted for feloniously forging, on the 20th of December , a certain order for the delivery of goods , which is as follows.

"Hostler, give the man my great coat; I don't want my box coat; I shall not leave town tonight.

Yours, J. GREEN."

With intent to defraud Isaac Green .

ANOTHER COUNT. Stating his intent to be to defraud Daniel Chilvers .

THIS case was similar in its circumstances to the last; and the Court told the Jury that this order supposed to be forged might be directed to any hostler in the Kingdom, and not the particular one Chilvers, who had the charge of Mr. Green's coat, though in fact it was delivered to him.

The prisoner was accordingly found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-115

401. JOHN BOYD was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a coat, value 2l. the property of Jeremiah Douton .

JEREMIAH DOUTON. On the 10th of January, I put my horse and chaise up at Mr. Chandler's livery stables, in Gray's-inn-lane. I left my great coat at Mr. chandler's, and when I returned at half past four in the afternoon, my coat was gone and I did not know how.

ROBERT PHILLIPS . I run of errands, and sweep the cross-way at Moore Gate; on the 10th of January the prisoner came to me, and asked me to go to the Red Lion Inn, Gray's-inn-lane, with an order for a brown great coat, which was delivered to me by Thomas French. The coat I received from Thomas French , I delivered to the prisoner.

THOMAS FRENCH . I am the hostler at the Red Lion Inn, and delivered Mr. Douton's great coat to the last witness, in consequence of a note which he brought.

JOHN LIMBRICK. On the 17th of February, I received some information in conseqence of which I apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-116

402. JOHN CONNELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , three petticoats, value 6s. four frocks, value 8s. two gowns, value 6s. and one handkerchief, value 3s. the property of John Crawford , esq.

HENRY HILTON, About eleven o'clock, on the

morning of the 1st of April, as I was coming down George-street, Hanover-square ; I looked down the area of No. 10, and saw the prisoner pulling something out of the kitchen window, apparently like linen. He put them into a bag, and twisted the bag up, and put it into the ash-hole. The prisoner then came up the area steps. I called to a person in the street to rap at the door; for I thought the prisoner was robbing the house. When the prisoner came to the top of the steps, I seized him, and put him into the hands of Mr. Crawford's butler.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am butler to Mr. Crawford, and took the things out of the ash-hole.

(Property produced and sworn to.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Whipped , and delivered to his Uncle.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-117

403. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , a game cock, value 3s. the property of Thomas George Williams .

THOMAS GEORGE WILLIAMS . I fed this cock in the yard, on the night of the 13th, and on the morning of the 14th, when I called my fowls, he was missing.

JOHN CRADDOCK. I am a baker, and bought a game cock of the prisoner on the 14th of March for three shillings.

EBENEZAR DALTON. I produce a cock which I found in the cellar of the last witness.

Thomas George Williams. That is my cock.

GUILTY , aged 18,

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-118

404. JAMES GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a pig, value 21s. the property of Thomas George Williams .

THOMAS GEORGE WILLIAMS. I live at Hackney , and in consequence of having been repeatedly robbed of my poultry, and one thing or other. I sat up in an out-house on the night of the 10th, to protect my pigs. Unsuccessful attempts had been made to steal one the night before, and therefore I sat up, well armed with a loaded blunderbnss, a brace of pistols, and two or three swords. We went out at about twelve o'clock, and I ordered the doors to be bolted after we went out; and we went into a shed opposte the pig-stye. About a quarter before three o'clock I heard something, and on looking through a hole in the boards, I saw the prisoner in the yard by the pig-stye; and I suppose he was going to kill the pig. I then levelled my blunderbuss through the hole; I cocked the blunderbuss, and being in the dead of the night, it made a tick, which he heard and looked towards the shed. The moon shone full on his face, and I could distinguish his features plainly. He then stooped again, and as he rose I fired. I immediately ran out, but he had gone over a wall six foot high. Since that we have killed the pig, and he must have had it in his arms when I fired, as the pig was full of shot. If it had been on the ground, the shots could not have hit it for the stye. We found a bat shot through with shot.

WILLIAM BOSTON sat up with the last witness and coroborated his account.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; I and Fortune went to a house in Globe Fields, where we had information the prisoner was; and a woman told him that the officers were at the door, and he ran out behind, and we pursued and took him. His face was all black and a number of shot holes in it; and he then appeared to have been very much wounded. We asked him where his hat was, and he said, he left it in the garden where he had been shot.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-119

405, ROBERT BRUNT and JOHN WOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , thirtyfour pounds weight of salt, value 12s. the property of Henry Delves Broughton , Clerk , and James Sutton .

RICHARD GEE, I am a patrole of Paddington; I was on duty on the night of the 29th of February last. I met the prisoners on the wharf, and followed them into the high road; I called after them repeatedly to stop, and they would not; they dropped the bundle in the road, which I picked up, and which contained thirty-four pounds weight of salt.

WILLIAM HILL . I am agent to the prosecutors, who are salt manufacturers in Cheshire; their salt comes to town in barges on the Paddington Canal; we had salt in the barges on that night on the Canal.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. I cannot swear that this salt belongs to my employers, though I believe it does; there were other barges on the Canal with salt in them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-120

406. MARIA SHAW , ALLAN MASON , ANDREW LYND , and JAMES HURLEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , three shirts, value 30s. a gown, value 1l. and a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Joseph Lawrence .

The cause of the prosecution in this case, which in fact had no foundation as against the prisoners, originated in a riot in a brothel, in Checkquer-alley, Whitecross-street, and Jury very property found all the prisoners

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-121

407. THOMAS REMMELER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , a tea-pot, value 8s. six dozen yards of lamp-cotton, value 4s. two tobacco-boxes, value 6d. one cannister, value 3d. six knives, value 2s. six forks, value 2s. one milkpot, value 3s. 6d. the property of Edward Madgwick and Josiah Cooper .

IT appeared after the case was gone through, that there was a second Mr. Cooper, who had money employed in the partnership concern to which the pro

Perty stolen belonged, and who shared both the profits and the expenditures of the trade.

The Jury therefore under the direction of the Court, found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-122

408. WILLIAM CONNER was indicted for an assault, with intent to rob .

But as no prosecutor appeared, he was found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-123

409. PETER KELLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , two cushions, value 3s. the property of Edward Jenkins .

WILLIAM SHEAN. I am a hackney coachman. I was watering my horses, and I went to get a quartern of beans, and a person told me that my cushions were stolen, and I saw the prisoner and the cushions in custody when I went out.

JOHN PARRETT . I saw the prisoner pull two cushions cut of the prosecutor's coach, and walk away with them. I jumped off my box, and stopped him; he seemed very tipsy.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-124

410. ELIZABETH MOSS was indicted for stealinging, on the 6th of March , a shoved, value 2s. the property of Alexander Bariag , esq.

WILLIAM COMMING. A plumber who was employed at our house, asked me if I had given a shovel to a woman; I told him I had not, and in consequence of some further information he gave me, I followed the prisoner, and took from her a coal shovel, which she must have taken out of our coal-vault.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-125

411. MORRIS MIERS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , four loaves of bread, value 1s.6d. the property of Sarah Staines .

SARAH STAINES. I lost these loaves, on Saturday, the 13th of March; I locked my door at about twelve and one, and left the key in; I went into the washhouse for a moment, and when I returned, the door was opened, and the loaves were gone. The prisoner was brought back with the loaves.

ANDREW MILLER , I saw the prisoner come out with the loaves, and on my stopping him, he threw them away.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-126

412. WILIAM BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a butter-flat, value 1s. One hundred and sixty penny-pieces, and seven hundred and five halfpence , the property of William Sadler .

JOHN CARLISLE . On the 17th of March, between seven and eight in the evening, I was in company with a person named Thompson, and we stopped the prisoner with the flat and money in question.

WILLIAM COURT . I am servant to Mr. Sadler, cheesemonger, in St. John-street, and lost this flat and the money out of my cart.

(Flat and money produced.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-127

413. JOHN BOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a bat-box, value 1d. four gowns, value 19s. a bonnet, value 3s. a pair of shoes, value 2s. two petticoats, value 4s. two shifts, value 6s. two yards of ribbon, value 6d. one half neck handkerchief, value 6d. two pairs of stockings, value 2s. and one shirt, value 2s. the property of Michael Green .

IT appeared in this case, that the articles stated in the indictment to be stolen, were thrown out of the prosecutor's window to the prisoner by the prosecutor's own daughter, and intended to have eloped with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-128

414. JAMES FILKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , twenty-six yards of calico, value 25s. the property of Thomas Cox .

WILLIAM WRIGHT. I observed the prisoner passing by my door, about ten o'clock in the morning, and as I entertained a suspicion on account of his appearence, I stopped him, and found the calico in question under his jacket. Mr. Cox the linen-draper, lives close by me.

THOMAS COX . This calico is my property.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-129

415. SARAH BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a silver fork, value 7s. the property of Isaac Hymen . And MARY BOLTON was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

MARIA LEWIS . I am a servant to Mr. Hymen; Sarah Bolton was a sempstress , and employed in his house; this spoon was not locked up.

JOHN AARON. I am apprentice to a pawnbroker, and on the 16th of February, Mary Bolton pawned this spoon with us.

SARAH BOLTON, GUILTY , aged 46.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

MARY BOLTON , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-130

416. JOHN COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , five yards of printed cotton, value 15s. the property of John Lamer .

JOHN LAMER. On the day in the indictment, the shop bell was rung violently, and on going down stairs, I perceived there was nobody in the shop,

and I understood from the people round the door, that my young man had gone in quest of some body who had stolen something.

BENJAMIN EVANS . I pursued the prisoner, and on overtaking him found a piece of print, which had been at our door, on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it given to me to carry.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-131

417. MARY LOTHERINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a saw, value 9s. the property of William Litton .

WILLIAM LITTON . I lost this saw from my door on the 15th of March; I saw it exposed for sale outside the prisoner's shop; she is a green-grocer; she said it was her's, and asked six shillings for it. She would not give it me, and I went before the magistrate, and got a search warrant, and had her taken up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-132

418. THOMAS SWINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a basket, value 5s. and seven loaves of bread, value 6s. the property of David Brown .

DAVID BROWN . I am a baker , and on the day in the indictment left my basket at the door of Mr. Stewart, in Broad-street, St. Giles's .

ALEXANDER STEWART . I saw the priosner take this basket from my door.

ANDREW ANDERSON . I am a journeyman baker; I knew the prisoner, he was also a baker; I knew he was out of work; he had the basket, and said he was carrying it for a young man, and was in a hurry.

JAMES HANCOCK. I went to the prisoner's lodging, and got the basket there.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-133

419. JOHN STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , four pieces of cotton, value 3l. the property of William Rickarby .

GEORGE DAVENPORT . About five o'clock in the evening of the 28th of February, going up Bernard-street, I observed the prisoner in company with two others. The prisoner had a bundle in his apron, apparently like linen. In a moment I heard the cry of stop thief, and stopped him; he threw away the linen; I saw one of Mr. Rickarby's young men pick it up.

MORGAN MORGAN. I missed some pieces of calico from the door, about five o'clock in the evening of the 28th of February, I picked up that which fell from the prisoner; it was what I missed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one month , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18160403-134

420. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , twenty four yards of flannel, value 2l. five yards of muslin, value 23s. four shawls, value 24s. three caps, value 2s. 6d. one pound of thread, value 21s. the property of Joseph Blake .

JAMES SMITH . On the 22nd of February, I received this package from Mr. Blake, at about half past twelve in the morning; I left the cart for a moment to leave a parcel at the corner of Bond-street; when I went out again, the prisoner was getting out of the cart, with the package, containing the goods in question. I immediately took it from him, and took him into custody.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-135

421. JOSEPH GARDENER and MARIA WRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , two sheets, value 6s. and one blanket, value 6s. the property of Thomas Norwood , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS NORWOOD. I let a lodging to the two prisoners, on the 9th of February; the man took the lodging, and the woman followed as his wife. They went away because they could not pay me my rent. and on examining the room on the day in the indictment, I missed the property in question. The prisoners were taken up, and one of the sheets was sent back to me.

EBENEZAR MOLTON. I am apprentice to a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket, which was pawned for two shillings at our house, by the male prisoner, on the 17th of February.

GARDENER, GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

WRIGHT, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-136

422. FREDERICK GASKILL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a dial, value 2l. the property of John Ryan .

JOHN RYAN. I am a publican . This dial hung upon a hook in the tap-room. The prisoner was in the tap-room on the evening of the 11th of March, and I missed it after he was gone. I saw it on the Wednesday evening following at Worship-street office.

ROBERT GOULD. I am a watchman, and stopped the prisoner with this clock on his shoulder at about eleven o'clock on the evening of the 11th, in Playhouse-yard, Whitecross-street, about five minutes walk from the prosecutor's.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the dial.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one month , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-137

423. SARAH GREATOREX and ANN ALLUM were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , a shawl, value 5s. and a great coat, value 2l. 6s. the property of William Sandell .

JOHN FAULKENOR . I was standing opposite Mr. Sandell's, in Newman-street , and saw the prisoner Greatorex, go in at the door; she might be two

minutes in the house; the other was standing at the door. Presently Greatorex came out, and I saw that she had clapped something under her shawl, which caused me to suspect her; I followed her, and tapped her on the shoulder, and then she said she was sorry for what she had done, and began to cry. I took them both to Mr. Sandell's. I found the articles in the indictment under her shawl.

GREATOREX, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

ALLUM, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-138

424. ELIZABETH GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a sheet, value 10s. the property of Joseph Fox , in a lodging-room .

SARAH FOX. The prisoner lodged in my husband's house for nearly nine months; she left on the Sunday before the day in the indictment, without any warning, and on examining the room, I missed the sheet.

JOHN BEAL. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this sheet on the 10th of February, for two shillings; I knew her well.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-139

425. MARY DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a sheet, value 6s. a counterpane, value 2s. a bolster, value 18d. a pail, value 2s. a coffee-pot, value 6d. a candlestick, value 6d. and a mug, value 3d. the property of Jeremiah Gurring , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH GURRING . The prisoner lodged in my husband's house in March last; all the articles in the indictment were let to her with the lodging. She went away without paying the rent. On examining the room, on the 15th of March, I missed all the things. When I spoke to the prisoner about it, she said, if she brought the things back, I had no business with it. She had the lodging, and the use of all the things.

JANE POWEL . I bought a pail of the prisoner; which pail was afterwards claimed by the prosecutrix. I also bought a bolster and coffee-pot, which were claimed by Mrs. Gurring.

ANN BULLOCK . I bought a patchwork quilt of the prisoner for eight-pence, which Mrs. Gurring claimed.

JOSEPH PRINCE. I apprehended the prisoner at a house in Chequer-alley, Bunhill-row. I found some duplicates on her of the rest of the property stated in the indictment, pawned at Mr. Burrow's in Barbican, who gave the things up to me as he could not attend himself.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-140

426. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , a great coat, value 5s. the property of Joshua Wright .

JOSHUA WRIGHT. On the 2nd of April, my great coat was safe in my cart when I got to London.

JOSHUA WRIGHT , JUN. My father left me in care of the cart, by Worship-street, and a gentleman ran after me as I was driving along, and told me to stop, for the coat was gone, and then I missed it.

JAMES CLARK . I saw the prisoner running, and hearing the cry of stop thief, I pursued him, and he dropped the coat; I took him and brought him back.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined one month , and whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-141

427. JOSEPH STAGG was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , three pair of pantaloons, value 30s. and one coat, value 5s. the property of William Mabberley and Joseph Thompson .

WILLIAM MABBERLEY. I am a pawnbroker , in partnership with Joseph Thompson, and live at Chelsea . The articles in the indictment hung by our door, before they were stolen. The prisoner was pointed out to me. I brought him back; on searching him, he had these things concealed on his person: and on examining him, I discovered that the coat he had on, was one I had lost from my door in a similar manner.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-142

428. EDWARD TUCKER THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , three spoons, value 40s. the property of Sarah Smith , in her dwelling-house .

JANE ROGERS . On the 8th of this month, on coming down stairs from the drawing room into the kitchen; I found the prisoner there; he was not a stranger to the house. He used to come to buy hare and rabbit skins; he asked me if I had any to sell, and I told him that was not the place to buy them, meaning he had no business in the kitchen. On turning my head, I missed three spoons; I had just put them on a shelf over the dressar; I told him to deliver up what he had got; he ran out. and I got up and ran after him; I never lost sight of him until he was stopped; he then threw the spoons away.

RICHARD WARD . I am a carpenter, and heard the cry of murder, stop thief. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner coming out of Mrs. Smith's area gate. He ran a little way, and then I stopped him, and he dropped the spoons. I picked up two and the young woman one.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-143

429. JOSEPH LE BRUN and ISABELLA LE BRUN were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , six silver spoons, value 15s. and one blanket, value 4s. the property of Hector Campbell , in a lodging room .

HECTOR CAMPBELL. The prisoners were lodgers of mine; they were about eight weeks with me alte

gether; they went away on the 14th of February; they paid four or five weeks, and they were three or four in arrear when they went away. Monsieur Le Brun cannot speak English.

JOHN FLOWER . I am journeyman to Mr. Guest, pawnbrker, in Fleet-market. The female prisoner pawned this blanket with me on the 19th of January, for three shillings.

THOMAS CANTRALL . I am shopman to Mr. Essex, in the Stand. I took in these four spoons from the man.

WILLIAM PENNY. I know the lady at the bar, I took in these two spoons from her.

Joseph Le Brun 's Defence, (in French) addressed the Court, and stated, that amidst the calamities which had lately visited France; he had been under the necessity of flying to this country, and without resource, after the little money he had with him was expended, he was tempted to the crime with which he was charged, by the pangs of hunger.

ISABELLA LE BRUN, NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH LE BRUN , GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-144

430. THOMAS MEGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April, a mattress, value 21s. the property of John Barrowcliff .

JOHN BARROWCLIFF . I am a mattrass manufacturer in Wardour-street . The prisoner was in my service, under warning of quittal; I missed this mattrass on the 2nd of April.

JOHN BURTON. I live opposite. There was a mattrass found in my house, which was claimed by Mr. Barrowcliff; that mattrass I received from the prisoner, who on a former occasion had borrowed a mattrass from me, as I understand for his master, and he gave me the one in question as an equivalent.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer. I produce the mattrass which I found at the house of the last witness.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-145

431. WILLIAM HARRIS , JOHN DANIELS , and THOMAS SHORT were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a seal, value 5s. and a key, value 2s. the property of John Marshall , from his person .

JOHN MARSHALL. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I had a watch in my fob, and was looking at the cairicatotes at the corner of Beauford Buildings . A person tapped me on the shoulder, and told me I had lost them, and then I perceived that I had.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I saw the three prisoners, some desseparated and sometimes in company together, on the afternoon in question; I saw the prosecutor looking at the print shop, with his seal and key hanging by a ribbon to his watch, and I concealed myself in a shoe shop opposite. The prisoners, Daniels and Harris, got close to the prosecutor, and beckoned Short over to them. Then Damels got on the prosecutor's left, and Harris on his right. Daniels then got Short by the collar, and shoved him in between the prosecutor and another person. daniels then put his coat round the boy, and his arm under the prosecutor's chin, and on to another man's shoulder, so as effectually to keep the prosecutor from looking down at his watch ribbon. Harris was behind the prosecutor putting his great coat round him, so as to screen from observations from behind. This is what they call covering. They were there a few minutes, and then the prosecutor came away. The boy Short was so covered that I could not exactly see what he did; but I observed Daniels' hand go down towards the boy's side, and I conceived that he had hold of the seal and key, while the boy was cutting the ribbon. The prosecutor came away, and I observed that the key and seal were gone from his watch. The boy left the prosecutor at a signal being given, and followed him into Southampton-street. The two other prisoners remained looking at the prints. I desired George Wooroffe, the young man that was with me, not to take the two prisoners that were in the crowd, for they might throw the seal away; but to wait 'til we got the boy, and until they got out of the crowd. When the boy got off a little way, Daniels and Harris quitted the shop. I took hold of Harris, and immediately Daniels ran away. I did not say any thing to Harris before Daniels ran. He ran down the middle of the Strand, and I hallooed stop thief; and he was stopped a great way down the Strand by another officer named Murry; George Woodroffe got the boy. When we got them altogether into a shop, I proceeded to search them, and in the bottom of the boy's trowsers, inside the lining, I cut out a pair of scissars made for the purpose for which I conceived they had been used; and also a piece of ribbon which matched with the remainder of the prosecutor's ribbon which was tied to his watch. These were in one leg, and on the other side I found a gold seal and gold key.

GEORGE WOOROFFE. Corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

Daniels's Defence. As I was going along the Strand, there was a crowd, and I thought there was row, and I went to look what it was; and the officer said I was one, and so I ran away.

Harris's Defence. I was looking at the pictures, and never observed who was standing by me; and as for this young man and the boy, I never seen them before in my life.

Short's Defence. I was sent to school by my father and mother one day, and met these two people, and after that I went home, and met them a great many times instead of going to school; and on this day, when I got to the picture shop with them, they put a pair of scissars into my hand, and told me to cut the seal off, and so I did.

HARRIS GUILTY , aged 10.

DANIELS GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for life .

SHORT GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-146

432. WILLIAM MEREDITH , alias MEREDURE ,

was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , an umbrella, value 5s. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I missed this umbrella, and went in pursuit of it. I understood that two men had thrown it over into a yard.

ROBERT LOCK . About a quarter before seven, I saw the prisoner and another man pass after each other by Mr. Smith's door, and the other man took the umbrella down. The man who took the umbrella, threw it over the wall into the yard. I took the prisoner into custody, and the other got off.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-147

433. JOHN WILD was indicted for stealing, on 9th of March , a saw value 5s. the property of James Paget .

JAMES PAGET . On the 9th of March, about one o'clock, as I was going into Mr. Harpur's yard, where I had been at work; I met the prisoner coming out at the gate. I asked a man to stand at the gate while I went to look in the shop if my saw was gone, and I missed it. I immediately pursued the prisoner, and stopped him with the saw on him.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-148

434. CHARLOTTE ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , a pair of shoes, value 5s. and a handkerchief, value 1s. the property of Abraham Fowler .

ABRAHAM FOWLER. On the day in the indictment, I went into the Delaware Arms, at the corner of Portman-street, Oxford-street ; and laid these shoes and the handkerchief down on the table. I went out for about three or four minutes, and on my return, the things were gone.

GEORGE BUGHES. I am a hackney-coach-man, and was at this public-house on the day in question. I was sitting in the same box where the serjeant had put his shoes, and the prisoner took them up and went out with them, and never returned.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I apprehended the prisoner; the shoes have never been recovered.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-149

435. MARY REVLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , a watch, value 1l. 15s. a seal value 7s. a key, value 8d. the property of William Glover , from his person .

WILLIAM GLOVER . On the 2nd of March, between twelve and one o'clock at night; I was talking to the prisoner in Vine-street , for about five minutes, and she took my watch out of my waistcoat pocket and went off; and I being lame, could not follow her. I told the watchman where I lived, and he came and brought me information that he had apprehended her.

Prisoner's Defence. He left the watch with me, because he said, he had not a halfpenny in money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-150

436. JOHN M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a sheet, value 3s. the property of Thomas Scoggings .

THOMAS SCOGGINGS. I keep a publick-house in Westminster . There are two ways to go up stairs in our house; one for ourselves, and the other for the lodgers. I lost the sheet in question off my own bed. I met the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs, just after he had come down, and he dropped the sheet. He had no business up stairs at all. I sent for an officer, and on his being searched, the sheet in question was found upon him.

THOMAS GARNER. I found the sheet on the prisoner's person, under his waistcoat round his body.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-151

437. JOHN HENRY MIERS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a bed, value 40s. and a blanket, value 2s. the property of Ebenezer Hook .

EBENEZER HOOK . I am a labouring man . It is six weeks yesterday, since I lost my bed and blanket. The prisoner lodged with me twelve nights. On the morning of 5th of March, I heard somebody coming down stairs very softly, and I had a suspicion that something was going. I went up stairs afterwards, and missed the bed; both the prisoner and the bed was gone; I went down to the Old Woman's Stairs, and found my bed in a boat, wrapped up in a blanket, and the prisoner with it, just going to row off. I sent for an officer and had him taken into custody.

THOMAS HARRISON. I apprehended the prisoner and took the bed into custody.

GUILTY ,aged 17.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-152

438. WILLIAM LOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , ninety pounds in bank notes, the property of George Piety , from his person .

GEORGE PIETY . I am a coal-porter , and when I lost this money; it was on 4th of March, while I was tossing Cook for some beer, at the Three Elms, St. Ann's-lane. Westminster . While I was tossing, this Lomas got by my side, and told me he knew me very well; kept tossing on for some time, and he kept leaning over my hand every minute, while I was covering a halfpenny with it after having tossed it up. I had this money in my pocket, on the same side of me on which he sat. He went away afterwards; and after he had been gone about a quarter of an hour, I missed my money; every one was searched there, and we found a ten-pound note under the table.

DANIEL RICKETS I saw them tossing, and saw the prisoner sitting by the prosecutor's side. I saw the prisoner go away, and iabout about quarter of an hour afterwards, the prosecutor said he was robbed. I saw the note picked up from under the table. Before that, I had seen the prosecutor with a bundle of

notes; I had seen him flash them on the table.

JOHN FOWLER . I was in this house, and kept the score while they were tossing, and I saw George Piety pull out three twenty-pound notes, two ten-pound notes, and two five-pound notes, and he put them into his left hand pocket. A man of the name of Cook called me out, and said he wanted to speak with me, and when I went in, after speaking with him about the fight between Curtis and West Country Dick, Lomas was gone. Then we were all searched when the prosecutor missed his money, and he was searched, but no money found. The prisoner was the only person who was missing; he had been sitting on the prosecutor's left hand side.

JAMES SALMON . I was in the room, and I was searched also. The prisoner sat on the prosecutor's left hand side, and he went out about a quarter of an hour before the prosecutor missed his money.

MARY HOMAN . My husband keeps a public-house in Stretton-ground, Westminster. The prisoner at the bar came to my house on the 4th of March, in the evening, between ten and eleven o'clock, and called for half a pint of gin, and he pulled out a bundle of papers like notes, and pulled one from among them, which he spread on the bar, and asked me to change it, and take the money for the gin; I told him I could not, for it was a twenty-pound note; upon which he grabbled it up; and put down another, which I also told him I could not change, because it was a ten-pound note; he then told me I must put the gin up to him.

JAMES GILMORE. I produce the note found under the table.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-153

439. SAMUEL JUDAH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a great coat, value 2s. the property of Isaac Harris .

ISAAC HARRIS. This great coat was stolen out of my cart in Mile-end-road , at about half past eleven in the forenoon of the day in the indictment; my cart was at my daughter's door.

ANN TWENDELL . I am the daughter of the last witness. I saw the prisoner take this coat from the cart; somebody called to him, and he immediately dropped the coat about three doors from our house.

CHARLES JAQUES . I apprehended the prisoner on suspicion of breaking into a house, and he was ordered to be detained for the coat.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-154

440. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , eight ounces of tea, value 5s. and eight ounces of chocolate, value 3s. the property of Michael Ashley .

GEORGE ASHLEY . On Saturday, the 2nd of March, the prisoner came into my uncle's shop, in the strand, and asked for the articles in question to be weighed for him he also asked for a aur of sugar, after the other things were weighed, and whist I went to get it, he ran off with the tea and chocolate. I pursued him immediately, and brought him back.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-155

441. HANNAH INNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , one watch, value 12s. one gown, value 2s, two shifts, value 1s.one pair of stave, value 2s. ten bits of caireo, value 2s. one cap, 6d. one apron. value 3d and one handkerchief, value 3d. the property of George Wood .

GEORGE WOOD . I am a gardener , and live at the Market-place, Kensington . I lost these things on the 28th of March; but was not at home at the time.

RICHARD HAYNES. I was called into the prosecutor's house by an alarm given by his wife, who is now in child-bed. I found the prisoner on the landing-place, near the chamber door; she had no business there; she was quit - A strange. Part of the things I took from her person, and the constable who was sent for, took the remainder from her.

GEORGE HULL , a constable, corroborated the last witness t stimony.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-156

442. ELIZABETH CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a cloak, value 2s. the property of Patrick Kelley .

BRIDGET KELLEY . I lost the cloak on the 27th of March. The prisoner came into my room about one o'clock in the day, she stared at me, and I looked at her; and she said, Mary knows me, meaning my child; the child said that she carried Mr. Lewis's milk-pails. She staid until tea-time, and I thought it would be cdd a she was a country woman, not to ask her to take a cup of tea; as I turned round, I saw her going out with my cloak, and she got clear off, and I did not see her for some time; she was afterwards taken up.

THOMAS HAYLETT . I took in this cloak, between seven and eight at night, on the 25th of March, from the prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-157

443. GEORGE BATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , a gown, value 3s. a waistcoat, value 4s. a stocking, value 4d. and a slip of flannel, value 6d. the property of Robert Allen .

ROBERT ALLEN . On the 29th of February, I was going to throw some stuff away backwards, and I saw something creeping along out of the front room, which I at first thought was a dog, but it was the prisoner, and I saw something under his arm; I caught him by the collar, and we fell in the street together; there was another man picked something

up which fell out of the prisoner's hat, and ran off with it. These things fell from the prisoner's person.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-158

444. CHARLES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , a such, value 4l. two seals, value 2s one key, value 6d and a watch-ribbon, value 3d. the property of John Henry Heiatmon , from his person .

JOHN HENRY HEIATMON. About ten o'clock at night, I and a friend were passing the Royalty Theatre, and four or five men together met us, and pushed us from one to the other; a man took hold of my watch, and drew it out of my pocket; I felt him; my friend was going to assist me; the prisoner had hold of him by the collar, and kept him tight, so that he could not, and kept saying to him, I will take your part. We delivered the prisoner to the watchman.

Prisoner Defence. I was going along, and I saw these persons together making noise, and after the mob had rspesed, a man said that I had taken the watch; I told him he was very wrong in saying that of me, and when the officers searched me, they found nothing but a few halfpence.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-159

445. JAMES BELL, alias LLOYD , and JOHN BIRD , were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , two shirts, value 5s. the property of James Thompson .

JAMES THOMPSON. In consequence of information, about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the day in the indictment, I saw some shirts thrown over the pales, which had been hanging on a line in my garden; I could not see who threw them, because there was such a quantity of linen between me and the place where the person who was doing it stood; I ran down the passage, and caught one of the prisoners buttoning my shirts under his jacket, and the other assisting him. I seized Bell, and Bird ran away; but he was taken soon after.

WILLIAM PICKERING. I am a Bow-street officer. I saw these lads lurking about Thompson's premises, and I told him to take care. I could see the heads of some persons in the garden; but could not tell who they were. The prosecutor momentarily ran down his garden, and out of a side door which lead in the park, and seized Bell, and I took the other.

BELL, GUILTY, aged 14.

BIRD, GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-160

446. DANIEL PRING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a spade, value 2s. 6d. the property of George Sewers .

GEORGE SEWERS. I lost my spade on the 30th of March, off Moulsley Common ; I left it on the Common while I went to dinner, and when I came back, it was gone.

JOHN MORGAN. I am a labourer, I was working in Hampton Common-field, when Daniel Pring came to me with this spade to sell.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-161

417. BENJAMIN VALLANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , a shawl, value 1l. 1s. the property of James Ince .

JAMES INCE . I keep a mercer's shop , at No. 75, Oxford-street . About seven o'clock in the evening, in consequence of some information, my father ran out, and brought the prisoner back. The shawl has never been found. My father will describe what he saw. I remembered the prisoner's person from having been on the Jury at the last December Sessions when he was tried.

THOMAS MORTLOCK . I live at Mr. James Davis 's linen-draper, in Oxford-street. Going by the prosecutor's shop, I saw the prisoner at the bar and another lad larking about it. The other lad made a pull at this shawl, which was hanging up; but did not succeed in getting it down; they made several pulls at it; at last the prisoner gave it a pull, and got it down, and the other lad ran off with it; the prisoner ran up Win-law-street.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-162

448. ANN SHRUBSHALI was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a bed, value 2l. a bolster, value 3s. a sheet, value 3s. three blankets, value 7s. a looking-glass, value 2s. a pair of bellows, value 1s. and two flat irons, value 1s. the property of Thomas Benwick , in a lodging-room .

MARY BENWICK . The prisoner had a furnished lodging in my husband's house, and the articles in the indictment were let to her to use with the lodging. On the 30th of March, she came down to pay me a shilling, and was very tipsy, so tipsy that I thought I would take her up stairs, and lay her on the bed; I then discovered that the bed was gone, and I also missed the other things.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I produce a sheet pawned by the prisoner, for two shillings and six pence, and a flat iron for fourpence.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I produce a blanket, a looking-glass, a bolster, a pillow, two other blankets, a flat iron, and a pair of bellows, pawned by the prisoner.

JOHN CROSS . I produce the bed, pawned by the prisoner for one-pound fifteen shillings.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-163

449. JOHN MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a tea-cadey, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Brown .

JOHN BROWN. On the 25th of March, my wife heard a noise, and called me up; I immediately

missed the tea-caddy; I had seen it safe five minutes before. I went out, and saw the prisoner walking off, with the tea-caddy under his arm; I brought him back, and took him to the office.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-164

450 CHURCH was indicted for stealing on the 11th of March , five pounds weight of tobacco value 1l. 5s. the property of William Hendebourck .

WILLIAM HENDEBOURCK . On the 11th of March, I saw the prisoner take the tobacco in question, and tie it up in his handkerchief, and hide it under an empty box. I then gave information to an officer. We waited until the prisoner was going, and then the officer brought him back, and searched him in the counting-house, and found the handkerchief with the tobacco in it in his small clothes, and some more in his hat.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-165

451. RICHARD WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a wrapper, value 6d. and twenty yards of kerseymere, value 20l the property of Andrew Holt .

RICHARD HOLT. Andrew Holt is a waggoner , in Grubb-street, Cripplegate, and this cloth was entrusted to him as a carrier. I took the parcel of cloth in question in my cart, for the purpose of delivering it according to its direction. I had occasion to stop in St. Martin's-lane , and left my cart for a moment, to deliver a parcel in St. Martin's court, and when I returned to my cart, a woman asked me if the cart was mine; I told her it was; and she pointed out the prisoner to me, who was making off as fast as he could, with the parcel in question; I pursued him, and he was stopped in Castle-street, at the bottom of Mercer-street, Long Acre.

WILLIAM LODLEY. I stopped the prisoner, hearing the cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner running with the parcel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-166

452. BENJAMIN HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a shawl veil, value 1l. 16s. the property of Job Barker .

JANE BARKER . My husband keeps a lace shop in High Hoborn . The prisoner came into our shop about seven o'clock in the evening, and laid hold of a lace veil in question, and asked the price of it; he bed me thirty shillings for it. He asked me to measure it; then he hung it up again, and went away; he came in about eight, and I saw him stretch himself at his full length, then he snatched the shawl, and ran off; I immediately gave the alarm, and he was stopped, and brought back; I am positive he was the man; the shawl has never been found. When he was searched in the shop, he pulled out a particular pocket handkerchief, with which he had blown his nose when he was in the shop before, and to the pattern of which I could swear.

JOHN RIDLEY . I stopped the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-167

453. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , two sheets, value 10s. the property of William Bartlem , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH BARTLEM. The prisoner took a lodging with us in November. On the night of the 16th, he went to bed, and I know the sheets were safe then. He went out very early the next morning, and when I got up, I missed the sheets. I met him a few weeks after that, and then he ran away from me; I did not see him again until I had him apprehended.

JOHN BARNLEY . I apprehended the prisoner, and asked him what he had done with the sheets, and he said he had sold them to a jew.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-168

454. MARY BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , two sheets, value 7s. one quilt, value 4s. one bolster, value 2s. and one bolster case, value 6d. the property of William Gabb .

ELIZABETH GAEE. On the 20th of February, I had occasion to go up stairs in the dusk of the evening, and one of the room doors was open, and all the bed clothes were taken off, and the bed was in confusion. The prisoner had lived servant with me a twelve month previous. I ran down stairs, and she was found in the house, and dropped the things immediately. She was running out, when she was stopped by a servant. She had taken ever so many of my lodger's things besides.

SARAH NEWMAN . I was servant to the last witness, and stopped the prisoner as she was trying to get out at the door.

WILLIAM STEPHENS. I was a lodger in Mr. Gabb's house. I saw the prisoner at the bar on the stairs with a bundle, and as the landlady was coming up stairs, she dropped the bundle, and ran down stairs.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-169

455. CATHARINE BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a gown, value 6s. the property of David Morgan .

SUDNEY MORGAN. The prisoner came into our house on the 17th of March. I had seen this gown safe about five minutes before she came in; she had no business in my house; the street-door is always open. I missed the gown after the prisoner was gone.

PHoest GAINS. The prisoner brought a gown

to our house; I gave her permission to leave it there. I know by the pattern that is the same gown that was claimed by Mrs. Morgan.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-170

456. JOHN REARDON, alias CORDON , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a watch, value 3l. a key, value 4d. a ribbon, value 1d. a pocket book, value 6d. a brooch, value 14s. a ring, value 12s, a handkerchief, value 5s. a knife, value 1s. three three-shilling bank tokens, five shillings, ten penny pieces, sixteen halfpence, four two-pound bank notes, and six one-pound bank notes, the property of James Lane , from his person .

JAMES LANE . The prisoner was in the same house with me. I had occasion to go backwards, and the prisoner followed me; and before I had buttoned my breeches up, he knocked me down; and the blow he gave me, took my breath away. He put his knee upon my breast; he then took my watch out of my pocket, and a ring from my finger, and a brooch from my breast, and the money from my pockets together with a smart ticket. I then made for the tap-room as quick as I could, and he tried to get in before me; and when I got to the tap-room door, he gave me a blow on the back of the neck, finding he could not get in before me, which knocked me down two steps into the tap-room, with my head against a settle. He then ran out, and it was a week after before he was taken up. I have seen my watch again, and that is all.

ANN COLLIER. I saw them go out into the yard, and the prisoner in coming back, ran by me like a dart.

JOSEPH FELLOWES. I am a pawnbroker, in Princes-street, Soho. I produce the watch which was pawned by the prisoner on the 29th of March. I advanced a guinea upon it; I am positive as to his person.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-171

457. ELEANOR CHALLENOR was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , four shifts, value 20s. and three shirts, value 30s. the property of George Nicholson .

SARAH NICHOLSON. I lost these duplicates of the shifts and shirts out of this little box. I had seen them safe on the 23rd of March. I did not miss them until the pawnbroker informed me that a man had been to take a shirt out. That is one of the shirts that the prisoner is charged with stealing.

RALPH HOPE . I found one of the duplicates on the prisoner's person; in consequence of which, I went to a person named Sarah Perry, who delivered up these things which were claimed by Mrs. Nicholson.

SARAH PERRY . I have known the prisoner at the bar about three years; the things which I gave up to the last witness, and which were claimed by Mrs. Nicholson. I had received from the pawnbroker's by sending the duplicates for them; which duplicates I had purchased from the prisoner, and gave them to Wright to redeem the articles, which I afterwards delivered to Hope.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-172

458. JAMES BELLINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , three pounds weight of soap, value 2s. the property of Nathaniel Godfrey .

NATHANIEL GODFREY. I sell soap ; I lost three pounds on the 23rd of March in the morning; I did not see it taken.

THOMAS WEATHERHEAD . From my up-stairs window, I saw the prisoner and another lad lurking about the prosecutor's shop. The prisoner went in and moved a cake of soap about a yard; his companion then tapped at the window, and he came out. They then both crossed over to my side of the way. I then went down stairs to watch them more narrowly, and the prisoner then went in again and brought the soap out.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined one month , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-173

459. JOHN KEPPEL was indicted for stealing a quantity of wearing apparel ; but as the principal witness could not be found, the prisoner was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-174

460. HENRY SWAINE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a sheet value 5s. the property of Charles Stewardson ; a coat, value 15s. a waistcoat, value 2s. a pair of breeches, value 10s. two handkerchief, value 6d. a knife, value 6d. six three-shilling bank tokens, value 18s. and a one-pound bank note , the property of James Capon .

CHARLES STEWARDSON. I am landlord of the King of Prussia, in Leather-lane . The prisoner lodged at my house on the 6th. A person of the name of Capon, also lodged in my house that night. The prisoner went away early the next morning, and Capon could not come down, because all his clothes were gone, as well as a sheet of mine. The prisoner was apprehended on the 11th.

JAMES CAPON. I slept at this house, in the same room with the prisoner, and in the morning all my things which are stated in the indictment were gone. The knife I had had in use four years; I can swear to it.

CHARLES BROWN . I searched the prisoner, and took from him this knife.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160403-175

561. THOMAS CHARLES SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , thirteen yards of woolen cord, value 4l. the property of James Wiggins .

GEORGE BLACKLAND . I was coming down Holborn , at about half past six in the evening of the 5th of April, and saw the prisoner reach across a pile of clothes, at Mr. Wiggin's door, and cut a

staing, and take off the top piece, and carry it away; he walked deliberately across the street, and then he ran; I called out stop thief, and followed him. He dropped the cloth at the end of the court opposite, and I pursued him, and never lost sight of him until I took him.

GEORGE BEST . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. We never missed the cloth until it was brought back to our shop, together with the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-176

562. JOHN THOMAS and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , two bushels of coals, value 4s. the property of Joseph Cromwell .

JOSEPH CROMWELL. I am a coal-merchant . These coals were among others in the River at Hammersmith.

WILLIAM HALL . I took the boys with these coals on them in Mr. Cromwell's barge, at about ten o'clock at night, on the 10th of March; they had a bag to convey them in.

THOMAS, GUILTY , aged 18.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-177

563. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a jacket, value 5s. the property of John Winter .

JOHN WINTER . On the 15th of March, I was at the Shakespeare's Head, and left my jacket on the table while I went out for a moment. On my return, I missed the jacket, and understood that this man went out with it. In about an hour and a half afterwards, he came in, and I charged him with stealing my jacket; he denied it, and I sent for an officer.

MARY WILLIAMS . I live at the Shakespeare's Head, as a servant. I saw the prisoner go out with the jacket under his arm; I am sure the prisoner is the man, and I am sure the jacket was Mr. Winter's.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-178

464. WILLIAM TWAITES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , a picture, value 20s. and a picture frame, value 10s. the property of Thomas Thomas .

THOMAS THOMAS. I am a pawnbroker . This picture stood at our door in Holborn . I saw the prisoner take it, and went out and brought him back immediately with the picture.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-179

465. CATHERINE CATON was indicted for sealing, on the 29th of March , a table, value 18s. the property of John House .

JOHN HOUSE. I am a broker , in Crawford-street . This table was standing outside my door, and the prisoner came on the 29th of last month, and took it off.

JOSEPH GONDEN. I was coming past, and saw the woman take the table, and I saw her with it.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-180

466. JAMES EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a coat, value 5s. the property of Matthew Bell .

MATTHEW BELL. I am a hackney-coachman . I was watering my horses at the Queen's Head, in the Strand , and went for a quartern of beans, and when I returned, the coat was gone from the box.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I apprehended the prisoner with this coat on him. He had it on the same evening when I took him for stealing a coach and horses, for which he was acquitted.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-181

467. JOHN HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , four books, value 1l. the property of William Taylor .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I saw the prisoner go out of my father's shop at about one o'clock on the 16th of March, with something, round which he was wrapping his handkerchief; I was in the parlour behind the shop; I immediately followed him out, and called to him until he got to Queen-street, to know what he had taken out of our shop; he said, nothing. I came back to our house, and then by my mother's request, I returned again to the stable-yard, into which the prisoner had gone; he had gone up stairs into a room, where I found him, and the books in question on a chair. He then went out, and ran away, and I followed him, and took him to the watchhouse.

JOHN WESTON. The prisoner came down the stable-yard with the books, and brought them up stairs into our room.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-182

468. HEZEKIAH KERSEYMERE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , five brushes, value 3s. the property of William Slater .

ROBERT TEASDALE . I saw the prisoner lurking about our neighbourhood, and at last he went to the prosecutor's shop, and took these brushes from the door-way, where they were hanging.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-183

469 . JOSEPH LAUGHTER , alias LAWTER . was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , a shawl, value 30s. the property of William Greenall .

WILLIAM GRENALL . The prisoner lived in my house, and was quite familiar. On the day in the indictment, he went to a drawer, and took out this

shawl; I thought my wife had sent him for it; but he went off with it, and never returned.

ELIZABETH GREENALL . I was going out to Covent Garden that morning for some oranges; but the prisoner said he would go for me, and I gave him the money, and he went off with it, and never returned; I did not send him for the shawl.

JAMES GILLMORE . I apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-184

470. ANN M'CULLUM was indicted for stealing, on the 31st March , five three-shilling bank tokens , the property of John Peasgood .

JOHN PEASGOOD. The prisoner was my housekeeper . In consequence of suspicion, I marked such money as I, had in my desk, and missed the money in question on the day in the indictment; I sent for an officer, and had her searched, and the money was found upon her. She had no authority to go to the desk to get whatever money she chose.

JOHN GILLMAN . I am an officer of the Thames Police. The prisoner at first said she had no money about her; then she said, she had only two or three three-shilling pieces, and on searching her, I found a purse containing this marked money.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-185

471. WILLIAM ROLFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a handkerchief, value 4s. the property of William Hollamby , from his person .

WILLIAM HOLLAMBY . I was standing at a picture shop in Bond-street , when the next witness pushed the prisoner against me, and asked me if I had lost my handkerchief, and on feeling, I discovered that I had.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I was in Bond-street. I suspected the prisoner was picking the prosecutor's pocket, and took the handkerchief from under his coat, where he had put it.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-186

472. WILLIAM RODD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a coat, value 30s. the property of Thomas Cussans .

JOHN GALE . I am footman to Mr. Cussans, who lives at 68, Harley-street. I saw the prisoner come down the area steps, and go into the pantry, and then he went up the steps again with this coat under his arm. I pursued him, crying stop thief, and he dropped the coat, but was brought back.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-187

473. RICHARD SAMMELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a plank, value 2s. the property of Thomas Cubit .

IT appeared in this case, that the prisoner had gone on the prosecutor's premises for the purpose of nature, and the plank did not appear to have been removed.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-188

474. RICHARD WAKEFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , two shirts, value 12s. three pains, value 4s. four handkerchiefs, value 5s. one pair of gloves, value 1s. one dickey, value 1s. one coat, value 10s. one waistcoat, value 2s. one pair of breeches, value 10s. one hat, value 1s. and one handkerchief, value 3s. the property of Isaac Jackson .

ISAAC JACKSON . The prisoner was carrying these things for me, and whilst I was making water, he ran away with them.

THOMAS BURTON . Corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160403-189

475. ELIZABETH WARE , alias BROWN , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , two petticoats, value 4s. one night-gown, value 1s. 6d. two towels, value 3s. two pairs of stockings, value 3s. 6d. and one handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Ann Matthews , widow .

ANN MATTHEWS. The prisoner lodged with me she was frequently in my bed-room, and when I missed these things, some of them were found on her, and a great many duplicates.

PETER WHITEHAIR . I searched the prisoner, and found part of the property on her, and the duplicate for the rest.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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