Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th February 1816.
Reference Number: 18160214
Reference Number: f18160214-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 14th of FEBRUARY, 1816; and following days,

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) BY R. BUTTERS, No. 22, FETTER-LANE, FLEET-STREET.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench: Sir Richard Richards knt, one of Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Justice Pank, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; and Mr. Justice Abbot, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas. Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. Aldermen of the said City. Sir John Sylvester , bart, Recorder of the said City; John Ansley , esq. Alderman of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City. His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joseph Bower ,

John Bentley ,

William Jackson ,

John Miles ,

Charles John Durand ,

John Denny ,

Michael Plumpton ,

George Cox ,

Matthew Atterly ,

George Stevens ,

George Franks

Joshua Munton .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Woodason ,

Thomas Earl ,

William Saxby ,

Peter Charman ,

William Senior ,

John Lacon ,

Peter M'Norton ,

Robert Gunter ,

John Thomas ,

James Fosbury ,

Robert Wright ,

John Fox .

Second Middleselex Jury.

Thomas Hunter ,

Robert Durham ,

Richard Roberts ,

John Corps ,

Alexander Cass ,

Richard Atkins ,

James Morris ,

Daniel Joshua Owen ,

Richard Miller ,

William Warren ,

Henry Fuller ,

Henry Otley .

Reference Number: t18160214-1

278. JAMES MILES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Strelly , and Grace Crookshank , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 31st of January , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, fifty-four yards of sheeting, value 5l. the property of the said Thomas Strelly and Grace Crookshank .

THOMAS STRELLY . I live at 123, Shoreditch ; I am a linen-draper ; I am in partnership with Grace Crookshank ; my mother and I keep the house; she is a widow ; the house belongs to my mother, and me as stock in trade, and we jointly pay the expences of the house-keeping; the shop is the lower part of the house. On the 31st of January, Wednesday evening. I was in the parlour behind the shop; nobody was in the shop after I left it. I had left the shop between five and ten minutes before I heard any noise. No person came in as a customer; a customer had been in three quarters of an hour before, and had gone out. I had had a person in about ten minutes before, and he had gone out again; he was not a customer; when I let him out, I fastened the door after him; I shut the door on the latch, and I am sure it was latched; I did not try it; but I know the door was shut and fast. Then I went into the back parlour. The first thing, I was sitting in the back parlour, with the parlour door open, and I heard a noise in the street, and directed my attention that way; I went out of the parlour towards the shop door, and I saw a man in the shop, near the door; I ran towards him, and stopped him, seeing him with something in his arms; that was the prisoner; he had a piece of sheeting in his arms; the piece of sheeting, when I stopped him, fell from his arms; I did not pick it up; my servant picked it up; I saw it on the floor, and knew it immediately, it was mine; we call it sheeting; it was given into the custody of John Armstrong , the officer, in about ten minutes. The prisoner is the man whom I caught in my shop; this was about a quarter before seven; I am perfectly sure as to the time, it was dark about an hour; we had candles lighted. I know nothing more than what the prisoner said when we were taking him to the office. I asked him when I caught him, what he was about; and he made answer that he wanted something for a pair of trowsers, and that was all I could get from him. I had seen that piece of sheeting on that day, in my shop; it layed on a box in the shop, on the right hand side, with six or seven other pieces; I had seen it, but I don't know at what hour; the place where it had been might be six or seven feet from where I laid hold of him; he was on the threshold of the door, just in the act of stepping out. When I was going before the magistrate, the same evening, he said he was sorry for what he had done. I said nothing to him; I made neither threat nor promise, and that is all he said. He might me a little in liquor, but that I can't say.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I was on duty on the 31st; I saw a mob round the door of the prosecutor, and upon that I went into the shop, and received charge of the prisoner; it was about a quarter before seven; I was going to the office to meet the rest of the officers. Mr. Strelly's house is in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch; Mr. Strelly had him by the collar when I went in. In going down to the office I met my father, and gave the sheeting to him. In going down to the office, the prisoner said he was sorry for what he had done. I had hold of the man when I met my father; Mr. Strelly had the sheeting. The prisoner was in liquor, and had been drinking, I have no doubt.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I produce the sheeting, and know nothing more but having had the custody of it.

Thomas Strelly . I look at this property; it is mock Russia sheeting; there are fifty-four yards; it is called sheeting; the value to buy it of me is five pounds thirteen shillings; it is my property, and my mother's, and had never been sold. I have no mark of my own; but I know it from the quality, and from the private mark of the house from which I bought it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and went into buy some shirts and handkerchiefs.

John Armstrong . I searched the prisoner, and he had two three-shilling pieces and some halfpence on him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45,

Of stealing to the value of 40s. in a dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering the said dwelling-house.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-2

279. DANIEL HOLLIDAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Griffiths , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 2nd of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one coat, value 1l. one shirt, value 10s. two waistcoats, value 6s. one pair of breeches, value 1l. one pair of boots, value 30s. one sheet, value 8s. one pair of stockings, value 3s. one handkerchief, value 6s. one hat, value 8s. one box, value 2s. and one pair of gloves, value 6d. his property .

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I live in Frying-pan alley, in the parish of Christ Church, Spitalfields ; I rent two rooms of Mr. Pettit, a livery-stablekeeper, in Bishopsgate-street; he does not live in the house in Frying-pan-alley; there are other lodgers in the house; he lives in the livery stables, in Bishopsgate-street; we all go in by the same door. Mr. Pettit never sleeps there. My

apartments are below stairs. On the 2nd of February, I had all my things taken out of the room; I had been in the apartment in the morning, and when I came home at about ten o'clock at night, I was told they were gone, and I missed them.

SARAH DAVIS . I live in Frying-pan-alley, with Thomas Griffiths; it is in the parish of Christ Church. I went out when the shops and lamps were alight; it was between five and six in the evening; it was dark when I went out, so dark that I could distinguish it was night, and not day. Before I went out of the apartment, I shut the shutter too, and bolted it; I locked the door, and left it so. I returned between eight and nine, I had the key, and put into the key-hole, as I thought to open the door; but the door was open; I went immediately to the window, and felt for the box; but the box was gone; a hat, a coat, a pair of boots, two waistcoats, a shirt, a sheet, a pair of breeches, (I can't say for any thing else,) were taken. All the things were in the box when I went out. The quilt from the bed was gone. I should know these things again if I were to see them.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer belonging to Worship-street. I know the house of the prosecutor is in the parish of Christ Church, Middlesex. On the 2nd of February, I was on duty; I was going down Rose-lane; I was walking on one side of the way, and I saw the figure of a man with a bundle, on the other side of the way; it was about twenty minutes before eight o'clock; I crossed into the highway, and got before the prisoner at the bar: I came up to him, and said, what are you carrying here; he said he was carrying his own things. I told him, the reason I stopped you is because I am Armstrong, the officer; you must give me an account what you have here; he said, boots, a coat, and silk handkerchiefs. I said come into this cook's shop, and I took him, and examined the bundle; I told him I would take him before the magistrate; I took him a little further, and then he said, I will not go one yard further with you, you have not shewn me any authority; I told him I had mentioned my name, and the office I belonged to, and to the magistrate he should go; I never let him go, until I put him in possession of my son, and the bundle also; I opened the bundle, and examined it. I charged the prisoner that night, and he was committed. I gave the bundle to my son, having to drag the prisoner such a length of way. This is the bundle I gave to my son. When I stopped the prisoner with this bundle, it was not two minutes walk from the prosecutor's room, and house. On the morning of Saturday, I saw the prosecutor, and shewed him these things. He came to the office asking for a search warrant. The next day the things were produced in the presence of the prisoner; when the prosecutor saw them, and swore to them. The prosecutor did not tell me what he had lost. The prisoner said that the bundle was his own property.

Prisoner. Did I not shew you the man going a head of me, who gave me this bundle, and did you not say you would have taken him if you had any one to assist you?

Witness. My lord, he never said any such thing to me.

Prisoner. Did not you say, you would have taken the man that was going a head of me, if you had any one to assist you?

Witness. My lord, I never said any such thing.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am a police officer, and I received the bundle which has been produced, from my father, at about half past eight. I went the next morning to the house of the prosecutor, and the wood work of the door about the lock was cut away. The prosecutor told me of his missing every article that was in the bundle, before he saw it.

Thomas Griffiths . I look at these articles; I know them; the coat is worth five pounds, the shirt worth ten shillings, (which is under the value,) the waistcoats I value the one at three shillings, and the other at five shillings, the breeches I value at one-pound, the boots at thirty shillings, and the sheet at eight shillings; there are a great many other articles stolen which are not here. I saw these articles in the morning, before they were stolen; they were kept in a chest; the chest was taken away.

Sarah Davis . These are all the property of Thomas Griffiths . I had no light when I first went in, and could not observe whether there was any thing done to the door.

Prisoner's Defence. All I have got to say is that I was desired by a man to carry the bundle into Bishopsgate-street, and the man was going a head of me when Armstrong stopped me, and he said he would have taken the man if he had any body to have assisted him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-3

280. RICHARD EXELBY, alias WILSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one jacket, value 10s. one handkerchief, value 3s. three stockings, value 1s. one pocket-book, value 1d. and four-one pound bank notes, the property of David Smith , in the dwelling-house of James Smith .

DAVID SMITH . I am a lodger of James Smith ; I lodged there in January last; I had lodged there some days, before the 15th of January; I was there on the 15th, and was in bed when this was committed. I went to bed about the hour of ten, or rather before; I slept in the house, up two pair of stairs; my clothes were not in the room in which I slept, they were in a little back room, on a platform; it is a back room which stands by the water side. There is a platform outside the room; my clothes were in that room, in a chest; that chest was not locked, but lashed down with ropes. I had seen that chest during that day after dinner. Sometimes I dine at two. I had not gone to take anything out of the chest, before I went to bed; it was properly secured, as I used to do, before I went to bed. When I was in bed, I was alarmed by the witness George Wilson ; he came to the door and informed me, that my chest was broken open. I got up, and went down stairs; and the first thing that was presented to me, was a pair of blue pantaloons; I do not know who shewed them to me. I afterwards went backwards, and

found some of my things were in it, and some were lying round it; there were some deficient, but I could not tell how many. I went into the tap-room, and the prisoner was pointed out to me; I had not known him before. He was there sitting in one corner of the tap-room; there were several persons round him. They told me they suspected him to be the man; he heard that; I do not recollect what he said; he said he was innocent; nothing more was said at that time. I thought, that as the necessary was over the river, and as it was then low water, that some of my clothes might be thrown down. When I was in the tap-room, the patroles went into the yard to search it. I examined my chest, and missed a blue jacket, in one pocket of which was a pocket-book, a red morocco one, with four one-pound bank notes in it; and a pair of drawers, two pairs and a half of stockings, which was worth about two shillings; a white flannel shirt, and a silk handkerchief, which was in the other pocket of the jacket. All these were mine.

GEORGE WILSON . I lived at the house of James Smith , in January last. The last witness lodged there. I knew the prisoner, and had seen him there before. He sat in the tap-room the most part of the day of the 15th; the day on which this happened about the chest. This house of James Smith, is in Lower Shadwell. He had sat in the house most part of the day, untill ten o'clock at night; he went out, and got a little supper, and asked me for a clean plate, and I fetched it him. He asked the landlady for a lodging; he was told he could have no lodging there; then he went out in the back yard, and went past this parlour in which the chest was; I remained in the the tap-room. I soon after went into yard for water to scour the tables; I saw his fingers holding the privy door, and I said, who do these trowsers belong to; I knew his voice, so as to know it was him. I found a pair of trowsers in one privy, and he was in the other. I asked him if they were his; and he said no. I had a candle in my hand, and I took them into the house, and I told the landlady that I had found a pair of trowsers, and she put them into the bar. The prisoner went out of the house, and he came back again for a three-shilling-piece, which he had given in a mistake; he was stopped in the house by the man who had lost the things; I called him out of bed. I saw David Smith's chest then, and the lashing was cut, and the chest was open; I saw his clothes about; several out of the chest on the floor. I know nothing more. The prisoner was taken out of the house by the prosecutor.

SARAH WRIGHT . I lived at Limehouse; I lived at Mr. Pooles, the Ship and Shears, St. Paul's Shadwell, in January last. I know no further than that this prisoner brought a bundle to my master's house and asked him to take care of it; my master told me to take care of it, until the next morning. We took the bundle into the kitchen, and put it on the dresser. The prisoner went away directly. Mr. Poole's house is a very little distance from where the prosecutor lodged. I had seen the prisoner at my master's house before. I did nothing more with the bundle than put it in the kitchen; the kitchen is not an open place, that every body may have access to. I did not stop with the bundle. I fastened the kitchen door when I went to bed. I went into the kitchen at a little after six the next morning; nobody could get into our house, I found the kitchen as it had been, and the bundle on the corner of the dresser where I had left it; it was in the same situatiation, as I had left it. The bundle was tied in a yellow handkerchief; I had not looked inside of it. Somebody came and told us, that the prisoner had been taken for a robbery. I gave the bundle to Mr. Poole, in the evening of the 16th; it stood on the dresser in the kitchen. My house-keeper, my master, and other people, went into that kitchen. I gave it to my master, in the same condition as I believe I received it. The yellow handkerchief was not hemmed. I am quite sure, that the bundle was delivered to me, by the prisoner at the bar.

JOHN POOLE . I live at 16, Lower Shadwell. I keep the Ship and Shears I know the prisoner. In consequence of something which was told to me, I went immediately for an officer and he came with me, and my servant, the last witness, brought me the bundle down stairs, which the prisoner had given to her the night previous; it was a bundle tied up in a yellow handkerchief. The officer took it into his charge. The bundle was opened in my presence; I can't say what it contained, but there was a red pocket-book, with some notes in it; that was taken out of one of the pockets of the jacket in the bundle. There were some papers. I don't recollect whether there were three or four one-pound notes in it.

RALPH HOPE . I went down to the house of Mr. Poole, on the 16th of January. The prisoner had been brought in custody to our office. Mr. Poole gave me this bundle, (producing it) The servant brought it, and delivered it to me.

Sarah Wright . That is the bundle which was delivered into my hands by the prisoner at the bar.

Ralph Hope . I found all these things in a bundle as they are now, except this rope, which is the lashing of the chest. There are three stockings, a blue jacket, and in one of the pockets of this jacket, was this pocket-book, (producing it,) containing four one-pound notes, and sundry other papers. The silk handkerchief, was in the other pocket. Here is another blue jacket, but the prosecutor does not claim that.

David Smith . I had seen the notes before the robbery, but I dont know the numbers of them. That is my pocket-book; these stockings are mine, and so is the jacket; this handkerchief is mine; but the other handkerchief in which the things were tied up, is not mine; the other jacket is not mine.

Prisoner's Defence It was the first crime I ever committed. I have lived in very respectable families.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160214-4

281. JOHN BATH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , one silver milk pail, value 24s. one silver milk ewer, value 15s. and one silver spoon, value 5s. the property of John St. Poyyer , esq . in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ST. POYYER , ESQ. I live in Mortimer-street, Cavendish Square . The prisoner at the bar was in my service; he was my footman between six and seven months. On the 10th of January last, he asked me for a holiday, which was given to him; he returned much after ten o'clock, and in consequence he was not admitted. He came to my house the next day, and I told him to go to the kitchen, and get up the silver and things that was under his charge, and he went down stairs, and declared he would not deliver up his livery. He returned the next morning again, and I told him to deliver up his things. I afterwards spoke to him. I paid him his wages on the 12th; I told him it was very hard for me to lose my plate; he declared he knew nothing of it, and called God to witness the truth of what he said. He wished me well, and hoped I should get a better servant. Shortly after this, I received some duplicates of person I don't know; there were two; there is John Bath on them. I am acquainted with the prisoner's hand writing. I have had letters from him since he has been in goal. I delivered the duplicates to the magistrate at Marlborough-street.

Prisoner. I had no invertory of the things under my charge.

Witness. My wife kept the inventory.

ROBERT MARCHANT . I am foreman to Mr. Baxter, pawnbroker, Norfolk-street, by Middlesex Hospital. I produce a butter-boat, and a tea-spoon, (producing them:) they were pawned at our house on the 18th of November, by the prisoner; I am quite sure it was the prisoner, being in livery we did not like to take it; but he said it had been in his wife's family a long time, and he pulled out the teaspoon.

JOHN MURRAY . I am apprenticed to Mr. Winfield, High-street, Bloomsbury. I produce a silver milk-pail, on which I lent one-pound four shillings; it was pawned on the 26th of December, 1815; the value is about thirty shillings; he gave me his name John Bath , and the direction as No. 4, Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. The prisoner said it had been given to his wife.

Prosecutor. These are my property; I have had them thirty years; I have no doubt about them; I have seen them in use while the prisoner was in my service. I had not missed them before he was leaving me; they were missed the day I intended to discharge him.

CATHERINE SKINNER . I am the cook, and the prisoner had the care of that plate, together with the rest; it was missed on the day after he had the holiday.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge pawning these articles; but at the time I pawned them, I wanted to raise a sum of money, as I had none. I agreed with my master for two suits of livery a year which I was to have; I never had the second suit. If I had not been locked out this night, I should not have left my master's service. I pawned the things in my own name, and gave my own address.

GUILTY, aged 37,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-5

282. ROBERT CARVER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Strapinte , at about the hour of three in the night of the 6th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, three gold seals, value 6l. one snuff-box, value 2l. one coat, value 30s. one letter-case, value 2l. nine pieces of foreign gold coin, value 10l. three 10l. bank notes, and thirteen promissory notes for the papment of 10l. each, the property of the Rev . John Helyar .

REV. JOHN HELYAR . I lived at 33, Duke-street, St James's . This was on the morning of the 6th of February; I was awakened by a noise in the room adjoining the one I sleep in; the door between the two rooms was shut. It was a nose like the moving chairs, and a bustle of that kind in the room, after which, I heard my bed room door opened; an being perfectly awake, I thought it was my servant cleaning the adjoining-room; it was dark. There is a venetian blind hanging at the window, which perfectly darkens the room. Several times I have observed that there is hardly any light come into the room, until I get up. At about a quarter of an hour after I heard this noise, I heard St. James's Church clock strike the quarters: not being then alarmed, I tried to go to sleep; but could not. I layed until the clock struck seven; my lodgings were so near St. James's Church, that I always hear the Chimes of the Church. I was then alarmed, and thought it was a robbery, because the noise was not continued; I then jumped out of bed. It was near when the quarter struck that the noise ceased. I jumped out of bed, and thought to myself, if the door be open, I have been robbed; it was nearly dark; it was so dark that I was obliged to feel my way across the room; I opened the window shutters, and feeling on the table, where I expected to find my writing-case, I perceived it was gone. I went to the other end of the room, and in a chair, I found flint and steel, and about three or four matches on a table close by. There were sparks of the fint on the chair, as if it had been much used, and one match was half consumed. There was a tea chest standing under the window, and there was the appearance of a candle having been stuck against it, and the tea chest appeared burnt; my silver snuff box was taken from the chimney piece; I missed a gold seal, which had also been on the chimney piece; on a chair had been a blue great coat, which was gone likewise. The contents of the writing-desk were, nine french gold coins, called Napoleons, thirteen ten-pound Country bank bills; all but one belonged to the Blandford bank, the whole twelve were payable at Sir James Esdale 's and Co; three ten-pound Bank of England notes, two gold seals, and a French pass-port. In consequence of this, I rang the bell; the window sash was open; that sash was shut the night before, I presume. I went into my room, and rang the bed-room bell; I rang it no more, conceiving the noise might disturb the

family. I went to bed again, and tried to sleep. When I got up, I went to Sir James Esdale's; I had privately marked the notes, and I gave them notice to stop them; I told them what the private mark was; it was such as would enable me to speak to the notes should I see them. I received a note from Sir James Esdaile's, and I went and got an officer. An officer of the name of Branscombe, produced a gold seal to me, which I knew to be mine.

JOHN JUNE . I am servant to Mr. Helyar. I had seen the room before I went to bed; I went into the room after my master went to bed; the window was shut, and I saw a writing-desk in the room, on the table. I recollect taking a gold seal off the table, and putting it on the chimney-piece; there was a silver snuff-box there before. I did not leave any steel or flints, or any thing of that sort there, the night before. The window was shut. The things were gone when I went into the room at about eight o'clock in the morning.

FRANCIS SMITH . I am a clerk in the Bank of Sir James Esdaile. Mr. Helyar had lost some notes, and he gave me the particulars of them, and he had not been gone long, before one was presented for payment; I do not know the person; but he has since proved to be a silversmith's man. On his presenting the note, we sent him out. That person came back again; he tendered the note to the prisoner at the bar; he came back with the prisoner, and one of the partners of our house sent for a City officer. The prisoner was delivered over to Bowstreet.

PHILIP FAREBROTHER . I am a silversmith, and jeweller. On the morning of the 16th of February, the prisoner came to my shop; by his desire, I shewed him several watches, and he selected one; he then wished to look at a gold watch-key; when he had selected one, he asked me to change a ten-pound note, and I immediately called my young man, and told him to get change; during the time the young man was gone, the prisoner left the shop; he waited some time, and then he said, he would go to the Bull inn, Whitechapel. He did not return. We saw him on the opposite side of the way, standing behind a coach, and upon that, my young man took him, I did not go. I should not know the note again; I am sure that the note which I received from the hand of the prisoner, I gave to my shopman to get changed; I am confident it was for ten-pound; my shopman is not here. I know it was a Country bank note; I told my shopman to take it to Sir James Esdaile; because I was suspicious; I live in Aldgate; I had rather a suspicion. I observed it was payable at Sir James Esdaile's, and that was what I sent him there for.

ROBERT SPARROW . I am shopman to Mr. Milton, in Bridge-street, Lambeth; he is a pawnbroker. I produce a great coat, which I took in from the prisoner, to pawn, on the 6th of February; I took it in in the morning part of the day; to the best of my knowledge about ten or eleven o'clock; I am sure this is the great coat that was pledged by the prisoner; I gave one pound six shillings on it; it was pledged in the name of John Jones ; I never saw him before. To the best of my knowledge that is the man, (pointing to the prisoner,) I have not a doubt of it.

JOHN BROWN . I am a City officer. I took the prisoner into custody at Sir James Esdaile 's, on Thursday, the 6th of this month, at about eleven o'clock in the morning; when I went into the counting-house, I searched him, and found on him two gold seals, and one ten-pound Bank of England note, a five-pound note, a two-pound note, and a one-pound note. I asked him where he got them, and he said he had picked them up in a handkerchief at about five o'clock that morning. I then took him to the Mansion House, and sent Branscombe to his lodgings, which he said were at 99, York-street, Westminster.

THOMAS BRANSCOMBE . I am also a City officer. I went to 99, York-street, Westminster; I enquired if a person of the name of Carver lived there, and I found a woman up stairs on the second floor acknowledged her name to be Carver. I told her what my business was, and I searched her, and the room. In her pocket I found this purse, containing a Bank of England note for the payment of ten-pound, eight ten-pound notes of the Blandford Bank, payable at Sir James Esdaile 's, and one ten-pound note of the Old Somerset Bank, nine pieces of gold coin called Napoleons, five of which were double, and four single; this silver snuff-box, containing two ten-pound notes of Blandford Bank, and likewise in her pocket, this small ink-bottle belonging to a writing-desk; also in the table drawer was this gold seal. I went to Mr. Helyar's, and brought away the tea-caddy; it is here.

Mr. Helyar. That is one of the notes I had; I know it by a mark, three little dots; it is a private mark of my own; I had seen the writing-case the day before; I think I put the notes into the case five or six days before; I have no mark on the Napoleons; I know the purse very well; I look at the great coat, and know it to be mine, by the deficiency of a button.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first offence I ever was guilty of in my whole life time; I was prompted to this by extreme distress; I have applied to two parishes, and I have been refused relief, by not proving my parish. I hope the consideration of my willingly giving up all the property, will plead in my behalf. I can have an excellent character; and should I be so fortunate as to obtain mercy, I shall ever as in duty bound pray.

Three respectable witnesses gave the prisoner a very good character for morality and honesty from his childhood.

GUILTY- DEATH , aged 23.

[ Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160214-6

283. THOMAS WEATHERSTON was indicted for burgluriously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hawkins , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 11th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing

therein, one feather-bed, value 5l. one blanket, value 5s. one pocket-book, value 6d. and two three-shillings bank tokens, the property of the said William Hawkins .

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I live in Joseph-street , and am a rope-maker . On the 11th of February, Sunday evening last, I left my house at half past six by my watch; I shut my door, and doubled locked it, and as was customary, I kicked at the bottom; the window was bolted with two bolts and a brass catch; so that the house was quite shut up. I returned at eight o'clock; when I returned, I found my door broken open; my wife and children were with me when I returned: when I found in, I found my table laying on the floor, and my looking glass gone. Then I entered my upper room; when I came up stairs, I found that my feather-bed and the clothes were all gone, and my wife's baby linen. I work for Mr. Simms. I had been up stairs before I went out; my bed and blankets and other things, and all my wife's and my own clothes were gone. When I missed these things. I ran about to try if I could hear any thing about them; I ran to the Commercial-road, and I afterwards saw the bed, the blankets, a pocket-book, and a three shillings token.

JOHN BROWNE . I am an officer, belonging to Shadwell. On Sunday, evening, the 15th, at about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in company with Butler and Partridge; we were in the middle of the road, and I saw the prisoner on the pathway, carrying the bed, which I will produce; I stopped him, and asked him where he got that bed; he said it was his mother's, and they were moving. I know Hawkins's house, and this was about two hundred yards from it, scarcely two minutes walk. I asked him the street, and he said he could not tell the street, for they had not lived there long. I told him he must go with me to the public-house, and that he must shew us the street where he brought the bed from, and that would be a satisfaction; he then said a man had hired him to carry it. We searched him, and found a knife and a comb on him, and a pipe with some tobacco. I saw Butler, the other officer, take a pocket-book out of the prisoner's pocket. We afterwards learned the prosecutor's house had been broken open.

JOHN BUTLER . I am a constable of Shadwell police office. I was in the Commercial-road at this time, and we secured the prisoner, and took him into the Half-way public-house; in his pocket I found this pocket-book; I found also a three-shilling bank token, and one shilling in silver; I also found this little box, with a three-shilling token and three shillings and sixpence in it. I examined the pocket-book, and found the certificate of the marriage of William Hawkins to Eleanor Mathews , together with a great number of receipts, all to Hawkins.

(Property produced.)

Eleanor Hawkins . I know the bed; I opened it in the Summer, and washed the tick, and sewed it up again; I also know the blanket; I can be upon my oath they are my husband's; I know the bed by a mark on the middle.

William Hawkins . I know the pocket-book, and here is the certificate of my marriage, and here are all the receipts for my rent; there is no mark on the bank token; but this shilling is mine, it is a crooked shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the Commercial-road, and I met a man, who asked me to carry the bed, and he told me he would give me four shillings to carry it to the London Hospital; I carried the property, and he was to meet there.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-7

284. JOHN CUTLER was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the first eight counts of this indictment mentioned, was a person employed by and under the Post Office of Great Britan, in certain business relating to the said Office, (that is to say,) in stamping letters and packets brought by the Post to the General Post Office in London , and that he on the 22nd of August , at St. Mary Woolnoth, a certain letter then lately before brought by the Post, (to wit,) by the Post from Bridport, in the County of Dorset, to the said General Post Office, for and to be delivered to a certain person at Richmond, in the County of Surry, (that is to say, one Elizabeth Garnick Gale , containing therein, one promissory note, made for payment of money, (to wit,) the sum of ten-pounds of lawful money of Great Britan, came to his hands and possession, whilst he so employed as aforesaid, and that he being such person, so employed, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said promissory note, being in force, and the property of John Gale .

NINE OTHER COURTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

JOHN GALE . I resided at Bradpole, near Bridport. In the month of August last, I had a cousin to remit some money to, Mrs. Garnick Gale, it was on the 21st of August; I remitted a ten-pound note of the Dorchester Bank; I took a memorandum of that note in this pocket-book; it was a Dorchester Bank note, No. 8042, dated the 10th of October; I have not got a minute of the amount. (A note produced to the witness.) I folded that note up in a letter and put it into the post."It was addressed to Mrs. Garnick Gale, to be left at Mr. John Bell 's, George-street, Richmond." I sealed the letter, and put it into the Post Office myself; into the Post Office at Bridport. I had got two five-pound bank notes, and I received this note about the Friday; I received it at the Bridport Branch, of the Dorchester Bank.

JOHN BROWN. I belong to the Bridport Bank, which is a Branch of the Dorchester Bank. (Note put into the hand of the witness.) I remember paying that note to John Gale . I paid it to him on the 18th of last August. There is a letter T before the number of the note. I never register a note. I have an entry made at the time by myself, in my

waste book, (reads,) "on the 18th of August, T. 8042," the name appears "debtor Mr. Gale." I have not the least doubt but that this is the same note.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I belong to the Dorchester Bank. All the notes which are issued at that Bank, are issued originally at Dorchester.

Q. Before the number of this note, I see the letter T. I will ask you whether there are any other notes of the number 8042 with the letter T. before the number of them - A. No. There is with the letter S.

Q. Are there any of this number without any letter at all before them - A. No.

Q. Is there any note of this description, answering in number, but with a different date - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. Mr. Patterson is the principal. There is another clerk besides myself, who is not here; he enters notes as well as I do. In speaking of this note, I speak from the books here. The entry is in my own hand-writing. This is the note issue book; it begins in 1809, and ends on the 30th of October, 1813. All the entries in this book, are in my own hand-writing.

Q. Do you mean to say that no notes have been issued from the year 1809, to the year 1813, but such as have been entered in that book - A. Not of that letter and number.

Q. Is there any other issue book - A. Yes; with different numbers that are done out with. There are other books with other letters, which I have left behind me. But there other books in which another clerk made entries.

Q. How can you then venture to swear that nobody else has entered a letter T-A. The letters follow regularly, and the letter T is in no other book but this. We issued none without any letter, except before I came to the Bank; none dated 1813, were issued without a letter. Those without letters are not all in yet.

COURT. Is it the course of your Bank to have a separate book for each letter - A. We go a certain number of Ss, and then begin Ts. The beginning of the Ss is in a former book; but there are some here in this book.

MARY ELIZABETH WARR . My father is the Post-master at Bridport. I am enabled to state that the bags were made up in the due course on the 21st of August, sealed and forwarded in the usual course. All the letters as far as I know, were put into the bag.

JAMES THOMAS BAKER . I belong to the Inland Department in the Post Office. It would fall within the duties of my office, to know whether the bags which left Bridport, on the 21st of August, duly arrived. On the morning of the 22nd of August, the Bridport bag duly arrived.

FRANCIS HARRISON . I am in the Inland department in the Post Office. The prisoner was employed as a stamper at the F table; a person of the name of Howlett was employed with him on that day. The letters from the General Post Office to go to Richmond, would be brought to the F table. I think that the prisoner was at that time, a letter carrier ; but I am not possitive.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. There is a great number of persons in the room where the F table is. Every person employed in the Inland Office has access to that room.

COURT. The letters that are brought to the table F, are brought by different persons - A. By two messengers only.

JURY. Have the different tables, any communication with respect to the distribution of these letters - A. They have not.

JAMES HOWLETT . I was a stamper at the F table on the 22nd of August last. It was the duty of the prisoner and me to stamp all letters regularly that came to that table. I did my duty; I took my letters that I stamped to the sorters. It is the duty of the person who stamps, to take his letters to the sorters. I did so, and it was the duty of the prisoner to take all his.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. A letter coming from Bridport, might go through fourteen or fifteen hands at the Post Office before it was delivered, at Richmond; it would go through the Two-penny Post Office.

JOHN NAPMAN . I was a letter sorter on the 22nd of August at the Post Office. It was in my department to sort the letters which came from Bridport. To the best of my knowledge, I did so. After the letters are brought to us to be sorted, they are sent over to the sub-division sorters, and they sort them again for the different districts for delivery.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I sorted letters that came from Bridport, and from other places. I have no recollection of the letter in question in particular.

COURT. I think it will be sufficient to shew that in the course of business, the letter would on one stage of its progress, pass through the prisoner's hands.

Mr. Reynolds. I will shew that it was not delivered at Richmond.

JAMES POOR . I am a letter carrier, at Richmond. I know Mr. Bell's house. A letter would be delivered to Mr. Bell, at a quarter past twelve; if a letter came to our hands to be delivered to Mrs. Garnick Gale it would have been so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. I cannot tell one way or other whether a letter was delivered to Mr. Bell's on that day.

ELIZABETH GARNICK GALE . I reside at Kew. I know Mr. Bell, at Richmond; he is my brother-in-law. All my letters are directed to be left there for me. In the month of August last, I did not receive any letter from Mr. John Gale, containing a Bridport bank note; not in August at all; I received no letter from him until September, the 12th, I was not in expectation of such a letter in August.

JOHN BELL . I reside in George-street, Richmond; I am the brother-in-law of the last witness. In the month of August last, I received no letter at my house intended for, or directed to the last witness.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I am frequently from home.

ANN BELL . I am the wife of the last witness. In August last, I received no letter from Elizabeth Garnet Gale .

ROBERT FLETCHER . I am clerk to Messrs. Coxe and Merle, who live in Little Britain. I am enabled from an entry in my waste book to say that a Dorchester Bank note came to our house on the 22nd of August last. (Reads.) "22nd August, Wilson, Dorchester Bank, 8042, Ten pounds." That is the whole of the entry. Then follow the notes which were given for it; I made no entry of the letter in this book; but I made an entry of the letter in the day-book, which is not here. The notes I gave in payment were eight one-pound notes, from 72,543, to 72550 inclusive, all dated August 3rd; I have no memorandum of the year, and two more notes dated 4th of August, No. 52611, and 52612; I received these notes at the Bank of England either on that morning or the morning before, I can't be sure; it was not further than the morning before; they were new notes, and had not the appearance of having been in circulation, because they were running numbers. The name of Wilson in my entry means that the person to whom the notes were paid stated his name to be Wilson; I have no recollection whatever of his person This note was brought at about three o'clock I should think in the day; it could not be much before or after; I know it was that hour, because the day book is balenced soon after three, and I observe there are only one or two entries after this; I made an entry in another book. (The note put into the witness's hands.) I know this to be the same note; I look at my day book, by which I know it to be the same note. Here is an entry of my own "to letter T 8042." That entry was made on the same date; but not until night.

COURT. Have you any other number 8042 with the letter T - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. When I say it is the same note, I mean it corresponds in number and in letter; there is no mark upon it, which enables me to know it. I believe there was a little error in my entry, I believe it ought to be 51611, and 51612, instead of 52611, and 52611; we got the numbers afterwards from the Bank.

Q. Did you make any other payments in the fiftyone thousand - A. Yes, there was a payment on the 23rd of August, of 51623; I had notes from 51601, to 51610, that was previous to this payment.

Q. The entry which you made at the moment of payment is fifty-two thousand - A. Yes; that entry I made from the notes. I have received information from another quarter that that entry is wrong. I have not yet had any other errors in my entries corrected.

MR. NORTHOVEN. I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I issued some notes to the house of Coxe and Merie previous to the 22nd of August, I issued fifty one-pound notes, and various others, amounting in the whole to nine hundred pounds; there were amongst the rest from 51601, to 51612, dated 4th of August; I have no entry of the year; but it must be last August; for they were new notes; I do know from another entry, and from mine being the hand that paid them, to whom the notes 52611 and 52612 were paid to Messrs. Willis and Co. on the 26th of August; they were bankers, and those were new notes also.

MR. HIGMAN. I produce a book, in which I made entries of the numbers of the notes which Mr. Northoven has been speaking of; he called the numbers out to me, and I entered them as he called them, from 51601 to 51612, were paid to Messrs. Coxe, Merle, and Co. and the two notes 52611 and 52612 were paid to Messrs. Willis, Wood.

GABRIEL BARKER . My situation in the Post Office is clerk in the Receiver General Office. I have seen the prisoner as a letter carrier, in our office to pay his charge. (The note 51611, put into the hands of the witness.) I received that note in payment of a charge; but I do not remember from whom; I suppose from the prisoner, by his name being on the back of it; his name on the back is not in my hand writing; it is the duty of the letter carriers to write their names on the backs of the notes which they receive in payment for the postage of letters. The name on this note is "John Cutler." I received this note on the 23rd of August, in the last year. I have no recollection of what time in the day it was paid, but I suppose it was about nine, half past nine, or ten, in the morning, which is about the time the letter carriers go out. It is the duty of the letter carriers to pay their charge into our office; that payment is a payment of money they have received on the two days previous; therefore the payment on the morning of the 23rd, ought to be the receips of the two days before; we receive only three times a week, and never in the evening: always before the letter carriers go out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. How do you know you received it on the 23rd - A. By my entry.(Reads.) "23rd, eight," that means the 23rd of the eighth month in the year.

JOHN HOLMES . I am a letter carrier. I know the prisoner at the bar. On the 22nd of August last, he was a letter carrier; he was an assistant to the Brunswick-square division; I am not certain whether Barton Crescent is in that division. (The note No. 72547, put into the hands of witness.) I received that note from Cutler, on the evening proceeding my paying it into the Treasury, at a house in Fulwood's rents; it must have been on the 24th of August, and I paid it in on the 25th; he wrote his name on it in my presence, (reads,)"12, Bar. Cresc." which means Barton Crescent.

JOSEPH MOLE . I am assistant inspector of letter carriers. I know the prisoner at the bar. (The note 72545 put into the hands of the witness.) I received this note from the prisoner at the bar, on the 1st of September; there is an indorsement on it of the prisoner's name; I am acquainted with his hand-writing, I have every reason to believe that that endorsement is his, it is " John Cutler , September 1st, 1815," (The note No. 72548, put into the hands of the witness.) I received this note

from the prisoner; the endorsement is "Webbe, John Cutler , August." It appears to be the second, but part of it is erased. The whole of the endorsement is in the prisoner's hand-writing. (The note No. 72549, put into the hands of the witness.) There is an endorsement on it of a figure of "8," and the word "Gurl," as it appears to me, and under that " John Cutler ," that endorsement is the prisoner's hand writing. (The note 51611, put into the hands of the witness.) Here is an endorsement on this "26, Lucas, John Cutler , August," and the day of the month is punched out, and there is"1815," I have no doubt that this endorsement is the prisoner's hand-writing. (The note 72547, put into the hands of the witness.) Here is "12, Bar. Crese." under that "John Cutler," that is the prisoner's hand-writing.

Mr. HUGH PARKINS . I am the son of Mr. Parkins, Post Office Solicitor. I was at the examination of the prisoner at Bow-street, on the 24th of October. (The five notes proved to have been in the possession of the prisoner subsequent to the 22nd of August, put into the hands of the witness." I received these notes at the Bank of England; the numbers are 51611, 72543, 72548, 72549, and 72547. I shewed them to the prisoner previous to the examination. I did not tell him that the best thing he could do would be to tell the truth.

Q. What did he say with respect to them - A. I shewed him each note separately, and his name on the back of it; he admitted that the name on each of the notes was his own hand-writing. 51611, he stated that he received it at 26, Lucas-street, on the 22nd of August; he stated that the words 26, Lucas-street, August 22nd, were his hand-writing, and that his name written under it was also his hand-writing; 72547, he stated he had received at Barton Crescent; but he could not say the date, for that was not upon it; he also admitted it was his hand-writing on that note; 73545 he stated he had received of Mr. Webbe, in Gray's-inn-lane, at the Nags Head public-house; 72548 he also said he received from Mr. Webbe; 72549 he said he had received at No. 8, Guilford-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. He knowing I had those notes, wished to see them; he rather expressed a wish to see the notes; he has been a great many years at the Post Office with a good character there.

ROBERT GWYNN . I am a servant to Mrs. Bennet, who lives at No. 10, Barton Crescent; I lived there on the 22nd of August last; it is on the other side of Brunswick-square; the prisoner was in the habit of delivering General Post letters at our house; his time of delivering them was about two o'clock. I paid him a one-pound note on the 22nd of August last, at about two o'clock, I believe I did not pay him a one pound note on any other day in August last, that I recollect. When I speak of two o'clock, I mean about that time; I don't know what sort of a note it was that I paid him; but it was a one-pound note, which I received from Mr. Bennet either that day or the day before; my master did not give it to me while the postman was at the door; I can't say at what time he gave it to me; I don't recollect what sort of a note it was, whether it was new or old.

WILLIAM WOODS . I am an inspector of letter carriers; the prisoner was a letter carrier in Mecklenburg-square, and that neighbourhood, on the 22nd of August; he would finish his walk that day at about one o'clock. It is a regulation at the Post Office that the letter carriers are to write on all notes that they receive, the place where they receive them and the date. Barton Crescent and Lucus-street fell within the department of the prisoner on that day.

The prisoner called several witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

[ Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-8

185. JOHN FANCUTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Alchorne and Richard Stubbs , at about the hour of twelve in the night of the 11th of October, 1815 , at St. Nicholas Olave, with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, thirteen pieces of canvsas, value 5s. five yards of rope, value 1s. two wooden cases, value 3s. one thousand three hundred and fifty-one yards of linen cloth, value 260l. two thousand and eighty yards of woollen cloth, value 140l. four hundred and eighty yards of woollen say, value 110l. of the goods and chattels of the said William Alchorne and Richard Stubbs , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. Laying the property of other persons.

RICHARD STUBBS . I live at No. 12, Old Fish-street, Doctor's Commons, in the parish of St. Nicholas Olave . I have a partner, William Alchorne ; we are Packer s, on Fish-street - hill; my partner does not always reside there. All of No. 12, and the under part of No. 13, are appropriated to the use of our business, as warehouses. We occupy the upper part of No. 13 as a dwelling-house; I reside there myself; I have done so for the last fourteen years, and did so at the time of the present robbery. The rent and taxes are paid out of the partnership firm. On the 11th of October last, at about seven o'clock in the evening, all the goods named in the indictment were in our warehouse. The value of the whole was about 600l. The say is a very particular species of woollen article, and is used only by the priests and monks, in Portagal and Spain I saw the premises between six and seven, and then I left them. I left Stephen Andrews there when I went away. These articles could not be taken away by one person. I think they would require four at least; the linens were in wooden cases; the say in bales, and the woollen cloth in bales. At about six o'clock in the morning of the 12th. I first received an intimation of the robbery. I found that the padlock had been wrenched off, and the spring lock on the inside had been picked, no doubt. There was a double lock be ie, which was picked.

Cross-examined. A man of the name of Hayward was convicted for stealing part of this property, and

the prisoner's wife was acquitted of receiving. This is our prosecution. We have advanced money for it, and it will be at our own expence.

COURT. You say it would require four persons to steal this property; do you think that four could carry it away. - A. I think it could not be carried away without a cart.

STEPHEN ANDREWS . I am foreman to the prosecutors. On the evening of the 11th of October, I fastened up the house myself at about half past seven. It was then dark; I fastened it by putting the door too. I double locked it; I put the padlock on; I locked the padlock, and tried if it was fast. At the time I locked up the premises, every thing was safe. I saw in the warehouse the article called say. I had occasion to cut a pattern off it, which I have in my pocket. I have since been shewn a piece of say, which is of the same pattern. I came by the premises about nine o'clock, and every thing was then safe. In the morning before seven I heard that the premises had been broken open, and I examined the door to see how it had been broke open. There were great dents made in the door-post before they could break the padlock; they must have been made with a crow, or something of that kind; these dents were by the side of the place of the padlock. I did not perceive any more violence; the padlock had been broken by violence; all the property was gone; I mean the property named in the indictment.

JOHN UPTON . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; in consequence of information which I received, I went to a house where the prisoner lived on Thursday the 19th of October, I did not know of my own knowledge that he lived there; the house is No. 4, North-street, Ducking-pond-lane.

MARY QUANTRIL . My husband is the landlord of No. 4, North-street, Ducking-pond-lane. I look at the prisoner at the bar. He is the man who occupied the house; Mr. Faneutt paid the rent and he lived there.

JOHN UPTON . I knocked at the door of this house; I saw a woman at the window; she opened the door; I enquired if the prisoner was at home; I did not find him at home; I went up stairs, and went into the bed-room. I perceived that the bed had been tumbled, as if a person had been in bed. It was a little before ten in the morning; it had the appearance of one person having been in the bed; it was not cold, but little warm. I saw a watch lying in a chair with a gold chain and two gold seals, and a pair of small clothes lying by the bed-side. I then looked on the top of the bedstead and found this black say, (producing it); I then searched the cup-board in the bed-room, and there was a number of pick-lock keys, and many pieces of new sponge. After that I went down stairs and searched the lower part of the house, where I found a bunch of keys in a cup-board there; they were not picklock keys. I then searched under the stairs, where I found a bundle of these keys of all descriptions. I found a pistol on the mantle-piece; that is all that took place; I left my brother officer, John Avery , in the house. I then went out and waited there all night, and until twelve o'clock next day. I went a dozen or fourteen times to enquire for him, but he never came home.

Cross-examined. Certainly I hope to have my share of the reward. I know there is a reward in case of a conviction.

Examined by the COURT. I watched the woman from the public-house to her own door, before I enquired for Fancutt, so that she could not have been in bed. There is only one bed-room in the house.

JOHN AVERY . I know nothing beyond what the last witness has stated. We took turn about to stay in the house until twelve o'clock next day.

WILLIAM HEWLETT . I am an officer belonging to Shadwell. I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday, the 4th of December last, at the sign of the Ship, King James's-stairs, Shadwell. In consequence of an information, I went to this public-house, and saw him there; he was standing up when we went in, which was about five o'clock in the evening; the moment he saw us come in he sat down; Michael Morris was with me. I then went up to him; I told him that I was an officer, and he must go with me; he then spread his arms abroad, and said d-n his b-y eyes, he would not go a yard. I told him he should go, and I then presented a pistol to him; I told him if he resisted, I would shoot him; he said shoot, and be d-mud, or be b-d, one of those two expressions, but which, I can't remember. I put my pistol into my pocket, and laid hold of him by the collar, with the assistance of my brother officer. I dragged him out of house; he resisted all that he could; the moment he got outside the door, he struck a violent blow in the face; I told him it was no use, I should not leave him, and we tustled together, and we got on the other side of the way; he then struck me another violent blow under the right ear, which caused the blood to flow; finding I could not get him along, I called out for assistance, and he got his left hand to my mouth, to try and prevent me; but with the assistance of some sailors, and after a great deal of struggling, we got him to the office; after that we took him in a coach to Cold Bath-fields; I can't undertake to say how it was, because I could not see, but the body of the coach went down; I can't say whether it was cut or not; we then got another coach, and took him to Cold Bath fields.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I know nothing more than the last witness has said. I produce the key, and here is the pistol.

John Upton. Cross-examined. I took another man, and we found two pieces of irish linen upon him; he had the irish linen; that was on Monday, 16th; three days before I went to Faneutt's house; besides the irish linen we found in Hayward's house, thirteen different pieces of canvass, and several other articles that were stolen.

Michael Morris . Re-examined. After the coach was down, and after we got into another, the prisoner said, if the b-y Sheriff hangs me above an hour, I will indict him.

Prisoner. Did not you say you took me for bad money?

Witness. I said no such thing.

Richard Stubbs . I look at the say found in the prisoner's house; I have no hesitation in saying that I firmly believe that to be my property.

Cross-examined. There are no marks; they have taken very good care to cut both the head and the fag-end off. This order has been nearly one year under hand; it is made at Sudbury, in Essex; I don't mean to swear that we have all the say manufactured at Sudbury; there are about twenty-six packers, who can all export it, if they are ordered. I only speak to the best of my knowledge. The maker who makes it, makes other of the same kind. Here is the pattern of what we had in the warehouse, and they match.

Re-examined. I have no doubt that they were originally one, and the same piece; this say is never in wear in this country; we had been about a year procuring the quantity which we wanted; here are about seven or eight yards, and it is a thirty-yard say.

JURY. Is it ever retailed - A. No, never; we had ordered twelve pieces, which were three hundred and sixty yards. From my knowledge of the manufacture, I don't believe it would take a year to make that quantity; but we are obliged to look over every piece with the greatest accuracy, and perhaps out of thirty pieces, we could only get twelve that would suit us; we are obliged to look them over from end to end.

JURY. What do you do with the pieces you don't export - A. They export them about St. Mary Axe, at about fifty per cent under our price.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 40s. in a dwelling-house; but not of the burglary.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-9

186. JOHN OATES, alias WILDE , and JOHN MARSHALL , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Palmer , at about the hour of eight in the night of the 3rd of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one leather boot, value 6s. his property .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer. On the night of the 3rd of February, I saw the two prisoners, in company with a third person, about five o'clock in the evening, in Long-lane, West Smithfield; I knew their persons very well, and followed them up Holborn, across Lincoln's-inn-fields, into Long Acre, where they made attempts three times, at a watch-maker's shop; but they did not succeed. I perceived Oates, alias Wilde, take a cord from his pocket; then they returned back to the shop; but the man was putting up his shutters. They then made their way out of Long Acre into Drury-lane, where Furzeman, another officer, joined my company in watching them. We continued to watch them. Then they went to a stay-maker's shop, in Great Turnstile, Holborn; the prisoner Wilde, and the man who is not in custody, went to the window, and attempted it; Marshall walked to and fro; then they proceeded to another shop window, a watchmaker's, in Cow-lane, West Smithfield, and tried that, and did not succeed. They then went to a linen-draper's shop, in Barbican, and starred the windows in two places. Then they proceeded to Agnes Terrace, in the parish of St Leonard's, Shoreditch , it was then about eight o'clock; there was a light in the shop, the prosecutor's shop; it was a shoe-maker's shop; the two prisoners and the third person made up to the prosecutor's window, into which they looked, and stopped about a minute or so; they they left the window, and went some distance from the prosecutor's house, and had some conversation together, all three After they had some conversation, the prisoner Wilde, and the man not in custody, went up to the window, and Marshall stood at a short distance. I saw them try the window; I saw one of them working something by the putty at the bottom of the glass; after remaining there two or three minutes, they left the window again. I then made up to the window, and perceived they had starred it; but they had not pushed it in then. During their absence, some person from within came into the shop, and snuffed the candle which was placed in the window. The prisoners stopped a few minutes, and then all three returned back, and made up to the window; the prisoner Oates, stood at one end of the window, and the man who is not in custody, at the other end, and the prisoner Marshall, in the centre, when the pane was starred; I was then on the opposite side of the road, just fronting the prosecutor's shop. I heard something snap like glass, and I went to the bottom of the street, and there I saw there was a hole in the window a great deal larger than a man's hand could go in. The prisoners then had run away to the bottom of the street; they were then all three on the opposite side of the road; they then came along on the opposite side to where the shop was; they came one by one, Marshall was first, Oates next, and the man who is not in custody; Marshall stepped opposite the prosecutor's house, and looked in; the other two passed him, and went to them. They then crossed the road, and made up to the prosecutor's shop again. Marshall and the other person stood on the right of Oates; Oates then put his hand into the hole in the glass, and I saw him take something out; it appeared to be a shoe; he put it into his his right hand pocket. Oates then turned short round, and went away by a street leading to the Tabernacle, and I lost sight of him immediately; there is a watch-box there, about three yards and a half from the foot-path, that is in the Tabernacle-yard. I lost sight of Oates, and I turned round, and took Marshall into custody; I took him into a shop opposite the prosecutor's shop, and a person from the prosecutor's house came in, and I gave him in charge of him while I went to look for the others. I found Oates coming back from the Tabernacle, and I took him into custody, and I searched him, and found on him two knives, a cord, a tobacco-pouch, and two duplicates. I afterwards examined the glass,(produces a piece of broken glass.) this glass was pushed inside the window; here is one of the knives, and there is an impression made on the putty exactly tallying with the point of this knife. Oates said, he had just come from home, and so did

Marshall. I told them that would not do for me.

Cross-examined. I am a scowrer and dyer. I can't tell whether that pane of glass was lately put in or not; the putty was not fresh. Marshall crossed the road when I went after Oates, and after losing sight of Oates, I took Marshall, he was making his way away.

Prisoner Oates. I should wish to ask the officer whether I was coming from the Tabernacle when he took me?

Witness. You were.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I was in company with the last witness, a quarter before six. I am an officer of Bow-street. I continued to follow the prisoners, and was in company with the last witness until nearly eight. What Barret has stated is correct; the two prisoners are the men I was observing; I lost them in Old-street, and I saw them at the different places Barrett has mentioned.

SARAH PALMER . I am the wife of the prosecutor; my husband's name is Philip; I was in the room behind the shop on the night in question; I went into the shop to snuff the candle; that was a short time before the prisoners were taken; it was after eight o'clock; the candle was burning perfectly straight when I went to snuff it, and there was no hole in the window. I sat in the parlour, I heard a kind of a noise like a draw on the glass, and I thought it was the umbrellas against the window, as it was raining a little; but as it continued, I jumped up immediately, and went into the shop, and found the window broken, and one boot of a pair (which I remembered to have stood opposite to that pane that was broken,) was gone; they stood exactly opposite to the hole. I did not see Barret, the officer, until Monday morning; when he came then I saw him compare a knife with the putty, and it tallied as far as I can guess.

Cross-examined. I was examined before the magistrate, and then I stated that this pane was cracked before.

Re-examined. There was no hole; it stood for six months in the same state; the candle was placed every night near it, and not the least air came in.

PHILIP PALMER . I live at No. 6, Agnes-terrace, Shoreditch; I am a shoe-maker , and lost the boot on the night in question; this is a left boot, and I have the right one.

RICHARD MINCHALL . I am twelve years old; I go to the Tabernacle, and on the Sunday morning I found a half boot; this is the boot; I marked it; I found it at one corner of the watch-box, in Tabernacle-yard. A little girl told me a place had been broken open, and I went to the place.

Cross-examined. The Saturday evening was a wet evening; the boot was not under cover, and I delivered it exactly in the same state I found it in.

Oates's Defence. I was coming up Whitecross-street, and when I came near the prosecutor's house, there several people, and I asked them what was the matter, and the officer came and laid hold of me.

Marshall's Defence. I was going after some money which was owed to me, and the officer took me into the shop, and said I was concerned.

Marshall called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

MARSHALL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

OATES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-10

187. JOHN HALL and RICHARD GILMORE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Moses Davis , about the hour seven in the night of the 5th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one shawl, value 3s. his property .

GEORGE VAUGHAN . On the 5th of January, I was coming down Gray's-inn-lane , towards my own house, and I observed the prisoners Hall and Gilmore, standing near the window of Mr. Davis's shop, it was twenty or twenty-five minutes after six in evening. Knowing the prisoners perfectly well, I crossed over the way; there was a coach directly opposite Mr. Davis's door; I stood behind that, and watched the prisoners, and I could observe them plainly from that situation; I could see them walking to and fro before the window, and I saw Gilmore put his right hand as if towards the bottom of the glass, and he directed his left hand across the pane; the moment he had done that, I heard something go crack; from the sound, I supposed that he had starred the window; they immediately ran towards Gray's-inn, about twenty yards from the house The coach went on, and I was obliged to change my situation; when I changed my situation. I was still in sight, and view of the prosecution's house. I crossed over the way; I was remaining there when one of the patroles was passing by; I stopped him. The prisoners came back directly after I stopped the patrole; they went to the prosecutor's window, where they had been standing before, and in two or three minutes, I heard the falling of some glass; they immediately ran away, in the same direction as before. When they ran away, I walked by the window, and perceived there was a hole in the window, it appeared big enough to admit a man's hand, and much more. After I had seen that the window was broken, both the prisoners came back; they went to the window, walked by, and looked into the shop; they then turned, and went up to the window which they had broken; then Gilmore put his hand into the window, and pulled out several things, which were white, and which appeared to me to be like stockings; he had an apron on, and he put them underneath it, and I thought, into his breeches; he walked about a yard or two, and then Hall put his hand into the window, and took something out, which he put into his right hand coat pocket. At that moment, the patrole that I had stopped, disturbed them, by going up and putting his hand to the window, and they ran away; I pursued Hall, and caught him within fifty yards of the prosecutor's house, he was running towards Holborn, and the other ran towards Gray's-inn. I directly laid hold of him; he put his hand to his right hand pocket, and I caught hold of it, put my own hand into the pocket, and pulled

out this shawl. (producing a shawl.) I then took him over to Mr. Davis's shop, and searched him, and found a note directed to a man at the sign of the Plough, in Fleet-market. Knowing the house perfectly well, after I had lodged him in the watchhouse I went there.

Q. Did you not shew the shawl to Davis before you went to the watchhouse - A. Yes, and he said that was one of the shawls that had been laying in his window. The prisoner Hall was present at the time, and heard what was said. I then proceeded to lock him up in the watchhouse, and Davis then accompanied me to Fleet-market; when I went into the passage of the Plough, I looked over the taproom window, to see who was there, and knowing Gilmore's person well: I saw him sitting at the left hand side of the tap-room, playing at dominos; I then went in, accompanied by Mr. Davis. I walked up towards the fire, and took no notice of any one. I turned round, and o my surprize, I found him pretending to snore, if he were fast asleep. I found on him knife. I can positively swear that Gilmore, whom I saw in the Plough, is the same person. I tapped him on the hat, and said I want you, and he said what do you want with me, and jumped over the table, and came out. I took him into custody, and lodged him in the watchhouse.

Gilmore. I wish to know from the witness, why he did not take me when, as he says, he saw me commit the robbery?

Witness I thought it was my duty to take Hall first as he was the nearest to me; it was perfectly dark, but by the light in Mr. Davis's shop, I had a full view of the prisoners. I had some business to do at the Six Clerks office, and the gentleman that I wanted to see there was gone; the answer that I received was that he had been gone a quarter of an hour; I observed the clock in the hall, it was twenty minutes after six. They were taken before the magistrate.

MOSES DAVIS . I live in Gray's-inn lane. On the night in question, I remembered Vaughan, the last witness, coming to me, between six and seven, when it was quite dark, and telling me that my window was cut out; I had lighted candles, and ever since a little before five o'clock; Vaughan produced a shawl to me, and I told him I had the follow of it; both these shawls were in the window, they were there at about a quarter of an hour before. When Vaughan told me that my window was broken, I went to see, and it was so. We heard it crack; but thought it was the umbrellas. When I lighted the candles, this window was perfectly sound. I have lost a shawl; but I don't know what the other things were, we had so many trifling things in the window, that I can't tell what we miss; we had stockings, shirts, and waistcoats; but we really don't count them.

Gilmore's Defence. I don't know any thing about the robbery, and I had not been in Gray's-inn-lane.

Hall's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery, and I bought the shawl of an officer; as for Gilmore I don't know him.

GILMORE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

HALL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-11

188. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Marshall , at about the hour of seven in the night, of the 12th of January , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, twentyfive yards of printed cotton, value 2l. 5s. eleven yards of gingham, value 1l. 1s. and four yards of queen's stuff, value 6s. 4d. the property of the said William Marshall .

SARAH MARSHALL . I am a married woman, my husband's name is William Marshall, and he lives at Mo. 5, Herisham-buildings, Sommer's-town, in the parish of St. Pancras . My husband rents the house and lives in it; he and I have the house. I lost some of my property on Friday the 12th of January. I first discovered that something was missing at about twenty minutes before eight in the evening. The first was, that I heard the door-bell ring; I then ran immediately to the door, and when I came I found the street door ready open; the shop door was also open; they are different doors. The private door opens into the passage, and the shop door is in the passage; the street door is always open, and I saw two persons cross the road, I observed that I had lost my property; the shop door was shut until they opened it. The shop door was a little open; I went to the street door and found it a little open, I had been in the shop a very few minutes before; it shuts by a lock, the same as the parlour. At that time I observed that the print was gone, and the gingham, and a piece of queen's stuff; they were missing from the shop. I took them down out of the window that evening, and put them on the end of the counter. When I came to the street door, I repeatedly hallooed stop thief, and in a few minutes after, I saw a young man run, but I did not know who he was. I stood on the steps a considerable time; a man brought back the piece of stuff. I saw neither of the prisoners that I know of.

HENRY BURTON . I am not an officer, I live at No. 12, West-street, Sommer's-town. I recollect this Friday-night, being near Mrs. Marshall's house, when I heard the cry of "stop thief!" as soon as I turned my head round, I saw two men run from the step of the door; I saw them on the step of the door coming out of the passage; that was after she cried "stop thief." They were in the house when she cried "stop thief." I am sure of that, for I saw them step out of the passage; they run down the chappel path. As soon as I gave the alarm, they threw the things away in the road; I gave an alarm; they were ten or twelve yards from me when I first saw them, not more, I only saw one throw something away; I did not stop to pick it up; I pursued them; I did not overtake either of them; I did not catch them. Mr. Teesdale stopped one; I was within ten or twelve yards from him when he stopped him. The one who was stopped, was the prisoner at the bar, because I knew him before, and he was the man who threw the things away, I am sure of that; I was near enough to see. I came up to Teesdale as soon as he had taken him. Teesdale

carried him to the watch-house; I don't know who took the things up; but whilst I was gone they were taken up and taken away. The stuff was picked up in the road by me. I went back to the place and picked up the piece of stuff; I saw more pieces than one thrown away; I carried the piece of stuff to Mrs. Marshall; it was moon-light, about half past seven, or within a quarter of eight.

Sarah Marshall . I gave the stuff to the constable.

JOHN FARRAND . I am an officer, and produce the stuff.

- TEESDALE. I was in the neighbourhood of Mrs. Marshall's; I was in my own house. No.88, Ossulston-street, Sommer's-town. It was a little before eight o'clock; long after candles were lighted. I was called out of my house, hearing an alarm of"stop thief;" I ran to Chapel-Path, and I met three persons, the prisoner at the bar and two more; I stopped the prisoner at the bar, and the other two ran up Ossulston-street; I took him to the watchhouse. Some person came up and said he was the man; I don't know whether it was the last witness or not; I took him to the watch-house; I did not see any thing thrown away.

Sarah Marshall recalled. Q. You say you came out of your house upon hearing your door-bell ring - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the bell of the door of the house, or of the shop - A. That is the shop-bell.

Q. Is it fixed to the door of the shop - A. yes; and if the door be opened, the bell rings; when I came out of the house door, I came through the shop. I saw nobody in the shop; I came out of the shop door into the passage of the house; I first got sight of them when they were passing off my steps.

Q. Did you get sight of them on the steps - A. I don't hardly know, whether it was on the steps, or on the pavement; I immediately cried" stop thief;" I don't know that any body had come from the shop into the street for a quarter of an hour previous. I saw the last person who had been in the shop go out; I fastened the door after they went out; I am sure it was fastened; it fastened by a lock, the same as the parlour I look at this piece of stuff; it is about four yards; it is queen's stuff; it is worth about five or six shillings; the other two things which I lost, were gingham and print; there were twenty-five yards of print and eleven yards of gingham.

Q. Is there any particular mark on that queen's stuff - A. I have no mark, but I cut all off that is gone. I cut some off a day or two before; I am certain it is the piece which was in our shop. It is my husband's property.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-12

189. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 5th of February , about eleven in the night, being in the dwelling-house of Stephen Cole ; in the said the dwelling-house did steal, one counterpane, value 3s. one coverlid, value 2s. one pillow, value 5s. and two pillow cases, value 2s. the property of the said William Cole .

ELIZABETH COLE . I am a married woman, my husband lives at No. 13, Little Russel-street, Covent-garden, in the parish of St. Martin . It is his own house; we let lodgings. I saw the prisoner at the bar on the 5th of this month; he came to our house on that day as a lodger, for a week. I dont know whether he went to bed; he first came between two and three in the afternoon; he liked the room much, and I apoligized for its not being so clean as I could wish, as I had two children dying with the meazles; I let it to him at three shillings and six-pence a week. At ten o'clock he returned to go to bed; I opened the door for him, and he asked me to call him the next morning at six o'clock to go to work. He said he was a taylor ; he shut himself in, and locked himself in. I and the family went to bed about eleven. The window of his own room was fast. The street - door was locked and the key was in it. There was only one window in the room, which opened in the gateway, and which was fast. I made my husband get up at six o'clock in the morning to to call him; I could hear my husband knock at the door several times. I arose myself at about eight o'clock; then I went into the prisoner's room. His door was locked inside. A young man went in at the window, which was open, and opened the door; when I went in, I observed that the bed-clothes were gone; every thing off the bed. I had a counterpane which was gone, and the blankets, and the sheets, and the pillow, and two cases; they were all gone. I did not see the goods again until I saw them on the Saturday following at Bow-street.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. At about eleven o'clock on the night of the 5th of February, I met the prisoner in Holborn; he had a bundle on his back; I asked him what he had got, and he said, dirty linen to wash; he said, he brought it from Princiss-street, Drury-lane. I asked him if he had any objection to my looking at it, and he said, no. I took him into the public-house, and examined the bundle; it contained one counterpane, two blankets, one of which was double, a pair of sheets, one pillow, two pillow cases, and a small coverlid. I asked him again where he got them; the outside sheet was dirty, by having been thrown into the mud; he said he had been at a public-house in Princiss-street, and a woman brought them to him in a public-house. I then detained the things, and sent my brother officer with him to point out the house. He went, and was gone about an hour; I told him I should take him to the watchhouse; I did so, and the next day, Tuesday, I took him before the magistrate; the prisoner was put to the bar on the Saturday, to be discharged; in consequence of our not being able to find an owner for the property. At that moment, Mrs. Cole came into the office; she was shewn the things, and identified them to be her property.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I was with the last witness. I went with the prisoner in search of the house; when we came to Princiss-street, he said it was not there; he at first told me that was the street. Then I took him to Drury-lane, to the part he spoke of; then he said it was not there. I told him I should

take him back, and have my brother officer's opinion.

(Property produced.)

Elizabeth Cole . Re-called; These are my husband's property; this is the sheet which is at top, it is my husband's, I know it very well; it is a cotton sheet, and has been turned, and this is an under blanket; I took it to iron upon, and there a mark; then there is the counterpane, of which I am sure; this is the pillow, for the ticking was broken, and I put two cases on it. These things are all my husband property. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say; I have no friends to speak for me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-13

190. JAMES CROW , and DAVID, alias JAMES BABB , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Valentine Read , at about the hour of eight in the night of the 24th of January , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one umbrella, value 25s. his property .

VALENTINE READ . I live at No. 15, Charing Cross, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields ; I keep an umbrella and stick shop . On the 24th of last month, I went out at a quarter after seven in the evening, I left my niece at home, my niece's name is Arabella Atkins ; she is here. My shop door was shut when I went out; the shutters were not shut; there was a light in the shop, a lamp alight. I returned as near eight as possible. When I returned, I perceived there was an umbrella missing.

ARABELLA ATKINS . I am niece to Mr. Read. I recollect my uncle going out on the evening he has mentioned; I was at the time sitting in the parlour, facing the shop door; was shut, the parlour door faces the shop; the shop door was shut, the parlour door was open. In my uncle's absence, a person came in; I did not go out at all. The servant girl was down stairs. A gentleman came in, and bought an umbrella; we did not touch any thing in the window; he did not touch any thing in that part where the umbrella; was stolen from. When he went away, I shut the door myself; it has a brass handle to turn, so that a person may open it from the outside by turning that handle; I latched it. After that I went back into the parlour, and sat there. To the best of my recollection, in about ten minutes after, I perceived that the shop door was open, by the difference in the sound of the coaches made in going past; I had not heard it opened; I instantly got up, and found the door was partly open; it was wide enough open for a man to put his hand in. I did not, at that time, miss any umbrella; I had no idea that any person had taken any thing out; I had no suspicion, but thought that the door might have given way of itself; it never did so, that I found out before. In about two minutes, I heard the cry of stop thief; Mr. Lee came to the shop, and brought one of the prisoner with him, it was the tallest. The umbrella was thrown away. After Mr. Lee brought the prisoner to the shop, he was taken to St. Martin's watch-house. A search was made, for the umbrella, but it was not found. When Mr. Lee came. I missed the umbrella, and even before, when I first heard the cry of stop thief; it was missed from the left hand as you go into the shop; I had it in my hands two hours before, and I am certain it had been there. A person, by putting his hand in at the door, so far open only as I found it, could reach the umbrella down from the form on which it was hanging. I am quite sure that might have been done. I know nothing more.

WILLIAM LEE . On the night at the 24th of January, I was passing Mr. Read's to a neighbour's; it was hardly eight, it might want about ten minutes to it. I observed the two prisoners looking in at his shop window; I am most positive of their persons. I went where I was going, and on my returning, I found their nearly in the same situation. I have suffered repeatedly from depredations of the same kind as the present. I passed them, and went to my own door; I cast my eye so as to get a view of them, and see their faces; there are two very small houses and Richardson's lottery office between my house and the prosecutor's; there are only two doors between us. I took advantage of a very strong gaz-light to look at the prisoners. I then crossed to the King's-mews gate, which enabled me to watch them without their seeing me, as I hoped; I saw them very intent upon the window, and then the gentleman alluded to by the last witness, went into the shop; upon that, they walked off. I followed them round Spring Gardens completely, and then they took their situation as before; I followed them, and I did not go as far back as the mews gate, but I went about three parts across the crossing. I then observed that the prisoner Babb, was very intent upon one of the lower squares of glass immediately adjoining of the door; from his manner, as from the first, I had a suspicion that he was going to cut the glass. Crow, the other prisoner, came close up to him at that time. I had a suspicion they were going to cut the glass; but before I had crossed, they both retired towards the Phoenix engine-house, where they were in the dark. I had an opportunity of seeing through the door that Arabella Atkins had taken her seat again in the parlour; it is a glass door. Babb then stepped forward, and I saw him most distinctly put his hand to the latch, and open the door; he opened it just sufficient to put his hand in the direction where the umbrellas was, and I saw him take the umbrella out most distinctly; I instantly ran, and he had put the umbrella into the left hand of Crow. I could have taken Babb, but I followed Crow, he having the property. Babb, but I followed Crow, he having the property. Babb ran almost against me; Crow went Westminster way, round the statue of King Charles; I pursued him; not having disengased the umbrella from his left hand, he threw it towards the coach stand; he then ran round the statute towards St. Martin's-lane; I pursued him, crying stop thief; by that cry, several persons came out, and he was impeded, and brought to a dodge, and I came up to him, and took him. After having taken him back to Mr. Read's, I went in search of the umbrella; I did not find it. I re

turned to Mr. Read's, and questioned the prisoner Crow, who that other man was, and where he was to be found; he very redily told us where we should find him. I took him to the watch-house. He said Babb lived in Gardener's-lane, York-street, Westminster; they both lodged in one house; in Crow's mother's house. The constable of the night and the officer went after him. I have tried all means to recover the umbrella; but can't get no tidings of it; the coachman on the stand have denied all knowledge of it.

JOHN NEWMAN . I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields. I was on my duty, and I went the next morning and took Babb; he was in bed; I found him in a house in Gardener's-lane, West-minster.

Arabella Atkins . This was a new umbrella, and cost twenty-five shillings; the selling price was a guinea and a half.

CROW, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

BABB, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160214-14

191. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , eleven yards of gingham, value 13s. the property of William Towse Bannister , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BANNISTER . I have a son who keeps a shop , William Towse Bannister ; I occasionally assist him in his shop; it is a linen-drapers shop, it is in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields . I was assisting in the shop on the 30th of January, at about half past four in the afternoon, there was a young man, an assistant of my son's, in the shop, that young man was in the shop serving a customer at the time, his name is William Wigg , and there was nobody else in the shop. The prisoner at the bar came to the shop, she came first by herself, and bought a small medallion, for which she paid me fourpence; it was a printed cotton medallion; whilst she was paying me for that, two other women came in, and each with a child in their arms. The prisoner went out, and I shewed one of the other women some goods; the other one, to whom I was not attending, said, if I could not wait on her immediately she must go out. Whilst I was shewing the other woman some goods, the prisoner at the bar came back, and asked for something for a child's frock; she asked for a particular pattern, she asked for a brown with a yellow spot; I had a green brown with a yellow spot, which I shewed to her. Then, the woman to whom I had been shewing some goods, went out, saying they would not suit her. The prisoner said, the patterns which I had been shewing to her, were pretty; but it was a bad light by candle light, and she said she would call and look at them by day-light; she then went out. The young man who was in the shop, called to me, and said, sir, that woman's pocket sticks up; I told him I thought so too. I got my hat, and followed her; at the end of New-street, next St. Martin's-lane, I saw her join the two other woman who had been in my son's shop; they had not appeared at all acquainted in the shop. They went up St. Martin's-lane, and turned into Long Acre, talking and laughing as if they were pleased. In Long Acre, just before they got to the chapel, I got near enough to them to hear the prisoner say, d n the old fellow, I did him, for I slipped in off the counter; at the same instant, she was taking it out of her pocket, and was shewing it to them under her coat; I immediately caught her in my arms, with the property; I called stop thief; for the other two women ran away. She had eleven yards of gingham, part in her hand, and part under her cloak; she had partly drawn it from her pocket, to shew the other women. I took her to St. Martin's watchhouse, and delivered to Pike, the constable; I delivered the gingham to the constable also.

(Property produced.)

William Bannister . This is the gingham, which I know to be my son's property; I did not see her take it; it is worth thirteen shillings, that is the cost price of it.

JOHN PIKE . The last witness gave the prisoner into my custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-15

192. JAMES SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Dowring , at about the hour of nine of the night of the 15th of January , with intent to steal, and for the burglariously stealing therein, one bed, value 5l. three blankets, value 5s. one counterpane, value 5s. two pillows, value 10s. one mattrass, value 1l. and one bolster, value 10s. his property .

SAMUEL DOWRING . I live in John-street, Whitechapel, in the parish of St. Mary Matfelon . On the 15th of last month, I went out between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I left my wife and two children in my house; I shut the door after me; it is a spring lock, which shuts itself by being pulled to. I returned at about half past nine; I had the key, and let myself in; I found the candle as usual, standing on the table in the front room. I observed a light in the back room shining across the passage; I went to see what it was; I missed the light before I got to the door, and I put my hand to the door, and something stopped it; I went back, and pushed the door, and saw the bed clothes rolled up; I pushed the door open so far as to see the bed, pillows, and clothes, rolled up, and the mattrass, all rolled up in three parcels. the feather bed by itself. I then looked at the further end of the room, and saw the prisoner laying across the bedstead; I had a candle in my hand; the back door was not bolted; I slipped the bolt in case the prisoner should get out before I got assistance; I went to the front door, and called the watchman. I had not spoken to the prisoner before I did that. The watchman and two neighbours came in, and went to the back room with me. I spoke to him, and struck him a blow; he did not answer when I spoke, nor did he answer when I struck him. I then pulled him off the bedstead; he said he wanted to go to sleep, let him

sleep, and seemed very heavy. The window was fast. I then gave him in charge to the watchman, and took him to Whitechapel watchhouse. I asked him what he expected to find there; but he gave me no answer. My wife was out at this time; the back door went into a yard of mine behind the house; that was a private yard belonging to my own house only; there are no houses on one side of my house, but there is a piece of ground fenced in for building on; but it is not built up; the side of my yard is a boarded fence against this piece of open ground, in some places that fence was six feet high, in some eight; but the highest part was broken down that evening; we found it broken down when we came back from the watchhouse; there was an appearance as if a person had come over the wall at the bottom of my yard; first over the other wooden fence, and then over the wall. The way I found he came over the wall was because a shutter had been laid over the corner of the wall, over a water-cask, and that shutter was thrown down near that, there stood a corner cupboard, and there were marks of lime on it, where he came over the bricklayer's premises.

ELIZABETH DOWRING . On the evening of the 15th of January, I went out after my husband went out; I left the back door upon the latch.

Q. Was it latched so that a person must lift the latch, in order to came in - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure you left it latched - A. Yes, I sure of that; because I must pass it in going to the door, and I know I had fastened it when I went out, and I fastened so when I came back; I came back a little before nine to get a child that was awake, and I took it to a neighbour's house, where I had a younger one; I took the child from the back room; there is only one back room on the ground floor. I did not return again until I was alarmed, and told that a man was in the house. When I went to the house the second time, I left nobody in it. There is only one door to go into the yard. The value of the bed, the bed clothes, and the pillows might me worth about eight pounds.

THOMAS MADDISON . I am the watchman of Spitalfields parish, that took the prisoner into custody.

JOHN PENNEY . I am the watchman belonging to Whitechapel parish; my assistance was called in, but the prisoner was out of the house before I came up.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160214-16

193. JOHN HURLEY and THOMAS TURNER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Goodman Solomon , at about the hour of three in the night of the 11th of January , with intent to steal, and for burgleriously stealing therein, seventy-two coats, value 79l. twelve pair of breeches, value 10l. twenty-eight pair of trowsers, value 14l. one pair of pantaloons, value 3s. twenty-three waistcoats, value, 6l. four Jackets, value 2l. three gowns, value 10s. one spencer, value 14s. two jackets, value 15s. one shirt, value 6s. one cloak, value 1l. one silk handkerchief, value 10s. two pelises, value 4l. one work box, value 3s. one ink-stand, value 5s. one silver milk-pot, value 2l. one strainer, value 5s. five pieces of gold lace, value 3s. three yards of lace, value 2l. one row of beads, value 1l. 10s. one watch, value 3l. one chain, 4l. three seals, value 2l. one watch-key, value 5s. two brooches, value 2l. one ring, value 10s. one pencil-case, value 3s. one pen-knife, value 5s. and one tea-kettle, value 15s. the property of the said Goodman Solomon .

GOODMAN SOLOMON . I live in Field-lane ; I have two houses there; No. 4, and 22. I and my family live and sleep generally at No. 4. I keep a servant, Jacob Valentine , who sleeps in the garret at No. 22; my house is in the parish of St. Andrew Holborn. I carry on the business of a clothes salesman . I generally leave my business at night, about eleven, or half after eleven o'clock; I tell it at rather better than eleven o'clock. My wife was with me, and we left it fastened by two street - door locks, perfectly safe; I felt against the door to try it; it was safe. All the property that was stolen, was safe at that time in my shop. The shop is separate from the lodgers; there is a private door for them. I went to bed shortly after I went home. I was called up at a little before three o'clock by the watchman; that was Chapman. In consequence what he communicated to me, I and my servant, named Valentine, discovered the shop was broken open; that one lock was off, and one staple also. I found my shop was all in confusion; the goods were turn off the shelves, and scattered about the shop; I found my property was gone, a great deal of it. I missed seventy-two coats, worth seventy-nine pounds, and the other articles named in the indictment, which was safe before. Afterwards I applied to an officer of the name of Hancock; I went in company with him to Saffron-hill. That house belongs to a man named Winsley; but it is let out in lodgings. I lit the candle, and had it in my hand; I stopped at the door; I heard some man coming down stairs, and I caught Butler, who had a bundle in his hand. That bundle contained my wife's clothing. When I found him and bundle; I said, where is the rest of the thieves. I called Hancock in. In the consequnce of what we heard of Butler, Hancock went up stairs, and I remained at the street - door to prevent any one going out; I did not afterwards go up stairs.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. My house No. 22, is in the city of London. The business is carried on at No. 22. in my name. I know a person the name of Smith; I sleep in the house some times; different lodgers sleep in the house. I am the ostensible owner of, and trader in, that house in Field-lane.

Re-examined by Mr. ALLEY. I pay the rent and taxes of that house.

Examined by the COURT. I had always some servant sleeping in the house to take care of my goods.

JAMES HANCOCK . I belong to Hatton-garden office; I was called on the morning of the 13th, a little before, or after six; it was day-light. In con

sequence of what was given to me in information; I went to No. 13, Great Saffron-hill; the house of which one Ellingham is the landlord; it is let out in tenements. The first man I lit on, was Butler, I met him just coming out of the street - door; he is the accomptice. I seized him, and pushed him into the passage; I told Solomon to go to the other door, as there was a double stair-case. I then shut the door, and hand-cuffed Butler; I then made Butler go up before me, and I held the skirts of his coat. I went up to the atttic-story. I held him with my left hand, and drove my right shoulder against the door and broke it open; I pulled him in with me and barricaded the door, in order that no one might surprize me without. I then said Tom Turner get up; he answered to that name; I took out a pistol. There were two more men and a woman in the room. They were lying in the bed, with the clothes covered up; the woman layed at the foot of the bed with her feet towards their head. I then told Turner to dress himself. He rubbed his eyes and walked to the window and looked out, and said, there is that b-y Jew. I believe the prosecutor was down stairs; I looked about for something, and fastened Turner to Butler. Turner said, he did not know what was the matter. I saw a long sword hanging up, and I took it down, and bid the other two get up, and I fastened them together also; then I proceeded to search the place, and found these skeleton keys, five bits of gold lace, a bottle of phosphorus, a file, and two or three matches (producing them.) I found nothing else in that room that applies to this subject. I saw the skeleton keys had been recently filed; I did not find any thing else that I place to this. When I entered the room I looked out at the window, and told somebody to go and fetch Banbury. I afterwards apprehended Hurley in Caroline-court; that is on one side Saffron-hill, you turn off Saffron-hill into it.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. There were other persons living in the house, beside Turner. I found Butler in that house; Hurley I found at his father's house, and not in that house.

Examined by the COURT. The other two men were discharged.

JACOB VALENTINE . I am servant to the prosecutor; I am the person who slept in the house at No. 22; I went to the house that was searched by Hancock; I found a duplicate where the prisoner Turner was.

Cross-examined. All the rooms at No. 22, are let our, except the shop, and one for myself; I don't know whether a person the name of Smith slept there.

THOMAS HAYLETT . I am a shoe-maker; I have a duplicate given to me by the last witness; I produce also a crow, which I found two doors from No. 25; It was laying in the passage, Mr. Solomon and I were together.

GEORGE MARTIN . I am a lamp-lighter; it is my business to go about in the middle of the night to trim the lamps. I was going home on the morning of the 13th, at three o'clock; as I went along, I saw three persons in Field-lane, and I saw a fourth coming from an entry, with a parcel under his left arm; the rest of them accompanied that man towards Saffron-hill. I made it known to the first watchman I saw. Then I went about my business. This entry is on the opposite side of the way from the prosecutor's shop, and about twenty or thirty yards up.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a watchman, and in consequence of some communication that was made to me, I went to the house which was robbed; it might be seven or eight minutes after three o' clock; the doors were very near shut, but not quite so. In consequence of that, I communicated to Mr. Solomons what I discovered, and he went with me to see it. I afterwards went into a passage in Field-lane, and found a large quantity of wearing apparel, on the opposite side of the way to Solomon's house, and two or three doors off. There is a kind of gate in this passage, which when shut, people can't see well what is in the passage. There is another passage on the same side of the way, a little lower down.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a beadle belonging to St. Andrew's parish Holborn. I went up stairs after Hancock, and on the stairs I found five blue coats, a little box, two waistcoats, and a tea-kettle, (producing them.) These things I found on the stairs of the house where Butler was taken. I did not at any time see him in possession of this bundle.

Examined by the COURT. I found these things on the garret stairs; I don't know in whose possession they had been.

Cross-examined by Mr. Barry. That house is let out in tenements, and belongs to a man named Winsley.

James Hancock , Re-examined. I received some directions from the accomplice which led me to Comer's house; I found a great quantity of things, which are now in court; they consist in wearing apparel; they were hid in the beds, and the beds turned upon them. I found also this silver milk-pot, and this plated strainer. The accomplice was very explicit in every thing he said. Solomons claimed all the things I found at Comer's.

JOHN BUTLEE , (accomplice.) I know the prisoners at the bar. On the night of the 11th of January, or the morning of the 12th, at about twelve or one o'clock, I left the Thatehed House in Field-lane, and was going towards the Borough, when I met Hurley; he asked me if I had seen a man named Mahony, or Comer, and I said no. He asked me if I would go a little way up Holborn to meet them, and I went with him, and met Comer and Mahoney coming down; when we met them, we went up Holborn, and met two girls, whom they knew, and coming down again, they had a quarrell, and the girls went away. Hurley said there was a shop in Field-lane they were going to break open. We went to the middle of Field-lane, and on the left hand side going down the lane is Solomon's door, I can't exactly tell the number, it is a clothe's shop. I did not know it to be Solomons's, but Hurley said it was. Then two of us. Hurley and I, went into Field-passage, at the other side of the lane; we

went there to look if any body was coming down while Comer and Mahoney were breaking open the door. Comer and Mahoney broke open the door; I and Hurley were in the passage. While we were in the passage, we heard some persons coming from Saffron-hill way down Field-lane, and then we called Mahoney and Comer off. They came to us, and we let those persons pass us; they were Turner and a man named Bradley, and several women. I called Turner back, as knowing him, and mentioned to him that we were going to break open Solomon's house; he came away with Bradley and these women, and stopped with us. When they were out of the way, we proceeded in opening the door again; Mahoney, Comer, and Turner, then all went to the door; they had a crow bar, and four keys, which I saw. Turner, Mahoney, and Comer, went in; they said the door was open, and Hurley and I followed them in; Turner got a light with some phosphorous, and he put the match to the parlour window, which is in the door, to see if any person was in the parlour; there was nobody there, and three of them went in; I went into the parlour, but was not in there a minute, I took out a lady's green pelisse from the parlour; that pelisse I believe has been seen since, Mr. Hancock apprehended me with it. After I took this pelisse out, I took a whole arm full of things, and went with them to Field-lane-passage. We went seven or eight journeys, all of us loaded with clothes. While we were carrying the things into the passage one of them said, that the watchman had gone out of the lane, from his box, so I carried the armfull of things I then had to Martin Comer's father's house, which is the first door in Red Lion-court; that is the house I gave Mr. Hancock direction to. We made four or five journeys to this house; we carried the things four or five times to Cormer's room; going up the last time, I saw a watchman going down that passage, and almost close by; then we took them up a passage where Arthur Ellingham lives up stairs; that was the house in which I was taken. I and Turner took a great many things into that passage. The lamps were lighted, and I saw the watchman from Holborn pass twice; I saw a light coming down from Holborn. I was apprehended before all the things were removed from the passage. A great quantity of things remained in Field-lane-passage when I was apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. At my call, Turner joined us; if I had not called him, he would have gone past. I came from the House of Correction this morning, and have turned King's evidence to save myself. I have fallen into bad company. I was never in this Court before. I have been to sea eight years, under Captain White, as his servant; I had left my master; I ran away from him, and went on board the Marine Society vessel. For the last two years I have been a shore; I have worked in the white lead mills during that time; I have worked with Mr. Smith, that keeps the large dust head in Gray's-inn-lane. I have been in custody for an assault about twelve months back; I believe I was in custody about five weeks; the person who gave charge of me knew I was in liquor, and left me to be turned up; I was never to have been tried. I have been taken into the watch-house for being drunk. I have been lodged in Clerkenwell, and now come up from the House of Correction. I had no lodging at Arthur Ellingham's; when I stopped out late, I generally stopped there. I have got my bread lately by thieving.

MARY SOLOMONS . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I know this strainer and this duplicate; this duplicate was my husband's, and this strainer was locked in my drawer, for my own common use; I know the cream jug. I have looked over all these things, and know them to be my husband's property. That is the duplicate that was shook out of the bed at Turner's house; it was locked in my drawer on the night that this robbery was committed.

Goodman Solomons . I have looked over these things, and they are my property.

John Butler . I was apprehended as I was coming out; I had been in the same room in which Turner was found. One of the other men was Arthur Ellingham , and the other was Joseph Wilson ; I believe his name to be so.

MR. BARRY, as counsel for the prisoners, submitted, that as there was no other evidence which affected Hurley, but the testimoney of the accomplice, un-corroborated by any circumstances, he was not in a situation to be called upon for a defence.

THE COURT was pleased to co-incide with the learned counsil's application.

Turner's Defence. I have got some property there; there is a gold band which I bought at Portsmonth, and that is mine; all our ships crew bought gold bands to put round their hats.

MR. ALLEY. Solomons does not claim that,

TURNER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

HURLEY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-17

194. GEORGE FREESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of the January , nine gowns, value 5l. nine pairs of silk stockings, value 2l. six handkerchiefs, value 1s. four shifts, value 2s. two pairs of boots, value 10s. two pairs of gloves, value 5s. five spencers, value 1l. one veil, value 2l. two petticoats, value 5s. two pairs of drawers, value 5s. and three caps, 9s. the property of William Cater , in the dwelling-house of Robert Robottom and Charles Robottom .

CHARLES ROBOTTOM . I live at the White Bear, Piccadilly ; my brother's name is Robert; we live in the house, and keep it jointly; it is a house to which stage coaches come from the Country. I know that the property in question came to my house on the morning of the 12th of December, by the Dover coach, Mrs. Cater came a passenger in the coach, and it was her property; she brought some luggage with her; she went up stairs, and took her luggage up with her; it was a small trunk I believe, She only stopped to breakfast, and said she would call in a day or two; she only called for her breakfast, and left her luggage in her bed room; what was in this trunk of course I don't know. Then she went away. I know the person of the

prisoner at the bar; I did not see him on the night that she came; but I saw him on the morning afterwards; I did not see him until the morning of the 13th of January, when I saw him come down stairs with a bundle in his hand; he went out, and I saw him no more. I sent up stairs to see if all was right; I did not go myself. My house is in the parish of St. James's Westminster.

TIMOTHY SKYRONE . I am porter at the White Bear; I did not live there on the 12th of December; but went there first on the 8th of January. I saw the prisoner at our house on the 12th; I took his boots off. I saw him in the coffee-room, and took his boots off there. I saw the chamber-maid light him across the coffee-room to No. 17, in the second gallery at the back of the house. I saw him again between one and two the next day; I then saw him come down with a bundle on the first gallery. I carried the boots up to him about half past one o'clock, or nearer two; he came down to the first gallery stairs; the chamber maid told him he had better go into the coffee-room, and put them on there, as they were there; but he said, he would rather put them on there, and he gave me sixpence for cleaning them. He had a bundle with him, and he went away almost immediately.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is the person whose boots you helped off at night, and whose boots you cleaned and carried to him in the morning - A. Not the least doubt.

PRISCILLA CATER . I am a married woman, and my husband's name is William Cater. I came to London by the Dover coach, before Christmas; but I don't know on what day of the week it was. I stopped at the White Bear Piccadilly; I went up stairs into a bed chamber; I had a small trunk with me; that trunk contained wearing apparel. I staid only a few hours at the White Bear; I left my trunk in the bed chamber; it was locked, and I then went away; I called a short time after.

Q. Was it after Christmas - A. I don't know.

Q. You may recollect whether you left it there a week, a fortnight, three weeks, or a month - A. I had left it there about three weeks; I am not certain; I called for my trunk; it was there; but had been broken open; all the things were gone.

Q. Did you see any of these things again - A. Yes, at Bow-street; it was a short time after that.

Q. Did you see all the things, or only some of them - A. All that I can remember; I recollect a person who shewed me those things; I don't know his name; but he is here.

Q. Have you any recollection of the situation of the room - A. The back part of the house, in a long gallery.

Q. How came you to leave the trunk in the inn - A. I did not expect to remain so long in town, and I was detained in expectation of a letter.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . I produce the bundle. I am an officer of Bow-street, I and Westbrook were sent for to the Angel-inn, St. Clements, to take the prisoner into custody. We went, and found him there; he had been stopped there by one of the porters. The greatest part of this bundle was tied round his person with a bit of packthread; some of these things were round his person; the rest were in a bundle. Those tied round his body were tied under his arm pits, and went into the waistband of his breeches. Then I took him into custody, and kept the things. I asked him where he got them, and he said, they belonged to his sister. I have had these things ever since.

Q. Were you present when these things were shewn to Mrs. Cater - A. Yes; I shewed them to her myself.

Mrs. Priscilla Cater . I have seen all these things at Bow-street; I believe there are six spencers; I should suppose they are worth about twelve shillings; I look at the gowns, there are nine, I should think they are worth about seven pounds; there are nine pairs of silk stockings, I suppose they are worth about eight pounds; they cost me a Napoleon each pair in France; there are six handkerchiefs; there are shifts, shoes, gloves, a veil, a petticoat, and a cap.

RICHARD WESTBROOK . I know no more than Limbrick has spoken. I saw the situation in which those things were found about the prisoner.

MARTHA BROWNE . I lived at the Angel-inn, St. Clements. I was chamber-maid there in January. I only speak to the prisoner coming to our house; he slept at our house, but I don't know on what day of the month, it was on a Thursday, and he came about half past eleven at night; he asked for a bed, and slept there. He did not bring any thing with him that I saw, I saw him on the next morning, he was up about half past ten, and in the coffee-room; two gentlemen's portmanteaus had been opened; he went away at about eleven o'clock. He came on the Saturday week afterwards; I saw him betweenn one and two, in our coffee-room; he was stopped by our porters; Limbrick and Westbrook came and took him. I don't know what day of the month it was.

Q. To Limbrick. What day of the month was it that you took him - A. On Saturday, the 13th of January.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not told my friends I was confined; I don't wish to say any thing.

Q. To Robottom. Did you ever see the prisoner at your house at any other time than when Mrs. Cater came to Town? Did you ever see him except that time you spoke of - A. No.

Timothy Skyrone . I never saw him there after that time, nor before it.

Limbrick. There was a velveteen jacket which does not belong to Mrs. Cater.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-18

195. CHARLES TOMKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , one pistol, value 40s. the property of Joseph Manton , in his dwelling-house .

PETER HAYWOOD . I am foreman to Mr. Joseph Manton ; he has no one in partnership with him to my knowledge; he lives at 27, Berkeley-street . I had missed property from Mr. Manton's

dwelling-house; I missed an under and over barrelled pistol, a double barrelled pistol, with one barrell over the other. The prisoner was a stock finisher ; all the time I have been there, he has been a workman. This pistol was in the front shop, which is certainly part of Mr. Manton's dwelling-house. On that pistol being missed, and other things, I, Mr. Manton's clerk, and Mr. Plank, went to the prisoner's lodgings; they were at a baker's, 51, High-street, going down to St. Giles's. When we arrived at 51, we went up stairs, and knocked at the door of a room in that house; no one answered. Our clerk, as well as myself, looked inside, and we saw a key in the door, and the reflection of a fire as well. At last we got into the room. by Plank bursting open the door with his foot. We then found the prisoner at the bar in the room, behind the bed curtains, concealed; he was putting on a shirt at the time. Plank searched him in my presence, and duplicates were found on him. He said he had got the duplicate of the pistol for which we came in search. Plank asked him that questions there was no promise nor threat held out to him, but the contrary. Plank asked him where did you pledge that pistol, where is the duplicate, give it to me, stop a minute, I will give it to you; was his answer. He delivered this duplicate, and afterwards Plank examined him, and found other duplicates.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I accompanied the last witness and Mr. Manton's clerk to the prisoner lodgings. When we went up stairs, there were three rooms, on the floor, and they were all fast, and a key was discovered in one. I called the landlady to see me break it open; I bursted the door open, and found the prisoner concealed behind the curtains. I asked him for the ticket of the pistol he had pledged at Mr. Hulm's, he said he would give it me in a moment; at length he produced some tickets, but not the one I wished. I then put my hand into his pocket, and pulled out a bundle of tickets, and among them was the ticket for the pistol.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. His bed, was turned up, and he was in his shirt sleeves without his coat.

JAMES HULM . This is a ticket of a pistol, pledged at my house; I took it in. I remember the person who pledged it; the prisoner is that person; it was pledged by him in the name of Thomas Prnson; I am certain he is the man who pledged it. I can't say the value of that pistol.

(Pistol produced.)

Peter Haywood . This is our pistol; it was taken out of our shop. It was brought to Mr. Manton's to be repaired; I will swear to the work and to the number; putting the lowest possible value on it, in the state it now is, it is worth ten guineas; I would give ten guineas for it; that one pistol now, would cost twenty five guineas.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

[ Recommended to mercy on account of his good character .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards,

Reference Number: t18160214-19

196. THOMAS COOPER was indicted, for that he, on the 3rd of February , upon Susaunah Perkins , spinster , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain instrument did stab and cut the said Susannah Perkins , with intent in so doing, to kill and murder her .

SeCOND COUNT. Stating his intent to be, to disabls her.

THIRD COUNT. Stating his intent to be, to do her some bodily harm.

SUSANNAH PERKINS . I was hurt on Saturday, the 3rd of this month; I was just turning down Field-lane ; I was going to the Thatched-house to look for a friend; it was about half past eight in the evening. Turning down Field-lane, I met the prisoner at the bar; I had lived with him about four months. He asked me in the public-house, if I would live with him any more; and I said I would not, and he then said, I should have the contents of his knife. I went out of the public-house soon after; he pulled a knife out of his waistcoat pocket. It was a small sized knife. He then put it in again, I turned round to tell the landlady, he had taken the knife out of his pocket, and I knew it was his intention to cut me with it. I lost sight of him, and then I came down the hill, and he came after me. He ran the knife in my left side through my clothes. I felt it at the time; it was bleeding. He was going on when he passed me, and I said. for God's sake stop him, for he has stabbed me. A gentlemen who is here, stopped him immediately; I was taken into the officer's at the corner of Saffron-hill; he is a shoe-maker. I was taken to the hospital, and left it last Thursday. The wound is almost healed, but it has the dressing on it still; I am sure the prisoner did it.

DAVID DAVIS . I live at the corner of Field-lane. On the 3rd day of this month, between the hours of six and seven o'clock in the evening; I saw the prosecutrix and the prisoner standing opposite to my door. There is a public-house just above there; they were not standing for a moment. The prosecutrix said, I am stabbed; I took the prisoner to Thomas Haylett , and delivered him to his charge. I saw the prisoner put something into his pocket; I saw him searched, and a knife found. The officer searched him, and found a pocket-bank with some papers in it, and the knife. I went back and fetched the woman; I asked her if she was much hurt, and she said yes. We untied her gown, and then the blood poured out most furiously; her clothes were all over blood. Some neighbours then came, and advised her to go to St. Bartholomew's Hospital. The instant she went to the hospital, I went home; I have known the prisoner; he lived somewhere about there; I have seen him pass me frequently, but don't know what business he follows. I said Cooper, what have you been doing; but he made no answer.

THOMAS HAYLETT . I am a parish constable; I heard a noise, and went to the door, and the prisoner at the bar was brought by Mr. Davis and another person by the collar. I searched him and found the knife; there is blood all over the knife. I was

searching in his pocket for it, and he had it in his hand. I pulled his hand forward, and took it out. There was blood upon it at that time, and there is now. It was shut; I sent the woman to the hospital; I first examined her person; she was holding her hand to her side, and the blood was running over the wound; and I got two persons to take her to the hospital. There was a great deal of blood on the floor. I took the prisoner before the magistrate at Hatton-garden.

JOHN PHILIP MARTIN . I attend at the hospital of St. Bartholomew. I am a member of the Royal College of Surgeons. I was not at the hospital when the prosecutrix was brought in; but I saw her on Saturday the 3rd of February after six o'clock in the evening. I believe she had not been there many minutes when I was sent for. I found a wound in her left side, somewhat below her left shoulder blade, made with a sharp instrument I think, I see the knife which is produced. It was such a wound as might be made with that knife; but any knife might make such a wound. I should suppose it was about three eighths of an inch obliquely. She may be considered as cured now, though the wound is not entirely closed. I should call it a slight wound as it did not penetrate the cavity of the chest. There was very little bleeding after I saw it. If it had penetrated the cavity of the chest, I should have considered it a most dangerous accident.

Prisoner's Defence, On the Saturday I was in liquor, and she was always abusing me; and she was abusing me then; and I went to strike her, and as I struck her, the knife went into her; the reason she left me, was, because I would not go thieveing for her to keep her; and she told me she would have the pleasure of laughing at me between the iron bars.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-20

197. MATTHEW READ , THOMAS READ , and JAMES DOWNES were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Harris , in the king's high way, on on the 11th of January , for putting him in fear, and for taking from his person, and against his will, one purse, value 2d. and one three shilling bank token, value 3s. his property .

JAMES HARRIS . I lost my purse about one in the middle of the day, on the 11th of January; I had been to carry a parcel, and was returning by the Globe Academy, and had occasion to stop to make water. While I was so employed, the middle prisoner came up to me and drew the bag out of my pocket. He is the younger Read; It was a leather bag, and the string of it was hanging out of my breeches pocket. He ran away; I ran after him; he ran into the field; I followed him, and the bigest Read knocked me down; the two Read's were together at first. I can't speak to the name of Downes; I did not see him. I never saw my bag or token again. I sell cakes, and was going to buy them with this token.

GETHRO VIEL . I live near Globe Academy, Bethnal-Green . I saw the prosecutor and the two Read's come by the passage, as near one o'clock as possible. I did not know the Reads before; the elder Read I swear to; but I don't swear to the little boy. I saw the elder Read knock down the prosecutor in the field; I saw the little one ran away at the same time.

THOMAS SANBURY . I apprehended the prisoners.

THOMAS READ , GUILTY , aged 12.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

MATTHEW READ , GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

DOWNES, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-21

198. ROBERT MILES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Mountford in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, chain, seal and key, value 5l. his property .

RICHARD MOUNTFORD . I am a gunpowdermaker , and was passing by the turnpike, Shoreditch , at about half past eight at night, with my watch in my pocket; just as I got between the posts, I felt both a man's hands put to my back, griping me. Perceiving that I turned myself round to take him by the collar, and said, "you scoundrel, there is room enough, "he made a spring, and I felt my watch go from me; there were several persons with him. This man's person I recollect. They all ran off. I pursued them myself to the end of Church-street, Bethnal Green. In consequence of this, I went that night to Armstrong, and gave a description of the man who had robbed me. I lost my watch on the Wednesday, and saw him on the Wednesday following at the public office, Worship-street. He was in custody and had a white apron, and was in the same dress he is now.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer belonging to Worship-street, and apprehended the prisoner by the description. He was searched, but nothing mas found upon him.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I know no more than that.

Defence. I was at home on the night of the robbery; but am taken at such a nouplus that I could not bring my friend to prove it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-22

199. JOHN BOWERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Barber , in the King's highway, on the 31st January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3l. his property .

JOHN BARBER . I am servant to Major Willis, and I went into a public house with my brother, and we had a glass of liquor a-piece at the bar. As we came out of the house the prisoner followed us; and as I crossed the road in Wentworth-street to go to another public-house, my watch was drawn out of my fob by the prisoner at the bar. I was standing still just at the moment, with my hands in my breeches pocket, speaking to my brother who was standing in front of me, and the prisoner came on my right hand. When

I missed my watch the prisoner ran away with it. I did not do any thing. I stood still in the street until my brother ran after him, and sang out, stop thief!

THOMAS BARBER . I am the brother of the last witness. I had seen the prisoner with a good many with him, but he was not sitting at all in our company in the public-house. As we came out several followed us. We crossed over the way, and we were standing at the other side when they came up to us. The prisoner came by my brother's side, and snatched the watch out of his pocket. I ran after the prisoner immediately, and halloed Stop thief! The man who came up to us with the prisoner ran after me. I had the prisoner in my view all the time I was running after me. There might be about four or five come up to me. I did not see or hear the prisoner speak to any of them. I caught the prisoner, and called the watch. The watch has never been recovered.

RICHARD NUTTER . I am a watchman. I stpped the prisoner, hearing the cry of stop thief, and seeing him running; it was on the 31st of January last. The prisoner said he had not got the watch, and I might search him if I pleased. I did felt the outsides of his pockets; but could not feel any thing."I took him to the watch-house, where he was searched; but nothing found on him.

WILLIAM LOCKE . I am headborough of the parish of Christ Church. On the night of the 31st of January, the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse on a charge of robbing John Barber of his watch. I searched him; but could find nothing of the kind about him. There are bars looking into the street in the place where we locked him up, and the next day. I heard a cry of "Jack, Jack, twice;" it proceeded from the street, and then I heard the same person say "have you got the watch; the prisoner replied no; but somebody else (whose name he pronounced so low that I could not hear it.) had got it; but if he went to Mr. Spooner's who occupied a chandler's shop, nearly opposite the Star in Wentworth-street, where the robbery was committed, and see Mr. Spooner, to tell him if inquiries should be made about him, to say, that he had worked for him, and had not left his work five minutes at the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. No one heard this conversation but myself.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealig from the person, but not of the assault .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160214-23

200. JOHN HUSSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , twenty-seven yards of cloth, value 50s. the property of Samuel Minton , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL MINTON . I live at No. 19, in the Minories . This happened on the 17th of January, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I went into the yard, almost opposite the shop door. I heard the shop door open; I went back into the shop as speedily as I could; I saw the prisoner at the bar with a piece of cloth on his shoulder, which he immediately threw down. I caught hold of him by the coat and waistcoat, and he made an ineffectual struggle to get from me. In the struggle, he broke two windows. I brought him into the house myself.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I took the prisoner into custody, and took him to the watchhouse.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-24

201. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , one spencer value 10s. one coat, value 2l. the property of Henry Hoffham ; and one coat, value 2l. the property of Philip Nonnett , in the dwelling-house of the said Henry Hoffham .

HENRY HOFFHAM . I am a broker , and live in Vine-street, Minories ; that is my private dwelling-house. I lost these things from that house between nine and ten last Thursday morning; they were taken out of the hall.

CATHERINE BECKET . I am servant to Mr. Hoffman. I heard the door shut at about nine o'clock last Thursday morning; it had been open. I went to the hall, and missed the coats and spencer immediately; I went to the door, and saw two men running with the things. The prisoner dropped the spencer, and I ran after him; I secured him, and brought him back to my master's house. I am sure he is the man; I saw him with the spencer, and I saw him throw it down.

JOHN HAGARTY . I attempted to stop the other man; but he got away.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a man running along with a bundle, and he dropped this spencer, which I picked up, and then I threw it down and ran away.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-25

202. BARNET LEVI was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , ten pairs of silk stockings, value 5l. the property of Daniel Pitt , privately in his shop .

DANIEL PITT . I am a hosier , and live in Fenchurch-street . On Friday last, at a little before eight at night, my lad was shutting up the shop; I was backwards in the parlour, and I saw the prisoner struggling with the lad, who was trying to prevent his gitting from behind the counter; he pushed the lad down, but shop was close to the street door, the lad gave the alarm of stop thief, and the prisoner was almost immediately brought back again. The stockings in question were removed from the shelf where they had been, and were on the ground under the counter, where the prisoner had left them.

WILLIAM JOSIAH ALLEN . I was going along Fenchurch-street, and I saw the prisoner enter Mr. Pitt's shop; he had no hat on; I waited a short time, not knowing but the prisoners belonged to the shop, and then I went about my business. When I had

got about thirty yards, I heard the cry of stop thief; I perceived the prisoner running in the direction which I was going, and I met him, and tripped him up, and look him back.

JESSE TARRANT . I am a servant to Mr. Pitt. As I was shutting up the shop at about eight o'clock on the night in the indictment, I observed the shadow of a man when I was outside, going towards the shelves; it caught my attention, and I looked behind the counter, and saw the prisoner there; I called my master, and the prisoner sprang against me, as I had a shutter in my hand, and pushed me with the shutter down, and with an endeavour to stop him, I knocked his hut off. I pursued him, crying stop thief, and in a minute afterwards he was brought back.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating his various services on board's numerous list of ships in the inte American War, and that on the evening of the 9th of February, he was passing by Mr. Pitt's door, and some drunking sailors sky-larking took off his hat, and threw it into Mr. Pitt's shop, behind his counter, and that in his attempting to recover it, he presumed he must have knocked the stockings down, and the fear of being taken into custody innocently, and for no real criminal cause, when the cry of stop thief was raised against him, made him run.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-26

203. JOHN ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , five pounds weight of mutton, value 2s. 6d. the property of Thomas Haggar .

THOMAS HAGGAR . I am a butcher , living in Watling-street . I lost my mutton on the 19th of January, I was in the shop at about seven o'clock in the evening; I turned round, and missed two breasts of mutton; they were in the window; I went out directly, and saw the man that I supposed had taken them; and I followed him into Bow-lane, just round the corner; he threw them down, and ran as fast as he could, and I called out stop thief; the patrole caught him; but another man came up, and hit the patrole by the side of the head, so that he was obliged to let him go. He was followed into Milk-street, and taken there, and I am sure he is the man whom I saw with the mutton; I had seen him about in the neighbourhood.

JOHN BUNTING . I am a linen-draper. On the 10th of January, about a quarter after seven in the evening, I heard a cry of stop thief; and I saw a man running through the yard; I immediately pursued him, and when I got into the court which leads into M-street, I found he was stopped by two gentlemen. After going a few paces towards the watch-house, something dropped from the prisoner, and on picking it up, it was an iron instrument there in crow.

ROBERT LOUDON . I am a patrole. Going along Bow-lane I saw three men, of whom the prisoner was one, whom I suspected. They separated while I was watching their motions. I heard a cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner run. I secured him, though but slightly by the collar. As soon as I laid hold of him, I received a violent blow on the back of my neck, which forced me on the payment; by that means the prisoner escaped, but was afterwards apprehended.

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I know no more than taking the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. Going along Bow-lane, I was in a crowd, I was running among a good many others, and some gentleman stopped me.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-27

204. FREDERICK CLEMENT BAWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , two coats, value 3l. the property of Lyon Levi .

LYON LEVI. I live at 29, Holywell-street, in the Strand; I am a tailor and clothes-salesman . The prisoner at the bar came to my house, and purchased two coats; but he said he could not take them away that night; but he would call for them in the morning; he did not pay for them that night, and he called at about three o'clock the next day, when I was out.

MOSES MOSES . I am servant to Mr. Levi. I was ordered to go with the prisoner to receive the money for the two coats, which was three pounds fifteen shillings. When he came to Fleet-street, the prisoner took a coach, and drove to Bishopsgate-street ; when we got there, we went up a passage to the Bull-inn; where the prisoner took the bundle from me, and said he would bring me the money. I waited not hardly a minute, and I did not see him again. I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The coats were not sold by my master to him. I was carrying them for my master, and when the prisoner gave me the money, I was to give him the coats. The prisoner spoke bad English. I don't understand Dutch. We stopped at the Bull-inn, and not at the Green Dragon.

JOHN HODSON . I searched the prisoner, and found a good many bills of parcels on him.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declairing the whole to be the effect of accident, and not of criminal design.

GUILTY , aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-28

205. FREDERICK CLEMENT BAWERS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, a coat, value 2l. the property of Judah Moses .

JUDAH MOSES . I live in Russel-court . On the 29th of January , the prisoner at the bar came to my house, between two and three o'clock in the day, he bargained for a great coat for two pounds, and he requested. I would go with him to get the money; but has it was a very cold day, he requested I would permit him to put it on, which I did, and while I went up stairs for a minute, he ran away, and I saw no more of him until I heard he was in custody

GUILTY , aged 19.

It now appeared on the part of the prisoner from the testimony of Captain William Gowing , of the County India ship, that the prisoner was the son of the Decountant General of Batavia a person of immense property, and that Captain Gowing had the charge of him to bring him to England and had orders to advance any sums of money on his account. On the Captain's promissing to see that he should be sent back to Batavia as soon as possible, the Court sentenced him,)

Fined 1s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-29

206. HENRY SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , one piece of ferret containing thirty-six yards, value 4s. 6d. two pieces of tape, containing twelve yards, value 6d. and forty-seven buttons, value 7s. the property of John Jacks and Isaac Picket .

ISAAC PICKETT . I live at No. 2, White Lion-court, Cornhill ; my partner's name is John Jacks . I am a tailor and draper . We lost a considerable quantity of ferret, and the prisoner was detected on the 26th.

THOMAS PINN . I am foreman to Messrs. Jacks and Pickett. In consequence of having missed some articles before, I requested my employers to take an account of the things under my charge; I accordingly did so on the evening of the 25th of January. On the 26th at nine o'clock in the morning, I found all right. The prisoner at the bar had not then arrived. Having a suspicion of him, I left the room when he had arrived. On my return, I missed a piece of ferret. In the mean time the prisoner having been sent out by Mr. Pickett. I went down and told my employers. and I was sent after him; he had been out some time, and we supposed he must have made away with it. I brought him back; Mr. Pickett told me to take no notice. As the prisoner was trying one coat we had made his own coat layed on the cutting-board, and I put my hand into the pocket of it, and found the things mentioned in the indictment. We missed such things as are mentioned by the indictment; but I can't swear to them.

(Property produced.)

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined three montns , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-30

207. LAWRENCE DA VOVEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , one trunk, value 25s. the property of Thomas Lane and Ann Billing .

THOMAS LANE . I live at 74, St. Paul's church-yard ; I am a trunk-maker . On the 15th of January, I missed a portmanteau, and on the 16th I went and fetched it from the place where I was told it was.

JAMES READ . I am foreman to the procecutors. I saw the portmanteau on the 16th, in Cow Cross, at a broker's shop, as I was passing. We had lost an article of that description, and it struck me as the one we lost. I asked the price of it, merely for the sale of inspecting it; the price asked was a guides, and I showed it was our's. On my return to St. Paul's I informed Mr. Lane, and he went and got it.

Thomas Lane I went to Romaine's shop, in Cow Cross, and brought away the trunk; I knew it to be mine.

AUGUSTA ROMAINE . My husband keeps a broker's shop in Cow Cross. I remember purchasing that trunk of the prisoner for four shillings.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-31

208. JOHN SIMMONS and GEORGE CRIBB were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , two sacks, value 2s. the property of William Maidlow ; one sack, value 1s. the property of John Bovill , senior, and others; and six bushels of oath, value 1l. the property of William Maidlow , And JOHN BAMBER was indicted for receiving them on the same day, knowing them to be stolen .

THEOBALD COULING . On the 15th of January, I saw the prisoners Simmons and Cribb, bring two sacks of oats and take them down into the cellar of No. 18, Swan-yard , that is John Bamber 's cellar I saw Bamber in his cellar along with them when they were down. They then went up with him into the parlour, and he asked his wife for a one-pound note, which he gave to them. When they were afraid of being discovered, they hid the sacks in the drain, and under the water-butt.

WILLIAM ELTON . I delivered twenty-five quartens of oats to Messrs. Bovill and Co. I hired Cribb to go for me, and Simmons went with the early; when we got there, I put the horses nose hagsion, and left them to deliver the sacks, as I felt very ill, I went to get something warm to drink.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. On the 27th of January, I went to the prisoner Bambeth house, in search of stolen property, but not this; and I found two wet sack marked Maidlow in the the cellar, and two sacks of oats under the bed I took Bamber to his stable and there I found a third sack, marked with the initials of Messer. Bovill and Co.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-32

209. AMEE , a Lascar, was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of February , one roll of flannel, value 20s. the property of Robert Dawson , privately in this shop .

JAMES MORDUN . I am shopman to Mr. Dawson who lives at No. 128, Ratcliffe-highway , he is a haberdasher ; I saw the flannel in question about an hour before it was missed. It was standing at the door within the threshold. I did not see any body in the shop. The first notice I had, was by man coming in, and in consequence of some thing he said to me himself the flannel, and I went along Ratcliffe-highway. At the corner of Cannon-street, I received some information; and turning round the corner to go into Back-lane, I saw the prisoner with the roll of flannel under his arm; I am sure it was

the prisoner. He dropped the flannel, and ran into Mr. Gald's barracks it is the East India Company's barrack or depot, where these men are kept. I saw a man pick up the flannel, and I went to Mr. Gale's House Mr. Gale delivered the prisoner to me. I I am sure the man Mr. Gale delivered to me was that man who dumpt flannel, (flannel produced) that is the flannels I know it to be my master's.

Q. Do you know it to be your masters, from any other reason, than you missed a piece of flannel from your master's shop - A. No, I had not measured the quantity of the piece that was lost, not do I know the quantity.

JOHN BROWN . I know no more this taking charge of the prisoner and the flannel.

Prisoner's Defece, (by interpretation.) I went into the shop to buy a pair of stockings, but did not steal the flannel.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-33

210. WILLIAM WATKINS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Yates , in the king's highway, on the 23rd of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, chain, seals, and key, value 13l. his property.

JOHN YATES . I live at Whitehaven. A little after four o'clock, on the 23rd of January, as I was turning round the corner of Holles-street , into Cadish-square, a man ran against my breast and begged my pardon; I was surprized at this thing, and he immediately went on my right side; I went on two or three steps and then looked down and put my hand and missed my watch. I turned round immediately, and said that man has stolen my watch; stop him, stop him; I supposed that the man who was going from me, was the man who ran against me; but I did not know; I saw him walking across Holden-street very deliberately; but I believe he afterwards went faster as I saw my watch afterwards; I could not come up with him.

JOHN SAVAGE . On the 23rd of January, I was coming across Cavendish-square, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and I met Mr. Yates coming towards me; he was much agitated, as if some body had been hustling him, or had run against him. I fancy I met him the moment after he had been run against. He advanced a few steps forward, and exclaimed, I have lost my watch; I asked him who took it; and he turned round and pointed to the prisoner, who was crossing Holles-street, and said, I think that is the man who has got it. The prisoner was then near the corner of Holles-street with two other men; I advanced towards them and they separated, and the prisoner went: across the street and then said what is the matter sir: what is the matter sir, and as I got near to him, I observed him give something to the other man who was than standing on the pavement and I was perfectly satisfied it was the watch, though I did not actually see it. My attention was then called off the prisoner. and fixed upon the man who I supposed had the watch. The prisoner then slipped back behind me to the other side of Hollis-street. When this man observed my attention upon him, he immediately took the watch in a handkerchief, and threw it after the prisoner, saying, take it along with you, or words to that effect. I immediately picked up the watch, and pursued the prisoner at the bar, crying stop thief, and he was secured.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a sea-faring-man seventeen years I was taken prisoner in 1805, and last year we were distributed throughout France. On my arrival in England, after my money was exhausted, I fell in company with two men who had been captured with us; they told me that our Captain resided in Cavendish-square, and I asked at several houses, but could not find him. I was just in that neighbourhood on the purpose I have mentioned, when I was apprehended. To prove I am the person I represent, here is my discharge my lord.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-34

211. WILLIAM DAUE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th February , a piece of cotton handkerchiefs, value 10s. the property of Charles Hardy , privately in his shop .

CHARLES HARDY . I live in Ratcliffe Highway . On the 9th of February last, at about half past five in the evening, I had left my shop about three minutes, and my wife said she saw a man run away with the handkerchiefs. These handkerchiefs hung on a line with the door. I ran immediately, and saw the prisoner running about eight or ten doors off. I ran up to him, and heard a boy cry, stop thief, and the prisoner then quickened his pace. I still pursued him, and cried stop thief several times. At length he was stopped by Mr. Coney, and I insisted upon taking him back to my own house. I saw the handkerchiefs afterwards.

CHARLES CONEY . I am a stay and corset maker. On the 9th of February last, at about half past five in the evening, I was standing at my door, and heard a cry of stop thief! which drew my attention, and shortly after I observed a man running. I live about twenty doors from the prosecutor. He who was running was running in a direction from Mr. Hardy's house; in the middle of the road. The man in the middle of the road threw a parcel behind him, which struck me in the lip. I did not stop to pick it up; but pursued the prisoner. and took him and brought him back to Mr. Hardy's. Mr. Hardy was following me.

GEORGE NEWBERY . I am apprenticed to Mr. Smith. On the 9th of February last, I saw a crowd near my master's, and I went into it and saw a man with these handkerchiefs in his possession. They were not in a paper. My master came out and enquired into it, and he sent me with the handkerchiefs to the prosecutor's.

Defence. I have been to sea 25 years, and in quite innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160214-35

212. BENJAMIN JOSE was indicted for

feloniously assaulting Thomas Donaldson in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, chain, seal and key, value 9l. 6d. the goods of the said Thomas Donaldson .

THOMAS DONALDSON . I lost my watch last Thursday, the 11th of this month, at about ten o'clock at night. I was at the top of St. Catherine's lane , speaking to a woman, and the prisoner and another man came up to me. The other man came right against me, gave me a shove, and the prisoner clicked the watch out of my pocket. They ran both down St. Catherine's lane, side by side, for ten or fifteen yards. I followed them, and cried "Stop thief!" and then one took one side of the way, and the other took the other side. I pursued the prisoner, and never lost sight of him until he was stopped by the patrole. It was a bright moonlight night. I did not see any thing given by one to the other. It was the prisoner clicked my watch out of my pocket, when the other ran against me. He was searched, but nothing was found upon him.

JOHN CORBYN . I am the patrole of St. Catherine's, and stopped the prisoner, hearing the cry of Stop thief! He was running, and had his shoes and his hat off.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined a shilling , and imprisoned six months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160214-36

213. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th January , two waistcoats, value 10s. the goods of Mark Moore .

WILLIAM GOODYER I am shopman to the prosecutor. I was in the shop on the 27th January, between eight and nine, with another person named Jenkins, and I saw a man come to the door, and put his arm in and snatch two waistcoats. He had on a sort of fustain or carpenter's jacket; and seeing him take the waistcoats, I called out, and a person followed him. I ran out immediately, and found the waistcoats in two several places. The farthest was not more than six yards from the door, and the nearest about four yards, or four and a half. I did nothing more, as there was nobody else to attend to the shop.

CHARLES JENKINS . I was in Mr. Moore's shop. I was conversing with the shopman, and he called out to me, "the waistcoats!" and I looked round, and saw the waistcoats moving. I only saw one man running. I went to the door immediately, and saw one waistcoat lie. and a man running. I saw another waistcoat drop from his person about six or seven yards from the shop. I pursued the man and took him. I took him almost immediately, for he stumbled over a step. He had not gone a dozen yards. It was the prisoner. I took him back to Mr. Moore's shop. (Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN LONGMAN . The prisoner was delivered into my charge.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Fined 1s. and imprisoned a month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-37

214. EDWARD CHAMBERS HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th January , a quilt, value 10s. the property of Edward Granger .

CATHERINE GRANGER . I am the wife of Edward Granger , and live at 87, New Gravel-lane . About nine or ten in the morning of the 15th of January, I had a bed quilt taken from me, out of a bed in our house. It was down stairs in a room adjoining to the bed room. I had not been in that room that day. It was not locked. The prisoner brought the bundle down stairs, and put it on the table. He was a lodger in my house for five nights. He slept in a two pair of stairs room adjoining the one from which the quilt was stolen. He asked me if I knew where he could get his jacket and trowsers mended; and I told him there was a woman next door who could mend them. One of my lodgers gave me some information about what the prisoner did at Mr. Lawson's, and in consequence of that I went there and saw my quilt.

JOHN CASTLE . On the morning the prisoner took the property away from my landlady's, I went to Mr. Lawson's, the public house. I had not been there half an hour before the prisoner came in with a bundle, and I heard him request Mr. Lawson to take care of it. Mr. Lawson asked him what it was? and and I heard him mention the word quilt; and in conquence of this, I gave information to my landlady.

JAMES LAWSON . The prisoner at the bar came into my house between nine and ten o'clock, on the 15th of January, and asked me to let him leave a bundle there. I asked him what it contained? and he said a jacket and a quilt; a handkerchief was on the outside of the bundle. He said he was going to the Docks, and he would come and fetch it at four o'clock. I let him leave it. I sent the last witness down to the woman to let her know of it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18160214-38

215. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a hat, value 6s. the property of William Ayres .

THOMAS FLETCHER . I am a carpenter. On the 1st of this month, as I was coming down Smithfield , about eight o'clock in the evening, and I saw the prisoner make several attempts to get into Mr. Ayres's shop; at last he went in, and brought out a hat covered over with paper; I followed him up Holborn-hill, and he crossed over towards Field-lane, when I seized him, and brought him back to Mr. Ayres's shop.

WILLIAM LEE . I produce the hat, it has been in my possession ever since the prisoner was delivered into my charge.

MICHAEL CANNON . I am shopman to Mr. Ayres, and know that to be his property.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-39

216. JOHN PAXMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January . one hundred and seventy-nine pounds weight of silk, value 450l.

the property of Mary Meadow , and Thomas Castle Meadows .

THOMAS CASTLE MEADOWS . I live in Princes-street, Spitalfields . On Sunday, the 28th of January last, I was called by my apprentice, William Paxman ; I went immediately into the dye-house, and I observed I had lost property in silk, part raw, and part in a state of forwardness for dying, to the amount of four hundred fifty pounds. I had seen it safe in the scaining-room as late as six or seven o'clock on the Saturday evening. Afterwards I saw some of my silk at Worship-street office; it was shewn to me by Ray, the officer. I knew the prisoner before; he had nothing to do with our dye-house whatever.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I had not seen our warehouse between six and seven o'clock. I had seen the prisoner from his coming to see a brother of his in my service; my knowledge of him only arises from that.

WILLIAM PAXMAN . I am apprenticed to Mr. Meadows; I live in his house. On Saturday night, the 27th of last month, I left Mr. Meadows's premises at about seven o'clock; they were fastened. I left a lad at work in the yard. I staid out until ten o'clock; I came home then; I came to Mr. Meadow's dwelling-house; all was safe at that time. After I put the dog in the dye-house, I went to bed. I got up at about twenty minutes before seven on Sunday morning; the dye-house was all safe then; I locked it, and carried the keys in again. I then went down to the Plough, at Mile-end, where was to meet the prisoner at the bar; I went along Brick-lane, that is about three hundred yards from where my master lives; I looked at a cart going along, but I can't say righty whether there was any thing in it. I returned home at about nine o'clock. I met my brother at the Plough; from the Plough, I went to my father's house; he lives about a quarter of a mile, or not quite so much, from Mr. Meadow's. I left my brother at the corner of Old Montague-street, he saying, that he was going into Whitechapel; that is about two hundred yards from my master's, and I went to breakfast at my master's. I then found the gate of the yard open; I found the dye-house open, and the scaining-room door was open; that opens out of the dye-house. I did not miss any thing; I looked into two drawers, but they were empty; but I did not know whether there had been any thing in them; they were a little way open. I can't say whether they were open when I went out. I had seen some of the silk on Saturday night as late as half past six. When I came home to breakfast the next morning, I looked round, but did not think at first of looking for this wet silk; but afterwards I recollected I had put it into the boxes, and had seen it there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. The prisoner is my brother. He came backwards and forwards to Mr. Meadows's; he has told me he was a fisherman . The reason I know it was half past six was because I heard the watchman cry it. I returned again before nine, but not so early by my master's desire; I went out for the day; I had no particular orders from my master to return so soon. I know it was nine when I returned, by the clock in Mr. Meadows's yard. I went to my father's with my brother before nine. The getting into the dye-house would take a great deal of time; it would have required a considerable deal of time; there is a door between the dye-houses; the door from the dye-houses to the scaining-room, was locked, and the key taken into Mr. Meadows's parlour.

STEPHEN ABBOT . I saw the prisoner at the bar in my master's premises. When first I saw him it was before six o'clock, when he came to see his brother. I did not see him again until after six. Going by the coppers. I heard a noise; there is a place down some steps below for the ashes; and going in there, I saw the prisoner in this place; I said, whose there, and he came out of a corner, and he said it is me, and he said he went there to ease himself. He followed me up out of the stoke-hole, and he went to go towards the necessary; that is in the black dye-house, and this place where he was concealed was down some steps in the stoke-hole, I offered him the candle, which he refused, saying, he could see. The black-dye house was not shut up at that time. I know of my own knowledge that the prisoner had been to the necessary, and knew where it was; if he had any such call as he mentioned, he knew the place to go to. I don't know when he went out of Mr. Meadows's house. I left the premises at half after six. This stoke-hole is where the fire-places are, where the fires are lighted under the coppers. I had a light, and thinking I heard a foot, I asked who was there, and he came forward, and spoke to me; I only saw two or three buttons of the lower part of his waistcoat undone. The necessary was at the other end of the dye-house.

JOHN RAY . I am one of the City officers. On the Sunday morning, at about eight o'clock, as I was scraping my shoes at my own door, I saw the prisoner coming down the passage facing; this place might be half a mile from Mr. Meadows's. He had a largish bundle under his arm, tied up in a spotted handkerchief; as he perceived me, he rather shyed and turned his head; his manner was such as to excite suspicion in me. I went towards him; he threw down the bundle, and away he ran. I then picked up the bundle, and took it to my own house. I did not open the bundle before. I saw the prisoner on the Sunday evening; I was sent for to Mr. Meadows's house; I have not the least doubt of the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I did not know him before. He might be as far from me, as from me to you sir; he had a blue jacket and trowsers on. The reason I did not pursue him instead of picking up the bundle was because I might have lost both.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. Ray brought this bundle to me on Monday morning, at the office. He gave me a discription of the man, and said he should know him from a hundred. I and Gleed apprehended the prisoner on the 29h, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, at the Queen Catherine, Brook-street, Ratcliffe, the brother being with me. This chissel was given to me by Mr. Meadows, on the Sunday that the robbery was

committed, in the morning. I found on the prisoner a one-pound note, a silver watch, some silver, two knives, and a key; the silver I returned to him; but the other things were kept to come here.

SARAH PAXTON , a witness for the prosecution, not appearing, was called on her recognizance.

REBECCA HANSON . I keep the Queen Catherine public-house. The prisoner had lodged with me for about three weeks, before the 27th. He left my house about ten days before the 27th. He came to me on the 28th; he owed me three pounds and some halfpence; he came between four and five in the afternoon, and he gave me four one-pound notes, and I gave him the change. He was at my house when the officers took him into custody.

Mr. Meadows. I took at this silk in the bundle produced by John Ray ; I know it by the manner in which it is done up, and by the ticket; it was hanging up by the door in the scaining-room; the ticket has on it certain marks, which mean that it came on the 23rd of January, from Messrs. Haddyman and Company, and was to be dyed black; it weighed seven pounds thirteen ounces. I saw this ticket on it on the Saturday night previous to its being stolen. This is a very small part of what has been lost.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

JOHN GODDARD . The prisoner quitted my house after seven o'clock on the Sunday morning, and my house is in the Pack-road, St. George's Fields; he came to my house again at a little after eleven, and dined with me, and stopped with me, until after two o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. He came there on the Saturday night, we had some bread and cheese for supper; we had some porter; I went out for the porter. I sell coffee. I work at the water-side. I have seen the prisoner work also, and I believe he lodged a long time at the Queen Catherine.

SARAH GODDARD . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner lodged at our house on the night of Saturday, the 27th of January; he went away at half past seven in the morning to meet his brother, and returned again at eleven, and ataid and dined with us.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. I made a bed up for him on Saturday night; we had some bread and cheese for supper; but nothing to drink; my husband never went out.

Re-examined by Mr. Andrews. Q. Did not your husband go out to fetch any thing home - A. He did not.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-40

217. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th January , four shirts, value 1l. two gowns, value 1l. 5s. one peticoat, value 3s. one frock, value 2s. two window curtains, value 1s. two pillow cases, value 3s. one table-cloth, value 2s. 6d. five handkerchiefs, value 10s. one pair of stockings, value 2s. one pocket, value 6d. one pair of stays, value 3s. and one box, value 1s. the property of Francis Dance .

ANN DANCE . My husband's name is Francis, He is a labourer . I lost these things on the 10th of January. I am a laundress living at Peckham, and these things were taken out of my cart in Thames-street , at the bottom of Martin's lane.

JOHN PEDLINGHAM . I am a smith. I saw the prisoner take a box out of the cart which was standing at the bottom of Martin's lane, in Thames-street. I think it was about noon. I am sure it was the prisoner.

Prisoner. He said before the Lord-Mayor that he was in doubt.

Witness. I said no such thing.

WILLIAM STONE . I saw the prisoner at the bar take the box out of the cart. He walked off with it, and I followed him until he was taken. I lost sight of him for a moment while he turned the corner. When I saw him again he had not the box. He had dropped it. I ran by the box and pursued him. I am sure he is the man; I am positive of it.

JOHN RINTON . I am a shoemaker, and saw the prisoner in possession of the box in Thames-street, and he went up Lawrence Pountney lane. He dropped the box, which I passed and went after him.

WILLIAM LYON . I am an officer. I produce the box (producing it). I was in Bush-lane about one o'clock in the day-time, and I saw the prisoner come running from Cross-lane. He crossed Bush-lane into Scott's Yard, where I secured him. There is no thoroughfare in Scott's Yard.

WILLIAM WYNCH . I was the driver of the cart, and left it at the top of St. Martin's lane, while I went up to No. 22 with a box of clean clothes. When I came back the box was gone. I had been in the cart behind the seat.

(Property sworn to.)

Defence. I was passing at the time, and the man threw the box certainly very near me; but I certainly did not steal it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18160214-41

218. JOSEPH BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th February , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Robert Combes , from his person .

ROBERT COMBES . I am a clerk in the Bank of England . I lost my handkerchief on the 6th February, in Cornhill , at about a quarter before five in the afternoon. I was looking into a bookseller's shop under the Royal Exchange. I felt something at my coat pocket, and on putting my hand to it. I missed my pocket handkerchief. I turned round, and saw a boy run round the corner. I ran after him. On Cornhill he dropped the handkerchief. I followed him through Change Alley into Lombard-street, and in Abchurch-lane somebody stopped him. I took him immediately to the Mansion-house, and left him in custody of the officers. I am satisfied he is the boy.

JOHN CLARE . This is the handkerchief(producing it) which the prosecutor said he lost.

(Handkerchief sworn to.)

The prisoner made a long and ingenious defence, denying his guilt.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-42

219. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th January , from the person of John Dunn , one watch, value 3l. one ring, value 8s. one watch key, value 10s. five Bank notes for payment of 10l. each, and value 50l. and five other Bank notes for 1l. each, and value 5l. the property of the said John Dunn .

JOHN DUNN . I lost all this property on the 18th January. I lost it at about a quarter before eleven at night. I was coming from the West end of the town, and coming along Newgate-street, I stopped at the corner of St. Martin's le Grand for a few minutes. During the period I was stopping there, this Elizabeth Taylor came up to me. I came through a court out of St. Martin's le Grand into Foster-lane , and stopped talking to the prisoner in the court for about five minutes. I did not go into any house there. She took my watch out of my pocket, and ran off directly. I followed her, and I lost sight of her going round the corner. I can't say she took my money. I saw no more of her. I had that money when I came past St. Sepulchre's church. I did not speak to any one but the prisoner. I never found my notes again. They had been in my small clothes pocket. There is a great intricacy about the courts there. I am sure she is the woman. She was taken up the second day after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I am twentynine years old. It was not a frequent practice for me to carry so much money about me. I am a labourer . My breeches were not unbuttoned, to my knowledge.

Q. When you felt her draw the watch out, as you say, why did you not seize her before she went from you - A. I had not power to lay hold of her. I was about five minutes with her. I did not tell the watchman I missed my notes. I then went straight home, for fear I should lose my situation. I had received these notes from my sister to purchase Stock for her. She sent them on the 17th, and I lost them on the 18th. Nobody in London knew of my possession of them. I had been up to see a person of the name of Kinzey, in New Bond-street; but he did not live there; and coming back, I stopped in my way in Brook-street, Holborn, at the Three Tuns. I had a pint of porter to drink, and I was perfectly sober when I came out.

THOMAS PRESSTIDGE . I am an officer of the city. In consequence of an application from Dunn, the prosecutor; I and Turnpenny went after the prisoner. The prosecutor gave as a description of her, and then we knew we had frequently seen her about St. Martin's Le Grand. We went in search of her, and found she lived in Willow-court, Willow-street, Curtain-road. We found her in bed; this was on the 20th of January, at eleven o'clock in the morning. I informed her of the charge that was against her. She denied all knowledge of it. We searched the premises, and found as many as sixty duplicates; some for watches, but none of them of the prosecutor's. Her husband was not at home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. The prosecutor said he had seen another woman, and we apprehended her; but she said she had seen nothing of the transaction.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-43

219. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing on the 12th of February , twenty-five yards of ribbon, value 12s. the property of Wynn Ellis and William Browne .

WYNN ELLIS . I live at No. 15, Ludgate-hill , and lost these ribbons on Monday last, at half past three; the prisoner at the bar came into our shop and took them out of my drawer; she asked to look at some black ribbons, and the drawer was shewn to her, and she contrived to take a piece of ribbon, and convey her hand from the drawer behind her, and into her pocket; I saw her hand go from the drawer into her pocket, and at the same time she paid three-pence with the other hand, for a yard which she had cut from another piece. I desired my young man to follow her and being her to the private door, and I went round to the private door and let him and her in. She made considerable efforts to get her hand into her pocket; but we prevented her. We sent for an officer who searched her in a private room. She said if we were men we would turn our heads aside; the officer then informed me he could find nothing on her; I wished him to take her to the Compter as a suspicious character, feeling convinced that she was a suspicious character; in about half an hour after she was gone we found a leather pocket with the piece of ribbon in it in a snuff-box, in the room where she was searched; the snuff-box was mine.

JAMES SAMPSON . I am journeyman to Messrs. Ellis and Browne; I saw the prisoner between three and four o'block on Monday afternoon; she being a woman that we had long suspected, we were more particular in watching her motions. She was purchasing a piece of black ribbon. I went from behind the counter, into the middle of the shop, and plainly perceived her hand go directly from the ribbon drawer into her pocket. From her motions I concluded that she had put a piece into her pocket; but that was merely suspicion at that time. When she went out, I followed her by my master's desire, and brought her back before she had got twenty yards, After she was searched Mr. Ellis missed a piece of ribbon.

(Pocket and ribbon produced.)

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-44

320. DANIEL SUMMERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d February , one pig's head, value 2s. 6d. the property of Banford Chandler .

JOHN WORSTER CHANDLER. I am shopman to my father, who is a butcher in Newgate market . I lost this pig's head on Saturday, February 3d, about eight o'clock in the morning. All I know of it is, that the prisoner at the bar was brought to me with the head in his possession. I know nothing of the taking of it.

ROBERT HARVEY . I am a butcher. I saw the prisoner at the bar take the head off the board, and carry it away, and I stopped him. I followed him

about twenty yards, and then stopped him. I took him back to Mr. Chandler's where he took it from.

THOMAS GILL . I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-45

221. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a pair of shoes, value 5s. the property of Alexander Wilson .

JOHN MARCHANT . I lived in January, at Mr. Wilson's, on Holborn-hill ; I was shopman to him at that time. On the 19th of January, between nine and ten in the morning, the prisoner at the bar came to the shop door, and took the shoes off two nails outside the door, just by the step of the door; he immediately ran away up Union-court, and I pursued him. He dropped one shoe, and I took the other from under his coat when I apprehended him.

WILLIAM LEE . I took the prisoner and the property into custody.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-46

222. THOMAS BERRY , JOHN SULLIVAN , and JANE ENGLAND , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a box of figs, value 1l. 15s. the property of William Smith , Francis Kemble , and others.

To this indictment the prisoner Sullivan, pleaded

GUILTY .

JOHN HORR . I am warehouse-man to Messrs. Smith, Kemble, and Company. On the evening of the day in the indictment, different articles of grocery, and among them the box in question, were put into our waggon, to be conveyed to different persons.

JOHN TUBB . I am waggoner to Messrs. Smith, Kemble, and Company. This box was put into the waggon at about three o'clock, in the fore part of the waggon, on the near side; it could be seen by any body all the way.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. It could not fall out.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I was an officer; but am not so now, on account of the new regulation of the police. On the evening of the 1st of February, I saw the prisoners Berry and Sullivan with another man, and a cart going along Holborn. In the course of the evening, they were joined by the prisoner Jane England , and a man; I saw them at the bottom of King-street, Holborn; they had a horse and cart. Sullivan and Berry attempted several waggons; but England kept close by the horse and cart; it was a little kind of a costermonger's cart. The fourth person I lost sight of shortly afterwards. Their horse and cart stood on the near side of Holborn. When the prosecutor's waggon was coming along. Berry and Sullivan made up to the waggon, and looked into it, and then came and spoke to the third man and England. Their horse's head was then turned round, and Sullivan went to the off side of the waggon, and kept close to the tail of it. After following it some time, I observed somebody on the tailboard; the moment the cart came to Smart's-buildings , I found Sullivan had got a chest, and I immediately collared him, and instantly knocked the chest off his shoulder. and took him into custody, and England came up, and attempted to rescue him; I threatened England if she did not go away, that I would take her into custody. She said, what do you ill use the man for. I secured the man, and took England into custody. The next morning, I went with Furzeman after Berry, and apprehended him. I am quite sure of Berry's person; I could not be deceived, for I have known him so long.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer, and assisted in apprehending Berry.

(Chest produced, and sworn to.)

Berry's Defence. I was going to the corner for Mr. Watkins, and after I had been there, I went home, and put my horse and cart up, and I have been obliged to sell them to provide for this case, and I know nothing at all of the robbery.

England's Defence. I was going up High Holborn, and saw John Sullivan with two men with him, and they asked me if I would have any thing to drink, and I said yes, and I went into a shop with them, and had something, and then I parted with them. I then went into the cook-shop to have a bason of soup, and heard a noise outside; when I went out to see what was the matter, Mr. Barrett had John Sullivan, and was beating him, and when I spoke to him, he took me into custody.

SULLIVAN, GUILTY, aged 33.

BERRY, GUILTY , aged 28.

ENGLAND, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-47

223. SARAH PANTON was indicted for that she, on the 27th of January , at St. John, at Hampstead, was big with a certain female child, and that afterwards on the same day, by the Providence of God, the same child secretly from her body did deliver alive, and that child, by the laws of this realm, was a bastard, and that she did afterwards feloniously, wilfully, and of her malice aforethought, kill and murder the said bastard child .

THE FIRST COUNT, Stated that she killed it by cutting and wounding it with a knife.

THE SECOND COUNT, Stated that she killed it by striking and beating it with a piece of wood.

AND THE THIRD COUNT, Stated that she having been delivered of the child, put and placed it under a certain hedge, and down to and upon the ground in a certain open place, and that then she did desert, leave, and abandon it, unprotected and exposed to the cold and inclemency of the weather, without any covering or clothing, and without any food, sustenance, or nourishment; by means of which it became mortally weak and sick, of which mortal weakness and sickness it miserably perished and died; and that she, in manner and form last mentioned, the said female bastard child, feloniously, wilfully, and of her malice aforethought, did kill and murder.

GEORGE RODD . I am a surgeon, residing at

Hampstead. On Thursday, the 1st of this month, I went down to the neighbourhood of Kilburn for the purpose of seeing a child, it was a female child, and I found it lying at a chandler's shop, in Kilburn; I found one wound on the right cheek, extending completely from the mouth to the extremity of the jaw. I found another smaller wound on the neck, and on the opposite side, I found a smaller one; I found sevaral others on the head, which seemed as if they had been made by some blunt instrument, as if a stake had been forced on it. I found underneath these wounds, on the top of the scalp, that the scull had been fractured. From the appearance I believe it was necessary to use considerable violence in causing the wounds. The first wound on the jaw appeared to have been forcibly ript open; the scull was in that state of hardness to have required force to fracture it. I opened the child, and examined the lungs; they appeared to have been inflated; but that is certainly no criterion to judge whether the child was born alive. The appearance of the wound on the head would not have satisfied me that they had been inflicted on a living subject; but the wounds on the face and neck did satisfy me that they were. There was a small portion of blood had issured from the surface of the skin, which would not have been if the child had been dead at the time the wounds were inflicted. It is my belief and judgment, that the child was born alive.

Q. In your judgment and belief, did the wounds occasion the child's death - A. It is uncertain whether they would have occasioned instantaneous death; it is questionable to me, but the child might have lived after the wounds.

Q. Was its death, whether instantaneous or not, occasioned by that violence - A. I believe so.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. I have been settled in practice for some years; I have been much in that part of my profession called midwifery. I have seen many children that have been born dead; I never before saw any where the death was alledged to have arisen from violence. I first saw this child on the 1st of February; it had been found some days, and there were several small portions of blood on it.

Q. Can you swear whether that blood issued from the wounds or from the mother - A. I believe it issued from the wounds. From the appearance of all the wounds, as they were partly cut and partly torn. I think they were inflicted by a violent instrument.

Q. If a young woman, like the person at the bar, were prematurely delivered, might she not by accidentally putting her fingers into the mouth of the child, and in the agonies of labour, have inflicted every wound you saw on it - A. From some parts of the wounds, I think it is impossible that fingers could make them.

Q. Tell me why not the nails - A. The wounds on the head it is impossible.

Q. Why - A. The scull was evidently penetrated.

Q. Might not that have arisen from the fall of the child from a woman's person, in the act of delivering herself standing, or a stone, or a brick, or the hard ground - A. I should not think so; it was directly a penetrated wound.

Q. Will you exclude the possibility? do you mean to say it was impossible - A. I think so.

MR. BOLLAND. I will not trouble you upon the subject of the inflation of the lungs, being a proof of the child being born alive, because that fallacious doctrine has been long exploded by men of the greatest science in your profession.

THOMAS WEBBE . I am a surgeon belonging to the Cold Bath-fields prison. I was requested by Mr. Baker, to make an application to the prisoner, for the purpose of examining her person, to ascertain whether or not she had been recently delivered of a child. I went to her on the 2nd of February, and I observed to her that I was requested by the magistrate to examine her person, to ascertain whether she had been recently delivered of a child or not She burst into a flood of tears, and seemed to shew great reluctance to my doing so.

MR. BOLLAND. Before she imparted any thing to you, did you not tell her that what she said to you was in confidence, and would never be used against her? did you not say she had better tell you whether she had been delivered or not - A. I might have made use of the word better. But to the best of my knowledge, it was that she had better tell me whether she had been delivered or not, because if I came to examine her, I should ascertain it.

COURT. Can you positively swear that you did not say to her she had better own that she had been delivered of a child - A. It is most likely that I did so.

WILLIAM WOODMAN . I am a publican, and at the latter end of January last, I kept a public-house in Poland-street, Soho. The prisoner was my servant, and passed as a single woman to me; she had lived with me very near five months before she left me; she gave me one week's notice on the Sunday to quit on the Sunday following; but she quitted me on the Friday. I made some observation on her person; from her appearance, I supposed that she was in a state of pregnancy; I did not communicate to her my suspicion. She went on the Friday. She came back to my house on the Monday following; she came back for her box. On the Monday when she came back, I did not see her. I saw her on the Thursday following at my house, she came back for a character, and I saw there were some little alterations in her; she was not so large as when she left. She came on the Thursday morning to know if I would give her a character, and then she went away shortly afterwards.

ANN APPLEBY . I keep the house of Mr. Woodman, the last witness. The prisoner at the bar came and lived in his service while I lived there; she and I slept together; I told her that I was sure she was in the family way, about two months before she left; she said she was not. I thought so by her size. I observed an increase in the appearance of her size, after she came to our house; that increase of her size appeared to be increasing and getting larger. In consequence of that it was that I asked her if she was not in the family way, and other circumstances, namely, her not being as other women are.

She went away on the Friday, and she came back on the Monday, and she returned also on the Thursday; I saw her face, but had not an opportunity of observing her person on the Monday. I saw her on the Thursday, and had an opportunity of observing her person; I perceived an alteration; that alteration was that she was quite thin to what she was when she went away.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. She told me in answer to my observation, that she was not as women are, that it arose from cold, and that satisfied me. As a woman, I knew it might arise from cold.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer of the public office, Marlborough-street. I went down to the house of a person named Lucas, living at Kilburn, on Friday, the 2nd of February; I there received some clothes; they were in Lucas's house for the purpose of drying. At that time I looked at those clothes, and upon examining them, I made an observation that they were badly washed, for that the dirt was not half taken out. They consisted of a gown, a petticoat, a chemise, a pair of stockings, and a handkerchief. I went there the next day, and brought away the clothes I had seen on the preceding day; I have them here.

Mr. Webbe. Those are the clothes I saw at Kilburn.

JANE LUCAS . The prisoner is my sister. I recollect the last witness coming down, and seeing these clothes in my house; these clothes belonged to my sister; she came to me on the Friday night before the Friday that she was apprehended; she told me she had a very bad cold, and on the Monday following she brought me these clothes; I washed them for her.

Q. In what condition were they - A. They were worn very dirty, and there was a little the matter with them, but no more than what I have myself.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. On the day she came she was dressed differently, and brought these clothes to me in a handkerchief.

Re-examined by MR. POOLEY. I lived about half a mile from the place where the child was found.

JOHN VERE . I live at the corner of West-end-lane, at Kilburn . On the 30th of January last, I saw something laying under a hedge in the lane, that was on Tuesday, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I don't know the day of the month; I saw something under the hedge, and could not think what it could be; father came first, and seeing what it was, he fetched my mother. I went and called my father, and discovered it was a baby; it was quite naked. I went to the beadle at Hampstead.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Mrs. Hemmington picked the child up, and put into her apron. This place had formerly been a field, but now it is a garden close by the road side.

LYDIA VERE . I am the mother of the last witness. On the morning of the 30th of January, I went to the place where the child was; I was fetched by my husband; it was in a garden, formerly a field; I saw a new born child; I was so much frightened, and so much shocked that I did not examine it then, but I went and brought a neighbour. She took her apron, and she and I picked it up and put it in; and then we examined it together. I found the face dreadfully cut, and its neck. I found wounds on its head; they were not perceivable at first, because it was so stiff with the frost, but when it came into the warmth of the house, the wounds opened and bled, and were then very plain to be seen on the head. We reckon it a quarter of a mile from our house to Mrs. Lucas's. I can't say how far from where the child was.

The COURT in charging the Jury informed them, that unless they should be of opinion that the child found in the garden was a child produced from the prisoner's body, they could not find her guilty of the murder, because they would not be connected together. But if they should think, that though the evidence did not satisfy them that the child found was hers; if they were of opinion that she had been with child, that she had been delivered of it, and had concealed its birth, then they would find their verdict so, specially, because she would be imprisonable for any term within the discretion of the Court

The Jury, however, found her generally

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-48

224. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th January , three yards of flannel, value 27s. the property of Thomas Lay , privately in his shop .

THOMAS PRALL . I live at No. 36, Tottenham Court Road . I am employed by Mr. Lay. He is a linen-draper . residing in Tottenham Court Road. On the 20th January, in the evening, I was informed that a piece of flannel was taken from the door. I pursued the prisoner, and found him in a bye street a short distance from our house. It must be at least a hundred yards to where I found him from our house. He was going on very slowly. I did not see him until I came close up to him. I went up to him, and seized him and collared him. He had the piece of flannel under his arm. I brought him back, and when I took him into the shop, I examined the flannel and knew it to be my employer's property. I knew it by my own marks upon it. (Property produced.) That is it. It cost 27s. and I have no doubt that it is my master's.

DANIEL NICHOLS . I know the shop of Mr. Lay, in Tottenham Court Road. I was going by, and saw the prisoner standing at the door. I saw him take this roll of flannel from the door. I immediately went into the shop, and gave the alarm to Mr. Prall.

WILLIAM CHILD . I am a constable, and was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. I have had the flannel ever since.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-49

225. WILLIAM GERLE and SOPHIA BUTLER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th February , at St. Giles's in the Fields, twenty-three glaziers diamonds, value 10l. and two bee glasses, value 2s. the property of Henry Hammond , Charles

Atwell , and Charles Woolcott , in their dwelling-house .

HENRY HAMMOND . I live in High Holborn . I am a glass cutter , and have two partners, Charles Atwood and Charles Frederick Woolcott . My house is in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury.

COURT. The prisoners must be acquitted. There are two mistakes. First, it is laid in the wrong parish; and then the property is laid to be the Co-property of Charles Woolcott and others, when in fact it is the property of Charles Frederick Woolcott and others.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160214-50

226. CHARLES LANDER, alias HARRIS , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Paul , at about the hour of twelve in the night of the 11th January , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein six fowls, value 12s. his property , and

CHARLES HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day the same goods, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM PAUL . I live in Sloane-street, Chelsea . I have a shop adjoining my kitchen. It is part of my dwelling-house. I keep fowls. I used to keep them of a night in the shop. I saw my fowls at 12 o'clock at night. They were in a sort of cage up by the window. The glass of that window was all safe. It has only three squares of glass. I can't tell whether they might not be cracked, but there was no hole in them. The window was fastened up with nails. I did not hear any thing in the course of the night. The next morning I went to the shop at a little after nine. I found the window was broken, and a knife was lying at the outside of it. Part of one of the squares moved up and down in a wooden frame, but it was bolted. All the glass was out of the middle frame. I missed six fowls, and the other five were left. There was not room for a person to get in at the window, because it was barred. They must have put their hands in and reached the fowls out. I told my son what I had lost, and he went somewhere. In consequence of information he gave me, I went to Mrs. Hicks in Knightsbridge, opposite the Cannon brewhouse. She sells asses milk. Hawkins was her servant, and I found him on her premises. I told him what I had lost, and I had a suspicion that it was on those premises. I asked him if he had any objection to my searching to see if they were these to clear himself, and he said he had not in the least. I searched his bed-room, and nothing could be found. Then I asked him if he had any objection to my looking in the hay stable, and he said not the least; but the key could not be found. After some looking about he found it, and then he opened the door himself, and there we found a sack with eight fowls, quite open, not tied nor covered with any thing. They were dead in their feathers, but their heads were off, and lying in a copper. I asked him what he knew of it; and he said he had been in liquor the night before, and had let two men have the key of the stable to sleep there. Four of these eight fowls were mine; I knew them to be mine, and could swear to them. I then went for an officer, and took Hawkins into custody. That is all I know. I know nothing about the other prisoner.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . On the 12th of January young Paul came to me, and told me his father had been robbed. I belong to the Public Office, Bow-street. I went in search of the prisoners. I went down and asked Hawkins; but he denied knowing any thing at all of the robbery. I went to apprehend him, and found him already apprehended. About ten or eleven I met the prisoner Lander in custody of George Ruthven , one of our patrole, and he admitted the whole of the robbery. I went to apprehend him, but found him already apprehended. He was then going to shew where a man named George Rowe was. He was the man I told him I wanted. He was going to shew where Rowe was, who is out of the way now. He was concerned with Lander in the robbery, as Lander said. We went to 15, Duck-lane, Westminster, but could not find Rowe there. Lander told me that Charles Hawkins knew nothing of the robbery whatever, and that he himself had been drinking with Rowe, and Hawkins let them have the key to sleep in the hay shed; and that then Rowe planned the thing to go and commit this robbery. That they then went to Pizey's and took the copper, and then afterwards went to Paul's and took his fowls, which was at about one o'clock in the morning. I never asked him any questions; he spoke it all voluntarily. He said he would find Rowe if he could, and I believe he gave us every explanation in his power.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer belonging to St. Luke's, Chelsea. Mr. Paul came down to me on Friday morning, and I went and examined the window of his house by his kithen, and saw the mark of the knife in the wood where the glass had been forced out. I then went with Mr. Paul to Mrs. Hicks's yard, where the copper was with some fowl's heads. I then apprehended Hawkins, and took him and the copper to the watch-house. He denied knowing any thing of the robbery; and I went in search of Lander the same day. It was from Hawkins's information that I went in search of Lander; then Lander told me in the back yard, Bow-street, all about it; he wanted to go out several times. I asked him if he knew this knife (producing it.) This is the knife I found at Paul's, by the window; he said he knew it perfectly well. He stated that he went to the White Hart, and staid there all the evening; that he met Rowe there, and saw Hawkins, and that he got the key of the stable from Hawkins to sleep there; that they quit the Hart at ten o'clock, and went to the premises of Mr. Pizey, and thence they took a copper and four fowls; that they then went to Paul's and took the glass out of the window, and got the fowls there; and after that they went to the stable and slept there, and left the things there. He then said it was a bad job, and he supposed he should have fourteen years for it.

Lander. It is all false what he says.

Witness. It is all true what I have said.

WILLIAM PAUL , jun. I know nothing more than that I found the robbery had been committed, and I saw Lander standing at the door of the hay-shed of Mrs. Hicks, at about nine o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE RUTHVEN. I am an officer of Bow-street. I am the person who first apprehended the prisoner Lander, in the pit of the Olympic Pavillion, in New Castle-street, in the Strand. I think it was a little after nine at night, on Friday the 12th of January. I told him it was for taking a copper and some fowls. He seemed much alarmed, and asked me what they would do with him; I told him I was not aware of the nature of the robbery. I asked him where Rowe was, and he said he did not know. When we got into Covent-Garden to the watch-house, he told me he would take me to where Rowe was. He took me down into Westminster, where I met with Westcoat. Before that, he told me how it was. I told him first that it was not in our power to promise him any thing. He said he had been drinking with this Rowe and a man named Hawkin's, and that they had stopped very late at Knight's-bridge, and that he was too late to get in to his lodgings; that he and Rowe asked Hawkin's for the key of his loft to sleep there. That in going along, they agreed to get some fowls; that they went to the house in a field, where the door was open, and took a copper and four fowls. I then told him he had named nothing of the fowls at Paul's; he said, that going by Paul's they head some fowls crow, and he put his hand in. and took four. I asked him if the glass was in the window, and he said, it was all out; a minute afterwards, he said it was only cracked, and he took the pieces out.

Lander's Defence. I asked this young man Hawkins, and he gave me and Rowe the key, and we both slept in the loft; I sat down, and went to sleep, and in the morning I got up, and went away. In the evening I went to the play with a young man I know, and Mr. Ruthven took me in the pitt; they asked me a great many questions; but I don't know what I said, for I was rather intoxicated with liquor, and this Mr. Maybank that says I owned to the knife, swears false; for when I was in the winevaults eating some bread and cheese, he produced that knife, and asked me if it was mine, and it being very like mine, I said it was, and I have got mine here now, and it is very like it.

LANDER, GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

HAWKINS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-51

227. CHARLES LANDER, alias HARRIS , was again indicted for stealing, on the same night, the copper found in Hawkins's stable , the property of William Pizey . And CHARLES HAWKINS was indicted for receiving it, knowing it to have been stolen .

The same evidence in the former case was again gone through, with the addition of that of

JOHN PIZEY, who proved that of the property, and swore to it on its being produced.

LANDER, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

HAWKINS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-52

228. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Skeet , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 3rd of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, twenty-eight pounds weight of lead, value 5s. the property of the said William Skeet, and fixed to the said dwelling-house; one thousand nails, value 2s. one trowell, value 6d. one vice, value 2s. one pair of shoes, value 3d. one bag, value 6d. one knife, value 2d. one basket, value 6d. and one chopper, value 6d. the property of William Skeet .

WILLIAM SKEET . I live in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square ; I am a builder , and occupy a house there; it is in the parish of St. George's Hanoversquare. On Saturday night, the 3rd of February, my wash-house was entered between half past six in the evening, and eight the next morning; my washhouse adjoins the kitchen, and is attatched to the dwelling-house. I was in the wash-house at half past six, the evening previous, and told my servant to fasten the wash-house; but did not see her do so. I was in the wash-house at about eight o'clock the next morning, it was then day-light; my servant is not here. I missed the property in question from the wash-house and the accounting-house; the lead was on the top of the copper to keep the setting from wearing.

JOHM EDMUND WILSON . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Sunday morning, the 4th of February, I took the prisoner into custody, in Cross-lane, Long Acre, at about eight or nine; I found the property in question on him. I asked him where he got it, and he said, he had found it. I told him that was very improbable, and on taking the lead out of the basket, I found it had been taken from the rim of a copper; I found the other things in the basket, and in the bag; and on taking him to St. James's watch-house, he told me he was very much distressed, and had not got a farthing; I took care of him and fed him; and on going down to Marlborough-street, I there received information of Mr. Skeet's house having been robbed.

(Property produced.)

Prosecutor. I can swear to the shoes, to the basket, and lead; but nothing else.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning in question, a person offered me a shilling at the top of Swallow-street to carry these things for him to Long Acre; he followed me to Beck-street, Swallow-street, and then I saw no more of him.

GUILTY, aged 56.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18160214-53

229. SAMUEL BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , one 3s. bank token , the property of William Lyon .

WILLIAM LYON . I am a cooper , and live in Goldston-square, Whitechapel . The prisoner was my apprentice ; he would have served a twelve-month today. On Saturday, the 10th, between three and four o'clock, I returned home, having been about my business; I went into the shop where the journey-men were at work, and not seeing the prisoner,

I enquired where he was, and the men told me he had been there two or minutes before. I supposed that he was on some part of my premises, and on going to the shop door, saw him come out of my dwelling-house; he said he had been to get a drop to drink. I asked him what, and he said rum. I told him I had been robbed often, and I feared he had robbed me again; he said he had not. I told him I was not satisfied with that, and I called one of my journey-men, and searched him, and found in his pocket a three-shilling bank token, which by a particular mark, I knew to be mine. I sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody. I told he had been in my bed-room, and had opened my drawer where there were nineteen three-shilling pieces; he said he had not, and that it was his own three-shilling piece. I have a wife, but no children. I know it by a small w near the figure 3.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask him whether he did not beat me severely?

Witness. No.

SAMUEL WELLBOURN . I am journey-man to the prosecutor. I know no more than seeing the token taken from the prisoner's breeches pocket.

Q. Did the prosecutor beat him - A. He did strike him with a cane; he did not strip him first; he struck him several times with a cane before he stripped him.

SAMUEL SOLOMONS . Mr. Lyon sent for me to take the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday last, I was standing in the shop, almost starved with cold, and I went into the parlour to get a drop to drink, and I saw this three-shilling piece on the floor; I picked it up, and put it into my pocket, and my master beated me most violently, and had an officer, and sent me away.

JURY. Q. To prosecutor. That mark on the three-shilling piece is not one of your own making?

Witness. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-54

230. GEORGE HARROWER was indicted for that he, on the 5th of February, 1794, at Bombay, in the East Indies, was married to Mary Usher , spinster, and her the said Mary had for his wife ,(to wit,) at the parish of St. George's Hanover-square, in the County of Middlesex, and that he afterwards, and during the life time of the said Mary, his wife, (to wit,) on the 20th of October, in the 52nd year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of St. George's Hanover-square , feloniously did marry Susannah Ann Giblet , spinster , and her the said Susannah Ann Giblet , did take as his wife , against the statute.

THOMAS LE GUARDE GRISSEAU. I am in the Secretary's office, at the East India House. I produce a book from that office which relates to the registers of marriages at Bombay, and which has been transmitted from that place to the India House, in the Company's vessels. I open this book at the year 1794.

THE REV. ARNOLD BURROWES . I am a clergyman; I have been for upwards of forty years Chaplain of the Presidency of Bombay. In the year 1794, I was acquainted with Miss Mary Usher ; I christened her, and married her mother and father. I knew Captain Harrower in the same year; I cannot say I ever saw him at the house where she resided. I was applied to to marry Captain Harrower and Miss Usher; I believe that application was made to me through my clerk. I did not in point of fact marry them. At that time I had the Rev. Mr. Owen, the Company's Chaplain at Calcutta, on a visit, at Bombay.

Q. In point of fact, did Mr. Owen leave your house for the purpose of marrying the Captain to Miss Usher - A. I think he did; I cannot positively say. After that time, I continued to know the lady, who had been Miss Usher, and she afterwards went by the name of Mrs. Harrower. The Captain and she lived together as man and wife; I recollect once receiving an invitation to dine with the Captain, and she presided. That was not an entertainment given on the occasion of the marriage; I was invited by him, and came to the entertainment, at which she presided as Mrs. Harrower; I never knew that there was any separation between them until he left India. I believe I only saw them this time I dined with them. In the course of the fulfilment of my duty, I used to transmit copies of the registers of marriages solemnized at Bengal to the Company. I take this book into my hand, which was produced by the last witness, and here I find a copy of a register certified my myself; the entry is not in my hand writing; this purports to be a copy of the original register, and at the end of the book, I find my signature, certifying that all the copies of registers, here inserted from the 14th of February, 1778, to the 8th of December, 1799, inclusive, are true copies, and I always compared them with the originals before I signed my name.

(An entry in the book was now ordered to be read.)

"Registers of the weddings at Bombay, beginning 1773, February, 14th."

(Here follows a number of entries until.)

"1794, February 5th, George Harrower , free Mariner, to Miss Mary Usher , spinster."

(Here follow on the entries to the end of the year 1799, and then come these words.)

"A true copy from the parish register of Bombay, between the 14th of February, 1773, and 1799, inclusive."

Signed "A. BURROWES, CHAPLAIN."

A degree of confusion here arose, upon the testimony of Mr. Borrowes, upon the question, whether the book produced, contained the original transmissions of copies of marriage registers at Bombay, sent to the Company in their ships, at different periods, and all doubt was cleared up by the witness's father's testimony, as follows. -

I believe I can now account for this now. The Court of Directors sent out word to the Govenour that the copies of the registers of marriage were not regularly sent home, and it occured to me, that the best way of convincing them would be to send home a fresh copy of all the registers, together with these interpolating remarks, of the original transmissions, "so far transmitted by such s ship,

so far by such a ship, and so far by such a ship."

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT BEST. Do you mean now positively to swear that you examined the original registers, word for word, with these entries from the year 1773, to the year 1799 - A. I can't recollect at this distance of time; I can't venture to swear I examined them word for word, although I believe this to be a good copy.

Re-examined by MR. GURNEY. I saw the lady who was formerly Miss Usher at the latter end of December, 1813, I saw her at Mr. Cook's house; she was then living.

Q. Did you receive these three letters from Mr. Cook - A. I received a bundle of letters from Mr. cook, but I cannot tell whether these are the actual letters I received. What I received from Mr. Cook, I received when I was coming to England. I made a communication to Mr. Giblet that the prisoner's wife was living in India; I made this communication in June, or July, 1814. I arrived in London on the 3rd of June, and shortly after my arrival, gave the information to Mr. Giblet; I attended at Bow-street to give evidence against this gentleman; between one examination and another, I understood that he was on his bail. He called upon me; but I think it was prior to my being at Bow-street; I believe it was at a time, at which I was given to understand, that I would be examined; he begged that I would not give evidence against; him he staid with me perhaps ten minutes; he did not request me more than once, not to give evidence against him. I told him I had seen his wife before I left India; I told him I had seen his wife at Mayhem, at Mr. Cook's; I declare I can't recollect what he said.

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT BEST. I communicated all this information to Mr. Giblet, as the prosecutor; he is the prosecutor, and the father of the second Mrs. Harrower; it is only within the last month that I was called upon to give evidence; during the whole of 1815, Giblet never called upon me to attend; Giblet has became insolvent, as I have heard. I saw the first Mrs. Harrower in 1813, at Mayhem; she was not raving; she was at liberty in the house.

Q. Was not she a lunatic - A. Yes, she was a lunatic; but she was perfectly quiet; I might have been half an hour in her company, and that was the first time I had seen her for several years; she was very much altered.

Re-examined by MR. GURNEY. I have no doubt of her being the person, I had christened her, and knew her from her child-hood.

THE REV. JOHN OWEN . Examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I am a clergyman of the Church of England.

Q. In the beginning of 1794, were you at Bombay on a visit - A. I think I was.

Q. Are you acquainted with Captain Harrower - A. I am not.

Q. Look at him - A. I have looked at him; I have been here some hours.

Q. Do you mean to say you do not know him - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know any young lady of the name of Usher, at Bombay - A. I do not.

Q. Did you not perform the marriage ceremony between Captain Harrower and Miss Usher - A. I do not recollect it; but it is such a distance of time, that I will not take upon myself to say. I can't swear to a negative; I will not venture to swear that I did, and I am far from swearing that I did not.

Q. Try to recollect - A. It is no use to try, I have tried already.

MR. PAUL SHOWCRAFT . Examined by MR. GURNEY. I was a residant in India, in the year 1794; in the course of the time I was there, I knew Captain Harrower; I knew him in Bombay; he returned there after his voyage to China, and other places; I knew him from the month of February, 1794; I was in the sea-line myself, and settled in Bombay, but I don't know when; I declare if I knew, I would tell you; I know I was many years in Bombay without going to sea, perhaps I may have been sixteen or seventeen years; in the course of those years, I very often saw Captain Harrower; I knew of his being away. I was intimate with him, after the period of his supposed marriage, and dined with him frequently after. I did not know Mrs. Harrower. I was walking one evening on the Esplanade, and some gentlemen took me there; I told them that I was not invited, and I did not know Captain Harrower; but they said you must come, we'll have some fun. The Captain had an entertainment in a shed on the Esplanade. I did not see Mrs. Harrower there; if I did see her, I did not know her. There were above sixty persons at that entertainment; but I cannot positively swear that the Captain was there. I don't know that I had ever any conversation with him respecting the subject of his marriage; he was living then with Mrs. Harrower, as man and wife; I dined with them frequently, and he might dine with me.

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT BEST. I was not acquainted with them until after their marriage; I have been from Bombay six years on the 2nd of this month, after I had been thirty-three years there. Lately I did not associate with Captain Harrower, and it may be twelve years since I have seen him.

MR. LIONEL THOMPSON . Examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I know Captain Harrower, and have seen him write. (The three letters which had been shewn to the witness the Rev. Mr. Barrows, were here put into the hands of the witness.) Those are his hand-writing. In the year 1814 I was acquainted with Captain Harrower. in November or October, in the year 1814, I had some conversation with him about his marriage I went to Calais with Captain Harrower. He called upon me two days before he went to Calais. He said there was a conspiracy against him to charge him with bigamy. He said he had not another wife living. I told him I had heard to the contrary. He said he wished he might never enter the kingdom of heaven if he had; and he called God to witness that he had not, and he asked me to assist him to get out of the country. I said,

'if you are an innocent men I will assist you;' and I then went with him to Caluis. Prior to my leaving Caluis, I went to him one day on the pier, and said to him, 'Harrower, I am going to ask you a question, which I hope you will answer me truly: if you do not, I will never know you again.' I said, 'is there a Mrs. Harrower at Bombay?' He said, 'there is;' and I entreated him never to come to England again. I received two letters from him while he was at Calais; I have one in my pocket, dated 12th of January, 1815; that was the first letter; I cannot say whether it was six or seven months before he was apprehended. When he came from France, I believe he came to his solicitors in the Borough, and I believe he went thence to Scotland. When he was residing publickly in England, he was residing at Caldicatt-hill, near Bushy. I told him he was not safe, because I knew he had another wife living.

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT BEST.

Q. You know no reason for his going to Scotland - A. Yes.

Q. Had he not an estate and place of residence in Scotland - A. I think not.

Q. Are you not a creditor under Mr. Giblet's commission - A. No.

Q. Have you not quarrelled with Captain Harrower - A. No; Captain Harrower for some reason withdrew himself from me.

Q. Have you not been at variance with him - A. I have never quarrelled with him. I have never been in his friendship since his second arrival in England.

Q. When did you communicate publickly, what he entrusted to your bosom, as his confidental friend - A. Almost as soon as I arrived in England.

Q. To whom did you communicate - A. To various persons about town.

Q. Why did you not communicate to Mr. Giblet - A. I did not know Giblet at that time.

Q. Your answer is, that you did not know Giblet? Do you mean to swear that you did not know him - A. I knew Mr. Giblet as a man residing in Bond-street.

Q. Have you not dined at his house before you went to Calais - A. Years ago.

DAVID WALLIS . I am clerk to Mr. Henson, attorney for the prosecution. (a paper put into the hand of the witness) This is a true copy of the register of Captain Harrower with Susannah Ann Giblet . I copied it myself (the paper was here put in and read.)

"St George, Hanover-square.

Marriages, 20th October, 1812."

782. " George Harrower , batchelor, of Rickmansworth, to Susannah Giblet , of this Parish, spinster, were married on this 20th day of October, by me,"J. CREVIL."

This marriage was solemnized in the presence of PAUL GIBLET .

(Here follow the names of several others of the family.)

ELIZABETH GIBLET (in tears,) examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. My sister's name is Susannah. I was present at her marriage.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar. (Under the greatest emotion, she was prevailed on to turn her head) - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT BEST. Your sister is living with him upon terms of the greatest affection - A. Yes.

Q. She is not living with her father-No.

The letters proved to be the hand writing of Captain Harrower, which were produced by the Reverend Mr. Burrowes, were now put in and read.

The first letter was dated November 21st 1811, and was addressed to "Mr. Thomas Cook , Mayhem."

" MY DEAR SIR, I shall be with you to morrow. You will make every provision with respect to Mrs. Harrower. All the things wanted will be sent for her. She is not arrived from Goa. I am going there immediately to bring her, if she is not come; I will send you the timber wanted to morrow. My compliments to your family."

(Signed) " GEORGE HARROWER ."

Another letter directed to Mr. Cook, at Mayhem,

"DEAR SIR, I send you a piece of timber for two or three beams. Get the room ready for Mrs. Harrower. The agreement will be kept by Hormigee, and you will have a copy, and I shall have a copy to refer to at all times. I sail to morrow.

(Signed) " GEORGE HARROWER ."

Another letter, no address, dated November 29, 1811.

" MY DEAR SIR, I now write to you from Goa, where I arrived this day. Hormigee will give you a copy of the agreement to keep. Mrs. Harrower will be easily managed, if she is spoke to resolutely. She is turned, and of course any person speaking to her in a determined way, will make her obedient. When she used to be in those heats, I found by telling her to obey, and threatening to put her into the room, that she did obey. It will be necessary sometimes to put her into the room when she is obstinate. As to her habits of cleanliness, she does not like to bathe; but you must make her. She was one of the most cleanly women living; but her habit is quite altered now, as is herself, I hope you will pay particular attention to her. Her wants are but few. You will call on Hormigee and Mr. Stewart and you will write to me twice a year. Your monthly allowance will be paid by Hormigee. She has a good stock of clothes; and when they are out, you will get her some more fit for her condition. I will send some out every year. My house at the Hill contains every thing for her room. I sent you the beam. That will be a good place when finished. Write to me twice a year. I shall be out with you in one or two years more, when I get all settled in England.

Signed " GEORGE HARROWER ."

HENRY ADKINSSWORN. (Examined by MR. GUR-NEY.) I am an officer of Bow-street. The first application that was made to me to look after Captain Harrower, was by Mr. Giblet, in 1814. I have no recollection at what time in the year. I looked after him much, but could not find time. I apprehended him as soon as I could find him, which was in Houndsditch, in Middlesex.

MR. BARON RICHARDS. Prisoner at the bar: the

case is now closed on the part of the prosecution; and if you I have any thing to urge in your defence, the time for so doing is now arrived.

Capt: Harrower then addressed to the Jury the folloving.

GENTLEMEN OF THE JURY.

On the part of the prosecution they have been afraid to call Mr. Giblet, for fear he should be cross-examined. I am the victim of a foul conspiracy, and not of a desire to satisfy the laws of my country. The moment I was married, Mr. Giblet's attornies made out instruments, which he told me were proper for his daughter's stand my benefit. I understand these instruments are illegal. Upon these instruments he got 10,000l. from me. I have been in the habit of associating with gentlemen, and was totally ignorant of this man's character. I could not have supposed that such a man could exist. I could not conceive the existence of a man who could --his own child. After Mr. Giblet got this ten thousand pounds, I said, 'if we should have children, I would make over the furniture, plate, and other things, to Mrs. Harrower;' and I asked him to take my plate, in order that my wife might be taken good care of; that if we had children my wife might not lie at the mercy of a child.' He said, 'No, you have been too liberal already; but if you wish it, you must put it in writing.' - I did so; I put what I meant into writing. The instrument was drawn out, and I understand it is different from all other instruments-for it is drawn so, that if I had not married Mrs. Harrower the property would have been hers not withstanding, and also at her disposal after my death. This man sitting here (pointing to Mr. Giblet, who was sitting in the centre of the Court)-out of the money which was hers. I could not think that a father existed who could - his own child. I thought I could not do too much for a family to which I was so nearly allied. In a few months after, he borrowed 1,270l. more; and about the 15th of March, 1813, he came and begged that I would serve him by lending him 2000l. He told me he was going to Mr. Coke's in Norfolk. to buy a large quantity of cattle, and that he should be ever grateful while he lived. He said, 'I only want it for a fortnight, and then I will pay it back.' And his wife said, 'Don't be afraid, Capt. Harrower, we always pay ready money, and a butcher never fails.' I gave an order for the money on my agents, Messrs. Percher and Co. in Devonshire-square, Bishopsgate-street. This man is now about to s-me. He brings this charge against me, in order that I may not be able to look after my property and my wife. On account of the best and most amiable of women, who deserves the best of husbands, I from time to time put off asking for the money; but at last I applied to him. - 'You want no money.' was his answer; 'you only do it to distress me.'-'Distress you,' said I; 'God forbid I should distress the father of my Susan.' I then said to him, 'I must have money or security.'-'You don't want security; it is as safe as the Bank.' In this way I was put off. I wrote a letter to Mr. Giblet, saying, you have had thirteen thousand pounds, and your son had four thousand pounds, and you cannot pay me back a penny. Be candid; tell me your circumstances; while I have a shilling you may depend the father and mother of my Susan shall never want half of it. He gave me bills payable at my agent's a thousand pounds a month till paid. I went to Scotland in 1814 with my wife. The whole time expired, and no payment was made. He told my agents, if we took any legal proceedings against him, he would throw the whole into Chancery, and we might starve. There is a gentleman here; that gentleman, Mr. Carr (pointing to him) who is in my agent's house, and who can prove what I say. Not a farthing was paid, but I was threatened with its being thrown into Chancery. This was the gratitude I received. After this, I said, 'I must and will have my money, or security.' He then tells me, that

'I have another woman in India, another wife.' And he threatened, that if I took any legal steps he would cast me into gaol on suspicion for two years; and I might there lie until I rotted. I replied,' I close up that business; I only want my money or security.' He says to my wife,'Be a good girl, and do what I tell you. We will get the 10,000 secured to the family, and heavy damages beside to the amount of the rest of the property. You shall burn or destroy the marriage settlements. You shall have the first floor to live in, and then in a short time you can marry whom you please. This is my case. There is not a man who can ever put a blemish on my character. I left my father's house at ten years old, without a sixpence; I never borrowed a shilling, nor ever was in debt. This is my prosecutor, (Pointing to Mr. Giblet) I will only appeal to the feelings of all men; could they believe a father existed in England who would-his own child. On the occasion I last alluded to my wife brought the carriage to me, and told me this conspiracy was found against me. She asked her father, can you give me any proof there is another wife existing? can you take me to any person who will tell me there is another wife? it does not signify, he said, do as I tell you, and we will get all the property. She replied, if it had not been for the money, I should never have heard a word of this. Money, father, is a blessing to some; but a curse to you. She said to me, for God's sake Harrower, let us go; for you may depond upon it, he will ruin us both if he can; he is in such a rage because I don't do as he bids me; you must go with me. I went into the carriage with her. This gentleman, (pointing to the witness Lionel Thompson ,) came to me, and brought a pair of pistols, and said I might depend he would protect my wife. I went with her; but it was not to fly the laws of my country; it was to protect my wife against her family, who had so barbarously used her. I then gave orders to my attornies to get the money from this man Giblet, in some manner or another; at last he gave a warrant of attorney to pay one hundred and twenty-five pounds per six weeks; he paid one installment; he paid part of another; there he stopped, and I could not get a farthing more. The next steps I took was when I found there were several executions against him, I put an execution into his house; the moment he found that, his son and he joined to put my execution aside; they became bankrupts, and out

of 7000l. that I proved under the commission, I shall not get a sixpence for the whole; they owe 60, or 70,000l. there is only-l. on their books to pay that sum; there wont be- in the pound. I have no wife but my Susan; she, and she only, is my wife; I have no other wife, Let the world take her from me, still she is my wife. The lady in question was living with me; I don't know that she exists; I don't know that she lives. My wife has opened every letter that came to me from India, and has seen the contents of it before myself. In this conspiracy, Mr. Thompson comes as a witness against me; he joins with Mr. Giblet, and they say lie cannot prosecute us; he will have no power to do any thing if we can only secure him in Newgate. The whole is a fowl conspiracy.

MR. BARON RICHARDS. Previously to summing up the evidence to the Jury for their consideration, informed them that he as well as they, were bound by their oaths to do their duty, and however painful it might be it was incumbent on them to execute it consciously. His Lordship then observed, least they might be misled by an erroneous supposition, that the whole question for their decision was, whether or not the prisoner married Susannah Ann Giblet during the existence of a former wife. He requested them to direct their attention to this question solely, agreeably to the evidence which his Lordship then summed up in detail.

The Jury then retired for half an hour, and on their return, pronounced a verdict of

GUILTY, aged 45.

But in the strongest term recommended Captain Harrower to mercy: to which the Learned Judge assured them he would attend .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards

Reference Number: t18160214-55

231. JOHN WHARE, alias JOHN WILLIAM WHARE , was indicted for that he, being servant to Charles Richard Constantine Gould , and employed and entrusted by him to receive money and notes for and on account of his said master, and being such servant, so employed, and entrusted by virtue of such employment, received and took into his possession, four three-shilling bank tokens, and one one-pound bank note, for and on account of his said master, and that he did afterwards feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal the said three-shilling pieces, the monies of the said Charles Richard Constantine Gould .

HENRY HOPE . I am acquainted with Mr. Gould, and am a friend of his; he is a hatter , on Ludgate-hill . I went to his shop on the 17th of January, and took with me money which was previously marked; I purchased a forage cap, and a traveling-cap; I paid the prisoner a one-pound note, and four three-shilling tokens; he made no entry of this. I afterwards went to Mr. Gould's; the prisoner was then present.

CHARLES RICHARD CONSTANTINE GOULD . I am a hatter, and live on Ludgate-hill. The prisoner was my shopman. I was out on the 17th of January, when this money was received. On my return home, I examined his books, and found in one an entry pay well, for cap, that means, that ready money was paid for a fur cap, and I und a one-pound note in the book, (witness prodces a book.) In the course of the evening, I called the prisoner up for the purpose of speaking to him; I charged him with many irregularities, and with being dishonest; he was very high at first, and denied it. I told him I had clear proof that it was so; I then told him two or three circumstances wherein he had been irregular, and he denied it, and among others, mentioned this. Immediately on my mentioning this, he stated that he had sold two fur caps to a gentleman, and sold them for thirty two shillings. I asked him how that could be, when he had only accounted to me for a pound; he stated that it must be an omission, and that the money was down stairs on the desk, or in his desk; he then was going down stairs to fetch it; but I would not suffer it. I then asked him if he felt disposed to let me see the money he had in his pocket; he said certainly he would. He then produced four three-shilling bank tokens; I believe there was more money. I furnished the money myself to Mr. Hope to purchase these things.

MR. GURNEY, Objected, that this was not money received for and on account of Mr. Gould; but actually money out of Mr. Gould's own pocket, and that therefore the prisoner could not be convicted under this indictment; he refered the Court to its decision upon this subject in an exactly similar case, tried at the September Sessions, and reported in these Sessions Papers.

THE COURT, was pleased to co-incide with the Learned Counsel's objection.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-56

232. GEORGE BANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , two copper plates, value 5s. and five hundred pieces of printed paper, value 5s. the property of William Phillips Norris from the person of Elizabeth Stewant .

ELIZABETH STEWANT . I am going for eleven; my father's name is James Stewant ; he is a printer; my father and mother live in Booth-street, Spital-fields, and work for Mr. Norris; I was taking some bills of parcels to Mr. Norris; there were five hundreds; they were printed bills of parcels, and two copper plates. I knocked at Mr. Norris's door, and the prisoner came and snatched them out of my hand; it was last week, I don't recollect the day of the month, it was about seven at night; it was light then, it was moon-light; I had a good opportunity of seeing the man; I am sure the prisoner is the man; he said he would have the bundle, and he snatched it out of my hand; there were two blankets and a pocket handkerchief outside. When he snatched it out of my hand, I cried out; the man turned round the corner, and a gentleman stopped him; he was not long out of my sight before he was stopped; I saw him again in about two minutes; I was then sure that he was the same man. The gentleman had picked the bundle up. I never said some other man had done it; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

MARY STEWANT . I am the mother of the last

witness. I had done some printing for Mr. Norris; I sent it at about seven o'clock, by my child, the last witness; they were his property; they were five hundred bills; he lives at No. 15, Broker's-row. I saw these articles again; I never saw the prisoner until I saw him before the Lord Mayor. The two copper plates were worth five shillings, and the printed bills are worth a similar sum.

DAVID WISEMAN . I am a messenger to Messrs. Kaye and Freshfield. On Friday, the 9th of February, I was on my way from London-wall along Winchester-street, and on hearing a cry of stop thief, I observed the prisoner running along on the other side of the way with a bundle under his arm; when he came to the corner, he threw something from him; but I did not look to that so much, as my eye was on him; he did not get above four or five yards further before he made a short stop; I challanged him with being the thief, and he said, he was not. There was not a person within thirty yards of us at that time. I told him he had thrown the parcel away, and I told the people to look after the parcel, while I had him in custody; the parcel was picked up. The little girl when she saw the prisoner, could identify him in the most clear manner, and declared that the prisoner was the man; she never appeared to have any doubt.

THOMAS SHACKEL . I am clerk to King and Company, merchants. I was proceeding homeward, and I reached as far as Winchester-street; I heard some child crying, and my curiosity, or rather my attention was attracted, and I heard a cry of stop thief. I joined in the pursuit, and they said that the man had been stealing a bundle. A gentleman came up with the bundle under his arm, and the child said that is the bundle, but by no means intimated that that gentleman was the person who stole it. I was going along and I picked up a bundle. This same gentleman went with me part of the way. It was as I proceeded homeward. The bundle the gentleman had was his own, and the child mistook. The bundle I picked up, I delivered to the last witness, and he gave it to the child.

Wiseman. The little girl delivered that bundle to the officer.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRAL . I was sent for to the Compter, and there the bundle was delivered to me.

(Property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Moor-fields, and as it was a very cold night, I was running, and hearing the cry of stop thief, I turned back to see what was the matter, and then they stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six month , and fined one shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-57

233. WILLIAM RAXWORTHY was indicted, for that he, on the 15th of January , having in his custody and possession, a certain false, forged, and counterfeit paper . Writing to the tenour and effect fellowing; that is to say, 'Messrs. Holrayd and Jackson will thank Mr. Marshall to send by the bearer, two yards of the best S. fine navy blue for an officer's coat, with the lowest price for money.'

'Leadenhall-street, 15th January, 1816.'

The said John Raxworthy , did then and there produce and deliver the said false, forged, and counterfeit paper, writing to William Carpenter , servant to Thomas Marshall , woollen draper , and did unlawfully pretend to the said Thomas Marsall , that he brought the said paper writing from Betty Holroyd and John Jackson , slop sellers; by means of which false pretence taken, and there unlawfully and designedly obtained of, and from the said William Carpenter , two yards of blue cloth, value 2l. 16s. the goods, wares, and merchandize of the said Thomas Marshall , with intent thereby, then and there to defraud him of the same. Whereas in truth, and in fact, he did not then bring the said paper writing from the said Betty Holroyd and John Jackson, to the great deception of the said William Carpenter , to the great injury of the said Thomas Marshall , and to the evil example of all other persons in like cases offending against the statute.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-58

234. JAMES SMITH and JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH were indicted, for that they on the 24th of January , at St, Botolph, without Aldgate, a certain stable of William Neal , there situate, unlawfully, injuriously, and against the will of the said William Neal , did break and enter, with intent his goods and chattels, then and there being feloniously to steal, take and carry away .

SECOND COUNT. Charged them with breaking the said stable with intent to enter.

THIRD COUNT. Charged them with breaking and entering a certain stable of the said William Neal , with intent to break and enter a certain warehouse, there over, situate, and with intent, the goods in such warehouse then being, feloniously to steal, take, and carry away.

WILLIAM NEAL . I am a hemp and flax merchant . My coounting-house and premises are at Goodman's Yard, in the Minories . I have a stable there; it is in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate. I keep flax and hemp, and considerable quantities of sail-cloth. A person by getting into the stable can get into the warehouse over the stable by a staircase, and by breaking two doors.

JOHN RAY . I know the stable of Mr. Neal; I am a patroll. As I was going my round, between four and five in the morning of Thursday, the 24th of January, and asked the watchman if all was right. I went to the box of the man in whose beat Mr. Neal's stable is; and on asking him, he said, he thought something was not right. In consequence of this, we went down Goodman's Yard and found both the prisoners there. Shuttleworth had this stick in his hand, (producing it.) We secured both the prisoners, and I asked them what brought them there at that time of the morning? Shuttleworth said he had got a little in liquor, and did not know when he was going. I searched them, and in Smith's hat I found this key, (producing it) with a bit broken

from the ward. I examined the door of the stable, and there I found the rest of the key in the lock of the stable. The door was unlocked. I went into the stable. There were several articles in it; such as harness, &c. On Smith's shoulder was wrapt up this bag, (producing it.) Neither of them appeared to be so intoxicated as not to know what they were about.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Mr. M'Combie has the other part of the key. These men might be forty yards from the stable when I took them.

DAVID M'COMBLE . I am a constable of the city of London. These premises are the last that are in the City of London in that direction. The warehouse is in the county, and the stable is in the city. I was in the watch-house at the time the prisoners were brought in; all was safe in the watch-house when I went down to examine it. I got this bit of key which matches the rest found in Smith's hat, out of the lock after considerable trouble.

JOHN ALLAN . I am a watchman; my box is two hundred yards or more from the prosicutor's stable. My box is at the corner of Goodman's-yard. I saw Shuttleworth standing in Goodman's-yard, and there appeared to be two more in company with him. I asked them what they were about there, and they said they were about nothing.

ISSAC MAIDMENT . I am carman to Mr. Neal, and had the care of the stable. In the evening before this matter was discovered, I locked the stable; none of the harness was gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. You don't know you locked the stable that night - A. It is my firm belief that I did so, as well as I did on all other nights. There were horses in the stable.

MR. ADOLPHUS as counsel for the prisoners, briefly addressed the jury with a considerable degree of ingenuity upon the mischiefs that might arise from convicting men of a misdemeanor upon evidence like this, where his clients might have got into this stable for the purpose of getting a bed, upon an amour with some lady; perhaps resident over the stable, or from fifty causes which every one knew, men in their circumstances of life were frequently more or less subject to. It would be hard to impute to his clients an intention to commit a felony, when in fact, all that was proved against them amounted only to tresspass, for which Mr. Neal might have his sction, if that was any satisfaction to him.

SMITH, GUILTY . aged 26.

SHUTSLEWOTH, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months , and fined one shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18160214-59

235. SAMUEL EMBDEN was indicted for perjury ; but no prosecutor appearing , the jury found him

NOT GUILTY.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-60

236. THOMAS RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , a sheep's carcase, value 30s. the property of Valentine Rutter .

GEORGE SILVESTER . I am a journeyman butcher in Newgate Market , and know Mr. Rutter. His name is Valentine, and he is a carcase butcher . On Thursday evening last I was standing at my master's door. At about half past six I saw the prisoner pass my master's door with a carcase of a sheep on his shoulder. I saw that he came in a direction from Mr. Rutter's, and the carcase of the sheep had the head on, which is not customary in those which are sold. I had some suspicion, and followed the prisoner into Ivy-lane. I then stepped up to him, and asked him where he was going? and he said he was going to a butcher of the name of Hill, who was a salesman in the market. I told him he was going out of his way, and immediately brought him back into the market. I knew perfectly well, by the marks on the sheep, to whom it belonged. All carcase butchers score their sheep differently, so that we can know them. When I brought the prisoner into the market, he threw the sheep off his shoulder. I caught the sheep, and he ran away. I pursued him, crying, Stop thief! and he was stopped in about five minutes.

SAMUML COPPS . I am Mr. Rutter's watchman. I did not know that a sheep was stolen from his premises; but on the last witness's asking me whether one was missing, I examined and found one was missing; and on seeing the carcase of the one that the prisoner was stopped with, I knew it to be my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. The sheep was given to me to carry.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Imprisoned one month , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-61

237. SERVO was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , five silver table spoons, value 5l. the property of John Gray Duncan .

In this case the prisoner pleaded GUILTY ; and it appeared that the prisoner was in the service of Capt. Duncan, whose ship was about to sail immediately for India, and he was bound under a bond to take the prisoner out to India with him.

The Court was pleased therefore in its le ity only to sentence the prisoner to be fined a shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-62

238. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one jacket, value 5s. one pair pantaloons, value 7s. one waistcoat, value 1s. one pair of braces, value 1s. and one handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Michael Stockdale .

MICHAEL STOCKDALE . My ship is a merchantman, and lies in the London Docks . I lost my things on the 20th of January from my chest. The prisoner was found with them at the Dock gate. He did not belong to our ship, nor had any business on board her.

THOMAS BALTON . I am a constable belonging to the docks. On the 20th of January, the prisoner was coming out about half past three o'clock. Suspecting he had something concealed about him. I searched him, and in his pocket I found this handkerchief; in the crown of his hat I found these braces and waistcoat. Over his working jacket he had this jacket, and he had these pantaloons over his trowsers.

MICHAEL STOCKDALE . These are my property, and I had left them safe in my chest.

Prisoner's defence. I found a bundle, containing these things. I had been two years in the King's service.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-63

239. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , twenty-two yards of printed cotton, value 5s. the property of Thomas Houlbrook , privately in his shop .

THOMAS HOULBROOK . I am a linen-draper , in Holborn . On Friday, the 9th of February, I lost a piece of printed cotton, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; but do not know the prisoner Wilson, nor the circumstances of the robbery.

THOMAS THOMPSON . On the 9th of February, I was in St. John's-street, and saw the prisoner in company with two more; I am a patrole, and had watched them the night before. I followed them into Holborn; they walked backwards and forwards past Mr. Houlbrook's from three o'clock until almost five. I saw the prisoner go up within about a yard of the door, and he immediately came away with a piece of print in his apron; he did not go into the shop himself; but one of others went in, and gave the cotton to him; I set a little boy to watch; immediately one of them ran down Holborn, the other up Holborn, and the prisoner crossed into Brownlow-street; I pursued him, and when I had got within about a yard of him, he threw down the print, which I had seen in his apron. I then took him into custody, and took him back to Mr. Houlbrook's, and he identified the cotton to be his property.

ROBERT BUNN . I was set to watch the prisoner, and the others, by Thompson, in Holborn. I saw one of those that were in company with the prisoner go to the shop; I saw him take the print, and fling it into the prisoner's apron; he took it from an iron railing just on the inside of the door, on which it hung; they then all ran away, and I followed the prisoner across the road, and when I got to the corner of Browlow-street, Thompson had taken him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was drawn in. and I hope for mercy.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160214-64

240. ANN HARDING and ANN BREWER were indicted for stealing, in the dwelling-house of Joseph Jerome , one pelisse, value 2l. one other pelisse, value 12s. two gowns, value 12s. one veil, value 6s. one handkerchief, value 1s. three pairs of stockings, value 10s. six yards and a half of silk, value 2l. one shawl, value 5s. two rings, value 12s. and one 1l. bank note, the property of Alexander Campbell .

SOPHIA CAMPBELL . My husband's name is Alexander Campbell ; we lived at 17, Cumberland-street , in January last, in the parish of St. Pancras, in the house of Joseph Jerome ; we were lodgers in the house; I lodged there on the 15th of January, and for some time previous. Ann Harding is my own sister; she came to me on the 10th of January, to stay until I could get her a situation; she came from the Refuge on the 10th, and staid with me till Monday, the 15th. I went out in the morning, at eight o'clock, and came home to dinner at one. When I went out in the morning. I sent my sister down to her cousin, and when I came home to dinner, she said, her cousin was not at home. After dinner, I took her out with me to a situation, which I was procuring for her, and had her engaged, and then sent her home to my house, and told her that I should not return before ten o'clock; I had to go to her mistress to settle about her wages. When I returned home at night, I rang at the bell three times, and could not get in until the landlady got up, and let me in: my sister used to sit up for me always; but I found she was gone from the house, and the property was gone too; my wearing apparel; one trunk was taken away, and the things were taken out of the other. When I went out, I left two trunks with wearing apparel in them; I had left them both locked. I found one gone, and the other opened, and empty. I never saw my sister from the Monday until the Saturday morning following, when between twelve and one she was brought to me. I never saw Ann Brewer until she was taken. When I sent my sister back, I gave her the key of the house to let herself in, and the key of my room also, and when I returned again, I found the key of my room door in the door.

CHARLES SAUNDERS . I did live at No. 6. Tom's-court, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square. I know Ann Brewer personally, and have seen her at my house; she has lodged there several times; I keep a lodging room, and on Friday night, an officer came to enquire for Ann Harding , and I was desired by her to say she did not lodge there, and I did say so. She had came to lodge with me on the Monday previous; she was an entire stranger to me, and Mrs. Brewer brought her to my house as a servant out of place; they brought a trunk with them, and a hat-box, which I understood were Ann Harding's own: Brewer came to sleep with her, and did so, that same night. On the next night Brewer brought a young man, and slept with him. Ann Harding gave me a parcel, and said she wished it to go to Wood'smews, Park-lane; it might be a small parcel tied up; but I don't know what it was tied up in. I offered to take it myself; but she said, she did not exactly wish her sister to know where she was. This parcel was to go to her sister's. I accordingly took the parcel, and she desired me to give it to a porter; I asked for the money to pay him, and she said her sister would pay him, and be glad of it. I directed it; but I don't know the name; it was to Wood'smews, and as I was going to my work, I took it to the Green Man and Still, in Oxford-street, and there got a man to take it, whose name I have since learned to be Sweeting. It was the morning before this

happened that Harding and Brewer went out with a bundle. Ann Harding said she was going to her cousin's in Swallow-street, and I saw them make up the bundle on the Tuesday night. I went with Ann Harding and my wife to the play; I paid for myself, and Ann Harding treated my wife. She went to the Regency Theatre with my wife on the Friday night following, and I went in after them, and found them sitting in the pitt, and I took Harding to her sister between twelve and one that night; I took her first to a sister of hers in Park-lane, who would not admit her, and then I took her to Sophia Campbell 's, in Cumberland-street.

Harding. Q. Did you not break the box open - A. No, my lord; but if she had asked me I would, because she said she had lost the key.

ANN SAUNDERS . On Monday evening, the 15th of January, Ann Harding and Ann Brewer came to my house; she brought nothing with them the first time; but they did at about half past three o'clock; Ann Brewer asked me if the other could have a lodging for that night; I told her I could not give her an answer then; but I would when my husband came home; when they were going they asked me to get a kettle boiled, and they would come and get some tea; they brought a small trunk, and a handbox, and said there were Ann Harding's; it was then settled that Ann Harding was to have a lodging at our house, my husband was come home. They asked me if I would go with them to Covent Garden Theatre; Harding paid for all three, and when we were in the Theatre, Harding took out a one-pound note from her pocket, and gave it to me to take care off; Mrs. Brewer told her I should keep it safer than she, and she had it the next morning. On the Tuesday morning, they had both gone out in a coach together, and had taken a very large bundle, and a pelisse; that pelisse was a cloth one, and Ann Harding took it across her arm; it was a light brown one; I did not see what the other things were that they took in the bundle; they returned together to the house; but I can't exactly say at what time; they did not bring any of the things back with them; I did not see that pelisse afterwards. When we were going to the Theatre, I asked Harding where she had taken her things, and she said to her cousin's in St. Paul's-church-yard, where she was going again; she said she was going to live there; she sold me two silver salt spoons, and half a silk handkerchief; that was on the Tuesday that she sold the salt spoons, and on the Wednesday the silk handkerchief. On the Thursday I had some black lace, and she said she should like it, and would exchange a gold ring for it, which she did. I returned her the things on the Friday night; I did not return her the ring, because it was in pledge; I have since redeemed it, and have it now; I understood that this ring which I have on my finger is Mrs. Campbell's. My husband took Harding up at the play; Brewer was not with her then. The trunk was at my longings; Plank took it away on the Saturday morning; that was the trunk that Ann Harding and Brewer brought to my house.

Harding. Q. Did you not say you would conceal me in a room if my sister came - A. No, there was no such words mentioned.

BENJAMIN SWEETING . I am at the Green Man and Still, in Oxford-street. I recollect receiving a parcel on the Wednesday morning from Charles Saunders, which I took to Wood's-mews, Park-lane; I don't know to whose lodgings, but it was over a gentleman's stable; that was the place to which Saunders desired me to take it; I don't remember the name.

JOHN FLOWER . I am a pawnbroker, living at Mr. Guest's, 63, Fleet-market. Ann Harding accompanied by the prisoner Brewer, pledged a pelisse, on the 16th of January, for fifteen shillings.

JAMES FRANKLYN . I am a pawnbroker, living with Mr. Flemming, in Fleet-market. I produce two gowns, a veil, and a handkerchief, which were pawned on the 16th of January last; I took them in of a woman of the name of Mary White , and gave fourteen shillings on them.

GEORGE PICKET . I am a pawnbroker, and live with Mr. Neat, in Duke-street, Manchester-square. I produce a gold ring which was pledged at our house on the 15th of January. The youngest prisoner, Harding, pledged it in the name of Ann Campbell , for two shillings and six-penee. It is worth five or six shillings. I produce also, two pair of silk stockings; they were pledged on the 16th of January, and the person who pledged them, gave in the name of Tyrwhyt. She pledged them for four shillings. I understand her name to be Brewer; but she always gave me the name of Tyrwhyt.

EBENEZER ALLNUTT . I am a journeyman to Mr. Mulcaster, pawnbroker; I produce a silk pelisse. and a piece of silk pledged for one pound on the 15th of January. I don't know by whom they were pledged; but they were pledged in the name of Mary Campbell. They are worth about twenty-five shillings; and I also took in a pair of stockidgs and shawl for five shillings.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I took Brewer and Harding into custody on the 20th of January. I went to Saunders's and found a trunk under the stairs in the kitchen, which I brought away.

PHOEBE WEBSTER . I live in Park-lane, at Wood's-mews, at my cousin's, Mrs. Campbell's sister; at the time Benjamin Sweeting brought the parcel, I remember his person; he delivered it to Mr. Ware, who brought it up stairs.

Brewer's Defence. I pledged the two gowns, and that is all I know, and Mr. Saunders denied Ann Harding whenever I went there to enquire for her.

HARDING, GUILTY , aged 16.

BREWER, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-65

241. JAMES FITZGIBBON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , one pair of shoes, value 7s. 6d. the property of Alexander Morres , privately in his shop .

ALEXANDER MORRES . I keep a patent nail shoe

warehouse , at No. 353, Strand . By the desire of the Patentee, I sell patent shoes. I lost a pair of them from outside the door, on the 12th of February. I was not in the shop myself. I have no partner.

JAMES MIMS . As I came down the Strand on the 12th ot February, I saw the prisoner take the shoes off the nails outside the door. He went on. I laid hold of him, and told him to bring the shoes back to where he took them from. The shoes were under his jacket. That I did not see until I took him to the shop. The shoes were put on the shop counter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got them down on the pavement near the door.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Whipt and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18160214-66

242. ANN BURN, alias MARY BURN and ALEXANDER BURN were indicted for stealing, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Blenkinsop , one Bank of England note for payment of 50l. value 50l. his property .

THOMAS BLENKINSOP . I am a stable keeper . On the 6th of November I had a 50l. note, and saw it in a small box in my desk on the morning of that day. It was on the dresser by the fire-place. I am coachman to Sir Henry Clarke in these stables, and rent rooms over them. They are connected with his house. I went out at about nine o'clock in the morning, and left my wife with the prisoner Ann Burn at home. The prisoner was washing for my wife, and I should think she came about eight o'clock. I went out again as soon as I had had my dinner, which was at about two o'clock. I left the female prisoner there, and my wife. I returned at about six o'clock. I then found the prisoner at home, and my daughter, who had come home then. My daughter is about nineteen years old. I went out in the evening at about seven, and got a draft for 25l. When I came back at about ten the prisoner was gone. When I went to put my draft into my little box, I missed my 50l. note. In consequence of missing it, I informed my wife. On the 14th of November, I saw Ann Burn and her husband in the woman's apartment in Swanalley, Mount-street. Limbrick was searching, and the husband came in. I told the female prisoner I was sure she had it. She said she had not got it; she wished she had. I told the man I was sure his wife had it, and if she had she must be a base woman. We found nothing, and went away. I never saw the note again until the 11th of this month. I saw it at the Bank of England. I was present when the man prisoner was apprehended, and he denied a'l knowledge of the transaction. The woman was taken the same night. The note was taken from the room in which we slept. I had the number of it.

SARAH BLENKINSOP . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 16th of November last, the female prisoner came to our premises between seven and eight o'clock in the morning to wash for me. When she first came, my husband, my daughter, and my son were at home. My son is a boy between thirteen and fourteen years old. I staid at home all day, and they were all out part of the day. The female prisone had frequently to go to the room in which the note was to fetch the water for washing, which was heating on the fire in that room. She would have occasion to do that frequently in the course of the day. I went down stairs at about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and left nobody there but her. I think I staid down stairs about ten minutes, leaving nobody there but her. During the time I was below, nobody at all came in or went up stairs. I had not seen the note myself for some time previous. She did not go away in the course of the day, but went home between seven and eight o'clock at night. There were two persons up stairs with me in the course of the day, but neither of them stopped a moment. On our missing the note, I went the next morning to the female prisoner, and accused her of having the note. She denied knowing any thing of it, and seemed confused. I never saw the man prisoner near our premises in the course of the day on which the note was lost. I saw the female prisoner again a fortnight afterwards, and accused her of it then again, and she said she knew nothing about it. I told her I was sure she did, and had given it to Burn, her husband, and she denied it. I have known her some time, and she can read writing.

Prisoner. Q. When I went away in the evening, did I not leave three young men in the room? - A. There might be my husband and the helpers, but I did not take particular notice of that.

CHARLES M'KINLEY . I am a taylor, (a 50l. note put into the hand of witness). There is my name on this note. I had it from the male prisoner at the bar. I received it on Saturday the 3d of this month. About three or four weeks previous to this, he asked me to go with him to buy some cloth. He called on the Friday following, but I was not at home. He had said that he expected some money from several families, who owed him a good deal. I understood he was a lamp-lighter by trade. He had several contracts to light at the illumination; and on the 3d of this month I saw him again. He came to me at about eleven o'clock in the morning, and asked me if I could go with him to purchase the cloth. I told him I was busy just then, but if he would call at about three o'clock I should be at leisure; and he said he would wait at his lodgings, where I afterwards called on him. His lodgings were at the Horse-pond public-house, in George-yard, Grosvenor-square. From that we went out to purchase the cloth; and going along we went up Oxford-street, and up Shepherd-street. I asked him if he wished it to be bought at any particular place, and he said he had not, and he would leave it to me. We went down-Shepherd-street, and as we passed the Junction Canal Company's office, he said he had between thirty and forty pounds to pay into them in a short time. I proposed to purchase the cloth at Mr. Fox's, to which he had no objection, and when we came to Mr. Fox's, then he told me he had net less than a 50l. note. I told him it was a large note, and I did not think he could get change for it. He then said, that the only place he thought best to get change was at a Lottery office, and he wanted me to go. I went with him to Cha

ring Cross, as he said he wanted to buy a sixteenth. He put his hand in his pocket and took out a piece of paper, on which he wrote two numbers, and as we were going along he gave me the fifty pound note into my hand. I looked at it and observed there was no name on the back of it, and I remarked that it was strange. He said that the person he had it from would not give him a bad one, he was sure. I asked him from whom he got it, and he said from a man named John Brown, No. 8, Brown-street, Edgeware-road. He asked me if I had any objection to present it, and I said no. He alledged as a reason for not presenting it himself, that he had his wife and three children on the parish of St. George, and if they discovered that he had so much money, their five shillings a week would be stopped. I then went and presented the note to the person in the lottery office for two sixteenths which he chose. He went in with me; the man could not give change. It was then too late to go to the bank with it. The note had a hole in the middle, just under the number. The prisoner then asked me if I would ask my landlord to lend ten pound upon it, and we agreed to go to the bank on Monday. My wife went with it to my landlord and brought back three ten pound notes, a cheque for eight pounds eight shillings, and twelve shillings in silver, and the rest one pound notes. I left four pound twelve shillings at home, and took the rest to Mr. Burn, and gave it to him.

TIMOTHY LANE . I look at the fifty pound note. The last witness's wife brought it to me to change. I am his landlord. She brought it to me last Saturday night. I gave her three ten pound notes, a cheque for eight pounds eight shillings, and the rest in one pound notes.

EDWARD CLARKE . I am a constable. The male prisoner was given me in charge. He took his coat off, and shewed me where between his botton-holes, there were three ten pound notes sewed in, and four ones.

ALEXANDER BURN, NOT GUILTY .

ANN BURN, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

Reference Number: t18160214-67

243. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for stealing on the 12th of January , one portmanteau, value 5s. one coat, value 1l, one gold ring, value 1l. and three bank notes for payment, of ten pounds each, value 30l. the property of Stephen Judd .

JOHN SNEE , esq. I reside at Knightsbridge, opposite to the officers quarters. When I was getting up in the morning, of the 12th of January, I saw something lying in my garden, apparently as if it had been thrown over the wall. It was this portmanteau; it was locked, but the end was cut, and wrenched open, so as to admit a persons hand into it. I told my people to try to get something out of it, if there were anything; and a taylor's bill and receipt to a Lieutenant Judd were got out of it. I delivered it to an officer immediately after breakfast.

JOHN WALLIS . Mr. Snee delivered that portmanteau to me on the morning of the 12th of January. It was locked, but open at both ends. It was empty, all but a bill and receipt of Captain Judd's, and a knife which Mr. Snee delivered to me.

STEPHEN JUDD . I belong to the Berkshire Militia. I took a place to go by the Andover coach. I left this portmanteau, at the coach-office; that bill and receipt were in the portmanteau, and one a bill and receipt from my taylor. I slept at the Angel Inn, St. Clements , where the coach set off from on the night of the 11th, and left that inn in the coach; on the morning of the 12th, I never missed my portmanteau until I got to Andover. I returned to town again on Sunday morning. I went to Bow-street on the Monday, but could get no tidings of my things; but on my going on the Wednesday, I saw some of my things, and this portmanteau.

WILLIAM GRINT . I am porter of the Angel-inn, St. Clement's. I was so on the 12th of January last. I remember giving that portmanteau to the coachman, and he strapped it to the back part of the roof of the coach, with other luggage, and a large leather was over them all, to keep the weather from them. I gave the coachman his weigh bill at half past five precisely.

WILLIAM WALTERS . On the 12th of January, I was coachman to the Salisbury coach, and took Captain Judd as a passenger that morning. I re-remember strapping that portmanteau to the back part of the roof of the coach. I delivered the coach to another coachman at Overton, ten miles on this side Andover.

JOHN PERCIVAL . I am the driver of the hackney coach 189. On the morning of the 12th, I was at a stand by Berkeley-square, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and I was hailed by another coachman. The prisoner at the bar was in his coach. He had two great bundles with him. He ordered me to drive to No. 40, Chancery-lane. When we got to the top of the Hay-market, he asked me if I would have any thing to drink. He sat in the coach, and a quartern of rum was brought. He sat in the coach and gave me a token like an eighteen-penny token, but it was not one. I offered it to the landlord and he would not take it. The prisoner then looked over his silver, and said he had no others. He then gave me the two halves of a ten pound note. The note was left with the landlord, and he let the prisoner have a poundsworth of siver upon it. Then I drove to the end of Chancery-lane, where he told me stop. He took out the bundles and went up the lane, and told me to stop until he returned to take him back; but the officer Wainright afterwards came to me, and told me to go about my business.

JOHN BATHE . I am landlord of the Royal Standard in the Hay-market. I recollect the coach stopping at my house on the morning of the 12th of January. The coachman brought in a one and six-penny country token. I would not take it; it was silver. I should not know it again; he went out again and brought in two halves of a ten pound note. I gave twenty shillings in silver for it. I pasted the halves together, and was applied to for it, at about nine o'clock that morning, and then gave it up.

JAMES EDWARDS . I am a lodger at the Hole in the Wall, Chancery-lane. On the morning of the

12th of January, I saw the prisoner at the bar going in, it was at about half past seven; I did not see where he came from; I saw him with the two bundles; I followed him in; he put them on the table, and asked the servant girl to let him leave them there for a few minutes, and that he would return again, for he was going to take them on board a ship. He went out immediately, and I looked at him as he went out. I thought he was not a sailor, and examined the bundles. I sent a young man for a officer, and gave an account of what I observed. I saw the prisoner again, brought in by Wainwright, the officer, in half an hour.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am a patrole of Bow-street. I went to the Hole in the Wall, and in consequence of something I saw there. I apprechended the prisoner; he was a few yards from the door; I found four Jersey tokens in the prisoner's pocket; one small Irish ten-penny piece, half a guinea, and a seven shilling piece; I took two ten-pound notes and the ring from one of the bundles; the general contents of the bundles were, the coat Captain Judd has now on, handkerchiefs, stockings, boots, and windsor soap. As I was taking the prisoner to the watchhouse, he told me he had changed a ten-pound note some where in Piccadilly; but he did not remember the house; in consequence of that, I got the ten-pound note from Bathe.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Captain Judd. I had several Jersey tokens, and some Irish tokens also, a half guinea, and a seven-shilling piece. All the property in the portmanteau might be worth sixth pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in the country to seek for work, and coming through Knightsbridge, between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I saw a man walk away from this property; he was stooping down over it, and as I came towards him he ran away.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-68

244. JAMES COUNTY and MORGAN DONOVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , fifty-seven coats, value 20l. the property of Eleanor O'Donnel .

ELEANOR O'DONNEL . I lived at Woolwich. I lost these things on the 9th of last month. I had a number of coats after my husband's death; my husband dealt in second hand clothes when he was alive. This Donovan knew me; having been a school-fellow of mine; I had not seen him for nine years before. County came with him to my house; I told them that I was going to sell the few coats I had, and I was then going to Ireland. County said he dealt in all kinds of goods, and that he would buy them from me. He asked me if they were altogether; I told him they were; there were to be fifty-six men's coats, and one boy's. He counted them. I sent out for a penny-worth of packthread, and packed them up. I agreed he was to have them for thirty pounds, and he offered me two pounds in part payment; but I said I would have the whole together, or none. I then went with them, and my son outside the coach, with the goods to come to London. When I got to the Bricklayer's Arms, I asked County if he was going any further, and he said no. I got off the coach, and put them into the passage of the Bricklayer's Arms, and I rolled them into the parlour. County then said to me, I expected a friend here with money; but he is not come. I have got fifteen pounds in my pocket, and if you will come as far as London-street with me, I will get a friend that will lend me another fifteen pounds; so I asked him where London-street was, and he said it was not fifty yards from the Bricklayer's Arms. I said to Donovan, might I not as well stop here until Mr. County comes back, and he said I had better go with him. I went with him, leaving my child and the goods in the parlour; Donovan said he would stop, and have an eye to the goods and the child until I came back. I and County set off together, and Donovan staid behind. As I went on with County, he said, I am afraid I won't get this friend within, as it is so late; I believe it was half past eight, in the evening of the 9th. I then said I sha'nt go any further; but shall go back, and remain at the Bricklayer's Arms to night. He told I had better go a little further, for the house was only a little way further; but I went back; he did not go back with me. When I went back to the Bricklayer's Arms, my child, my goods, and Donovan were gone. I did not see either of them until the Saturday following, when the prisoners were taken on the top of a coach. I had gone to Bow-street, and related what had happened to me. I found my child on the Saturday following, at the office. I saw all the goods on the Friday night.

FRANCIS MURRAY . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Friday, the 12th of January last, I was solicited to go with Edwards, and we made all enquiries possible relative to the prisoners; we went to Meard's-court, Old Bond-street; in consequence of some information, and there intercepted a letter in the postman's hands, which was directed to Mrs. County. Afterwards in consequence of further intelligence we had gained, we went to the Green Man and Still, in Oxford-street, and we had not been there five minutes, before three parcels were delivered into the office. My brother officer and I seized them; they are here. When the prosecutrix saw them at our office, she claimed their contents, which were fiftysix coats. These parcels were delivered at seven o'clock, and we did not see the prisoners until ten o'clock the same night; we did not apprehend them ourselves. I asked them where the boy was, the prosecutrix's son and Donovan said that he was at Mr. Marshall's, the George public-house, in Greek-street, Soho. I went to the house to escertain whether what he told me was correct, and I found the boy there.

THOMAS EDWARDS . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

THOMAS MARSHALL . I keep the George, Greek-street. Donovan came to lodge with me on the 24th of December; I have seen the other prisoner come to him at my house. I know a little boy who was found at my house; Donovan brought him to my house; he had nothing with him but the little boy.

I asked him where he brought the boy from, as the boy seemed very uneasy, and he said, that the boy had lost his mother, and he had been trying to find her, but could not that night; but he would in the morning. They got up in the morning at about ten o'clock and breakfasted together. I asked Donovan for some money which he owned me; he told me if I would make his bill out, he would pay me in the course of ten minutes. He went away; but never returned; he left the boy with me.

JOHN GOSLING . I am a hackney-coachman, and drive for Mr. Mumford of Kennington. I was sitting down a fare at the Bricklayer's Arms, on the 9th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and a man came out of the house, and asked me if I was engaged; I told him I was not, and he said I have got a good job for you, to go to Bond-street; immediately afterwards Donovan and the man who spoke to me, brought a large bundle to put into the coach; but it was too large to go in. I told Donovan to roll it over the bind wheel, and I would get a rope to fasten it behind; but I told him, unless he rode on it, and took care of it, I would not be answerable for it; he had a little boy, whom he put into the coach. He ordered me to drive to No. 3, Meard's-court, Bond-street. When we got there, Donovan and a watchman carried the bundle on the right hand of the court. He asked me my fare, and I told him there was a little boy in the coach, and he said, oh! then bring him up. I brought the boy up, and left him in the parlour with a woman and Donovan. The next morning Mrs. O'Donnel came to my employers; she found out that I was the person who drove Donovan, and I told her where I had driven him to.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am an officer. On the 12th of January, I went to Tyburn turnpike, and soon after a stage coach drove up to the gate, and the two prisoners were pointed out to me, on the outside; it was the Beaconsfield coach. I took Donovan, and County jumped off the coach, and was making his escape, when the turnpike man stopped him; I took them to Covent Garden watchhouse.

At the instance of MR. GURNEY, as counsel for the prisoners, the case of County was reserved for the consideration of the twelve Judges, upon the question, whether he could be convicted in Middlesex for stealing property, with which he was in no wise connected by any evidence in that County.

DONOVAN, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

COUNTY, GUILTY, aged 34.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-69

245. WILLIAM CASWELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Peggy Mills , widow , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 26th of December, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty sheets, value 6l. twenty-two pillow cases, value 1l. two table-cloths, value 5s. two caps, value 4s. one pair of stockings, value 2s. and twenty-one shillings in monies numbered, her property .

PEGGY MILLS . On the 26th of December, I lived at 18, Horton-street, Clare-market ; I keep a clothes-shop . In the evening of the 26th of December, we locked up the house perfectly safe, and went to the play. On our return home at about eleven, I found the door fast as I had left it; but on opening it with my key, I discovered that the shop door was open, which I had left fastened, and all the property mentioned in the indictment was gone. In consequence of this, we gave information at St. Clement's watchhouse; I have seen about half my property again.

GEORGE ROBERTS . I live at No. 1, Stonecutter-street, Fleet-market. I have known the prisoner at the bar about twenty months. On the 26th December, he came to my house, at a quarter before eight at night; there was a person of the name of Harling in my shop; the prisoner came there to leave a bundle, which contained ten pairs of sheets. That property will be produced in Court. He left it until the morning following; we drank some gin together; I gave him leave to leave them until the next morning. I did not see him at my shop the next day. The things were taken away to be produced.

THOMAS HARLING . I am a pastry-cook; I live at No. 4, Exeter-street, in the Strand. I know the hair-dresser, the last witness. I saw the prisoner at the bar at his shop, at about a quarter before eight in the evening, of the 26th of December; the prisoner brought in a large bundle; I believe he was there about an hour; I was there when he first came, and when he went away. There were two more came in with bundles; I did not hear what was said; they came through the shop into the parlour; one of the bundles was left.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18160214-70

246. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Arabella Williams , in the King's highway, for putting her in fear and taking from her person and against her will, one shawl, value 1l. her property .

ARABELLA WILLIAMS . I am a single-woman ; I live at No. 7, Orange-street, Liecester-fields. I lost my shawl at about half past eleven at night, on the 15th of January , opposite to St. Clement's church in the Strand . I met the prisoner, and he gave me a violent push, and I felt my shawl go off my shoulders; I looked round immediately, and saw the shawl in the prisoner's hand. I did not lose sight of him; he ran away, and I ran after him, and called stop thief; and Mr. Cocks stopped him.

EDWARD COCKS . I am inspector of the Bank of England. On the night of the 15th of January, at about twenty minutes before twelve, near St. Clement's church. I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner rushed by me, and from his manner, I thought he was the person wanted; I pursued him about twenty yards, and secured him.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-71

247. THOMAS TURNER , ARTHUR

ELLINGHAM , and WILLIAM BRADLEY , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wilson , at about the hour of two in the night of the 10th of January , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two coats, value 6l. two coach-glasses, value 3l. one pair of horse ear-caps, value 1s. two towels, value 1s. the property of the said Thomas Wilson ; two books, value 5s. two coats, value 6l. one pair of boots, value 5s. two pairs of shoes, value 12s. one jacket, value 6s. one pair of overalls, value 6s. one silk-hat cover, value 1s. one gold hat-band, value 1s. two pairs of gloves, value 1s. one handkerchief, value 1s. one pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of James Spencer ; one gown, value 4s. and two aprons, value 2s. the property of Hannah Spencer , spinster . AND HANNAH WINFIELD , ELIZABETH WINFIELD , and ANN SMITH , were indicted for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen .

JAMES SPENCER . I am coachman to Mr. Thomas Spencer , of Tindal-place, Islington . He has stables, I can go from the back-door of the house into the stables; they communicate internally. I left the stables on the night of the 13th of January, at about ten oclock, leaving all perfectly safe; the doors were locked, and all fastened. All the property that is stated in the indictment, was contained in the stables. Some of it belonged to myself, some to my master, and some to my daughter. I live half a mile from these stable. I saw the stables the next morning at about six, or a few minutes before six, as near as I can guess; it was not day-light. I saw the stable door nearly open. It appeared to be forcibly opened by the impression of an iron crow. The lock was completely torn to pieces. It had been bolted with a very strong bolt also; and as I proceeded, the first thing I saw was the door leading into the coach house open, and one of the glasses on the ground; that was broken. The silk blinds were also on the ground, and the coach doors open as far as the walls would permit, and the pannels very much scratched. One front glass was gone. I had two coats, and they were both taken; a box-coat, and a livery coat, nearly new. I also lost a stable jacket, and a pair of horse ear-caps, two towels, a pair of overalls, a great many books, a pair of boots, two pair of shoes. The stockings, the gown, and the apron were my daughters property.

JOHN BUTLER . I was taken up on another charge. I came in custody to day. I know the three men prisoners, and two of the women. I don't know Ann Smith . On the 9th of January last, I was in company with the, three men prisoners. I went to Islington with them that night, to some premises, facing some fields by the New River. The place we went to look at, was at the corner of a lane. We went there to look at them, and then it was agreed the next night to break them open. That would be the night of the 10th. Nothing else passed at that time. We then came to Ellingham's lodgings. We got to his lodgings about four o'clock or later, in the morning. I went out the next day at about eleven. I left them, and did not afterwards accompany them to the burglary.

JAMES HANCOCK . I apprehended the whole of the prisoners at the bar. I apprehended Turner and Ellingham for the robbery in Field-lane, at Ellingham's lodgings. I have heard the accomplice speak of where they lodged; that is correct. I apprehended them on the morning of the 12th of January, at a little before or after six; they were lying in bed; there was a bed on the floor. I had apprehended Butler at the door coming out, for the robbery of Solomon's in Field-lane. I hand-cuffed him and pushed him in. I had not a candle; but Solomon's had a candle. After hand-cuffing Butler, I made him walk up stairs and shew me where the rest were, and so he did. I took him up, and held him by the coat whilst I broke the door open. When I had broken the door open, I pulled him in; I barricaded the door inside, and fastened myself in with three men beside Butler Turner, Ellingham, and another. Hurley was turned up for want of evidence. Their heads were under the bed-clothes. The three men were lying with their heads towards the pillows, and a woman was with her feet towards their heads. I pulled out a pistol, and having received information that Turner was one of them. I called him by name. I told Tom Turner to get up first; I told him to play no tricks with me, but to get up first. I tied him to Butler. I made them sit down in one corner of the room, and then made Ellingham, and a man calling himself Wilson, get up also. I tied them together also, and made them sit down with the other two, whilst I made the woman get up, and searched the apartment I looked about the room for the property. I found on the mantle-shelf a bit of gold lace, and I found the ear-caps laying on one side of the bed, and I found this jacket on the bed where they lay,(producing them.) I found the books in that room, and I found two bunches of skeleton keys, some watches, and a bottle of phosphorus; the phosphorus was on the mantle-shelf. I found no crowbar; I found that some of the books had the name of Spencer in them; I found two duplicates; the one for a gown pledged for three shillings, the other for a coloured apron pledged for nine-pence; both pledged on the 11th of January. I apprehended the prisoner Bradley on the 19th. He came into the Royal Oak to see the other prisoners, and then I took him. I had previous to that, received some information from Butler about him. When he was taken he had a pair of shoes on. I afterwards apprehended Elizabeth Wingfield , on another case.

Prisoner Ellingham. On that witness searching, he put these things into my room.

Witness. No, I should rather take them out.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer; I have some coach glasses. I was below stairs during this search to keep them from coming out. I saw Bradley come out of Ellingham's house, on Saturday evening the 13th. It was dusk, between five and six o'clock; I went up stairs and found these two coach-glasses; they were standing on the outside of Ellingham's red room door, wrapped up in this blue apron; I found nothing else in this case.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawn-broker; I saw the prisoner, Hannah Wingfield, on the 11th of January; she pawned a gown with me, and an apron; the gown is for three shillings, and the apron is for nine-pence.

HANNAH SPENCER . I am the daughter of James Spencer, The apron and gown I can swear to; they are mine; these pair of stockings is mine also.

James Spencer . I have lost a great many things which I have never discovered. I look first at the horses ear-caps, they are my master's; the coachglass as those missed. Here is one of the books in which are made entries of when all my children were born and christened. Here is a prayer-book of mine, and this jacket is also mine; I saw it before.

Turner's Defence. I have nothing to say, only that I am totally innocent of the charge laid against me.

Ellingham's Defence. When this robbery was committed in Field-lane, things were brought into brought into my room, that I knew nothing about; and these skeleton keys, belonged to the witness Butler.

THOMAS TURNER , GUILTY DEATH .

A. ELLINGHAM, GUILTY DEATH , aged 24.

ELIZABETH WINFIELD , NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM BRADLEY , NOT GUILTY .

HANNAH WINFIELD , NOT GUILTY .

ANN SMITH , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

248. THOMAS TURNER , ARTHUR ELLINGHAM , WILLIAM BRADLEY , ELIZABETH WINFIELD , HANNAH WINFIELD , and ANN SMITH were all again similarly indicted ; but as the prosecution was not urged against them, by the direction of the learned Judge, the Jury found them all

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-72

249. JAMES WOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Appleby , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 8th of February , with intent to steal; and for burglariously stealing therein, a glass-case, value 8s. fourteen knives, value 7s. and twenty pairs of scissars, value 10s. the property of the said John Appleby .

JOHN APPLEBY . I live at 16, Colman-street, Bunhill-row . I was at home at the time the robbery was committed. I came home a little after six o'clock on the 8th of February, and as I was knocking at the door I looked at the shutters, and perceived that they were closed. They were not fastened. The shop was shut. I then went down into the kitchen; the family was alarmed by a noise at the parlour window. By the alarm that was given, I ran up stairs. I opened the parlour door myself, and saw the parlour shutters open. The window was open, and the glass-case was gone. That glass-case stood within the window, and it is near a foot longer than the window is wide. When it stands within the window, the window is shut. The glass-case was gone, together with its contents. I am sure the window was open when we came up into the room. At about a quarter of an hour after that I saw the glass-case again, together with the contents, at the prisoner's dwelling, Mr. Upton, an officer who took him, was there, and Mr. Avery, another officer.

SUSAN CROKER . I lived at Mr. Appleby's at the time. I shut the window on that evening; I shut it at a little after five. I am certain and sure that I shut the window on that evening. The glass-case was there, and all was perfectly safe.

COURT. There are in the family, Mr. Appleby, his wife, and two boys. whose ages I do not know. One of them is older than myself. He was at home that evening. When I shut the window, I shut the shutters to. I did not open the window to shut the shutters. I heard the alarm; it was like as if the window was thrown up. I did not go up at all, but Mr. Appleby's daughter followed him. I recollected that I had shut the window that evening, and I heard a noise as if it were thrown up. The glass case was always kept withinside the window.

ELIZABETH APPLEBY . Susan Croker shut that window. I had noticed the window and the shutters that afternoon. I went into the room about ten minutes before I heard the noise. The window was shut, and the window shutters were shut, and the glass case was there quite safe. I was alarmed by the noise about ten minutes after that. The family were all sitting below in the kitchen. My brother was at the top of the house in the shop. My father went up first, and I followed him; when we found the window open, and the window shutters open, and the glass-case gone.

JOHN UPTON . I am a Police officer. I remember the 8th of February. I was in company with my brother officer Avery. It was about ten minutes before seven o'clock. I met the prisoner in Lamb's court. I had gone there to watch his motions. I knew him. I had not been in the court above two minutes before the prisoner with this case. I asked him what he had got there, and he said a case. I asked him where he got it from, and he said he stopped a boy with it in Chequer-square. I asked him then what watch-house he had put the boy in. With that he said, that when he came up to the boy, he threw the case down and made his escape. I then told the prisoner by his name, that that account would not satisfy me. With that he said,"Upton, you know me; I am an officer;" and he shewed me his staff. I believe he was a head-borough, or constable. With that, I told him I must take him into custody. He told me not to handle him as if he was a thief. I told him I should, as I suspected he was one. Upon that he begged to go up stairs. This was close to his own door. I searched him, and found a few old halfpence on his person, and a knife. There were twenty pairs of scissars in the case, and fourteen knives. There were also cards of address of the prosecutor. These cards were in the glass-case. He asked, should he send for his brother officer, and and I told him he might do as he pleased. It was then moon-light.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. He actually is a headborough of St. Luke's.

JOHN AVERY . I am on the Bow-street Police establishment. All I have heard of Upton's testimony is true. Then we took the prisoner up stairs, and before, when he said the boy threw the glass case down and ran off, I asked him if he cried out, Stop thief! and he said, 'to be sure he did!' I put the question a second time, and he again said, to be sure

he did. To satisfy his friend, I put it in his presence, and when we enquired, we learned that no such cry existed that evening. I found out the prosecutor's by the cards in this case. The prosecutor saw the property, and stated that it was his.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I know there is 40l. reward in this case. I know that that reward rests with the jury, whether they find the prisoner guilty.

Q. I take it, an old thief would have taken away any direction - A. So I should think, if he had an opportunity of doing it. I have been an officer fifteen years.

Property sworn to.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it all to my counsel.

Mr. Andrews called several witnesses to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-73

250. JOHN SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Bushmore , at about the hour of seven in the night of the 1st of February , with intent to steal .

SAMUEL BUSHMORE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Church-lane, Whitechapel ; part in White-chapel, and part in St. George's; but I live at No. 11, in St. George's. At about seven o'clock in the evening of the 1st of this month. I was sitting then in the lower room. I took the candle to see what it was, and I saw the man go up into the up-stairs room, up one pair of stairs, the back room. I told my husband there was a man in the house, and to call the patrole. He did so. We heard the window thrown up; and I told my husband that the man was coming out of the window. He said he would take care he should not. The patrole came up; the prisoner ran down stairs; the patrole took him. He had got into the room by the street door. I don't know whether it was fastened or not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-74

251. WILLIAM ROSE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Shaw , at about the hour of eight in the night of the 5th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein three coats, value 25s. three pairs of breeches, value 15s. one shirt, value 8s. two waistcoats, value 3s. four pairs of stockings, value 2s. one hat, value 5s. one looking-glass, value 7s. four blankets, value 15s. two handkerchiefs, value 6d. the property of the said Benjamin Shaw ; three curtains, value 4s. three petticoats, value 3s. two pillow cases, value 6d. one apron, value 6d. five gowns, value 2s. one pair of stockings, value 2s. three caps, value 6d. six ribbons, value 6d. three gloves, value 3d. one pair of pockets, value 3d. four yards of black stuff, value 6s. five yards of linen, value 10s. three yards of flannel, value 5s. and six handkerchiefs, value 4s. the property of Sarah Hards .

BENJAMIN SHAW . I am a waterman . On Monday the 5th of this month, I left my house at about ten o'clock in the morning; and when I went out I told my housekeeper I was going to my uncle's, and she might follow after me. She came to my uncle's to me, in St. Paul's Alley, Cripplegate. We got home between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. When I came to go into the door, the door was open, and two or three watchmen and a lodger of mine were in the house. I looked in my lower room, and saw my looking-glass was gone from my lower room. They had broken open the door with something. My lodger came home before we got there. They had taken the blankets off the bed.

SARAH HARDS . I am a widow , and the mother of Richard Hards . I came home with Benjamin Shaw. I am the housekeeper, and we found my son in the house. He is so deaf that he can't hear a word. I went out at eleven in the morning.

THOMAS SNOWDEN . I was going my rounds with a brother watchman, and we saw three men that we suspected had got a swagg. It was about half past seven. My brother watchman remarked to me, that there were three men going along with a swagg. I followed them, and took the foremost man into custody with the bundle. The other two ran away. The one ran up Cornwall-street, and the other ran down Cornwall-street. The prisoner is the man I stopped. I took him as far as Mr. Smith's the pawnbroker's door, with the bundle. He put it on a carpenter's bench, which stood at the green-grocer's door, and said he would not carry it any farther for me. I wanted to get him into Mr. Smith's, and he kept backing in the mud, and I saw his left hand come out of his left hand pocket, and he threw something behind him. I drew my cutlass, and threatened him very hard if he did not keep his hands out of his pocket. I had him in charge, until James came back with a coat and hat which one of the other's had thrown away. I told James not to be in a hurry, but to get a light to see what the prisoner had thrown behind him. At first he said it was spoons, and we found it to be a bag of picklock keys. James took the bundle, and I took the prisoner.

JOHN JAMES . At a quarter after seven, on the 5th, I saw William Rose and two other men. They had a swagg. The foremost man ran up Cornwall-street, and I lost sight of him. He threw a great coat and a hat away, which I picked up. I ran as fast as I could. Snowden told me not to be in a hurry, and I got a candle and lantern from a woman. She looked in a direct line behind the prisoner, and I looked and picked up a bag. It was keys. I opened the bag, and there were eight picklock keys, and one of them was a double one.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I was on my rounds, and met the prisoner and the patroles coming to the watchhouse. I returned back to them. I have got the keys(producing them) which the patrole handed over to me. I asked the prisoner where he got the bundle, and he said he was going to carry it for a man, and was to have 1s. 6d. for it. I asked him where he lived, and he said, at the White Hart. Liquorpond-street; but that he had never had a lodging since then. He said he was a carpenter , but had not worked lately.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had to carry this bundle for

1s. 6d. and a pint of beer. I had no such thing at all about me as these keys.

The COURT, in summing up the evidence for the consideration of the Jury, told them that there was no evidence of a burglary against the prisoner.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 39.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-75

252. JOHN BOSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , eighteen knives, value 3s. and eighteen forks, value 3s. the property of Thomas Goodere , privately in his shop .

THOMAS GOODERE . I keep a hardware shop at 232, High-street, Shadwell . On Friday last, at about the hour of nine in the morning. I was alarmed by a neighbour telling me that I had been robbed. I immediately went to the door. I went into the street, and saw a quantity of people. Looking on the ground as I went along with them, I saw two parcels, one of knives and the other of forks. I knew they were mine by my mark that was on them. I took them from the ground, and gave them to a neighbour, and I went in pursuit of the thief. When I got to the top of the street, a witness that is here had him in his possession. We immediately took took him before the magistrate, and he sent him before your Lordship.

WILLIAM NOTT . On Saturday morning, about nine o'clock, I saw two lads by the prosecutor's. I live opposite to the prosecutor's. The other told the prisoner to go in. The other boy went in first and this boy went in afterwards. The prisoner came out, and seeing me cross the way, he dropped a paper parcel he had brought out and ran. I ran after him, and called stop thief, and a young man a sailor stopped him, and I gave him in charge of the officer who is here.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am the officer, the prisoner was delivered into my charge, and I produce the property which I had from the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined six month , and fined one shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-76

253. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously sealing, on the 16th of October , one handkerchief, 4s. the property of William Wyatt , and one hundred and twenty-three promissory notes, for payment of five pound each, value 615l. one hundred and sixtyone other promissory notes, for payment of two pound each, value 322l. nine hundred and sixty-three other promissory notes, for payment of one pound each, value 963l. the property of Robert Williams , William Williams , William Muffat the younger, and William Hugh Burgess .

Other counts varying the manner of laying the charge.

HENRY BROWN . I am the managing partner of the Windsor Bank. Henry Brown and James Coombs , are the other partners. I know a person named James Allen . He is a clerk to Messrs. Williams and company. I know Wyatt, the driver of the Windsor coach . I had given him directions to bring a parcel of notes of the Windsor Bank down to us.

JAMES ALLEN . I am clerk to Messrs. Williams and company. I gave one hundred and twenty-five five pound notes, one hundred and sixty-one two pound notes, and nine hundred and sixty-three one pound notes, to William Wyatt . They were all Windsor Bank notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. WALFORD. Will the London banker s pay these notes - A. This parcel of them that I gave to Wyatt, were to be re-issued.

MR. ALLEY. You know that these had run time enough to be reissuable - A. Yes, but some were cancelled, though the greater part of them were reissuable.

WILLIAM WYATT . I am coachman of the coach called the Windsor Union coach. In consequence of some directions, I called at the banking-house of Messrs. Williams, in Birching-lane, on the 16th of October, I called there for a parcel, which I received. It was a brown paper parcel, sealed; I kept it in my hand, and when I got out, I put it into my silk handkerchief and carried it in my hand all the way to Piccadilly. My coach went from the Cross-Keys, Wood-street; that is our city inn. When I was in Lombard-street, in putting out my handkerchief, I pulled out a piece of paper, and a gentleman, who I have since learned, was Roberts, picked it up and gave it to me; I said thank you sir, it is of no value. I then tied the parcel up in my handkerchief on my knee; that gentleman saw me tying it. After this I walked on. As I went along, I went into a place where they were selling pictures by auction; when I came out, I saw the same gentleman again. I then went to the Cross-keys to see if the coach was gone on to Piccadilly. I then went on, and in about twenty minutes I saw the same person again. I had the parcel in my hand when I got up to the Gloucester Coffee-house, Piccadilly . I then put it in the house while I looked out for my passengers. I then went in again and fetched this parcel out and gave it to Mrs. Flowers in the coach, and told her to take great care of it, for it was of great value. She said she would. The parcel was exactly in the same state from the time I received it at the bankers, to the time I gave it to Mrs. Flowers in the coach. I put in the seat by her. When I took it out of the Gloucester Coffee-house to put it into the coach, it was in the same state.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. The notes were not passable. I stopped at the Bolt in Tun, Fleet-street, and there I did not shew my parcel.

Q. Did you not say if you had the value of that parcel, you never would be a coachman again - A. No, I will be upon my oath I did not. I went up with it to the Gloucester Coffee-house, and put it in the office. I did not see it all the time it was there; I have not been turned away on account of loosing this parcel. I started from Piccadilly at a quarter before three, only loosing this parcel, I delayed a little. It was a few minutes before three that I missed the parcel.

Examined by the COURT. I will take my oath that it was the same when I delivered it into Mrs. Flower's hand, as it was when I received it at the banker's.

REBECCA FLOWERS . My husbands name is Eli Flowers . On the 16th of October last, I was in the

last witnesses's coach, at the Gloucester Coffee-house. The coachman gave me a parcel to take care of, whilst the coach was standing there. That parcel was tied up in a red silk handkerchief. At the time he gave it to me, there was one old gentleman sat on the other side of the coach. The coachman gave it to me in my lap. After I had the care of that parcel, the prisoner at the bar came to me for it; it was not many minutes after. I heard him open the coach door. I looked round, and he had just then got his hand on the parcel. I had put it on the seat by my side. It was on my left side. He said, 'here is my parcel, that is just right.' I said; no sir, it is Mr. Wyatt's, and leaned towards the door. He said,'oh, no ma'am, it is my parcel; it is all right;' and he went away and shut the door. He took the parcel. I had seen him half an hour before at the Gloucester Coffee-house door; he was dressed in a green coat, a light waistcoat, and had a great coat hanging on his left arm, quite a light coloured traveller's coat. Such as to give him the appearance of a traveller. I looked round directly to try if I could see the coachman. The coachman was coming out of the coach-office, with a paper in his hand; I called him. I said Wyatt, the gentleman has got his parcel. He said, what parcel? I told him what had happened. I had a good opportunity of seeing his side face, and his full face, and I have not the least doubt that the prisoner is the man. I attended the first examination at Queen-square, I saw a man of the name of Roberts there. After Robert's had been admitted to bail, White, a short gentleman, and Mr. Bellows the attorney, came down to my house. I live at a place called Mills. Only these three came down. I did not expect any visit from them. It was twelve o'clock on New Years Day that they came. Mr. Bellows came in first and made an apology for troubling me; he said, he had brought two friends with him, or something to that effect. He asked me was I not the person who was in the coach at the time the parcel was taken; I told him that I was. He asked me if I thought Wyatt had any hand in it; I told him, I thought him as innocent as myself. He asked me if I thought that he,(himself,) was the man who took the parcel; I said, no; he was too old, and too tall. He said, he had brought two friends with him, who had disagreeable reflections cast on their characters, and he had brought; them down for me to see them; I said, I was very sorry. He asked me what I thought of the short man, who sat close to him; I said, I did not think it was him. He said, what do you think of the other gentlemen,(meaning White,) and I then looked at White, and was just going to say, neither do I think it is him, but when I looked at him, he struck me in his appearence, and I said, you are the height and the complection of the man who robbed the coach; but I dare say it is not you, for I thought they were all Mr. Brown's friends, and I was sorry to say or to think any thing against the man. I took it they came from Mr. Brown. I said, I thought he was rather lustier than the man who robbed the coach; he was a bigger bellied man, and rather bigger. I am sure the prisoner is the man. He is much thinner now to what he was when he came down to my house. But I am sure he is the man who came down; it was the following Sunday I saw Mr. Brown, and then I went to London. I am sure he is the man I saw at Queen-square, and he took the parcel I am sure.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Wyatt lived at Great Marlow; I know that the poor man lost his place. Mr. Brown was the banker; I never knew him before. I knew the coachman nearly thirty years. I did not at Queen-square swear positively to the prisoner; I thought his complection was the same.

Q. Did not the magistrate tell you to look at his nose - A. Yes, and I said I did not recollect his nose; he was made to speak at the office; but I did not remember his voice, as he spoke so low at the coach. I don't recollect that he was told to put on his hat. I was very much confused, and never was before a magistrate or a court. I am very sure it is the same man. I was above half an hour under examination at the office; Sir Patrick Colquhoun examined me. The prisoner stood in a full clear light; I had full time and leisure to examine him, and I said, I would not swear positively. I had no acquaintance with him before. I did not like to swear to him; I was very much hurt to do so; but I don't know why, unless it was, that I had never done such a thing before.

Q. Did not the magistrate put the question repeatedly to you, whether you would swear to him, and did you not refuse - A. Twice he did so; I don't recollect more.

Q. Did you not positively swear he was not the man - A. They came down to take me in, and if I had known, they should not have come in.

Q. Did you not say at your house, that you was sure he was not the man - A. I don't recollect that I said such a word as sure; I won't swear I did not use it; I might in the course of conversation. Nobody has spoken to me a single word. I had at first, made a resolution never to swear to any one; but afterwards I thought that when I knew who the man was, if I did not swear to him. I should not have done my duty. If I had not sworn to the prisoner, I should not have sworn the truth.

JAMES JONES . I live at the parish of Bray, in Berkshine. I was going from London on the Windsor coach, on the 16th of October; I was at the Gloucester coffee-house, with that coach; I was outside; I was sitting there whilst it was waiting for passengers; it was nearly opposite the door of the Gloucester coffee-house; I should think it was waiting there half an hour. I knew who the last witness was; I recollect she was in the inside of the coach on that day. I have been examined at Queen-square after White was taken into custody. I recollect that I saw a man at first standing up by the door of the coffee-house; he had a sort of a green coat on, and a drab coat hung on his left arm; for some time he came and stood near the door; he then moved towards the coach, and went towards the tail of the coach; I saw him look towards the coach, and he could look into the coach, and I thought from his dress, and from his moving about, that he was coming on the coach as a passenger;

there were a great many people about at the time. From the length of time I saw him, and the observation I made on his person, I think the prisoner is the man. I observed his countenance; he looked up towards toe coach several times; he looked up at the coach I dare say six, eight, or ten times; I had a complete opportunity of observing his countenance. The last time I saw him was at the hinder part of the coach; I did not see him afterwards that day. I believe the prisoner to be the man. He had not been missing many minutes, when he was brought to my recollection, and in consequence of what passed between Wyatt and Mrs. Flowers; the coachman seemed in a great rage, and she was in tears. She referred to me, and asked me if I recollected the person, and I said I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. WALFORD. This man was a perfect strangers to me. I said at Queen-square, I could speak to him out of a few, but not out of a great many.

WILLIAM MILLER . I keep the Crown-inn, at Egham. On the 1st of November last, I recollect two persons coming to my house. Some time after that, I went to Queen-square; Roberts was in custody at that time Afterwards I saw White there. Roberts was one who had come to my house on the 1st of November; I could not swear to White. I only saw a glimpse of the other man's back as he was going out.

JOSEPH WATSON . I am clerk to Hull and Company, the Uxbridge bankers. I believe I have seen the prisoner before: but I can't swear. On the 3rd of November, about twelve or one o'clock, two persons came into our bank, one got a bill on London for forty pounds, the other for fifty-five pounds; we were paid for them in Windsor and other bank notes; there were fifteen one-pound Windsor bank notes paid with others for the first, and twenty-two for the second. I think the prisoner is the man who came first; I would not swear. There are two banks at Windsor; but these notes were Brown and Coombs.

JOHN NELSON LAVENDER . I know the prisoner White; I have known him seven or eight years; he lived in Lisle-street, Liecester-square; that was his residence. I recollect the robbery of the Windsor coach; I went in a week or ten days after to the prisoner's house; I could not find him; I searched at places where he used to go, but did not see him. I did not make enquires at these places; I saw him in about a month. I recollect Roberts being examined; I apprehended him. The prisoner did not surrender until after Roberts was bailed.

THOMAS MACE . I have here a new black coat; I have not the great coat; I found a white drab coat, a kind of farmer's coat.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I found a large box coat.

Objections were taken by MR. WALFORD and MR. ADOLPHUS, as counsel for the prisoner, as to the value of the notes stolen, they having been actually paid at the bankers in London, and being when stolen, on their way to be re-issued; but they were over-rulled by the Court.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of this charge, as a child sucking at a woman's breast, on my God.

JOHN ROSE . I am a lighterman; White applied to me to be bail for him. For that purpose I went with the prisoner and Mr. Bellows, on the first of January, to Temple. somewhere by Marlow. I went to the house of Mrs. Flowers; the prisoner was dressed with a black coat and a dark waistcoat. He did not appear thicker than usual. I don't believe he had used any thing to make him look bigger. I went to the house of Mrs. Flowers; I saw her; the prisoner White saw her, and she saw him. Mr. Bellows said, he came respecting the parcel that was taken, and he said, that a gentleman's name had been mentioned at the Police Office, Queen-square, and she said she should know the man perfectly well. if she saw him; for she had twenty minutes, or near half an hours view of him. Mr. Bellows asked her if she thought he was the man; she said she did not. He was too old, and too tall. He then asked her if she thought I was the man, and she said no. He then asked her if she thought White was the man, and she said no, I don't think that is the man. Mr. Bellows told White to get up for her to examine him, and after she had examined him, she said she was positively sure that was not the man; that the man was a taller man than Mr. White, and not so dark. This was about twelve o'clock; it was perfectly light. White left his address; he wrote it down. In consequence of this, I became bail for him, and appeared several times.

Cross-examined by MR. POOLEY. I have known White several years. and never knew him called by any other name. I have not been in the habit of seeing him very often during the time I have known him; I may have seen him once or twice in three months; sometimes I called at his house, and sometimes he called at mine. I believe a person named M'Gibbery was the other bail. White applied to me to be bail, and not Mr. Bellows; I had seen him frequently at his own house after the 16th of October; I don't know what he is; I don't know how he supports himself. I went down with him when I understood he was under suspicion, to hear if there was any thing against him. before I went bail for him; he did not positively tell me that he should want bail. but he said, he believed he should. I went down to examine her, to see as far as her knowing Mr. White; I don't know why we did not take the other bail; he might have gone if he liked. I don't know Roberts. I don't recollect a word of Mr. Bellows saying two of his friends had unpleasant reflections cast on them. For the last seven years the prisoner has lived at Lisle-street, it is a shop-window; I don't think that he carries on any business there, not that I know of. Mrs. Flowers said at first she did not think he was the man, and after she had examined him, she said, she was quite sure he was not. I can't tell where the prisoner was living for a month before I went bail for him; he had been in my boose in the course of that month, but not every week; he had slept at our house once or twice during the month, but not every night.

Re-examined by MR. WALFORD. I don't know whether he had lodgers. My hesitation in becoming his hail, was to ascertain whether that charge was true or false, and on finding Mrs. Flowers said he was nto the man, I became bail for him.

-PETZOLD. I am a watchmaker; I live at No. 1, Smith's-buildings, Bunhill-row; I have one man under me. In the course of last October. I went to Mr. Palmore, with a watch, at 34, Charles-street, Goswell-street, City-road; I took the watch, it wanted twenty minutes to three o'clock, just as I knocked at the door; I made no memorandum what day of the month it was; I am positive it was on a Monday; when I went in, Mr. Palmore was at home; the prisoenr was there, and sat with his back towards the parlour window; the prisoner was at dinner with him. Mr. Palmore asked me to sit down, and he would settle with me: I sat there until half past three, before I was settled with. White was there the whole time, and Mrs. Palmore was there. I was settled with a little before half past three, very nearly; I was coming out of the passage, and had got to the street door, when Mr. Palmore called me back, and asked me which way I was going; I told him along the City-road, and he asked me if I would take two great coats under my arm along the City-road, and he would over-take me; I did so; I walked to the end of that street very nearly, before I saw them come out of the street door; I walked along the City-road before them, until I came near the Lying-inn-hospital; then Mr. Palmore called me back, and said, this gentleman, (meaning Mr. White,) is going to give you his watch to repair; which he did, a gold watch, and two gold seals: I only walked just across Old-street-road, and there there is a livery-stable, and they went in there, and I saw them no more. I can recollect is must be near the middle of October; I have a ticket for a diamond, with the name of Wicks upon it, dated the 27th of October, and I am sure it was about a fortnight before the date of that. White called for his watch; but it was nto done, and I delivered it to Mr. Palmore when it was done, and he paid me four shillings and sixpence.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. This ticket is signed Mr. Brown junior; he is not here. Mr. Wicks is not here. This was a jewel left at my house, with this ticket; I did not file this ticket; I returned it to Mr. Wicks, and went for it last week. Mr. Palmore is a hawking pedlar; I have seen his license; I must have been at his house more than a dozen times; he is a general dealer in jewellery, and so forth; I have sold him two or three watches. There were Mr. Palmore. his wife, Mrs. Jones, and the prisoner at dinner, when I went in; they had a turkey and pickled pork, there might be also greens and potatoes: I drank nothing, except coming out at the passage, Mr. Palmore gave me a glass of gin; they all appeared to me perfectly sober; the turkey was boiled.

THOMAS BRICKUEL . I keep a livery-stable, in the the City-road. Mr. Palmore kept a horse and gig at my stables. On the 16th of October last, he came to my stables, with the prisoner; they came alone, and I think in a few minutes after, a person brought two great coats: I know if to be the 16th of October, by my books: there is my own entry that the chaised and horse went out on the 16th. and came back on the 18th; Mr. Palmore and Mr. White both went together: I don't know whether they returned together; the chaise was ordered at three o'clock, it was ready waiting under the ride; as near as I can recollect it waited half an hour; they started as near about half past three as possible. Our stables from the Gloucester coffee-house are three or four miles.

Cross-examined by MR. POOLEY. I had never seen White before, that I know of.

WILLIAM WINCH . I was in the service of the last witness in October last; then Mr. Palmore kent a horse and gig at our stables; I recollect him and the prisoner coming to our stable particularly, it was on a Monday; some great coats came nearly at the same time; I don't recollect the person who brought them; it was at about half past three that they came. I had had the gig prepared some times before; it had been prepared by Mr. Palmore's orders; it came home on the Wadnesday evening; I had sat up for it on the Tuesday night, but it did not come home. I am sure the prisoner was the other gentleman; I had seen him before.

JOHN WINCHESTER . I am hostler at the New Cross-inn, on the road to Maidstone. I know the prisoner Mr. White, and I know Mr. Palmore. I remember their coming to our house in October last; they were going in a horse and chaise towards Maidstone; it might be a quarter or twenty minutes after four, or somewhere there away; it was on a Monday; my birth-day was the next day, my birthday is on the 17th of October, which is Maidstone Fair. I watered their horse; I think they took something in the chaise; I remember their returning to Town after the Fair, but won't be positive; they called again, and I watered their horse. One of them bought a horse from Mr. Rolph, nearly opposite to our house. I lived once at the Three Tuns at Maidstone.

Cross-examined by MR. POOLEY. They might have stopped ten minutes; the horse did not look hot; he did not want a cloth over him; they told me to un-bear him, and give him some water, and asked me how far it was to Maidstone. The horse they bought was deal for at our house. I know where Piccadilly is, but I don't know how far it isfrom that to New Cross. Mr. Palmore was a good customer, he used always to give me sixpence; it was on a Monday that they called.

MARY JONES . I worked for Mr. Palmore's wife, in October last. I remember the prisoner being there about the middle of October; it was on a Monday; he came there at about two o'clock in the day; he and Mr. Palmore came in together; the dinner was to have been ready exactly at two o'clock, but it was not ready until a little after; there were Mr. Palmore, his wife, the prisoner, and myself, to dinner; before dinner was over, there was a man came in with a watch-case; he stopped ther until half after three Mr. Palmore and the prisoner went out; the watchmaker went out, and carried their great coats; I

went and fetched them for them; I heard them say that they were going to Maidstone Fair. I went home with a bonnet to Mrs. Palmore in the morning, and she asked me to stop to assist her in cooking the dinner, because she was disappointed of a servant. I am a bonnet maker. There was a roast turkey, and pickled pork; there was nothing else but greens and potatoes

Corss-examined by MR. ALLEY. I am positive it was on a Monday; Mrs. Palmore had been without a servant a week or a fortnight. I am positive the turkey was roast; it was not boiled; there were no sausages round it; it was not hung in chain; there was a pair of watch-cases; I believe the watchmaker had had them to gild, but I don't know; I don't think I ever saw the prisoner before that time. The watch-maker said he brought a pair of watchcases; it was not a watch, I am sure of it.

GUILTY , aged 36

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-77

254. ROBERT FENLON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a hat, value 6s. the property of John Swan , from the person of Henry Swan .

HENRY SWAN . I am the son of John Swan ; I live at No. 8, Brunswick-street, Hackney-road. At about a quarter before eight in the evening of the 11th of last January, I was going down the Hackney-road , home, and just as I was going to cross the road, two persons came behind me, and one took my hat off my head, and they both ran off; I could not see either of their faces. I called out stop thief, and then they threw an old hat of one of them away; it was not mine; they ran down a place where there were some gardens and huts. I told some persons standing round what had happened, and gave them my address, and soon after they came to my father's house, and in consequence of something they told me, I went down to the watchhouse, and found the prisoner in custody there, and saw my hat.

JOHN POLLARD . I am a weaver; I live in Loggerhead-late. On the 11th of last month, I was at my mother's, in Cooper's-gardens; and the prisoner came and knocked at my mother's door; it might be a hundred yards from the spot where the young man says he was robbed of his hat. The prisoner had an apron on then; he had one of his shoes in his hand, and asked if any shoe-maker lived there; we told him no, that we were weavers. With that he shut the door, and put his shoe down on the floor, and put it on,and went into the next room; then he looked there twice, and pulled the hat off his head, and swung it about twice. I asked him what business he had going into the next room, and he said, don't turn me out, I am only playing at hoop, and he said if I turned him out, they would catch him.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Whipped , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-78

255. ALEXANDER CHAMBER, alias HENRY PRICE , was indicted for felony .

But the prosecutor not appearing , the Jury found him.

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-79

256. WILLIAM BLAKE and WILLIAM TURNBULL were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , one shirt, value 2s. one jacket, value 11s. one pair of trowsers, value 7s. one pair of pantaloons, value 5s. five pairs of stockings, value 5s. nine handkerchiefs, value 9s. one towel, value 1s. one pair of drawers, value 2s. one flannel shirt, value 2s. one prayer book, value 1s. two apprentices indentures, value 2s. and eleven 1l. bank notes , the property of James Todd .

JAMES TODD . I am master of a ship . The prisoners belonged to her. On the 27th of January, the vessel was lying in Shadwell Dock-tier , and I was on shore; I left all the things mentioned in the indictment in my trunk, which was broken open. When I came on board again, I heard it had been broken open.

RICHARD WEATHERSTONE . I belong to same ship. At about half past ten on the night of the 27th, they had had leave to go on shore, and seemed very much intoxicated; at about twelve o'clock. the boy came tto me, and told me the two Bills were going to run away; I got up, and found they were in the boat, and had cut the headfast.

ADAM HIGH . I saw a boat coming towards the shore, with the two prisoners and Weatherstone in it. Seeing there were two bundles, I asked where they were going, and they said, to the washer-woman; but seeing they were jackets and trowsers, I proceeded up the river to the office. I asked Weatherstone how he came to be in the boat being naked, and he told me. I found the bundles contained the clothes stated in the indictment.

BLAKE, GUILTY , aged 25.

TURNBULL, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-80

257. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , one hundred pounds weight of lead, value 30s. the property of John Herbage , and then fixed to a building of his .

It appeared the building to which the lead was affixed, did not belong to John Herbage .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-81

258. SUSANNAH SOUTHWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , two three shilling tokens, value 6s. and two penny pieces, five halfpence, and one farthing, the property of Joseph Cotton , from his person .

JOSEPH COTTON . I am a hatter ; at about half past eleven o'clock on the night of the 17th of last month, I was in the Curtain-road, and saw the prisoner, who solicited me to go home with her. I had been drinking, but not so intoxicated, but I knew what I knew what I was about. The prisoner finding I would not go home with her, requested me to to give her a glass of gin; I gave her one at the

Horse and Groom in the Curtain-road ; I am a married man, and have a family; I had my money in my pocket, and was then proceeding home; I had not got a dozen yards before I missed my money; he was not far from me, and I charged her with the watch; she denied taking it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-82

259. JAMES ROBINSON and CHARLOTTE DAVEY were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January . one bonnet, value 10s. two yards of linen, value 4s. two shirts, value 2s. five handkerchiefs, 5s. one cloak, value 2s. two pair of stockings, value 1s. and one bunch of keys, value 5s. the property of John Heming .

ELIZABETH HEMING . I am the wife of John Heming, who is a brush-maker , and lives in Broad-court, Covent-garden . These things were taken out of a cup-board in our dining-room.

ELIZABETH WOODMAN . I know both the prisoners at the bar. I saw them at my mistress's house between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of the 30th of January; they came to ask for lodgings. I shewed them into the dining-room on the first floor. There was a bill up for lodgings. I left them in the room whilst I went down to tell my mistress that they wanted lodgings. I returned, and then the man had gone away. and left the woman standing in the room. My mistress did not come up at all. I immediately missed the keys of the cup-board, and said neither he or she should be there, and she immediately ran down after him. Then we sent for a blacksmith to pick the lock of the cup-board, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment.

JOSIAH SHERGOLD . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoners in Gray's-inn-lane, on the 30th of January, charged with another robbery. I applied to Mrs. Heming the same evening. On the man I found a straw bonnet; it was in his bosom. In his hat I found two shirts, in his pocket I found four handkerchiefs and the keys, also two pair of stockings and a small purse; all claimed by Mrs. Heming. I found a silk handkerchief on the woman, between her bonnet and her head; the cloak I found close to where she stood, on the ground I found them both in a pawnbroker's passage. The man ran away at first, but I purshed him and brought him back.

ROBINSON, GUILTY , aged 22.

DAVEY, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-83

260. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one boot, value 1l. the property of John Mann .

JOHN MANN . I live at No. 11, Rose-street, Soho . At about noon, on the 31st of January, in consequence of some information I received, I missed my boot from my door. The prisoner was pointed out to me by a little girl. I told him he had better tell who stole the boot.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-84

261. JOHN GOOTHERN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , one sheet, value 4s. and one blanket, value 4s. the property of George Bacon , in a lodging-room .

MARTHA BACON . The prisoner had a lodging at our house, on the 24th of January, and on his coming down stairs between nine and ten o'clock the next morning; I asked him to stay until somebody went up stairs to see that all was left right. He said he would, but the moment I turned my back, he made his escape out of the door. I followed him, and stopped him, and took the sheer and blanket from him.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-85

262. JOHN BARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one silk handkerchief, value 10s. the property of John Gold , and James Baber , the younger, privately in their shop .

MATILDA RICHMOND. I attend in the shop of Messrs. John Gold and James Baber . It is a childbed linen warehouse. On the 26th of January. between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came into our shop; another youth was with him. We had silk handkerchiefs hanging up in our shop window. To the best of my recollection the lamps were lighted. They asked for a stiffner for a cravat. I shewed him some, and he objected to the price; and said it was very dear; I told him to go into the Strand where he would meet with some cheaper. This boy said nothing; he stood very silently, near where the handkerchiefs were hanging in the window, and by the side of the other boy. On my telling the bigger boy that he could get one cheaper in the Stroun, the both went away. Mr. Hawkesworth just then came in; Mr. Hawkesworth and I were the only persons in the shop. I missed the handkerchief, I told Mr. Hawkesworth to pursue them. In the course of five minutes, Mr. Hawkesworth returned with the prisoner. I am quite sure that this boy was in the shop, and standing near the window where the handkerchief was. They went close to each other; but this boy was nearest the handkerchief. My attention was engaged by the boy buying the stiffner. I am sure the two boys came in together. I can't swear I saw the boy take the handkerchief; but I am sure one of thom must have taken it.

WILLIAM HEPRY HAWKESWORTH . I called in at the shop by accident. Upon Miss Richmond's request, I went out and saw the two boys running, and I immediately pursued them. They turned down Ryder-street, St. James's-street; at the corner of a street in Berry-street, I overtook the least of the two; he was behind the other. He had at the time I took him, a silk handkerchief in his hand, which he was endeavouring to conceal.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 9.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-86

263. ANN BATCHELOR and CHARLES HENRY MINERS were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , two blankets, value 5s. the property of

Sarah Green , widow, in a lodging-room.

SARAH GREEN . I am a widow . I live in Angel and Porter court, Golden-lane . I let lodgings ready furnished. I let a lodging ready furnished to Ann Batchelor , or Miners. She goes by the same name. She was to pay me 4s. 6d. a week, and I was to see the property whenever I pleased. Miners came to the lodging the same night that she came. On the Monday morning she came down to borrow two shillings, which I told her I could not lend to her. I knew no other but that they were man and wife. In the course of the 22d I went up stairs to see my property, and the room was locked. I looked through the aperture between the bottom of the door and the floor, and saw a man's foot by the side of the fire. I called, 'Miner, open the door.' I said I would break it open. The young man said, 'don't do that, Mrs. Green, I will open it.' He did so, and I walked in, and let down the bed, and found my blankets gone.

GEORGE TURVEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live at 26, Great Surrey-street, Blackfriars Road. I took in these blankets (producing them) on the 16th of January. The prisoner, Charles Miners, pawned them.

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable. In consequence of information, I apprehended Miners in Gravel-lane, Surrey Road, and found on him the duplicate for these blankets.

DAVID ATCHESON . I was sent for, and apprehended the prisoner Ann Batchelor . I asked her what she had done with the property, and she said she had not taken it, but that the man who cohabited with her had.

BATCHELOR, NOT GUILTY ,

MINERS, GUILTY , aged 19.

Imprisoned a month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-87

264. EDWARD GIRLING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Lea , at about nine in the night of the 17th of February , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein one tin hoop, value 1s. three patty pans, value 9d. four cakes. value 2s. 3d. and three pies, value 1s. his property .

HENRY WICKS . I am a journeyman confectioner, and work for Mr. Lea, at 34, Wigmore-street, Cavendish Square . On Saturday night last, at about half past nine, I was at supper with Mr. and Mrs. Lea in the parlour, and looking towards the shop I observed the sash thrown up, and a hand taking something from the window. I made towards the door, and saw the prisoner and another lad running from the window. I followed him down to Marylebone lane, and took him by the collar, and asked him what he had in his hand; he said he had thrown it away. I brought him back to the shop, but missed nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-88

265. HANNAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , eight shirts, value 24s. one shift, value 2s. two sheets, value 5s. and three table-cloths, value 6s. the property of Francis Hayward .

FRANCIS HAYWARD . I reside in Burton-place. in the New Road . I am of no business or profession. The prisoner was a servant of mine. She had lived with me upwards of two years, and was employed in washing some linen the week before Christmas. After that the linen in question was missed, and was not forthcoming. He was questioned by me repeatedly concerning it, and made various equivocating replies; that it was gone to be ironed; that it was taken to be mangled. I then taxed her with having pawned it, and she gave up three duplicates. I went to the pawnbroker's and identified the linen. Under an impression that she was connected with others, I went to the Police-office, and Mr. Leach committed her for a week, and then her father came up from Denbigh. She always conducted herself with honesty in my service.

GEORGE SQUIBB . Mr. Hayward brought her to me on the 12th, and she gave up the tickets first to Mr. Hayward, and afterwards she gave me three tickets. On asking her how she could be so foolish as to bring herself into so unfortunate a situation, I learned that she had pawned almost all her own things to purchase Lottery tickets - I suppose of the Little Go.

JAMES DREW . I produce some of the property pawned at our house, and two of the duplicates found on the prisoner, given to the person who pawned them.

THOMAS BATEMAN . I produce seven shirts and two table-cloths, pawned in the names of Harris and Smithson. I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 23.

Recommended to mercy .

Mr. Hayward having kindly declared that he would take her back into his service, believing her conduct would be altered in future, his Lordship, after warning her of the dangerous situation in which she would be if she was again brought before the Court, mercifully sentenced her only to be fined a shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-89

266. ANN READ was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , five yards of calico, value 2s. 6d. one pair of stockings, value 2s. one lace collar, value 5s. two pieces of muslin, value 5s. and one pocket, value 2d. the property of Henry Hunsden .

ELIZABETH HUNSDEN . I live at 17, Brook-street, Holborn . My husband keeps a potatoe warehouse . The prisoner was a servant of mine; and on the 21st of January, in consequence of missing several things, I went up stairs to search his bed-room. Under a bed, that is to say, between the bed and the mattress, I found a bag, with some silver, halfpence, and a lace collar. I also found some calico. I then went down stairs to where she had slept the night before, and found a pair of stockings, some muslin, and a pocket handkerchief. Then I sent for an officer, having missed a great many other things that I could not find. The stockings, and the other things, were between the mattress and the bed where she slept.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I apprehended the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a most excellent character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-90

266. EDWARD BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , one pair of trowsers, value 5s. one pair of stockings, value 6d. one shirt, value 6d. one razor, value 6d. one pair of scissors, value 2d. two knives, value 4d. and one needle-case, value 1d. the property of Matthew Cox .

MATTHEW COX . I belong to the Acorn brig , and on the day in the indictment, she layed in the London Docks ; all these things were in the forecastle; I saw the prisoner on board a ship lying alongside us. I went down into the cabin, and heard a noise in the forecastle, and soon after, I went on deck, and asked the prisoner what he had been doing; he was on board our vessel; he said nothing. When I went down, I found the things all out of my chest, and the lock of it forced off; all the things stated in the indictment were gone; I went on deck immediately, and asked where the prisoner was; he had gone on shore. I ran on shore immediately, and saw him going before me; when he saw me coming after him, he ran, and I cried stop thief; he had my trowsers, a shirt, and stockings; I can swear to the trowsers.

DANIEL CLEMENTS . I am the constable of the gate, and stopped the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined three months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-91

267. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two sheets, value 12s. the property of Alexander Cameron .

ALEXANDER CAMERON . I keep the Three Lords in the Minories . on the night of the 16th of January, the prisoner applied at my house, between nine and ten at night, for a lodging; he had one. Between nine and ten the next morning, he came down stairs, and walked out of the house quickly. I told the servant to look into the room in which he had slept, to see if all was right; in consequence of what she told me after examining, I pursued the prisoner, and overtook him at the bottom of Little Minories; he objected to coming back, and stated that he had paid for his lodgings, and what he had had. I brought him back, and my attention being called to some company, he ran off again. I pursued him, and brought him back, and sent for an officer. Being pressed hard for an account of what he had done with the sheets, after denying all knowledge of them many times, he said he had thrown them into the corner of the room from which he had made his escape, and there was found one.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined three months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-92

268. GEORGE BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a brass candlestick, value 3s. the property of William Edwick .

WILLIAM EDWICK . I live at the sign of the Porto Bello, in St. Martin's-lane . In the evening of the 7th of February, the prisoner was in my house, and having observed him go to the back yard several times in a very short time, I kept my eye on him, and at last he was going to return into the room where he had been sitting; I observed something sticking out under his coat, and on examining him, he pulled out the end of the candlestick; I immediately sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-93

269. HENRY PERRY and HENRY JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , one saucepan, value 2s. the property of William Childs .

WILLIAM CHILDS . I am an ironmonger , and live at North Horton-street . I was standing in a room adjoining my shop on the evening of the 12th of January, when William Barrett brought the prisoner Perry into the shop, with the saucepan.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the evening of the 12th of January, I was in company with Woodroffe and Barrett. We observed the prisoner Perry in company with another, in Soho. Presently the prisoner Johnson came from Comptonstreet, and joined them; they went through different places, trying various shops, until they came to the prosecutor's. They then walked to and fro before the door. Barret, I, and Woodroffe concealed ourselves. The two prisoners stood outside while the other man went in and brought out something like s copper saucepan; but we could not distinctly see, as we were a considerable distance off. Woodroffe followed that man, and the two prisoners stopped behind. We did not take them then, in hopes that the other man might again join them. The two prisoners walked round Park-lane, and through the square to the prosecutor's house again. After being there some time, both prisoners went into the shop; then they came out; I was standing at the square end of the street, and Woodroffe and Barret at the other end. Before I could get up to them, Barret had got Perry, who had chucked a saucepan away, and was fighting with him. I called him by his name, and told him to be quiet. We did not take Johnson until two days after. He made his escape, and I found him at the Wheatsheaf, Drury-lane. As we followed them, it rained dreadfully, and we were wet through.

WILLIAM BARRET . I am not an officer. On the 12th of last month, I was in company with Johnson and Woodroffe. Knowing the two prisoners and the other man, we followed them. They made several attempts at a number of shops, and when they came to the prosecutor's, they walked to and fro; the account Johnson has given is perfectly correct. I caught Perry with the saucepan. He made great reresistance, but I took him into the shop.

GEORGE WOODROFFE . I went after the man who is not in custody, but could not overtake him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PERRY, GUILTY , aged 18.

JOHNSON, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-94

270. JOHN BUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , one watch, value 3l. the property of Hugh Sutherland , from his person .

HUGH SUTHERLAND . I belong to the third garrison battalion , so does the prisoner. I was on guard on the 14th of January, at the West India Docks . I was sleeping on the guard-bed in the watch-house, and my watch was taken from me between nine o'clock at night, and one o'clock in the morning. When the guard was relieved. I gave the number of the watch to the pawnbroker.

THOMAS WOOLSTONHOLME. I am journeyman to Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker, No. 128, Minories. The prisoner at the bar brought a watch to pledge, and seeing it answered the description of the one stolen, we sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-95

271. JOHN MANUEL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a shirt, value 2s. the property of Robert Dangreen .

ROBERT DANGREEN . I lost my shirt from the back room two pair of stairs; the prisoner had lodged with me.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I apprehended the prisoner; I found the shirt pawned at Mr. Dicker's for a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-96

272. MARTHA GALLAGON was indicted for staling, on the 30th of January, three gowns, value 14s. two handkerchiefs, value 3s. and one shawl, value 2s. the property of Charlotte Farmer , spinster .

CHARLOTTE FARMER . When I lost these things, Martha Gallagon was in my room; I went out, leaving her to go of an errant. As I was coming in again, I met her coming down stairs, but did not know she had my property.

PATRICK O'NEIL . I appreheeded the prisoner, she was fighting with another woman in Bucket-street; part of the property was on her, and part she had taken off to fight. She said she had pledged the rest, and told us where the pawnbroker lived.

JOHN BAGULEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Daubrase, pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a gown with me.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-97

273. JEREMIAH O'SHEE was indicted for felony , but no prosecutor appearing , he was found.

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-98

274. JOHN GARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , six tea-spoons, value 14s. two table spoons, value 20s. and one pair of sugar tongs, value 5s. the property of Mary Ann Nixon , spinster .

MARY ANN NIXON . I lost these things on the 30th of September. I had met the prisoner, and walked with him in the city and Islington-road , fourteen or fifteen times previous to the 38th of September, when I asked him home, it was about nine o'clock at night, and left him in my room while I went out for some porter. On my return again, I met him coming out, and asked him if he was going to stay, and he said he would return again in a minute. On my going up stairs I missed my property in question from the table drawer.

WILLIAM BEZANT . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pair of table spoons, six tea spoons, and a pair of sugar tongs; they were pledged in the name of John Tomkins originally, on the 31st of September; but since that, the ticket had been sold, and the interest paid in the name of Sarah Barker .

MICHAEL LYONS . I am an officer. On the evening of the 10th instant, I was standing in St. Paul's Church Yard; I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw a man run by me in a great hurry; I pursued him; he slipped down, upon which another man and I came up to him; it was the prisoner; immediately after, the young lady, who is the prosecutrix, came up, and charged him with stealing these articles.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-99

275. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , a waistcoat, value 2s. and a neckerchief, value 6d. the property of James Wildgooss .

JAMES WILDGOOSS . I am chief mate of the ship John , in the West India trade. I lost a waistcoat and handkerchief from on board; they were in the cabin. The prisoner belonged to the next ship to the John. I missed them on the Monday, immediately after my return to the ship; I suspected the prisoner, and the boy took him, and gave him in charge, and the handkerchief and waistcoat were found on his person.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-100

276. THOMAS PERRYN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one clock, value 30s. and one picture, value 5s. the property of Harry Philiips .

MOSES COHEN . I am a broker and salesman; I know the prisoner at the bar; I received from him a duplicate of a clock, about a fortnight before last Christmas. I afterwards went after the clock to the pawnbrokers, in Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place; it was Mr. Daubrise's; I got a clock there, and afterwards I pawned the same clock at the same place; I gave the duplicate to the pawnbroker when I re

deemed it. Afterwards when I pawned it again, I gave the duplicate to the prisoner.

HARRY PHILLIPS . I am an auctioneer . The prisoner had been in my employ two or three years I look at this clock. It was mine, It was in my own room. I had bought it for my private use, but had not used it. I did not miss it until I had received some information. I got it from Daubrise's. I asked the prisoner if he knew any thing of the clock, and he said, he was sorry to say he did. I then asked him where he had pledged it, but he would not acknowledge. I had a subsequent conversation with him, in which he acknowledged having given the duplicate of the clock to Cohen, and getting it back again, and where he pledged it. I also lost a picture. It was of some value; I should not like to have parted with it under 100l.

RAYMOND HENDERSON . I am a Clerk in the employ of Mr. Phillips. I left his service. I absconded, and went to Calais. I was followed thither, and brought back. After my return, I made a disclosure, which led to the discovery of the greater part of the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. When I absconded. I took goods to the amount of several thousands. I had not taken the goods in question, but had connived at the stealing. I was present at some thefts, and other I partook of.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-101

277. GEORGE CLERK was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , one silver mug, value 30s. the property of Harry Phillips .

The only evidence which affected the prisoner in this case was that of Henderson, the accomplice in the last case; and being in a similar situation in this, and his testimony not being corroborated, the Jury were directed to find the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-102

278. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , four three-shilling Bank tokens, an eighteen-penny Bank token, five shillings, ten penny pieces, and eight halfpence , the property of William Garrand .

WILLIAM GARRAND . I keep the Robin Hood, at Upper Clapton . The prisoner used to be about our house to assist my wife. I had missed a great deal of money out of my till. The prisoner slept three or four nights in my house, and the rest she used to sleep with her parents. In consequence of missing so much money, I marked some with G's and some with W's. We can't keep our till locked always. I left my bar in about an hour and a half, and left my wife at home. I had locked my bar. When I returned, I asked her for the key. When I opened the bar, I missed a three-shilling token and some halfpence. I then fetched an officer, and when he came, I charged the prisoner with having the money, and she said she had none. She did not serve in the bar. She was searched in my presence, and a three-shilling Bank token, a shilling, and a sixpence, all marked were found on her. She also had some half-pence which were marked. The shilling and the six-pence were both marked with a W. The three-shilling token was marked with a G.

GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and delivered to her friends.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-103

279. LUKE CORNER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 11th of January , twenty-nine coats, value 40l. eighteen waistcoats, value 4l. four jackets, value 2l. twenty-eight pairs of trowsers. value 9l. two gowns, value 6l. two sheets, value 15s. one shirt, value 5s. one handkerchief, value 3s. one cloak, value 1l. one spencer, value 15s. one ink-stand, value 5s. one tea-spoon, value 5s. one row of heads, value 30s. one silver milk-pot, value 2l. and one strainer, value 5s. being part, and parcel of certain goods, the property of Goodman Solomon , of which Thomas Turner was at these sessions convicted of feloniously and burglariously stealing, he well known them to have been so stolen .

GOODMAN SOLOMAN . I live in Field-lane. I have two houses, Nos. 4 and 22. The burglary was committed at No. 22, on the night of the 11th of January - I left all fastened and safe at night, and in the morning, a little after three, I saw it had been broken open. I saw part of the property stolen at the prisoner Corner's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. When I saw the goods in the house, I did not see the prisoner there.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. On the morning of the 12th of January, I apprehended some persons for a burglary. I apprehended the man named Turner, at about six, or a little after. He was convicted for the burglary at Solomon's, the other day I received some information from the accomplice, which led me to the prisoner's house, which is over a gateway, in Red-lion-court. He was not at home. I examined the first-floor of the house. When I entered the door, on the left hand, I saw a bedstead tied up to keep it in its place. I pulled down the bed, and found a great quantity of wearing apparel, men's and some women's, but I had not time to look over them. All of that was afterwards claimed by Solomons. A silver milk-pot, and plated strainer, were also found. They were also claimed by Solomons. I was also present when my brother officer, Brown, assisted by Barnley and Haylett, opened another bed in the room, a quantity of wearing apparel was also found in that, doubled up in the flocks. All this property Goodman Soloman's has since claimed.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. The door was fastened with a gimlet. I have no knowledge of my own that that was the prisoner's room.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am officer. I was along with the last witness, when we searched this room. It was Luke Corner's room. I live next door but one, and I am sure he was the person who inhabited it. I afterwards apprehended him.

JOHN BUTLER . On the night of the 11th of January, I was in company with Turner, who was convicted. We carried the greater part of the stolen property to the house of the prisoner, at about half past two in the morning. We journeyed to his

houses about five times. His son was one of the parties concerned in this burglary. The son and Hurley went up first. I was in the room several times. We told the prisoner that they came from Field-lane.

Cross-examined by Mr. BARRY. This is the third time I have been here to give evidence against my companions. For the last two months I have got my bread by thieving.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-104

280. WILLIAM STEWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , two jackets, value 13s. the property of Richard Barry .

RICHARD BARRY . I am a seafaring-man . On the 3rd of this month our ship was laying at Rattenbury's-quay . The prisoner was helping us to do some work, and I went below, and on my coming up again, I saw the prisoner going out of Rattenbury's-yard, with my two jackets; he had taken them out of my hammock; he got clear off them; but he was taken on the 6th.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody on this charge; he said he had just come out of the Hospital.

Prisoner's Defence. I had just come out of the Hospital on the Monday evening.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-105

281. GEORGE WEST and JOHN MORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two shirts, value 8s. and two waistcoats, value 7s. the property of Christian Ausberg .

CHRISTIAN ANSBERG . I am a seafaring-man . These shirts and, waistcoats had been washed, and were hung in the yard of the Three Sweedish Crowns, Old Gravel-lane , to dry; I saw them safe at seven o'clock in the evening; I saw West in the taproom that evening. I afterwards missed them.

HENRY WALLIS . I am a seafaring-man. I was standing at the corner of the Sweedish Crowns, between seven and eight o'clock, and saw West come out with a bundle of clothes; West gave the clothes to the prisoner Morris, whilst he went to wish his agent good night. Morris was standing near the door. Morris afterwards gave the bundle to West; I don't know what it contained.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am a constable; these prisoners were taken up on the 6th of this month; I received West in custody between nine and ten at night. I afterwards took Morris. In the morning, West said he had sold the things to a woman who sold apples.

WEST, GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

MORRIS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18160214-106

282. JOHN LANGFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , one basket, value 6d. and sixty pounds weight of potatoes, value 4s. the property of James Tinham .

JAMES TINHAM . I live at 50, Molineax-street Edgeware-road , and lost these potatoes from my door.

EDWARD WALL . I was passing the prosecutor's door; I saw the prisoner cross the street with the basket of potatoes; a man in the street stopped him and the prosecutor claimed the basket.

Prisoner's Defence. The clothes were worn off my back, and I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined a month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-107

283. WILLIAM AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , four pounds and a half of beef, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Honiball ;

WILLIAM HONIBALL . I am a butcher , and live at 11, King-street, Clerkenwell . I lost some meet on Saturday, the 3rd of this month; but don't know how it was gone.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrole. I saw the prisoner and two other lads lurking about several shops, and attempting them in Clerkenwell, on the evening of the 3rd of this month; at length they came to the prosecutor's shop, and after lurking about it for a long time, the other two boys went in; they all three separated, and went away. I observed the prisoner had something, and I stopped him. and I found this piece of beef in his apron.

(Beef produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-108

284. CHARLES KING was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , ten quires of waste paper, value 3s. the property of Thomas Cadell and William Davis .

JOHN MITCHELL . I am a warehouse-man to Messrs. Cadell and Davis, who are book-seller s, and have a warehouse in Drury-lane . Whilst I was up stairs at that warehouse, some body came and took this paper off, the window being open; it was imperfect copies of Burne's Justice.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the evening of the 19th of January, at about seven o'clock, I was in Drury-lane, near the Wheatsheaf, and I observed the prisoner coming from the Wheatsheaf. with a parcel under his arm; I stopped him, and he had this paper. The Wheatsheaf is a notorious house that thieves use.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-109

285. MARGARET FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , five yards of gingham, value 8s. and five yards of printed cotton, value 8s. the property of John Rout .

JOHN ROUT . I am a linen-draper , and live at 138, Whitechapel ; at about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 29th of January, I was behind my counter, and saw the prisoner through the window, take a piece of gingham and a piece of printed

cotten off a line, where we usually hung them at the door; I crossed the counter, followed her, and overtook her, about three doors from our house. I took the gingham and the piece of print from her, and detained her until I sent for an officer.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and picked the cotten up; it was rolled up by a grocer's shop, and I told him so; the gingham I bought.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-110

286. JOHN ALLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , sixteen pounds weight of bacon, value 6s. the property of Hecton Maclane .

HECTON MACLANE . I keep a chandler's shop , at 185, Golden-lane . I lost my bacon on the 15th instant, between nine and ten at night.

MARY ANN WALKER . I am the daughter. The prisoner was in the habit of coming into the shop, and asking for a halfpenny-worth of tobacco, which when I let him have, he would shuffle, and want bread instead of tobacco. He was in our shop on the night in question, and after he was gone, we missed the bacon; in consequence of some information, we went to the public-house close by, and there we found the bacon in the settle, with the prisoner; he then said to me that is your bacon.

JAMES FORDHAM . Corroborated the last witness' account, and took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18160214-111

287. RICHARD VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , one coat, value 2s. one shirt, value 3s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of James Lovegrove .

JAMES LOVEGROVE . I was in the habit of lending the prisoner wearing apparel; at the latter end of November, he absconded, with these articles upon him.

COURT. That is no felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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