Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th September 1815.
Reference Number: 18150913
Reference Number: f18150913-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 13th of SEPTEMBER, 1815, and following days,

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSIONS IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY R. BUTTERS, 22, FETTER LANE, FLEET STREET.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Mr. Justice Heath, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; Sir William Leighton , bart. John Atkins , esq. William Heygate , esq. Joshau Jonathan Smith , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Hurson ,

George Heath ,

Charles Stone ,

Valentine Tune ,

Henry Scambler ,

Benjamin Godfrey Windus ,

Richard Bousfield ,

Thomas Price ,

William Lucking Wright,

Edward Stillard ,

Thomas Palmer ,

William Mann .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Glover ,

Thomas Gilgrist ,

John Briggs ,

Charles White ,

William Furber ,

Francis Wright ,

Thomas Elliott ,

Thomas Dunhill ,

John White ,

Thomas Barlow ,

John Thorn ,

Thomas Wilmet .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Edson ,

Edward Balduck ,

John Dodd ,

John Harvey ,

William Crowther ,

William Watson ,

James Ross ,

James Lovell ,

George Pitt ,

James Spring ,

Richard Close ,

William Richardson .

Reference Number: t18150913-1

773. THOMAS BEDWORTH was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Beesmore on the 20th of June , 1815.

SARAH COLLIS. I was a lodger with the deceased, who lived in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane ; she was a married woman, and was married to John Beesmore, by whom she had several children. I knew her for the last fourteen years; for the last two years, she has cohabited with the prisoner. In consequence of a quarrel between the son of the deceased and the prisoner, relative to their cohabitation, it was agreed that the prisoner should take separate lodgings; which he accordingly did, in Queen-street. On Tuesday morning, the 20th of June, the prisoner at the bar called at the lodgings of the deceased, and inquired if she was at home. I told him, she was not; and he asked me if I would have some gin. We went to the Two Spies public-house, and while we were drinking there, he said, " it would be blood for blood."

Q. In allusion to what, was that - A. I understood it to be relating to the quarrel between the deceased's son, and himself; for there was ill blood between them. When we went over to the lodgings again, the deceased was come; and the prisoner being intoxicated, requested permission of the deceased to lie down on the bed, to sober himself, that he might go to work the next morning, and she gave him leave. He layed down, and in about half an hour, he got up, and asked for his razors, saying, Bet, I shall take them away, for fear of the boy; meaning a son of the deceased's. He remained in the room until five in the afternoon. We were then at tea, and he expressed a wish for some gin. I accordingly got a penny, and went for a pennyworth of gin, and mixed it with a basin of tea, which I gave him, and which he drank. After that, he took a knife out of his pocket, and threw it on the ground, damming it, and saying, it was of no use. He remained in the room a while longer, and then pulled out his pension ticket, and threw it into the fire. I snatched it out, and gave it to the deceased.

Q. What do you mean by his pension ticket - A. He had been a sailor; and this was the ticket by which he procured his pension. He remained in the room until a little after six o'clock; and then he took a penny, and went over the way for some gin, without his shoes; and returned immediately. Presently afterwards, he wanted to go home; and the deceased said, you had better stop a little, until it is dark, least you should see my son John. The prisoner then sat down behind the door, and he had something in his hand; and some blood fell from his hand. I did not know what it was that was in his hand. I told the deceased, (who was close to him working,) to mind that no blood fell on the work; she was working at Army work, making soldiers coats. She then went to the other end of the room; and he went out, and called her. She said, she would come presently; and he told her to come immediately, and he would not keep her a minute. She went, and after having been gone about ten minutes, she returned for a piece of lace to tie up his trowsers, which were loose, on account of his braces having been broken. I gave her the lace, together with a handkerchief of his; with which she went down stairs.

Q. Did you see her any more alive - A. No, I did not. When I saw her again, it was in about five minutes, at the foot of the kitchen stairs, with her feet up four steps, and her head on the stones. I lifted her up, and her head fell right back on my arm; it was only held to her body by a bit, (Here the witness explained the breadth of the integument, as equel to the length of the fore finger.) I immediately ran to the gate, and called murder.

Prisoner. She has foresworn herself. I never sat behind the door, nor ever had the razor in my hand.

Witness. I did not say he had the razor in his hand. I could not distinguish what was in his hand.

ANN WEBBER . I was a fellow lodger of the deceased's; I knew her while she lived with her husband, John Beesemore , and for the last two years and two months, she cohabited with the prisoner, At about half past six o'clock in the evening of the 20th of June, 1815, the prisoner came into the deceased's lodgings, and asked her permission to lie on the bed, to sober himself, in order that he might go to work the next morning. He layed down behind the bed for about two hours, and then he got up again, and wanted some gin. Mrs. Collins went, and got him some. In the evening he drank tea with us; and after he layed down, he was quise sober. He walked backwards and forwards, up and down the room several times, with something in his hand. He finally left the room at seven o'clock; he then called Mr. Beesemore, the deceased, out of the room, and said, he wanted to speak with her; she went to him; and came in directly. She went to him on the landing place, and then came back to go on with the loops of the jacket, which she was working. He called her again, and she went; and on returning again in about ten minutes; she took with her to him some lace and his handkerchief, and went back again.

Q. Did you ever see her alive again - A. No, I did not. The next time I saw her was in about five minutes, with her head on the stones, at the bottom of the stairs, her feet up four steps and her head early severed from her body.

Prisoner. She never was ten minutes out of the room with me during the whole night.

MR. CHARLES SMITHSON . I am the surgeon who examined the body of the deceased, upon being called in. When I saw her, there was a slight pulsation in her wrist; a very deep wound on her neck; the windpipe was divided; and the corotid arteries as well; she was perfectly dead; and I have no doubt that her death was occasioned by this wound.

FRANCIS THOMAS . I am clerk to the magistrates at Bow-street. The prisoner at the bar was examined there. (The paper put into his hands.) I took this confession from the mouth of the prisoner. It is signed by Mr. Nares, and signed by me, as subscribing witness, and countersigned by the prisoner at the bar with his mark.

"Who says on the 20th day of June last, about eleven or twelve o'clock in the forenoon he went to the apartment of the late Elizabeth Beesmore , who lived in a front room on a second floor in Short's Gardens, Drury Lane; where he saw the said Elizabeth Beesmore; but being very much intoxicated, she put him to bed, where he lay till between six and seven o'clock in the evening; she, the deceased giving him gin several times. The deceased took away his shoes to prevent his going out; but after being repeatedly asked for them she restored them to him, and he went down stairs, asking her to come with him, which she did, and when they came to a space between the kitchen and where the water-butt stands, he seized hold of her with his left hand; got her head under that arm, and with a shoemaker's knife which he brought from his own lodging for the purpose, cut her throat, and she dropped dead from him without making any noise, on which he ran away, taking the knife with him, which he threw away the next morning into the Regent's Canal."

Taken before me, on the day and year aforesaid,

Signed J. NARES.

Witness F. THOMAS.

Countersigned T. BEDWORTH, his X mark.

Q. Now, before he made that confession, was there any threat or promise held out to him - A. Certainly not. In fact he was advised to say nothing more.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-2

774. JAMES BAILEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Jennings , Joseph Adam Jennings , and Samuel Jennings , about the hour of ten, in the night of the 22nd of July , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two bank notes for payment of fifty-pounds each, value 100 l. four other bank notes for the payment of five-pounds each, value 20 l. and thirty other bank notes for the payment of one-pound each, value 30 l. the property of William Jennings , Joseph Adam Jennings , and Samuel Jennings .

JOSEPH ADAM JENNINGS . I am a crape manufacturer , and am in partnership with my father and brother, who reside at No. 14, Worship-street, Finsbury-square ; we all live in that house; and it was broken open on the night of the 22nd of July. I went out of town the night before the robbery; and did not return until Monday morning. I can only prove the loss of my property; which was kept in a small drawer, in an iron safe. I saw the property there on Saturday afternoon at about four o'clock, but did not count it.

Q. Might not some of your partners get some of it away - A. No. The key was never out of my possession. The safe was not broken open; but opened with a key.

ROBERT JENNINGS . I was in the house as late as eight o'clock, and left all safe.

SARAH LACK . I am in the employ of the prosecutors, as is the prisoner. He left the house at about twenty minutes before eight, in the evening of the robbery, and returned at about nine. He went into the kitchen; and from that, he had occasion to go past this safe.

Q. At nine o'clock on the night of the 22nd of July, was it dark - A. We had just taken candles into the parlour to my mistress; our house is not a particularly dark house. The next morning, the prisoner was standing at his door. He then came with us; and we told him, that his master had been robbed. We then unlocked the warehouse door, and found a fifty-pound note, and a one-pound note on the floor. The warehouse is in the dwelling-house. Nothing was broken.

ANN COOK . I am in the employ of the prosecutors; but I don't live in the house. I know nothing more than has been said by the last witness.

BARNARD GLEED I am an officer of Worship-street office. The prisoner was left in my charge in the room adjacent to the office. I sat with him in that room, and after we had sat some time, he said,

"nobody but myself robbed my master." I then said, what have you done with the money. He had previously asked me whether it would be better for him to tell all; and I told him, that was a question I could not answer, for it was with the magistrates. He then told me to tell Armstrong, to go to his father's house, and on a shelf in the chimney, he would find ninety pounds rolled up in a piece of parchment. He said, that some of the notes had been lost out of his waistcoat pocket.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer, and by the direction of the last witness, I went to the house of the prisoner's father; and on a shelf up the chimney, I found a piece of parchment rolled up, containing one note of fifty-pound; four of five-pounds, and twenty-six of one-pound. Here they are.

Joseph Jenning . I only took the number of the fifty-pound note.

Ann Cook . When I opened the warehouse door, I found the back warehouse window open; that was between six and seven o'clock in the morning.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am son of John Armstrong ; and found the window of the back warehouse open.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence; but have some witnesses to my character.

Several witnesses were now called by the court, who gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH ,

Of stealing to the amount of forty shillings and upwards, in the dwelling-house; but not of breaking and entering.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury, on account of good character, and as they believed it to be the first offence.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-3

775. SAMUEL HALLIDAY was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Nicoll , on the night of the 24th of July , did feloniously steal therein, four loaves, value 3 s. seven pounds weight of cheese, value 5 s. two sheets, value 5 s. eight pounds weight of beef, value 4 s. five ironing cloths, value 5 s. and one basket, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Nicoll ; and afterwards did burglariously break the said dwelling-house, to get out, thereof .

THOMAS NICOLL. I live at Page-street, Hendon . The prisoner was in my employ, and I discharged him in November last. On the 24th of July last, at eleven o'clock at night, I locked my cellar door; the window of the cellar was barred. I was called up the next morning at five o'clock, and then the cellar door was fast; I unlocked it, and on going in, the casement of the window was open, and the bar was taken down, and placed on a ledge inside the cellar. I can't say that I looked at the window, to see if it was fast the night before; but it was impossible for any one get out while the bar was up. I know nothing of the contents of the cellar.

MARY SIMMS . On the 24th of July last, I was in the service of Colonel Nicoll , in the capacity of laundry-maid. There were some cheese and loaves in the cellar before my master locked it, on the night of the 24th of July; there were three quartern loaves, two half quartern loaves, a large piece of cheese, a small piece of boiled beef, and a small piece of roast beef; there was also some salt beef uncooked; altogether they were worth more than seven or eight shillings. I called my master at five o'clock in the morning of the 25th, and he went into the cellar. I saw the state of the window the night before, and it was safe; it was tried, but I was not present. I opened the casement the night before, to admit the air; the bar was then fast. I then went into the laundry, and missed the ironing cloths. The laundry is about two yards from the dwelling-house. I had been in the laundry the night before, and saw the ironing clothes, and a pair of sheets; and at five o'clock in the morning, I missed them. They were worth ten shillings at least.

JOHN SKEFFINGTON . I am a hair-dresser, and live at No. 1, George-street, St. Giles's. I purchased some articles from the prisoner at the bar, about two months ago; I saw him at a public-house in my neighbourhood one morning; there was lot a of victuals laying on a table, and the people all round were eating of them. I asked him, if they were to be sold; and he said, yes, and I should have them all very reasonable; there was a piece of cooked beef, and a piece of uncooked, a quartern loaf, a piece of cheese, and half of another quartern loaf; these things were in a basket, but that, he did not sell. I bought all for six or seven shillings. I conveyed the victuals in the basket to my place. He told me on my enquiring of him, that he knew an old house-keeper who used to save broken victuals for him, and used to give him several old things about the house; and the next day he was to go, and fetch some old pieces of blankets. He brought me the blankets by agreement the next day, and some old sheets; and I bought them of him. The basket he left till he came again, for he said, he must take it back again to the house-keeper. When I was asked a few days go, I gave up all I had.

JOSEPH BECKET . I went to the house of the last witness, last Thursday, in consequence of some information that I had received, I got there a sheet, a blanket, and five ironing cloths; here they are.

John Skeffington . These are part of the things that I bought from the prisoner.

Mary Simms . I believe these are part of the things that were missed. On the sheet there is a 1 with a dot over it. There are no marks on the ironing cloths; we lost six; but here are but five. I think the basket is the one stolen. The piece of beef which was uncooked, was a piece of thin flank, weighing nine or ten pounds.

John Skeffington . The uncooked piece was about that weight, and it was thin flank.

ROBERT FORD . I am clerk to the magistrates at Hatton Garden. I remember the prisoner being examined at that office; and here is his voluntary confession.

"The confession of the prisoner stated, that he entered Colonel Nicoll 's house by the hall door, at about seven o'clock on the evening of the 24th of July, and went into the cellar, where he remained until about eleven o'clock, when he heard somebody come, and lock the door; and at about two o'clock in the morning, he stole the articles named in the indictment, and broke out of the cellar, by removing a bar in the window; and afterwards proceeded to London, where he sold them as stated to John Skeffington , was now put in, and read.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-4

776. SAMUEL HALLIDAY was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , twenty-seven silver forks, value 12 l. seventeen silver tablespoons, value 10 l. three silver desert-spoons, value 15 s. one silver soup ladle, value 1 l. one silver gravy-spoon, value 15 s. two silver butter ladles, value 10 s. two silver tea-spoons, value 5 s. one silver fish slice, value 15 s. one silver sallad fork, value 5 s. and one basket, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Nicoll , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT GALE . I was footman to Colonel Nicoll , but am not now in his employment. I lived with him in June last; and on the 18th of that month, I attended him at the dinner table, and collected the plate after dinner, and put it in a basket; and the groom took it from the room. I saw the basket containing the plate in the scullery, and afterwards I removed it to my pantry, at about half past six in the afternoon; I then went to my dinner; and staid about an hour: and on my going back to get them, they were gone. The basket was brought back on the Tuesday following.

JAMES BARNES . I live at Page-street, Hendon; and I found a basket in a ditch in Mr. Johnson's field. I told my mother; and she told me to take it to Colonel Nicoll 's. I afterwards shewed Colonel Nicolls where I found it.

THOMAS NICOLL . In consequence of some information which the prisoner gave me, I went with the

last witness, who pointed out to me the place where he found the basket; and that was the place where the prisoner told me he had hidden it. All the plate is mine, and I have no doubt of its being worth upwards of twenty pounds.

WILLIAM REID . I am an officer. I produce this basket, which I received from James Barnes .

Robert Gale . This is the basket in which I put my master's plate, on the 18th of June last.

ENGLAND BLOWER . I was in Newgate as a prisoner, in June last; and I remember the prisoner coming to Newgate eight or nine days before the last sessions, he brought a blue bundle under his left arm; he gave it to the wardsman, named Galler. I did not then see what it contained; but they put it under a bed; and soon afterwards a prisoner of the name of James Hankey , was sent for, and took it away, with two or three others; and they took it to the necessary, and there opened it; and I saw it contained a great quantity of spoons, and forks, and a slice, I believe they were silver; I never saw such things before. Galler and the prisoner had some beer together, and soon after, they went to the bed to look for the bundle, and Galler said,

"my God, it is gone."

ROBERT FORD . I am clerk to the magistrates of Hatton Garden. This is the confession of Halliday; it was made voluntarily, and under the influence of neither threat nor promise.

Colonel Nicoll . I am a magistrate for the County of Middlesex. Halliday, the prisoner at the bar, was brought before me on a seperate charge from the present, and made a voluntary confession.

"The confession of the prisoner was now put in, and read, and stated, that on Sunday, the 18th of June, between the hours of seven and eight in the evening, he went into the grounds of Colonel Nicoll , and the back door being open, he entered the pantry, and took a wicker basket, containing several articles of plate, and as he went along, he threw the basket in a ditch in a field; he then made his way to London, and went to Newgate to Galler, the wardsman, who had previously told him, that if he could catch hold of any plate, he would dispose of it for him. The wardsman took the bundle, and put it in his bed, and they then sat down together, and had some beer; and in some time afterwards, the wardsman went to search for the bundle, and found it gone.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-5

777. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Patrick Smith , about the hour of five in the forenoon, of the 16th of June , Winifred, the wife of the said Patrick Smith , and others of his family in the said dwelling-house then being, and stealing therein, five yards of printed cotton, value 5 s. one inkstand, value 1 s. two knives, value 1 s. one pair of trowsers, value 9 s. two pelisses, value 12 s. one child's pinnafore, value 1 s. one shirt, value 2 s. two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. and one tablecloth, value 18 d. the goods and chattels of the said Patrick Smith .

PATRICK SMITH . I live at No. 37, Well-street, Mary-le-bone ; I rent the whole house. On the morning of the 16th of July, I went out between the hours of three and four; and returned at a quarter before six; my wife was in bed, as I left her. I understood that the prisoner was taken to the watch-house.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I produce the stolen property.

Patrick Smith . On looking at the several articles here; I can identify them as my property: here is no particular mark that I know of, on the cotton, but my wife can positively swear to it, only she is not here. I can speak to all the small articles; the knives are worth one shilling; the pelisses are also mine, as are the trowsers, and the other things The trowsers are well worth five shillings.

WILLIAM SANDISON . I am foreman to Mr. Davis, and live opposite to Patrick Smith 's house. On the 16th of July, at about a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, I was at my window; in a few minutes, the prisoner and another came and tried Smith's door, with some instrument; which not answering their purpose, they went to a post at the corner of Book-court, and after hammering it, returned again, and after several hammerings they got it to open the door; the prisoner then went in, and the other stood upon the watch. I immediately went down stairs, and called one of the lodgers; but he refused to get up, and so I went myself; and then the one that was on the watch, ran away; and on going into the house, I found the prisoner behind the door, hiding himself; he had nothing about him but the ink-stand; the knives and the other things were packed up inside, ready to be brought out; some part of the printed cotton was in his hat, and some in his trowsers. I took him to my own house, and locked him up in my room until I had put my clothes on. I knocked at Smith's door, to see if any body lived there; and afterwards I saw Smith, when he returned home from the country with his milk, about six o'clock. I gave the things I found on the prisoner to the constable.

William Newitt . I am a constable, and received the articles which I produced from the last witness at the watchhouse.

Patrick Smith . When I went out at the street door, I am sure I fastened it, by pulling it too after me; it is a spring latch, and there is a small hole to open the spring. When I returned, I found some of these things in the passage. When I went out in the morning I left my wife asleep, and she was so when I returned. I have also three children, who were in the house that morning; they were in bed when I went out, and also when I returned. My wife is not here.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-6

778. JOHN PARNELL was indicted for privately stealing, on the 24th of August , in the shop of Robert Dawson , one lace shawl, value 28 s. his property .

JOHN SNOWDEN . I am shopman to Robert Dawson ,

who is a haberdasher , residing in Ratcliffe Highway . The shawl in question was hanging up inside the shop. I saw it about three minutes before it was taken. I was soon after informed, by a fellow shopman, who is not here, that the shawl was missing; I immediately went to the door, and seeing the prisoner running; I pursued him, and stopped him. I charged him with stealing the shawl from the shop; he said, he knew nothing about it. I brought him back to the shop; and an officer was sent for.

RALPH HOLME. I searched the prisoner, and in his breeches I found the shawl, which I have had in my possession ever since.

ROBERT DAWSON . I am a haberdasher, residing in Ratcliffe Highway. On the shawl being missed, I saw the prisoner pursued and taken, and on his being searched in the shop the shawl was found on him; it is my property, my private shop mark is upon it.

Prisoner. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-7

779. MELINA CAME was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Walker , privately in his shop .

ANN WALKER . I am daughter to the prosecutor, who keeps a linen-draper's shop in Blandford-street , A piece of blue printed cotton was missed on the 22nd of June, and the prisoner had come into the shop the day before it was missed, at about two o'clock, for the purpose of purchasing some blue printed cotton; she followed me to the bottom of the shop, where I cut the print off for her, and she asked me to let her tie up her stocking; she stooped down at about the middle of the shop, as if to tie up her stocking, and just there a pile of prints was standing. After that, she asked me if I had ever tasted turtle soup; I answered, no. She promissed she would bring me some. I knew her by her frequently coming to purchase articles in my father's shop, and always understood she was Lady Say or Seles servant. She left the print she had bought on the counter, without paying for it, and went as I thought for the soap. I never missed any thing until the next day, when my father missed a piece of cotton print, and spoke to me about it. I had not particularly noticed that piece to have been in the place where she stooped down.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, at No. 14, Shuldam-street. Mr. Walker had got some information that she was there, and having procured a search warrant delivered it to me to execute. When I went to her lodgings, she was at home. I found these two pieces, (producing two pieces of cotton,) in the room in which she was sitting. Mr. Walker had gone in first and said something to her. I asked her if she had any more: the woman of the house said, that she had got six yards of her, and was to give her eighteen pence a yard for it, to make a gown. I took this piece (producing another piece.) out of the woman of the house's premises. Then the prisoner said, that her landlady did not buy it of her, but took it in lieu of rent. Mr. Walker asked the prisoner what she had done with the remainder; and she said she had sent it into the country. I then took her to the office.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a linen-draper, residing in Blanford-street. A piece of cotton was missing from my shop on the morning of Thursday, the 22nd of June, it contained twenty-eight yards, and stood with others against an iron pillar in the centre of the shop. I was not at home on the day previous, when the prisoner came to my shop; we had in general understood that she was a servant of Lady Say and Sele, but on enquiry, we found she was not. Subsequently I was informed by my boy, that he saw her taking in milk at 14, Shuldam-street. I accordingly got a warrant and went there with an officer; I found her sitting in the window at work, with a piece of cotton in her own hands, but not the whole piece. I asked her how she came by it; and her reply was, that she bought it. She then said, she had bought a piece of print at my house, and was coming for it. I said to her, Melina, you did not bring the turtle soup to my daughter; and I then put my head out of the window, and beckoned to the constable. She then gave us part of the print, and the constable asked her if there was any more, and we got some from the woman of the house, to whom she said, she had given it in the place of rent. We got all three pieces, and they are all parts of one piece, which was the one I lost. These pieces has my shop mark upon it, and I saw it in the shop the day before I missed it.

Ann Walker . At the time I saw her in the shop on the 21st, the boy was in the shop, who is not here: I don't know that he did not see her take it.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not private ly.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-8

780. FRANCIS COIL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th August , one pair of breeches, value 14 s. the property of John Ashbridge , privately in his shop .

JOHN MANSER . I am a journeyman pawnbroker, to Messrs. Deer and Dickins. The prisoner at the bar pledged this pair of breeches for ten shillings, on the 4th of August, 1815. I have had them ever since.

JOHN ASHBRIDGE . I believe these breeches to be mine, but I can't positively swear to them. I am a pawnbroker , and live at 101, George-street, Ratcliffe Highway . I had such a pair, which I lost between the hours of one and two, on the 14th of August.

JAMES CAMPER . I am a shopman to Mr. Ashbridge, who is a pawnbroker, and live in George-street, Ratcliffe Highway. I never saw the prisoner in my master's shop that I remember. I know the breeches to be his property, by a mark of my

own making, which is in the waistband. The last time that I saw them was between nine and ten in the morning of the 4th of August, and then they were hanging up inside the shop.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer. All I know is, that I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner, which I did, and took from his person on searching him, a duplicate for a pair of breeches, which he pawned for ten shillings, and which duplicate he got from John Manser .

Prisoner. I was asked by a shipmate to pawn these breeches, and he told me if he never returned from sea, I might keep the duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-9

781. FRANCIS COIL was again indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , one shawl, value 2 s. the property of James Robert Cassel .

But the evidence in this case being equally defective, the Jury found him

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-10

782. MARY POWELL , AND SARAH KELLY , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Mary Ann , the wife of William Russel , on the 27th of June , in a place near the Kings highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one shawl, value 3 s. one penny-piece, one halfpenny, and one farthing, of the goods and monies of William Russel .

MARY ANN RUSSEL . I am the wife of William Russel , who is a butcher , residing in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. On the 27th of June, I was going by the pathway through the fields from Battle-bridge to Islington, and just as I got by the back of Islington workhouse , the prisoner Powell, rushed out of a hedge, and stopped me, and called Kelly from behind the hedge, demanded my money to buy gin, saying, I was a wh - e of the fields, and I must pay my footing; she made use of several horrid expressions, and insisted on seeing the contents of my pockets; I had a purse, but all the money I had was three halfpence and a farthing. I told her, I had no more, but if she would not use me ill, and would go with me, I would give her a shilling. Kelly then seeing I had no money, told the other prisoner to let me go, but she said, she would have my shawl to get some gin, and she took it. I was then going away, and she called me back, and told me, if I would bring her a shilling upon the hill in the next field, she would give me my shawl back again. I was very much frightened.

WILLIAM LACK . I went into the field adjoining that in which the robbery was committed, by the directions of the prosecutrix; and took the prisoners. On Powell I found a penny-piece, a halfpenny, and a farthing.

THOMAS BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, in Islington, and the prisoner Kelly, whom I knew before, pawned this shawl, (producing a shawl,) on the 27th of June, on which I gave her three shillings.

Mary Ann Russel . That is my shawl.

JOHN ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 28th of June, I apprehended the other prisoner, in Crooked Village-yard, Kingsland-road. She said, she knew what I took her for, it was for the shawl. I then took from her hand, a small screw box, with a duplicate for the shawl in question, in it, and it appeared by that, to have been pawned for one shilling and sixpence.

Powell's Defence. We met this woman, and asked her for some gin, and she gave us the shawl to pawn to get some.

Kelly's Defence. I will leave it to the mercy of the court.

POWELL, NOT GUILTY .

KELLY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-11

783. JOHN MAHONY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles M'Dovat , on the 2nd of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, three Bank of England notes for the payment of one-pound each, value 3 l. his property .

CHARLES M'DOVAT . I lost some bank notes on Saturday, the 2nd of September. I went into the Black Horse that night, and called for a pot of beer; shortly afterwards, the prisoner came in, and sat on the other side. I treated him, until at length, the landlady would not let us have any more liquor. The prisoner then called me out, and asked me as a countryman, to come, and eat a bit of supper with him. I went with him to his lodgings, but I don't know in what street they are; and there was a girl there; we had supper, and when I had finished mine, I wished to go, but the prisoner held me back three or four times, and said, I should not go yet; I then kicked violently at the door, and cried out murder; and then he took me by the other shoulder, and hit me in the face; he then took his knife out, and cut the handkerchief which was round my neck, and took three one-pound notes out of it. I am sure they were in it. I came on shore that day, at Tower-hill, from on board the Menelaus frigate, and had received the notes from Captain Dicks . I immediately ran out then, and went for a watchman, and found three in about half an hour. I brought them to the door of the house, but they would not break it open, as it was locked. I soon after, saw the prisoner in a cook's shop, and then I called some watchman again, and when he came out, they attempted to take him, but he made his way through the whole of them. He was taken on the Sunday afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Burry. I received three pounds fourteen shillings from Captain Dicks , and put the notes in my handkerchief, and never took them out. I was perfectly sober, as sober as I am now.

MARY CORBETT . I know the person of Mahoney. I keep a public-house in George-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner came in with Mary Watson ; he wanted

some supper, and he offered me a note, which I did not take from him.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a patrole. I took the prisoner into custody, on an application made to me for that purpose, by a watchman, from whom he ran. I found him at his lodgings, in Maney-street , on the Sunday morning, I apprehended him laying on his bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a labourer in the London Docks; I saw the prosecutor in the public-house with three girls, and heard him say, he had been robbed of five-pounds.

MARY TAYLOR . I was at the public-house where the prosecutor was, with some girls, and I heard him say, that he had been robbed of every farthing he had between Church-lane, and Turk's Head, by a woman. There were other woman present. He said, when he was robbed, an oyster woman cut him across the face, in my presence, with an oyster shell, and he said, that it was she that robbed him. He did not appear to be in liquor. I next saw him in the Black Horse.

CATHERINE LOWE . I am wife to Edward Lowe . I know M'Dovat by person, but not by name. He is the man who struck me in the face on Sunday night; I saw him between five and six o'clock, eating oysters in Dyott-street, and he would not pay for them; I saw a great mob, and the prosecutor was cut on the face with an oyster shell, by the oyster woman, and on his coming out of the crowd, I spoke to him, and he said, he had been robbed of his notes out of his handkerchief round his neck, and some halfpence were taken from him.

Charles M'Dovat. I never saw the two last witnesses in my life, and never spoke to them. I never gave any account of having been robbed to any one at that time, for I had not been robbed then. I was not robbed until I fell in with the prisoner.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-12

784. JOSEPH DRAPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , one hundred and twelve sheep, value 192 l. the property of Joshua Lomax , esq .

JOHN BURGESS . I am shepherd to Mr. Joshua Lomax . On the 12th of August, there were one hundred and twelve sheep of my master's in a paddock of his at Childwick-bury, St. Albans . On Monday morning, the 12th, at six o'clock, they were gone, and the field was open; there was a gate to it, which I had shut on Sunday night. The next time I saw the sheep was on Monday evening, at Hendon.

GEORGE SIBLEY . I am a drover. I was at Holloway on Monday morning, the 13th of August, at about seven o'clock; I saw the prisoner driving the sheep through Holloway while I was taking a pint of beer. I asked him if he wanted any person to help him to drive them, and he agreed to my assisting him. Going along, he said, he was going to Smithfield. I asked him whose sheep these were, and he said, they were his own, and he was a farmer, at Bowden Green, below Northampton, from whence he had brought them. I asked him, who was his salesman at Smithfield, and he said, he had no one in particular; I recommended Mr. Ealand to him, and he agreed to him. When we came to Smithfield, I spoke to Mr. Ealand, and he spoke to the prisoner, and entered the sheep into his book. In about an hour and a half, the officers came in search of the prisoner, and he was taken at the Fortune of War public house.

GEORGE EALAND . I am a Smithfield salesman. Application was made to me by the last witness to seel these sheep, on the morning of Monday, the 13th of August; I was introduced to the prisoner, who told me that they were his own, and he was a farmer, at Bowden Green, below Northampton. I asked him if he was a dealer in sheep, and he said, no. He said, that there were six score; they were all marked J. L. I asked him his name, and he said, it was Wright. He then asked me if I was a regular salesman? I told him, I was; and he said, very well, he should put the stock in my hands, and I must do the best I could for him.

JOSHUA LOMAX , ESQ. After I had received information of the loss of my sheep, I went up to Smithfield immediately, and we took the prisoner at about eleven o'clock at the Fortune of War public-house. These sheep were worth one hundred and ninety-two pounds; that was what I gave for them; but I should be very sorry to take that for them.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. In consequence of an information being given me against the prisoner; I took him into custody, at a little after eleven, at the Fortune of War. I asked him what his name was, and he told me it was William Watson . On searching him, I found a paper, and asked him from that, if he did not live at Redburn, and he said, he did, and had worked with several farmers there. I then asked him if his name was not Draper, and he said, it was. I asked him what was his reason for taking so many sheep; his answer was, that as " he was determined to be hanged, he might as well be hanged for the whole flock, as for two or three. He said, he had shortly before come out of Hertford gaol, where he was imprisoned for three years before, for sheep stealing. I then took him to Guildhall.

Prisoner's Defence. If there had been twice as many more, I should have taken them, for I was quite insane at that time. About sixteen years ago, I was bitten by a mad dog, and was dipped in the salt water at Gravesend for it, and I am always insane in the months of July and August. I really do not know how I came by these sheep at all.

GUILTY - DEATH .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-13

785. JOHN WILSON and WILLIAM BLACKSTONE were indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting one note purporting to be a note of the Governour and Company of the Bank of England, for the payment of 1 l .

To which indictment, they severally pleaded NOT GUILTY.

786. JOHN WILSON and WILLIAM BLACKSTONE were again indicted, for feloniously having disposed of, and putting away, as true, one false and

counterfeit note, purporting to be a note of the Governour and Company of the Bank of England, for the payment of 1 l. they well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; and also for having in their possession at the same time, two other similar false and counterfeit notes .

To this indictment the prisoners severally pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-14

787. JOHN FRASER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , one sheet, value 6 s. the property of Stephen Parker , in a lodging room .

STEPHEN PARKER. I am landlord of the Coach and Horses, in King-street . The prisoner at the bar lodged at my house on the night of the 26th of June, and paid one shilling for his nights lodging. The sheet in question was let to him with the lodging. In the morning, as the prisoner was going out, the sheet was missed, and he was stopped on Westminster-bridge, and on his being searched, the sheet was round his hips; it is worth six shillings.

JOSEPH WANDER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. Here is the sheet.

WILLIAM BRUMBLE . I am a waterman. On the day mentioned in the indictment. I was plying at Westminster-bridge stairs, and hearing a cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner running, I stopped him. I saw the sheet taken from about his hips.

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday morning, I was taken very bad with the rhumatism in my hips, and wrapped the sheet round them, and hearing the soldiers going off to the continent, I jumped up, and put on my clothes and forgot to take off the sheet.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-15

788. JAMES FRANKLIN and JOHN THOMAS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John North , in the night of the 15th of July , or early in the morning of the 16th, and feloniously stealing therein, four coach glasses, value 2 l. the property of John Jones .

THOMAS BARNS . I am coachman to Miss Morgan, who rents a stable from Mr. North, in Berkley-mews , and the room over it is inhabited by Mr. Hare. I saw the coach glasses safe in the stable on the night of the 15th of July, and they were gone on the morning of the 16th. I had locked the stable the night previous.

JOHN LAUDERDALE . I am a watchman. I apprehended both the prisoners; I saw them together in Berkley-mews on the night of the 15th, and I immediately took Frankling to the watchhouse, and Thomas ran away. On searching Frankling, I found a piece of a coach glass frame; which is here. I then went and took the other prisoner, and afterwards I found the four coach glasses in the mews on the ground, close by Miss Morgan's coach-house door. This piece of frame fits one of the glasses.

RICHARD STIMPSON . I am a watchman. About two o'clock in the morning of the 16th, I heard a rattle spring, and went to the place from whence the sound appeared to come, and seeing Thomas run, I assisted in apprehending him.

JOHN NEWIT . I am a constable of the night. I searched Frankling, and on him that piece of coach glass frame was found; it fits one of the glasses. This skeleton key was delivered to me at the watch-house, by John Derbyshire , a watchman.

JOHN DERBYSHIRE . I am watchman. I gave that skeleton key to the last witness. I found it in Franklin's left hand coat pocket.

Prisoner Frankling. I wish my lord you would ask Newit whether he found that piece of frame in my hat, or in my pocket?

John Newit . I found it in your pocket.

JOHN JONES. I am a coachmaker , and let out the coach from which these glasses have been stolen, to Miss Morgan, on a years job. I have examined these glasses, and I believe they are mine.

THOMAS, NOT GUILTY .

FRANKLING, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-16

789. MARY LYNCH was indicted for feloniously secreting and embezzling ten shillings and two-pence received by her, for and on account of her master and employer .

EDWARD PEET . I am a milkman , and the prisoner was in my employ to carry milk about to my customers, and received this money in payment of bills from Mr. William's servant, at 34, Bloomsbury-square. I repeatedly asked her about this money, and her answer was that Mrs. Williams was out of Town.

ANN WILLIAMS . I am cook to Mr. Williams, of 34, Bloomsbury-square. I used to receive the money from my mistress to pay for the milk once a week or fortnight, and always used to do so. I received a bill from the prisoner at the bar on the 6th of August, and paid it; and she signed it as received, with a cross, as her mark. Here it is.

(The bill put in, and read.)

Edward Peat . This bill I delivered to the prisoner to get the money for it, but she never gave that money to me. I see it has been paid.

The prisoner called several witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-17

790. GEORGE NEWTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, one blanket, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Clare , in a lodging-room .

SARAH CLARE . I am wife to John Clare , and my husband's house is in Type-street. On the 24th of June, I let one room on the first floor to the prisoner at the bar, and let with it all the furniture necessary for a bed and amongst other things, three blankets; he paid no rent, and left the lodging on the Saturday. I went into the room on the Monday morning, and the blanket was gone.

GEORGE GARRAND. I am shopman to Mr. Timbleby,

a pawnbroker, at No. 8, Old street-road, This blanket was pawned by a man in regimentals, whom I believe to be the prisoner, on the 6th of July, and I advanced two shillings and sixpence upon it.

JAMES BINN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at another lodging. He gave me the duplicate of a blanket, which he acknowledged he had stolen, and said, it was out of distress.

Sarah Clare . That I believe is my blanket, and I really think the prisoner took it in distress.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-18

791. WILLIAM CASTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of Samuel Williams , on the 1st of September , one Bank of England note, value 10 l. his property .

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I am a sailor . I went down to Greenwich on Friday, the 1st of September, to receive my prize money, but not finding my Captain there, I went to his lodgings at Limehouse; I there got from him a ten-pound note, two dollars, and ten-pence in halfpence; I put them into my left hand waistcoat pocket; I was then going home. I looked into the Nelson public-house ; in a few minutes, the prisoner came in, but did not come into my box; I called for a glass of gin and water, which the servant brought, and I told her to drink; she did, and then handed it to the prisoner; another man immediately came in; I did not know him; between the three, they finished it; and I called for another; after about a quarter of an hour, the other man said something to me, and the prisoner thrust his hand into my pocket; I felt it go out, and on feeling for the money, I found it was gone. I told the mistress how I lost my money; and have never seen it since. I charged the prisoner with the theft; but he denied it. I then asked him where the man was that had left the house; and he said, he did not know The prisoner was taken the next morning.

JOHN HOPE . I am a constable. The prosecutor told me on Saturday morning that he had been robbed. I went to the Nelson public-house, and there I took him into custody.

JURY. To Prosecutor. Did you feel the money in your book before he put his hand in it - A. Yes.

GUILTY .

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-19

792. EDWARD FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , fifteen yards of printed cotton, value 27 s. the property of William Pullen .

JAMES ARCHER. I saw the prisoner, and a lad, standing at Mr. Pullen's door, at about half past seven in the evening, of the 15th of August, and presently I saw the lad take a piece of printed cotton, which was standing on the threshold of the door, half in, and half out, and deliver it to the prisoner at the bar. They immediately ran up the court, and I pursued them, and laid hold of the prisoner, who had the cotton, and had thrown his apron over it. Just at the end of the court, I met a man, who assisted me in securing the prisoner; and the lad got away. We then opened the apron, and took the prisoner to Mr. Pullen, who claimed the cotton. The prisoner said, he was employed by some person, whom he did not know, to carry the cotton, and he was to have had a shilling for his trouble. An officer was immediately sent for, and the prisoner was delivered into his custody.

Cross-examined. I am confident it was the prisoner that received the cotton from the boy, for he had it in his apron when I took him.

ROBERT BENGAL . I am an officer. I was sent for, to take charge of the prisoner: and this piece of cotton was delivered into my care at the same time. I have kept it ever since.

WILLIAM PULLEN . I am a linen-draper , residing at 145, Bishopsgate-street . I know nothing of the particulars of the robbery of my own knowledge. The prisoner was brought into my shop, and this piece of cotton, which Bengal, the officer, has produced, was taken out of his apron, and it is my property, it has my shop mark upon it; it is worth one pound seven shillings at prime cos.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-20

793 WILLIAM KEEK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , twelve yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Galplor .

No witnesses appearing against the prisoner, they were called upon their recognizances, and the Jury found him,

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-21

794. CHARLES LOVELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , twelve black lace shawls, value 10 l. the property of William Jerome , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am street-keeper of Aldersgate parish. I stopped the prisoner at the bar when I was on duty, at about eleven o'clock in the morning, of the 5th of September, a the corner of Bull Head-passage, just by Wood-street, he had a bundle under his arm, and on my interrogating him, he neither knew where he got it, nor where he was going with it, nor what he was going to do with it. He appeared to be a hawker of wood. He had this bundle of pitch wood in his hand. I took him into a house. In this bundle I found twelve lace shawls. This might perhaps be four hundred yards from Mr. Jerome's house. I afterwards found they were Mr. Jerome's property.

Prisoner. Did you never say you saw a man in a black coat running away?

Witness. Never in my life.

WILLIAM JEROME . I am a shawl-dealer , and my warehouse is in Wood-street, Cheapside . On the 5th of this month, I was in my counting-house, behind the warehouse, and at about eleven o'clock

in the morning, I heard the door open, and somebody asked if there was any wood wanted? (without taking my attention from my books, which I was then looking over,) I answered, no. These shawls had been on the counter, and were not missed until they were brought back by the officer. I did not see the face of the person who asked if any wood was wanted, because I did not raise my head. My counting-house looks into the warehouse. The shawls here produced by the street keeper, are my property; they have my private shop mark, masculine, on them, and they are worth from ten pounds to twelve pounds.

WILLIAM HOLDER JEROME. I am the son of the last witness, and know these shawls to be my father's property; they were missed just as they were brought in by the street keeper, William Taylor .

GUILTY,Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-22

795. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , one mahogany knife-case, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of Charles Wright .

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am an upholsterer , and live at No. 11, Charles-street, Soho-square . At about six o'clock in the evening, of the 28th of June, I was sitting at tea in my back parlour, which looks into my shop: and I observed a man and the boy at the bar, standing at my shop window, which was open, and the man appeared to make a signal for the prisoner to take this knife case, which he immediately did, and ran off. I ran out directly, and the man was just then leaning over to get something else, but I did not mind that, and pursued the boy, whom I never lost sight of, and shortly after came up to, and then he threw the knife case down. I took him, and sent for an officer.

CHARLES CUNNINGHAM . I am a constable, and being sent for by the prosecutor, I took charge of the prisoner, together with the knife case.

GUILTY .

Confined two months , and privately whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-23

796. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , one plane, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of George Turner .

GEORGE TURNER . I am a carpenter , and work for Mr. Bonell. The prisoner is a fellow workman of mine. I left my plane in Mr. Bonell's shop, on Saturday night, at seven o'clock, and when I went on Monday morning, at six o'clock, all the planes in the place were thrown about, and this plane gone. I had seen the plane on the Saturday evening, but was not sure it was mine until I knew mine was missing.

JOHN DEVONSHINE . I am a servant to Mr. Warmington. My master's premises adjoin those of Mr. Bonell, and I saw the prisoner there, at about nine o'clock on the Saturday evening; I asked him what brought him there; and he said, he only went to lie down. I told him that was not a proper place, and immediately took him to the watchhouse.

SAMUEL WILKINSON . I am a watchman, and saw him take this plane out of his pocket.

George Turner . It is my plane I know; and it is worth one shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY .

Publickly whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-24

797. GEORGE BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , one sack, value 2 s. and one bushell, and a half of oats, value 6 s. the property of William Pratt .

JOSHUA POND . I am a soldier, and was quartered at the Three Tons, at Uxbridge , on this side of the bridge, which is in Middlesex, and in the evening of the 8th, I saw the prisoner bring a sack with some oats in it out of the granary, into the yard, and he placed it on a tub under the window of my room. At about a quarter before ten o'clock, he came back, and took the sack; I went down stairs, and followed him round the market place, and just as he turned a corner, I lost sight of him, and on regaining it, the sack was gone. I then went, and told the master.

THOMAS KING . I am in the employment of the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner take the sack, but I don't know whence to.

Prisoner. Ask that witness what sort of grain it was?

Witness. I don't know; it was corn of some sort.

WILLIAM PRATT . I keep the Tons, at Uxbridge , and have the contract for changing the mail coach horses there. This corn was my own. I know nothing of the circumstance of the stealing, except through the information of other witnesses.

Prisoner. I took this corn and shot it into the bin, and then fed my horses all round.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-25

798. ANN MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , one shawl, value 2 s. the property of John Brown .

SARAH BROWN . I am wife of John Brown, and lost a shawl, but did not see the prisoner take it.

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I am a pawnbroker, at 105, Bishopsgate-street. I took this shawl in as a pledge, but don't know from whom.

Sarah Brown . That is my shawl.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-26

799. PETER NELSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , one saw, value 3 s. the property of George Daws .

GEORGE DAWS I am a cabinet maker . The saw was stolen from my yard behind the house.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a watchman, and saw the prisoner with a basket on his shoulder at the back of Spencer-street, Northampton square; I asked him what he had there, and he said fowls which he was

going to take to his Captain on board a ship, and there was also a saw.

JOHN OUDINOT . This saw was brought to me. I am an officer of St. James's parish, Clerkenwell .

George Daws . That is my saw; I lost it from an out-house in my back yard.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and privately whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-27

800. JOHN FARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a copper, value 25 s. the property of Joseph Barrett .

ROBERT MAY . I saw the prisoner at the bar, bring a copper out of No. 1, Red Lion-market, Whitecross-street , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and I followed him into Little Shire-lane, just by Temple bar, and he left it at a house there. When I came back, I went to tell Mr. Barrett, but there was nobody at home; but when Mrs. Barrett came home, I gave her the information.

ELIZABETH BARRETT . I am the wife of Joseph Barrett , and in consequence of some information, which I received from the last witness, I went to Hatton Garden office, and got a warrant to search the house where the copper was deposited.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I have the copper here. I went with a search warrant to a house in Shire-lane, and found this copper in the back yard.

Elizabeth Barrett. That is my copper.

Robert May . That is such a copper as I saw brought out of Mrs. Barrett's house.

MARY DENNY . My husband is a dealer in Marine stores, and lives in Shire-lane. The prisoner at the bar brought this copper to our house, and wanted to sell it for fifteen shillings. I told him I did not know the value of it, but if he would come again when my husband was at home, he would speak to him about it. He left the copper in the back yard, and when he returned, my husband detained him, in consequence of some information which he had received.

WILLIAM DENNY . I am the husband to the last witness. The prisoner came to our house, and I had heard from Read all about it; so I told him to walk in, and I would settle with him; and when he came in, I sent for the officer.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-28

801. JAMES KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , one pair of pantaloons, value 6 s. the property of Henry Harris .

HENRY HARRIS . I am a slop seller , and live at 88, Rosemary-lane . This pair of pantaloons was hanging outside the shop with other clothes. I did not see prisoner at the bar take them. I did run out, hearing a noise and there was a mob round him when I saw him.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and saw him take these pantaloons. When I searched him, he appeared in the greatest distress, and had only three farthings.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-29

802. ELIZABETH LOWE and SARAH LOWE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a pocket-book, value 1 d. a pencil-case, value 2 s. a Bank of England note, for the payment of 1 l. four three-shilling bank tokens, value 12 s. and a watch and chain, value 2 l. the property of Anthony Budd , from his person .

ANTHONY BUDD . I am a journeyman carpenter , and live at Highwood-hill, in the parish of Hendon, and came to London on the 8th of September. I spent that evening with a friend, whom I quitted at about two o'clock in the morning of the 9th, when I had all my property safe. I knew very well what I was about. The bank tokens were loose in my coat pocket. I wanted to go to Covent Garden to my lodgings, but not knowing my way, I asked a watchman, and then the prisoner Elizabeth Lowe , and another girl, came up, and said, they would shew me the way. I went with them, and they said, they would take me to a better place, and they took me to No. 6, Charles-street, Drury-lane . I have since learned that is the name of the place. We went up stairs into a bed-room; Sarah Lowe was there, and I gave her sixpence to go out of the room; the other girl had gone away. Elizabeth and I lay down on the bed, and I fell asleep. When I awoke about five o'clock in the morning, I jumped out of bed to see what o'clock it was, but my watch was gone; both the prisoners were then in the room. I did not miss my money. The mistress of the house said, that she saw my watch chain hanging out when I came into the house, and the watch must be produced. I then dressed myself, and when I put my hand in my pocket, I found my pocket-book was gone. The prisoners denied knowing any thing about it. I then asked the landlady to give me a sheet of paper and pen and ink, that I might write for an officer. Elizabeth then ran away, and I after her, and secured her. I got my watch from the landlady.

ANN TROY . I am the landlady of the house in which this robbery was committed. The prisoner Elizabeth Lowe , was a lodger of mine, and the prisoner Sarah, had no place to go to, and came to lodge with her sister. I was alarmed about five o'clock in the morning of the 9th, by hearing the prosecutor say he had been robbed of his watch, I had seen the chain hanging out of his fob the night before, and determined that he should not be robbed in my house; I told Elizabeth that the watch must be given up, but she denied all knowledge of it. The prosecutor then was writing for an officer, when she said to me, if he would remain there, she would get the watch. She took me down the Coal-yard, and called at the bottom of a pair of stairs, Sally, and then brought me the watch, which I delivered to the prosecutor. Afterwards she said, she had one pound twelve shillings, but it was her own. I went to the watchhouse, and fetched Furzeman. She delivered the one pound twelve shillings to me at the time she delivered the watch. When Furzeman came, the

prosecutor discovered he had lost some money as well as the watch.

JOHN FURZMAN , SENIOR. I am a patrole. The pocket-book has never been found. I afterwards went and searched the room, and found the pencil case under the bed.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I went to Mrs. Troy, and got the one pound note and the silver.

JOHN FURZMAN , JUNIOR. I am a patrole. I took Elizabeth into custody.

ELIZABETH LOWE , GUILTY .

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

SARAH LOWE , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-30

803. JOHN CHAMBERLAIN GODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , one hundred thousand tacks, value 4 l. 3 s. 4 d. the property of Henry Wingfield and John Blunt .

HENRY WINGFIELD . I am an agent for Messrs. William and Jones, nail manufacturers , at Birmingham; John Blunt is my partner. The prisoner was in our employ. These tacks were packed up in a packet, with others, at our warehouse, which is at Scott's wharf, on the Surrey side of the River . I know nothing of the circumstance of the robbery. I can swear to these tacks, and on the loss of them we were debited for them four pounds three shillings and fourpence.

JOHN HUNTLEY . I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden office. Between four and five in the afternoon, of the 8th of September, I was standing in company with Limbrick, a brother officer, and I observed the prisoner with something apparently very heavy tied up in this piece of green baize, (produces it,) and hanging by a cord over his shoulder, which it appeared to cut; I remarked this circumstance to Limbrick, and we agreed to follow the prisoner, which we did, across Clerkenwell green, and into Red Lion-street, and there we went up to him, and stopped him; we observed him looking into a good many old iron shops on Mutton hill. I asked him what he had there, and he said, nails: he said, he had them from his brother, who was a manufacturer at Sheffield. I asked him where he was going to sell them, and he said, in Smithfield. I went with him to Mr. Wright's, the great nail warehouse, in Smithfield, and called Mr. Wright out of the counting-house. Mr. Wright asked him where he got them, and he said, from Sheffield; Mr. Wright said, that was a falsity, for they were Birmingham nails. After going to various nail warehouses, we at last, discovered them to be the property of Messrs. Williams and Blunt.

EDWARD HANCOCK . I am clerk to Messrs. Williams and Jones at Birmingham, and know these tacks to be their manufacture.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I was in company with Huntley during the whole conversation. The prisoner afterwards said, he found the nails on Blackfriars bridge.

GUILTY .

Confined one year , and privately whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-31

804. BENJAMIN NOBBS was indicted for stealing on the 20th of August , a silver watch and chain, value 30 s. the property of Edward Pearce .

EDWARD PEARCE . I am a seafaring man , and met the prisoner in a place called the Back-lane, Ratcliffe Highway, and we fell into conversation; I told him I came home in the Gretna, and asked him if he had no better rigging than that which he had on, and I told him, if he would go with me, I would rig him better. He went with me to my lodgings, and I took out of my chest, a silk waistcoat, a pair of trowsers, and a jacket, and gave them to him. My landlady then came in, and told me I was giving clothes away to a common thief, and shoved him out of doors. I thought he was really in distress, and jumped over the hatch which she had shut, and followed him. He said, he would get a warrant for her for saying what she did of him, and soon after, he remarked what a pretty little watch I had, and asked me to let him look at it; I took it, and gave it into his hand, holding the chain myself, which he gently drew out of my hand; I turned, and immediately he was gone; I pursued, and lost sight of him, and so I gave information at the office. The next time I saw him was in the custody of Brown, the officer.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and asked him what he had done with the watch, and he said, he had taken it back to Pearce. Going along, he said, Brown, it is no use telling you a lie, I have pawned the watch; he told me the pawnbroker's, and after I took him to the office, I went and got the watch; and here it is.

DAVID SOLOMONS . I am a slop-seller, and lent the prisoner two shillings upon a duplicate for a watch, which I went and redeemed immediately; and when Mr. Brown, the officer, came to me, he got it.

Edward Pearce . That is my watch.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-32

805. THOMAS PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , seven pounds weight of cheese, value 5 s. the property of William Hodson .

THOMAS FAIRCHILD . I am in the employ of Mr. Hodson, who is a cheesemonger , at the corner of Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields . I was in the shop on the 14th, and saw the prisoner take the cheese away; it was just within the window, and the window was open.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am a patrole, and was going with Roberts down to Bow-street on the evening when this cheese was stolen, and the prisoner was delivered into our custody just as we passed; he refused to go with us, and we were obliged to call Patrick Cowley , a watchman, to assist us to carry him.

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am the patrole.

PATRICK COWLEY . I am the watchman.

WILLIAM HODSON . That is my cheese.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-33

806. MARIA PAGE and ELIZABETH PAGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , twenty-two pounds in Bank of England notes, the property of Christopher M'Cartney , from his person .

CHRISTOPHER M'CARTNEY. I am a seafaring man , and on the 15th of July, I happened to be in the Catherine Wheel public-house, in Whitechapel , and there I fell in with the prisoners at the bar. I had twenty-two pounds in English notes in a pocketbook. I was drinking with the prisoners in the tap-room; I was perfectly sober, and having fallen off the Portsmouth coach coming to London, I was not able to look out for a bed for myself, so I said, I would thank any one to help me to a bed; Elizabeth Page told me she would help me to a bed, which she did, and not being able to strip myself, laid down with my clothes on, and soon after, the other prisoner, Maria, came up. I fell asleep, and they remained in the room. My money was safe then in a pocket-book, which was in a sort of belt round my body. I was awakened by the prisoners rummaging my clothes about, and then I perceived they had got the pocket-book. I saw Elizabeth take the notes out of it: then she threw the pocket-book at me, and then they both ran down stairs. I picked the pocket-book up, but it was empty. I then went down stairs, and to the place where I first fell in with them, but could learn no tidings of them. At last, I fell in with them at the Kettle Drum, in Ratcliffe Highway, and I immediately procured an officer, and had them taken into custody. I am sure I had four notes for the payment of five pounds each, and two for the payment of one pound each.

DOROTHY GRAHAM . I keep the Rose and Crown public-house in Essex-street. The two prisoners came into my house on the morning of the 16th of July, and Maria gave me two notes, asking me at the same time, whether they were two one-pound notes or two two-pound notes, and I told her they were five-pound notes; I don't know what became of them, they paid me three shillings and sixpence, which they owed me, and they told me if any one enquired for them, I was to say I had not seen them, and I said, very well.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am the officer called in by M'Cartney, and took the prisoners into custody, but found nothing on them.

MARIA PAGE , GUILTY .

ELIZABETH PAGE , GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-34

807. THOMAS PINCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , two pieces of iron railway, value 4 s. the property of Hugh M'Intosh .

JOHN UPTON . I am an officer. I met the prisoner at the bar on the 18th of July, at about nine o'clock in the morning, with these two pieces of iron railway; I asked him where he got them, and he said, he picked it up at the back of White Conduit House. I then took him to Somers Town watchhouse.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer. I was with the last witness at the apprehension of the prisoner.

HUGH ROSS . I am clerk to Mr. Hugh M'Intosh, who is contracter for the cutting of the Regent's Canal . These two pieces of iron railway are such as we use for the carts to run upon, and I know them to be Mr. M'Intosh's property.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and privately whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-35

808. JOSEPH RACINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , one mahogany writing desk, value 2 l. two Bank of England notes, for the payment of twenty pounds each, value 40 l. and two other Bank of England notes, for the payment of ten pounds each, value 20 l. the property of William Ball Stapleton , esq .

WILLIAM BALL STAPLETON , ESQ. I am a lieutenant in his Majesty's 21st regiment of Light Draggons. On my return from the Continent, after the late campaign, I took up a temporary residence at the Northumberland coffee-house, and shortly afterwards took lodgings in the prisoner's mother's house, at the West end of the Town. The prisoner I believe, is a musical instrument maker. I employed him to bring several articles from the Northumberland coffee-house to his mother's, and last of all, I told him to go for the desk in question; I apprized him of its contents, which were two twenty pound notes, two ten-pound notes, and several valuable papers, which were infinitely of more of consequence than my money. He never returned at all.

ELIZABETH MOLES . I am a servant at the Northumberland coffee-house, and delivered lieutenant Stapleton's desk to the prisoner, who said, he had orders to fetch it.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am a constable, and after hearing often of the prisoner, and going in pursuit of him a long time, I at length apprehended him between eleven and twelve o'clock, on the 14th of September, opposite Somerset House.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-36

809. ROBERT SMITH and SOPHIA TROTTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, a sheet, value 2 s. a bolster, value 3 s. and a blanket, value 3 s. the property of Lambert Harford , in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH HARFORD . My husband's name is Lambert Harford . The prisoners were lodgers of ours.

COURT. Q. In what parish does your husband reside - A. St. Matthew, Bethnal green.

COURT. Then that will not do. - The indictment states it to be in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-37

810. JOHN SUMMERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, four three-shilling Bank tokens, value 12 s. two eighteen-penny tokens, value 3 s. three shillings, two shillings, and one sixpence , the property of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . I live at 148, Shoreditch , and am a corn chandler . I lost this money out of the cupboard in the parlour; my shop door is constantly open; I saw the prisoner in my parlour at about twelve o'clock at noon, and I sent for an officer, and I told him to put the money down, which he did, on the table,

JOHN TENDALL . I am an officer, and was sent for to take the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY .

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-38

811. SARAH FREELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a mahogany box, value 3 s. the property of John Bembridge .

SARAH BEMBRIDGE . I live at 44, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell : and the box was put against a pane of glass which was broken. I saw it at one o'clock, when I went out, and when I returned at eight, it was gone. Louisa Woolley is a little girl, who was the only person in the house during my absence, she is the daughter of a lodger of mine.

LOUISA WOOLLEY . It is a bad thing to tell a lie, persons who don't tell the truth go to the bad man. I am six years old; I live at Mrs. Bembridge's, 44. Turnmill-street. I saw the woman at the bar take a box out of the window at about dinner time; I had seen her before. I did not tell any body then, because there was no one at home; I told Mrs. Bembridge when she came home.

JOHN BALLARD . I am an officer. I was sent for to search the lodgings of the prisoner on the 9th; I went to her lodgings and told her what I came for, and she threw the box out of the two pair of stairs window.

Sarah Bembridge . That is my box.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-39

812. HANNAH PEARO PRESCOTT and MARY CONEY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, a snuff-box, value 15 s. the property of Edward Stewart , from his person .

WILLIAM BOUCHER . I am shopman to Mr. Watts, who is a pawnbroker, residing in East Smithfield; I received a snuff-box from the prisoners at the bar to pledge. But the prosecutor has neither attended here nor at Hick's Hall: there is nobody here who can prove the property to be Edward Stewarts .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-40

813. BARNET LIPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, a watch, value 7 l. the property of Peter Solus from his person ,

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson

Reference Number: t18150913-41

814. JAMES FOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a pair of keysemere breeches, value 10 s. the property of Nathaniel Smith Machin .

ROBERT DEDMAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Machin, who is an auctioneer ; his doors are in King street, Covent Garden . This pair of breeches were hanging in the room for sale.

JOHN SALTKIN . I happened to be in the Salerooms, and saw the prisoner snatch up the pair of breeches.

Robert Dedman . I have had the breeches ever since, and know them to be my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I confess the crime imputed to me, and committed it to stop the mouths of my crying infants and sick wife.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-42

815. SARAH OSBORNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , one three-shilling Bank of England token , the property of Phoebe Bailey .

PHOEBE BAILEY. I did live in Adam and Eve court, Whitecross street ; I left this token on the table in my room, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon of the 26th of July.

MARY BILLINGS . I saw the robbery. I was in Mrs. Bailey's room and the prisoner had come to see some person up stairs, and came down for a light, and took the token off the table.

CATHERINE EAGLETON . Mrs. Bailey had borrowed sixpence of me, and laid this token on the table to pay me, and the prisoner who came in for a light, took it up, and it was afterwards found on the stairs.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-43

816. JOB WHITE RICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , five books, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Yandell .

BUT it was clearly proved the prisoner was mad, the jury found him NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-44

817. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , one Bank of England note, for the payment of ten pounds, value 10 l. the property of Michael Griffen .

MICHAEL GRIFFEN . I am a seafaring man , and know the prisoner, who is my shipmate's father. I was paid off on the 11th, and the prisoner brought a boat down the river for his son and me. This note was in my left hand jacket pocket; we got into the boat at about twelve at noon; he took us to his house in Cannon-street-row ; I slept with the prisoner that night. I waked the next morning at about seven o'clock, but did not miss my money until the prisoner

was gone to Chelsea to get his pension. Then I examined my pocket-book, the ten-pound note was gone, but two two-pound notes, and a five-pound note remained. The prisoner was taken up on the 25th of August, and then owned that he took it but afterwards denied it.

THOMAS FRED . I am the officer who apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY .

Confined one year , and publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-45

818. JOHN THOMAS and JAMES ROBERTS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a chaise cart, value 10 l. the property of John Warden .

JOHN WARDEN . I live at No. 22, Frederick-place, Hampstead-road . I lost a chaise cart on the 16th of August, from an open yard behind my house; it was safe at eight o'clock in the evening, and on my going round my premises at about ten minutes before ten, it was gone. The season was very dry, and I could only trace which way the wheels went for a short space, and it was in a direction for the High road, in front of St. James's chapel. In consequence of information which I received, I went down to Dunstable, in Bedfordshire, and there I saw the wheels and springs, which I can swear are my property, and belonged to this chaise cart.

THOMAS NICOLLS . I am a farrier, at Dunstable, in Bedfordshire. I know both the prisoners at the bar; I saw them both at Dunstable, at my house, on the morning of the 17th, between five and six o'clock in the morning; Thomas I knew before. Thomas told me he had a friend, pointing to Roberts, who wished to sell a chaise cart; he had sold it at Smithfield to a grocer, who resided at St. Albans, and he had taken it down to him, but found he had not the money, and so they brought it to me, thinking I was a likely person to purchase it. Roberts was standing by when this conversation took place. Roberts appeared to be the owner, and I bargained with him for it; after some chaffering, I agreed to give him four pounds ten shillings for it, it was out of repair rather, the wheels were bad, and one of the springs was bent, so I took off the springs, and put wooden ones in their places, and put on another pair of wheels. Thomas and Mr. Warden came down together in a gig in a few days afterwards, and I understood it was to shew Mr. Warden where they had sold the cart. Warden immediately claimed the wheels and springs when I shewed them to him. John Thomas said, he knew where Roberts lived; Thomas had told me at the time of the purchase, that he, himself, lived in Chapel-place, Little Coram-street, Russell-square.

Cross-examined. Roberts asked me to buy the horse which was in the cart at the time he sold it; but I did not.

CHARLES BROWN . I am an officer. I apprehended John Thomas on Monday, the 11th of September, in Cold Bath-fields; he said, there were two others remained, a baker, and another named Bason, and if I would go with him, he would shew me where to find them; he said, this Bason lived over the water, and then he said, he lived some where else, and at last, from the description he gave me, and a direction to Shropshire-court, Pancras-street, Tottenham-court-road. I apprehended Roberts. Roberts told me that Thomas, and a baker, named Riddell, (who has since absconded,) told him that he was to appear to be the owner of the cart, and Thomas knew a smith down at Dunstable, who would buy it; I first saw the cart at Mr. Fox's, in Cold Bath-fields.

PHILIP FOX . I live in Baker-row, Cold Bath Fields. I know nothing of the sale of the cart. All I know is, that I went to Dunstable about the 8th of August, and Nicolls bought the gig I went down in from me, and lent me the chaise cart in question to come up to London in. That cart was afterwards seen on my premises by Marden, and claimed to be his.

THOMAS THISSELTON . I am an officer. I was in company with Brown when he took Roberts, on the 11th of September; he said, that Thomas, and a man named Riddell, drew away the cart, and he, (Roberts) considered it as Thomas's property. It was taken from the back of the prosecutor's house, he said, but he did not know but what it was Thomas's own property, and he being poor, and having a large family starving, was induced to go down to Dunstable to sell it, and present himself as the owner.

Cross-examined. I saw his family, and they really were in a most wretched condition; no furniture in the house at all, except an old box, upon which Roberts himself was sitting, and three straw beds up stairs, upon which the children were laying.

(The cart springs were here produced.)

John Warden . These are the springs of my cart, and I have seen the rest in the yard; it might be worth ten pounds; it cost me thirteen pounds three months ago.

Thomas's Defence. I was in company with Roberts at a coach-maker's in the New-road, and we were asked over the way by a man named Riddell, a baker, who asked us to buy a cart; I said I did not want one, and Roberts said, he had no money, but we agreed to sell it for him.

Roberts's Defence. What Thomas says is true; that we were invited by this Riddell, (who has since run away,) to buy this cart, and as I had no money, I could not, and we agreed to sell the cart for him, and accordingly that night we went into the Regent's Park, and he led us to a yard where the cart was, and he and Thomas drew it through a dust yard, and into the High-road, and I borrowed a horse of a man who is here, to take the cart down to Dunstable, which I at first understood was only fourteen miles from Town. We saw Riddle the Friday following in Smithfield, and gave him the money.

EDWARD THOMAS . I live in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square. I know Roberts to be an honest man; I have worked for him; he is in the coach-broking

line. I lent him a horse to go in a chaise cart with him to Uxbridge, where he was to take his wife to. I told him, he might sell the horse for as much as he could get.

Cross-examined by the COURT. I understood this was a journey of pleasure; I don't know how they were to get back.

Other witnesses were called, who gave the prisoners good characters.

THOMAS, GUILTY .

ROBERTS, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-46

819. BENJAMIN GIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May , six quarts of ale, value 3 s. and two quarts of wine, value 2 s. the property of Daniel Gurner .

ELIZABETH LAKE . I am a servant to Mr. Gurney, at Hendon. In the month of May last, my master and mistress went to Hounslow fair. The prisoner was also in the service of my master. He took a board out of the cellar, with a plough hammer, and brought out a pail full of ale, and a gallon pan not quite full of wine; I had some of both. I did not tell my mistress directly, because the prisoner told me, I should be transported. At last, after he had been to the cellar several times, I told.

MR. DANIEL GURNEY . I am a farmer , residing at Hendon . I have frequently lost wine and beer from my cellar.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-47

820. WILLIAM PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , two gowns, value 10 s. two shifts, value 10 s. two petticoats, value 8 s. and one handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Alice Young .

ALICE YOUNG . I am a servant to Mr. M'Guire, who is a publican. These things were stolen on the 15th of August; they were taken out of my bedroom: I saw the prisoner going out of the passage in the evening, and on my going up stairs immediately, I missed the things.

JOHN M'GUIRE . I am the son of the publican. I was going up to bed between eight and nine, and hearing a footstep above me, I said, whose there? on going higher, I saw the prisoner's back; I then ran down down into the tap room, and said, there was a man up stairs.

Alice Young . I ran after the prisoner into the street, and found my clothes upon him.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody at M'Guire's. I got this beadle from the young woman.

GUILTY .

Confined three weeks , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-48

821. AMELIA PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , two bank notes for the payment of two-pound each, value 4 l. and one bank note for the payment of five-pound, value 5 l. the property of Christopher Flood , from his person .

CHRISTOPHER FLOOD. I am a sea-faring man , and lost these notes together with eighteen shillings in silver, on the 27th of August; this money was in a handkerchief round my neck. I met the prisoner at the bar in Ratcliffe Highway, and she took me to a house in Blue Gate Fields ; we went to bed; I put my neck handkerchief under the pillow. She left me in the morning before I was awake.

ELIZABETH PARROTT . I keep this house in Blue Gate Fields. The prisoner and the prosecutor came to my house on the Sunday evening, and asked for a lodging: the sailor paid me two shillings for the night's lodging. In the middle of the night the prisoner said, she and the man had quarrelled, and she would go home; she dressed herself, and went home. In the morning, the sailor said, he had been robbed.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am the constable who apprehended the prisoner; on searching her, I found five one-pound notes. I asked her where she got them, and she said, from her daughter, at Liverpool.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-49

822. JOHN PENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , one watch, value 1 l. one seal, value 5 s. and one key, value 3 d. the property of William Alexander .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER . I live at No. 18, Mansell-street, Goodman's Fields, and am marker in Mr. Hippesley's billiard-rooms ; there is a closet in that room, in which a chamber-pot is kept, for the accommodation of the gentlemen who frequent the room. My watch and seal were hanging in this closet. There were only two gentlemen in the room besides the prisoner. The prisoner went into this closet before they came, and did not quit it until a quarter of an hour after they were gone. I did not miss the watch until after they were. I saw the watch the next time at Bow-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. I was disposed to consider this a mistake, but I was instigated to the prosecution by a man who I believe has a spite against the prisoner.

JOHN GLOVER . I am a pawnbroker, 10, Greek-street. The prisonere pawned this watch with me, on the 8th of July, upon which I gave him fourteen shillings; he did not pawn a seal with it. I am certain it was the prisoner.

GEORGE FISHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bridges-street, Covent Garden. The prisoner pawned this seal with me, on the 8th of July, for two shillings.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner upon this charge at the Brown Bear , opposite our office. He said, so help me God, George, you know I am not capable of such a thing. I searched him, but found nothing on him. I took

him to the watchhouse, and knowing where he lived, I went to his lodgings, and there found the two duplicates, for the watch and seal, on the table.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN . I am an officer. I was with my brother in my business.

William Alexander . This is my watch and seal. The watch is an old family watch; my father had it ten years, and I had it two.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-50

823. MARY REEVES and SARAH BLAKENEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , four pounds weight of bacon, value 3 s . the property of James Lavell .

JAMES LAVELL . I am a grocer and cheesemonger . At about four o'clock in the afternoon, of the 4th of August, both the prisoners came into my shop in company with each other, and Reeves snatched up this piece of bacon, weighing about four pounds, and they both went out in company with each other; I followed them, and gave them both into the custody of a constable, who happened to be passing; when they were both brought back into the shop, Blakeney dropped the bacon from between her legs.

REEVES, GUILTY .

BLAKENEY, GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-51

824. MARY REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , one sheet, value 5 s. one pillowcase, value 1 s. one child's shirt, value 2 s. one child's cap, value 4 s. one shift, value 2 s. one silk handkerchief, value 5 s and one flat iron, value 6 d. the goods and chattels of James Wixon .

FRANCES WIXON . I am the wife of James Wixon ; I live at 23, Old-street, Bethnal Green . I know the prisoner at the bar; I employed her in my lying in , in the month of July last. On my missing my property, I told the prisoner, she had taken it, and if she did not let me have it, I would certainly prosecute her; upon that, she produced three duplicates, and I sent for James Freeman , the constable.

JAMES FREEMAN . I am a constable, and was sent for by the last witness, who delivered to me some duplicates. The prosecutrix asked her for the duplicate of a child's cap, and she said she had burned it, but she gave it on the Sunday following.

WILLIAM SOWEELY . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 100, Brick-lane, I remember the prisoner pawning this sheet and this pillow-case with me, on the 6th of July.

JOHN CHARMER . I am a pawnbroker, and took in a child's shirt from the prisoner, on the 6th of July; here it is.

JOHN LEBLIND . I am a pawnbroker, and took a silk handkerchief and shift in pledge, from the prisoner.

Frances Wixon . All the articles are my husband's property.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-52

825. JOHN BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , two blankets, value 19 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a pillow case value 6 d. and one key, value 6 d. the property of Isaac Gregory , in his dwelling house ,

CATHERINE GREGORY . My husband is a watch-maker . On the 25th of May, we lived at No. 25, Shepherd's Market ; we did not rent the whole house, we had only the first floor; a part of the first floor was let to the prisoner at six shillings a week, together with the things that were stolen. He left his lodgings on the 25th of May, without giving any notice whatever; nor had he paid any rent; he used to leave the key with me, but that morning he did not. He not being returned on the Thursday following, my husband burst open the door, when we discovered that all the things named in the indictment were gone. The next time I saw the prisoner was at the Lemon Tree public house in the Haymarket. I was going in, and I met him coming out. I asked him where my property was, and he said

"he would tell me more about it another time." I told the landlord to take charge of him until I fetched an officer, which I did immediately, and he was taken into custody.

JOHN HILL . I am the constable who took the prisoner into custody. I took him on the 7th of August, at the Lemon tree in the Haymarket. I remonstrated with him, and he acknowledged that he had taken the things, but he said he would make a recompence.

GUILTY .

Confined two years , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-53

826. SAMUEL JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , two opera glasses, value 8 l. five seals, value, 10 l. one knife and fork value 30 s. two Bank notes, for the payment of ten pounds each, value 20 l. and one other Bank note, for the payment of five pounds, value 5 l. the property of George Reid .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-54

827. CHARLES PRESCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , one watch, value 5 l. and one watch key, value 5 s. the property of John Renshaw from his person .

JOHN RENSHAW . I am a servant to his Grace the Duke of Gordon . On Wednesday evening, I had been on a messuage for his Grace, and was returning home at about a quarter before eleven, when just at the corner of Charles street; Drury lane , the prisoner came up to my right side, and after walking by my side, for about half a minute, he twisted my watch out of my fob, and ran off; I followed him, and he ran up Smith's rentss which goes out of Charles street; I thought I saw him go into the top house, I went to the door, and called the watchman, who

went up stairs and searched the house, while I remained at the door, but he did not find the prisoner. I gave a description of him to the officers, in consequence of which he was apprehended.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a patrole. I did not see the prosecutor until I brought the prisoner to the watchhouse, whom I apprehended because he answered the description I received of a person who had robbed a gentleman of his watch. When I took him to the watchhouse the prosecutor immediately said, that is the man who robbed me of my watch. The prisoner denied any knowledge of the transaction.

WILLIAM READING . I am a watchman in Drury lane. At a little before eleven o'clock on the night of the 21st of June, on hearing a cry of watch; I went to Smith's rents in Charles-street, and found the prosecutor at the door of the top house in the court. By his request, I searched the house, whilst he remained at the door, but found nobody answering the description I received. I afterwards gave Furzeman the description I had received, which led to the apprehension of the prisoner.

JOHN LEMON . I was at the watchhouse, and heard the complaint of Renshaw, who said he had lost his watch. He appeared fresh in liquor, but he knew very well what he was about. He said it was a boy, about thirteen or fourteen years of age who stole his watch, and he had on a pair of corderoy breeches and a dark jacket and waistcoat; which description the prisoner then answered.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-55

828. MARY ANN PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , one watch, value 2 l. one chain, value 2 s. and one seal, value 2 s. the property of George Hammond , from his person .

GEORGE HAMMOND . I am a carpenter , and live in the parish of St. Ann, Soho. My watch, chain, and seal, were taken from my person, at about twelve o'clock at night. A friend of mine had been taken to the watchhouse, and I wanted to go there to bail him out. I had just got to the front of the watch-house, without knowing it, when I asked the prisoner the way to it; she said she was also going to the watchhouse, and if I would go with her, she would conduct me thither. She walked down the lane with me, and contrived to get behind me; in a moment I missed my watch, but did not feel it go from me; I suppose she took it, when I stopped to ask her my way. I called the watchman, and saw her trying to shove the watch into his pocket.

THOMAS ALSOPS . I am serjeant of the night, and coming down Mary-bone-lane , saw this man and this woman disputing about a watch, which he said she had stolen. She nudged me with her elbow, and the prosecutor said, come I'll have none of that she has the watch in her hand; upon which Dent, another officer, took it from her hand. We then went to the watchhouse, and the prosecutor said, he was standing there, when he asked her the way.

JAMES DENT . I took the watch out of the prisoner's hand; here it is.

George Hammond . That is my watch.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-56

829. GEORGE SCARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , one hundred and seventeen yards and a half of linen cloth, value 5 l. and ninety eight pounds weight of thread, value 10 l. the property of John Fenn ; and THOMAS SCARR for feloniously receiving on the same day the same goods, he knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

SECOND COUNT. Against GEORGE SCARR for stealing the linen cloth the property of Alexander Morrison , and the like thread, the property of Andrew Brooks . And THOMAS SCARR for receiving the before mentioned goods knowing them to be stolen.

JOHN FENN . I am a Scotch Factor, and my premises are at 55, Lothbury . I left them at a quarter before eight o'clock on the evening of Saturday the 28th of July; the property was then all safe. I returned on Monday morning, at about half past ten; there are three locks to the outer door of my premises, a top one, a bottom one, and one in the middle. I usually unlocked the middle lock, but when I put in the key, I found it was not locked; I had locked it I am certain on the Saturday night. I could neither unlock the top nor the bottom locks, they were both spoiled. I suspected all was not right. I accordingly went to the back part of the premises, and perceived the doors which I had locked on the Saturday evening, were broken open. I got in, and on examining the goods, found twenty seven dozen pounds weight of thread, and one hundred and seventeen yards of linen gone. The whole of what was taken away was worth forty pounds, and what I got back, might be worth eighteen pounds.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a City constable. On the 30th of July, at about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I saw a chaise cart standing at the door of the Punch-bowl, just opposite Little Queen-street in Holborn. There was a man in it, and presently I saw George Scarr come out of the house which is his father's, and the man in the cart gave him a large black canvas bag which appeared to contain bundles of something and which he took into the Punch-bowl. On the Tuesday morning following, I accompained Salmon and Wilson, two other officers, with a search warrant at about six in the morning, to search the Punch-bowl, Old Scarr's house. Salmon told him, we came to search his house, and he said very well, and he would accompany us, and he would just go and call his wife, to mind the business. He went up stairs, we followed him close and met him just coming out of the room where his wife was in bed, with the same dark canvas bag in his arms which I had seen his son carry in on the Sunday morning. Salmon told him to put it down, which he did, and I was sent to call Davis, the clerk to the prosecutor, who was waiting outside; he came in immediately, and said the contents was his master's property. I searched the bedroom, and in a box, I found a quantity of linen,

which Davis also said was his master's property. The father told me that a man named George Madden , brought the goods into the house, and his son carried them up stairs, as he did not choose to trust Madden up. He said, if we went to the public-house where they both slept, in Angel-alley, we should find them there. Soon after we went to that public-house, and George Scarr , was in the bar; we told him he must go into the tap-room, and sit down, which he did, and we asked the landlord's permission to search the house; he said, by all means, and we went into George's own room. The bed was not made, and only appeared to have been slept in by one person. In his box, I found this bunch of skeleton keys, and these bottles of phosphorus; I knew it was his box, for his shirts were in it, and when we were taking him away, he wanted a clean shirt out of that very box. We told him not to mind it then, as he could have it another time. He then went with us.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer, and was with the last witness, at the execution of the search warrant at Old Scarr's house and at the apprehension of George. Old Scarr behaved very civily. Wilson was with us.

JOHN EDMOND WILSON . I am an officer. I was with the two last witnesses at Old Scarr's house, and afterwards in Angel alley, to get young Scarr. I searched a cupboard in the back room on the ground floor; Old Scarr was with me; before I opened it, he said there was nothing there belonging to this business, but said he would go and fetch the key to unlock it; I told him there was no necessity for that, and would not let him go; I took out a knife to open it, but found that it was not locked. In this cupboard, there was a piece of green baize, under which I found these three separate parcels of linen, each of them wrapped up in a silk handkerchief. I said to him, that this is what we were in search of. I next searched the bar, and there I found a pound of whitey-brown thread, and a remnant of linen. I then searched the cellar, but found nothing there. Here are all the things we found.

THOMAS LAME . I live in Wood street, Cheapside, and on Sunday morning, being about to accompany a party of friends, upon an excursion of pleasure, I set out at about a quarter before six in the morning. As I passed the door of the prosecutor, I observed a one horse cart standing there with a man in it; presently, I saw two men bring a dark canvass bag, out of the house, and put it on the shafts of the cart, and the man in the cart took it in; presently a fourth man came, brought something and put it into the cart, and they then drove away with only one in it. I was taken to Newgate subsequently; and thought the prisoner George Scarr was one who assisted in bringing out the first parcel.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am clerk to the prosecutor, and identified these things to be his property, when they were first found, at Thomas Scarr 's. These things were consigned to his care, by Mr. Morrison, and Mr. Brooks, of Edinburgh.

George Scarr 's Defence. I took those things to my father's house, and he knew nothing about them. They were found just where I left them.

Thomas Scarr's Defence. I knew nothing of my son having deposited these things in my house.

GEORGE SCARR , GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS SCARR , GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-57

830. JOHN WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of August , one apron, value 14 d. the property of Samuel Nott .

SAMUEL NOTT . I am a carpenter , and am employed in rebuilding the houses in Cadogan place . On the night of the 22nd of August, I left my apron on the premises, and in the morning several squares of glass had been cut out of the windows, a lock had been taken off one of the doors, and my apron was gone,

JOSEPH HOBSON . I am a watchman, and my beat is at the back of Cadogan place. I saw the prisoner on the morning of the 23rd, with the carpenter's basket on his shoulder. I asked him what brought him out so early, and he said it was only four o'clock, and he was going to do a job at Mr. Whitehead's shop. Mr. Whitehead is the gentleman who is building in Cadogan place. When I afterwards saw him taken up, he told me he would get clear of this job, and lay wait for me.

WILLIAM GORDON . I am a watchman, my beat is situated two fields from Cadogan place; I was going to call half past four o'clock, on the morning of the 24th; and seeing a man coming across from Cadogan place, I stood still; that man was the prisoner; he was coming towards the ditch; I called to him, but he did not answer, and I went towards him, and found him in the very act of getting over the ditch; he had some squares of glass tied up in his apron; I asked him what he was going to do with them, and he said, he was going to work at Mr. Whitehead's. I took the glass from him. and taking him by the right shoulder, was conducting him to the watchhouse, when he slipped his coat off, and was attempting to run away, when he was secured. I took him to the watchhouse, together with the glass and it was afterwards discovered that the apron he had the glass in on the morning of the 24th, was stolen on the 23rd.

MARK CARTER . I am watchhouse keeper to the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse by the two last witnesses. I produce the apron.

Samuel Nott. That is my apron.

GUILTY .

Confined one year and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18150913-58

831. MARTHA ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , two sheets, value 12 s. one bolster, value 12 s. one blanket, value 4 s. one pillow and case, value 4 s. one tablecloth, value 2 s. and one quilt, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Norton , in a lodging-room .

SARAH NORTON . I am a single woman , and have two rooms let to me in Fitzroy-place , in the

parish of St. Pancras, one of which I let to the prisoner at the bar; I contracted to let to her with the lodging the things which are named in the indictment, and which were stolen. She left my lodging, and kept the key for a long time after she left. I could not get into the room, and after she had been gone seven weeks, and not before, I sent for a blacksmith, and broke open the door, and then I found these things missing. I sent for a constable named Read, and had her apprehended. We found her in Tottenham-place, and then she gave the duplicates up to the officer.

HALL REID . I am the officer who apprehended the prisoner, and she gave me six duplicates, which were for the articles stolen.

THOMAS WADMORF . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. All these things were taken in by me and my shopman, Baylis.

CHARLES BAYLIS . I am shopman to Mr. Wadmore, pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road, and I took in a part of these things.

Sarah Nowton . All these are my property.

JURY. Did you, during these seven weeks, which you state to have elapsed, between the time of the prisoner's quitting her lodging and her apprehension, always know where to find her - A. I did.

JURY. Then why did you break the door open - A. Because I applied to her several times for the key, and she said, she would not give it up until she had put back the things which she had taken, and so I broke open the door to see what were missing.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-59

833. ANN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , two frocks, value 2 s. one bed gown, value 1 s. one handkerchief, value 10 d. two petticoats, value 18 d. two pillow-cases, value 2 s. one apron, value 2 s. and one cloak, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Lodge .

ELEANOR LODGE . I am the wife of Thomas Lodge , who is a labouring man . I left a number of things to the care of Mr. Richardson, from whose premises they were stolen.

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am a smith, and some articles were entrusted into my care; I put them into a closet. The prisoner became a lodger of mine on the 23rd of August, and she absconded on the 25th, when these things were found to be missing; I sent to Mrs. Lodge to get an inventory of them. In consequence of some information which was received, the things were got from one Jane Powel .

JOSEPH PRINCE . I produce the things, which I received from Jane Powel .

JANE POWEL . I know the prisoner at the bar, and bought these articles from her at three separate times.

Eleanor Lodge . These things are my husband's property.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-60

834. GEORGE MANNERS was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he, on the 25th of August , in the King's highway, upon Robert Johnson Parker , esq. unlawfully made an assault, and with menaces, that is to say, by threatening to charge him with an unnatural crime, in a forcible and violent manner, feloniously did demand the money of and from the said Robert Johnson Parker , with a felonious intent to rob him of his money from his person, by force, and against his will to take .

CAPTAIN ROBERT JOHNSON PARKER . On the 24th of August, I dined with Sir Lumley Skeffington, in Charles-street, Grosvenor-square. I quitted his house at about nine o'clock in the evening, for the purpose of going to the Haymarket Theatre; Sir Lumley accompanied me part of the way; I went through the Green Park, down Constitution Hill, where Sir Lumley quitted me. Just as I got to the Queen's gate , by Lord Harrington's, I was going through the stable yard, where I felt a tap on my shoulder; I turned round, and it was the prisoner; he said, I believe your name is Parker; I replied, it was. He said, my name is Manners, and I wish to speak to you. I told him, he must be mistaken, and desired him to leave me immediately. He then said, he was in great distress, and he wanted some money, which I refused to give him, having never seen him in my life before. He then seized me by the collar of the coat, and said, unless you give me some, I will accuse you with having attempted to commit an unnatural crime upon me, and will follow you to your own house. I was not at all alarmed; but told him to follow me quietly into Pall Mall, and I would borrow some money of a friend, as I had none about me. I had money about me, he said so, and the first watchman I met was just at Hammersley's the banker's, to whom I gave him in charge. He then begged pardon, and begged to be let go. I went with him to the watchhouse, and there when I had given in my charge, the prisoner dropped upon his knees, and entreated me over and over again to let him go. I was determined however not to let him go.

Prisoner's Defence. I was one night, about this time twelvemonth, sitting in the stage box at Covent Garden Theatre, when Captain Parker came in, and fell into conversation with me; after the play was over, he went and spent the evening with me, at the King's Head coffee-house, just by Furnival's-inn, in Holborn, and I paid five and thirty shillings for him, as his share of the reckoning, and this evening, I was in the Green Park, he met me as he was walking with Sir Lumley, and said, how do you do, Manners, where have you been all this time; I told him, I was in very great distress, and would thank him to let me have the money that he owed me, but he said, he could not speak to me then, as I was dressed so shabbily, and Sir Lumley Skeffington was with him.

Mr. Alley. Since the prisoner has dared to set up a defence of this kind, I must go farther in proof.

WILLIAM PARSONS . Mr. Alley. Q. You are an officer. Look at that letter, did you convey that

from Newgate by the prisoner's desire to Captain Parker - A. I did.

(The letter was now read.)

Signed GEORGE MANNERS , and dated from Chapel-yard, Newgate.

"Confessing his guilt of the charge against him, imploring Captain Parker's forgiveness, and imputing his guilt to intoxication."

ANDREW ROGERS . I am the watchman into whose custody the prisoner was delivered. I heard him repeatedly implore forgiveness of Captain Parker, both before he went to the watchhouse and afterwards.

Captain Parker. At the time the prisoner states, he was in my company in the stage box at Covent Garden Threatre , I was recruiting with his Majesty's 41st regiment; since that, I exchanged into the 21st Dragoons, and I have now quitted the service.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-61

835. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of Benjamin Harvey .

BENJAMIN HARVEY . I am a linen-draper , and live in Ratcliffe-highway . I lost this cotton from the door post; it was safe at two o'clock, and in ten minutes afterwards it was gone.

FLORA TOURNIER . I was going along Ratcliffe Highway, on the 5th of September, and saw the prisoner snatch this cotton up, and ran off: it was outside of the shop by the door post.

JAMES SWALLOW . Mr. Harvey came into my shop, and asked me if I saw any one running with a bundle; I was about to answer, no, when I saw the prisoner running. Mr. Harvey ran after him, and caught him by the skirt of the coat.

FRANCES JACKSON . I am a constable, and this print was delivered to me by Mr. Harvey, together with the prisoner.

Mr. Harvey. That is my print; I caught the prisoner by the skirt of the coat, and took it from him.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-62

836. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , twelve yards of cotton, value 20 s. the property of John Barratt .

JOHN BARRATT . I am a linen-draper , and live at 163, in the Strand . This cotton was placed rather within the door. I saw it safe a few minutes before it was stolen.

JOHN FORSTER . I live at 302, in the Strand; I am errand boy to Mr. Brooks, seal engraver. The prisoner was pointed out to me; he ran down Strand-lane; I followed him, and brought him back to Mr. Barratt's shop, and I took this cotton from him.

John Barrett . That is my cotton.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-63

837. MARY CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , one feather bed, value 2 l. one bolster, value 4 s. two pillows and cases, value 6 s. a set of tent furniture, value 2 l. two sheets, value 10 s. one counterpane, value 4 s. one looking-glass, value 2 l. four chairs, value 25 s. one tablecloth, value 12 s. one stove and fire irons, value 1 l. two mattresses, value 1 l. and one tea-kettle, value 3 s. the goods and chattels of William Hinde , in a lodging-room .

FRANCES HIND . I am the wife of William Hind , who lives in Union-court, Ratcliffe Highway . The prisoner took a furnished lodging in our house, at four shillings and sixpence per week. The stolen articles were let to her with the lodging. She paid me six weeks rent very regular. One morning I missed my broom, when she was out, and thinking she might have borrowed it, I went to look in her room for it, and then missed all these articles. When she came in, I charged her with the robbery, and she did not deny it. I saw the duplicates found upon her, when the officer searched her.

THOMAS PETO . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Mr. Kellingsworth's, in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. he first thing the prisoner pledged with me, was a looking-glass, on the 18th of July, for fifteen shillings; on the 20th, she pawned a bolster; on the 22nd, two pillows and cases; on the 26th, a round table. The things are not here, as I did not think it necessary to bring them, but Mrs. Hind claimed them as her's when she saw them.

JOHN ASHTON . I am apprentice to Mr. Stephen's, who is a pawnbroker, and lives in Whitechapel-road. On the 10th of July, the prisoner pawned with me, a tent bed furniture; on the 19th, she pawned two sheets; that is all I have taken from her. They are here.

Frances Hind . Those are my husband's property.

FRANCES JACKSON . I am the officer who was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. On searching her, I found the duplicates for these several articles.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-64

838. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , one gold seal, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Tucker , from his person .

THOMAS TUCKER . I am clerk to Mr. Brown, Proctor of Doctor's Commons. I lost my seal on the 14th of July, it was attached to my watch by a black ribbon: I had been in the pit of the Royalty Theatre , and was waiting in the avenue for my father to come out; I observed my ribbon blowing about by the wind, and at first, I thought my watch was gone, but upon further examination, I found it was not, but the ribbon had been cut. I had observed the prisoner very near me in the pit. I stopped

him as he was going out, and saw him throw the seal from his left hand.

JAMES STIRLING . I am the officer who was sent for to take the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-65

839. JANE DUGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , one watch, value 18 l. one seal, value 2 l. two bank notes for the payment of one-pound each, value 2 l. and one bank note for the payment of two-pound, value 2 l. the property of James Blades AND JOHN WALLIS was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods, he well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen .

JAMES BLADES . On the 28th of July, I was coming up Broad-street, St. Giles, when I was accosted by the female prisoner, who asked me to treat her with something to drink; I am quite sure my watch and notes were about me when I went with her; I went home with her, to a room up one pair of stairs, at about eight o'clock. I laid down on the bed, and fell asleep, and on my awaking in the morning, I found myself alone. I went down to the mistress of the house, who told me she knew nothing of the prisoner. I have never seen neither watch or notes since. On Thursday, the 3rd of August, the prisoner was in custody at Bow-street; when I saw her, I knew her immediately; she acknowledged at the bar there that she was the person who robbed me.

HENRY GODFREY . I am an officer. I met the prisoner at about two o'clock in the afternoon of the day after the robbery. She then told me she had robbed this man, and given the property to Wallis. She did not tell me where to find him, but I knew, and went, and took him into custody.

DUGGINGS, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

WALLIS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-66

840. PATRICK HEFFERNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , ten pounds weight of lead, value 2 s. the property of George Bullock .

GEORGE BULLOCK . I am a sculptor , but carry on the cabinet making business as well. I lost some lead, but did not miss it until the 11th. I live at No. 4, Tenterden-street, Hanover-square . I was returning home on the 11th of September, and met the prisoner, who is in my service; I observed a protuberance under his arm rather unnatural; I stopped him, and made him come back with me, and when we came back into the warehouse, I unbuttoned his waistcoat, and between his shirt and his skin, I found the lead in question, and on looking at a lump of lead which I had in the yard, I found the piece from which it had been cut.

JOHN ALEXANDER . I am a constable, and the prisoner and this piece of lead were delivered into my custody.

George Bullock . That is the piece of lead.

GUILTY .

Whipped and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-67

841. JOHN PETERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one shawl, value 10 s. 6 d. the the property of Stephen Reynolds .

REBECCA REYNOLDS . I am the wife of Stephen Reynolds , who lives in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields . I saw my shawl in my drawer, in my bed-room, at about five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 14th of July, and it was taken to be pawned at my nephew's. I know nothing about the robbery; I did not see the prisoner about the house at all.

JAMES LOVE . This shawl was brought to be pawned with me on the evening of the 14th of July; I thought it was like one which I knew my aunt had; part of my mother's house had been burnt down in the great fire, and the shawl was taken from it.

ROBERT COOMBS . I am an officer. I produce the shawl. The prisoner told me, that on the night of the fire a gentleman and lady whose house had been burned down, came to his house, and asked for a night's lodging, which they had, and not being able to get change for a ten-pound note in the morning, they left this shawl.

Rebecca Reynolds . That is my shawl.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-68

842. JOSEPH SKIPPS and HENRY STREAMER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of July , one sheep, value 2 l. the property of William Mellish , esq .

THOMAS FIELD . I am a shepherd to William Mellish , esq. who is member of parliament for this County, and resides at Enfield . I counted my sheep three or four times over between the hours of five and six in the evening of Saturday the 22nd of July, they were all right then; I saw them on the Sunday, but did not count them. On the Monday I counted them and missed one ewe sheep. Afterwards upon an examination before the Magistrate, I saw a sheep's skin, which I knew was the skin of one of Mr. Mellish's sheep.

The skin produced.

Mr. Gurney. Is this the skin produced before the magistrate, and is it the skin of one of your master's sheep - A. It is. I know the marks, I and the bailiff marked them.

DANIEL SHORT . I live at Endeid. I know the two prisoners, they and a man named Corbey, who has run away, all lived in the same house, which is Corby's father's house. We went to the Two Brewers public house, at Ponders End; we there had a pot of beer outside of the door. After that we went to Mr. Mellish's field above the brick ground, and drove the sheep up against the hedge and the gate, and there Thomas Corbey caught one by the leg, dragged it into the ditch, tied its legs together, and put it into a sack. We took it down to Corby's

house, Streamer carried it part of the way, and we all assisted for that purpose. When we had got to Corbey's house, Streamer stuck it. We then went into the brick ground for some wood; we then went back to Corbey's, and Corbey skinned it, and I purchased it. We took the skin into a bean field, and we buried it in the field. I afterwards told Mr. Reynard, the patrole, where it was buried, and it was dug up there. The carcase was cut up into quarters, and put into a box, and the box was taken into a field of Mr. Allen's, two fields off of Corbey's house. I was afterwards taken up for an assault, and confessed to the patrole.

JAMES KENT . I am a constable. I had a warrant to take Short, Corbey, and Streamer, for an assault, and in consequence of some information which Short gave, I assisted in taking Skipps.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am a constable also. Skipps was delivered to my charge. I told him it would be better to confess; Streamer was not present at that time. I was afterwards present at the examination of Skipps and Streamer: before the Justice; I don't know whether what Streamer said there was taken in writing or not.

MR. SAWYER. I acted as clerk to the magistrates on this occasion. But what Streamer said in reference to Short's evidence, was not taken in writing.

John Knight . After Short had given his account of the transaction, I heard Streamer say that he stuck the sheep, and Short took the knife out of his hand, and finished it, saying, he (Streamer) did not know how to do it.

Mr. Sawyer. During the examination of Short, before the magistrate, when he was giving his testimony against the two prisoners, Streamer made several remarks, without any promise, or threat, or inducement whatever; he was told to be quiet. He said, that what Short had said with respect to his (Streamer's) sticking the sheep, was not true, for that he (Streamer) only stuck the sheep once, and Short took the knife out of his hand, and finished it, saying, he (Streamer) did not know how to do it.

JOHN REYNARD . I am a horse-patrole of Bow-street. After Short was in custody, he told me where to find the skin of a sheep, which had been stolen from Mr. Mellish's grounds; he told me that it was buried in a bean field, opposite to Corbey's house; I went there, and dug out the skin as near as possible to the place he described to me. This bean field belonged to Mr. Mellish.

JOHN HEWITSON . I am bailiff to Mr. Mellish, and was with the last witness when this skin was dog out.

DAVID ORME . I keep the Two Brewers, at Ponders End, which is very near where the sheep was stolen from. I heard that a sheep had been stolen that night. Short came into my house that night, and took a pot of beer outside the door, to Corbey and the two men, one of whom I knew to be Skipps, and the other might have been Streamer, but I don't know.

Thomas Field . On examining the field on the Monday morning, when I missed the sheep, I could perceive by the tracks, that they had been all driven up against the gate and the edge in one corner.

Streamer's Defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

Skipps's Defence. I am innocent.

SKIPPS, GUILTY - DEATH .

STREAMER, GUILTY - DEATH .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-69

843. WILLIAM SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , one waistcoat, value 7 s. one pair of breeches, value 7 s. one handkerchief, value 6 d. and one knife, value 6 d. the property of George Bunn .

MARY MAXEY. I washed these things for the prisoner.

CHARLES GAMMON . I produce the property. I heard Bunn, the prosecutor, swear to it before the magistrate; but he is not here to-day.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-70

844. GEORGE YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , one picture, framed and glazed, value 10 s. and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I live at 72, Brick-lane . I lost a picture framed and glazed, together with a handkerchief out of my bed-room. The prisoner lodged at my house. The picture was safe on the 11th; and on the 13th, it was gone. I did not charge the prisoner with stealing it, but he confessed it, and said, if I would not make a piece of work about it, he would give me the duplicate, which he did, and I redeemed it.

SARAH SMITH . I know no more than my husband has stated. I have seen the handkerchief, and know it to be mine.

WILLIAM WARD . I am the constable who took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY .

Whipped in gaol and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-71

845. ANN MASCAL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , one counterpane, value 1 l. the property of James Dickason .

MARY DICKASON . I am the wife of James Dickason . I was employed to live at No. 38, Montague-square , whilst the family were out of Town. At about half past one o'clock on Saturday, the 12th of August, the counterpane was in the house-keeper's room, down stairs. I heard a noise at the area door, which I went, and opened, but saw nobody. I then missed the counterpane, and on my immediately running up the steps, I saw the prisoner in Montague-place, with a clothes basket under her arm; I followed her, and she turned up Gloucester-place; seeing me running after her, she threw the counterpane out of the basket, just as she got to King-street. I did not stop the prisoner myself.

WILLIAM HEWIT . I am a constable, and the prisoner was stopped by four soldiers. I produce the counterpane.

Mary Dickason . That is my counterpane.

The prisoner called several witnesses to her character.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-72

846. JOHN GREATHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one watch, value 30 s. one chain, value 2 s. and two seals, value 10 s. the property of Richard Williams .

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I am a servant to the Honorable Robert Walpole . On the 28th of June, at about nine o'clock in the evening, I was bathing in the Serpentine River, Hyde Park , and told the prisoner, I would give him two-pence if he would mind my clothes; which he undertook to do. I put my watch, chain, and seals into my hat, and swam a distance out; I remained in the water perhaps five minutes; on my coming out, I missed the prisoner, and my watch, chain, and seals. I never saw my watch since. I saw the prisoner about a fortnight afterwards, and charged him with the theft, but he denied all knowledge of it.

WILLIAM HEWIT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, where he acknowledged he took the watch from the hat, and said, he sold it to one Phillips, in White Hart-yard, Covent Garden. I went to that Phillips, and he promissed to appear, but he has absconded.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-73

847. BRIDGET WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , two yards of lace, value 12 s. the property of Robert Dawson .

ROBERT DAWSON . I am a haberdasher , and my shop is in Ratcliffe Highway . On the 9th of August, I came from the back part of my premises into the shop, and saw the prisoner looking at some lace; my servants were shewing her some. I went, and stood at the door; she passed me by. I enquired of my servants if she had taken any thing. I ran after her, and brought her back; I then sent for an officer, who searched her, and two pieces of lace were found upon her, in my presence.

MARY WYNNE . I am shop-woman to Mr. Dawson. The prisoner asked me what I asked for a remnant of lace; I told her two shillings and eight-pence, and she said. no; and then run away.

WILLIAM HEWIT . I am a constable, and on being sent for to search the prisoner, I found on her nese two pieces of lace.

Robert Dawson . Those are my property.

GUILTY .

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-74

848. SARAH ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , one wheelbarrow, value 10 s. the property of John Sullivan .

JOHN SULLIVAN . I live in St. Giles's, and lend out wheelbarrows occasionally; I have altogether six. I never saw the prisoner until I saw her at the watchhouse.

MARY SULLIVAN . I am the wife of the last witness. Our barrows are kept in an open yard, behind the house. I saw the prisoner with the barrow in Woodstock-street; I knew it to be my husband's, for he made it. The watchman took her into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent for this wheelbarrow by two women, whom I knew, and did not know it was not theirs.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-75

849. BENJAMIN JAMES and JOHN HALLET were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , four towels, value 1 s. 9 d. two napkins, value 4 d. and one garden water-pot, value 18 d. the property of Frederick Roope .

MARY ROOPE . I live at 21, Hind-place . These articles were in our garden on the evening of the 13th of August, and were gone on the morning of the 14th.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. On the night of the 14th of August, I was at Hoxton, in company with Anthony Cavalier , a brother officer; we stopped the prisoners at the bar, with these articles, and others, which had been stolen also.

Mary Roope . These are my husband's property.

BOTH GUILTY .

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-76

850. MARY WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , four curtains, value 38 s. the property of John Mead .

MARIA FRANCIS . I am servant to John Mead . All I know is, that the prisoner came to my master's house on the 4th of August, for a night's lodging; which she had; and in the morning, the curtains were missed from the room in which she slept.

ISAAC PIKE . I produce the curtains, which were taken from the prisoner when she was stopped.

JOHN MEAD . Those are my curtains.

GUILTY .

Confined three months .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-77

851. EMMA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , one pair of sheets, value 12 s. the property of Charles Innis .

CHARLES INNIS . I live in Dyott-street, St. Giles's . The reason I suspect the prisoner of taking these sheets, is because she lodged with me in the back room on the first floor, and when the sheets were missing, I know nobody could take them but her.

MARY INNIS . I am the wife of the last witness, and on missing these sheets, I went into the prisoner's room, and found her cutting the marks out with a pair of scissars.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I produce the sheets.

Charles Innis . I know them to be mine.

GUILTY .

Confined a week , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-78

852. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June , two gowns, value 10 s. the property of William Smart .

WILLIAM SMART . I live at Pancras . The prisoner came to my house as a servant of all work , on the 2nd of June; and the gowns were missing out of my bed room on the 3rd; and she left my service without any notice on the 4th. In consequence of this, I gave information, and next saw her in custody at the public office Lambeth-street, together with the gowns. which I knew to be my property.

SARAH SMART . I am the wife of the last witness, and on going out on the morning of the 4th, to get some tidings of the robbery, I met the prisoner, with one of my gowns on her back, and had her taken into custody, and then sent for my husband.

JOHN DODD . I am an officer, and these gowns were delivered into my custody, together with the prisoner.

GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-79

853. JAMES SPRING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , one sheet, value 3 s. the property of Timothy Donovan , in a lodging-room .

TIMOTHY DONOVAN. I am a labouring man , and my wife let a room for one night to the prisoner, with my consent; but I was not present at the time the contract was made. My wife is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-80

854. JOHN NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , seven yards of oil-cloth, value 30 s. the property of Daniel Wright .

WILLIAM SCOLDFIELD . I am a servant to Mr. Wright, who is an upholsterer . The prisoner came into the shop on the 7th of September, and asked my mistress for work; she told him, she had none for him; and just as she turned her back, he snatched up the oil-cloth, and ran off; he had got about two doors, when I stopped him, and brought him back.

JOHN READ . I am an officer, and being sent for to Mr. Wright's, I there took the prisoner into custody, together with this oil-cloth.

DANIEL WRIGHT. That is my oil-cloth.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-81

855. BRUER MARCELLOT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one coat, value 20 s. one waistcoat, value 10 s. one shirt, value 3 s. and one pair of silk hose, value 1 s. the property of John Beresford .

JOHN BERESFORD . I am a waiter at the New York Hotel, Bridge-street, Blackfriars . I lost these articles from my dressing-room. The next time I saw them was at a room which the prisoner had, at the Golden Cross, Charing Cross.

THOMAS TURNER . I am porter at the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill. On the 22nd of June, the prisoner arrived at our inn, by the Portsmouth coach, slept there that night and the next day went away. The next day, I went to the York Hotel, and there heard that the prisoner, or a foreigner answering his description, had taken up his abode there. I asked the waiter to let me look at his trunk; which I did, and then was convinced it was him. The next day the waiter's clothes were stolen, and I went to Bow-street to get an officer, and on our enquiring at the Golden Cross, Charing Cross, we found that the prisoner had sent his trunks there, and was to sleep there that night, in order to go off by some one of the coaches in the morning. We examined his room, and there we found the waiter's clothes laying open and exposed in the room, but his trunks fast. Beresford knew them to be his property. We gave information at the bar, and requested to be informed when the prisoner came in, which was at eleven o'clock that night, and then he was taken into custody; he was taken to the watchhouse, and on Monday morning to Queen-square office.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I am a Police officer. On the Monday morning I went from Queen-square office, with the prisoner and my brother officer, Pilgrim, to the Golden Cross. Pilgrim went up stairs to the prisoner's room, whilst I remained below with him

PHILIP PILGRIM . I am an officer. On my arriving at the Golden Cross, I went up stairs to the prisoner's room, No. 34, and unlocked it, and in it, we found two tranks, a leather one, and a pasteboard one, and loose on a chair were laying all the prosecutor's clothes, which he missed, except the silk stockings, which were afterwards found in one of the trunks. By the direction of Mr. Fielding, I brought every thing of the prisoner's to the office. Here are the clothes.

John Beresford . I know these to be my property.

Prisoner's Defence. Being deprived of my papers and money by the Police, I have been unable to procure an advocate: I have therefore committed my defence to paper in my own language, and will take the liberty of reading it to the court. I am an officer in French Army , and served under the Emperor Napoleon in all the battles on the Continent, and in Egypt, where by an ophthalmia I was nearly deprived of my sight, and cannot distinguish any object except by the assistance of my spectacles. On the return of the Bourbon family to the French Throne, I was honoured by having a commission in the Garde De Corps. But soon after Napoleon returning from Elba, and I wishing not to draw my sword against my lawful Savereign, I returned, by the advice of my friends, to this Country, where I remained at bath for a considerable time. In June last, I came to this City to meet some of my brother officers; I took up my lodging at the York Hotel,

at which place the innocent cause of my present misfortunes arose. I have been reared in the paths of rectitude and truth by my excellent parents, and am confident that justice for which a British Jury is celebrated throughout Europe, will this day be shewn towards me. I am most innocent of the charge which is imputed to me, and I will in a moment account for this unhappy mistake. The morning after I arrived in London, I received orders with some of my brother officers, to join my regiment; the next morning, I packed up all my clothes, and went to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross, but then found the coach had gone off. I returned to the York Hotel to change my trowsers, and without going up into my own room, went into an empty room, which I saw open, and there unpacked the whole of my things in one trunk, as my trowsers were at the bottom; in re-packing them, I suppose it was, that I put up the clothes of the prosecutor's; for as I said before, I am so blind that I never perceived them; I then went to the Golden Cross, determined to sleep there that night, in order to be in time for the coach the next morning. When I went into my room, I put my spectacles on, and on examining my clothes, was greatly surprized to find a coat, waistcoat, shirt, and stockings, which did not belong to me; I could not conceive how they came there, and it was not until I was in prison, that I supposed they came there, by the means I have suggested. I did not conceal them as if stolen, but put them openly out, and locked my trunks. Unfortunately all my papers and trunks have been kept from me, together with a pocket-book, which if I had, I might be able to convince the Court and Jury of the rank I held in the French Army, and of my belonging to the Legion of Honor. I have not a friend in this Country, as all my brother officers are gone. I have only again to repeat my innocence, and place myself in the hands of a British Jury, from whom I am sure I shall receive justice.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-82

856. JOHN BINSTEAD was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he, on the 26th of June , at St. Matthew, Friday-street , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain promissory note, for the payment of money, (to wit) the sum of 10 l. which is to the tenor following, (that is to say,)

"N. e, 1765, Chichester Old Bank.

"I Promise to pay the bearer, on demand, Ten Pounds, here, or at Messrs. William, S. Fry , and Sons, bankers, London, value received. Chichester, the 16th day of February, 1815.

W. RIDGE, R. MURRAY, and B. RIDGE. R. MURRAY,

Entered, W. S. GOODEEVE. Ten Pounds."

with intent to defraud Robert Romanis , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, For feloniously disposing of the same with the like intent, he knowing it to be so falsely made, forged, and counterfeit.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, The same as the former, only stating the intention to be, to defraud William Ridge , Richard Murray , and Charles Ridge .

ROBERT ROMANIS . I am a hosier , and reside in Cheapside . On the 26th of June, the prisoner came to my house, and purchased some goods from William Must , a person in my shop. The prisoner had some person in company with him. When he had satisfied himself with the goods, he tendered me a ten-pound Chichester Old Bank note; I hesitated, and one young man of mine whispered in my ear, that he knew one of them. I took it, and requested him to put his name on it. He endorsed it, Henderson, 16, Great Portland-street, on it. All that was done afterwards was done by my orders.

WILLIAM MUST . I served these goods to the prisoner, and the account Mr. Romanis has given, is true. It was not I, who knew the prisoner; it was another young man.

Q. To Robert Romanis . Is the prisoner at the bar, the person who gave the note; are you certain - A. Yes; I went to Chichester to identify him, as I did not like to trust to my recollection, when a description was given to me.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I enquired at No. 16, and several other houses, in Great Portland-street, and in all the Portland-streets, and could neither find nor hear of any person named Henderson.

(The note produced to witness.)

That is the note which I took to enquire about.

Robert Romanis . That note has been out of my hands, but I marked it with a dot, before the prisoner was out of my presence.

WILLIAM DINMORE . I belong to the house of Fry and Co. bankers. The Chichester Old Bank notes are paid at our house. Mr. Murray signs notes for the house drawn upon us. The signature of this note is not his signature. This is not a Chichester note.

Q. Is it engraved, drawn, or painted - A. I think it is painted with a camil hair brush.

THOMAS FOGG . I am a marshalman of the City of London. Having a warrant to apprehend the prisoner, I went and found him at Arundel; I called him down stairs, and told him I had a warrant against him for forgery; we went to a tavern, where Romanis was; the prisoner requested to speak to Mr. Ridge, one of the partners of the Bank. Nothing was said to him to induce him to confess. He said, I am guilty, and claim your mercy.

Q. Had he seen the note when he said this - A. He had not. I told him not to say any thing, but he said he had made them with a camel hair brush. He said he had made more than this one. We then went into a carriage, and went to Chichester, and there he took us up stairs, and shewed us some coulouring, and some brushes, with which he had done them. His companion is a man, whom we have not in custody. He did not at that time tell me any thing more; all that he has told me since is much to the same effect.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. I found no other notes. I did not find Jordane. He said, he had been in company with Jordane.

MR. WILLIAM RIDGE . I was present with the

prisoner the next morning after his apprehension. The prisoner acknowledged that he had negociated this note with Romanis in Cheapside, London. He said, he had negociated several others, one at the Star inn, Gosport. I went there, and found the note.

(Note put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have to say that I did not know the note was forged when I passed it.

Five respectable witnesses gave the prisoner a most excellent character for honesty, sobriety, and integrity.

GUILTY - DEATH .

[Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, the jury, and the Chichester bankers, on account of his youth, inexperience, and good character.]

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-83

857. JOHN ELMES was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he, on the 17th of June , at St. Margaret, Westminster , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause, and procure, to he falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly did act and assist in the false making, &c. a certain order for the payment of money , which is as follows, (that is to say,)

"London, June 4th, 1815.

"GENTLEMEN, Please to pay Mr. Thomson, or bearer, the sum of Ten Pounds, fourteen Days from the date of the above, and place the same to the account of

JOHN WILLIAMS .

"To MESSRS. HAMMERSLEYS, AND CO. bankers, Pall Mall.

With intention to defraud Abel Munton , against the statute.

AND SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, For like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS DAY . I recollect taking a letter to Mr. Munton, but I don't know when; I got that letter from that man, (pointing to the prisoner,) he is a stranger to me; he said, will you go on an errand for me? I said, yes. He then gave me the letter, and shewed me the place where I was to deliver it; it was at an office in Downing-street. He told me to ask for Mr. Munton, and if I did not see him, I was to enquire after him. He said I was to bring the answer to him opposite Downing-street, where he would wait. I carried the letter, and saw Mr. Munton, who came back with me to the place where the prisoner said he would wait; but he was not there. I never saw him before I saw him in the Westminster-road, but I am quite sure it is him.

Mr. Alley. Q. Now, you know this man is trying for his life. This which you state was what happened three months ago. Can you say on what day it was - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you never say it was on the 10th of June - A. I don't recollect that I did. I talked to some one here in the yard; and I believe it was on a Friday in May. I think I said so to the justice at Bow-street; I think it was about Friday, the 14th of May.

COURT. Q. Do you know when it was - A. It was on a Friday. I gave it to Mr. Munton on the same day, and I believe I told the justice at Bow-street that it was on a Friday in May. I am quite sure the prisoner at the bar is the man who sent me with it. I saw him in Prison.

Mr. Alley. Q. Now when you saw him in Prison, are you sure you were not told that the man you would see, was the man who gave the letter to you, and therefore you believed so when you saw him - A. No; nobody told me so. The prisoner walked over Westminster-bridge with me, and pointed out the place in Downing-street where I was to deliver the letter.

ABEL MUNTON . I am in the Secretary of State's office , in Downing-street. I remember the last witness bringing me a letter on the 17th of June, between the hours of three and four in the afternoon; the boy told me he had been there before when I was not there, and returned to the person who sent him, and came back to me a second time with the letter. That letter enclosed a draft to me upon Hammersley and Co. for ten pounds, which draft was signed Williams. I went with the boy to where he said the the prisoner was to wait, but he was not there; it was just by Whitehall, opposite to the Treasury; nobody was there. The note enclosing this draft was signed Allen. I know a person of that name who belongs to the Excise office. The prisoner knew Mr. Allen. When I first saw the note I really thought it was Allen's hand-writing, but afterwards I was confident it was not, when I compared it to Allen's hand-writing. That draft appears to have been drawn by a Mr. Williams in favour of one Thomson, neither of whom I know.

THOMAS ALLEN. I am in the Excise office, and am on terms of friendship with the last witness, Mr. Munton. I have known the prisoner Elmes six years. (Letter put into the hands of the witness.) Looking at this letter, it is not my hand-writing, nor signed by me; it has a very strong resemblance to my hand-writing. I never saw this draft until it was shewn to me by Mr. Munton.

SAMUEL ARIEL . I have no knowledge of the circumstances of this case. I am clerk to Messrs. Hammersley and Co. and came to prove that there is no such person keeping cash at our house as Mr. Williams. A Mr. John Williams had kept cash there, and closed his accounts with us about a week before this draft was presented. I know Mr. Williams's hand-writing well, and in my opinion this does not resemble it in the least; he was an oculist, and used always to sign his name J. Williams, oculist, and not John Williams, without mentioning his profession.

(The letter was now put in, and read, and was nearly as follows,)

"DEAR ABEL,

"Enclosed you will receive a check, which if you present at a proper time, will be paid. I request you will send me two pounds this morning. You no doubt think it singular, but I will explain when we meet according to appointment in the evening. Be so good as send me two pounds by the bearer, and if you have not so much, send as much as is convenient; the boy will bring it safe."

"Signed THOMAS ALLEN ."

"Addressed to Mr. Abel Munton ."

(The draft was now put in, and read also, and was the same as cited in the abstract of the indictment above.)

Thomas Allen . I had made no appointment with Mr. Munton whatever to meet him in the evening of the 27th of June. I had received two notes previous to this, purporting to be from Mr. Allen, but which were not, and by them three pounds had been obtained from me. So close was the imitation of the hand-writing of Allen on each of those, that I could have sworn to it; one of them was dated from Westminster Hall, requesting one pound, which was sent. On the morning I appointed to meet him, and in answer to the letter I had sent, this letter enclosing the draft was returned to me, by the boy I had sent three pounds to him in similar requests in writing, by two different persons.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

[Strongly recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-84

858. JAMES CURTIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Holmes , widow , about the hour of ten in the forenoon of the 27th of July , no person in the same dwelling-house then being, and stealing therein, two bonnets, value 5 s. one sheet, value 6 d. and one bonnet-box, value 6 d. the goods of the said Ann Holmes .

ANN HOLMES . I am a lodger at Mr. Fonten's, Little Gray's-inn-lane ; he lets the whole house in lodgings; I am a widow woman, and get my living by keeping a fruit stall in the street . When I left my lodgings on Thursday morning, the 27th of July, I fastened the door, and left nobody therein. I had occasion to go back again at ten o'clock, and the padlock was off the door, and I could not get in. I pushed, and the person who was inside was pushing also; in an instant he rushed out upon me, and I saw it was the prisoner; I laid hold of him, and said, murder, and thieves; he ran down stairs, and I after him, and I cried stop that thief, and he was taken. I found nothing was removed out of the room; but a bonnet-box, which had been on the top of another box, by the side of the bed, was removed, that contained a black silk bonnet, and a straw bonnet, for one of which I gave fourteen shillings, two years ago; and the straw one twelve shillings. I don't think together that they are worth more than five shillings.

JAMES MOISEY . I keep a fruit stall at the end of Little Gray's-inn-lane, so does the prosecutrix; she requested me took after her stall for a moment, while she went home; and in a minute afterwards, the prisoner came running down the lane, and she after him, and she said, stop that thief; I pursued him, and took him. He was not more than a moment out of my sight.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer, and searched the prisoner, but found nothing on him. I found the door had been broken open by the hasp being wrenched off.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a smith by trade, and went to look after a shop mate, who told me he lived in Little Gray's-inn-lane, but did not tell me the number of the house, and I went into the first house to enquire. I was in the greatest distress, and have a large family of small children.

GUILTY - DEATH .

[Recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his poverty, and his having several children.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-85

859. THOMAS JARDINE was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Edge in the King's highway, on the 2nd of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one pair of spectacles, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of the said George Edge .

GEORGE EDGE . I belong to the Excise . On the 2nd of July last, I was going with my wife to Hackney in the afternoon, a little after three o'clock; I passed by the prisoner, and was immediately afterwards struck down, and the blow knocked my spectacles from my face. I don't know that it was the prisoner struck me. When I got up, I could not find my spectacles.

MARY EDGE . I am the wife of the last witness, and can only give the same account that he does.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-86

860. DENNIS SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Yan Van Dorlo , on the 9th of September , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 30 s. one chain, value 6 d. and one seal, value 6 d. the property of Yan Van Dorle .

YAN VAN DORLO . I am a seaman , on board a ship of War. I lost my watch on Saturday, the 9th of September, down at Poplar ; I was at a public-house at Poplar, down by the West India Docks . The prisoner asked me to drink with him; after that he asked me what o'clock it was? I pulled out my watch, and told him. I then went out of the public-house, and he asked me if I would sell my watch; and I said, I would, for five pounds. He then took the watch from me, and said, he would give it to the mistress of the house, and if I would stop a little the mistress would sell it. After that, he came and gave me the watch again; and then knocked me down; and when I came to, I was all over blood, and my watch was gone. I had not known the prisoner before I saw him at the public-house.

JOSEPH WILSON . I remember seeing Yan Van Dorlo on the Saturday night, a little after nine o'clock, with his face very much smeared with blood, and the frill of his shirt was bloody. He told me he had been knocked down, and robbed. I went immediately, and fetched William Barnes , an officer. After searching in a good many places, at last we found the prisoner sitting up in his lodgings in Robin Hood Lane, with two or three others in the house. Yan Van Dorlo charged him with robbing him; but he made no answer, for I don't think he heard the charge. I told him he must come along

with me; I called the watchman, who took him, and I followed after him. Somebody told me he had the watch in his hand; I immediately told the watchman to stop, and when I came up, I heard something like a watch fall; I could not find the watch, and told the watchman to go on with him; but he hesitated, and under his feet we found the watch. He was taken to the watchhouse. Here is the watch.

PHILIP BARNES . I was called upon by Mr. Wilson, and accompanied him and Van Dorlo to the prisoner's lodging, and saw the prisoner delivered into the hands of the watchman; I followed about two yards behind. In consequence of some information that somebody gave, they were ordered to stop, and just as they stopped, I heard a jingling upon the stones like the falling of a watch, and the watch was found under the prisoner's feet.

Prosecutor. This is my watch; here is my name on the seal.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

JAMES RUDGE . On Saturday, the 9th of this month, Dennis Sullivan , the prisoner at the bar, and the prosecutor came to my shop, which is a shoemaker's, and Sullivan bought a pair of laced up shoes for ten shillings: while buying the shoes, he produced the watch in question, which he offered for sale; I told him I did not want such a thing. He said, he was to sell the watch for the prosecutor. Van Dorlo was by all the time. He told me if I went to Mr. Green's, who keeps the White Hart, Poplar, I should there get the money for the shoes. I went to Green's, but she would not give me the money until they had seen the prisoner. I kept the watch until the money was paid; they brought the money, and I gave the watch into the hands of the prisoner, in Van Dorlo's presence.

ANN MARTIN . Sullivan was at supper at my house, where he lodges, when the officers came and took him; he had lodged with me from the Saturday week before. I heard him say he had the watch to sell for Van Dorlo.

Yan Van Dorlo . I never gave the prisoner orders to sell my watch, nor did he ever buy a pair of shoes in my presence.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am the landlord of the White Hart, Poplar. I know the prisoner; he had some money in my hands; a shoe-maker came for the price of a pair of shoes, but he did not get it, as I had not seen Sullivan; but Van Dorlo afterwards came in with Sullivan, and there he got the money to go and pay for the shoes himself.

JURY. My Lord, we should wish to know whether Van Dorlo was sober?

Yan Van Dorlo . No, I was not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-87

861. JOHN BOOT , alias JOHN BULLOCK BOOT , was indicted for feloniously forging, and counterfeiting, and causing and procuring to be falsely made forged and counterfeited on the 16th of April , a certain promissory note for the payment of ten pounds, with intent to defraud James Boyer .

JAMES BOYER . I am a grocer , and live at 95, Newgate-street . I was first acquainted with the prisoner in 1809, he was in the habit of constantly coming for small parcels of goods to the amount of twelve or fourteen shillings for which he always paid ready money. From being a man of gentlemanly appearance and address, he gave me an order to send some goods to his house in Queen square, Aldersgate-street. The money was not brought back, but the receipt I sent was, and the goods left. I did not see the prisoner for a long time, and when I did, it was in a quarrel in our street, which he had with a woman, who exclaimed, Mr. Bowyer, here is Jack Boot , who owes you money. I did not speak to him and he walked off. The next time I saw him, was on the 16th of April, 1813. he came into my shop on that day, in company with a gentleman, and said I suppose you don't know me? I said I did; Ah, said he, I have suffered a great deal since I saw you, I have been in a French prison, but being released, I have just landed at Plymouth, and I determined the first step I would take in town, would be to discharge your debt; but how you have altered and improved your shop! Whilst he was making this last observation, he presented me with the bill in question.

JOHN HAWKINS . This is the note.

James Bowyer . This is the note, I know it by the prisoner's name being written upon it. I wrote it myself, in his presence, before I gave him the change. It was for ten pounds, and I gave him a check upon my bankers Down Thornton, and Tree for the difference. After the prisoner went out, I began to suspect, and went immediately to stop payment of the check, but the prisoner had just got it cashed, and gone out of the house. I sent the bill to my banker, and did not do any thing, until it became due which was on the 23rd of April. On that day I went to No. 4, Mark-lane, I found there a counting house, but shut up, and nobody there. I did not see the prisoner again until the 27th of July last. I never found the person to whom this bill was directed.

Cross examined. At the time I trusted the prisoner with this money, I had a partner named Elizabeth Collingshaw ; she was my partner both when I trusted him with the goods, and when I gave him the check for the difference.

CHARLES MARKS . I am in the post office, at Plymouth town; I have held that situation for two years, and know it well; before that two years I used occasionally to assist a gentleman who held the situation that I now have. I do not know any person of the name of Bowman and Co. in Plymouth. There is no Thomas Bowman and Co. bankers. There is James and there is John Bailey , but neither of them has any connexion with a firm named Bowman and Co. as I know of.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. I have only held this situation two years, before that time I had occasionally assisted a friend who preceded me, and who some time on account of ill health, could not attend to business.

Q. Then consequently before March, 1813, your acquaintance of Plymouth, was but slight - A. Certainly it was not so extensive as it now is.

COURT. How often did you go to Plymouth, before

March, 1813, and how recently - A. I think I was there a week before March; but I will not positively swear.

JAMES WALLER COFFIN. I am postmaster of Plymouth Dock. I do not know Bowman and Co. not do I know a person of the name of Bailey; I never heard of either of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Plymouth Dock is two miles from Plymouth town, and has about three thousand two hundred inhabitants. I do not know any person of the name of Bailey, a banker; but I do not say, but there may be a person of that name a merchant at Plymouth Dock, or at Plymouth, for anything I know. There might be a firm of Bowman and Co. It is not my business to know the name of every merchant there.

(The note put in and read.)

COURT. Q. To James Bowyer . When you went to Mark lane, to No. 4, at what hour was it - A. It was in the afternoon part, but before five o'clock. I did not look to see what name there might be written up; I don't know that it was not Bowman and Co. it might have been so, and have escaped my notice.

COURT. Then the non-entity is not established.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-88

862. GEORGE HENTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , five pounds weight of unmanufactured tobacco, value 2 s. the goods of our Sovereign lord the king.

SECOND and THIRD COUNTS. Stating it to be the goods of the London Dock Company , and of of certain persons unknown,

The witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-89

863. ROBERT BURNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , twenty seven pounds weight of pepper, value 54 s. the property of John Heath , John Benjamin Heath , and John Furze .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be the property of our lord the king.

THIRD COUNT. Stating it to be the property of certain persons unknown.

WILLIAM TWINE . I am a commodore, in the East India Docks. On the 27th of June, ninety five bags of pepper were taken to be delivered; thirty one were marked. E M C; and numbered from 1, up to 30. The nett weight of the thirty, was nine thousand five hundred and ten pounds. They were delivered to the prisoner to be conveyed to the Custom house. The nett weight of a bag No. 16, was three hundred and seventeen pounds when delivered to him, and he had the charge of the whole, as a Custom house officer .

JAMES BLAKE . I am a carman, who on this occasion, was employed to convey this pepper from the East India Docks. The prisoner was the revenue officer, attending the loading and delivery; he got up into the cart on the road, because he was lame, and there were no other person in the cart but he.

THOMAS PIERCY . I am an officer of the Thames police, and was going along the East India Dock road ; and observed a waggon coming along laden with pepper; I observed the prisoner at the bar, in the cart, very busily employed, and as I suspected plundering one of the bags; he was taking something out of the fore bags, which were in the waggon; I then perceived he had another small bag, which I have here, and which had the stolen property in it; he was shaking the contents of the bag to go to the bottom; he then closed the mouth to tie it. I still followed on, and observed him very busy, and in about twenty minutes I got up into the waggon, and observed him sewing up the seam of bag 16, Seeing me get up into the waggon, he swore at me, and demanded, did I come to plunder it? I told him no; but I was a police officer, and I should apprehend him for doing so; and I told him, I had been observing him all the time. He besought me to desist, saying, he had a large family, and it would be the ruin of him. I then examined the bag when we came to the London Dock, and found that a hole had been cut in it, large enough to admit this tin tube; that would be a very convenient tube for conveying the pepper out of bag 16 into his own bag, and it is the same size as the hole.

THOMAS MORRIS . I can only give the account which Piercy has given, and which is a correct one.

ALEXANDER FORKS . I am a clerk in the London Docks, and have examined the pepper in the small bag, and it is the same pepper as was in bag 16.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-90

864. JACOB MORRIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Uxbridge , in the King's Highway, on the 18th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 6 d. and three Bank of England notes for the payment of twenty pounds each, value 60 l. the property of the said Joseph Uxbridge .

JOSEPH UXBRIDGE . I am a seafaring man , and was paid off, from L'Aigle, on the 17th of August, at Woolwich. I received four twenty pound Bank notes and some small notes; altogether, I received eighty four pounds, and some few shillings; I received this at about three or four o'clock in the afternoon, and came on shore at six; before I came on shore, the prisoner had asked me and some of my shipmates to come and lodge with him. We went up the water in a boat, and landed at Blackwall, and I don't know the name of the place where the lodging is. We put our chests on board the waggon at Blackwall, and we got to town about eleven o'clock that night, got all my things up stairs, at the lodging in my chest, and I told Morris I wanted something to eat. I gave him a twenty pound note, and told him to go and get something for supper; and then I had three twenty pound notes, and my smart ticket, all wrapt up together. He went down and gave the note to the landlady, and she got change; she came and gave me a three shilling piece and told me I

had better go to the cook's shop and get some supper. I said, mother, you take care of the change. I went to the cook's shop, and got my supper, and soon after, the prisoner and some of my shipmates came in; I went out with them. The prisoner wanted me to go with girls, and he took me and my shipmates to a house where there were some. I did not stay there; we had some beer there together. My shipmates all went away together with girls, and he and I set out together to go home to the lodging; it was about half past twelve at night; and just as we got ten yards from the house, in a dark place, he stepped behind me, and up with his first and knocked me down directly; my hat fell off. and he kept me down with his knee upon my breast, and stopped my mouth. Some gentlemen were coming by, my hat fell off when I was knocked down; I got up, and called out watch, a man came up tome, and wanted to drive me away, I picked up my hat, but my money and handkerchief were gone, and I could not find them any where. I said the prisoner had robbed me and he was taken to the watchhouse; where the notes and handkerchief were found on him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. I never saw the prisoner before he came on board our ship, down at Woolwich. We came on shore at six o'clock, and had some beer at a public house we came to; we got a boat and went ashore at Blackwall, and then we got into the waggon, and got to London about eleven. I was perfectly sober all the time, I had no liquor before I came on shore; and was perfectly sober when I was with the girls. I never gave the prisoner these notes to take care of. I had no quarel with the prisoner, nor do I know a person named Mary Robinson .

THOMAS LLEWELLYN . I live at No. 6, Ball street, St. George's. On the night of the 17th of August, between the hours of twelve and one, I was standing at my own door, I saw two coloured men, the prisoner, and the prosecutor, coming along the street; I saw the prisoner knock the prosecutor down; I did not see him do anything else, as I went and called the watch. I took them both to the watchhouse, where they could not make out who was the person charged; for the prosecutor said he had been robbed, and the prisoner said he had drawn a knife upon him. The prisoner was searched, and in his breast jacket pocket, the notes were wrapt up in a Jark handkerchief. The prisoner claimed it as his; the prosecutor as his. The prisoner was told if it was his, to tell what was in it? this was said before the handkerchief was examined. The prisoner said there were nine one pound notes in it, the prosecutor said there were one, two, three twenty pound notes in it, and upon opening the handkerchief, it was exactly so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. At first I took no notice of them in the street; but the prisoner charged the prosecutor with drawing a knife against him; and for that they were both taken to the watch-house.

Q. Was the prosecutor searched - A. No, but he produced a knife, when he was asked if he had one; it was a small one.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am beadle of the parish, I was at the watchhouse, when these parties came in; I did not at first hear the charge of robbery against the prisoner; but when it was made he said

"So help me God, he had no money but a few halfpence, which he produced." I then searched him, and found and old handkerchief in a breast pocket, which ran down on the inside of his jacket; here it is. Before I opened it, I asked whose it was, and what was in it, the prisoner said it was his, and contained nine one pound notes. I asked the prosecutor if it was his? he said it was, and contained three twenty pound notes, and a smart ticket. I opened it and found three twenty pound notes, a smart ticket, and a piece of leather wrapt round them. That smart ticket has the name of Joseph Uxbridge on it, and is his. There were no one pound notes whatever upon the prisoner.

JOHN GREY . I am headborough of the parish of St. George's, and was present upon this business, at the watchhouse. Jackson has omitted nothing that happened.

Cross-examined by Mr. walford. This was at first a charge against the prosecutor for drawing a knife.

AUGUSTUS SCOTT . I am clerk in the Navy pay office at Woolwich. I was at Woolwich on the 17th of August, and paid the prosecutor the sum of eighty four-pounds nineteen shillings and six pence, as his share of prize money and pay, without any deduction whatever. I paid him tour twenty pound notes, four one pound notes, and nineteen shillings and six pence in silver; it is not customary for us to take the numbers of notes which we pay.

Joseph Uxbridge . This is my handkerchief, and this is my smart ticket; the notes I believe are mine, but I cannot swear to them.

Prisoner's Defence. By the good God I am innocent of robbing this man, I had the note to take care of for him as a friend. I went down to Woolwich and went on board his ship, knowing some of the crew; and he being a stranger, and a man of my own colour, I asked him to lodge with me when he came to London, which he agreed to. He told me I had better stay on board, for there would be blankets and things which would be throwed away, and as I might as well have them as any one else. When the crew was paid off, he sent one here for half a gallon of rum, and we got all quite comfortable; and when we were coming off, they all made me commodore, and this here Jack, (pointing to the prosecutor) was drunk, and very riotous, and disobeyed my orders; when we came on shore, he would have more rum; I told him I was commodore; I was superior officer, and would not let him, but he would have some, and went and got some. We hired a cart to bring up the chests, and my blankets and things, and we all got on board, and was very merry; but this Jack was drunk and quarrelsome, and would have something to drink, at every public house he came to. After we came up, he changed one note, and gave me the rest to take care of; and went to a cook's shop, and got something for supper; we went into him at the cook's shop, and he wanted to go with girls; we went to a house where there were

some, one got one, and another got one, and this Jack made a bargain with a lady, but something was the matter and she went away. I fancy they did not agree. Jack made a row, because she would not stay, and blamed me for it, saying I took her away. At last we agreed to go home to our lodgings; he was very quarrelsome; and in the way pulled out his knife, and swore he would kill me Portugue. I was obliged to knock him down to try to take away the knife, and when the watchman came up, he swore I had robbed him, and I was taken to the watchhouse. He came here to swear away my life to day (addressing himself to the prosecutor.) You Jack, you know it was all a drunken frolick; so help me God Almighty I am as innocent as the child unborn.

MARY ROBERTSON . I am an unfortunate girl, and live at No. 5, Williams court, Cable-street. In August last, I remember being in company with the prisoner and the prosecutor; it was on a Thursday, I heard a noise at No, 7, of some people merry making, and being in an importunate situation, I went and opened the door, and saw a number of sailors and women drinking and making merry. I said I suppose I am not wanted here; Mr. Morris the prisoner, said, Oh yes, we shall be glad to see you; here is a gentleman here, who has not got a lady, that was the prosecutor. I saw the prosecutor give Morris a dark blue handkerchief, saying Morris, take care of that until to-morrow morning. I don't know what were the contents; I did not like the prosecutor's company, he was very quarrelsome, and I got up and went to my own lodgings.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. I have been in this unfortunate situation between nine and ten years. I have known the prisoner at the bar about nine months, by his coming to see a girl that is in the same situation as I am in, and who live up my court; I have known the woman with whom he cohabits, nine years. I was informed that this prosecution was made against him, and that was the reason I came here to day; he did not send for me.

GUILTY - DEATH .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-91

865. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Thorp , about the hour of one in the night of the 29th of June , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal .

JOHN DENNIS . I am a watchman, and on the night of Thursday, the 29th of June, at about twenty minutes after one, the prisoner, and some others, were standing against Thorp's window, and I saw the prisoner draw his hand from the window, and then they all went away. I went up to the window, and found the shutters wrenched open, and the glass broken; but I never heard that any thing was taken.

CHARLES THORP . I examined my property in the window, when I was told of the circumstance, but missed nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-92

866. MARY O'BRIEN was indicted, and the indictment stated, that she being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Geeves , about the hour of four in the night of the 29th of August , did steal therein, one pillow-case, value 2 s. two gowns, value 10 s. four frocks, value 10 s. one pair of trowsers, value 2 s. seven pair of stockings, value 14 s. one petticoat, value 5 s. three caps, value 15 s. two frills, value 2 s. one habit-shirt, value 5 s. one shawl, value 5 s. one handkerchief, value 1 s. three shifts, value 9 s. two boy's shirts, value 4 s. three towels, value 3 s. and two pair of women's half boots, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Geeves ; and that she having committed the said felony in the manner aforesaid, afterwards (to wit) about the hour of four in the night of the same day, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house to get out thereof, against the statute .

THOMAS GEEVES . I live at Hendon , in this County. The prisoner at the bar, was in my service. I don't know that I was up last the night previous to her leaving me; but the door was locked between eight and nine in the evening, and nobody went out after eight. We went to bed between nine and ten o'clock. The things stolen were in a tub of water in the washhouse. I heard the prisoner up about four o'clock in the morning, it was about twilight; when we got up, we found she had absconded, and the things were missing. I found her, and she was taken at Islington.

MARY ANN GEEVES . I can speak to the property; it was in a tub of water, in the washhouse, the night before it was taken; I saw the boots the night before they were taken.

JOHN BUMBY . I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and took her at about seven o'clock the same morning, at Islington; she had with her a bundle.

WILLIAM READ , SENIOR. I saw a shawl on the prisoner, and said, I supposed this belongs to your mistress; and she said, it does. I asked her a similar question with respect to the bundle, and she made the same answer, saying, at the same time, that she believed the devil possessed her to take it.

(The property was here sworn to by the Prosecutor and Prosecutrix.)

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the amount of 39 s. only

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-93

867. WILLIAM TOWNSEND was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Alders , at about the hour of ten in the night of the 30th of July , at St. George's, Bloomsbury, with intent to steal, and stealing therein. three head dresses, value 5 l. twenty-one pair of earrings, value 6 l. ten pairs of waist-clasps, value 3 l. ninety-two brooches, value 18 l. five crosses, value 2 l. one pair of shoe buckles, value 8 s. one pair of knee buckles, value 3 s. three shirts, value 50 s. one gown, value 10 s. one night gown, value 3 s. one petticoat, value 5 s. one pair of breeches, value 9 s. and one canary bird, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Alders .

JOSEPH ALDERS . I live in Duke-street, Bloomsbury ;

I am a jeweller , and kept the house, and had no partner. On the 30th of July, I went out with my wife, at about two o'clock in the afternoon, and left my son at home. I returned at about eleven o'clock the same night; the street door was all right, but when I came up to the shop and parlour, I stooped down to get the key from under the mat, but found the door open. I thought my son was asleep inside, but on our striking a light, we found nobody there. On my going into the back parlour, I found my case in which I keep my work, on the floor, and empty; all the things named in the indictment were gone. I had left the canary hanging outside of the window, but the cage was put on the top of the bed and the bird taken out. The prisoner at the bar lived within six doors of where I live now.

CHARLES ALDERS . I am the son of the last witness. On the 30th of July, I staid at home after my father and mother were gone out, until eight o'clock; I then went out with a young man named Burgoyne, who called for me. We locked the door, and put the key under the mat. We met the prisoner Townsend, and a young man named Marrian, together. Townsend asked me if my father was out? I told him, he was. They asked me where I was going, and I said to the Wheatsheaf, in Drury-lane. They asked me how my father would get in when he came home? I told them, he would find the key under the mat. They said, they would come down to me at the Wheatsheaf. That was all that passed. Marrian had been a school-fellow of mine; I did not know where Townsend lived at that time. I heard that my father was robbed, for the first time, at about eleven o'clock, the same night when I went home. Neither Townsend nor Marrian came to us at the Wheatsheaf. The next morning, I told Townsend, that I had a suspicion it was him that did the robbery; he denied it. At eleven o'clock, I got a search warrant, and searched his place, but found nothing.

JOHN BAGNELL . On the Sunday night that the robbery was committed, I saw the prisoner and Marrian walking up and down Duke-street. The last time I saw them was making believe to make water against a water spout, at about three doors from the prosecutor's house. In a moment I missed Townsend from the spout, and saw Marrian go into the prosecutor's house; he pushed the door, and it opened of itself. I went into my father's house, and saw nothing more.

GEORGE BURGOYNE . I know nothing more than that it was I who locked the door, and put the key under the mat. I was with the prosecutor's son when he met Townsend, as has been stated.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am a patrole. I took Townsend into custody; he swore he would not go along with me, and I was obliged to get assistance. The next morning, the 1st of August, I opened the prisoner's door to let young Alders in to him; young Alders said to him, in my hearing, you have ruined my father for ever. Townsend made answer, and said, it may be better than what you imagine; the things were sold for four pounds ten shillings, and if the money could be raised, they might be got back again. They both went to Marlborough-street, and then Townsend denied all knowledge of the robbery whatever.

WILLIAM FISH. I know no more than that Furzman called me to assist in taking the prisoner to the watchhouse,

(The prisoner called the following Witnesses.)

ELIZABETH SHAW . I am mother-in-law to Townsend. I remember the Monday when my son-in-law was charged with this robbery. On the Sunday, when the robbery was committed, he went out at about four o'clock in the afternoon, and returned at about nine o'clock the same night. On that Monday I saw a canary bird flying about the back windows, at the back of Monmouth-street.

MARY MARRIAN . I am mother of John Marrian , who has absconded. Charles Alders told me of the robbery, and asked me where was my Jack? I was very much alarmed for fear he should have been concerned in it. He told me it was all right, not to be alarmed, to put Jack out of the way, for if he was found, it would go hard with him; they were the very words. He asked me if Jack had brought any thing to my house; I said, he had not. He said, if you have any thing here that Jack has brought, put it out of the way. When my son came home, I told him, I would not be harrased by his pranks, and he must quit my house. I sent him away by Charles Alder 's wish and desire.

Q. To Charles Alders . Do you remember going to the last witness' house, and telling her to put her son out of the way, and if he had brought any thing there, to put that way also - A. No, I did not. I was at her house before the robbery, but not since. I never suggested any thing of the kind to her.

MARY BUTLER . I live on the first floor of Mrs. Shaw's. Between five and six o'clock on the Monday evening, I heard a knock at the street door, and the prisoner at the bar went down, and opened the door for Charles Alders . I saw Charles Alders lift Townsend over a wall at the back of the house, after a canary bird, which was flying about there.

JAMES CARTER . I never saw Marrian; but Charles Alders I know put him out of the way.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-94

868. ELIZABETH TRAIL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , twenty-eight pounds weight of iron, value 2 s. the property of William Browne , and THOMAS BRETT , was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a farrier , and live opposite to Shoreditch Church . I saw this iron in my shop between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, of the 10th of August, when I went out, leaving nobody in the shop. On my return, I missed it, and the next time I saw it was in Brett's shop. In consequence of information I received, I went to Brett's house, and Elizabeth Trail was there. I asked Brett what she had brought to his house; he said, twenty-eight pounds of iron. He told me without

any hesitation. I knew it to be mine.

JOHN TUCK . I went into Brett's shop with Browne, and the woman was rather impudent.

Browne. That is my property.

TRAIL, GUILTY .

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

BRETT, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-95

869. MARY WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , a watch, value 4 l. the property of Nathaniel Abrahams , from his person .

NATHANIEL ABRAHAMS . On the night of the 3rd of September, I met the prisoner in Cable-street, and not being very sober, I went home, and went to sleep with her. My watch was in my fob when I went home with her. When I awaked in the morning, she was gone, and so was my watch. The next time I saw it was in Lambeth-street office.

JOHN BONTLE . I am headborough of Whitechapel parish. Between eleven and twelve o'clock on the Sunday morning, a man charged this woman with stealing a three-shilling token, and on searching her, I found this watch, (producing a watch,) which Abrahams has since sworn to.

Nathaniel Abrahams . That is my watch, I am positive.

GUILTY .

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-96

870. ROBERT JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , one gown, value 3 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. three frocks, value 3 s. two pin-cloths, value 1 s. two shirts, value 2 s. one sheet, value 2 s. one pair of trowsers, value 6 d. one sheet, value 3 s. one pair of gloves, value 6 d. one apron, value 6 d. and one handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Pelton .

MARY PELTON . I am a married woman, and keep a mangle , in Whitechapel . These things were sent to me to be mangled, and the prisoner at the bar came for them in the name of Jones. The person from whom I had received these things was a new customer and I did not know her name, and on interrogating him, I thought the name was Jones, and accordingly gave him the things.

JOHN BONTLE . I am a headborough, and in consequence of information which I received, and a description of the prisoner, I apprehended him in Hawkins's-court, Rosemary-lane.

SARAH PINCOT . On the 4th of August, I sent these things to be mangled to the prosecutrix. I never authorised the prisoner to go for them. I never saw him in my life.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and produce a shirt and a frock, pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I produce a shirt, frock, and a pair of gloves, pawned by the prisoner.

RICHARD MATTHEWS . I am also a pawnbroker, and produce the rest of the things, which were pawned by the prisoner.

Mary Pelton . These things were sent to me to be mangled, and are the things which I gave to the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-97

871. EDWARD KIDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , six pair of gloves, value 12 s. the property of Robert Kennyon .

ROBERT KENNYON . I am a hosier and glover ; I have a shop on Ludgate-hill , and another in the Strand. On the 20th of August, suspecting all was not right, I followed the prisoner out my house on Ludgate-hill, into the Strand. I requested him to walk into my shop in the Strand, and on searching him in my bed-room, I found two pair of kid gloves in his side pocket, and four pair of silk gloves in the back part of his trowsers. I sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody.

JOHN BOLLAND . I produce the gloves, and am the constable sent for to take the prisoner into custody.

Robert Kennyon . These are my gloves, and I took them from the prisoner's person.

GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-98

872. JAMES BROWNE , alias JAMES BROOKS , was indicted for stealing, seven pounds five ounces weight of raw coffee, value 12 s. the goods of Gerrard Wilkins Scudder .

GERRARD WILKINS SCUDDER. I am a master carter , and the prisoner was a carman of mine; the prisoner had been for five casks of coffee at the West India Docks, to deliver at the Colonial establishment, in Fenchurch street ; I saw him a short time after he came home, when I went into the stables. He was at the corn bin, and his not coming from the bin when I called him it caused a suspicion, I told him to go and sweep the kennel; I observed him first hang up his nose bags. When he was gone, I put my hand into one which appeared the most heavy, and drew out some coffee; on further examination, I found there were seven pounds six ounces; it was tied up in a handkerchief, and in the nose bag. I took it up into my own room, and then went to enquire if he had delivered the coffee safe. We weighed the coffee he had delivered at the coffee establishment, and found one cask deficient eight pounds nearly. He had lived with me three weeks.

GEORGE LINDSAY . I am clerk to the Colonial establishment. I assisted M.. Scudder, in weighing five casks of coffee, delivered at our house, by one of his carman; and in one, there were eight pounds deficient. Mr. Scudder afterwards brought me a sample of what I understood he had found in a nose bag, and it was the same coffee that was contained in the casks.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am a constable, and the coffee and the prisoner were delivered to my care.

Gerrard Wilkins Scudder. The prisoner acknowledged to me, that the handkerchief which contained the coffee, was his, and that he gathered the coffee from the bottom of the cart, and intended to return it to me.

JURY. We would wish to ask Mr. Lindsey whether there was sufficient straw at the bottom of the cart when the coffee was delivered, to have concealed any if it had fallen from the casks.

Mr. Lindsey. No; I don't believe there was any. I cannot swear whether there was any coffee at the bottom of the cart.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-99

873. AMELIA BLACKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , one basket, value 2 s. the goods of Charles Price .

CHARLES PRICE . I am a manufacturer of baskets , living in Whitechapel . My baskets are exposed outside the door. I was in a neighbour's shop, and saw the prisoner take this basket off the pavement, and walk off with it; I followed her, and stopped her, and took the basket from her. I asked her first, whether the basket was mine or her's? she said, it was mine, and I might have it. I got an officer, and took her into custody.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-100

874. THOMAS ASKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , eight hens and two cocks, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Spring

THOMAS SPRING I live in Chelsea, and am a milkman . I keep my fowls in the Marlborough garden yard ; and saw them between the hours of eight and nine o'clock on the evening previous to the robbery. The hen roost was in a fenced yard, and the fence between nine and ten feet high. The next morning. I went to milk my cows, at about three o'clock, and the yard pale was open. I did not miss any fowls until I saw them at the watchhouse, which was between six and seven in the morning; there were eight hens, value eight shillings, and two cocks, value six shillings. I knew them immediately to be mine, for I had been in the habit of feeding them.

RALPH BARNETT . I am a watchman, and having left my beat on the morning of the 20th of August, I was going home, at about half past five; I saw the prisoner with a basket on his back, standing still. I turned back, and he ran away, which made me suspect. I over took him in Church-lane; he drew back, and struck me over the arm. In the basket, I found ten fowls, which Spring claimed at the watchhouse.

RICHARD MAYBANK. I am the watchhousekeeper, 1and have brought the fowls here, (producing them.)

Thomas Spring . I have seen these fowls, and know them to be mine.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one month , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-101

875. THOMAS BROWNE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , one counterpane, value 15 s. the property of William Crapp .

MARY CRAPP . On the 23rd of July, I had occasion to go down to Greenwich; and when I came back, which was some days afterwards, the counterpane was gone. I am quite sure I never gave any permission to the prisoner to take this counterpane. I don't know how he got it.

JOHN BONTLE . I am a headborough, and took the prisoner.

JOHN TILLEY . I am a servant to Mr. Bannister, who is a pawnbroker; and the prisoner at the bar offered this counterpane to pledge with me, on the 31st of July, and I advanced six shillings on it.

Ann Crapp . That is my counterpane.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-102

876. MARTHA BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , six pounds weight of bacon, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Jones .

SAMUEL JONES . I keep a bacon shop , in Norton Falgate , and lost some bacon on the 19th August. I was in the window next the shop; it weighed about six pounds.

DANIEL JONES. I am not a partner of the witness, I serve in his shop; and the prisoner came in to buy a piece of bacon; I did not sell her this piece; I had a suspicion, and stopped her, and took the bacon out of her apron; here is the bacon.

Samuel Jones . That is my bacon.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined three weeks , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-103

877. ELIZABETH BLUCK and MARY ELLIS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , from the person of Edward Sheeham , one watch, value 2 l. one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. two bank notes for the payment of ten-pounds each, value 20 l. and three bank notes for the payment of one-pound each, value 3 l. the property of the said Edward Sheeham .

EDWARD SHEEHAM . I am a poor sailor , and lost these articles. I don't know whether it was in the company of these women or not.

PETER MAGUIRE . I am a publican, and keep the sign of the Blue Anchor, York-street . Sheeham and the two prisoners came into my house, about nine o'clock, on the night of the 16th of August; they ordered a pot of beer; the prosecutor was quite drunk; they went into the parlour; and soon after I went into him, and said, Jack, come, think about stirring; and they went out immediately afterwards. I went into the room soon after they were gone, and saw a watch laying on the floor. It was my girl first told me to send the prosecutor away, for she said, he had a watch, and being with bad women, would lose it.

MARGARET MILLER . I am servant at the Blue Anchor, and saw the prosecutor drunk with the two prisoners, in our parlour, on the night of the robbery. I saw some papers in Elizabeth Bluck 's lap, looking like notes, but I don't know that they were so. The prisoners went out of the house, and

on being brought book in custody. I saw the prisoner Bluck put her hand into her bosom, drop some paper on the floor, which on my picking up, I found was two twenty-pound notes, three one-pound notes, and a discharge ticket. I did not see Ellis do any thing.

GEORGE PIGE . I was in the watchhouse when the two prisoners were brought there; and the property was delivered to me.

JOHN LACOMBER. I am a gentleman's servant, and was in the tap-room of this public-house, in company with Mr. Parker. I saw the prisoner Bluck, drop the papers, which were afterwards discovered to be notes.

JOHN PARKER . I am a coal-metre's man, and saw the watch which has been produced, found some time after the prisoners were taken to the watch-house.

Edward Sheeham . That is my watch, and that is my protection ticket, which was found with the notes.

BLUCK, GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELLIS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-104

878. MARIA DALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a handkerchief, value 6 d. and two three-shilling bank tokens , the property of Abraham Marks .

SARAH MARKS . My husband is a seller of fruit and we live at 48, Crispin-street, Spitalfields . The two three-shilling tokens were on the dresser, but I don't say where the handkerchief was. I had hired the prisoner for that day, as a washer-woman . I missed the two three-shilling tokens about one in the afternoon, and the handkerchief at the same time. She went away without giving any notice, in the middle of her work. I did not see her until the Thursday following, and I never went after her but once.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer, and found the handkerchief in the prisoner's lodgings; and she acknowledged she had spent the three-shilling pieces. Here is the handkerchief.

Mrs. Marks. I can't swear to that handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-105

879. GEORGE SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , sixteen pounds weight of cabbage seed, value 2 l. three pounds weight of turnip seed, value 1 s. six pints of wine, value 1 l. fifteen yards of cloth, value 15 s. three quires of paper, value 3 s. three bags, value 2 s. and five bottles, value 1 s. the goods and chattels of Jacob George Wrench , in his dwelling-house .

JACOB GEORGE WRENCH . I live in Lower Thames-street , and am a seedsman . The prisoner lived with me two years; and, suspecting he had robbed me, I applied to my Lord Mayor for a warrant, to search his lodging, which were in Meeting-house-court. The prisoner was with me at that search, and opened a box by my desire, in which I found six bottles of wine, and various parcels of seed; there was more than twelve pounds altogether; there were some few pound of turnip seed; the cabbage seed cost me four shillings and sixpence a pound; the turnip seed might be worth one shilling; fifteen yards of Osnaburg linen, value fifteen shillings. The prisoner had access to all these things while in my employ. I asked him where he got all these things, and he confessed they were mine, and that he took the wine when Mr. Lucas gave him the cellar key.

WILLIAM MILLER GOOD . I am a shopman to Mr. Wrench. I know the bottles of wine; some part of the seed also, a bag of which I found secreted in his lodgings.

HENRY GILL. I went to search the lodging of the prisoner, along with Mr. Wrench; but did not hear the prisoner make any confession. I found this property on the premises. (producing the property.

JOHN BAILEY . I was present at the search of the prisoner's lodgings; and heard several questions put to him, but did not hear any answers.

Mr. Wrench. All I know about the wine is, that it was very learious and remarkable good wine, and I had it from a wine merchant named Power, whose name was sealed on the cork of each bottle.

Cross-examined. I suppose Mr. Power migh have put his name on every bottle of wine he sold.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one year , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-106

880. JAMES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , seven pieces of muslin, containing ten yards each, value 10 l. the property of John Cooper and James Cooper , in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT. Stating it to be the dwelling-house of John Cooper only.

JOHN REES . I am clerk to Messrs. Cooper, who are muslin manufacturers , and whose town warehouse is at 89, Watling-street . They lost some pieces of muslin, on the 22nd of August I was in the accounting-house, and heard a noise in the warehouse; I went towards the noise, and could not see any person; but on looking towards the door, saw the prisoner going out, with the parcels of muslins under his arm; it was wrapt up in paper. I followed him gently and saw some of my own hand writing on the parcel. I immediately stopped him, and took him into my custody, and told him, he had my master's property under his arm. I pushed him into Mr. Bulmer's passage, whose warehouse is under ours; but we have the dwelling-house, and Mr. John Cooper sleeps in it. When I told him he had my master's property; he said, you are mistaken. There were seven pieces of muslin in the paper, each containing ten yards, and they were altogether worth ten pounds.

SAMUEL ROGERS . I am a constable, and was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, and I produce the muslin.

John Rees . I know these pieces of muslin to be

my master's property, and these are what I saw the prisoner taking out of our house.

The prisoner put in a written defence, plending distress, and hoping for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 66.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-107

881. WILLIAM GRIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , three silver pencil-cases, value 3 s. the property of Isaac Cameron .

ISAAC CAMERON . I live in Gray's-inn-lane , and am a dealer in hard ware , and sell pencil-cases . The prisoner was brought into my shop, at about two o'clock, on the 5th of July, by George Vaughan, who produced three silver pencil-cases, which I knew to be mine.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer. On the 5th of July, I was going along Gray's-inn-lane, and just by Verulam buildings, I saw the prisoner looking over a glass case outside Cameron's shop: I saw him move the glass, and take some thing out; I went over the way, and seized him, and found three silver pencil-cases on him, which Cameron claimed as his. Here they are. (producing the pencil-cases.)

Isaac Cameron . They are my property.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-108

882. ELEANOR HARPER was indicted for stealing on the 24th of August , a ring, value 5 s. a frill, value 3 d. and a bit of lace, value 3 d. the property of Ann Patterson .

ANN PATTERSON . I live at 13, Compton-square ; and the prisoner was my servant . I had missed several things before this ring; it was a gold ring, with a garnet in it. I applied for an officer to search her box; he searched it in my presence; he found a pocket-book in the box, which she immediately snatched from him; he got it from her again, and in it were a bit of lace and the frill.

Cross-examined. I have gone by the name of Dure; Captain Dure took me from my parents at an early age; but since his death, as he has provided for me, I have adopted my father's name. The prisoner at the bar had taken me up for an assault, because I struck her for being impertinent. My name is Ann Eliza Patterson .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-109

883. MARY HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , from the person of William Holworthy , five shillings in monies numbered, one bank note for the payment of five-pound, value 5 l. and one other bank note for the payment of two-pound, value 2 l. and three other bank notes for the payment of one-pound each, value 3 l. his property .

WILLIAM HOLWORTHY . I am a sailor . On the 31st of August last, I was going down Whitechapel, I was rather groggy, between four and five in the afternoon, and the prisoner spoke to me; I went with her into the tap-room of the Lord Nelson's Head ; we did not drink together there. I opened my notes, and counted them before her there, and then put them into my left hand jacket pocket. She went out before I counted them. I asked the the landlord for some beer; but he would not give me any; he said, I had had enough. I asked the landlord if there was any convenience backwards; she came there to me, and made much of me, and took away my notes, and I could not lay hold of her; she immediately ran away; and I asked the publican which way she ran, and he said down North-street; but I did not find her, and she was not taken until the following morning.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am a publican, and keep the Nelson's Head. The prisoner and the prosecutor came into my house, between four and five on the 31st of August The prosecutor would have some beer, but I would not let him have any, for he was tipsy. I shewed him to the convenience backwards, by his desire, and she followed him, saying, she wanted to go to her husband. Soon after, she came running out, and in a minute after, he came, and said, she had robbed him of his notes. I knew he had some notes, for he offered them to me to pay for the beer, but I did not let him have any.

ANN CROSS. I am a silk winder, and live in Nelson's-square. I and another woman lived together. The prisoner ran into our place between four and five in the afternoon of the 31st of August. The prisoner came and ran up our stairs, as if running away from somebody. I never saw her before in my life.

JOHN MORCKEY . I am a pawnbroker, and the prisoner came and released several articles, which she had in pawn at our house, between the hours of six and seven, on the 31st of August; she paid me with a two-pound note.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-110

884. HENRY PAXTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one box coat, value 30 s. two stable frocks, value 30 s. three stable waistcoats, value 30 s. three great coats, value 30 s. one pair of overalls, value 5 s. two buckles, value 30 s. one set of four-horse reins, value 5 s. and three brushes, value 5 s. the property of the Honourable William Gordon ; AND ISAAC POPE , was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 30th of June , at St. Pancras ; the same goods, he well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

JOHN MERCHANT . I am a butler to the honourable Mr. Gordon. On the 28th of June, Henry Paxton , who was in my master's service, as a coachman , quitted it; he had been but a short time in the service; and he delivered up his box coat, and stable things to me. At about three o'clock in the afternoon when he was discharged, I gave these things to John Evans , the coachman who succeeded him.

JOHN EVANS . I am coachman to the honourable William Gordon . About three o'clock in the afternoon of the 28th of June, some stable clothes were delivered to me by John Marchant , the butler;

I took them, and put them on the box of the carriage, in the coach house. There were then in the stable that I remember, three great coats; and another stable frock and waistcoat, beside the things that I put there in the morning; they were missing at about seven o'clock. In the morning the coachhouse, and stables were unbolted, but shut to; this must have been done from the inside. These clothes were then all missing, together with the clothes of the second coachman, and the postillion. I shall not be able to swear to them if they be produced, as I had them in my possession so short a time.

JOHN HOUGH . I am a publican, and keep the Blue posts, in Charlotte street. I saw both the prisoner's on the 28th of June. The prisoner Paxton asked me, if I had a single room to be let; I told him I had one with two bedsin it, in one which two young men slept. He agreed to take this, and brought several little bundles there that night; the other prisoner came in on Friday following and asked for these bundles; he came and said, has not Harry something here? I said he has; he said I am come for his things, has he not a packing case here; I told him he had, but refused to let him have his things at first, but afterwards permitted him to take them. I can't say what were taken away. My servants brought the things down, and Pope packed them in the packing case. He said Harry, meaning Paxton had got a place as coachman in the country, and he, Pope, was to send his things down to him. Pope was dressed like a coachman, and I said where do you live coachman? he told me at the other side of Russel square; but it afterwards appeared he did not. I said if Paxton went to him to tell him to send his clothes into the country, he might have called upon me in his way; but Pope said it was he that went to Paxton.

RICHARD CREED . I am stage coachman to Mr. Bishop, the Peckham stage keeper. At eight o'clock in the evening of the 30th of June, when I was at the Kings and Keys, Fleet street a hackney coach drove up to my coach with a gentleman's servant in it who delivered a packing case to me with orders to be left at the Inn at Camberwell, I said I would leave it at the Red cap, and told him so; there was a small box, as well as a packing case. When I got to Camberwell, I gave them in care to the ostler, Frederick Fraggleton . I don't remember the gentleman's servant, whether it was either of the prisoners or not. I think the packing case and box were directed

"to Mr. Prittie, to be left at the Inn, Camberwell, until called for."

FREDERICK FRAGGLETON . I am ostler at the Red cap, Camberwell; Richard Creed the last witness, left a packing case and a box in my charge, the direction was

"Mr. Prittie, to be left at the Camberwell booking house until called for. At nine o'clock the next morning, I delivered the small box to a young woman who paid the carriage, and said she came from Mr. Prittie. I never saw her since. The large packing case remained there till about three o'clock, when it was called for by Mr. Plank the officer, and delivered to him.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of the public office, Marlborough street. On Friday the 30th of June. I took Paxton into custody on suspicion of having stolen the articles mentioned in the indictment. I told him what he was taken for, and that it was very material to inform me where he spent the evening and night of the 28th of June; he said he slept at No. 20, Gower Mews; I went with him there and saw the coachman who lived there; I asked him if Paxton slept there, on Wednesday night? before the coachman had time to answer, Paxton said, you know I slept there; the coachman then said yes. I told him that Paxton was charged with having committed a my on that night. Then said the coachman if that is the case, I won't tell a lie for any body; he never did sleep here. Paxton then acknowledged that he did not; but he really slept in the stables belonging to Isaac Pope , at Cheney's Mews; and he said the reason he did not tell me the truth at first, was for fear he should get the coachman anger. I then went to 25, Cheney's Mews, with Paxton; but Pope was not there. We then went to his lodgings, which Paxton knew, and which were in Mortimer Market. I found Pope there. I put some questions to him whether Paxton had slept at his stables on the Wednesday night; he said he had; he had lent him a horse cloth, in which he slept in the hay loft. I said if you can prove that, this man must be innocent; you had better come with me down to the magistrates; he said I can't do that, for I must drive my master out in about three quarters of an hour. I told him that Paxton should not be examined until he came; and the magistrates waited until five o'clock in the evening in order that he might come down, but he never came at all. In consequence of some information which I received, I went to Pope the next morning, and said, you did not come according to your promise yesterday; he told me it was not in his power, for he could not get time. I then asked him whether he had fetched anything from Mr. Hough's and said if you could not find time to come to the office, you could find time to go to Hough's to fetch the things away in the packing case; he denied that he went to Hough's immediately. I told him he had brought Paxton's things away, and the landlord knew him. I then searched the stables, but found nothing relating to this charge. I then went to his lodgings with him but found nothing there; I told him he had fetched something from Mr. Hough's; and he certainly must know what it was, for he packed it up himself. He then said, well I will tell the truth, and pointing to a box, that is the box I fetched away; I looked into it, it was empty. I said that can't be the box, it was a large packing case, and so full, that you could not put a hat in it, and you were obliged to carry it in your hand. He then began crying and his wife fainted away, and there was a great deal of distress; and he said he had fetched them away for Paxton, and when I and Paxton went together to his stables, Paxton made a signal to him to say he slept there. I asked him what he had done with the things, he said he brought them away from Hough's to save Paxton if he could, as he had a friendship for him, and had sent them to Camberwell by the Peckham stage directed to James Prittie , to be left at the booking office until called for. I secured him, and immediately

went to the Red caps at Camberwell, and there found all the things named in the indictment. All the things are here.

John Marchant . All these things belong to the Honourable Mr. Gordon. The prisoner came into my master's service on the 10th of June and left it on the 28th.

John Evans . I can't swear to any of these things because I had them so short a time.

PAXTON, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

POPE, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Comman Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-111

885. WILLIAM FREEMAN was indicted for embezzleing money on the 4th of May .

SAMUEL MOORES . I am clerk to Richard Whitten esq. attorney at law ; and the prisoner was also in his service from November last until May; I am cashier clerk; and on the 4th of May last, the prisoner applied to me for money to get the City seal affixed to two powers of attorney to send to India, Not knowing how much they would come to, I gave him ten pounds, and on his return he said he had paid to Messrs. Windle, two pounds nine shillings for the sealing of those instruments, as it was his business to forward them to India; he said he had put them in the post, and paid one pound eleven shillings and sixpence as postage; he absconded himself on the 6th of May. In two or three weeks it appeared he had not paid for these instruments, as Messrs. Windle sent for the money for them, charging two guineas, which was paid.

GEORGE ASHLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Windle, who are senior attornies in the Lord Mayor's Court. On the 5th of May, the prisoner applied to me to get them sealed, which I did, and knowing him to be Mr. Whitten's clerk, I trusted him for the amount; which was two guineas. I don't recollect that I asked him for the money.

RICHARD WHITTEN ESQ . I am an attorney; and the prisoner was in my employ from November last, until May. These powers of attorney were never sent to India, for they were brought to me by the prisoner's father in law, and have since been sent to India; and the postage paid out of my pocket. Messrs. Windle sent in a bill for the sealing of them, what has also been paid The powers of attorney were brought to me, about a week after the prisoner was discharged from my service. I did not get the prisoner into custody until about a fortnight ago.

JOHN HUTT . I am a police officer, belonging to the police office Hatton Garden; and in consequence of directions received at Mr. Whitten's took the prisoner into custody, after having been in search of him more than two months.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 4th of May, I was directed to get two powers of attorney stamped to go to India. Not knowing the amount, I got ten pounds from the cash clerk, to pay for them; when I got to the office, I found it was a holiday, and they would be three shillings and sixpence extra each; the usual charge being now two guineas, that made two pounds nine shillings. I left two pounds to pay for them, and said I would call for them the next day as they could not then be done; which we learned when I accompanied George Ashley to the Mayor's Court; and I intended to call and pay the nine shillings the first time I went that way.

George Ashley. I never remember accompanying the prisoner to the Mayor's court.

Prisoner. Do you remember my returning with any clerk to Mr. Windle's office - A. No; you might have returned, but I don't recollect it.

Prisoner. Don't you know I paid you two pounds - A. I don't recollect any money being paid at all by you; if any had, it would have been entered in the books.

Mr. Whitten. When the prisoner was before the magistrate he never made any defence of this kind nor ever said he paid the money.

A letter was now read in court directed to Mr. Whitten, and signed by the prisoner, confessing he had embezzled the money: imputing it to an intimacy he had contracted with bad company; acknowledging a considerable balance due from him to Mr. Whitten, which should be set to rights; offering to call upon Mr. Whitten, to give assistance in an explanation of various frauds which he had committed upon him; and praying pardon on account of his wife and child.

That letter was sent by me immediately after my discharge.

GUILTY aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-112

886. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , one watch, value 2 l. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Smith .

DAVID DAVIDSON . I am a seaman ; and our captain meeting the prisoner walking about the streets, without any employ, took him on board his ship; my watch and William Smith 's, a messmate of mine, were both taken on the same day. I did not see the prisoner take them, as I was asleep.

EMANUEL MERCURY . I am an officer, and in taking the prisoner into custody I found the two watches on him; here they are.

David Davidson . This one is my watch, and William Smith is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-113

887. DANIEL HILL , JOHN SWEETING , and CHARLES TAYLOR , were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , one bank note for the payment of ten-pounds, value 10 l. two bank notes for the payment of five-pound each, value 10 l. twenty bank notes for the payment of one-pound each, value 20 l. and one promissory note for the payment of one-pound, value 1 l. the property of John Bell .

SAMUEL HOLLAND . I am clerk to Mr. John Bell , whose house of business is in Clare-court, Drury-lane . On the 19th of June, at night, I locked up forty pounds in my desk, in the accounting-house; there were one ten-pound note, two five-pound notes, and twenty one-pound notes. This is only the house of business. I was not last in the house. The prisoner

Sweeting was a fly-boy in the employment of my employer. The next morning, I found the desk was broken open, and the money was gone.

THOMAS DELANCY . I am a printer to Mr. Bell, and locked up the house on the night of the 19th of June, and had the keys in my possession all that night; I was the first who entered it the next morning, at about twenty minutes after seven o'clock, and in going to my breakfast, I perceived the window of the counting house door was broken; I should rather say the glass was not broken, but taken quite out; I knew it was not broken the night before; I observed Mr. Holland's desk was not shut down. I went for the key, and on opening the door, perceived that the desk had been wrenched off; and perceived some indentions or marks of the instrument, with which it had been forced open. My suspicions immediately alighted, on Sweeting. In consequence of that suspicion I went with Clarke, the constable to the Cornish Arms, on Wednesday evening, about nine o'clock; and on finding him there, apprehended him. He was taken to the watchhouse, and the next morning he sent an officer to me, saying he wanted to speak to me; on my arrival he told me he knew some of the parties who had committed the robbery; and said he had received a one pound note, and some silver, for information which he had given to the parties who had committed the robbery. He said that bad company had been the ruin of him. He said one Hill, and a Charles, but he mentioned no surname, had led him to it; he said if I could make an intercession he would be glad; and I said, I would make any intercession that laid in my power. He said he was not present at the robbery himself, but was at the Adam and Eve all the evening. I saw a hammer tried to marks on the desk, which hammer exactly fitted the indentions.

JOHN BEAN I am a patrole of the parish of St. Clements Danes; and saw the three prisoners at the bar at a quarter before two, in the middle of the Saturday night, between the 19th and 20th of June; they were with two others, and two girls; I did not know Hill before; but I knew Sweeting, I followed them up Catherinestreet, from the Strand, up Brydges street, into Russel street, and so on, until I lost sight of them in Drury lane; I had my reason for looking after them. The next time I saw them was at about ten minutes before three; they were all the same persons again; I was standing at the end of Fountain court, which may be about twenty yards from them. I saw Taylor take something like notes out of his pocket, together with some silver, and I saw him sharing it; I saw him give a three shilling piece to one, and a three shilling piece to another. I then heard a boy, named Ned Butler , make use of this expression; here is Jack Bean , meaning myself. I then told one of the watchman, to go round Founting court, as they immediately separated when they discovered I was there; I had no chance of catching any of them then. I apprehended Taylor, on the first night of the illumination for the battle of Waterloo. I did not take Hill into custody until afterwards. I searched Hill's lodgings, on the same morning that he and Sweeting had an examination at Bow street, I found at his lodgings this slater's hammer; I don't know that Hill is a slater. I have seen that hammer tried to the marks in the desk, and from its fitting the marks in every part, even the teeth and all, I am enabled to say, that I believe it is the instrument made use of to break open the desk.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am constable of St. Clements. In consequence of a description which we received from the last witness he was found in his lodgings, and there also the dress he was described to have worn, was found. We did not bring the hammer away at first; but afterwards we fitted it to the marks on the counting house door, and found it fitted the holes which were made in it. We afterwards tried it to the desk, and there it fitted in a similar manner. Here are some pieces of wood which were broken off the door, they have similar indentations, and the hammer also fits them. I don't know what business Hill is; he said, he was a coppersmith. At Bow-street, I was present when Sweeting told Delancy that he introduced the other two prisoners how to commit the robbery; but was not present with them when it was committed; he told Delancy after he had been crying.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I am an officer, and assisted in taking Hill, on Tuesday, the 20th, between eleven and twelve at night, at his lodgings. I only took Hill; I saw the hammer, but it was not brought away at first. I afterwards saw it fitted to the desk; from the marks there, and on the door, I think I can positively swear that it was the instrument made use of; for on the claw there is a little bit sticks up, and the indentations correspond exactly with it as to that.

JOHN TOWNSEND . I was in company with the last witness at the apprehension of Hill; and on searching round the room, I saw this hammer; it was Hill who said it was a slater's hammer; I was also in company with Bean, when we took Taylor, in the Strand, on the first night of the illumination. Seeing us, he made for the main road but we followed, and took him.

Sweeting's Defence. On the night of the robbery, I was in bed asleep from nine at night, until nine in the morning; and when they got me to the watch-house, by promises, they made me say things entirely false.

Hill's Defence. I was in bed on the night Bean says he saw me in the street.

Taylor's Defence. I was never in the street on the night of the robbery, and when I was taken up, I knew not what for, and was sent to Tothill Fields.

LOUISA BOLTON . I am nineteen years of age, and am acquainted with the prisoner Daniel Hill, whom I have known six months, during which time, I have cohabited with him. I remember his being taken into custody, on the 20th of June. On the night of the robbery, which I think was on a Monday night, the prisoner, Daniel Hill, slept with me; he was at home at dinner time on that day; he staid at home until tea time, between five and six; he drank tea with me at that time; at seven o'clock

he and I went out together, and I drank with him at the Wheatsheaf. He then parted with me, and I saw him walking up and down Drury-lane alone. He came home at half past eleven o'clock, and never left me until eight in the morning; he slept in the same room with me, and in the same bed all night.

John Bean . That is one of the girls, and this Louisa Wilmott was the other, who was standing with the three prisoners and the rest, when the prisoner Taylor was dividing something like notes and silver.

The prisoners, Taylor and Sweeting, called one witness, each, who gave them a good character.

HILL, GUILTY , aged 32.

TAYLOR, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

SWEETING, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-114

888. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , a hammer, value 1 s. and a wrench, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Hemmens .

THOMAS HEMMENS . I am a coach-maker , and work for Mr. Tookey, in Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square . I lost these things from the shop. I saw the prisoner stop at the door, and go in. After remaining about five or six minutes, I saw him go out with his coat off, and supposing something might be concealed in it, I stopped him, and the hammer and wrench were found in his coat.

JAMES DIXON . I assisted in stopping the prisoner, and saw the hammer in his coat.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Whipped and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-115

889. SARAH FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a watch, value 3 l. and a shawl, value 5 s. the property of Richard Hoare . AND THOMAS COOMBES , and ANN HOOPER , were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the same goods, they well knowing them to be stolen .

ANN HOARE . I am wife of Richard Hoare , and live in Stratford Mews ; my husband is coachman to a nobleman , and we live over the stables; there are two rooms, and these things were taken out of the one in which I sleep; it was on the 12th of July. I missed the things on the Saturday morning, and I cast my eye upon them as I went to bed on the Friday night. I took the prisoner home, as she said she was distressed for a night's lodging; I gave her part of my supper, and permission to sleep in the room with me. She went away about half past two, or three, in the morning; I did not hear her go out, but was awakened by the watchman at half past two, who told me that the stable door was open. In the morning, I found the watch and shawl missing. The prisoner was afterwards taken into custody, and I saw my shawl at the pawnbroker.

ANN WORRALL . I am an acquaintance of Mrs. Hoare's; and learned from Mrs. Hoare, that the prisoner, whom I knew, had robbed her. Before that, I had seen the prisoner Foster, and when I heard of the robbery, I told Mrs. Hoare, I should endeavour to find her out. I accordingly saw her at Marybone; I asked her how she was? she said, she knew what I came for, and took me into the back yard, and told me if I would go to Ann Hooper , the other female prisoner, I could get the shawl; and if I went to Thomas Coombes , I might get the watch. I afterwards saw Coombes, and he told me how he parted with the watch; he said, he sold it to a Jew for a pound, and gave the money to Sarah Foster .

WILLIAM HENRY ROGERS . I a pawnbroker, and took the shawl in from a person named Hooper; but I don't know her person. Here is the shawl.

(producing it.)

Ann Hoare . That is my shawl.

FOSTER, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

COOMBES, NOT GUILTY .

HOOPER, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-116

890. PHILIP GOWON and BRIDGET CARRON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , one bolster, value 4 s. two pillow-cases, value 3 s. one sheet, value 1 s. 6 d. and one quilt, value 1 s. the property of John Thomas , in a lodging-room .

JOHN THOMAS . I am a house-keeper, and live in Anger and Porter court, Golden lane . The two prisoner came in, and the prisoner Carron took the lodging, as if for herself and Gowon, and we thought Gowon was her husband. The lodging was to be let furnished by the week; I don't know how much was owning, but there was generally two shillings short of the five shillings. They left the lodging on the 6th of June, with the door shut, but not locked; that day my wife went into the apartment, and missed all these things, which were let to them as furniture with the lodging.

MARY THOMAS . I am the wife of John Thomas . All these articles were in the lodging as furniture, let to the two prisoners by contract. I went up into the room on the 6th of June, and found the things missing; the female prisoner slept in the lodgings one night after these things were missing, and said, she would come the next day and bring them back.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, and live on Mutton Hill, Clerkenwell Green. I know the person of the female prisoner: she pledged a sheet for one shilling and sixpence at my house, on the 2nd of June, and a bolster on the same day.

WILLIAM TILLIER . I am a pawnbroker, and my shop is at No. 12, Smithfield Bars. I have two pillows here, which the female prisoner pawned at my house on the 8th of June, and also a quilt, upon which I advanced one shilling; I advanced one shilling and sixpence upon each of the pillows; I am quite sure it was the female prisoner.

JOSEPH HAWKES . I am the headborough, and apprehended Philip Gowon , and was present when the woman was apprehended; I was in my own

shop, and seeing the prisoner run with twenty or thirty people after him, I stopped him, but did not understand the charge until I got into the watchhouse. He said, he knew nothing at all about it. At about half past ten, or nearly eleven, on the same night, we took the female prisoner, going along to the watchhouse; I saw her deliver some tickets to my brother officer Prince.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I got some duplicates from the female prisoner, and on my going to the pawnbroker's, from which it appeared she had had them, I got all these things.

(producing the property.)

John Thomas. These things are all my property.

GOWON, NOT GUILTY .

CARRON, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18150913-117

891. THOMAS HOWLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , a waistcoat, value 4 s. a pair of breeches, value 6 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of George Coppin .

GEORGE COPPIN. I am servant to Mr. Roberts, who lives at Muswell Hill . This property was lost from the farm yard; they were laying upon some sticks in the yard, which was not fenced round. I saw them safe at about seven in the evening, and missed them about ten; but did not see the prisoner take them. I went to take my supper, and when I came out after supper, I saw the prisoner in the yard; I saw he had the things, and asked him what business he had there? he made no answer; he ran about twenty yards, and then dropped the things.

JAMES HANDCOCK . I am a constable of Muswell Hill, and was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, which I did. Here is the property.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Whipped and discharged .

[Recommended to mercy on account of his age.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-118

892. PHILIP MORES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , four tablecloths, value 15 s. the property of John Cook .

JOHN COOKE . I live in Oxford-street, Commercial-road , and had some of my tablecloths stolen, but cannot exactly say when. I missed them about the 12th of July; I don't know who took them of my own knowledge. The prisoner was a lodger of mine; he was accused of stealing them on the 20th of July, and then he said he brought them from America with him. I had had them I don't know how long. A publican told me he had bought them of the prisoner. I am sure they are mine; they had been marked J S with a C over it, and the C was picked out. We could see it was marked with blue where the C had been. The publican is here.

JOHN TEASDALE . I am a publican, and keep the Queen's Head, Charlotte-street, Whitechapel. I produce seven tablecloths and a pair of sheets, which I bought of the prisoner, at the latter end of June, or the beginning of July. I shewed the tablecloths to Mr. Cooke, at his request.

SARAH COOKE . I am the wife of Mr. Cooke. I missed some tablecloths some time after the prisoner had left our lodgings; he said he was going to lodge at Mrs. Wilson's in Nottingham-place. On my missing the tablecloths, I went to Mrs. Wilson, having heard he had offered some to her for sale. I told him I had missed them: but he said, those which he had offered to Mrs. Wilson, he had brought from America with him, and that they were his property. I begged to see them; but he said, he could not produce them, as he had given them to a brother officer, of the name of Dodd, who was then at Portsmouth. The next morning, the tablecloths were found at Mr. Teasdale's, the publican's; I knew them to be my tablecloths, and the C was picked out. I went to the prisoner's lodgings again, but found he was gone to others, a Mrs. Burton.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I believe the defendant has been serving in the British Army in America. I had a reference for his character to Mr. Glover, Secretary at the Admiralty. I believe it was four or five weeks before the prisoner was examined before the magistrate.

ANN WILSON. On the 21st of June, the prisoner came to lodge at my house; it was the same day that he left Mrs. Cooke's; he offered me four tablecloths to sell; I observed, I should like to know where he got them? he said, he had bought them of a brother officer, at Bermuda, who told him that he had given ten dollars for the largest of them, for a mess-cloth. I did not purchase them of him. I afterwards saw the same tablecloths at Teasdale's, the publican's, and those which he has now produced are the same.

John Cooke . I applied for a search warrant, to search Teasdale's, and found my tablecloths there. They had not been in use as mess-cloths.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-119

893. JAMES LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , two candlesticks, value 5 s. the property of John King .

JOHN MARKS . The prisoner and another man, came into the prosecutor's house, which is the Mason's Arms, Oxford-market , on the 5th of July, for a pint of porter. Lewis went back wards, and remained for a long time, and then came and drank with the other man, and went out directly. I immediately went into the kitchen, and missed two candlesticks; Matthias Forward went after the prisoner, and I afterwards saw him with the candlesticks at the police office, in Marlborough-street. I was with Forward when the prisoner was found with the candlesticks in his pocket, at the Feathers public-house; we got Alexander, the constable, and took him to Marlborough-street.

MATHIAS FORWARD . The account the last witness has given, is true. One candlestick was in each pocket.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am the constable, and produce the candlesticks, which I got from the two last witnesses.

JOHN KING . These are my candlesticks, and they are worth four shillings.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Whipped and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-120

894. HENRY PAVETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , thirty pounds of metal, value 30 s. the property of Sarah Knight , widow; AND ANN ABLE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

SARAH KNIGHT . The prisoner, Pavett, was in my employment; and the metal in question was entrusted to his care; when this metal was missed, he absconded.

ROBERT BOWEN . I am a brass and bell founder, and Mr. Wheatcroft sent for me.

WILLIAM WHEATCROFT . I live in Berkley-street, Clerkenwell, and am a brass founder. Some metal was brought to my house by George Norfolk.

GEORGE NORFOLK. I am a dealer in marine stores, at 140, Golden-lane; and bought thirty or forty pounds of this metal from Mr. Davis, who lives in Red Lion-street, Spitalfields, the day before I sold it to Mr. Wheatcroft.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a dealer in marine stores. I sold forty or fifty pounds weight of brass metal to Mr. Norfolk, which I had purchased from Mrs. Able.

JOHN CAVALIER. I produce the metal, which I got at Mr. Wheatcroft's.

Sarah Knight. I did not lose so much as forty or fifty pounds, and I can't swear that any of this is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-121

895. EDWARD ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , a watch, value 2 l. and a seal, value 10 s. the property of Andrew Johnson .

ANDREW JOHNSON . I am a seafaring-man , and was in the Cannon public-house, Cannon-street , where I lodged, at a little after ten in the morning, of the 3rd of September; the prisoner was there; and I took out my watch, and asked him what the value of it was? he took it up to look at it, then walked towards the door; I followed him; he attempted to make off with the watch; but when he found I pursued him, he threw it away. I picked it up, and another man stopped him.

DAVID DAWSON . On the day in the indictment, seeing Johnson running after the prisoner, I stopped him, and gave him to a constable, at Ratcliffe Highway.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am the constable to whom the prisoner and the watch were delivered, and here is the watch.

Andrew Johnson . That is my watch.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-122

896. RICHARD RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , at St. Margaret, Westminster, twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Henry Smith and Thomas Price .

THOMAS PRICE . I am a linen-draper , in Tothill-street , and being in my shop on the 21st of June, I heard somebody say that a man had stolen a piece of blue print. I immediately went to the door, and saw the prisoner with it, and upon attempting to stop him, he threw it down, and ran off.

THOMAS MITCHELL. I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him.

JOHN MOORE . Here is the print; I am the officer who took the prisoner.

THOMAS PRICE. I am in partnership with Henry Smith , and this is our print.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-123

897. ELIZABETH SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , a sheet, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Butterfield , in a lodging-room .

PHOEBE BUTTERFIELD. I am daughter of the prosecutor, who is not here, and I was not present when the contract was made between the prisoner and my father.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-124

898. ELIZABETH SKINNER was indicted for stealing, a shirt, value 3 s. the property of John Walker ; and a towel, value 6 d. the property of Benjamin Bright .

JOHN WALKER . In June last, I lost a shirt out of my room; and when the prisoner was stopped for stealing Mr. Butterfield's sheet, my shirt was found upon her, in my presence, as well as my comrade's towel.

BENJAMIN BRIGHT . I lost a towel on the same day out of my knapsack.

LEWIS PIGE . I am a constable, and was called in to search the prisoner, and took from her a bundle, containing this shirt and towel.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-125

899. JOHN TUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , eleven pounds weight of leaden pipe, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of George Conteto .

GEORGE CONTETO. I live in Prentice-court, St. Matthew, Bethnal Green , and lost some leaden pipe from my water-butt, on the 20th of July.

ROBERT POUR . I live in the same house with Conteto. About nine o'clock in the night of the 20th

of July, I heard a noise below stairs when I was at supper; and on going down stairs, I saw somebody going out at the door, with something under his coat; on over taking that person, it was the prisoner, and he had the leaden pipe under his coat.

ANN MEADOWS . I am the person who gave the alarm when the prisoner was going out of the house.

GEORGE CONTETO . That is my lead.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-126

900. JOSEPH NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , four quart pewter pots, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Pugh .

THOMAS COLLIER. I am a tallow-chandler, and was cleaning windows in Wigmore-street, in company with Thomas Blisley ; when we saw the prisoner take two quart pots from the step of a gentleman's door, we went after him, and found him with more in a bag which he had; we took him to Marybone watchhouse, and delivered him and the pots to Newit, the watchhouse-keeper.

THOMAS PUGH . I can swear to three of these pots, but not to the fourth.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-127

901. MARGARET HILL was indicted for stealing, from the person of Richard Henry Fisher , on the 5th of September , one piece of gold coin, value 7 s. three bank tokens, value 9 s. and one bank note for the payment of two-pound, value 2 l. his property .

RICHARD HENRY FISHER . I am a musician , and was returning home from the Lyceum Theatre , on the 5th of September, at about a quarter before one. The prisoner came up to me, and laid hold of my arm; in an instant I felt her hand come from my pocket, in which three three-shilling pieces and and a seven shilling piece had been, and which I missed, together with a two-pound note. I immediately took her to the watchhouse; the money was found in her hand, and the note in her pocket, in my presence.

JAMES FLETCHER . I am watchhouse-keeper, and on the prisoner being brought to the watchhouse, I searched her, and found this property on her.

Richard Henry Fisher . I believe this to be my property.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18150913-128

902. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , one counterpane, value 1 l. one pair of sheets, value 1 l. one towel, value 1 s. one pillow-case, value 2 s. and one night-cap, value 6 d. the property of William Francis , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM FRANCIS . I live in Hungerford-street . The prisoner came to my house for a night's lodging; I let him have one, for which he was to pay a shilling; and he went to bed at about half past ten. The things named in the indictment were let to him with the lodging; he paid me for his bed the night before. He came down at six o'clock in the morning, had a glass of gin, and then went out; and I missed the things in about five minutes afterwards.

JOHN BRADLEY. I belong to St. Martin's watchhouse, and on searching the prisoner, found the counterpane wrapt round his body, and a sheet round each thigh. Here are the things.

William Francis . Those are my property.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-129

903. CATHERINE CLARK , JANE CLARK , and MARY FLETCHER , were indicted for stealing. on the 18th of June , one watch, value 4 l. one chain, value 2 l. two seals, value 1 l. and one watch-ring, value 2 d, the property of Christopher Chandler , from his person .

CHRISTOPHER CHANDLER . At about nine in the morning, on the 16th of July, I was in Drury-lane, after being up all night; I fell into company with the prisoners one at a time, and lost my watch between nine in the morning and four in the afternoon. I was first in company with Jane Clark , at the Black Dog, and I went home to her sister's, the other prisoner, she lives in Church-lane . I am sure I had the watch then. The sister joined company with us, as well as Mary Fletcher , the daughter of Fletcher at the bar. The other girls went away, and I pulled off my things, and went to bed, and when I wakened in the morning, Catherine Clark was in bed with me; she went away, and I thought she would come back again. Somebody afterwards came, and broke the door open, and then I missed my watch; and then the prisoner Mary Fletcher , wanted to turn me out of the house. I don't know what I did with my watch before I went to sleep. The duplicate was afterwards sent to me at my lodging, and I went to the pawnbroker's and released it.

GEORGE LEE . I am a pawnbroker, and live at 93, High-Holborn. Between two and three in the afternoon of the 18th of July, the watch in question was pawned with me, by Mary Fletcher , the daughter of the prisoner Fletcher, who pledged it in the name of Jane Briscoe; I advanced one pound five shillings upon it.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am a patrole; and the landlady of the house where this robbery was committed, came to me, and acquainted me with it. When I went up stairs into the room, the prosecutor wanted me to take charge of the woman. The next morning, Mrs. Rowe brought Jane Clark to me at the watchhouse, but she said, she knew nothing at all about. The other two prisoners were afterwards apprehended.

SAMUEL ROBERTS , I am watchhouse-keeper, and produce the watch, which I got at the magistrates at Marlborough-street.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-130

904. DAVID WILKINGS , and THOMAS BALDWIN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , twenty eight yards of gingham, value 40 s. the property of Edward Edwards .

EDWARD EDWARDS. I am a linen draper , and my shop is in Wilmot street, St. George's, Bloomsbury . This gingham was taken from outside my door, and I was present when it was taken from the prisoners.

ANNE PAWSON . I happened to be passing by, at the time of the robbery. I observed the two prisoners coming along the street together. The smaller one took the gingham, while the other prisoner waited for him, three or four yards off; and when they had got it, they both ran together. Baldwin must have seen Wilkins do it; they ran full drive by me, and I went into the shop to tell the linen draper.

BENJAMIN THOMAS CROWE . I am shopman to Mr. Edwards; and being informed by Ann Pawson of the robbery, I went after the prisoners, and they were stopped, when they got into Marchmont-street. They were both running together, and Wilkins had it under his arm; and when I stopped him, he threw it down. I knew it to be Mr. Edwards's, for it has his shop mark upon it.

WILLIAM READ , SEN. I am the officer who took charge of the prisoners and the gingham. Here it is.

Edward Edwards . That is my property; my shop mark is on it.

WILKINGS, GUILTY, aged 18.

BALDWIN, GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-131

905. JOHN HEWLINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a portmanteau, value 3 l. the property of Richard Dixon .

JOHN CHANCELOR . I am in the service of Mr. Dixon, trunk maker . I was coming along, between one and two in the afternoon of the 28th of August, I met the prisoner three doors from our shop, with this portmanteau on his shoulder; I knew it had been Mr. Dixon's, but was in doubt, whether it had been purchased, as I had been from home. I followed him, and he perceived I was following him, and he went up a court which leads to Mr. Smith's the attorney's office; I went into Mr. Sewell's shop, a seedsman opposite of Mr. Smith's, and presently I saw the prisoner come down the court and look about him; I pointed him out to Mr. Sewell and requested him to watch if he carried the portmanteau away, whilst I ran home to enquire whether it had been bought; I found it had not been bought, but was just missed. I went and got the prisoner and the portmanteau and brought them both back to our shop.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-132

906. ANN SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , three yards of muslin, value 6 s. the property of Charles Thomas Brooks .

SAMUEL STABLE . I am an apprentice in the house of Mr. Brooks, a linen draper , at 47, Duke street, Manchester square ; and there was between three and four yards of muslin hanging outside the door, on the 12th of July; I saw it about a quarter of an hour before it was taken; but did not see it taken myself.

JAMES LETTER . I am a beadle of St. George's, Hanover square, and saw the prisoners in Oxford street with this muslin. I stopped her, and asked her what she had under her cloak, and she said nothing; I told her I should search her; and she then gave me the muslin, which she said she found. I took her to Marylebone watchhouse; and afterwards went to Mr. Brooks's. where the muslin was claimed. Here is the muslin.

Samuel Stable . That is all Mr. Brooks's property; it has his shop mark on it. I am sure it was not sold.

GUILTY aged 38.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-133

907. WILLIAM WOODNESS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , one pair of sheets, value 14 s. the property of John Bates , and JOHN WOODNESS and JAMES SPEAKE for feloniously receiving the same goods, they knowing them to have been stolen .

JULIA BATES . I am the wife of John Bates , and live at 25, Wigmore street, Cavendish square . I lost nine pair of sheets, and a half, but only detected one pair.

JOHN HATCH . I bought the duplicate of a pair of sheets, from James Speake ; I redeemed the sheets on the 18th of July. from a pawnbrokers in Marylebone lane. There is no mark on the sheets; and I don't know I should know them again.

JAMES DENT . I am a police officer, and apprehended William Woodness at his mother's apartments.

WILLIAM COSLAKE . I am a journeyman to Mr. Lightman, pawnbroker, in Marybone lane. I did not take in the sheets; but I delivered them to a person, who came to redeem them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-134

908. ELEANOR FARRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of John Hole .

JOHN HOLE . I am a linen draper , and live at No. 20, Norton Falgate and in consequence of information which I received I traced my handkerchiefs to a pawnbroker's.

JOHN ATCHED COOPER . I am a servant to the last witness; and the prisoner came into our shop, between four and five in the afternoon, to purchase a handkerchief: which she did. She came back to our house a second time, to be of the bargain of the first handkerchief she had bought; and then she was taken to the watchhouse, and searched, and a

duplicate was found on her; which she immediately put into her mouth.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-135

909. JOHN GOFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , two gowns, value 9 s. one waistcoat, value 5 s. one jacket, value 3 s. one coat, value 3 s. two brushes, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 6 d. one neckerchief, value 6 d. one handkerchief, value 6 d. one habit shirt, value 6 d. and two plated tea spoons, value 1 s. the property of John Avery .

ELIZABETH AVERY . My husband is a sawyer . I lost two gowns and the other articles, mentioned in the indictment, on the 9th of August. I left my room between one and two for half an hour, during which time it was locked. When I was coming home, I met the prisoner coming out of the door, with a coloured gown of mine in his hand; which I took particular notice of, together with a bundle wrapt up in a white apron of mine. I said, good God! you have my gowns; how came you by them; he was immediately secured, and taken to St. Ann's watchhouse. When I went up stairs, the door was open, and the lock had been picked,

WILLIAM GOSLIN . I am a beadle of the parish, and was sent for, to take the prisoner into custody; but when I arrived, somebody had taken him to the watchhouse. I searched him, and all the the things were found on him.

Elizabeth Avery . All these things are my husbands property.

GUILTY aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-136

910. RICHARD JOWLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , two glass goblets, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Nathaniel Huson , and James Huson .

NATHANIEL HUDSON . My father is my partner, and we carry on the business of china and glass dealers . The prisoner was a porter of ours; and has been in our employ a year and three quarters. On Monday the 11th of September, I was informed by my servants, that two goblets were concealed in the cellar. I knew them to be my property, and marked them, and watched to see who would come and take them; and the prisoner come and took them. He had one pound a week in my service; I immediately stopped him, and took the goblets one out of each pocket; and immediately sent for a constable into whose custody I delivered the goblets and the prisoner.

Prosecutor. Those are my goblets.

GUILTY aged 30.

Confined two months .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-137

911. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , one shirt, value 5 s. the property of James Styles .

JAMES STYLES . I lost my shirt out of my garden, where it was hung up to dry, after having been washed; it was safe a few minutes before it was stolen. In consequence of some information which I received, I saw the prisoner at the bar take my shirt out of a handkerchief, and throw it on a hedge: he was laid hold of after running right round the field; there is no path goes near my garden.

MARTHA BATEMAN . I live at Potters Bar , and saw the prisoner jump over the pales, and jump back again with the shirt. I told Styles, and he went and took him.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-138

912. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , twenty shillings in monies numbered, and two 1 l. bank notes, the property of Samuel Savegar , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL SAVEGAR . I am a publican , and keep the Blue Posts, Southampton-buildings . The first time I saw the prisoner was at seven o'clock in the morning of the 5th of March, when he had three quarterns of gin and milk, for which he paid, and ordered me to get a coach for him, saying, he was going to get some money of a gentleman in the Strand, who owed him for a horse; he ordered me to have a rump steak ready at half past twelve, and I had it ready against he came back. He came to my bar, and asked for change of a ten-pound note; I told him I had only two pounds in notes and twenty shillings in silver; he said three pounds would be enough for him, and he would leave the ten-pound note until he returned. I put the money down; he had some sort of a piece of paper in his hand, but I don't know that it was a ten-pound note. He snatched up my money and ran away. I expected him to have given me the ten-pound note. I did not see him again until he was taken into custody, and I believe that was in June.

WILLIAM GEERING I was in this house at the time the prisoner came, at about half past twelve, in a coach. I saw him come to the bar with some paper in his hand, but what it was, I could not tell.

Prisoner. Here is a bill sent me by the prosecutor, charging me with three pounds as money lent, and this three pounds he lent me. I would wish to ask him if that bill is not his hand-writing?

Prosecutor. (looking at the note.) It is not my hand-writing. I made out a bill, but not charging him with this money as money lent, but merely for the officer to find him.

GUILTY , aged 35,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-139

913. MARY PRICE , alias LADY PRICE , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , two sheets, value 2 l. and one silver spoon, value 20 l. the pro-property of Abraham Darton Branthwaite , the same goods being in a certain lodging-room, in the dwelling-house

of the said Abraham Darton Dranthwaite , and let by contract by him to the prisoner, and to be used by her with the lodgings aforesaid, against the statute .

SARAH STAFFORD . I am servant to the prosecutor, who lives at 18, Greville-street, Hatton Garden . The prisoner had apartments in my master's house, and left on the 25th of June; she had five children, two nursery maids, and herself. A man of the name of Carter used to come every day. She usually dined between four and five. She dined on Saturday, the 25th, at about half past one; after dinner was over, the spoons were brought into the kitchen. The servants and four of the children left the house at half past two; Lady Price and her eldest daughter remained behind; she rang the bell, and I answered her; I was called up stairs, and she said, bring up the spoons; I took up one, and put it on the sideboard; Lady Price was in the room then, and nobody else; her daughter was in the yard at the time. They afterwards left the house; the key was not left in the door; I don't know who took it out. Lady Price did not return that night, nor any of her family. The next day a letter came, with something like a key in it; my master opened it, and the key of the dining-room door was in it. We made search, to see that all was right; and the table-spoon was missing, and a pair of sheets. We found no spoon in the lodging. These things were let with the lodging.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. I was not present when the agreement was made.

ABRAHAM DARTON BRANTHWAITE . The prisoner at the bar, was a lodger in my house; she came on the 17th of June, and left on the 25th; when she left, the door was locked. The next day I received a letter, which letter contained the key of the dining-room door. We went into the dining-room, and found one pair of sheets missing, marked A B in blue, and one silver table-spoon missing. These things she had as part of the furniture with the furnished lodging. She never afterwards called at my house. I afterwards found her at 56, or 57, Gee-street, Goswell-street. I was not present when the lodging were let.

ELIZABETH BRANTHWAITE . I am the wife of the last witness. I let the prisoner the use of spoons and sheets.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Was there any positive agreement made that two sheets and a silver spoon should be lent - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-140

914. HENRY PHILLIPS was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he falsely pretended to John Minter Morgan , George Meadows Morgan , and Robert Morgan , that he was in the service of one Richard Evans , of White's-row, Spitalfields, and presented a forged order , which was as follows,

"Please to let the bearer have two bundles of blue demy," signed

" Richard Evans , White's-row, Spitalfield," and thereby fraudulently obtained from them the said two bundles of blue demy, and he not being in the service or employment of the said Robert Evans , did feloniously cheat, defraud, and rob them of the same.

JOHN BROOK MEADOWS . I am a servant to Messrs. Morgan and Company, stationers, at 39, Ludgate Hill . I recollect Henry Phillips, the prisoner at the bar, coming to our warehouse, and bringing an order to me, which I have in my hand.

"Please to let the bearer have two bundles of blue demy,

" RICHARD EVANS ,

"White's-row, Spitalfields."

Witness. Richard Evans was a person who had dealing with our firm. I don't know his hand writing. I let the prisoner have the goods; they might be worth four pounds; he went away, and came a second time, but I was not at home then. I am sure the prisoner is the person; he did not say where he lived, nor mention any thing about White's-row, Shitalfields. I asked him was Mr. Evans busy? and he said, yes, since the last order came in. While he was there, one of the Mr. Morgans came in, and told me to give him the beat paper; nobody was present when he gave me the order.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-141

915. JOHN FREDERICK AUGUSTUS MAYBRICK was indicted for obtaining money under false pretences .

MARY MEHEWX . I am the wife of Anthony Mehewx , and keep an eating-house, in East Smithfield. About the 29th of June, the prisoner and another young man dined at our house; he dined again, and asked me how I was? I told him when my husband had done with the sea, he would be glad of some employment. He said, it was in his power to do some thing for him. He then said he belonged to the Custom House himself, and then pulled out some warrant, or something to shew me that he did: and he could get my husband a situation, and it would only be two or three pounds expence to him; he said he did not want any thing for his own trouble, unless he was asked to drink a glass of any thing with the parties. When my husband came home, I told him what he had said. I told him when my husband would be at home, and he accordingly came; he said to my husband, your wife has been saying that you would wish to get some employ in your leisure time. He told him that it was in his power to obtain him some employ, and a place in the Custom House, and that it would only cost him two or three pounds expence for fees of the office. I was obliged to go away, and did not hear him say any more then.

ANTHONY MEHEWX . After the night of the 29th of June, my wife informed me what the prisoner had said to her. The next evening he came to sop at our house, seemed very friendly, and asked us how we did; he told me my wife had been telling him that I should wish some employ in my leasure hours; that he could get me a situation as weigher in the Custom House, that would not require above three or four hours daily attendance, and that it would bring me in three or four shillings a-day, and it would not cost more than two or three pounds for office fees to get that situation. I told

him, I was very much obliged to him. He said he did not want any thing for himself, unless it was to take a glass of any thing with the parties; he appointed the Monday following to go to the Custom House, and said it would want twelve shillings for fees of the office, and ten shillings to pay for the printed warrant. I went with him to the Custom House, and he went into an office, having got this money from me, and told me to wait outside; he returned, but without the warrant; and put me off by telling me it was not ready; he got other sums from me at different times, and always put me off with different excuses.

THOMAS WHITMORE. I am in the Custom House , and the prisoner held a situation there also. I am enabled to say that it was utterly impossible for him to procure a situation for any person in the Custom House. He never paid any money for any printed warrant, nor was any thing of the kind required.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-142

916. JAMES CHARLES SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , nine elephant's teeth, value 110 l. the property of Alexander Sinclair and Robert Sinclair ; by a certain ill disposed person, (to the jurors unknown,) then lately before stolen , feloniously did receive and have, he well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen.

THOMAS ANNESLEY . I live at 35, Great Tower Hill, with my uncles, Messrs. Alexander and Robert Sinclair . In the month of March last, my uncles' warehouse on Tower Hill was broken open, and some elephants teeth which were there and alotted for sale, they were stolen. The warehouse was secured between four and five o'clock in the afternoon of the 13th, and on the morning of the 14th, we were alarmed by the servant, who told us that the warehouse had been broken open; a hole had been cut in the door, a hand had then been inserted, and the bar had been taken down, and the nine teeth were gone, which weighed four hundred weight, The prisoner was tried for stealing.

JAMES HARWOOD . I am an ivory-turner, and live in Houndsditch. On Saturday, the 18th of March, the prisoner came to my house, and asked me if I wanted to buy some ivory. I asked him what sort of stuff it was? he said, there were nine teeth, weighing four hundred weight. At this time I knew of the robbery having taken place. I asked him where I could see it, as I did not like to buy it by samples, without seeing the whole. He said, it had been smuggled, and therefore cut into pieces to be brought on shore. The real reason I said I wished to see the whole was because it was exactly the same number of teeth, and nearly the same as had been stolen. He said he would endeavour to get the person who owned it, to let me see the whole; he said they were down at Blackwall. When he was gone, I communicated the substance of what he had said to Messrs. Sinclair. He came again in the morning, and came after that again at three o'clock in the afternoon. He came again on the Monday, and said he had four teeth weighing two hundred and six or two hundred and eight pounds. I understood them to be of the same parcel that he had first mentioned. He said, he would bring a piece to shew me, and in the afternoon, about three o'clock, he brought this piece; he brought it strangely wrapt up in a sack, so that it did not look like what it was. I told him I should like to have seen the whole. He said, if I would buy this piece, he would bring another, and so on, until he had brought the whole. I told him, I thought it was stolen, and as I had a suspicion of two persons, I should like to know the name of the person from whom he got it? he said, he could not help it. I said, I must detain the piece. He said, you have brought me into a strange dilemma, and then he went away. I gave information to Sinclair. I had known the prisoner fifteen or sixteen years. I had heard of the robbery on the Wednesday morning before.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner in Cree Church-lane, at the Cock and Horn; he said, he had neither house nor home. I searched him, in hopes of finding out where he lived, but could find no trace upon him.

JOHN SIMM . I am an ivory-broker, and have been in the habit of sorting teeth for Messrs. Sinclair, and identify this piece to be a part of a tooth which I sorted among others, in March last.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-143

917. ABRAHAM JACOBS was indicted for that he, on the 13th of January , two hundred and fifty skins of parchment, value 12 l. the property of Thomas Shepherd and Thomas Hine ; by a certain ill disposed person, (to the jurors unknown,) then lately before, to wit, on the same day, feloniously stolen, unlawfully did receive and have, he well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen .

THOMAS SHEPHERD . I am a parchment-maker , and my premises are at Bury, St. Edmunds; my partner's name is Hine. I send my goods up by the coach or waggon to the Bull-inn, Bishopsgate-street, addressed for

"Shepherd and Hine, to be left until called for." We send up a number of trusses at a time. We sent up four on the 17th of December, 1814, directed as I have stated. On the 4th of January, 1815, we sent up three; on the 7th, we sent up one, and afterwards I came up myself, to dispose of them; when I went to the inn, I only found seven there, and those were all I could get; I could tell that the one lost, was one of the three trusses sent up on the 4th of January, or the 12th of January following, I will not be sure. I went in company with Mr. Mills and Mr. Hutchinson, two officers, to the Cock and Horn, the house of the prisoner, in Duke's-place, at the bottom of Creechurch-lane; when I went in, Mr. Mills and Mr. Hutchinson had four bundles of parchment produced, which I knew to be my manufacture; they had passed through my hands so many times, that I could identify them. I never sold any to the defendant; each roll contained sixty skins. The

officers went in before me, and afterwards made a signal to me to come in; and I went in; after the skins had been produced, the defendant was asked where he got these skins? he said he could immediately tell, he said he had them in the house six months, and afterwards he said he took them for a bad debt, from a person of Liverpool.

ALEXANDER WILLIAM MILLS. I am a law stationer in Great Shire lane. On the 12th of January, the prisoner called at my house in company with another man; I am quite sure of the prisoner's person; the man who was with him said he had a friend; who had an article which might suit me; and then he pointed to the prisoner, as the person of whom he was speaking. The prisoner then produced a roll of skins, containing sixty, wrapt up in brown holland cloth. I asked him what the price of them was; he told me four and sixpence a skin. I told him he was very young in the business because it was far above the price. I had a quantity of skins by me, each considerably larger in size, than these; for which I only gave one and sixpence per skin. I asked him where he got them from, he said he obtained them in payment of a bad debt. At that time he did not say where the persons lived whom he had got them. I told him what he asked, was above the value. He then asked me, were they worth a shilling a skin; I told him they might be, but not to me, and suspecting something, I told him I did not chuse to buy them; the person's name who came with him was Phillips from whom I had some times purchased pens, and stationary. In about half an hour afterwards Mr. Shepherd came in, to whom I communicated the circumstance. It was afterwards agreed that I should call at the prisoner's house; I never went alone; it was on Friday the 30th of January, I asked him had he disposed of the parchment, he said no, and he produced four rolls. I told him I wished to see it all, and I would call the next morning, with Hutchinsoe and Shepherd, who remained outside; he said he had two or three rolls. I asked him, had he not sold one to a Mr. Waterhouse, he said he had, to a person in Carey street, who in being described, was Mr. Waterhouse. The next morning, there were only two rolls produced to me and Shepherd; which was claimed by Shepherd, as his property. The officers went up stairs with the defendant, and brought down two more; I asked him where he got them, and he said he could not recollect. He then said, he had them in the way of his business, and had had them in the house six months; he then said he took them for a bad debt, of a man at Liverpool, but named nobody, nor the amount of the debt.

JOHN WATERHOUSE . I am a law stationer; and live at 12, Carey street. I bought a roll of parchment of the prisoner, for which I gave two pounds. I used part of it, and the rest is here. He asked me was it worth a shilling a skin, for he had taken it in payment for a bad debt, and had allowed that for it. He said he had five or six rolls. This passed on the 13th.

JOHN WILSON HAWKINS . I accompianed Fogg to the house of the prisoner; and he produced two rolls of parchment; and afterwards he shewed me two rolls up stairs.

SAMUEL FOGG. I produce the parchment, and know it to be what we got at the prisoner's house.

SAMUEL HUTCHINSON . I am a book keeper to the Bull Inn Bishopsgate street ; and the prosecutors are in the habit of sending up trusses of parchment, to be left at our booking office until called for. On the 31st of December, four trusses came up. On the 5th of January, three, and one on the 8th. The eight were received safe, and one of them was afterwards stolen, but I don't know how.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

JOSEPH JACOB CANTON . I am a quill manufacturer and know the prisoner, Abraham Jacobs ; to be in the quill and stationary line ; but I never heard anything against his character. I live in Gun square. Hounsditch.

SIMON HART . I live in Duke's place, and know the prisoner to be in the stationary line, as well as keeping a public house.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months , and fined 50 l. and to be further imprisoned. until the fine be paid .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-144

918. JAMES BIRCH , and JOHN DOWDING , were indicted for unlawfully conspiring on the 23rd of November together, and with William Miller and Richard Leavitt , to fraudluently prove a commission of bankruptcy to be awarded and assigned against the said William Miller, and Richard Leavitt .

WILLIAM MILLER . I first became acquainted with the prisoner about four years ago when I was in partnership with Richard Leavitt , as joiners and builders, residing in Hinton street, Mile end. He was a saffron cake maker , and lived in Rope-maker street, Finsbury square. I have known Dowding four years, as a clothier ; I was acting partner with Mr. Leavitt kept the accounts and so forth. In the early part of the year 1813, we were possessed of a good many houses, which we built ourselves; I believe we had about eighty cottages of different sizes; some in Summerford field, Mile end; Others in Globe fields. They were of considerable value; I had no dealings with Birch before the year 1813.

Mr. Andrews. Q. Were you in that year, at all embarrassed for money, and if so, at what time - A. About April I was a little pushed for money, but it did not arise from insolvency, but merely from a temporary run which we had not at that time the means of supplying. The first of my creditors that were the most pressing, was Mr. Norman, of Earl street. The next was Mr. Bumford.

Q. Had you recourse to Birch - A. Yes, I sent for him to become one of my bail.

Q. Before you sent for him for that purpose, was there any account subsisting between you - A. Not any. He did not become my bail, but prefered to pay the debt; for which Mr. Bumford accepted a bill as security for eighty pounds four shillings. Birch agreed to the security. and Mr. Bumford gave him a bill.

Q. Is that the bill - A. It is.

Bill read, drawn by Miller and Leavitt, accepted, by Bumford, and endorsed by Birch.

Q. Is that endorsement Birch's hand writing - A. It is; eighty four pounds four shillings; but there were some little expences, the sum for which I was arrested was not so much, but the bill was drawn enough to cover the expences. I think Mr. Birch, and Mr. Bumford to the best of my reccollection, went to pay that bill. I afterwards had a communication with Birch on the state of my affairs; I told him I was affraid of being arrested by the same party; and asked him, if he could lend me the money to pay the bill which amounted to a hundred pounds. He said he had not the money, about him, but recommended me to call upon Mr. Gower: after seeing Gower, I returned to him for the purpose of seeing if he knew any body who could lend me the money. I told him I had applied to Gower, who was in company with a gentleman named Kinnaird. Mr. Kinnard said he had been making a purchase, and he did not know how he stood upon his bankers; books, but he said if I would join Birch in a bill for a hundred pounds he could give me a draft, which he did; and that bill was paid afterwards by Mr. Birch.

Q. Did Birch ever after that. get the hundred pounds from you - A. He had more of me; I think the bill became due in May, and some few days afterwards, I handed him the money; or he had money's worth of me.

Q. Do you say, that after this you received some money - A. I received money on the 19th of May, on an annuity deed.

Q. Who was the person who paid you - A. Mr. Brownsworth; and my solicitor was Mr. Christie. I went to execute the annuity deed in company with my partner, Leavitt; Birch, and Reynolds a publican and builder, at that time living at Mile end; to Mr. Christie's office. Birch went with me to give security on the annuity, against my being a bankrupt in two months. I received four hundred and eighty odd pounds. Leavit, Birch and Reynolds dined with me, on the same day at the top of Fleet street. After dinner, I withdrew with Birch, into the next room; and gave him nearly the whole of the money at that time; I can't say exactly how much, but I think about four hundred pounds. After that we adjourned to Mr. Nelsons, in the neighbourhood of Temple bar; for me to assign to Birch eleved houses; and I did assign them, Mr. Nelson had been spoken to before I gave him instructions to make a lease to assign the houses over to James Birch . Before I went to Mr. Nelsons, I had deposited an agreement, in Birch's hands; which I executed in going to Mr. Nelson's; Mr. Birch executed part with me. About the same quantity of money that I gave him before, he returned the same sum of money to me in Nelson's presence. We then left Nelson's office, and returned to the eating house; I returned him the same money in the evening.

Q. Why did you return it to him again - A. I returned it to him, that he might keep it; and to draw it as I had occasion. We then parted for the day.

COURT. Making him your banker - A. Yes. The next morning, I called upon him for a hundred pounds to pay the bill, with the joint acceptance.

Mr. Andrews. Was that the hundred pound bill upon which Kinnaird's draft was granted - A. Yes, Birch paid it.

Q. Was the hundred pounds, applied to the eighty, pound four shilling bill - A. No, I went to him, and he gave me a hundred pound note to pay the eighty pounds four shilling bill with, which I went to Messrs Down, Thornton, and Co and took up the bill, kepping the overplus myself.

Q. At this time did you come to any agreement or understanding of money matters - A. Yes, I told him of the state of my affairs, and told him I was involved in difficulties. He persuaded me to assign eleven more houses, besides the former eleven to him, to raise money upon them to supply my wants.

Q. Was this the proposition to you - A. It was; and I took steps towards carrying it into effect; Mr. Nelson was employed to make out the instrument.

Q. How soon was this done - A. I think about June, and the other was about the 20th of May.

Q. Did you execute any deeds then - A. I did; and deliver them into Birch's hand.

Mr. Gurney. Notice had been given to produce those deeds.

Mr. Andrews. The deed was made over. Yardley made the assignment over, and the money was paid at Yardley's office.

Mr. Miller. Nelson was employed to make out the ground land instrument, and Yardley was employed to make assigment to Birch, to the amount of three or four hundred pounds, paid by Birch to me; that money was part my own, and one or two of the bills were his, and one was mine. He had received about three hundred pounds of me.

Q. What bill was it of yours that he paid back to you - A. On the bill of twenty pounds. After I left the office, I returned to Birch, and paid him back the money, and all the bills; not all the money, but the greater part. He was to keep it in security for me, and I was to draw it when I wanted.

Q. Why was not Yardley employed to do this - A. Because he was Birch's attorney, and might be suspected.

Q. What was the next application? Was it to make him owner of the property, that he might raise money for your use - A. Yes.

Q. Why did he do it rather than yourself - A. Because I was in difficulty, and he could do it without any.

Q. Was it customary for him on these occasions, to ask you for a voucher - A. Yes; he used to write it down upon a piece of paper, and make me sign it. I kept account against him, and he kept another against me.

Q. After he made this proposition to you about the sureties, did you go to him again to raise money - A. I did.

Q. How many houses were assigned to him - A. Twenty-two; and the value about one hundred pounds.

Q. How many did you make over to him after that - A. Nineteen, and part of two.

Q. What might be the value of the forty-one houses - A. About two thousand pounds; seven

hundred pounds were raised upon the twenty-two first houses; and that seven hundred pounds went into Birch's pocket. In the whole, I might have got of that, between two and three hundred pounds.

Q. How much in the whole did you receive from Birch for all the houses - A. I don't think that I received a shilling. I received about three hundred pounds for the annuity deeds. This transaction happened previous to my bankruptcy. The last time I assigned over any of my property was on the 7th of September, 1813. After September, my affairs pressed upon me, and I had a communication with Birch.

Q. What passed between you - A. He said the best thing would be for me to be a bankrupt; he persuaded me after that time to be a bankrupt; it was arranged two months after the 7th of September, that he should strike a docket against me, for the purpose as he said, for me to have part of the property back again, namely the houses, that I had assigned over to him. At this time, and not before, I had a communication with the prisoner Dowding, at his own house, at Mile End.

Q. What induced you to go there - A. We had often met at a public-house. Birch was present, and they pursuaded me to issue out some accommodation bills; which I did, in a considerable quantity.

Q. What do you mean by accommodation bills - A. Bills which they were to give to fictitious creditors, to prove under the commission of bankruptcy, upon my estate, in order for me to procure the certificate. The property was to remain in Birch's hands, until after the bankruptcy, and then he returned to me, that I might pay such creditors as I thought proper. There were some stamps procured, some of which, I signed in blank; some Dowding wrote, and some I filled up myself; some of them were made complete, and one or two were filled up by a person named Grey, and there was another person, whom I don't know; I gave the biggest part of these bills to Dowding, for him to circulate them to different people; he was to give them to whom he thought proper; I signed one for Dufton. Dowding gave them to different people. Birch had only one to my recollection.

Q. What was the description of that one - A. It was for three hundred and forty-nine pounds nineteen shillings and sixpence.

Q. What passed between you and him before you drew this bill and gave it to him - A. He told me to get a bill drawn up for him, that he might appear the biggest creditor; Dufton wrote the body of that bill, and I signed it myself.

Q. Did any consideration pass between you and. Birch for that bill, at that time, or before - A. None

Q. Was he your debtor, or you his - A. He owed me money.

Q. Did you afterwards meet Birch - A. Yes; Dowding and Hughes were present.

Q. Did you know a man named Rigs - A. No, not until after the docket was struck, and he was to do it. We some times met at Birch's house, near Finsbury-square. It was on the 27th of November that I attended the bankruptcy at Guildhall,

Q. Had you continued up to that time in your own residence, or had you removed - A. I removed on the 7th of November, from Hinton-street, to No. 7, Ropemaker's-street.

Q. How came you to move - A. Birch persuaded me to move, and had taken an apartment for me.

Q. In what name did he take the lodgings for you, and what name did you assume - A. The name of Thompson.

Q. What became of your goods - A. They were removed after I was removed, as I was told, by Birch and Dowding.

Q. For what purpose did Birch remove you to this lodging - A. He advised me to keep out of the way of my creditors, that he might have a docket struck against me, and for me to keep out of the way until it was struck. I passed by the name of Thompson. Birch used to come and see me two or three times a day. He told me my goods were removed a week afterwards, and said, he assisted in removing them; he said he would keep them for me, until I got my certificate, and he would give them to me afterwards. Before I went to Guildhall, Birch and Dowding told me what had been done with some of the bills; Dowding told me he had passed them away to different persons; he said, Dufton had one and Kent had one; he told me other names, but I don't recollect them; and he had some himself.

Q. Was there at that time, any debt owing from you to Kent, to Dufter, or to Dowding - A. No.

Q. Did he name a man named Drake - A. Yes; Dowding told me Drake had a bill; Drake lived in Whitechapel, and was not a creditor of mine. I had met Birch and Dowding at Drake's house by appointment, to talk over these affairs. Dowding used some times to talk it over in Drake's presence.

Q. Where and whom did you meet on the first morning that you went before the commissioners at Guildhall, on the 27th of November, or thereabouts - A. I met Dowding at Birch's, and that was before I went before the commissioners; we had some conversation. They went with me to Guildhall, and it was appointed that Dowding should meet us that morning, to go with us to Guildhall, to prove my act of bankruptcy; a man had been procured to go and prove it, but he would not go; and Dowding went into the street, and brought in a man named Nobles, who was to go before the commissioners to prove the act of bankruptcy. We all went then to Guildhall; Nobles was examined before the commissioners, but I was not present. After the examination was over, we went to an eating-house across Cheapside, and there one was speaking about the bills; but nothing was said about assignees. Birch was intended to have been an assignee from the very first. The next meeting was to be on the 4th of December; Briggs, Hughes's clerk, wrote out some depositions to prove debts. I saw several strangers with fictitious bills, which Dowding had given them. When I went to Guildhall, I saw young Dufton, Birch, Robinson, and several others offer themselves as creditors. On that day there was

a dinner after we came from Guildhall, and Birch asked several to choose him as assignee, and Mr. Reynolds, who was not present. I understood that the persons who were to prove these fictitious bills, had make Reynolds and Birch assignees, were to have a pound a piece. Afterwards there was a conversation in my presence between Birch and Dowding, at Dowding's shop, and Birch said, if there is not enough bills, never mind a few pounds in stamps, let there be bills enough. Accordingly some more were made. Hughes thought there was not sufficient proved when we applied to him; altogether, there was about one thousand pounds worth of bills. I was not to let the just creditors prove their debts, by Birch's and Dowding's direction; and I was to say the fictitious bills were just debts; and if I was asked what consideration was given for the bills, I was to say, I lent my acceptances to Dowding and others, and they had been passed away. Those houses which I had disposed of to Birch, I was to say, he had bought, and paid for. On the meeting, on the 11th, some were proved, and some were rejected. On the third meeting, they asked me, in Birch's presence, where my residence was? and Birch interposed, and told them where I lived. I made no answer where I did live. I was previously told by Birch, not to give them a direct answer. The commissioners enquired after my books; I told them some were at Hughes's. A messenger was directed to accompany me to get them; and as I was going along, Birch stopped me, and said, he was my bail, and would not let me go; nor did I return to the commissioners; but Birch took me away. Birch paid for the dinner at the tavern, where the men who held the bills, dined. I was not at that dinner. Birch, who paid my lodging in Ropemaker's-street, said it was necessary that I should remove; which I did, to a lodging in Cripplegate, where I remained until the 6th of January, when I surrendered to the Fleet. My books at that time had not been delivered to the assignees. It was Birch that told me to go to prison. (Book put into the hands of the witness.) This is one of my account books. Here is a cash account, in which, there is an alteration made by the direction of Birch, of the sum of three hundred and ninety-six pounds nineteen shillings and sixpence, and is in my handwriting. I did not surrender my books to the commissioners, because Birch persuaded me not. (The witness now proceeded, by the direction of the counsel for the prosecution, to mark several false entries in his Book, which he had made by the direction of Birch.) I was supported in the Fleet by Birch, and after that, went to the King's Bench. After my surrender, I submitted to an examination before the commissioners, and was committed for gross prevarication, I had seven examinations, and had the assistance of counsel, Mr. Montague; for all of which expences, Birch paid.

Cross-examined. I was twelve months in prison before I gave up the second account; and that I gave up because I saw my error.

Cross-examined by the prisoner Dowding. I have bought blankets of you; I know you are a cloth-draper, and had large bill transactions with you; you were in the King's Bench for one of my bills; but I believe you have got most of the money or goods for it.

JUDITH MILLER . I was present at some meetings before my husband's bankruptcy, with Mr. Birch and Mr. Dowding; and heard them propose to effect the act of bankruptcy. I heard them planning about it; but I don't think they were very anxious that I should hear. I saw some of the fictitious bills made. My husband left his house on Sunday, the 7th of November, and assumed the name of Thompson. Birch came the next morning, with a young man, named Thompson, before it was day-light, and moved part of the furniture. After it was removed, I went to Ropemaker's-street. After the second meeting of the commissioners, we removed to a tobacconist's, at Cripplegate. Dowding came very frequently while we were in Ropemaker's-street. Birch supplied us with money while we were in lodgings. My husband remained in lodgings until he surrendered to the Fleet, where he was about five weeks, and in the Bench about a year. Birch supplied him with money while in confinement.

Cross-examined. We were not intimate with Mr. Birch. I never asked him to move a bed, nor said, it would be a bad job to lie at the back of my brother-in-law; I never said to any one, I never saw any person hanged, but would make a hanging match, and go to see Birch.

(The commission was here read.)

BENJAMIN NOBLES . I know Birch; I saw him twelve or fourteen days before I went to Guildhall, at Dowding's house. After that, I saw them at Mr. Reynold's public-house, the Collingwood; while I was there, Dowding requested me to present a bill of Miller's. (Bill put into the hands of the witness.) This is the bill: Dowding's name is written upon it, and so is mine. I tried to pay it away. but did not succeed. Dowding asked me to go to Guildhall, to prove the act of bankruptcy. Dowding asked me to get some bills into circulation, to prove the commission of bankruptcy. I afterwards saw some bills in his hand, I suppose twenty or thirty. I can't say whether I gave bills to John Bruce and William Dennis , or not; I know I had spoken to them on the subject. I saw a party at dinner at the tavern, and Hughes, the attorney, was at the top of the table. Dowding was to give me a pound note for going to Guildhall to prove the act of bankruptcy. There might be twenty in the room at dinner. I never got my one-pound note. I saw Kent and Drake in the tap-room, and I saw two Duftons there.

JOHN BRUCE . I was at the dinner, and had a bill to prove. Mr. Birch was to pay for the dinner. Dowding went out of the room before we went to Guildhall, and came in, saying, he had seen Mr. Matthews, who had said, that if I had any thing to do with it, it would not do. I went to the meeting to prove my bill, but did not like to attempt, as I saw so many. I returned to the French Horn, and saw about thirty persons there come for dinner; some of them were persons whom I had seen at Guildhall,

attempting to prove bills. Birch did come into the dinner room, but took Miller away with him; I saw them send Miller for his books with a messenger from Guildhall; and I saw Birch insist on taking him away, saying he was his bail. Several people made a piece of work with Dowding for their pound notes, which they were to have, for proving their fictitious bills; and particularly one Drake. Dowding said he was afraid he should have to pay all the expences, because Birch and Reynolds had not been chosen assignees, Dowding told them to hold their tongues about it; but some of them wished to have their money, and wanted to go home.

Cross examined. I was to have nothing for proving this bill. I am a colour manufacturer, and did not swear I was a ship owner; I have been a ship owner but I am now a colour manufacturer.

WILLIAM DENNIS . I remember going to the Rose and French Horn. I was told to go there by Dowding, who told me I would find something to my advantage. I saw Dowding give to a man named Taylor, a bill for ninety seven pounds, ten shillings; which he was to prove on the estate. (Bill put into the hands of the witness.) That is the bill. (Another bill put into the hands of the witness.) That is the bill, with which I was to answer the same purpose. Dowding said it was a mere matter of form; I said it was a matter of form I did not understand, and did not like. I saw Dowding give bills to other people at the French Horn; and I went to Guildhall with them, but did not attempt to prove my bill. I afterwards went and dined with them.

Cross examined. I kept this bill until the 5th of March. I have not justified bail above ten times,

Cross examined by the prisoner Dowding. You gave me this bill.

JOHN MILLER . I assisted Mr. Birch in removing my brother's goods. We used to begin between five and six in the morning, before it was light. We used to leave off about a quarter before seven; some of the goods were removed to Dowding's but Birch told me to say, that they were all gone to Globe fields, and to make as much a fool of myself as I could; and to speak as broad as a countryman; some went to No. 1, Ann street, Globe fields; which was an empty house. The rest, six other loads, were taken somewhere else that I dont know; by a young man named Thompson. I afterwards received orders from Birch to break open No. 1, Ann street, as if there had been thieves; and I was to say that to Mr. Bumford, or to any of the creditors, that should ask me; I took the things out of the house, by Birch's orders, and was to say this to make it appear they had been stolen. I broke open the door with an axe, by his direction. Soon after this, my brother got into the Fleet, and I saw Birch and him looking over some accounts there, and papers; and I saw my brother sign some blank papers, by Birch's request. I have carried money from Birch to my brother; I received a paper from the commissioners summoning me to attend them, which Birch told me to lose, and not to attend. A second came, and a third came; and Birch told me not to attend until they fetched me; and then he said, I was not to know anything. Dowding also assisted me in moving the goods. Birch said if I got into prison, or any trouble, I should not long he in it; he would get me out.

JOHN THOMPSON . I know Miller, and in the month of November, I moved some furniture from his house. We began at five o'clock in the morning, and used to leave off at half past six, or seven. I moved the goods, principally to Ropemaker street, next door to Birch's. Birch used to be with me in the morning, in moving the furniture.

ELIZABETH LOUCH . My husband formerly kept the Rose and French Horn. I remember Dowding ordering a dinner at our house; Mr. Dowding, and Mr. Miller took upon themselves to order it; Birch paid for the dinner. It was a dinner ordered for twenty four, but more came, and we had enough prepared for them.

JOHN ROBINSON . I know Miller and Leavitt, and was a creditor of theirs in November, 1813. Miller told me he was going to have a docket struck against him, and he would make it all right afterwards with me; and in consequence of that, I promised to be his friend. He asked me to attend the first meeting, and prove my debt; I was also to attend the choice of assignees; and was to chuse Birch and Reynolds. After dinner, Birch called for the bill and paid it.

SAMUEL LIPTON. Being in the habit of using the French Horn public house, I got acquainted with Dowding; and one day in October, 1813, he asked me could I sell him a hundred pounds worth of cloth for a bill. I saw the bill, which was upon persons named Miller and Leavitt; and was accepted by them. I told him I did not know the parties; and afterwards he said, if I would only go and prove the bill at Guildhall he would give me a one pound note. I said you have got a hold of the wrong man; I won't do any such dirty work. He then told me not to mention it; and parted with me.

MR. EDWARD BUMFORD. At the time of the dissolution of the affairs of Miller and Leavitt, I was a creditor of theirs to the amount of several hundred pounds. At the meeting of the commissioners, several persons attempted to prove bills; Mr. Sheffield as our solicitor, cross-examined them, and their proofs were rejected. Miller was asked where he then lodged, by Mr. Sheffield; he hesitated, and then said No. 2, Neck lane. He was then asked whether his books were to be found there? then Birch said, he lived at No. 7, Ropemaker street; and he took the lodging to keep him from wandering in the streets. He was again asked where his books were? and after some hesitation, he said at Hughes's his attorney's in Dean street, Fetter lane. He was then ordered to accompony Mr. Codd and me to Hughes's, to deliver up the books. On our going into the hall, we were surrounded by a number of persons, who had been offering to prove bills; amongst whom was Birch; Birch took hold of Miller's left arm and said to me, he shall not go with you, he shall go with me; I am his bail. In fact, Miller was rescued from us. I went back, and the commissioners were dispersed. I then went to Hughes's but could not get the books. I then went to No. 7, Ropemaker street, and enquired for Miller by name, but could not find him I went to Birch's also, but could not find him.

JAMES POWEL . I came up to London to dispose of my goods; I had some dealings with Dowding, and sold some cloths to him, to the amount of about three hundred and sixty pounds, which he paid me in bills, upon Miller and Leavitt, which were never paid when they become due; except one. I prosecuted him upon that one bill, which was for forty pounds, and got the amount.

MR. ISAAC SHEFFIELD. I am solicitor for the parties; and the proceedings were handed over to me and I attended at the meeting of the commissioners for the purpose of opposing the proof of debts. A number of persons offered to prove bills; one of the name of Matthew Smith , whose deposition was written, and who was described as a gentleman. The debt was rejected, and I was desired to keep the bill. I have made enquiry after him, according to his direction, but could never find him, nor has he ever appeared since. His bill, was for a hundred and sixty-six pounds twelve shillings; drawn by Mr. Rhodes, upon the bankrupts; and accepted by them. William Grey was the next person; but finding how matters were going with Smith, he walked off. His bill was for a hundred and ninety six pounds. I have enquired after him and I can't find him.

[Mr. Sheffield proceeded to read over the names of a number of persons, holders of this fictitious bills; none of whom could be found, except Samuel Laver , a sheriff's officer, in Chancery lane; whose bill was a valvid one, and had been fixed for it; but he never claimed it.] After this, I summoned Birch before the commissioners several times, but he never came. Mr. Montague attended several times for the bankrupts.

Mr. Edward Bumford . The prisoner Birch, is now in possession of forty one houses; and according to his own statement, he has given two thousand pounds for them. He has made an offer to me that he will give up the annuity deeds of the houses; in payment of his debt on this bill, and five hundred pounds.

THOMAS WATKINS . I arrested Miller, and Birch gave bail for him.

JACOB PARSEY . I heard Birch say he would bail Miller, to any amount; for he had a sufficient security.

(The adjudiction was here read.)

The prisoners called several witnesses, who gave them a good character.

BIRCH, GUILTY , aged 45.

DOWDING, GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined two years , and pillored twice .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-145

919. WILLIAM FINLAY , alias GEORGE CROFTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a silver pap boat, value 12 s. a scent box, value 7 s. a pair of spectacles, value 10 s. two coats, value 6 s. two pair of breeches, value 4 s. four pair of trowsers, value 4 s. one waistcoat, value 1 s. and one great coat, value 2 l. the property of Thomas William Wansborough , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS WILLIAM WANSBOROUGH . In consequence of an intimacy I had formed with the prisoner, after attending him in my profession, as surgeon , I took him into my house to board and lodge with me, on the 7th of August. On the 10th of September, the prisoner bid me good buy, saying, he was going to Woolwich to see his brother. He did not return that night; and I missed all the things, but the great coat, which I did not miss until his apprehension. In consequence of information I received, I went to a barber's shop, on the Friday following, where we found him in a back room, the door of which he had locked, and did not open it until the officer threatened to break it open. The duplicates of my property were found on the mantle-shelf. I have never seen my great coat since.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I am an officer, and went with Mr. Wansborough, on a search warrant, and found the duplicate in an image on the mantle-piece, at the prisoner's lodgings.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS . I produce the pap-boat and scent-box, which were pledged by the prisoner.

JOHN FOUCH . I produce a pair of silver spectacles.

JOHN PETO . I produce the coats, waistcoats, breeches, and trowsers, pawned by the prisoner.

Prosecutor. These are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. Nothing that was taken out of the house was taken out with a fraudulent intention. Here is the great coat, which Mr. Wansborough lent me, and which was in the country.

GUILTY , aged 28,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-146

920. JOHN COOPER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Clow , in the day time, on the 27th of August , and stealing, nine gowns, value 2 l. 5 s. four petticoats, value 1 l. ten petticoats, value 30 s. six pair of stockings, value 12 s. and several other articles of wearing apparel, the property of William Clow and Elizabeth Done , spinster .

WILLIAM CLOW . I live at 124, Golden-lane . The prisoner used to come into my house to some of the lodgers up stairs, occasionally. My wife and I went out at about three o'clock on the Sunday afternoon, and the robbery had been then committed. I did not fasten the door, and my wife is not here. A great deal of property missing, was my sister's in law's, and she is nut here.

ESTHER EDGE . I saw the prisoner with a large bag on the Sunday afternoon, coming out of White Hart-court.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-147

921. JOSEPH CUNNINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a coat, value 5 s. the property of George Oakley Hemming .

GEORGE OAKLEY HEMMING . I am an assistant surgeon to Mr. Sandy, of Kentish Town , and lost

my coat out of the surgery, on the 14th of August; and I saw it on the 15th, at Morlborough-street police office.

JOHN HOBBS . This coat was brought to be sold to me, by the prisoner. I took him to Marlborough-street, with the coat.

SAMUEL PLANK . This coat was delivered to me by John Hobbs , together with the prisoner, and in the pocket of it I found a letter directed to Mr. George Oakley Hemmings , and on writing to him, he came to town, and claimed the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the coat from a man between Highgate and Hyde Park corner, on my way from Liverpool.

GUILTY , aged 75.

Confined two months , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-148

922. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , a great coat, value 5 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

GEORGE SALTER . My coat was stolen from my box, in the London Dock , between the hours of twelve and two, on the 14th of June; and, suspecting the prisoner, he was taken into custody. The coats are given us by the London Dock Company.

JOHN SMITH . I found this coat, in consequence of information which I had received, at an old clothes shop.

DANIEL LEARY . The prisoner sold that great coat to me.

George Salter . It is my great coat.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-149

923. JOHN BRYAN LACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one watch, value 2 l. one hair chain, value 2 s. and one seal, value 5 s. the property of James M'Carday , from his person .

JAMES M'CARDAY. On the night of the 19th of July, I had been drinking at the White Horse Piccadilly, until very late; but don't know what happened to me.

RALPH SEDDON . On the night of the 19th of July, the prosecutor was lying so much intoxicated as to be helpless, by the Horse and Groom, in Oxford-street; I saw he had a watch then. I got out of him where his lodgings were, and conducted him to them; the prisoner helped me; and just as we got to the prosecutor's lodgings, I perceived his watch was gone. I know nobody could take it but the prisoner, who on being taken to the watch-house, the watch was taken from him.

ALEXANDER FRAZER . I am a watchman. helped to take the prisoner to the watchhouse.

JAMES DENT . I am a constable, and found the watch in the knee of the prisoner's breeches.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-150

924. JOHN HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , five pigs, value 10 l. the property of William Maltby .

JOHN STYLES . My master lives in Clay-street, Walthamstow . I fastened the pigs up at seven o'clock, on the night of the 28th of June, and bolted them up in the pig-pen, so that they could not get out. The coachman alarmed me about two o'clock, and told me the pigs were gone. I saw them in the Back-lane, at Clapton, near Hackney, about four o'clock, the same morning; they were laying in the road, panting for breath. Some of Mr. Johnson's pigs were stolen, and they were with my master's.

JOHN EYLES . I apprehended the prisoner, lying in the Back-lane, by a shed; he was about two hundred yards from the pigs. I never saw him in the possession of the pigs. I asked him why he left the pigs? he said what pigs? I said the pigs you were driving through the gate at Clapton, about half an hour ago. He said to the best of his knowledge he had not seen a pig for three weeks. I took him into custody.

THOMAS BOWLES . I saw the prisoner driving twelve pigs through Clapton gate, towards Town; he was driving very quick; he was afterwards shewn to me lying in the Back-lane, against a shed, about two hundred yards from the pigs; they were lying in the road, panting for breath. Five of them were afterwards claimed by Maltby's man, and seven by Mr. Johnson.

EDWARD BEECH . I keep the gate at Clapton. My gate was shut, and the pigs must have gone over the foot-path.

PETER KELLY . I am gardener to Mr. Maltby and know five of the pigs to be his.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-151

925. JOHN JEBB and THOMAS BAISBEY were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , four rabbits, value 4 s . the property of John Roberts .

JOHN ROBERTS . I live at Longford ; I keep rabbits . I lost four on the 9th of July; they were kept in an out shed; but could not get out of themselves. I saw them safe on Saturday evening; and saw them on Sunday morning, at the Black Boy, at Slough, with the prisoners. We took them into custody.

JOHN ARLOTT . I saw the prisoners on the Sunday morning in a meadow of my master's, about a quarter of a mile from Roberts's, coming in a direction from his house. I went with Roberts to the Black Boy, at Slough, where we found the prisoners, with the rabbits.

JOHN PHILP . The prisoners were delivered into my custody.

Jebb's Defence. We found the rabbits tied up in an apron in the road.

Baisbey's Defence. The same.

JEBB, GUILTY , aged 35.

BAISBEY, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one month , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-152

926. ELIZA DAY , otherwise DEE , was indicted

for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , one sheet, value 4 s. three table-spoons value 18 s. one tablecloth, value 2 s. 6 d. two child's napkins value 1 s. a tea-spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. two tablecloths, value 11 s. one sheet, value 4 s. one tablecloth, value 1 s. two tea-spoons, value 2 s. 6 d. one table-spoon, value 8 s. 6 d. three tablecloths, value 1 l. one curtain, value 3 s. one pair of snuffers, value 3 s. and one waistcoat, value 3 s. the property of William Dollman , in his dwelling-house , AND MARTHA alias MARY FAIRBANK , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been feloniously, stolen .

WILLIAM DOLLMAN . I live at 30, Foley-place, Cavendish-square . The prisoner Day lived with me as servant from March, until the 6th of this month. My wife told me, the prisoner had robbed her of some spoons; and I received twenty-three duplicates. On the, following day, I had the prisoner apprehended. She stated that Fairbank pledged the different articles. I told her before hand, that if she confessed, it might do her an injury. She gave the residence of Fairbank, and the constable went and apprehended her. On Fairbank being apprehended, she confessed her guilt, and said, she would contribute her part towards the recovery of the articles stolen. Fairbank had assisted the other prisoner during my wife's confinement.

MARIA DOLLMAN . On the afternoon of the 6th instant, I desired the prisoner Day to bring me five table-spoons; and she only brought me one, for a long time; she went, and brought me tea spoons. She came up in a little time, confessed she had parted with them and produced the duplicates. I told her I missed some linen also, and other articles; and she confessed she had pawned them, and gave me a great many duplicates.

BENJAMIN NASH. I apprehended both the prisoners, and twenty-three duplicates were delivered to me by Mr. Dollman. The pawnbrokers are here; they will produce most of the things. Both the prisoners confessed, and there was no promise nor any thing.

CHARLES WILLIAM OSMOND . I produce a sheet, pawned for four shillings, to me, which Fairbank pledged; also three table spoons, on the 26th of June; another on the 3rd of July, one on the 10th of July, a tablecloth on the 20th of June, two child's napkins on the 15th of July, a tea spoon on the 19th of June; Fairbank pledged all those things, except the napkins. I don't know who pledged them.

EDWARD DYER . I produce two tablecloths, pawned on the 4th of August; a sheet, on the 19th of May; a tablecloth the same day. I don't know who pawned them.

RICHARD WAYMAN . I produce two tea spoons, pawned on the 28th of August; another on the 1st of September; three tablecloths, on the 11th of August; one on the 8th of August, and a curtain, a pair of snuffers, and a waistcoat, all pledged on the same day. All these things were pledged by the prisoner Fairbank.

Mr. Dollman. The spoons, curtains, snuffers, and waistcoat, I know to be mine.

DAY, GUILTY , aged 35.

Of stealing to the amount of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

FAIRBANK, GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined a year , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-153

927. JOHN BURGOIN was indicted for stealing, on 3rd of July , two cakes of soap, value 5 s. the property of David Montague .

DANIEL HALLICY . I am in the employ of Mr. Montague, soap-maker , in Chick lane . I watched the prisoner, and saw him put this soap into his small clothes. I followed him, and took him into a public house, and delivered the two cakes of soap and the prisoner to him.

THOMAS BEALE . The prisoner was delivered to me, and I produce the soap, which I marked with my name on receiving it.

DANIEL HALLICY . That is my master's soap, I cut it.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-154

928. RICHARD HURD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , one pocket-book, value 1 s. three Bank of England notes for the payment of 5 l. and eight Bank of England notes for the payment of 1 l. each, the property of Moses De Lara , from his person .

MOSES DE LARA . I am a merchant , and on the night of the 9th of July, I was returning home, towards Haydon-square, in the Minories , from Drury-lane Theatre. My pocket-book was in my inside coat pocket; my coat was buttoned, and I thought it impossible to get at it. There were three five-pound notes, and eight one's in it. I saw a fire as I was coming out of the Theatre, and I went to see where it was: it was on Tower Hill, at the back of the Minories. My pocket-book was safe when I got to the Cresent; I wanted to get out of the crowd, and in a place where there was no crowd at all, the prisoner and another came just before me, and stopped me; they said, take care, sir; and there was nothing to take of. At that moment, I felt my coat torn open, and clapping my hand upon my pocket, found the pocket-book gone. I immediately seized them both, and held them for three or four minutes in the mob without any assistance; and at last I was obliged to let one go to secure the other, and I held the prisoner fast. I did not see the pocket-book pass between them.

JOHN HODSON . I was attending the fire that evening, near the Cresent. I did not see the prisoner until he was got hold of, and Mr. De Lara came up just after, and said, he was one that had robbed him. I knew the prisoner's person before; I searched the prisoner immediately, but found nothing on him.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-155

929. HILTON MORRISON was indicted for

stealing, on the 27th of August , two books, value 1 l. the goods of our Lord the King .

EDWARD PRIDDLE . I am in the Victualling Office . The prisoner was once. He came to see us on the 9th of September, and sent for some porter to treat us. He went up stairs on a pretence of going to the water-closet, which was on the second floor. I went after him, and perceived he was on the third floor; there were some old books there. I ran down, and ordered the door to be locked; we then sent for an officer, and on his being searched, some paper was found on him.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I found these two book covers in the prisoner's coat pocket, and the sheets of the books wrapped round his body, under his clothes. The prisoner confessed he had taken this paper repeatedly, and sold it to a cheesemonger's in Carnaby-market. I found also upon him a key, which unlocks the door of one of the closets on the third floor, in which these old books are kept. It is rather the handle of a turn latch, which has been broken.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-156

930. HENRY LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously and without legal cause, being at large within this Kingdom, before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN STAFFORD . I produce the certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, and his sentence to be transported, which I got from the town clerk at Nottingham.

JOHN NELSON LAVENDER . The prisoner was brought to the office by a serjeant; it was on the 19th of June last; he was brought to be attested at the office. I looked at the Hue and Cry; and asked him if he was not Henry Lawrence , who deserted from the Retribution Hulk; and he confessed he was the person. I was present when the certificate was read to him. He said, he was the person described there. and it was no use to deny it. He said, he had been convicted at Nottingham.

The prisoner put in a written defence; acknowledging his guilt, and stating, that at the time he deserted, he had but eight weeks of the term for which he had been transported to serve; that he was at Sheerness when he deserted, and was sent for a pitcher of water by one of the keepers, and was lured by a woman of his acquaintance in 180, Blue Town, to make his escape. He had not been accustomed to drink any liquor while on board the Hulks, and the small quantity of liquor he drank with this woman, so much intoxicated him, that he knew not what he was about.

JOHN MORGAN . I am a keeper at Sheerness; I have been with the prisoner two years; and he bore a very bad character on board the ship, but had only eight weeks to serve.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

[Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the shortness of the time he had to serve.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-157

931. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , one piece of spotted print, value 28 s. the property of Thomas Craig , privately in his shop .

JOHN GRAHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Craig. The prisoner came into his shop, on the 11th of August, about twelve at noon; she bought a small quantity of print; which she paid for; I thought I observed something thicken out, under her gown; I did not know what it was. When she went away, I missed a piece of print off the counter, measuring twenty eight yards, value twenty eight shillings. That is my master's print; my master's shop mark is on it.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-158

932. MARY SMITH was indicted for for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , ten yards of carpeting, value 30 s. the property of Sarah Crocket , privately in the shop .

SARAH CROCKET . I live at No. 4, Red Lion street, Whitechapel . This piece of carpeting, was placed inside the shop about a yard from the door; between eleven and twelve in the afternoon; there was an alarm given, and in consequence of some information somebody pursued after the prisoner; the prisoner was brought back, and the carpet with her. I know the carpet to be mine though there is no marks upon it. I had some more of the same pattern.

SARAH STANTLEY . I am mother to the last witness. I did not see the prisoner take the carpet; an alarm was given. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner at a little distance; she was stooping, and endeavouring to hide the carpet if she could. She was eight or ten yards from the shop. When I came up to her, she sat down; some more people assisted us to bring her back to the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and a porter with a load, pushed me against the carpet, and knocked it down; and I was going to put it up again, when they stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Simon Le Blanc .

Reference Number: t18150913-159

933. ELIZABETH HAMPSTEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of July , ten yards of muslin, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of John Selwood , and William Balling , privately in their shop .

JOHN SELWOOD . I am in partnership, with William Balling , we are linen drapers . The prisoner at the bar came into the shop, on Tuesday the 2nd of July; she came in company with another woman; the other woman bought things to the amount of eight shillings and nine pence; there was a piece of muslin lying on the counter near them. I went to the other end of the shop for something; and on my return, I missed the muslin. Not knowing but it might have fallen, I went round the other side of the counter; and there I saw the prisoner with something in her apron, which on examination was my muslin. I sent for an officer, and gave her and the

muslin into his charge.

(Muslin produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 29.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-160

934. THOMAS VICKERS and THOMAS MARSTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , one pair of half boots, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of James Smith , privately in his shop .

JAMES SMITH . On the evening of the 9th of July last, the two prisoners came into my shop to buy a pair of boots; Vickers tried a pair on, which he said were too big; he said he would fetch his mother; he went towards the place, where the boots were hung before he came in; and I supposed, he hung them up. They both went out of the shop; a woman told me they had taken a pair of boots, and I then missed them.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an officer. I saw the two prisoners in Smith's shop, and on stopping them I found on them a pair of boots, which on taking to Smith, he claimed.

James Smith . Those are my boots.

VICKERS, GUILTY aged 13.

MARSDEN, GUILTY aged 11.

Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Sir Simon Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-161

935. THOMAS WATLING and LUKE BELL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Brown , on the night of the 15th of August , with intent to steal therein the goods and chattles .

MARGARET BROWN . I live at No. 11, Pancras walk ; the back window on the first floor, was safe, about five minutes before nine, on the night of the 15th of August. I saw the two prisoners, with a man named Palmer, walking up and down before our door; at about ten we set down to supper, and we heard a great noise over head which was in the back room on the first floor; my daughter and son ran up stairs, and I run into the back yard with the apprentice. The apprentice pointed out, John Watling upon the tiles, at about half a yard from the window, which I had seen fast. He went across the tiles over the top of the shed towards his own house. His own house, was two or three houses off. The bed in the back room on the first floor, was against the window; when I was in the room last, the quilt was smooth, but when we went in, after we had seen Watling on the tiles, the window was open, and there were marks of feet on the bed.

CHRISTIAN ASTWORTH . I am apprentice to Mr. Browne. I heard the disturbance and saw Watling go from the tiles just by my master's back window. He went across the tops of the shed, towards his own house.

HANNAH BROWNE . I heard the disturbance, and saw some of the tiles knocked about, and the bed trampled upon.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

THOMAS HARRIS . I was standing opposite to Mr. Browne's house from before a quarter before ten, until considerably after; I could see those tiles, on which they say Watling was: and I never saw him upon them.

HENRY STREET . I sleep with the prisoner Watling. I remember the night of the 15th of August it was a very dark night; I went up to bed between eight and nine, and he was in bed then. We both slept until ten o'clock, when we was alarmed by the cry of a robbery; and we afterwards understood that the robbery was at Mr. Browne's. Watling was never out of bed after I went to bed to him, until the morning.

THOMAS JORDAN . I assisted with a light to examine the shed, hearing that a person had gone over them; I don't think those sheds would bear any one to walk over them; it was Mrs. Wood's shed I examined, over which it would be necessary for a person to go, in going from Browne's to the prisoner Watling's house. Bell was with me when we examined the shed.

JAMES WHITAKER . I heard the alarm, and they said the robber had dropt into Mr. Wood's garden. I went there, and searched the premises all over, and could find no track of any one.

MARTHA WOOD . I have some shed between Browne's house and where Watling lives; a person going from Browne's to Watling's, must go over my shed. They have been built upwards of twenty years, and they would not bear a cat to go over them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-162

936. WILLIAM STAGG , NATHAN COHEN , and JOHN KELLY , were indicted for feloniously assaulting David Dorward in the King's Highway, on the 8th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one Bank token, value 3 s. his property .

DAVID DORWARD . I was in George street, Spital fields , on the 8th of July last. The prisoner Kelly and another man, who is not here, came up to me, and pushed my arms forward; and the man who is not here, put his hand into my breeches pocket, and took out a three shilling piece. Upon that, I took hold of them both, and the prisoners, Stagg and Cohen, and a great many others that are not here, came up to me, and made me leave go of the one that robbed me; I enquired after a constable, but nobody could tell me where to find one. The next time I saw Kelly was in the watchhouse, in the dusk of the evening, with a great coat on; and I could not then be sure of him. I was perfectly sober when I was robbed. Cohen and Stagg went to a public house afterwards; I am now sure Kelly is one of those that robbed me.

JOHN PARKER . I am a headborough, and apprehended the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Simon Le Blanc .

Reference Number: t18150913-163

937. JANE OLIPHANT and MARY KING were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Sullivan , on the 22nd of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, part of a man's cloth coat, value 3 s. his property .

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am a taylor , and on the night of the 22nd of August, between twelve and one, the prisoner and two others stopped me, as I was going home, and some of them took out of my pocket, a piece of black cloth; they wanted me to go home with them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-164

938. THOMAS HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 1813 , one watch, value 40 s. the property of Margaret Silverwood , in her dwelling-house .

THOMAS PALEMAN . I am grandson to Mrs. Silverwood. I knew the prisoner two years ago; he was an acquaintance of mine. He came to my grandmother's on the 20th of May, and got a handkerchief from me to bring some biscuits in. My grandmother's watch was in the room before he came in, and I did not miss it until she came home.

MARGARET SILVERWOOD . I know the prisoner, he used to come to see my grandson. He never brought any biscuits; I did not see him from the day I lost my watch, which is two years last Whitsuntide, until last Thursday. I never saw my watch since.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-165

939. ELEANOR ENGLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , eleven yards of printed cotton, value 11 s the property of William Ashdown , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM ASHDOWN . I am a linen-draper , in Well-street, Wellclose-square . Somebody informed me that a piece of cotton was taken from outside of my door. I immediately ran to the door, and saw the prisoner making off; I secured her, and found the cotton upon her, concealed in her apron. I sent for an officer, and had her taken into custody.

(The property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-166

940. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting, a certain bill of exchange , which is as follows;

London, 13th of March , 1815.

46 l. 10 s 0 d.

"Three months after date, pay to my order Forty-six pounds Ten shillings, value received,"

"Signed THOMAS SMITH .

"Accepted BONWELL & HAMMAR.

"Addressed to MESSRS. BONWELL, & HAMMAR.

"43, Seething-lane, Tower-street."

AND OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN TORRIL . The prisoner came in a single break to my house in the month of March last; he said, he was M. Smith, of Marybone-street, and he had been buying a horse, and was out of money; I let him have three pounds, for I thought he meant he was Mr. Smith, hackneyman, of Marybone-street. He did not say he was a hackneyman; and he gave me this bill by way of security; the bill is signed Thomas Smith , but there is no hackneyman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-167

941. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a watch, value 40 s. the property of John Foxcroft , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH FOXCROFT . My husband's watch was taken out of our house, on the evening of the 5th of August; it was on the mantle piece in the shop. The prisoner came in, and took it; I never saw him before; I never saw him afterwards, until he was taken last Saturday; I heard his own confession, that he took it; it was a very old watch. He said he did not know what became of it.

ROBERT HOWARD . I know nothing more than that I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 16,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-168

942. NORAH MAHONY was indicted for breaking and entering on the 8th of August last, the dwelling-house of Jean Baptiste Mathien , and stealing therein a pocket-book, value 1 s. six Bank of England notes for the payment of 1 l. each, two bank tokens, value 3 s. each, a waistcoat, value 3 s. three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. and one gown, value 6 s. his property .

JEAN BAPTISTE MATHIEU . I had chambers at the Hare and Hounds . I went out at three o'clock, locking the door, and taking the key in my pocket. On my return, between seven and eight, the door was broken open, and the lodging robbed of all the things in the indictment. The bank notes were in a pocket-book. Somebody apprehended the prisoner between eleven and twelve the same night; I called the watchman, and she was taken to the watch-house. She had my pocket-book in her hand, and she threw it away, and the watchman picked it up; it is here.

MARY MATHIEU . When I came home with my husband, we found our lodgings robbed of all the things in the indictment. We never got any thing but the pocket-book.

TIMOTHY LANE . I took the prisoner to the watchhouse; as we were going along, she threw away the pocket-book; it is here.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book.

GUILTY , aged 55,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-169

943. WILLIAM BALDWIN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Adolphus Barnes , at twelve in the night of the 18th of June , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one pair of silver candlesticks, value 6 l. four silver table-spoons, value 3 l. two dozen knives and forks, value 50 s. and a ham, value 16 s. the property of the said Adolphus Barnes .

ADOLPHUS BARNES . My premises were broken open on the night of the 18th of June last, after I went to bed. I saw the house fastened before I went to bed. The servants alarmed me the next morning, at half past seven; I found then the house had been broken open, and all these articles missing. In consequence of an information, I went to the house of the prisoner, and there found part of the ham; it is now in my possession, and in court. The prisoner told me he had found it, and shewed me the garden at Haggerstone, where he said he did find it. He told me that a gentleman had seen him take it out of the garden. The prisoner then went with me to my garden, and on trying, his foot exactly fitted the foot-marks in the mould in my garden.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I produce the ham, which I received from William Wadd . I observed the brand of the prosecutor's name upon the knuckle of it to the prisoner's mother.

Cross-examined by Mr. Adolphus. The ham was shewn to me at his mother's house without any hesitation.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother told me that a gentleman had been, and seen that ham, and had said it was his; I went with that gentleman, and told him where I found it. They searched me, and found nothing on me. The person is here who saw me find it.

JOHN MORRISON . Early in the morning of the 19th of June, I saw the prisoner by Mr. Clanfield's house. The prisoner was coming along with a two horse cart. A ham was laying in Mr. Clanfield's garden. When the prisoner came up, I shewed it to him, and he got over the pales, and took it up; I remember it appeared as if it had been gnawed by some animal. He took it under his arm, and drove his horses on. I was dressed that morning in a pair of grey pantaloons, a blue coat, and a buff spotted waistcoat.

Adolphus Barnes . That is the dress the prisoner described to me that the gentleman who saw him take the ham, had on.

JAMES WISE . I saw the prisoner stopping by Mr. Clanfield's garden; and when I came up to him, he was conveying the ham openly under his arm.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-170

944. MICHAEL KENNON , alias CANNON , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , twenty-eight pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Henry Peto .

HENRY PETO . I am the contractor for the building of the new Custom House ; and stopped the prisoner, who was employed by me, as he was going out of the gate; I had some suspicions of him; on searching him, he had the lead in the indictment suspended by two pieces of old stockings and some cord, over his shoulders, in his small-clothes; there were twenty-eight pounds and a half.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am the gate-keeper at the new Custom House, and saw the lead found on the prisoner.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-171

945. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , two seals, value 6 s. one watch-key, value 2 s. 6 d. one ring, value 2 s. and part of a watch-ribbon, value 1 d. the property of Ralph Dodsworth , from his person .

RALPH DODSWORTH . On the 11th of August, I was looking into a print shop at the corner of Serjeant's-inn . I felt a jerk at my watch ribbon, and on putting my hand down, I discovered that my seals and key were gone, and my watch ribbon was cut. The prisoner was standing just under me; I seized him, and took the seals, key, and ring out of his hand. There was a pair of scissars lying on the ground, close to his feet.

CHARLES GIMBER . I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-172

946. ROBERT ASHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , seven Prayer books, value 2 l. 16 s. the property of Francis Maugham .

FRANCIS MAUGHAM . The prisoner was in my employ; he left my service on the 1st of June, 1814; after which time, my Prayer books were missing. The next time I saw them was in the window of Mr. Sadler, a pawnbroker, at Aldersgate.

JOHN BEAL . I am in the service of Mr. Sadler, pawnbroker, at Aldersgate, and produce five Prayer books, which the prisoner pawned.

Francis Maugham . Those are my Prayer books.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-173

947. THOMAS WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , five bank notes, value 33 l. the property of John Savage .

JOHN SAVAGE . I am ostler to Mr. Western, and left these notes in the privy. The prisoner went there after I quitted it in about ten minutes.

MARY CARLING . The prisoner came home to his lodgings in my house between nine and ten.

ANN SMITH . I happened to be in the house where the prisoner and a man they call Yorkshire Will were, and all I know is, that I heard a conversation between them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-174

948. JOHN BURROWES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of a person unknown.

JOHN BRAY . I am a constable. On the 4th of September, I was in Bartholomew fair , and observed the prisoner and three others picking every pocket they could come near; one of them says to the prisoner,

just when he was behind a gentleman, Jack, have you got it. I seized hold of the prisoner directly. He made such resistance, I was obliged to strike him several times before I could get him out of the crowd. Here is the handkerchief, and marked with P.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-175

949. THOMAS ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , one pocket-book, value 1 s. the property of William Fogram , from his person .

WILLIAM FOGRAM. I was in Bartholomew fair , on the 2nd of September, between nine and ten at night; I had a child on my shoulders. My pocket-book, containing nothing but some receipts papers, was in the bottom of an inside pocket, in my shooting jacket; I did not miss it until I was stopt by the constable in the fair.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer, and was watching the prisoner about the fair; I knew his person before. I saw him near the person of Fogram, who had a child on his shoulder; I could guess when he had got something from him. My brother officer, Benjamin Johnson , told me to follow the prosecutor, and he would take care of the prisoner. I followed the prosecutor, and brought him to the Ram public-house.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I know the prisoner well. As soon as we guessed he had got something from Fogram, I followed him through the crowd, going through the mob, he put whatever he had got into his breeches; as soon as he got outside of the mob, I laid hold of him: he then ducked his head; he put his hand into his breeches, and then threw down the pocket-book, and then all the papers flew about. I was obliged to beat him desperately before I could get him along. I took him to the Ram, and there the prosecutor owned the pocket-book. Here is the pocket-book.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-176

950. JOHN BROWNE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a pair of cloth pantaloons, value 40 s. the property of Thomas Lingham , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY HARDWICK . I am in the employment of Mr. Lingham, breeches maker , in the Strand . I was at work in the gallery in the shop, on the 10th of July; and I heard a noise, and on looking down into the shop, I saw the prisoner there, with a mob round the window. I did not see him do any thing. Here is a pair of trowsers, which was on the counter. There is nobody here who saw him steal them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-177

951. ISRAEL BAROND was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Giles , in the day time of the 3rd of July , no person being therein, and stealing, one box, value 1 s. two pair of pockets, value 2 s. eight petticoats, value 10 s. his property .

JAMES TANCOCK . I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house about one o'clock, on Thursday the 3rd of July.

RICHARD GILES . I watched the prisoner into my house first. He first looked through the window; the door was only latched. He walked in as gently as he could, and that raised my suspicion; I am sure the door was latched. I stopped him, when he was coming out with the trunk; and took him back to my house; and afterwards delivered him to a constable.

JOHN BOOTLE . I produce the property.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering.

Fined one shilling, and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-178

952. PETER CHRISTIAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , seven handkerchiefs, value 11 s. the property of James Walford privately in his shop .

JAMES WALFORD . I am a slop seller . The prisoner was in my shop on the 24th of July. In consequence of a signification given to me, by a neighbour in the shop at the same time, I searched him, and found five pocket handkerchiefs under his jacket. I sent for a constable, and had him taken into custody.

WILLIAM HUNT . I am the constable, and here are the handkerchiefs.

Prosecutor. That is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not sober when I went into the shop; and I picked the handkerchiefs up off the floor.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-179

853. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , thirty seven books, value 5 l. ten prints, value 20 s. a proof of the arms of Sir Godfrey Webster upon leather value 1 s. the property of Sir Godfrey Webster , in his dwelling house .

ANY LAVER. I was servant to Sir Godfrey Webster . The prisoner at the bar used to visit me, when the family was out of town, and I was the only person left in charge of it; I have left him in the house by himself more than once,

BENJAMIN HANCE . The prisoner at the bar pawned these thirteen books at my master's shop.

(producing them.)

SAMUEL PLANK . I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of August last. He then said his name was Bell; he would not tell me where he lived. At last I found out his lodgings, at 32, Buckingham place, Fitzroy square, and in them found a key to Sir Godfrey's hall door. I found also twenty five books, six towels, marked G. W. add two duplicates for thirteen books, and Sir Godfrey's arms and crest, in a pocket book,

Prisoner's Defence. I took these books for the purpose of reading, and intended to have returned

them. Those towels are mine, and the initials are those of a relation, who gave them to me.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Of stealing, to the amount of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Simon Le Blanc .

Reference Number: t18150913-180

954. ELIZABETH HAYNES , HARRIET PAGE , and SARAH WHEATLEY were indicted for assaulting Edward Augus , in the King's Highway, on the 15th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a gold watch, value 10 l. a gold chain, value 1 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. and two watch keys, value 5 s. the property of Edward Augus .

EDWARD AUGUS . The prisoner Wheatley came up to me in Drury lane between eleven and twelve, on the night of the 15th of August. My watch, chain and seals were wrapt up in my pocket handkerchief, in my coat pocket. Page came up to me soon after, and they both laid hold of me, and dragged me twelve or fourteen yards. Haynes did nothing, she only was with them; I missed my watch soon after. They were taken into custody, and searched, but nothing found upon them. One of them, I can't say which, threw the pocket handkerchief away as they were going to the watchhouse.

PATRICK COWLEY . I took charge of the prisoners, some of them threw this pocket handkerchief away.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-181

955. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Jeffard , on the King's Highway, on the 25th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a pencil case, value 3 s. a ring, value 10 s. a knife, value 2 s. nineteen shillings in monies numbered, and three Bank notes for the payment of ten pounds each, value 30 l. his property .

WILLIAN JEFFARD. On the 25th of July, I was going along Grays-inn-lane , about half past four, in the afternoon. I had this property about me. As soon as I got as far as Grays-inn street, I forgot that I had to call in Grays-inn-lane, and came back again. The prisoner was standing at the corner of Charlotte Buildings, and putting his foot behind me, knocked me into the passage; I put my hand into my right hand breeches pocket, and felt his hand here that was where the notes were. I hallooed out that I was robbed, and he swore he would rob me more. I was knocked senseless for some time; and when I got up, we went into Grays inn lane, and fought; at last he said he would not fight any more, and I ran to Hatton Garden, and got an officer.

Cross examined by Mr. Adolphus. I know a person they call Irish Eliza. I received this money of my master, Mr. Marshall, who is an auctioneer in Picket street. I had Mr. and Mrs. Wright, Mary Finchams, Elizabeth Histop , and a person named Blake, all taken up, and they were discharged, until Stevens was found. At the time I was fighting, there were upwards of three hundred people about; after we had done fighting, because he said he had hurt his hand, I shook hands with him. and told him I would fight him any day he liked.

JOHN UPTON . I apprehended the prisoner.

SAEPHEN O'GRADY. I saw Jeffard with the money in his pocket, at a public house where I took share of a pint of beer with him. I saw him after the fight in a public house, where they were doing something to his face.

The prisoner called the following witness.

REBECCA WHEELER . On the 24th of July, Mary Prior , and Irish Eliza, was coming down Gray's inn lane, and the prosecutor knocked Mary Prior down. The next day, I saw what passed, and there was a dispute between Irish Eliza and Mary Prior , about tearing a gown. The prosecutor said something to Stevens about it, and Tom Stevens said they had better let them settle it between themselves. Jeffard knocked Stevens down; I was standing at the corner of Charlotte Buildings, and I saw Stevens on the ground, before they went into the lane to fight.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Simon Le Blanc

Reference Number: t18150913-182

956. EDWARD MANLY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Matthew Franks , on the King's Highway, on the 16th of August, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one pocket book, value 1 s. eleven shillings and sixpence in monies numbered, and seven Bank notes, for the payment of one pound each, value 7 l. his property .

EDWARD MANLY . As I was going home through Well close square , on the evening of the 16th of August, the prisoner and another man said they knew me, and laid hold of my arms; and soon after pushed my arms forward and took my pocket book, containing seven pounds, eleven shillings and sixpence out of my pocket. I asked for my pocket book back, and they immediately knocked me down. They then ran away, and I pursued the prisoner. I was not sober, I was about half and half; but I knew very well what I was about. The watchman stopped the prisoner when I sung out. He was never out of my sight.

JAMES STIRLING . I took the prisoner into custody, but found nothing on him.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Of stealing from the person, but not of violently assaulting him.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-183

957. JAMES READER was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the 6th of September , upon Mary the wife of John Haughton , a subject of our Lord the King, with a certain sharp instrument, did feloniously stab her, in and upon her neck, with intent to kill and murder her .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-184

958. PATRICK BURNS was indicted for feloniously

assaulting Martin Connelly , in the King's Highway, on the 28th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, two eighteen penny Bank tokens, value 3 s. five Bank notes for the payment of one pound each, value 5 l. his property .

MARTIN CONNELLY . I went to Chelsea on the 26th of July last, to receive my pension. The prisoner and his wife were with me. After we both got our pensions we went to the back of the College for some refreshment. Nothing happened until we got into the road, and then the prisoner came up to me and put his hand into my pocket, and took out my money. We were both rather intoxicated: I said, you have robbed me, and he immediately knocked me down. After he was taken up he said, Connelly, don't send me to prison, and here is your money back again.

FREDERICK M'DOWAL. I saw the prisoner at the bar put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket and took some papers out, and then asked him where his money was? I afterwards saw the blows given. They were both intoxicated.

RICHARD SMITHER . I searched the prisoner, and found on him five one pound notes, and two eighteen penny tokens.

JOHN WILLIS FORD . I am clerk to the agent, for paying out pensioners at Chelsea. It appears by the books, that Patrick Burns received five pounds nine shillings and three pence, on the 26th of July, but I have no minute of the numbers of the notes.

The prisoner called the following witnesses.

BRIDGET DUNN . I heard Mrs. Hayley ask the prosecutor, whether he was sure the prisoner robbed him, and he said he was so drunk, that he could not swear who it was.

BRIDGET HAYLEY . The prosecutor told me in the presence of the last witness, that he was so stupidly drunk, that he did not know who robbed him.

MARY CALLAGHAN . I met the prosecutor, and he told me he was so very drunk when he lost his money; and was not sure it was Burns, who robbed him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-185

959. MORDECAI LEVI , ANGEL LEVI , and EDWARD GARCIA , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Cerf , in the King's Highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a gold watch, value 10 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. and three gold seals, value 5 l. his property .

JOHN CERF . I am an apothecary , and lost my watch, but can't tell the day when; it is about a month ago. I left home about half past eight, and going through Bury street , I received a violent blow on the back of my head, which knocked me insensible; I don't know who gave it me; when I came to, I found I was robbed.

MARTHA LYSTER. I am servant to Mr. Isaacs, an attorney in Bury street. I saw Mr. Cerf knocked down by three men, who ran past me; I picked Mr. Cerf up, and he was bleeding. and said he had been robbed of his watch; one of the three men, was rather lame.

ELIZA WEBB . I live at No. 15, Bury street. I saw three men run from Mr. Cerf, after they had knocked him down, Two days afterwards, I saw five or six men in custody, among whom were the prisoners at the bar.

JOHN BISHOP . I am one of the keepers of Newgate. The prisoner Angel Levi is rather lame.

Eliza Webb . When I saw the three prisoners at the Mansion House, I thought they were the men, but would not be sure. After the robbery, one of the prisoners, the one who limped, said, run it.

SUSANNAH MULLINS . I live in Bury street, and saw Mr. Cerf knocked down by three men. I saw the three prisoners at the Mansion house, but can't swear they were the persons.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoners; and they denied all knowledge of the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-186

960. WILLIAM JACKSON were indicted for feloniously secreting and stealing, twenty pounds, on the 19th of March, 1814 , the property of Margaret Gordon , he being her clerk and servant . Other counts, only varying the manner of laying them.

MARGARET GORDON . I carry on the business of a silversmith in the Strand . The prisoner had the whole management of the business. He had one hundred and fifty pounds a year, with his board and lodging. He left me, and on his return in 1812, he did not lodge in my house. He absconded on the 12th of April last. The next time I heard of him, was by a letter, but I don't know the date, He absconded in consequence of my finding fault with the manner in which he had disposed of some money which he had been paid for some goods. He kept my accounts, and used to shew me every day by the account, the money which he had received; I found an entry of twenty pounds in cash received, but no account given of it in the books. It was his duty to account for it, if he had received it.

ROBERT DEBENHAM . I am clerk to Mr. Machin. On the 19th of March, 1814, I see by my books, that I paid a sum of twenty pounds, on account of Mrs. Gordon. I don't know how I paid it but I know it was in Bank notes. It was paid to the prisoner.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. I do not speak from my recollection of having paid this money, but from an entry in my book. We now have goods in our hands of the prisoners. Here is the entry in the day book, and here is the entry in my ledger.

Q. How do you know that you did not pay the twenty pounds to Mrs. Gordon herself - A. I don't recollect ever paying any to Mrs. Gordon; it was not customary.

Margaret Gordon . My business was entirely in the management of the prisoner.

Cross examined. If a payment was to be made up, the prisoner had to make up the money, and if he could not make up enough, he was to apply to me. He has now some little money due to him as salary.

Sometimes he used to pay himself; but he then would so account for money.

(A letter was now read, signed by the prisoner, and addressed to the prosecutrix, confessing his guilt, and hoping for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. From my earliest youth my exertions have been devoted for the prosecutrix The reason I parted from her, in 1812, was owing to some disgusting treatment I received from her husband's executors. When I returned, I had the absolute controul of her affairs, with the expectation of being taken into partnership, and was told to supply myself with my salary, from the money that came into my hands.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Simon Le Blanc .

Reference Number: t18150913-187

961. JAMES DEANE was indicted for falsely pretending, on the 10th of June , to Samuel Hayes , clerk to James Williams and Co. stationers and paper stainers , that a certain order in writing, signed John Deane , which he then produced to the said Samuel Hayes , was an order from John Dean , of Congleton, to be delivered to the prisoner and by such false pretence, for fraudulently obtaining from the said Samuel Hayes , one umbrella, value 1 l. 12 s. one parasol, value 1 l. 7 s. one box of colours, value 1 l. 19 s. 6 d. one hundred leaves of leaf gold, and a small box, value 8 s. 9 d. the property of the said James Williams & Co .

SAMUEL HAYES . I am clerk to the prosecutors, who served Mr. Dean, of Congleton, with stationary and other articles. On the 4th of June, the prisoner at the bar came into our shop, and enquired for Mr. Cooper, one of the partners; he said he came from his fathers at Congleton, and produced this letter; (producing a letter.) The letter stated as if from the father, that we were to deliver to the prisoner all the articles mentioned in the indictment, and the prisoner would convey them down, as he was to send a box to his mother, in which he could inclose them. Upon that order, I gave him a box of water colours, one hundred leaves of gold, one dozen packs of playing cards, nine pounds of sealing wax, a silk umbrella and a parasol. The amount was nine pounds fifteen shillings and nine pence. I let him have some of the things, for the convenience of going more safely in a box, which he said he was going to send to his mother.

JOHN DEAN . I am the father of the prisoner, and reside at Congleton in Cheshire. (Letter put into the hands of the witness.) This is not my hand writing; I never authorised any person to write it for me.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended the prisoner, between the ceiling and the tiles of a house in Castle street, Long Acre. He told me he had sold the things.

Prisoner's Defence. I got these things for my support, as I was out of any situation.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18150913-188

962. JAMES CHINNERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of August , three yards of flannel, value 7 s. three yards of calico, value 3 s. thirty bits of calico, value 6 s. and three yards of corderoy, value 10 s. the property of James Croft .

JAMES CROFT . In consequence of some suspicions I entertained, I took the prisoner up stairs to his box, and told him to open it; he hesitated, and said, he had lost the key. I told him to break it open with a hammer, which he did, and I found all the articles mentioned in the indictment, in the box. I knew the flannel to be mine, for it exactly fitted a piece to which it apparently belonged, by the jaggs, and it not being cut straight. (The two pieces of flannel were here produced, compared, and appeared to correspond.) I can swear to all the articles except two remnants of corderoy. to which I cannot positively swear. (The property, except the corderoy, was here produced, and sworn to.) The bits of calico were cut out of breeches pockets, and I had a great many such. The other calico corresponds in the folds with some calico which I have by me; and to the best of my belief, all the property is mine.

CHARLES GIMBER . I took the prisoner into custody.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-189

963. WILLIAM KEEL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , a piece of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Gaylor .

CHARLES DIDDEAR . I am shopman to Mr. Gaylor, linen-draper , at 111, Fleet-street . Mr. Gaylor told me to watch. This piece of cotton was on the inside of the door. The prisoner came and tried to take it off; he went away without taking it. He returned in two or three minutes, and put a black apron over the print, and carried it off. Mr. Gaylor went after him, and brought him back.

THOMAS GAYLOR . In consequence of information which the last witness gave me, I brought the prisoner back to the shop, with my property in his possession.

ABRAHAM CRESSWELL . I produce the property.

Prosecutor. That is my property.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-190

964 JOHN BIRNHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , six tin plates, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Daniel and Co.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am in the employ of Daniel and Co. tin plate merchants . I saw the prisoner, who is a porter in our service, come out of the cellar at a quarter to nine; and suspecting something, went after him, and brought him back, after calling him several times, and he never taking notice of what I said. He had a great coat on, and it was a very hot morning. I asked him what he had under his coat? and he said, for Gods sake,

don't hurt me! I have got some tin. On searching him, I found six plates of tin in the waistband of his breeches. I know them to be my employers' property.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-191

965. JAMES JUDAH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , one tea-caddy, value 30 s. the property of William Rhodes .

ELIZABETH SABY . On the morning of the 7th of August, the tea-caddy in question was on the kitchen table; the kitchen door opens to the yard, which is open to the street. I saw the prisoner going out of the kitchen, with the caddy under his arm; I stopped him, and a man passing by, took him into custody.

JOHN LINNETT . I am a constable. I produce the tea-caddy.

Elizabeth Saby . That is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined three months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-192

966. WILLIAM HEARN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of August , three bank tokens, value 9 s. four other bank tokens, value 6 s. two 1 l. bank notes, and one 2 l. bank note , the property of William Lawson .

EDWARD MICHAEL SHEPHERD . I remember the prisoner coming into my master's house on the 23rd of August I took four pounds fifteen shillings from Mr. Jonathan Smith , and laid it on the counter. The prisoner came in with a parcel, and after he was gone, the money was gone.

JONATHAN SMITH . I don't know the numbers of the notes I paid to the last witness; but I wrote the name of Carvel in pencil on the backs of them; and there was the name of the person, Adington, from whom I received them.

JOHN BAKER . I received a two-pound note and two one-pound notes from the prisoner, on the 24th of August The notes were afterwards claimed by Lawson. I put the prisoner's name on the notes, by his own request, when he paid them.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoner.

(Notes produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-193

967. MARY CONNOR AND CHARLOTTE WAKELYN were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , a watch, value 40 s. a chain, value 30 s. a seal, value 20 s. a key, value 3 s. and a snuff-box, value 5 s. the property of John Brodie .

JOHN BRODIE . I met the prisoners at twelve o'clock at night, in James-street, Covent Garden. I had been at work until twelve o'clock; and walked about the streets, as I did not like to go into strange beds, as my own lodgings were shut. The prisoners took me to the Coach and Horses, Greek-street, Soho , and I fell asleep in a box in the tap-room; I don't know what time I lost my watch after twelve o'clock.

JOHN REDFEARN . I keep the Coach and Horses. When the prosecutor came into my house he was intoxicated.

JAMES GILMORE . I apprehended the prisoners. The prisoner Wakelyn told me she took the watch, and gave it Conner. I found nothing upon either of them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-194

968. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Morris , at about ten o'clock on the night of the 10th of July , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, two silver table-spoons, value 2 l. two silver pepper caster tops, value 2 s. and six silver tea-spoons, value 10 s. the property of the said Thomas Morris .

THOMAS MORRIS . I am an apothecary , and live in the parish of St. Paul's, Covent Garden . My house was broken open on the morning of the 11th of July. I went to bed last on the night of the 10th; my windows were all secure when I went to bed, and the door on the spring lock. I was alarmed between three and four in the morning; I heard the footsteps coming cautiously up stairs; it was rather day-light. I always sleep with my bed-room door a little open. Hearing footsteps, I pretended to be sleep. The prisoner came and looked at me, as I was in bed. My bed-room was on the first floor. I saw it was a tall dark man. He then went into the front room; and then returned again, as there was nothing there worth his taking; he then came and looked into my room again, and seemed to hesitate a long time; he did not come into the room, but went down stairs into the shop. I then got up cautiously, and went into the balcony, and beckoned to people in the street, telling them to come and surround the house, as there was a thief in it; I saw a young man, and asked him to go round the corner, which way the prisoner got in. When the prisoner found the house was surrounded, he went into the back parlour. threw up the window, unfastened the shutters, and jumped into the court; and in a minute he was brought in custody. When I had leisure to observe, I saw marks on the door-post as if a crow had been used, and the screws were loosened in the lock. After he was in custody, I found that two table-spoons were gone, which had been on the sideboard in the back parlour; and six tea-spoons, which had been in the same place; the table-spoons were old, and were worth about eighteen shillings; the tea-spoons might be worth three or four shillings each; and the pepper caster tops worth two or three shillings.

THOMAS POTTER . I am a tallow-chandler, and live at 38, Chandos-street. It was day-light when I saw this; I was passing through Chandos-street, and was called by Mr. Morris, from the balcony; he told me that there were thieves in his house. I perceived that there had been force used to the door; I pulled it to, and held it; in about two or three minutes, I heard the window in Castle court open; I saw the prisoner come out of the window; he got

about one hundred yards before I caught him. I saw him searched, and on him was found two tablespoons; two tops of casters, and six tea-spoons.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am the watchhouse keeper of St. Paul's Covent Garden. The prisoner was searched by me in the watchhouse; and I found these articles in the prisoner's left hand small clothes pocket.

Mr. Morris. These things are my property; the caster tops fit my cruets.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court; I had been twelve years at sea, and had no friend.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40,

Of stealing to the value of 40 s. in the dwelling house, not of the burglary.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-195

969. JOHN HOLLAND , alias JONATHAN WILD , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Henry Bodkin , about the hour of nine, in the night of the 13th of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, four curtains, value 4 l. and two carpets, value 1 l. the property of the said William Henry Bodkin .

WILLIAM BLAINE. I sleep at the house of Mr. William Henry Bodkin , who is an auctioneer . I left that house at about eight o'clock on the night of the 13th of September; I locked the door, leaving all safe. On my return, about ten, I missed the carpets from the floors; I then missed four drawing room curtains; the drapery vallance was gone. My master had to sell the goods in this house; the owner had quitted it; he also had the letting of it; and I slept in it to take care of it.

Prisoner. Q. To Witness. How many houses does your master pay rent and taxes for - A. I don't know.

Q. Does he pay rent and taxes for this here house, where you say a robbery was committed - A. No.

Prisoner. My Lord, I am indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Henry Bodkin . This witness says, William Henry Bodkin does not pay rent and taxes for it; and my Lord, I think it can't be his dwelling-house.

COURT. That is no matter.

Prisoner. My Lord, it has been decided by the twelve Judges.

COURT. It is not because he does not pay rent and taxes, that therefore it is not his dwelling-house; he has the letting of it, it is intrusted to his care, and therefore it is his dwelling-house.

JOHN UPTON . I am a patrole belonging to the public office Bow-street. About nine o'clock on the night of the 13th of September, I met the prisoner and another man in company together; the prisoner looked me short in the face; I turned round, in order that he should not know me. I had information of the robbery next day, and went into Checquer-alley, near Whitbread-street; I found some property in the house of Mary Church.

JOHN AVERY . I am a patrole of the public office Bow-street; and was in company with the last witness; and saw the prisoner in Spencer-street, on the the night of the robbery. I afterwards saw him at the door of 24, Spencer-street , where the robbery was committed; he had tied up a piece of green baize with a cord, and slung over his right shoulder. Knowing him, I thought something was going on, not exactly right. He came after me with the other man that was with him; I went into a brother officer's house, and shut the door, lest he should know me. The next day, I went with Upton and Shires, to Mrs. Church's house, in Checquer-alley; and there we found some articles, which, she said, she believed the prisoner brought.

MARY CHURCH . I think I know the prisoner; I am not certain; because he has not the same clothing on as the person who brought the things. I have no doubt about him; I think I may be positive; only I won't swear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-196

970. AGNUS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , a coat, value 30 s. and a net scarf, value 20 s. the property of William Anglis , in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET ANGLIS . On the 22nd of July, I saw the prisoner at the bar, standing on the stairs in my house; when she saw me, she came and said, I have brought you six shillings for the things you have sold this morning. I told her she must be mistaken; whilst I was talking to her, I saw my husband's great coat in a basket she had in her hand. I took her into the kitchen; and took out the coat, and then there was a black net scarf, and some candlesticks. The scarf had been in a drawer in the back first floor room; that drawer was not locked. The great coat was hanging up in that room. There were other things which were not meddled with. I sent for a constable, who is here with the property. I don't think the lace would sell for one pound; but it would be difficult to get it second hand for that money; my husband's coat is worth about one pound.

ISAAC NICHOLSON . I am the officer, and produce the property,

Prosecutrix. They are my husband's property.

GUILTY , aged 28,

Of stealing to the amount of 39 s. only.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-197

971. JOHN LOWE was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Porter , on the 21st of August .

SARAH JONES . I keep a shop in Well-street . The prisoner and the deceased were standing against my door; they were differing about a reckoning. The deceased called the prisoner a rogue. The prisoner asked him would he say that again; he did, and Lowe knocked him down; immediately a one horse cart was coming by, and went over him.

JOHN TAYLOR . I saw Lowe strike Potter on the left side, and knock him down into the road, and a one horse cart went over him.

BENJAMIN BLIGH . I belong to the London Hospital; and remember the body of the deceased

being brought to me; he was then alive, but in a dying state, six of his ribs were fractured, and there was a wound on each lung; this occasioned his death.

GUILTY , aged 24,

Of manslaughter only.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-198

972. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Story , in the King's highway, on the 8th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. one chain, value 5 l. two seals, value 10 s. and a watch-key, value 6 s. his property .

WILLIAM STOREY . On the 8th of September, I was in the Golden Anchor, at Wapping . I came out at about ten o'clock at night, rather the worse for liquor; I know I had my watch when I left the room to come out. When I came out, I was hustled by a man; but I don't know that it was the prisoner. I think I was knocked down. After I got up, I missed my watch; Captain Hudson delivered it back to me.

AVERY HORNSLEY. I saw the last witness just as he was rising, after being knocked down. I saw a man, who afterwards turned out to be the prisoner, snatch at his watch; I immediately cried stop thief, and pursued him The prisoner out run me, and Captain Hudson overtook him.

LAUNCELOT HUDSON . I was standing about four yards from Storey, when I saw him and another man fall together; I did not know that that man was the prisoner, at first. How they came down, I can't tell. The man got up, and ran away; and hearing Captain Hornsley call stop thief, I pursued that man, who turned out to be the prisoner; I overtook him. I lost sight of him; but he had a white coat on, and I soon regained him; I knocked him down, and said, where is the hat; thinking he had only stolen Storey's hat. He said, there is the watch, and pointed it out on the ground. I called the watchman, and gave him in charge; and returned the watch to Captain Storey .

THOMAS HOWES . I am headborough, and received this watch from Captain Storey .

Captain Storey . That is my watch; it has Henderson, Sunderland, on it.

JAMES INCH . I am a watchman. I heard a noise at about ten o'clock, on the night of the 8th of September. I went to see what was the matter, and saw Captain Storey on his back, and the prisoner took his watch, and ran away; and we ran after him.

Prisoner's Defence. The watchman knew nothing of the matter, for he was in his box.

GUILTY , aged 21,

Of stealing from the person, but not of the assault.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18150913-199

973. HANNAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a cotton shawl, value 12 s. the property of John Clively , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL CATER . The prisoner came into my master's shop, at about five o'clock in the evening, of Saturday, the 7th of August; she bought some articles; there were other customers in the shop. After she was gone, I missed two shawls; they had been inside the window, and she could have reached them were she stood whilst in the shop. I went out immediately, and stopped her about twelve yards from the door. When searching her in the shop, one fell from her apron, and the other was thrown back into the window. None of the other people who were in the shop are here. They might have seen her, but they did not tell me. It is my master's shawl.

GUILTY , aged 49,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150913-200

974. THOMAS WILLIAMS and MARY COOK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , one jacket, value 3 s. one shawl, value 3 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Richard Rook .

MARY ROOK . My husband keeps a lodging house. The prisoners were lodgers of ours. I left the house at about eleven o'clock at night; I had seen my property safe two hours before that, when the prisoner Williams, went up to bed. On my returning, my property was missing, and I had him taken into custody. Some of my property is in court.

ROBERT WISE . I am a pawnbroker; and this shawl and jacket were pawned on the 5th of August, at our house; but I don't know by whom.

THOMAS TEXTERS . I am a pawnbroker; and this pair of stockings was pawned in the name of Cook, on the 5th of August; but I don't know who pawned it.

EDWARD JACKSON . I am a constable; and took the female prisoner on the 6th; I found a duplicate on her for a shift, pawned for a shilling.

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-201

975. ELIZABETH FOGG and JANE DOCKERILL were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Springfield , in the King's highway, on the 31st of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. and one watch-key, value 1 d. his property .

JOHN SPRINGFIELD . I was robbed of my watch, on the 31st of August; I was waiting at Scandler's livery stables, for my master, whom I was going to attend to his house at Walthamstow. I went into a public-house to get some refreshment, and the prisoners followed me in; I called for a quartern of gin, and drank a little, and left the rest for the women. I then went out, and the two prisoners followed me; Dockerill laid hold of my watch, and Fogg held me while Dockerill pulled it out. I did

not then call out; she ran down Angel-alley. I was in great fear, and pursued after her. I saw the watch drawn from my pocket, in her hand; Fogg came down the alley with us. She asked Fogg for the key, and they went into the room, which was quite dark, and locked the door upon me with them. Whilst we were in the room, I felt the watch in her hand. She pulled me down, and I cried out I wanted to get up; and she said, I had money about me, and money, by God, she must have. I won't say whether the door was properly fastened or not, I don't know. After this, Fogg and Dockerill both went out with me; and as it was late, I was obliged to go to my master, whom I found waiting for me. I have never seen my watch since.

WILLIAM GILDERSFILD. A little after ten o'clock, I was told a young man had been robbed; I saw the prosecutor, and he said, two women had robbed him in the street, and he had followed them up into their room in Angel-alley, and felt the watch in one of their hands, while struggling with them. The prisoner, Fogg, was found, and taken to the watchhouse, and searched, but no watch found on her. I wanted him to go to the watchhouse; but he said, he had not time, he was obliged to go to his master.

SAMUEL SHEPHERD . I was present at the apprehension of both the prisoners, and saw them searched; but nothing was found on them.

FOGG, GUILTY , aged 20,

DOCKERILL, GUILTY , aged 19,

Of stealing from the person, but not of the assault.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-202

976. THOMAS HOWARD and JOSEPH PEPPERIDGE were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , a coat, value 3 l. a waistcoat, value 1 s. one curtain, value 12 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of Robert Norton ; a pair of boots, value 12 s. and a shirt, value 2 s. the property of William Lyon .

ROBERT NORTON . I live in Parliament-street; I did live in Queen's-court, Circus, Minories . Part of my house was consumed in the great fire. I saw the articles named in the indictment safe before the fire. I did not see the prisoners there. The next time. I saw the articles were at the Mansion House.

ELLEN LYON . I also inhabited a house consumed by the fire. I lost a great many things, some of which were burnt, and a great many stolen.

WILLIAM NORTON . I am the son of Robert Norton . He had a great deal of property carried away by different persons for him. I found two drawers with my father's property in them at Mr. Bennett's, the baker's.

JOHN EDWARD BENNETT . I am a baker, and live in the Minories. The fire broke out at a little after nine o'clock, at the back of Mr. Wilson's; I went to assist him; and when I came back, my house was full of furniture. In about ten minutes, both the prisoners came in; Howard pretended that he was a sufferer in the fire, and that almost all the furniture there was his. He asked me for an old hat; I offered him one all over flour, but he did not choose that. He asked me to lend him a one-pound note to pay the men who had been assisting him to move his goods. Pepperidge was with him, and brought in some of the things; I told him a little beer would be quite enough to give the men, and lent him five shillings; he then wanted to sleep in my house; but I could not let him do that. The next morning, they both came about eight o'clock, and claimed all the things that were there, chairs, tables, sheets, chest of drawers, and such like; they brought porters with them, with knotts, straps, and ropes, to carry every thing away. At first, I did not object to it; but soon after, the real owners came, and then it was discovered. Howard was then taken to the watchhouse, and Pepperidge went away.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I a man officer, and took both the prisoners into custody. I received a curtain from Burgess.

ELIZA BURGESS . The prisoner Pepperidge, lodged with me; and brought a curtain to his lodgings; which I delivered to the officer.

David M'Combie. There are a coat and waistcoat, the coat was in a drawer, outside Mr. Bennett's shop; and the waistcoat was on Howard. This shirt was on the prisoner Howard; the boots were picked up in Horton's house.

(The property was sworn to by the prosecutors.)

PEPPERIDGE, GUILTY , aged 42.

HOWARD, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150913-203

977. JOHN LILLEY and JOHN BAGSHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , two 50 l. Bank of England notes, and one ship's register, value 1 d. the property of John Williams , in the dwelling-house of Charles Price .

JOHN WILLIAMS. On the 30th May, I went in company with Thomas Williams , a friend, to the Marlborough, in Shoreditch . Williams left me in the parlour, not very sober, and I fell asleep. I had two fifty-pound notes, and two five-pound notes, and a ship's register, in my pocket-book, which was in the inside pocket of my coat. The landlord at length shut me out at the door, and my friend, Thomas Williams , came and took me into another house, and then I missed my property, and the pocket-book.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I went with the last witness to the Marlborough, on the 30th of May. I remember Williams was a little intoxicated; not being able to get a bed in the house, he went to sleep in the back parlour. I did not see his money; but I saw him put his pocket-book into his breast pocket. When I left him, there was not a creature with him in the parlour; and people could only get into that parlour through the bar. I told the landlord, he had property about him. The next time I saw him was on the landlord of the Marlborough turning him out of doors; and then I took him to the Eagle in the Kingsland-road, and there he missed his money.

CHARLES PRICE . I am landlord of the Marlborough. I remember the two last witnesses coming to my house, and the prosecutor going to sleep in my back parlour. Understanding he had property, I locked the other door which goes into this room, and then a person could only get in through the bar; nobody went into the room that I know of; but the room window was open after the prosecutor was gone; and it was not open when he first went to sleep. When he went out, he wanted to go into the taproom, but I would not let him, for fear he should be robbed; and I advised him to go home, and pushed him out at the door. I then went and shut the window down, but did not think of any robbery. In consequence of information I gave at the watch-house, Lilley was apprehended, and the other prisoner afterwards, at Coventry.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ballantyne. I remember when Lilley came into the house with Trotter, but I don't know when he went out.

JOHN TROTTER . I am a headborough of Shoreditch parish. I went into the watchhouse at about two o'clock, on Tuesday morning, and saw John Lilley , who is a drover , and who said he had been driving beasts, but could not get into his lodgings; and then he went with me to the Marlborough, where he had half a pint of gin. I went and sat down in the tap-room. Presently Captain Williams came in, and I saw the landlord come and take him out of the tap-room; a very decent young man said he could not get out at the door, and went down to the bottom of the room, and got out at the window, which looks into the skittle ground. This was before Captain Williams came into the tap-room; in a little time Bagshaw and another man went and opened the window; and the man who got out at the window came and spoke to them. They went out, and presently I saw the young man come into the house by the back door, and go out at the front, and Lilley got up, and followed him, at which I was rather surprized. I went out as far as Swan-yard, and saw Bagshaw and the man that was with him, and the young man who had gone out at the window, end Lilley, all walking about together.

JOHN NIGHTINGALE . I am a green-grocer; and took a ten-pound note from Lilley, in payment of a debt; he was so honest a character, that I had no suspicion. I gave it to Blake in his presence.

WILLIAM BLAKE . I received a ten-pound note from Nightingale; which I gave to Armstrong, the officer.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Here is a ten-pound note, which I received from the last witness.

WILLIAM DICKINSON. I am a pay-clerk in the Bank; and on looking at my book, I perceive that on the 30th of May, a fifty-pound note was presented to be changed, in the name of Rushfield; for which I gave two ten-pound notes, of which this is one; and thirty one-pound notes.

JEREMIAH GOODALL . I apprehended the prisoner Bagshaw at Coventry.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-204

978. WILLIAM BROWNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , ten pounds weight of Italian silk, value 20 l. the property of William Broom and Matthew Taylor , in their dwelling house .

WILLIAM BROOM . I live in John street, Spitalfields , and am in partnership with Matthew Taylor ; next door to us, we removed a great deal of our goods out of the warehouse; some people assisted us; a great deal was thrown out of the window, and a great deal was burnt; I can't say whether the silk in question was thrown out at the window, or stolen in the house.

NATHAN LEVI . On Thursday night, July 14th I was going towards the fire, and met the prisoner coming from it, with this bundle of silk, (producing it.)

William Browne. That is my silk.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18150913-205

979. GEORGE MURRAY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Gillmore , on the King's Highway, on the 26th of August , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two Bank notes, for the payment of 15 l. his property .

EDWARD GILLMORE . I was coming with Patrick Downs , (who is not in custody,) from the Deptford coach, at Charing cross, to Charles street ; where he was to take me to lodgings. He brought me to the prisoner's mother's house. His mother was feeding a donkey at the door. I went in, and seeing them all whispering together about me, I guessed all was not right, I went out, and the prisoner followed me and shoved me up against the wall and held me there, while Pat Downs took a ten pound note, and a five pound note, out of my pocket. They both pushed off, and I made sail after the prisoner. I lost sight of him, so I came back, and boned the donkey. I was getting on his shoulders, when the prisoner came back, and I seized him; but he was rescued from us. He was afterwards secured, and taken to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM COWLEY . I am a patrole. Seeing a mob in Drury lane, just by Charles street, I went to see what was the matter, and there I saw the prosecutor, trying to get a donkey on his shoulders. He said he had been robbed. Just then the prisoner came riding down the street, upon a donkey; and the prosecutor said he was the man that robbed him; and I took him into custody.

WILLIAM MOLES. I was in Charles-street, Drury-lane, and saw the prosecutor trying to get a donkey on his shoulders. He said he had been robbed by the people of he house at which the donkey stood.

THOMAS EDWARDS. I searched the prisoner, and took from him his money. The magistrate asked him how much he laid out, and what profit he had got, and he said he had sold all his goods for twenty-seven shillings, and that was all the money he had. When we came to count the money I took from him, there were two pounds five shillings and sixpence, and some halfpence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.


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