Old Bailey Proceedings, 5th April 1815.
Reference Number: 18150405
Reference Number: f18150405-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 5th, of APRIL 1815, and following days,

BEING THE FOURTH SESSIONS IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commision of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; The Right Honorable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of Kings Bench; Sir Allen Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer: Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Sir Charles Flower , bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; George Scholey , esq. John Atkins , esq. William Haygate , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Charles Fielder ,

Nicholas Pheney ,

John Pettitt ,

George Kempster ,

Joseph Snape ,

Charles Knight ,

Thomas Paul ,

John Clark ,

Robert Scarrett ,

William Newman ,

Frederick Powell ,

Reuben Edwards .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Kew ,

William Brazier ,

John Murphy ,

Thomas Henderson ,

William Bell ,

William Barnard ,

John Thomas ,

Jacob James ,

Francis Mackelew ,

Thomas Close ,

Thomas Gullam ,

William Hall .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Bent ,

Anthony Assereti ,

William Warsley ,

Robert Chadwick ,

William Lardner ,

Thomas Godier ,

George Tweedy ,

Edward Smith ,

William Crawford ,

John Wilkinson ,

Joseph Cooper ,

John Lering .

Reference Number: t18150405-1

425. WILLIAM SAWYER was indicted for the wilful murder of Harriet Gaskett , on the 27th of April, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , at Lisbon, in the Kingdom of Portugal .

(The case was stated by Mr. Attorney General.)

WILLIAM EDWARD GREEN . Q. You belonged to the Auditers department, at Lisbon, in Portugal - A. I did.

Q. Was the prisoner at Lisbon at that time - A. Yes; he was in the Field Train of Artillery .

Q. Do you remember being at Mr. Ricord's - A. Yes.

Q. Was Mr. Fiander there - A. He was.

Q. Do you remember the deceased Mrs. Gaskett - A. I do; I remember her coming into the room in which Mr. Ricord and Mr. Fiander were; she was almost immediately followed by Mr. Sawyer.

Q. Did that party sit down to dinner - A. They did, with the exception of myself.

Q. What was the appearance of Mr. Sawyer at that moment - A. Great agitation.

Q. What day was this - A. The 27th of April.

Q. Did Mr. Ricord and Mr. Sawyer retire into any other part of the house - A. They did.

Q. What house was it - A. A private house of Mr. Ricord's.

Q. Who lived there besides Mr. Ricord - A. Harriet Gaskett , Mr. Ricord, and Mr. Sawyer. Mr. Ricord and Mr. Sawyer went out of the room; Mr. Ricord returned soon after; Mr. Sawyer did not. During the time that Mr. Ricord and Mr. Sawyer were out, Mrs. Gaskett went into another room, and had some conversation with me; she requested I should see them both, Mr. Ricord and Mr. Sawyer; and then Mr. Ricord withdrew with Mrs. Gaskett; I never saw her afterwards. Mr. Ricord returned very soon afterwards.

Q. When Mr. Ricord returned, was he much agitated - A. A great deal agitated; I then went with him into the tent in the front of the house.

Q. While you were there, what did you here - A. I was merely with Mr. Ricord walking up and down about a quarter of an hour, and then I went into the house, and searched for the deceased Harriet Gaskett , I did not find her; we then both of us proceeded into the garden at the back of the house, and during our search in the garden, we heard distinctly the report of two pistols; we went towards the spot from whence we had heard the sound, and upon our near approach to that spot, we heard the report of a third pistol; Mr. Ricord immediately left my arm, and went to the spot; he instantly returned exclaiming that both the parties were dead. We immediately went towards the house; on our near approach to the house, we were met by the servants; we all went in pursuit of medical assistance; not being able to procure any on the spot, Mr. Ricord and myself proceeded to the house of Mr. Tobin, he was a friend of Mr. Ricord's; we went there for the purpose of getting assistance. I left Mr. Ricord at Mr. Tobin's house; we then went to the City of Lisbon to get assistance.

Q. Did you see the bodies - A. I saw the two bodies at some distance from where I was in the garden.

Q. Did you know either of the bodies - A. I concluded from their appearance, that it was a man and a woman; I was certain of it; I have no doubt of it.

COURT. Q. You thought it was the body of Harriet Gaskett and William Sawyer , did you - A. No; they were laying on the ground when I saw them.

Mr. Alley. Q. I think you said, this poor woman's name was Gaskett - A. Yes; I never heard her called by any other name; she passed by that name at dinner time.

Q. The young man, Sawyer, seemed to be in a great agitation - A. In a great deal of agitation.

Q. Did not he seem to be that he was not master of himself? he seemed to be in that state that he was not in possession of his mind - A. I cannot go so far as that; all the parties appeared much agitated.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You knew the subject of their previous discourse - A. No, I did not. They all appeared much agitated.

Q. Had he been writing that day - A. I heard so.

COURT. Q. You said, you had a few moments conversation with him - A. At the dinner time.

Q. How long was that before your hearing the sound of the pistols - A. I should consider it near half an hour.

Q. What was the subject of your conversation - A. Not upon any particular subject.

Q. Did he talk rationally upon the subject whatever it was he was conversing about at dinner time - A. With much agitation.

Q. Did he appear to understand what you said to him - A. With much inattention to the subject I was mentioning.

Q. This was about half an hour before you heard the pistols - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Were they dining - A. All the rest were dining together except myself.

Q. They sat down to dine together as other people do who dine together, excepting their appearing agitated? There was nothing that struck you out of the ordinary course - A. No.

WILLIAM FIANDER . Q. You were employed as conducter of ordinary stores in April last - A. Yes.

Q. On the 27th of April, in the evening, did you go to the house of Mr. Ricord - A. No, on the 23rd of April.

Q. I am speaking of the 27th, the day of the death of Mrs. Gaskett - A. Yes, I was at the house of Mr. Ricord at the time,

Q. How lately before the death took place, had you seen Mr. Sawyer - A. About an hour.

Q. What office did he fill - A. He was an assistant commissary: he was not on duty at that time.

Q. Had you seen him that day in the morning, or afternoon - A. Yes, he rode out on horseback with Mr. Ricord and Harriet Gaskett .

Q. How long were they out - A. From about half past twelve until past two or three.

Q. After their return, did they sit down and dine together - A. They sat down to dine; only Harriet Gaskett ate any thing; Mr. Ricord and Mr. Sawyer sat down at the table, they partook of nothing.

Q. How long did you remain in the room with them - A. About half an hour; I sat down at the table, and remained in the room the whole time. About half past five, Mr. Ricord and Mr. Sawyer quitted the room; I did not see Mr. Sawyer again until about seven, an hour and a half after; I saw Mr. Ricord about six, and Mr. Sawyer about seven. When Mr. Ricord came in, he went out with Mr. Green; Harriet went out before Mr. Ricord, before half past six. The next that I saw was Mr. Sawyer, he came in with a handkerchief tied round his head; that was about seven o'clock.

Q. Was that after the firing of the pistols in the garden - A. Yes, it was; I had not heard the firing, I was told of it by Mr. Ricord; and after that, Mr. Sawyer came into the room with a handkerchief tied round his head.

Q. Had he the appearance of being wounded in the head - A. I saw no blood; the handkerchief was tied round his head as if he was not well; he ran to the table drawer to open it; I tried to prevent it, because I had seen pistols there; I was in ill health; I was not able to prevent him, he pushed me away; upon that, I went to another part of the house for assistance; I returned in about two or three minutes, as soon as I could get Mr. Ricord and Mr. Green; I then found the prisoner laying on the floor with his throat cut, and a case of razors laying by the side of him; he was taken care of directly, and a surgeon was sent for.

Mr. Curwood. I think you said, when these parties were at dinner, the prisoner and Mr. Ricord eat nothing - A. No.

Q. The prisoner appeared very much agitated - A. Yes.

Q. From the phrenzy state of the prisoner's mind, do you know or not whether he was going to use them pistols - A. Yes.

Q. Was not he in a phrenzy state of mind - A No, I do not think he was; he was very low indeed.

Q. You were apprehensive he would use the pistols against himself - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Ricord told you they had shot themselves - A. Yes.

Q. What character did this young man bear - A. Good tempered and humane.

DANIEL TOBIN . Q. Were you at Lisbon at the time of this unfortunate transaction - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you know these persons before this unfortunate woman came by her death - A. Yes; I had known them about six or eight months; Mrs. Gaskett and Mr. Ricord lived in the same house together; Mr. Sawyer lived in the same house, and boarded with them.

Q. The day this unfortunate person died was the 27th of April - A. Yes, the 27th of April.

Q. How lately before she was killed had you seen these parties - A. I had accidentally called on the evening of the 26th, and seen them; Mr. Ricord complained of illness; I visited them the following morning; all the parties were together in the same room; they had been dining together, it appeared it was after dinner; I thought they appeared all agitated; Mr. Roach appeared ill; on the 27th Mr. Ricord was in bed. When I first called about eleven o'clock, the prisoner desired I would go with him, and view a piece of ground, and a house in the neighbourhood that he was thinking of renting; I accompanied him to the ground, and the house.

Q. How long had you been in company with him - A. Perhaps two hours and a half; he looked at the house; he appeared very auxious to take it, he persisted in taking it; I thought it objectionable for many reasons; when I returned home with him, he requested I would go back again, taking a portuguese servant with me that understood the English language to speak with the landlord about taking the place; he at the door left me without any reason assigned, and went up stairs; I remained at the door some time; I went up stairs, and asked him if he was going; he said, no, I will not go now; I went away.

Q. How soon after, did you see any of the parties that lived in that house - A. About eight o'clock, Mr. Ricord and Mr. Green came running into the my house, very much agitated; Mr. Ricord required I would repair to his house, that Harriet and the prisoner had murdered each other; I went immediately to the house; I found the prisoner laying on the floor in a room in Mr. Ricord's house with his throat cut, and a wound in one of his temples.

Q. Was she there - A. No. I remained there some time; I washed him, and dressed the wound, and had him removed into another room. In the room in which I first found him, the parlour, there was a paper which he had been writing.

Q. Upon your first going into the room, and you finding him on the floor, state what passed - A. Upon my enquiring for the female, he desired the paper might be handed to him, it was half a sheet of footscap paper, and pen and ink on the table; he wrote upon my enquiring, that she lay in the garden, at the back of the house, in the first lane.

Q. Did you happen to go and find that was a true description - A. Yes, I did, and found the body, she lay on her side in the front of the seat where she had been sitting, as it appeared; I saw a ball had passed through one temple and out of the other; I caused the prisoner to be washed, and placed upon a sofa in the drawing-room; about eleven o'clock Dr. Donnally came to dress him; I remained till two o'clock in the morning; the doctor dressed the wound; nothing material passed that evening. On the next morning I called again at eleven o'clock, I

found him in bed; there were several gentlemen of the department of the prisoner in the house; we judged it adviseable that he should give an account of the transaction.

Q. In what manner was that communicated to him - A. I wrote it from my own and joint sentiments.

COURT. Q. Did you write it by the prisoner's dictation - A. No; I wrote it from certain facts and accounts that I collected from him, and the general reports in the house, and from what I saw after I had written it. I went into the room with it to Mr. Sawyer; I stated to him, that it was agreed by all the gentlemen, that he should state or avow the particulars of this unfortunate circumstance, and then read over this paper to him; he asserted to the truth of this paper; I read it distinctly over to him; he asserted to the truth of this paper, by writing and by words, he signed it, Dr. Donnelly witnessed it, George Pink , and myself, and Frederick Gay , we all signed it in his presence.

Q. In consequence of what passed between you and the witnesses, did you see Mr. Sawyer again - A. Yes; I went to Mr. Sawyer again on the 30th, I came to Mr. Sawyer on the next day, with an arrangement made according to my own mind; I read over the memorandum to Mr. Sawyer; Mr. Pink accompanied me. I read over that paper which had been signed on the 28th; I said, I considered the paper signed the day before, left room for a consideration, that the female had murdered herself, and requested that I might be permitted to amend it, as it wanted the word my.

Q. Read two or three words before that - A.

"From the unfortunate circumstance of my having laid violent hands upon myself, and the death of Harriet Gaskett , I solemnly declare that her death was accasioned by her having taken part of a bottle of landanum, and by my discharging a pistol at her head, at the back of the house I now reside in; I afterwards took the remainder of the vial of laudanum, and discharged two pistols at my own head, but failing in that, I went into Mr. Ricord's house, and cut my throat, to endeavour to put an end to my own existance, without any person being accessary there unto; signed William Sawyer , Daniel Tobin , George Pink , and William Donnelly ."

Royal Marine Hospital, Saturday, seven o'clock.

"The word my, interlined between the ninth and tenth line in the paper, is with my free concurrence, having been distinctly read over to me; and further I wish to add, that it was mutually agreed between us to destroy each other, and she requested that I would destroy her previous to my destroying myself, signed William Sawyer , witness George Pink , Daniel Tobin , William Donnelly ."

WILLIAM DONNELLY . Q. You were assistant surgeon to the Royal Artillery at Lisbon - A. I was, sir.

Q. Were you called upon on the 27th of April at night, to see the body of Harriet Gaskett - A. Yes; I saw the body in the garden of Mr. Ricord's house; she had a wound in the right temple.

COURT. Q. Had it gone through her head - A. Nothing had made its exit out; I apprehend the wound was occasioned by a pistol bullet, and that wound was the occasion of her death; she was dead when I first saw her.

Q. Were you present at the enquiry the next day into this business - A. I was; I was present when Mr. Sawyer put his signature to that paper, and I witnessed it; I think I saw Mr. Pink sign it, and Mr. Tobin.

Prisoner's Defence. A severe wound in my throat renders me incapable of distinctly articulating; I have therefore reduced to writing a few observations; no man could feel a greater regard for the young woman; never for a moment had I a thought of killing her; I have but a confused recollection of this melancholy event; I very much regret the absence of Mr. Ricord, he would have been a most important witness in my behalf, as he alone is acquainted with all the circumstances of this case; the gentlemen who conducts this prosecution, have done every thing in their power to obtain his presence; I understand their applications have been ineffectual; I express my acknowledgement for the endeavours they have used, I leave my case to your lordship and the gentlemen of the jury.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a humane and good tempered character.

GUILTY, aged 29,

But not with previous malice prepense, no further than what was incurred in the act.

Judgement Postponed ,

On account of the Court not being advised.

London Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-2

426. RICHARD NAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of May , a mare, value 20 l. the property of William Maul .

WILLIAM MAUL . I live in Piccadilly.

Q. In May, 1813, had you a black mare in your possession - A. I had; that I was disposed to part with.

Q. On the 21st or 23rd of May, did the prisoner call upon you - A. It was on Saturday, the 22nd, I think.

Q. You were called upon by the prisoner - A. I was; he said, his groom said, I had a horse to dispose off, which his groom represented likely to suit him, as he was very anxious of putting his little niece that he had, upon a safe animal, that he had ten or eleven horses always, that he would profer buying one of me than a dealer; he then gave me his card of address, which I had previously learned from the person that came before was in Park-lane; the card was in writing; his address was in Park-lane, the next door to my Lord Petre's. He requested I would give my servant leave to bring the animal the next morning to his house to try her in order that he might ascertain her paces in the opposite riding house; I did so, but I did not give the servant any caution not to leave it if in the event it should not be convenient to him to try her at that moment; I think he asked the price, but the groom had asked the price before; the price announced was twenty-six guineas. I accordingly sent my servant the next morning at the hour appointed, ten o'clock on Sunday morning.

Q. Did you in any way commission or instruct your servant to sell the horse - A. No, decidedly not; it was sent there to be tried in the riding house, and for no other purpose; the servant was sent with the horse to let it be tried, and nothing else.

Q. After the horse had gone there, did you see it again - A. Never.

Q. Did you receive these papers on the Monday - A. They were left at my house on the Monday morning early.

Q. The horse was sent for trial on Sunday morning - A. On the Sunday morning.

Q. After receiving the note in the letter, did you go to the house in Park-lane - A. Immediately.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. No, nobody was to be found there, but the creditors. On Monday my servant who had delivered the horse at Park-lane, took me there; I went on receiving that letter immediately; that letter opened my eyes.

COURT. Q. Did you go immediately with your servant who delivered it - A. I did; we found nobody in the house, there was a servant left in the house; we found nobody but the servant; I found a person there; the prisoner I did not find; I have never seen him since.

Mr. Gurney. When the price was mentioned on Saturday it was agreed to - A. Yes.

Q. You stated the price, it was settled - A. Yes, certainly, on the Saturday.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. Was there any sale affected for the price mentioned - A. There was no sale certainly; our conversation was then in that sort of a way, believing I was talking to a gentleman, I sent the horse for trial, which would lead to a sale in all probability.

COURT. Q. If the price had been paid to your groom, you would have taken no further steps - A. Certainly not; I do not recollect that ever I told the groom what the price was. I should not have considered it a robbery if he had sent back the money.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. You sent your horse with a bridle - A. Yes; I received the bridle back four or five days afterwards, after I received the first letter, another letter accompanied it, and a brown paper parcel.

JAMES HODSON . Q. You were a servant to Mr. Maul - A. I was at that time.

Q. Did you on Sunday, the 23rd of May, two years ago, take a horse to Park-lane - A. Yes, a black mare, to No. 22, Park-lane; I saw Mr. Naylor and another gentleman; Mr. Naylor I believe opened the door to me; he stood at the aperture, he came down the steps to me; I had the mare in my hand at the time by a bridle; he said, if I would follow him, and take the poney to the stables where his horses stood, he would try it at Mr. How's stables if I would leave the horse; upon that, I left the horse with the ostler at the livery stables, I delivered the horse to Mr. How's servant.

COURT, Q. You left the horse with the servant at Mr. How's stables - A. Yes. Mr. Naylor said, after he had tried the poney, if he approved of it, he would settle for the poney; if not, he would send the poney back. That is all that passed.

Q. Did you go there the next day - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find Mr. Naylor there - A. No; I never saw him afterwards.

Q. You went the next day - A. Yes, I went to Mr. Naylor's house, No. 22, Park-lane, the next morning; I did not see any body, I found he was gone.

Q. How did you find he was gone if you did not find any body - A. There were some trades people in the house.

Q. Were there many trades people in the house - A. Three or four. After that, I went to the livery stables immediately, to Mr. How's stables.

Q. Did you find the horse there - A. No.

Q. Did you find the other horses there that he talked of - A. No.

Q. What instructions did your master give you when you took the horse, what were you to do with it - A. He said, he would send the horse, the poney, for Mr. Naylor to try it, and if Mr. Naylor approved of the poney, he would settle with Mr. Maul for it.

Q. Did you communicate that to Mr. Naylor - A. No, I did not tell Mr. Naylor that.

Q. Had you any authority from your master to leave it - A. Mr. Maul told me I might leave the horse for trial.

Q. Was that all he said - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say he might keep it if he approved of it - A. No.

JOHN SPITAL . Q. Were you two years ago groom at Mr. How's - A. I was ostler there in May, 1813, I have been six years there, and am now. I received a mare poney of the last witness: I cannot tell the day of the month; I remember the last witness putting a poney into my hands; a gentleman was present who called himself Naylor.

Q. Is that the person now at the bar - A. I cannot swear to his person; I was not long with him.

COURT. Q. To Hodson. Is that the groom to whom you delivered the black mare - A. Yes, it is; the prisoner was present at the time, and this other gentleman was with him.

Q. To Spital. There was another person present with him, was there - A. Yes.

Q. How long did that poney remain in your hands - A. I should think twenty minutes, from that to half an hour in my possession; I put it up in the stable, tied it up to a rack, by Mr. Naylor's direction.

Q. Had you seen Naylor before on the subject - A. The servant told me he had brought a horse there for Mr. Naylor to try; Mr. Naylor told me to put in the stable; there it remained for twenty minutes.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. Who took it away - A. Mr. Naylor, he took it away himself, he led it away with the bridle; I thought it singular the horse having no saddle; I watched him; he led it up into Upper Brook-street, Park-lane.

Q. Did you ever see that poney again - A. I never

saw saw it before or since to my knowledge; nor I never saw Mr. Naylor before or since to my knowledge; he told me he would send another horse that afternoon. When I delivered the mare into his custody he went up Upper Brook-street, which is towards Grosvenor Gate; our stables are within two doors of Upper Brook-street, Park-lane.

Q. Had Mr. Naylor any other horse with you - A. He had not.

MATTHEW M'COMBY. Q. Do you know Naylor's hand-writing - A. I have seen him write his name.

Q. Look at them papers, do you believe that to be his writing or not - A. I should believe it to be his writing.

(Read.)

Addressed to Mr. Maul, Piccadilly, May 24th, 1813.

"SIR, I like the poney very well, I enclose you a draft at seven days.

I have the honour to be yours, R. N."

Q. To M'Comby. What name did he go by when you knew him - A. By the name of Naylor. I saw him write his name at the time of my apprehending him, and I have got a good deal of documents of his hand-writing in my possession.

(Read.)

London, 24th of May, 1813.

"Seven days after date, I promise to pay Mr. Maul, or bearer, twenty-six guineas for a black poney.

signed R. N. 22, Park-lane."

Q. To M'Comby. You did not know any thing of this man prior to our apprehending him, did you - A. No. I apprehended him upon another charge.

Q. To Mr. Maul. You saw him in prison - A. Yes, two or three days after last sessions.

Prisoner's Defence. I never intended to defraud Mr. Maul, at the time I was embarrassed in signing a bill for my friend; when Mr. Maul came in Clerkenwell Prison with Hutt and Vickery, Mr. Maul said, did not I recollect buying a poney of him; I was always ready to pay him; I can only say I had no intention to defraud him.

Q. To Mr. Maul. When did you receive the bridle - A. I received the bridle four or five days after I received these papers in a brown paper parcel.

Q. Did you go to Park-lane before you received this note - A. No; immediately upon receiving that note.

Q. After you received that promissory note, you went to Park-lane - A. Yes, I went there, I could not find any thing of him; I never found him until he was in custody in Clerkenwell Prison.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

[ The prosecutor said the object of the prosecution was to satisfy the Public justice of the Country; he would wish to recommend him to mercy as far as was proper, as his friends were respectable people .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-3

427. THOMAS SHEPHERD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Joseph , about the hour of seven in the night, of the 6th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two hats, value 5 s. the property of John Joseph .

JOHN JOSEPH . I live in Cranburn-passage, Liecester-square, and likewise the house stands in Castle-street; the front is in Cranburn-passage; I was robbed at the back of the house in Castle-street ; the house is in the parish of St. Ann's .

Q. What is your business - A. A hatter .

Q. Were you at home on the 6th of March - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the evening on which your attention was called - A. Yes; after having lit up the shop, I went into the parlour to tea, I went back into the little parlour, which is detached from the shop; after having had my tea I came out again into the shop; I looked round the shop; I found a great draft; I looked up, and found a window down; when I was in the parlour I left the windows closely shut, I had observed it.

Q. How were they secured - A. By pulleys, that pull them down; I had suspicion that I had been robbed; I looked round the shelves; I found two or three hats gone.

Q. What time in the evening do you suppose it was - A. About half past seven; I am sure it was half past seven, it was nearer eight than seven; it was quite dark; no remains of day-light left.

Q. You have no other fastenings - A. No, only the shutters; we do not shut up before nine o'clock.

Q. How high was this window - A. About nine or ten feet from the ground, or more, it is about eighteen feet to the top of the window. I saw the prisoner get upon the top of the brick wall; it was the upper sash that was pulled down; I perceived that two or three hats were gone; I then went out of the passage door to this window, to see if I could observe any person thereabouts.

Q. You went round to this window - A. Yes; after being there about a minute, I saw the prisoner come out of a very dark court, where there was no thoroughfare; he appeared to me to be waiting for an opportunity to get at this window again; I then suspected that he might be the man that opened the window; I did not think it proper it being a dark street to attack the man by myself; I went to an opposite neighbour, and asked him to assist me; I got my neighbour to assist me; my neighbour and I went round, and in about two minutes, he made a dash on the top of this brick work, he jumped upon the brick work at the corner of my house, which is built to keep off nuisances; he threw his head and shoulders into the window, and took another hat; I saw him do that; they were within his reach by putting his head and shoulders in and half his body; then me and my neighbour secured him, with the hat in his hand; we took him to the watchhouse; I there saw him searched; we found upon him the papers containing the former hats, the papers and string that tied them up.

Q. How did you know it to be the paper and string that tied them up - A. By the marks; they

were the shape of a hat as it lay upon the shelf; I knew it by the marks, and by the appearance; I knew the hats that were gone.

Q. Have you got the hat that he took last - A. Yes; this is it; it is marked with my private mark; I believe the witness that assisted me, William Chandler , took the hat out of his hand; the beadle has had it ever since. I know that hat by the private mark; it was marked twelve months before it was stolen.

Q. What is the value of the three hats - A. Half-a-crown each

WILLIAM CHANDLER . I am the neighbour to the last witness. Mr. Joseph called to me for assistance on the 6th of March, between seven and eight in the evening; I went into the street with Mr. Joseph, he pointed out the prisoner to me. I saw the prisoner stand upon this brick work at the window; I saw nearly half his body in the window, he was half hanging over the sash; Mr. Joseph said, this is him; I ran, and seized him with the hat in his hand; he made a blow at me with the hat; he was taken to the watchhouse immediately, and the hat was delivered to the beadle.

WILLIAM GOSLING . I am beadle of St. Ann's parish. On the 6th of March last, I was sent for to the watchhouse to take care of the prisoner, and to search him; I felt in his pockets; I took out this paper; Mr. Joseph said they were the papers of the other two hats that were lost. This hat was in the watchhouse; Mr. Joseph gave me the hat; I have had it in my possession ever since.

COURT. Q. To Prosecutor. Do you inhabit the house - A. Yes; I let the first floor; I live in the same house; I have no partner in the business.

GUILTY, aged 44.

Of stealing only, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-4

428. ABRAHAM ADAMS was indicted for an unnatural crime .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 51.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-5

429. WILLIAM OLDFIELD was indicted for that he, on the 21st of January , at the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea , upon Eliza Willis , spinster , of the age of nine years and upwards, did make an assault, and her the said Eliza Willis , feloniously did ravish, and carnally know .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-6

430. EDWARD WEBB was indicted for that he, on the 21st of January , was servant to Daniel Gadane and Charles Nichols King , and was entrusted to receive goods and monies for them, and being such servant, so entrusted, and employed, did receive and take into his possession, six reams of demy paper, value 14 l. and four reams of medium paper, value 13 l. and having received these reams of paper on his masters account, he afterwards did feloniously secrete, embezzle, and steal the same .

DANIEL GADANE . My partner's name is Charles Nichols King ; we are paper rulers, and account-book makers . The prisoner was my apprentice .

Q. Was he entrusted to receive goods and monies for you - A. Yes, at various times; it was a part of his duty; I entrusted him to receive packages; he frequently did it.

Q. With whom did you deal for paper - A. Alderman Magnay and Company, they are wholesale stationers, in Queen-street.

Q. On the 21st of January, in the present year, had you given him any order to receive paper of Messrs. Magnay and Pickering for you - A. No.

WILLIAM PICKERING . I live in the house of Messrs. Magnay and Company; I am no partner.

Q. On the 21st of January, did the prisoner come to you as if from the prosecutor - A. He did, about eleven o'clock in the morning, he ordered six reams of demy paper, and four reams of medium, ten reams altogether, on account of the prosecutor; the paper was delivered to the prosecutor's carman.

Q. What is the value of it altogether - A. About thirty-one pounds ten shillings.

WILLIAM EDON . I am carter to the prosecutor.

Q. Did you on the 21st of January, take from their house ten reams of paper by the direction of the prisoner - A. I did, to No. 7, Long-lane; I took ten reams altogether; the prisoner directed me to Searle's house; Searle said he had no silver, he would give the prisoner the money to pay me; I delivered them at Searle's, No, 7, Long-lane.

WILLIAM BLAND . I am an officer. I went to the house of Searle; I found nine reams of paper there; these are two of them; the tenth ream we found afterwards.

Q. To Gadane. Q. Are you sure you received no reams of paper on that day - A. I am quite positive of it.

Prisoner's Defence. The evidence alledged against me is that of the crime charged in the indictment; I never before had any thing imputed to me dishonest, or of a disgraceful nature, which my master can testify.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-7

431. ELIZABETH ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , thirty-six yards of ribbon, value 14 s. the property of Valentine Toone .

VALENTINE TOONE. I am a hosier and haberdasher , Bishopgate without . On the 13th of March I was called into the shop by the shopman, who was serving the prisoner some ribbons, soon after I came into the shop, he gave the prisoner what he had sold to her; she was about to go, he caught hold of her, and told her to give back the pieces of ribbon she had taken out of the drawer; she denied haveing any, she put her right hand into her pocket, and bought her hand behind her; I then saw her with a

the ribbons in her had I saw her drop them behind her, I picked them up, I gave the ribbons to the constable.

ISAAC NICHOLSON . I am shopman to Mr. Toone. On Saturday the 18th of March, the prisoner came into the shop and asked to look at some ribbons, I had one customer in the shop serving with lace; I took out the ribbon drawer and put it before the prisoner, the other customer desired me to cut off some lace; in the mean time I turned my head I saw the prisoner take her hand from the drawer, and put some ribbons into her pocket; I cut her off about three quarters of a yard at three-pence halfpenny a yard and gave it to her, she paid for it, another customer came into the shop, I called out for Mr. Toone, who was in the back parlour and desired her to give me the ribbon which she had put into her pocket, she said she had no ribbon, she immediately put her hand into her right hand pocket and threw the ribbons behind her, I saw her take them out of her pocket and likewise saw her throw them down, Mr. Toone picked them up, the ribbons were given to Sapwell.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I produce the ribbons.

NICHOLSON. They are my master's property,

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman came into the shop and took the two pieces of ribbon off the stool, he said they were the pieces that I had in my pocket; I never had them in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-8

432. JOHN MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of William Rolers , from his person .

GEORGE WILLIAM ROLERS . Q. When was it you lost your handkerchief - A. On the 27th of March, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Newgate Street . All I know, I lost my handkerchief somebody tapped me on my shoulder and told me I had lost my handkerchief.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. On Easter Monday I was in Newgate street, and when the possession had set down, there was a great crowd to get into the church; I followed the prisoner about a quarter of an hour, I saw him attempt to pick pockets, at last he put his hand into this gentleman's pocket and pulled this handkerchief the first time about half way out, the next time he pulled it quite out, and put it under his apron, and as I suppose he put it into his breeches; I tapped the gentleman on his shoulder, and told him to follow me, he had lost his handkerchief, and then I caught the prisoner; I found the handkerchief in the prisoner's breeches, the prosecutor was close by me. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. I don't know that I can swear to it, it looks like one that I had in my pocket; I can swear that I lost a pocket handkerchief, but not that this is the same.

Prisoner's Defence. I was there about one o'clock, I was coming down Newgate street; I saw the handkerchief laying on the pavement; I picked it up and put it into my breeches pocket; there was a hole in the pocket, it fell through, the officer said it was not my property; he knocked me down; I asked him what he did that for, he said, to take me in custody.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined three months and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-9

433. CATHERINE WALLACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of March , a bonnet, value 4 s. and a feather, value 2 s. the property of George Franks , privately in his shop .

GEORGE LOCKEY . I am shopman to George Franks , he is a hatter , at the corner of Red-cross-street ; on Friday the 3rd of March between five and six in the evening, the prisoner with another woman came into the shop, and asked to look at a drab hat, at about seven shillings, for a boy; I was then attending another woman in the shop, and a hat which I was going to try on a boy's head, when I turned round to put it on the boy's head, the two women went out of the shop, without saying anything; I immediately missed a beaver bonnet and feather from the window; I immediately went in pursuit of the women, and overtook them about half a dozen houses down the street, I caught hold of the prisoner by the shoulder, I informed her she must go back with me, she immediately dropped the bonnet and feather from under her clothes, where she had it concealed; I stooped and picked it up with my right hand from between her feet, as I held her with my left hand; I then took her back and gave her in charge of an officer; the other woman made off.

BARTHOLOMEW WOOD . I produce the bonnet; I took charge of the prisoner and the bonnet; I have had the bonnet ever since.

LOCKEY. The bonnet is my master's property, and the feather. I know the bonnet by the private mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little intoxicated, a woman asked me to go into the shop with her, she asked to buy a boy's hat.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, to the value of 4 s. 9 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-10

434. ELIZABETH YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , six yards of sarsenett, value, 24 s. two yards of sattin, value 25 s. one yard and a half of crape, value 6 s. two pair of gloves, value 2 s. one hundred and thirty three yards of ribbon, value 3 l. 6 s. six yards of triming, value 2 s. two night caps, value 2 s. twenty-five yards of lace, value 5 l. the property of Charles Dines , in his dwelling house .

CHARLES DINES . I am a haberdasher , 19, Holborn . On Sunday the 19th of March, I left my shop locked up, I deposited the key in a wardrobe in the room that I sleep in, and the key of a wardrobe I locked up in the table drawer in my dining room; the key of the table I put in my pocket, I went out about one o'clock; I left the prisoner with

another servant in the house; the prisoner was my servant, she had lived with me five months; I had another servant that nursed the child. On Sunday I went out about one o'clock; I returned about nine. On Monday morning, when I got up for the purpose of the boy cleaning the shop, I observed some silk upon the counter that I had not left on the Saturday night previous. I looked into the ribbon drawer I found a vast many ribbons had been cut, in consequence of which, I rang the bell, and charged the prisoner with knowing something of the property that I had missed; I told her, I must look into her boxes she said, very well; when we got up above the one pair of stairs, she told me I could not do it without an officer; I told her if she wished I would send of an officer but she should not stir from that place, she then gave me her keys, I went up stairs into the garrett where the boxes were kept, and I discovered all these things, and all the other things, I found four lengths of sarsenetts, I call it six yards, and about a yard of muslin, I found these ribbons, and these tapes, some of them have got my private mark upon them.

Q. Did you find any sattin - A. Yes, I found these lengths of white sattin; I found the crape and one pair of gloves; I got information that a young woman of the name of Ann Black came to the door with the prisoner; I asked the prisoner where she lived, she said, she was coming to see her that afternoon. By enquiry I found that Ann Black lived at home with her father and mother, in Kingsland Road; I went there, I found Ann Black , she confessed that she had been with Elizabeth Young at my house on the Sunday, I found some part of my property at Ann Black 's in the privy belonging to the house of Ann Black 's parents; I found this parcel scattered about the yard, and these papers in the privy; I knew that I had not got some particular things that I missed, this is the sattin this I found in the yard, the ribbon I found behind a gown in the room, and the papers that contained these ribbons were in the privy; I brought Ann Black before the Magistrate; she is here, some of these things were found in the prisoner's box, the white lace was found in the prisoner's pocket when the officer came in my presence. I lost the key of a Piano, which key was found in the prisoner's pocket, that key would unlock the table drawer, where the key of the wardrobe was locked up; I left the other servant who nursed the child at home, with the prisoner, she was to come to Pentonville to me after dinner with the child at one o'clock, then the prisoner was left in the house with Ann Black until after three o'clock.

ANN BLACK . Q. What are you - A. A servant out of place, I live in Kingsland Road.

Q. Is that the place where Mr. Dines came - A. Yes, he came to me on Wednesday.

Q. What did he find - A. These ribbons.

Q. Where were the ribbons - A. In the privy in the garden.

Q. Who put them there - A. I fancy my mother, Elizabeth Young gave them to me, on Sunday the 19th of March.

Q. What time did you go to the prisoner - A. About a quarter past two I staid there until about six o'clock in the evening. About three o'clock Mr. Dines's servant the nursery maid went out I was left alone with Elizabeth Young , we ware down stairs about half an hour she left me alone in the kitchen.

Q. Where is the kitchen, below stairs, or up stairs - A. Up stairs, she left me in the kitchen above half an hour, she went down stairs and let the nursery maid out, she came up stairs to me and told me to come down to her which I did; I went into the shop with her, she gave me some ribbons, she told me to cut some pieces off, I cut them off while she was busy, about some other things she pulled off her apron and told me to put these ribbons into her apron, I put the ribbons in, they were taken up stairs by me, Elizabeth Young went with me she carried something up in her hand, I did not see what she carried up, I saw it after she had taken it up stairs, it was two pieces of sarsenett, and a piece of white sattin; she doubled up the ribbons and gave them to me to take home for her; she said she was going to leave Mr. Dines's situation. I was to keep the ribbons until she had left Mr. Dines, and then I was to deliver them to her. I took them home.

WILLIAM LEE I am a constable. On Monday morning the 20th of March, I went to Mr. Dines's, I went to the Attic story, I found Mr. Dines and the prisoner there, Mr. Dines said, these articles that lay here in the first parcel, they were then laying on the floor, he told me that he gave me that property and the prisoner into custody; he said he found the laees in the prisoner's box. I searched the prisoner, in her pocket, I found nineteen lengths; I likewise found in her pocket this small key, on trying it, it fitted a piece of musick, that Mr. Dines had in his room, I took the prisoner and the lace into custody, the key I found upon her opened the table drawer I enquired in what room she laid the night proceeding, he said in the kitchen, in one of the beds, the feathers began to issue out, Mr. Dines said, here is a creek here, we began feeling about the bed, I found four pair of silk stockings about the feathers in the bed, and likewise this bugle lace wrapped up in paper, and this paper of pins.

Q. To Dines. Look at that property - A. The stockings have got my mark upon them; the sattin had been used by the work people, a bonnet had been made by the work people; they cut it off with a slope, the prisoner cut it off with a slope to prevent detection. I compared the sattin before the officer, it tallied exactly, I can swear to the whole of the articles produced.

Q. Where is your house situated - A. In the parish of St. Andrew's Holborn.

Q. What is the lace worth - A. The twenty-five yards of lace five pounds, and the four pair of silk stockings I value at two guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-11

435. JAMES FLINN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , fifty-eight shawls value 3 l. the property of Joshua Noble , in the dwelling-house

of Jonathan Palmer .

JOHN PLACE . I am a clerk in the house of Abbey and Cook, wholesale tea dealers. On Wednesday, the 8th of March, as I was walking along Pancras-lane, about half past nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in company with another lad, they were a short distance before me; one of them made a sign by which one went on one side of the way, and the other on the other side of the way, when the person that took the goods he came to the warehouse, he made a sign sufficient for the other to know that that was the place.

Q. Did the prisoner make the sign - A. No; the one that took the goods when they got to the house of Joshua Noble.

Q. What is Mr. Noble - A. He keeps a manchester warehouse . The man that took the goods made a sign to the other, that, that was the house; he walked on three or four steps, returned, and went immediately in, which the prisoner observed, went across to the door where the other had gone in, he looked in, opened his coat ready to receive something when the other came out, and popped it under his coat; then they went down Size-lane. I went into the warehouse, and informed the prosecutor that he had been robbed.

Q. Was any body in the warehouse - A. There was a person in the warehouse; he locked the doors and went in search of him; I went with him; I saw which way he went, he went towards the right to Queen-street, and I fearing he might miss him, I went to the left; the person from the warehouse overtook the prisoner, and took him with the property. The prisoner was the man that received the goods at the door, I am sure of that.

JOHN BROWN. I am warehouseman at Mr. Noble's; he keeps a manchester warehouse; he has no partners. Mr. Place called at the warehouse, and informed me the warehouse had been robbed by two boys, one of the boys had a loose coat on, and the other with a close body coat; one handed the goods out of the warehouse, and the other received it them; according as he described the persons, I pursued down Size-lane, into Queen-street, and at the top of Queen-street in Chepside, I saw the prisoner with a bundle under his left arm; I seized him, and found two pieces of printed shawls; I took him into custody, and delivered him up to an officer; what became of the other man I cannot say; he must get into the passage to go into the warehouse; the warehouse belongs to Mr. Noble; the upper part of the house belongs to another person; Mrs. Palmer is landlady to Mr. Noble; she rents the house.

JOSHUA WATTS . I am an officer. I received the prisoner and the property of Mr. Brown. This is the property.

Q. Now, Mr. Brown. Look at that property, are they Mr. Noble's - A. I cannot tell that they are; the shawls were wrapped up in this hessian when I found them; the shawls were loose in the warehouse piled up in a heep; there is no private mark to them; they are the exact patterns that Mr. Noble had.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. I have a doubt; I cannot swear positively; there are other goods in the market of the same pattern.

Q. You lost such goods, did not you - A. They are of the same pattern and the same quality of cloth as were left behind; the mark on them is fifty-eight shawls in two pieces.

Q. To Place. Did you see what was taken out of the warehouse - A. I saw a blue parcel done up in a square form; I saw the prisoner take two pieces of goods of that colour.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Queen-street about nine o'clock in the morning, a young man of genteel appearance asked me which way I was going; I said towards Cripplegate; he asked me to carry these parcels for him; at the corner of Queen-street this young man tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me what I had got; I looked round for the other young man, he was absent.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-12

436. SAMUEL COHEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , one handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Jonah Spode , from his person .

MR. ARMSTEAD. I am a clerk to a merchant, in the City.

Q. When did this happen - A. On the 29th of March, about half past eight in the evening, in the Strand, between St. Clement's and the New Church, on the South side . I saw the prisoner's hand take a handkerchief from Mr. Spode, the prosecutor's pocket; I was close to them; I tapped Mr. Spode on the shoulder, and told him he was robbed, at the same time pointing to the prisoner, whom I never lost sight off; he merely walked across the way; Mr. Spode and myself followed him, and just as Mr. Spode was going to collar him, he dropped the handkerchief at his feet that he took out of Mr. Spode's pocket; we secured him, and took him into a baker's shop; he there confessed that he had done the robbery.

JOSIAH WILLMOTT . I assisted in securing the prisoner; I saw the handkerchief laying at the prisoner's feet.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. This handkerchief was delivered to me by the prosecutor.

JONAH SPODE . I was informed by Mr. Armstead that I had been robbed; I pursued the prisoner with Mr. Armstead, and with his assistance and others, we took the prisoner into custody. I took my handkerchief up at his feet, told him it was my handkerchief. This is the handkerchief; it is my handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-13

437. JAMES RIPLEY , ROBERT HERBERT ,

RICHARD BURTON , and RICHARD MATHEWS , were indicted for that they, on the 7th of March last, upon Jane Watson , widow , did make an assault, and that they, with a certain gun loaded with gunpowder and leaden shot, feloniously did shoot off and discharge at the said Jane Watson , and that they, out of the said gun with a leaden bullet, so shot off as aforesaid, out of the said gun, her, the said Jane Watson , on her head did strike, penetrate, and wound, thereby giving to her on the head two mortal wounds, of which she languished from the 7th of March, until the 18th of March, and then died; and so the Jurors say, that they, the aforesaid prisoners, her, the said Jane Watson , did kill and murder . The prisoners also stood charged upon the Coroners Inquisition, with killing and slaying the said Jane Watson , widow.

RICHARD SUTTON . I am a servant to Mr. John Frederick Robinson; he lives in Old Burlington-street.

Q. Were you at home on Tuesday, the 7th of March - A. Yes; on the evening of that day there was a great assembly in the street; I could not see them; I could hear a great mob in the street, about half past eight or nine in the evening, as near as I can say.

Q. What prevented you from seeing what passed in the street - A. I could not get at the windows to see.

Q. Did you hear any expressions made use of by the people in the street - A. I heard the mob say, if they could get in, they would murder every servant in the house; this was after the mob had been some time.

Q. Who was in the house for its protection - A. Six private soldiers and a corporal, besides me and my fellow servants, The mob began attacking the house in pulling down all the pallisadoes on Monday night, and on Tuesday morning a door was broken open.

Q. On Monday night or Tuesday morning, were the soldiers sent for - A. On the Tuesday; on the Monday the mob was there; on Tuesday they forced open the door of the house, and threatened to murder every servant if they did not tell were their master was, they would murder us; they forced open the door, and took away a chair, table, and other fixtures of the hall; they threw a large ball at me, saying they would murder me if I did not tell where master was; they forced the railing down on Monday night.

Q. Were these outrages the occasion of sending for the soldiers - A. It was.

Q. You heard the mob threating - A. Yes, and I heard the corporal address the mob,

"that if they would not be quiet, they must take the consequence of it."

Q. The corporal is Richard Burton , is it not - A. Yes. I heard the people say they would pull the house down if they could not murder us all.

Q. Did you hear them say any thing about the soldiers firing - A. I heard them say the soldiers dare not fire, any thing but powder.

Q. Did any firing take place, and how soon - A. There was firing took place; they fired blank cartridges, as they told me, when they forced open the windows that were nailed up; that firing was from the parlour.

Q. Did you see any pistols taken possession off - A. My fellow servant, the butler, he had a pistol; I saw him go to the window, and discharge it. The mob were coming in very rapid at the time; he drew back, and told me he had discharged the pistol in the direction of the area door; he told me he thought he heard them breaking in below; I, myself, thought I heard the same. I heard the reports of several guns firing, and the mob attacking the door: after the discharge of the pistol, they did break open the door; they threatened they would if they could. The pistol was loaded again; I saw it loaded, it was loaded with shot; me and my fellow servant loaded it together; one of the soldiers as the mob were so very rapid, took the pistol from my fellow servant, Ripley's hand, he took it, and discharged it; one of the soldiers asked me for shot; I gave it him; it was the same soldier that took the pistol from my fellow servants hand, his name is Mathews; at the time that he discharged, there were several pieces discharged, and after they were discharged, I heard say, there was some body killed or wounded; that was the last firing.

Q. Were was it you got the pistol and the shot - A. The pistol from Lord Buckingham's servant; Ripley, my fellow servant, sent me for it; as we had nothing but one pistol to protect ourselves; he said we were left open to the street.

Q. During this time you had no opportunity of seeing the mob so as to know their numbers, or to know their persons - A. No, I could not; I heard some of the soldiers say they hoped some body was gone for the horse soldiers; if not, they should not be able to protect my master's house, and their lives; I know the pistol I brought from Lord Buckingham's servant was loaded when I brought it; that charge was drawed, and some of the shot fell on the ground in drawing it.

Mr. Attorney General. Q. What hour was it when the mob first attacked your house - A. About half past eight, or nearer nine; I cannot say which.

Q. Your master was at that time attending his duty in Parliament - A. He was away from home, and I believe him to be there.

Q. Was it upon the first attack that the mob tore up the iron rails and used them as instruments to break into the house - A. Yes, and they did get in at that time.

Q. You spoke of some of them throwing a large ball at you - A. The ball was from a large lamp in the hall, it has two large weight to pull it up and down; they threw that weight at me, and threatened they would destroy me if I did not tell were my master was. On Monday and Tuesday I was confined at home very much for the protection of the house.

Q. I do not know whether you saw chalked on the wall an exhibition of your master upon a gibbet - A. Yes; I had seen that in different parts of the town; I saw it on that very Monday, I saw it on dead walls, and I have heard there was chalked up a reward of

five hundred pounds for Mr. Robinson's head.

Q. After the attack on the evening of Monday, was the attack renewed again on Monday night, or Tuesday morning - A. The mob returned on the Monday night about eleven; on the first attack about nine, they succeeded in tearing up the pallisadoes; they carried out the furniture, and broke it in the street; there was a carpenter in the house, he nailed up the shutters; we made the house as secure as we could; they broke the fastenings by throwing brick bats in. When they returned on Monday night between eleven and twelve, they threw in iron bats then, and brick bats, and broke the fastenings of the house, and other materials were thrown in that had been torn up in front, and drove us completely back. They came again on the Tuesday; in the mean time the house had been put in a state of security as well as we could by a carpenter. When they came again on the Tuesday, on a third attack, they attacked it with the same violence as on former occasions; on Tuesday morning near nine, they tore open the shutters again, they succeeded in breaking the fastenings, and driving us backwards; afterwards the mob dispersed. They had taken a large figure for a lamp; we could not prevent them from taking the figure, had we attempted to prevent them our lives I believe would have been sacrified; I believed so then, and I state it now. They broke this figure into fragments in the street, and then used it to break the windows at the upper part of the house, as high up as possible; at the time I heard the mob withdraw, I thought I heard somebody call out, the horse soldiers were coming; their retreat was occasioned by supposing that the cavalry was coming upon them; when they found the horse soldiers were not coming, in spite of all the resistance we could make, they broke into the house again. They came into the house very rapid; I was driven back with brick bats, and iron bars; they faced the inner door, and attempted to break into the parlour, where the furniture had been stowed away for safety; they did not succeed in breaking open the parlour door; while they were breaking open the parlour door, the cavalry came upon them; they retired using very bad expressions, and saying that they would have my master's head before night; they retired, and we got a carpenter, he put the house into as good a state of security as he could. They renewed the attack on Tuesday, between eight and nine in the evening, in the mean time, the foot soldiers had been introduced into the house for its protection.

Q. Describe the attack on Tuesday evening - A. A violent attack was made at the shutters that had been fastened up, with brick bats and iron bars being thrown at them, which burst them open, and fell into the room; the soldiers fired several times; nobody was hurt as I heard; the soldiers fired blank cartridges; the mob shouted, and said, the soldiers dare not fire any thing but blank powder; the corporal then warned them that they had ball cartridges if they did not disperse, they must take the consequence.

Q. If the soldiers had been disposed to fire wanted only to destroy life, were they not able to fire ball cartridges - A. I heard them say ball cartridges; I think they fired to protect my master's property, and to save our lives, they were protecting my master's property. From the mobs declarations I apprehendded the greatest danger to our lives; I do not believe we should have been safe, if the soldiers had not fired more than blank cartridges; I thought so then, and I think so now.

WILLIAM SMITH . Q. Were you at the house in Old Burlington Street, on the evening of Tuesday the 7th of March - A. Yes, about eight o'clock; the attack was made upon the house, by the people in the street, between eight and nine, the mob attacked the house by throwing stones and brick bats; after they broke through a little; a soldier was placed to prevent their coming in; the stones and brick bats, broke open the shutters; the mob kept on throwing stones and brick bats for half an hour before any fire arms were used; I saw the soldiers fire, but I cannot swear who it was.

Q. Do you know what they fired with first - A. No, I could not tell; I heard the soldiers say they fired with blank cartridges; the soldiers told the mob if they did not disperse, they must fire with something else, the mob kept violently throwing brick bats and stones, which forced open the shutters several times. The soldiers fired again, but what with I cannot tell; when the last firing took place, I was in the dining room backwards.

Q. Was any pistol fired in your presence - A. I heard say the butler fired one; I did not see it,

Q. What was your opinion of the security of your person, and of the other persons - A. I thought my life in great danger, and all the other persons likewise; I was very much frightened; I heard the mob say, where is Robinson, out with him. bring him out.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Were you there on the Monday night when the riot begun - A. No, I was not; I came home a little after eleven on the Monday night; I saw the riot on the Monday night; from the violence of the mob, I considered my life in great danger; we were oblidged to retreat backwards to Mr. Wood's, to save our persons; iron railings as long as my arm were thrown in upon us; if one of them had hit us, it must have killed us, on Tuesday morning; and Tuesday evening the riot continued; they called out for Robinson; I heard the soldiers fire, and I think the firing was necessary to save our lives, and to save Mr. Robinson's property.

MR. JOHN FREDERICK ROBINSON . Q. Your residence is in Old Burlington-street - A. Yes.

Q. On Monday, the 6th March, were you under any apprehension of any attack from the mob - A. I was.

Q. When did you learn that any attack had been made - A. I believe it was between nine and ten, when I was at the House of Commons, I was then informed of the particular circumstance attending the attack; I then wrote from the House of Commons to the Secretary of State, informing him that my house had been attacked by a mob; I requested

that he would send protection.

Q. Do you know whether any military had been sent before he received your letter - A. I believe there might.

Q. You did not see what they had done that night - A. No, I did not. On the next morning I think between ten and eleven, the footman, Sutton, came to me; in consequence of the information I received from him, I wrote to Lord Sidmouth, requesting that whatever protection was sent to my house might be there permament, as I understood that some of the soldiers who had been sent there on the Monday night, in consequence of the first attack had withdrew from the house at an early hour on the Tuesday morning, and that the house had been subsequently entered by the mob; which I received the intelligence by my footman. I should think, in an hour I went down to the Secretary of State myself, to represent the danger which I received, to present the state of the case as it reached me. I understood that protection had been sent to my house, I requested into the course of that morning; I told the footman, and I believe the butler also, that it should be taken care; that they should have some thing to eat and to drink.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you seen the state of the your house - A. I saw it some days ago, after it had happened.

Q. Describe the state of the house when you saw it - A. At the time that I went into the house all the windows almost in every floor were broken to pieces; it was manifest to me at last, that great violence had been used against the windows and the doors of the dining-room, and the wall in front of the house was also down; in the hall and in the passage near the foot of the stairs, there were marks of stones, brick bats, or things of that kind, having been struck with violence against the walls; on one door, which is a very old one, one which communicates between the dining-room and a room backwards, there were similar marks of violence, and on the pannel of that door, there was the mark of some sharp instrument having been forced through it; a window also on the stair case about half way up was also broken backwards, and a figure which had stood in that window had disappeared, and some pieces of furniture which were in the hall, chairs, tables, and a lamp that hung there also disappeared, and I saw some fragments of broken chairs. This was some days after the affair had happened; and the doors and windows were very strongly barricaded in order to prevent a renewel of a successful attack.

AMELIA DAVIS . Q. Where do you live - A. No. 2, Duke's-court, Duke's-street, St. James's.

Q. Were you in Old Burlington-street on the evening of Tuesday, the 7th of March last - A. Yes, I entered the street about nine o'clock.

Q. What was the occasion of your going there - A. Merely to look at the houses which had been injured, on the Monday evening, first I went into the the Square; they said it was Lord Darnley's House. Then I came down Bruton-street, and looked at a house there, which they said was Mr. York's; I then came into Old Burlington-street, and went in it at the end of Clifford-street, in Old Burlington-street; I went, and stood up at a step of a door almost opposite Mr. Robinson's house.

Q. What number of people were assembled in the street at that time - A. The Horse Guards were riding up and down the street; they did not remain long in the street after I went there.

Q. Did you find any other person on the step where you stood - A. The deceased was standing on the same step with me; the door was open, and the servants of the house where standing at the door; Mr. Robinson's door was almost opposite of the step where we stood; I had a conversation with the deceased; I never saw her before.

Q. What was the subject of that conversation - A. We were merely saying it was a pity that they pulled the houses to pieces, for we should all have to pay for it; I said, it was a pity that people should let their children out, because I heard it was done by boys; it was done concerning the Corn Bill. I heard stones throwing several times, and I saw the shutters open a small space a great many times, when the stones or bricks were thrown, they said it was done by boys; I did not see them myself. The deceased and I left the steps, and walked up and down the street towards Clifford-street; there was a small quantity of people in the street, there was not an hundred, I do not think there were more than fifty, if there were fifty, they seemed to be walking to and fro; I was at the end of Clifford street when they fired.

Q. At the time that they fired was the deceased with you - A. She took hold of my arm as we stood at the step of the door, and never loosed it until she fell from the firing of the gun.

Q. How long did you walk in the street together - A. A short time, we came and stood upon the step again, where the servants were standing at the door; after that, I was proceeding to go home, the deceased said, she would walk to the top of the street with me, and with that we left the step of the door we were walking up the street as the gun was fired; we were at the fourth door from where we were standing, as she fell from my arm, at the firing of the gun, we were walking to go home about four doors from the step where I had stood, one of the guns fired, and she fell to all appearance dead; the Horse Guards came up almost immediately; I did not know what to do with her. The Horse Guards said it was best to bear the body away: I found myself in a aukward situation, I was covered with blood from a wound in my face; the deceased was carried to a chemist's shop, in Bond-street, and from there to St. George's Hospital; I never left her.

Q. In what part of the street were the persons collected together - A There seemed to be no one but what was passing and repassing before the doors they seemed to be chiefly on the pavement by what I could see.

Q. Did you hear any person say any thing about the Corn Bill - A. No. I heard a riot, and that some person was taken into custody, that throwed a stone.

Mr. Gurney, Q. You heard a riot - A. I heard

a noise; I do not know that I said a riot.

Q. Did the people about there say that they were firing - A. Yes, they said powder, merely to frighten the boys.

PHILIP CHEFFEY . Q. You are a servant to my Lord Somerfield - A. Yes, I was in Old Burlington-street on the evening of the 7th of March, a little before ten o'clock; I went merely out of curiosity. I knew Mr. Robinson's house was in that street. There might be about thirty people near that house, or within twenty yards of it. I might be there about five minutes; I heard something thrown; it appeared at the lower part of the house. I saw the other people dispersing, and I went about my business.

Q. Did you see the deceased - A. I did, I fell over her before I saw her.

GEORGE HULPH . I am a soldier in the third regiment of Foot Guards.

Q. Are you one of the soldiers that was placed in the house of Mr. Robinson, in Burlington-street - A. Yes, I was stationed at the kitchen door by the stairs. William Graves was stationed with me; he is another soldier: he was in the same place with me. It was about six o'clock in the evening when I went to the house first. I remained there about half an hour. Before we were posted centry at the kitchen door, we were inside of the house. The corporal called me up stairs between nine and ten o'clock to assist him above stairs.

Q. While you were below, did any thing happen to attract your notice - A. Nothing happened were I was. I heard what passed above. I heard a great many brick-batts and stones thrown into the house above. I heard them coming into the house all the time; I was below. Immediately I came up stairs the Life-Guards came up directly; the officer of the Life Guards ordered us to fall into the street, and after that we were ordered into the house, and there to remain until the morning. I had twenty-one rounds of ammunition myself; when I came up stairs the shutters were open, and large stones and brick laying about the floor; it must have been a large man to have thrown them. I returned all my ammunition.

WILLIAM GRAVES . I am a private in the 3rd regiment of Foot Guards. On the 7th of March I was stationed with the last witness.

Q. How were you armed for the protection of the house - A. I was furnished with a firelock, and twenty-one rounds of ammunition.

Q. When you were below did you load your piece - A. Yes, with blank cartridge. I remained below as long as my comrade. I heard some persons say, if we did not open the door they would break it open and come in, and put an end to our existence; I thought myself in great danger; I heard a firing; the firing ceased. When I came up stairs the Horse Guards came into the street directly. I heard a great many stones thrown against the window shutters and the doors.

JOSEPH POWELL . I am a comrade in the same regiment. I was stationed on the 7th of March at Mr. Robinson's street door. William Clements was along with me.

Q. While you were there, did you observe whether any stones were thrown against the street-door - A. There were brick-batts thrown at me over the door; they fell into the passage; they were throwing stones about an hour. They told us to open the street-door, or they would break it open. They threw the brick-batts through the fan-light over the door. I was in great danger. I was then armed on this occasion with blank cartridges, and I had twenty-one rounds of ball. I returned twenty-one rounds of ball, and twelve of blank cartridges. I returned the balls without the powder; I bit the balls off. I could not see the number of persons. collected in the streets.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am a private in the same regiment.

Q. What time in the evening did you go to Mr. Robinson's house - A. About six o'clock. I was stationed in the kitchen.

Q. Did you all go together - A. We set down for some considerable time, during which, we had half a pint of beer; we were in a state of perfect sobriety; in about an hour we were stationed by Burton, the corporal, bricks and stones were thrown in great quantity against the windows, some fell in the passage that came through the fan light; I could hear them throw at the windows and at the fan light a considerable time.

Q. Did you hear any fire arms discharged - A. Yes, between nine and ten o'clock; I did not see it it sounded in the parlour, it was occasioned by the stones and bricks coming through the windows, that was before any person was wounded; after that firing, I went into Mr. Robinson's parlour to see what had happened, I saw Burton the corporal, the butler, and two soldiers, that were with them; they had their firelock but I did not see them do any thing with them; I heard the people out of doors say, let us begin to pull the house down, and I heard a man say, so we will; I heard some persons trying to move the bricks at the bottom of the door I did believe they had begun to pull the house down; I fired off my piece.

THOMAS WHITE . I live at 39, Broad street, Carnaby market, I am a cabinet maker.

Q. Were you in Old Burlington street on the evening of the 7th of March - A. Yes, I got there about ten o'clock; I went there out of curiosity to see the damage that had been done the night before.

Q. When you got there how many people did you see there opposite of Mr. Robinson's house - A. When I first entered the street there were about fifty; they were in a body near Clifford-street, at the end of Burlington-street.

Q. How many did there appear to be directly opposite to Mr. Robinson's house - A. When I first came to the door there did not seem any body at all, only people passing and repassing.

Q. Did you observe any conversation between the soldiers and the people - A. Not at that time; afterwards I did. Between the first time of my going to Mr. Robinson's house and the second at the end of the street, there was a fire; with that I walked down to the end of the street; there was no mob then; I returned from the end of the street; I think it could not be above three or four minutes.

when I got to the post of Mr. Robinson's house, that fire was considered as an alarm to disperse the people at the end of the street, it was considered, so I returned to the front of Mr. Robinson's house, at that time I made a stop, the people were coming both ways at that time, there were about a dozen people collected at the front, I made a stand; I looked down into the area, I saw a soldier stand at the right hand parlour window, and at his right hand there was a man with a black or blue coat; I saw the third person behind them, I saw a third person between them in the back parlour there was a light behind; I heard one of the men out of the twelve men standing in the front of the house this man out of the twelve was rather joking to them, he said they had no business to fire we heard the report five minutes before that he was saying it in a jocular way that he had no business to fire with ball, he had better to load his piece with bullocks blood, and something was said about eighty shillings, with that the soldiers said, you had better mind how you act, or what you are about, or you will find the contrary, or something to that effect; the moment the soldier spoke I considered he spoke in such a manner I thought myself in danger, I made off momently my brother had come along with me, I thought we were in danger. I took an oblique direction from the front of the house right oblique across the road. Before I got three parts of the way across the road, a stone, or a brick or something was thrown against the house; it hit against the wood, and the moment the stone reached the house there were three successive fires at one moment, I heard the report, I ran, and then this unfortunate woman fell before me, or rather inclined on my left side I stooped down and laid hold of the persons head; I saw she had received a wound on the right temple, there was a person with her, I held her for the space of a minute and a half, there was an immence quantity of blood, and I conceived brains, it must have been congealed blood, or else she could not have lived so long as she did. I was very much affected, at that time, my brother called me, he came and laid hold of me by the shoulder and pulled me away, I left her.

Mr. Attorney General. Your brothers object, and your object was the same - A. Yes, to see the havock the public had done to Mr. Robinson's house.

Q. Had you happened in the course of your walk towards Burlington-street, observed any writings on the walls - A. Yes, many.

Q. Among others perhaps fifty pounds for Mr. Robinson's head - A. I do not recollect any such thing I saw chalkings on the walls, his effagy exibited upon a gibbet against the Asylum wall.

Q. When did you see a copy of your deposition - A. Yesterday, it was not exactly correct. I gave that book to one of the constables in attendance, he lent it my brother.

RICHARD WHITE . I am brother to the last witness, I live in Broad street Carnaby market. I was in Old Burlington-street on the evening of the 7th of March; I went with my brother out of curiosity, I saw a few people in Burlington-street. I had been in the street no great while, when I heard the report of a pistol, or a gun, I cannot say which, it was there were fourteen or fifteen people faceing of Mr. Robinson's house; I heard a conversation pass between the people who were in the front of Mr. Robinson's house, and the men within.

Q. You do not no whether that was the man that fired the piece, that man was a soldier I suppose - A. I do not know, there was a soldier at the window, I heard the man in the house wish the people to keep off the pavement, I cannot say, whether he was a soldier or not, the people seemed to signify the pieces were not loaded with shot, and they considered that they ought not to fire, without the riot act had been read; I heard somebody make use of these words, very soon a stone or brick was thrown in the window, they fired immediately three successive fires, at the first fire I made away from the house I went down Burlington-gardens, when I got into the street, I heard the cry of murder, at last I saw my brother, and the deceased young woman in his arms, she was wounded, and I considered she was dead; I got my brother away; some horse soldiers came into the street; that was after the firing there were hardly any one in the street then.

Mr. Serjeant Best. When they desired the people to go off the pavement from withinside of Mr. Robinson's house, the people said, they did not think their pieces was loaded with shot - A. Yes.

Q. You did not get your brother away until the horse soldiers were coming - A. No.

ROBERT BLACK . I am one of the butlers of Lord Buckinhamshire.

Q. Did you see James Ripley on the morning of the 7th of March - A. I saw him in Lord Buckinghamshire's house, he did not come to me in particular, I should think it was between ten and eleven o'clock; I furnished him with some small shot, I believe it is called swan shot, I had been loading a brace of pistols for Lord Buckinghamshire's butler that morning; his name is James Mitchell , he merely asked me to give him some of these shot, I supplied him to the best of my judgment, with two or three dozen in number, about the size of a pea

THOMAS MITCHELL . I am Lord Buckinghamshire's butler. On Monday evening, the 6th of March, about ten o'clock at night; I received a note from James Ripley , butler to Mr. Robinsons it was brought by sutton the footman.

Q. Have you got the note - A. No, I thought it of no consequence. I throwed it into the fire, it only was to request that if I had any thing in the shape of fire arms, I would send it by the bearer.

Q. Did he assign any reason for it - A. Yes, a most violent attack had been made upon Mr. Robinson's house the windows and doors had been broken in, and they were laid open to the street, it was apprehended that another attack would be made and that they had nothing to defend themselves with. I went to Robert Pack , the under butler, he was gone to bed, I stated to him what had happened in Burlington street at Mr. Robinson's house, and that Ripley had wrote to me, requesting that I would lend him fire arms; I told him to give me a pistol, he had got out of his bed; he unlocked a cupboard took a loaded pistol out, gave it me, I took the pistol and delivered it to Sutton, Mr. Robinson's

footman, he was very much agitated, he appeared so at what had taken place. I gave him the pistol; he put it into his jacket pocket; I told him it was leaded, to be careful; he went away.

WILLIAM HONE . Q. What have you to relate upon this subject - A. I was in Burlington-street on Tuesday evening, the 7th of March, in company with two other persons; I, and the two persons with me, looked down the area of Mr. Robinson's house; we had hardly got there, before a voice from the opposite side of the way said, come away from that side; we came from that side of the way, and crossed to the persons on the opposite side of the way, to Mr. Robinson's house; I staid looking there some little time nothing particular took place. The people seemed to stand out of curiosity; there were some boys running in and out of the people tossing, they noisy and troublesome to the people standing about, the boys were not standing together as a mob, they were standing in little lots of three and four; the mob or assemblage, were composed of men and weman, some of whom had children in their arms; they were people that seemed to be assembled out of curiosity. I suppose, in about five minutes after I had been in the street, a stone was thrown from just behind where I stood, the stone hit the broken fragment of glass, it was not a large square of glass that was struck, it sounded as if it was a loose piece of glass at the top of a pane; it came tinkling down from the top of the house; I remained there a little while longer and a person said, there was a corporal and a file of men in the house; we went further on, and something was thrown of a soft heavy substance like clay, it hit the shutters, of one of the windows; as soon as that was thrown there was a musket discharged; I saw the flash, and I heard the report, and as soon as that musket was discharged we moved further on, and stood on the steps of a door way; on the report of the musket, the people went up the street, and some down the street, the boys hooted and hissed and were very noisy; several stones were thrown in succession, at no time did I hear stones throwed more than one at a time. There were no volley of stones; the mob returned again; I saw no peace officers there, except about ten o'clock there were two officers and horse soldiers opposite of Mr. Robinson's house they turned down Clifford-street; the throwing continued; there was a substance came against the boards or shutters as I before described, that had a dead sound like clay, as soon as that was thrown, there were four muskets discharged from the parlour window of Mr. Robinson's house, there were not discharged in a volley, but in succession sharp, one after the other, the instant they were discharged, the people begun to run.

Mr. Attorney General. I understand you are a printer residing in Fleet-street - A. I am a bookseller not a printer.

Q. You were examined before the Coroner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you publish yourself what purported to be the depositions of the whole of the witnesses before the Coroner - A. I took down the depositions of the witnesses myself on the third and fourth day; the first and second day I took from the newspapers, assitsed by two persons minutes of the Inquest, of Jane Watson 's Inquest; I took the depositions my self, I have no knowledge that any of the witnesses, were yesterday reading that pamphlet.

DANIEL HARRIS . On the 7th of March, I was in Old Burlington-street, a little before seven o'clock, I was desired to be on duty at the Gloucester coffee-house, Piccadilly; I went from there into Old Burlington-street, in company with Daniel Heron and John Thomas Holmes ; we all three went down to Mr. Robinson's house together; there we saw one hundred and fifty people at the least; we went back to the magistrate, by his direction, to report to him every quarter of an hour; we went back to the house of Mr Robinson's again; we took into custody a young man for throwing of stones. I heard the stones go fast, and I heard the glass fall; there were one hundred and fifty people there, at the least.

DANIEL HERON. Q. Were you in court while Harris was examined - A. No. I was in Burlington street on the 7th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening.

Q. Did you see any number of people assembled - A. We did; throwing stones at Mr. Robinson's house; there might be two hundred persons, I speak within compass. We took a young man into custody that throwed a stone at Mr. Robinson's shutter, and bursted it open; we took him immediately to St. James's watchhouse; the mob said, they would come to him; we found ourselves in danger; we drew our cutlasses, and told the mob to keep back.

EDWARD CLARK . I took the prisoners into custody upon the Coroners warrant.

MR. THOMPSON. I am a surgeon; I attend at St. George's Hospital.

Q. Do you remember the deceased, Jane Watson - A. Yes; she was brought to the Hospital after she received the injury in Old Burlington-street; she was not dead then.

Q. Did you examine the wounds that she had received - A. Yes; immediately after she was admitted.

Q. Can you judge from the injury that she then had, what was the cause of her death - A. She had two wounds on the right temple; she died about twelve days after she was admitted into the Hospital. After she was dead, I examined her brain; I found it very much injured indeed; a large substance was in it; I could find nothing else; the injury that she had received, was the cause of her death; I have no doubt of it.

James Ripley 's Defence, read.

May it please your lordship and gentlemen of the jury; my counsel being prevented by the law from either observing on the evidence offerded against me or laying my defence before you, I am obliged to have recourse to this mode of defending myself against a charge of wilful murder. Considering the painful situation in which I stand; the discussion that our cause has undergone out of this court, and the various publications respecting it, which have lately been most industriously circulated through this town, I am sure you will pardon my requesting you to dismiss from your minds whatever you have

read or heard of this transaction before you came in court, and that you will give your verdict on this evidence that you shall this day hear. Let me also entreat of you to separate our case from a subject that has lately been the topic of much discussion, and on which there has been a great difference of opinion.

Neither I, nor my fellow prisoners, had nothing to do with the Corn Law. We were ordered to defend a house; the felonious distruction had been attempted; and we are brought here to answer with our lives, because we have faithfully discharged the trust committed to our care, and the duty imposed upon us.

Our defence rests upon general principles; you, the Jury, and every member of the Community, have an equal interets with me, and my fellow prisoners, in supporting these principles; if these principles are broken in upon, or brought into doubt, the security of property is distroyed; and the peaceable and well disposed men of society, will be at all times at the mercy of a furious and inraged populace.

The crime of murder, as the language of the record itself informs you, consists in killing a fellow creature with malice aforethought; I learn indeed besides, that direct malice against an individual, which is made out by direct proof, and is called express malice; the law in certain cases, presumes the existence of malice, and describs it by the term of implied malice; From express malice our cases must be entirely free; we could by no possibility have had any knowledge of malice against or disposition to injure either the unfortunate deceased or any other person that were before Mr. Robinson's house on the night when she unhapily met with her death; I think I can with equal clearness, shew you that there is no pretence for saying there exists any implied malice. The Law which I am about to state cannot but be familar to the Learned Judges, but I trust I shall be forgiven in shortly bringing it before their review for your information in the humble hope that it will receive your Lordships sanction, and desiring only that as it is sanctioned by them, it may be acted upon by you in the decission of our case.

I submit that every man is justified in the use of fire arms in defence of his life, or protection of his own property, or that a fellow subject in whose assistance he is called against the commission of a felonious attack. It is not necessary to delay the use of arms until the felonious attack be actually made; it is only necessary to wait till the immediate intention to make such an attack be manifested by some open act. The principle of Law is bottomed on our nature, and is recognized in that sacred act which establishes the liberty of our Country.

In the Bill of Rights it is expressly declared that the subject of this Country, may have arms for their defence suitable to their conditions. Lord Chief Justice Hale, one of the most learned and humane Judges that ever sat in Westminster Hall, says, if A had attempted a burglary upon the house of B with the intent to steal, or to kill him, or had attempted to burn the house, if B of any of his servants, or any within the house had shot and killed A, this had not been so much as felony nor had he forfeited ought for it; for his house is his castle of defence, and therefore he may justify assembling persons for the safe guard of his house.

The case made out against us, if made out in fact, comes completely within the doctrine of Lord Hale, as the law stood with regard to the breaking of houses in his time. After the house had been broken in the manner in which it was, in the continuance of this riot; after the threats uttered against Mr. Robinson and his family, what could those who were in the house expect, but that if the populace succeeded in forcing admission, they would kill those whom they found in it, who had endeavoured to resist them? But since Lord Hale wrote, the law has made it a capital felony for any persons riotously and tumultuously assembled together, to demolish or pull down any dwelling house. Some writers have, with universal approbation, carried the doctrine of Lord Hale beyond the case of burglary. The only injurious breaking of a house known in his time to any felony committed against or in any house.

Mr. Justice Foster says, in the case of justifiable self-defence, the injured party may repel force by force, in defence of his person, habitation, or property, against any one who manifestly intendeth and endeavoureth, by violence or surprise, to commit a known felony on either. In these cases, he is not obliged to retreat, but may pursue his adversary till he findeth himself out of danger, and if in a conflict between them, he happeneth to kill, such killing is justifiable. The right of self-defence in these cases is founded in the law of nature, and is not nor can be suspended by any law of society, (Foster, 277.) The words now read to you, are those of that learned and excellent Judge Mr. Serjeant Hawkins, in his Pleas of the Crown, says, the owner of a house, or any of his servants or lodgers, may kill any one who attempts to burn it, or to commit murder, robbery, or any other felony, I Hawkins, c. 28, p. 21.

It has been generally understood, that the great Lord Mansfield, in consequence of the riots which so long disgraced this metropolis in the year 1780, declared, that he was astonished that it could ever be doubted that soldiers called upon to preserve the public peace, and to protect the lives, houses, and property of his Majesty's subjects, did not stand precisely in the situation of any other individual, and had not a right to repress force by force, in the same manner, and to the same extent, as the owner might have done.

Let me now, Gentlemen, intreat you to apply this law to the case you are now called upon to decide. For many days before the spirit of disorder broke out into acts of riot, attempts were made to intimidate the members of parliament from exercising their judgment on a measure then depending in the House of Commons, among various other means, placards, and writings on the walls, threatning those who suggested or supported the measure. Among others that were seen, Mr. Robinson was exhibited on a gibbet, and rewards was offered for his head. The fury of the populace were directed against him, and those

who should protect him, or his house or property. On Monday, the 6th of March, in the evening, his house was, by a large concourse of persons attacked, broken and entered. In the middle of the night of the 6th the attack was repeated with increased violence. On the morning of Tuesday the house was again attacked with increased violence; the house was entered, and furniture and property publicly destroyed. On the evening of Tuesday the attack upon the house was renewed with increased violence; on these occasions the windows were broken, the pallisadoes in front of the house torn up, the doors forced; some of the mob broke in and destroyed a a part of the furniture which they used in committing fresh acts of violence, and the lives of Mr. Robinson and his servants were loudly and repeatedly threatened. The frenzy which directed the rioters was increased, and their mischievous designs were aided by the advance of night. An attack of a most alarming nature was again commenced, and those to whom the care of the house was entrusted would, as I humbly submit, have been justified in taking the strongest measures for dispersing the rioters; instead of this, it has already appeared, that blank cartridges only were fired; this was found rather to provoke insult than repel aggression. The mob encouraged each other to still further acts of violence, by calling out, that the soldiers did not dare to fire ball.

Felony upon felony had already been committed; for I believe my Lord will tell you, that every tumultuous breaking of any part of the house is a beginning to demolish, and a felony within the law; and the next thing to be expected was the entire destruction of the house, and the murder of those who defended it.

If it should occur to you that the deceased was not engaged in these riots, his Lordship I conceive will tell you that makes no difference in our case. If a man, meaning only to resist felons, unfortunately kills an innocent person, such killing is not murder; that case was expressly decided in the case of Lovett, cited in Coke, c. 538. It may perhaps be said, by some persons, that there was not sufficient violence to justify firing from the house; if that be said, it must be by persons who stood only a short time on the scene of action. In all alarms there are short and dreadful instances of calamity. Your attention, if after what you have heard, you shall think it necessary, will now be called to those who witnessed these transactions from the commencement. On the Monday night again, on the Tuesday morning, and the Tuesday evening, which unfortunately terminated in the death of the deceased, these witnesses can only present that entire case, on which alone your judgment can be formed. With these observations, Gentlemen, I leave my case in your hands, perfectly satisfied that I shall receive from your justice a verdiot of not guilty.

Burton, Herbert, and Mathews's defence.

My Lord, we have not any observations to trouble the Jury with. We were called upon to assist in protecting the house; that we acted with caution, moderation, and care, for the lives of our fellow subjects. After blank cartridges had been fired without any other effect on the mob than to encrease their violence and defiance; at length, two pieces, one a pistol, was fired with shot, when our lives was in the greatest immediate danger. The object of this was to intimidate; and we regret as sincerely as any men can do, that any person should have been mortally injured.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-14

437. GABRIEL MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , two hempen sacks, value 6 s. two bushels of oats, value 6 s. and one bushel of split beans, value 6 s. the property of Edward Dampier .

EVAN DAVIES . I am in the service of Edward Dampier , he has a country house at Enfield; the prisoner was his servant , I was intrusted by my master to watch the prisoner, on the 28th of March, the prisoner said he had no oats; I looked down, and found four or five sacks. On the 29th, I was ordered down to Mr. Dampier's, I watched the prisoner with the team out of the yard; the prisoner stopped his team at Norton Falgate; Smith the officer was appointed to meet him there, Smith examined the cart, I saw Smith the officer find a sack of oats, and a bushel and a half of split beans in sacks, the sacks were Mr. Dampier's sacks.

MR. SMITH. I am an officer. I got upon the dung and found the oats and split beans in sacks, they were concealed under the dung, I have had them ever since; I produce them.

MR. DAMPIER. I can swear to the sacks, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It was a general rule for me to take what corn I thought proper for my horses, and what the horses did not eat; I left in the stable for them when they returned.

GUILTY aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr, Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-15

438. ELIAS LEVY was indicted for feleniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a wooden chest, value 18 d. and ninety pounds weight of tea, value 35 l. 9 s. 2 d. the property of John Challenor .

JOHN CHALLENOR . I am a grocer . On the 18th of August, 1813, I sent my carman, William Prior to the East India Company's warehouse; he only brought four out of the five home.

WILLIAM PRIOR . On Wednesday the 18th of August, I was sent by Mr. Challenor to the East India Company's warehouse, in Crutched Friars; I got five chests of tea, I brought home four, I was going for a hogshead of sugar; I left my cart in Wentworth street , I was absent from the cart about ten minutes; I went to the cart to take it into Mr. Costen's, the sugar baker's yard, and when I came to the cart, I missed one chest of tea; I had seen five in the cart before that time, and when I returned there were only four in it.

Q. Do you know any thing about this chest of tea - A. No, I saw the same chest that I lost in Coblers-court, Essex-street, I got the empty chest again, the tea was taken out of it.

Q. How came you to find it in Cobler's-court - A. I went with the officers, and they found it; I am sure it was the came chest, the number on the chest was 6947, the same number as was in the permit.

SHIPLEY. Q. What do you know about it - A. I know nothing of the prisoner at all; I never saw him before to my knowledge; I can swear to no more than the two that I swore at first. I saw them empty a chest of tea out into a bag, one was a jew, and the other a butcher, the prisoner was not there I know nothing of him.

LITTLE JOHN. On the 18th of August, 1813, I came down Wentworth-street I saw three men standing before the cart; two of the men have been transported.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-16

439. JOSEPH RUDD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , in the dwelling-house of the Right Reverend Father in God, Edward Vernon , Archbishop of York, a pocket book, value 6 d. a Bank note, value 10 l. and a Bank note, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Mowle .

JOSEPH MOWLE was called and not appearing, his recognisances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-17

440. WILLIAM SWEETMAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Jonathan Coxwell , on the 20th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two three shilling Bank tokens, one hat, value 6 s. and one box value 1 d. his property.

JONATHAN COXWELL . I am a journeyman shoemaker . On the 20th of March, I had been after seeing a daughter of mine that lived in London, that made me out late, it might be after eleven o'clock I cannot justly say what o'clock it was.

Q. Where were you - A. In Drury-lane ; three men laid hold of me, one of them put his hand into my breeches pocket and took out two three shilling pieces and some halfpence out of my breeches pocket.

Q. What were you doing - A. I was going down the street; I was afraid to resist there were three of them; I was afraid of my life, they, all had hold of me; the prisoner was one of them; the prisoner held me the second time I got away the first time; when I got away I was going along the street; the same man laid hold of me again, one of them threw me down.

Q. Were they the same men - A. The prisoner was one of the same; I cannot say to the other men; I am sure the prisoner is one of the men that got hold of me the second time; I hallooed watch, the prisoner swore I should not hallow, he clapped his hand over my mouth; I was almost strangled.

Q. Are you sure of his person - A. Yes, they cut my coat pocket to get at a screw box, in which was a duplicate of a watch, they took the box out of my pocket, and the duplicate in it, the second time.

Q. Was there any thing else that they took from you, besides the screw box and the duplicate - A. My hat, nothing else. The prisoner held me down upon the ground on my back; the prisoner is the man that clapped his hand over my mouth, and they took from me these things.

Q. Have you seen any of these things that were taken from you since - A. No, they took these things from me by force; I lost a screw box, a duplicate, a hat, and two three shilling pieces; I have not seen any of them since.

ISAAC DUNKLEY . I am a patrole. On the 20th of March, I lit of Coxwell, he said, he had just been robbed, he told me the same account, and related the same circumstances to me, as he has now, he told me, that he was just come up to town, that he had been looking for his daughter, I recommended him to go on, he went on, to his daughter, presently I heard him call out watch, I went up to him; as I was going, I met the prisoner in full run; I catched the prisoner running from him; I asked him where he was going running at that time of night, he said he was going home; I asked him what was the matter of calling out for the watch up there, he said, he did not know; I said, you must come with me, while I see what is the matter; I seized him, after that, I got to Coxwell, Coxwell said, patrole I am robbed again, by the same three men that robbed me before. I had hold of the prisoner by the collor, I said, do you know any thing of this young man, he said, I know this man particularly well he is the man that stood before me, and catched hold of me by the throat while the other man robbed me, and run away with his hat, he said that immediately upon seeing the prisoner, the prisoner said, he knew nothing of it.

Q. To Coxwell. What do you mean by their robbing you the second time - A. The first time was my money, the second time was my hat, the screw box, and the duplicate.

GUILTY - DEATH . aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-18

441. ELIZA FENNING was indicted for that she, on the 21st of March , feloniously and unlawfully did administer, and caused to be administered, to Haldebart Turner , Robert Gregson Turner , and Charlotte Turner , his wife , certain deadly poison, to wit, Arsenic, with intent the said persons to kill and murder .

SECOND COUNT. That she did cause to be taken by the same persons arsenic, with intent to kill and murder them.

THIRD and FOURTH COUNT For like offence, as in the first and second, only charging the offence to be committed against Robert Gregson Turner only, in one of the counts, and in the other, against Charlotte Turner .

CHARLOTTE TURNER . I am the wife of Robert Gregson Turner; he is a law stationer in Chancery-lane; his father , Mr. Haldebart Turner, is his partner ; he lives at Lambeth . The prisoner came into my service as cook about seven weeks before the accident.

Q. In a short time after she came into your service had you occasion to reprove her - A. I had, about three weeks after she came.

Q. What was the occasion that you reproved her - A. I observed her one night go into the young men's room partly undressed. I said it was very indecent of her to go into the young men's room thus undressed.

Q. What age were the young men - A. I suppose seventeen or eighteen years old.

Q. How many of them were they - A. Two; I reproved her severely the next morning for her conduct; I threatened to discharge her, and gave her warning to quit; but she shewed contrition for it. I forgave her, and retained her; that passed over.

Q. What was her department after that for the remaining month - A. I observed that she failed in the respect that she before paid me, and appeared extremely sullen.

Q. Did she, after this, say any thing to you upon the subject of yeast dumplings - A. She did; a fortnight before the transaction she requested me to let her make some yeast dumplings, professing to be a capital hand. That request very frequently was made. On Monday, the 20th of March, she came into the dining-room, and said the brewer had brought some yeast.

Q. Had you given any order to the brewer to bring any yeast - A. Oh, no. I told her I did not wish to trouble the man, that was not the way I had them made, I generally had the dough of the baker, that saved the cook a good deal of trouble, and was always considered best, but as the man had brought a little yeast, on the next day she might make some. On Tuesday morning the 21st, I, as usual, went into the kitchen. I told her she might make some; but before she made the dumplings, to make a beefsteak pye for the dinner of the young men; and as she would have to leave the kitchen to get the steaks, I did not wish her to leave the kitchen after the dumplings were made. I told her I wished them to be mixed with milk and water. She said she would do them as I desired her. This was about half past eleven; she carried the pye to the baker's before the kneading of the dough commenced. I told her, I wished her not to leave the dough, that she might carry the pye to the baker's. She carried the pye to the baker's near twelve. I went into the kitchen after she had been to the baker's; I gave directions about making the dough. I said, I suppose there is no occasion for me stopping; she said, Oh, no, she knew very well how to do it. Then I went up stairs. In about half an hour I went into the kitchen again; I then found the dough made; it was set before the fire to rise.

Q. What other servant have you - A. Another maid; her name is Sarah Peer ; at the time that the dough was made, I had given Sarah Peer orders to go into the bed room to repair a counterpane. I am certain that during the time the dough was made no person was in the kitchen but the prisoner; this was about half past twelve; we dine at three, the young men at two. From half past twelve to three I was in the kitchen two or three times, until the dough was made up into dumplings.

Q. Where was the dough - A. It remained in a pan before the fire to rise; I observed it never did rise. I took off the cloth, and looked at it. My observation was it had not risen, and it was in a very singular position, in which position it remained until it was divided into dumplings. It was not put into the pan as I have seen dough; its shape was singular; it retained that shape to the last. I am confident it never was meddled with after it had been put there.

Q. About what time was the dividing the dough into dumplings - A. I suppose about twenty minutes before twelve. I was not in the kitchen at the time; I had been in the kitchen half an hour before that time.

JURY. Q. Did you remark to the prisoner the singular appearance of the dough - A. I did not remark to her the singular appearance; I told her it never had risen; the prisoner said it would rise before she wanted it.

Q. How many dumplings would there be - A. Six; the prisoner had divided it into six dumplings. About three o'clock I sat down to dinner; the dumplings were brought upon the table. I told the other servant they were black and heavy, instead of white and light.

Q. Who sat down to dinner with you - Mr. Haldebart Turner, myself, and my husband. I helped Mr. Haldebart Turner and my husband to some dumpling, and took a small piece myself. I found myself affected in a few minutes in the stomach after I had eaten; I did not eat a quarter of a dumpling; I felt myself very faint, and an extreme burning pain, which increased every minute. It became so bad I was obliged to leave the table I went up stairs.

JURY. You eat nothing else - A. I eat a bit of beef steak that the prisoner had cooked. When I went up stairs I perceived my sickness had increased and my head was swollen extremely. I reached very violently; I wondered none of the family come up to my assistance; I was half an hour alone. When I came down I found my husband's father very bad, and my husband. I was ill from half past three till nine, sick and reaching; at nine it abared, but did not cease; my chest was swollen; we called in a gentleman near, and afterwards Mr. Marshall, the surgeon.

HALDEBART TURNER. A. You are the father of Robert Gregson Turner - A. Yes. On Tuesday the 21st of March I was at my son's house; I dined there. Our dinner consisted of yeast dumplings, rump steaks, and potatoes.

Q. Did you eat of the dumplings - A. I did; after some time Mrs. Charlotte Turner left the room indisposed. She went up stairs; we did not then know she was very ill. Some time afterwards my son left the room, and went down stairs. I followed him shortly afterwards, and went into the parlour below. Coming out I met my son at the foot of the stairs; he told me had been very sick, and had brought up his dinner. I found his eyes were exceedingly swollen, very much indeed. I said, I thought it very extraordinary; I was taken ill myself in less than three minutes afterwards; the effect was so violent, that I had hardly time to get into the yard before my dinner came up. I felt considerable heat across my stomach and chest, and pain.

Q. Was the vomitting of a common kind - A. I

never experienced any thing before like it for violence; I was terribly irritated; it was not more than a quarter of an hour my apprentice Roger Gadsell was taken very ill in a similar way to myself.

Q. Was your son sick also - A. He was.

Q. Did the prisoner give any of you any assistance while you were sick - A. None in the least.

Q. Did you observe whether the prisoner eat any dumplings - A. I did not; I had suspicion of arsenic; I made a search the next morning; I found a brown dish or a pan that the dumplings had been mixed in; there appeared to be the leavings of the dumplings in it; I put some water into the pan, and stired it up with a spoon, with a view to form a liquid of the whole; I found upon the pan being set down for half a minute, upon my taking it up slowly, and in a slanting direction; I discovered a white powder at the bottom; I shewed it to several persons in the house; I kept it in my custody, and shewed it to Mr. Marshell when he came; no person had access to it.

Q. Had you any arsenic - A. Yes; I kept it in a drawer in the office: any person might have access to it.

Q. Do you happen to know whether the prisoner can road - A. I believe she can read and write.

Q. To Mrs. Turner. Is that so - A. She can read and write very well.

Q. To Mr. Turner. Was that drawer locked or open - A. It always has remained open.

Q. Who lit the fire in that office, do you know - A. It was the prisoner's duty to do so; waste paper was kept in that drawer; she might properly resort to that drawer for paper to light her fire. I saw that paper of arsenic in that drawer on the 7th of March, never after that time; I heard of it being missed about a fortnight before the 21st of March. I observed that the knives and the forks that we had to eat the dumplings with were black; there was no vinegar used in the sauce at all. I have two of them in my pocket to shew, (witness producing two of the knives,) I saw them with this black upon them the next day; on the next day I asked the prisoner how she came to introduce any ingrediants into the dumplings that were so prejudicial to us; she replied that it was not in the dumplings, but it was in the milk that Sarah Peer brought in. I had several discourses with her on that day on this subject; during the whole of which, she persisted that it was the milk, as before described, that milk had been used for the sauce only; the prisoner made the dumplings with the refuse of the milk that had been left at breakfast. I asked the prisoner if any person but herself had mixed or had any thing to do with the dumplings; she expressly said no.

Mr. Alley. Q. In the conversation you had with the prisoner, did you tell her that you had missed the poison - A. I did not.

ROGER GADSDELL . I am an apprentice to Mr. Turner.

Q. Do you remember seeing in the office in a paper with arsenic deadly poison upon it - A. I do, sir; the last day I saw it was Tuesday, the 7th of March, I missed it in a day or two after; I mentioned in the office that I missed it. On Tuesday, the 21st of March. I went into the kitchen between three and four in the afternoon; I had dined at two; I observed there a plate on the table with a dumpling and a half; I took a knive and fork up, and was going to cut it to eat it; the prisoner exclaimed, Gadsdell, do not eat that, it is cold and heavy, it will do you no good; I eat a piece about as big as a walnut; there was a small quantity of sauce in the boat; I put a bit of bread in it, and sepped it up, and eat it; this might be twenty minutes after three. Mr. Robert Turner came into the office soon after, and said, he was very ill. I was taken ill about ten minutes after but not so ill as to vomit. In consequence of the distress the family were in, I was sent off to Mrs. Turner, the mother; I was very sick going and com- coming back; I thought I should die.

Q. Had the prisoner made you any yeast dumplings the night before - A. She had; I partook of them, and the other maid; they were light and white; quite different from these dumplings.

Q. Who made the fire in the office - A. The prisoner; nobody could get into the office until I did; any person might go into the office in the day; at night it was locked; loose paper was kept in the drawer where the arsenic was kept. I seeing her going to that drawer, it would not strike me as any thing extraordinary; I should not watch to see what she did there.

MARGARET TURNER . Upon this melancholy occasion I was sent for: when I arrived, I found my husband, son, and daughter, extremely ill, and soon after I came, the prisoner was sick, and vomitting; I exclaimed, oh, these devilish dumplings, supposing they had done the mischief; she said not the dumplings, but the milk, ma'm; I asked her what milk she meaned; she said the halfpenny worth of milk that Sally had fetched to make the sauce.

Q. Did she say who had made the sauce - A. My daughter. I said that cannot be, it could not be the sauce; she said, yes; Gadsdell had but a very little bit of the dumpling, not bigger than a nut; but he had licked up three parts of a boat of sauce with a bit of bread.

Q. To Mrs. Turner. Was any of the sauce made with the milk that Sarah fetched - A. It was; I mixed it, and left it for Eliza to make.

ROBERT GREGSON TURNER . Q. Did you partake of the dumplings - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you eat any of the sauce - A. Not a portion of it whatever. I was taken ill soon after dinner, I first felt an inclination to be sick; I then felt a strong heat across my chest; I was extremely sick.

Q. Did it produce any swelling in you - A. I was exactly as my father and wife, was sick and stronger symptoms; I had eaten a dumpling and a half.

Q. Were your symtoms any other but such as would be produced by poison - A. I should presume so. We were all taken in the same way and pretty near the same time.

SARAH PEER . I am house-maid to Mrs. Turner; I have lived in the family near eleven months.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of warning being given to the prisoner some time after she came - A. I do, sir; after that I heard her say she should not like Mr. and Mrs. Robert Turner.

Q. On the morning of the 21st of March, did you go for any milk - A. Yes; that was after two, after I had had my dinner, I eat beef steak pie for my dinner; I never eat any of the dumplings; the same flour was used for the crust of the pie as the dumplings.

Q. Had you any concern whatever in making the dough for the dumplings - A. No, sir, nor the sauce, I was not in the kitchen when the dough was made; I had permission of my mistress to go out that afternoon; when I had taken the dumplings up I went directly.

Q. To Mr. Haldebart Turner. Did you keep this arsenic to poison the mice that infested the office - A. Yes, it was only to be used in the office.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I took the prisoner into custody on the 23rd of March, I asked her whether she suspected there was any thing in the flour - A. She said she had made a beef steak pie that day with the same flour that she had made the dumplings; she said she thought it was in the yeast, she saw a read sediment at the bottom of the yeast after she had used it.

JOSEPH PARSON . I am a servant to Mr. Edmonds, the brewer, in Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. Were you in the habit of taking table beer to Mr. Turner's - A. Yes. On Thursday the prisoner asked me for some yeast; I told her if I came that way on Saturday I would bring her a bit, if not on Monday; I brought her the yeast on Monday; I took it out of the stelliards were the casks lay; it was the same yeast as bakers have.

Mr. Alley. Q. When you brought the yeast to the house you gave it to the last witness, not to the prisoner - A. Yes, I gave it to the house maid.

Q. To Sarah Peer . What did you do with the yeast - A. I emptied it into a white basin; I told Eliza that the brewer had brought the yeast; she took the basin; I saw no more of it.

MR. JOHN MARSHALL . I am a surgeon. On the evening of the 21st of March, I was sent for at Mr. Turner's family in a great hurry; I got there a quarter before nine o'clock; I found Mr. Turner and Mrs. Turner very ill; the symptoms were such as would be produced by arsenic; I have no doubt of it by the symptoms; the prisoner also was ill, that was caused by the same.

Q. Did Mr. Haldebart Turner shew you a dish or pan the next morning - A. He did; I examined the dish; I washed it with a tea-kettle of warm water, I first stand it, and let it subside; I decanted it off, I found half a tea spoon of white powder; I washed it a second time; I decidedly found it to be arsenic.

Q. Will arsenic if it is cut with a knife, will it produce on the knife the colour of blackness - A. I have no doubt of it; I examined the remains of the yeast; there was no arsenic in that.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I am truly innocent of all the charge, as God is my witness; I am innocent, indeed I am; I liked my place, I was very comfortable; as to my master saying I did not assist him, I was too ill. I had no concern with the drawer at all; when I wanted a piece of paper I always asked for it.

COURT. Q. To Roger Gadsdell . You say the prisoner used to light the office fire - A. She used, I and my fellow apprentice have seen her go to that drawer a many times.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-19

442. CHARLES BEARD , HENRY BEARD , and JOSEPH MOULDER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Jonas , about the hour of four in the night on the 17th of January , and stealing therein four waistcoats, value 12 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. a shawl value 16 s. a coat, value 1 l. 4 s. and a remnant of patent cord, value 1 s. his property.

ANN JONAS . I am the wife of John Jonas , my husband is very ill and cannot attend. We live in High-street in the parish of St. Leonard. Shoreditch .

Q. On the night of Friday the 17th of February, what time did you go to bed - A. About half after ten o'clock; I went up stairs; I looked to see the house was all safe, I came down about seven o'clock I was alarmed, I saw the hole from the stall into the shop, and I missed the articles in the indictment.

RACHAEL DAVIS . I am servant to Mrs. Jonas. On the night of the 17th of February. I saw the house fastened up at half after ten, I noticed the partition between our house and the cobler's stall, it was whole on that night; the next morning I came down at six o'clock to fill the tea kettle; it was quite dark then, I remained up after that.

Q. When did you first discover that the place had been broken through - A. About seven o'clock; the shoemaker's boy knocked at the counter through the hole with a hammer; that hole had been broken through without my hearing it; we were up two pair of stairs; it was about seven o'clock when I first saw the hole.

HENRY SLATON . Q. Your father keeps this cobler's stall under Jonas's shop - A. Yes; my father usually locks the stall up with a padlock, when I came to the stall on the morning of the 18th, I found the staple wrenched out, it laid in the stall; when I opened the stall, I found the boards of the stall had been broken away, and there was a hole into Mr. Jonas's shop, I took the hammer and knocked on the counter to alarm Mr. Jonas's people, and then I went and knocked at Mr. Jonas's door.

SARAH BRITT , JUNIOR. On the 18th of February, the prisoner, Charles Beard, brought me two pair of breeches and a waistcoat piece, he told me to go and pledge them, and to get as much upon them as I could; he wanted the money for his brother, Henry Beard . I pawned them at Mr. Harris's, Old Street-road, for eleven shillings; I gave the money to Charles Beard ; Charles Beard works for my brother, he is a wood-chopper.

SARAH BRITT SENIOR. Q. Do you know Charles Beard - A. Yes; on Saturday between twelve and one o'clock, Charles Beard brought me a bundle tied up in a white handkerchief, two waistcoats, and one pair of breeches; he told me to take care of them.

THOMAS THWAITES . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, pawnbroker. On the morning of the 18th of February, Sarah Britt , jun. pawned two pair of breeches with me for eleven shillings; they were tied up in this bit of cord.

Prosecutrix. These breeches are my husbands property, they are part of the articles that I lost.

SARAH BRITT . They are the two pair of breeches and the remuant of cord that Charles Beard sent me to pawn.

Charles Beard 's Defence. My brother came to me and gave me them things.

Henry Beard was not put on his Defence.

Moulder's Defence. I bought the breeches of Henry Beard , I gave him three shillings for them.

CHARLES BEARD GUILTY , aged 16.

MOULDER GUILTY aged 18.

Confined six months and whipped in jail .

HENRY BEARD NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-20

443. ANN CARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February two coats, value 1 l. 4 s. one pair of breeches, value 5 s. a pillow, value 2 s. a blanket, value 4 s. three shirts, value 16 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. and a waistcoat value 3 s. the property of Israel Newfalte , in his dwelling house .

ISRAEL NEWFALTE. I live at 134, Rosemary Lane , I am a dealer in Marine stores , the prisoner was my servant , her conduct has not been so well the latter part as at the first part of her service. On the 28th of February, I asked her for my clothes she had the care of all my clothes; my clothes laid upon a mahogany table; she said they were on the chair; I asked her to show them to me, she went to the chair and said they were not there she hesitated, and seemed to be in a fright, she put her hand into her pocket and pulled out twenty one duplicates I took them out of her hand and charged the watch with her, afterwards I asked her where she had pawned them she owned she had pawned them herself.

THOMAS PARSONS . I am shopman to John Annis , pawnbroker, Sparrow corner Minories.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner before - A. Yes, several times; I produce the articles that she pledged at several times, since the 13th of October, the duplicates that the prosecutor has got correspond with the duplicate in my hand.

Prosecutor. This is the pillow that was on her own bed, and the blanket they are mine, the coat, waistcoat, and shirt, is mine.

Q. The prisoner was not entrusted to sell any of these articles was she - A. Never, I had no occasion for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged these things with intent to get them back again.

GUILTY aged 62.

Confined one Year and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-21

444. HENRY MAY was indicted for that he at the delivery of the King's Goal of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 20th of September, in the 49th year of his Majesty's Reign, was tried and convicted of grand larceny, and sentenced to be Transported for the term of Seven Years; that he afterwards on the 8th of March last, feloniously, and without lawful excuse was at large in this Kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be Transported .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex jury before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-22

445. WILLIAM FOWLER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Story about the hour of three in the night on the 26th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, five horse shoes, value 5 s. two prickle-punches value 1 s. a hammer, value 2 d. and three punches, value 6 d. the property of Stephen Hambrook .

STEPHEN HAMBROOK . I live in Charles Reeve's house.

Q. Who is Robert Story - A. He is landlord of the premises where this shop is that I rent, he lives at the back part of the premises of the shop.

Q. Does he occupy any part of the dwelling house - A. The back part of the shop is his dwelling, it is one building altogether.

Q. Who and what is Mr. Story - A. He keeps an hackney coach , and lets out all the different parts in tenements, it is all one building, the dwelling houses are in the galleries, the lower parts are stables and coach houses alone.

Q. Does Mr. Story sleep there - A. Yes, he sleeps in the gallery adjoining the shop in a part of the same building, he has a maid servant; she sleeps in the same building as far as I know; he has two rooms.

Q. When was the time you had the information that something had been stolen from you - A. On Sunday morning the 26th of March, about a quarter past five, I was called up by Mr. Furzeman and Cowley, I was in bed at the time; I came down, they informed me that my shop had been robbed of the property, I had left in it, I do not sleep in the same building, as the shop, I live under another landlord.

Q. When you went to bed on the night of the 25th do you know whether the shop was fastened - A. I fastened it myself with a padlock, in the front, and with a chissel jammed in the private door that I made no use of, it is always shut there was no window open; it was all fast all round when I came to my shop; I found the private door open; that door had been forced with a chissel; I looked round and found all the old horse shoes gone; I went with Furzeman to the watch-house, where I found the prisoner, and the horse shoes.

Q. Was this chissel outside of the private door - A. No, inside; I go out of the folding doors, and padlock them, I knew the horse shoes in the watch-house to be mine, they were my own work, they

were in the shop when I left it on Saturday night.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. Yes, he was a porter at the next shop to me, an iron plate worker.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . On the 26th of March, about haf past five I was going through King's Arms Yard, I saw the prisoner come from behind a coach that stood before a door that was broken open; I asked him what he did there, he said, he had been locked out of his lodgings, he had been laying underneath the coach all night; I said I was afraid he had not; I turned my head round; I saw the horse shoes in a sack at the back part of the coach, they were tied up. I asked him what he had got there in the bundle, he said, he knew nothing at all of them. I then saw the door broken open; I secured the prisoner, the shoes and the tools, and took him to the watchhouse. I produce the horse shoes chisels and punches, that were in the bag, and this hammer.

Prosecutor. They are all my property, and what I had left in my shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in real distress, I did not force the doors open; I found them open.

GUILTY aged 38.

Confined one Year and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-23

446. MARY RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , nineteen yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of Richard Darvell , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH WATTS . On the 21st of February, I was passing by Mr. Darvell's shop between five and six in the evening, his shop is 118, Cock-hill, Ratcliffe , I saw the prisoner with a piece of printed cotton in her apron, she was about a yard from the step of the door; she perceived I was looking at her, she threw it down on the step of the door, and walked away; I took it up, and followed the prisoner, brought her back, and gave her and the printed cotton to Thomas Morris , Mr. Darvell's shopman.

THOMAS MORRIS , I am servant to Mr. Darvell, he is a linen draper ; I produce the piece of print, Joseph Watts delivered to me; I know it to be Mr. Darvell's property by the mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence I was passing Mr. Darvells, shop; I picked up this print outside of the door; I had no apron on.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-24

447. THOMAS YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a box, value 1 s. and twenty nine pounds weight of tea, value 18 l. the goods of Esther Lloyd .

SECOND COUNT. For stealing the like property, the property of Thomas Green .

WILLIAM PALMER . I am a porter. On the 21st of February, I was employed by Esther Lloyd to take seven chests and one box of tea, from the East India Company's warehouse, to Thomas Green, Little Windmill-street; I stopped in the way at the corner of Rose-street, Soho ; a coal waggon was coming past; I had hold of the truck; I turned my head, and saw the prisoner Thomas Young , about twenty yards off with the box of tea on his shoulder, I left the truck and pursued him, and the box of tea was taken to Thomas Green's, and the prisoner to Malborough-street.

Q. Was there any mark on the box - A. There was 932. the King's number. I noticed it before it was taken from the truck, this is the box, I am sure it is the same, it was taken to Green's, for fear the time of the permit should expire before it reached him, and afterwards taken to the office; the officer produces it here.

ESTHER LLOYD . I employed Palmer and Humphreys to bring tea for me from the East India Company's warehouse for customers; at the time I saw the tea loaded on my truck; I knew the number of the box before it was stolen, the number was 932; I employed Humphreys and Palmer, to take the tea to Mr. Greens.

FRANCIS HUMPHREYS . I am servant to Esther Lloyd ; I was assisting William Palmer in carrying this tea; we had seven chests of tea and this box in Rose-street, at the further end of Rose-street, there is a gate way, at the entering into Greek-street we had occasion to stop by a coal waggon crossing that end, on turning to look behind us, Palmer said the box is gone; I bid him run back; I then asked a person that stood by to mind the truck, while I pursued after him; Palmer came up to the prisoner first, he seized him by the collar with one hand, and the box of tea with the other; the officer came up, Palmer gave him in his charge; the box was lodged at Thomas Greens, we acquainted him what had happened. The box was taken from there to the office in Malborough street. this is the box.

GEORGE GILLAM . I am beadle of St. Ann's parish. On the 21st of February, I was in Rose-street I saw a truck under a gate-way with boxes like this; I thought the prisoner had taken the box from the truck, he got in the wide part of the street, and put the box on his shoulder, and then he run very quick; I saw Palmer pursuing him, Palmer seized the prisoner, I came up and took the prisoner to the watch-house, I saw the box delivered to Mr. Green in his shop; I requested him not to disturb the box we should want it, to take to Malborough street office. I marked the box with a notch that I might know it again, and after it was taken to the office; I have had it ever since, this is the box, it contains Hyson tea.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a man to take the box, to the Spotted Dog in Holborn.

GUILTY aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-25

448. THOMAS BUTTONSHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a watch, value 2 l. and two seals, value 1 l. the property of John Miller , from his person .

JOHN MILLER . I am a carpenter . On the 19th of March, between eight and nine at night, I was in Fleet Street ; my friend and me were returning home. I said to my friend shall we ride home. He said, I

do not mind if I do; I will go and ask the fare. My friend stepped off the pavement to ask the fare. A genteel young man stepped up, and took me by the right arm; he asked me if I wanted a coach, and drawed my watch instantly. I then said to my friend, Willoughby, I am robbed of my watch; he he made me no answer; they both disappeared.

JOHN WILLOUGHBY . I was in company with Mr. Miller. When I stepped off the pavement Miller called me, and said he was robbed of his watch. I saw a young man run directly from him, that was the prisoner. I followed him through Fleet-street into Fetter-lane. He was stopped; I am sure the prisoner is the man. I followed; I desired the constable to take him into custody, and to be particular that he did not let any thing fall.

JOHN EVANS . I am a constable. I heard the cry of stop thief. I stopped the prisoner; a person came up and gave me charge of him. I conveyed him to the watchhouse with difficulty. On taking the prisoner into the watch-house he squatted down on his bottom; I put my hand down to help him up round his waist; I found in his hand the watch ribbon. I took the watch from him; the prisoner denied all knowledge of the watch and seals some of the young men about the watchhouse said, they had seen the ribbon hang out of the prisoner's breeches. A search was made for the seals; the ribbon and seals were found in the constable's chair, close by the fire place; the prosecutor came into the watch-house, and owned the watch and seals; I produce the watch and seals.

Prosecutor. That is my watch and seals.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home from Kennington, and coming along Fleet Street there was a mob; I went to see what was the cause of this mob; I then proceeded towards my home; I heard the cry of stop thief. This gentleman came up and said, I was the person that had robbed him of his watch; I was then dragged to the watchhouse; I told them I had not robbed any one of his watch.

GUILTY , aged 18,

Transported for life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-26

449. JOHN STEWARD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Miller , about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 2nd of April , no person in the dwelling house then being, and stealing therein five keys, value 5 s. and a key ring, value 1 d. his property.

JOSEPH MILLER . I live in Barnard's inn ; last Sunday morning I went by invitation to Furnival's inn, to breakfast with Mr. Neave, one of the Magistrates; I left him about five o'clock, and then went home. I found my outer door broken open, the lock is in Court, it is bent; I then went to enter the chambers; and the moment I entered the lobby, a man came forward, and rushed by me, he aimed a blow at me, but I leaned back; he rushed by me, and went down stairs; I followed him; he run up the inn towards Fetter-lane; he was taken; the people that took him asked me if that was the man? I said it was; Mr. Fletcher the constable searched him; none of my property was found on him, but there was a bunch of my keys; which he dropped down on the bottom of the stairs, which I had left on my desk. The prisoner was taken to the Compter; no person was in my chambers. I missed nothing but the bunch of keys, they were found on the staircase; these are them, they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a person quite different to what that Gentleman represents me.

GUILTY .

Confined two months , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-27

450. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , half a ream of paper, value 16 s. the property of Charles Foudrinier , Joseph Brook Hunt , William Abbott , and Francis Morse .

HENRY WILLIAM FOUDRINIER . I am clerk to the prosecutors, their names are Charles Foudrinier, Joseph Brook Hunt, William Abbott , and Francis Morse ; they are wholesale stationers ; the prisoner was their porter .

On Monday the 18th of February, I watched him about dinner time. I was below; he was above in a room where the yellow thick post paper was kept. I saw him looking out of the window; I then went up stairs; on his seeing me, he threw a quantity of paper out of his apron. I took no notice; I came down stairs, and kept on the watch. In about five minutes he came down stairs. I watched him to the Post-office; it then appeared to me as if he had something under his apron. I left the prisoner at the Post-office. I communicated to Towgood what I had seen; he watched him.

Mr. TOWGOOD. I followed the prisoner from the Post-office to Mitre-court; he hurried down Mitre-court, and stopped at the corner. I came upon him unexpectedly, by reason of his stopping, and told him to come back; he came along with me as far as the public house in Sherborne-lane, then David Gibson, another clerk, came up. I told Gibson to go up to him, to see that he threw nothing away. I saw found upon him half a ream of paper.

ROBERT BRANSCOMB . I searched the prisoner; I found this half ream of paper concealed upon him, under his waistcoat and the waistband of his breeches. I asked him how he came by the paper; he said he knew nothing at all about it. I produce the paper.

Mr. FOUDRINIER. We had such paper in the house, the prisoner had access to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the paper.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined one year , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-28

451. GEORGE COLVIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Shermer , about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 1st of March , William Shermer and others of his family being therein, and stealing therein a shawl, value 10 s. the property of George Cox and Thomas Cox .

SECOND COUNT the same as the former, only stating the dwelling house to be the dwelling house of George Cox and Thomas Cox .

WILLIAM SHERMAN . I am warehouseman to George and Thomas Cox , No. 7, Watling-street. On the 1st of March I found the prisoner in the custody of the boy; the boy informed me, that the prisoner had taken a shawl from the window. I immediately sent for an officer, and gave charge of him.

WILLIAM WILKINS . I live with Mr. Sherman. I was in the warehouse of Mr. Thomas and George Cox by my ownself. On the 1st of March I heard the sound of glass breaking; I looked about the warehouse window; I saw two young men standing outside of the warehouse window. I observed one of them with his hand in the window; he kept pulling the shawl out of the window. I ran out of doors, and caught hold of him; he had got the shawl in his hand. The prisoner is the man that pulled the shawl out. When I took hold of him, he threw the shawl down, the other man ran away. I picked the shawl up, and brought the prisoner into the passage; I called the warehouseman down stairs, and told him what the prisoner had been doing of. This is the shawl; it is the property of Mr. Thomas and George Cox .

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking by Mr. Cox's door; I picked up a shawl; the young man came out of the shop and took me into custody.

GUILTY , aged 1.

Confined two months , and whipped in jail :

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-29

452. WILLIAM GRIFFIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of February a watch, value 26 s. a watch chain, value 1 d. and a watch key, value 1 d. the property of John Walker .

JOHN WALKER . I am a stationer ; I live at 110, Bishopsgate Without . I lost my watch on the 22nd of February; I was out at the time.

GEORGE BRIGGS . I am an errand boy to Mr. Walker. I saw Mr. Walker's watch before Griffin, came in, he came in between two and three o'clock, on the 22nd of February, and directly Griffin was gone, we missed the watch; I went to Mr. Jones, the pawnbroker, and found that Griffin had pawned the watch there.

PHILIP JONES. I produce the watch; I took it in pawn of the prisoner; in about three minutes after, Briggs came, and asked me if Griffin had been, and pawned a watch with me; I told him he had, he had pawned it in his own name; I have known Griffin ten or twelve years; I really believe he is not right in his mind, or else he would not have come to me that have known him so long. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time this offence was committed I was in a state of intoxication, and when I am so I am in a state of insanity.

Q. To Prosecutor. Was he a distressed man - A. I have every reason to suppose that he was distressed; I have heard his father say that he was insane at times.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-30

453. JAMES WILLIAM COLLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of February , two thousand tacks, value 3 s. and one thousand nails. value 3 s. the property of Thomas Pickford , the younger .

JOHN WILLIAM FURBER . I am a servant to Thomas Pickford , he is a sadler's ironmonger ; the prisoner was his porter . On the 22nd of February, about one o'clock was the prisoner's time to go to his dinner; in consequence of directions I received from my master, I put myself into a situation to observe the prisoner's conduct; the prisoner could not see me where I was placed; about five minutes after one, I saw him go to the pigeon holes where the tacks were kept; he put his hand into the pigeon holes two or three times; the tacks were papered up in thousands; he took out several papers, and put them into his pocket; then he went to another hole were clout nails are kept; he took out one paper of them; then he was ordered to go to his dinner; we had an officer in waiting; the signal was given to the officer that he was coming out, by ringing the bell for the officer to pursue him; the prisoner was brought back by the officer in about a quarter of an hour; he was searched; I saw him searched, and two papers of tacks were found in his waistcoat pockets, one paper in each waistcoat pocket; nothing more was found upon him. I am sure he took the clout nails out, I did not see him put them into his pocket. These are the tacks; I am sure they belong to my master.

WILLIAM APPLETON . I am a constable. I was in the parlour when the prisoner went out; I heard the signal given; I followed the prisoner into Thames-street; I brought him back and searched him; I found one paper of tacks in each of his waistcoat pockets.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-31

454. WILLIAM DEAN and ELIZABETH JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a sheet, value 5 s. two blankets, value 4 s. a quilt, value 3 s. a rug, value 3 s. a tea kettle, value 4 s. a pillow case, value 9 d. a saucepan, value 1 s. and a looking glass, value 4 s. the property of John Jones , in a lodging-room .

HANNAH JONES . My husband's name is John Jones .

Q. Did you let a lodging to these people - A. Yes, they came in the lodging on Christmas Eve; they both lived together, and passed as man and wife, they had one room ready furnished in the first floor at five shillings a week; they had two blankets, a quilt, a rug, a tea kettle, a saucepan, and a looking-glass; all these things they were to have the use of.

Q. When did you loose these things - A. I believe on the 4th of March they were taken in custody I opened the door and went in, and missed these

things; not seeing the woman for two days; I had seen the man, he left the lodging on the Saturday; she left it on the Thursday. I got an officer, and had them both taken into custody.

JOHN BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a rug, quilt, a tea kettle, and a saucepan, I took them in pawn of the woman prisoner on different days.

JOHN BONNY . I am a furniture broker. The woman prisoner sold me the duplicate of a sheet, she had pawned at Mr. Blackburn's.

Mrs. Jones. They are all my husband's property.

Jones's Defence. I pledged the things with intention to bring them back again; I positively lost the duplicates out of my snuff-box; I was afraid of leting the man know it.

Dean's Defence. I never took the room, nor paid the rent.

DEAN, NOT GUILTY .

JONES, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-32

455. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, three forged bank notes, for the payment of one-pound, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-33

456. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 20th of March , a bank note, for the payment of five pounds, with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-34

457. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, on the 7th of February, feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a forged bank note, for the payment of one-pound, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-35

458. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, on the 7th of February , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a bank note, for the payment of one-pound with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-36

459. JOHN BARGIN was indicted for that he, on the 21st of February , had in his custody and possession, a forged bank note, for the payment of two pounds, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-37

460. JOHN BARGIN was indicted for that he, on the 21st of February , feloniously did forge a bank note, for the payment of two pounds, with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-38

461. GEORGE SPYER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of March , one fender, value 9 s. the property of Joseph Paul .

JOSEPH PAUL . I am a broker , I lost my fender on the 2nd of March. I was at my door; two persons came to my shop, and informed me, that a man had taken my fender; they pointed out the man to me. I pursued him: he dropped the fender, and was running away. I picked up the fender; this is the fender, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the fender, I was employed by a person to take the fender to 35, Blackfriars-road.

Prosecutor. I saw you drop the fender.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined three calendar months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-39

462. HENRY BEARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of March , four pound ten shillings in copper monies numbered, five pound weight of pork. value 5 s. four pound weight of butter, value 3 s. three pound weight of bacon, value 2 s. one pound weight of cheese, value 9 d. the property of James Reynolds , in his dwelling house .

JAMES REYNOLDS . I am a cheesemonger . On the 1st of March, the patrole alarmed me, and said there was some person in the cellar, a little before six in the morning. I jumped up, took the poker, and went to the cellar door; at the top of the cellar stairs I struck against the boards, I did not strike the man, I thought I heard him come up the stairs, the man ran down the stairs, and began to cry.

Q. Did the patrol accompany you - A. No, he was not in the shop; I called my brother up; he got up, and opened the door, and let the watchman in; the watchman brought his lanthorn in the shop; I opened the cellar door; the man came up stairs.

Q. Was the man coming up stairs or going down when you first let him in - A. He came up from the cellar; he had been in the cellar and in the shop.

Q. You had not seen him there - A. No.

Q. You only found him on the stairs - A. Yes, and when he came in the shop I gave him to the patrole.

Q. You keep the house do you - A. Yes; I have no partner.

Q. How do you know that he was in the shop or in the cellar - A. I saw him in the shop; he came up stairs without my fetching him, and delivered himself up to the patrole, and me. He had packed up these things in the shop, and took them into the cellar; they were all in the shop at one o'clock when I went to bed. The basket that now contains the things, is mine; the things were not in the basket when I found them in the cellar, the loose copper he had tied up in my apron, with other things.

Q. Was there any copper money tied up in the apron - A. Yes; all this four pounds ten shillings.

Q. Was there any butter - A. Yes, four pounds three pounds of bacon, and five pounds of pork, they were all in my cellar; the copper that was tied up in the apron was left under the counter when I went to bed, the butter was on the board, it was a full tub of butter turned out, he had taken one slice off, it weighed four pounds; the bacon was in the shop when I went to bed; it was in the cellar when I saw it again; the pork was in the cellar, it had been in the shop when I went to bed, at one o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was your cellar secured - A. Yes; the door that led to the shop was bolted; he had got a knife and cut it, and got the bolt back; I found the knife on him that he cut the cellar door, and a piece of cheese in his pocket. The cellar flap he broke into and made an entrance into the cellar.

Q. Was there any body else of your family that had access to this shop - A. No, I have buried my wife; I had no servant lived with me.

Q. Do you know that apron in which the money and things were wrapped in - A. I am positive it is mine; I had worn it the day before; there is no particular mark upon it.

Q. Did he give any account of himself - A. All that he said was a person pushed him down the cellar.

Q. Did you see how the flap had been opened - A. He had opened the cellar flap, after that was open, he could not go down unless he had ripped up a board at the bottom, he had taken one board up. There is no particular mark of mine on the butter, bacon, or cheese; I know where he had taken them from; this handkerchief was on a horse in the cellar; he took the handkerchief, and tied the bacon up in it; the handkerchief is mine; he had this piece of cheese in his pocket; I had such a piece of cheese in the shop very much like it; the halfpence are all new, and the penny pieces.

EDWARD BAKER . I am a patrole of St. Mathew, Bethnal Green. On the 1st of March, in the morning, I observed a board of the cellar flap of the prosecutor's house was taken up; I laid hold of the door, it came open; I put my ear to listen if any body was there; I heard the sound of feet walking, I hallooed out, who is there; the prisoner said, the master of the house.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner that said that - A. There was no other person in the cellar; I took him coming up out of the cellar; I alarmed Mr. Reynolds, and ordered him to open the celler door that leads into the shop that there was some person in the cellar.

Q. That was before you laid hold of the prisoner - A. Yes, Mr. Reynold's brother opened the shop door then it was, that I found the prisoner; I secured the prisoner. I searched him in the prisoner's right hand coat pocket, I found this piece of cheese, in another pocket I found this knife; the prisoner acknowledged that he cut the cellar door, and unbolted it. I then ordered Mr. Reynolds to go down into the cellar to see if any of his property was there; he went there, and found a quantity of copper tied up in a cloth, he found a piece of bacon in another cloth. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. I neither promissed or threatened him; he said, this was the knife that he cut the cellar door to come into the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say; I trust to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-40

463. JOHN CHARLES SAMSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Alexander Sinclair , about the hour of one in the night of the 13th of March , and stealing therein, nine elephants teeth, value 110 l. the property of Robert Sinclair and Alexander Sinclair .

SECOND COUNT. For like burglary, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of Alexander Sinclair and Robert Sinclair .

THOMAS ANSDELL . I am nephew to Messrs. Sinclairs; they are general merchants, residing at 35, Tower hill.

Q. Previous to this robbery, had there been any elephants teeth in their warehouse - A. Yes, that had been allotted for sale.

Q. On the evening of the 15th of March, did you secure the warehouse - A. Yes, between three and four in the afternoon.

Q. How early in the morning did you hear of the warehouse being broken open - A. About half past seven in the morning; when I went into the warehouse I found a light coming through a hole in the door, there was a bit of paper stuck over the hole, it did not totally exclude the light coming in; it was not on the door the day before; when the hole was made, a person could put his arm in, and undo the bar of the door; I missed nine elephants teeth when I got in in the morning; it was day-light then.

Q. What day of the week was it - A. Wednesday evening I fastened the door; on Thursday morning I discovered the elephants teeth had been stolen.

SOPHIA WILLIAMS . I am servant at Messrs. Sinclairs. On Thursday morning, I discovered the warehouse door had been broken open, between seven and eight; I think it was Thursday morning, I cannot possibly say I was cleaning the steps of the door, I observed a hole in the door, that hole was covered with brown paper.

JAMES HARWOOD . I am an ivory-turner, No. 30,

Houndsditch. In the month of March last, the prisoner came to my shop on Saturday morning, I think the 18th; it is three weeks ago to-morrow. About a quarter past eight in the morning, he came and asked whether I would buy any ivory. I told him I could not tell, if I saw it I could tell. He said, there were nine elephant's teeth, about an 100 lb. I asked him whether I could see them. He seemed to intimate, that I might see them; he said they were cut in pieces, they had been smuggled, and that was done for the convenience of getting them on shore. I believe that is the substance of what passed in the morning. He left me; I then wrote a note, and sent it to Mr. Sinclair by my boy. In the afternoon of that Saturday he called again; he called again on Tuesday afternoon, and brought this piece of ivory with him, it was in a bag, or in a canvas wrapper wrapped round it; it was tied with a string, this is the piece, I have had it ever since. He said here is a piece of stuff; I said I should like to see the whole. He said he could let me see the whole, if I bought this piece and paid him for it, he would bring me another piece, until I had got the whole. He put down the particulars on a piece of paper in my shop; the weight of the four teeth, two hundred and six pound. He asked three shillings a pound for this piece, if I was to buy it; the weight of this piece is about thirty pound. I told him I had a suspicion it was stolen. I said I must detain it; he said I had used him very ill, and I had brought him into a dilimma. I said public justice was of more importance to me than buying a piece of stuff under price. I have known him fourteen or fifteen years, I entertained a better opinion of him: I had no idea of his being a thief; I said Messrs. Sinclairs wished to find out the person that broke open the house; if he would disclose that, they might make him an evidence.

JOHN BROWN. I apprehended the prisoner at a public house in Creed-lane; he told me had no lodgings.

JOHN SIMS . I am a commercial broker. I lotted these elephant's teeth for Messrs. Sinclairs; the allotment was on the Saturday preceeding the loss.

Q. Do you remember making any particular observation of teeth upon lot 6 - A. Yes, one tooth in lot 6 had been originally in lot 3; and upon examination I put it into lot 6; there was a blemish in the tooth that would depreciate the value of the other teeth.

Q. Take that tooth into your hand; do you believe that tooth to have been in lot 3, and was put into lot 6 - A. I do; there is a blemish in it, that is the tooth that was in lot 6, and had been in lot 3.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I called on Mr. Harwood with this piece of an elephant's tooth; I asked him three shillings a pound for it; he detained it, and said he had suspicion it had been stolen. I had called upon him before; I said I was sorry he had brought me into trouble. I told him I could take it to the man I bought it of.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-41

464. ANN ANNARD and HESTHER JAME were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Dorsey , widow , no person being therein, about the hour of five, on the 6th of March , and stealing a gown, value 5 s. five petticoats value 4 s. five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. three aprons value 3 s. five shirts, value 5 s. a quilt, value 5 s. a piece of carpetting, value 2 s. and three towels, value 1 s. her property.

MARY DORSEY . I am a widow; I live at No. 25, Field-lane , in the one pair back room, Mr. Solomons has the house, he lets it out in tenements, and does, not live in the house himself. On Monday the 6th of March, about a quarter before eight in the morning; I am a nurse in St. Bartholomew's Hospital. I left no person in my room, I am sure I left it secure. I locked my door, and left my key with Mrs. Riley, at another house in Field-lane. On the next morning Mrs. Riley came to me; in consequence of what she said, I went to my room; I found the door cut away where the lock goes. I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment. Some of my things have been found since, and some not.

MARTHA RILBY . Q. Are you an acquaintance of Mr. Dorsey - A. Yes; she left her key with me for to light the fire for her before she came home; about five in the afternoon of the same day I went to her room, I had the key in my hand to open the door; the wood-work of the door was all cut away from the lock. When I got in the room, I missed a piece of carpetting that was on the bed, and the bed quilt was gone; I found her trunk broken open; I knocked at the prisoner Annard's room, I asked her if she had seen any body go into Mrs. Dorsey's room? She said no, she had been out all day at work. I told her that some person had broken Mrs. Dorsey's door open.

JAMES BRAY . I am a constable, apprehended the two prisoners on Tuesday evening about eight o'clock. I saw Annard putting a piece of carpet under the door. I looked under the door, and saw her put it. I knocked at the door several times, and when I got in the room I saw her and her husband in the room, Hesther Jones was not in the room; then I searched the room, I found this piece of carpet under the bed. Hesther Jones came in the room; she said she did not live there. I searched Annard and Jones, and found some duplicates upon them, they did not relate to this charge. Jones said she was an unfortunate woman, and had lodged with Annard a few nights, as she had not got an lodging.

Q. to Mrs. Dorsey. Is that the piece of carpet you lost from your room - A. It is.

Annard's Defence, That piece of carpetting is mine; why did not the prosecutrix claim it when she came home, and saw it in my hand?

Jones's Defence, I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-42

465. CORNELIUS CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a trunk, value 12 s. two watches, value 6 l. two gold seals; 30 s. two pieces of foreign silver coin, value 9 s. two pieces of foreign gold coin, value 3 l. 7 s. one guinea, a coat, value 16 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 16 s. two pair of breeches, value 16 s. six shirts value 30 s. three handkerchiefs, value 6 s. eight cravats, value 8 s. three pair of stockings, value 6 s. the property of Casper Potenstains . in the dwelling house of John Reynolds .

CASPER POTENSTAINS . I am a German , a sugar baker . I work for Mr. John Reynolds; he has no partner, he lives in Upper Thames-street, in the parish of St. James's, Garlick Hill . He is a sugar-refiner.

Q. Did you lose at any time a trunk, with watches and wearing apparel in it - A. Yes, all the things were in my trunk when it was taken away. I kept my trunk in my bed room where I used to sleep. Nine workmen slept in that house, we all slept in one room the prisoner was one of the workmen, my trunk was taken away on the 6th of February, it was safe in the bed room, at six o'clock in the morning, on that day the 6th of February, was Monday, the prisoner left the house on the Friday, before that; he had not left master's his service, he had not slept in the house since the Friday, I left the bed room about six in the morning, all was safe on the 6th then; between two and three in the afternoon I went into my bed room again my trunk was gone then.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner on the Friday on your master's premises - A. No, I saw him on the Saturday.

Q. Is the door of the house during working hours generally left open - A. It is left open in the day time. I saw my trunk again on Tuesday night, this happened on Monday night, the next night on the 7th of February, I saw it again.

Q. Had the trunk been emptied entirely - A. No.

Q. When you left it in your room had you two watches in it - A. Yes, they were worth six pounds, and two gold seals, worth thirty shillings, two spanish Dollars worth nine shillings, an half Doubloon a quarter Doubloon, a guinea was in my trunk, and a coat worth sixteen shillings, and other articles.

Q. Where was it you saw your trunk the next night - A. At a house in St. Giles's; two officers Bland and Townshend, went with me, I knew my trunk, it had C P upon it, and I knew the wearing apparel; I found it to be mine; I gave the key to Mr. Bland, he opened the trunk with it; I have seen the watches again; the prisoner owned that he had taken this property on Wednesday, at Guildhall he called me on oneside into another room, and told me where the watches were, and the money; I found them accordingly, I should not have known where to find them if he had not told me, the officer has got the watches.

WILLIAM BLAND . I am one of the Marshalmen of the City; I found this trunk that I now produce at No. 6, Church-street St. Giles's, in the lower front room, Mr. O'Cornell occupied that room; the prosecutor saw the trunk, and said it was his; he produced a key that opened it; he claimed the trunk, and every thing in it, there was C P upon the trunk in brass nails; the watches were not in the trunk; I apprehended the prisoner in the street, about a hundred yards from O'Cornells's room, he was talking to a girl of the town in the street; I told him he was my prisoner, he said, for what; I told him if he would go with me to O'Cornell's where he lodged, I would tell him, he made resistance, for the moment, but we forced him there, and then I asked him if he knew any thing of this trunk; I took him in charge for stealing this trunk, I told him I must secure him, I took out a pair of hand cuffs; he made resistance, we were oblidged to throw him on the ground to handcuff him, and with great difficulty we put the handcuffs on him; a rush came from the outside by the people that had assembled, and smashed the door in upon us; the prisoner seemed to be in liquor, and said but little; the people found that we had pistols, they came no further; we took the prisoner to the Compter and searched him; we did not search him there, on account of the mob at the Compter we found on the prisoner's neck, this silk handkerchief, that the prosecutor claimed and swore to; in his left hand pocket a cotton handkerchief; the prosecutor claimed that also; in another pocket we found a key, exactly the pattern of the prosecutor's key; it was quite new, on the next day I accompained the prosecutor to the same room where the trunk was, we found in the room under a loose brick at the fire place, the coin I now produce, a spanish dollar, a half doubloon, and a quarter doubloon, and an English guinea; the prosecutor said they were his; under a part of the floor which had the appearence of having been mended, we pulled up a piece of board; we took a silver watch out of there; the prosecutor claimed it. Mrs. O'Cornell was bound over to prosecute, she has absconded; we found the other watch at Mr. Harper's, a publican, in Shorts Gardens, he is here, the publican produced the watch; the prosecutor claimed it; that is a silver watch. I have kept the silver watch, I found at Mr. O'Cornell's ever since, this is it.

COURT. Q. To prosecutor. Look at the watch - A. That is my watch, it is one of the watches that was is my trunk; I saw the pieces of money under the brick, they were the same kind of money, I had in my trunk; they were the same in number, except one Spanish dollar, he told me he gave to the woman: the trunk is mine, and all that is in it are mine; the handkerchief that was taken from his neck is mine, and also the cotton handkerchief.

WILLIAM TOWNSHEND . Q. Do you know any thing more than what Bland has told us - A. No, he has omitted to mention that one of the best shirts was taken off the prisoner's back.

Q. To prosecutor. Did you see the shirt on the prisoner's back - A. Yes, it is mine, it is now in this trunk.

THOMAS HARPER . I keep the Three Tuns at the corner of Shorts Gardens. On the 7th of February, in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house, and asked me to lend him twenty shillings upon this watch; I had known him five years before, I lent him twenty shillings upon it; when the officer

came. I produced the watch, this is it; the watch was afterwards claimed by the prosecutor

Prosecutor. That watch is mine, and also the watch found at Mrs. O'Cornell's.

The prisoner said nothing in his Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-43

466. JOHN CAMBRIDGE and MARY ANN CLARK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , a box, value 2 s. six gowns, value 30 s. eleven petticoats, value 3 l. eight pair of stockings, value 8 s. and a cap, value 5 s. the property of Mary Williams , in the dwelling-house of Peter Robinson .

MARY WILLIAMS . Q. On the 18th of March, you were about to remove from your house, were not you - A. On the 18th of March, I removed from my lodging; I lost my box on the 18th of March.

Q. Where did you put your box - A. At a friends house, at Mr. Robinson's, No. 63, East-street, Manchester-square ; I desired him to let it remain there until I called for it.

Q. What did the box contain - A. Clothes, six gowns, eleven petticoats, and eight pair of stockings; I cannot say every thing in particular that was in the box. Mr. Robinson keeps the house, a Mrs. Elliott kept the shop, and Mr. Peter Robinson kept the house. When I found my box, I found some of my things in it; I found it in a stable in Crawford-street; it was first removed to a Mr. Hamilton's, and from there over a stable in Crawford-street.

MRS. ROBINSON. My husband's name is Peter Robinson .

Q. You let a room out of your house as a shop did you, to Mrs. Elliott - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember this box coming to your house - A. Yes, very well, with Mrs. Elliott's permission.

Q. I suppose the box was locked - A. Yes About ten days before Lady Day Mrs. Elliott left the shop and parlour, and left the box in my shop, and as I had the shop and parlour to let again, it remained in the shop. On the 16th of March, the prisoner, John Cambridge , he took the shop and parlour of me, for him and his wife, as he stated to me before; I delivered him the key of the shop; I sent my little girl to the owner of the trunk, but she was not to be found at her lodging; I took it up in my arms to try to carry it away, but it was too heavy. He said Mrs. Robinson, do not trouble yourself to take it away, it is not in my way, it is very welcome to stand there. The next day Mrs. Williams came, and Mary Ann Clark was there, and told her she might leave it; she told her it was her trunk, she would take it away; Mary Ann Clark said she might leave it: she gave her leave to leave it. Mrs. Williams seeing a parcel of new furniture in the place, she told me she thought she would leave it. He had new furniture in the apartment that come to above twelve pounds, of a poor widow woman's, in Charles-street. Mrs. Williams left the box there. On Saturday night, the 18th, I saw a porter there whom I know, come out of the parlour. On Sunday, we did not know until the evening, that he had quitted, and stripped the premises.

Prisoner Cambridge. I did not say she was my wife; I said, I had a wife.

Prisoner Clark. I am his servant.

JAMES STORKEY . I am a porter.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. I know both of them; no further than that night.

Q. Did they ever employ you - A. Yes, last Saturday night three weeks, it was between eight and nine in the evening, my bell rang at the house where I lodge at; my wife answered the bell; I was in the yard; I came out, and went into the parlour; I saw the prisoner, Cambridge: he said you are the porter, he asked me if I was a porter, and would take a parcel; he took me out of doors, he said, it was not a parcel, it was a trunk, to be taken out of 63, East-street, Manchester-square, he had left it there at Mrs. Robinson's house; I know the house years ago: I went there, and Mary Ann Clark would not deliver the trunk to me; I went to her in the name of Cambridge; she would not deliver it to me. I went over to the York Arms, and told Cambridge; he wrote a few lines; I gave it to her. She told me the trunk was in the parlour; I went in, and took it; when I came out of the house, I asked Cambridge where I was to take it to; he said to Mr. Hamilton's, the Beehive; that is the house I live at; Mr. Hamilton keep the Beehive public-house. I took the trunk to Mr. Hamilton's; in about five minutes afterwards, the prisoner Cambridge came to me, and asked me where the trunk was; I told him it was under a table by the head of the cellar stairs; he said he would not wish to leave it there, he was afraid it will be lost. He asked me if I could take it up stairs into my room; I told him I could. I took it from Mr. Hamilton's into my own room. About an hour after that, Mary Ann Clark , wife of the prisoner, as I thought, came in, and said she wanted a bundle of things out of it; she took a bundle out of it; she came into my room, and emptied the trunk into a large bundle; the contents I do not know; I did not see what she took; I was standing by the fire; I did not see how she opened it: she took out a large bundle of clothes from the trunk, I cannot say what they were. My wife came up at the time; she asked her whether she could tell her of a pawnbroker; she said there was one at the corner of Paddington-street; she asked my wife if she would go along with her; my wife said she was sorry she could not. She went out of my room, down stairs, with the bundle; she paid my wife two shillings, and the price of a pint of beer. I saw no more of her until I saw her at the office.

MR. HAMILTON. I only know the box was at my house till Monday morning.

THOMAS BELL . I have stables, No. 3, Dorset-mews. I was at Mr. Hamilton's; the prisoner, Cambridge, was there; he asked me to let this box stand at my stable for a few days; the box was not brought to me until I saw it at Mr. Hamilton's; on the Monday the prisoner, Cambridge asked me if I would let that box that was at Mr. Hamilton's, stand in my stables for two or three days until he called for it; I observed the box was open; I could see

some wearing apparel in it; I refused to let the prisoner put it in my stable. Mr. Hamilton sent for me to take it away from his house, that was on Monday; seeing the box open, I thought I would have nothing to do with it, however, I let the box be put into my stable.

THOMAS BLAND . I am an officer. The prisoners was given into my charge by some trades people, before he was charged with this robbery, and brought to my house; the lady came up to me about the trunk. Mr. Hamilton directed me to Thomas Bell , I found the box there; he gave me the trunk; this is the trunk.

COURT. Q. To Storkey, Is that the trunk you brought from Robinson's - A. It is the same; I am quite sure of the trunk.

Bland. When I found the trunk, I nailed the lock on, and gave the lady the key.

Prosecutrix. This is my trunk; the best of the things are gone; here are four petticoats left; I have lost seven; the trunk is my own. I missed six gowns, they were worth three pounds; the seven petticoats, I value at twenty shillings; I lost eight pair of stockings, they were worth eight shillings; the box is worth five shillings.

Cambridge's Defence. I had two of my own trunks there; I sent the porter for a trunk, but not this; the young woman went and took the things out; I knew nothing of it.

Clark's Defence. I was engaged to live servant with this person, at ten pounds a year; when I came the day after, there were three trunks in the place, and when the lady asked me to let the trunk be there I did not know which trunk it was; I had only been five days in the house at the time this happened.

CAMBRIDGE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

CLARK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18150405-44

467. ELIZABETH WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a pocket-book, value 2 s. the property of George Way , from his person .

GEORGE WAY . I am a tide-waiter ; I live on Tower Hill. I lost my pocket-book on the 25th of February, between ten and eleven at night; I had come from Gravesend; I was walking along Whitechapel ; the prisoner came up to me, and asked me for a glass of gin; I was sober. She asked me two or three times; I said, if you want a glass of gin, I do not mind giving it you. She took my pocket book out of my side coat pocket; I had no inclination to go with the woman, or to give her any money; just after I gave her a glass of gin, I felt my pocket book go, and I saw it go; I saw her through her hand behind her, as if she threw the pocket-book away.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me by a watchman, charged with stealing a pocket book; I searched her; nothing was found on her person. This pocket book was brought in the watchhouse by a person that picked it up; he is not here.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket book.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-45

468. WILLIAM LISTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of February , a pocket book, value 2 s. the property of William Green , from his person .

WILLIAM GREEN . I live at St. Thomas Apostle. On the 22nd of February, I was between Gracechurch-street and Fenchurch-street ; I lost my pocket book; I felt the pocket book go from me; I felt a twitch at my pocket; the prisoner was behind me; I looked round, and saw the prisoner crossing the road, and seeing him watching me and my friend that was with me. I suspected him, that he was the person that had taking my pocket book from me; I ran, and took hold of him; he threw the pocket book away from him, from under his coat; my friend picked the pocket book up, and delivered it to me; it contained a note for twenty pounds, and eighteen pounds. This is the pocket book; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

JOSEPH DAY. I saw the prisoner drop the pocket book when Mr. Green laid hold of him.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-46

469. EDWARD HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of February , forty-four pounds weight of pewter, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Hudson .

JOHN HUDSON . I am a pewterer ; the prisoner worked for me several years.

SARAH MALLARD. I am house-keeper to Mr. Hudson. On the 22nd of February, I got up at seven o'clock in the morning, and let the prisoner in; after I had let him in, I went up to my own room; I saw him come through the back shop with something heavy in his apron; he went into the front shop, and out into the street; I pursued the prisoner into the street, stopped him, and took this piece of metal from him; I brought him back, and the pewter; he said, he hoped I would not tell master, he should be hanged. Mr. Hudson returned the next morning; I told my young master; he sent for an officer; the prisoner was apprehended. This is the pewter.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-47

470. ABRAHAM ALLEN was indicted for that he, on the 13th of February , unlawfully did utter to James Goodall , a certain counterfeit token for the sum of three shillings, and that he on the 15th of February , did utter to the said James Goodall , one other false and counterfeit token for the sum of three shillings, he knowing it to be false and counterfeit, and that he had about him at the time, one other false and counterfeit token for the sum of three shillings, by means of which premises, he became a

common utterer of such counterfeit three shillings tokens .

JAMES GOODALL . I am a shoe-maker ; I reside at No. 8, Collier-row, Bethnal Green. I first went to the prisoner and bought nine counterfeit tokens at the Red Lion Petticoat-lane; I purchased the nine three shilling tokens, I paid him thirteen shillings and sixpence for them. I saw the prisoner there, I told the prisoner I wanted some of the tokens he dealt in; he said, he had nine; he gave me nine, and I gave him thirteen shillings and sixpence for them. On the 15th, I went to him again, at the same place; I told him I wanted twelve; he gave me a dozen; these are the dozen I bought of him on the 15th of February; I marked all the three shilling tokens before I delivered them to Mr. Westwood. I told Avory, the officer, of this; I shewed Avory where this transaction passed; it was agreed that we should go and apprehend the prisoner on Sunday; I saw Avory apprehend him in the City Road, he was selling oranges; I am sure the prisoner is the same person.

JOHN AVORY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in the City Road, he was selling oranges, on Sunday, the 29th of February; I searched him; in his breeches pocket I found four counterfeit tokens, and one good one, and a good shilling.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am a teller at the Bank. The nine tokens purchased by Goodall, are all counterfeits, and so are the twelve, and the four that the officer found upon him; they seem to be all of one manufactory; they are made to resemble a good three shilling bank token; they are all counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor in my life.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined two years in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time, to find sureties for two years good behaviour .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-48

471. MULEY COHEN and MORDECAI LEVY were indicted for that they, on the 19th of March , did utter to one Charles Matthews , one counterfeit three shilling token, and that they had about them at the time, one other base counterfeit token for the sum of three shillings .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am cousin to Charles Matthews , the officer. On Sunday, the 19th of March, I received of my cousin a three shilling bank token; by his direction, I went to buy some oranges of the prisoner, Cohen, I saw him in Watling-street, Levy was about ten yards off; I told Cohen I wanted two oranges, I gave him a three shilling token to pay for them; he said, he could not give me change; he put my three shilling token into his pocket, and gave me another; I then gave him threepennyworth of halfpence to pay for the two oranges.

Q. What did you do with the three shilling bank token that you received of the prisoner - A. I kept it in my hand, and gave it to my cousin; he was just by. The three shilling bank token that my cousin gave me, was marked with 3 upon it; the one Cohen gave me for it had no figure of 3 upon that.

CHARLES MATTHEWS. I am a city constable; the last witness is my cousin, he is about fourteen or fifteen. I was in company with Johnson, on Sunday, the 19th of March, I saw the two prisoners together in Watling-street; in consequence of suspicion, I employed my cousin to buy two oranges of them; I put a notch upon a three shilling bank token, it had No. 3 upon it; I gave it to my cousin, and told him to buy two oranges of the prisoners; I saw the two prisoners together in Watling-street; I and Johnson kept out of their sight. I saw my cousin go towards them; my cousin came back to me, and brought me a three shilling piece, he did not bring back the same I gave to him, it was another, a bad one; I marked that at the bottom with the key of my handcuffs. I told Johnson it was all right, to go and apprehend them; we followed the prisoners into Newgate-street, they went from Watling-street in company together in Newgate-street; I catched hold of Cohen; I said to Johnson, catch the other; Levy threw his basket down, and ran away; I held fast of Cohen until Johnson brought Levy back; we then took them both into a public-house in Distaff-lane; I searched Cohen; I found on him the three shilling token I had given to my cousin in his left hand breeches pocket, and two bad three shilling tokens besides; in his coat pocket I found two bad shillings, and one bad shilling in a pocket at the back of his breeches.

Q. Look at these two counterfeit tokens, and these three bad shillings, and tell me whether they are the whole that you found upon Cohen - A. These are the tokens, and these are the three shillings; I found one at the back of his breeches, and two in his coat pocket. I saw Johnson take something from Levy's sleeve, I did not see what it was.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city constable. I was with Matthews on the 19th of March; I saw the two prisoners together in Watling-street; I pursued Levy into Newgate-street; Matthews got hold of Cohen; Levy observed me, he chucked down his basket of oranges, and ran away; I pursued him, and caught hold of his sleeve; I perceived something in his sleeve; I kept hold of him until I got to the public-house; on searching him, I found one three shilling piece in each of his coat pockets, and one in his sleeve. This is the bad money I found upon him, Matthews delivered to me the bad money that he found upon Cohen; I delivered it all to Mr. Westwood.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . Q. Look at all this base money - A. They are all counterfeits.

Cohen's Defence. I was with Levy, two officers catched us in Newgate-street.

COHEN, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined two years in Newgate , and to find sureties for two years more .

LEVY, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-49

472. WILLIAM BURLISS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Benjamin Slate .

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I took the prisoner into custody.

THOMAS CARL . I live in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane.

Q. Were you at the Crown public-house in White's yard, Rosemary-lane - A. Yes, I was, it was on a Saturday; I saw Burliss coming into the house about nine o'clock; there was a raffle at that time in the house; Slate was clerk to the raffle ; he put the names down; I saw the prisoner strike the wife of Slate, he hit her in the eye; the deceased leaned over the table and struck the prisoner, and they had a fight; I tried to part the deceased and the prisoner; they were put out of the house, by the people in the house; they came into the house again, and fought again, the deceased was knocked down, he never got up again.

JOSEPH CHRISTOPHER . I was in the Crown public-house, on this night, the 25th of February, I saw the prisoner strike Slate's wife; he hit her on the right eye, Slate jumped over the table. and struck the prisoner; they fought together, they both got on the ground, and when they were down, I took the prisoner off the deceased; I never looked at the deceased after; I took the prisoner off him.

Q. Was Slate's neck broken - A. I don't know; I did not know that he was dead until the day following, and then he was examined by a surgeon, his neck had been dislocated.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I was present at the public house, I saw the deceased strike the prisoner, they fought in the tap room, and on the skettle ground, the deceased threw the prisoner down and fell on the top of him; the prisoner cried take him off, he had got hold of him in an improper place, they were parted, and they fought again.

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150405-50

473. EDWARD HARLAND was indicted for that he on the 7th of February , feloniously did forge a Bank note for the payment of five pounds with intention to defraud the Govenour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For disposing and putting away a like forged Bank note with the same intention and other counts, for like offence, only varying the charge.

To this indictment, the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-51

447. EDWARD HARLAND was indicted for feloniously forging on the 15th of February , a Bank note for the payment of five pounds, with intention to defraud the Govenour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For disposing and putting away a like forged note, with the same intention, and other counts for like offence, only varying the charge.

To this indictment, the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18150405-52

475. THOMAS SHARP was indicted for that he on the 22nd of June at the parish of St. Peters Paul's wharf , having in his custody a bill, of exchange, on the same day afterwards did forge an acceptance to the said bill of exchange with intention to defraud Thomas Scardney Carpenter .

MR. PAYNE. Q. What are your partners names - A Thomas Scardney Carpenter, Thomas Harford , Thomas Tendon , John Daniel , and Joseph Ballad ; we are iron merchants in Thames-street. On the 24th of June, the prisoner paid me a bill of exchange for iron, that was sold to him on the same day, in consequence of proving this bill at Guildhall an enquiry was made into this bill. I received the bill of the prisoner to the best of my knowledge, my clerk marked it, he is not here and there is a mark that I put upon it myself at the time I proved it at Guildhall; I believe that is the same bill I received of the prisoner, it became due on the 27th of September.

Q. Did he ever pay that account - A. He placed a bill in my hands for one hundred and fifty four pounds seven shillings and ten pence, that bill was honoured, and I was over paid if the transaction had ended there; I do not carry on the prosecution it is carried on by the assignees under the Commission.

Q. Who was the prisoner's partner - A. Mr. Stables the assignees son; this bill was given for the account of the son of the prosecutor, in the indictment.

JOHN BLUNT . I live opposite of Islington church, I have for thirty or forty years.

Q. Do you know such a person as William Horn Esq. living opposite of the church - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Islington is a place in which a number take lodgings and live in Islington for a little while - A. Yes, and there are a many houses opposite of the church all round.

WILLIAM DREW . I am a tax gatherer at Islington, I do not know such a person as William Horn , Esq. that lives opposite of Islington church.

JOHN BAILEY . I have been clerk to the prisoner three years; I have made enquiry for William Horn opposite of the church, I could not find him.

Q. Look at that acceptance the name of Horn, do you know whose hand writing it is - A. It resembles the prisoner's it is like Mr. Sharp's writing I cannot say exactly; I rather thing it is so than otherwise; I have seen him write often; this bill is drawn by Mr. Sharp, and accepted by him.

THOMAS BALLAD . I was clerk to the prisoner two years; I left him a twelvemonth ago; I know his hand writing.

Q. Look at that acceptance, and tell me whether that is the prisoner's - A. I think it is not, he write a better hand than that.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-53

476. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Westgate about the hour of ten in the night of the 21st of January , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, a bolster, value 10 d. two blankets, value 2 s. and a quilt, value 3 s. 6 d. his property.

GEORGE WESTGATE . I live at St. Paul's Shadwell . On the 21st, near eleven o'clock at night; I went up stairs I saw my hat lay in the middle of the floor, I suspected there were somebody in the house, I went into the garret, and looked under the bed: I saw a man under the bed rolled up in a blanket; I went down stairs, and got help, and went into the garret again; I could not find him, I came down stairs to my own bed room, I found him under my hedstead; I delivered him to the patrol. I went back to my house, I found this bundle rolled up under the bed, two blankets, a quilt, and a pillow, these things belonged to the bed in the garret; I am sure the prisoner is the man. I do not know how the prisoner got into the house. This is the property, it is mine.

GUILTY aged 36.

Of stealing only, not of breaking and entering .

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18150405-54

477. JOHN STRINGLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , seven yards of floor cloth, value 2 l. 5 s. and two yards of baize, value 5 s. the property of John Hare , in his dwelling house .

GEORGE TITTERTON . I am clerk to Mr. John Hare. On the beginning of December, I observed there were two pieces of oil cloth missing from the shop; I had seen them in the shop a few days before, that they stood in the shop with the other goods.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he is a carpenter , he had been working in the house, three weeks before this happened; he was at work at the time he was taken in custody. On the 9th of March Thomas Gardner , the officer came, he asked me if I missed any cloth, pointing to the pattern in the shop; I told him I had; he took the prisoner into custody in our house.

RICHARD MONDAY . I am a broker and appraiser, on the 28th of February, I made a distress on the prisoner's goods, his room was in Dorset street, Westminster; I distressed the prisoner's goods among the articles were a piece of green baize, and two pieces of oil cloth; I value them at thirty-five shillings; the officer has them.

THOMAS GARDNER . I am an officer; I heard that Mr. Monday had made a distress on the prisoner; I went to Mr. Hare's, and asked Mr. Titterton if he had sold any of that oil cloth, he said no, he had lost some; I told him, Mr. Monday had seized some off the prisoner; I took the prisoner into custody, this is the oil cloth, and the baize.

Titterton. It is Mr. Hare's property.

GUILTY aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-55

478. THOMAS HARDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of March , a till, value 2 s. and 21 s. in monies numbered , the property of Matthew Ekstedt .

MATTHEW EKSTEDT , I keep a chandlers shop , No. 10, Essex-street Hoxton . On the 27th of March, between nine and ten o'clock as we were sitting at supper woman came in for some table beer my dangter went to serve it; when she came up to the counter, she hallooed out, oh, father, here is a man behind the counter; I jumped up, and seized him; when I moved him up, I saw he had the till, which he had taken out of the counter down on the ground where he lay. I asked him what he wanted; he told me some victuals, he was hungry. I told him if he came and asked me he should have had some, I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. What money was in the till - A. Nineteen shillings in silver, and one shilling in copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no work to do for two months.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-56

479. JOSIAH BOX was indicted for feloniously forging on the 7th of March , a promissary note for payment of 64 l. with intent to defraud Thomas Capp and George Walker .

SECOND COUNT. For uttering and publishing as true a like promissary note with the same intention and other counts for like offences, only varying the charge.

MARY WOOD . I belong to the society called the Provident daughters, we meet at the sign of the Hope Smithfield bars.

Q. Were you a committee woman on the 7th of March last - A. I was, I was going out of office that night, with five others, the prisoner was our secretary to keep our accounts and to give us the best advice in his power. On the 7th of March, the box was opened; I examined the box to see what money was in it, we enquired for an acknowledgement of one hundred pounds which was lodged in the hands of Messrs. Calvert's the brewers; I enquired of the prisoner for that money, he said it was in the box, but it could not be found, in looking over the papers in the box, we there saw an acknowledgement purporting to be a paper of Messrs. Calverts, for sixty four pounds, that had been put in their hands about four weeks.

Q. Do you know whether that is the paper that was found in the box - A. Most undoubtedly, I am sure it is; I was ordered to make enquiry at Calvert's, I went there and found our money was not in their hands; this money had been in the Bank of England, and sold out by the prisoner's order, and instead of his placing the money in Calvert's hands, he has kept it himself.

MARY HYSER . I am a member of this society; in March last, I was governess; on the 7th of March, I and some others were going out of office; we enquired of the prisoner where our money was; he said, dear ladies, here is a paper fortunately, where your money is, and I think the name of Foster was mentioned by Mr. Box; he read the paper, and I think the name of Foster was read.

ANN WALKER . I am a member of this society; I was there on quarterly night to pay my money, on the night the last witness has spoken of. I enquired it any of the society were apprized of our money

being drawn from the Bank; Mr. Box said he would speak to me presently; I am stewardess, he withdrew; I went into the passage to him; he drew out of his pocket this paper, he said he had not acquainted any of the ladies of it, but he would do it that evening, the money he said was taken out of the Bank, and put into the brewer's hands; I then went into the club room, and stopped until he had finished, he read the paper to us, he said that paper was a security for us, it was given to Mrs. Hyser; I think this is the same paper.

(The paper read.)

GEORGE WALKER . I am the husband of the last witness; and one of the stock holders for the society.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time come to you about the subject of that stock - A. He did, he said, he was come at the request of the society, for me to transfer the money to him, the stewardess's had come to an agreement to draw the money out of the Bank, and place it in Messrs. Calvert's hands; I made an appointment the next day to meet him, believing that representation; I met him; Thomas Capps was the other stock holder. We both met him the next day, and sold out the stock; I believe it produced sixty-four pounds some odd shillings; the money was given to the prisoner to take to Messrs. Calverts, as he said he could make more money of it.

THOMAS CAPPS. I am the other stock holder. The prisoner called on me; he desired me to meet him at the Bank the next day; he said, he had the consent of the majority of the society to sell out the hundred pounds, and to place it in Messrs. Calvert's hands. I met him; it was sold out by Mr. Davis, the stock-broker; he gave the money to the prisoner, to place it in Messrs. Calvert's hands for the good of the society; the prisoner said he could make more money of it.

JOHN CHURCHER . I am clerk to Messrs. Calvert's, the names of the partners in that house are Robert Calvert , Charles Calvert , John Calvert , Edward Calvert , Thomas Calvert , Thomas Hedsell , and John Foster .

Q. I believe sir, the stewardess of the society brought that instrument to you - A. They did. I have been clerk in the house seventeen or eighteen years; I am acquainted with the hand writing of Mr. Foster, This is not the hand writing of Mr. Foster, nor any one in the house. The prisoner has not sixty-four pounds, or any other money in our house; the name of Foster is not any thing like Mr. Foster's hand writing; it is spelt Fostir; he spells his name Foster. Mr. Calvert does not spell his name with an i, but an e, Calvert. This transaction could not have taken place without my knowledge.

Q. Calvert and Company brewers, carry on business in the firm of Felix Calvert and Company - A. Yes; not Felix, Calvirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention to defraud the society.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 41.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18150405-57

480. JAMES EVANS , alias CHARLES SLATER , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Ward , about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 15th of March, Mary Ann Ward , and others, then in the house being, and stealing, eleven books, value 11 s. one umbrella, value 5 s. and part of a watch stand, value 6 d. the property of Richard Ward .

MARY ANN WARD . I am the daughter of Richard Ward . At the time of the robbery, my father had a house in the parish of St. Luke's . On the 15th of March, about four in the afternoon, my father was absent, there were three people in the house besides myself, lodgers; at four o'clock, on the 15th of March, I was taking my tea in the one pair of stairs room; I had locked my father's room below, and had the key in my pocket. I thought I heard a noise in the room below; I looked out of the one pair of stairs window, Martha Rian was coming by the house, she said there is a man in your room below, he is a coming out; I said, there is no such thing; I knew I had locked the door, and had got the key in my pocket; I ran down stairs, and saw the prisoner with a bundle and an umbrella in his hand; as soon as he saw me, he threw the things down, and ran out of the room.

Q Is the prisoner the man - A. Yes, I believe he is the man When he saw me coming, he threw the bundle down, they were tied up in my apron; he took away a shirt that has never been recovered; he threw away all the other things; these are them; they are my father's property. The prisoner lived in the same court as I lived; I ran to the end of the court, and saw the prisoner go to the wine-vaults in Whitecross-street. I went and fetched Prince, the officer; he was taken in custody.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am a constable. Mary Ward fetched me, and took me to a house in Whitecross-street where the prisoner was drinking; I took him into custody with the assistance of Mr. Merrick.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18150405-58

481. JAMES RING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Elliott , about the hour of seven in the night of the 15th of January, and stealing therein, nine watches, value 15 l. two watch cases, value 5 s. and five pounds in monies numbered , the goods and monies of Thomas Elliott .

THOMAS ELLIOTT . I am a watch-maker ; I live at Edmonton, near the church . On the 15th of January, I left my house at four o'clock in the afternoon; I returned again at ten in the evening, I then found my house had been broken open, and entered by some person, and the watches and the articles mentioned in the indictment were taken away, nine watches, and about six pounds in silver, and several watch cases; the watch cases were gold, silver, and metal. They broke open the shutters, and forced open the windows; I left it fast at four o'clock, locked up, and bolted.

Q. Who did you leave in the house - A. Nobody

in the house. I found the window broken open, a pane of glass broken, the screw of the sash undone; they went in, and out the same way.

Q. What time it was entered you do not know - A. Between four and ten. I only know of the discovery of two watches afterwards; I can swear to the watches myself; there were nobody in the house when I left it; I kept the house empty; I was alone at the time.

GEORGE FREDERICK MILES . I am a constable of Edmonton. I apprehended the prisoner at Hackney, on the 21st of March; when I apprehended him he seemed surprized. I told him what I apprehended him for; he said, he was willing to go with me any where, he knew nothing of it. I left him in security of a person of the name of Stamford, and when I returned to Stamford, Stamford told me he had told him all about it; the magistrate took down what the prisoner said in writing; it was read over to him before he signed it; this is the paper; the prisoner signed it, and the magistrate signed it also.

(Read.

" James Ring being charged by Thomas Elliott of robbing his house at Edmonton, confesses, that on the above day, he being in company with a young man of the name of George of the same trade as himself, a painter and glazier, he asked me if I knew of any place where they could go and rob, he wanted; I told him there was a person of the name of Elliott, where I dare say he might get some watches. We then proposed to go down, which we did; we arrived there at four o'clock; we went to the chapel at Tottenham, where I knew Mr. Elliott was in the habit of going; we saw him there; from there we went to his house; George with a chissel opened his shutters, and entered his house, struck a light, he had a tinder-box with him for the purpose; I told him where the drawer was; he brought me several watches, and old watch cases, and some old silver, a gold seven shilling piece, with which we both came away to London, and at the corner of Widegate-street; we parted. When I went to my room, I took out all the articles he had stolen, and shewed them so Mr. Barnes, a fellow lodger, who was quite astonished, and said James, you have been in bad company; I told him I had been at the other end of the town at a bawdy-house. Barnes called up my landlord; the landlord advised me to take the property to the young fellow, my companion; I took a gold watch to the pawnbrokers by the church in Spitalfields, I offered it for a guinea. I said I had it of a sailor; the young man told me to fetch the sailor; I went out, but did not return, for fear of being stopped; I pawned another watch close to the trunpike in the Commercial-road, a silver hunting watch, with a diamond, made by Miller, at Tottenham; the other watches I gave over to my companion. I and my companion roved about for several days together; he wished to be engaged in other robberies; I said, I would do no more, I was so uneasy in my mind; he said, he would go to France; I do not know where he is;

Taken by me T. R. MORES."

JOHN KILLINGSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. In the early part of February, the prisoner came into the shop, he offered this gold watch to pledge, he asked one pound upon it; he said, a sailor had sent him with it, he did not know it was gold. I told him he must fetch the person that sent him; he said, he was round the corner; he went out, and did not return any more.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence, and being led into it by one that was worse than himself, and on account of his good character .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-59

482. RENE SCOULER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , three hundred diamonds, value 150 l. the property of Thomas Parsons and John Surill .

THOMAS PARSONS. I am a jeweller , in Salisbury-street, in the Strand ; John Surill is my partner . I had diamonds deposited in my work shop to the value of seven hundred pounds, yallow and white diamonds. I am sure I saw them all safe on the evening of the 5th of October. The prisoner worked for me since the month of August in the shop where the diamonds were deposited; all the work men and apprentices worked in that shop. On the evening of the 7th of October, I found I had been robbed; I sent for an officer, and had all my men searched; nothing was found upon any of them. I caused an advertisement to be inserted in the newspaper. I saw some of my diamonds again in Parton-street, in the possession of Mr. Levy. The prisoner left his employ; I had not discharged him. On the 20th of last March, I met the prisoner in Chandois-street, I seized him by the collar, I said, I believe you are the scoundrel that robbed me, you must go with me. I asked him what induced him to rob me; he said, he did not know, he did it in an unlucky moment; it was his intention to replace the property; I replied, that is impossible. I took him to my house in Salisbury-street, before my partner; he begged our pardon, and hoped we would forgive him. I sent for an officer; he was taken to Bow-street. I found about three hundred diamonds at Mr. Levy's, we do not count them, we weigh them; I found them at Mr. Levy's, there was one yellow stone I particularly know; I am sure these diamonds are part of the diamonds I lost.

ISRAEL LEVY. I reside in Parton-street, in the Haymarket. About the beginning of January, a glazier, who had a job to do for me, said he knew a young man that had some diamonds to sell; the glazier sent the young man to me; he had some white and some yellow diamonds; I believe the prisoner is the young man that brought them. I sent for Mr. Isaacs. The prisoner said he had some more to bring me. Mr. Isaacs came, and looked at the diamonds, and while he was looking over them, the prisoner came in with the other diamonds; Mr.

Isaacs said, he believed they were stolen, to stop them; the prisoner said he could not stop them; he said, he could, and him also. The prisoner ran out of the house, and left the diamonds behind him; I kept the diamonds until Mr. Parsons came with Mr. Isaacs, and then I delivered them to Mr. Parsons, I am not sure whether they were left in my possession, or Mr. Isaacs's, he can tell; I wish to be correct.

MR. ISAACS. In January, I went to Mr. Levy's house; I there found a parcel of diamonds; they answered to the description of diamonds that Mr. Parsons had lost. I told the prisoner I would keep them, unless he would go to Mr. Parsons, and contradict that they were his property; the prisoner said I could not stop them; I said I could, and stop him too. He bolted out of the house, and never came back for the diamonds; they were the exact weight that Mr. Parsons had lost.

Prosecutor. They are the property of me and my partner.

GUILTY aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-60

483. HENRY HULLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a gelding, value 10 l. the property of James Brazier .

JAMES BRAZIER . I reside at Hammersmith , I am a chimny-sweeper . On the 17th of February, I saw my horse in the stable; I left home at seven in the morning, and returned at eleven, my horse was gone then. I saw my horse again in Mr. Barryman's possession; it was a serrel gelding, worth ten pounds.

THOMAS BERRYMAN . On the 17th of February, the prisoner brought me a horse at Walham Green; I gave him eight pounds for it.

Prosecutor. The horse was delivered to me at Bow-street; I knew it to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 17th of February, Mr. Brazier asked me to take this horse to Smithfield to sell it for him; I said, yes; I was to have five shilling for my trouble; I have got witnesses.

SARAH DALEY . I live next door to the prisoner. On the 17th of February, Mr. Brazier came and asked the prisoner to sell his horse at Smithfield; Mr. Brazier went away, and the prisoner followed him.

Q. To Prosecutor. Did you call upon the prisoner on the 17th - A. I did; I asked him if he was going to Smithfield he said no.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-61

484. JOHANNA DUGGIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a shawl, value 20 s. the property of George Grisbrook , privately in his shop .

GEORGE GRISBROOK . I am a linen-draper , 24, Sloane Terrace, Chelsea . I lost a shawl on Thursday, the 16th of February, it was in the shop on the counter, on that day, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came in with a child in her arms, she asked the price of some silk shawls that were in the window; I told her the price, and shewed her several others; I asked her thirty shillings for a shawl; she bid me twenty. I had a great suspision of her; I cleared the counter, and while she was in the shop a person came into the shop to change a shawl for another; she left the shawl with me; I folded it up, and left it on the counter until she came for it.

Q. That is the shawl you charge her with stealing - A. Yes. I missed that shawl after the prisoner was gone; the prisoner bought a gown, and left three shillings on it. The prisoner called on the Thursday following, and paid the remainder of the money for the gown, and took it way; I desired my wife to watch her; I intended to take her up on the Sunday following; I did not do it. She came again on the Tuesday, I took her up then. I saw my shawl again on Thursday after, at the pawnbrokers.

MOSES GAMMON . I am shopman to Maberly and Thompson, pawnbrokers. On Saturday, the 18th, I took in this shawl of a woman.

Prosecutor. That is my shawl I believe.

BRIDGET DENNIS . I pledged that shawl at Maberly's and Thompson's; I bought it at York; this is the duplicate I received for it; I am sure it is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-62

485. JANE PANTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Baker , Ann Story and others being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 19th of March, and stealing therein, an ear-ring, value 14 l. a finger ring, value 1 l. a pair of stockings, value 6 s. and a tablecloth, value 6 d. the property of Jeanet Amelia Solitdtair .

JEANET AMELIA SOLITDTAIR. I am a Swedish lady ; I came to London six months ago; I brought a trunk with me, containing ear-rings, finger-rings, and ear-drops; I went to live with Mr. Baker, in Dean's-court, St. Martin's-le-grand .

Q. On the 19th of March, did you go out, and leave your property at home - A. That is the day I missed them at twelve o'clock; I cannot say whether it was on the 15th or 16th, I went out at five o'clock.

ANN STOREY . I am sister to Mrs. Baker; I came there for two or three days, at No. 6, Dean's-court, St. Martin's-le-grand.

Q. The prisoner and the Swedish lady lodged there, did they - A. Yes. On Wednesday, the 15th, the prisoner came down to me, and said, the Italian lady was gone out: she said, she would go and have a rout, she asked me to go with her, I refused: she said she would bolt the door; I went up with her; I stood at her door; I did not go into the room; the prisoner went into the lady's room, she unlocked the door with her key: I saw her take the trinket box off the table; I saw the prisoner with a seal in her hand. That is all that I saw.

ELIZABETH ROWLINS . I live at No. 6, Dean's-Court,

St. Martins Le-grand, I live with my uncle, he is a glass cutter; the prisoner pulled a little drop out of a pocket book, and told me to ask my uncle if it was a diamond; I took it to my uncle, he said it was not,

Q. To prosecutrix, Had you such a drop as this - A. I had one like it, I have never found any of the property that I lost whatever.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-63

486. WILLIAM CROWDER, alias JOHNSON CROWDER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a trunk, value 5 s. a coat, value 1 l. a waistcoat value 5 s. two pair of breeches, values 10 s. a pair of boots, value 5 s. a razor-strop, value 5 s. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. the property of John Coleman Rashleigh .

JOHN COLEMAN RASHLEIGH. On the 4th of March, I left my house in Town, to go into the Country; about twelve at noon, I saw my cook strapped to my carriage, in Great Russell Street, it the door of the house, from which I came; I proceeded then to the Harrow Road; at the chapel in Paddington, I found my trunk was gone. I saw a crowd of persons assembled at a butchers shop in the Harrow Road, and when I came there, the prisoner was among them; some person told the prisoner that he had cut the trunk off the carriage; the prisoner appeared in great aggitation, and said nothing; I saw the trunk that was brought out of the butcher's shop, it was mine; the prisoner was taken to Marlborough street office.

JOSHUA ROBINSON. I was in the Harrow Road , I saw the prisoner lift the trunk off the carriage, it fell on the road, I went into the butcher's shop, and told there was a thief, had taken a trunk from a carriage; as soon as the prisoner came up to me, he had the trunk on his shoulder; I said to him, have you not taken that trunk from the carriage, he said, what is that to you; I laid hold of him by the collar, he threw the trunk on my head; I was obliged to let go, he run away, I after him, calling out stop thief, a person stopped him; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES SOVERBY . I saw the trunk throwed on Mr. Robinson, I laid hold of the prisoner, this is the trunk, I gave it the officer.

Prosecutor. It is my trunk, and the articles in it are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along the road I saw the trunk fall from the carriage; I was going to take it to the first public house until it was advertised.

GUILTY aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-64

487. JOHN MALTWOOD , and FRANCIS M'DONALD , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a pocket-book, value 1 s. and two pieces of stamped paper, value 6 d. the property of Edward West , from his person .

EDWARD WEST . On the 1st of March I was standing in a crowd at the door of St. George's church Hanover square . I missed my pocket book the crowd was very great.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the 1st of March, I attended the welch children from Grays-inn-lane, to St. George's Hanover square; I observed while the children were going into St. George's church the two prisoners with their hands in the peoples pockets; I saw Maltwood take something out from Mr. West's pocket, and put it into his breeches; I apprehended Maltwood, and Matthews apprehended M'Donald; I searched Maltwood and took the pocket book out of his breeches; this is the pocket book.

CHARLES MATTHEWS. I saw the two prisoner's put their hands into peoples pockets; I apprehended M'Donald, I found two handkerchiefs in his breeches, and one in his hat.

Prosecutor. It is my pocket book; the two receipts are in it.

Maltwood's Defence. I am innocent.

MALTWOOD GUILTY , aged 17.

M'DONALD GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-65

488. THOMAS CASTLE , and THOMAS LOVELL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , two hundred scarlet beans, value 1 s. the goods of a certain man, whose name to the jurors is unknown.

BENJANIN JOHNSON. On the 15th of March, I was in the Strand , I saw the prisoners follow a gentleman; Castle tucked up his sleeve, and took some thing out of a gentleman's pocket, a small parcel, he gave it to Lovell, Lovell put it underneath his jacket; I immediately ran after Lovell and took him, Edmonds took Castle.

THOMAS EDMONDS . I was with Johnson, I saw Castle tuck up his Sleeve and put his hand into an elderly gentleman's pocket, and take a parcel out; I pursued Castle, and took him.

Lovell's Defence. This young man I never saw before in my life.

Castle's Defence. The same.

CASTLE GUILTY , aged 19.

LOVELL GUILTY , aged 17

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-66

489. JAMES ATKINS was indicted for making an assault upon Harriet Collins , and her the said Harriet Collins feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-67

490. WILLIAM WHEEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of December , a watch, value 2 l. and a silver tea spoon, value 3 s. the property of William Lock , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM LOCK . I live in Hackney road . On the 23rd of December, the prisoner was going by my house; I asked him to have some dinner; after dinner I was called to serve a customer, the prisoner went out and said nothing; my watch was hanging over the mantle piece; I did not miss any thing until towards the evening; I then missed my watch;

and a silver tea spoon this happened in December; I met the prisoner in Fore street, in March; I asked him where my watch was, he said he had pawned it, and sold the duplicate; I had him taken in custody, he then said he had sold the duplicate to a man that lived with the Rev. Dr. White, at Hampstead; I and the officer went to Hampsted; and got the watch, this is the watch, it is mine.

SAMUEL PHILLIPS . I am servant to the Rev. Dr. White at Hampstead; the prisoner came to me being out of place, and asked me to buy the duplicate of his watch. I gave him twelve shillings for it, he said it was pledged for thirty shillings, I took it out, this is the watch, the prosecutor has got it.

JAMES ROGERS . I am a pawnbroker I live at 27, Barbican; I produce a silver tea spoon pledged by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY aged 28.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18150405-68

491. HENRY KIDMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of March , a watch, value 3 l. a watch chain, value 3 s. a seal, value 1 s. and a key, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Henry Buckland , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS HENRY BUCKLAND . I am a watch maker , I lost the watch on the 2nd of March, it was taken out of the window; I never saw the prisoner at all.

THOMAS BARNES . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, pawnbroker, Whitechapel On the 23rd of March, the boy and his mother came and asked me to valu the watch; I kept the watch, I asked the boy where he got it, he said, he bought it in Whitechapel, he could not tell me where. Mr. Dexter fetched an officer, and then the boy told me he took it from a shop at Woolwich, this is the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave it me to carry to such a place, it was tied up in a handkerchief.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Judgment respited ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-69

492. ELIZABETH HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of February , a handkerchief, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a spencer, value 2 s. a gown, value 16 s. a scarf, value 15 s. two gold pins, value 15 s. a silver pin, value 3 s. and two yards of stuff, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Tate , in his dwelling house .

MARY TATE . I live at Gloucester place, Mile End. When the prisoner was taken she produced the duplicates and acknowledged taking them; the officer has got the duplicates,

MR. HART. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a spencer, a gown, and a scarf. pawned by the prisoner at different times.

JOHN RAY . I apprehended the prisoner, she fell down upon her knees, and acknowledged taking them and told me where to find the property,

Prosecutrix. It is my property.

GUILTY aged 22.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-70

493. THOMAS POWELL and BARA DOMINGO , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , one diamond ring, value 10 l. a fur tippet, value 3 l. three table cloths, value 3 l. three shifts, value 1 l. three napkins, value 3 s. three jackets, value 7 s. the property of Stephen Beaufort , in the dwelling house of Anthony Partington .

STEPHEN BEAUFORT . I am a merchant ; I have been residing in India some years, I brought the two prisoners with me from Bengal, the man as butler . and the woman as ladies maid ; I took lodgings at No. 6, Lambs-conduit-street .

Q. On the 10th of March did Mrs. Beaufort miss a ring - A. No, not till the morning of the 11th.

MRS. BEAUFORT. I missed the diamond ring, on the 11th of March; I took it off my finger and laid it on the table on the 6th and missed it on the 11th, I communicated it to Mr. Beaufort, I was present when Powell was called up, he at first denied knowing any thing of it, he afterwards confessed he had found it, I have seen the ring since.

Q. To Mr. Beaufort. In consequence of information, from Mrs. Beaufort, did you inform your servants of your loss - A. I did, Bara Domingo denied any knowledge of the ring; I said, if the ring was not found by Monday morning I would go to Bow-street. On Monday morning I went to the office and got Westbrook, he came to my house, and searched Powell, in his pocket he found this receipt, this receipt was put into my hands, and in Powell's chest he found some duplicates, nothing was found upon the woman.

RICHARD WESTBROOK . I am an officer, I searched Powell, and in his right hand breeches pocket, I found a receipt.

Q. Read it - A. No. 51, Marybone-lane. March 12th, 1815. Received of Thomas Powell a diamond ring, price eighteen guineas, signed Charles Henderson . And in Powell's box I found a quantity of duplicates of articles pledged at Mr. Wood's; I went to Mr. Henderson; and shewed him the receipt, he said, that is my receipt, he gave me the ring, I produce it.

Mrs. Beaufort. That is my diamond ring, I value it at ten pounds.

CHARLES HENDERSON . On Sunday March the 12th Powell called upon me, he said he had five diamond rings four of which he had sold for nine guineas a piece, he had been offered for the fifth ring eleven guineas, he thought it of more value, and had not sold it; I then said, I had a respectable acquaintance a jeweller, if he would let me have it, I would show it him, he would tell him what he might expect to get for it, he gave it me and I gave him that receipt; I delivered the diamond ring to the officer.

POWELL GUILTY aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

DOMINGO NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-71

494. JOSEPH ASHFORD and JOSEPH APPLETON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , a gown, value 1 l. two shawls, value 12 s. eleven handkerchiefs, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 6 s. a pair of gown sleeves, value 2 s. and eleven pieces of cloth, value 11 s. the property of Matthew Pickford , Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , and James Pickford , in a certain boat, in a certain Canal, near the River Thames .

GILES WIER . I reside at Stratton, in Warwickshire. I packed up all the property mentioned in the indictment, and sent it with other packages by Messrs. Pickford's boat: the box was directed to Lady Skipwell, to be left at Paddington wharf. I saw my box again last Tuesday; the box appeared as if it had been opened.

EDWARD NICHOLLS. I am Captain of the Volunteer and Union boats. On Friday, the 31st of March, I saw the trunks and box put on board the Volunteer, which we received at Stratton; they were directed to Lady Skipwell, to be left at Paddington wharf; the packages were all safe and corded when I received them.

Q. Who navigated the Volunteer - A. Joseph Ashford and Joseph Appleton . When we arrived at Paddington, one or two of them appeared strained, as if they had been plundered; I picked up a pair of gown sleeves at the bottom of the boat, just by where the box stood.

JOHN ELLIS . I was working the Union. The Union and Volunteer sailed in company together on the 2nd of April, as we were moving along past Uxbridge, I saw the two prisoners on board the Volunteer; the hay lay in the middle of the boat; one of the prisoners was ripping, and the other hammering; about five minutes before that, I saw Appleton with a chissel in his jacket pocket.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am clerk to Matthew Pickford , Thomas Pickford , James Pickford , and Matthew Pickford . I saw the packages unloaded directed to Lady Skipwell; two or three of them appeared to have been broken open with a chissel, just by the lock.

JOHN GIBBONS . I helped to unload the Volunteer; two or three of the boxes appeared to have been broken open by a chissel; one of the boxes is here.

GRACE BRINDLE . I live on the South side of the Bason of Paddington Canal. I wash for Ashford. On the 23rd of April, Ashford came to me about eight in the evening, he brought this bundle, and asked me to let him leave it until Monday night; I examined it after he was gone; it contained all the articles in the indictment.

Prosecutrix. The gown sleeves are mine, they are the sleeves of the gown I have got now on; this gown is mine, it is worth twenty shillings; and all the other articles are mine.

Ashford's Defence. I know nothing about the matter.

Appleton's Defence. I know nothing about the bundle.

ASHFORD, GUILTY , aged 26.

APPLETON, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-72

495. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , two coats, value 10 s. a hat, value 4 s. a cloak, value 6 s. a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. and a shirt, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Fullerton .

THOMAS FULLERTON . I am the second mate of the Partridge , a merchants ship, laying in the London Docks . I lost my clothes out of the carpenter's store room; they were taken on the Sunday; I missed them on Monday. The prisoner had been a seaman on board; he was discharged from the ship on Saturday. On Monday, I went to Mr. Moses's to buy a great coat; I saw my own great coat there. This is the great coat.

MR. MOSES. I am a salesman. On Monday, the 7th of March, I bought this great coat of the prisoner, I gave him seven shillings for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken at a nonplus; I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 23.

To be sent to Sea .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-73

496. THOMAS FOSTER was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Susan Smith , and her, the said Susan Smith , against her consent, feloniously did ravish and carnelly know .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-74

497. ISAAC MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , twenty-seven bushells of coals, value 50 s. in a boat, in the Navigable River Thames , the property of William Charles Thomas .

WILLIAM CHARLES THOMAS . I live at Teddington. In the month of September last, I bought tea chaldron of coals of Cox and Company, Beaufort-buildings, in the Strand. I employed Robert Gildon to bring them to Teddington, that is the brother of the man that was indicted here a sessions or two ago. I know nothing more of this prisoner than that he took the boat away.

THOMAS PERRIN . I live at Teddington; I am a carter. I helped to unload this lug boat of coals to take to Mr. Thomas. Robert Gildon hired the boat of Mr. Turner; I and Dorset unloaded it; all the coals that we saw, we took to Mr. Thomas, without measuring.

Q. Was there a cabin to that lug boat - A. Yes, it was locked.

Q. When you had finished unloading that lug boat, who took it away - A. Thomas Gilden, Isaac More , and Enoch Rednap ; the prisoner is Isaac Moore ; they went towards Twickenham with the boat.

RICHARD DORSET . I am a labourer, at Teddinging. I and Perrin were employed to unload this lug boat; we emptied the lug boat of all the coals that we saw; there was a padlock on the cabin; we

took the coals to Mr. Thomas.

Q. What became of the boat - A. Thomas Gildon , Enoch Rednap , and Isaac Moore , took it away; I am sure Isaac Moore was one of them that went away with the boat.

THOMAS WEST . I live at Twickenham. On Saturday, the 17th of September, I observed a lug boat by the edge of the River Thames, between eight and nine in the evening, it was rather dark; she was laying at a wharf by the Thames side, at Twickenham; I heard some men at work shoveling coals; I went to Mr. Turner, knowing he had a lug boat of that description; I and Mr. Turner went to the wharf; I found the boat fastened to the wharf. I spoke to the men who were at work; I could not distinguish who the men were; I spoke to them about the impropriety of the time they were at work, and whose coals they were. Mr. Turner asked them who they were; they made no answer. Mr. Turner then left me; Rednap came on shore; I went towards him; he went into the boat again, and cut the cord that it was fastened by; Rednap I knew; I cannot say who the others were; one of them cut the hawser, and the boat went off. Mr. Turner came and took a boat, and went after it; we found the boat on the Twickenham side, on the heigth, there were a number of coals in the bottom of the boat; it turned out to be Mr. Turner's boat, the Henry. Moore was taken; he escaped.

HENRY TURNER . I am a corn-chandler; I live at Twickenham. I had a lug boat called the Henry; I lent the Henry to Robert Gildon , for the purpose of taking the coals to Mr. Thomas. On Friday evening, the 17th, Mr. West came to me, and informed me there was something going on wrong in my lug boat; I went down to the wharf; I saw there was something going on; Gildon, Moore, and Rednap, took the boat off from Twickenham; I and West hailed the boat; I went down to my own men, and when I came back the boat was gone. I and Mr. West pursued them, and when we came up to the boat, there were a quantity of coals in the bottom of the boat.

Q. Did you examine the cabin - A. No.

Q. How many bushels of coals will the cabin hold - A. Sixty. The prisoner was taken up, and put in the cage, he absconded; and Rednap has also absconded.

JOHN PORCHMOUTH . I am a coal-metre. I measured the coals at Mr. Thomas's house; there were forty-three bushels deficient, allowing for the ingrain.

ANN RUSSEN . I keep the tap at the George Inn, at Twickenham. On the 17th of September, I purchased two bags of coals, five bushels, of Isaac Moore , I gave him eight shillings for the five bushels; he said they were the sweepings of the boat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-75

498. JOHN COCHRANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , one shovel, value 3 s. the property of George Thomas ; and THOMAS ELMER , for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods, he knowing it to have been stolen .

GEORGE THOMAS . I am a tile-maker ; I work for Mr. Rhodes. I lost my shovel on the 19th of March, from Mr. Rhodes's premises, where I was digging gravel; I left it in the gravel pit while I went to dinner, and when I returned, it was gone. I saw my shovel in Thomas Elmer 's shop as I walked by his shop, at the corner of Smock-alley, Petticoat-lane; I knew the shovel to be mine. I asked Elmer how he come by it; he said, he had it for a twelvemonth. I told him I had only lost it a week; the shovel I had marked G. T. I am sure it is mine.

BARNARD GLEED . I went to Elmer's shop on the 27th of March, I asked him if he had bought any shovels lately, or if he had any shovels; he produced this shovel, he said, he had it a twelvemonth. I told him to come to the office with the shovel; he readily came to the office, and brought the shovel in his hand. I produce the shovel.

Prosecutor. It is my shovel.

COCHRANE, GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

ELMER, GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one year , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-76

699. JAMES SMITH , WILLIAM FENN , and THOMAS JONES , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , seventeen pieces of serge, value 34 l. one box, value 1 s. four gowns, value 4 l. a petticoat, value 12 s. and four shifts, value 12 s. the property of Nicholas Brown , and Charles Brice .

JOHN THORN . I am book-keeper to the Wincanton and Taunton waggon; the owners are Nicholas Brown and Charles Brice . The waggon was loaded on the 7th of March, at four in the afternoon; Thomas Brown drives the waggon from Taunton to Egham, and Leves from Egham to London. I saw two packages loaded, and a box; the packages contained serge, consigned to Messrs. Herdsfield and Powell, and a box was put into the waggon containing wearing apparel; the box was directed to Priscella Wilkins; I saw these things put into the waggon, and go out on Saturday, at twelve o'clock at night.

THOMAS BROWN . I am waggoner to the Taunton waggon. I took the waggon to Egham on Tuesday, the 11th of March.

ROBERT LEVES . I took the waggon from Egham to London, as I received the waggon from Brown, so I took it on to London; at Piccadilly, I discovered something had been taken from the waggon, two packages and a box; I am sure they were taken from the waggon between Brentford and London.

JOHN WARNER . I am a fisherman; I reside at Kew. On Sunday evening. the 12th of March, I was drinking at the Waggon and Horses, at Brentford, I went in there about six o'clock in the evening

at Mr. Kill's, there were four men in the house, Smith, Feen, and Jones, are three out of the four; they came in between seven and eight, and staid till near eleven; they represented themselves to be Bow-street officers; they accused me of being a deserter from a Man of War; I told them I had a protection, and if they would shew me their authority for being officers, I would show them my protection; Fenn got up, and asked me to drink out of his gin and water; he has a patch on his eye now. I went home, leaving them there.

JAMES KILL . I keep the Waggon and Horses public-house, at Brentford.

Q. Do you know the persons of the three prisoners - A. I do; I think I have seen them in my travels.

Q. Do you know John Warner - A. I do; he was at my house drinking on Sunday night, the 12th of March.

Q. Did he sit in the same box where there were four men - A. I believe he did.

Q. Were the prisoners three of them out of the four - A. I was in and out of the parlour to the taproom.

Q. What is the prisoner's name with the patch on his eye - A. I heard him called Finny Morgan at Bow-street.

Q. Will you swear that these three men were not in your house on the night that Warner was there - A. No. I said at Bow-street, I thought they were the men.

JAMES DEWDIN . I keep the Chaise and Horse, at Hammersmith. On Monday morning, the 13th of March, about three o'clock in the morning, the three prisoners came into my house, and called for a pint of ale; I have seen them since at Bow-street, they were not dressed then as they are now; Fenn had a patch on his eye, he had no patch on when at my house.

THOMAS FAITHFUL . I live in Cutler's-yard, City road; I sleep in the yard. On Monday, the 13th of March, two men called me up at half past five, they asked me to give them the horse and cart they had left three or four days before; I told them the cart was broken down. They then said I was to give them the horse, they could borrow a cart in Old-street. I gave them the horse; the mens names are Smith and Fenn; I gave them the horse, and they went about their business; and about ten minutes before ten the same morning, I saw them again, they came up the yard with a horse and cart; they had me to take care of the horse.

Q. Was there any thing in the cart - A. Yes, two bales, something tied round with cord, and a box. I put the horse into the stable, the horse sweated very much; they tilted the shafts of the cart up in an open coach house, nobody could then see what was in the cart.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . On the 13th of March, I and Bishop went to Cutler's-yard, City-road; I observed a cart in a cart-house, with the name of Read, Old-street; the cart contained a quantity of surge, and a box: after we had been some time in the yard, the three prisoners came into the yard; I and Bishop apprehended them. I produce the property.

WILLIAM SMITH . I was coming to London with the Newbury waggon; I followed the Taunton waggon to London, coming along the road, I found two pieces of cloth; I gave it to Leves, the driver of the Taunton waggon.

Robert Leves . The last witness gave me some serge that he said, he found in the road, by Gunnersbury-lane; I had past near Gunnersbury-lane coming to Town.

PRISCILLA WILKINS . I am a servant in Ely-place, Holborn. I expected a box by the Taunton waggon; I have seen the box that is now produced, it is mine, and all the things in it.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 23.

FENN, GUILTY , aged 26.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-77

500. WILLIAM WOOD and MICHAEL BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , four pounds weight of cheese, value 3 s. the property of Matthew Low , esq.

GEORGE CARTER . On the 10th of March, about half past seven in the morning, I saw the prisoners Wood and Brown get over Mr. Low's iron railing into the area, and took a piece of cheese from the safe in the area; he gave it to Brown; I told my master.

MR. HART. I am a publican, From the information of my boy, I followed the two prisoners, I called stop thief; they were stopped. Wood is the boy that took the cheese. That is all I know.

WOOD, GUILTY, aged 16.

BROWN, GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-78

501. JOHN WOOLFUS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Wilkinson , about the hour of three in the night of the 5th of April and stealing therein, three blankets, value 9 s. a counterpane, value 1 s. a pair of pillow cases, value 1 s. and a hat, value 6 s. his property.

JOHN WILKINSON . I live at Poplar . the prisoner came to me last Wednesday about one o'clock; he said his ship had just come up; I saw him in bed at twelve o'clock, he said he was to lodge and board with me at half after three; I had suspicion that Woolfus was not in the house, and when I got up in the morning, I found he was gone, he had taken the blankets, sheet and pillow case and a lodgers hat and left his own hat, this was on Wednesday, the 5th of April; I saw him again on the Sunday, at the watchhouse, there has been nothing found but the band of Lambert's hat.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went out in the morning, I passed the landlord, he could see I had nothing with me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-79

502. HENRY POPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , a pair of shoes, value 6 s. the property of John Dovey .

JOHN DOVEY . I am a shoe-maker , in Monmouth-street . On the 29th of March, about a quarter before six, I saw the prisoner, and another man, standing outside of my window, where my shoes hung; I saw they were watching me; one said to the other, now is the time; the prisoner took a pair of shoes off the nails, put one shoe in the other, and put them under his coat; I pursued him, and called stop thief; he was stopped by the next witness.

JAMES MEADOWS . I saw the prisoner running, and heard the cry of stop thief; I stopped the prisoner; the shoes fell from under his coat; I picked them up. These are them.

Prosecutor. They are my shoes; they cost me seven shillings.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-80

503. JAMES HOOKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , seven yards of ribbon, value 4 s. the property of Robert Heslep .

EDWARD BRAYBROOK . I am shopman to Robert Heslep. I saw the prisoner draw the ribbon through the bolt hole, he cut it off; I called out to the other shopman; he ran out, and caught him.

ROBERT BARFORD. I am shopman also to Mr. Heslep. From information of Braybrook, I ran out and caught the prisoner, and took the ribbon from him; there are seven yards, it is worth four shillings; it is Mr. Heslep's property.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-81

504. JOHN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , a waistcoat, value 5 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of John Gambling ; two jackets, value 1 l. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Jaques .

JOHN GAMBLING . I lodge at the Castle public-house, in Smallborough Green; I and my fellow servant , Jaques, slept in one room there; we belong to one of the coaches. I got up in the morning, and went to look after the horses, and when I returned to the bed room, I missed my property.

THOMAS JAQUES . I slept in the same room with Gambling; we both got up at six o'clock to look after our horses; about half an hour after that, I saw the prisoner running from the house; I immediately ran up to the bed room, and saw my clothes gone. I took a horse out of the stable, and pursued him; I took him near the Isleworth-road; I found one waistcoat and a jacket on his back, and a bundle of clothes under his arm.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-82

505. MARGARET COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a silver milk pot, value 12 s. two silver table spoons, value 12 s. and three silver tea spoons, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of David Leo .

CATHERINE LEO . On the 20th of February, the prisoner laid the cloth for dinner, and put a pewter spoon on the table; I said I did not like a pewter spoon, wished her to put a silver spoon instead of that. She went out of the house. I went to my cupboard, I missed my milk pot, two table spoons, and three tea spoons, all silver; they have all been found at the pawnbroker's since; the officer found all the duplicates upon her.

WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH . I produce a silver milk pot, pawned by Mary Stratton , and a tea spoon, pledged by the same person; the person that took in the other articles, is not here. I produce the property.

MARY STRATTON . I pawned the milk pot and the spoon for the prisoner; I gave the money to her, and the duplicates.

Prosecutrix. All the articles produced by the pawnbroker, are my husband's property.

JOSEPH CHAMPION . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody; I searched her; I found six duplicates upon her; they corresponded with these articles exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I meaned to replace the articles as soon as I had my money.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-83

506. JOHN COLLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , six yards of cottage stuff, value 7 s. the property of Mary Ann King .

MARY ANN KING . I keep a shop . On the 27th of February, my servant saw the prisoner take the cottage stuff from my window; I saw the prisoner brought back, and the stuff.

MARY WHIFFEN . I saw the man take the stuff from the window; he gave it to the prisoner; they both ran away; I pursued the prisoner about an hundred yards; he dropped the stuff; I picked it up. A man stopped the prisoner; we delivered him to a constable. I am quite sure he is the lad that ran away with it, and dropped it; I took it up. This is the piece of stuff that was taken from the window; it is my mistress's property.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-84

507. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , a shawl, value 2 s. and a cloak, value 3 s. the property of Sophia Newman , from her person .

SOPHIA NEWMAN . On the 30th of March, I was coming from the public-house with a pint of beer, a sailor followed me, and took my cloak and my shawl off my shoulders; I turned my head round, and saw it was the prisoner; he ran away; I called stop thief; he was stopped, and taken to the watchhouse. I am sure he is the man.

SAMUEL TEDDY . I am the watchman that stopped the prisoner, upon the cry of stop thief; he said, it was his own mother that cried stop thief; I stopped him until the prosecutrix came up, and then I took him to the watchhouse; he was searched; nothing was found upon him.

GUILTY aged 27.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-85

508. THOMAS BEEBY , alias BEVAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , a watch, value 1 l. and a silk shawl, value 19 s. the property of Daniel Sullivan .

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I lost my watch and a silk shawl on the 8th of March, I left my watch by the fire side at two o'clock in the afternoon, I then went to my shop.

SARAH SULLIVAN . I know the prisoner; he called on me on the 8th of March, at my room, in Lamb's-court, Chiswell-street , he asked me leave to sit down, he was tired; he gave me sixpence, and asked me to fetch a quartern of rum; I went for it; the watch and the shawl were in the room when I went out for the quarten of rum, and when I returned, the prisoner, and the watch, and the shawl, were gone; I have seen them since, I know the watch to be my husband's, and the shawl.

WILLIAM ASHLEY . I took the prisoner into custody. I searched him, and found a quantity of duplicates, two of which applied to the watch and the shawl.

WILLIAM HARPER . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. I produce a shawl; I believe pledged by the prisoner; I am sure the prisoner came with the duplicate, and wanted to sell it out and out. This is the shawl.

MR. WILLIAMS. I am a pawnbroker's servant. On the 25th of March, the prisoner pledged this watch with me. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch and shawl.

GUILTY aged 20.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-86

509. THOMAS WATTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , twenty-eight pounds weight of lead, value 8 s. and a brass cock, value 1 s. the property of Levy Hart , affixed to a certain building of his, called a house .

LEVY HART . I have a house No. 1, Monmouth-court, Seven Dials . On the 25th of February, I was up stairs, I heard my little dog bark; I came down stairs, and saw the prisoner coming out of the kitchen, with the lead pipe doubled up on his shoulder, and the brass cock affixed to it; I laid hold of him; he threw the pipe down; he had taken the leaden pipe and the brass cock from the kitchen; I am sure it is my property.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-87

510. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , sixteen pounds weight of bacon, value 10 s. the property of William Dennis .

WILLIAM DENNIS . I keep a cheesemonger's shop , No. 10, Bath-street, City road . I lost this bacon on Monday, the 27th of February, it hung up in the shop on a hook.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. On Monday, the 27th of February, I was on duty with Thomas Mayhew ; the prisoner passed me in Bath-street, City-road, with this bacon under his arm; I asked him what he had got; he immediately dropped the bacon, and ran away; I followed him, and secured him, with the assistance of Mayhew.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I was with Wainwright. I picked the bacon up, and took it to Mr. Dennis's shop; Mrs. Dennis claimed the bacon.

Prosecutor. This piece of bacon was taken from my shop; I am sure it is my piece of bacon.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-88

511. WILLIAM STREET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , forty-three sheets of paper, value 3 s. the property of Robert Wilkes .

ROBERT WILKES . I am a printer , in Chancery-lane . The prisoner was one of my workmen . On the evening of Tuesday, the 7th of March, on my going into the shop, I found the prisoner had locked up the warehouse, and was going away, at a little after eight; I then observed he had something bulky under his coat; I desired him to take it out; he took it out; I then saw it was forty-three sheets of paper of an expensive work, entitled the Gallary of Nature and Art, that sells for twelve pounds; the forty-three sheets was one sixth part of the work. He could not sell it for more than a shilling for waste paper. He said, he was going to take it home to wrap up bread and butter. These are the forty-three sheets, it is my property.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-89

512. ELIZA SCOTT was indicted for that she, on the 12th of March , a certain female child under the age of two years, of John Hulme and Mary Hulme , feloniously did take by force, and carry away, with intention to deprive the parents of the possession of the said child .

SECOND COUNT. For like offence, with intention to steal the clothes of the said child, the property of John Hulme .

AND TWO OTHER COUNTS. For carrying away the said child by fraud, not by force.

MARY HULME . My husband's name is John Hulme .

Q. Have you a daughter - A. Yes; she is two years old next May. The prisoner lived next door to me; she had the child to nurse for a fortnight at first, and afterwards one week to wean; she brought the child to me on the Sunday morning, I paid her,

and wished her to leave the child; she said she was going to Whitechapel, she would take the child with her, and return to breakfast, the air would do the child good. She did not return to breakfast; I never saw her nor the child until the Saturday following.

CHARLES WILBRAHAM . I heard of this child being missing on the Sunday; I had known the prisoner some time. On the Saturday following, I saw the prisoner in the Lambeth-road, with the child in her lap, as if to exite compassion; I took the prisoner home to my own house, and then I acquainted Mrs. Hulme of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the child to a gentleman's house to get some money.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-90

513. JOSEPH EADY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , one boot, value 17 s. the property of Robert Trevett .

ROBERT TREVETT . I am a boot and shoe-maker , in Finsbury-street, Finsbury-square ; I keep a shop there. On the 6th of March, about half after five in the evening, this boot was hanging against the door on a hook; my wife saw the prisoner take the boot; I ran after him, and took him, and when I got within two yards of him, he dropped the boot; I picked it up, and took him. This is the boot, it is my boot; it is worth seventeen shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the boot.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-91

514. SAMUEL FEATHERSTONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a pair of pantaloons, value 4 s. the property of Henry Jones .

HENRY JONES . I keep a clothes shop , in Whitecross-street. The prisoner's brother lived servant with me; the prisoner was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to see his brother. I missed the pantaloons, on the 25th of February. The prisoner came to see his brother on the Friday evening, I had suspicion of the prisoner; I gave him in charge of a constable.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, 50, St. John-street. On the 25th of February, I took in these pantaloons for two shillings, of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are my property; they are worth four shillings.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-92

515. ELIZABETH WILSON , and FRANCES WILSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , four pillow cases, value 5 s. two pair of sheets, value 15 s. one gown, value 5 s. one silver table spoon, value 20 s. and one plated fork, value 6 d. the property of Samuel Sadd , in his dwelling house .

SARAH SADD . My husbands name is Samuel Sadd he is a goldsmith : I live in Hart street Covent garden , on the 8th of March, I lost these things; I went from home about two o'clock in the afternoon. When I returned home I missed all the property in the indictment; I was told that Elizabeth Wilson , my servant was very much intoxicated, and that she had gone out, she staid out all night, in the course of the next day. Lack the officer brought me a spoon, and asked me if it was mine, it had my name upon it; I said it was mine, I had seen the spoon in the morning; Elizabeth Wilson lived with me in the capacity of a servant, I always thought her an honest industrious woman; I do not believe she would have committed this robbery, had not she been intoxicated.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer, on the 9th of March, I was sent for to Mr. Bensons, 209, High Holborn; I went there, and apprehended Frances Wilson , she was there pledging this spoon; I asked her where she got it, she said she would take me to the woman that sent her to pledge it; she took me to a house, where Elizabeth Wilson was laying on a bed; she said Elizabeth Wilson was the person that sent her to pawn it; on the bed was this bundle, I asked whose property that was, she said Elizabeth Wilsons ; I took them both to the office, at the office I said to Elizabeth Wilson if this is not your property do not own it, she said it was her property, I produce the property; in her pocket I found a plated fork.

Prosecutrix. The spoon and the fork is mine, and all the articles in the bundle are mine.

Elizabeth Wilson 's Defence. I beg for mercy.

Frances Wilson 's Defence, The same.

ELIZABETH WILSON GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

FRANCES WILSON NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-93

516. SARAH CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a watch, value 20 s. the property of Mary Ann Prestage .

MARY ANN PRESTAGE . I have had a watch eighteen years; I kept it in this case over the mantle piece. On the 17th of March, I saw it ten minutes before three; the prisoner came and asked to warm herself; I gave her leave, she sit down by the fire, and fell asleep; and when she went out of the room, I missed the watch; she came again on the Thursday, I got a constable, and took her into custody. I have seen the watch since, it is worth twenty shillings.

JOHN BULL . I am a baker, in High-street St. Giles's, the prisoner came in my shop one morning and asked me to lend her a shilling upon the duplicate of this watch; I gave her a shilling, she came again, and wanted more money; I advanced four shillings, my daughter took it out of pledge, the watch was afterwards claimed by Mrs. Prestage; I delivered it to the constable.

SAMAEL ROBERTS. Mr. Bull delivered the watch to me, I produce it.

Prosecutrix. It is my watch.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-94

517. PETER MYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , one lock, value 3 s. the property of Richard Levitt .

RICHARD LEVITT . Having been robbed every day, for eight days, I set myself upon the watch, to detect the offender; on the 28th of March, the prisoner came into my shop; I asked him what he wanted, he appeared confused, he asked me for a knife; I shewed him some knives, and while I was getting him other knives, I heard the sound of paper drawing along the counter; he saw I detected him, he left the shop, and went about his business.

Q. What was in this paper - A. It was a paper of goods, that I had done up for a customer, he went away: I watched him about sixty yards distance from the shop; I returned into the shop again and concealed myself behind a cabin stove. In the space of two minutes the prisoner came into the shop again, he took a lock from off the counter; I pursued him, and took him, about an hundred yards from the shop; I took the lock from underneath his jacket; this is the lock, it his my lock.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-95

518. WILLIAM PARNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Walker .

THOMAS WALKER . I am a linen draper , 49, Dorset street, Manchester square . On the 22nd of March, about one o'clock, in the middle of the day, I saw the prisoner put his hand behind a piece of bed furniture, within the shop, and take a silk handkerchief; I called stop thief, he dropped the handkerchief in the door way; this is the handkerchief, it is mine; the prisoner was brought back to the shop; I am sure the prisoner is the same person that took the handkerchief.

GUILTY aged 12.

Privately whipped and discharged

privately whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-96

519. JAMES FINLAY was indicted for that he, on the 2nd of February, was servant to Henry Oswald , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him; that he did receive and take into his posession, the sum of fifteeen shillings, for and on his master 's account, and that he did afterwards embezzle, secret, and steal the same .

HENRY OSWALD . I am a baker in the Curtain road, the prisoner was my servant, it was his duty to deliver bread to my customers, and to receive payment and to account to me; on the 4th of March, the prisoner left me; I made out a bill to Mrs. Randelow, of fifteen shillings and nine pence, she sent me word that she had paid the prisoner; I made out her bill from my book: my book is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-97

520. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a range, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Wood .

ANN WOOD . I lost my range, on the 26th of February, from out of a cupboard, in the two pair of stairs room; the prisoner lodged in that room; the cupboard was not locked.

ANDREW BIRNIE , I lodge in the first floor in Mr. Wood's house. On Sunday the 26th of February. I heard a man carrying something along the passage; I came down stairs with a candle in my hand; I saw the prisoner with a range on his shoulder; I called Mrs. Wood, he dropped the range off his shoulder, and ran out of doors, I ran after him, and brought him back: this is the range.

Prosecutrix. It is my range.

Prisoner's Defence. I kept my clothes in that cupboard, the range had dirtied my clothes; I took it out of the cupboard, and was going to put it into Mrs. Wood's cellar.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-98

521. THOMAS HASELL and JOSEPH MINDIE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March . a box, value 1 d. a watch, value 2 l. a ring, value 2 d. a seal, value 1 s. and a key, value 2 d. the property of Charles Nichols .

CHARLES NICHOLLS . I live in Fair-street, I am a cook , I lost my snuff box, it contained the duplicate of my watch, a ring, a seal, and a key; it did not contain the watch. I lost it out of the kitched drawer the prisoners were employed in Mr. Herton's stables ; the watch I had pledged for a pound note.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant,

Reference Number: t18150405-99

522. JAMES CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a piece of gingham, value 30 s. the property of John Stiles .

AUGUSTUS PENTWAY . I am shopman to John Stiles , this piece of gingham was lost on Friday, the 17th of February from off a bar that is on the door inside of the shop it hung at the door at two o'clock I missed it five minutes afterwards I went to the door some man at work close by said, there runs the thieves; I saw three men running away together; I pursued them, the prisoner was the one that had the gingham on his arm he put it under his coat, part of it hung below his coat I saw it, they were all three running together, two of them took one way the prisoner the other way, when he got to the corner of Pancras-street, he threw the gingham into a garden; I still pursued him, and caught him a few doors below; I never lost sight of him, a young woman picked up the gingham and brought it to the shop; this is the gingham, there is seventeen yards of it, value thirty shillings, it is my master's property

MARY WHITING . I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner runing, he threw the gingham into our garden; I picked it up, and delivered it at Mr. Stiles's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man dropped this

print I picked it up, not knowing it was stolen, and when I heard the cry of stop thief, I threw it away immediately.

GUILTY aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-100

523. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , twenty-three yards of flannel, value 19 s. the property of John Townshend .

JOHN TOWNSHEND . I keep a linen-drapers shop , in Bath-street, City-road . On the 24th of February, I missed the flannel from my shop window, about a quarter past six in the evening; I had seen it in the window about two o'clock in the afternoon.

ROBERT SAW . I live opposite of the prosecutor. On the 24th of February, a little after six o'clock, I saw the prisoner pull the flannel through a broken pane of glass in the prosecutor's shop window; I pursued him, and stopped him, about thirty yards off the prosecutor's shop; I collared him, and held him until Mr. Taylor came up, and took him into custody. This is the flannel.

Prosecutor. It is my flannel.

JAMES TAYLOR . I came up and saw the prisoner held by the collar by Mr. Saw; I took him into custody.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-101

524. JAMES WILLIAMS , alias JOHN WILLIAMS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , twenty pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. and one pound weight of brass, value 9 d. the property of Henry Meux , John Newbury , and Company.

CHARLES WITTY . I am a servant to Meux and Co's brewhouse ; the names of the partners are Henry Meux , Thomas Florence Young , John Newbary, and Richard Layton . All the materials of the old brewhouse that was pulled down, were stowed away in Stoney-lane, about an hundred pounds of lead, and one pound of brass; these materials were in Stoney-lane; I sent a cart to Stoney-lane by John Hasell to fetch them away, and Valentine sent John Williams to assist Hasell in conveying the materials from Stoney-lane to St. Giles's.

ROBERT CAVE . I am an officer. On the 17th of February, about six in the evening, Godfry, and me were standing at the bottom of George-street, St. Giles's; I saw the prisoner go in the middle of the street, he had something heavy on his shoulder; I went up to him, and asked him what he had got; he said lead, that had been given to him, and some brass screws; he said, a labouring man gave it him; he afterwards said, he had found it. This is the property.

Whitty. These are part of the old materials that came from Storey-lane, it is part of the lead that was in the cart; it is the property of Messrs. Meux and Co.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-102

525. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for that he, on the 12th of October, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , feloniously did take to wife one Isaballa Whitehead , Ann, his former wife , being then alive .

CHARLES WHITEHEAD , was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizances were orderded to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-103

526. HENRY MERRIDDITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of February , a coat, value 6 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. a pair of breeches, value 4 s. and a pair of overalls, value 6 s. the property of Charles William Pekin .

CHARLES WILLIAM POCHIN. Q. How do you spell your name - A. Pochin.

Mr. Arabin. It is Pekin in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Seajeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-104

527. MARY WATSON and ELIZABETH BAXTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , six pieces of ribbon, value 1 l. 14 s. the property of Thomas Harndell .

THOMAS HARNDELL . I keep a haberdasher's shop , 20, Ratcliffe Highway .

WILLIAM GARRETT . I am shopman to the prosecutor. On the 18th of March, the two prisoners came into the shop, they asked to look at some ribbons; I put the ribbon drawer on the counter; the prisoner Watson put her bonnet on the ribbon drawer. I saw her take four pieces of ribbon out of the drawer under her bonnet, and put them into her pocket. She desired me to cut off a yard and a half of ribbon; the other prisoner was standing by her; she told me to cut her off a yard; I cut her off a yard, and then I told Mr. Harndell; they both left the shop; I never lost sight of them, I fetched them back, and then I fetched Jackson, the officer; he secured them, and I saw him pick up off the ground close to Watson four pieces of ribbon.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. I was sent for to take charge of these two women; I have seen Watson before. I found four pieces of ribbon on the ground when I came in, close to the right side of Watson, and a pocket, containing two other pieces of ribbon; the pocket was Watson's pocket, it had a duplicate of a shawl in it that Watson had pledged that morning; I went to the pawnbroker's with the duplicate; the pawnbroker said Watson had pledged the shawl that morning. I searched Baxter; I found nothing upon her.

Watson's Defence. I bought a yard and a half of ribbon, and paid for it; I know nothing of the other.

Baxter's Defence. I know nothing about it.

WATSON, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

BAXTER, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-105

528. WILLIAM BENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a great coat, value 10 s. the property of James William Melvin .

JAMES WILLIAM MELVIN . I live in King's-road, Fulham. The prisoner was my servant . I missed the coat on the 10th of December.

HENRY BROWN. I bought the duplicate of the great coat of the prisoner, I gave him four shillings for it; the coat did not fit me. I pledged it again at Mr. Carter's, where I took it out of pledge.

WILLIAM CARTER. I am a pawnbroker, at Hammersmith. The great coat was pawned with me by virtue of this duplicate; I do not recollect the first pawning it. The great coat brought to me by Brown, was the one that Brown redeemed by this duplicate. I gave Mr. Brown this duplicate. This is the great coat.

Prosecutor. It is my great coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was induced to pledge the coat through the distress of my family, to buy them bread.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Vailants.

Reference Number: t18150405-106

529. THOMAS PUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a female ass, value 2 l. the property of George Morewood , esq.

JOHN COLLIER . I am a servant to George Morewood , esq. he lives at Newington Green . On the 3rd of March, he had a she ass in the field; I saw it safe in the field; I missed it on the 4th, in the middle of the day. I saw the ass again in the possession of Miller, the officer; I knew it again as soon as I saw it.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the morning of the 4th of March, I met the prisoner, he was driving a she ass; I asked him whose ass it was; he said, his own, he had bought it at the fair. Afterwards I had information the ass was stolen; I went in search of it, and found it locked up in a stable in George-street, Spitalfields; I found the stable belonged to a blind man, of the name of Miller. I was obliged to go to Winchester Assizes. One of my fellow officers took the prisoner the next day. I took the ass from Miller's possession; the same ass was delivered to Collier for his master at the office, by the order of the magistrate.

JAMES MILLER . I bought the ass of the prisoner, on the 4th of March, it was a she ass; I gave fifteen shillings for it; it was in my stable in George-street, I put it there. I heard the prisoner's voice at the office, I am sure he is the same man that I bought the ass of, by his voice; he was charged with stealing the ass.

John Collier. I went to Miller's stable, and saw the ass there; I am sure it was my master's ass, it is worth two pounds.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Valiants.

Reference Number: t18150405-107

530. RICHARD KEYTE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , eighteen pounds weight of sugar, value 1 l. the property of Simon Blake , and Edmund Blake .

MRS. BLAKE. I am the wife of Simon Blake , he is a partner with his brother, Edmund Blake . On Saturday night, the 18th of March, I saw a man come into the shop, he took a loaf of sugar from off a canester, near the door, and ran out of the shop very quick, with the loaf of sugar in his hands; I ran out of the door after him, and made an alarm, and a gentleman brought the prisoner back to the shop, and afterwards the sugar. I did not see sufficient of the man that took the loaf of sugar, to say the prisoner is the man.

CHARLES TURNER . On Saturday, the 18th of March, I was coming down King-street, Goswell-street; there was the cry of stop thief; the prisoner passed me with a loaf of sugar in his hands, I could see it was a loaf of sugar, he was running speedily; I pursued him, and stopped him, and took him back to Mr. Blake's shop; I went back to the spot where I heard the sugar thrown down the way that the prisoner came; I found the loaf of sugar on the area of 23, where he ran by. The prisoner and the loaf of sugar was taken to the watchhouse. This is the loaf of sugar.

EDMUND BLAKE . The loaf of sugar is the property of me and my brother.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Vailants.

Reference Number: t18150405-108

531. CHARLES PRIMMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , a watch, value 6 l. a chain, value 2 l. a seal, value 1 l. and a key, value 10 s. the property of Walter Evans , from his person .

WALTER EVANS . On the 28th of March, I lost my watch about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the Green Dragon public-house, Stepney ; as soon as I had entered the long room, I was surrounded by a parcel of men, and immediately the prisoner came and took the watch out of my pocket; I laid hold of him, and Mr. Deane came, and took my watch out of the prisoner's hand; it is a silver watch worth ten guineas.

JAMES DEANE . I am a waterman. I was at the long room in the Green Dragon. I saw Mr. Evans seize the prisoner, he sung out he had lost his watch; I went up, and took his watch out of the prisoner's hand; a parcel of young men came round, and shoved us all down stairs head foremost; we kept hold of the prisoner, and delivered him to Mr. Scott, the constable.

EDWARD SCOTT . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered to me. I produce the watch; Deane delivered me the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my own watch.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Vailants.

Reference Number: t18150405-109

532. ROBERT BRUCE was indicted for that he,

on the 28th of February , was servant to William Gee , and was entrusted to receive money and valuable securities for him, and that he being such servant, so employed, and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession a warrant for the payment of 56 l. 6 s. that he did afterwards secrete, embezzle, and steal, the same .

WILLIAM GEE . The prisoner was my second receiving clerk , his duty was to receive money, notes, and valuable securities for me, and to account them to me; he went round to collect money for me; I know the goods were sold to Mr. Bywaters, I was in the shop at the time.

NICHOLAS GOODBURN . I am clerk to Mr. Bywaters, an upholsterer. Mr. Bywaters purchased woollen cloth of Mr. Gee; I received the cloth of Mr. Gee's porter. I paid Robert Bruce , the prisoner, fifty-six pounds six shillings, for the cloth, on the 28th of February, by my master's order, I paid him a check upon Messrs. Hammersley and Company, bankers; this is the check, it is signed by my master, and filled up by me; I paid it to Robert Bruce for some drab cloth, he gave me a bill and receipt; this is the receipt.

Mr. Adolphus. You did not go to the bankers with the prisoner at the time he presented the check - A. No.

COURT. Q. To Mr. Gee. The 28th of February was Tuesday, supposing he had received this on the Tuesday, when was it his duty to have brought it to account - A. It was his duty to have brought it to account immediately; we have a book; he ought to have entered it in the book paid, checks and bank notes are always put in the drawer; he never brought it to account.

Q. Is your book here - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Varlants.

Reference Number: t18150405-110

533. EDWARD BUCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a bank dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. and a three shilling bank token , the monies of James Sells .

JAMES SELLS . I live at 123, Whitechapel-road , I am a cheesemonger . The prisoner was my servant . In consequence of suspicion, on the 14th of February, I marked three pounds in silver, and put it in the till. I went to the Police office, and desired an officer to come to my shop; about three o'clock Freeman came; I marked some more money, and gave it to Freeman, four three shilling tokens, which I marked under the head; I desired Freeman to come and lay it out while I was at tea, to see if my servant would account for it, and at the time I was at tea, Freeman sent a woman to make a purchase, and after tea I came in the shop, and said, Edward go to your tea; I then examined the till; the marked money was not to be found, there was one dollar deficient and a three shilling token. On Freeman searching the prisoner, he found the marked dollar and three shilling token.

JURY. For ought you know, he might have put silver in the drawer for the dollar and the three shilling token - A. I had a good character with him.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-111

534. PHINEAS EASTMOND and SOPIA BAYLIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , a gown, value 5 s. and three pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Eleanor Blackburn , a pair of stockings, value 3 s. and a half handkerchief, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Benjamin Harris , and three pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Lydia Blackburn .

JAMES HOSKINS . I live in Hackney-road, I am the master of the Refuge for the Destitute, the two prisoners were inmates of that charity.

ANN WILSON . I am one of the matrons of this Hospital; I searched Phineas Eastmond ; I found stockings and a gown upon her; I asked Eastmond what she had done with the things that she was seen to have about her, she said, she would produce them if her master would forgive her; she produced a gown, and six pair of stockings; I gave them to Mr. Hoskins, they ought to have been in the laundry.

ANN HAWKINS. I am a lanndry maid I searched Sophia Baylis; I found nothing upon her; all the property was found in Estmond's bed; these three pair of stockings are Miss Lydia Blackburn's, the gown belongs to Eleanor Blackburn , these three pair of stockings and half handkerchief, are Mr. Benjamin Harris 's.

EASTMOND GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

BAYLIS NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-112

535. JOHN WOODHOUSE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a pair of breeches, value 10 s. and two jackets. value 10 s. the property of Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , James Pickford , and Matthew Pickford .

SAMUEL MAY . I am a gentleman's servant, I live near Coggerton. On the 16th of March I packed up my trunk, I put two jackets and a pair of breeches in it; I sent them by the boat to London, to be forwarded to Lanting, in Cheshire; they were to go by the Grand Junction Canal, the trunk was directed to Messrs. Pickfords Paddington wharf; I have since seen my trunk; I missed two jackets and a pair of breeches; I saw the things since at Marlborough street office.

WILLIAM LOADER . I am in the service of Messrs. Pickfords; I am the Captain of two boats; the Britannia and the Samuel; Woodhouse' and Cock navigated the Britannia; I saw May's trunk put on board all safe and corded, and when the two boats arrived at Padington together, Cock and Woodhouse absconded; that gave me suspicion; I examined the cargo, to see that all was right; I examined May's trunk and found it was broken open; in the bed where the prisoner slept, I found this bundle two Gurnsey jackets and a pair of breeches.

Q. That does not relate to this charge - A. I saw a pair of breeches found upon the prisoner's person on Tuesday when he was taken the breeches was taken from him.

JOHN GIBBINS . I am a servant to Messrs. Pickfords, at the time of unloading the boat, I saw May's box it appeared as if the box had been broken open.

SAMUEL COCK . I navigated the Britannia with Woodhouse, in our passage up I saw Woodhouse open May's box, with a key of a cupboard; he took out a pair of breeches and two jackets, he said he should take the breeches to a taylor to put buttons on the knee; I was taken up, and come now from the House of Correction.

ROBERT HALL . I am a taylor, 107, Marybone lane, On the 20th of March, the prisoner Woodhouse brought me these breeches and jacket; I put eight pearl buttons on the knees of these breeches by his order; he took the breeches away, and said, he would call for the jacket the next day.

GEORGE HARRISON. I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner; I took these breeches from his person, and this jacket Mr. Hall gave me.

Prosecutor. The breeches and the jacket are my property.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-113

536. JOHN GLOVER , and JOSEPH FENTON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March a watch, value 3 l. 3 s. a chain, value 14 s. and a seal, value 1 l. the property of James White . from his person .

JAMES WAITE . On the 20th of March, I was coming along Chiswell street ; there was a crowd at the picture shop, and before I came to the crowd, I was going out into the highway, to get clear of the crowd, the two prisoners joined their hands, and come before me and would not let me pass; they each of them put their hands to my shoulder gave me a push and took my watch from me, it is a silver watch, gold chain, and gold seal, I did not perceive my watch go by reason of this pushing me. I clapped my hand down and missed it instantly; they both run away, the cry of stop thief proceeded, both the prisoners were taken by the crowd, and brought back, I saw my watch again, this is the watch, I am sure it is mine; I am quite certain the two prisoners are the men that would not let me pass, they gave me a thrust and took my watch from me; I am certain I had my watch about me, when they gave me a push, and a thrust that took my attention.

GLOVER GUILTY . aged 20.

FENTON GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-114

537. EDWARD STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , two coach glasses, value 5 l. and two laced strings, value 5 s. the property of Frances Elizabeth Sampryo , widow.

JOHN DOYLE . On my going through Covent garden market at half past eleven on the 11th of March, I saw the prisoner leaning over a stall board, he rose from the place, and passed me, I went immediately to the place, and found one coach glass and frame, in about three or four minutes the prisoner came again, I had removed the glass from where it was, into a fruiterers shop. I took the prisoner into custody, I took him to the watchhouse, the watch man returned with me to the same stall board and with the assistance of his lanthorn, in the same place we found another coach glass, the strings were cut compleatly off the frame; I left the two coach glasses in the custody of the watchhouse keeper.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am the watchhouse keeper, Doyle brought a coach glass and the prisoner to me, I took a lanthorn, and went to the place he directed me, and found the other coach glass.

JOHN SIMMONS . On the 11th of March, I left my mistress at her own house at eleven o'clock at night, I went to take two gentleman up from the play. I was stopped in Bow-street, ten minutes by the number of carriages. I then perceived the glasses had been taken out of the carriage; I have seen the glasses again, they are here, I know them to be the glasses belonging to my mistress's coach; they are worth five pounds.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-115

538. ELIZABETH HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , from the person of Mary Whiffen , sixteen shillings in monies numbered, and a one pound Bank note , the property of Edward Smith .

EDWARD SMITH . On Sunday the 19th of March the prisoner came and ordered two pots of beer, and half a pint of brandy, to be sent to 24, Berner street and two pots to be sent at night; I was to send change for a two pound note; the half pint of brandy was a shilling, and the four pots of beer twenty pence; my wife gave the maid the change, seventeen shillings and four pence; she wrapped it up in the one pound note. I watched the prisoner in Berner street ; I saw the prisoner take the money out of the maids hand; I immediately seized the prisoner, and took the money from her, and took her to the watchhouse, I gave the money to my wife, she mixed it with other money.

MARY WHIFFEN . I am servant to Mr. Smith, as I was going along the prisoner took hold of my wrist, and took the money out of my hand; I was to carry the beer to 24, Berner street, and when I came to 24, she said, that was not the house; my master overtook her, and took the money from her.

GUILTY . aged 41.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-116

539. JOHN GOLD and CHARLES MOORE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , four live pigs, value 6 l. the property of Thomas Neale Esq.

WILLIAM FISH COLLINS. I am servant to Mr. Dancer, he is a butcher. On the night of the 26th of March, I and Plank, were sitting up all night to watch; I heard a noise among Mr. Neale's pigs; I went near the pig-stye, I found Charles Moore with a sack at his back, I took Moore by the collar and felt the sack and found live pigsin it, he said

he found them; he called Jack, I asked him if he had got John Gold with him, he said he had; he threw the sack down, and run away, I fired at him, and shot one of his fingers: I went to Plank, we looked after Gold, we found him getting over Mr. Dancer's gate, he fell down. I and Plank seized him, and took him to the watchhouse.

JOHN PLANK . I was watching with the last witness, I found Gold with a barrow pig dead in a sack.

JOHN SMITH . I am a servant to Thomas Neale , I have the care of his pigs, on the night before this happened, I saw them all safe in the stye at six o'clock; on the morning of the 26th, I found I had lost four pigs, when I got them again, three were alive, and one dead.

GOLD GUILTY , aged 21.

MOORE GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-117

540. SARAH LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of February , two shirts, value 9 s. and three caps, value 2 s. the property of John Taylor .

ANN WHELPDALE . I keep a cooks shop in Turnmill-street ; this property belongs to John Taylor , it was left in my care, it was in my yard hanging to dry; I had just come out of the yard, where the linen was hanging to dry, I bolted the door, and went into a little parlour, I heard a person in the passage, I immediately run into the passage, and saw Sarah Lane come out of the yard, with the wet linen on her arm, this is the linen, it is John Taylor's property, I had it in my care.

GUILTY aged 35.

Confined three months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-118

541. JANE GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , two gowns, value 30 s. five caps. value 10 s. one yard of printed cotton, value 4 s. four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. and half a yard of muslin, value 3 s. the property of Susannah Steel .

SUSANNAH STEEL . I am a single woman , the prisoner came to my service after I had gone away, on account of ill health; I lived at Mr. Bayne's, in St. Paul's Church yard; I left my box with all the articles in it mentioned in the indictment, in Mr. Bayne's kitchen; the box was locked and corded; I sent a porter for my box in about three weeks after I had left; I examined my box, directly the porter arrived with it, and missed all the articles in the indictment; the prisoner left Mr. Bayne's, and went to live with Mr. Wilkins in the Strand; my mistress told me, that no one had access to the kitchen, but the prisoner. I went to Bow street and got a warrant to search for my property.

EDMOND WILSON . On the 25th of February, I went with the warrant to Mr. Wilkin's, in the Strand, I apprehended the prisoner, in her bundle I found these handkerchiefs, and a gown on the bed; the prosecutrix claimed the gown; I searched the prisoner and found the duplicate of a gown and a shawl, I accompanied the prosecutrix to Mr. Lane's, she claimed the property and a remnant of cotton and muslin; Mr. Lane delivered them up to the prosecutrix.

Prosecutrix. All the property produced is mine.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-119

542. WILLIAM COOK and GEORGE JOHNSON ROCHFORD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , one coach glass, value 30 s. the property of George Hall .

CHRISTOPHER GALLET . I am coachman to Mr. Hall, I was at 35. Seymour-street ; I lost the coach glass about half past three in the morning; I was in the kitchen taking some refreshment.

PETER BRIDAY . I am a watchman. On the 25th of February about half after three in the morning, I saw the two prisoners together at a coach in Seymour street; I saw Cook take something from the far side of the coach, I pursued him, and took him in custody; I saw Rochford come from the other side of the coach, I assisted in taking Rochford; we found this coach glass on Rochford.

GALLET. That is my master's coach glass.

COOK GUILTY , aged 19.

ROCHFORD GUILTY , aged

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-120

543. NICHOLAS MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , a wrapper, value 2 s. thirty-six yards of quilting, value 3 l. twelve handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 10 s. thirty-six pair of stockings, value 3 l. thirty-eight yards of callico, value 3 l. 8 s. the property of Charles Bly .

SECOND COUNT. For stealing like property, the property of Richard Bly .

CHARLES BLY . I am warehouseman in Maiden Lane, Wood-street. On the 14th of April, I packed up the articles, and gave the parcel to my nephew to carry to Mr. Hooper Cock-hill, Ratcliffe.

RICHARD BLY . I took the parcel to Ratcliffe Highway , and put it on the pitching-block; I put my arm on the pitching-block, and kept looking into a window on the opposite side of the way; and when I looked for my bundle, it was gone, I went into Rosemary-lane, I asked Mr. Moses if he had seen a man with a bundle; he took me up White's-yard Rosemary-lane; I saw the prisoner smoaking his pipe at the window, Mr. Moses told him to come down, and to give me the goods, he said he had not got them, Moses said you have them, he took me up stairs into the prisoner's room, gave me the goods and took the prisoner to the office; these are the goods, they are all here, except the three dozen of stockings.

MR. MOSES. On the 4th of April, the prisoner passed me with a bundle, the boy came and asked me if I had seen any man with a bundle, I told him I had, I went to the prisoner and took him and the goods to the office.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

GUILTY aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-121

544. GEORGE BOWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , a handkerchief, value 6 s. the property of Samuel Daffin , from his person .

SAMUEL DAFFIN . I am a warehouseman , in Silver-street, Wood-street. On the 2nd of April, I lost my handkerchief from my pocket, I was just coming out the gates of Shoreditch Church , I had been at service in Shoreditch Church, there was a considerable crowd there, and the Duke of Kent; it was a Charity Sermon for the Sunday School Society; I had occasion to use my handkerchief while I was at the service; I felt my handkerchief go from my pocket, I turned round as soon as I could for the crowd, and saw my handkerchief lay at the prisoner's feet; the constable had got hold of the prisoner; my handkerchief is worth seven or eight shillings.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I was at Shoreditch Church on this day. I watched the prisoner's notions a long time; I saw him attempt a number of gentleman's pockets; I see him put his hand into the prosecutor's right hand pocket, and pull his handkerchief out; I instantly seized him by the collar, and tapped the prosecutor on the shoulder, and told him he had lost his handkerchief; the prisoner dropped the handkerchief; I picked it up in the presence of the prosecutor. I searched the prisoner; I found three handkerchiefs in his possession; this is the handkerchief he took out of the prosecutor's pocket.

Q. To Prosecutor. Is that your handkerchief - A. It is.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-122

545. JOHN BRIANT was indicted for that he, on the 13th of March , eighteen pounds weight of lead, value 3 s. belonging to Thomas Duggin , and affixed to a building of his, feloniously did cut, with intent to steal it .

THOMAS DUGGIN . The house where this lead was cut is No. 21, Short's-gardens, Drury-lane ; I rent that house by the year, it is in the parish of St. Giles's .

Q. Was the house robbed of any lead affixed to it - A. Yes; I did not see it cut; the watchman called upon me.

WILLIAM POTTER . I am a watchman, in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane. I know the house rented by Duggin. A woman called to me, on the 13th of March, about a quarter past one in the morning; I opened my lanthorn, and crept into the passage; I saw the prisoner pulling the pipe up, it was cut at both ends, he was in the yard with the pavement up; when he saw me, he left the pipe, and attempted to get over the wall; I pulled him down, and secured him; he had not doubled the pipe up; I doubled it up to bring it here; the pipe came out of the dwelling-house, and ran along a wall to a water butt. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. When I saw the prisoner in the yard pulling the pipe up, he was the only person in the yard.

Prosecutor. The pipe was affixed to the dwelling-house.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-123

546. HANNAH NEADS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Hawkins .

THOMAS PICKETT . I am shopman to Joseph Hawkins , linen-draper , in St. John-street . On the 18th of February, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner and another woman came into our shop, and asked to look at a shawl; I was engaged at the opposite side of the counter in cutting off a handkerchief for a lady; I cut the handkerchief off for the lady, and left the remaining two handkerchiefs on the counter; the lady took the handkerchief away that she paid for; the prisoner was then engaged with the other shopman, at the other counter; I went to the door to fasten some prints that were near the door, and while I was doing this, my back was to the counter where I had left the two handkerchiefs; the prisoner and the other woman passed me, and went out. When I returned to the counter, I missed the two handkerchiefs; I pursued the prisoner, and brought her back; I saw the two handkerchiefs under her cloak; I took them from her. These are the handkerchiefs; they are my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-124

547. CAROLINE OSMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a bank note, value 50 l. a bank note, value 20 l. a bank note 5 l. and four 1 l. bank notes , the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am an accomptant ; I live in Pall Mall.

Q. When did you lose your notes - A. On the 21st of November last, between eleven and twelve at night, I met the prisoner in Fleet-street, I went home with her to her lodging, in Wellington-place, Drury-lane ; before I went to bed, I counted my notes over, and saw I had fifty-nine pounds; after that, I went to bed, and fell asleep, and did not awoke till between six and seven in the morning; I then found my pantaloon pocket turned inside out, and my notes all gone.

JAMES MORLEY . I am a shopman to Mr. Lloyd, linen-draper, 24, Oxford-street. On the morning of the 22nd of November, the prisoner came to our shop, and bought a shawl at three pounds, and three pair of stockings at three shillings and sixpence a pair; she asked the other woman that was with her to pay for it; she gave me a twenty-pound note, No. 13,973, I paid it away.

ROBERT LEWIS . I am clerk to Sir John Lovett , and Co. I paid the notes to Mr. Williams, a fifty pound note, No. 573; a twenty pound note, No. 13,973, and other notes, on the 21st of November.

WILLIAM GOLD . I belong to the Bank of

England. I produce a twenty-pound note, No. 13,973.

Mr. Lewis. That is the note I paid to John Williams .

GUILTY aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-125

548. ROBERT BRUCE was indicted for that he, on the 11th of March , was servant to William Gee , and employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and that he being such servant, so employed, and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 7 l. 2 s. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same .

WILLIAM LEE , JUNIOR. My father is a woolen-draper. I paid the prisoner seven pounds two shillings, for an account that we had purchased the Friday before. This is the receipt he have me for it, (read) the receipt is his usual hand-writing.

WILLIAM GEE . The prisoner was my clerk . This receipt is his hand writing; he never accounted to me for the money. This is the day-book, in which Mr. Lee is debitted; he ought to have entered it in the cash-book as paid; he has not; he never accompted to me for this seven pounds two shillings.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-126

549. MICHAEL CORSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , a seal, value 1 s. and a key, value 2 d. the property of Bartholomew Richmond , from his person .

BARTHOLOMEW RICHMOND . I am a bricklayer . On the 2nd of April, I met Bull, the watchman, about three o'clock in the morning, I spoke to him; I afterwards met the prisoner, he made a pluck at my watch ribbon, and with the violent pull, he took my seal and key; I put my hand down, and missed my seal; I am quite sure he is the same man.

GUILTY aged 30.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-127

550. JOHN PATERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of March , a pair of boots, value 1 l. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. five cotton shirts, value 1 l. two flannel shirts, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of John Allen .

JOHN ALLEN . I am a seaman ; I lost my things on board a ship; my clothes were in a bag. I only know that I lost my things; who took them I cannot say.

JOHN MITCHELL . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in a boat with this bag of clothes; the boots and the shoes were out of the bag, loose in the boat. I asked him who the bag of clothes belonged to; he said, to two boys: seeing the boots and shoes were too big for a boy, I took him in custody, and found out the owner Allen.

Q. To Allen. Look at the clothes in the bag - A. They are all mine, and the boots and shoes are mine.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-128

551. WILLIAM HOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , sixty-three pounds weight of sheet lead, value 63 s. the property of William Piper .

WILLIAM PIPER . I am a plumber ; I was doing some plumbing work at Islington Chapel . I lost this lead from there; it is for the ridges of the roof, it was all cut in lengths and of one thickness.

SAMUEL BOOTH . I am a watchman. On the 14th of February, I saw the prisoner in Whitecross-street, with a sack on his shoulder: I felt the sack, I found there was lead in it; I said to him, you have got a pigeon here. I took him to the watchhouse and the lead.

Prosecutor. This is my lead, I know it by the substance and size; it matches with the other pieces; I am sure it is my lead; it was taken from Islington Chapel.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry this lead; the man that hired me I have not seen since.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-129

552. ELEANOR RUSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of April , six pewter pots, value 9 s. the property of Jacob Hart .

JACOB HART . I keep the Rose and Crown public-house , Sloane-street, Chelsea . On the 3rd of April, the prisoner came into my house, and called for half a pint of beer; I saw her sitting in the tap-room drinking it; after she had drank it, she went out.

AMELIA CAPPER . On the 3rd of April, I carried a pint of beer into the tap-room; a man asked me if I had taken the half pint pot from the prisoner; I said, no. The prisoner went out; I followed her, and took the half pint pot out of her apron.

GEORGE PRINCE . On the 5th of April, I searched the prisoner's lodging; I found these six pewter pint pots there, and a frying pan with mettle in it.

Prosecutor. This is the half pint pot the girl took out of her apron, and these are the six pint pots she took out of my house on Sunday morning; the whole of them had just come from the scowerers; they are all mine.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-130

553. OWEN SWIFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , three deal planks, value 1 l. 7 s. the property of Richard Wall .

RICHARD WALL . I am a timber-merchant , in Sutton-street, Soho . I saw the prisoner bring the three deals out of my timber yard, on the 28th of March; my wife came and asked me if I had sold him the deals; I said, no. I followed him to No. 24, Peter-street, St. James's; he put the deals down in the passage; I took him in custody. These are the deals; I am sure they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-131

554. THOMAS TILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , nine shirts, value 2 l. 10 s. three waistcoats, value 2 l. 10 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a pair of shoes, value 7 s. two handkerchiefs, value 7 s. a bank dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Brisson ; a jacket, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a bag, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Perrin .

RICHARD BRISSON . I am a seaman , and the prisoner had been a seaman in the same ship also. I missed my things on Monday, the 2nd of April, my chest was brought on Sunday, and broken open on Sunday night. The prisoner was discharged from the ship on the Thursday before the Sunday; he had no business on board on that Sunday.

ROBERT MARSHALL . I am a publican, I keep the Yorkshire Grey, Mint-street, in the Borough. On the 2nd of April, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner called at my house, he asked me if I could give him a nights lodging; I told him no. He then asked me to take charge of his bag of clothes, and to lock them up; I took the bag. I afterwards delivered the bag to May, the officer, at Union Hall. On Tuesday morning, Partridge, the officer, of Shadwell Office, came, and asked me if I had got any thing of a man of the name of Till; I told him I had delivered the bag to Mr. May.

JOHN PATRIDGE . I called at the Yorkshire Grey, I there heard the prisoner was in the custody of May; the clothes I have got here were upon him, and the clothes in the bag, are the property that he had stolen. I produce them.

Brisson. They are all my property.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-132

555. JOSEPH VERBESA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , two shirts, value 4 s. three pair of stockings, value 4 s. a pair of sheets, value 6 s. a towel, value 6 d. and half a yard of calico, value 6 d. the property of Isabella Welch , widow .

ISABELLA WELCH. I am a widow. I lost my things on the 10th of March, they were laying out in the garden to dry; I live at No. 1, Johnson's-place, Commercial-road .

JOHN STAPLETON . The prosecutrix's daughter desired me to stop the prisoner; I pursued the prisoner, and stopped him; his hat fell off, and this bit of cotton fell out of his hat. This is the bundle of linen I took from him.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-133

556. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , five sheets, value 15 s. the property of David South .

DAVID SOUTH . I keep the Red Lion at Highgate . On the 29th of March. I lost my sheets, about half past nine in the morning; on the over night, the prisoner came in for a lodging; in the morning he was last up, and when he went out in the morning my servant noticed him running, she told me she thought he had something more than he ought to have; I pursued him and took him into the constable's house; I told him to strip he had five sheets round him, there mine.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one month and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-134

557. AUTHUR DABBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of April , a hat, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Daniel Gardner .

DANIEL GARDNER. I am a hatter , No. 3, Chiswell-street, I lost my hat on the 3rd of April; a gentleman came past, and asked me if I had lost anything; I said yes, a hat; he said it was over the way at the public-house: I went over to the public-house, and saw the prisoner with my hat, I took the hat from him, this is the hat, it is mine.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-135

558. MARY DIXON was indicted for felonionsly stealing, on the 17th of March , one hundred and seven ounces of silk, value 1 l. 10 s. and a wooden bobbin, value 1 d. the property of Joseph Wilson .

EBENEZAR DALTON. I am an officer; on the 17th of March last, I went to the prisoner's house in John's-street, Brick-lane, Spitalfields; on searching her house, I found this silk and this bobbin; the bobbin Mr. Wilson spoke of at the office.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a warehouseman to Mr. Joseph Wilson , silkman in Milk-street; we had an hundred weight of silk of this description; stolen from our warehouse by a burglary, I cannot swear positively to the silk, it is a rare material, the bobbin is ours, I know it by the private mark.

Prisoner's Defence. A man left it at our house, I never bought it.

GUILTY , aged 76.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-136

559. JOHN DIXON and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , eleven pair of cotton drawers, value 1 s. the property of Eleanor Coleman .

ELEANOR COLEMAN . I work at slop work , I live at 13, Bluegate-street, Whitechapel ; I lost these

things, on the 16th of March, between nine and ten o'clock at night, they were in a chair in my room; I had been at work, and put the work down on the chair; Dixon the prisoner came into the room, knocked the candle off the table, took up the bundle, and run out.

GEORGE HOPEMAN . I saw the prisoner Dixon, at Rosemary-lane offering these two pair of cotton drawers for sale; I took him into custody.

ERENEZER DALTON. On the 16th of March, Dixon was brought to the office; I overheard some conversation between him and a person that came to visit him; he told the woman to go to George yard, and to tell William Smith to make away with the drawers directly; I went there, and took Smith in custody; he was in bed with the drawers under his head; I produce the property; the drawers, a gown, and an apron.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

DIXON, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-137

560. JOHN WILLIAMS and MICHAEL BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , one hundred and twenty-nine yards of printed cotton, value 3 l. the property of John Birt .

JAMES FORD . I am shopman to John Birt , linen-draper , 8, Russell-street, Covent Garden . On the 25th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw six pieces of print tied fast to a chair before our door; I went out, and I heard some boys say that the men that took the print were taken to the Brown Bear , Bow-street; I went to the Brown Bear , and saw the prints and the two prisoners.

MR. GASKINS. On the 25th of February, I was going along Wild-street; I saw the two prisoners with a bundle, and a great number of persons after them; they turned up. Orange-street, ran into an empty house; they came out again without the bundle, and went away. I then went up to Bow-street, I met Dickens, the officer; I told him; he said, he would go with me if I would shew him the house; I took him to the house, and in the dust hole, there were six pieces of print; on our leaving there to go to Bow-street, I saw John Williams : I am sure he is one of them; when I saw Brown, he was disguised; I was not so sure of him.

JEREMIAH SCRIVEN . I saw the two prisoners go up Wild-street; a mob of people followed them; I was looking at them; they turned up Orange-court, went into an empty house with the prints; they staid there a bit, and came out without it. When the officer took the property, the officer asked if any body knew them; I said, I did; I went with the officer. I am sure the two prisoners are the men.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. Gaskins came and informed me he saw John Williams go into an empty house with the prints that I produce; I found the prints in the dust hole of No. 3, Orange-court.

Ford. These are the six pieces of print that we had in the chair before the door; they are Mr. Birt's property.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 19.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-138

561. ANN NICHOLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , two gowns, value 6 s. the property of Elizabeth Watts .

ELIZABETH WATTS . I lost my gowns on the 15th of February; on the Saturday week following, I saw the prisoner in the passage with one of my gowns on her back.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the gown in Petticoat-lane.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-139

562. SARAH HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of February , a watch, value 1 l. and a seal, value 10 s. the property of John Coles , from his person .

JOHN COLES . I am a plaisterer ; I live at Battle-bridge. On the 22nd of February, near three in the morning, in Holborn, I met with the prisoner, she asked me to go home with her; I was not perfectly sober. I walked up Holborn with her as far as Gray's-inn-lane ; I missed my watch, and the prisoner left me.

THOMAS BAKER . I am a watchman. On the 22nd of February, the prosecutor and the prisoner came to me at the corner of Hatton Garden; the prosecutor treated me and the prisoner with a glass of gin; he told the prisoner to go away from him; she kept following him; in about an hour afterwards, I saw the prisoner running by me, I stopped her, and asked her where her customer was; she said, gone home. I said what have you got in your hand, you have stolen the man's watch; she said, I have, and threw the watch out of her hand; I picked the watch up, and took the prisoner and the watch to the watchhouse.

JOHN BARNLEY . I was constable of the night. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-140

563. CHARLES JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a veil, value 3 l. the property of William Leversatch , from the person of Catherine Leversatch .

CATHERINE LEVERSATCH . William Leversatch is my husband. I lost my veil on the 6th of April, at eight o'clock in the evening, I was walking along

Long Acre , I heard some footsteps following me very quick; the prisoner came up to me, and took my veil off my head; I turned immediately round, I saw the prisoner's face: the veil was not quite gone over my shoulder; I put up my hand to save myself, in my doing that, he took away the veil, and ran up Angel-court; I pursued him up the court, I cried stop thief; he was stopped at the end of of Rose-street and King-street; I came up and accused him; the veil was tied on my head when he took it away from me.

WILLIAM BAILEY . On the 6th of April, about a quarter past eight in the evening, I was coming along Rose-street. I stopped at the end of Rose-street; I saw the prosecutrix come up to the prisoner, she said, he had robbed her of her veil. I said where; she replied, in Long Acre. I took the prisoner, and gave him in the charge of a constable; he took him to Bow-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge as God is my Saviour.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-141

564. JOHN POWELL , alias RICHARD BLOOMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , two great coats, value 10 s. the property of Robert Webb .

ROBERT WEBB . I am a servant to Henry Creed , esq. 19, Hans-place, Chelsea . On the 27th of February, the prisoner between two and five o'clock, came down the area steps, along the passage, unhung a great coat of mine in the kitchen, and another that hung in the passage; at that time I was in the parlour, immediately over the kitchen; I saw the prisoner come up the area steps with the great coats under his arm. I asked him what he took them for; he said, the tailor sent him for them, they wanted altering. I secured him, and took him to the constable. These are the two coats; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-142

565. MARGARET PARCELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of February , a counterpane, value 8 s. the property of Peter Christopher Harms .

ELIZABETH HARMS . My husband's name is Peter Christopher Harms , he is a carpenter . I lost my counterpane on the 23rd of February, out of my garden at the back of my house, in Christian-street, St. Georges in the East . I saw my counterpane again at the pawnbrokers.

MR. PARKER. The prisoner pawned this counterpane with me; I stopped her.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned the counterpane for a sailor, he said it was his own.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-143

566. WILLIAM SPARKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of April , a pair of shoes, value 11 s. the property of John Swan .

JOHN SWAN . I am a clothes-salesman , in Sharp's-building, Rosemary-lane . On the 3rd of April, I lost a pair of shoes, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop with some articles to sell, and after he was gone, I missed the shoes; I pursued him, and found him with the shoes wrapped up in his handkerchief. These are the shoes; they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-144

567. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of February , one shawl, value 1 l. 18 s. the property of William Waithman , John Miles , John Smith , and Thomas Smith .

JOHN MILES . I am a linen-draper , the corner of Turnstile, Holborn; my partners names are William Waithman , John Smith , and Thomas Smith , and myself; we four are the only partners. I can only speak to the property.

WILLIAM BARNARD . I was passing the shop; I saw the prisoner in the shop; I saw her take the shawl from where it was hung up, no great way from the door; she walked out of the shop with the shawl under her cloak. I called the shopman; we pursued her into Lincoln's-inn-fields; I took the shawl from under her cloak. This is the shawl.

Prosecutor. It is my shawl.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined two months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-145

568. SURROO was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Soosar Dooser , four 1 l. bank notes, and four three-shilling bank tokens , his property.

SOOSAR DOOSER. Q. Did you lose any bank tokens and bank notes - A. Yes, four one pound bank notes, and four three shilling tokens; I had the one pound notes tied up in my handkerchief, and the three shilling tokens; I was sitting in the Wellington public house, Cemball street , and Sarroo, the Lascar , came in, and snatched my turban off my head, and my handkerchief out of my hand with the money and notes in it; this was on the 6th of March, and as soon as the prisoner had snatched my turban and handkerchief, he ran away.

Q. What time of the day did the prisoner take it from you - A. About half after eight o'clock; I ran after him, and asked him for my turban and my handkerchief; he said, if I asked him for my money, he would strike me, I went for an officer;

he was taken by nine o'clock.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I went to the Lord Wellington public house, at nine o'clock, and took Sarroo into custody. Dooser charged him with robbing him of four one-pound notes, four three-shilling bank tokens, his cap, and handkerchief. This is the cap, it has been claimed by Dooser, but not that evening; I searched Surroo; I found on him five three shilling bank tokens, and two-pence halfpenny, no notes; this is the handkerchief I found on him.

Q. To Dooser. Is that your cap - A. It is mine, and this is my handkerchief.

GUILTY .

Confined two months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-146

569. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , two bed curtains, value 4 s. the property of Benjamin Holmes .

RUTH HOLMES . I live at No. 90, Saffron-hill ; my husband's name is Benjamin Holmes ; he keeps a broker's shop . These curtains were in the shop, on the back of a chair; the prisoner came in, and took them off the back of the chair, and went off with them; I pursued her, and took the curtains from her. These are the curtains; they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-147

570. JOHN MAY and JAMES MAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , four bushels of coals, value 5 s. the property of John Tinlater , Robert Ellis , and Samuel Pugh .

JOHN SAMMAN . I am an officer. On the 27th of March, I went out between five and six in the morning, when I came off Rotherhithe , I saw a boat along side of a collier; one of the prisoners was in the craft, and the other in the boat; James May handed the basket up to John May , the basket was empty; as soon as John filled, he put it into the boat, and came out of the craft into the boat; they both rowed off; we rowed after them, and saw they had large coals in the boat, and in the bulk of the coals in the barge, there were holes on the top of the coals were these large coals had been taken out. Mitchell asked them how they came by the coals; they said, the coals were in the boat when they came to her in the morning. I asked them what they did at the barge; they said, they went to the barge to turn the water out of the boat.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I saw the coals in the prisoners boat, there were eleven bushels, and all large coals; there were holes on the surface of the barge, where large coals had been taken out; I saw James May hand the basket up to John May .

JOHN WARNER . I am a foreman to the prosecutors; their names are John Tinlater , Robert Ellis , and Samuel Pugh . On the 25th of March, I went with the barge, and filled it with a room of coals, and when I came to the barge, the large coals at the top were all picked out.

JAMES MAY , GUILTY, aged 19.

JOHN MAY, GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-148

571. GEORGE CHAMBERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of William Grimaldie .

WILLIAM GRIMALDIE . I am a butcher , in East-street, Lamb's Conduit-street. On Saturday evening, the 25th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was walking along New-street, Covent Garden , and when I came to the corner of Rose-street , I felt a twitch at my pocket; I saw the prisoner by the side of me, and nobody near me excepting the prisoner; a young woman three or four yards off, pointed to the prisoner; I seized the prisoner, and with the assistance of a gentleman, took him to the watchhouse. The young woman told me he gave the handkerchief to his companion, who ran up Rose-street with it, and a lad come and said he saw him give my handkerchief to another man that was with him.

HARRIET MUNROE . I saw the prisoner pick the prosecutor's pocket of this handkerchief; he gave it to his companion, who ran away with it up Rose-street.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-149

572. ANN LIGHTWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , from the person of Henry Neads , a pocket-book, value 6 d. a pair of buckles, value 2 s. 6 d. ten 10 l. bank notes, and three 1 l. bank notes , his property.

HENRY NEADS . I am a Chelsea Pensioner . I lost my pocket-book in Paradise-row, Chelsea ; I was coming from a public-house to go home to Chelsea Hospital, about eight o'clock in the evening, on the 29th of March, I had been making merry; the prisoner over took me, and asked for relief; I gave her a shilling, and went up an alley with her.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the woman - A. I cannot swear that she robbed me; I had seen her at the Green Dragon public-house, where I had been drinking. I only had her taken up on suspicion.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-150

573. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 10th of March , from the person of Jeremiah Murphy , a bag, value 1 d. eighteen shillings in monies numbered, and two 1 l. bank notes , his property.

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-151

574. JOHN JOHANNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John M'Carthy .

JOHN M'CARTHY. I am a seaman . I lost my trowsers on the 16th of March, out of my lodging room, in Ship-street, Wapping. The prisoner slept in the same bed with me two nights. I saw my trowsers again at the office.

GEORGE PATRIDGE . I am an officer. These are the trowsers I took from the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are my trowsers; the prisoner took them from my lodging-room.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-152

575. ELIZA ANN HOLLOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a gown, value 10 s. a cloak, value 15 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Jane Butler , widow .

THOMAS BUTLER . I live with my mother, Jane Butler , she is a widow. The prisoner was a servant to her.

MARY FOX. The prisoner came into my mistress's service on the 8th of November. The prisoner had locked herself in the room were my mistress's gowns were kept: I saw her locked in. We missed one of my mistress's gowns; I took a bit of the patern, and went to Mr. Wright's, the pawnbroker; there I saw the gown.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this gown with me; I took it in myself, on the 13th of March; I advanced seven shillings upon it; and this cloak I took in on the 11th of March, I advanced fifteen shillings upon it, to the prisoner; and this pocket handkerchief I took in with the gown.

Mary Fox . The handkerchief, gown, and cloak, are my mistress's property.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined two months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-153

576. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , three quarters of a yard of lace, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Dawson .

ROBERT DAWSON . I am a mercer , in Ratcliffe Highway ; I sell lace . On Saturday, the 8th of April, in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, she asked to look at some lace; Mary Windham served her.

MARY WINDHAM . I am shopwoman to Mr. Dawson. The prisoner came into the shop with a young woman with her; she asked to look at some lace; I shewed her some; she said they were not broad enough; she took up one bit of lace, and asked the price of it; I told her eight shillings and sixpence; she concealed it in her hand, and asked the price of another. I then informed Mr. Dawson that the prisoner had concealed a piece of lace in her hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I had seven shillings in my pocket to pay for it, and halfpence besides.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-154

577. JAMES KEMP was indicted for that he at the delivery of the King's Goal of Newgate, holden at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, on Wednesday. the 15th of February , James Renney was tried and convicted of stealing two table cloths, value 10 s. eight towels, value 4 s. five bed gowns, value 5 s. a sheet, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. and a shawl, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Redkinson , from the person of William Redkinson . And that the prisoner James Kemp , did incite, aid counsel the said James Renney to do and commit the said felony as aforesaid .

MARY REDINSON . My husband's name is Thomas Redkinson . not Redison.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-155

578. JOHN DEWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , a coat, value 5 s. the property of John Smith .

MARY SMITH . My husband's name is John Smith he keeps a clothes shop , No. 10, Monmonth-street ; I lost this coat, on the 21st of March.

WILLIAM MARKS . On the 21st of March, I was standing at my own door; I saw the prisoner un-pin the coat at John Smith 's door, and run off with it; I pursued him and took him with the coat; this is the coat.

Prosecutrix. It is my husband's property.

GUILTY aged 15.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-156

579. JOHN CASIMERE and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a watch, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of George Riches .

MARY RICHES . My husband's name is George Riches , he is a milkman ; I lost my watch out of my parlour in West-street, St. Martin's Lane . On the 6th of April, three boys came into my shop,

and asked for cakes; they began to play tricks with each other, Smith took off Casimeres's hat and throwed it into the parlour, Casimere ran into the parlour to fetch his hat, on his returning he seemed to be fumbling something; I looked at the nail and missed my watch; as Casimere went out, I run out and called stop thief, he was taken, and in a quarter of an hour after, the watch was found under a fish stall where Casimere passed.

MR. GREEN. I am a fishmonger. I heard the cry of stop thief; in about a quarter of an hour afterwards, I found this watch under one of the fish stalls, in Lumber-court, just by where Casimere was stopped.

Prosecutrix. That is my watch.

CASIMERE GUILTY , aged 15.

SMITH GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined three months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-157

580. PETER BRADY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. and an apron, value 2 s. the property of Mary Camel , widow .

MARY CAMEL . I am a widow; I lost my shoes and apron on the 9th of March; the prisoner came in and said, he had no work nor any thing to eat and drink; the man that kept the house gave him some supper and a pot of beer; in the morning I missed my shoes and apron.

JOHN HILL . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pair of shoes and a check apron. I took them in pawn on the 9th of March of the prisoner; I lent half a crown upon them.

Prosecutrix. They are my shoes and apron.

GUILTY aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-158

581. CATHERINE BARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a gown, value 5 s. the property of James Copper .

MRS. COPPER. My husband's name is James Copper ; I lost my gown on the 11th of February from out of my back room; the prisoner sold the duplicate of the gown to Mr. Ricords; I asked the prisoner when she nursed me to look for my gown; she said, it was in my box, but she did not show it me; she went away; I asked my husband to look in my box, he did, and missed nine of my duplicates, the prisoner took them away and sold them.

Q. Did you ever find your gown - A. Yes.

MRS. RICORDS. The prisoner gave me the duplicate of a gown, I gave it to Mrs. Davis, she went to the pawnbrokers with it, and took the gown out; this is the gown.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown.

GUILTY aged 56.

Confined one Year , and fine 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-159

582. WILLIAM BARRETT and ABRAHAM FULLER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of March , a handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of some person to the jurors unknown.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. In consequence of information of several people having their pockets picked at the Auction Mart, Picket Street ; on the 3rd of March I went there; I saw the two prisoners there about five o'clock in the evening; I saw Fuller go about the Auction-room, several times, feeling peoples pockets, and Barrett along with him; at last Fuller went up to a gentleman, took his handkerchief out of his pocket, and gave it to Barrett, Barrett put it behind him; Godfrey and I took them into custody; I found the handkerchief behind Barrett.

BARRETT GUILTY aged 20.

FULLER GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-160

583. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a blanket, value 2 s. and a quilt, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Kelly , in a lodging room .

THOMAS KELLY . Q. Do you know of these lodgings being let to the prisoner - A. I heard the woman in the house say so.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-161

584. WILLIAM HOPWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of March , two three shilling Bank tokens, and three shillings the monies of William John Wright .

ANN WRIGHT . My husband's name is William John Wright ; he is a publican , he keeps the Duke of Clarance, public house ; the prisoner came to our house on the 23rd of March; he asked if Mr. Wright was at home, I told him no, it was uncertain when he would be at home, he was attending Westminster Hall, he said he was a Bow-street officer; he had come to caution against taking bad notes that were offered by people living there; he asked me if I could change him a ten pound note; I said no, he then asked me to give him change for a one pound note; I said, yes; I took out two three shilling tokens, and three shillings and laid them on the bar shelf, he put them in his pocket; I asked him for the one pound note, and said I would give him the rest of the change; he said he was coming in again or I might send the girl with it; he went out of the house with the two three shilling tokens and the three shillings; I never saw him again until I saw him at the office.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I apprehended the prisoner and took him to the office; I searched him and found four three shilling tokens, and some bits of paper upon him about the size of Bank notes.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . The prisoner does not belong to Bow-street office, he has got his living in this way for six years past, and has been twice convicted.

GUILTY aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-162

585. SAMUEL HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , one iron plinth, value 1 s. 6 d. two iron blocks, value 2 s. two iron ornaments, value 2 s. 6 d. and twelve spitoons, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of William Birch ; And WILLIAM BISHOP , for feloniously receiving one iron block, value 1 s. one iron plinth, value 1 s. 6 d. and two iron ornaments, value 2 s. 6 d. he well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM BIRCH. In consequence of information, I went with Brown and Limbrick to the White Horse public-house, St. John-street; I there saw Bishop and Humphreys drinking and smoking together; Bishop was sitting on the form We searched Humphreys, and found nothing about him; on the seat where he sat, Limbrick took from him, the block, plinth, and two ornaments; the officer asked Bishop what he did with them; he said Humphreys brought them there.

Humphreys's Defence. I did not take them with intent to defraud, but to make a casting from them.

Bishop, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-163

586. THOMAS COLLINGS COWLING was indicted for a misdemeanour .

CHARLES RODNEY UXLEY . I live at 123, Newgate-street, I am a wholesale glover. The prisoner Cowling came to my house, on the 21st of January, he brought an order, as if coming from a customer of mine; this written order is one of my customer's cards

"two dozen woodstock gloves, one dozen tan ditto, and two dozen coloured kid;" at the bottom it is,

"let the mens be as near the size of the pattern as you can". I executed the order, and gave them to him, five dozen in the whole; this was between twelve and one o'clock. I knew the prisoner, he had lived with a customer of mine, a Mr. Tidcomb, of Knightsbridge; the prisoner delivered me the pattern; I delivered them to the prisoner as the order of Mr. Tidcomb. He came again on Monday, the 23rd, with this written order, as from the same person, for

"three dozen of Norway ditto gloves, of different colours;" that I delivered also. I sent to Mr. Tidcomb; he said, he never received the goods, in consequence of that, I had the prisoner apprehended.

MR. TIDCOMB. I live at Knightsbridge. The prisoner never lived with me as a servant; he has been in the trade. I never gave him any order, or sent him to Mr. Uxley for goods, nor ever did I receive the goods; the order is not my writing.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-164

587. THOMAS LONG was indicted for that he, on the 19th of February , the door of a passage leading to the warehouse of Joseph Clements , Thomas Berradaile , and Clement Jackson , unlawfully did break and enter the said passage, and also unlawfully did break a certain inner door in the said passage, with intent to enter the said warehouse, to steal the goods therein .

THOMAS HUDSON . I am Ward beadle of Cripplegate Without . On the 19th of February, Wilson, the watchman, came into the watchhouse, and said, there was something amiss doing in the Ward; in consequence of that, Couzens, the patrole, me, and the constable of the night, went out together; I gave orders to take any body into custody that was out at that time in the morning; on our going half way down London Wall we saw nobody at all: there is a passage that leads from Fore-street to London Wall; we all there met together; I gave directions for the other men to go down Fore-street, and I, and Conzens would go down London Wall, and when we got into London Wall again, we fell in with the prisoner; I took hold of the prisoner; Couzens came up, and took hold of him round the waist, and said, master, it is all right, he has the tools about him; he took a crow from him; we took him to the watch-house, and on searching him, we found a parchment of his profession, as a tide-waiter, and about him was paper of the colour of shutters to stick on the holes when they are cut, that the holes may not be perceived; we secured him in the watchhouse. We returned to the spot where we apprehended him, opposite of the warehouse of Clements and Berradaile, we found the premises broken open; these two pannels were broken out of the door, and this lock was off the outer door.

JOHN COUZENS . I produce the crow, I took from the prisoner.

THOMAS WILSON . I saw the prisoner and three more with him, at half past twelve at night, in this passage that goes from Fore-street to London Wall, they passed me several times; I thought they were after no good; I went to the watchhouse, and informed the beadle.

THOMAS BURNELL . I am clerk to Joseph Clements , Thomas Berradaile , and Clement Jackson , china and glass merchants , London Wall. On the 20th of February, when I came to the warehouse, I found it had been broken open; nothing had been taken away.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined one year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-165

588. SAMUEL PETERS was indicted for burglariously

breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Hutchins , about the hour of eight in the night of the 11th of February , and stealing therein, two saws, value 8 s. the property of Felix Murphy .

FELIX MURPHY . I am a chair-maker ; my workshop is in Chequer-alley, Bunhill-row , in the house of Richard Hutchins . I lost my saws on the 11th of February, they were taken out of the shop while I was in the act of putting the candle out and locking the door.

Q. Then the house was not broken - A. No, it was not, by any body; another man has a key as well as me. I lost two saws, one was sent home, and the other was pawned by a woman. I cannot tell how the prisoner got in; he sent me one saw; this is it; I know it is mine; the other saw was pawned by a woman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150405-166

589. JOHNNY , SIDER CAUN , ANTONIO FRANCISCO , and ANTONIO FERNANDEZ , were indicted for conspiring to charge Thomas Dixey Finney with the murder of Butler John .

FRANCIS HOBLER. I am clerk to the Lord Mayor. I received this paper from Johnny, the serang .

(The depositions of the different witnesses brought before the Lord Mayor by Johnny, the serang, to support the charge against Captain Finney , read.)

CAPTAIN THOMAS DIXEY FINNEY . I was the Commander of the Ship Caroline, of Bombay ; she was built in that Country, her burthen was four hundred and fifty tons.

Q. Is this a correct part of the aft part of the ship - A. Yes; it appears to me to be a perfect model; the model represents my cabin and Captain Woodhouse 's cabin; the partition between my cabin and Captain Woodhouse 's cabin, is about three quarters of an inch deal; what passes in one cabin must be heard in the other cabin; our ship is steered by a wheel; my crew were the greater part Lascars, except six or eight Portuguese. The prisoner, Johnny, was a Lascar , he was the serang, the boatswain , he is the man that engaged the whole of the ships crew, and pays them; he has the complete command over them; his duty on board is similar to a boatswain; the tindal is the next man, he is the boatswain's mate; we have other persons on board, who are called sea cunneys, they are Portuguese, who steer the ship.

Q. You had a little boy of the name of Dagoo, who attended you - A. I had.

Q. What was your steward's name - A. John Decrase , he went by the name of Butler John; he was recommended to me by a very particular friend of mine; he is the object of enquiry; I engaged him to come to England; a very few days before the voyage commenced, I entrusted him with three thousand eight hundred rupees, which is about five hundred pounds, to furnish a stock of vegetables for myself and passengers, it was quite sufficient for the purpose.

Q. When did you sail - A. Finally on the 24th of June.

Q. When you had sailed a little while, was a complaint made of the stores that had been purchased by Butler John - A. Yes; he never gave me any accompt of the money; I applied to him for an accompt of my money; I never could get it; he always said I should have it to-morrow. I never got that accompt. Finding the supply of vegetables short, I became more anxious for the accompt. I had him tied up to punish him, seeing him so indifferent; I had him loosed, and said it was of no use to punish such a man as that. I told Butler John that he had disgraced the character given him, and that I would turn him on shore at the Isle of France. On the morning of the accident, I was in the cabin, the table stood opposite of the cabin door, so that as I sat at the table with my back to the cabin windows I could see all that was done on deck. Butler John came to me with several papers, without any vouchers to his accompts; I was by no means satisfied. I pointed that the charge was large, and there was nothing forth coming to answer to it. I said, he must see himself that he had wronged me very much; I told him, I would over look it if he would tell me how the money had gone; I repeatedly asked him; he seemed in a state of apathy, he would return no answer. I slapped his face with my hand, and told Dagoo to fetch me a cane; when Dagoo was gone for the cane, I was sitting at my table; I thought Butler was sitting in a chair behind me, in the mean while Dagoo was. I did not speak to Butler John, or strike him one blow. I heard a noise at the corner window of the cabin, which I cannot explain, was the first thing that attracted my attention, on turning round instantly, I saw nothing but the legs of a man at the window; I rushed out immediately, and ordered the man at the wheel to put the helm right starboard, the ship was going at the rate of eight knots an hour, all the canvas was set; I immediately ordered the boat to be put out, in order to save the man; all was done as fast as it could to save the man, he perished.

Q. Do you know if any man whatever contributed to the loss of his life - A. Certainly not, by no means whatever; I, myself, bore not the smallest resentment against him at the time; I have no other reason to think he came by his death but by accident in going to look at the vegetables that were stowed over the cabin windows. I arrived in the River on the 27th or 28th of November, the ships crew were put into Mr. Gold's barracks. I first heard of the death of this man that a complaint had been made before the Lord Mayor by Johnny, the serang; that is the first time I heard my conduct was called in question; I attended before the Lord Mayor on the Thursday, after the information reached me on the Friday; when I appeared before the Lord Mayor, Johnny appeared as prosecutor; at the second examination, Sider Caun attended; Dagoo, my boy, said that Sider Caun had said what he had said before the Lord Mayor at the instigation

of Johnny, the serang, I asked Sider Caun if he had any objection to go to Mr. Harmer, the solicitor, and state that; he said, he had not. I put Dagoo and Sider Caun into my coach, and took Sider Caun to Mr. Harmer's.

JAMES HARMER . Q. You are the solicitor for the prosecution - A. I am; between the second and third examination the prosecutor, Dagoo, and Sider Caun, came to my house about the 11th of January, that I might hear the confession of Sider Caun as to what he had said at the last examination; I had my clerk present to reduce my questions into writing, and Sider Caun's answers to my questions.

(Read.)

ABRAHAM GOLD . Q. You are superintendant of the East India Company's service - A. I am. I remember the arrival of the ship Caroline; the Lascars came to me about the end of November. I asked Johnny, the serang, whether he had any cause to make any complaint; Johnny, the serang made a complaint that the Captain had used him ill, the Captain had put him on duty not common for a serang to do. I asked the whole of the sea cunneys if they had any cause of complaint; Francisco said he had been punished during the Voyage; the sea cunneys complained generally of ill usage from the Captain. They made no complaint of any man losing his life by the Captain, nor I never heard of such a complaint until I attended at the Lord Mayor's.

ESTHER REBECCA ASTLEY . I was servant to Mrs. Woodhouse in the voyage; our cabin adjoined the captain's cabin, it was parted by a thin partition of wood, we could hear loud talking and a noise in each other cabins; on the day this accident happened, I heard no loud talking, or blows or quarrelling in the captain's cabin. Francisco had been cleaning out our cabin that day.

CAPTAIN WOODHOUSE. I was a passenger on board the Caroline.

Q. Do you recollect the day on which this accident happened - A. I do, after the accident the captain came on deck, ordered the ship to be stopped, and the boat to be lowered, in order to save the man's life; the boat was put out immediately, and every thing was done that could be done to save the man's life; the Captain was very humane and kind; he would make the men do their duty, occasionally they were not willing to do their duty; he made the serang work, and he complained of it; I never heard any complaint that the Captain was the cause of this man's death not till I was in England eight or ten days,

JOHNNY, GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s.

SIDER CAUN, GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

FRANCISCO, NOT GUILTY .

FERNANDEZ, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150405-167

590. MATTHEW JAMES ELLIOTT , THOMAS DAVIS , SARAH DAVIS , ELIZABETH ELLIOTT , MARGARET EVANS , HENRY EYRE SUGGOTE , and MARTHA KNELLER , were indicted for conspiring together to charge William Godfrey Kneller with a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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