Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th December 1815.
Reference Number: 18151206
Reference Number: f18151206-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 6th of DECEMBER, 1815, and following days,

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) BY R. BUTTERS, 22, FETTER LANE, FLEET STREET

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , Esq. Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc knt. one of the Judges of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir George Wood knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq.Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter bart; Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt; Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; Sir John Eamer , knt; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt; Sir William Domville , bart; Thomas Albion Cox , esq; and John Atkins , esq. M.P. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City: His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Jonathan Hayton ,

John Howe ,

William Johnson ,

Thomas Woolard ,

Daniel Coe ,

William Holloway ,

William Kere

Robert Rooke ,

Shem Batho ,

Thomas Kidder ,

Francis Jowers ,

Randle, Burrow .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Morris ,

John Lewis ,

George Hobbs ,

John Venables ,

William Walters ,

Joseph Bosley ,

William Shaw ,

John Betts ,

Richard Dale ,

Francis Steele ,

James Ince ,

George Hutchinson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Lawrence

John Tyers ,

William Austead

Thomas Aines ,

John Platt ,

George Walker ,

John Dixon ,

George Stevenson ,

Richard Robson ,

Abraham Turner ,

Robert Roberts ,

John Wilson .

Reference Number: t18151206-1

1. ROBERT PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , one watch, value 7l. two seals, value 2l. one magnifying glass, value 1l. one locket, value 2l. one eye glass, value 7s. and one chain, value 2s. the property of Robert Raynsford , esq . in his dwelling-house .

ANN GLADBURY . My master's name is Robert Raynsford; he lives in Howland-street, Fitzroy-square, in the parish of St. Pancras . The Prisoner was employed in my master's house, on the 3rd of November, in taking down the furniture of a bed. Before the prisoner came, I took down the watch, which was hanging up in the room, and put it into a drawer, in the same room. The prisoner came to work at about ten o'clock in the morning, and went away at twelve; at times during that period, he was by himself; I was going backwards and forwards; but did not remain in the room the whole time he staid. At about four o'clock, I was sent up stairs by my mistress for the watch; I looked in the drawer, and the watch was gone. We did not miss the other things until the Saturday morning.

Q. What other things were there in this room, or else where, that were missing on the Saturday, and which you had seen before-A. I had only seen them on the Sunday previous; there was a chain and an eye glass, that belonged to my mistress; there were two mourning rings, and a hair ring, and the other things. It was not I that missed them on the Saturday, but I was in the room when Hutt, the officer, looked in the wardrobe, and then they were missing. I have seen the things since, and know nothing more.

JOHN SALMON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Lambeth; I am shopman to Mr. Milton. I produce a watch from the hands of the officer; I took that watch in pledge from the prisoner, at about six o'clock in the evening of the 3rd of November; I am sure of his person; there were two gold seals and a metal chain; it is a gold watch; I lent him five pounds upon it; I have no doubt that it is worth six pounds.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I produce two mourning rings, a hair ring, three brooches, and an eye glass and chain; also the duplicate for the watch. I apprehended the prisoner at the workshop, on Saturday,the 4th of November; I told him what I apprehended him for, on suspicion of stealing a gold watch, the property of Mr. Raynsford; he denied any knowledge of it. I asked him where he lodged? he said, in Colwille-court, and took me to his lodgings. I searched them; but without any success. He still persisted in knowing nothing of the matter. I took him and his wife to our office, on suspicion. He was committed for a re-examination, and in consequence of information which I received while he was locked up, I went with his wife to No. 2, Monmouth-court, Seven Dials; his father-in-law lodged there, and I got the property there. The prisoner did not express to me his wish in words for me to go, but I saw a letter of his; that letter is his. I had gone to Mr. Raynsford's house, and examined with the servant the bureau or wardrobe, and on her opening this little box, it was empty, and she said the things were gone.

Prisoner. That witness has said it was No. 2, Monmouth court; it was 8, Lumber-court.

Witness. I believe it is Lumber court; that is my mistake.

CHARLES BROWN . After the prisoner was apprehended, and examined, the first time he was locked up again in the place at the office, I heard some person cry "hoy," to me from that place, and it was the prisoner; I went to him; he said, he wanted to speak to me; he asked me if Mr. Raynsford was gone from the office; I told him he was not. He said, he wished to speak to him; he had something very particular to say to him. I told him I would tell the magistrate; I went, and did so. The magestrate then ordered him into the office. He then said to Mr. Raynsford, that he was very sorry for what had happened, but would confess the whole; he said that the watch was in pawn, over Westminster bridge. He asked, might he be allowed pen, ink, and paper; he was informed he might if he wished. He said, that the watch was in pawn, over Westminster bridge, and the rest of the things his wife knew of. (Witness producing a letter.) I saw him write this; I know it to be the same; here are my initials at the corner.

(The letter was here read, and was as follows.)

"Directed to Mrs. Parsons, No.2, Colville court,"or 8, Lumber court, Seven Dials.

"DEAR, WIFE,

"Have the goodness to sell or pawn my things, to get back the watch; likewise go to Mr. Parkiss, and ask him for my wages, and regain the property that I have sold him; do it immediately, and bring it down.

"I remsin your broken-hearted husband,.

"R. PARSONS."

"P.S. Have the goodness to bring also the quizzing glass, rings, three brooches, being all."

(Property produced.)

Ann Gladbury . I know this watch; I have been in the habit of seeing it for the last eight years; I know it to be my master's property; I look at the brooches, the rings, and the other things; they are all my master's property.

The prisoner called one witness to give him a geod character.

THE COURT, in summing up the evidence for the consideration of the Jury, informed them, that in order to substantiate the capital part of this charge, a stealing to the amount of forty shillings in a dwelling house at one time must be established;-here, one article, the watch, was considerably above that amount, and if they were fully satisfied in all

the other particulars, it would be their duty, however painful, capitally to convict the prisoner; but, if on the other hand, they had any doubt, it ought to be thrown into the scale in his favour.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-2

2. GEORGE BROWN and JOHN BROWN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Anthony Rich , esq . in the King's highway, on the 4th of November , at Hendon, and putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 3l. two seals, value 2l. one key, value 1s. one note case, value 6d. one 2l. bank note, and three 1l. bank notes, the property of the said Anthony Rich, esq.

ANTHONY RICH , ESQ. On the evening of the 4th of November. I was going down to Hendon, in a one horse chaise, in company with Mr. Robert Withey. We passed the five mile stone, and got on Goulder's green , at about half past five o'clock in the evening; it was then dusk, and a fair night; I saw three men before us, on the footpath, either standing still or else walking very slowly; one of them stepped off the footpath, and made up to the horse's head; he drew a pistol, and cried stop ! I then pulled up my horse. A second came immediately to the side of the chair, and planted himself at the dashing iron; he also presented a pistol into the chair towards one of us; he came on the near side; they were both on the near side, Mr. Withey told them to take away their pistols, and one of them said, if you will deliver your money, we won't hurt a hair of your head. In a very short time, a third man stepped on the step with one foot, and put the other into the chair; that man had a pistol also, which he put to my breast; he had a black patch hanging from his hat over his face, so as to conceal it. He demanded our money. I was about to put my hand to my pocket to give it him, when he said, don't touch your pocket! sir! if you do, you are a dead man! I then dropped my arm, and then he put his hand into my right hand breeches pocket, and took from it a small note case, containing five pounds in small notes, and some memorandums. He then took my watch; last of all, he put his hand into my right hand breeches pocket, where was some silver; it had got into a corner, and he did not thurst his hand to the bottom, so that he missed it; he then ran his hand down on the outside, and missed it then also. He then proceeded to Mr. Withey, who can relate better than I can what he did to him. I believe he did not take any thing from him. He then got out of the chair, and one of them said, now drive on as fast as you can, but do not look back. I think all this happened in about two minutes; during the whole of the time. I had particularly in my command the man at the horse's head; I mean I took particular notice of him.

Mr Gurney. Look at the bar, and tell us if either of the priooners is that man - A. I have no doubt at all that the man in the black coat is he,(John Brown,) I am also satisfied that the other is the man who stood at the dashing iron; that is George Brown .

Court. Do you mean to swear positively to either of them - A. My firm conviction is that they are the men, and I can't swear more strongly; they both had great coats on at the time.

Paisoner John Brown. Do you know any particular mark by which you speak to me - A. I took such particular notice of the character and person of the man, as leaves no doubt in my mind, that you are he. The prisoner John, at the time he committed the robbery, wore a drab coloured great coat. When I went to Bow-street for the purpose of seeing whether they were the persons who robbed me, on their apprehension, they were not dressed in the great coats, but as, they are now; still I was satisfied by the prisoner John Brown's face, and his person, that he was the man who stood at my horse's head. When they were taken from the bar, I went into the place of confinement to look at them again, and observing one of the officers to wear a drab coloured great coat, I requested that it might be put on the prisoner John Brown; it was accordingly put on him, and then I said, I have no doubt. He then either said, you have seen me before, or else interrogatively, have you seen me before? I said I had, and then he asked me where? I said that must be enquired into in another place.

ROBERT BURTON WITHEY , ESQ. I was in the chaise with Mr. Rich, going down to his house at Hendon, at the time of the robbery. I have heard the account which Mr. Rich has given of the transaction; it is correct, except that I was the first searched. I was searched by the man with the patch over his face. I am not enabled to speak positively to the persons who robbed me; only as to my belief; I think that George was the one who stood on my left side at the dashing iron. I cannot speak at all to the other, nor particularly to either.

THOMAS MATHEW . I am a conductor of the Bow street patrole. On the Saturday evening next after the robbery, the 11th of November, I was in the Green Lane road, to Hornsey, in company with others of my patrole; I went on duty at about five o'clock. At about twenty minutes after six, we met three men in the company together, walking within two or three yards of each other, We apprehended them all; they turned out to be the two prisoners at the bar, and one who has made his escape. I searched George Brown ; on him I found this pistol, (producing a large horse pistol,) primed, and loaded with powder and five or six small balls, or sluggs; it was next his shirt, sticking in the waistband of his breeches and under his waistcoat. We brought them towards Islington? the third got away. We lodged these two in Clerkenwell watch-house, whilst we went to look for the third; but unsuccessfully. When they were fully committed, George asked me for a key of his box which I had of his, he said, I had no key at all, but one of my brother officers had taken a key from the man who made his escape, and that was the one to which he alluded. I mention this, to prove that they were all in company together.

JOHN AVERY . I am one of the patroles belonging

to Bow-street. I was in company with the last witness on the evening of the 11th of November; I apprehended John, and searched him; on him I found this horse pistol, (producing it,) the muzzle of which was either in his breeches or waistcoat pocket, and his coat buttoned over it; it was loaded with five balls and powder. (Producing the charge.) In his pocket I found five more balls, and this powder. (Producing them.) On his person I also found ten shillings and sixpence, which I returned.

JOHN FROST . I am another of the patroles. I searched the third man before he made his escape; on him I found one ball and two slugs; but no pistol.

Mr. Rich, re-examined. At the time John Brown was standing at the horse's head, I took particular notice, owing to some cause which I was not aware of, but which I now perceive to be a fracture in the stock of the pistol; I could plainly distinguish the ram-rod sticking out from the stock, and am by that means enabled to swear more positively that it was a pistol.

Both the prisoners made long defences, denying their guilt of the robbery in question, and setting up an alibi, but the witnesses whom they called to substantiate it, not only contradicted each other upon several leading points, but were also contradicted by the officers.

THE JURY, retired for a considerable time, and on their return to the box, to the astonishment of the Court, found the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-3

3. ISAAC DAVIS and MOSS JACOBS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Margaret, the wife of John Quinland , in the King's highway, on the 24th of November , and putting her in fear, and taking from person, and against her will, two shawls, value 8s.6d. and one three-shilling bank token, the goods and monies of the said John Quinland .

MARGARET QUINLAND . I am the wife of John Quinland . I lost my shawl on the night of the 24th of last month; I was coming from Greenwich, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I crossed the river at the Isle of Dogs, and intended to walk up to Cow-lane, where my own habitation is. I first saw Isaac Davis close by Aldgate Church yard; he spoke to me first; he asked me where I was going to; I told him I did not know, I had lost my way, and as it was so cold, I only intended to go to Brick lane, to a friend's house; he said, he would shew me a short cut into Petticoat lane; he brought me out of the way, he brought me close to Duke's place, and then I knew where I was. He said he wanted to change a pound note, and he would give me something to drink. I told him not to change his pound note for the sake of a glass of liquor, for I would pay for one for him, and accordingly I did; I went to a wine-vaults with him, close by Duke's place; we had two glasses of gin, for which I paid. When I came out, I told him I knew my way, and thanked him, but he would not leave me. We walked near Petticoat-lane ; he stopped at a door to get the key of his apartment, which he said was there. I then saw the other prisoner, he was standing at the corner; I don't know where he came from; he called out is that Isaac; the prisoner who was with me answered it was. Then the other prisoner asked him what he had got, and he said it was all prime. He was leading me by my arm, and was undoing my shawl, which was wound round that arm; the shawl was round my neck, and he threw the end of it over my shoulder, and the other prisoner ran off with it; then he held me against the wall, and rifled my pockets; I found his hand in my pocket; I called out "watch! watch! stop thief!" I had a cotton shawl, a pair of new cotton stockings, and a three shilling piece, in my pocket, but I did not miss it (the three shilling piece) until I got to the watchhouse. When I called out."watch," Moss Jacobs called out, stamp her b'oody guts out, I held the shawl that was round my neck as long as ever I could. Davis said nothing at all, all the time, only he strived to get my pocket off. He had not time to take the stockings, by the watch coming to my assistance. I never saw either of them before, only one called the other Isaac. I followed Isaac, and saw the house he went into. It was very foggy at the beginning of the night; but at this time it was light. It was under a lamp where he held me against the wall. Two watchman went to the house where Davis went into, and another watchman and I went to Spitalfields watchhouse. I told them there, what had happened to me, and came back to the house where Davis had gone into, and where the watchman were standing sentry at the door. The watchman asked me to describe Davis, and I told him he had a longish nose, and a ring in his left ear, a dark coat, a light waistcoat, and pantaloons. They took him, but let him go, as one of them knew him. I went immediately with the watchmen to his father's house, up a court, not far off the place; he was not in bed; he had his coat off; I said that is the young man who assisted in taking my shawl, and rifled my pockets. He then said he had never seen me. I gave charge of him to the watchmen, and he was taken to the watchhouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I did not tell an officer when I was asked if I had lost any money that I had not, for I had none to lose. I gave a description of Moss Jacobs . I do not walk the streets. I am known to the watchman and officers in the neighbourhood. I am a married woman; I'do not live with my husband; I saw him yesterday; I could swear to Jacobs in any place.

JAMES BURRELL . I am a watchman of St. Mary's, Whitechapel. I am the watchman who first came up to the last witness, on the alarm being given; between the hours of eleven and twelve, I heard "watch! watch! stop thief!" cried; upon that, I went in the direction I heard the voice; when I got up to the prosecutrix, I found her stoopping up against the wall; I took hold of her shoulder, and asked her what was the matter; she said, she had been robbed. I asked her which way they went; she said that one ran up the court, and one went into a house, which she pointed out to

me. She was frightened, and I afterwards found she pointed out the wrong house, I told her to go to Spitaltields watchhouse, and I would stop, and watch over the door, and see that nobody came either in or out. While she was gone, I heard the door of No. I, open quite gently. I instantly went to the door; I saw the prisoner Isaac Davis, there, whom I told if he offered to come out, I would knock him down. He said, why, watchman, you ought to know me. I told him I knew nobody in the execution of my duty. At this time there was a young woman came down stairs, with a shawl thrown carelessly over her shoulder. He then came again to the threshold, upon which I gave him a shove back again, the second time. This young woman that I have mentioned, seeing me shove him back, went up stairs again, and I saw no more of her. I heard u great deal of whispering in the house, and I called an Aldgate watchman to my assistance; his name is Richard Kirby ; he came to me, and then Davis said to him, watchman, you know me, yes, said the Aldgate watchman, I know you, and your uncle, and your father, and all your family, and the house where you live. We accordingly then let him go. In a short time, the prosecutrix came back; I asked her if she knew which house Isaac Davis went into, and she pointed out the house he came out of, and she described him to the Aldgate watchman, and me. Then we went to the prisoner's father's house, and knocked at the door; the prisoner Davis, came down, and opened the door, and the prosecutrix said, that is the man, I will take my oath of it. Accordingly the Aldgate watchman went and saw that he put his clothes on, and then brought him down, and we took him to the watch-house. On my returning to my beat, at about a quarter after twelve o'clock, I saw Moss Jacobs crossing over to his own habitation, at the corner of New-court; he went into the corner house, No. 1. At that time I did not take Jacobs, for I knew nothing of his being concerned in the robbery.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. It was a dark night, and almost all the lamps were out, except where she said she had been robbed, which was just under a lamp, which lamp was then alight; the lamp-lighters were just going round.

RICHARD KIRBY . I am a watchman of Aldgate parish. At a quarter before twelve o'clock, on the night in question, the last witness called me; he was talking to the woman, who was the prosecutrix, just by New court; I asked her which was the house the man went into, and she told me the first house, and pointed it out. I then persuaded her to go to Spitalfields watchhouse, to get the officers down, and I pursuaded the other watchman to stay at the door, while I went the hour of twelve. When I returned, I found Davis at the door, and the other watchman would not let him come out. He called to me by the name of Bill, and said, you know me; I said, I did know him, and then the other man let him go. I knew where to find him; after that, the woman returned from Spitalfields watchhouse; I asked her then, which was the house the man went into, and she pointed out the house that Davis had come out of. She gave me a description of him; which answered that on which I apprehended him. I took her and the watchman to the door where the prisoner lived, and knocked at it; Davis came down to open the door, with a light in his hand; he was half dressed. I put the light to his face, and asked the prosecutrix if that was the man? She replied, it was. I then took him up stairs, and made him dress himself, and afterwards took him to Aldgate watchhouse.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I am an officer belonging to the City. I was in the watchhouse just after the charge was brought in; he requested me to take the charge, because he could not attend the next day; I did so, and the next day took the prisoners to the Compter, and thence before the Lord Mayor; his father went into the Compter to him, and asked him if he knew any thing of the robbery; he denied it for a long time. His father went to him again just before he went before his Lordship, and then he said, he was concerned in the robbery, with-

COURT. Don't tell us whom he said was the other person; don't tell us his name. Because in Law, what one prisoner says in favour or against another, cannot be received.

Kinnersley. He told me the name of another, who, he said, was concerned with him, and he said, if we would go to a certain house, we should find that person. After Davis had undergone an examination before the Lord Mayor; we apprehended the other prisoner at his father's house: but I don't know the name of the place.

Davis's Defence. I know nothing at all of this woman.

Jacobs's Defence. I know nothing at all of this woman.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I know that woman, who appears this day, as prosecutrix against the two prisoners. I went into Aldgate watchhouse, and saw them brought in and I thought they had been brought in as disorderly. I asked the prosecutrix what brought her there, and she said, she had been robbed. I said, robbed! who the deuce would rob you? I asked her to explain? She said, she had been into a wine-vaults with a young man to have a drop of gin. She did not tell me where she had come, whether from Greenwich or elsewhere. She said, she had asked the young fellow to shew her the way into Spitalfields. I said, she knew well enough without asking any one. I asked her what she was robbed of, and she said her shawl. I asked her if she had lost any money, and she said no, for a good reason, because she had none to lose; she had nothing but an old pocket handkerchief in her pocket. I asked her in what manner she was robbed, and she told me that they took her to a kind of puddle, and she had her shawl over her shoulder, and somebody whipped it off, and ran away with it.

Examined by the COURT. The reason I had all this conversation was because I knew her well. I have had a deal of trouble with her, when she gets a hold of some person to treat her to a glass of liquor. I am a street - keeper, and am often called to remove her from different public houses. I have no

cause to come here to-day. I never dreamed of coming here until I was subpoened.

JURY. Was she sober when you had this conversation with her - A. Yes.

William Kinnersley . I am also a street-keeper, and have been so for ten years. I was examined before. I have travelled the streets up and down during that period, and never saw her drunk or disorderly in the streets in my life. I was in the watchhouse from the time the prisoners were brought in until five o'clock in the morning, and never heard any communication of the kind that the last witness has spoken of.

THE COURT, in summing up the evidence for the considerstion of the Jury, informed them, that if they only believed the prisoner Jacobs snatched the shawl from her, that would not be a charge of sufficient consequence to effect his life; however, the subsequent conduct of the other prisoner, would effect his; but if the prosecutrix tried to prevent Jacobs from getting the shawl, by holding one end of it, and resisting the attempt, if he succeeded in getting it, that would be force and violence enough to constitute a highway robbery.

DAVIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

JACOBS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-4

4. WILLIAM SMITH and JOHN FEATHERSTONEOR was indicted for a felony .

Mr. Reynolds, on the part of the Prosecution, opened an Acquittal, by stating to the Jury, that the purposes of Justice would be fully answered, without putting the prisoners upon their trial, and therefore he should not trouble the Jury with any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-5

5. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a wicker basket, value 2s. and twenty four bottles of wine, value 6l. the property or Samuel Brown .

WILLIAM SHAW . I am in the employment of Mr. Brown, who is a wine merchant on St. Mary's Hill . I did not see the prisoner come into the warehouse; but in consequence of some information which I received, I went out and detected the prisoner with the wine on his shoulder.

WILLIAM PRATER . I am a servant to Mr. Grobb, Rood lane. I was coming up St. Mary's Hill on the 3rd of November between ten and eleven in the morning, I saw some persons at Mr. Brown's house. I saw them with a hamper at the door; they lifted it on the prisoner's shoulder, and he took it away. I noticed which way he turned; the others turned down little Tower street. I immediately went to give Mr. Brown information that he had been robbed. His servant was sent, and he took him with the hamper on his shoulder. There were four or five concerned in this; I fetched the officer who took charge of him.

Prisoner. Did you see me take it out of the warehouse - A. No you did not.

JOSEPH SMITH . I know all the wine merchants; they are in the habit of employing me to carry hampers and things for them. I was standing at the corner of St. Dunstan's hill, and the prisoner came along with the hamper on his shoulder. Shaw beckoned to me, and I followed the prisoner with him. We went up to the prisoner, and Shaw said to him, "halloo my friend, you have gone quite far enough with that." I helped the hamper off the prisoner's shoulder, and then he ran away. I followed him and took him in Mincing lane; I collared him, and brought him back to Shaw, and took the property to Mr. Brown, and he took the prisoner.

CHARLES WHITE . I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I took charge of him and the wine, and took both before the Lord Mayor.

JOHN TIDEFOLD . I am in the employ of Mr. Brown. The wine is not here, but the hamper is in Court. I packed the wine in the hamper myself and unpacked the hamper after it had been stolen; and took out the wine; (hamper produced.) It had two dozen of old port in it.

William Shaw. That is the hamper which we took from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men asked me to carry that hamper to Tower street, and I did not know it was stolen.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-6

6. MARGARET HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , one yard and a half of Russia duck, value 1s. 6d. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King .

WILLIAM JOSEPH LYON . I am a foreman in the employ of his Majesty's store keeper general; the warehouse is situated at French wharf . The prisoner at the bar was in our employ, to prepare work for the other work women. The prisoner at the bar had two shillings per diem, and the other women who work piece work, cannot earn more than eight or nine shillings a week. On the 15th of November last, we searched the prisoner, and found on her the property in question. After her name had been called over which is customary every evening, previously to the dismissal of the workwomen, I observed something bulky about her pocket; and I insisted on its being pulled out, and it was taken from her hand by Joshua Bumford the inspector; it was a yard and a half of Russia duck, which we use to repair the tents. I gave it to Tyler, having first marked it.

JOHN TYLER . The duck, was given into my charge, and I have kept it ever since.

JOHN BAMFORD . I am inspector, and found the duck in the prisoner's pocket; that is, I took it from her hand when she pulled it out of her pocket, at Mr. Lyon's desire.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months , fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-7

7. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , sixteen pounds weight of thread, value 2l, 18s 4d. one groce of galoon, value

18s. three yards of silk, value 7s. 6d, the property of Isaac Nicholson , the elder, Thomas Haydon , Samuel Nicholson , and Isaac Nicholson , the younger, in the dwelling house of Isaac Nicholson , the younger.

ISAAC NICHOLSON , JUNIOR. My partner s names are Samuel Nicholson , and Isaac Nicholson , the elder; our house is at No. 15. Cateaton street ; I live alone in that house; it is in the parish of St. Lawrence Jury. I lost these things at about twelve o'clock in the mid-day. I know that the property stolen had been in my house. I saw the prisoner after he was detected.

JOSEPH WILSON . I am warehouseman to Mr. Nicholson. The prisoner came in under a pretence to sell fire wood. There was nothing at the door. I understood that his cart was in the next street. He took hold of the parcel of goods, and was going out of the warehouse with it; I immediately laid hold of him, and he dropped the parcel. We sent for a constable, and had him taken into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to ask the gentleman if he wanted any wood, and coming out I happened to knock the parcel down.

Joseph Wilson . This parcel could not have fallen down; nor could it be knocked down accidentally.

(Property produced)

Isaac Nicholson , Junior. The warehouse where this was taken is a part of the dwelling-house; the property is ours, and it is worth four pounds four shillings; the retail price of the threads alone is fifty shillings, and it could not be purchased under forty shillings.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-8

8. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS , SARAH KENT , and CATHERINE SIMMONDS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of November , seventeen yards of printed cotton, value 35s. the property of Thomas Hall , privately in his shop .

THOMAS HALL . I am a linen draper , in Bishopsgate street . The prisoners came to my shop on the 2nd of November, between three and four in the afternoon; Williams and Kent came into the shop, and asked to look at some Irish linen; some was shewn to them, which was too narrow; another piece was shewn, which was not fine enough; in the art of taking down a third, I looked round, and saw the prisoner Williams, as I supposed, tying her garter, but bad not the least suspicion. I served them with one yard of linen, at two shillings and ninepence, and took the money for it. When the prisoners were going out, I was much struck with the awkwardness of the walk of Williams. I immediately told my son to go and watch their conduct, for I feared they had got something which was not their own. My son followed them, and traced them to different places, and then came back, and then he and I went into Bishopsgate-street, where they had arrived, and where the three were arm in arm at the corner of Old Bethlehem. When I came within about three yards of them, they looked round; seeing me and my son so close to them, they parted; I immediately seized hold of two of them, and my son seized the other. I thought if they had any property, that it would be dropped. Simmonds opened her cloak, and immediately the cotton fell, and I picked it up. They have changed their dresses. The property was seventeen yards of printed cotton, and it cost me one pound fifteen shillings. Then we brought them towards my own house, and met the constable and gave them into his custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. My shop is in Bishopsgate Without. My wife was in the shop, but she is not here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. From the time the two women went out of the shop, to the time I saw three in company, and arm in arm, it might be a quarter of an hour.

GEORGE HALL . I am the son of Thomas Hall ; I remember the two prisoners, Williams and Kent, coming into my father's shop on the 2nd of November. As soon as ever they were gone out, my father sent me after them in consequence of some suspicion he had. They went round Union street, and at about twenty yards from our house, they were joined by a third; they went along Union street, and into Duke street, and then into Sandy's row, leading into Petticoat lane; then I saw the two prisoners, Williams and Kent, standing with their backs against the wall Simmonds stood before them; I saw Williams drop something from underneath her clothes, and Simmonds picked it up, and put it under her cloak. They then went down Widegate alley, which leads into Bishopsgate street; Simmonds kept on the one side of the way and Williams and Kent went on the other. When they got into Bishopsgate street, I ran home and told my father. He and I came out in pursuit of them, and caught them all arm in arm, just by Old Bethlehem. My father caught hold of Kent and Simmonds, and I caught hold of Williams. Then we met Mr. Sapwell the constable, and I saw the piece of cotton lying by the side of Simmonds; but I did not see my father take it up. My father gave them in charge of Mr. Sapwell; I was not twenty yards from the house, when I saw Simmonds.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. On the 2nd of November, between this hours of three and four; I was in Bishopsgate street; I met Mr. Hall and his son, and the three prisoners at the bar. Mr. Hall delivered the property, to me with the prisoners. Here is the property, (producing it.) I have had it ever since.

Thomss Hall . That is my property; it has my private mark upon it; I saw it only a few minutes before it was stolen; It cost me thirty five shillings.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 61.

KENT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

SIMMONDS, GUILTY - DEATH aged 55.

[ Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor upon his belief it was their first offence .]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-9

9. THOMAS BLAKESLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of August , nineteen sheep skins, and three thousand tinned nails, value 4l. the property of William Bishop , and John Southgate .

JOHN SOUTHGATE . I am a trunk maker . I live in Watling-street . I lost my trunk on the 3d of August. I left my warehouse perfectly safe the evening previous to the robbery. In the morning, when I came, I was informed the premises had been broken open, and I was shewn the lock that had been wrenched from the premises.

THOMAS -. I am a servant to Mr. Southgate. On the 3d of August I was going to my business at five o'clock in the morning; I met the prisoner coming down a court called Well court, Fleet street. He came in to Pancrass lane, where I stopped. As soon as he came up to me I called him by his name three times. He did not stop. I crossed the way, and laid hold of the trunk which he had on him. I said to him, this is my masters' trunk. I thought it was empty. He directly replied, it is my trunk, and I will have it. I forced it from his shoulder, and as soon as it reached the ground, he made his escape. There was not any one near that I could give charge of him to. I took the trunk to the warehouse from whence he had it. I could not carry the trunk all the way to Watling street to get the key, so I put it behind a truck of ours, to fetch the key: and when I came back I found the padlock of the door was wrenched off, and the warehouse broken open.

WILLIAM BRADFORD . I am a constable. I know no more of this than that the prisoner was delivered into my custody.

John Southgate . I can swear to that trunk being my property. The skins and the nails were in it in the counting house the night before the robbery.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask him if he has a partner - A. Yes, I have; Bishop.

Prisoner. My Lord, it is not so in the commitment.

COURT. That is no matter. It is in the indictment, and that will do. - What have you got to say in your defence.

Prisoner. That morning a man was going to the Gravesend boat, and he gave me one shilling and six pence to carry this trunk.

COURT. Well; you'll call that person. Is he here?

Prisoner. No, my Lord.

GUILTY , aged 48,

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-10

10. THOMAS COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , three pigs, value 5l. the property of John Marr .

JOHN MARR . I am a labouring man . I live at Eastham, in the County of Essex . I lost three pigs out of my sty on the night of the 30th of October.

JOHN BOWLER . I keep a chandler's shop. On the 30th of October, between two and three in the morning, I saw two men driving three pigs. At first I was not sure they were pigs, it was so dark. The pigs laid themselves down in the Kennel. I stopped the prisoner, and the other man ran away. I questioned the prisoner a good deal, where he was going; and he said he was going to market at Cow Cross. I told him there was no market that morning. He said that the little pig belonged to him, and that the other two belonged to the other man. Then I said to him that he must give a better account, and when I got near enough to him I seized him. I called the watchman, and he was taken to Bishopsgate watch-house. I gave the pigs up to the officer of the night, and he kept them in his cellar.

JOHN HARVEY . I am the officer of the night, and have had the pigs in my possession ever since. I kept them in my cellar. The prosecutor has seen them, and says they are his.

John Man . I have seen the pigs, and know them to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor labouring man , and was coming along the road to London, and was accosted by a man who said he would give me a shilling and half a gallon of beer to drive his pigs to London. I bought one of the pigs from him, going along; and when we were stopped in London, he ran away.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-11

11. WILLIAM CUTHBERT was indicted for uttering and putting away several forged and counterfeit notes, purporting to be the notes of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , with intent to defraud the said Governor and Company .

He was also indicted for forging the same, with the like intent.

Mr. Reynolds stated this case to the Jury, and informed them that the latter of these indictments was a capital one; and that the prisoner had pleaded guilty to the former; and the Bank, with the usual clemency which marked all their proceedings, had instructed him not to offer any evidence upon the capital charge. He therefore should not trouble them with any evidence.

GUILTY , aged 23,

Of uttering, knowing to be forged.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-12

12. THOMAS EASTWAITE was similarly indicted , and pleaded in like manner.

Mr. Reynolds. - Gentleman of the Jury, for similar reasons in this case, I shall not trouble you with any evidence.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of uttering,knowing to be forged.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-13

13. ANNE TAYLOR was put to the bar, charged by similar indictments , and pleaded in like manner. Mr. Reynolds. -There will be no evidence in this case, Gentlemen, for similar reasons.

GUILTY . aged 32,

Of uttering, knowing to be forged.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before the Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-14

14. WILLIAM GARDNER was indicted for that

he, being ordered to be transported to such parts beyond the sea as his Majesty by the advice of the Privy Council should direct and appoint, for the term of seven years; and being so transported, was at large within this Kingdom before the expiration of the said term of seven years, feloniously and without lawful cause .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-15

15. JOHN WEBBE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , two pair of snuffers and two snuffer stands, value 1l. 7s. 10d. the property of Granger Ive , James Burbridge , and John Staples Ive .

JAMES BURBRIDGE . I am an ironmonger in Fleet street . We lost a great many snuffers, and amongst others we lost the two pairs in question; but we cannot say when they were taken. The prisoner had left our employment about three weeks, and went to live with Mr. Malsing. On the 2d of November, Mr. Malsing called on us with one pair of snuffers and tray, stating, that two pair had been offered to him for sale by John Webbe . I knew the snuffers to be our property, in consequence of our private mark being on them. I sent for a constable, and in the course of the evening the prisoner was taken. Next morning Mr. Malsing called on me, and I wished him to attend at Guildhall in the course of the day. He had then found the other pair of snuffers in his warehouse.

JOHN MALSING . I live in Great Russell street, Bloomsbury, and am a coffee roaster. John Webbe had been in my service the third week, as porter . He had brought these two pairs of snuffers and stands, and had given them to my foreman to sell for him. When I got to the warehouse, the foreman shewed them to me. On Thursday the 2nd of November, Webbe asked me to let him have two shillings in advance of his week's wages. I gave him five shillings and sixpence, and he gave me one of the pairs of snuffers. I put them in my pocket, and took an opportunity of taking them to Mr. Burbridge's; in consequence of which he was apprehended. He had denied all knowledge of the second pair, but I found the other pair in my ware-house.

ABRAHAM CRESSWELL . I am an officer, and produce the snuffers, which were given into my custody after I had taken charge of the prisoner.

(Property produced, and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-16

16. HANNAH HAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , eight pounds weight of mutton, value 3s. the property of John Atkinson .

THOMAS DEANE . I work with Mr. Atkinson, who is a butcher , and lives in High street . I was minding my shop on the 17th of November, and the prisoner at the bar came and took a loin of mutton from the stall, and wrapped it up under her cloak; I immediately laid hold of her, and took the mutton from under her cloak; and told her she must go to the Compter. She then said, she only took it in a joke. I told her that would not do, for she had taken a loin of mutton on the Wednesday before, and had been let off; and she had robbed several butcher's shops in the neighbourhood. I accordingly sent for a constable, and had her taken into custody. The mutton would not keep.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-17

17. SUSANNAH LOVELL and JEMIMA SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one bank note, value 1l. the property of Hannah Atwood .

HANNAH ATWOOD . I am servant to Mr. Hearn, at Nine Elms watermill, in Surry . This Jemima Smith asked me if I would have my fortune told, and I agreed to give her a shilling; I gave her a note, and she said she would give me nineteen shillings change; I gave her the note, and then she refused to return me the change. The other prisoner was with her at the time. I sent for a constable, and then she gave me the change; but I made the constable take her up.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-18

18. THOMAS DALE was indicted for feloniously atealing, on the 10th of October , one 10l. bank note, one 2l. bank note, and two 1l. bank notes , the property of William Hine .

Mr. Gurney, stated this case to the Jury, as afterwards borne out in evidence.

WILLIAM HINE . I am coachman to one of the Brighton coaches. On the 10th of October, I arrived at the Bull inn, Holborn , at about five o'clock in the afternoon, as I got off my box in the yard, the prisoner accosted me; at that time, I was rather busy, and told him I would speak to him bye and bye. I then ran down into the tap, and somebody said, there is an old informer wants to speak to you. I took off my great coat, but did not see the prisoner in the tap at the time. I gave my coat to Andrews, telling him to take care of it, for there was something valuable in it. I then went to get a cup of coffee with a gentleman who asked me, and staid about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour; after that, I felt in my great coat pocket, for I wanted a ten pound note out of it, and then I missed the notes.

Cross examined by Mr. Barry. At the time I told Andrews there was something valuable in my coat, I did not see the prisoner.

JAMES ANDREWS . I received from the last witness his great coat; I took it, and rolled it up, and laid it on a bench in the parlour, by the side of the clock; there was nobody in the room at that time but Dale, the prisoner. The people were mobbing him in the yard, saying he was an informer, and I took him to get a glass of gin, and to get him out of the row; I took him into the parlour, in which I had laid the great coat; I left him alone for about five minutes to enquire something about him; but

on my return, he was gone, before Hine came.

Cross examined by Mr. Barry. I left the room for five minutes; whether any one else in that time went in, I don't know. When Hine told me to take care of his coat for something was in it, the prisoner was on my right hand. There was a great many people in the tap room, but there was none in this room.

WILLIAM STANLEY . At that time I was landlord of the Bull inn, Holborn. I went into the room while Mr. Andrews and the prisoner was there; I saw the coat rolled up upon the bench by the clock. That is not a room where every one can go into; people might go from the tap into it; but certainly nobody did.

WILLIAM CAVANNAH . I lodged in Union-court, Holborn hill. The prisoner and his wife lodged in the same house with me. On the night of Tuesday, the 10th of October, the wife came to me in a hurry, she brought me a ten pound note and two one's, to know the amount of them.

SARAH LUNN . I lodged in the same house with the prisoner and his wife. Before the 10th of October, I had means of knowing that they had no money. Before the 13th, they purchased some new cotton at thirteen pence halfpenny per yard. Mrs. Dale said it was her money, and that she had taken it for her first husband's pension at Somerset House. The prisoner said that it was not hers, for it was his, and that he had a damned good run at a coachman for it, who owed him twenty pounds, and had paid him the best half of it.

Cross examined by Mr. Barry. I am not the wife of the last witness; but lodge on the same floor.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden. I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of October; I found a great many new things lying about on the floor. I searched the prisoner's wife, and found on her three pounds fourteen shillings. She would not know any thing.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-19

19. WILLIAM BARRY and RICHARD THOMAS COOPER were indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Wren in the King's highway, on the 26th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, two silk handkerchiefs, value 8s. a telescope, value 5s. and 17s. 6d. of the goods and monies of the said Joseph Wren .

JOSEPH WREN . On the 26th of October, I was at a public house in Foster's buildings, Whitecross street . I was at a benefit society club there, called the Free and Easy. I went out of the house at about one o'clock in the morning. I was followed out of the house by the two prisoners at the bar and two other men who assisted in robbing me, but who are not yet taken. William Barry then came before me, and said, don't go yet, let us have some more drink. I said I should not stop, for I should be locked out. Before I could well give them that answer, the other three were round me; Barry put his hand into my pocket, where there were two old silk handkerchiefs; I found another hand in my breeches pocket, and on looking round, it was George Green, who is not in custody; I laid hold of Green's hand; he kept lungeing me with his shoulder, and said, "I had better take it quietly, for I must be served." The prisoner Cooper, had his arms round me, and kept my arms down. Finding I was overpowered, I would not resist any more. They took from me seventeen shillings and sixpence or eighteen shillings, two silk handkerchiefs, and my tellescope, which I use in my employ. They had not gone far before they fell quarrelling about dividing the money. I did not like to go to the watchman who were near me, for fear they should come back to me again and illuse me. The two watchman went up to them, hearing them quarrelling, and then they dispersed. I followed them into Whitecross street, and then I saw George Green , and asked him for my money; but he must give me no answer. Then Barry came to me, and asked me what I had lost? I told him what I had lost, and he said, he would go and try to get it back from them. They then went along talking and swearing, and I followed them through Finsbury square; then Richard Cooper came and asked me what I had lost? I told him, and he said it was a great shame, for that George Green had sold him, he only got two or three shillings from me. He told me I had better be quiet until the morning, for he did not suppose they would give me my property back that night. I then went home to my own lodgings. On the Friday evening following, we found Barry sitting in the Sun Dial in Goswell street, and apprehended him, and the officers searched him; they look two silk handkerchiefs from him; they asked me if they were mine? before I could well answer them, Barry said, they were not mine; for mine were two old ones, and one of these was almost new; they were neither of them mine. Cooper was found in Giltspur street Compter, upon another charge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I have been an extra tide waiter; I have been disemployed for the last two months; I now collect debts for my relations, and sell goods for my father, who is in the turnery way.

Q. Pray were you ever at Chelmsford - A. Yes; I believe I have been there.

Q. Did you ever deal in pigs, -

Witness. My lord am I bound to answer that question,

COURT. You are not obliged to answer it if you think that it reflects upon yourself.

Mr. Alley. Then we are to take it, that that is a question you dont chuse to answer - A. I do not. I did not tell the watchman I had been robbed. After the watchman went away, though I was afraid of the men, I went after them; but while the watchmen were present, I did not like to go near them. I had been in two public houses that evening, and met them at the Sun Dial; I might have had one glass of gin and no more.

Q. You won't answer this business about Chelmsford directly; but I will have it out of you in some way.

Q. Do you know where the Court house is at Chelmsford - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever in it - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where the gaol is - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever in it - A. Of course I was.

Mr. Alley. Of course, indeed. Then I shall ask you no more questions.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton Garden Office. On the evening of the 27th, I went with the prosecutor in search of some people; he took me to the Sun Dial in Goswell street, where we apprehended Barry. We afterwards heard Cooper was in custody, and I went there, and searched him.

Cross examined by Mr. Reynolds. I found nothing on him belonging to the prosecutor.

GEORGE HAM . I keep the George, Foster buildings, Whitecross street; that is the house in which this club is held. I recollect Wren, the prosecutor, being in the public house on the evening in question. I know the prosecutor was up in the club room, and so were the two prisoners also; I also saw Green in the club room; Barry broke the pannel of the door in the room, and we were obliged to get four watchmen to clear the house.

The prisoners called the following witness.

JOHN REDDING . I keep the Sun Dial, in Goswell street; I can't call to mind the night that the prisoners were in my house, but the next morning I heard of the robbery, being committed. The next morning the prosecutor told me he was robbed, and about one o'clock on the same day, I saw him and the prisoner Barry, playing skittles together in my ground; it was the same day after, the prosecutor told me he was robbed. He told me that about ten o'clock in the morning that he was robbed; and he was playing at skittles with Barry at about one o'clock.

Mr. Alley and Mr. Reynolds, as counsel for the prisoners, called several witnesses, who swore that the prosecutor was a man of most infamous character, and not to be beleived upon his oath.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-20

20. PHILIP HOOD, alias WOOD , CHARLES SLATE , and EDWARD SURGEY , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Willingham , on the night of the 20th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two trusses of hay value 3s. his property . And EDWARD BUREAU , for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS WILLINGHANS . I live in Cock yard, Tothill fields, Westminster ; I am a master of Hackney coaches , and keep thirteen pairs of plates: I have two ranges of stables, one where there are twenty three stalls, which joins the house, and forms part of the house; there is a door from the house into the stable, but it is nailed up.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I am a horse-keeper to Mr. Willingham. Philip Wood the prisoner, left my masters employ in March last. I fastened the doors at a little after six o'clock, on the evening of the 26th of November, I fastened the loft door over the stable. I then went for some cheese, and I was returning, I saw a truss of hay coming along the yard; going up the yard, I heard a rustling in the passage; that is the passage leading to the back stabling. With that I went down the passage, and said, who is here? and I caught hold of William Brown in the passage. In consequence of what he told me, I took him in custody to my master, and sent for a constable; Hood had been in my master's servce; I found two trusses of hay in the passage. There is a loft door over the passage, and if anything was thrown out of it, it would fall into the passage; that loft door was open when I went into the passage; I know I had fastened it before.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am sixteen years of age, I have known Wood and Surgey two years, and Slate about five months. On the night of Monday the 20th of November, about eight o'clock I was in; Tothill street, nearly opposite to Mr. Willingham's place; I saw the two prisoners, Slate and Surgey, and was talking to them, when Phillip Wood came up and said, he had one truss, and then we agreed to go and get some of Mr. Willingham's hay; he told us he had got one truss before we agreed, and said he had taken it to the stable of Edward Bureau. We went up the Yard; Charles State and I assisted Wood to get up into the loft; he was to get in at the loft door. He got on my shoulder; the loft door was then open; and while we were in there Wood threw down three trusses of hay; one was taken away by Slate, and I should have taken one only. I was secured by Matthews. Wood was in the loft as I believe, when I was taken by Matthews; and I told Mr. Willingham whom to look for, and where to look.

RICHARD SMITHERS , I am a constable; I was called in on this occasion by Matthews. In consequence of what Brown said, I went with him; and we met the three other prisoners, in New Pye street; I can't say how near to Willingham's. Brown said that is Charley Slate, you must snuff him; that is he that took the truss of hay away. I took Slate by the collar, and the other two ran away, but I can't swear to them. I took Slate as far as the White Horse in Broadway, and there I met Mr. Bligh, the officer of Queen square; I told him what had happened, and then we went to Bureau's, in Orchard, street ; he is a dealer in several things, greens, potatoes, iron, and Marine stores ; and Surgey was lying down by a kind of counter in the shop without his coat; and Bureau was sitting on the left hand side of the fire place; and Brown pointed out Surgey as one of those who were concerned in the robbery, and I believe he was one who made his escape from me. We took Surgey away. Afterwards I went with Bligh, to Bureau's stables some distance from his house; we found the stable locked, and a woman acting as Bureau's wife opened it for us. We went into the stable, and found part of a truss of hay, quite loose, and part trampled under feet, serving as a bed for the horse, and in a little place on the right hand, like a sort of bin, there was another truss of hay, and a great coat spread out; Mr. Bligh pulled up the great coat, and Phillip Wood was under it

We took him into custody; Brown saying that he was one of the party. Brown was with us all this time.

William Brown re-examined. I went with the last witness to the stable where the hay was; it was Bureau's stable, but I never saw Burean in it.

JAMES BLYE . I am an officer of Queen square ofice. I happened to be in the public house when Smithers brought Slate in. In consequences of what pased there, I went with Brown and him to Bureau's stables; I did not before know it was his stable, but I knew him well. When we went there, we found the stable door locked; we asked Bureau whether he had seen any hay that evening? and he said, no I looked behind the counter, and saw Surgery lying upon a kind of bed; and I took him into custody. I sent Smithers away with him, and I staid untill he came back. Bureau at that time was sitting by the fire side, and apparently very ill. When Smithers. returned, I asked Bureau for the key of the stable. Nothing wsa said while Smithers were gone, to ny knowledge. His wife went down to the stable with me. as he was lame' and when we went into the stable I discovered two horses feeding on hay; there was no racks. Looking into a kind of grain hole, which is appeared to be, I saw a whole truss, and at the other end a large dirty great coat spread out; and I suspected some person was under, and on moving it, I found Philip Wood , the late servant to Mr. Willingham. After we apprehended Wood, we searched him, and found on him some halfpence, and asked him how he came by them.

Thomas Matthews re-examined. Q. Blye has told us of a hole which came through from another loft; was that on your master's premises - A. Yes; it was a place coming from the corn loft into the hay loft, and which I fastened up on the Sunday morning.

THE COURT Then proceeded to sum up the evidence, and informed the jury, that in this case, the principle evidence to criminate the prisoners, was that of an accessary, whose testimony ought upon all occasions to be received with the greatest care and doubt, and ought not to be credited, unless bourae out by a coincidence of facts, and accompanied by corrobirative circumstances. In the first place, no evidence at all had gone so far as to criminate Surgey; and in the next place, the jury would consider whether a case of burglary was established against any of the prisoners. The accomplice Brown, who is the only person who afforded any proof upon that part, had sworn that he was talking with Surgey and Slate, when Wood came up; and then they agreed to go to get some of Mr. Willingham's hay; but when they got down the passage, the loft door was open; in his presence no violence was used, nor had it appeared at all how the partition between the corn room and hay loft had been broken down. In cases of burglary, though a man be at the end of the street watching to prevent detection, and was not at all present at the actual breaking, yet the law would consider him to be full as guilty, as the man who used the crow, or any other house breaking instrument. But in this case, in order to establish a burglary against the three it must be supposed that when they were talking together, and through not present with Wood, they were in contest with him.

There had been no evidence to that fact, and that was a mere question of probability not supported by any fact.

The next question would be, like the former, a question of probability, whether Wood broke into the stable!-and then, if he did, whether it was dark at the time. If upon these points, and doubts should arise, it in the duty of the jury to give that doubt to the prisoners. If however they were convinced that the hay was stolen by all or any of the first three prisoner then, and not till then would the question arise, whether Bureau had received the hay with a guilty knowledge of its being stolen.

WOOD GUILTY, aged 16,

SLATE, GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Cobnfined six months , and fined 1s.

SURGEY, NOT GUILTY .

BUREAU, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-21

21. WILLIAM BRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , half a yard of Kerseymore, value 4s. one snuff box, value 6s. one pair of drawers, value 1s. two handkerchiefs, value 1s. one pair of spectacles,value 7s. one pair of gloves, value 6d. one pen knife, value 1s. one pair of braces, value 6d. one pair of scissors. value 2d. and one coat, value 4s. the goods of Abraham Green .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court , the prisoner was

ACUQITTED

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-22

22. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one bed, value 7s. one blanket, value 1s. 6d. one sheet, value 2s. and one rug, value 1s. 6d. the property of Elizabeth Roach , widow in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH ROACH . I live at No.5, Church lane . I let a furnished room to the prisoner and his wife, at three shillings and six pence a week; I am a widow woman. Among the furniture in the room, were blankets, sheets and a rug; he only staid with me a week, and on the last evening, he told me he would pay me in the morning, but in the morning he took up the things and went away.

WILLIAM KINNERSLY . I am an officer. I was coming up Hounsditch, and I met my brother officer, who had the prisoner in custody, and was accompanied by the prosecutrix. We took him to where his wife was, and there was nothing in the room but the property of the prosecutrix, and his wife was just about to lie in. There was neither stove nor fire, and they appeared to be in the greatest misery and distress. He is a jew, and has been deserted by his friends, on account of his marrying a christian.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-23

23 THOMAS HAYLEY was indicted for burglariousiy breaking and entering the dwelling houses of Patrick Gibbons , about the hour of five in the night of the 15th of November with intent to steal, and

burglariously stealing therein, one coat, value 20s. the property of Edward Gibbons .

PATRICK GIBBONS . I keep the Red Lyon, in Nightingale lane . On the morning of the 5th of November, at about five o'clock in the morning, one of the lodgers was coming down stairs, and he called my son; I was in bed. A few minutes afterwards, I got up, and went down stairs, and when I got down stairs, my son was down before me, with John Lewis , and a Portuguese lodger, whose name was Francis; I heard him cry out that there was a Latheroon; (meaning a thief,) in the house. Then we found the pannel of the back door going into the yard broken.There was a hole large enough for a man's head to go in and undo the bolt. When we came to the bar, there was a pane of glass broken, in a side window adjoining the door; that window looks from the bar into the tap room, and side passage. I was generally up last myself; and every night we observed the doors and windows fastened before we went to bed; I saw the door safe and fastened, and this pane of glass whole the night before. The houses is my dwelling house,I rent it. I knew the prisoner about a fortnight, from his coming backwards and forwards to my house; but I had not seen him the day before; he did not lodge in my house. I saw him in my house, on the morning of the robbery, my son brought him up stairs, with the assistance of Lewis.

EDWARD GIBBONS . I am the son of the last witness. On the morning that my father has been talking of, I was called up at about five o'clock, by John Lewis , who told me there was a Latheroon breeking into the bar; I told him to get me a light, and he got me one, and I went down in my shirt, and there I caught the prisoner at the bar, in the passage, just alongside the bar, where he had broken the window; he was standing there with his jacket and trowsers off; he had left them just alongside the window. I said to him, is that you Hayley? have you come here to rob me? he never spoke; and then I called John Lewis , and John Francis, to aid and assist me. I then ordered him up stairs, and with the assistance of John Lewis , and John Francis , I kept him up stairs untill I went for an officer; at that time I had not observed the situation of the back door of the bar was padlocked, and had another lock on it; nobody could get into the bar before the window was broken; any man could get in when it was broken, but not before. I went then for the officer, and when he came, we unlocked the bar, and went into it, and I found all the papers scattered about, and the till lying on the door; my coat was missed from the bar, I had left it the night before in the bar; I found it aftrewards on the landing place of the stairs, alongside the prisoner at the bar; that was not the place were he was standing without his jacket and trowsers, it was up stairs; I ordered him up stairs, and he had my coat under his arm. I then went with the officer, and found where he broke in, which was at the door; I saw that the door was firm and fast the night before. At the time I got up it was dark, it was about five o'clock but I can't say exactly. I had known the prisoner a fortnight; in the course of the day preceeding he was in our house, but he did not lodge in it. He was not in the house when I locked it up at night; there was not a soul in the house then, but the lodgers and our family. That back door goes into our yard, and then there is the yard of the adjoining house.

Prisoner. It was past six o'clock, and quite day light when he came down.

Witness. It was only a little after five.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a lodger at this Red Lion. I was alarmed on that morning at about five o'clock, it was a little past five o'clock; one of my countrymen called me; I am a Portuguese; it was John Francis called me; it was quiet dark; I could not see any thing. I went down stairs; I heard a piece of glass fall down, and then I heard in a little time another bit fall. I could not see; but I heard some one making a scratching noise. I called up young Gibbons, and he saw somebody gathering up his jacket and trowsers under his arm.

Prisoner. Did you see the person walking up and down - A. No. The prisoner came out of the bar. I heard the crash; he came out of the glass.

JOHN LEACH . I was fetched that morning to the Red Lion, by Edward Gibbon ; to the best of my knowledge it was between five and six o'clock; at the time he fetched me it was just the peep of daylight; as I was coming along, it was scarcely dark; he took me into his father's house, the Red Lion; I found the prisoner there, in the custody of two lodgers, Lewis and another. He was then up stairs. He then had his trowsers on, and his jacket was off. I and Edward Gibbons went into the bar; Gibbons opened it. I saw the till laying in the middle of the bar floor, and likewise the other drawers were pulled out. We looked to see if any thing was taken away. The bar window looking into the passage, was broken, one pane. When that was broken, I think a man could very easily get through. I observed the back door and one of the pannels was broken; it was broken so that anybody could put their hand in, and draw the bolt. I examined the pannel, but can't tell whether it was broken from the inside, or from the outside. I saw another place where an attempt had been made with a sharp instrument, to cut the glass of the window out, which looks into the yard. I got this coat, (producing a coat,) on the stairs, lying underneath the prisoner's feet; they told me he dropped it, but that I did not see.

Edward Gibbons . That is my coat; that coat was left in the bar on the over night, and in the morning when I came down the prisoner had it; he dropped it, and we found it under his feet. I gave it to the officer. I am perfectly sure that the prisoner was not in the house; I searched it all round.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been newly paid off, and spent all my money in the prosecutor's house; this day in particular, I stopped during the whole day in the tap room dancing, and got drunk in his house, and fell asleep in a box, which was backwards, and I was awakened by two girls, and we had some gin, and then I went to sleep again.

Besides it is well known, that there are two dogs in the house, one of which is a mastiff, and is so fierce, that if any body went to break into the bar, as they have sworn, he would tear him to pieces.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-24

24. FRANK PURDON and SAMUEL THOMAS GOULD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Isaac Mendoza , at about the hour of eight in the night of the 14th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, eight 1l. bank notes, two 2l. bank notes, two silver tea spoons, value 4s. and an immense quantity of other articles, the property of the said Isaac Mendoza .

ISAAC MENDOZA . I am a baker , and live at No. 2, Petticoat lane, Spitalfields . I went out between seven and eight on the night of Saturday, the 14th of October; I left my dwelling house without anybody in it, it was then dark. I fastened the yard door with two bolts, and double locked the front door, and put the key in my pocket; all the windows were fastened; the back windows were nailed down; the wall of my back yard was down, so that any body could get into the yard. I returned home at about a quarter before twelve, and went to put the key to the key hole to open the door, and found it was open, it went from me; I found the back door wide open. I immediately ran up stairs, and found drawers open, and on putting my hand I found they were empty. I suppose the value of all the property we lost was at least thirty pounds; besides the notes; there were eight one pound notes, and two two pound notes, besides a one pound note which I did not know of, and which my wife had in one of her gloves. We then got a light, and I proceeded down stairs; on the wooden cover of a water jarr I found some matches, and a pipe with some tobacco in it. On the following morning in the yard I found this piece of candle broken.

PRISCILLA MENDOZA . I am the wife of the last witness. I went out with him between seven and eight o'clock on the night of the 14th of October; it was dark; we were obliged to light candles before we went out of the house. I returned with my husband at about a quarter before twelve; all the property was gone. I had seen that the drawers were full in the morning. I had a one pound note which my husband know nothing of, in a pair of gloves, in one of the drawers where my clothes were; I had taken it from a Dutch Jew, a young man who had sold me a Dutch tablecloth; I had had it three or four weeks; he wrote the persons name from whom he had received it in Dutch or Hebrew; I could not read the writing he put upon it; but I have seen a similar note since, and to all appearence it is the same.

SARAH THORP , a material witness, not appearing, was called upon her recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-25

25. JOHN SMITH , JOHN DURHAM , and JAMES RIDER , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Little, at about the hour of six in the forenoon of the 28th of November , with intent to steal, and for feloniously stealing therein, five pairs of shoes, and one pair boots, value 3l. 2s. the property of the said John Little .

THOMAS JORDAN . I am apprenticed to John Little . Our house was robbed on Tuesday morning, the 28th of November. I sleep in the shop; my master is a shoe maker . On that morning, I was awakened by the jingling of glass in the shop window; I got out of bed, and as I was gitting out, I heard one of the prisoners say to John Smith , d-n your eyes Jack, make haste. I went towards the window, and saw the glass was broken; they had got to the glass by taking a shutter down, and a hand in the broken pane, in the act of taking a pair of shoes; I saw that it was the prisoner John Smith 's hand; I saw his face; I knew him, by seeing him so often. I saw the prisoners John Durham and James Rider standing by him. I did not see what Smith did with the shoes he took out. He put his hand in again, and then I saw he had a hook stick, and was pulling a pair of shoes out with it. I then went and alarmed my master; at that time, it was just getting the break of day, it was rather better than half past six; it was light enough for me to see their faces, and I am positive as to all of them. When we came down, the prisoners were gone; we found what had been taken, five pairs of shoes, and one pair of woman's boots When I went to bed on the night before, the shutters was up, and all safe, and these shoes and boots were in the window. Smith had a blue coat on, out at the elbows; Durham had a green coat on, and Rider had a witish coloured jacket on. The same morning I gave a description of their dresses to the officers. They were taken at about twelve o'clock. It was not day-light; it was getting day-light.

Prisoner Durham. What part of the shop were you standing in, when you pretend you saw the colour of the coats?

Witness. I was not standing at all; I was sitting on a chair just opposite the window.

Prisoner Durham. How was the shutter taken down?

Witness. It was dropped, and pushed on one side.

Prisoner Durham. You swore the shutter was reared up.

JOHN LITTLE . I am the master of that boy. My house is in the parish of St. Mary Whitechapel . I was disturbed at rather better than half past six, by the last witness; he knocked at my room door, and said that thieves were breaking in. When I came down, I found that the shutter was put on one side, and a pane of glass was broken; five pairs of shoes were gone, and one pair of woman's boots; the value was three pounds two shillings; I made them at that price, and they were worth full that. The boy described the dress, and the prisoners to me. They were taken in consequence of that description. When they were taken at about twelve o'clock, their dresses they had on,

corresponded with that description. I had seen them for nine or ten months up and down the street and the neighbourhood in company together. When the boy alarmed me, he described that he knew them all; he said, one had a blue coat on, out at the elbows, and he said, another had a light jacket on, and the third had a green coat.

JURY. You say you have been in the habit of seeing them up and down for the last nine or ten months; do you mean in the same dresses - A. Yes.

Prisoner Rider. Where did you see me before - A. A number of times.

Q. How long before - A. Two or three days.

Q. Was the shutter gone right away - A. No; down by the side.

Re-examined by the COURT. There was light enough to distinguish the different prisoners' faces, had they been outside.

Prisoner Durham. Could you, if you had been in the place of the boy, distinguish the different colours of persons coats, between blue and green, or any other colour - A. I believe I could distinguish the difference between blue and green.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am a police officer. I saw this boy on the morning of the robbery, and received from him a description of the dresses of the persons who committed the robbery, which description I wrote down, and told my brother officers to go and take them. They were taken. Rider had on a great coat, and when I desired him to take it off, he had on a white jacket underneath, and the dresses of the others also corresponded with the description.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I received directions from Griffiths to go in pursuit of these young men. I found them in the Princess of Wales public house, about a hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor's house; they were in company with several more, and playing at cards; Smith was dressed in a blue coat, with both the elbows out. Durham had a green coat, and was dressed as he is now, only that he had a coloured handkerchief; Rider had on a great coat, and a light jacket underneath. I know them all three.

EBENEZAR DALTON . I was with the last witness, and was present when the prisoners were taken. The elbows of Smith's coat were out. The house is known better by the name of Black Hell than the Princess of Wales; it is a notorious house, where thieves resort.

Smith's Defence. I have got no more to say than that I know nothing at all about it.

Durham's Defence. It is impossible for that lad to swear to the colour of coats, for he could not tell whether it was green, or blue, or black, or any other colour, it was so dark.

Rider's Defence. The lad swore to me when I had my coat on, and then he afterwards swore to my jacket.

THE COURT. In re-capitulating the evidence to the Jury, informed them, that if the shutter was removed when it was quite dark, that was a burglary, and not house-breaking in the day time, with which the present indictment charged the prisoners; one of the witnesses has said, that it was not day-light, but getting day-light; that was when they were taken the property. It must have been a very short time previous, that the shutter was removed, but still there was a doubt as to its being day-light at the time of the breaking. In all cases where a doubt existed, and more particularly in cases of life and death, the prisoner ought to have the full benifit of that doubt. -Another question would arise as to the value of the property stolen, for if they should think that the property was worth forty shillings, it would be still a capital offence.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 23,

DURHAM, GUILTY, aged 25,

RIDER, GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only, and not of breaking and entering in the day time .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-26

26. HENRY HOLMES and SAMUEL BIRD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , one piece of printed cotton, value 40s. and upwards, the property of William Taylor and John Davies , in their dwelling house .

JAMES LEE . I saw the two prisoners, and watched them, on Thursday, about four-o'clock in the afternoon; I saw them at the end of Rathbone place, with another young man with them; Bird was looking in at a shop door; the other two were standing at the corner of Rathbone place; Holmes had a bag under his arm. They crossed over, and went to the opposite side of Oxford road; then the prisoner Bird went to a shop door that was shut; he opened the door, and walked away; a woman came to the door. They then turned back, and went to the end of Rathbone place, and went into Percy street, and thence to Tottenham-court-road, and then up Hanway street, across Oxford street, into Soho square, and then they went through a number of streets, and at last we traced them to the house of the prosecutors; Bird walked backwards and forwards before the door a number of times; he several times went to Holmes, who was standing at the corner of Boswell-street; the prisoner Holmes then came with him; they stood talking together three or four minutes at the door of Davis and Taylor, then Bird took the bag from Holmes, and Holmes laid hold of the cotton; he stood at the door, and pulled it from the shop; I did not see him in the shop. Bird then followed Holmes as he was walking away. There was a young man with me all the time; he ran forward, and seized Holmes, asking him what he had got there? he replied, what he had got, he picked up. I told him he had not, and Bird interfered, by laying hold of his collar, and saying, what he had got, he picked up. I told Bird be had better be quiet, or we would lay hold of him. We then took Holmes into Davis's shop, and Bird followed us to the door. I told the young man in the shop there was another chap in company with the prisoner at the time of his commiting the robbery, and he said, he ought to be taken also. An officer was sent for, who searchen Holmes, and I told him Bird was outside, and he went out, and took him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I am not an officer. I did not know the prisoners, but I had seen them. I did not say before the magistrate that I was not sure of Bird; it was getting dark; they were lighting the lamps. We waited until the young man in the shop said Bird should be taken, before we took him.

JONATHAN FULLENOUGH . I was with the last witness, Lee, during all the time. The account he has given is perfectly correct.

WILLIAM MARSH . I am shopman to Mr. Davis, in Oxford-street ; his partner's name is Taylor; they are linen draper s. That print was in the shop a few minutes before; I saw it; it was standing inside the door. (Print produced.) I know it to be my employers property; there are twenty two yards and a half; the value is two pounds; it cost twenty-two pence halfpenny a yard, which would amount to about two pounds one shilling and sixpence.

HOLMES, GUILTY, aged 18,

BIRD, GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing only .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-27

27. SAMUEL SUMMERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , two coats, and one pair of trowsers, value 3l. the property of James Wall , in the dwelling-house of Ann Wall .

JAMES WALL . I am the son of Ann Wall, and live in my mother's house. I know the prisoner; he used to sleep with me. On the night of the 20th, he was not in bed with me; I heard some silver fall from the bed to the floor; I was just got into bed; I was not asleep; it was about a quarter before eleven. I felt on the bed, and there was silver there also. I kept my clothes in a box, in this room; this box was not locked. I searched my box, and missed two coats and a pair of trowsers. I had had six shillings worth of silver in the pocket of the trowsers; the silver which I found on the bed and on the floor was that which I had in the pocket. I had seen the prisoner going up stairs at about four o'clock that afternoon. I did not see him after that. He had lodged three or four weeks in the house. I valued the two coats at two pounds ten shillings, and the trowsers at ten shillings; I had not worn them much; they stood me in ten pounds five shillings when I purchased them. I can't tell rightly how long I had worn them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. My mother is a widow; it is her house. The silver was emptied out of the pocket; he did not take that. When I saw him at four o'clock, he was considerably the worse for liquor. I saw my clothes on the morning of the 20th, they were safe then.

JOHN OLLEY . I am a pawnbroker, at Poplar. I have seen the prisoner before; he has pawned several things with me. He offered the coats to pledge with me at a few minutes before eight in the evening of the 20th of November. (Coats produced.) I suspected he had stolen them, and therefore stopped him and the coats.

(Property sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 42,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-28

28. BENJAMIN PEARCEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one jacket, value 7s. the property of Lyon Levi , privately in his shop .

LYON LEVI . I live in Rosemary-lane ; I keep a sale shop . I lost a jacket on the 21st of November; I was at the side of my door; I saw the prisoner coming out of my shop with something under his jacket. I did not see him go into the shop. I stopped him; he would not let me see what he had got; I opened his jacket forcibly, and there he had the jacket belonging to me. I had shewn it for sale three minutes before.

(Jacket produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along drunk, and was sky-larking with my shipmates, and they shoved me into the shop, and I did not know what I was about.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-29

29. THOMAS PURDAY was indicted for having felouiously stolen, twenty-eight yards of black bombazet , the property of John Howel and John Bonnel ;

BUT as no witnesses appeared on behalf of the prosecution, the Jury found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-30

30. BENJAMIN VALENS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , twenty-six yards of bed ticking, value 1l. 10s. the property of Thomas Walker , privately in his shop .

THOMAS WALKER . I am a linen draper , and live at 49, Dorset street . Between eleven and twelve o'clock, on the 4th of December, Mrs. Walker was sitting in the parlour, and said, she heard something fall in the shop. I immediately looked, and saw a piece of flannel laying on the ground; I was in the shop; at the same time I missed a piece of bed tick; I did not see any person in the shop at all. I ran out, and turned into East street, and saw the prisoner running with something under his arm, and under his coat; I called stop thief, and ran after him; I got within two or three yards of him, and then he dropped the tick; I picked it up; he ran about twenty yards further, and was stopped by somebody else. That tick was on a stool inside the shop door, at about two feet from the shop door; the flannel which was knocked down, was on the same stool. That is all I know. The tick is here, and is worth thirty shillings; that is the buying price. (Tick produced.) That is my tick.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along the street, and heard a cry of stop thief, and I ran; I never had the tick in my possession at all.

THE COURT, after summing up the evidence to the Jury, resolved the case as follows for their

consideration. "I then asked the witness as to the situation of the ticking in the shop; he said it was inside the shop, about two feet from the door. If you are satisfied that the prisoner is the person who had the tick in his possession, and dropped it on being pursued, it is then for you to say, whether that is conclusive evidence of his having stolen it; and then, (this being a capital charge,) only one question will remain for your consideration, namely, whether the situation of the tick was such that a person coming by, could snatch it without going into the shop, for that would not be privately stealing in the shop."

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined one month , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-31

30. JOHN MOORE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward Irwin , at about the hour of twelve in the day time of the 4th of November , with intent to steal, and for feloniously stealing therein, two table spoons, value 1l. four tea spoons, value 8s. one handkerchief, value 1s. one gown, value 7s. 6d. one waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. and seventeen yards of linen cloth, value 2l. 2s. 6d. the property of Edward Irwin .

MARGARET IRWIN . I live in Kingsland road, Shoreditch . At about twelve o'clock in the day time of the 4th of November, I fastened up the house, and went out, and left nobody in it to my knowledge. I was absent till nearly half past two; when I returned, I sent my servant in first; she is not here. When I returned, I saw the drawer of the dresser in the kitchen had been very ill used; there was little bits of wood knocked off by the keyhole; it had been broken open; every thing was taken out of the drawer, which had been in it; there were seventeen yards of linen cloth, worth two and sixpence a yard; there were four tea spoons, and two table spoons; the table spoons are worth ten shillings a piece, and the tea spoons were worth two shillings a piece; the girl's shifts was taken out of her box, but these did not belong to me. There a gown of mine, worth seven shillings and sixpence; also a waistcoat, worth one shilling and sixpence. When I returned to the house, I did not at first find the prisoner, but I looked about, and found him in the pigeon loft; that is over the coal or hen house; when I discovered him, he dropped down, and I went and took him; he was laying in the pigeon loft as if he was asleep, and as soon as he saw me, he dropped down into the coal house, on the coals. He did not attempt to make his escape, nor did he make any resistance whatever. I said, John, you are a very bad boy. I was acquainted with him before; he said, if I would let him go, he would go to sea, and I should never see him any more. I took him into the front kitchen, and sent for my servant man, his name is Thomas M'Grove . I asked the prisoner where the things were that he had taken; he said, they were laying by where I took him. I went and fetched them up. They are the things which I have enumerated. He had tied them all up in a handkerchief. I did not find the house, nor the doors, not windows broken at all, on my return. I only found the drawers broken open.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I was sent for on the 4th of November to take the prisoner into custody. The things in the indictment was given to me by Mrs. Irwin, who said she found it in a pigeon loft by the prisoner's direction.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing only .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-32

31. THOMAS SMITHERMAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault, upon Henry Ryners , on the King's Highway, on the 28th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, three keys and one ribbon, value 40s. his property ,

HENRY RYNERS . I live in Short street. On the 28th of October, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was going home to St. George's turnpike in the East , I was sober. I was going along the back lane, and I saw the prisoner running very fast at the other side of the way. He crossed the street, stepped up to me, trod on my foot, and said, halloo! and then snatched my watch out of my pocket. I then sang out stop thief, and he was immediately stopped by a young man; he was not got five yards before he was stopped; I went up to them; it was a little dark, but it was opposite to a butcher's shop, where he ran against me, and there was plenty of candle-light; when I came up to him, I knew him.

Prisoner. Were you sober - A. I was sober, I had not left my work five minutes.

Prisoner. Ask him if he was sober how he came to give the watchman a shilling for seeing him home - A. I did not give any shilling.

WILLIAM JAGGERS . I was in Back lane, on this night; the first thing I heard was a cry of stop thief! I turned round, and saw the prisoner running; I stood where I was, until he came up to me; he ran against a man, and knocked me down into Mr. Tyler's shop,; that man was some distance from me. The prisoner crossed the road, and I crossed the road at the same time, and caught him in my arms when I caught him, he twisted me round, and something dropped from him; I heard something fall, but I did not see it. A young man stooped and picked it up; he afterwards produced a watch, and gave that watch to the patrole; I do not know the young man. I saw Ryners come up in a minute or two afterwards, and when he came up he said, thet that was the man who robbed him; the watch was shwen to him in the house. The prisoner did not say anything. There were a great number of persons assembled, and the patrole and others had hold of his collar. The prosecutor was not in liquor at the time,

JOHN TOWNSEND . I was in the Back lane at the time. I saw nothing of this until I heard the cry of stop thief; I did not see the prisoner until he was stopped, Some persons gave me a watch, but I don't know who. The prosecutor saw that watch

and claimed it, and he was perfectly sober.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I was officer of the night, for that night. The prisoner was given into my charge and I received this watch (producing it,) from the patrole. The reason the watchmen went with the prosecutor was, to find out where he lived, for he wanted to have done with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, and seeing people running, I ran too, and then this gentleman stopped me, and the prosecutor said it was I that robbed him.

THE COURT, in going over the evidence to the Jury, informed them, that if they should be of opinion that the prisoner ran against the prosecutor, and trod on his toe, in order that he might give himself an opportunity of the more imperceptibly completing his purpose, that would in law be sufficient force to constitute a Highway robbery.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-33

32. FRANCIS GRIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one silver watch, value 2l. two gold seals, value 2l. one key, value 1s. 6d. one ring, value 5s. a great coat, value 10s. and a pair of gaiters, value 3s. the poperty of William Jenkins , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM JENKINS . I live in Charlotte street, Portman place, in the parish of Mary-le-bone , I have a house there. The prisoner lodged in that house for three weeks before the 15th of October, he slept in the same room with me. My brother and I have the house between us, it is a small house which we rent from my mother; it belongs to both of us. The prisoner got up between eight and nine on the morning of the 15th, which was Sunday. He got up and went out of the house; I was very ill in bed; I had asked the prisoner to get me a letter to go into the hospital. When I got up, I missed my watch and seals; I gave seven pounds for them, and I suppose they were worth three. I did not see him for a fortnight after that. I saw him in about a fortnight at the White Horse cellar, and I asked him what he thought of himself for taking my property, he made no answer but said in a very slow voice which could scarcely be heard,he was sorry; he told me he had pledged them, and said he would take me to a place where I could get the duplicate; I got them I think in Beaufurt buildings Marylebone; she went with me there. I found the things at a pawnbroker's, I think the name is Baylis. The prisoner told me that a woman pawned them for him; he did not tell me her name then, but afterwards he did.

ANN BOLTWOOD . The prisoner employed me to pawn the watch and seals for him; I pledged the watch at Baylis's in Portland street, and the seals and key at Mr. Danbrise in Charlotte street. I believe, the prisoner pawned the other things himself.

JOHN BAYLIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Portland street, Cavendish square. The last witness pawned a silver watch a great coat, and a pair gaiters with me. I believe I have the silver watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took the watch, but with an intention of making it good again when I got into work.

THE COURT informed the Jury, that the indictment charged this felony to have been committed in the dwelling house of William Jenkins , whereas it was the joint dwelling house of him and his brother; therefore the prisoner must be acquitted of the capital part of the charge.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-34

33. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ferdinand Sorr , in the night time of the 17th of November , with intent to steal,and for burglariously stealing therein, a loaf and a bladder of lard, value 2s. 6d. his property .

PHOEBE MATTHEWS . In November I lived with Mr. Sorr, who lives at No. 6, Bullsrode Street . At about a quarter before six in the evening of the 17th of November, I was employed in sending up the dinner. I had occasion to go to the larder for something, and heard the cry of stop thief; and at the same time perceived a bladder of lard, a half quartern loaf, and a plate of meat on the area steps. When I had gone to the larder a few minutes previous, I had locked it, I am sure; and left the key in the door. This larder is in the area fronting the area steps, and is affixed to the house; but is not a part of it. There is no internal communication from the dwelling house to it.

Cross examined by Mr. Challoner. I was very busy in sending up the dinner. There are only a lad and myself employed in the house; so that no other servant could have taken these things out of the larder and put them on the steps.

RICHARD DUNN . I was in Bullstrode Street, passing by at about a quarter before six in the evening of the 17th of November. It was dak. The lamps were lighted. I observed three boys loitering about, and as they were suspicious looking characters, I determined to watch them. I live at No. 7, and rang our bell to tell my fellow servants to be careful. I saw the prisoner at the bar come twice up to the area steps of Mr. Sorr's house. The other boys were out in the street. I saw him bring first a plate, and then the lard and loaf, and lay them on the area steps. The area gate was shut. He saw me looking at him, and jumped over the area rails. stumbed at the other side of the way, and ran off. I ran after him, and the other two knocked me up against the railings at the other side of the way, whilst I hallooed stop thief. The prisoner was taken soon after. I pursued him and took him.

Cross examined by Mr. Challoner. It was dark, but I am sure it is the same boy. I stopped him just at he end of James Street,

WILLIAM EAVES . I was in James Street, Manchester Square. The first thing I heard was stop thief. I knew nothing of what was passing before that. When I heard stop thief, I saw the prisoner running at the other side of the way; I assisted in stopping him immediately. He was taken to Bullstrode Street, and afterwards delivered to the case of the watch-house keeper.

JOHN LANGLRY . I am an officer, and he was delivered into my charge. I produce the lard and the loaf which the cook delivered to me.

Property sworn to.

Mr. Chaloner, as the priaoner's advocate, called some witnesses to his character, and submitted that a burglary was not established.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Fined 1s. and imprisoned three months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-35

34. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Bryan Sweeney , at about the hour of eleven in the night time of the 10th of November , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein a Turkey carpet his property .

JOHN CONNOR . I am partner of Mr. Sweeney's. I have nothing to do with the proprietorship of the house. At about twenty minutes before eleven in the night of the 15th of November, I was at work in the dye house; I heard the door bang, upon which I went forward into the street, and saw two or three men with a carpet, which they immediately, dropped, and ran away. That carpet was Mr. Sweeney's. Mr. and Mrs. Sweeney were in bed. I called Haines, who was at work with me; I did not run after these people; I waited a minute or so, and the prisoner passed me and went into the shop door way, and came out again directly; I said here is one of them, and he said, yes, certianly I am one of them; take care of me now you have got me. I did so, and delivered him to the watchman: I am not sure he was one of those who had hold of the carpet.

Carpet produced and sworn to by the prosecutor Sweeney.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-36

35. JOHN SOLOMON was indicted, for that he at a general session of the peace, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the twenty eighth of May, in the 54th year of His Majesty's reign, was convicted of uttering twice within the space of ten days, counterfeit tokens made to the resemblance of those issued by the Bank of England for three shillings each, well knowing them to be counterfeit, by reason of which premises, he became and was a common utterer of such, and was convicted as above, and was sentenced to be imprisoned for one year, and at the expiration of the same, to find sureties for his good behaviour for two years; and that he having been so convicted on the 2nd of November , in the present year, feloniously did utter to one Edward Scott , one false and counterfeit token, made with intent to pass as and for one of certain silver tokens for the sum of three shillings issued and circulated by the Governour and Company of the Bank of England, well knowing the same to be counterfeit .

MR. THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD. I am assistant solicitor to the Bank of England. I produce the certificate of the clerk of the peace of this County, of the conviction of the prisoner for uttering base money. I saw the deputy clerk of the peace sign it. I was at Clerkenwell Sessions House at the prisoner's former trial, and know him to be the person alluded to by the certificate.

(The certificate was here put in and read.)

EDWARD SCOTT . I procured an introduction to the prisoner in November last. In consequence of that, I made an appointment with him; I met him accordingly at the Coventry Cross, Petticoat lane ; I had been in that house about two minutes when he came in; he asked me how many I wanted, and I said, two dozen. That was meaning tokens. He went away, and in about two minutes returned, with two dozen, which he delivered to me; they were wrapped up in paper. I looked at one, to see what they were. I paid him two pounds for them. I afterwards delivered them to Mr. Westwood. The prisoner said, they were all good ones, and taking three and sixpence in his hand, he said, this is all I get by them, by God.

Mr. Westwood. I received a paper of counterfeit tokens from the last witness, with paper between each of them, to prevent their rubbing together, and thereby taking off the colouring.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a City constable, and apprehended the prisoner, on Sunday, the 5th of November; I told him I had information from Mr. Westwood to apprehend him about some three shilling tokens; I took hold of him in Newgate street. He said, I held him as tight as if it was for a highway robbery; I told him it was nearly as serious an affair. He said, he did not care, they could not hang him; they could only transport him.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I am one of the tellers at the Bank. I have examined the tokens in question; they are all counterfeited, and have never been in circulation; they resemble tokens issued by the Bank.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-37

36. OWEN LYNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of November , two butter baskets, commonly called flats, value 6s. the property of Joseph Hearn .

CHRISTMAS WINTER . I am a watchman, in Newgate market. On Friday morning, my brother watchman came and told me that a man had pitched two butter flats close by his beat. I went with him, and presently the prisoner came to take them away, and I stopped him. He said, he was going to Billingsgate to get some herrings in them. I told him he must first go to the watch house with me, and give a better account of them.

(Property produced.)

JOSEPH HEARN . These are my property.

SAMUEL STEBBING . On the 2nd of November, the prisoner came and left these flats close by my beat. He went away directly and I told my partner, and when the prisoner came again, we stopped him.

Joseph Hearn . Those are my flats, and our losses

of others in a similar manner is almost incalculable; we are necessarily obliged to leave them exposed in the market.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-38

37. JOHN WILSON and JOHN BODERO were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief, value 6d. the property of John Abbot , the younger, from his person .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a City constable; I was on duty on Lord Mayor's day last. I saw the prisoner, Wilson, before the procession came from Guildhall, attempting several pockets. When the procession was coming down Bridge street, Blackfriars , to take water, Boldero and Wilson were together. I then called Huggins, and saw them go behind the prosecutor, Mr. Abbot; Boldero put his hand into Mr. Abbot's pocket, and took out his handkerchief. Wilson was covering him all the time; I mean by covering, standing so near him as to try to avoid the perception of the surrounding people. When I saw him, he dropped the handkerchief; Boldero dropped it when I seized him; it was a cotton handkerchief. (Producing it.)

JOHN HUGGINS . I was there, and was called by Barret. I saw Wilson go on the left hand of Mr. Abbot, and Boldero on the right; then Wilson lifted up the pocket, and Boldero drew out the handkerchief. That is the handkerchief.

JOHN ABBOT . I was in Bridge-street, Blackfriars, on Lord Mayor's day, and lost a pocket handkerchief.

The prisoners in their Defences, most stoutly denied their guilt, and all knowledge of the transaction.

John Barret . I knew Wilson had taken a red pocket handkerchief from a gentleman in Guildhall yard, and I could not get up to him. There is another indictment against him for that.

WILSON, GUILTY , aged 23.

BOLDERO, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-39

38. JOHN WILSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one pocket handkerchief, value 9d. the property of a certain person unknown .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I first observed Wilson at about half past eleven, in Guildhall yard ; he was then employed in company with another, in attempting to pick every pocket he came near. He went behind a gentleman, and put his right hand into the gentleman's left hand pocket, and took out a red handkerchief. (Producing a pocket handkerchief.) I believe this is it; he put it into his breeches before he quitted the gentleman. I got up to the gentleman, and tapped him on the shoulder, but he said, d-n the handkerchief; it is of no consequence.

JOHN HUGGINS . I took that red handkerchief from the prisoner's breeches.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-40

39. WILLIAM COLLINS , WILLIAM ADOLPHUS THOMPSON , and FRANCIS ALLSOP , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of a person unknown .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a City constable. I saw the three prisoners at the bar, on the 9th of November; they were pointed out to me by Johnson; they were in Bridge-street, Blackfriars . We saw them attempting gentlemen's pockets; they hurstled a gentleman, and I saw Collins take a handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket; I was within half a yard of them; they were all three together. I then lost both them and the gentleman. The next time I saw the prisoners, was on the return of the procession; I then observed them at the corner of King street, Cheapside; they were attempting to pick pockets then. We watched them until the procession had nearly got in; they then went down Trump street, King street, into Lawrance lane, and took handkerchiefs out of their pockets, and put them round their necks; I saw Allsop in particular; I found three round his neck, and three in his pocket. I then saw Collins had one, and a pair of gloves, in his pocket. The other prisoner had nothing upon him. (Produces the handkerchiefs.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. I had known Thompson before; the others were strangers. My attention was drawn to them, by Johnson. I could not take them in Bridge street, although I was so near to them.

Re-examined by Mr. Bolland. As soon as I had sufficient assistance, and an opportunity, I took them.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . My attention was draw to the prisoners at about half past one, or nearly two, after the procession had taken water; they were round the Lord Mayor's carriage; there was a great mob, and the three prisoners were very active in picking pockets; they were all three together. I observed them during nearly three quarters of an hour. I saw them put their hands into many pockets round the carriage. I was obliged to go after some others. I saw them again when the procession came from Westminster, between three and four; they were then altogether, and hustling. I left them, whilst I went to apprehend some others.

JOHN GODDARD . I am a constable, but was not on duty. I observed all three of the prisoners; I first saw them at the corner of King-street; they were then attempting gentlemen's pockets; I watched them for nearly an hour. They turned down Trump-street, into Lawrence lane, and there I saw the shortest, Allsop, putting something round his neck. We then followed them to the gate of Guildhall yard, and then we took Allsop at the corner of Cateaton street; he said, he had no handkerchiefs, and we found three round his neck, and three in his pocket. I was present when Thompson was apprehended, and one was round his neck. I am certain the three prisoners are the men.

William Barrett . I can't swear positively which

of these handkerchief it was that I saw Collins took, but certainly he took one, in Bridge street, and they were altogether then, and hustled the gentleman.

COLLINS, GUILTY , aged 29.

THOMPSON, GUILTY , aged 23.

ALLSOP, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-41

40. BENJAMIN BRADBURY was indicted for stealing, on the on the 11th of November , three ounces and a quarter of silver, value 16s. the property of William Jackson and Henry Jackson .

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am in partner ship with my brother, Henry. I in consequence of a suspicion, marked a piece of silver wire, on the 10th of November, and gave it to a person named Davis. The prisoner was at work as usual that day; I saw him at about seven o'clock. I saw him on the 11th; I asked him whether he had any flat edges over, after the work he had been appointed to do was completed;(that was some which we had marked;) he said, no; he had had a piece of Mr. Davis, which was just sufficient for the required purpose, and no more. I then sent for Davis, and asked him how much he had given him, and then it appeared by the quantity given him, and the work done, there must have been a considerable remainder. The prisoner then said, he believed there was a little bit over, and it was in his can. We had searched the can, and there was none there, and we told him so. He then said, it was on the board. I told him it so unfortunately had happened, that we had searched both can and board, and there was none about either. I then sent for an officer. I gave him to understand that, I had done so. A few minutes afterwards, he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out the wire, rolled up, for the more convenience for putting into his pocket; I observed my mark very plainly upon it.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am a journeyman to the prosecutor. On the 10th of November last, I received some silver from the prosecutor, for the purpose of my keeping it in my can until I should want it. I gave the prisoner four case edges and four flat edges in the afternoon of the 11th they were marked. He could not have completed the work for which they were necessary until the following; morning. In the evening, Mr. Jackson asked the prisoner. If there was any of the flat edges left, and he said, there was a bit, which was in his can. I had not seen the can. I had seen the board, and it was not there, when he said it was. After a time he produced a piece out of his pocket; one of the pieces which I had delivered to him that day. Mr. Jackson asked him for the rest, and in a little time he produced more, in all, about two ounces and a quarter.

JOHN CROSSLAND . I know nothing more, than that I apprehended the prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-42

41. JOSEPH WEST was indicted for feloniously making an assault, upon Martha Webb spinster , on the King's Highway, on the 3rd of December ; for putting her in fear and taking from her person and against her will, one lace veil, value 14s. her property .

MARTHA WEBB . I am a single woman, I live in Morgan street, Commercial Road.I was robbed of my veil, between the hours of seven and eight in the evening; there was a young woman with me; I was in Lemon street going towards Whitechapel; It was a very wet evening, and my veil was pined on my bonnet with two pins, and on a sudden, a snatch came from behind me, and took it from me; if my bonnet had not been tied on, It would have gone too. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner running away with the viel in his hand; I ran after him, and cried stop thief. He was never out of my sight until he was stopped; I came up directly and it was the prisoner; he then gave me my viel, and hoped I would forgive him.

SUSANNAH SMITH . I was walking in company with the last witness and on a sudden, somebody from behind tore off her veil, and run off. We turned round immediately, and saw the prisoner running off with it, we pursed him, and cried stop thief; he was stopped and was never out of our sight.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing, but not of the assault .

Confined one Year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-43

42. ELIZABETH WEST and SARAH GUMMER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , one tea caddy, value 6l. one morocco case, value 2s. one pin cushion, value 1s. one pair of scissors, value 6d. eleven pairs of stockings. value 3l. six pairs of socks, value 6s. four pair of gloves, value 2s, six caps. value 6s.one shift value 3s. eight handkerchiefs, value 2l. three scarfs, value 3l. three shawls, value 1l. three pieces of lace, value 7s. three pieces of muslin, value 5s. six pieces of ribbon, value 3s. two table cloths, value 3l. five sheets, value 5l. one silver folk, value 5s. one silver spoon, value 5s. one petticoat, value 3s. one hat, value 1s. twelve shirts value 10s. three forks, value 3s. one blanket, value 2s. one napkin, value 6d. three pin-befores, value 2s. two tippets, value 5s. one pillow case, value 2s. twelve yards of lace, value 12l. five books, value 1s. one lace body, value 1l. and one necklace, value 2s. the property of Charles Cook , in his dwelling house .

MRS. ELIZABBETH COOK . My husband's name is Charles Cook . On the 10th of last month, we had a house at Parsons Green . The servant s who had the care of it, were the two prisoners, and Thomas Dupins , My husband and I were not then residing in that house. I went to it on the 10th of November, and I asked Thomas Dupins the man servant, for a beaver hat of my son's; and he said he knew nothing of it; and I sent him to enquire of the prisoners. In consequence of something that he told me, and some direction which he gave me, I ordered both the prisoners up stairs, and asked each of them if they knew anything of a tea caddy which was missing;

and they both denied any knowledge of it. I then desired them both to come up into their bed rooms, and also the footman, in order that he might be a witness to all that passed. The prisoner Gummer was the first person I desired to let me see her clothes, that was to open her box; she did so, and to my great supprise, it was nearly empty; I found nothing in it, which I claimed. I enquired where her clothes were, and she informed me in the drawer; by my orders, she turned the contents of the drawers out. I found a plain muslin cap belonging to my mother; that is not in the indictment. I found no other property of mine in these drawers. Then I told West to open her trunk. She unlocked it, and the first thing that presented itself, belonged to one of my children; several other things I saw in her trunk, peices of muslin; but I did not count the number. Then she put her hand into the centre of the box, and took out the tea caddy, for which I had been enquiring; it was a tortoise shell caddy, and I had had it about a year; I don't really suppose it is worth more than twenty shillings. She said, there is your caddy ma'am, and I have no more of your property in my possession. She was then going to close her trunk, when I desired a further search. I found various articles which are mentioned in the indictment, and which will be produced. The twelve yards of lace, valued at twelve pounds, was not found. There was a great quantity of baby linen, and various small articles. I did not send for a constable until after some conversation had taken place. Whether these things were taken all at one time, or at various periods, I cannot tell.

THOMAS DUPPINS . I am servant in Mr. Cook's family, The prisoner West acted as a nurse, and Gummer as a cook, and housemaid in the family I remember my mistress coming to the house at Parson's Green, on the 10th of November. I was employed in removing part of the things from the house at Parson's Green, to Walham Green. When my mistress came on the 10th, she made some enquiry respecting a hat, which I had had to brush. When I looked for it, I found it was missing, from a shelf in the pantry where I had put it. I told my mistress I could not find it, and she ordered the two prisoners up stairs. I have heard the account my mistress has given of what took place then, and it is perfectly right.

JOHN ROGERS . I am a constable, and live in the parish of Fulham, and Mr. Cook's house is in that parish. I was sent for to take the prisoners into custody. When I came, I was shewn some property by Mrs. Cook, that was in a large bundle, here it is. I saw Mr. Cook gave some keys belonging to West's box. I took the prisoners to our watchhouse. Sent by the direction of Gummer, I went to the washerwoman's for a bundle.

Thomas Duppins . I was sent to Mary Griffith 's the washerwomans at Fulham for a bundle, and in my way, to her house, I met her coming with the bundle. The last witness did not go, but when he says he was sent, he means as Gummer told him to go; but he desired me, and I delivered the bundle to Mrs. Cook.

WILLIAM BOND . I am an officer belonging to Bow Street, and was sent with a search warrant, on the application of Mr. Cook, at our office, to the house of the father and mother of West. They acknowledged that they were the father and mother of a servant of Mrs. Cook's. I went to the watchhouse; after I went to Mr. Cook's home, and then received a veil and a piece of lace. I then went to the watchhouse and searched the prisoner West, and on her found a key, (producing it.) This key opens a cupboard in the bed room, from which the large bundle was taken, I have marked the key.

MARY GRIFFITH . I am a washer woman; I worked for Mrs. Cook; I know Elizabeth Gummer and the other prisoner. I went to Mrs. Cook's one evening; the evening before they were apprehended, and as I was going out, Elizabeth Gummer followed me, and asked me if I would take care of a parcel for her for a day or two; I told her I had no objection; and she gave me the same parcel which I was bringing to Mrs. Cook's; when I was met by Thomas Dupin, which he delivered to Mrs. Cook, which she handed over to Bond, the Bow street officer, and which he has produced.

MRS. ELIZAABETH COOK. I know these articles to be my property? this hat is my son's. I have examined all these things before, and know them to be our property. These things might be taken all at different times; I do not suppose that there is any one would amount, or exceed, forty shillings. in value, if sold.

ELIZABETH WEST , GUILTY, aged 26.

SUSANNAH GUMMER, GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-44

43. JOHN ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st. of December , 1 basket, value 6d. two shawls, value 1l. two neckcloths, value 2s. two shirts, value 12s. four frocks, value 8s. two petticoats, value 2s. two pin cloths, value, 2s. two caps, value 2s. two shifts, value, 4s. three aprons, value 1s. and a bed gown, value 6d. the property of Andrew Schmickert , in the dwelling house of William Chertin .

CHRISTIANA SCHMICKERT . My husband lived in Wentworth Street, White Chapel ; our landlord was William Chertin ; he lived in the house. Last Friday, the 1st of December, the articles mentioned in the indictment were in the front parlour; I saw them in the parlour safe in the basket about ten minutes before I missed them. There are other lodgers in the house, and the street door generally stands open. I went down at near five in the evening into the kitchen, to get some water, leaving my children in the room. I heard a foot in the passage, and heard one of my children cry out mother; I ran up stairs immediately, and then the basket and its contents were gone. The things were in the basket, and must have been taken at the same time.

JAMES GIBSON . I am fourteen last December; at about five o'clock in the evening of the 1st of this month, I and another boy were playing in the street

[Text unreadable in original.]ar the house where the prosecutor resides; the [Text unreadable in original.]y who was with me, said the prisoner was cutting [Text unreadable in original.]e panes of glass out of a window opposite; I can't [Text unreadable in original.]if whether he was, or was not; it was at the house in which the prosecutor lives; he then went into the house; there were two more with him; the door was open. I did not know the prisoner's name. It was not the prisoner that went in; it was one of the other two; I saw him come out with a basket and something in it. He had not been ten minutes, nor so long as that. The prisoner was dressed like a blacksmith, and the man gave the basket of clothes to him. One of them gave me a smack on the head, and one of the others said, take him into custody Jack, and put him into the watchhouse; meaning him to take me up. They ran away, and I told the prosecutrix. The next time I saw the prisoner was at Lambeth Street office; I had given a description of him.

ROBERT COOMES . I am an officer, belonging to Lambeth street office, I know the boy who has just given evidence. The woman came to the office, on the apprehension of the prisoner and the boy came with her, and described the prisoner before he saw him, as appearing like a blacksmith, and a long brown great coat, and walking lob sided. The prisoner's person certainly answered taht description; and he has a kind of roll in his walk. We have not found any of the property.

Prisoner's Defence. The good woman said she lost her property about five o'clock; and at that time, I was up at Mrs. Wards, in Church street, St. Giles's, where I went to get nine shillings, which she owed my mother. Mrs. Ward is here.

ANN WARD . I live at No. 5, Church street, St. Gile's. I do not rent the whole house, I live in the back parlour. Yesterday, for the first time, I heard of the prisoner's apprehension; he sent for me, because he slept with me, last Friday night was a week. He came from his mother. to whom I owed a little money; and as I could not make it up that night, he staid with me until the next morning, when I could get it for him. I am a barrow woman. The messuage to attend here, was left at my house. I met his mother at Billingsgate the next morning, and gave her the money.

THE COURT, in summing up the evidence to the Jury, told them that the first point which was necessary for their strict attention, was the evidence of the last witness, who was called in the part of the defence; she had been called by the prisoner to substantiate the place which he had set up of alibi, and which was either the best or the worst of defences. Best, if the manner of the witness who was called to establish it, was given in such a manner as to clear up every doubt and abolish every suscipion entertained against the prisoner; but worst, if the contrary. To the evidence of this woman, apposed that of the boy, who not only speaks now that the prisoner is before him, to the identity of his person, but gave such a description of him before he had had opportunity of seeing him after his apprehension, as in the mind of the officer to whom it was given, corresponded with the prisoner's person, and particularly of his taste. In this case, the woman in, which the conflicting evidence was given opposite witnesses, was the chief thing to be examined. If any doubt, in favour of the prisoner, should be cleared up in the mind of the Jury, then their consideration would be turned to value. Unfortunately, they had not an opportunity of judging of it themselves, by the production of the stolen property, in the absence of which they had but the value as described by the prosecutrix; and which did not very far exceed that amount which was required by the stalute to make this a capital felony.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-45

44. MARY CLARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July, 1815 , one 1l. bank note, and fourteen shillings in monies numbered, the property of John Domimico , from his person .

JOHN DOMIMICO . I am a green grocer , and live at No. 7, Queen's row, Knightsbridge . I lost this money on the 26th of July last, between the hours of three and four in the afternoon. The prisoner at the bar came to the door, and asked the price from the boy of pickling wallnuts; she was told four shillings a hundred. The boy brought her into the shop, she wanted some cauliflowers. Then I stepped out of the parlour, and she had the wallnuts and cauliflowers in the shop; that is the boy had them ready to go with her. She asked for change of a two pound note, with a bill and receipt, and said that the people over the way were so very sorry that her mistress had left off dealing with them, she asked for two quarts of white currants, and four pottles of raspberries for table. I told her I did not think I had any that was fit for table, but I would endeavour to get some; she said they were not for that days dinner, but for the next. She told me to make out the bill, for her mistress always paid ready money. I asked her where it was? and she said 21, Grosvenor place. I asked her if the name was Madam Tait, and she said, it was. I then called the boy into the parlour, gave him change for a two pound note, deducting the price of the articles, and cautioned him not to let either money or goods go until he had got the two pound note, nor to leave them with the prisoner under any pretence whatever. Then I know no more until his return.

HENRY STANMORE . The prisoner at the bar, first asked me the price of the walnuts; she said her mistress was a very good customer, and used to deal over the way; but they were so saucy that she was obligad to quit them; She then asked me if I knew a boy who wanted a place? this was after I was carrying the things with her; she said it was a very good place; they found them in shoes, and would give four and sixpence a week, and I told her I did not know of any body wanting a place; she then got a little way on, and I was before, she asked for the change; I had the things; she said she wanted to get some tea and sugar for the

company; I gave her the change; she told me to go to 21, Grosvenor place, to get the two pound note, and she said, I might have two or three old pottles for myself, which were under the dresser. I went, and saw the footman in the servant's hall, at 21, and told him I was ordered to bring these things by the cook, and asked for the two pound note; I found it was not there. I went to No. 20, and found it was not there, either. I then asked them to be so good as to let me leave the things, until I went to look for the woman; I went to a grocer's shop in Piccadilly, thinking she might have gone there; but I could hear no tidings of her. I returned, crying, down Piccadilly, and got the things from No. 20, and then went to 30. I had a lettuce to leave at No. 41. I then went to where my father worked; but he was not in the way, and I heard that there was an old French Lady lived at 21, King's road; but it was not there. The Lord Milton's footman looked into the Court List for me; but could find nobody of the name of Madam Tate. I gave the prisoner a one pound note and fourteen shillings.

JOHN GILMORE . On the last day of the last Westminster Sessions, the prisoner was acquitted of a similar offence, being charged with false pretence, and the false pretence not being made out against her. I detained her on account of several other charges of a similar nature, which were against her, and gave notice to the present prosecutor.

THE COURT, in summing up the evidence to the Jury, informed them, that though the prisoner stood charged with stealing from the person of John Dominico , when in fact, it was from Henry Stanmore; that would not alter the case against her, as it was merely a larceny.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-46

45. JOHN NEWCOMB was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , twelve books, value 1l. the property of Robert Saunders .

ROBERT SAUNDERS . I am an auctioneer , and was professionally employed to sell the goods of Mr. Barrington, late bookseller, and a bankrupt, at the corner of Catherine street, in the Strand . On the fourth day, soon after the sale commenced, we missed two volumes out of three, of a book entitled the "Catholic." I spoke of it during the sale, and a bookseller standing by said, he had observed a person with two volumes in his hand. The prisoner had bought a lot a few minutes before, and paid one shilling and sixpence for it. The bookseller went out to look for the person of whom he spoke; but his search was fruitless. On the 2nd of December, the prisoner bought three lots, amounting to one pound fourteen shillings, and he paid four shillings deposit. When the sale of that day was concluded, I was going out, and was stopped by two booksellers, who were bringing the prisoner up to the sale room, on the first floor; they accused him of having taken a book, and put it into his pocket. I requested him to produce it; at first, he denied having taken it; but, at last, produced it, saying, he purchased it at the sale. I remarked that that could not be the case, as the book was the "Polite Philosopher," and had not been sold. He was then taken to Bow-street, and I gave him in charge of an officer, and requested he might be searched immediately; to this he made so violent a resistance, that it required four persons to do it. In the scuffle he put some duplicates into his mouth, which he chewed to pieces. They succeeded in taking seven from him, which contained twelve books, my property.

THOMAS THORP . I am a bookseller, and was at the sale of Barrington's books. I saw the prisoner there on the 30th of November, with two volumes of the "Catholic," in his hand, which were subsequently missed. Seeing him in the shop on the 2nd of December, and knowing him, I watched him; I saw him take a book, which afterwards turned out to be the "Police Philosopher," from a shelf in the shop, and put it into his pocket; upon that I acquainted Mr. Saunders; and after denying his having the book, the prisoner gave it up. He was then taken to Bow-street, and searched; it required four or five to search him. He put a ticket in his mouth, which he chewed, and spit out, and rubbed it with his foot on the ground.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and produce six books, and four books; the six pledged for four shillings, on the 29th of November, by the prisoner; I am certain as to his person, for I have known him before. On the 1st of December, he pledged the other four, for two shillings and sixpence. I was about to say I thought he was mad at the time he pledged the books. He stated, he was going to start on Blackheath on the Sunday following, to walk a thousand miles in a week; he said, he had come from Rochester that morning in three hours. He also said, he had discovered what he called, a pinnacle process, which would turn fresh beer into sour, and sour into fresh. He pledged the books in his own name.

(Property produced.)

WILLIAM TULLY . I was apprentice to the bankrupt. Mr. Barrington, and by that means became acquainted with the books on the premises. I also assisted in making out the Catalogue for Mr. Saunders. I look at the books produced by the pawnbroker, and know them by my own marks to have been on the premises.

Mr. Andrews, as counsel for the prisoner, called a great number of witnesses to establish the prisoner's insanity; and from their evidence, it appeared that the unfortunate man had on several occasions combined drugs together to make a panacea as he supposed for all diseases, and had taken them himself, and had most materially injured his constitution, by producing a discharge of bloody urine. He had also appeared to have conceived himself contractor for the illumination of Charlton House; he was engaged by Government to go from the Downs to Brest, and burn the French Fleet. That he could turn old boots and shoes into new, and various other extravagancies, which clearly proved that at times, he laboured under mental derangement.

THE COURT, in summing up the evidence in

formed the Jury, that if they were convinced that the prisoner laboured under periodical fits of insanity, their attention would be turned to the question, whether at the time he committed the offence with which he was charged, he laboured under that degree of insanity, which would disenable him to distinguish right from wrong.

NOT GUILTY.

Upon the ground of insanity .

An order of the Court was accordingly made to keep him in custody.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-47

46. JOHN HENRY BRINKMAN was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Torvick, otherwise Torving .

JOSEPH WIGNELL . I keep a public house, in St. Catherine's . The deceased was a seaman , and on his last return from sea, on the 22nd of July, he lodged with me, and had done so up to the time of his death; he was in a very bad state of health when he first came home; he used to take medicines every morning, and was subject to fits; he was trying to get into the hospital; but could not get in, He then went away to lodge with a countryman of his. On Thursday, the 2nd of November, he was in my house almost the whole day; he had not a good deal of liquor to my knowledge, none at all, that I knew of; at a quarter past ten o'clock, I was in the bar, and heard a noise in the tap room; I went in, and saw the prisoner standing in a kind of fighting posture; but I did not see any fighting. I took hold of the prisoner, and pulled him out of the tap room, telling him at the same time, that if he would not be peaceable, I would send him to the watchhouse; I left him outside in the passage after I pulled him out of the tap room. I then returned into the tap room, and saw the deceased sitting upon a bench; he did not appear to have received any injury; I saw no blood nor any thing about his face; he staid some time after that in the house; I saw him go out at the door with the woman he lives with, and he said, good night to you all; he left my house at about eleven o'clock, and soon after I sent a lodger to see him, and after, that news arrived that he was dead.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. I heard a noise like a quarrell. I did not see that the deceased was hurt at all; I neither saw blood nor any marks upon him. There were twenty or thirty persons in the tap room. Torvick appeared to me sitting as he always did, and staid about half an hour in the house, and then bid us all good night.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I was in this house on that night; I was in the tap room; I saw the prisoner there; there was a girl there also. The girl and the deceased's woman were quarrelling together. I saw the prisoner and the deceased's girl quarrelling, and the prisoner said, have you any one to take your part, he said that to the deceased's girl. Then the deceased came out of his seat where he sat, and struck the prisoner; then they fought together about five or ten minutes; neither of them fell; then the deceased gave in. Then they went out and came in again in about ten minutes. Then the deceased wanted to shake hands with him and make it up, and the prisoner hit him over the left temple. He would have fallen, only somebody caught him and put him in the the seat. He looked very pale, and appeared very bad indeed; some water was got to wash his face with, but I can't say whether he fainted or not. He appeared better after that. and went out in about a quarter of an hour.

SOPHIA JONES . I live in Bell alley, St. Catherines. The deceased lived in the same house with me. I was in this tap room of this public house. The woman who belongs to the prisoner, was quarrelling with another young woman; and the prisoner knocked me down, and Torvick took my part. He took hold of the prisoner, and shoved him, and they fought together, but not much. The prisoner struck the deceased in his left temple, and he fainted with that blow. Some water was thrown in his face, and he got better after that, and I went home with him. After he recovered, he said he should have a black eye, and that would prevent him getting into the hospital. He sat down when he got home, but never spoke after he sat down. He opened his eyes, and fell off the chair dead. He had not been in the house more than a minute, when he fell off the chair dead.

MR. DAVID EVANS . I am a surgeon, and was sent for to look at the deceased on the morning after his death. I found no marks of blows or violence whateves on any part of his body. I opened his head, but could discover no marks that I could naturally suppose was the occasion of his death. His head was in a natural state; and I believe his death was occasioned by an apoplexy.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-48

47. WILLIAM BAGNELL THE ELDER, WILLIAM BAGNELL THE YOUNGRR, and THOMAS BAGNELL , were indicted for that they feloniously on the 17th of November , did make coin and counterfeit, and did willingly cut and assist in the making coining, and counterfeiting, ten pieces of coin, resembling certain silver dollars, coined, stampt, issued and circulated by the Governour and Company of the Bank of England, containing on the one side thereof an impression of his Majesty's head, and with the following words, to wit "Georgius III. Dei Gratia Rex." And on the reverse side thereof, an impression of Brittania, and the following words and figures to wit "Five shillings, Dollar, Bank of England, 1804;" against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. The same as the first, only substituting the words, "made with intent to resemble, instead of resembling."

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. In consequence of some information which I received, I went on the 17th of November, to Sewel street, Clerkenwell . My brothers Thomas Foy , who is an officer, and William Foy , who is not an officer, and Samuel Plank , accompanied me. We went to No. 8, very early in the morning, and st about six o'clock in the evening, we heard a noise as if a press were at work, at the back part of the house; that is at No. 8, Sewell street. The door of the adjoining house was open, and I and Thomas Foy went through No, 7, into its

garden. The garden of No. 7, is separated from that of No. 8, by a small low fence. I left Plank and William Foy in the street, and desired them when I got through, to knock at the door, and get admittance that way. When we were in No. 7, we heard the same noise. I got over the fence, and into the prisoner's garden. The whole back of the prisoner's shop, at the back part of the house, is a window, and looks into this garden. I saw all the prisoners, at that part of the shop where the press is. The candles were lighted, but I could not immediately see how they were employed; but they were all at the press. I went into the shop by a door which goes from the garden. My brother went in with me. At that time there had been a knocking at the front door, but I did not hear it. When I went in at the shop door, William Bagnell the elder went into the kitchen; he attempted to pass one of the front kitchen door, but finding it secure, and finding some one there, he return'd into the shop where I was. We took the three prisoners into custody, and as soon as my brother took hold of William he threw down a quantity of dollars; I saw him throw them down; there were six in number; they were perfect dollars; I marked them, and gave them to Mr. Westwood. In taking the father into custody, I was about to search him; he had his hand clinched, I opened it, and found four dollars on him in that hand (dollars put into the hands of the witness. Those are the four dollars I found in the hand of the father. Those are the six thrown away by William Bagnell the younger. Then I searched the shop, and found a stamping press; the lower dye of which bearing a matrix of the King's head, was fixt; I parted it, at the same time I found that the collar was on.(Articles put into the hands of the witness.) This is the upper, and this is the lower dye; the collar fits them. The use of the collar is to prevent the mettle spreading in stamping. From the appearance of the press altogether, it is my opinion that it had been working previously, and from the upper dye being warm, I think it had been just struck. On the press I found a spanish dollar, with the original impression upon the sides and edges, obliterated apparently by a file or some such instrument; that would inable the impression to be made with more facility. There was an iron tray, in which were thirty two Spanish dollars similarly prepared From the appearance with which it was working, when we heard it, there must be three persons at work at it. The principal upon which it is worked is this. - An immense weight is raised by two persons, and then let go, after the manner of a pile-driver, upon the dyes, and thereby occasions the impression to be made on the piece of metal between them. This weight is raised by a rope going over a wheel, and a third person feeds the dyes, that is, puts in the blank metal, and takes out that which has the impression. Plank and my other brother had come in at the front at the same time. The father said I hope you will observe, we are only stamping Spanish dollars, and hoped his case would be represented as favourable as possible; and said, that if his giving up the persons who employed him would be of any service, he would do that willingly. We apprehended all three and brought them away, with the press and all the other things,

THOMAS FOY . I am a police officer belonging to the same office. I heard the press going before we went in. I seized William Bagnell the younger, and he threw something behind him. I have heard the account which my brother has given, and it is perfectly correct.

SAMNEL PLANK . I am an officer belonging to Marlborough street, and knocked at the front door, at the same time that John and Thomas went in through the next house Mrs. Bagnell opened the door, and I stopped the other Bagnell at the other door, as he was making an attempt to come out, I took the elder Bagnell by the arm, and John Foy took the four dollars out of his hand. I took the stamping press, dies, and all the things which have been mentioned.

WILLIAM FOY . I went into the front of the house with Plank. I saw nothing different from what my brothers saw. I went into the kitchen and saw old Bagnell just in custody; I saw all the things in the shop.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I am a teller of the Bank. I look at the four dollars taken from the elder Bagnell's hand, they are counterfeit. The impressions on them are as stated in the indictment. I now look at the six found on the younger Bagnell they are all counterfeit, and bear similar impressions. I know look at the dyes, and think that those dollars were struck by them.

JOSEPH HENRY HARPER , I am engraver to the Bank. I look at the dollars, and the dyes, and these dollars are made from the dyes.

Mr. Alley, on the part of the prisoners, objected that the offence with which the prisoners were charged, was not the one contemplated by the statute; because that was to prevent persons for counfeiting five shilling dollars-when in fact, this was counterfeiting five and sixpenny dollars; and therefore this offence did not come within the letter of the statute. A similar punishment was alloted to persons convicted of coining three shilling, and eighteen penny bank tokens. Suppose the bank chose to issue the one for three shillings and six-pence; the other for one shilling and ninepence; after such nominal value, could the counterfeiter be punishable under the act as it now stood? unquestionably, in the learned counsels opinion-not.

Mr. Barry, on the same side stated, that in the preamble of this statute, the bank appeared to think it necessary to recite their authority for assigning three shilling and eighteen penny tokens, by doing so; and he objected that it had not shewn its authority for issuing five and six penny dollars; and the case of the prosecution being closed, they were now excluded from doing.

COURT. We will first dispose of the objection taken by the latter gentleman.

It is not material upon the present occasion, for the bank to shew their authority for affixis ng a nominal value of five shillings and sixpence to the dollar; and it is merely an engagement on its part with the public, to give that sum for the dollar. In respect of the first objection taken, the

the indictment charges the prisoners with making and coining, and acting and assisting in such making and coining pieces of coin, resembling certain silver dollars coined, &c. by the governor and company of he bank of England, containing certain impressions; which the indictment recites, and in the indictment of which consists the offence aimed at by the statute, and therefore the value nominal, or real, has nothing to do with it.

Bagnell the elder defence, now put in a written defeuce, most solemnly denying any intention to defraud the bank; but stating that he had been employed by a person named Goldston, to immitate a certain coin which that person gave him, which though in a degree it resembled, was not so like the bank dollar, or for any one to be deceived by it. This he immitated, and it was in its impression considerably different from the bank dollar; he further agreed that it was a well known fact, that he as a dye sinker, and every man in his profession, with equal case, had he been fraudently inclined, could copy most correctly the impression upon genuine dollars; and he concluded by endeavouring to exculpate his sons from any blame in the matter.

A number of witnesses were then called to character.

THE COURT then summed up the evidence for the jury, and informed them, that it was immaterial for this charge, what the mettal or composition was of, which the counterfeit coins were made.

WILLIAM BAGNELL, senior, GUILTY aged 46.

THOMAS BAGNELL , GUILTY , aged 26.

WILLIAM BAGNELL , junior, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for fourteen years ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-49

48. JOHN HOPCROFT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Grigg , at about the hour of six in the night time of the 5th of November , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, a box, a sheet, a counterpane, and a great number of other articles, value 10l. the property of Thomas Walker .

THOMAS WALKER . I live at No. 3, in the Green Yard, East Smithfield ; I am a lodger in the house of one George Grigg; he lives in the house himself. On Wednesday the 15th of November, I went to work in the afternoon about two o'clock, after having fastened my room door. I returned at about seven in the evening, after I had done work, and then I heard that my room was broke open. I perceived I had lost a box of wearing apparel; we have got about five pounds worth back.

MARIA WALKER . I went out on the 15th of November, before my husband, and did not return until after he had returned. I missed a blue pelisse which I had laid on the bed on going out, and the bed clothes were taken with it. There was a gown cut out in the box, a silk petticoat, and all the things that have been found are in court, in the custody of the officer.

JOHN BULL . I am patrole belonging to Aldgate parish. On Wednesday, the 15th of November, at about five o'clock in the evening, I met a man in a place called Back Rents, Rosemary Lane, with a deal box on his shoulder; I am not quite sure that that man was the prisoner; it was quite dark. He went into Solomon's shop. After we had heard of this robbery, I went with a brother officer to search Solomon's house, and there between the ceiling and the tiles, we found a box, to which the prosecutor will swear. I cannot swear that that is the box which I saw a man take into Solomon's shop.

MARY FANTWELL . I lived servant with Solomon, on the 15th of last month; I saw the prisoner that evening; he came into Solomon's house between six and seven o'clock in the evening, with a deal box; he put it down in the middle of the room, and said, "he had made a bloody smash." The first thing he pulled out, was a blue pelisses; he said he should keep that for his girl. My master, Solomon, was at home then, and gave him a one pound note for them. I knew the man twice before; he had been at our house at about four o'clock on the day of the robbery, eating a herring.

Prisoner's Defence, To the best of my knowledge I have not eaten a herring for the last twelve years.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-50

49. JOHN WHITE and WILLIAM GRIFFITHS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Nugent , on the 27th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, five pictures, two mugs, and one brush, value 5s. her property .

MARY NUGENT . I am a single woman , and an unfortunate girl; I live in Sun-yard , at a house belonging to Mr. Hart, a publican; I have one room there; the whole house it let out in tenements to different people; Hart does not live in it himself. On the 27th of October, I went out between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, it was dark when I went out; I left a young woman in the room, whom I told to lock it when she should come out. I was in company with the two prisoners from eight until between eleven and twelve. When I was coming home, I found the patrole before I got home. The prisoners had gone with me from my lodgings, in company with two more; they left me, and the other young woman in the public house, and went away at about eleven o'clock; they did not say where they were going to. On our return to my room, I found the door had been broken open; five pictures were missing, two mugs, and a brush. I had clothes, money, furniture, and others things in the room, all of which were safe.

MARIA TURNER . I lived in the same room; I lodged along with this young woman; we both lodged in one room; she hired the room, and held it of Mr. Hart, and I was a sub-tenant of her. The two men were a night and a day with us. I have heard the account which Mary Nugent has given; it is correct; I was last in the room; I shut the door, and locked it; I had the key in my hand all the evening. We all went to a public house together.

WILLIAM HUTCHINS . I am a patrole of the Lower Precinct of St. Botolph, Aldgate. The first I heard was a cry of watch, which proceeded from a comrade of mine. named Jones; I came up, and found the prisoners in custody of Jones; he said, they have broken open this room, and pointed to the room of the prosecutrix. The prisoner White, made his escape from me. Jones took care of the other whilst I went after him. I found him, and then took them both to the watchhouse, and gave them up to the care of the beadle. When I first came up to them, Jones had the pictures. The beadle searched Griffiths, and found the brush on him.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a beadle. I knew nothing of this transaction, until the men were brought to the watchhouse. After that, I searched Griffiths, knowing him to be a bad character, and on him, I found this clothes brush. (Producing it.) I found it in his jacket pocket.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-51

50. CATHERINE MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of November , two 1l. bank notes, and ninepence in monies numbered, the property of Benjamin Barrett , from his person .

BENJAMIN BARRETT . I am a carpenter , belonging to the Hon. East India Company's service. On the 2nd of November last, I was coming along Bishopsgate street , towards Half Moon alley, and I met the prisoner at the bar; I accosted her, and agreed to give her four shillings to go home with her for the night. When I got home with her, I thought it too little, and gave her seven shillings extra. We had some spirits to drink, and we then went up stairs, and I began to undress myself, and she took three three shilling bank tokens out of my waistcoat pocket; I did not care a b-r about the silver, and therefore she might have it. I put my clothes under the pillow, and she under a pretence of adjusting it, took the two one pound notes out of my pocket; instantly she flew down stairs. I did not think it safe to pursue her, not knowing who might be below, as perhaps there might be a combined party, who would take my clothes too. I reported it to the landlady, and she gave me leave to stay all night. When it was day light in the morning, I took down the number of the house, and the name of the alley, and observed, that exactly opposite the chamber window, there was the sign board of one Locke, a carpenter. I then went and informed an acquaintance of mine, named Charles Trotter . In consequence of information we received, we went to the corner of Short-street, Old street road, where the prisoner had some articles left in lieu of a triffle of money she owed them; she had a trunk, and some things, and I concluded as she had got money, she would pay the debt and come and take them away. We waited there all the day, and in the evening, sure enough she came; we then apprehended her, and had her taken into custody. I am positive as to her person; I was quite sober.

CHARLES TROTTER . I have known the prosecutor for some time. I assisted him in the search after the prisoner. I was in his company the evening previous to the robbery, and therefore he came to me the first thing in the morning. I went with him to the house at the corner of Short street, and waited with him until the prisoner came in; we then gave her in charge of Mr. Harding, the City constable.

JOHN HARDING . I am a constable of the Ward of Bishopsgate. On Friday, the 3rd of November, I was sent to No. 56, Half Moon alley, where the prosecutor was robbed; but only got some tidings of her there, which did not prove of any use. She was brought to me by the prosecutor and the last witness. None of the money has been recovered.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the money at all.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-52

51. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , seventeen hats, value 5l. the property of Charles William Hick , Thomas Moore Keates , Thomas Ovey , and John Richard Stipton ; in the dwelling house of the said Charles William Hick .

MR. THOMAS MOORE KEATES . I am a hatter , and live at 61, Cheapside ; I am in partnership with those gentlemen named in the indictment. I had no knowledge that we lost any hats, until the evening of Thursday, the 24th of November, when Mr. Du Val of the Custom Huse, called at our counting-house, and requested me to send some confidental person down to the Custom House, as there was a great number of hats with our names in them, entered for exportation, considerably under value. I went down to the Custom House myself, the following morning, and was not a little surprized to see a great number of hats there, which I knew to be our property, and which I knew could not have gone from our warehouse without the prisoner's knowledge. They were entered considerably under value.

THOMAS ANDERSON . I am a labouring man. I know the prisoner, Wilson, and have known him for some time; I have carried hats for him several times, to his own house, and to other places to be dressed and cleaned; he lived at No. 3, Goswell street road, Islington road. In November, I took six hat-boxes of hats from Mr. Hick's shop to Wilson's house, and left them there. The next day I carried a bag containing hats from Wilson's house to the house of a man named Joseph, in Monmouth street; that was this day fortnight.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. The day before when I carried these six hat-boxes, I did not open them to look in them; and therefore do not know what were their contents.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalman, and was employed on the 24th of November, to accompany Mr. Keates to the Custom House, respecting a quantity of hats which were entered there

considerably under value, by a person named Gabriel Jacobs , whom we took in custody, together with his son, when they arrived at the Custom House, as their answers to certain questions we put to them, were very unsatisfactory. In consequence of evidence, which they gave before the Lord Mayor, a suspicion fell upon somebody else. In consequence of that, two persons were apprehended, and from information they gave, the prisoner, Wilson, was apprehended. A dispute took place at the examination of the prisoner, between himself and a person named Joseph, who was apprehended as a receiver; it was a dispute as to the price which Joseph gave, and the prisoner received for the stolen hats."Joseph said, he paid ten shillings a piece to the prisoner for them, and the prisoner said, he only received eight shillings for each hat."

MR. CHARLES WILLAIM HICK . I am one of the partners in this house. We have been robbed to a very considerable amount, to the amount of some hundreds. The prisoner was a servant of ours; he was our foreman , and had the whole of the retail business entrusted in his care. He had the taking of hats from the warehouse, as well as the ordering of them from the manufactories, without any controul whatever. On Friday, the 24th of November, sixteen or seventeen hats were brought to the Mansion House, by a man named Drinkwater, and with him a man named Joseph. An examination took place on the Saturday, when a man named Anderson was brought forward, as a witness, and the prisoner was committed in consequence.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . On Friday, the 24th of November, I had a warrant to apprehend a man named Jacobs, who lived in Carey street. I could not execute that warrant, as he was not at home; but I went with his daughter to the house of Joseph, at No. 0, Monmouth street. She took a bag from her father's house to bring the hats back again in. Joseph was gone to the Synagogue; at about a little after five he came in; after he had been in about five minutes, the daughter of Jacobs came out with a porter, and this bag of hats. (Producing them.) She gave me the hats, and I took Joseph into custody.

HENRY TURNPENNY . On the 24th of November, I apprehended the prisoner; I searched him, and found a five pound note, a one pound note, and a silver watch, which I delivered to Mr. Hick, in the presence of the Lord Mayor, to give to the prisoner's wife

Mr. Hick. I was present during this dispute which took place between the prisoner and Joseph. The dispute was whether Joseph had paid the prisoner ten shillings or eight shillings a piece for the hats."Joseph said he paid ten shillings, and the prisoner said, he only received eight shillings for those he had sent on the Friday morning, and he had given him one in." I reside in this house; it is my dwelling house.

Mr. Gurney, as counsel for the prisoner, called several witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 38,

Of stealing to the amount of 39s.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-53

52. JOHN TURNELL was indicted for burglarily breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Oliver , and William Hibber , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, four pieces of bombasin, value 24l. one hundred and thirty six yards of printed cotton, value 7l. and seventy five yards of Irish linen, their property .

SAMUEL HIBBER . I am in partnership with Samuel Oliver, we are auctioneers . In the beginning of this month, we had a stock of drapery goods to dispose of which were placed at No. 129, Wood street . We put John Draper there, as our servant, to take care of them, and to sleep in the house; we had catalogued goods for sale, which took place yesterday.

JAMES BROOKS . I am an auctioneer's porter. I ticked all the articles off for sale, with the catalogue and found they were on the premises. The articles mentioned in the indictment were among them. I had left the things safe at about half past four, in the afternoon.

JOHN DRAPER . I was in the employ of Messrs. Oliver and Hibber, I was sent by them to sleep in the house where the goods were, at No.129, Wood street on the 2nd of December. I used to go to the house about every hour. I went at about five o' clock on the evening of the 2nd of December, and found the locks fast, and all was quite secure. I went at about a quarter past six the same evening, and found the padlocks and binges wrenched off the door, and the door shut quite close to. I opened the door gently and heard somebody on the premises, I immedaitely pulled it to, and held it quite close. As soon as I had done that, some person who was inside tried to pull the door open. I put my feet against the door post and held the hasp tight, and called for assistance; all this time the person inside was pulling the door trying to get out. That pulling tore the skin off my hand, and hurt me a good deal. As soon as assistance came which was Mr. Weller, and the person inside finding he could not get out, he bolted the doors, as we should not get in. As soon as we found the door was bolted, I asked some one to go to the next door for not to let them go to the top of their house, and I requested somebody else to get an iron crow, to break open the door; I requested all this so loud, that the person inside might hear it. In about three minutes, the person inside unbolted the door, and endeavoured to come out, when Mr. Weller seized him by the collar, and I likewise by the jacket. We forced him back into the warehouse, and there were lights brought immediately; it was the prisoner. We then found the articles named in the indictment, missing, and there were three pieces of bombasin lying on the floor; I had seen them myself on a temporary shelf which was made shortly before. It was quite dark when I went to the house at five o'clock, and saw it safe, and this was at six; I afterwards examined the door, to see whether it had been forced or not, and there were the marks of a chissel, or small iron crow. The hasps were on the door, and the staples were found out, and the locks were forced off, at the side of the door, and gone. I had seen an hackney coach as I came down the street at a quarter past six, a little way from the premises; I did not see it driven away, but it was gone as soon

as I came out for the purpose of informing my employers.

EDWARD WELLER . I am a publican. I happened to be going by at about a quarter past six, on the2nd of this month, and as I was coming up the street, I heard a cry of theives. I jumped out of my cart, and went to give as much assistance as was in my power. I have heard the account given by the last witness, and it is true. The prisoner was taken to Giltspur street compter.

FRANCIS STURGESS . I live at No. 3, Wood street, precisely opposite to this house which was broken open. In the evening that this happened, I saw a hackney coach at that door. At about six o'clock I had occation to go into the Cross Keys yard, and on my return, I saw the coach door open, and the coachman giving something white, to what I conceived to be a female inside the coach, but that I am not certain. I went in doors, and took no more notice afterwards, until about a quarter after five, when I heard a cry of thieves! I went over and found the young man and Mr. Weller holding the door. They requested me to get a light, which I immediately did, but in crossing the road, A biew out; in the mean time somebody brought one from the Cross Keys booking office. When I came out, hearing a cry of thieves, the coach was at the door, but when I came out of the house after assisting in searching it from top to bottom, the coach was gone.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I examined the hasps of this door; there were marks upon the door post, as if an iron crow had been used to wrench the door open, and the hasps appear marked also in three places.

WILLIAM HIBBER . The value of one piece which was gone, and the three pieces of bombasin which were on the floor, was twenty four pounds, and the value of the linen missing, was seven pounds, and that of the cotton siz.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work a long time, and carried a parcel from Wardour street to St. Mary Axe; and seeing this place open in Wood street, I went in, thinking I could get a job, but finding nobody there I was coming out again, and I found the door fastened.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-54

53. FREDERICK MYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , four metal axle-tree boxes, value 10l. the property of the West India dock company .

WILLIAM TUTTLEBY . I am a wharfinger of the West India Dock . On the 21st. of October I received a couple of axle-trees with mettal boxes, and placed them under the side of the shed numbered 3. At four in the afternoon I saw them safe. At eight the next morning, it was pointed out to me that they were missing, and I perceived that they were.

Cross examined by Mr, Reynolds. There were no other axle-tree boxes in the docks I believe; if there had, I should have known of them.

FRANCIS FAIRBAIRNS . I am a Thames Police officer, attending at the West India Docks; upon the news of the loss of these mettal boxes, I searched for them, among other places, I made search on some piles of fustic wood; John Roebuck found one on the top, covered over with two or three pieces; we did not move it; but waited to see who would come and fetch it. We watched that pile by turns. Roebuck and I were on a stack together, and saw the prisoner go by; the prisoner walked by, and looked round towards the stack as he passed. The next time I saw him was at a quarter before four, and then he was looking round, evidently to see if any one was on the watch for him, or looking at him. He then got upon the stack and looked round again; we were concealed. He then moved two pieces of wood with his left hand, and laid hold of the box with his right; I jumped down immediately and went and seized him. This stack was about four feet high; he said he had got up there to ease himself; there is a privy within forty yards. He could not have seen the box on the top of the stack passing by because it was concealed with two pieces of fustic wood; he let the box drop before we seized him.

JOHN ROEBUCK , corroborated the satement of the last witness.

(Property produced and sworn to by witness Tuttleby.)

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one year , and whipped.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-55

54. JOHN RIDGEWAY, alias THOMAS TAYLOR and JOHN HASTINGS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , two hundred and sixty-seven shawls, value 75l. twenty-one pieces of muslin, containing one hundred and seventy five yards, value 25l. six pieces of Scots cambrick, containing forty-five yards, value 5l. and twenty pieces of handkerchiefs, containing two hundred and sixty-eight handkerchiefs, value 31l. the property of Oliver Wilcock and George Carr , in a certain boat called a lug-boat, upon the navigable river of the Thames . And JOHN RAMMAGE and JOHN BROWNE was indicted for receiving on the same day, one piece of muslin, containing five yards, value 15s. seven other pieces of muslin, containing seventy yards, value 10l. one other piece of muslin, containing five yards, value 15s. and twenty-nine shawls, value 5l. part of the goods aforesaid, so feloniously stolen, they well knowing them to have been so . And JAMES GATES was indicted for receiving on the same day, four pieces of handkerchiefs, containing fifty-two handkerchiefs, value 5l. and three shawls, value 18s. other part of the said goods, so felouiously stolen; he well knowing the same to have been so .

Twelve more COUNTS stating the property in the indictment of different persons.

OLIVER WILCOCK . We reside at No. 81, Watling Street. in the month of October last, we packed up some goods for Surinam. We packed up two excise trunks on the 7th. and another on the 10th. In the trunks on the 7th. were ginghams in No. 1, and shawls in No. 2. In No, 3, on the 10th there were handkerchiefs and six pieces of cot

ton cambrick. These goods were to be shipped for Surinam, in the ship Henry, Captain Mosely, and we employed Messrs. Jacklyn and Williams, as our lightermen. On the 30th of October, these goods were taken from our warehouse to Galley Quay, where I went and saw them on the 31st, in consequence of some information which was given me. They were not then in the state we sent them. The exterior matting was nailed in a very slovenly manner, and they had every appearance of having been opened. When we sent them, they were all locked, and the key of each fastened to the handle by a string, and nailed with small tacks. In consequence of this change of appearance, we opened the trunks to examine them; and found they were evidently plundered; about a third part of each were gone.

JOSEPH MACKLEISH . I am a porter to the prosecutor, who are packer s. On the 30th of October, I took three trunks to Galley Quay, after breakfast. They are the trunks of which my master has been speaking. I delivered them in the same state in which I received them, to Payne, the foreman of the wharfingers.

JOSEPH PAYNE , I am foreman to Messrs. Williams and Jacklyn, of Galley Quay, I received the three trunks in question from the last witness, on the 30th; they were covered with matting and corded. I took them out of his cart and put them on the wharf, and afterwards on one of our boats. John Flygar , (accomplice,) had the care of that boat, which is a lug boat; I saw it next morning at Galley Quay. I saw Mr. Wilcook come down to examine the trunks that morning; they appeared to have been opened; the mats and cords appeared to have been taken off, and not put on again in the same manner as before. The trunks were not full and what were in them were very much tumbled.

JOHN WILLIAMS JUNIOR . I am the foreman to Messrs Jacklyn and Williams. In consequence of orders which I received, I gave some directions to Flygar. On Tuesday morning the 31st of October I saw him going down the river on the upper side of Execution Dock, in a skiff of ours; he had the three trunks in question, and a tilt in that skiff. I stept into that skiff and ordered him back. I perceived the mats of one of the trunks was quite loose, in consequence I put them into another boat, and took them to Galley Quay to remain there until we sent to Mr. Wilcock. In consequence Mr. Wilcock came down, and I was present when they were reexamined.

JOHN FLYGAR . I am a lighterman, in the employment of Messrs Williams and Jacklyn. On the Monday the 30th of October last, I received the directions to take them to Blackwall, and ship them on board the Henry, Captain Mosley, I had two ships goods to take. The vessels on board of which they were to be shiped, were lying at Limehouse. Which is short of Blackwall, if I should have time that night; but if not time, I was to bring them back to Gally Quay. I left Galley Quay, at about half past three. I delivered the two ships goods at Limehouse, and then proceeded towards Blackwall. In consequence of something which passed between me and a person named Spendlove, he came on board me after I had passed Limehouse, he brought a chisel with him, which he said, he would have brought; that chisel was to open the trunks. As we were going along, one of trunks was opened by Spendlove; something was taken out, which he asked me to fell, saying, he thought they were silk shawls. They were some shawls and some muslins. Spendlove and I agreed to go to Gates's; but before that, we were to go to Rammages's; Rammage occupies a public house, close by the engine house, at Blackwall, close to the River; at high water, you can step from his back door into a boat. Spendlove went on shore first; he took something, the contents of the trunk with him. Spendlove came back to me, and then I went on shore. I went into Rammage's by this back door, and saw him at the bar. I went up two pair of stairs into a room, by his direction; presently Brown came up, and Rammage came up afterwards. When they were both there, twenty-nine shawls and about eight or nine pieces of muslin were produced; they were up stairs in this room; I did not see who brought them up; I brought some up; I brought shawls; Spenlove had taken muslins. I, Brown, and Rammage, looked over the things Spenlove and I had brought. Rammage said, they were rubbishing things, and were going out to the Negroes in the West Indies. I don't know whether Rammage knew me; he knew I was a lighterman. I knew Brown before; he was a rigger . Spendlove came up, and he asked Brown what he thought of them; Brown said, he did not know what to think of them; but if he had them at home, he should be a better judge. Spendlove told him to determine something about them; he said, he did not know what to determine; he had only a five pound note in his pocket, and if he wanted money, he could have that. Spendlove and I came down. Rammage left the room before we came down; he did not say any thing. We first went into a lower room; but Rammage took us into a room over head, because he said there were some mates of East Indiamen below us, and they might hear us. Mackarel, (not in custody,) was then taking care of the boat, whilst I and Spenlove were in the house. I met Mackarel in the passage of Rammages's house, as I was going up; in consequence of what he said to us, I saw the prisoner, Ridgeway; Ridgeway and Mackarel had some private conversation together, and then I and Mackarel went down again from the house to the lug-boat; we took a lighted pipe of tobacco; when we came to the back door, the lug-boat was gone; in consequence of something that had been told us, I expected that I should find it along side Mr. Nott's barge; Ridgeway and Hastings worked for Mr. Nott. The barge was about a quarter of a mile from Rammage's house. I was taken in a skift belonging to Messrs. M.Kenzie and Grey, for whom Mackarel worked. I found the lug-boat along side the empty barge; when I came on board the barge, Hastings came out of the barge cabin. I also found Spendlove and Ridgeway in the cabin of the barge; two of the trunks were in the lug-boat, and the third was in the cabin of the barge; it was taken there in my absence.

Mr. Reynolds. My Lord, I am for Hastings. Does your lordship think that my friends on the others side are entitled to give evidence of more than one felony. He has given complete evidence of one committed by the witness and him, Spenlove, who is not here.

COURT. I must hear the whole; because if there be two felonies, as you say, I must see whether they are connected or not.

Witness, Re-examined. There was a light on the cabin, and a tilt over the cabin head, which was to prevent the light from being seen. I found one trunk in the cabin of the barge, which had been opened, and the goods were laying on the cabin seat. When the goods had been taken out, the matting was nailed over again; Ridgeway drove the tacks. That trunk was put back into my boat, and another taken out, and put into the barge. That trunk was the trunk which had been opened before; I was not in the cabin at that time. I remained out with Hastings, and was in my own boat along side; I did not hear them at work inside. Then I saw Spendlove with some pieces of dark blue paper in his hand, and he said, they were cambricks; he said, they would do very well. Then that trunk was nailed, and put back into the boat, and the third was put into the barge; it had red shawls or handkerchiefs in it. There was a man came to take away a sailing barge, to which Nott's barge was moored; that was while I was outside. Spendlove said, that he had taken shawls out, and they would do very well. After the sailing barge was moved, we made Nott's barge fast to lighter. Spendlove said, that he had made the trunks up, and had made all correct. The end of one of the trunks was uncovered, and I told Spendlove of it, in the hearing of the others; he said, I would see to that in the morning, and put some tacks in. The last trunk was opened whilst I was away with Hastings, in getting up his anchor; I was gone about a quarter of an hour, and when I came back, the trunk was replaced. Then Spendlove and Ridgeway went up with the barge. Mackarel had gone in his skiff while I was away. Hastings went up Bow Creek with a loaded barge. Spendlove and Ridgeway took the things with them. I did not see the goods after I left the cabin. I let my boat drive up with the tide, and put the tarpaulin over the three trunks. I passed Ridgeway and Spendlove off the Folly House; but did not speak to them. I came up to Galley Quay at ten minutes or a quarter before eleven. My trunks remained on board the boat all night, and in the morning, I put them into a skiff, and was going down with them, when Mr. Williams came on board me, and made me turn back. The trunks were then searched in the searcher's office; I was in the searcher's office while they were examined. Mr. Edmund Burton , one of my masters, had me taken to the Thames Police office, where I told the same story I have told here to-day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. I saw the Trinity yacht at about half past eight on the night of the 30th; they made the barge fast to a lighter which was along side the Trinity yacht; we did not hail the Trinity yacht; but a ma me on deck, and he hailed us; he said, you must not lay here' for this lighter has been laying here for two days, and we shall cut her adrift. Hastings said she was not going to lay there above a quarter of an hour, for she was going to lay astern of the vessel which was astern of the yacht to load stone in the morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Marshall. It never accourred to me to rob these trunks until I saw Spendlove.

Re-examined by Mr. Gurney. We could not have managed to rob the other trunks without a cabin to couceal us, and a light to see by.

SAMUEL NOTT . I am a lighterman. I know the prisoners Hastings and Ridgeway; Hastings was my apprentice, and the other was in my employ. On the 30th of October, they were ordered by me to go to Bow Crcek, to navigate two barges, to take a loaded one up, and bring an empty one down; the empty barge had a cabin. In going after them, I found the loaded barge in its place; but the empty barge was not in its proper place; nor were the prisoners, Hastings and Ridgeway, to be found. Afterwards I found the empty barge by the lower tier of the town of Blackwall, I saw a skiff made fast to the back door of Rammage's house; I went into Rammage's, and Ridgeway and Hastings were both in one box in the tap room. I took Hastings backwards, and asked him how the barge came to be there in the place where it was? he told me that they brought her down Bow Creek without an anchor or cable, and they were forced to fasten her to a sailing barge; as the flood time came, the sailing barge turned their barge adrift, and he had been in search of her all night, and found her by day light in the morning at Greenwich, and they could not save tide with her any higher than where I found her. I gave them orders to come to Town.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a Thames Police officer. On Tuesday, the 31st of October, I went to Brown's house, in consequence of an information which I received from Flygar; he lives in Wellesley-street, Poplar. I found a piece of muslin and a handkerchief in the passage of the house; Mrs. Browne was in the passage at the time they were picked up. Browne was not at home I also found in the same bundle, a piece of blue print, and four pounds in bank notes, and also some silver. From the information of Flygar, I went to the house of Gates, and found some handkerchiefs, in two separate paper parcels. All these were at Gates's; I found them in a chest of drawers. On one of the papers is the name of Spendlove; it was so when I found it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. Gates was not at home when I found these things, and for any thing I knew to the contrary, did not know these things were in the house.

JOHN WOOLLARD . I am a Thames Police officer, and went with others to Browne's house; a woman opened the door to me; that woman answered to the name of Mrs. Browne; as she was going along the passage, she dropped a small parcel, and Benjamin Blaby picked it up; that parcel contained

the money and other things that were described. I went to the house of a person named Smith, who is a linen-draper, and received from him these seven pieces of muslin. (Producing them) I did not see Smith; but had a warrant to search his house, and saw Mrs. Smith; she denied that there was any thing of the kind in the house, and on my going again, they were given up to me;

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a linen-draper, residing at Poplar. On the 13th of November, I delivered up some goods to the officer, Woolland. I had bought these goods of Mrs. Browne, the wife of the prisoner Browne, on the 31st of October, and paid her four pounds ten shillings for them; I paid her in bank notes, and ten shillings in silver; at the same time she purchased of me a piece of blue print. containing six yards, and took it away with her at the same time.

ANNE SMITH . I am the wife of the last witness. Mrs. Browne brought some property, seven pieces of muslin plain, and one piece striped; I did not like to buy the striped piece, and was to give two shillings a yard for the other; she only mentioned five pieces. She was paid four pounds ten shillings; besides a deduction for six yards of blue cotton which she purchased.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. This cotton was not measured; we only guessed at the number of yards in each of them; I only agreed to pay her for five, but there were seven; only I did not perceive it. I was not so honest as to tell her she had given me two too many, the next time I saw her. I cut the fag end off by Mrs. Browne's request.

Oliver Willcock . In the first place, all of these seven pieces of muslin, the fag ends of which have been torn off, are similar to some we packed up in trunk No. 1, they are exactly the same sort; I cannot say positively, but I believe they are our property, I now look at a piece of striped muslin, found in the bundle which Mrs. Browne dropped in her passage; that I can swsar to. I now look at the piece of red Turkey bandanas, commonly called red handkerchiefs; I can swear to them; I can swear they were in box 3. I next look at the things found at Gates's; one of them, an article of the same sort, I can swear by the mark, and the rest I firmly believe to be ours. I look at this piece of paper with the name of Spendlove on it; it was an envelope to a dozen shawls, and I can swear to some hand writing upon it, it is mine.

Mr. Pooley. My Lord, I submit here are two felonies, and I submit my learned friends must elect upon which they will go.

COURT. If the first be a distant felony, there is no principal.

Mr. Pooley. My Lord, I submit that it is a distinct felony, and that the property which was taken in the first instance, cannot affect Rammage, as there is no principal in that felony; and the second does not affect him at all.

Mr. Andrews, & Mr. Marshall, as counsels for the other receivers, submitted the same objection to the Court.

Mr. Gurney, submitted that it was all one transaction, and each individual acted his part of it allthough at different places, and different times.

COURT. It is a matter of fact to go to the Jury. whether the transactions are distinct or not. The latter felony does not affect Rammage, nor do I think it goes to Browne, nor the other receivers.

The prisoners called the following witnesses.

JOHN STONE . I belong to the Trinity yacht, and was on board her all night on the 30th of October. There was nobody else on board all night but Morley. I did not hold any conversation all night long with any body out of the yacht. There was no lighter moored to us at all, nor craft of any kind of description. We turned in at about ten o'clock.

JOHN COULLER MORLEY . I am mate of the Trinity yacht. We turned in at ten o'clock on the night of the 30th of October. I never stired on deck all night. There was no craft at all moored to the yacht; but there was a stone brigg about two cables length astern of us. I did not hold any conversation with any person from the yacht all night.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-56

55. THOMAS FOX was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Colman , in the night of the 23rd of November , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two pairs of men's boots, value 1l. and two pairs of half boots, value 10s. his property .

THE only evidence in this case against the prisoner, was that of his own daughter, a servant in the prosecutor's house, who at first, had said, she stole the articles named in the indictment herself, and sold them for two shillings, had spent one, and lost the other; and then on her being threatened with a presecution, she accused her father.

THE COURT, directed the Jury to find the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-57

56. JOHN COATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of December , five pounds weight of cheese, value 2s. 6d. the property of Thomas Kirkpatrick .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrole. I saw the prisoner at the bar about half past five, walking in company with two others along St. John-street ; the prisoner made several attempts at some cheese at Mr. Kirkpatrick's door; at last, he succeeded in taking the piece in question, and I immediately sesured him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. How do you know his name is Thomas Kirpatrick-A. I do not know it.

Q. Is he here - A. No.

Mr. Walford. Objected, that the prisoner was indicted for stealing property of Thomas Kirkpatrick , and it had not appeared what was the prosecutor's name at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-58

57. LEVY BURNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a silk pocket handkerchief, value 5s. the property of some person unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the 9th of November last, I was in company with Woodroffe, another officer. I observed the prisoner at the bar in the middle of Bridge-street, Black-Friars ; as the Lord Mayor's procession was returning to Guild-Hall, attempting several gentlemens pockets; but more particularly one. He put his hand into the gentleman's left hand coat pocket, and pulled out a silk handkerchief about four or five inches. He left it then for about a quarter of a minute, and then returned; when he pulled it totally out, I was shoved away from him by the mob; but told Woodroffe to keep close to him. I and Woodroffe took him into custody just as he had wiped his nose with the same handkerchief, and put it into his hat. I told Woodroffe to take him to the compter, while I went after the gentleman, but I could not come up to him.

JOHN WOODROFFE . I am an officer, and produce the handkerchief in question, (producing it,) which the prisoner took from the gentleman's pocket. He wiped his nose with it. and put it into his hat; and we immediately seized him, and I conveyed him to the compter.

GUILTY , aged 15,

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-59

58. SAMUEL FORSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , two gold seals value 1l. the property of a person unknown, from his person ,

WILLIAM BARRET . I am a city constable. On Lord Mayor's day last, I was on duty the corner of King-Street, Cheapside , in company with Johnson. The procession was then coming from Guild-Hall. I saw the prisoner at the bar with a jew. I watched their motions; I saw them attempting several pockets, and at last they came to a gentleman who had seals. The jew was in front of the gentleman, pressing with his herd and his hands against his breast, and the prisoner was behind the gentleman, with his arms round his waist, and I saw the jew with a hold of the gentleman's seals, with an intent as I supposed, to draw the watch and give it to the prisoner, whose hand was round the gentleman's waist; but they could not succeed, and the jew exclaimed, "dawn the people, how they push." They then left the gentleman about ten yards, and I saw the jew pull a knife from his pocket. They then proceeded to the gentleman again. The jew got in front, and the prisoner behind, as before. I saw the jew's hand in motion, and guesed he was cutting the seals. The jew and the prisoner then quit the gentleman, and the jew gave the prisoner the seals, at about five or six yards from the gentleman. I saw him looking at them; and he put them into his jacket pocket. The prisoner then crossed Cheapside, and I lost sight of the gentleman. We then apprehended them, and the jew rescued himself in Fleet-street, leaving part of his coat in my hand. We then took the prisoner into a wholesale linen draper's shop, and on searching him, we found the seals in the lining of his jacket, behind. On unbuttoning his small clothes, we found this silk handkerchief. (Producing it.)

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I saw the prisoner with the jew, and my attention was called to another man who will be brought up next.

BENJAMIN FRANCIS . I am a constable, and was stationed at the corner of Queen-Street. Barret called my assistance; but not being able to run so fast as he could; he got hold of the prisoner before I came up. Barret asked him where the seals were, and he said he had none. Then he was searched, and the seals were taken from his jacket.

GUILTY , aged 16,

Transported for life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-60

59. JOHN PRICE was indicted for feloniously sealing, on the 9th of November , a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of some person unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the 9th of November, I saw the prisoner attempting several gentlemen's pockets; at the corner of King-Street, Cheapside , he pulled a great many handkerchiefs out, and when he perceived they were cotton, he let them hang. He then pulled a yellow silk handkerchief out of a man's coat pocket; and the crowd was so great, that it was as much as ever he could do to get it into his pocket. He was then pushed off the pavement, and crossed the road, and I followed him down Cheapside, round St. Paul's Chorch-Yard, until I came into Bridge-Street. It was impossible to get to the man he took the yellow handkerchief from. When he got into Bridge-Street, he look another handkerchief; but what one that was, I cannot tell. I could not get up to him immediately; but in about a quarter of an hour I saw him again. I spoke to Hudson, a brother officer, and told him to be with me at the corner of Water-Lane; from all probability the prisoner would pass us on the return of the procession. He did return pass us, and on seeing us, he bolted across Water-lane into Bridge-Street, and I followed him and took him into custody. We took him into a house, and searched him. In one of his pockets we found a very sharp pair of scissors; we found some handkerchiefs upon him, among which was a yellow one, which I firmly believe to be the one he took at the corner of King-Street.

Prisoner. There is a handkerchief of mine there, which is mine, and which has the initials of my name on it.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON (holding up a handkerchief,) a gentleman claimed this handkerchief; as his saying his initials J.P. were upon it. The prisoner immediately said it was his, for his name was John Price . Before this he would not give any name at all.

JOHN HUDSON . I also took two handkerchiefs from the prisoner which are not marked; they were under his shoulders, between his shirt and his skin,(Property produced)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them handkerchiefs for five shillings, of two men. I have been in his Majesty's service for twenty-two years, and fought for my king and country, under the command of Commodore Chauncey, on the Lakes in America.

COURT. Under Commodore Chauncey?

Prisoner. I mean, my Lord, under Sir James Yeo .

GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-61

60. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, thirty pounds weight of pork, value 1l. the property of William Macey and John Macey .

JOHN GEDLING . I am scales-man to Messrs. Macey, who are wholesale butcher s, in Newgatemarket . I lost some pork, last saturday three weeks. The prisoner came and took away a side of pork off the place. I could not immediately go after him, being very busy, and obliged to mind the scales; but afterwards I told him if he did not immediately bring it back, I would inform my masters, and have him apprehended. He promised he would bring it back; but he never did. The pork was worth at least one pound I can only guess at the weight, as it had never had been in the scales. I suppose it was about thirty pounds weight.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 6 month , and find 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-62

61. JAMES PETHERICK and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , one pair of coach glasses, value 1l. the property of William Poynter .

WILLIAM POYNTER . I am a coach maker, and master , and live in Great Ormond yard . I have a nephew, an apprentice of mine, who has lived with me for the last six years.

ROBERT POYNTER . I am the nephew of the last witness. I know the two prisoners. My uncle carried on his business in Great Ormond yard. In consequence of what passed between me and the prisoners, I went with them on the night of the 30th, to get my uncle's coach glasses. There was a man of the name of Banting went with us. As we were going along, Petherick pulled of his great coat, and gave it to Williams, and Willisms took off his jacket and gave it to Petherick. When we got into the coach-house next the dwelling-house, we took a pair of side glasses out of a landaulet, Williams took the glasses. He had a bag with him to put the glasses in. We thought we heard somebody coming down stairs, and went away. Williams put one glass into the bag as he went along Ormond street, and carried the other in his hand. Petherick was standing at the corner to watch. We went with these glasses to Mr. Richards's in Bird-street, which is near Manchester-square. We took them before nine in the evening, as soon as we got in, we were taken into custody.

WILLIAM BANTING . In consequence of an agreement made at a public-house, I met the prisoners at the Roebuck, James-street, Grosvenor-square; I went for the purpose of assisting Richards. We went all together to Ormond-yard; but did not go into the coach house. I saw Williams and Pointer running from the mews, with something, which appeared to me like coach glasses. I went into Queensquare, and soon after saw Pointer and Petherick, and asked where Williams was. I went with Petherick and Poynter to Richards's, in pursuance of the plan I had entered into; when I went in. I found Williams in custody, and Poynter and Petherick were taken as well as myself. Mr. Plank did not know I was in the plan.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am a police officer. On the night of the 30th, I was in a dark passage opposite Mr. Richards's door, waiting for them. The first thing I saw was a coach draw up to Richards's door; Williams got out of it, and knocked at the shutters, and was let in. I went in immediately afterwards, and took him into custody, and the glasses which he had, and then returned out again. The moment Williams saw me, he said, we are sold, they are all coming in half an hour, or rather more. Petherick, Poynter, and Banting, came and knocked at the shutters in the same way, and were let in. I took charge of the glasses, and took them all into custody; I took Banting into custody, never having seen him before, and not knowing him.

JOHN RICHARDS . I keep a shop at the other end of the town, and what Banting did on this occasion, was under my direction. I am a friend of Mr. Poynter's.

(The coach glasses produced by the officer Plank, and sworn to by the prosecutor.)

PETHERICK, GUILTY , aged 21.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-63

62. JOHN SANSBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a barge, value 5l. the property of Joseph James Church .

WILLIAM LEITH . I am a ship-breaker, and live at Brentford. I bought the barge in question from the prisoner, on the 26th of October; he told me he was employed by another person, and was to have ten shillings and six pence commission. I did not ask him whose barge it was; Ovingdon was the name upon it; I agreed to give him seven pounds for it; but only paid him four ready money; she was a very old barge, and I bought her to break up. I have a wharf upon the Thames. That barge was claimed by Mr. Church. The prisoner was to have the rest of the money on the Saturday. I did not see the prisoner again until I went and took him. He did not mention any name at first; but he afterwards told me a man named Smith told him to sell it. He rowed her up to Putney, and told me it was there. I brought it up the river to my wharf.

JOSEPH JAMES CHURCH . I lost my barge from inside the Houndsditch-road , where she was moored; I missed her on the 26th, I know the prisoner well, and he is the last man in the World I should suppose would do such a thing. I found the barge at Brentford.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I belong to the Thames Police office, and I went to Brentford, and brought away the barge in question.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a person named Smith to sell this barge, and I gave him what money I had received.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-64

63. SARAH REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , six shifts, value 12s. four slips, value 12s two petticoats, value 5s. two pair of stays, value 3s. three jackets, value 3s. one night gown, value 3s. twelve towels, value 12s. thirteen table-cloths, value 1l. one sheet, value 10s. one shirt, value 3s. twenty-one children's night gowns, value 1l. seven aprons, value 7s. forty-five pinafores, value 45s. and twelve childrens frocks, value 12s. the property of Mary Tippets .

ELIZABETH SHILSTON . I am a mangler, and live at No. 4, West-street, Somers Town. Mrs. Mary Tippets lives at 19, Judd-place , and employed me to mangle for her. I mangled the articles named in the indictment, on the 10th; I packed them up on the 11th, and sent them home by my son, at about nine o'clock in the morning. At about four in the afternoon, Mrs. Tippets's servant called for the clothes, and I told her I had sent them by my son; never thinking but that they had been delivered safely.

JOSEPH SHILSTON . I received a basket of clothes on the 11th, to take to Mrs. Tippets's; I left my mother's house at about nine o'clock. The prisoner met me at the corner of Jane-street, which leads into West-street, where I live. She asked me if those were Mrs. Tippits's things? I told her they were. She asked me to leave them with her, for she expected her fellow servant to come and help her with them. I said, I was going of another errand for my mother, and I would assist her as far as Mrs. Tippets, as I was going past the door. She took hold of one side, and I took hold of the other, and I helped her as far as Mrs. Tippets's gate, which I opened for her, and she carried them towards the door; I then left her.

MARY DEAN . I know part of the things which were to be brought home from the mangle; I knew some sheets that were among them, and some shifts, and twenty-five night gowns, and the other things.

MRS. MARY TIPPETS . I know nothing more. I know all the articles perfectly. I did not see the boy bring them to our gate.

JOSEPH HOWARD . I am a milk-man, and know Mrs. Tippets. I saw the prisoner at the bar, at about nine o'clock in the morning, in Skinner-street, Somers Town; it was on Saturday morning, the 11th of November; she had a basket, apparently full of linen, and lodged the basket on some steps, which are on the other side of the way. She appeared to be in a flurry, and that attracted my attention.

WILLIAM READ , SENIOR. I am an officer, belonging to Hatton Garden office. The prisoner was brought to our office on suspicion of stealing a piece of bacon, and then this thing came against her. I have made every search in my power to recover Mrs. Tippets's things, and could never find them.

The prisoner set up an alibi in her Defence, but was not established.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-65

64. MARY ANN WILMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , a dollar, and a three-shilling bank token, the money of Frederick Rheinlinder , from his person .

FREDERICK RHEINLINDER . I am a baker . I lost a dollar and a three-shilling piece, on the 27th of November. The prisoner spoke to me in St. Martin's-court , on the night of the 27th of November; she took hold of me, and I found her at my pocket, and missed the dollar. I had nothing to say to her at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-66

65. REBECCA PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , two ducks, value 5s. the property of Sarah Smith .

SARAH SMITH . I live at No. 9, Bluecoat-place, Shadwell , I kept two ducks, which I used to let run about the streets; I fed them at about two o'clock on the 8th of November, and missed them about three. The prisoner has a husband, who is a chimneysweeper. I asked her, as she lived next door; she said, she knew nothing of them. I got a search warrant, and found one of the ducks, which I knew to be mine, by some brown feathers on the breast, in the room in which the prisoner was. I had seen some blood spilt by the door of her husband's stable, which is next door to the prisoner's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I get my living with a little washing, and a little needle work; I don't let lodgings, even for a short time. My door is not constantly open; my ducks walked the streets; the prisoner's husband has apprentices, and for what I know to the contrary, they might have killed the duck.

RALPH HONE . I searched the prisoner's husband's house, and found the duck.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-67

66. THOMAS PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 10s. the property of Robert Obbard , and then affixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN FOWLE . I am a servant to Mr. Obbard, who lives in Fulham parish. I saw the prisoner in my master's premises, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, on the 29th of November; he was then going from the back part of the premises, and had got through the fence. He did not see me until I came up to him; he ran through a gap in the fence, and I secured him setting down,

when I was getting through. On examining our premises, I found the lead in question wrapped up in an apron in the kitchen; it had been cut from the copper in the washhouse, and then carried into the kitchen. The prisoner said he never had been there.

EDWARD EDGESON . I am a constable, and produce the lead. I have compared it with the place on the copper from whence it was cut, and find it tallies.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-68

67. MATTHEW WHITTLE and JOHN HAZLEWOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , ten pounds weight of rope, value 1s. the property of Joseph Partridge .

JAMES HURD . I am a lighterman. On Tuesday, the 24th of October, between twelve and one in the day, I saw the two prisoners at the bar in a barge belonging to Mr. Partridge. The headfast of the barge was laying on the mud, and Hazlewood hawled it up into the barge; he then tried to get it from the barge's head; but not being able, they cut it, and put it into their boat, and rowed off with it, towards King's-yard, Deptford.

ALEXANDER LEMONE . I am a police officer, and produce the headfast in question.

NORTH SIMMONDS. I am in the employ of Mr. Partridge, and know that headfast to be his property.

WHITTLE, GUILTY , aged 16.

HAZLEWOOD, GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-69

68. ELIZABETH JOHNSON and MARY JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , from the person of William Offord , twelve 1l. bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM OFFORD . I have been a seafaringman ; I live in King-street, Rotherhithe. I had been drinking at a great many public-houses, and crossed the water at about eight o'clock; I had twelve one-pound bank notes, a quantity of silver, and a duplicate of a watch wrapped up in the notes. Coming along just at Ratcliffe Highway , and at the corner, I saw the two prisoners, and they happened to speak to me, and one of them asked me if I would go home with her. I went home with one, only the tall one; the other left us when we went into the room. I fell a sleep, and when I wakened in about an hour, and found myself in darkness; she was gone; I found my trowsers in the middle of the floor, and my notes gone. She came in the next morning; I told her if she would give me half of my money, I would say no more about it. Before she came in, I had had in the watchman to overhaul her box; and when I made this offer to her, she said she would, if I would give her the duplicates which the watchman took out of her box.

MARGARET HAGGARTY . On the morning of the 14th of November, the prisoner Johnson, came into my room for a kettle of water, and I saw seven one-pound notes in her lap, and she was very much in liquor.

ROBERT WILLANS . I am an officer of Shadwell. I took both these women into custody. I searched them; but found nothing on them. None of the property has been recovered.

JOHNSON, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

JONES, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-70

69. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , twenty-eight pounds weight of soap, value 1l. the property of Joseph Fletcher .

JOSEPH FLETCHER . I am a wharfinger . I had some soap on my wharf, which I missed on the 2nd of December; I had only one package. I saw it safe about five in the evening of the 1st, and about eight in the morning of the 2nd, the package had been broken open, and some of the contents of it taken; there were about twenty-eight pounds of it gone.

JOSEPH POWIS . I am an officer of the Thames Police. I stopped the prisoner Wilson, about eight o'clock on the evening of the 1st, just by New Crane-stairs; he was carrying a bag, which contained about twenty-eight pounds of soap; he said, he had brought it from on board a Dutch galliot in the River, to sell. I knew Mr. Fletcher's wharf had been robbed two nights preceeding, and therefore I was upon the look out.

(Soap produced.)

Joseph Fletcher . It is impossible to swear to soap; I have the man of the manufacturer here; but he cant't swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-71

70. DURHAM SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , one pair of spectacles, value 12s. and a pair of shoes, value 3s. the property of Michael Johnson .

MICHAEL JOHNSON . I am a journeyman weaver . I lost a pair of spectacles and a pair of shoes out of my shop. The prisoner was a shop-mate of mine. I lost them on the 23rd of October; I went out on that day upon business, and left my shoes and spectacles behind me. I went out at half past nine in the morning, and did not return until half past seven on the following morning, and then I immediately missed my spectacles, and on looking for my shoes, they were also gone. The shoes I found on the prisoner's feet, and the spectacles in pawn, at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN KILLINGSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, and took in this pair of spectacles, (producing it,) on the 23rd of October, from the prisoner at the bar.

(Property sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor left me without victuals, and owed me money; and therefore I made bold to take this to get me some flood.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-72

71. JOHN YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , three hundred pounds weight of printed paper, value 10l. the property of Thomas Bensley . And JOHN FRANCIS , for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

WALTER CHATFIELD . I am warehouse-man to Mr. Bensley, of Bolt-court, Fleet-street ; John Young was in our employ during four years previous to last Christmas; he was a reading boy . During his service, we missed several sheets, and books in sheets out of the warehouse. In the month of November last, as I was passing by the shop of Matthews, a fruiterer in Leather-lane, Holborn, I was induced to go in, by seeing in the window, some paper printed by Mr. Bensley, and which ought to have been in his warehouse, because I knew it had never been published. In consequence of what passed between me and Mr. Matthews, I went to the house of the prisoner Francis, on the same day; he lived in Cross-street, Hatton Garden ; I found him at home. I asked him if ever he had sold to Matthews, any paper of the works called the Earl of Surry? and without hesitation, he said yes, he had, and said he had bought them of a young lad, named John Ball , whose person he described, and by which description, I guessed it to be Young. I asked him if he had sold any other works than this, and he told me he had, but he did not know what works they were, not having opened them. I told him I was warehouse-man to Mr. Bensley; and he told me that the boy had told him, he lived with a printer in Earl-street, who used to allow him waste paper, as a perquisite. He went to enquire after the printer in Earl-street, but could not find no such person. He shewed me six quires, as being the whole of what he purchased from this boy; young Mr. Bensley went to his house.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a fruiterer, and live at 91, Leather-lane, Holborn. I remember to have bought a quire of paper from the prisoner Francis, on the 11th of November last; it was waste printed paper, clean and in sheets. A short time afterwards, the last witness Chatfield, called at my house; I paid ten-pence a quire for this paper; I purchased it, to set my fruit off in my baskets.

MR. JOSEPH BENSLEY . I am a son to Mr. Thomas Bensley . In consequence of what was told me, I went to the house of Francis; when I went in, he was at home, and on entering, I informed him who I was, and stated that I believed our warehouse-man, had been with him in the morning; he told me, that since our warehouse-man had been with him, he had discovered more; a bundle he said, of the Sparkles of Glory. He then went down to his warehouse, and brought it up. He then said, that perhaps I and my brother, who was with me, would like to walk down into his warehouse, and examine it ourselves. We immediately went down, and found a large quantity of our paper there was a portion of Banks's Peerage, a quantity of lberia's Crisis, and a large bundle of Observation on the Cure of Cancer, by Dr. Denman; also about fifty volumes of the works of the Earl of Surry; the works of the Earl of Surry had never been delivered for publication, but the others had. It would cost one hundred and fifty pounds to replace them. The prisoner Francis, described to me that he had purchased it of a boy whom he described so accurately, that I had not the least doubt but that it was the other prisoner at the bar. He said that the boy had told him, he worked for a printer in Earl-street, Blackfriars, and was allowed waste paper, as a perquisite. I went to Francis's house again on the 24th, in company with Read, the officer. The prisoner Francis had entered the house just before us. On turning over some old pamphlets on a shelf in the shop, I discovered two copies of Denman on the Cure of Cancer, stitched, and Francis said he had stitched them for his own reading.

MR. BENJAMIN BENSLEY . I have heard the account my brother has given, and it is perfectly correct; and I sealed up the parcels of paper found in Francis's possession, which be assisted me in doing.

CHARLES GIMBER . I am a constable, of St. Dunstan's parish. I apprehended the prisoner Young, in Chandos-street, Covent Garden, on the 17th of November, I first took him to Mr. Bensley's in Fleet-street, and thence to the prisoner Francis's with the young Mr. Bensley. Francis said, that he was the boy of whom he bought the paper; the boy was told what he had been taken for. The paper was then tied up in the state in which it now is. I went to Francis with a hackney coach, to take away the papers, and Francis asked me did I think it necessary for him to go with me to Hatton Garden office? I told him I did not think so, but afterwards on his coming, the magistrate thought he ought to be detained.

MR. JOHN SHEARMAN . I am clerk to the magistrates at Hatton Garden office, and also attorney for the prosecution in this case. I produce the confession of the prisoner Young, which is in Mr. Ford's hand writing, which I heard Young read over, and then saw him sign it.

Mr. Adolphus, submitted, whether the confession could be read or not, as there were statements in it coming from the mouth of the prisoner Young, which went very materially against the other prisoner, and which statements were made in his absence.

COURT. It has been decided by the judges, that where there are more prisoners than one; so much of a confession as relates to the confessor, and none other is to be read, and no more.

Mr. Andrews. Mr. Shearman, was Francis present when Young made this confession - A. I don't know whether he was.

"So much of the confession of the prisoner Young, as related to himself, was now read by the clerk of the Court, and acknowledged that he had stolen the paper, and had sold it to the prisoner Francis."

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I was with the Mr. Bensleys, in Francis's shop, on the 24th of November. In the shop, upon a shelf, I found these two pamphlets, called Denman on the Cure of Cancer. (Producing them.) They are stitched. Mr. Bensley asked Francis, what he sewed them for? and he said, for his own reading.

(Property produced, and sworn to)

EDWARD GARDINER . I am a book-seller, in Paternoster-row. I have at various times bought and sold waste paper, but have generally given the same price as Francis gave.

YOUNG, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

FRANCIS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-73

72. JOHN NICHOLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of December , a box, value 1s. and sixteen pounds weight of biscuits, value 11s. the property of George Mills .

GEORGE MILLS . I am a carrier from Eltham and Lee to London . My cart was robbed in West-street, Smithfield , on the 2nd of November, about half past two. I took the box in question up at the Pewter Platter, in Gracechurch-street, at a little after one o'clock, and was to have conveyed it to Shooters Hill; it was addressed for "Colonel Coolbrook, of the Royal Artillery."

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am an assistant to my father, who is a milkman. I was in West-street, on the 2nd of November, at about half past two. I saw a man get up into Mr. Mill's cart, and take out a box. The prisoner stood at the other side of the way. I was looking at him; he crossed the way, and gave the box to the prisoner, and said, come along, follow me. Then I went, and told Mr. Mills, and Mills went after the prisoner, and collared him, and the other man who had taken it ran away.

THOMAS HUDSON . I am a constable, and the prisoner was given into my charge, together with the box.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-74

73. JAMES FLYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , two pairs of boots, value 10s. the property of Francis Lanard , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH LANARD . My husband is a shoemaker , and lives at 28, Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell . I lost my boots on Friday, the 31st of October, I was sitting in the parlour, and saw the prisoner going out of our shop; I did not see him come in. I immediately went out, and took hold of him, and he dropped the boots from under his coat. I brought him in, and my husband took him to Hatton Garden office.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-75

74. JOHN BONE , JOHN PETERKIN , and JOHN LEESON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a hat, value 7s. the property of James Thompson , privately in his shop .

JAMES THOMPSON . I deal in hats , and live at No. 22, Ayre-street - hill . I lost this hat on the 31st of October, in the evening, at about five o'clock; I went and snuffed the candles in the window, and the hat was then hanging up safe. In about ten minutes or so, a man came running in, and said, what have you lost, and after I looked, I told him my black hat was gone; that was the only one of that sort I had in the window. He said don't you disturb yourself, you shall see the hat and the thief in ten minutes, and so I did, for he brought them both back, and that is all I have to say.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 31st of October, I observed the three prisoners in Clare-street, Clare-market; I have a knowledge of them, and suspected them as they were standing together; I saw them separate, and go to a cheesemonger's shop, and from their motions, I could perceive that they wanted to steal some cheese, but they could not succeed. I followed them, and saw them attempting at several shops, until they came to Leather-lane, and then I ran down to Hatton Garden office, to get young Read to come and assist me. When I fetched him, we saw the prisoner Bone, attempt to lift off a box of plumbs from a grocer's door, but he could not succeed. While Bone was at the grocer's shop, the other two were walking up and down outside; we then got them into Ayre-street - hill, to the prosecutor's house; Leeson then went into the shop, and the other two went a little lower down. He had not been in a moment scarcely before he came running out, with something in his hand in front of him; I thought it was no use to let them go any further, and so we apprehended them. Peterkin left the other two, with the hat in his hand; Peterkin soon after put the bonnet out of his hand, and I went back and found it stuck upon the railing, at a door where we took him, and I found Bone walking at the bottom of the hill with Leeson.

WILLIAM READ . I saw Leeson go into the shop, and in a moment he ran out down the hill as hard as ever he could, and soon gained the other two, he gained the other two in Warner-street, opposite the public-house; there I saw them hand something, and then they separated; Peterkin went one way, and the other two came towards Ayre-street - hill. We found the hat on the railings.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

BONE, GUILTY, aged 28.

PETERKIN, GUILTY, aged 29.

LEESON, GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-76

75. ELIZABETH TENNANT , and EDWARD FORD were indicted for making an assault on the King's Highway, on the 8th of November , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will 80l. in Bank of England notes, his property .

WILLIAM WARD . I am a green grocer . On the 8th of November last I went into the City, to settle a little business with a gentleman, and he paid me one hundred and fifteen pounds, which with the deduction of twenty five pounds expences, left me eighty nine pounds odd. I and this gentleman had

been drinking together rather freely, and I left him when I was very much intoxicated. On my return towards home, I met with a desperate fall; by what means, I cannot tell; but I believed I was tripped up. I cannot say who picked me up, nor have I any recollection of any thing that happened until I found myself in Newton-court, Chandos-street. I have some recollection of the female prisoner. When I recovered myself, I found the whole of my property was gone. I got the number of the notes, and got them advertised, and the next day I got some information. I then applied to Bow-street, and went with Mr. Donaldson and Westbrock. The notes were not found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-77

76. MARY PRESTON was indicted for felouiously stealing, on the 21st of October , one silver table-spoon, value 7s. two tea-spoons, value 5s. one table-cloth, value 3s. one frock, value 3s. one pair of ear-rings, value 2s. and 1s. 6d. in money , the property of Mary Masters .

MARY MASTERS . I lost these things on the 21st of October; they were taken out of a drawer. There were no persons in the apartment but the prisoner and me.

WILLIAM KING . I live in Cambridge-street, Golden-square. On the 21st of October, the prisoner at the bar pledged this table-spoon, and this tea-spoon. (Producing them.)

Prisoner's Defence. I own I pledged these things, but with the prosecutrix's consent.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-78

77. HENRY OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , one coat, value 8s. the property of Benjamin Nathan .

MARY NATHAN . We lost a blue coat on the 31st of October, at about three o'clock in the afternoon; it was taken from the door.

WILLIAM KING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cambridge-street, Golden-square. The prisoner pledged this blue coat with me, on the 31st of October.

JACOB NATHAN . I cannot say whether that is the coat which was stolen or not; I have a great many blue coats in my shop, and they are all marked alike. I don't know, but I may have sold this.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-79

78. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for stealing on the 29th of November , two tea-spoons, value 4s. two glass-saits, value 2s. two handkerchiefs, value 3s. two pairs of stockings, value 4s. one pair of spectacles, value 3s. and one table-cloth, value 2s. the property of Sarah Mitchell .

SARAH MITCHELL . I live at 22, Featherstone-street, St. Luke's . I lost these things on the 29th of November, at about one o'clock in the morning.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER . At the time of the fire, I had been assisting my neighbours, and I heard a cry of stop thief! I went, and the prisoner was handed over to me, and I searched him; in his jacket pocket I found two glass-salts, and the rest of the property upon him, and also some sugar loose.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-80

79. JOHN MANLEY and JOHN LLEWELLYN were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one coach-glass and frame, value 1l. the property of Thomas George Street , esq .

HENRY HASLET . I am a coachman; I drove for Mr. Street, of No. 1, Adelphi-terrace, whilst his own coachman was ill from a kick of one of the horses. On the day mentioned in the indictment, I drove two gentlemen and two ladies to Bow-street , where I sat them down at the office door. When I went to turn my carriage round, I observed the off side door open; ours is a landau. I got down immediately, and examined it, and found the glass gone.

THOMAS TELLOWS . I am an evening patrole of St. Martin's in the Fields. As I and my partner were coming along Craven-court, we saw the two prisoners coming along, carrying something; we ran after them, and cought them. I heard glass crash; we caught them in Northumberland-passage. The glass was laying on the ground.

EDWARD GREGSON . I am Mr. Street's coachman. I was unable to drive for him at that time. I can swear to this frame, as being his property.

MANLEY, GUILTY , aged 16.

LLEWELLYN, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-81

80. FRANCIS FRYER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , two shirts, value 14s. the property of Sarah Jacobs , spinster , and Julia Jacobs . spinster .

SARAH JACOBS . I and my sister are in partership together; at about eight o'clock in the evening of the 21st, a boy came into our shop; I cannot swear it was the prisoner. He asked to look at some shirts; I thought I heard a noise at our shop door; I asked the boy what it was, and he went and pulled it open. I called my mother, and at that instant, the boy snatched at a bundle of shirts, which was near him, and rushed out of the shop. I went to the door, and cried stop thief, as did our servant at the private door. He was caught. When I saw my property again, I knew it.

THOMAS JEFFREYS . I am a mattress-maker, and work at the feather-bed warehouse, in Compton-street. I was coming along Rathbone-place, and hearing a cry of stop thief. I stopped the prisoner, as he was running; I saw him putting something under his coat white I pursued him a little further, and I saw him throw whatever it was that he had, white, under his coat, over some railings into an area. Immediately after I stopped him, a watchman came up.

WILLIAM MADLEY KEELING . On the evening of the 21st of November, between the hours of eight and nine, there was something thrown against my kitchen window, which by the sound, I conjectured to be small dirt; I had not time to go and see what it was, before a neighbour of mine came and knocked at my door, and told me they had got a thief, and he said, he believed that part of the property was in my area. On my looking, not far from the water-but, was one shirt, and another near it.

HENRY HOWARD . I am watch-house-keeper, and produce the two shirts.

(Property sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-82

81. SARAH POOR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one pair of woman's shoes, value 3s. the property of William Thomas Wilkins .

WILLIAM THOMAS WILKINS . I am a saleman , I live at 214, Shoreditch . In consequence of some information, I went to a house in Foster's-buildings, respecting the pair of shoes in question. When I knocked at the door, the prisoner at the bar opened it, but denied all knowledge of the shoes. I sent for a constable, and she begged very hard, saying, if I would not prosecute her, she would tell me where they were. I did not make her any promise at all. She said her mother had got them, and jumped out of a back window over a wall, and upset a water-butt. On coming down stairs, we met the mother, who is a very bad character, in company with another of the same description.

MARY JONES . As I was coming home, I saw the prisoner at the bar at the shop window of the prosecutor, looking at some woman's shoes, which were hanging outside, and I saw her take off a pair, and run off with them.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-83

82. CHRISTOPHER MAYBOORN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , nineteen pounds weight of raw sugar, value 12s. the property of Thomas Walton and Henry Kurht .

CLAUS WAHLERS . I am a sugar-baker. On the 23rd of November last, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I stood outside my master's premises to watch; I was sent for that purpose. When I had staid about two or three minutes, I saw the prisoner come to the gate, and open it; I saw he had a bundle at his breast, with his apron put over it; I stopped him, and took him back to the warehouse, and I found he had got this sugar, it is nineteen pounds, and is raw; it is my masters' property.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined a month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-84

83. GEORGE FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , three 1l. bank notes , the property of Gottlieb Trent , against the statute.

GOTTLIEB TRENT . I am a seaman . The prisoner is also a seaman, and belongs to the same ship; he was a cook . I had four one-pound notes and a two-pound note in my chest, on board our ship. On my going to my chest, at about two o'clock, I found every thing was moved round, and not in the way in which I had left it in the morning; I missed three one-pound notes, and I told the mate, and he called all hands up, between four and five in the afternoon; they all came up, except the prisoner, who went forward, in the cooking-room. He was desired to come up, and after some reluctance, he did. They all took off their clothes, and he kept his waistcoat on 'till the last. I said he had something in his left hand, and he said he had not. The mate opened his hand, and there was a one-pound note, which I will swear I put into my chest the night before; it was No. 17,208. We never found the other two.

HENRY PETERS . I am a seaman, on board this vessel, and did not know of the robbery until I was called up in the cabin. I saw the prisoner refuse to come up, and afterwards I saw the note found in his hand.

JOSEPH WILSON . I know nothing more than taking the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the note up coming to the ship.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined three months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-85

84. THOMAS DEAKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , three bushells of barley, value 10s. and two bushells of oats, value 4s. the property of James Angle .

Mr. JAMES ANGLE, JUNIOR. I reside at Duckell's Farm, in the parish of Tottenham . The prisoner was a jobbing man of ours; some times acted as a carter, or any thing. In consequence of information which I received, I saw about a bushell and a half of barley in a sack concealed in our dung-hill, in the farm yard.

JAMES LANE . I am foreman to Squire Angle, and saw a bushell of barley on the Monday night, between five and six o'clock; I saw the prisoner take it off my master's premises. On Tuesday night I saw two bushells of oats; he took them out of one of my master's barns; I saw him carry them away that night, on his shoulder. Then on the Wednesday night, he got about a bushell and a half of barley; he took it from the barn, and hid it up in the dung-heap.

MARY LANE . I am the wife of the last witness, and was mangling in my master's barn, and saw him take about half a bushell; I don't know whether it was barley or oats. He had been threshing barley that day.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-86

85. JOHN WARDEN , and THOMAS RADLEY,

alias WILLIAM SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , twelve dusting brushes, value 2l. 2s. the property of Samuel Batt .

SAMUEL BATT . I am an oil and colour-man , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the 28th of November, I lost these brushes; but was not at home at the time.

JOSEPH WINKWORTH . On the 28th of November, I was standing at my door, at 153, Howland-street, and I saw the two prisoners pass by with some dusting brushes beetween them; so I thought it proper to follow them. They went up a few steps, and then crossed between the coaches, and then they run. I followed them, and stopped them at the corner of John-street, in Howland-street; I secured one with my right hand, and the other with my left. Radley made his escape, and then come to the watch-house to see the other, when he was detained. I am positive as to both the prisoners.

RADLEY, GUILTY , aged 17.

WARDEN, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-87

86. JOHN SHERIDAN was indicted for stealing on the 28th of November , two frocks, value 15s. the property of James Lockhead .

ELIZABETH LOCKHEAD . I lost these two frocks, on the 28th of November, I live at 28, George-street, Grosvenor-square . The prisoner at the bar came in and took these two frocks out of the basket, in the yard, adjoining the washhouse; I don't know how he got in. I ran after him crying stop thief! and he was stopped in Oxford-street, by a gentleman; he dropped the frocks in the yard, as he was making his escape.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-88

87. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one hammer-cloth, value 10s. the property of Thomas Hudson .

CHRISTOPHER HAMPTON . I am a watch-man. I had just called half past six, to the extent of my beat, on the morning of the day mentioned in the indictment, and I saw the prisoner at the bar passing by with a bundle under his arm; I stopped him, and found he had got a hammer-cloth.

THOMAS HUDSON . I am a hackney coach master , and know this hammer-cloth to be my property; it was left on a hackney coach box, in Grafton Mews .

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-89

88. JOHN NEWBOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a shirt, value 3s. a shirt, value 2s. and a pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of Christopher Woodhead .

ELIZABETH WOODHEAD . My husband's name is Craven.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-90

89. ANN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a watch, value 3l. two seals, value 2l. one watch-key, value 1s. one handkerchief, value 10s. and one pair of braces, value 1s. the property of John Titmar , from his person .

JOHN TITMAR . On the night of the 11th of November, I was locked out of my masters house, and was walking down Drury-lane, between twelve and one, when the prisoner accosted me, and I went home with her to Charles-street, Drury-lane . I went to bed with her, and fell asleep immediately, and never awoke until about half past five in the morning. I put my hand on the table to feel for my watch, where I had left it, and found it was gone. I then got up, and felt about for my clothes, and I found them all safe except my braces. I found twenty shillings were gone out of my left hand waistcoat pocket. I then went to the door, and found it fastened outside. I knew what sort of a neighbourhood I was in, and did not like to make a noise. When it was light, a man came and let me out, and I asked him if he knew anything about the woman, and he said no.

JOHN EDWARD WILSON . The last witness came to me, in company with Parsons, and informed me that he had been robbed of his watch, chain, seals, handkerchief, and braces. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and knocked at the door, but she refused me admittance; and I told her who I was; I told her I should break open the door, if she did not; and I did break open the door, and she was lying on the bed in her clothes. Between the sacking and the bed. I found this pair of braces. I then told her I must search her person, and on searching it, I found this handkerchief tied round her body, under her clothes.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-91

90. JOHN JOHANNES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , two waistcoats, value 5s. one shirt, value 3s. one handkerchief, value 4d. one jacket, value 9s. and one pair of trowsers, value 3s. the property of Law Russel .

LAW RUSSEL . The prisoner at the bar lodged with me for five days, and then went away, and took the property in question. I never have recovered anything but a jacket. I gave a description of him, and he was apprehended.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I found this jacket on the prisoner, when I apprehended him.

(Jacket produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-92

91. ANN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , seven sheets, value 28s. three pillow-cases, value 6s. one table-cloth, value 10s. five towels, value 5s. two shirts, value 4s. one nightcap, value 6d. two pairs of drawers, value 5s. two pairs of stockings, value 2s. two shifts, value 4s. one gown, value 5s. and one childs frock, value 2s. the property of Sarah Lee , widow .

SARAH LEE . I am a laundress , and all the things were entrusted to my care, in the way of my business. I live at 18, New-street, Carnaby Market . The prisoner went to the mangle for these things, for me; I had brought her home through charity. The prisoner never returned the things.

HANNAH SANDAVER . On the 10th of November the prisoner came to me with a basket of linen to be mangled; about five o'clock in the afternoon she returned for them, and I delivered them to her. I am positive as to her person.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18151206-93

92. HUGH CHURCHILL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , two floor joists, value 4s. the property of James Burton , esq .

JOHN JENNINGS . I am clerk and superintendant of the works carrying on in the front of Carlton House . We lost two joists, on the night of the 9th of November. The watch-man called me in the night, telling me that he had apprehended a man for stealing two joists; and I told him I should attend to it in the morning.

JOHN BRANCH I am a watch-man. On the 9th of November, in the evening, I heard a rattling noise, and met the prisoner with the two joists in question on his shoulder. I apprehended him.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and whipped ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-94

93. JOHN EVERETT alias WILLIAM PALMER , was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , two gowns, value 10s. two shifts, value 2s. one towel, value 2d. one apron value 6d. two caps, value 6d. and one gown piece, value 10s. the property of Julia Leary .

JULIA LEARY . I lived in the Edgeware Road, and lost these things, on the 8th of October. The prisoner took me from my master's house, on pretence of marrying me, and took me to a church, and went in and spoke to a man, and then come out, and said we were married; I was not married to him, but he pretended to be taking me to be married. He told me he was a shoe-maker, but he was not. I staid out with him four days. He said he would take me down to his mother's at Epping; and when we got there, he said his mother had quitted there. He had my bundle to carry. When we got to Edmonton , on our return to Town, he told me to wait a moment at the corner of a street, until he returned, and then he never come near me.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I am an officer. In consequence of a description of the prisoner, I apprehended him; when he was deceiving another girl in a similar manner; whose company he had kept for three months.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-95

94. JAMES ELLESLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , a pocket-book, value 6d. and eleven 1l. bank notes, the property of Samuel Day , from his person .

SAMUEL DAY . I am a waggoner . On the 16th of November last, about twelve o'clock in the middle of the day; I was at a public-house in Spitalfields market . At first the prisoner took a one-pound note, and then made an attempt to take my pocket-book, but I baulked him, and afterwards he took it out unknown to me.

THOMAS HAGUE . I keep the public-house in which this took place. I heard there was gambling in the tap-room, and I went in, and stopped it, and then they were disputing about a one-pound note; there were two men and a woman in the room. I closed the door, and said nobody should quit the room until it was known who had got the note, and then the prisoner signified that he had got it; after that he denied that he had it a great many times, and so I sent for an officer. After that the pocket-book was missing. I understood that a man and his wife had gone out of the room. Armstrong searched the prisoner; but could find nothing upon him. The prisoner requested to be searched, nothing was found on him.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-96

95. WILLIAM COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , two looking-glasses, value 1l. one cane, value 5s. one dressing-case, value 2s. three gowns, value 4s. one petticoat, value 2s. and one shirt, value 2s. the property of Jane Barnet .

HENRY PAGET O'SHAUGHNESSY . On the 5th of December, I was in Half Moon-street, at the time of the fire. I saw Mr. Topliss with a hold of the prisoner by the collar, and calling out for a constable; it was between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I desired him to halloo out, and he would soon get a constable; at last he got a patrole, and I went with him to the watchhouse, to give the charge.

JAMAS TOPLISS . I am surveyor to the Sun Fire office. I was coming from Bagshot on the evening of the 5th of December, and alighted at the White Horse Cellar, as I heard there was a fire in Half Moon-street. I observed the prisoner with two glasses, and asked him where he got them, and he said, from one of the houses in Half Moon-street. I followed him, and he tried very much to evade me, and got into the crowd again. At last I got him out, and took him into a pastry cook's shop, until I could procure a constable to take him into custody.

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a constable of the night, and found the rest of the property upon the prisoner, besides two looking-glasses.

SUSAN PLUMRIDGE . I am servant to Mrs. Jane Burnet , and have been in the habit of having this property in my hands. I know it to be my mistres's.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-97

96. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one sheet, value 7s. the property of William Kemp , in a lodgingroom .

WILLIAM KEMP . I let a bed to the prisoner at three shillings a week; he came on the 5th of December, and quitted on the 6th, and took with him a sheet. There was a counterpane and two razors gone in the same room, but they were not let to him by contract. We went after him, and secured him, and took him to Jones, the constable.

SILAS HANKS . On the 6th of this month, I heard a cry of stop thief! and I saw the prisoner running. I passed the prosecutor, and took the prisoner in Gower-place.

JOHN JONES . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my custody; I searched him, and found the sheet wrapped round his body.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-98

97. GEORGE RICHEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , one pound of metal, value 9d. and one pound of block-tin, value 1s. the property of John Plumb Baldry , and others.

JOHN PLUMB BALDRY . In consequence of information which I received, through the medium of an anonymous letter, I sent for a police officer, on 2nd of November, to search the men as they left work.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a police officer, and on searching the prisoner at the bar on this occasion, I found a pound of mixed metal and a pound of brass on his person.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-99

98. MATTHIAS PORTMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , two baskets, value 4s. one cloth, value 1s. and three hundred and sixty halfpence, value 15s. the property of John Barber Field .

JOHN BARBER FIELD . The prisoner came one day and said he wanted something to eat; whilst he was eating his victuals which I gave him, he said it was the first he had eaten for the last two days. I kept him of a morning to bring things from market for me. One day, the day in the indictment, I had occasion to go to London Wall; I told my little boy to come after me, with the prisoner, and to bring with him the things mentioned in the indictment.

GEORGE FIELD . My father had told him to take fifteen shillings worth of halfpence and the other things to him in Leadenhall-street. The prisoner was going with me, and took them out of my hand, and walked away with them, just by America-square . We never saw him after.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined a month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-100

99. LEWIS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one shawl, value 5s. one quilt, value 3s. the property of Jacob Levi ; and one handkerchief, value 1s. and a shirt, value 2s. the property of Antonio Mosquito .

JACOB LEVI . I live at Poplar . On the 1st of last month, I let a night's lodging to the prisoner at the bar. In the morning when I went to look for him, he was gone. We took the prisoner soon after, and Mosquito's shirt and handkerchief we found on him; he owned he had sold the rest.

ANTONIO MOSQUITO . The shirt and handkerchief are mine.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-101

100. JAMES HAND was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a coat, value 9s. the property Joseph Sayres .

JOSEPH SAYRES . I lost my coat when I went to put my goods into my waggon; it was not in its place. I was informed that it was hanging up for sale in Golden-lane, and there I went, and saw it.

WILLIAM CLAW . I bought this coat from the prisoner at the bar.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-102

101. EDWARD HALES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one sheet, value 5s. the property of Joseph Vitreen and Robert Carvin , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH VITREEN . My husband has a partner named Robert Carvin . I let a lodging to the prisoner, on Sunday evening, the 5th of November; the furniture of which lodging was the joint property of my husband and Robert Carvin . There was a person of the name of Patterson slept in the same room. In the morning when the prisoner went, one of the sheets on his bed was missing, and the sheet of another bed put in its place. The missing sheet was never found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-103

102. JAMES GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one great coat, value 1l. the property of William Males .

WILLIAM MALES . I lost my coat at the Boot, at Edgeware ; I left it on one of my horses, at the door, while I went in for some refreshment, and on my coming out again, I missed my coat. I got intelligence which way to go, and after going up the road about a mile and a half, I found the prisoner concealing himself behind a hedge, with my coat, very near him. I brought him and the coat both back.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-104

103. JAMES GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , two coats, value 4l. the property of Henry John Legrave , esq .

JOHN KELLY . I am servant to Mr. Legrave, and his carriage stands at Boradale's livery stables.

in New Bond-street ; we had five horses there; these coats were stolen out of the place where I clean my things.

ROBBERT BORADALE . I am a livery-stable keeper, in New Bond-street. The prisoner assists his brother, whose master keeps some horses at my stables. I had a suspicion that he had stolen these coats, and I questioned him, and he confessed he sold them at a shop in St. Giles's.

THOMAS FIDO . I am a constable, and went to Chambers's, in St. Giles's, where the prisoner said, he sold them; but Chambers denied all knowledge of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-105

104. WILLIAM FENSHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a tea-spoon, value 2s. a plated toast-fork, value 2s. and two bottles of wine, value 6s. the property of Robert Tate .

MR. ROBERT TATE . On the 24th of November, a fire broke out at Mr. Slacks, next door to me, at Kentish Town; it was found necessary to move a great quantity of my property, and amongst other things were moved between thirty and forty dozen of wine; I was out of town myself. I lost a great deal of property, and took Smith, the Bow-street officer, to search the prisoner's lodgings.

JOHN SMITH . I found this toasting-fork and this spoon, with the mark erased by a file, or some such instrument, and two bottles of wine, in the prisoner's lodgings.

Mr. Tate. I know this toasting-fork to be my property, and I likewise believe the spoon to be my property; I cannot swear to the wine.

A good character was given of the prisoner, by two witnesses.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-106

105. PATRICK DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a watch, value 30s . the property of John Smart .

JOHN SMART . The prisoner was sent into my back parlour to get wood, and other things, and we suppose he must have taken the watch then; the watch was missed between five and six o'clock; he left the house at that time. I went after him, and found him. I told him if he would tell me what was become of the watch, I would say no more about it; but he denied any knowledge of it whatever. I got an officer to search him, and the watch was found on him.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer, and searched he prisoner, and found this watch concealed in his reeches.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-107

106. JAMES CAVANAGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , from the person of James Cornish , two 5l. bank notes, his property .

No witnesses appearing against the prisoner, the Jury found him

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-108

107. JEREMIAH CREW was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a pig's cheek, value. 1s. 2d. the property of John Barber Field .

JOHN BARBER FIELD . I am a hog-butcher . I lost my cheek on the 1st of November; it was in salt, in a tub, at the shop door. The prisoner took it; I saw him take it; I immediately took him into custody, and took him to the magistrate at Lambeth street office. He bore a very good character, and I now know he did it through distress, and had I known that before, I would not have prosecuted him.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-109

108. DAVID CASTLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , an axe, value 4s. the property of William Oliver .

WILLIAM OLIVER . I am a carpenter , and I left my axe on the 16th of November, where I was at work, in Spa-road . I left it in the yard between twelve and one.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a carpenter, and saw the prisoner take this property.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-110

109. THOMAS CRIPPS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a bridle, value 2s. a pair of gaiters, value 1s. the property of Henry Stuchbury ; also a waistcoat, value 2s. and a pair of stockings, value 6d. the property of William Norris .

WILLIAM NORRIS . I work at a horse-dealer s stables, Mr. Stuchbury's. The prisoner was detected in taking the property in question, which is mine, and my master's.

JOHN BEARD . I met the prisoner coming out of Mr. Stuchbury's yard, at Ealing, with the property in question under his arm; I stopped him, and detained him.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-111

110. HENRY BEADLE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , two shawls, value 2s. one gown, value 6d. and two yards of calico, value 1s. the property of Ann Beadle , spinster .

ANN BEADLE . I am a sister of the prisoner's; I live at home with my mother now. The prisoner broke open my box; there was nobody to break it open unless he did. He owned he broke it open, and said he sold the things.

JOSEPH BEADLE . I can't read; but I know it is a bad thing to tell a lie. I saw my brother, the prisoner, take the hammer, and break open the box, and take out the two shawls, and the calico.

MOSES FORTUNE , I apprehended the prisoner

he bears a very bad character, and has robbed them two or three times.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-112

111. WILLIAM BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , two bird cages, value 2s. a bird trap, value 1s. and two birds, value 6s. the property of Edward Williams .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-113

112. WILLIAM BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , sixty glass ornaments, value 4l. and eight fowls, value 17s. the property of Richard Lee .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-114

113. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , four yards of muslin, value 7s. the property of Charles Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS HUTGHINSON REILLY . The prisoner came into my master's shop, at 47, Duke-street, Manchester-square , for the purpose of looking at some muslins. I saw the muslin in question at her feet and I saw her put it under her clothes, and walk put with it; I followed her, and brought her back, and that is all I know.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury. before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-115

114. WILLIAM BROWN , and THOMAS JONES , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , sixteen pounds weight of rags. value 6s. the property of Matthias, Prime Lucas, and others .

JAMES OUTON . I am carman's beadle, of the fellowship of carmen. I saw the prisoner Brown, riding on the top of a load of rags.

GEORGE FROST . I am a carman, and saw Brown [Text unreadable in original.]s I was coming along East Smithfield; he had some rags.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-116

115. HANNAH JONES , and ISABELLA CLARKE , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a watch, value 2l. nine shillings and six-pence in monies numbered, and a one-pound Banknote , the property of William Washbrooke .

WILLIAM WASHBROOKE . I lost this property on the 25th of November, at about twelve o'clock at night. I was in Charles-street, Drury-lane , with the prisoner Jones. She asked me if I would give her anything to drink? and I gave her some money to go and get some. She returned back to me, and we went to bed. I had one pound nine shillings and sixpence, and my watch, in my breeches; which I put under my pillow, under my head. I awakened about an hour and a half, and heard the two prisoners talking together in the room I heard them saying, she had got my money and watch, and would have my breeches, and get off as soon as possible. With that I ran down stairs, as fast as I could after them, and Bella Clark stopped me; and the watchman stopped Jones, as she was going out of the door, hearing me scream. The watchman then came up stairs, and took them both into custody, and we found the watch in the tea-kettle, under some tealeaves.

PATRICK COWLEY . I am a watch-man, and stopped Jones coming out of this house, hearing a scream. I took her up into Bella Clarke 's room; Bella Clarke was sitting by the fire. I found the watch in the tea-kettle by the fire-side.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 26.

CLARKE, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-117

116. JOSEPH HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a pail, value 2s. the property of George Applewhite .

GEORGE APPLEWHITE . I live at the Pack Horse, Turnham Green . I lost this pail in September, and did not see it until November, and then it was in the constable's hands; it was worth about two shillings.

CHARLES GAMMON . I found the pail in question in the prisoner's house; he said he had bought it, and gave it up very readily; it was November when I found it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-118

117. TERENCE MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a gown, value 3s. a a pair of stays, value 8s. a shawl, value 2s. and a smelling bottle and case, value 1s. the property of Ann Cadmore .

ANN CADMORE . I am a single woman . I lost the gown and the other things at about nine o'clock. I went out to go to church and pulled those things off, and left them in the two pair of stairs back room. The prisoner was a lodger in the house. When I returned I missed these things. The prisoner lodged up two pair of stairs.

MARY WUITE . I live in this public-house, as servant. Mr. Darvin is the landlord. The prisoner slept in the house on the Saturday night before these things were missing. There were some other things missing, which are the subject on another indictment.

WILLIAM MORTON . I was sent for by Mr. Darvin, to search the prisoner, and on him I found a small bundle, and some duplicates, relating to the other bundle, the property of the last witness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-119

118. JOHN PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a counterpane, value 6s. the property of Jane Burgess . And ANN MILLS , for feloniously receiving on the same day the same counterpane she knowing it to the have been stolen .

LUCY TYBRELL . I am servant to Mrs. Burgess.

I made the bed in the garret between three and four, and the counterpane in question was then safe. The window was half way open; I came up stairs just as it was dark, and missed the counterpane in question. A person might have got over the tops of the neighbouring houses, and come in at the window.

THOMAS NICHOLL . I produce a counterpane, which was pawned by the female prisoner; I knew her person before.

PICKERING, GUILTY . aged 19.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

MILLS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-120

119. ALEXANDER ROSETTA was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , seventy-five pounds weight of quick-silver, value 10l. the property of the London Dock Company .

JOHN THOMAS . I saw the prisoner on the 2nd of December, the first time at about twelve o'clock. I thought he had something concealed in front of him; he was coming from No. 4, towards 5; I walked round him, and saw him jump into a lighter. I jumped down after him, and at that moment he fell, and let a skin of quick-silver fall; it weighs seventyfive pounds.

JOHN SPENCE . I am a ware-house-keeper at the London Docks . I know there was a large quantity of quick-silver deposited at warehouse 3; I am certain it is one of the bags of quick-silver, it is worth ten pounds.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one month , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-121

120. THOMAS TURNER , and THOMAS PERRING , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , one silk handkerchief, value 1s. 2d. the property of Raymond Jones , from his person .

RAYMOND JONES . I live in Cross-street, Hatton Garden. On the evening of the 16th of September, between five and six o'clock, I was walking up Holborn , and just as I got to Red Lion-street, a person stopped me, and asked me if I had lost my handkerchief? I then felt and missed it; I had felt it about ten minutes before. I was taken to a linen draper's shop across the way.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer belonging to the public office Bow-street, and was in Holborn, at the time the prisoners were secured. I knew their persons perfectly well before that time; I saw them before Mr. Jones came up, on Holborn Hill, and watched them for the space of ten minutes. Just as Mr. Jones got by Hand-court, Turner went up to his pocket, and felt it, and the other covered him; they were both in company together. Turner withdrew for a moment, but they continued following Mr. Jones until he got to Red Lion-street; then Turner went to him again, and drew a handkerchief out of his pocket, caught it up, and gave it to Perring; at that moment Barrett came up to me; he was following them and watching them, although I did not know it. We apprehended them, and Perring made some resistance, and at that time he dropped the handkerchief.

TURNER, GUILTY , aged 21.

PERRING, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-122

121 THOMAS BODDINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , eight loaves of bread, value 6s. the property of James Surry and John Surry ,

ANN CRIPPS . I keep a baker's shop of Messrs. Surry's; I manage the business for them; a person of the name of Marsden came for some bread, he sells bread on our account; he went into the bake-house at about three o'clock in the afternoon on the 2nd of December; I saw the prisoner deliver to him sixteen quarterns, and twenty six half quarterns; that was the quantity which Marden was to have. I then went to the truck, and saw eight quartern loaves he had delivered to Marsden more than he ought.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-123

122. THOMAS CANTRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 31th of October , a pewter quart pot, value 1s. 6d. the property of James Baker .

JAMES BAKER . I am a publican , and keep the White Lion, in Curzon-street, May-fair . On the 31st of October, the prisoner was detected in stealing a pot of mine, and brought to my house. I am not sure that it is my pot, but I think it is.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-124

123. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , two blankets, value 2s. two sheets, value 2s. and one quilt, value 1s. the property of James Geeves .

JAMES GEEVES . My door was on the latch; but I never saw the prisoner in my life before. I lost my sheets and blankets, and the watchman stopped the prisoner with them.

JOSEPH TREMBEY . I am a watchman, and stopped the prisoner at the bar, with the property in question on his person.

(Property sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-125

124. WILLIAM TWEEDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a mast, value 1s. a boat's fore-sail, value 5s. and a main-sail, value 10s. the property of John Chapman .

JOHN CHAPMAN. I am a water-man . I lost these articles; but I don't know the day of the month. An officer brought some bills to me.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a police constable. I met the prisoner on the 17th of November, at about eight o'clock in the evening, with some canvass; I asked him what he had got, and he told me it was a boat's sails; he had had a job for the day on the River, and those were the sails, which he was taking home for safety; this account turning out untrue, we advertised the sails.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-126

125. SARAH FANCOTT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 19th of October , seven yards of woollen say, value 30s. part of the goods of which Joseph Hayward , was at the last Sessions for the City of London, convicted of feloniously and burglariously stealing, the property of William Allcorn and Richard Stubbs , she well knowing the same to have been so feloniously and burglariously stolen .

IT appearing that the husband of this prisoner was living, and in custody, and also that the property in question was found in her husband's house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-127

126. WILLIAM HENRY BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , three pieces of tyre, value 1s. a chissel, value 2s. and a pair of stockings, value 6d. the property of John Renshaw .

JOHN RENSHAW . I am a mason . The prisoner drove my cart for me. I had information given me, and took him on the Saturday; I told him I had reason to suspect his honesty, and he confessed he had sold some property of mine at an old iron shop.

ANN BOWES . I keep an old iron shop, on Ayre-street-hill. The prisoner at the bar sold me two bits of iron; he sold them on the 26th of October, at a farthing a pound.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-128

127. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a trunk, value 15s. the property of William Ayre .

WILLIAM AYRE . I live at 19, Cockspur-street , and lost this trunk from my door. My next door neightbour saw the prisoner cross the road with the trunk. I immediately followed him, and brought him back, with the trunk on his shoulder.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-129

128. ANDREW MEEK was indicted for a misdemeanor .

GEORGE WILSON . The prisoner was a servant of mine, and was entrusted to receive money on my account.

FRANCIS BATTEN . I deal with Mr. Wilson for bread. I recollect paying the prisoner for bread several times. Here is a receipt for three shillings and eight pence, which the prisoner gave me on the 12th of November ; I paid him that three shillings and eight pence.

George Wilson . That three shillings and eight pence was never paid to me. I took in a bill of seven shillings and sixpence to Mr. Batten; when I was surprized to find that he had paid for the bread he had had, and he shewed the receipts of the prisoners to that amount.

(Receipt produced to witness.)

Prosecutor. That receipt is the prisoner's hand writing.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-130

129. MARIA MOORE . was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , two sheets, value 6s. and two pillow-cases, value 2s. the property of John Ellick , in a lodging-room .

JOHN ELLICK . I live at 44, North Coleman-street, St. George's in the East . I did not let the room in question to the prisoner; I let her lodge with me in the same room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-131

130. MARY MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , a tea-kettle, value 10s. the property of Dennis Sheeghan .

DENNIS SHEEGHAN . I lost my tea-kettle on the 3rd of last month; it was taken from the fire, and I know nothing more about it.

TIMOTHY LANE . Mr. Sheeghan came after me, and told me of the robbery. I apprehended the prisoner, and she confessed she sold the teakettle.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I found this kettle at the house of John Duggins , a dealer in marine stores, in Great St. Andrew's-street, Seven Dials. I know the girl; her character is good, and I believe she did this through distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-132

131. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , one waistcoat, value 4s. a pair of pantaloons, value 5s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of James Cass .

JAMES CASS . I lost these things on Thursday, the 7th, from my bed-room; about three o'clock, the prisoner came in with three or four more, and took refreshment. The prisoner was missing, and I met him coming down stairs, and I sent for an officer; who searched him, and found the articles named in the indictment; which are my property.

RALPH HOPE . I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, and found the articles upon him.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-133

132. PETER ANDREW AUGUR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one pair of pantaloons, value 5s. and one waistcoat, value 3s. the property of Timothy Foggarty .

TIMOTHY FOGGARTY . I am a carpenter . I lost my things on the 9th of November; they were stolen out of the room where I lodged. The prisoner lodged in the same room. I went out in the morning at six o'clock, and left him in the room, with the things, and when I came home at night, he was gone; he never came back to the room.

ANN BECKET , a witness not appearing, was called on her recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-134

133. MANUEL DE SILVA was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , one hat, value 5s. one shirt, value 3s. one jacket, value 7s. one waistcoat, value 4s. and one pair of trowsers, value 4s. the property of Ferdinand Josef .

FERDINAND JOSEF . I am a Portuguese, and live in Lower Gun-alley, Wapping . I had several chests containing articles of wearing apparel in my house; amongst others, I had the articles mentioned in the indictment. The prisoner was a lodger of mine. I saw him one day with a new Guernsey frock on, and I knew he had no money to buy it. I asked him how he came by it; he said he had had a job, and a sailor had given it to him. I sent for an officer, and had the hand-cuffs put upon him, and then he confessed the truth; he confessed he sold the things, and told me where.

THOMAS NEWTON . I am a slop-seller; I live in Ratcliffe Highway. I produce a jacket, waistcoat, and a pair of trowsers; I bought them of the prisoner.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-135

134. JOHN RILEY was indicted for embezzling money .

JOHN SWARBRECK GREGORY . I am in the house of Shepherd, Adlington, and Co. Solicitors. We have a gentleman in our house of the name of Faulkener; I gave him a draft upon Messrs. Hoare and Co. for ninety-seven pounds. Upon going into the office a short time afterwards, the prisoner was not there; he did not return that evening. In the course of the next day, I received a letter, in the hand writing of the prisoner; that is it.

(Letter read)

"Directed to J. S. Gregory, esq.

"SIR. I am sorry to inform you that I have lost the notes. I throw myself entirely on your mercy. I shall write to my friends, and make up the money for you. I am extremely sorry, but cannot help it."

" JOHN RILEY ."

Witness. I know nothing more of my own knowledge. I have seen the draft; that is the draft.

MR. GEORGE FAULKENER . I was managing clerk in the house of Shepherd and Co. I gave the prisoner the draft in question to get cashed at Hoare's; he went out before three o'clock, and never returned. I heard nothing of him until the next morning, when I received a letter, which I believed to be the prisoner's hand writing; that is the letter.

"Addressed to George Faulkener, esq.

"DEAR, SIR. I have lost all but the silver. I shall not abscond. Perhaps you will write to my father; he, with my friends, will be able to make it up for you."

"YOURS, JOHN RILEY ."

Witness. He was apprehended before I received that.

"A letter was now read, which appeared in the prisoner's hand writing, and which only shewed that he was applying for a situation in a school, in the Country, and which application was made in an assumed name, - JOHN HORNSHAW ."

MR. WILLIAM WILLOUGHBY . I am clerk to Messrs. Hoare and Co. I look at the check produced, which was paid by me, on the 1st of November; I paid it to the prisoner; he requested me to give his as small notes as I conveniently could, a certain number of five's, and ten's, and some silver, for Mr. Gregory.

WILLIAM HOOLE . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce a note No. 16,198, a ten-pound note, dated 23rd of September, 1815; also 16.195, a ten-pound note, dated 23rd of September, 1815.

ELIZABETH CORKEN . My husband is a watchmaker, and lives in the Commercial-road. (Note 16,195, put into the hands of the witness.) I know this note; I took it from the prisoner; he paid it to me for a watch, on the 1st of November; I see the words "John Hernshaw, Houndsditch," upon it; the prisoner wrote those words in my presence.

Mr. Gregory. I believe that endorsement to be the prisoner's hand writing.

Mr. Faulkener. I am of a similar opinion.

SAMUEL DICKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I found the prisoner at about four o'clock, in Dogrow, Mile-end. I found nineteen shillings on him. He said, he had been obliged to spend one shilling, and he had lost the rest.

Mr. Willoughby. I produce my book. I paid the note 16,195, to the prisoner, as part cash for the check.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-136

135. GEORGE TAPHAM and THOMAS LYNCH were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Spencer , at about the hour of nine, on the night of the 5th of November , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, a feather bed, value 40s. and a quilt, value 2s. his property .

HENRY SPENCER . I live in Gloucester-buildings, Whitecross-street, St. Luke's . A person named Carr lodges in my house; the furniture in that room in which he lodges, are mine; the bed and bedding are mine.

ROBERT CARR . I lodge in Spencer's house. I went out between eleven and twelve's o'clock in the morning of the 5th of November; I pulled to and latched my door after me. When I came back, at night, the bed and quilt were missing. Nobody ought to go into the room unless it was the landlady or landlord.

GEORGE HILLER . I live in Spencer's house. I was at home in the evening of the 5th of November. I opened my door, and saw the two prisoners coming down stairs, with a bed in their hands, each had hold of it. I had a fire in my room, and having

opened the door, the light shone against their faces; I did not speak to them. I went down stairs, and informed Mrs. Spencer, and in consequence of what she told me, I pursued the men with the bed; I found both the prisoners standing close by the Duke of Gloucester, with the bed on the ground between them.

HANNAH SPENCER . I was sitting in my room on the evening of the 5th, at supper, when the last witness came and told me that somebody was carrying a bed down stairs. I went out, and Martha Stephens , who was sitting with me, went out; she laid hold of the prisoner Topham, by the Gloucester Arms. I never saw the prisoner Lynch, that night; he had ran away. Topham and the bed were taken to the watchhouse, and also I went to the watchhouse, because my husband was not at home. I had seen the bed and the quilt in Carr's room in the course of the day, and about tea time I saw Lynch and another in the yard.

ROBERT LOCK . I am an headborough. I was sent for on the night of the 5th of November, I saw the prisoner Topham, standing with a bed at his feet, and a man had hold of him. I asked him how he came by it, and he said, Lynch put it on his shoulders. He told me where to go and get Lynch. I, and Thomas Vaughan , took him according to the direction.

TOPHAM, GUILTY, aged 42,

LYNCH, GUILTY, aged 63,

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-137

136. MARY WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a time-piece, value 40s. the property of Thomas Webster , in his dwelling-house .

CATHERINE WEBSTER . The prisoner came to our house on Saturday, the 25th of November; she came in on a pretence of hiring lodgings, which I had to let, she walked about. The time-piece was on a table in the room, by the window. The prisoner said, she would bring her brother and sister to see the lodgings. After she was gone, I missed the time-piece, and my husband went after her, and brought her back in a quarter of an hour.

THOMAS WEBSTER . I was at home on this day. I recollect my wife telling me she missed the timepiece. She gave me a description of the person who had looked at the lodgings. I saw the prisoner in St. John-street; she answered the description my wife gave. When I came up to her, I saw the foot of the time-piece sticking from under her shawl; I went up to her, and laid hold of her arm, and took the time-piece from under her arm.

JOHN HODDINOT . I took charge of the prisoner, and this time-piece. (Producing the timepiece.)

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-138

137. WILLIAM TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , one plated turene stand, value 40s. the property of the Barroness Nolleken , in her dwelling-house .

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I am footman to the Barroness Nolleken, whose christian name is Mary; she lives is Gloucester-place, in the parish of Marylebone . I went out of my pantry at about half past one o'clock, on the 2nd of December. The pantry opens into the front area, of the dwelling-house. I left a plated turene stand, in the window of my pantry, and on my return, I saw the prisoner. I saw him in Crawford-street; and I saw the turene stand, thrown into the gutter. I saw him running away, and several people running after him. He was taken directly into custody; I saw him afterwards, when he hoped for forgivness, saying it was the first crime he ever commited.

WILLIAM HEY . I saw a mob of people running after the prisoner; and being a peace officer, I ran after him too, and took him into custody.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18151206-139

138. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , a chest of tea, value 10l. the property of Charles Smith , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES SMITH . I live at 54, Southampton-row Russell Square . I lost a chest of tea, between the hours of four and five, in the afternoon of the 11th of November; my shop is in the lower part of the house. I received some information, and heard the words, he is gone! he is gone! and then I saw the prisoner crossing the road. with the chest of tea from my shop; he was carrying it on his shoulder; and he was brought back immediately after. He threw it down, and then ran about a hundred yards; one of my workmen took care of my tea, while it was on the ground. I pursued the prisoner, but somebody stopped him before I did.

JAMES MANNING . I was in Southampton-row, on the evening in question; I am a workman of Mr. Smith's, I am a plumber. Towards the evening, I saw the prisoner lurking about the shop window. I was in the shop at the other end, drinking some beer, with the other workmen, and I saw him take a chest of tea out of the shop; I saw him on his knees with his hands before him. When he got to the door he set off running, and run across the road, with the tea; the tea was on his arms. I assisted in pursuing him, and he dropped the tea, which I took care of while the prisoner was stopped and brought back by Mr. Smith.

GUILTY, aged 41,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-140

139. THOMAS RICHARD CASPER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , four silk handkerchiefs, value 1l. the property of Thomas Reev

MR. JOHN REEVE . I am a hosier on Ludgate Hill . On the evening of the 4th of November last, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner

came into our shop, and requested to look at some shirts. I shewed him some, and he fixed upon one; and then he desired to be shewn some silk pocket handkerchiefs. I took some from the window, and shewed them to him; there was a particular pattern which he said he wanted, but which he said was not there. I turned round to a draw behind to get some others; and by his position, with his hat off, and placed upon the counter, I guessed all could not be right. On my turning round again, he had got his hat on; and I jumped over the counter almost directly, and in his hat, was a whole piece of silk handkerchiefs. I sent for an officer, and delivered him and the handkerchiefs into his custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-141

140. JOHN ROBERTS , and JOSEPH ATKINSON , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Lawson , and David Palmer , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, a piece of printed cotton, value 4l. their property .

GEORGE EAKIN . I am a servant to these gentlemen. I was coming at the back part of our warehouse, at a little before ten in the morning, and saw the back door open, and I was a little surprised at not seeing any one there. I went forward, and saw a man going along with the goods on his shoulder. I missed the cotton from the bail, and suspected he had taken it, and I called somebody out of the cellar and then went after him, and met an officer bringing him in custody with the cotton, in St. Paul's Church Yard; I believe John Roberts is the man that I saw with the bale. I can't tell how they got into the warehouse, for I know the door was shut a few minutes before. It was a catch lock, but whether it caught or not, I don't know; but I suppose it did.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a City officer. The prisoners both walked up a little way together, until they came to Palmer and Lawson's: Roberts went in, but came out again in a moment, and joined company with the other. They then walked up and down a little time, and then Roberts went in again, and come out again but did not bring anything then. He joined company with Atkinson, and in a few minutes went in again. While he was in, Atkinson walked past the door; and then I saw Roberts bring these printed goods out. I kept in the court, until their backs were turned, for fear they should see my face; and as soon as they got into St. Paul's Church Yard, I went after them, and took them both into custody.

ROBERTS, GUILTY, aged 19,

ATKINSON, GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-142

141. JOHN WOOLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , ten volumes of the Statutes at Large, value 30l. the property of Andrew Strahan , and George Eyre .

JOHN DE ARCEY . I am a book-seller, and reside in Holborn. Some time before the beginning of November last, the prisoner at the bar, came to me, one morning, and brought with him a parcel which was the ten volumes of the Statutes at Large, the value of which was thirty pounds; but for which he only asked ten pounds. I asked to whom they belonged? and he said to a gentleman of the profession going out of town, and he told me his name was Mr. Able Wright, of Lincoln's Inn. I told him in the first place, I must see if such a person lived in Lincoln's Inn, and if he did, and had sent these books, I would pay him for them myself. I went to enquire, and found that Mr. Long lived there, and not Mr. Wright. That same day, the prisoner came to my house, and I told him he was an impostor. He said he would take the books away, but I told him he should not, for I would keep them to find an owner; and he went away, and left them with me. In consequence of my making enquiries at all the law book-sellers, I found out the real owners. Paradice came to my house, and after examining them, knew them by some defection.

(Property produced.)

JOSEPH PARADICE . I was in the employment of the prosecutors. I remember taking stock at Christmas last; and then having two hundred and four sets of the Statutes at Large, and I selected twelve sets as imperfect. In consequence of information, I went to Mr. De Arcey's shop, and then I brought this set home, knowing it to be one of the sets, which I had sealed up as imperfect. The prisoner was in our employ; and on my return from De Arcey's, he had absconded. I never saw him again, until he was apprehended.

JOHN M'ARTHUR . I am in the employ of the prosecutors, and know these to be their property; I saw the prisoner the day he was apprehended. I was desirous of knowing in what way he committed the theft, as I knew it must be committed with considerable difficulty; and without any promise or threat he told me he had got a key to a private door. which leads from the ware-house, into Gunpowderalley .

Prosecutor. That is my property.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-143

142. ANN THOMPSON and ELIZABETH FORD were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , three beaver hats, value 1l. 4s. the property of George Franks .

GEORGE FRANKS . I am a hatter , and live in Redcross-street, Cripplegate . On the 25th of October, the two prisoners came into my shop, to order a riding hat, and on the 31st, they came in to know if it was ready; it was the prisoner Thompson who ordered it, only she left her name Fulford. She tried it on, and it fitted her, and she remarked there was no band on it; I told her I could put a band on it in a minute, but she said no; she had seen a pattern a day or two before, and she would come the next day and bring it, They then went out of the shop, they went both together; and had not been

me scarcely a moment, before I heard a violent scream, and a man came past the door, with the woman who calls herself Thompson, and held up three beaver bonnets, saying at the same time, here are only there. He took her to the Compter, and came again, and shewed the bonnets to me, and asked me if they were my property? I told him they were, and he said I must go to Guildhall the next morning.

JAMES BRAY . I am an officer, and on the evening of the 31st of October, I was standing at about five o'clock at the corner of Barbican, in company with another officer. The prisoners went past us, and a little girl with them. Knowing them before, I was induced to watch them; they went into a large linen-draper's shop, in Barbican, and staid in for a full hour. When they came out, I immediately went in, and asked if they had missed any thing; but they said no, they had not; for they had been aware of them, and had watched them too closely. They then went into a hatter's shop, at the corner of Redcross-street; they talked together in the shop for a little bit, and then hustled up together to a chair against the counter. Thompson was pulling her own bonnet off, which she had on, and the other was covering her, and I saw her scramble one of the hats from by the chair, and clapped it under her petticoats. Then she went behind the counter, to try her bonnet on, where she was about two or three minutes, and then she came back again, where she was before, and stopped, and put another hat under her petticoats. She then fumbled about a good bit about a band for the bonnet, and then she took another, and put that under her petticoats. In about two minutes they came out; I let them get about two houses from Mr. Frank's, and then we stopped them; they struggled very hard, and a gang of fellows came over from the corner of Golden-lane, and rescued Ford from me. I brought the other prisoner and the hats back to Franks's and he said that the hats were his property. I am sure Ford is the person who was in company with Thompson; Barrett apprehended Ford the next day.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

THOMPSON, GUILTY , aged 28.

FORD, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-144

143. JAMES SMITH and JAMES SCULLON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a box, value 2s. four coats, value 6l. four waistcoats, value 10s. four pair of breeches, value 2l. five pair of pantaloons, value 2s. two pair of stockings, value 2s. and four handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of Thomas Gorrod , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Clarke .

THOMAS GORROD . I lost my box on Friday, the 17th of November. I had last seen it on the landing-place, outside my room door, at about four o'clock in the afternoon; it was put there because my wife was going to clean my room; there were four coats, four waistcoats, four pair of breeches, five pair of pantaloons, two pair of white silk stockings, five handkerchiefs, some gloves, and gaiters.

I had some of these things a good while. I had been a gentleman's servant , and had got these whilst in service. I could have sold them for ten pounds, and they were worth more to me.

HAM BEETON . I am a stage-coachman. I have a bundle of things, which I bought at the sign of the Coach and Horses, St. Martin's-lane, on the 18th of November; I bought them of the prisoner Scullon. I was in the Coach and Horses when he was offering them for sale, at between nine and ten in the morning; I gave him six shillings for them; there were two waistcoats, and a pair of small clothes. I saw he offered a pair of leather breeches for sale; but nothing else. Smith, the other prisoner, was with him; they appeared to me to be acquainted with each other. Smith seemed to interfere as a friend to the other, in saying he was selling the things for too little.

JAMES LAWSON . I am shopman to Mr. Daubrise, pawnbroker, at No. 3, Charing Cross. I produce a coat and two pair of breeches; I am sure Smith pledged them, for sixteen shillings, on Saturday morning, the 18th of November, between nine and ten o'clock. He left part of the things with me until he went back and got more; he pledged them in the name of Jones.

Prosecutor. I look at the things produced by the coachman, and the pawnbroker, and know them to be my property.

JOHN SMITH . I was beadle of the night of St. Giles's watch-house, when the prisoners was brought in, at about twelve o'clock; I was ordered by the constable of the night to search him, and on doing so, in his right hand pocket, I found this duplicate, for a coat and two pair of breeches, for fifteen shillings.

James Lawson . That duplicate belongs to us; I have the corresponding one in my possession, and have produced the articles for which it was given.

PHILIPPA HARDING . I lodge in the same house where the box was stolen. On the 17th of November, Friday, I went into the yard to empty a pail of water, it was about six o'clock in the evening; I met two men coming into the passage; one of them I knew, and the other I did not know; Scullon was one, but I don't know that Smith was the other; I knew Scullon before, at the same house; he was in the habit of coming to the house; he had a sister lodging up stairs.

Scullon's Defence. I got these things to sell, from a sailor.

Smith's Defence. The sailor, and the prisoner, Scullon, overtook me, and asked me to sell apart for them.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

SCULLON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-145

144. MARY STONEHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , one 40l. bank note, and one 5l. bank note, the property of Peter Ainsham , in his dwelling-house .

MARY AINSHAM . I am the wife of Peter Ainsham ; I am a laundress , and employed the prisoner at the bar, as a washer-woman constantly, and on

the 8th of November. On that day, I had in a drawer in my house a forty-pound note, a five-pound note, and several others; the last time I saw the notes, was on the Sunday previous. I kept the drawer locked; but missed the key on the 8th; the day the prisoner left me. The forty-pound note I had had from my aunt. I never saw any of my notes since. On the 8th of November, I went out at about three o'clock in the afternoon; I left nobody in the house but the prisoner. I returned home at about six o'clock in the evening; I had left word for the prisoner to come to me if I did not return by dusk in the evening; she accordingly came to me at No. 15, Finsbury-square , and we both came home together. I observed nothing particular in her conduct. She left me at about eleven that evening, and was to have returned the next morning. I gave her one shilling and sixpence, and a shilling remained due to her. She never returned to me. I had no suspicion until the Thursday, the Lord Mayor's day, when Mrs. Godfrey came to me; I then went to the drawer, and found it open, that is unlocked; but it was pushed in as close as if it was locked; the forty-pound note, the five-pound note, and several small notes, were missing; there was some notes left in the drawer. When I missed my money, the prisoner was apprehended.

ELIZABETH GODFREY . The prisoner lodged with me. She came home at about a quarter past twelve on the Tuesday night, the 8th of November; she went out at about nine or ten the next morning, and never returned. She said, she had taken some money on the will and power of her brother.

SARAH SINCLAIR . I lodged in the same house with the prisoner, and went to a linen-draper's shop with her, on the Wednesday morning; it was in Beech-street; I don't know the linen-draper's name; she changed a five-pound note there.

ALLAN TURNWELL . I live in Fore-street, and am a linen-draper. I recollect the prisoner at the bar, and a woman named Evans, called at my shop, on Wednesday, the 8th of November; she stated that she wanted some mourning, for her father was dead. The woman, named Evans, said, perhaps he wont change the note you have got, we had better go to the Bank, and we will call on our return; at that time, I did not know the amount of the note, and fearful of loosing a customer, I said I would change it. Then the woman, Evans, produced the note, as the prisoner's. When I saw it, I had a suspicion that it was not good, and not having any one in the house, I beckoned to a neighbour to go to the Bank, to see if it was good. He returned with two twenty-pound notes, and then I had no doubts, and therefore sold the prisoner the articles she wanted; she bought goods to the amount of upwards of five pounds. I gave her a twentypound note, and the difference out of the change of the other twenty-pound note. I tendered the change to Evans, as the prisoner seemed in such distress at the loss of her father; I gave it to Evans, because she said she had heard some account of the death of her husband also that morning, and seeing the prisoner over-whelmed with grief; I thought it more decorous to give it to Evans. The next day she came again, and bought some trifling articles; Evans had not then the property. She then tendered me a ten-pound note, which I believe to be one of those I had paid to her the day previous.

WILLIAM STAINES BROXOP . I am a neighbour of the last witness. He commissioned me to go to the Bank, and take a forty-pound note, to see if it was a good one or not. I took it to the Bank, and brought two twenty-pound notes for it, which I gave to Mr. Turnwell, in his shop.

ESTHER ANN OFF . I know the prisoner at the bar, and have known her some time. I went to her in Newgate, by her request. When I saw her in Newgate, I was so much affected, that I began crying; she told me not to cry, that she had a friend who had sent her a twenty-pound note, to provide attorney and counsel, Mr. Fancom, in Tooley-street; she desired me to buy her a few things for the trial; she gave me the note. When I came home, I told my husband where I had been; he was very angry with me for going to Newgate, and said, if I did not go to Mr. Fancom, he would. I then went to Mr. Fancom, and in consequence of directions he gave me, I went to the Bank, where I found the note was stopped.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of the Bank of England. I produce a forty-pound note, No. 1915, dated the 11th of January, 1815; there is an indorsement on it "Mrs. Evans, Ship-yard, Redcross-street," on the 9th of November, it was presented for payment in the hall. I now produce a twenty-pound note, No. 2182, 23rd of September, 1815. That was stopped on the 11th of November.

Allan Turnwell . I can't swear to the forty-pound note that I gave to Evans. The indorsement on it, "Bank of England," is in my own handwriting.

William Staines Broxop . The forty-pound note is the same. I wrote the indorsement in two several places.

SARAH BARTON . I know the prosecutrix. I had previous to November deposed in her hands that forty-pound note, to get her through her troubles; I lent it to her.

THOMAS PRESTON . I am an officer of the City of London. I recollect apprehending the prisoner on the 10th of November; I apprehended her in Ship-yard, Redcross-street; I made her acquainted with the nature of the charge. She confessed she had taken the property, but had got drunk, and did not know what she had done with it. I told her I must search her, and so I did, as far as decency would permit. I got a woman to strip her, and search her; there were sixpence, and six-penny worth of halfpence on her. She said, she had some property in the house where she lodged; that was at Evans's, who gave me up some property which the prisoner confessed she had purchased.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the money at the bottom of my mistress's gate, as I was going out.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-146

145. JOHN PRING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , three 1l. bank notes, the property of Felix Murphy , in the dwelling-house of Richard Hutchins .

FELIX MURPHY . I live at No. 20, Checquer-alley, Bunhill-row ; I am a lodger in the house of Richard Hutchins , who lives in the house himself; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me. On the day in the indictment, he was sitting in the cold, in the room, and would not move, for several days, he had not left the appartment. I told him he had better take a run round the square, but that he declined, saying, that he had some halfpence, and if I would lend him two or three, he would be able to get half a peck of coals. I went to get change of a one pound note, and when I came back, I could not get the halfpence out of my pocket, and put my pocket-book down on the bench, while I got them out. I forgot to put my pocket-book into my pocket again, and then went up to work again. In about two or three hours, I put my hand in my pocket, and missed my pocket-book. Filled with terror, I ran down frightened, and looked upon the bench, where I remembered I had left it, but it was gone; and the prisoner was gone too. There was a most excellent fire in the room, and plenty of victuals, and I am sure the prisoner would not have quit them, unless it was for something better. He came home about eleven o'clock that night, drunk; and I know he had no money to buy liquor. I sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody; but we found nothing on him.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer, and was fetched up on this night. I first saw the prisoner after Locke had been up stairs. I asked him how he came to leave the good fire? and he said he had been to Temple Bar, to his sisters, but he would not assign any reason for quitting the fire.

ROBERT LOCKE . I am an officer, and I went up with Hutchins, the landlord, to where the prisoner was, but knew nothing of it until then. The landlord pulled him out of bed; and I asked him what he had done with the pocket-book? and he asked me what pocket-book? and I told him the pocketbook with the three notes in; and he said if he had it, he would keep it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-147

146. HANNAH COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of November , one broom, value 3s. and eighteen pounds weight of bacon, value 9s. the property of Robert Hargrave , privately in his shop .

ROBERT HARGRAVE . I keep a chandler's shop . The prisoner was a lodger of mine, and was about to move. On the 23rd of last month. I missed the property about ten o'clock in the evening of that day. The last time I saw the bacon, was at nine o'clock in the morning, hanging by the side of the counter; and I saw the broom, about the same time.

ELIZABETH TURNER . The prisoner came to my house, on the 24th, and asked me if I belonged to the yard? and I told her I did; and asked her what she wanted? and she said that she and her daughter had had a few words, and that her daughter had thrown something into the yard; and she wanted it out. I told her to come when my husband was at home, but before she came, a boy of mine brought a bit of bacon into the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-148

147. JAMES SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Griffiths Foulkes , about the hour of seven in the night, of the 30th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, a piece of chints furniture, value 5l. his property .

GRIFFITHS FOULKES . I am a linen draper , and live at 2, and 3, Russell-street. Drury-lane, in the parish of St. Martin s. On Monday evening the 30th of October, at about half past seven; I had occasion to go over the way for one of the shutters, to shut up the shop, I heard glass fall, and on my immediately turning round, I saw a man pulling something out of my window. He run away as fast as he could, and I run after him, and overtook him, and it was the prisoner; I never lost sight of him; he was putting the chints under his coat, when I stopped him; he endeavoured to get away, but I was a little stronger than him, and brought him back, and then sent him to Bow-street. When I came back to my shop, and looked at the window, and found there was a hole in it, and part of the furniture hanging out. This was at the shop of No. 3, the upper part of which was let out. There is a communication from one house to the other; there is a passage between the two houses.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I was sent for to the shop of the prosecutor, and took the prisoner into custody, as well as the piece of chints.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury. before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-149

148. WILLIAM TUFNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , one pelise, value 4l. 4s. the property of Thomas Adderly Phipps , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS ADDERLY PHIPPS . I am a printer , and live in Bridges-street, Covent Garden ; that is my dwelling-house. The prisoner was a fly boy , and worked in my house. In his going backwards and forwards to work, he would pass the door of the bedroom in which this pelise was. I saw it on the 8th of November; I was present when the prisoner was taken up, and taken to Bow-street.

CATHERINE LAWSON . I am a dealer in second hand clothes, and live at 48, Drury-lane. A young woman brought the peliese in question to my shop, on the evening of the 8th of November, between six and seven in the evening; she wanted to sell it; I did not think she could have come by it honest, and therefore I stopped it. In about a quarter of an hour after she was gone, the prisoner came and asked me, if I had not got a pelise which a young woman left, and I told him I had; and he wanted it, but I did not chuse to give it him; he said if I did not

choose to give it him; and he said if I did not give it him, he would smash the glass; I told him he might do that if he choose, but he certainly should not have the pelisse. The woman has run away that brought the pelisse to me.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields. I produce a pelisse, which the last witness gave to me. The girl who had to sell it, has run away; I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th.

Thomas Adderly Phipps . This is my wife's pelisse; I am not a judge of the value, but I suppose it cost ten or twelve pounds, and is now worth four or five pounds; it is made of silk velvet.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blane.

Reference Number: t18151206-150

149. CHARLES GILVIN and HENRY BROOKS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Meredith , in the night time of the 1st of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therin, two looking-glasses, value 2l. his property .

WILLIAM WAINRIGHT . I am an officer belonging to the public office, Bow-street. I recollect meeting the two prisoners at about a quarter past six, on the evening of the 1st of December, in Play-house-yard; they had two looking-glasses, each carrying one. Frost was with me; he laid hold of Brooks, and asked him where he got the glasses, and he pointed to Gilvin, and said this is the person who employed me to carry them; I directly went and laid hold of Gilvin, and told Frost to keep fast hold, for I knew Gilvin. We took them into the public-house, and I searched Gilvin, and found on him a pair of gloves, and a pair of spectacles. I asked him where he got the gloves, and he said they belonged to himself; and the spectacles he could give no account of at all. We took them to Bow-street, where they were committed; and in coming across Spa-fields we heard of the robbery. We went to the prosecutor's house and there they gave an accurate description of one of the glasses.

JOHN FROST . I know nothing more than Wainright has said; only that I found on Brooks a gimblet, and a piece of chalk, with which the shutters were marked.

ELIZA SLACK . I am a servant to Mr. Meredith, who lives at No,7. Lloyd's-row . I saw the two glasses in his houss, at ten o'clock on Friday morning, and missed them about six in the evening; they were hung up by screws to the wall. The bottom sash of the windows was laid open at that time, and the parlour blinds laid open two; but the shuttets put to; any person could have got into the parlour by opening the sash. I had not seen the windows from teno'clock in the morning. until six in the evening. I won't say anything about the gloves, but I know the glasses to be my master's property, as well as the spectacles.

GILVIN, GUILTY, aged 20.

BROOKS, GUILTY,aged 20.

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18151206-151

150. JOHN IRWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , a shirt, value 8s. the property of John Baptist Phillip .

JOHN BAPTIST PHILLIP . I am a physician , and live at No. 2. Bell's-buildings, Salisbury-squate, Fleet-street . The prisoner lodged in the same house. I have frequently lost shirts and handkerchiefs; but did not know it was through the prisoner until he was detected.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Portugal-street, St. Clement's Danes. I took in this shirt, from the prisoner at the bar, on the 27th of November, and I advanced on it eight shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. I never saw the young man before in my life. A great many persons come into our shop; but I think I can swear to him.

JOHN WHITEMAN . I am sexton of the parish of St.Bride's, and went last Thursday to search the prisoner at the bar; I found upon him eleven duplicates for shirts, and there was nothing in his apartment, but an old handkerchief and an old pair of small clothes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. He had no money about him, and had every appearance of distress, misery, and the greatest indigence.

RICHARD GILL . I am a warehouseman, and live in Bell's-buildings. Dr. Phillip lived in my house, as did the prisoner. In consequence of information which I received, I had the prisoner apprehended, and then the duplicates where found on him.

Cross-exaamined by Mr. Arabin. The prisoner has been in respectable circumstances, and I received the strongest recommendation, and a most excellent character with him.

GUILTY , aged 22.

confined three months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-152

151. CHRISTOPHER THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , two loaves, value 1s. 8d. the property of Thomas Weaver .

THOMAS WEAVER . I am a baker , and lost this bread last Friday. at half past two in the afternoon, in Watling-street ; I pitched my basket down in Aldermary-church-yard, to serve a customer.When I returned to my basket, I missed two loaves,and saw the prisoner running a short distance with them; I went after him, and brought him back, and he was taken before the sitting magistrate at Guildhall.

GEORGE JACKSON . I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-153

152. ROBERT BRODIE was indicted for that he, on the 10th of November , one piece of false and counterfeit money made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence. unlawfully and unjustly did utter to Mary Symonds , he well knowing the same to be false and

counterfeit; and that when he so uttered the same, he had about him, and in his possession, one other such piece of false and counterfeit money, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit .

JOHN SYMMONDS . I keep the Old King's Head, in Pudding-lane . On the 10th of November last, the prisoner at the bar came into my house, between eleven and twelve o'clock; he asked for change of sixpence; I gave it to him. He said I will have a glass of gin now, as you have been so good as to change me the sixpence; he gave me two-pence out of the halfpence, and went out. In a minute a man came in, and tendered a shilling, and I offered him this sixpence in change; he told me it was a bad one. I gave him another, and laid it on the counter I then went down to my coal-merchant, at his coal-wharf, and on my return, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner was in the shop, getting a glass of gin. She shewed me a sixpence he had tendered; I compared it with the one I had in my pocket, that he had given me before, and I perceived they were both bad. I then put them both into his hand, and collared him, and told him he was a smasher. A person named Loveday, who was in the tap-room, came to my assistance, and went for an officer, who on searching the prisoner, found eighty-five pieces of bad money about him, resembling sixpenny pieces.

MARY SYMMONDS . I am the daughter of the last witness. I remember the time my father speaks of. I shewed my father the sixpence the prisoner offered me.

JAMES LOVEDAY . I went for the constable, and saw the prisoner searched.

HENRY WOOD . I am street-keeper belonging to Christ Church Hospital, and the prisoner was delivered into my custody. I asked him if he had any money about him; he told me, no. Upon that, I told him it would save himself and me a great deal of trouble if he had any, to count it out on the table. He then counted out eight penny-pieces, and thirteen pence halfpenny. I then proceeded to search him, and found eighty-seven sixpenny-pieces on him. (Producing them.) They are in the same state in which I found them, with paper between them.

Mr. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I assist in the conducting of these prosecutions at the suit of the Mint. I look at the two sixpences tendered by the prisoner; they are each counterfeited. I now look at the eighty-seven; they are also counterfeited.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and bound over in sureties for his good behaviour for two years at the expiration thereof .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-154

153. THOMAS NOON was indicted for that he, on the 21st of November , one piece of false and counterfeit money made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, unlawfully and unjustly did utter to John Owen , he well knowing the same to be false and counterfeited; and that he, when he so uttered the said piece of false and counterfeit money, had about him, in his custody and possession, one like piece of counterfeit money, knowing that also to be so .

JOHN OWEN . I am shopman to Mr. Kennyon, hosier, upon Ludgate-hill . I know the prisoner at the bar; he came into my master's shop, at about seven o'clock in the evening of the 21st of November; he asked for a pair of worsted hose, the price of which was two shilings and sixpence; he tendered me payment in three single shillings; I looked at them, and they were all bad. I told my master to look at them, and he was of the same opinion. The prisoner then wanted them back, and put a three-shilling piece down. Mr. Kennyon asked him if he had any more of the same sort, and would not let him have them back. He said he had no more, and pulled some halfpence out. He swore that he had no more. Then Mr. Kennyon sent for a constable. The prisoner stood there. He was running away, when Mr. Kennyon took hold of the flap of his coat, and detained him. He then put his hand in his pocket, and pulled out a purse, which he threw behind the counter. I picked it up, and kept it until the officer came. Then he examined the purse. They had shocking hand work in keeping the prisoner down; he knocked Mr. Kennyon down, and he knocked the shopman down, and when the constable came, he knocked him down also. I escaped; I got behind.

ROBERT KENNYON . The account my shopman has given is not correct, with respect to my being knocked down. In other repects it is correct. I have the three shillings which he tendered in payment. (Producing them.) Here is also the purse, in which there two divisions, (producing it,) ine one of which there is good money, a dollar, a three-shilling piece, and a shilling, and in the other division there are four more bad shillings.

JOHN BOLLARD . I am a constable, and searched the prisoner, and found another bad shilling in his waistcoat pocket, together with about five shillings worth of halfpence.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I look first at the three shillings tendered by the prisoner; they are counterfeit, and merely washed. I now look at the four found in one of the divisions of the purse; they are of a similar species. I now look at the one found in his waistcoat pocket which is also of the same description.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and bound over to find sureties for his good behaviour for two years more, after the expiration thereof .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-155

154. CHARLES NEWMAN and JOHN MOORE were indicted for that they, on the 14th of November , at St. Andrew's Holborn , unlawfully and injuriously, did put and place themselves close to a certain person unknown, and that the said Charles Newman , did put one of his hand in and upon the pocket of a certain coat of the said person unknown, which he then and there had on, and wore, with a felonious intent, the goods and chattels in the said pocket then being, to steal, take, and carry away .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a City officer, and was in company with Vaughan, on the 14th of November last, in Holborn; I was following one Connelly, a notorious character, and at that time, the prisoners passed us, and Vaughan said, there goes two more. After they passed Hatton Garden , I observed Newman make up close behind a gentleman, the other covering him. I saw Newman put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, and I suspected that he had taken something out. Vaughan at that time crossed the road, and I feared they should see him. They went a little further close to the side of Elyplace, and there attempted the pocket of another gentleman. They both continued in company, and turned up Union-court, Holborn Hill, which leads to Field-lane, towards a noted receiving house; Vaughan and I followed them. Newman was just going in at the door, when I ran forward, and seized hold of him, and Vaughan seized hold of the other prisoner. Newman at the same moment, dropped a handkerchief, and on searching him, I found another, and a knife.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I don't know who this gentleman was, nor what was in his pocket.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I was with Barrett, on Holborn Hill, it was about six o'clock. I saw the two prisoners pressing a gentleman, and we followed them; just before they came to Hatton Garden, Newman went up to a gentleman, and put his hand into his pocket; the other was covering him. We apprehended them going into Mother Dyna's, in Fieldlane.

Mr. Adolphus, on the part of the prisoners, objected to the foundation of this indictment, and conceived that nothing could be made of it at all, because the indictment started, that they put and placed themselves close by a certain person unknown, and that one of them put his hand into the pocket of a coat, upon a person unknown, with intent the goods and chattels therein contained, to steal, take, and carry away. When, for ought any one knew to the contrary, there was nothing in the pocket at all.

In the second place, this was not done under any cognizence of the Police Act; for that only enabled the officers of Justice to apprehend such persons as they knew to be notorious characters, and to deal with them as vagrants only.

And, in the third place, no intent at all was alledged to the prisoner Moore.

Mr. Reynolds, contra, submitted, that the attempt to commit a felony was an offence, and that the quoanimo was the principal thing to be looked at. The prisoners were charged simply with an attempt to commit a robbery, and he conceived that from the mouths of his witnesses, he had fully established that entent.

Mr. Bolland, on the same side urged a similar answer, and the mischief that would arise from the admisubility of his Learned Friend on the other side's argument.

Mr. Adolphus, again contended, that there was no Overt Act, or Asportavit, that could constitute an indictable offence.

THE COURT, was of opinion, that the argument of the Learned Gentlemen who was concerned for the prisoners was invalid.

Mr. Adolphus, then addressed the jury, on the novelty of this spicies of the indictment, and assimulated it to an accusation against a man for an intent to commit

"Arson, in desects of Chabia," where there was no ignitable substance, because he had a lighted torch in his hand. Here the prisoners were charged with an attempt to pick the empty pocket of a coat, on an unknown person.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-156

155. PHILIP SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 11th of October , unlawfully, and deceitfully did utter to one Benjamin Spanner, a certain false and counterfeit token, made with intent to pass, as and for one of certain silver tokens, for the sum of three-shillings, therefore stampt, issued, and circulated. by the Governour and Company of the Bank of England, he well knowing the same to be counterfeit. And that he within the space of ten days then next, (to wit,)on the 12th of October, did utter to the said Benjamin Spanner , one other such false and counterfeit token, knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; by reason of which premises, he became and was a common utterer of such counterfeit tokens .

BENJAMIN SPANNER . I was employed by Mr. Westwood, the deputy solicitor of the Bank, to act under Dickens the officer, for the purpose of getting introduced to the prisoner at the bar. I was introduced to him on the 10th of October, and made an appointment to meet him the next morning at nine o'clock at the sign of the white Dog, Widegate-alley. I met him at the appointed time, and place, but he could not see the person whom he wanted to see. He should not be able to let me have any before the evening. We then went out together, to Barbican . Then he crossed the way, and desired me to walk slowly on; and in the course of five minutes, he overtook me, and said it was all right; he told me he had got one for a sample, and he gave me a counterfeit three-shilling piece, for which I gave him one and sixpence; I marked this one, and afterwards gave it to Dickens. (The counterfeit three-shilling piece put into the hands of the witness;) that is it. We were then to meet by his appointment, at the sign of the Baker and Basket, in Cloth Fair . That appointed meeting took place. When he came in, he told me all was right; he had seen the person whom he wished to see, and I could have them. He asked me then how many I wanted? and I told him fifteen shillings worth; and he told me that the person of whom he had them, would not serve him under a pounds worth. I told him I had no more money, and then he gave me ten counterfeit three-shillings pieces, which I marked and gave to Dickens, the officer, in about ten minutes after I received them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. What do you get by becoming an informer - A. Nothing that I know of.

Q. Do you get anything that you don't know of? do you do it for the good of your country - A. Yes; I was introduced to the prisoner by a person who

was a stranger to me, whose name in Jack; I believe Jack as they call him is in Court. I have been once here before upon a similar prosecution, and once at Clerkenwell. Jack is a stranger to me, but not to the prisoner.

JOHN DICKENS . I am an officer. On the 11th, I saw the prisoner and Spanner in company together at the Baker and Basket, in Cloth Fair. In the morning, I gave him nine shillings, to buy six counterfeit tokens of the prisoner. He brought me seven and sixpence, and one bad token, which he marked in my presence. (Token put into the hands of the witness.) That is the token; Spanner brought me ten on the 12th. I had searched him before he went into the prisoner's company and after he came back. I had given him fifteen shillings for the purpose of purchasing, and I saw him mark them. (Tokens put into the hands of the witness,) these are they.

MR. THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . I received on the 11th of October, a counterfeit three-shilling piece from the witness Dickons; and on the 12th, I received the ten also, and have had them in any possession ever since.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I am one of the tellers in the Bank of England. I look at the two three-shilling pieces produced; they are all counterfeit; they resemble those issued by the Bank of England.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and bound over to find surities for two years after the expiration thereof .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-157

156. SUSANNAH HODGKIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , one silver spoon, value 12s. one handkerchief, value 8d. and two towels, value ls. the property of John Mitchell , M D.

JOHN MITCHELL . The prisoner was my cook , and we discharged her at a moments warning, on Wednesday the 15th of November. There were three silver spoons brought back to our house, the evening that she left our service; I found that all these spoons were our property, and I am sure they were in our house during the prisoner's service to us. It was our man servant brought these spoons to Mrs. Mitchell, and at the same time be enquired about a table spoon, and upon search, we missed the table spoon mentioned in the indictment. The next day it was found at the pawnbrokers.

MARY KEDGELEY . I am a chair woman. I knew the prisoner during her service at Dr. Mitchell's. She left two bundles and a box at my house, the day she left her master. I was taken into custody on account of these bundles, as part of the contents was the property of Dr. Mitchell. When she left them with me, she said she would be back for them in half an hour. In one of the handkerchiefs, was the duplicate of the table spoon.

JOSEPH HART . I am a servant to Mr. Wells, Gate-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. That is next door to Dr. Mitchell's, in whose service I was lately, On the day the prisoner went away, two tea spoons, and a desert spoon were brought in from the servant next door, they were Dr. Mitchell's property; and the same evening, I enquired about a table spoon and that was missing. I have seen the spoon since, it has been pawned, and the duplicate for it was left by the prisoner in a bundle containing other things, at the house of the last witness.

JOHN BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker; I live at No.135, High Holborn. I produce a table spoon on which I advanced ten shillings, but I do not recolect to whom. It was pledged in the name of Mary Smith.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . I am a Bow-street officer, On Friday the 24th of November, I went Mrs. Kedgley's search. Mrs. Kedgley had a child of the prisoner's to nurse. I found the two towels they were claimed by Dr. Mitchell, and this blue handkerchief.

(Property sworn to.)

GUILTY . aged 30.

Confined one month and fined ls.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Commou Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-158

157. CHARLES SHARRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , thirty five glass hottles, value 12s. the property of Ann Jones widow , and others. And GEORGE WAINWRIGHT , for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods he well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM BENSON . I am cellar-man to the prosecutors, who are wine merchant s. The prisoner was our carman , and continued so until the 16th of November, on which day he took two dozen of wines to General Darling, in Crawford-street, and two dozen to Ravenshaw in Bullstrode-street. We do not charge for the bottles, but empty ones are brought back.

WILLIAM PARKER . In consequence of something which passed between me and the proseutors, I applied to Godfrey, the Bow-street officer, and he came to my house, on the 16th of November; and in the course of that morning, the prisoner brought a letter to me. I observed that there were two prickles in his cart. I followed the cart in company with Godfrey. The prisoner first went to Bullstrode-street . He there took one of the prickles out of the cart, and took it into the area. He then returned with a small hamper packed and corded, which he put into the cart. He then went into the house again, and brought out a prickle, which appeared to be completely empty. He then went to No.21, Crawford-street . He took the other prickle, which contained wine, from the cart. I looked down the area, and saw him looking at some empty bottles. He brought the prickle up full of empty bottles, and placed it in the cart; and then turned the cart round towards Holborn, and drove off; I was within thirty yards of him all the time; I never lost sight of the cart. When he got into Oxford-street, he crossed over into Charles street, Soho; that was not his nearest way, his nearest way was through Holborn. Then he drove into Greek-street, where there is an archway, which leads thence down Crown-street, into Phoenix-street. He stopped in Phoenix-street, and took the prickle which he had filled in Crawford-street, and carried it to the end of the street, and turned down into Stacey-street. I lost sight of him for a minute, and when I recovered it, he was gone into Wainwhight's shop. He keeps a bottle and rag shop.

WILLIAM GODFREY . A Bow-street officer, confirmed the account of the last witness.

ANN STAINCLIFFE . General Darling lodges at our house. I recollect two dozen of wine being delivered at our house for the General; his servant was out and I took it in; fifty-two empty bottles were returned.

JANE BUTLER . I lived in the house of the prisoner Wainwright; my mother lodged in the house, and I lodged in the house.

The prisoner Wainwright, received an excellent character from a great number of witnesses.

SHARRATT, GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

WAINWRIGHT, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151206-159

158. MICHAEL COLLET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a great coat, value 1l. a body coat, value 15s. a waistcoat, value 2s. a pair of small-clothes, value 5s. and a knife, value 1s. the property of Thomas Diaper , in the dwelling-house of Ann Diaper , widow .

THOMAS DIAPER . I lost my clothes in my room, at about one o'clock in the morning of the 1st of November. The prisoner lodged in my house. I went to bed, and fell asleep, at about nine o' clock. I was awakened by some one pulling a great coat off my bed; I said, "who's there?" nobody answered. I immediately rose up in my bed, and caught hold of the person's very hand. I called out to my aunt, who slept in the next room, to strike a light. She gave me a light, and I found it was the prisoner at the bar. Before the light came, I let go of his hand, and he went up stairs; in making his way up stairs, he dropped a coat, a waistcoat, and a pair of small-clothes, of mine, on the landing place. He made his way up to the loft, and there we found him, laying down behind the door; he had shut the door, and tied it with a piece of string. I had called in the assistance of John Daniel , who searched him, and found on him, a waistcoat and a shawl of my brother's, and a knife in his pocket.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-160

159. JOHN LEWIS KINGSNORTH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas West , in the King's highway, on the 2nd of December , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, forty-one ll. bank notes, his property .

THOMAS WEST . On the 2nd of this month, I was in company with the prisoner at Mr. Grainger's, the Peacock in the Minories, where I lodged. I had received forty-one new one-pound notes for my wages; I had them tied up in a song book, called the Berkshire Lady, I had them in my breeches pocket. I don't know whether the prisoner knew or not of my having them. He and I went down to the Crown in East Smithfield, and staid there until dusk, drinking. I had five old notes besides. Thence we went to the Hambro' Arms, on Tower-hill. I was not drunk; I was a little fresh, but knew what I was about; he drank gin and water with me there; then he said I must go home with him; he took me by the collar, and pulled me out of the house; we left some liquor behind us in the glasses. When we got on Tower-hill , he kept my hand tight, until we got to the lamps close to the gate of the Mint; then he made a kind of a stop, and I felt his hand go into my pocket, and take out the bundle of notes, by force, and he tore my trowsers. He ran away immediately; I ran after him; but could not catch him; he was out of my sight in a moment. Then I ran up and down the streets, thinking to fall in with him. I went to Mr. Grainger's to enquire after him; but could gain no information. I saw Mr. Forrester, the officer, in about three quarters of an hour afterwards, and I told him the sort of notes I had lost, and what they were tied up in.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a City officer. On the 2nd of December, I saw the prosecutor, between six and seven in the evening, and he said he was going to make away with himself; he was in a very dejected state. I asked him what was the matter, and he said, he had been robbed. I asked him if it was a woman who took his money, and he said no; it was a shipmate. He gave me a description of the person who had robbed him, and told me the notes were wrapped up in a ballad book. I met the prisoner coming back from Grainger's, in the Commercial-road; I asked him if his name was not Kingsnorth, and he said it was. I told him there was a very serious charge against him; he said, he knew all about it; it was about the money; he said he had it to take care of. When we got to Grainger's, I said, the best way would be to count it on the table, to relieve the man's mind. He then said, he had not got it. I asked him where it was. He said he had taken it up to his own brother's, in Islington. We went to his brother's-in-law; he asked us what was the matter; we told him his brother was in charge of two officers for the money. He then said he had got it, and he took out a handful of notes; I got them, and only three more; we counted them out in the Minories, there were twenty new notes for one-pound each. I took from the prisoner this watch. (Producing it,) which he would not tell how he came by.

DAVID FLEMMING . I sold that watch to the prisoner, for four pounds four shillings, with the seals and key he paid me seven pounds four shillings in new one-pound notes, and four shillings.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-161

160, CHARLES FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a watch, value 3l. the property of John Davis , in his dwelling-house .

MARY DAVIS . On Saturday, the 25th of November, I was cleaning my door down, and the

prisoner went down the lane. I live in Philip-lane ; he looked at me, and I looked at him, not supposing him to be a thief, I went into the yard for some water; I put the pail under the cock, and set it running, and I happened to look just then at the street door, and saw a man dressed as the prisoner was a minute or two before going out. In my hurry to take off my pattens, I took off one of my shoes; I went on, following the man, until he came to Whitecross-street, where he was taken; I lost sight of him. I got the watch afterwards from Mr. Flanders.

WILLIAM FLANDERS . I am a fishmonger, and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate. All I know is, that whilst I was standing at my shop, a boy was looking into one of the water tubs at my door, and whilst so doing, he repeated the words half past nine o'clock; in consequence of that, I went to the tub of water, and there I saw the watch at the bottom of it; I gave it to Mrs. Davis, who said it was her's.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-162

161. JOHN SMITH and JOHN WARD were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , five pounds weight of beef, value 2s. the property of Thomas Spargin .

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. I was going down the Minories, on the 1st of December, and saw both the prisoners in company; I saw them go up to Spargin's the butcher 's shop, and the lad took the piece of beef in question off the stall, and put it under his jacket. I took them into custody.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

WARD, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-163

162. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Coulter Mitchael , at about the hour of five in the afternoon, and stealing therein, four pieces of shawl cloth, value 9l. his property .

THOMAS OLIVER . On Thursday evening, the 2nd of November , I saw the prisoner coming out of the house, with some goods; I looked at him; but did not know him. I asked the warehouseman if he had given any goods out; I went into the warehouse, and asked him; he said no. I followed the man up the Old Change; I crossed Cheapside, into Foster-lane, and cried out stop thief! a person stopped him at the corner of Horse-shoe-passage, and brought him back to the house again; I saw him with some goods. He caught him with the goods upon him. I am sure he is the man.

JURY. Did you look at his face, when you saw him in the passage?

Witness. Yes, and know it was the prisoner.

JOHN WILLIAM GRAFFAN . I am a news-man. I was going down Forster-lane, on the evening of the 2nd of November, and I heard a cry of stop thief! at first, I thought it was some boys playing, I turned myself round, and the prisoner passed me, with some goods on his arm, running; I stepped after him, and took hold of his collar; as soon as I laid hold of him, he dropped the goods. I held him until Oliver came up.

THOMAS POTTS . I am warehouse-man to the prosecutor.

Q. How did the prisoner get in - A. He got in without any force; the door of the warehouse in which the goods were was locked, and the key in the lock; that is an inner door.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-164

163. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a boy's jacket and trowsers, value 2l. the property of William Tingell .

JOHN WIGMORE . I am foreman to Mr. Tingell. On the 9th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, I was going out of the shop, and I saw the prisoner walking away with a dress under his arm; I immediately stopped him, and enquired what he had got. I knew it to be Mr. Tingell's property.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-165

164. FREDERICK PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one pound eight ounces of wool, value 5s. the property of John Cooper .

CHARLES GROVES . I saw the prisoner at about half past two on the 25th of November, take this wool out of a bag in the warehouse, and put it into his hat, and the remainder under the tar-paulin, with which he covers his bags to keep them from getting wet.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined fourteen days ; and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-166

165. ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , two rings, value 6s. the property of John Stevens .

MARY STEVENS . The prisoner was a lodger of ours, and in cleaning the place on the day stated in the indictment, I was obliged to take off my rings, and to put them down on the table. The prisoner went out, and after that, I missed the rings. On her return, I asked her about them; but she denied all knowledge of them.

WILLIAM READ . I found the duplicates in the prisoner's room.

JOHN FLOWER . I am shopman to Mr. Guest pawnbroker. I produce a ring, which the prisoner pawned for three shillings.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151206-167

166. HIGHAM PHILIPS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jewell , about the hour of eight in the night of the 26th of November , and burglariously stealing therein, forty-four yards of kerseymere, value 20l. and twenty-six yards of brown cloth, value 24l. his property .

JOHN JEWELL . I quitted my house, leaving it perfectly secure, at about a quarter before seven, on the evening of the 26th of November. On the my return, I found my door open, and my stock in trade gone to the amount of seventy-eight or eighty pounds.

THOMAS VANN . I and another officer, were in company together, on Sunday, at about nine o'clock in the morning; a coach drove up to the prisoner's door, and his door opened; we saw a large green bag full of something thrown into the coach, and the prisoner got in after it. The coach drove away, and we followed it, and stopped it; upon opening the bag, we found pieces of kerseymere, and broad cloth. We asked him where he got them; he said, he was going to take them to Portsmouth, with jewellery goods. He told us when he got to the watchhouse, that he had bought the goods in the City, and could shew us bills of parcels; we let him go. He promissed to appear before the magistrate the next day; but he never came: nor did I see him afterwards until he was taken into custody,

THOMAS LOCKE . Corroborated the statement of the last witness.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, and shall prove I was at my house at the time the robbery was committed.

RALPH LAZARUS . I am brother-in-law to the prisoner at the bar. On Sunday, the 26th of November, I was in company with the prisoner, at his own house, in Playhouse-yard. We played at wist from six o'clock until ten o'clock.

Several other witnesses who were at the prisoner's house corroborated the statement of the last witness.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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