Old Bailey Proceedings, 25th October 1815.
Reference Number: 18151025
Reference Number: f18151025-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 25th of OCTOBER, 1815, and following days,

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) BY R. BUTTERS, 22, FETTER LANE, FLEET STREET.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; The Right Honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Mr. Baron Graham , one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart; Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; George Scholey , esq. John Ansley , esq. George Bridges , esq. John Atkins , esq. Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Blofield ,

Thomas Broxap ,

Thomas Cooke ,

James Bell ,

George Simmonds ,

William Wallace ,

Richard Hayward ,

John Modler ,

James Tane ,

William Hood ,

Samuel Hennell ,

Leonard Eden .

First Middlesex Jury.

Jeremiah Geeves ,

John Richley ,

Henry Williams ,

Edward Boucher ,

David Edwards ,

Cornelius George ,

Rowland Ryley ,

William Linset ,

Job Day ,

John Frederick Garling ,

John M'Bride ,

Robert Call .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Kent ,

John Willings ,

John Wright ,

Robert Hornsey ,

John Daniel ,

William Blankley ,

Joseph Garnet ,

Thomas Davis ,

Thomas Mantel ,

Matthew Haines ,

John Briggs ,

John Game .

Reference Number: t18151025-1

980. PATRICK CREAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , ninety feet of cedar wood, value 20 l. the property of Robert Higgins , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT HIGGINS . Q. When did you lose this cedar wood - A. I am not sure it was cedar wood.

Q. Is there any one here who knows that it was cedar wood - A. No.

COURT. You have indicted him for stealing cedar wood, and nobody knows that it was cedar wood. You might as well have indicted him for a horse.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-2

981. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Kenton , about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 7th of October , no person in the same house then being, and stealing therein, a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. and a towel, value 6 d. the property of the said William Kenton .

WILLIAM KENTON . On the morning of the 2nd of October, I left my cottage to go to work, at about a quarter after six.

Q. Where is your cottage - A. In the parish of Paddington .

Q. Is there only one door to it - A. That is all.

Q. Was that door shut, and were the windows down - A. The door was shut; there are no shutters to the windows; but they were shut.

Q. Who lived in your cottage besides yourself - A. Only my wife; she was out to nurse a lady at Bayswater, and had been so for a fortnight before the robbery.

Q. Then you left nobody in the house - A. Nobody.

Q. What time did you return - A. At about a quarter after eight; I found my door upon a jar, a little way open; I pushed it with my hand, and opened it; the prisoner looked me very hard in the face.

Q. What! was he in the house - A. In the house at the time. I said, you villain, what business have you here? what could you expect to find in a poor man's cottage like this? he said, he was searching for money and victuals. He had tied up in a clean white napkin, a coat, waistcoat, and breeches, of mine; they were tied up on the bed. He laid hold of me to try to get out at the door; we struggled together a good deal, and he said, I was not going to lock him in there. My coat, waistcoat, and breeches, were not tied up on the bed when I went out. I ran to call somebody; he got right through the roof of the cottage, and ran down Black Lion-lane; I ran after him, and caught him.

Q. What did he then say - A. He said, he did it through distress. I brought him back to the side of the house. I then got a person to go in, and see what damage was done, and then I got another person to go in, and we took him to the watchhouse, and after that to Marlborough-street. I have one thing to say in his favour, he offered me no violence. I found that the drawers in my house had been rummaged.

JOHN KELLY . At about a quarter before nine in the morning of the 2nd of October, I was by the turnpike gate, at the end of Black Lion-lane; I saw Kenton with the prisoner at the bar; he hallooed out, Kelly, and told me, that man had broken into his house; and then he gave him in charge to me.

Q. What did the prisoner say - A. I asked him what he did it for? he said, he was in expectation of finding money there, as he thought, it was the foreman of the field's cottage I led him to the Crown at Bayswater, and there searched him; but found nothing on him. I then took him to the watchhouse, where I left him, and came back to the cottage. I found that the staple of the bolt was wrenched off.

Q. To Kenton. Did you find the staple broken - A. Yes.

Q. To Kelly. What did you then find - A. I found this bundle of clothes tied up on the bed; they were tied in a towel; there are a pair of small-clothes, a body coat, and a waistcoat.

Q. To Kenton. What is the value of the body coat - A. Why, it may be ten shillings.

Q. What is the value of the waistcoat - A. Five shillings.

Q. And the breeches - A. Five shillings.

Q. You have no doubt at all that they are all together worth five shillings - A. No doubt at all.

Q. To Kelly. Was the prisoner present when you found this bundle - A. No.

Q. Had you ever any further conversation with him - A. Yes. He said, he tied up these things, and expected something better than what he found.

William Kenton . I can tell you more my lord. There was a box where I had some money in, and part of the lock was wrenched off.

Q. Nothing taken out - A. No; but it was moved from another place to the bed; and he said, he had moved it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

[Recommended to mercy on account of his apparent distress, by the jury; and by the prosecutor, on account of his having offered no violence on his person.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-3

982. CHARLES LINTON and ANN FARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , one pocket-book, value 1 s. and four 1 l. Bank of England notes, the property of William Walton , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WALTON . I keep a cook's shop , at

59, High-street, St. Giles's ; that shop is in my dwelling-house. The prisoners at the bar came into my shop at about eleven o'clock on the night of the 29th of September, for two plates of beef for supper. I had shut up my shop; but on their knocking, I let them in; I was just going to put a note for which I had given change into my pocketbook. I let them in. There were four one-pound notes in my pocket-book. The watchman came in for a light just then; and the two prisoners came in whilst he was there; he went out on his duty. I then served them with what they wanted.

Q. Where was the pocket-book - A. In the till. There were four notes in it; and the one I was going to put in, was in the till. When I had given them the beef, they wanted some pickles. I went down to the cellar, and I heard a foot go from the place where the prisoners sat over to where the till was; and I returned directly; I immediately suspected; I returned directly, with only a few pickles; I was not gone above half a minute. He asked me was my stock of pickles almost out; I told him, no, but my time was almost out. I went to the till, and found my pocket-book gone. The prisoner wanted to go out to make water; he said, he could not get out without my assistance; I opened the door for him. No one can get either in or out without my help. Then being in fear, I went to look for the pocket-book in the till.

Q. Then you did not look for the pocket-book until the prisoner was gone out - A. No. He then knocked at the door, and I let him in again, and he finished his supper. I did not say any thing, nor make it known that I had lost any thing, at that time. I left the door open for a minute, and ran to the watch-box at the corner; I told the watchman I had been robbed, and he came back after me; he did not say any thing to the prisoners then; but he saw the patrole passing by the door, and called him. They then paid for their supper, and wanted to go; I said, they would not go yet, for I had been robbed since they were in the place, and it must be they who had done it. I told the watchman to search in the street, to see if they had thrown down a pocket-book, while we were away; but nothing could be found. We then took them to the watchhouse; they were searched there, but nothing found on them. When we came back again, I said to the watchman and the patrole, I wish you would assist me to look. We must have a good look, and I dare say we shall find it some where about. We then searched all along St. Giles's Church railings, and Little Denmark-street, and through Dudley-court, and then came back into High-street, out of Dudley-court; they shewed a light with the lanthorn into all the corners. Just there, there is a spout comes down by a doctor's shop; and there, by their shewing me a light, I spied the old pocket-book stuck behind the spout; the doctor's shop is two doors from my house, and Roberts's, the tobacconists, is next door. We took the pocket-book down to the watchhouse, and then brought it home again; the notes were in it, and three of them had my name on the back. When we came back to the shop, the woman was sitting where we left her; she was there when I heard a foot go towards the till; so it was between them.

DANIEL HOGAN . I am a watchman, and was on duty at the end of the street. On the 29th of September last, I went to get a light at the shop of the prosecutor; and while I was there, the prisoners came in. I then went to my box; and I had not been there ten minutes, when the prosecutor came, and said, Hogan, Hogan, I am robbed; he said he believed he was robbed of five pounds. He went into the shop, and I followed him. The prosecutor whispered across the counter into my ear, and told me to look about the door, to see if they had thrown it into the street. I could not find it; and as the patrole was coming by, I called him to assist us. We went into the house, and took the prisoners into custody. They were searched at the watchhouse, but nothing found upon them. Coming back from the watchhouse, the prosecutor, Mr. Walton said, we will have a general search, with your assistance.

Q. Then you assisted in that search, when the pocket-book was found - A. I did.

Prisoner Linton, Q. He said he searched us in the cook's shop, and he pulled the young woman's shoe off.

COURT Q. To Hogan. Were the prisoners searched in the house - A. No, they were not; the woman pulled off her shoes, and the man offered himself for that purpose, but we did not lay a hand on either of them.

GEORGE VESSEY . I am a patrole. I assisted in taking the two prisoners to the watchhouse. They offered themselves to be searched in the shop; but they were not; they were searched at the watch-house, and nothing found upon them, except some duplicates and halfpence.

Q. Did you on your return assist in that search in which the pocket-book was found; and did you see it found - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the pocket-book examined when it was found - A. Yes; they were four one pound Bank notes. We took them to the watchhouse, and after that gave them to him; and he gave them back to me next day at Marlborough street; and I gave them to Samuel Roberts .

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am the constable of the night. The two prisoners were delivered into my charge, on the night of the 29th of September. I saw the pocketbook and notes that night; and the next morning, at Marlborough street, Mr. Baker the magistrate ordered them to be given to my care. Here they are, (producing them.) I received them from the last witness; they have never been out of my possession since.

Prosecutor. That is my property.

Prisoner Charles Linton put in a written defence, stating, that he was searched in the shop when he was first suspected, as well as the woman; and declared his innocence of the fact, as well as his ignorance of the means by which the pocket-book came behind the spout.

LINTON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

FARRIS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-4

983. ELIZABETH SIBLEY was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 27th of September , a three-shilling bank token, and one shilling , the property of Barrington Pope Blackford , esq. M. P .

BARRINGTON POPE BLACKFORD, ESQ. I live in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square . When I dress myself of a morning, I am in the habit of leaving such loose silver, as I may have in my pockets, on my dressing-table. I had very frequently missed some of it. I marked some on the 25th; I also marked some on the 26th, and 27th; some of them had such accidental marks on them, as I might know again; and the others I marked. On the morning of the 25th, I missed a three-shilling piece; on the morning of the 26th, I missed two shillings; and on the morning of the 27th, I missed another three-shilling piece. The officer, Foy, arrived on the Wednesday morning, after I had sent for him two or three days before; I mentioned to him generally the circumstances of the robbery, and told him to proceed in his own manner, in order to discover it. He first called up John Eames , my groom; he was asked whether he had any silver about him; he said he had one shilling, which he immediately produced; and which I immediately knew to be one of those I had marked, and left on the morning of the 26th. We asked him where he got it; he said, he had received two shillings of Ann Branch , the house-maid; one of which she owed him, and the other was to get some sugar. We then called up Ann Branch , the house-maid, and asked her whether she had given Eames any money that morning; she said, she had given him two shillings. We asked her where she got them; she said, from Mrs. Sibley. On asking who Mrs. Sibley was, she confessed after some hesitation, that Mrs. Sibley was a person whom she had brought into my house unknown to me, and who had been living there for some time. She further said, that she had received a three-shilling token from Mrs. Sibley the same morning. We sent down for Mrs. Sibley, and she came up. She acknowledged she had given five shillings that morning to Ann Branch ; but declared most solemnly that she had received them from her husband. She was then examined before the magistrate; after that, her box was examined; there was some silver in it; I looked carefully over the whole, but none of it was marked.

Cross-examined. There was a loose three-shilling piece lying outside of the box not marked. She admitted she had lent Ann Branch five shillings that morning.

JOHN EAMES . I received two shillings from Ann Branch on the morning of the 27th; one of which I laid out in sugar, and the other I gave up to Mr. Foy.

ANN BRANCH . The prisoner Mrs. Sibley had been in my master's house better than a month, without his knowledge. I had Mr. Blackford's butler's leave for letting her be there; she was just then out of place, and had been a gentleman's house-keeper. I gave two shillings to the groom on the morning of the 27th; they were part of five shillings which I borrowed of Mrs. Sibley. The three-shilling piece I understand was also marked. I had no other money when I received this of Mrs. Sibley.

Cross-examined. I swear that I had no other money when I received this from Mrs. Sibley. I do my master's room every morning; so that if he left his money on his table, I had an opportunity of taking it. The prisoner said she was just in that room that morning, but never touched the money. The dressing-room is left open in the course of the day. The three shilling piece was found in a drawer where I said I had put it.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I got a shilling from the groom; which he told me he had got from Ann Branch . I also found a three-shilling piece in a drawer, which Branch told me was lent her by the prisoner. The prisoner said, she had received the money from her husband the week before. Here is the money.

Mr. Blackford. That is my money; I know the mark on the shilling; the mark on the three-shilling piece is a notch opposite the letter T in the word Gratia.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I have lived the whole of my life in families of the highest respectability and distinction, and never was suspected of any thing dishonest. I never had occasion to commit such an act. The money which I lent Ann Branch was never Mr. Blackford's property; and I trust the character I have borne through life, will releave me from such a charge.

Several witnesses of the highest respectability, with whom the prisoner had lived as house-keeper, gave her a most excellent character; and declared as their belief, that it was impossible she could be guilty.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18151025-5

984. RICHARD MORGEE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Davis , in the day time, on the 14th of October , no person in the same house then being, and stealing therein, one silver milk-pot, value 20 s. the property of Michael Davis .

JONATHAN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in East Smithfield. On the 14th of October, the prisoner came to pawn a silver milk-pot with me; his answers not being satisfactory, I gave him in charge of an officer. I gave the pot to the magistrate, to advertise for the owner.

(Property produced.)

MICHAEL DAVIS . That is my property; I know it by the three letters, M. R. M. which stand for Michael and Rebecca Mitchell. I missed it on the 14th of October, which was Saturday; and on Monday, the 16th, I learned that a man was in custody for stealing a milk-pot; and on making enquiries, I found it to be mine.

GUILTY , aged 38,

Of stealing only.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-6

985. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for making an assault upon William Bickford , on the 2nd of

Octobe r, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, twenty 1 l. bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM BICKFORD . I am a sailor . On the 2nd of this month, I went into the Turk's Head, St. Giles's , to get a glass of gin; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the morning. I had twenty one-pound notes in a glove; I got them at Greenwich; they were what I sold my pension for, to take me home. In shaking out a shilling to pay for the gin, the notes fell from the glove, which a woman observed, and went into the tap-room, as I thought, to tell the prisoner and the other men. I picked my notes up, and put them securely into my pocket; I pinned the glove in my pocket. Immediately the men came out of the tap-room to me; one man asked me for a pipe of tobacco. I went into the street, and they shoved me in again, and shut the door; then a man of the name of Gooding asked me for a pipe of tobacco; I gave him two farthings. He said, he did not want any; but putting his hand on my pocket where my money was, and said, this is some of the tobacco that I want, There were nine men standing round me at this time, and the prisoner was one. They were all pushing me about; I knew directly what they wanted, and called to the landlord for help; but he turned himself away, and said, he would not get himself hurt among so great a sight of people. The prisoner had hold of my right arm; I kept singing out to the landlord all the time. This Gooding tore my money out of my pocket in the glove, and jumped out into the street, and ran away. The prisoner had hold of my right arm where he did this; but immediately afterwards let go, and quitted me. I immediately ran after Gooding, and followed him half an hour, and then lost him. I met a gentleman in the street, who took me down to Bow-street, got a warrant for me, and we came back to the house; when I came into the room, the prisoner dodged his head down immediately, and made believe he was drunk. The constable held his head up, and I knew him to be the man that held my right arm. The prisoner was taken down to Bow-street; he was searched; but nothing belonging to me was found on him. I appeared the next day at Bow-street. I have never seen my glove or my money since.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer. On Sunday morning, the 1st of October, between eight and nine o'clock, the prosecutor and a parish officer came to me, and told me what had happened. I went with them, and enquired of the landlord, who were the people that robbed the man; he said, that he knew nothing about the people; they had followed the black man in. I then searched his house. I went into the tap-room: the prisoner's face was towards the tap-room door, and he was talking to the company when I opened it; the prosecutor was close behind me. The moment he saw the prosecutor; he shut his eyes, pulled down his hat over his face, ducked his head, and made believe to be drunk, and fell off the settle. I immediately lifted up his head, and the prosecutor swore he was the man who held his right arm in the robbery. He did not deny being in the scuffle; but said he was not the man that robbed him.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am an officer. The prosecutor came down to Bow-street office between eight and nine on the Sunday morning; I went with him and the gentleman who was with him, to the Turk's Head, where he said, he had been robbed. I called the landlord into the parlour, and asked him if he knew who robbed this poor man; he said, he saw the scuffle, and was afraid to go amongst them, but did not know who it was in particular; and that he had enough to do to mind his customers. I then went and fetched Godfrey, who lives closely; and when he came, we went into the tap-room; as soon as we went in, the prisoner held his head down, and appeared to be very much in liquor. Godfrey held his head up, and the prosecutor said that he was the man who held his right arm while the robbery was committed.

Prisoner's Defence. The landlord knows that I was not in the house at the time of the robbery. The landlord is here.

JAMES BARRETT . I know the prisoner at the bar. He was in my house on the morning of the robbery from seven o'clock until Godfrey took him out: he never left.

Prisoner. But I was not where the robbery was committed.

Witness. The place where the robbery was committed was a large passage in the front of the bar. I did not see the prisoner at the time of the robbery; but he might have been there without my seeing him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-7

986. MICHAEL REILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , one piece of printed cotton, value 40 s. the property of James Shew , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES SHEW . I am an upholsterer . The prisoner was my porter . On the 2nd of October, nine pieces of calico or printed cotton were brought to my house by my orders. The following morning, the prisoner did not come to open the shop as usual, and I was obliged to open it myself, between seven and eight o'clock. At breakfast, a woman came and told me Michael Reilly was in the watchhouse, and wished to see me I went to the watchhouse, and asked him what brought him there; and then I learned that he had been stopped at the pawnbroker's with my cotton; and then, on examining, I missed one piece.

JAMES HEARN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 3rd of October, the prisoner attempted to pawn this piece of cotton; he wanted twenty-five shillings on it. By the account he gave of it, I thought he could not have come honestly by it; I told him, I would send my boy with him to know where he got it. I told my boy to tell the watchman to take him into custody, and take him to the watchhouse immediately. It may be worth about two shillings a yard, and I don't think it is worth forty shillings; though I dare say it cost more.

Prosecutor. That is my calico; it cost me four shillings and sixpence a yard; but perhaps it is not worth so much; great houses charge high for fashion. I had rather say it is not quite worth forty shillings.

GUILTY , aged 24,

Of stealing to the amount of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18151025-8

987. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , one pair of sheets, value 8 s. and one pillow-case, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Hart , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS HART . I keep the Hampshire Hog, in the Strand . I let lodgings in that house; I let a room to the prisoner, on the night of the 7th of October. The things stolen were let to him. In the morning, the sheets and the pillow case were missing. Just after the prisoner was gone, my servant brought him back; and I saw the sheets taken from his person; one was folded down his back, and the other down his stomach.

(Property produced, and sworn to)

JOHN DONALDSON . The prisoner had taken his coat off for a pillow in the watchhouse; and in the pocket of it, I found the pillow-case

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-9

988. LAWRENCE DUREY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of a certain person unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM BARRATT . On the 3rd of October, I was in Piccadilly . I saw the prisoner at the bar, in company with another thief; they were following two gentlemen; it was about two o'clock in the day. The prisoner attempted one of the gentleman's pockets; but did not succeed; they followed them on, and then the prisoner pulled the handkerchief a little way out of his pocket; then he made a snatch at it, and stuffed it up between the waisthand of his breeches and his apron. I immediately seized the prisoner, and told the gentleman he was robbed. Here is the handkerchief. The gentleman gave me his card, and said he would attend at Bow-street; I went to his house, which was in Piccadilly, and learned he was an officer in the Army, and was obliged to join his regiment.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-10

989. DAVID CRUIKSHANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , one pair of top-boots, value 1 l. the property of Samuel Smith .

ELIZABETH SMITH . My husband is a shoe-maker , and lives in Soho . These boots were hanging at the door. On the 10th of October, a man came in for a pair of strings; when I cut them for him, he threw down two-pence, and went out. I observed while I was cutting them, he tried to stand between me and the door, that I could not see it. As he went out, I perceived the boots were snatched by somebody, but not by that man. I told my husband, and he ran out, and soon returned with the boots.

THOMAS MILES . I live next door to the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner standing at his door; I saw him cut the boots down, and ran off with them. I stopped him, and in the scuffle he broke a window. Mr. Smith then came up, and took him, and got the boots; and then he got away from Mr. Smith; but afterwards was taken; I am sure of his person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 11,

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18151025-11

990. JOHN MARKS and PETER NOAKES were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , three hats, value 1 l. the property of William Ayres .

MICHAEL CANNON . I am shopman to Mr. Ayres, hatter , Holborn-bridge . On the 21st of September, a quarter before six in the evening, I missed three hats from the door; I immediately went over to an old woman sitting opposite, and received a description of two men from her. I then went to Mr. Lee, an officer, in Field-lane, and almost immediately afterwards, we found Marks disposing of one of the hats in Mrs. Cottorell's shop; we took him into custody; he answered the description of one of the men, given me by the woman. In a short time afterwards, I and Lee went into the Thatched House, and found the prisoner Noakes, with another of the hats on his head.

DAVID DAVIDSON . I am a salesman, and live at the corner of Lower West-street, West Smithfield. On the day mentioned in the indictment, a person very much like John Marks , came into my shop, and asked me six shillings for this hat; I offered him five; and he went away, and after having tried several other shops, he came back to me. I can't swear to his person; but I am almost sure it was the prisoner Marks.

WILLIAM LEE. I am an officer. Cannon gave me some information. I found the prisoner Marks, in Mrs. Cotterell's shop, trying to sell this hat; I instantly seized him, and gave him into the charge of a brother officer, named Corby. I then went into the Thatched House, in company with Cannon; and there I found Noakes, with this hat on his head.

(Hat sworn to by Cannon.)

Marks's Defence. I honestly bought the hat; and as I went along Field-lane, these gentlemen shoved me into the woman's shop, and said I wanted to sell it there.

Noakes's Defence. I had just got my week's wages, and bought this hat with the money I worked hard for.

MARKS, GUILTY , aged 36.

NOAKES, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-12

991. WILLIAM EATLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Edward Thomas Platt , from his person .

EDWARD THOMAS PLATT . I was walking along Leadenhall street , on the 5th of October, at about noon. I turned round, and found the prisoner at the bar, in the custody of an officer as I suppose, with my handkerchief in the prisoners hand. I did not feel it go from my pocket.

JOHN RAIN . On the 5th of October, I was going along Leadenhall street, and observed the prisoner walking very close to the prosecutor. At last I saw him draw the handkerchief out of his pocket. I ran across the way, and secured him. I told the gentleman, and then took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-13

992. JOHN KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 13 s. the property of John Waller .

MATTHEW HARRISON . I am shopman to John Waller , he is a linen draper , and resides at 13, Aldgate High street, Whitechapel . On the evening of the 23rd of September, a person passing by, told me a boy had stolen a piece of printed cotton from the door. I immediately ran out and caught the prisoner with the printed cotton under his coat; we brought him into the shop and there was a mob wanted to rescue him and get him out. At last John Ray the constable came and secured him.

JOHN RAY . I was sent for to the prosecutor's house, and when I came there, there was a great mob round the door. Some of them were saying,

"go it, go it, we will have him out." I went into the shop, and took the prisoner into custody, and going along with him to the watchhouse, I got most violently abused. Here is the cotton.

Matthew Harrison. That is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-14

993. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, sixteen yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of John Gunn .

JEREMIAH WINDUS . I was going towards Mr. Gunn's, and saw the prisoner take a piece of printed cotton from his door. I told the baker of it, and told him to stop him. It was between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day time; the baker held him, until I called Mr. Gunn.

JOHN GUNN . I am a linen draper , in Bishopsgate street Without . I was called to the door, by the last witness, and found the prisoner with my cotton, in the custody of a baker.

JAMES ALLEN . I am the baker who held the prisoner. He tried to get away from me.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one month and whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-15

994. ROBERT BROWN was indicted for embezzleing money .

JOHN WICKEN . I live at Sheerness, and keep a cookshop there. The prosecutors, Messrs. Oxley , Green , and Company, are vinegar and mustard manufacturers in London. I had an account with them. and the prisoner was their rider . On the 26th of April last, eight pounds seventeen shillings was due. The prisoner called for it, and I paid him the eight pounds, and he allowed me the seventeen shillings discount. He gave me a memorandum as an acknowledgment.

MR. THOMAS GREEN . I am a partner in the house of Oxley and Co. The prisoner is a rider for our house. When he sets out upon a journey, it is the constant practice for him to take a little book, with the names of the persons upon whom he is to call in the course of his journey, each upon a page; and the sums due by each of those persons written there-under; then on his return, he gives that book to us, with the sums received upon each of those accounts entered in the several pages. He rendered this book to us on the 6th of May, after the journey in which he ought to have called upon Mr. Wicken. (Book put into the hands of the witness.)

Q. Is that the book which the prisoner rendered to you - A. It is.

Q. Turn to Mr. Wicken's page and see what entry there is there - A. Mr. Wicken is charged eight pounds seventeen shillings, and under that is the prisoner's hand writing, in the words

"next journey;" signifying that it was to be paid the next journey. The next journey, we sent another traveller and by that means discovered this fraud. The words

"next journey," are in the prisoner's hand writing. We never have received this money upon Mr. Wicken's account.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-16

995. JAMES CASEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Milbourne in the King's Highway, on the 19th of September , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. his property .

EDWARD MILBOURNE . On the 19th of September, the prisoner knocked me down, and took my watch out of my pocket. It was a little before seven in the evening; it was light, so that I could observe him.

Q. What did you do - A. I cried stop thief.

Q. Was he stopped upon that cry - A. Yes.

Q. How did he knock you down - A. With a violent blow on the head with his fist.

Q. You did not pursue him yourself - A. No, he got away too soon; he was brought back to me when he was stopped. He had walked behind me from Aldgate pump, all the way, before he knocked me down.

Q. Did you feel your watch go from you - A. Yes, as I was falling.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a copper plate engraver. On the 19th of September, at about ten minutes before seven in the evening; I was standing at my own door, and heard a cry of stop thief; and saw a crowd

of people run round the corner of Osborne street; they were running after somebody, but I am not sure that person was the prisoner. I saw something in the kennel shining; I was going to pick it up, when a man picked it up. I took him by the collar, and asked him what he was going to do with it; he immediately put it into my hand without saying a word, and ran off. It was the prosecutor's watch.

JOHN SMITH . I am a patrole of the parish of St. Mary's, Whitechapel. I remember hearing a cry of stop thief and saw the people running after the prisoner at the bar. I am sure it was the prisoner at the bar, I knew him well before. I caught hold of him; he struggled and got away from me; I run a few yards again, and took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home at night, and saw a row, the people run, and I run too, and was taken before the magistrate without knowing anything at all about this. The prosecutor's wife was walking arm and arm with the prosecutor, and she said, that I never interfered with the man at all.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-17

996. JOHN LANE was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Daly , in the King's Highway, on the 1st of October , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 10 s. his property .

JOHN DALY . On the night of Sunday the 1st of October, the prisoner passed me in Wellclose square , and whipped my hat off my head, and ran off. I cried stop thief; and ran after him with the rest.

JOHN LILLE . I am a waterman and lighterman. On the 1st of this month, I heard a cry of stop thief! and saw the prisoner running. He got up under the pillars in Wellclose square. I followed him up there, and the people run by him and me. I told him he had stolen the hat which I saw in his hand. He made use of shocking had language, and I collared him; we struggled together, and he made use of horrid imprecations, what he would do to me, if I did not let him go. He swore he would cut my b - y guts out; and I don't know what he would not do. He struck at me, and I hit him very hard in the eye, and knocked him down. I then got on him, and kept him down. Nobody would come to help me, though there were plenty standing about, because he was such a desperate villian. A young man I knew came up to me, and said Lillie, let him go, he is an, out, and outer. I had not lived so long near Tower Hill, without knowing pretty well what that means. It means, one of the very worst description of thieves. I then let him up, for I was frightened. When I got up myself, I found my seal was gone, and a double breasted waistcoat which I had on, cut through and through. He then took off his coat, and put himself in an attitude for boxing; and said, come on you b - y b - r. He squared backwards, until he came to the corner, and then he right about face, and was off in an instant.

JOHN BOYD . I saw the last witness with the prisoner down, by the pillars in Wellclose square.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I knew the prisoner well; I received a description of Lille; he told me he knew he had a black eye, for he hit him hard.

John Lille . When I went back to the pillars, I found the hat there.

The prisoner put in a written defence, in no way exculpating himself from the robbery, but making several charges, against the witness John Lille .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-18

997. WILLIAM LINCOE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Page , in the King's Highway, for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a silk handkerchief value 5 s. his property ,

THOMAS PAGE . I live at Hoxton. I was going along Old-street-road , at about ten o'clock, on the night of the robbery; I was in company with two females relations of mine; they had hold of my arms. The prisoner and another man, run with such violence against me and the females to separate me from the females; and at that instant I missed my handkerchief. I seized the prisoner before he got three yards from me. I could not judge which of the two men took the handkerchief; it was taken from my right hand coat pocket, and the coat was torn completely down. The prisoner was taken to the watch-house, and there searched, but the handkerchief was not found upon him.

ELIZABETH PAGE . I was with my husband when this robbery was committed. The men rushed and parted him away from us. There was nobody in the street near at the time. The handkerchief has never been found since.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he knew nothing of the robbery, but that he was only in company with another young man running along, and run by accident against the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Of stealing from the person, but not violently.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Graham.

Reference Number: t18151025-19

998. MARY STARKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , one coat, value 1 l. one waistcoat, value 15 s. and one pair of of breeches, value 15 s. the property of George Williams , in his dwelling house .

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I was robbed of a suit of clothes, out of my front room, which is in Mark's place, Hoxton . I saw them at five in the evening of the 11th of September, and found them in pawn at the corner of Tabernacle Walk, at Mr. Walker's, I don't know who took them.

JOHN TINNER . I am shopman to Mr. Walker, who is a pawnbroker. On the 12th of September, the prisoner pledged a suit of clothes at my master's shop; she pledged them for sixteen shillings. They might be worth sixteen shillings to the wearer, but I would not give that for them to make my money of them again.

GUILTY , aged 14,

Of stealing to the amount of 39 s only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-20

999. WILLIAM CONGRESE and SARAH RABNETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September, one wooden till, value 2 s. four pounds in copper monies numbered, and one key, value 1 d. the property of John Doyle , in his dwelling house .

JOHN DOYLE . I am a publican , and keep the King's Head . I remember the two prisoners being in my house on the 20th of September; they were in company with each other; my till was in the bar; I don't know exactly what money was in it; when it was full, it contained between four and five pounds in halfpence. It was full that night. There was a gold ring in the till, and a key. I cannot swear positively to the quantity of halfpence; I am sure there was more than forty shillings, that I can swear, I was called into the parlour, and left the bar for a moment; and on my return, the lights were out. There were a candle and a lamp, and they were both extinguished. The male prisoner was gone, and Sarah Rabnett remained; I gave her in charge to the watchman, and she was taken to the watchhouse. I should tell you, I found my till gone, and all the contents. Soon after the charge was taken, the watchman brought in the till, empty; it had been found in the street. I went to Worship street the next morning to support the charge against the female prisoner. The man was brought in on the information of a witness who will appear.

JAMES SANTER . I was at the King's Head on the night of the robbery; I went in for a pint of porter. The female prisoner had a glass in her hand, serving liquor round. The glass was broken, and they insisted on my paying half towards replacing it; I had not money enough about me, and I went home to get four-pence; on my coming in the second time with four-pence in my hand, the woman put out the candle, which was on the counter in the bar; the landlord was not then in the bar. I laid hold of the candle to go and get a light; and when I was coming out with a light, I saw the man at the bar, jump over the counter, out of the bar, and run out at the door.

JAMES ROACHE . I live in Cow-cross. On the night of the robbery, I was going into Mr. Doyle's, and as I went in, I met the prisoner Congrese coming out with something in the form of a till under his left arm; I knew there was some copper in it, but I don't know how much; I saw them inside the till. He ran right against me; I seized him with my right hand, and he seized me back handed, and shoved me into the passage, and so got off. I have known him this twelvemonth back.

JOHN MILLER . I am a watchman. I found the till empty in the street. The female prisoner was in the watchhouse when I went there with the till.

JOHN PRINCE . I am headborough of the parish of St. Luke's. I was sent for to take Congrese into custody, on the 21st; Roache said, he was the man who ran away with the till.

RICHARD LONG . I am an officer of St. Luke's. I was at the watchhouse when the female prisoner was brought in.

Congrese's Defence. It is impossible for me to have committed the robbery, and I most solemnly deny before God that I ever committed it. If I had been the man that stole the till, I would not have gone into the prosecutor's house the next morning after the robbery.

CONGRESE, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

RABNETT, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham

Reference Number: t18151025-21

1000. DENNIS CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a watch, chain, and seal, value 10 l. the property of James M'Coy , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES M'COY. I have a lodging-room in St. Martin's-lane, in the Strand . The prisoner came on the 10th of last month; I was confined to my bed by a pain in my bowels. The prisoner came in, and asked for a lodging, and I told him he would get one. The woman here made answer, and said to him, that he should have a lodging for a week, for two shillings a week. The watch at that time, was under my head, between the pillow and bolster. I pulled it out in the prisoner's presence, to tell the woman what o'clock it was. I then fell asleep. I wakened again; in a few minutes the prisoner went out of the room; I then missed it, and went after him; I never saw him afterwards until I saw him at Greenwich. He had informed us that he was a Greenwich pensioner ; so my wife went, and watched at the gate of the Hospital at Greenwich, until the third day, and then we saw him; he then told me, he sold the watch to a man at Greenwich, for thirty-five shillings.

Q. Then he admitted that he took it - A. He did. He said he was sorry for it; he said he pawned the seal and key for twenty shillings, and afterwards sold the duplicate for ten shillings.

MICHAEL ARRAHAMS . I live at Greenwich, and am a watch-maker. The prisoner at the bar brought a watch to me to be repaired, with a sailor.

Q. Is that the watch - A. It is.

Q. When did he bring it - A. On the 12th of September. He sold me the duplicate of a seal and key also, which I released. Here they are.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-22

1001. JOHN CARTER , alias REDFERN , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , four silk handkerchief, value 1 l. the property of John Stephenson , privately in his shop .

JOHN STEPHENSON . I am a linen-draper , and live at No. 42, Tottenham-court-road . I only know the prisoner by his coming into my shop, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 11th of October; I was in the shop at the time he came in, I was at my writing desk, and my young man shewed him some silk handkerchiefs; I don't believe he bought any; he staid in the shop from six to eight minutes. Immediately after he went away, my young man observed to me, that there was a piece of silk handkerchiefs missing. I told him he had better go to Mr. Thrickley's, the haberdasher; for perhaps the prisoner might be trying to sell

them there. On his telling me that a piece of silk handkerchiefs was missing, I missed them myself. I afterwards went to the watchhouse, and saw the prisoner; the watchhouse-keeper had the handkerchiefs then.

JOSEPH GLADSTONE . I am shopman to the last witness. The prisoner came into his shop on the 11th of this month, for some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed him several patterns, and at last, he pulled a handkerchief out of his pocket, and said that that was the patterns which he wished; he said, unless we had the same pattern it would not do. I could not come to an agreement with him; he staid in the shop from five to eight minutes; he then went away. As soon as he was gone, I missed a piece of silk handkerchiefs, containing four. I told Mr. Stevenson, and he told me to go to Mr. Thrickley's. I found the prisoner coming out of Mr. Jones's; Mr. Jones is a haberdasher. I stepped into Mr. Jones's, and asked him if a person had been looking at some silk handkerchiefs. I did not find the handkerchiefs at Mr. Jones's. I then crossed over into Mortimer-market, and saw the prisoner pull the piece of handkerchiefs out of his pocket; I stepped up to him; I laid hold of him with one hand, and took the handkerchiefs from him with the other; he got away from me, and ran as hard as he could; I cried stop thief, and he was stopped in the street. The watch-house-keeper has got the piece of handkerchiefs. The prisoner was taken to the watchhouse.

JOHN HOWARD . I keep the watchhouse at Charlotte-mews, Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner at the bar was brought to the watchhouse on the 11th of this month, and delivered into my charge, together with this piece of silk handkerchiefs.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the handkerchiefs of a person who is gone into the Country.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

[Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury on account of his youth.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-23

1002. JAMES MOOREHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , two silver gravy-spoons, value 2 l. two silver sauce ladles, value 1 l. one silver sugar sifter, value 12 s. one silver fish knife, value 2 l. four silver forks, value 3 l. ten silver tablespoons, value 8 l. six silver dessert-spoons, value 35 s. and being in the dwelling-house of Richard Crompton , with having feloniously broken out of the same .

ANN WILLIAMS . I am in the employ of Mrs. Crompton. I know the name of Mrs. Crompton's other servant, it is Sally Turner . The prisoner used to come to see her; I had seen him there three or four times. On the evening of the 10th of this month, I was at Mrs. Crompton's house; my mistress was not at home; Sally was also gone out. I was in the house by myself.

Q. How long had Sally been gone out - A. She went out between three and four o'clock.

Q. What time in the evening were you called to the door - A. At about six o'clock.

Q. Was it the prisoner that came to the door - A. It was; he asked if Sarah was at home? I told him she was not. He then said, she had told him, if she was not at home when he called, to wait until she came in: upon that, I asked him down into the kitchen. He sat there a very few minutes, before I said, I was going to shut up the house, and he said, he would go with me, and help me. We went into the parlour, where the plate was, and shut up the shutters.

Q. What plate was there - A. I don't now exactly recollect; the plate was on the table, in something of a tray; there were some gravy-spoons there, there were some sauce-ladles, a sugar sifter, table spoons, tea spoons, silver forks.

Q. Were all these in the parlour when you went in with the prisoner - A. Yes; I had cleaned them all myself, and put them into the tray that day. My mistress did not dine at home that day. We then went into the kitchen, and after that, I went up stairs to see after the drawing-room fire.

Q. Had it then become dark - A. Yes, it was.

Q. When you were up stairs, what then - A. When I came down, the street door was open.

Q. How long had you been up stairs - A About ten minutes.

Q. Had you shut the street door after you let the prisoner in - A. Yes, I was sure the street door was shut.

Q. What did you do then - A. I was very uneasy, and stood still for a few minutes; then I went into the parlour; I missed the plate, it was gone.

Q. All - A. No; the greater part of it was gone.

Q. The tray then, and some part were left behind - A. Yes.

Q. Now, all this time, had there been any other person in the house but the prisoner - A. Yes; a porter had come and sat a box down in the hall, and then went away again directly.

Q. Was there any body else in the house after you had shut the shutters - A. No one.

Q.Upon missing the plate what did you do - A. I put the candle down, and stood at the gate; I was very much surprised, and frightened; the first person I saw was Mr. Butterfield; I communicated this to him. I know no more, except I was taken to the police office to identify the plate.

JAMES JACKSON . On the 11th of this month, I saw the prisoner at the bar, whom I knew, in Tottenham-court-road. I had heard of the robbery. I saw him go into a pawnbroker's; I followed him in, and asked him if his name was not James Moorehouse? he denied his name a dozen times and more to me. I said to him, it is very strange you don't know your neighbours. I then asked him, if he knew that good woman, (pointing to my wife, who was at the door) he said, no; he had not the least knowledge. I then asked the young man in the shop, what property he wanted to leave; that moment, the prisoner ran out of shop, over a basket of linen; I followed him directly; I brought him back; when I brought him back, he acknowledged that he knew me. I said, why not know me before? he said,

"a guilty conscience wants no accuser." He then put his hand in his pocket, and said, I will give up

to your care, all that I have about me; the first thing he gave me was a one-pound note; and then a quantity of plate that he had not made away with; he then gave me as much as three pounds one shilling and sixpence in silver, and fourpence in copper, and said, that was every thing material he had about him.

Q. Did he say how he came by this plate and money - A. No.

Q. What was he at Chelsea - A. A schoolmaster .

GEORGE LOWTHER . I live in Tottenham-court-road; I am a constable, and a pawnbroker. The prisoner had not pawned any thing at my shop; he offered something, but the instant he was in the shop, Jackson came in, and recognized this person.

Q. Do you produce the plate he offered to pawn, and the plate he surrendered to Jackson - A. I do.

Q. Now, tell us all that was found on the prisoner - A. I took an inventory of it; there were four silver forks, two sauce ladles, one silver fish slice, a silver sugar sifter, four gilt egg spoons, one salt spoon, a one-pound note, three pounds one shilling and sixpence in silver, and four-pence in copper.

Q. What may be the worth of that - A. Why, about fifteen pounds altogether.

Q. Do you put it at a low value - A. It is fashionable plate; I put it at an humble value when I say thirteen or fourteen pounds. I also found some pawnbrokers' duplicates on him.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker's servant.

Q. In whose employ are you - A. Messrs. Rochfort, Jermyn-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he pawned these three table spoons.

WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH . Q. You are a pawnbroker also: what do you produce - A. Five egg spoons. and two tea-spoons.

Q. Pawned by whom, and when - A. By the prisoner, on the 11th of this month.

LAUNCELOT WILD . I am apprentice to Mr. Wood, pawnbroker. I produce six dessert spoons, pawned by the prisoner, on the 11th of October.

THOMAS RUTLAND . I am shopman to Mr. Lane, pawnbroker, High Holborn. I produce four table spoons, pawned by the prisoner.

JOSEPH ROSIER . I am apprentice to Mr. Hulm, pawnbroker, Bow-street, Bloomsbury. I produce two table spoons and three tea spoons, pawned by the prisoner, on the evening of the 10th of this month.

MRS. SARAH CRUMPTON . My husband's christian name is Richard. At the beginning of this month, I had a house in Beafort-row, Chelsea . I was out when this business took place. I have carefully looked over all the articles of plate produced, and can safely swear they are my husband's property; he is not now in England. The whole of the property has been valued at thirty-nine pounds seventeen shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18151025-24

1003. JAMES LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , two thousand nails, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Wright and William Hannables .

JOHN SPARROW. I am a clerk to the prosecutors, they are ironmongers , and live in Smithfield . In consequence of a suspicion, I entertained of the prisoner, I stopped him going out of our warehouse; he was also in my master's employ. I searched him, and found the paper of nails in his breeches. I sent for a constable, and he was given in charge.

THOMAS BEAL . I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. Here are the nails.

John Sparrow . Those are my master's property.

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying his guilt pointedly.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-25

1004. JOHN HALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , one box, value 1 s, one cream ewer, value 2 l. one mug, value 3 l. one wine strainer, value 2 l. 8 s. twenty-three knives, value 2 l. 10 s. thirteen forks, value 1 l. 18 s. six spoons, value 2 l. and one sugar ladle, value 12 s. the property of Joseph Brasbridge .

JOSEPH BRASBRIDGE . The prisoner was in my employment on the 29th of September. On that day he was out, and a person called for him. I asked the boy what he wanted, he said the prisoner owed him one and sixpence; I asked him what for? he said for carrying a box, to the Bolt in Tun Inn, in Fleet street. I remarked that a shilling might have been enough for that. I got this box, from the Bolt in Tun, and found it contained a cream ewer, and a silver mug, and other articles of my property. The box itself was mine.

ANN GARNETT . I received the box from Lewis. I am booker at the Bolt in Tun.

WILLIAM LEWIS . The prisoner desired me to convey that box to the Bolt in Tun in Fleet street, which I did.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-26

1005. THOMAS HOPKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of Richard Bradley .

RICHARD BRADLEY . I am a publican , I live in Fleet Market . At about twelve o'clock in the day, on the 7th of October, the prisoner came into my house, and called for a pint of beer. I suspected all was not right, and stopped him, as he was going out. On his being searched, the pot was in his breeches.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked this pot up in the street.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined one year , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-27

1006. RICHARD HUNT and WILLIAM HUNT were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , four silver table spoons, value 3 l. twelve bottles of wine, value 2 l. and twelve glass bottles, value 2 s.

the property of the Wardens of the Sadler's Company .

JOHN LIMBRICK. I am a police officer. On the morning of the 4th of October, we met the two prisoners, one with a basket and the other with a handkerchief. I asked them what they had there; they said, wine, from Sadler's Hall , which was the perquisites of their father, who was beadle there. I was not satisfied with that answer, and took them both into custody; I took them to the office, and searched them, and found four silver table spoons on Richard Hunt , wrapped up in a piece of paper, which is a leaf of this account book, which belongs to Sadler's Hall. I found on William Hunt this key, which I delivered to Mr. Clark, at the Hall.

WALTER LEE . I am also a police officer, and was in company with the last witness, and found a duplicate for a silver spoon on William Hunt ; that spoon appeared by the duplicate to have been pawned at Mr. Essex's, in Aldersgate-street.

ROBERT ESSEX . I am a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street I produce some spoons, pawned at my house; originally there were two pawned, in September, and on the 3rd of October, one was released. and a new duplicate given for the remaining one.

SARAH LUCAS I am hall-keeper in the Sadler's Company. I know the prisoner William Hunt. In consequence of his father's infirmity as beadle, he was permitted to do his duty. On the 3rd of October, there was a dinner at the Hall. I have looked at the four spoons produced by the officers, and know them to belong to the Company; before they were lost, they had all the Company's arms on them.

MR. THOMAS CLARKE . I am clerk to the Sadler's Company. The officer, Limbrick, brought me a key, which opened a small door in the cellar, where on a shelf we found a skeleton key, which opened the wine cellar. I got the treasury broken open, and found two spoons, with the Company's arms filed out; also a file, with silver in the teeth, and a polishing stone, which when used, would take of the marks of the file. In consequence of an information which I received, and which I supposed came from the prisoners, I sent Mr. Ness, my clerk, to them; I made use of neither promise nor threat.

CHARLES NESS . I was sent to the prisoners in the New Prison, Clerkenwell. William Hunt gave me this paper, and said, if that was not sufficient, he would write more. It is a statement of various articles which they have stolen, and how they can be recovered.

RICHARD HUNT , GUILTY , aged 18.

WILLIAM HUNT , GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-28

1007. MARY COULSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , two 5 l. bank notes, and one 1 l. bank note, the property of Thomas Stedman , from his person .

THOMAS STEDMAN . I am a servant . I was not expected home on Monday night, the 18th of September, as I staid out so late, and the house was shut up. I went home with a girl to bed, in Westminster . I had the notes in my pocket then. I was awakened in the morning by the prisoner at the bar; I then missed the notes, and acquainted her with my loss. She said, she would take me to the house where the person was who slept with me; she took me to a house, but the person was not there. I then suspected her, and invited her into a public-house, until I could get an officer; I sent for one, and then she made her escape.

JAMES BLY . The prosecutor acquainted me with his loss; in consequence of which, I apprehended the prisoner; she immediately put something like a bit of paper into her mouth; I suspected it was a note, and seized her by the throat, to prevent her swallowing it; but it was no use. I then was about to search her hair, when she put up her hand, and took something out of her cap; it was a five-pound note. The prosecutor told me he had the five-pound notes, all of following numbers two were stolen, and he had one in his possession. On comparing the note I found on prisoner, it was the following number to note the prosecutor then had in his possession.

Prosecutor. I can only say it is my firm belief that note is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the note in the room where the prosecutor slept.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-29

1008. DAVID WOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Jenkins , at about the hour of twelve in the night of Tuesday, the 26th of September , with intent to steal .

WILLIAM JENKINS . I am a clerk in the Navy office ; I live in Mount-street, Whitechapel . At about twelve o'clock on the night in the indictment, I thought I heard the glass of the kitchen window broken; I got up, I struck a light; I went down to the kitchen, and under the window, I saw some fragments of glass. I did not appear to notice it, and went up stairs.

Q. Do you mean that you acted in such way, that if any person was looking at you, you would not seem to see it - A. Yes. I then extinguished the light, and went to an upper room; I then gently opened the window where I sat. The watchman then came down the street, crying the hour; and then I heard footsteps coming down before him; they did not come as low as my house. The watchman then went round to the front of the buildings, and on his coming into the other end of the street, the footsteps then retreated. At one o'clock, a coach drove through the street; I observed a person following the coach, and I saw him come over to my kitchen window, and kneel down upon the grating. The only light there was, was the light of a lamp opposite my door. I then took a dirk, and proceeded down stairs, very softly, into the kitchen; I then heard some one endeavouring to get out a gimblet, with which I had fastened the two sashes together; for I had been robbed so often. The person then desisted for some cause. I then went to the window, and perceived it was broke, and felt something

moist, which moistness afterwards turned out to be blood. I then took a chair and sat myself down, opposite to the window; after a little time, the person came again.

Q. When you say the person, do you mean to say, you had so much light as to be able to discern it was the same person that came at first - A. No; that is only as I conjecture. The person came again, as I was saying, and succeeded in getting out the gimblet; he then forced down the upper sash, and introduced an instrument; it was a stick, with a hook fixed to the end of it. I could see, by the light of a lamp, that he was reaching to a basket of clothes, which was under the window; there was only his arm in; I thought a little management would be only requisite to take him. I then put the dirk into my pocket, and ntly advanced towards him. When his arm was in he full extent, I then seized it with both hands above wrist. I pulled him as tight as ever the railing w permit; at one time, he almost got away; but by sudden hard pull, I brought him down to his shoulders. I then called to the watchman, and so did Mrs. Jenkins; the watchman came; I refused to deliver him up the watchman until he had got more assistance; then two gentlemen, neighbours, came to our assistance, and then I let him go.

(A stick was here produced, with a large fishing hook affixed to it.)

Q. What do you conceive that is for - A. The family had been washing; the sheets were hanging before the fire, and a basket of clothes was immediately beneath the window. I, and my neighbours, have lost our clothes frequently in the same manner.

THOMAS COX . I am a watchman. When I had called the hour of one o'clock round the extent of my beat, and came back to my box, I heard a female cry of watch! watch! my husband will be killed! I ran immediately, and found the prisoner laying on his face on the iron bars, by the kitchen window; Mr. Jenkins had hold of him; Mr. Jenkins told me I had better spring my rattle for more assistance, which I did; two gentlemen then came from over the way, and then Mr. Jenkins let the prisoner go to us; we then took him to the watchhouse, where there were four more fish hooks taken from him; also a green bag, and a piece of black crape.

JOHN BOOTLF . I am an headborough. The prisoner was brought into the watchhouse by Cox, and I searched him; I found this green bag, and the hooks. I asked him what the hooks were for, and he said he went fishing some times.

Q. What did he say the hook was tied to the stick for, was that for fishing - A. I don't know. He said, that the bag was to put the fish in.

Q. Did he say what sort of fish - A. No. Here is a crape bag. One of his hands was very bloody, and here are some of the fragments of the glass, also bloody.

Prisoner. That crape bag was sowed up, so that it was impossible for any body to get their head in; and the constable has undone it.

John Bootle. It is exactly as I had it, only the wire at the bottom is broken, by the doubling it up to put it into my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. It was necessity made me do it; I am two hundred miles from home, and had no friend in London, and could not get any work.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-30

1009. JOHN MAXFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , three silk handkerchiefs, value 18 s. the property of Thomas Walker , privately in his shop .

THOMAS WALKER . I live at 49, Dawson-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone ; I am a linen-draper . At about one o'clock, in the middle of the day, on the 5th of October, the prisoner came into my shop, and requested a pennyworth of white cotton balls. When he first came in, I was in the parlour, adjoining the shop; I went out into the shop to him; he seemed very much confused. I suspected all was not right. I told him we had no balls of cotton. I did not see him do any thing that created any suspicion, nothing but his being confused. During the that he was in the shop, a piece of stuff fell; I don't what occasioned it to fall; the prisoner was at least two yards from it and appeared very much frightened. I thought as he went out, I saw him take something from the door, but I was mistaken, and missed nothing thence. As soon as he had been gone about two or three minutes, I missed a piece of silk handkerchiefs; I asked Mrs. Walker if she had sold this piece of handkerchiefs, and she told me not. I immediately went to the corner of East-street, and saw the prisoner running: he then looked back, and I cried stop thief; he then turned along Blandford-street, into Manchester-street, and through a court, into a mews. the persons who were in the pursuit, as well as myself, made a motion for me to go along South-street, into which the end of the mews runs. I got to the end of the mews, and the prisoner ran into the side door of a pawnbroker's shop; I ran in at the front door, and so secured him. I searched him, but did not find any thing on him. I thought perhaps he might have thrown them away. I took him down the mews, in order to find the property, if he had; a few doors from the pawnbroker's side door, the handkerchiefs were picked up; a coachman picked them up, in my presence, and gave them to me immediately; the constable was present at the time they were picked up; they were delivered to him, as well as the prisoner; the constable's name is Hunter.

WILLIAM HUNTER . I am a constable. I was sitting in my parlour on the day of the robbery, and saw the prisoner run by, with the prosecutor after him. I saw the prisoner taken just by the pawnbroker's. I also saw the handkerchiefs picked up; they were delivered into my charge, with the prisoner. Here they are.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to my master's house, and he told me to call upon him at two o'clock for some work. I met a person I knew, he told me to go to Mr. Smith's; I went into the prosecutor's

shop to purchase some cotton balls; he had none; while I was there, a piece of stuff fell down, and that made me jump. I was going along, and heard a cry of stop thief; I knew it could not be after me; I went into this mews, and made water; seeing the crowd come rushing along, I just put my foot on the threshold of the pawnbroker's side door, to button up my small clothes; whilst I was there, they took me for the handkerchiefs, and I declare I know no more about them than the child unborn.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury, on account of his youth and good character.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-31

1010. MARY MARCHANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a copper coal-scuttle, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Hart , privately in his shop .

THOMAS HART . I am a broker ; I live in Church-street, Bethnal Green . I tied my scuttels with a string through the handles, outside the door. I saw them all safe at half past five in the evening of the 19th; the string comes from outside the shop, but the scuttles were inside. Soon after, I missed a scuttle; I then ran to all the pawnbroker's in the neighbourhood, I put them all on their guard. In about half an hour afterwards, the young man at Mr. Cotten's came for me; I saw a coal-scuttle at his shop, much like mine, but I could not swear to it.

JOHN CHALLARD . I am shopman to Mr. Cotten. In consequence of some information that the last witness gave me, I stopped the prisoner at the bar, when she came to pledge a coal-scuttle, she asked ten shillings on it; she said, her husband was outside the door. We told her it was stolen, and then her husband came in; he said, he could take us to a man of whom he bought it ten minutes ago. He has since absconded. For what I know to the contrary, he was the prisoner's husband.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18151025-32

1011. JOHN WALLIS and HENRY PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , seven yards of oil cloth, value 30 s. the property of William Cock , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM COCK . This oil cloth was just inside the threshold of my shop door. I was standing at my door, on the 14th of October; I had occasion to go into the shop; in about a minute, a person stepped up to me, and asked me if I had lost any oil cloth; I then stepped to the door, and missed this roll. In consequence of the information this person gave me, I went with him in pursuit of the thieves.

JOHN BLACKLOWE. On the 14th day of October, I was coming down Barrack street , and perceived the two prisoners at the bar within ten yards of Cox's shop; in fact they were going so close together that I supposed they were handcuffed together. I turned round, and saw Wallis take a piece of floor cloth from his side, and give it to Price; they then ran across the street, and into a small court, called Kemp's court. Mr. Cox's being the first broker's shop, I went in there to enquire. We went after them, but could not find them then. I was speaking to a friend at a few minutes after seven, in Wardour street, on the Monday morning, and they both passed us; we followed them through a good many streets, and at last, with the assistance of an officer, we took them in Hopkins-street.

WILLIAM PARSONS . I am an officer, and took the prisoners into custody.

WALLIS, GUILTY , aged 18.

PRICE, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18151025-33

1012. RICHARD JAMES PRESCOTT , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Chevalier Phillipe Louis De-la Marteliere , in the King's Highway, on the 3rd of October , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, chain, and seals, his property .

CHEVALIER PHILLIPE LOUIS DE LA MARTELIERE, by interpretation. On the 3rd of October, I was pushed down, but I don't know by whom. My watch was taken from me, and I have never seen it since. I only think it was the prisoner, who knocked me down; I do not swear to the man, but it is like him in stature and in shape.

JOHN PORTER . Seeing the prisoner running, and hearing a cry of stop thief! I stopped him. He, Chevaliere, came up immediately; I do not under stand French myself, but he appeared to me, by his signals to mean that the prisoner was the person who took his watch.

JOHN CONNELL . I am serjeant of the night at Mary-le-bone watchhouse. I assisted in stopping the prisoner on his being searched at the watchhouse, there were nothing found upon him.

COURT. Now Chevalier, look at the prisoner and tell us whether you have such a recollection of the person who robbed you, as to be able to swear it was the prisoner at the bar?

Chevalier, by interpretation. I cannot swear; it is like him, in stature, and in shape.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-34

1013. JOHN WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , two table cloths, value 14 s. nine yards of calico, value 7 s. nineteen handkerchiefs, value 1 l. four yards of French cambric, value 3 l. one piece of nankeen, containing twenty four yards, value 1 l. 4 s. one patchwork coverlid, value 5 s. twelve yards of trimming, value 12 s. eight yards of printed cotton, value 16 s. ten candles, value 1 s. and ten parcels of paper, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Pope , Thomas Bickham , and Samuel Pope , Junr. in their dwelling house .

THOMAS BICKHAM . I belong to the arm of Pope, Bickham, and Pope; we are Manchester manufacturers , and reside in Cheapside . We do not reside in he house ourselves, but two servants who are paid out of the partnership fund, do. On the 18th of September, I bought a lot of silk and cotton shawls. On

the 19th, I discovered they were colours I did not like; I wanted to return those which displeased us, but they would not take any back, without the whole. Then it was discovered that four were deficient; the prisoner was in our employ. We questioned all the servants; they all denied as well as the prisoner. I then went to the Mansion house, and got two officers. I told all the servants to remain within while I was gone; for I was going to search their respective lodgings. On coming to the prisoner's lodgings, in Swan alley, Coleman street; we found all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

JOHN HONE . I am warehouseman to the last witness. I sleep in the house; my masters do not. These shawls were missed; Mr. Bickham told us all to stay within while he searched the respective lodgings, but the prisoner went out, for about twenty minutes. He said, gentlemen I suppose you think me guilty, from my leaving the premises so long; the reason is, my wife is very much indisposed, and I went home to apprise her of Mr. Bickham's coming. These shawls that were taken, must have been taken between the 18th and 19th,

CHARLES MATTHEWS. I and Harrison went with Bickham to the prisoner's lodging, and found all the articles, named in the indictment, concealed in different parts.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I assisted in this search, and took from the prisoner's wife, five one pound notes, and four dollars. We did not find the shawls.

GUILTY , aged 26,

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-35

1014. SAMUEL TANNER was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he, on the 13th of September , on Thomas Ellingham a subject of our Lord the King did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, that is to say, a knife, did inflict upon him, one grevious wound, in and upon his right side, with intent to kill and murder him, against the statute, and against the King's peace .

TWO OTHER COUNTS. The one, stating his intent to be, to disable the said Thomas Ellingham. The other, to do him some grevious bodily harm.

THOMAS ELLINGHAM . I work for Mr. John Lloyd , a tobacconist on Snow Hill ; so did the prisoner; he was a cutter , and I was a filler ; I was to fill it up in the boxes for him after he had cut it. We had lived together fourteen months, On the 13th of September, at about six o'clock in the evening, I was nailing up a stick against some boards. I had driven one nail, and I wanted another; I said to the prisoner, I want another nail, and must have one, from some where or other; but I won't go down stairs for one, if I can help it.

Q. Had you been quarrelling with him that day - A. No. When I said I wanted a nail, he said, look in one of those holes, and you will find one. He meant the old holes in the wall.

Q. Did he speak that angrily - A. No, good humoured.

Q. Did you at all suspect that he was angry with you at that time - A. No not at all. I found an old nail where he directed me, and said, I have got one, if I can make it do. I went and kneeled down, and straightened it on the floor, and began driving it into the floor, to keep the end of the stick from slipping out of the boards; I was driving this nail, when he came and stabbed me; he stabbed the knife into my side.

Q. Did he say anything to you - A. He never spoke, he ran away.

Q. I think you said, there was nobody else in the shop besides you two - A. No.

Q. Did he leave the knife sticking in your body, or did he carry it away with him - A. It was found in the room. I ran after him; when I came to the top of the stairs, I put my hand to my side, and felt it wet, and looking at it, and there it was all over blood.

Q. What was the effect of this wound upon you - A. I was taken to Bartholomew's Hospital almost immediately; I was confined there a fortnight and two days.

Q. Did he ever give you any reason since, for doing this - A. I never have seen him since, but once at Guildhall. Not an angry word passed between us. I kept my bed with the wound for about eight days; I never was out of it during that time.

Cross examined. Q. Can you venture to say he did not fall upon you - A. No.

Q. Your back was towards him; now can you venture to swear he did not fall upon you with the knife - A. No.

Q. Had you observed he had any occasion to use his knife - A. We had been cutting tobacco stalks but with other knives. We had not been eating bread and cheese, nor any thing of the kind.

GODFREY GOODMAN . I am shopman to Mr. John Lloyd , a tobacconist. On the evening that this happened, I was alarmed by a cry of murder, proceeding from the cutting room, where the two men were at work; I immediately ran towards the warehouse, and met the prisoner; I asked him what was the matter, and he said, that damed raseal! I then saw Ellingham coming down the steps, with his hands on his belly, covered with blood. I said, good God! what have you done! he made no reply. I rang the bell immediately for Mr. Roberts, the clerk, who came down immediately, and procured a coach, and had him conveyed to the Hospital; I assisted him to the Hospital. When I came back, the prisoner was sent to the Compter.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am clerk in this house. I was coming down, alarmed by the cry of murder, when I heard the bell rung; the cry appeared to come from the cutting room. When I came down stairs, I found Ellingham with his hand on his side, covered with blood. The prisoner was then sitting on a cask at the end of the warehouse. I asked Ellingham what was the matter, and he said, that villain, has murdered me. I asked the prisoner what was his motive; he said, it is done now, and cannot be helped; he knew we were all against him, and he knew what was coming. I asked him what he did it with; he said, a knife. I sent a neighbour and the constable up stairs, and they brought a

knife down, it was not bloody when it was brought down. He said, that is the knife. That is all I know. Ellingham was conveyed to the Hospital, and the prisoner was taken to the Compter.

HENRY CHARRINGTON . I am a licensed victuallar, and keep the Cock, on Snow hill. On my being sent for, I came in, and found Ellingham standing bleeding; he was conveyed to the Hospital in a coach. I asked the prisoner whether he had stabbed the prosecutor with a three pronged fork, as Ellingham had told me. He said, he did not do it with a fork; he did it with a knife. I asked him where the knife was, and he said, he did not know. I asked him where he had thrown it to, and he said, he did not know. I took a candle and went up stairs into the cutting loft, or snuff room, and I looked about, and in the right hand side on the bed. I saw the knife laying by a candle, which was burning; there were no signs of blood on it. I brought it down, and asked the prisoner if that was the knife, and he said, it was. I asked him why he did it, and he said, it served him right, they were all against him. I said, he had sharpened the knife on purpose; he said, no, he had not; he sharpened it to cut his corns.

Q. Did it appear to have been sharpened - A. Yes; it was very sharp indeed. He was then sent away to the Compter.

JOHN GRACEY . I am a constable of the parish of St. Sepulchre. I was sent for on this occasion; when I arrived, the wounded man was gone to the Hospital. I asked the prisoner what he did it with; he said, a knife. I asked him where the knife was; he said, he did not know. Charrington and I went up stairs, and found the knife.

GEORGE HAZELWOOD WORRALL . I am a constable of St. Sepulchre's. I produce the knife. I compared the knife with the cut in the clothes, and they exactly fitted.

JOHN CHARLES BURROW . I am a pupil of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. The prosecutor was brought to me; he had a wound on the right side of his belly, near his navel; it appeared to have been inflicted by a knife; it was not a dangerous wound. He was confined to his bed for a week. He bled profusely when he first came, but I soon stopped the blood.

Nine respectable witnesses gave the prisoner a most excellent character for quietness, harmlessness, and good nature.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-36

1015. SAMUEL ASHBY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , one head-cloth of a bedstead, value 3 s. one tester-cloth of a bedstead, value 2 s. one vallance of a bedstead, value 3 s. two curtains, value 10 s. one bolster, value 8 s. one candlestick, value 18 d. one hearth-brush, value 6 d. and one flat iron, value 6 d. the property of William Forster , in a lodging room .

WILLIAM FORSTER . The prisoner took a lodging at my house, on the 29th of March last. All the things specified in the indictment, were let to him, by contract, with the lodging, except the flat iron. On the 16th of September, he left the lodging locked, and not returning in a week, I went in, and found these things missing.

THOMAS PETO . I am a servant to Mr. Killingsworth, a pawnbroker. I produce some of the things, pawned by a woman.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-37

1016. JOHN THOMPSON , alias THOMAS , and EDWARD CLARKE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William March , in the night time of the 13th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, ten shawls, value 9 l. 9 s. six scarfs, value 5 l. seven gowns, value 11 l. 8 s. five yards of crape, value 2 l. 2 s. three silk stockings, value 6 s. one black cloak, value 15 s. fourteen silk handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 8 s. and one yard of green baize, value 1 s. his property .

WILLIAM MARCH . I am a dyer ; I live in Brook street, Holborn . I was at home on the night of the 13th of this month,

Q. What time in the morning were you alarmed, and by whom - A. About half after five, by the watchman. I got up instantly; on my coming down stairs, I found the street door open, and my servants in the shop; it was quite dark at that time.

Q. Who was up last the night before - A. That I can hardly tell; I was not; but I rather think the servants were. I went to bed myself at about half past ten; all was then safe, I am convinced. The door was fast before I went to bed.

Q. Could you discover by what means the people got in - A. At the top of the house, by taking a pane of glass out of the lead, and then undoing the flap.

Q. How could they get at the top of your house - A. From an adjoining empty house.

Q. What is this flap at the top of hour house - A. It is a wooden shutter, with a flap to it; it is secured by this hook, and a pane of glass had been taken out, and the hook removed, and then the flap could be opened. The only way I can suppose is, that they must have got over both houses to get into the gutter at the side of my house.

Q. Then you found the front door open - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any marks of violence - A. None.

Q. Was the key left inside the door usually - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know, could persons who had entered at the top of the house, get out of the street door by means of the key being on the inside - A. Yes. I missed two spoons, from the kitchen, a silver sauce ladle, and other articles of plate; but none of them have been found at all. A Bow-street officer came to us, and told us he had apprehended a man with part of the property. Out of the shop, I missed several shawls, six scarfs, seven gowns, twelve yards of sarsnet, five yards of crape, three silk stockings,

a black cloak, fourteen silk handkerchiefs, and a yard of green baize. We have got the things that were taken from the shop. but the silver things are not come-at-able.

Q. Did any of your family sleep in the place where the persons broke in - A. I have three maids, who slept in the adjoining room.

Cross-examined. The flap leads to the leads on the top of the house. I know my servants had not been using the leads to dry clothes.

Q. Your man used these leads to dry the things in your business - A. Yes.

Q. Is he here - A. No; I could not bring him; he is Clarke's father. I took Clarke in because his father had a bad leg, and discharged him about two months ago, for stealing a shawl.

THOMAS EDWARDS. I am a watchman; Brook-street is in my beat. I was crying half past five on the morning of the 14th of this month, in Brook-street; a man going past asked me what the time was? I told him. I just turned round, and at the other end of the street, I saw a man cross the road with a bundle under his arm. Knowing he had not passed me in the street, I guissed all could not be right, and ran after him; coming up to Mr. March's door, I perceived it was open: I saw two bundles laying on a table, and that made me suspect there was some one in the house. I sprang my rattle, and called for assistance; when they came up, we went into the house. I found the drawers had been opened, and a quantity of things taken out. We examined the lower part of the house, with the shop and parlour.

Q. Was Mr. March with you at this time - A. No. I rang the bell, to alarm Mr. March and the family; there were two other watchmen with me at this time. I asked the servant girl if she had locked the door when she went to bed.

COURT. But we can't hear what she said.

Witness. I then requested Mr. March to go along with me to the upper part of the house. When we got to the lap of the house, there is a kind of a workshop, with a ladder going up to this flap, that has been described. On the top of the leads, I found an old knife. The night before the robbery was a wet night; so that the knife must have been brought there on the night of the robbery, for it was quite bright.

ROBERT MACKAY . I am a constable. On the morning of the 14th, I was in Catherine-street, in the Strand, at about seven o'clock. I know the prisoner Thompson well. I perceived the prisoner Clarke, in company with another man, who is not in custody; the other man was carrying this bundle; I saw them talking together, and evidently in company with each other; I was close by Eagle-court. I went up to them, and asked them if that was Eagle-court; they told me yes. I went up it a little way, and then returned, and watched them; they were then joined by Thompson. The man who is not in custody, then gave the bundle to Thompson; then they all three went into Eagle-court. I laid hold of Thompson; he then had the bundle, and the others ran away, On searching him, I found a pair of black silk stockings, and a letter directed to

"Mr. Marsh, silk dyer;" these were in his great coat pocket. After I had locked Thompson up, I went with Ruthwin, and we found out where Mr. Marsh lived, and told him what I have now told. In consequence of information I received there, I went in company with Ruthwin, to Somers Town, and apprehended Clarke in his lodgings. I saw Ruthwin take some silk fringe from a cupboard.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN . I am an officer. I was in company with Mackay, when we apprehended Clarke; he had a lodging at Somers Town; we apprehended him between eight and nine o'clock; we met him just coming out; we desired him to torn back, and he unlocked the door, and let us in; Mackay put the handcuffs on immediately. In one corner I found a pair of boots pulled off quite wet, and he said he had not been out at all. I also found this silk fringe in a cupboard. I took two handkerchiefs out of his hat; he asked me for one of them, as he said, to hide the handcuffs; I told him if he was not ashamed to break into a man's house, he need not be ashamed of the consequences.

Mr. Marsh. That is my silk frings. One of my servants is here now, who can swear to all the articles.

SARAH LAPPADGE . I am a servant to Mr. March; I have been so these six months. I slept in the roam adjoining that which was broken into; I was not disturbed by any noise during the night. I, and two other servants, were up last in the house; I am sure the street door was fast; we all went to bed together; we did not get up the next morning until the alarm was given. The female servants used not to dry clothes out on these leads. I don't think a female could open the flap. I know this silk fringe to be my master's property; I also can swear to this letter, for I delivered it to Mr. Marsh myself. I know all the other articles also to be my master's property. I saw them the evening before the robbery.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

Thompson's Defence. I met a young man in Drury-lane, and he said, if I would be so good as get a coach for him, he would give me a pair of silk stockings. I got a coach for him, and he gave me that pair of silk stockings.

Prosecutor. I know the stockings to belong to me.

THOMPSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

CLACKE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-38

1017. GEORGE SWEETING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Jane Kelly , at about the hour of nine in the night time of the 16th of September , and stealing therein, five gowns, value 1 l. 9 s. two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. one pair of trowsers, value 3 s. one blue cloth cloak, value 7 s. one pair of stays, value 7 s. three sheets, v. 15 s. one blanket, value 4 s. one counterpane, value 5 s. one pair of ear-rings, value 24 s. one pair of boots, value 7 s. and one pound fourteen shillings and sixpence in silver, her property .

JANE KELLY . I am a single woman ; I lived at a place in Gravel-lane . On the 16th of September, in the evening, I quitted my house between seven and eight o'clock; it was between light and dark; I had locked my door, and fastened my windows. I returned at half after nine, and when I went to open the door, I found it opened; I put the key to it, and pushed it open. I went and got a light, and went up stairs; when I went into the bed-room, I found my box was broken open; the window by the side of the box was also open.

Q. Had you observed what your box contained before you went out - A. Yes; I was at it about five in that afternoon; all was then safe, and I shut it after me. All the articles named in the indictment were in the room; all the things together cost me about seven pounds. I went out immediately, and told the watchman of the robbery. That same evening, Mr. Jackson produced to me a gown and an apron of my property; he first asked me whether I had had a gown with two darns in the back; I told him I had, and then he produced the gown, which I immediately knew to be mine.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am a headborough of the parish of St. George's in the East. On Saturday, the 16th of September, I saw the prisoner, between the hours of eleven and twelve at night, in Cable-street; that is not so much as half a mile from Old Gravel-lane. I observed something under his coat. Knowing him before, I suspected all was not right. I saw him go into an old clothes' shop; I stood at the door, and watched him; I saw him offer this gown to the woman for sale; they could not at first agree about the price; he was about coming out, but he did not; he went back again; they agreed upon the price; I think it was three shillings and fourpence for the gown and apron too: they were counting out the money when I went in. I seized the prisoner, and took the gown and apron off the counter. I asked him where he got them? he said, from his mother's. I told him that was not true for it would not fit his mother; I knew his mother. He then said it was not his mother's, but his sister's. I then took him, and locked him up in the watch-house. Soon after, I heard that a house had been broken open in Crane-court, Old Graval-lane; I went there, and asked the prosecutrix what she had lost? she said, several articles; at last, she said, she had lost a blue gown; this gown was blue. I asked her could she describe it by any thing else but the colour, and then she described two darns, which the gown really has upon the back of it. She described the apron also sufficiently to prove to me, before I shewed them to her. I examined the door of her house, and could perceive that it had been broken open with a chisel or small crow.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home from the Royalty Theatre on this night, and saw this gown wrapped up in an apron, upon the ledge of a window, and I did not think any harm in selling them, and Mr. Jackson came and took me up when I was in the shop.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18151025-39

1018. GEORGE WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , three 2 l. bank notes, and twenty 1 l. notes , the property of Lewis Abrahams .

LEWIS ABRAHAMS . I put up three two-pound notes and twenty one-pound notes in a parcel, at Chichester; I directed it to Mr. Philips, High Holborn, took it to the coach office myself, and booked it. Before I put them up, I took notice of the names that were on the backs of them.

ROBERT GRAY , JUNIOR. I belong to the Bolt-in-tun, Fleet-street ; my father is in partnership with me. On the 16th, I marked the parcels off that came by the Chichester coach. I saw one directed for Mr. Philips, High Holborn. The next morning the porter told me he had gone to Mr. Philips's, and when he came there, he missed the parcel. The prisoner has no business in the office where the parcels lie; he is a horse-keeper , he was searched and nothing was found upon him. Then I thought it necessary to search the stables, which the prisoner had the care of. Whilst the officers were searching the stable, he went to one of the coaches in the yard, and stood on the step for between two or three minutes. When he came down, the officer said, now, let me get up; he then got in, and brought out thirteen one-pound notes.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am the person whose business it is to deliver the parcels. I received a parcel directed to Mr. Philips; it was a small brown paper parcel. On the morning of Tuesday, I asked the prisoner to help me up with the parcels into the cart. The man who usually assisted me in this, was busy about something else. The small parcels remained in the office until the last. The prisoner assisted me in putting them in. I never missed this parcel until I came to the place of delivery; I can't say that he gave it up to me into the cart, I do not remember.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. I was applied to on this occasion. I went on the Saturday, and searched the stable; whilst I was searching the stable, the prisoner got up on the steps of one of the coaches, and remained there two or three minutes. It was the Reading coach. When he came down, I got up, and found these thirteen one-pound notes, (producing them,) under the carpet, on the bottom of the coach.

Lewis Abrahams. I can swear to three of these notes; but not positively to the rest.

JURY. Q.To Gray. When would the Reading coach go out that day - A. At one o'clock, and it was near one then; they were getting the horses ready for it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-40

1019. ROBERT TURLE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , seven pounds weight of tea, value 1 l. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to India .

THREE OTHER COUNTS. Varying the manner of laying the charge.

THOMAS WALKER. I am an officer. In consequence of an information which I had received, I

watched at the gate of the East India Docks , on the 16th of September last, and stopped the prisoner; in his hat I found two pounds of tea.

PHILIP BAYLIS . I am second mate on board the Glatton; I was commanding officer on board on the 16th of September; that vessel was at that time in the East India Docks. and laden with tea.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer on board the Glatton. I went to the manger, and found three bags of tea. There was some tea there scattered about also. I also found an handkerchief, and an empty bag.

MR. THOMAS BROOK . I am superintendant of the East India Dock. The prisoner was in the service of the Company; it was his business to mark the chests of tea. It was brought to me by the police officer. He confessed to me that he had got the tea in his hat from on board the Glatton, and that which was in the manger was put there by the coopers, for him.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-41

1020. JOHN LANE was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon George Lille , in the King's Highway, on the 1st of October for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one gold seal, value 2 l. his property .

GEORGE LILLE . I am a waterman , and lighter-man . On the evening of Sunday, the 1st of October, between seven and eight, the prisoner was running along with a hat on his head, and another in his hand. As soon as he saw me, he shyed me, and ran into a corner, where there are some pillars, in Wellclose square . The people who were crying stop thief, after him, ran by him and me. I went up to him, and he was jammed up in the corner, as close as he could get. The prisoner hit me, and I hit him again in the left eye, and down he went; I fell with him, I was uppermost; and I kept him down. Whilst he was down, I felt a tug at my watch, but did not give it a thought at that moment. I called for assistance but the watch was not then set. Nobody would assist me, for the people said, he had a knife in his hand. I saw something in his hand, but whether it was a knife or not, I do not know. He vowed all manner of things he would do to me. He said he would cut my b - y guts out, if I did not let him go. A young man that I knew said Lille, let him go, he is a complete out and outer; that means, the worst description of theives, and a fellow who would as soon run a knife in you as lock at you. I then let him up; and when he got up, I missed my seal, and told a witness, who is here. He then put himself in an attitude for boxing; and backed, and backed, until he got to the corner, and then he turned about, and was off, as quick as an arrow from a bow. My waistcoat was cut through and through. I suppose my seal was worth two pounds.

JOHN BOYLE . I am a journeyman baker, I was coming through Wellclose square, and heard a cry of stop thief, and saw Lille with a hold of the prisoner by the collar. I heard the prisoner make use of very bad expressions, and heard Lille say, his seal was gone. I saw his waistcoat cut. The prisoner made believe to show fight, when Lille let him up; and then turned about at the corner of the passage, and ran off.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I received information of the robbery, of the hat; and took the prisoner at about ten o'clock at night. I found his left eye black, as Lille told me he knew it would be.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

COURT. The force and violence was not used to procure the seal; and therefore it does not amount to a Highway robbery.

GUILTY , aged 30,

Of stealing from the person, but not of the assault.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-42

1021. WILLIAM PASSENGER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one deal plank, value 9 s. the property of Isaac Sargent and John Rutty .

WILLIAM GALE . I am clerk to Messrs. Sargent and Rutty, who are timber merchants , and reside at Paddington . I was returning to the wharf, at about nine o'clock at night, and saw a plank moving along, above the top of the fence. After I had rung the bell, I looked through the gate, and saw the prisoner making his way off from where he had thrown the plank down. Smith opened the gate, and told him. The prisoner got over the fence, and was making his escape, when Smith made a nearer cut, and took him in my presence.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am also in the employ of the prosecutors. I stopped the prisoner. The deal was moved a considerable way from its place where the others were.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-43

1022. THOMAS BRAY , JAMES ING , and JAMES LAVENDER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , thirteen fowls, value 26 s. the property of Richard Martin .

RICHARD MARTIN . I live at Harefield . I saw my fowls on the night of the 22nd of September; I never knew they had been stolen until they were brought the next morning all dead.

JAMES WING . I am a gardener. I live at Ickenham. On the night of the 21st of September, I was watching some fruit which I had, and saw the three prisoners come out of the public house; I watched them, and saw them go into widow Woodman's hen house; I heard the fowls halloo. I saw them run with the fowls down the orchard. I went and got a constable; it was then between ten and eleven o'clock at night. We followed them across two or three fields. At about a quarter before one, on the morning of the 22nd, we met the two prisoners, Bray and Ing, coming towards Bray's house; we were lying in a cart shed, near the house. I told the constable, as soon as they came up that I would jump ever the pales, if he would run to the gate. I jumped over the pales, and took hold of both of them. Ing had eight fowls tied up in the lappels of his coat, and Bray had one. I did not see Lavender again, until

the next morning, at about six o'clock, when he was taken, as he was going to work.

WILLIAM BULL . I am a constable. I know no more about it, than Wing has stated. Mr. Martin owned eight of the fowls.

BRAY, GUILTY , aged 22.

ING, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

LAVENDER, NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18151025-44

1023. THOMAS BRAY , JAMES ING , and JAMES LAVENDER , were again indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , two fowls, value 10 s. the property of William Hammons .

WILLIAM HAMMONS . My fowls were kept at widow Woodman's. I lost a black cock, and a black pullet.

JAMES WING . I was watching my fruit as I stated, when I saw the three prisoner go into widow Woodman's hen house. When we took the fowls from them, Hammons owned the black cock.

William Hammons . They brought me my two fowls killed; I knew them to be mine.

BRAY, GUILTY , aged 22.

ING, GUILTY , aged 22.

LAVENDER, GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-45

1024. ANN TURNER and MARTHA BENTLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , one umbrella, value 3 s. two caps, value 3 s. one pair of pattens, value 10 d. and one handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Francis .

MARIA FRANCIS . My husband lives at No, 18, Morgan street, Tooley street . I lost these things on the 12th of October; it was a rainy night; the two prisoners came to my house, and wanted a night's lodging. They went backwards, and after that, went away, and then I missed the things.

DIX MOORE. I am a constable. The prosecutrix informed me of the robbery; I went with a brother officer and apprehended them; each of them had an apron on; and the umbrella was found at the prisoner Bentley's.

Bentley's Defence. The prosecutrix took us home, and lent us these caps and the pattens, and told us to take the umbrella, and go to the end of the court and wait to see if anybody would came home with us to her house; but we went home, and then the officers came and took us up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-46

1025. WILLIAM WILLIAMS and JOHN GREY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , one basket, value 2 s. the property of Richard Stewart .

RICHARD STEWART . I am a fruit salesman , in Covent Garden . This basket was left in the market full of apples, under a tarpaulin all night. I was told by the watchman, that he had stopped two men, and I went to the watchhouse, and there I found my property.

JOHN DANIEL . At half past three in the morning of the 13th of this month, I stopped the two prisoners with a bag of apples, and a basket of apples; I stopped them, and took them to the watchhouse, and the prosecutor owned the basket. The apples have been sold, but here is the basket.

Williams's Defence. We are distressed sailors ; we had not eaten a bit for two days, and finding these apples open in the market, we filled our bellies with them, and then took them away from distress.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 25.

GREY, GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-47

1026. THOMAS BALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , twenty eight pounds weight of butter, value 30 s. the property of John Drew .

JOHN DREW . I am a cheesemonger , and live at 171, Shoreditch . I sent a boy with half a tub of butter on the 10th of October, to Ratcliffe Highway. That butter was stolen; and in consequence of an information I received, I went to the prisoner's lodgings with an officer; we found some butter on the table there, which was mine.

Cross examined Do you mean to say, that you will swear by the colour and the taste, that a bit of butter which was at the prisoner's lodgings, was part of the half rub of butter which somebody stole - A. Yes, I will swear it.

WILLIAM FORD . I had this butter to take to Ratcliffe Highway; I put it on the tall of a town cart; when the cart stopped, I went to look for it, and it was gone.

MARY KELER . I saw the prisoner pass by the cart, and pass me; he took something out of the cart, but I don't know what it was.

ELIZABETH STRONG. I saw the prisoner pass the end of the cart, and take something out of it; but I don't know what.

EBENEZER DALTON . I am the officer, and went with Drew to the prisoner's lodgings; Drew swore that some butter which was in a bason there was his.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-48

1027. SUSANNAH GOSLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , two sheets, value 6 s. two pillow cases, value 2 s. and two yards of cloth, value 2 s. the property of Charles Wickham , in a lodging room .

CHARLOTTE WICKHAM . We let furnished lodgings to the prisoner, at three shillings and sixpence a week; she left the lodging, without giving us any warning. When she was gone, we missed the sheets and pillow case, which had been let to her by contract with the lodging.

THOMAS SYMONDS . I am the constable who took the prisoner; she gave me a duplicate for the sheets and a piece of linen, and confessed she had taken them.

JAMES WALKER . I am a pawnbroker; the sheets and linen were pawned at my house, but I don't know by whom.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-49

1028. JAMES LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , one pound three quarters of brass, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Mears .

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am clerk to Mr. Mears, bell founder , in Whitechapel road . The prisoner was also in his employment. I stopped him going off the premises, on the 18th of September; he had a bulk in his small clothes, which I took out, and which was a pound and a half of brass which from the peculiar manner in which it had been broken, s could swear belonged to my master.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-50

1029. DAVID MARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of Harris Lazarus .

HANNAH LEVI . Mr. Lazarus's servant , the prisoner at the bar, offered me two handkerchiefs to sell, on the 22nd of September.

HARRIS LAZARUS. I don't know that I lost these handkerchiefs.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18151025-51

1030. ROBERT RYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , one lace veil, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of John Webbe , from the person of Susannah, his wife .

SUSANNAH WEBBE . On the 22nd of last month, I lost my veil, going up Whitecross-street ; the prisoner snatched it, and ran up Whitecross-court with it; I never lost sight of him until he was taken.

ELIZABETH FARMER . I saw the prisoner snatch the veil from Mrs. Webbe's head, and run up Whitecross-court.

THOMAS PRICE . I heard a cry of stop thief, and stopped the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-52

1031. WILLIAM STAGG was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a shift, value 3 s. the property of George Eglar .

ELIZABETH EGLAR . I lost my shift on the 27th of September; the prisoner came in, and took it; I saw him go out with it; I did not see him come in; I only saw him going out with it; I cried stop thief; he threw them away, and he was stopped; I picked them up.

JAMES VALLENTINE . I heard a cry of stop thief, and stopped the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. That is my shift.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-53

1032. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , two iron wedges, value 1 s. the property of Mary Ann Ayles , and others; and one adze, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Hannah .

THOMAS HANNAH . I am a shipwright , I lost an adze, on the 7th of October, from the place where we were working in the yard.

JOHN JONES . I saw the prisoner take up the adze and wedges, and was running off with them, when I stopped him, and he threw them down.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-54

1033. PHILIP POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one gown, value 4 s. one petticoat, value 3 s. and one apron, value 1 s. the property of Sarah Mason , spinster .

SARAH MASON . I am a weaveress by trade. I lost my gown and petticoat on the 17th of October; the prisoner came to my bed three times, and would not go away; he slept in the same lodging room that we did. When I got up in the morning, I found my things all gone, and he was gone too.

MARY JACKSON . I slept with the last witness, and I missed a handkerchief in the morning.

MICHAEL MORRIS. I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner, with the property on him.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-55

1034. JAMES KENNEDY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a watch, value 15 s. the property of William Norgle .

SECOND COURT. Stating it to be the property of Michael Clarke .

BRIDGET CLARKE . This watch was not our, it was only entrusted to our care; we lost it, and supposed Kennedy had stolen it. I wanted him to come to the pawnbroker's, because I thought the man who stole the watch had also pawned it; but he would not come.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and produce the watch, which was pawned with us for twelve shillings, but I don't know by whom.

JOHN CASSIDY , a material witness, not appearing, was called upon his recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-56

1035. RICHARD HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , two gowns, value 4 s. one petticoat, value 4 s. two waistcoats, value 6 s. one shawl, value 2 s. two children's petticoats, value 2 s. one night gown, value 2 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Roger Macdonald .

ROGER MACDONALD . I am a victualler , and keep the Harrier, in Poplar On the 23rd of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was standing at my bar, I saw the prisoner at the bar, coming down the stairs, with several articles of wearing apparel, belonging to my family, in his possession. I asked him what he had in that bundle; he said, they were his own clothes. Then I went gently round the bar, and laid hold of the bundle,

and found it contained the articles named in the indictment, which are my property.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-57

1036. JOHN GEOGHEGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , ten pounds weight of sugar, value 6 s. 8 d. the property of Robert Sutton and William Davis .

WILLIAM WOOD . About four o'clock in the afternoon of the 20th of October, I had private information that the prisoner was upon my masters' premises; I went immediately to Mr. Davis's counting-house to inform Mr. Stacie; in coming out of the counting-house, Mr. Stacie and I observed the prisoner coming out of the sugar house; we immediately went after him, and seized him, when he had got about thirty yards from the premises; on searching him, a quantity of sugar fell out of his hat, and then I sent for an officer.

RICHARD STACIE . I am clerk to Messrs. Sutton and Davis, who are sugar refiners , and live in Rupert-street, Whitechapel . About four o'clock, on the 20th of October, the last witness gave me some information relative to the prisoner. We seized him, and on searching him, found the sugar on him. We found a cask of sugar in the sugar house with the marks of fingers in it. The sugar in that cask was of the same quality as that found upon the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-58

1037. JOHN FERNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , one blanket, value 3 s. the property of Richard Barnard .

RICHARD BARNARD . I keep a public-house , the King's Arms, Golden-lane, Upper East Smithfield . I stopped the prisoner going out of my house, with the blanket on him.

RICHARD LLOYD . I was in Mr. Barnard's house, and saw the prisoner concealing something under his waistcoat; on searching him, the blanket was there.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-59

1038. WILLIAM GEORGE FARRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one hat, value 2 s. and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Smith , widow , from the person of Edward Smith .

EDWARD SMITH . On Tuesday night last, I was in Old-street-road ; the prisoner at the bar, came and hallooed in my ear; he took my hat, with the handkerchief in it, off my head, and gave it to some of the other boys who were with him; a young man took him into custody. Some of the other boys knocked me down, and made my mouth bleed.

JOHN HENRY CLARKE . I seized the prisoner, and took him to St. Luke's watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this boy's hat off, but did not know any of the other boys who took it from me.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-60

1039. ROBERT BRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , thirteen quires of writing paper, value 13 s. the property of Edward Church .

HUGH BIDWELL. I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Church's office; Mr. Church is a lawyer , and lives in Paternoster row, Spitalfields . I saw him come out with a number of quires of paper.

WILLIAM MILLER . I ran after the prisoner, with others, and saw him drop the paper.

Prosecutor. That is my property.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-61

1040. JAMES ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , two blankets, value 8 s. the property of Samuel Harris and David Remaine .

SAMUEL HARRIS . I bought a lot of blankets down at Chatham, and brought them to London, in waggons. I lost a good many of these blankets.

WILLIAM LOCKE . I took two blankets from the prisoner, on the morning of the 23rd; I told him it was better to speak the truth about them.

COURT. Then we must not hear what he said after you told him that.

Property produced; but the prosecutor could not swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-62

1041. THOMAS ATKINS and MARTHA ELLIS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one sheet, value 2 s. one feather pillow, value 2 s. and one pillow case, value 6 d. in a lodging-room; and one shift, value 3 s. one sheet, value 3 s. one handkerchief, value 1 s. one pillow case, value 1 s. and one towel, value 6 d. the property of Catherine Reynolds .

CATHERINE REYNOLDS . I let a lodging to the prisoners; they came together, as man and wife. I missed these things from the room, and I saw the prisoner run away with the bundle under his arm.

JOHN RUSSELL LAW . On the 13th, I apprehended Atkins.

CHARLES WILLIAMSON . I produce a sheet, which I took from the female prisoner, Ellis.

ATKINS, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

ELLIS, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-63

1042. NATHANIEL ROLLINGBROKE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , two pounds twelve ounces weight of currants, value 2 s. one pounds weight of ginger, value 2 s. the property of Benjamin Severn , and others.

EBENEZER DALTON. On the 13th of October, I was employed to watch at the door of the prosecutors,

on account of a suspicion which was entertained against the prisoner; he came out of the shop at about ten minutes past seven; he went into the Sugar Loaf public house; I went in after him; he remained there ten minutes; he never was out of my sight. When he came out, I stopped him at the end of White Lyon street, I told him we suspected he had something about him what he ought not to have; we then took him into a public house, and in his coat pocket we found about a pound of ginger, loose, and about two pounds three quarters of currants in one breeches pocket, and the other was clammy and sticky, as in something of the same kind had been in that. He described his house as No. 8, Crabtree row, Bethnal Green; we went there, and found a quantity of candles, twine, sugar, a great quantity of sacking, and a sack, marked 4788; the twine and sugar were up stairs; the candles were part hanging up, and part concealed.

MOSES FORTUNE . I was also stationed with the last witness to watch the prisoner when he came off the prosecutor's premises. I was with the last witness, saw the prisoner searched, and the things found upon him; and at his house we found part of the sugar under the bed.

Property produced, and sworn to.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-64

1043. JOHN SULLIVAN and WILLIAM PULLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , seventy pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of Lord George Henry Cavendish .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be the property of Thomas Dudley .

THOMAS DUDLEY . I have the repairing of Burlington House . The two prisoners were employed upon the premises as plumber's labourers . I watched the prisoners into the plumbery, where they melt the lead. I saw them take some old lead, and concealed it under their clothes. When they were going out, in about five or ten minutes afterwards, I stopped them, and took them into a little room adjoining the porter's lodge when they dropped the lead from them; they then owned their guilt, declared their contrition, and offered if I would let them go never to be guilty of the like.

Lead produced, and sworn to.

SULLIVAN, GUILTY , aged 32.

PULLEN, GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-65

1044. THOMAS WILSON was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he, on the 5th of October , did unlawfully and deceitfully utter to one Sarah Archer , a false and counterfeit token, for the sum of three shillings, bearing date 1813, knowing the same to be counterfeit; and that he, within ten days, that is to say, on the same day, unlawfully did utter to one John Foster , one other such false and counterfeit token, by reason of which promises he became and was a common utterer of such counterfeit tokens for the sum of three shillings .

AND NINE OTHER COUNTS. Stating the offence to be offering, and not uttering, and charging him with similar offences upon other persons, and charging him as a common utterer.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . On the 5th of October, I saw the prisoner at the bottom of Old Fish street hill; I saw him go into Thomas street, there were two other persons with him; he went into Upper Thames street , towards Blackfriars bridge; he first went into a chandler's shop, opposite the Hour Glass public house; he stood there two minutes; I saw him put down a three shilling piece on the counter. I followed him then into Mrs. Archer's shop, a baker 's, which is No. 177; I saw him go into the shop. My situation was such as that I could perceive all that was going on inside. He brought a loaf out; I went in when he came out, and saw a three shilling piece which he had tendered to her; I marked it, and she marked it. (A three shilling piece put into the hands of the witness.) That is the one she shewed me, and which I marked. I then saw the prisoner go into a butter shop, which is Mr. Brown's; I saw him tender a three shilling piece to the young man named John Foster, which was refused. That was also marked by me, and the young man. Before that, I watched him into Mr. Maguire's shop; I went in after he came out, and saw a three shilling piece which he had tendered, and which was marked also. Then he went to Browne's, the butter man's, and there I apprehended him; I searched him, and found three penny pieces, with which he was going to pay for the chees, when the three shilling piece was refused. I found nothing more, only a quartern loaf.

WILLIAM BEEN . I keep a chandler's shop, in Thames street. The prisoner came to my shop on the 5th of October, he wanted a half quartern loaf; he put a three shilling piece down on the counter; I refused it; it was a very bad one. He said, he had received it for his day's work.

SARAH ARCHER . On the 5th of October last, the prisoner came to my shop, and tendered in payment a three shilling token; I gave him two shillings and a penny in change. As soon as he went out, Matthews came in; I shewed him the three shilling piece the prisoner had given me, which he said, was a bad one, and which both he and I marked. (A three shilling piece produced to witness.) That is the one.

HUGH MAGUIRE . I am a baker, in Thames street. The prisoner, on the 5th of October, bought a quartern loaf of me; he tendered a three shilling token in payment; I gave him an eighteenpenny piece a sixpence and a penny. Matthews came in, and in consequence of something he said to me, I marked the token, and so did he. (A three shilling token produced to witness) That is the token.

JOHN FOSTER . I am a shopman to Mr. Brown, who keeps a cheesemonger's shop, at 29, Watling street . The prisoner asked for threepenny worth of cheese; he tendered a three shilling piece in payment; it was a bad one. Matthews came in immediately, and apprehended the prisoner. In consequence of what he told me, I marked the token.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I am a teller to the Bank of England. I have examined the tokens tendered to the several witnesses; they are all counterfeit tokens, merely washed.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and bound over to find securities for good behaviour for two years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-66

1045. WILLIAM WILLIAMSON was indicted for that he, on the 4th of October , unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one Jane Slocombe , a certain false and counterfeit token, for the sum of three shillings, bearing date 1813, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; and that he, within ten days, to wit, on the same day, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one Elizabeth Flower , one other such false and counterfeit token, for the sum of three shillings, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit, by reason of which premises, he became and was a common utterer of such false and counterfeit three shilling tokens .

NINE OTHER COUNTS. Charging the prisoner with a similar offence against divers other persons, and upon each, charging with tendering to payment, instead of uttering.

RICHARD GEORGE TAYLOR . On the 4th of October, I saw the prisoner in Upper Thames street , at about half past six, I saw him go into Mrs. Slocombe's chandler's shop; I believe he got a half quartern loaf; he tendered a three shilling piece in payment, and got the change; I went into the shop just as he was coming out; I saw the three shilling piece which he had tendered; I marked it, and Mrs. Slocombe marked it. He then went into Mrs. Flowers's; I went to the window, and saw him offer a three shilling piece; I went in, and she shewed me a three shilling piece, which I marked, and which she marked. (A three shilling piece produced to witness.) That is it. Then he went into Mr. Kinnis's, which is a baker's shop, in Salmon lane; he there offered a three shilling piece for a half quartern loaf. I went in directly, and seized the prisoner, and marked that token.

JANE SLOCOMBE . I keep a chandler's shop . The prisoner tendered me a three shilling piece, which I took. (A three shilling piece put into the hands of witness.) That is it.

ELIZABETH FLOWER . I keep a chandler's shop . The prisoner tendered to me a three shilling piece for half a pound of cheese. I gave him the change. Mr. Taylor came in when he went out, and marked it. (A three shilling piece produced to witness.) That is the three shilling piece.

ROBERT KINNIS . I keep a baker's shop, in Salmon-lane, Doctor's Commons. The prisoner tendered me a three shilling piece; Mr. Taylor immediately came in, and seized the prisoner. We cut the three shilling piece, and it proved to be a bad one. (The three shilling piece produced, and identified by the witness.)

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I have looked at the three shilling pieces tendered to the several witnesses; they are all counterfeit.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined one year , and to find securities for good behaviour for two years afterwards .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-67

1046. THOMAS PRIEST was indicted for that he, on the 29th of September , unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one George Wright , a certain false and counterfeit token, for the sum of three shillings, bearing date 1813, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; and that he, at the time of his uttering the said false and counterfeit token, had in his custody and possession one other such counterfeit token, for the sum of three shillings, by reason of which premises he became and was a common utterer of such counterfeit tokens, for payment of three shillings .

THREE OTHER COUNTS. Charging him for offering in payment, instead of uttering, and omitting to charge him as a common utterer.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . On the 29th of September, I saw the prisoner with several other persons; I saw them go into several shops. I was afraid of getting too near to them. I followed him into Wright's shop, and found a three shilling token in Wright's hand, which was tendered to him by the prisoner. I asked the prisoner if he had any more about him? he denied that he had. I found three other counterfeit tokens upon him, and some copper. The tokens are all counterfeit. (Tokens produced to the witness, and identified by him as found upon the prisoner.)

ROBERT NEWMAN. I keep a chandler's shop, in Whitecross-street. I remember the prisoner coming to my house, on the 29th of September last, he tendered me a three shilling piece in payment for a threepenny loaf, which being a bad one, I refused, and returned it to him again.

ELIZABETH HILL . I am servant in a chandler's shop, Mr. Friend's. I remember the prisoner coming into our shop, on the 29th of September; he tendered me a bad three shilling piece in payment for a half quartern loaf. I refused it, and he went out of the shop.

GEORGE WRIGHT . I keep a tobacconist's shop , at 35, Long lane . The prisoner tendered me a bad three shilling piece, on the 29th of September, for some tobacco. Matthews immediately came in, and secured him.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD. I have examined the three shilling tokens found upon the prisoner, and that one tendered to the last witness, George Wright ; they are all counterfeit, and merely washed.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined one year , and bound over to find sureties for good behaviour for two years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-68

1047. MATTHEW ROWLAND was indicted for a misdemeanour .

SERJEANT SMITH . I am a slop-seller . I have a servant of the name of Samuel Palmer , and another of the name of Joseph Mason . We were in the habit of purchasing leather breeches from the prisoner. I have two partners, Thomas and Joseph Smith .

SAMUEL PALMER . The prisoner produced a bill to me, on the 23rd of September , for the amount of three pounds five shillings and ninepence; that bill purported to be signed by J. Mason, who is shopman and foreman to the prosecutors. I paid the prisoner in three one-pound Bank of England notes, a dollar, and three pence in halfpence.

JOSEPH MASON . I am foreman to Messrs. Smith. The prisoner disposed of twelve pairs of breeches to them; the amount was two pounds and threepence. I had made him a bill for that amount, which would be paid on his presenting it to Mr. Palmer. I see the ticket for three pounds five shillings and ninepence, which was presented by the prisoner to Mr. Palmer; the signature to this ticket,

"J. Mason," is not my hand writing. No such sum was due to the prisoner. That bill charges eighteen pair; the true bill which I gave him charges but twelve, which are all that were received.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am the constable who took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined one month .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-69

1048. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , two pounds of tobacco, value 12 s. and one jar, value 3 s. the property of James Mills .

JAMES MILLS . I did not see the prisoner come into my shop; but while we were sitting at tea, I saw the jar move from the counter; I fancy he came on his hands and knees. I ran out of the parlour directly, and pursued him down Stewart's rents; he then threw the jar away, and dashed it to pieces. I ran as far as the court after him; then the watchman took up the pursuit, and stopped him. There was nobody running but the prisoner and the watchman.

PATRICK CARMOODY . I pursued the prisoner, and took him, and there was a mob wanted to rescue him.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-70

1049. FREDERICK HILDRETH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , a gold chain, value 1 l. three seals, value 30 s. and one watch-key, value 2 s. the property of John Briggs , from his person .

JOHN BRIGGS . I live at No. 9, Great Portland-street. I was coming across St. Martin's-lane , on the night in the indictment, perfectly sober; I was going home, in company with Mr. Ricketts; I saw several persons coming in a crowd through St. Martin's-court; I plainly distinguished the prisoner among them; he passed me on the right hand, and looked me very full in the face, and at the same instant, made a snatch at my watch; the last link of the chain, next the watch, broke, leaving the watch in my fob. I instantly turned round, and made a blow at him with a stick; instantly I heard him drop it. I immediately said, Mr. Ricketts, he has dropped it; pick it up. The prisoner then ran round and round, and the other people ran across me, and knocked the stick out of my hand. I pursued the prisoner, and took him, and delivered him to a watchman.

SAMUEL RICKETTS . I happened to be walking with the last witness, just at the end of St. Martin's-court. I saw this business. Mr. Briggs said, he has dropped it. The prisoner ran away. I said, never mind, follow up your man, and take him; which he did. It was impossible for the prisoner to have got out of our sight. We never got the chain or seals since.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-71

1050. WILLIAM THOMPSON and DANIEL BURKE were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , twenty-three yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. the property of John Hale .

ADAM DRUET . This piece of cotton, with others, was at the door between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day. About three o'clock, I found one missing. Mr. Barrett brought it in the evening, and then the private mark was taken off.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer. On the 29th of September, I met the two prisoners; Burke had a bundle; I took him, and Thompson ran off. I asked him what he had got? he said, he did not know, for he had just picked it up. I guessed it came from Shoreditch. I took him into the Sir John Falstaff, in Old street road. Kell, the landlord, wanted me to let him go; but I would not. He then took me by my coat, and made believe to be whispering in my ear, and then pushed me down between two chairs, into the fire. Burke then got off; but I got him again, and I afterwards apprehended the other prisoner.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

THOMPSON, GUILTY , aged 14.

BURKE, GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-72

1051. WILLIAM PENNISTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , one jacket, value 5 s. one pair of trowsers, value 7 s. and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William James .

WILLIAM JAMES . I had a lodging at No. 17, Sun court, Back lane, Shadwell . I left my room at half past five in the morning, and returned at half past nine. The landlord told me I had better go to Somerset House for my prize money; but when I went up stairs to change my clothes, they were gone.

WILLIAM RUMBLE. I am a slop seller. On the 23rd of September, at about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me, and offered to sell a jacket, a pair of trowsers, and a handkerchief; he asked thirty shillings for them. I examined them, and knew them to be part of what I had sold to some one; I did not know exactly to whom; but I knew I had not sold them to the prisoner. He

aid, they were his own, and he had bought them at Plymouth. He then said, as I knew the clothes, he would tell the truth; he was selling them for another man. I told him if that was so, to leave the clothes in the shop, and fetch that man. He went out for the purpose of doing so, but never returned. In about two hours afterwards, the prosecutor came in to enquire, and then I shewed him the clothes, and described to him the person of the prisoner.

MICHAEL MORRIS. I apprehended the prisoner, and I produce the clothes.

ELIZABETH RUMBLE . I am the wife of the prosecutor's landlord. The prisoner was a lodger in the same house.

(Clothes produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-73

1052. CHARLES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , two shoes, value 1 s. one knife. value 6 d. and one pair of compasses, value 6 d. the property of Robert Brandford .

ROBERT BRANDFORD . I am the commander of a ship in the West India Docks . About the 7th of October, the painter s were on board the vessel; the prisoner was one of them. I lost several articles, and amongst the rest, the articles in the indictment, and which were found upon the prisoner's person, when he was stopped, in consequence of a suspicion we entertained. The knife and the compasses had been in a coat pocket of mine, which was hanging up in the state room.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined two months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-74

1053. JOHN REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , four bushels of oats, value 18 s. the property of William Bell .

WILLIAM BELL . I am a corn chandler , in the Hay market . The prisoner at the bar was in my employ in the early part of October. I had an order for half a load of hay, half a load of straw, two sacks of oats, and a sack of bran, to be delivered at Capt. Ridges's stables, in Princes Mews; I told the prisoner to execute this order. Having a suspicion of him, I placed myself in a loft, over my granary, in a situation which I could observe every thing that he did. He came into the granery, and put up a sack of my very best oats I had, and put into the cart; then he came and filled up Capt. Ridges's two sacks, and put them also into the cart with the bran; and then he put the hay and straw over them, which effectually concealed them. I then followed the cart, at a distance, to the stables, and told the governess of the charity school the circumstances; and she let me go up to one of her windows, where I could observe the prisoner, and watch Capt. Ridges's groom; I saw the three sacks of oats taken in by Walsh; I then went down, and taxed Walsh with having three sacks of oats, instead of two, but he strongly denied it. I then went into the loft and there I found them. When I came home, I told the prisoner that I had discovered this, and several other things against him, and I would give him a day to make all right. He then went away, but never returned, and soon after was taken by Cooper the constable.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended the prisoner in St. John street, Paddington, half naked; in a privy.

WALTER WALSH was called, but the counsel for the prosecution declared he should ask him no question as he did not believe him worthy of credit; and expressed his surprise that he was not also put at the bar with the prisoner, as the wilful receiver of the stolen property.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined two years , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-75

1054. ALEXANDER MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , four gourds, value 2 s. the property of John Frazer and James Thomas Frazer .

JAMES THOMAS FRAZER . I am a nurseryman , at Slaone square, Chelsea . The prisoner was a servant of mine. Having a suspicion of him, I watched him on the 16th of September, and took one gourd from his pocket when he was going to dinner. On his lodgings being searched, the other three were found.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-76

1055. MARY ANN FREEMAN and ELIZABETH SAVERY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , three chairs, value 4 s. six tea cups, value 1 s. four saucers, value 6 d. two mugs, value 2 d. and one milk jug, value 1 d. the property of Elizabeth Evans , spinster ; and ELEANOR MOXLEY for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH EVANS . I left the prisoner Freeman with the care of my room in which the things named in the indictment were; I did not know Savery, she was a stranger to me; I left the room in the care of the prisoner Freeman on the Saturday; and on the Monday. I sent to her to ask her for the key, and then I went and got into the room, and missed both the things and the prisoner. The officers took the prisoner in Rose lane; the things were found at Mrs. Moxley's in George yard.

WILLIAM LOCKE . I took up Freeman in Rose lane; Freeman said that Savery had sold the things for her; upon which I took Savery; Moxley owned that the things were brought to her, but she had only lent the prisoner some money upon the things; as they pleaded the greatest distress, and want of victuals.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-77

1056. WILLIAM EVESON and GEORGE EVESON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , two glass lamps, value 10 s. and two tin rims, value 1 s. the property of John Hatham Windle and George Byron .

WILLIAM HATHAM WINDLE . I am a lamp contractor , and contract for furnishing lamps, for the

parish of Whitechapel . The lamps in question are our property.

JAMES NEEDS . In consequence of a loss of several lamps, I went to look after some of them and found two: the rim of one of which one of the prisoners was painting in a hut which they inhabited. The garden of this hut was fenced off from the others; one of the lamps was laying open in the garden; I knew that lamp to be one which I had furnished Mr. Windle with for the completion of contract. I also found another thrust up into the roof; George was painting the other in the garden.

WILLIAM EVESON , GUILTY , aged 16.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

GEORGE EVESON , GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one month , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-78

1057. MARGARET DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , two sheets, value 10 s. the property of James Robertson .

ELIZABETH ROBERTSON. I am the wife of James Robertson ; I lost a pair of sheets on the 16th of September; the prisoner had been a lodger of mine, but she did not take these sheets from the room in which she lodged.

ANN WALLACE . I lodge at the prosecutors, and stopped the prisoner with the sheets on her.

THOMAS DOWNES . I took the prisoner into custody, and produce the property.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-79

1058. AMELIA BUTFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , one blanket, value 1 s. one napkin, value 1 s. one pillow case, value 1 s. and one table cloth, value 4 s. the property of Thomas James Annett .

HARRIET ANNETT . I live at 92, Lucas street, Brunswick square . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to my house to sleep with, and suckle a little boy of mine; I told her I had lost many things, and on searching her lodgings, there was a duplicate found of a pillow case, which pillow case was mine she afterwards gave up several other duplicates of my property.

WILLIAM ANDERTON . The prisoner pledged the property with me, and I produce it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-80

1059. ESTHER HORTON , FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ , and JEROME SANTUS , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one watch, value 30 s. one chain, value 30 s. three seals, value 2 l. one key, value 2 s. and nine 1 l. bank notes, the property of Joseph Taylor , from his person .

JOSEPH TAYLOR. I met a girl named Mary; she is not here; she took me to her own home, which is in Shakespeare Walk ; I was intoxicated, but not insensible. I gave her two or three shillings to go and get liquor. This woman, Mary, returned, and brought Esther Horton . Mary said, she was ill at that time, and she left me. I had a silver capped watch with chain and seals, and either eight or ten one-pound bank notes. Francisco Rodriguez came in, and he had not been in half an hour, when the other prisoner, Jerome Santus , came in for a little time, and then went up stairs. I then went out, and Esther followed me, and we went and had some shrub and water. She told me I had left my watch behind me; I found I had. I returned to the same room again, but could not see my watch then, nor ever afterwards. I then sat down, and went to sleep. When I awoke, the prisoner Esther, was with me, and nobody else. The notes were found upon Rodriquez at the office; they were taken from me while I was at the house the second time. Esther Horton , Santus, and two others, were in custody; and after that, Rodriguez was apprehended; I asked Rodriguez when I apprehended him, if he had any money? and he denied that he had. I then took him into the office, and searched him, and found on him eight one-pound notes, and fourteen shillings in silver. The numbers of the notes were in rotation, from 306 to 313, inclusive. I asked him where he got these notes? and he said, he had been paid them by his captain six weeks back. This was on the 28th of August, 1815; and the notes had not been issued six weeks. When I told him that, he said, he would tell me where he really got them. I made him neither promise nor threat. He told me Esther Horton gave them to him to take care for her. At this time, Esther Horton , and the other prisoner, were in custody. They then went back, and were all examined together.

ANN SCOTT . I used to wash and clean for Esther; she has only a room in that house; that room belonged to Mary Davis . Mary Davis said to me on the night of the robbery, Mrs. Scott, I have brought home a nice gentleman; you know the situation I am in; I think it is a pity to go with him. She then went and fetched Esther Horton , who cohabited with the prisoner Rodriguez; she came; and bye and bye, she told Rodriguez that the captain's watch was laying on the bed, and told him to fetch it; he went, but I believe he did not return.

(The bank notes produced by the constable, and sworn to by the prosecutor.)

HORTON, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

RODRIGUEZ, GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

SANTUS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-81

1060. JOHN BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , one chaise saddle, value 8 s. two pair of reins, value 12 s. one bridle, value 1 s. and one box great coat, value 1 l. the property of Robert Wragg .

ROBERT WRAGG . I am the Walthamstow stage master . I lost the articles named in the indictment from the top of a flight of stairs leading to the granary; I saw them at seven o'clock, and missed them at eight.

HENRY HORNSBY. I am patrole of Hackney parish, and stopped the prisoner on Wednesday the 27th, at about four o'clock in the morning; he was going towards London; he said he had only got some old things of his own; but on examining them, I found a set of new reins, and a saddle which was only about half worn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-82

1061. JOHN CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a sheet, value 3 s. the property of John Read , in a lodging room .

JOHN READ . The prisoner was a lodger of mine for one night only. He came down stairs in the morning, and I stopped him on suspicion, and on him we found the sheet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 34.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-83

1062. SARAH BEER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , a shirt, value 2 s. 6 d. four yards of linen cloth, value 3 s. 6 d. and one shift, value 1 s. the property of Henry Case .

JANE CASE. I know the prisoner at the bar; I am daughter to Henry Case; I am thirteen years old. The prisoner came up into our room while my mother was out, and sent me for a pipe of tobacco; I met the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs. On my going up, the drawers were broken open and these things gone; a shift, a shirt unmade, and one made.

ANN CASE. I am the mother to the last witness. I left my daughter at home between the hours of twelve and six, in the middle of the day; the drawers were locked when I went out, and on my return between four and five, my daughter told me what she has told the court, I found the drawers broken open, and missed the property in question; I have never seen them since.

CHARLES BROWN . I am the officer who apprehended the prisoner; I searched her, but found nothing on her concerning this robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-84

1063. MARY ANN CAFFRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , four Bank notes, for the payment of one pound each, the property of John Cogan , from his person .

JOHN COGAN . I live at No. 2, King street in the Borough; I am a carpenter . I went to see a female acquaintance of mine, at Mrs. M'Cartey's; it is a house of ill fame: I was not drunk. I fell asleep. I lost my notes out of my breeches pocket; the prisoner was in the room. I had her and several others taken into custody; I have never found my notes.

JAMES MULLINS . I apprehended the prisoner on the charge of Cogan; I did not search her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-85

1064. REBECCA WIXON and REBECCA PACK were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , two shillings and sixpence, in copper monies numbered , the property of William Hewit .

WILLIAM HEWIT . I live at 34, Church street . I lost these halfpence on Sunday week; I had missed money several times. We have no other evidence against the prisoners than the confession of each against each other.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-86

1065. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , two great coats, value 5 s. the property of Richard James .

RICHARD JAMES . I am a watchman at the West India Export Dock . My coats were in my box, and I was on duty. The prisoner passed me in the Docks and was going a direction towards the gate. I soon after missed my coats.

WILLIAM FISHER. On Wednesday night last week, I was standing at the Export Dock gate; and the prisoner passed me in attempting to get out, but I stopped him, and took from him these great coats.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-87

1066. MARIA SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , one gown, value 10 s. the property of John Powers .

ANN POWERS. I lost my gown on the 21st of October, but did not charge the prisoner with stealing it until the 26th, because she was not apprehended before.

ELIZABETH FOX. I purchased a gown of the prisoner at the bar on the 22nd, which I delivered to Mr. Vann.

THOMAS VANN . I produce the gown, and apprehended the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I sold the gown for another person, but did not steal it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-88

1067. ANDREW CROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , seven pounds weight of lead, value 14 d. the property of Moses Davis , affixed to his dwelling house .

MOSES DAVIS. I live in Princes street, Leicester square . I lost some lead between one and two on Friday last, in the noon day.

ELEAZER DAVIS. On Friday last I was lying in bed between the hours of one and two in the day, and saw the prisoner cutting the pipe in the front area. I immediately went out and brought him into the kitchen until I had dressed myself; and then I took him to the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-89

1068. THOMAS BURNING and MARY HIGGINS

was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , four bed curtains, value 1 l. three valances, value 3 s. one sheet, value 5 s. and one pillow, value 2 s. the property of Edward Tomkies , in a lodging-room .

EDWARD TOMKIES . I live at No. 9, Tower-street, Seven Dials . I let out lodgings. The two prisoners came together as man and wife to hire the front room in the second story; it was let to them at the weekly sum of seven shillings. The articles stolen, were a part of the furniture of this room.

THOMAS WINDSOR ALLEN. I am a pawnbroker, and produce a pillow and a curtain, in two separate pledges, which I took in from the female prisoner.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and produce a pair of sheets, pledged at my house, for four shillings, by the prisoner, John Burning .

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am also a pawnbroker, and produce three curtains and three valances.

BURNING, GUILTY , aged 28.

HIGGINS, GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-90

1069. PETER CAMPBELL was indicted for that he, on the 21st of October , was servant to Thomas Deakin , and employed and entrusted by him to receive money, notes, and other valuable securities, for and on his account, and being such servant, by virtue of such employment, received, and took into his possession, eight shillings in monies numbered, and one one-pound bank note, for and on account of his master, and afterwards feloniously secreted and embezzled the same .

THOMAS DEAKIN . The prisoner was my servant; he was entrusted to receive money on my account. I have a shop on Ludgate Hill, and have another shop in Aldersgate-street . The prisoner managed the business at my house in Aldersgate-street. A friend of mine purchased a stove there last Saturday week.

ANN HUGHES. I live at 15, Redcross-street. I made a purchase of a stove, on the 21st of October; I bought it at Mr. Deakin's warehouse, in Aldersgate-street; it was the prisoner who served me; I paid him a one-pound note and eight shillings, and he gave me a receipt for that amount.

(Receipt produced, and read in Court.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I did not want a stove.

Q. Did you not get the money from the prosecutor to go and purchase this stove - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you did not buy a stove, because you never had any property in that stove - A. No.

Q. Have you returned that stove to Mr. Deakin - A. No.

Q.But you are to do so, for it was Mr. Deakin's own money - A. Yes.

Thomas Deakin . I did not ask the prisoner any questions about this business.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. The money was given to the last witness to purchase the stove, with my consent, at the suggestion of my wife.

Q.Then in truth, and in fact, the money was only taken from your right hand to your left; that is to say, to a person in your employment by this Mrs. Hughes - A.Just so.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-91

1070. PATRICK CANE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September, twelve pounds weight of lead, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Peto .

WILLIAM SIMPSON. I am gate-keeper at the New Custom House , and stopped the prisoner coming out at dinner time, on the day named in the indictment; the lead fell from him when I asked him what he had got; and then he said, it was the first time, and it should be the last.

BENJAMIN BLOOMFIELD . I saw the lead fall from the prisoner.

ROBERT MACKAY . I took the prisoner into custody, and produce the lead.

HENRY PETO . I am the contractor for the building of the New Custom House . All the lead there is my property. The lead produced, I know to be mine; it is worth about two shillings.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Publicly whipped one hundred yards as near as convenient to the New Custom House , and confined one month in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-92

1071. JOSEPH HAYWARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Stubbs and William Allcorn , in the night time of the 4th of October , and burglariously stealing therein, thirteen pieces of canvass, value 5 s. five yards of rope, value 1 s. two wooden cases, value 5 s. one thousand three hundred and fifty-one yards of linen cloth, value 260 l. two hundred and eighty-eight yards of woollen cloth, value 140 l. four hundred and eighty yards of woollen say, value 110 l. the property of William Allcorn and Richard Stubbs .

RICHARD STUBBS . I and my partner, Mr. Allcorn, are packers , in Fish street, Doctors Commons . We occupy the houses No. 12 and 13; they are joined together. We make a warehouse of the whole of No. 12, and the ground floor of No. 13. My partner has a residence in the Country, and does not always sleep in Town. There is an internal communication between the two houses, by a skylight. I went to bed at about eight o'clock, on the night of the robbery. I left the warehouse on the evening of that day, at about five. At the time I left the warehouse, the property was all safe. When I got up in the morning, In consequence of an alarm, at a few minutes after six, I found the padlock had been wrenched off, and the spring lock picked; it was just beginning to be day light; when I went into the warehouse, I missed a bale of kerseymere, one thousand three hundred and fifty yards of linen cloth, two hundred and eighty yards of woollen cloth, four hundred and eighty yards of woollen serge, a quantity of canvass, in which the things were packed, and five yards of rope. All this was the property of myself and partner. I have seen part of it since; there is a part in court.

STEPHEN ANDREWS. I am in the employment of

the prosecutors. I fastened up the premises at nine o'clock, on the night previous to the robbery, when all was safe. All No. 12 is a warehouse, and runs under No. 13; the lower part of No. 13 is a warehouse, and in one room with the ground floor of No. 12. I returned to the premises the next morning at a little after seven; it was day light then. I found that the lock was picked. I had double locked the door, and locked the padlock on the outside. The padlock was broken off in the morning; it was afterwards found at Mr. Smith's door. All the property in the indictment was gone.

WILLIAM ALLCORN . I am in partnership with Mr. Stubbs. The upper part of No. 13 is applied to the purpose of a dwelling house; the ground floor of No. 13 is in one room with the ground floor of No. 12; the goods are lodged in both; there is no partition whatever between them; part of the ground floor warehouse is under the roof of 13; the internal communication which has been spoken of, is a sky-light; it is not generally made use of for the purpose of a communication.

Richard Stubbs . Day had hardly broken when I was first alarmed. The door was fastened by one of Branthwaite's catch locks, and a padlock on the outside. When I got to the warehouse, the robbers had completely gone. There must be more than one concerned, for the largest parcel was so heavy, that it would require two or three strong persons to lift it.

Q. Could one person have moved the smallest - A. Yes, if he had been a stout person.

Q. Were all these things which were stolen, on the ground floor - A. Yes.

Q. When you got to the warehouse, did you see any body - A. No, not a soul near. Our warehouse is about twenty yards from the corner; if six or eight good stout hands had been engaged, they might have got the property round the corner in a short time.

JOHN UPTON . I am a police officer. On the 16th of this month, I was at Kingsland, with Avery, a brother officer, at about half past four o'clock in the afternoon of that day, we were walking down Coffin Castle lane, and the prisoner was riding in a one horse cart. I asked him to give me and Avery a ride, for we were very tired; we got in; he said, he was going as far as the Thatched House, at Islington. As we were going along, I saw two pieces of Irish cloth laying at the bottom of the cart; I did not say any thing. He set us down at Scott's-place. We watched him. At this time, we had heard of this robbery. We saw him take a young woman into his cart, and then turn back again, towards Ball's Pond, and the Thatched House. We went into the parlour at the Thatched House, and found him, and the young woman, in company with a man, named Thomas Henry . The prisoner at the bar, said to us, you have got here nearly as soon as I have. We told him we were officers, and must search him, on suspicion of a burglary, on account of the linen we had seen.

Q. Did you see this linen in the Thatched House - A. Yes, laying on the table in a handkerchief. I took care of the door whilst Avery searched the prisoner, in my presence. Henry said to me, do you think he is a smuggler; I said, no; sit you still, we will search you presently. I saw Henry searched, and on him were found ninety-six counterfeit three shilling tokens, and a number of notes, of Country Banks which have broken. I saw them all three searched, but nothing was found on them relative to this business. After the prisoner was searched, we took him to the watchhouse. We then went back to his house in Coffin Castle-lane.

Q. How did you know that it was his house - A.Because as we were coming along the lane, we saw the horse and cart in which he rode, standing at the door. I did not see the prisoner come out of the house, but I saw him come out of the yard, and get into the cart, and after that, we asked him for a ride. The house consists of two stories. I searched the top part first; I found three ends of kerseymere; I went into the bed room, and found some black serge in a drawer in the bed room; I found some buckram likewise. I then went down stairs, and found thirteen pieces of canvass under the stairs. I then went the next day. That was all we found that day. I went the next day with my brother officer; the prisoner's wife was in the house; I found one wooden packing case, and the boards of another; I found a rope with a noose bag hanging over a beam in a shed in the yard. We afterwards communicated to the prisoner what we had found, and he did not deny that this was his house.

Cross examined. It might be an hour and a half after the prisoner left this house, that we searched it the first time. I never knew the man before, nor saw him, before I saw him get into the cart. The prisoner gave a true account of himself, so far as, that he said, he was going to the Thatched House, and so he did. He did not say he bought the linen, nor do I know what he said about it, nor whether any thing.

JOHN AVERY . I am a officer of Bow street. I was in company with the last witness when we met the prisoner at Kingsland. I perceived the linen in the cart. After we alighted, he took up a female, and went with her to the Thatched House. He told us he was going there; we followed him in; we found him in company with Thomas Henry , and Sarah Cooper , that was the young woman's name. Upton held the door whilst I searched them all three; on the prisoner I found a two pound Bank of England note, which I returned to him. We took him to the watchhouse. We found nothing on either of them relative to this business. We then went to his house. I afterwards told him, we had been to his house. I saw what Upton found. He never denied that it was his house. The next morning we went there again, at about twelve o'clock; we found a packing case, and the boards of another, and the rope was hanging over them. In the front room, I found a phosphorus bottle; that was the last thing found. When we were coming along this lane the day before, I saw the cart and horse in which we afterwards rode, standing at the door of this house, where we found these things, and saw the prisoner come out of the gateway of that house, and get into the cart. We told him, we had been to his

house, and had found something that answered the robbery. He made no answer to what we said; he only smiled. We did not mention to him where the house was that we had searched. We only told him we had searched his house, and found these things, and he never denied that it was his house.

(The phosphorus bottle and the other articles found, were here produced.)

JOHN FIELD. I am in the employment of the prosecutors. I saw the state of the premises the day before they were robbed.

Q. Look at that rope; did you ever see it before - A. Yes; on my masters' premises; I tied that noose myself.

Q. How do you know it - A. Because I have a particular way of fastening it; that cord I can swear was round one of the bales that were stolen.

Cross examined. Q. Do you mean to swear that nobody else ties a knot or makes a noose in this manner - A. I mean to say, that if I begin a noose of this kind, you will not find any one else that will finish it; I have knotted some hundreds in my life, and this one corresponds with those which I have knotted.

William Allcorn. I look at the linen found in the cart, and can swear to it.

John Upton . That linen was open in the public house. We took up a person of the name of Hyams that very afternoon, but he was discharged; we also apprehended a Mrs. Faucett; we would have apprehended her husband, only he has absconded. On their premises we found two hundred picklock keys. Hayward said to us before we went to his house, I suppose you will go and search my house, be as delicate as you can on account of my wife. I did not hear any thing about his buying these things of a licensed hawker. We afterwards told him we searched his house.

Richard Stubbs. This say, or serge, is a woollen cloth, used by the Priests in Portugal and Spain; it is an article of British manufacture, but not used in this Country. We lost the quantity of it stated in the indictment. I firmly believe this to be part of it. We have been a whole year having four pieces made.

Q. Is there any thing else you can swear to - A. As a packer, I know that buckram, like this is used only by packers for the purpose of packing up such cloth and things as we have lost. The kerseymere I know particularly, because here is the part where there has been a card pasted on; I know no other persons had such a large card upon it as we had; the kerseymere I can swear to; here is a pattern book, and one of the pieces corresponds with it in every respect, in pattern, in all the marks, even in the maker's name.

Cross examined. You don't supply all the tradesmen in Spain and Portugal - A. No.

Q. You do not mean to say there is but one manufacturer of it - A. These are all made down in Essex; I don't know that there is another manufacturer; but I don't mean to say there is not.

Prisoner's Defence. I keep livery stables; I take horses in to bait, and receive parcels for the Endfield and Winchmore Hill caravan. On the 18th, a licensed hawker put up at my stables, and the things that were found in my house, as well as the two pieces of linen I had in the cart, I bought of him, and the packing cases and the rope were in the shed by his putting there. Had I any guilty intention, or had I known that the linen in the cart was stolen, I should have hardly let these two gentlemen get into my cart.

WILLIAM WEBB . I was present when these things were found on the prisoner's premises, and can swear to the packing cases positively.

The prisoner received a good character from several witnesses.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-93

1072. CHARLES BEDSON , alias CHARLES WILLIAM BEDSON , was indicted for that he, on the 14th of January, in the 41st of year of his Majesty's reign, at St. Martin, Birmingham, in the County of Warwick, did take to wife one Elizabeth Yeates , widow ; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 7th of May, in the 55th year of his Majesty's reign , at St. George's, Hanover square , feloniously did marry one Mary Cunningham , his former wife being then alive .

SAMUEL BLYTH. I am a resident in Cherry street, Birmingham. I knew the prisoner a short time before his intended marriage, in 1801; he was then married to a widow Yeates; I believe her name was Elizabeth. I knew they lived two or three years together, as man and wife, after they were married. They were married at St. Martin's, Birmingham.

SARAH FOULKES . I am niece to Mrs. Yeates. The prisoner was married to her in 1801; they lived together afterwards as man and wife, in the Country, and in London. I saw her in July last.

MR. THOMAS HENRY SAWYER . I have been to Birmingham on this business; I was there on the 23rd of October. I produce a fair copy of the register, which I made myself, and which is signed by the minister.

(Register produced, and read in court.)

Mr. Sawyer. I saw Mrs. Bedson, or Mrs. Yeates, there, and was in her company two or three hours; she was living on the 23rd of this month.

MARY CUNNINGHAM . I have been house keeper in several respectable families. I became acquainted with the prisoner at the bar, about two years ago; he first paid his address to me by letter. I married him on the 7th of May last, at St. George's Hanover square; he lived with me ten weeks, when he was apprehended for another crime. He had about four hundred pounds with me; the savings of my wages during the whole of my life, and I am now so reduced as to be obliged to go to service. He represented himself as a widower, and as having considerable property. He told me he had lost his wife some years by hard drinking.

Prisoner. I have not had any of her property, she has had it all back again.

COURT. Q. To witness. Has the prisoner restored you your property - A. No, not a halfpenny.

MARY ROBSON . I was present on the 7th of May last, at the marriage of the prisoner, at the parish church of St. George's, Hanover square, to the last witness, Mary Cunningham , and I subscribed my name to the register.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a proper deed of separation drawn up by Mr. Bedford, my attorney, between my former wife and myself, and as I had not seen her so long, I considered her dead.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-94

1073. GASPAR TANN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , four yards of woollen cloth, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Wilson , privately in his shop .

THOMAS WILSON . I live in Ratcliffe Highway , and am a linen draper . I do not know any thing of the robbery.

JOSEPH HARVEY . I live in Ratcliffe Highway, and am a linen draper. On the 24th, in the evening, at about seven o'clock, I understood that there were some suspicious characters about the door of my shop; I walked to the door, and saw three men standing; they went away, seeing I observed them. I then put on my hat, and followed them. When they got to Mr. Davis's shop, the smallest of the three, went in, and brought out a piece of cloth, and gave it to the prisoner; they were all in the same party. The prisoner put it under his great coat. I went across the street, and laid hold of him; another person had hold of his coat. He slipped out of his coat; but I had a hold of him by the breast; I held him fast. I do not know what became of the cloth; I never saw it since.

JOHN DOWSET . On the evening of the 24th, I was called in to take charge of the prisoner.

JAMES PROUDFOOT . I was standing at my door on the evening of the 24th, and I saw the three men standing at Davis's shop. Presently I saw the prisoner give a signal, and immediately the boy, or the smallest, went in, and brought out the cloth, and gave it to the prisoner. I went over, and seized him; he nearly got away from me, by slipping his coat, but Mr. Harvey had him by the waistcoat.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I produce the cloth, which was delivered to me by Mr. Davis.

THOMAS DAVIS . I know that cloth to be mine. Two of my young men must have been in the shop at the time it was stolen; they are not here.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going along, I saw the scuffle, and went to it, and then they seized hold of me, and said I was one.

GUILTY , aged 22,

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-95

1074. EMANUEL JOSE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , one chest, value 3 s. one coat, value 5 s. five waistcoats, value 25 s. six pair of pantaloons, value 12 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. five pair of stockings, value 5 s. one pair of shoes, value 2 s. one hammock, value 4 s. one rug, value 1 s. and two blankets, value 2 s. the property of Antonio Gormese , in the dwelling-house of Mary Bolton .

ANTONIO GORMESE . I am a Portuguese; so is the prisoner. My chest I left at the house of Mrs. Bolton. The prisoner helped me to take it there; we brought it there on the Saturday, and when I went on the Monday, it was gone; the prisoner had taken it away.

MARY BOLTON . I live in Greenwell-court, London Docks ; I don't keep the whole house; a person of the name of Smith lets the whole house out in tenements; Smith does not live in it. The prisoner and the young man who belongs to the clothes, asked me to let a chest, and hammock, and bed, lie in my lodging for a day or two, until the young man got a ship; I had no objection, and let them do so. This was on the Saturday, and on the Monday, the prisoner came, and took the things away, as he said, to take on board, for he said, the young man was not coming on shore again. He took the things, and went away. The next day, the prosecutor came, and asked me if I had seen Emanuel. I told him I had, and asked him if he had not seen him, for he had taken his things on board to him.

MARY WELSH . The woman who brought this chest and these things, asked me to take care of them for her. Her husband was indicted for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen, and he died in gaol.

JOSEPH POWIS . On the 15th of last month, I apprehended the prisoner, in a house in Well-alley. He said, he had carried the things to one Emanuel Antoni . In consequence of what Antoni's wife told me, I went to the house of the last witness, and there I found the things.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

The prisoner when called upon for his defence, said, he did not understand what had been said, whereupon, the learned Recorder, with his usual perspicuity re-capitulated it to him, through the medium of an interpreter.

Prisoner's Defence. This Emanuel Antoni , who is dead, told me to go for the things, in order that Antonio Gormese might not go on board the ship which he had engaged with, for he was going to get him a better ship and more wages.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-96

1075. MARTHA MEETCALF was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one handkerchief, value 1 s. one pillow case, value 1 s. one cloth bag, value 6 d. and one glass cloth, value 6 d. the property of Francis Brennan , one silk handkerchief, value 1 s. one petticoat, value 2 s. one cap, value 2 s. one habit shirt, value 1 s. and one shift, value 3 s. the property of Mary Brennan , spinster .

After the evidence in support of the prosecution, was gone through, it clearly appeared by the testimony of the witnesses adduced for the defence, that the unfortunate prisoner was deranged; she

was accordingly, by the direction of the learned Recorder, found NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-97

1076. CAROLINE ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , two gowns, value 7 s. three yards of flannel, value 3 s. and one apron, value 6 d. the property of Susannah Jacobs .

SUSANNAH JACOBS. I am servant to Mr. Bumpkins. These things were taken out of my bed room, and I don't know by whom. Mr. Bumpkins lives at 13, Great Friday-street, St. James's . We were sent for to the Cock and Harp, to see the prisoner, who was detained there, on a charge of stealing a tablecloth. On her being searched, the duplicates for my property were found upon her.

WILLIAM MALLET . I produce a gown, pawned by the prisoner.

GEORGE SKEFFINGTON . I produce three yards of flannel, which was pledged with me, on Thursday, the 21st of September.

ALEXANDER MACBETH . I produce a gown, pawned on the 20th of September, by the prisoner at the bar.

JOHN KNIGHT . I produce the corresponding duplicates for all these several articles; I found them on the prisoner.

Susannah Jacobs . I live at Mr. Bumpkins's, who is a publican, in Friday-street, St. James's. I went out in the morning, leaving all the articles in my room, and the door locked. On my return, at four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed my property. All these articles produced by the pawnbrokers, are my property.

GUILTY , aged 29.

1077. CAROLINE ATKINS was again indicted, for stealing, on the 21st of September , a tablecloth, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Barber .

CHARLES BROWNLER . I assist at the bar of the Cock and Harp, which is in Jermyn-street, Piccadilly , and kept by Samuel Barber . On the 21st of September, I was sitting in the bar, and the prisoner came and had a glass of liquor; she then went as if she was going into the yard. Some time afterwards I recollected she had been gone a long time; I went to look for her, and after searching various parts of the premises, I found her in my master's bed room, and found one of our tablecloths on her.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 29,

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-98

1078. ELIZABETH ASHFIELD was indicted for that she, on the 19th of September , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, a certain child of William Dawson and Susannah Dawson , his wife, under the age of ten years, (to wit,) of the age of six years, maliciously, and feloniously, by force, did take, and carry away, with intent to deprive the parents of possession the said child, by concealing and detaining the said child from them .

SECOND COUNT. Stating the prisoner's intent to be, to steal the articles of apparel off and from the child.

THIRD COUNT. The same as the first, only stating the prisoner to have taken the child by fraud, instead of force.

FOURTH COUNT. The same as the second, only stating the prisoner's intent to be, to steal the apparel on the child by fraud, instead of force.

SUSANNAH DAWSON . I live in the Curtain-road; my husband's name is William. My child that was stolen was six years old; she was playing in Curtain-road, with a little girl, named Ann Dickinson.

ANN DICKINSON . I don't know how old I am; I know it is a bad thing to tell a lie. On the 16th, I was playing with Susan Dawson , in the Curtain-road; a woman came and asked me if I would go up to the top of the road, and she would give me a penny; when I got to the top of the road, she took me all up Hoxton; Susan Dawson was with us at this time. She sent me to a house to ask for a shift and a shilling, and she said, she would take care of Susan Dawson while I went. When I came back, she was with two men. She took Susan Dawson round by the fields, and the two men brought me home. I know the woman; there she is, (pointing to the prisoner at the bar.)

THOMAS LACEY . The prisoner lives in Pear Tree court. On the 19th of the last month, between the hours of five and six in the evening, I went up the prisoner's apartment; the prisoner was not there. I found this duplicate.

ROBERT UPSALL . I am a pawnbroker. That is my duplicate. I produce a frock; it was pawned at my house, but not by the prisoner.

MARY BARBER . I saw the prisoner with a child in her hand, coming out of the court where the duplicate was found, Pear Tree court; it was between five and six to the best of my recollection. I heard her say to the child, don't make such a noise, and I will give you a halfpenny worth of plumbs; she accordingly bought the child a halfpenny worth of plumbs, and gave them to her. Seeing the child clean, but without a frock, I said, pray ma'am is that your child; no, said, she, ma'am, but it is my sister's.

PHOEBE MOODY. I live in Crown-court. I am the person who found the child; she was in the Curtain-road, coming home crying; I asked the child where her frock was; she said, the prisoner had it, and took me where the prisoner lived, in Pear Tree Court.

THOMAS HAYCOCK. I apprehended the prisoner; there was a wonderful great mob of people round her; I went to see what was the matter; then they charged this woman with stealing the child, and I took her to Worship-street.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Tuesday, the 19th of September, the mother came to my house, about six o'clock in the evening, and told me there was a woman charged with stealing the child. I found the prisoner in custody. I, and Haycock, put the child into a room with the prisoner, and six other persons, and she singled out the prisoner from all the rest.

(The child's frock sworn to, by Susannah Dawson .)

GUILTY , aged 20,

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Upon the Fourth Count of the indictment only.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-99

1079. ELIZABETH HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , one watch, value 5 l. one gold chain, value 3 l. two seals, value 11 s. one watch key, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Wood , from his person .

JOSEPH WOOD . I am a linen draper . I spent the evening with some friends, on the 15th of October, and left them at about half past twelve, and I know I had my watch and seals then. I had drank very freely, and was very much intoxicated; so much so, that I don't know how I lost my watch.

JOSEPH MIDFORD YOUNG. I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of this month, the prisoner brought me a gold watch, chain, and seals, and wanted me to lend her four pounds upon it. In consequence of her not giving me proper answers, I stopped her, and had her sent to Worship-street.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I produce the watch.

Joseph Wood . That is my property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-100

1080. BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , one great coat, value 6 s. the property of John Stone ; and two aprons, value 2 s. the property of Mary Betts , spinster .

JOHN STONE . I am a pot-boy; my master keeps the Berwick Arms, Castle-street . On the 30th of September, my great coat was hanging on the balusters of the stair case; it was stolen at about eleven o'clock in the evening. I saw the prisoner go out at about that time, with a bundle under his arm; I went after him, and collared him, and asked him what he had, and found he had my great coat, and Mary Betts 's aprons.

BENJAMIN HAMPDEN . I took the prisoner into custody, hearing the watch called.

RICHARD M'CONNELL. I produce the great coat.

(Property sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 69.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-101

1081. THOMAS HESSOMS , alias EPEMS , was indicted for bigamy .

But as the existence of the first wife could not be established, the Jury, by the direction of the learned Recorder, found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-102

1082. JOHN MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , two rabbits, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Fardoe .

JOSEPH FARDOE . On the 19th of September, I kept two rabbits railed in, in my garden. When I got up in the morning, they were gone; they could not have got out of themselves.

THOMAS PAGE . I am a watchman, and stopped stopped the prisoner, with a bag, with these two rabbits, and five ducks.

(Property sworn to, by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 45.

1083. JOHN MARSHALL was again indicted, for stealing, on the 29th of September , five ducks, value 7 s. one shirt, value 1 s. one waistcoat, value 9 d. and one pair of stockings, value 6 d. the property of William Purssord .

THOMAS PAGE . I am a watchman, and stopped the prisoner, as I have stated, with a bundle, which besides the two rabbits, contained five ducks killed, with their legs folded up, ready for market; also a shirt, a waistcoat, and a pair of stockings. The ducks would not keep; but we have out off the wings; and I produce them, together with the shirt, waistcoat, and stockings.

(Property sworn to by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-103

1084. JOSEPH PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , one jacket, value 1 s. one hat, value 6 d. the property of George Ingle ; and one shirt, value 2 s. the property of John Solley ; and one waistcoat, value 2 d. the property of John Nichelsoe .

GEORGE INGLE . I am an apprentice on board the Lord Townsend, West Indiaman . I lost my things on Sunday morning, or Saturday night, off the forecastle. When the prisoner was taken by our second mate, the things were found on him.

JOHN LOLLEY . I belong to the same ship, and lost my things at the same time; they were also taken from the forecastle.

OLIVER SUTHERLAND . The prisoner was brought to our office, and was delivered to my custody, together with a jacket, waistcoat, shirt, and hat. I produce them.

(Property sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-104

1085. ELEANOR LOGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , from the person of Jacob Anderson , a pocket-book, value 1 s. two 5 l. bank notes, and nine 1 l. bank notes, the property of the said Jacob Anderson .

JACOB ANDERSON . I am a ship carpenter . On the 20th, or 21st of September last, I was going on board my vessel, between two and three o'clock in the morning, when the prisoner came up to me, and asked me where I was going; I told her I was going on board. She said it was so late, I had better stop on shore. I thought I had better, and said I would go with her. We went to a house at the corner of Gravel lane , which was open, and got two glasses of gin; there were two young men in the house, who, she said, were her brothers, and asked me would I not give them something to drink; she then took my pocket-book out of my bosom, and ran away. When I saw her again, I reproached her.

I never saw my pocket-book, nor any thing of the kind since. I am quite certain the prisoner was the person.

JOHN BROWNE . I am a patrole. I was on duty at about half past one; I heard a cry of watch, and the prosecutor told me that the prisoner had taken him round his neck with one hand, and taken the pocket-book with the other. I searched her, and found two five-pound notes and six one's; but we never found the pocket-book.

Prisoner. Q. To witness. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober - A. He was neither drunk nor sober, that I know of; for being a foreigner, we could not make him understand.

THOMAS HARRISON . On this morning, the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, we found two five-pound notes and six one-pound notes on her. She told me to take them, and not say a word about them.

Jacob Anderson . I did not take notice of the notes when I was paid off; but I suppose those are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor made me a present of the notes.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-105

1086. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Hawker , esq. from his person .

JOSEPH HAWKER , ESQ. I am the Richmond Herald, at the Herald's College . At about twenty minutes before four, on Friday last, I was returning from the Bank, with a friend of mine; it was an excessive wet day. Just by Bow Church, we felt several persons pressing upon us from behind. I was holding an umbrella over my friend's head. I remarked it to him, and looked back; when immediately they left off pressing. When we got some way up Cheapside, we felt them pressing again; I observed the prisoner on my left hand; I walked faster; he kept by my side, and did the same. I slackened my pace; he did the same. When we got to the end of Paternoster row, my friend crossed over, and I crossed to the East side of St. Paul's Church yard. Presently a young chap came up on my side, and made believe to be looking up in the air. When I got to the corner of Watling street, I thought I had got rid of them. I turned round to look which way they went, and saw them going in a direction towards Ludgate Hill. In a few minutes, to my surprize, I found the prisoner behind me. When I got to the corner of the Old Change , there is a post, and the passage between it and the wall is very narrow. I was in the act of going round the post, and I felt something at my pocket; I instantly turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief, going up the Old Change. The prisoner immediately said, there is your handkerchief, I picked it up in the street. I said, he had picked my pocket, and he said, it was a man in blue picked my pocket. There was nobody near but a sailor. The prisoner ran away: I followed him; he was stopped; I collared him, and brought him back, and delivered him and my handkerchief to Matthews.

JOHN SUGDEN . I am master of a vessel. I did not see the prisoner take the pocket handkerchief, but I saw him following the gentleman; there was no one near but myself at the time; I was at the opposite side of the way. I saw the prisoner turn to go up Old Change. I did not see him offer the handkerchief. I was obliged to go about my business; but in half a minute afterwards, hearing a cry of stop thief; I turned back, and helped to take him.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a police officer. I know nothing of this transaction, any more than that the prisoner and the handkerchief was delivered to me. The handkerchief was quite clean; and if it had been picked up, as the prisoner said, it must have been very dirty.

(Property produced, and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday afternoon, I was going down Old Change; the prosecutor was before me; his pocket handkerchief dropped out of his pocket, and I immediately picked it up, tapped him on the shoulder, and gave it him.

Mr. Hawker. He did not tap me on the shoulder at all.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-106

1087. DANIEL DAVIS was indicted for that he, on the 7th of October , unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one Benjamin Spanner , a certain false and counterfeit token, made with intent to pass as and for one of certain silver tokens for the sum of three shillings, heretofore, to wit, on the 1st day of January, in the 53rd year of our Lord the King, made, stamped, and issued, by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, by the sanction of his Majesty's Privy Council, being likened unto the same in all outer appearancy .

BENJAMIN SPANNER . In consequence of my seeing the Solicitor for the Bank, and having a communication with him, I was introduced to the prisoner, on the 7th of October; it was at the Old Bell, in Petticoat lane. The person who introduced me to the prisoner, spoke to him, in consequence of which, the prisoner asked me how many I wanted, and told me I might have half a dozen; but I could not have them before seven o'clock that evening. I according made an appointment with the prisoner, to meet him that evening at the White Dog, Widegate alley . He came at the appointed hour, and called me out, saying, he had the goods, and wanted my money. I then gave him nine shillings, and he gave me six three shilling tokens; he bid me go to the window, and look at them. We went into the public-house, and then he gave me part of a quartern of gin. When we were parting, he bid me put my hand to his pocket, and feel, for he had ten pounds worth about him to serve his customers. I did feel, and felt a great weight. He said, I

might have some any time I chose, by going down Petticoat lane and seeing him. I immediately went to the Red Lion, in Bull and Mouth-street, where I had an officer in attendance, and there I marked them, in his presence, on the head side.

(Counterfeit tokens put into the hands of the witness.)

Q. Are these the tokens you received from the prisoner - A. They are.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. I received these tokens from the last witness, and delivered them to Mr. Westwood.

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD , ESQ. I am assistant solicitor for the Bank. I received these tokens on Monday morning, the 9th of October; they have been in my possession ever since.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD. I am one of the tellers of the Bank, and know all these to be counterfeit.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months , and bound over to find sureties for good behaviour for six months more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-107

1088. EDWARD BLAKENEY and CATHERINE CONNER were indicted for that they, on the 22nd September , unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one John Wakelin , a certain false and counterfeit token, for the sum of three shillings, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit, and that they, within the space of ten days afterwards, (to wit,) on the same day, did utter to one John Shafford , a like false and counterfeit token, for the same value, well knowing that also to be false and counterfeit, by reason of which premises, they became, and were common utterers of such like false and counterfeit tokens .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . On Friday, the 22nd of September last, I was in Tower-street, between five and six in the evening; I saw the man prisoner, gingling a three shilling token, which was bad, on the step of a door. I followed them up Mark lane, in company together; the man went into a baker's shop, the woman went in after him, and I stood on the outside; I saw him tender a three shilling token; it was refused. They joined again, and went through a court, which lead into Billeter-square; they then went into London Hall street; there the female prisoner went into a chandler's shop; the man stood outside, at about ten yards from the shop. She staid a very little time in the shop; when she came out, I went in. Mary Hurd keeps that shop; I made enquiry; in consequence of which, I continued to watch them; I followed them through Billeter-square, into Fenchurch-street, and to Mr. Sharp's shop; the woman went in there; Blakeney stood outside; it is a grocer's shop. She came out, and they immediately joined company again. I then went into the shop, and was shewn a three shilling piece, which I desired the young man in the shop to mark, and he marked it in my presence. I then followed the prisoners into Crutched Friars; there the woman sat on the step of a door, whilst the man went into a baker's shop. I saw him throw down a three shilling piece, which was refused; that was Moxey's. Then they joined company, and went into Mark-lane, from thence into Tower-street, where they went into a public-house; I followed them, and made some enquiry of the landlord. I followed them from thence into Thames-street; the man then went into a cook's shop, and came out almost directly; upon his coming out, they joined company again directly, and went into the Red House, Lower Thames-street. I went in, and observed the person, whom I thought to be the landlord, coming from the tap room towards the bar, with a three shilling piece in his hand. I asked him what the people had given him, and he shewed me the three shilling piece, which he said was a bad one, and in my presence he marked it, by my directions. I then apprehended the prisoners, who were in the tap room. I found nothing on the man; on the woman I found a counterfeit three shilling en in her right hand, and fourpence halfpenny in copper.

(A counterfeit three shilling token was here put into the hands of the witness.)

Q. Is that the token you took from the female prisoner - A. It is.

MARY HURD . At about twelve o'clock at noon, on the 22nd of September, a woman came into my shop, and tendered a three shilling piece, which I thought bad, and which I told her to get change for at a neighbouring house, but she never returned.

JOHN WAKELIN . I am shopman to Mr. Sharp, who is a grocer, and lives in Fenchurch-street . On the 22nd of September, the prisoner Conner, came into our shop, at about seven o'clock in the evening, she came for a small quantity of tea and sugar; I told her we did not make so small a quantity, and then she asked for a larger quantity. I made up her articles to the amount of eleven pence; she gave me a three shilling token, and I gave her a penny and two shillings; she went out; immediately Matthews came in, and I marked the three shilling piece I received from her. (Token produced to witness.) That is the one I marked.

JOHN MOXLEY . I am a baker, in Hart-street, Crutched Friars. On the 22nd of September, a person came in just before Matthews, and offered a bad three shilling token for some bread, which I refused.

Charles Matthews . That was the prisoner Blakeney.

JOHN SHAFFORD . I was at the Red House , assisting in the place of the landlord , who was sick in bed. On the evening of the 22nd of September, the two prisoners went into the tap-room, and called for a pint of beer, in paying for which, they tendered me a three shilling token; the man gave it me; they were sitting together. I took it in my hand, and perceived it to be a bad one; I immediately said, as I was coming out of the tap-room, I really think we have got smashers in the house; then Matthews came in; I shewed it him; he bade me mark it. (Token produced to witness.) That is the one tendered to me by Blakeney.

MR. JAMES THURGOOD . I have examined the two tokens uttered by the prisoners; they are counterfeit. I have also examined the one found in the hand of the prisoner Conner; it is a counterfeit also.

BLAKENEY, GUILTY , aged 58.

CONNER, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year, each , and bound over to find sureties for their good behaviour for two years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-108

1089. WILLIAM BEVERS , CHARLES SMEDLEY , and GEORGE CONNOR , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Stevens Ingleton , about two in the night of the 24th of October , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, five burnishing stones, value 1 l. 5 s. of the said Joseph Stevens Ingleton .

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am apprenticed to Mr. Ingleton, carver and gilder , in Moor's yard, St. Martin's lan e. Mr. Ingleton lives at Highgate, and goes out there every night. The house where I sleep is divided into three dwellings, the one over the other. On the 25th of this month, at a few minutes before three in the morning, the two prisoners, Smedley and Bevers, came into the room where I sleep, and asked me for my money? I told them I had none. They asked me for some gold? I told them, what there was was about the shop, and then they went and looked for it. They then came and asked me for my burnishing stones. I did not know them before. Then they asked me where my box was. They got five burnishing stones. I told them my box was at the farther end of the shop. They went and broke open a little tea caddy that I had in the shop, which I used to keep my money in; there was no money in it then. I was then dressing myself, when they came to me, and called me a bl - dy b - r, and said, if I did not lie still, they would murder me. I laid still, until they had got out of the shop, and then I followed them down stairs; I put on my trowsers, my waistcoat, and my shoes; I followed them; when I got on the last landing, Bevers came up to me, and told me to go back; I told him, I would not. He told me a second time to go back? I told him I would not. He said, I'd be d - d if I would go back. Then he shoved me against the ladder, which stood on the landing, and then ran down stairs, and he got out, and left Smedley behind him; Smedley was inside the street door; I caught hold of him, and then somebody was pushing the outside of the door, to try to get Smedley out. Smedley then ran up stairs from the first landing on the outside of the house. I then ran out of the yard, and ran after him, and cried murder, and stopped him; he ran up Hemming's row then. When I was fighting with them at the top of the stairs, I got two of their hats; I do not positively know whose hats they were; there were W. B. in one, and a shirt and two muslin handkerchiefs. When I was scuffling with them, one of them caught me by the throat, and tried to gag me; that was Smedley; he got his hand in my mouth, and I bit his fingers. That same day I went out, I saw Smedley and Connor; Connor was an errand boy to my master. I followed them, until I met a man, and told him to mind where they went to, until I fetched Mr. Fitzgerald, who is a saddler, and has the manufactory below ours, in the same house. We pursued them, and took them just by Whitehall, in Parliament-street. I had not seen Connor at all that morning, until I saw him when we pursued and took him. I am an apprentice to Mr. Ingleton. They broke in, by breaking away some wooden bars over the front door.

Q. How do you know it was Beaver and Smedley - A. By the light of the moon, as I lay in bed.

Q. Was it light enough to see their faces - A. Yes.

Q. Then you are sure you saw both of them - A. Yes; they came close to my bed side.

Prisoner Bevers. Q. What do you swear to me by - A. By your features.

- FITZGERALD. All I know is, that when I arrived at about eight o'clock on the morning of the robbery, I found my premises broken open also; I am a saddler; my manufactory is on the same premises; it is a large factory and there are three floors; one door leads to the whole, but each has a separate door, my premises are under Mr. Ingleton's, where Butler sleeps. When I came there in the morning, at about eight o'clock, I perceived the door broken open, the second door of the entrance; there are two doors in the entrance; there is an outer door; then at the end of the passage there is another door, leading to the factories. It was the second door which was broken; and as I went up to the counting house, I perceived the window was open, and the different drawers all knocked about the floor; I had been robbed too. I found a hat which is here.

ISAAC PIKE . I was sent for at about four o'clock on the afternoon after the robbery was committed. When I came into the workshop, there was Connor and Smedley, whom they gave into my charge. I then took them to St. Martin's watchhouse; and got information where the third man was to be found, at No. 30, Orchard street, Westminster. I took another with me, and went and found out the room in which he lived, and found him at home; he was at tea. I asked him if he knew any one of the name of Smedley or Connor? he hesitated, and then said he knew them a little. Then I told him what I came upon, and that he was suspected to be one of the party. With that I took him into custody, together with the hat, and brought him to St. Martin's. I found out on Thursday, that five burnishing stones were pledged in Smith street, Westminster. The pawnbroker is here.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. Mr. Fitzgerald came in the morning to Bow street and stated the particulars of the robbery, and I went with him. On examining the premises, I found that a sort of railing, which runs over the outer door, and along the lower part of the premises was broken; and when two or three bars of this were removed, there would be room for a man to get in without disturbing the fastening of the outer door. Then you turn to the left, and there is a staircase, at the bottom of which, there is a strong door before you come to Mr. Fitzgerald's door. A considerable part of the wood of this door was cut away, to get at a strong lock, so as to shove it open. Then the stair case is open to the top of the house. On coming to Mr Fitzgerald's

factory door, there is a place large enough to admit a hand to the inside, where I am given to understand the persons in his employment hang the key, for each others convenience. This door had not been broken, but had been opened with the key; then they can go from there up another flight of stairs to Mr. Ingleton's; Mrs. Ingleton's warehouse is made secure by a flap door, so that that was forced, and by that means, the bolt pushed up. When Butler goes up of a night, he bolts this after him, and then nobody can get in there without bursting this flap door up. These things were given to me. (Witness here produced two neckerchiefs, one shirt, and a hat, marked on the inside W. B. another old hat, a tinder box, and a dark lanthorn.) I went in search of the prisoners, and whilst I was gone, they were taken.

William Butler . I made this trap door fast, and put the keys on the inside, and went to bed at half after nine. When I examined it the next morning, I found that the staple was forced, and laying some distance from the trap door, and the keys which I always leave in the lock, to prevent any one putting false keys in, were taken out. The shirt and two handkerchiefs belong to Mr. Fitzgerald. I found one of these hats inside the door, and the other directly I got out, it was upon the premises; I do not know whose hats they are.

- Fitzgerald. I found one hat in my counting house. The key of my factory was generally hung up on the inside, in a place where the workmen could get it, to let themselves in of a morning. I know the shirt and the handkerchiefs to be my property. I had left them in a trunk on my premises. The new hat which was found at Bevers's, is mine.

JOHN BASNET . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 16, Great Smith street, Westminster. On the 25th of October, I received in pledge five burnishing stones. I conduct the business for my father. The prisoner Smedley, corresponds exactly with the person who pawned them.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. When I went to Bow-street, his appearance struck me, and when he spoke, I was more convinced. He pledged them in the name of William Davis ; I never saw him before; he seemed to be more decent then, than he is now.

Smedley. What can you swear to me by - A. Your appearance, and your peculiar voice, now removes every possible doubt that I could entertain.

JOHN WATSON . On Wednesday evening last, I searched, and found a silk handkerchief on him. I found on Mr. Ingleton's premises, this little tea caddy or box, broken open as it is now.

William Butler . One of these four hats I know belongs to Connor, and this handkerchief I know to be mine. I think one of the other hats is Smedley's, because it was found at the door where we had the scuffle; and the other I think belongs to Bevers.

William Salmon . The initials correspond.

Bever's Defence. Upon the Wednesday morning, that new hat was brought to me by George Conner , he left it at my lodgings between eight and nine in the morning.

COURT. How came you to say you bought it. -

Smedley's Defence. I have got nothing to say, but that I was not in the party. I never saw the burnishing stones, nor that young man, who says I pawned them at his house.

William Butler . I can swear to the burnishing stones produced by John Basnet ; they are worth seven shillings each.

William Salmon . The middle finger of Smedley's left hand appeared to have been severely bitten.

BEVERS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

SMEDLEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

CONNOR, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-109

1090. JOHN PETTIT STONE was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the first eight counts mentioned, was a person employed by the Post Office of Great Britain, in sorting letters and packets brought to the General Post Office in London, and that on the 14th of July , a certain letter than lately before sent by the Post from Gargrave, in the County of York, to the above mentioned General Post office, for and to be delivered to Jane Simpson , at Knightsbridge, containing one bank note for the payment of 20 l. and one other bank note for the payment of 5 l. came to his hands and possession, while he was employed as aforesaid, and that he, feloniously did secrete the said letter the said bank notes therein contained being then in force, and the property of Frances Mary Richardson Currer , and the money payable and secured by them being unsatisfied .

SECOND COUNT. Charging him with stealing and taking from and out of the said letter, the said bank notes.

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS. Substituting the word packet for letter; stating it to be the property of Andrew Simpson ; and for stealing the letter out of a certain Office in London.

MARTHA WILSON . I reside near Gargrave, in Yorkshire. Miss Currer resides at my house. On the 11th of July, I delivered a twenty pound note and a five pound note to Miss Currer. (Witness produces a book, and reads an entry thereform,

"cash bank notes to Miss Currer, 11th of July, dated 9th of May, 1815, No. 12979, value 20 l.") I have the particulars of the five-pound note. These are the notes I delivered to Miss Currer, on the 11th of July.

FRANCES MARY RICHARDSON CURRER . On the 11th of July, I received from Mrs. Wilson, two bank notes, one of twenty pound, the other of five pound; I folded them up in a letter, and directed it to

"Mrs. Simpson, Knightsbridge, London." I believe it was wrote

"opposite the brewhouse." As to that addition, I am not positive. I sealed that letter; I put it on the ledge of the pianoforte, where it is customary to put the letters which are to go by the Post. I wrote upon it

"paid."

EDWARD HOLDITH . I was servant to Mr. Wilson, in July last. I recollect on the morning of the 12th of July, taking a letter, marked post paid, and directed to

"Mrs. Simpson, Knightsbridge, London," from the ledge of the pianoforte; I put

into Mr. Wilson's letter bag, and locked it, and delivered the bag to John Hart , and with it one shilling and tenpence, in payment of the postage for this letter. Hart keeps the Post office at Gargrave; I believe he is a quaker.

Cross examined. I did not take the letter to the Post Office. The letter was missed about three weeks after this. I recollect that letter positively, by a reference to a letter book, which I keep; that letter book is in the carriage at the door of the Court. I never took a double letter paid before, to Mrs. Simpson. I certainly don't know, but by a reference to that book.

Mr. Attorney General. Go to the carriage and get the book.

Miss. Currer. I sent a double letter three or four weeks after the miscarriage of this; but never before the 11th of July, to Mrs. Simpson. I heard the first letter had miscarried before I sent the second.

MARGARET TYNDALL . I am Post mistress, at Skipton. The Post Office through which the letters go before they come, some is kept by John Hart, who is a quaker. I received the bag from his Office on the 12th of July. (A paper put into the hands of the witness.) That is a bill of all letters sent to and received from Darnley, on the 12th of July. There is an item here which shews me that there was apart paid double letters from Gargrave to London; there is the sum of one shilling and ten-pence opposite it, which is put there as the sum paid, and which is the amount of the double postage of a letter from Gargrave to London. Part of this bill is made by me; that is the part relative to letters sent by me to Gargrave; the other part is made by Hart, and is the account of letters sent from Gargrave to me.

Mr. Alley. Submitted that the man who wrote this himself, ought to be called.

THE COURT. Ruled that, that was not necessary; for the evidence of this witness, as to the identity of Hart's hand writing, was quite sufficient.

Margaret Tyndall . The letters agreed with this list, and of course the double letter paid one shilling and tenpence come. Had it not come, or had not the one shilling and tenpence been paid, I should have taken notice of it, and have written upon it. I afterwards made up the bag from Skipton to London, and made up the list of the letters. (List put into the hands of the witness.) That is the list; the amount of paid letters is four shillings and eight-pence; that is including the double paid letter from Gargrave.

Cross examined. Q. D. C. C.? what does that mean - A. That is the mark expressing double.

Q. It does not express how many double letters there were? could it not have been a double letter to some place from Gargrave, but not to London, the postage of which would be elevenpence - A. No; two double letters would be more.

WILLIAM PACKHAM . I am in the Post office, in London. The Skipton bag arrived on the 14th of July; I received it in due course. (A paper put into the hands of the witness.) There is a minute here of four shillings and eightpence, for paid letters. The paid letters I received, came to that amount; or of course I should have taken notice of it. A letter directed to Knightsbridge, would go from me to the stamper at the B table.

JEREMIAH ADAMS . I am employed as a stamper at the B table, in the Post office. I was so employed on the 14th of July. Joseph Bedford is also employed at the same table. A double letter post paid, directed to Knightsbridge, would come to us to be stamped. I stamped all letters that came to me at my table, in the course of that day.

Cross examined. There are seven tables; but the letters never get mixed. A letter belonging to table B, could not get to letter C.

JOSEPH BEDFORD . I am a stamper also at the B table. I stamped all letters that came to me on this day.

THOMAS HIRD. I am inspector of London and Two-penny Post paid letters. Letters paid for in the General Post office come from all the seven tables to me, in their way to delivery; I, and my assistant, examined all these letters on the 14th of July; when we have done with them, we give them to the sorter, whose name is Bond. We put them on the other side of our table, and he takes them. I examined all letters that came to me on that day in the usual way.

WILLIAM HOLDGATE . I am assistant to the last witness. I assist him in examining the different letters brought from the various stampers; and after having so done with all the letters that came to me, I put them on the other side of the table, for Bond, the sorter, to take away.

JOHN BOND. I was employed in the General Post office, on the 14th of July last, to sort all Post paid letters. I sorted the letters for Knights-bridge. When I had sorted all the letters, there is a person comes from the Two-penny Post Office, and takes such letters as are for Two-penny Post Office away. I am the only sorter of Post paid letters.

Cross examined. A letter would have to pass through a good many hands before it came to mine.

WILLIAM THURLING . I belong to the Two-penny Post Office.

Q. When a letter coming by the General Post Office paid, what course will it take after it has been to the sorter - A. I go to Bond, and collect them, and take them to the Two-penny Post Office.

Q. That is another office under the same building - A. Yes.

Q. How do you take them - A. I take them in my arm, and put them in a box; that box is then locked, and conveyed over to the stamper of Two-penny Post Office. All this was done, as in the usual course, on the 14th of July

JOHN ELLIS . I am a stamper to the Two-penny Post Office. I was on duty on the 14th of July last. A paid letter intended for Knightsbridge, having come by the General Post , would be brought to me by the last witness, among others, locked up in a box. Then I stamped them, and put them over to Mr. Read. Such letters as there is not room for in the box, are brought by hand at the same time.

I went through the usual course, and stamped all the letters that came to me on the 14th of July.

THOMAS READ . I was employed on the 14th of July, in sorting letters paid for Knightsbridge. Mr. Payne, and the prisoner Stone, were also employed in the same business. It was the duty of the prisoner to put the letters sorted for Knightsbridge, into the bag; that bag is then sealed, and conveyed by a boy on horeback to Knightsbridge.

THOMAS PAYNE . I was employed with the last witness, on the 14th of July, in sorting paid letters for Knightsbridge. It was the prisoner's duty to put them into the bag, and Mr. Thurling's to seal them.

William Thurling . It was my duty to seal the Knightsbridge bag, and I have no doubt, but that I did so on the 14th of July.

JOHN SMITH ATLEE . I was employed in the Post Office at Knightsbridge, on the 14th of July, I received the bag as usual, on its arrival. There is but one deliverer at Knightsbridge. I, and a person, named Lowndes, sorted the letters; I sorted all that came to my share, and gave them to Jannaway, the deliverer.

THOMAS LOWNDES . I assist in sorting the letters that come to Knightsbridge Post office. I assisted in sorting those that arrived on the due delivery of the bag, on the 14th of July; they were delivered to Joshua Jannaway .

JOSHUA JANNAWAY . I am the deliverer of letters at Knightsbridge. I was on duty on the 14th of July. I knew very well where Mrs. Simpson lived. If I had had a letter for that day, I should certainly have delivered it.

MRS. JANE SIMPSON . I am the wife of Andrew Simpson ; I live at Knightsbridge, opposite the brewery. I did not receive a letter from Miss Currer, with whom I carry on a correspondence, on the 14th of July. I afterwards received a twenty pound note and a five pound note; at least, a draft for that amount, from Miss Currer, in a letter dated, the 27th of July. The second letter with the draft was a single letter, but Post paid. I made enquiry at the Post office about the missing letter.

Edward Holditch . (Producing the book mentioned.) From an entry in this book, of the payment of a double letter, I am enabled positively to swear that I did delivered it to Hart. I turn to an entry

"on the 28th of July," of a single letter, to Mrs. Simpson, Post paid," on that day.

ANNAND VESTRIS. I am a dancer to the Opera House. My benefit was on the 20th of July; the Public were respectfully informed by advertisements, that they might be supplied with tickets on their application at my house, at No. 11, in the Haymarket. I remember some application to me relative to the subject of a bank note, supposed to have passed from me to Mr. Price.

Q. Do you remember that a bank note was sent to Mr. Price's to be changed. I don't know that there was. I have a recollection of a person paying me a twenty-pound bank note in payment for some tickets; that person was a stranger; he was dressed in a blue coat, and a yellow waistcoat, and I believe he might have nankeen trowsers on; but I am not sure; he asked me for four pit tickets, and gave me a twenty pound note; I was to take two pounds, and return him eighteen pounds; I could not return him the eighteen pounds, and sent out for change; I gave it to Ann White to get changed.

Cross examined. I certainly cannot swear to the person of the gentleman who purchased these tickets; he had a blue coat, and a yellow waistcoat, and I think nankeen trowsers. That is the common dress I believe worn by the generality of young gentlemen at that time of the year in this country.

ANN WHITE . I am a servant to the last witness. I recollect his delivering to me a twenty pound note to get changed, on a Monday, in July. I took that note to Mr. Price's, and got it changed. I saw a person in the room with Mr. Vestris, with the appearance of a gentleman; but I don't remember that it was the prisoner. I believe he had the dress on that has been described by Mr. Vestris. I took the note to Mr. Price's, and got it changed; I returned the change to Mr. Vestris, and the same person was then with him.

THOMAS PRICE . I am in partnership with my brother, and keep an Italian warehouse. The last witness brought a note to me to be changed, on the 14th of July; it is impossible for me to say at what time of the day; but I believe it was in the afternoon, after two or three o'clock; that note was a twenty pound note, and I endorsed it,

"Mr. Vestris, 14th of July, 1815." and put my initials to it. (Note produced to witness.) I have no doubt that that is the note I changed; I gave small notes for it.

EDWARD PRICE . I am the brother to the last witness, and remember the transaction. I did not see my brother endorse this note; but I know his hand writing. This endorsement upon the back of it,

"Mr. Vestris, 14th of July, 1815," is his hand writing, as are the initials,

"I. P." and I have not the least doubt but that, that is the note brought by Ann White .

(The note read in court, appearing to have been cancelled on its payment at the Bank of England.)

EAMUND WELLS. I am a clerk in the Two-penny Post Office. I know the prisoner. I remember Mr. Ventris's benefit. The prisoner offered me a ticket to go it; it was a ticket to the pit. He said the tickets were given to him by his uncle, in Arundel-street. I do not know his name; but I believe it to be Piper. The prisoner gave me the ticket, and told me he would meet me at the Opera House. He said, he would ask his uncle for a ticket for Mr. Tomlinson. This was on the morning of the 18th. I went to the Opera House, and saw Mr. Tomlinson, and a lady there; but I don't know who she was. I do not know that I took particular notice of the dress of the prisoner about that time. He some times used to wear a blue coat, and nankeen pantaloons.

Cross examined. There is nothing particular in a young man like him wearing a blue coat and nankeen trowsers at that time of the year; I have a blue coat myself.

CHARLES TOMLINSON . I am acquainted with the

prisoner. He gave me two tickets to go to Mr. Vestris's benefit; he said, he received it from his uncle, in Arundel-street, whose name I believe is Piper. With one ticket I procured admission for myself, and with the other for a lady. I saw the prisoner there and Mr. Wells. I believe the prisoner wore a blue coat, a yellow waistcoat, and nankeen trowsers.

Cross examined. There is nothing particular in that, that I know of; I have a blue coat and yellow waistcoat on now.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am an officer. In consequence of a suspicion of this young man, I heard him asked, on the day he was apprehended, where he got these Opera tickets; he said, from his uncle, Mr. Piper, of Arundel-street. Mr. Piper was informed, in the presence of the prisoner, where he said, he had got the tickets. He said, the prisoner never had the tickets from him, for he never had had any himself.

THOMAS PIPER . I live in Arundel-street; I am the uncle of the prisoner at the bar. I never gave him any Opera pit tickets for Mr. Vestris's benefit, nor had I ever any thing of the kind in my life.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to assign.

The prisoner received an excellent character for honesty from two respectable witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18151025-110

1091. WILLIAM SEABROOK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Hagan , in the night time, of the 12th of May , and burglariously stealing therein, five bushels of flour, value 3 l. the property of George Hagan and Thomas Hagan .

HANNAH FISHER . I am servant to Mr. George Hagan , who is a miller , in partnership with his brother, Mr. Thomas Hagan , and resides at Stanwell Moor ; the mill joins the dwelling house; there is an internal communication from the one to the other, and they are under the same roof. My master went out on the night of the 12th of May, between seven and eight o'clock; I fastened the doors at about half past nine; I did not observe that the window in the mill was fast. I heard no noise at all. If any person got into the mill between nine and eleven, we must have heard him.

Q. At any time, and what, were you called up - A. We were alarmed at about one, by a noise near the water. I got up, and saw my master struggling with a man named Henry Bailey . That man was taken, and tried here. The next morning, I saw five strong sacks in the mill, and three of them nearly filled with flour; they were not there the night before. If they had been there, I must have seen them. I saw the place from whence the flour was taken.

THOMAS SEXTON . I am a constable. I was called in on the 13th of May, between seven and eight in the morning; I was sent for to take charge of Henry Bailey , and did so. I received three sacks, partly filled with flour, and two empty ones; there were five bushels, three pecks, and six pounds of flour; the value is about three pounds ten shillings; I have kept one bag, which is made of leather, and marked with sealing wax. I know Seabrook by sight; he lives in Stanwell Moor, at about four miles from the mill. I had a warrant to apprehend him, and could never find him there. To be sure, I never actually went to his house. I had been in the habit of seeing him in the neighbourhood, and after I had got this warrant, I could not see him; after a considerable lapse of time, I at last, apprehended him; I made him neither promise nor threat, nor held out any inducement to him to confess. He told me, that Henry Bailey came to him late at night on the 12th of May, and called him up, and asked him to go along with him, and to bring a stick with him, and he would help him to something. He went with them; between his house, and Hagan's mill, they fell in with one John Collins , and they all three proceeded to the mill; Bailey went to the window with himself, (Seabrook,) and got the window open.

Q. How is the window, is it within reach - A. It is

Q. Who got it open - A. Seabrook told me Bailey got it open, and asked him, (the prisoner,) if he thought he, (the prisoner,) could get in? Bailey said, I can, and did get in, and opened the door, as he, (the prisoner,) supposed, and let in Collins. The prisoner said, he remained on the outside to watch, until he was seized by Mr. George Hagan and Henry Miles . He said, he did not attempt to strike them with the stick. That was all he told me. The bag has been out of my possession.

Cross examined. Now with respect to this bag, what particular marks has it - A. This sealing wax.

Q. Is that sealing wax stamped with any impression to enable you to swear to it - A. No. I can swear to the bag.

Q. How is that, you swore just now to the wax, and now you swear to the bag, independent of it - A. I believe it to be the same.

WILLIAM BATES . I live at Stanwell; I am in the employment of Mr. Saunders, a miller. I accompanied Sexton to look at some sacks; I looked at some. I have looked at the leather bag produced, and believe it to be the prisoner's. It has often come to our mill. Being a leather one, I have taken notice of it, as I never saw such a one before.

Cross examined. Is there any mark upon it, by which you are enabled to swear to it - A. There are marks where it has been held upon hooks while we have put the flour in.

Q. That is to say, it appears to be a sack what has been sent to a mill. -

Thomas Sexton . Q. Now you were present at the examination of the prisoner, before Mr. Henderson, the magistrate; did you hear him hold out any inducement to the prisoner to confess - A.None whatever.

Q. Do you know Mr. Henderson's hand writing - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that paper, (paper put into the hands of the witness,) Is that signature of his name, his hand writing - A. It is.

Q. Did you see the prisoner sign it - A. Yes.

Cross examined. Do you know Seabrook's hand writing - A. I know Mr. Henderson's.

Q.You saw Seabrook sign a paper, but whether it was this or no, you can't tell - A. I certainly think it is.

Mr. Adolphus, as counsel for the prisoner, objected that this paper, (which purported to be a confession taken in writing from the prisoner's month,) could not be admitted in evidence, until the signature of the prisoner's name affixed to it, was proved to be his hand writing; as in all other cases where documentary evidence was adduced, the handwriting of the person whose name appeared affixed, ought to be proved.

Mr. Arabin, contra-contended. First, that this must be taken for granted as the prisoner's hand writing, for it was the magistrate's duty not to sign it until he had seen it signed by the prisoner. Secondly, the last witness, Sexton, had sworn he had seen the prisoner sign it, though if he had not, he could not perhaps have sworn to his hand writing. If seeing a man sign a paper was not proof of the identity of his hand writing, half the documentary evidence ever adduced, would be invalid. Suppose the case of a person who could not write, and therefore affixed some mark, why, one could swear to one mark from another; but if they saw a certain person make a certain mark, they might surely be enabled to prove that it was his.

COURT. This witness has said, I know Mr. Henderson's hand writing; one of those signatures is his; I saw the prisoner sign that paper also. That is quite proof enough of the prisoner's signature.

(The paper was now read, and appeared to be a confession taken from the prisoner on his examination, and the same in effect, as what he first made to the witness Sexton, and which appears upon his examination.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and never knew what the meaning of signing was.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-111

1092. STEPHEN JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Node , and stealing therein, one great coat, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Stephen Node ; one great coat. value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Frederick Pheipher , and one silk umbrella, value 20 s. the property of William Node .

STEPHEN NODE . I live in the parish of St. Ann by the Wardrobe, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctor's Commons ; I rent the whole house. The prisoner is a stranger to me; I never saw him until I apprehended him. On Wednesday evening, at about eight o'clock, a knock came to my door; which the servants answered; one of them came up, and had hardly got into the drawing room to deliver her message, whatever it was, before I heard the banging of the door. The servant went to the head of the stairs, and immediately returned, exclaiming,

"the coats, a man;" that was all she said. I instantly ran down stairs.

Q. Had you seen any coats hanging up - A. I can speak to two coats; mine was hanging up in the passage.

Q. Did you see any other hanging up - A. A great box coat, belonging to Mr. Pheipher; it was hanging up a little after five o'clock, when I hung up my own; there was also a silk umbrella, belonging to my brother. I ran into the street, and soon after, I saw a man near Thames-street, coming down St. Andrew's Hill, with a coat in his possession. I was returning, thinking the pursuit fruitless, when I met him coming in a direction from my house; by the colour of this coat, I thought it was Mr. Pheipher's; I seized the man, who was the prisoner, and asked him how he came by that coat; he said. he picked it up at the top of the street, pointing up St. Andrew's Hill. I said, if you found it. I will shew you where you took it from; the back of my house runs into Addle Hill. I took him in the back door, and the servant immediately said, that is the man, in his presence. Upon that, I immediately sent for a constable of the Ward. He denied he was the person, and said he picked up the coat. Now, the weather was very dirty; and had he picked up the coat, it must also have been so.

HANNAH MAVATT . I am servant to Mr. Stephen Node . I was called up at about eight o'clock in the evening, by a knock at the street door; the person to whom I opened the door, was the prisoner; he came within the door; when he came in, I am confident there were two great coats and an umbrella hanging up in the hall. I can't swear there was more. He said, he came from Mr. Gould, a hatter, on Ludgate Hill, for a hat to be cleaned. I had some recollection that I had seen that name up. I asked him to wait until I went to enquire. I observed the person's features when I was speaking to him.

Q. Now look round the court, and tell me if you can see him in court - A. Yes; there he is, (pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. Had you any suspicion - A. I rather doubted, but was under no alarm. About two minutes after, I went up to the drawing room where my master was. I heard the door slam. I immediately ran to the top of the stairs; the person was gone; I cried out, oh! the coats! a man! I missed the coats. In a few minutes, my master ran out, in pursuit, and in about five minutes he returned with the prisoner, whom I know to be the man. I saw the coat my master brought back; I knew it to be one of the coats that was hanging up in the hall. None of the other coats nor the umbrella has been found.

Prisoner. I am not the person who knocked at the door; but I would wish to know whether she shut the door after that person came in - A. I did.

Prisoner. Then you shut the door while that person was in the passage - A. Yes, while you were in the passage.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my charge by Mr. Node; and the coats also was delivered to me, which was said to have stolen. The prisoner interrogated

he servant over and over again, whether he was the person whom she let in, and she as often positively declared he was. The night was dirty. The prisoner said, he had picked up the coat. If he had so, it must have been dirty; but it was quite clean. I produce the coat.

FREDERICK PEIPHER . I had lent a box coat to Mr. Node; the coat produced, is the one I lent him; it is worth between two and three pounds; it cost me seven pounds, and I have had it three year.

Stephen Node . At the same time that that was taken, another was taken, which cost me about six guineas, and would have fetched at least one third; the umbrella cost thirty shillings, and was very little the worse for wear.

Prisoner's Defence. On this evening I had been at a friend's, and was returning home, when just by St. Andrew's passage, I saw a great coat laying at the step of a door; the passage is always clean, because very few people go through it. I picked up this coat, and when I got to the bottom of the passage, that gentleman stopped me, and took me to his house, and then they did not know whether there was any more goods in the hall or not.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-112

1093. RICHARD RIPPENS was indicted for that he, being in the employ of William Rider and Edward Cherry , and being employed and entrusted by them to receive money, notes, bills, and other securities, on their account, by virtue of such employment, did on the 27th of May, receive a bankers draft, value 10 l. 10 s. and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete, embezzle, and steal the same .

WILLIAM RYDER . I am a livery stable keeper ; Edward Cherry is my partner. The prisoner at the bar was in our employ, at the time of the last Epsom races ; he was a confidential servant , and part of his employment was to receive money. A carriage and four was hired to go down to the races, by a Mr. De Fontaine; the price was ten guineas. After the races, I made up the bill, and told the prisoner to go to Mr. De Fontaine; the bill was my hand writing. (A receipt produced.) That receipt is the prisoner's hand writing. On his return, he said, he had not received all the money for the bills he had taken out, but he should receive the whole on Monday morning; and then he would account with me. After that, he absconded. On enquiry, I got that receipt from Mr. De Fontaine, who said, he had paid the prisoner. I found by further enquiry, that he had received upwards of one hundred pounds, for which he had given receipts. I never received a halfpenny from him.

EDWARD CHERRY . Nor did I.

STEPHEN BRANDON . I am clerk to Rider and Cherry. I applied to Mr. De Fontaine for this bill, and then I learned he had paid it with a check to the prisoner; neither that check nor the amount ever came into my hands upon the account of my employers.

MR. LOUIS DE FONTAINE. I paid the prisoner in a check for ten pounds ten shillings, for which he gave me that receipt.

JOSEPH METCALF. I am clerk to Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Smith, who are Mr. De Fontaine's bankers. I paid that check, but I don't know to whom. (check read.) Receipt read appearing to be a receipt for the sum of ten pounds ten shillings, given by the prisoner on the account of his employers, to Mr. De Fontaine, and signed by the prisoner for and on such account.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-113

1094. MARTHA MERREDITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , one pewter quart pot, value 2 s. the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I keep the King's Arms, public-house, St. Giles's . The prisoner at the bar came into my house, at about five o'clock in the afternoon of the 27th of September; she wanted a pint and a half of beer; I gave it her in a quart pot, and she was to take the pot home with her. She said she was going to take it to Nicholl's, the barber's, in the one pair of stairs back room. I asked her where the people who did live there gone? She answered they were; she went past Nicholl's door, and I watched her into a house, at the further end of Short's gardens, I though she wanted to steal my pots, and I got a constable. We went into the two pair of stairs back room, and found her melting the pot on the fire, I saw the handle fall out, which I could swear to.

EDWARD GAMMAGE . I am constable, and produce the handle fall out, which fell from the fire.

John Davis . That is the handle of one of my pots.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-114

1095. FRANCES FLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , two sheets, value 4 s. the property of Leonard M'Nelly , in a lodging room .

LEONARD M'NELLY. I live at No. 125, Golden lane . The prisoner at the bar took a lodging of me a twelve month ago in the three pair of stairs room, at three shillings and sixpence a week; she lived with me until the the time of the robbery; she went away, without giving warning, or declaring it her intentions to leave the lodging. The sheets stolen, were part of the furniture in the room. The door was fast, and on our opening it, the sheets were gone.

HANNAH M'NELLY. These sheets were worth four shillings.

RICHARD LAWLESS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of this month.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18151025-115

1096. WARREN CARR was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 23rd of September , fourteen, gold rings, value 8 l. and two gold watches value 10 l. the property of Samuel Thornton , Esq. M. P. in his dwelling house .

THOMAS RAND. I am footman to Mr. Thornton, his dwelling house is in St. James's square . The prisoner is a journeyman painter . In the course of last month, he was working as such in Mr. Thornton's house; the drawing room was locked up. In the back room, there is an escritoir; I had seen a bunch of rings on an orange ribbon in that escritoir and two watches without glasses, on Monday the 18th. On Saturday the 23rd, the prisoner came down to me saying that he wanted the key of the drawing room door, to paint the edge of the door on the outside, which he could not do unless the door was opened; I said I would come and open the door myself, which I did. After I had done so, he related to me what direction Miss Thornton had given him about the back drawing room on the Wednesday preceding; it was to make good some places where the paint had been chipt off. He had paint to do the front drawing room door, but he had not paint to do the back drawing room. There is a door between them, which door was shut, but not locked. He came down to me in a very few minutes afterwards, he brought the key, but not to me; I was not in the servant's hall at the time; I afterwards went up and found the door locked. - He did not come on the Monday morning to his work at the usual time; I saw him on the premises at about a quarter before twelve. My seting him then, was in consequence of an information I received from one of the painters that somebody had gone up the back staircase; the prisoner had no business up there whatever. When I saw him there, I asked him what he wanted? he was up about fifteen stairs on the first landing place. He replied to my questions, putting his hand before his face, and appearing very much confused, that he did not wish to be seen, as he had been a bad boy, in getting tipsey, and not coming to his work. He then came down stairs, and said he would come to work in the afternoon, after dinner; that would be in about an hour, but he never came. On the Wednesday following, Limbrick the officer, and his master came to me; and in consequence of something they told me, I went to the escritoir in the back drawing room, and then I missed the watches and rings. The escritoir was not locked; it was not usually locked, on account of the lock being out of repair.

Cross examined. The key of the front drawing room, was usually kept in the housekeeper's room; it was sometimes in the possession of one servant, and sometimes of another; there were sometimes five or six other painters at work on the premises beside the prisoner.

THOMAS BRADY . I am a shoe-maker. I know the prisoner at the bar; I saw him on the morning of Tuesday the 26th of September. He came into my room as I lay in bed, it was before eight o'clock in the morning; he asked me was I in bed yet? I told him I was; he shewed me a ring on his little finger; I asked him where he had got that from? his reply was, don't you know I am a gentleman. He afterwards said, if I have any money I will give you some gin, and if you will come along with me I will give you some; there was another man in the room. We went out with the prisoner, and he went across Soho square to a pawnbrokers in Princes street, I believe the name is Bartram; in our way there, he shewed me a bunch of rings tied on an orange ribbon, and two watches without glasses to them. I saw him go into the pawnbroker's house, and when he came out, he said he had pledged a ring for twelve shillings. We then went and drank together the greater part of that day; the next day he came to me, and called me a b - y thief, and accused me of robbing him of his money and watch. There was a violent dispute about it between us, and he charged me with a constable, but I was discharged He did not finally take me before a magistrate, but accused me several times in the street. I after that went to Limbric and told him what I have been telling here now.

Cross-examined. I never knew him as a gentleman, nor any body else, I believe.

Re-examined. Q. Did he tell you how he came by these rings and watches - A. He said he had made a good haul at the gentleman's house where he had been at work.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am a police officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday the 27th of September. In consequence of an information given to me by the last witness, we were taking him to the office, when I observed he was trying to get his hand into his left hand breeches pocket; and on searching him we found this duplicate in his right hand breeches pocket.

(Producing it.)

This duplicate was now read in Court, and appeared to be a duplicate for a ring pawned for eleven shillings, in the name of James Williams , at Mr. Batram's, in Princes street, Soho.

JOHN PURDAY . I am a servant to Mr. Batram, pawnbroker, in Princes street, Soho. I produce the corresponding duplicate to the one just produced and read, together with the ring, (producing them.) The prisoner at the bar pawned the ring, I know his person; it was on the 26th of September.

ABRAHAM MYERS . I am a salesman, I live in Swallow street; I produce a ring (producing it.) I received that ring from the prisoner at the bar, on Friday the 22nd of September. He came to me at about five o'clock in the evening of that day, and asked me to lend him one shilling and sixpence; I hesitated at it; he then took the ring off his finger, and said, there was security for me, I need not be afraid; he said he would call and pay me the next night, but he did not. I saw him at the beginning of the following week, when he called and asked me to lend him three shillings and sixpence more, and that would make it five shillings, and he would call on the Friday following, when he got his pension, and pay me, and buy something of me. On the Sunday I was reading the paper, and saw his name, and then I went to Bow street. It was a mourning ring.

SAMUEL THORNTON , Esq. M. P. It is impossible to identify one mourning ring from another; Mr. Reakes's son married my daughter, and upon her death, both Mrs. Thornton and myself were presented

with similar mourning rings. The ring given to myself, is now in my possession; that given to Mrs. Thornton was in this escritoir, where all the other rings were kept; the other ring belongs to Mary Ann Reakes, and was in the escritoir with the others; it was given to her on the death of her cousin. There were also two watches, without glasses in this escritoir; they cost about ten guineas a piece; their present value I am not so well able to speak to; but I know they are worth seven or eight guineas the two.

Thomas Rand . I know the other of the rings that belongs to Miss Mary Ann Reakes ; I can swear to it by a piece of the enamel being chipped from the side of the motto.

The prisoner made a long defence, denying his guilt.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18151025-116

1097. WILLIAM BRADFORD was indicted for that he, on the 3rd of June , at St. Mary Le Strand , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain bill of exchange , to the tenor and effect following, (that is to say,)

"868 l. 9 s. 6 d. Sterling,

"His Majesty's ship Acasta, 27th of March, 1815.

"GENTLEMAN, Thirty days after sight of this my first of exchange, my second and third of same tenor, unpaid, please to pay unto Mr. Jonathan Gaine , or order, the sum of eight hundred and sixty-eight pounds nine shillings and sixpence sterling, for value received in provisions, purchased for the use of his Majesty's ships, Acasta, Newcastle and Leander, as per vouchers, to be transmitted by,

"GENTLEMEN,

"Your humble servant,

" JOHN TREVARTON , Purser."

"The Commissioners for Victualling his Majesty's Navy, London."

"I do hereby certify that the above bill is drawn for the services therein expressed, and by my order,

"A. R. KERR, Captain."

With intention to defraud our Sovereign Lord the King, against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged bill of exchange, with the like intent.

THIRD & FOURTH COUNTS. The same as the two former, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Clark Searle , esq. George Philip Towry , esq. Nicholas Brown , esq. Thomas Welch , esq. John Aubin , esq. Frederick Edgecumbe . esq. and Robert William Hay , esq. Commissioners for victualling his Majesty's Navy .

FIFTH & SIXTH COUNTS. The same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Alexander Robert Kerr .

SEVENTH & EIGHTH COUNTS. The same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud John Trevaston .

NINTH COUNT. That he having in his custody and possession a bill of exchange as described in the first count, feloniously did falsely make, &c. upon the said bill of exchange, an indorsement thereof, as follows, (that is to say,)

"G. Guy" with intention to defraud our Lord the King.

TENTH COUNT. That he having in his custody and possession a like bill of exchange, upon which was a like forged indorsement thereof, feloniously did utter and publish as true the said forged indorsement of the said bill of exchange, with the like intention, he knowing it to forged, against the statute.

ELEVENTH & TWELVETH COUNTS. The same as the ninth and tenth, only with intent to defraud the persons named in the third and fourth counts, viz. The Commissioners for Victualling his Majesty's Navy.

THIRTEENTH & FOURTEENTH COUNTS. Only with intenth to defraud Alexander Robert Kerr .

FIFTEENTH & SIXTEENTH COUNTS. The same, only with intent to defraud John Trevaston .

SIXTEEN OTHER COUNTS. The same as the former sixteen other counts, only in setting forth the bill of exchange putting

"perv hers," instead of

"per vouchers" and

"Commissioners," instead of

"Commissioners."

SIXTEEN OTHER COUNTS The same as the first sixteen Counts, only in setting forth the bill of exchange, putting

"dates" instead of

"date."

SIXTEEN OTHER COUNTS. The same as the second sixteen counts, only in setting forth the bill of exchange, put

"dates" instead of

"date."

WILLIAM BOWKER . I am a clerk in the bill department at the Victualling Office, Somerset House. When bills are drawn by his Majesty's officers, they are left in a box at the office for acceptance. (Forged bill put into the hands of the witness.) I look at this, and remember to have found it in the the box, as I described, on the 2nd of June. I find an entry made upon it, of

"the 3rd of June," which entry I made myself. (Reads.)

"On the 3rd of June, ordered to be accepted from the 2nd of June, and charged as interest against Captain Kerr." This entry is made upon the bill for the purpose of ascertaining whether an examination is made to see whether the duplicate and triplicate are paid. There is another

"not paid," and my initials,

"W. B." are affixed to those words; there are also the initials

"T. R." which I believe to be the initials of Mr. Richardson; he checks my examination, and these initials are indicative of his check,

"W. Gosling, ordered to be accepted," is also written on the bill; that is his hand writing; I have also,

"5th of June, V. O." I believe that to be Mr. Evitson's writing. - No; I am corrected; it is not so.

- HOLDFORD. I am a clerk in the Victualling Office. I look at the forged bill, and see

"5th of June, V. O. 1147." V. O. means Victualling Office; the last means that it is registered on the 5th of June, and that the number of the entry is 1147.

JOHN EVITSON . I am a clerk in the Victualling Office. I look at the forged bill, and see my initials on it. I wrote them for the purpose of signifying that I checked it off; I mean by that, that I had heard the case read off against the bill.

CHARLES SMITH . I am also a clerk in the Victualling

Office. (Turning to his book.) I have an entry of the delivery of a bill, on the 13th of June; it is

"on the 13th of June, to George Williams, for George Guy , 7, Montague-street, Russell-square." That entry refers to the bill No. 1147, registered 5th of June, the amount eight hundred and sixty eight pounds nine shillings and sixpence. (Forged bill put into the hand of the witness.) I think that is the bill. By the entry in my book, I am enabled to say, that I delivered the bill to a person named George Williams , for Mr. Guy; that is, that the person who came for the bill called himself Williams, and said he came from Mr. Guy.

RICHARD BOWER. I am a clerk in the Victualling Office. It is my business to deliver out what is termed the case.

LORD ELLENBOROUGH. Then the case is a proecipe to the cashier, for the payment of the bill.

Mr. Attorney General. Yes.

Richard Bower . (Reads.)

"Case, 5th of June, date of assignment, 4th of July." I mean by the date of assignment, the date for the order for payment. (Continues to read.)

"eight hundred and sixty-eight pounds nine shillings and sixpence, bill delivered on the 5th of July, to George Williams, for George Guy , 7, Montague-place, Russell-square." The latter part of the entry enables me to say that the person who called for the bill, called himself George Williams , and said he came from George Guy . (Forged bill and case thereof, put into the hands of the witness.) There are the bill and case to which my entry relates; I annexed the bill to the case, and delivered them to Williams.

CHARLES TWEDIE . I am cashier of the Victualling Office. (Bill and case thereof, put into the hands of the witness.) That bill and its case were delivered to me for payment. on the 5th of July last; I recollect that it was past two o'clock considerable; that was after the hour of business, which closes at two. I recollect a reason for my giving a draft; the person who brought the bill said it would be a matter of consequence, as he came a considerable distance. I accordingly paid him with this draft upon the Bank of England. (Producing the draft.) The name of

" George Williams ," is on the back of the bill; that is the name of the person who brought the bill, and by whom, by that means it was discharged.

Mr. Attorney General. Then John Nokes brings his bill to you, and you having given him a draft upon the Bank of England for the amount, he puts his name upon the back of it, and by that means discharges it - A. Exactly so.

Q. I observe that there is an endorsement on the back of the draft

" George Williams " - A. I did not see it then.

Q. Was it written at your office - A. I know nothing at all about it.

GEORGE JAMES WILLIAMS . I am in the employ of the East India Company, as a rider in the home department. I have been acquainted with the prisoner for the last three years. He called at my father's house, and requested I would call at Somerset House to do a little business for him; he told me to come between twelve and two. I went. He gave me a particular bill, and told me to go to a certain apartment for a bill; he pointed out the particular apartment to which I was to go; he gave me some instructions; he told me to say I came from Mr. George Guy , Montague place, Russel square. He assigned as a reason for his not doing this, that he, being a clerk in Somerset House, was not allowed to do agency business. He said, the bill had been sent to him by a friend, a lieuteuant, in the Country. He shewed me a part of a letter, which had an import to that effect. So instructed, I went to the place which he directed me; I was asked the questions which he pre-supposed to me that I should be asked, and I gave the directed answers. I got the bill; I gave my name in, George Williams , for George Guy ; the bill then purported to be accepted. (Forged bill put into the hands of the witness.) That is the bill; my signature is affixed to it, which I did when Mr. Twedie gave me the draft upon the Bank of England for the payment of the amount. When I so received the bill, I gave it to Bradford; he, and I, then walked into the City together; then we parted. He called upon me, on the 5th of July, at my father's house, and requested I would call upon him that day at Somerset House, before two o'clock. I went accordingly to his request. He then gave me that bill, and directed me to go into a certain apartment for a case. I did not then know what the case meant. He pointed out the appartment. I went, and gave in the bill, and got it back affixed to the case; the bill was wafered to the case. (Case put into the hands of the witness.) That is the case to which the bill was wafered when delivered to me. I was then directed by the gentleman from whom I got it, to go to Mr. Twedie, but I went to the prisoner, who accompanied me to the outside of the door of Mr. Twedie's office, and as it was past two o'clock, directed me, if Mr. Twedie should object to pay the bill on account of its being past the hour of business, to say, he would oblige me by paying it at that time, as I came a considerable distance. I then went to Mr. Twedie; he made the objection, on account of its being past two o'clock; I made the directed reply, and received the draft from Mr. Twedie to prevent my having the trouble of calling again. On my coming out, Bradford was in the hall, and I gave him the check.

Q. What is on the back of the draft, (putting the draft into the hands of the witness,) - A.

"Received for George Guy, 7, Montague place, Russel square. George Williams." When I delivered that draft to the prisoner, no such writing as that was upon it. There is no part of that my hand writing. We then went to the Bank together; I saw him write something upon a piece of paper, which I supposed was the description of the notes he wished the check to be paid in; I remember he received a five hundred pound note, for I heard the clerk say what notes he wanted. After he was paid, we walked together as far as the end of Leadenhall-street, and there we parted. I never have received any gratuity or recompence in any way whatever for this business which I transacted for the prisoner.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. I am positive I

received the bill in Somerset House, and not in the City. I believe this bill to be the same I left for acceptance; it was out of my possession for a considerable time, from the middle of June to the 5th of July; but under all circumstances, I believe it to be the same.

Be-examined by Mr. Attorney General. When I delivered the bill to the prisoner after I received it again, he did not make any objection that it was not the same bill.

PETER BENTLEY. I am a clerk in the Bank of England. (Check put into the hands of the witness.) On the 5th of July last, that check was entered for payment; I look at the back of it, and by that means am enabled to say that it was presented on the 5th of July; on its being presented, I requested the person who presented it, to write a receipt on the back of it, as is customary; that person did so, and I gave him an order, a voucher on the cashier for payment. I hold in my hand the order I gave the presenter for eight hundred and sixty-eight pounds, and a separate order for nine shillings and sixpence.

THOMAS WRAGG . I am pay clerk to the Bank. On the 5th of July, an order was sent to me by the last witness, for payment of eight hundred and sixty-eight pounds; the bank notes in which I paid it were checked by Mr. Bonquet.

JAMES JOHN BONQUET . I checked the notes which were paid by the last witness, in satisfaction for that draft; among others, I paid a five hundred pound note, dated the 20th of June, 1815, and numbered 5327; also a twenty pound note, dated 26th of May, 1815, number 3747, and also a ten-pound note, dated 7th of June, 1815, number, 12,553; I also paid two hundred pound notes; I paid to the amount of eight hundred and sixty-eight pounds.

MARY HEDGES. My husband keeps a public-house, called the Nelson, in Nelson-street, Hackney road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes. I recollect his calling upon me some time in the month of August last, to pay a small debt he owed, not exceeding four shillings; he paid it in a twenty-pound note, which he endorsed with his name, and which endorsement, I subscribed,

"at Mr. Sharp," that being the place where the prisoner lodged.

(Bank of England note for the payment of twenty-pounds, number 3747, was here put into the hands of the witness.)

Q. Is that the note - A. It is, I believe.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I am a journeyman to Mr. Fielding, pawnbroker, of Whitechapel. I recollect a person coming to our house, on the 5th of July, in the present year, to redeem a silver watch, which had been pledged; the principal and interest of which amounted to one pound nine shillings and seven pence; he tendered in payment this note, (producing a note,) which I changed, deducting the amount, and delivering him the watch, together with the change; he put on the front of the note, Mr. Smith, 7, Oxford street, Whitechapel, and that was the name in which the watch was pledged; (turning to a book.) The number of the watch was 2698, and the name of the watch maker was James Rollinson , London.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When was that name and number entered in that book - A. On the day the watch was pledged.

Q. Who made the entry? did you - A. No.

Q. Is the person here who did make it - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Then my lord, I submit that this will not do.

COURT. Q. To Vaughan. Did he describe the watch? did he produce a duplicate - A. Yes, and I gave him that watch for it. (Both duplicates produced.)

Mr. Attorney General. The reason it is called a duplicate, is this; two tickets are made out, one is affixed to the article pledged, the other, which is a facsimile of it, is delivered to the pawner, who upon wishing to redeem the pledge, presents you that ticket; you then have recourse to the pledge; on your observing a correspondence, between the ticket given you and the duplicate on the back of the pledge, you know it to be the same, and deliver it to the pawner, on the payment of the principal and interest - A. Exactly so.

Q. Was this done in the present instance - A. Yes.

LORD ELLENBOROUGH . That will do.

Mr. Abbot. Then what was that note - A. A ten pound note, number 12,555, 7th of June, 1815.

(Watch produced to witness, by Vickery, the officer.)

Q. Is that the watch of which you have been speaking - A. Yes.

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in custody after he was apprehended. He directed me to go to his father-in-law's, Mr. Sharp's, No. 10, Nelson street, Hackney-road; he told me, I should find the five hundred pound note and the two one hundred pound notes in a drawer under a press bedstead, in the front room, in which he lodged, at his father-in-law's house; he said, the notes were wrapped up in a piece of paper, under a quantity of old newspapers. This is the five hundred pound note in my hand, which I found as he directed, and the place answered in every respect his description. It is a five hundred pound note. (read)

"No. 5327, dated 20th of June, 1815." The watch was produced to me by Mr. Sharp; I had my reasons for asking for it.

ALEXANDER ROBERT KERR . I commanded his Majesty's ship Acasta . On the 27th of March, she was between three and four hundred miles to the Windward of Barbadoes; I was then on board; I never received any supplies on the 27th of March; it is the custom of the service when provisions are required, for the purser to draw a bill upon the Commissioners for Victualling his Majesty's Navy, at the bottom of which bill, I signify that it is well and duly drawn, for the consideration therein mentioned. (Forged bill put into the hands of the witness.) The name of our purser is Trevaston; the signature of this bill,

" John Trevaston ," is not his hand writing.

JOHN TREVASTON . I am purser of his Majesty's

ship Acasta; that vessel was at Say on the 27th of March. This signature affixed to the bill in question,

"A. R. Kerr," is not his hand writing.

JOHN ROSS . I was acting lieutenant of his Majesty's ship Acasta. I have examined the signatures

"John Trevarton and A. R. Kerr," affixed to this bill. I am well acquainted with Captain Kerr 's and Mr. Trevarton's hand writings, and neither the one nor the other of these signatures is either of their hand writings.

- TULLY. I have had various opportunities of observing Captain Kerr and Mr. Trevarton write their signatures. Neither of these names written on this bill is either of their hand writings.

MARY SHARP . The officer, Vickery. came to my apartments for a watch; it was Mr. Bradford's watch; he used not constantly to wear it about his person. I saw the officer search the drawer under the bedstead Mr. Bradford occupied the apartment where that drawer was, in which the note was found. Mr. Bradford slept in that room the night previous, and went out at the usual hour in the morning.

THOMAS MOORE . I am a clerk in the Victualling Office. The prisoner sits in the next desk to me; I have known him and his hand writing for three years. I look at the indorsement on the order for payment, and the words,

"received. 5th of July, George Williams, for George Guy ," are the prisoner's hand writing.

Mr. Alley. Objected that in this indictment, in setting forth the bill, stated,

"that the bill was for provisions purchased for the use of his Majesty's ship Acasta. Newcastle, and Leander, as per vouchers, to be transmitted by, &c" Now, on the face of the bill, no such word

"as vouchers," occured; for there was only

"as" of some letter or other, and the letters

"hers," and therefore that statement was not maintained.

LORD ELLENBOROUGH. This has been the case by the application of a wafer, and I don't think it is a defect at all. I am endeavouring to find a word of which this can be a fragment consistent with the context, and there is no other word than

"vouchers." Without that, it would be rank nonsense.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the bill from Guy.

Eight respectable witnesses gave the prisoner a good, character for integrity and assiduity in his official duties for five years previous.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18151025-117

1098. CHRISTOPHER LOCKERS was indicted for that he, at about the hour of three in the night of the 19th of September , being in the dwelling-house of James M'Neal , did steal therein, two shirts, value 2 s. one pair of spectacles, value 2 s. one child's frock, value 2 s. one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. one waistcoat, value 5 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of the said James M'Neal ; and that he having so committed the said felony, afterwards at about the same hour burglariously did break the said dwelling-house to get out thereof .

JAMES M'NEAL. I am a housekeeper, in the parish of St. Giles's; I keep a public-house, the sign of the Mogul . On the 19th of September, at half past three o'clock in the morning, the watchman called to know whether we had left the door open or not, all night. I know nothing more than it is my property. I never saw the prisoner before the evening before; he got in in the evening, and hid himself in the tap-room.

Q. How do you know that - A. I think he must have done so. When I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, I fastened the door; it was fastened with a wooden bar across. When I was called up in the morning at about half past three o'clock, it was open.

PATRICK CROWLEY . I am a watchman; my beat is in Drury-lane; it was so on the 19th of September. When I came back to my box, after calling three o'clock to the extent of my beat, I went into it. Presently I heard a great knocking, I then went out of my box, and walked up and down, and I came up to the Mogul, which is M'Neal's, and found the knocking was there.

Q. How far is the Mogul from your box - A. The second house. I came to the door, and put my hand to the door, and it was fast. I drew back then, and stood up against the side of the house, and left my lanthorn in my-box. and harkened to the knocking all the time. In the course of a quarter of an hour. I heard a person coming to the door, and undoing the bolts, taking the bar off. I then drew back from the door about three or four yards, and the person opened the door, and out the prisoner came with a bundle under one arm, and a quartern loaf under the other. and a bottle in his hand, with as good as half a pint of liquor in it, with his thumb in it for a cork. As soon as he had got as far as the curb stone, I collared him; I walked with him across the street, and asked him what he had in the bundle, and he said, his clothes. I asked him what he had in the bottle, and he said, sugar and water. I called the private watch to my assistance. I put my hand to the door where the prisoner came out of, and it was open We then knocked at M'Neal's to awaken them, and down stairs they ran. I gave the prisoner in custody to the private watchman, while I went into the house. While I was undoing the bolts to let M'Neal's people down into the tap-room, I heard the bottle go smack upon the stones, and away he ran; the private watchman ran after him. I saw them both running along the street; I caught him myself, in Coach and Horses yard, Drury lane, and then I took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM READING . I am a watchman; my box is opposite Brownlow street, Drury lane. I saw them both crossing Drury lane, and brought them back to the Mogul door; it was about five minutes before M'Neal was called. While the last witness was calling M'Neal, the prisoner made a blow at me, and at the same time, made a spring, and ran off; we pursued him, and took him in Coach and Horses yard, and then took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him - A. Yes; in turning the corner.

Q. Are you sure it is the same man - A. Yes, I am positive it is the same, by the light of the moon. I searched him at the watchhouse, and in his right hand breeches pocket, were Mr. M'Neal's spectacles, also a pair of worsted stockings, and a parcel of papers belonging to the Lying-in Hospital.

EDMUND KELLY . I am a locking glass maker; I lodged with Mr. M'Neal, and I was alarmed by the watchman; I saw the prisoner make his escape from the private watchman, and was present at his apprehension.

WILLIAM COWLEY . I am a patrole belonging to that parish. I followed them down Drury lane, I searched the prisoner, and found several child's frocks between his shirt and his skin.

JOHN FAYMAN . I saw a black man in the tap room the night before the robbery. When I heard of it afterwards, when I came off duty, I went to the watchhouse, and asked the prisoner, whether there were any more in the robbery? he said, there were no more in the robbery. I asked him how he came to break open the till, and asked him if he had took any money out.

Q. Was the bar broken open - A. It was. I asked him how he came to do it, and then he began to cry, and said no more.

WILLIAM COTTER . I heard a rattle spring at about half past three on the morning of the 19th of September; I went out of my box to the assistance of the rattle; the prisoner was taken by my partner; we brought him to the watchhouse, and found a pair of spectacles and the other things on him. We then went back, and found the other things, which he had dropt, and delivered them to William Yandell .

WILLIAM YANDELL . I am the officer of the night, and produce the property.

James M'Neal. The till was not broken open, but the bureau was; a couple of sheets and a child's frock were taken out of it; my spectacles were taken off a shelf in the bar; these papers belonging to the Lying-in Hospital are of no value; this waistcoat and handkerchief belonged to my lodger, and were taken out of my house that night. I know the other things to be my property.

Prisoner's defence. I and another shipmate went into this house, and had something to drink, and then we layed down and went to sleep in the taproom; my shipmate awakened, and went away. I had brought a bundle with me; I was in the dark, and was trying to find my bundle, and found these things which I thought were my own bundle; I then went out of the house, and was immediately seized.

COURT. Q. To M'Neal. Were these things all tied up together - A. No.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

[Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury, as they supposed he committed the crime of which he was convicted through distress.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-118

1099. CHARLES RYDER , alias HENLEY , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Spencer , at about half past seven o'clock in the evening of the 24th of September , with intent to steal .

JOHN SPENCER . I live at 43, Brick-lane, Spitalfields , in the parish of Christ Church. I keep the house. I went out on the evening of the 24th, and returned between the hours of seven and eight, and saw a person standing at my door; I instantly collared him, and he gave me a great deal of resistance. By this time, the prisoner came out of the shop, and was passing between the door post and my knee, and I held him there, and let the other go; I had a child two years old in my arms, but held the prisoner until such time as the officer was sent for. My hall door is always open, for the accomodation of my lodgers. There is a wainscot divides the shop from the passage; this wainscot is all in one piece, and was secured by two spike nails; it was six feet long, and five feet high; the space between the top of it and the ceiling is filled up with shelves; no person could get over the top of it; one end of it locks into a piece of wood. This wainscot was forced in from the bottom, and by that means, part of the piece of wood into which it locks, was forced off. The prisoner was coming out upon his hands and knees where the wainscot was shoved in at the bottom.

JAMES LOWE . Between the hours of seven and eight in the evening of the 24th, I was coming from Church street, Spitalfields; I heard a woman sing out,

"the child." It was Mrs. Spencer. I saw a man run along, and when I got up to the door Mr. Spencer had hold of the prisoner by the collar. We then fastened him into the yard backwards until such time as the officer came.

JOHN PARKER . I am an officer of the parish of Christ church, and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I had taken a glass of liquor, and was standing with a young man I knew by the prosecutor's door, and he knocked my head against the wainscot, and shoved it in.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[Recommended to mercy on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-119

1100. MARGARET POWER was indicted for assaulting George Bannister , in the King's highway, on the 7th of October , for putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, one brooch, value 30 s. the property of George Bannister .

GEORGE BANNISTER . I am a goldsmith and jeweller . I was coming along the Strand on the night of the day stated in the indictment, at about half past eleven o'clock; near the Oxford coffee-house, two females, of which the prisoner was one, came up to me, and stopped me, by putting their hands round my neck. I turned instantly from them, and got a few yards, when I perceived my shirt frill out, and on putting my hand up, found my brooch

gone. The two women were arm-in-arm. I immediately charged her with the watch.

JAMES FLETCHER. I am an officer. I was in the watchhouse when the watchman brought the prisoner in; she was searched, and nothing found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw this young man until he charged the watchman with me, nor never saw his brooch in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-120

1101. JAMES MILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, a watch, value 4 l. the property of William Roder , in his dwelling-house .

CAROLINE RODER . My husband's name is William Roder ; he is a seaman . The prisoner came into my house last week, in Old Gravel-lane , and he and another came into my parlour; my husband's watch was hanging by a string to a looking glass, two turns round it. I saw the prisoner take it in his hand, and when he saw me, he let it go, and it hung by the string.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18151025-121

1102. JOHN BALL was indicted for embezzling money on the 21st of August .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a cooper . The prisoner was an errand boy to me. The first day he came to me, I sent him to a customer in Mount street, Grosvenor square, with some washing tubs, which had been repairing, and a pound note's worth of silver; he was to bring back a pound; but he never brought it to me, nor did I ever see him afterwards until he was apprehended.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am a turner, in Mount-street, Grosvenor square. On the 21st of August; the prisoner brought some washing tubs, and a pounds worth of silver to me, for which I returned him a one pound note, and never saw him afterwards.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring he lost the note, and arguing upon that circumstance; that if he had a fraudulent intention, he would have absconded in the first instance; with the washing tubs and the silver.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: o18151025-1

N. B. The Case of George Maddox is to remain over until the Report of the next Session, until a Point of Law be decided whether he be Guilty or Not.


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