Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th February 1815.
Reference Number: 18150215
Reference Number: f18150215-1

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 15th of FEBRUARY, 1815, and following Days

BEING THE THIRD SESSIONS IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath Esq. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas, Sir Richard Richards knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Curtis bart. Sir Charles Price bart. John Ansley esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , bart. Christopher Smith esq. George Bridges esq. Aldermen of the said City, and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Gaol Delivery Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Barner Hicton ,

Benjamin Lion Coxhead ,

John Bracewell ,

Frederick Woolfe ,

William Hinde ,

William Flannery ,

Thomas Leonard Barber ,

Robert Nicholson ,

James Robinson ,

John Beal ,

John Taylor ,

James Oliphant .

First Middlesex Jury.

Charles Barber ,

John Gregory ,

Thomas Moss ,

Thomas Wayland ,

William Abbott ,

David Jackson ,

Stephen Bird ,

Edward Hawkes ,

Samuel Kingston ,

James Brothers ,

Robert Howard ,

William Cousens .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John James ,

Joshua Creed ,

John Lum ,

Thomas Walker ,

John Annis ,

Benjamin Ploughman ,

George Baker ,

George Whiteman ,

John Edward Coulmaray ,

George Tunks ,

Henry Hollowman ,

George Blakey .

Reference Number: t18150215-1

268. CHARLES HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , eight cakes of soap, value 12 s. the property of Nathaniel Dowrick , John Way , and John Nowlan .

JOHN NOWLAN . My partners names are Nathaniel Dowrick , and John Way; we are soap makers . The prisoner was our carman and confidential servant , he assisted in carrying on the business. On the evening of the 25th of January, the prisoner was apprehended, by the officer, Barratt; on the morning of that day, the prisoner had been at work in the store-room where the soap was doposited; he frequently came from the store-room to the stables; he had the opportunity of taking the soap if he choose it; some soap was produced to me by the officer, Barrett; the soap so produced was the property of me and my partners.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer. On the 25th of January, between six and seven in the evening, I was in Shoreditch, near the Ship public-house; I observed the prisoner cross the road, he was by himself at the time he passed me; I perceived he had something under his coat on the left side, with his left arm supporting it, apparently to me; I followed him into Cumberland-street, and when I came nearer to him in Cumberland-street, he hastoned his pace; I ran forward, and collard him, and asked him what he had got; he said nothing. He scuffled with me, and this soap in the handkerchief as it is now, dropped from him at his feet. He scuffled with me a long time, and struck me several blows, and endeavoured to make his escape; I kept my hold. He denied stealing the soap, he said, he had bought it then. I was obliged to strike him a violent blow; I secured him. Where I took him was about a mile from the prosecutor's premises. This is the soap in the handkerchief that fell from him.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 25th of January, the prisoner was under examination at the office in Worship-street; I searched him at the office; I found these four cakes of soap concealed in his breeches, extended up under his smock frock. I sent for Mr. Nowlan; Mr. Nowlan came the next day, and knew the soap. This is the soap.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the soap, first look at that found by Barratt - A. I have seen it, I have no doubt it is my property; the other soap found by Armstrong, that is also my property. The prisoner had access to that soap; he was packing it that morning; I have not the least doubt it is mine; I wish I had.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-2

269. JOSEPH SWEET was indicted for that he, on the 28th of November , with a certain gun charged with gunpowder and leaden shot, feloniously and wilfully did shoot at Samuel Sewell , with intent in so doing, to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating the intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, stating the intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

FOURTH COUNT, for shooting at him, not stating the intent.

SAMUEL SEWELL . Q. What reason have you to think the gun was loaded - A. I have no absolute proof that the gun was loaded.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-3

270. THOMAS GILDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , twenty-seven bushels of coals, value 50 s. the property of Charles Thomas .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing like coals out of a certain barge in the River Thames.

THIRD COUNT, for stealing like coals out of a certain boat in the River Thames, the property of Charles Thomas.

CHARLES THOMAS . Q. Did you on or before the 15th of September, purchase any coals - A. I did, of Cox and Company, of Beanfort-buildings; I purchased ten chaldron; this is the order for them. I was to receive them out of the ship, they refused to deliver them at my house at Teddington; in consequence of this, I gave Robert Gildon the order to go to Cox and Company for the coals.

Q. Who is Robert Gildon - A. The brother of the prisoner. That certificate was delivered to me on the Saturday evening.

Q. In consequence of information given you by West, did you go with the brother of the prisoner on board any barge - A. I did, on board a boat, on Sunday morning; the boat was laying off in the stream; I could see the coals in her. The prisoner's brother took a wherry, and put me on board; there were a considerable quantity of coals in the boat; when we went on board of her, there were some sacks. partly filled, and some empty sacks; we came on shore again; we went to Mr. Turner and West, and then to the prisoner's house, and saw him; his brother asked him who brought the boat down to Twickenham; the prisoner said, I brought her down. Robert Gilden said, who was with you; the prisoner said Enoch Rednap and Isaac Moore. He asked him what coals were in the boat, and how he came to bring them there in the boat; he answered, I saw no coals. His brother said, you must know there are coals in the boat, and how did they come there; he said. I took them off a boat going up the River to lighten it. He asked him what boat; he could not tell him the name of the boat, nor who she belonged to. I then said, I saw clearly how it was, and went home, and sent to Kingston for a coal-metre to measure the coals, his name is Perchmouth; he measured the coals; he is here. The prisoner was

apprehended in December; Redoap and Moore have absconded. I employed the prisoner's brother to bring the coals by water, not by land, and his brother employed him as boat-man; I employed a man that kept horses and carts to bring them from the boat to my house.

Q. You employed the prisoner's brother to bring the coals by water - A. Yes, and the prisoner's brother employed other persons to navigate the boat, and when they were brought to a given place, the carts and horses were to bring them to my house. The prisoner's brother did not keep carts and horses; other persons were to bring them by land.

Q. With respect to coals; there is not a possibility of swearing to coals - A. I believe not; I cannot swear to them.

ROBERT GILDON . I am brother to the prisoner; I live at Twickenham.

Q. Were you employed by Mr. Thomas to bring him any coals from London to Twickenham - A. Yes; I employed my brother to go to London for me, that is the prisoner: the boat I borrowed of Mr. Turner. I had nothing to do with the coals when they arrived at the place of destination; I had only to lighter the coals. Mr. Thomas was to employ the men carts and horses to take them from the boat to his house at Teddington.

JONATHAN STACKHOUSE . I am a coal-dealer.

Q. Did you superintend the delivery of coals from the Betty, a collier, from Shields - A. I did.

Q. Look at that ticket is that your ticket - A. It is my hand writing; I delivered it for Mr. Thomas, into a sailing lighter, the name of her is the Henry; I asked the lighterman his name; I think the prisoner is the person that I delivered that ticket to.

"ten chaldron, and two vats; Thomas Gildon , lighterman."

MARY SHEPHERD . I am Mr. Thomas's servant. The prisoner brought me this ticket; I delivered that ticket to Mr. Thomas. He said when he gave me the ticket that he had brought Mr. Thomas his coals.

Mr. Thomas. That is the paper I received of Mary Shephard . (The paper read)

"Coal-metre's office, ten chaldron of coals and two vats, Stark house, metre, Thomas Gildon lighterman.

Q. Did the prisoner desire you to go to Mr. Colson to tell his men to unload the boat - A. No, he said he would go himself, and tell Mr. Colson's men he wanted the boat unloaded.

THOMAS PERRY. I was one of Mr. Colson's men at that time. The prisoner came and told me Mr. Thomas's coals were up, he wanted the boat unloaded, in consequence of that, Richard Dyson, John James , and myself, went to get the coals out; we were employed in unloading from six o'clock in the morning, until between seven and eight at night; we cleared the boat of all that we saw.

Q. Did you look in the cabin - A. No, Gildon came down, and the men, to see whether we had unloaded it or not; we had not then, we took all the coals away.

Q. Did Gildon desire you to look in the cabin - A. No, he did not.

THOMAS WEST. I live at Twickenham. On the evening of Saturday, I saw this lug boat in the River at the wharf at Twickenham, a little after eight at night, I was at some distance passing; I heard some men shoveling of coals in the boat; Mr. Turner was there; he asked them whose coals they were; the men at work said they were their coals, and after that one of the men cut the cord that tied the boat to the wharf, and pushed over to the other edge of the river. Mr. Turner called; his man got a boat and went after them, and when we got to the lug-boat, the men whoever they were, were then gone; in the lug-boat there were coals: there were three sacks filled.

Q. Did you afterwards see the cabin filled - A. Yes, we put in sixty-one bushels in the cabin, we found the cabin would hold that quantity.

FRANCIS REDFORD . I am a corn chandler, at Twickenham. On Saturday evening, I went to my boat with Mr. West; when I got down to the wharf, two men were shoveling coals in the boat, neither of them were the prisoner; Mr. West cried out, they had cut the roap, and got across the River; I crossed the River, and went after them; I saw in the boat about twenty-seven bushels of coals of a very good quality; I did not examine the cabin for about a fortnight afterwards, and then I saw nothing that satisfied me, there had been a great quantity there, Mr. West gave information to Mr. Thomas I believe.

JOHN PORCHMOUTH. I was a coal-metre at that time. On Monday morning, the 19th, I measured the coals that had been delivered at Thomas's; I did not find the quantity delivered to be ten chaldrons and two vats; there were fourteen sacks and one bushel deficient.

Mr. Thomas. The twenty-seven bushels were by order of the magistrate delivered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I loaded these coals from the ship, and as I loaded them so, I delivered them at Teddington; I know nothing at all of what I am accused of.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-4

271. WILLIAM LACON , SUSANNAH LACON , and SARAH WARD , were indicted for that they, on the 18th of January , three pieces of base coin, each of them resembling a shilling, falsely did colour with materials, producing the colour of silver, against the duty of their allegiance .

SECOND COUNT. They stood charged, that they three round blanks of metal, each of them resembling a shilling, falsely and traiterously did colour with materials, producing the colour of silver; and also one other blank of round metal as and for a sixpence, did colour with materials, producing the colour of silver.

JOHN RAY. I am a constable. On the 18th of January, I apprehended the man prisoner in Aldgate High-street, just as he came out of a stationer's shop, I had been watching him; I saw him go into Mr. New's shop, who is a stationer, I saw him go in there, and come out; when he came out, he had a sheet of brown paper and a pen in his hand; I went in the moment he came out, and gave information

there; I followed him, and apprehended him; I took him into the Blue Boar Inn, Aldgate; I searched him; I found upon him a quantity of good money, twelve or fourteen shillings in good money, a quantity of good copper, and sixpences; there was no more bad money upon him; I have the sixpences here. I then brought him back to the shop from whence I saw him come out; a shilling was produced by the person that took it, the shop-woman said the prisoner was the person that she took the shilling from; the prisoner made no answer to that. I have got that shilling. I then took the prisoner to the watch-house. I asked the prisoner who he was, and where he lived, and his name; he told me he lived down a lane near the Red Lion at Ilford. I asked him what business he followed; he told me he had nearly enough to live upon, he now and then dealt in a little corn to make things comfortable, and to make all things meet. I know he lived at No. 12, George-street, Stepney Fields. When he told me he lived at Ilford, I told him, he told me a story; I told him I was going to a house in George-street, Stepney Fields, that I knew to be his lodging; he made no answer; afterwards I left him in the watchhouse, and I went with William Kennersley, the officer, to No. 12, George-street, Stepney Fields, when we got down there it might be a little after two o'clock; I knocked at the door, being a small house, I heard somebody run up stairs; the woman that stands in the middle.

Q. What is her name - A. Jennings; she gave her name in then, she is the wife of the man prisoner. She throwed up the one pair of stairs window, looked out of the window, and asked me what I wanted; I told her there was a mistake in some taxes, I wished to speak to her. I left Kinnersley at the front door. I got over the wall backwards, I got into the house; I observed the two women very busy at the fire-place in the kitchen, as I was out of doors upon the wall, I had to get upon another wall, and upon the tiles: at last I got into the house; I found the two women prisoners in the kitchen down stairs; I let the officer, Kinnersley, in at the front part of the house.

Q. What was the appearance of the women - A. After Kinnersley took and secured them, their thumbs and fingers were dirty, as if they had been rubbing of metal, the same as coiners hands are; I searched upon the shelf, in the kitchen; I observed a quantity of base metal; these are them.

MR. NICOLL. Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's Mint; look at the money produced by the officer, what are they - A. Base, and counterfeit, thirteen base and counterfeit sixpences; they all have been coloured except one, that is a blank.

Q. How many shillings are there in that parcel -

Ray. The shillings were found upon another shelf, in the same room five shillings, and six sixpences.

Mr. Nicoll. They appear to have been coloured, they are counterfeits.

Ray. I examined the saucepan on the fire; this parcel was found in a drawer in the front room, there are six shillings and a half crown.

Mr. Nicoll. They are all of them counterfeits, part coloured, and part not.

Ray. I found these thirty-five blanks in the same room; I took the saucepan off the fire, which had peas soup in it; in that saucepan I found one hundred and ninety-two shillings.

Mr. Nicoll. The one hundred and ninety-two shillings are all counterfeits, they are coloured, and fit for circulation.

Ray. I found by the side of the fire-place this ewer with some liquid at the bottom of it; I poured that liquid into this bottle, in the presence of the two women, it is a solution of aquafortis, in another pot in the same room was some cream of tarter, which the middle woman got hold off, Mrs. Jennings, otherwise Lacon, she got hold of that, took it into the front room and threw it in the fire place; I scraped part of it up, and this pot with backing in it; here are two pieces of blankets very much stained with aqafortis; these were on the top of a table in the same room. I then went up stairs to a room with two beds in the room, and under one of the beds on the floor, was a quantity of good silver, near two pounds; Ward owned the handkerchief and the silver, she said she slept in that bed with her child, on that bed under which I found the good money; I returned the good money to her, there was no bad money found up stairs. The prisoner Ward said she was a servant out of place, she was in the habit of lodging there. I took the two women into custody. Mrs. Lacon acknowledged to living there, she put on some things that were there, and said the house was her's, I had seen William Lacon four or five times before, I have seen him feeding his fowls, and go in and come out of there, I supposed that was his house. I got into the house at the window, and when I came down into the kitchen, the women they were standing up near the fire; I laid hold of them one with one hand and the other with my other hand as they were standing up near the fire.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY. I am an officer. I went with the last witness to apprehend the coiners: I never was at the apprehending of coiners before. Mr. Ray shewed me their hands; their thumbs and fingers seemed very much daubed; I know no more than what Mr. Ray has told you. Ward's thumbs and fingers were the same as Lacon's; their thumbs and fingers had the same appearance in both of them, their hands were coloured as if with a liquid all over, but there was a difference between the thumb and the finger to the rest of the hand.

WILLIAM SMITH . I live at No. 9, Silver-street, Stepney; I let my house No. 12, George-street, Stepney, at Michealmas, 1813, to William Lacon , he pays me the rent for it; I never saw Ward there; I had been there about a fortnight before, I did not see Ward then.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint.

Q. You have been a long time acquainted with transactions of this coin - A. Yes, a good many years.

Q. To what purpose is aquafortis applied - A. Aquafortis and cream of tarter are the principal ingredients for colouring counterfeit coin it produces the colour of silver.

Mrs. Lacon's Defence. There is no aquafortis in that bottle, nor is it blacking.

Mr. Powell. It is aquafortis lowered with water; I have made no experiment with it.

Ward's Defence. I am a servant out of place; they had the nursing of my child, I had been in the country, and returned that night, and slept there that night; I lodged with Mr. Harrison, my clothes are there now. I am quite innocent of what is transacted in that house.

William Lacon 's Defence. I know nothing at all of it, I had not been at home that morning from between eight and nine o'clock; I did not suspect such a thing upon the face of the earth; as for the shilling, that I took of an acquaintance with two three-shilling pieces and two dollars in change of a one-pound note.

MRS. CHAMBERS. I live next door to William Lacon . I lent his wife a saucepan; I did not take any notice of the time. I asked Ward for it back again; I have seen her now and then, she was not a lodger there I know; she said it was not clean, she would clean it, and bring it in.

WILLIAM LACON , NOT GUILTY .

SUSANNAH LACON GUILTY - DEATH , aged 59.

SARAH WARD , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

[ The prisoner Ward was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of their believing her not so implicated in the crime as the other .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-5

272. RICHARD DRAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of November , a great coat, value 2 l. and an umbrella, value 7 s. the property of William Rickard , in the dwelling-house of Robert Chapman .

WILLIAM RICKARD . I live in Fleet-place, Hackney-road. In the early part of November last, I went to the Caledonian coffee-house, in the parish of St. Leonard Shoreditch ; I went there to take some coffee; the prisoner went in at the same time. I sat down in the coffee-room, pulled off my great coat, and placed my great coat and my umbrella on a table in the coffee-room. After I had taken the coffee, I desired the master of the house to bring me the great coat and umbrella. He returned, and told me it was not there; I did not go myself, I sent the landlord; I then suspected the prisoner, who was sitting by me; I went immediately with the landlord in search of the prisoner, suspecting he had gone off with the great coat; I did not find him. I did not see him afterwards until the 9th of January last; I have never seen my great coat and umbrella in the mean time; I have not seen it since. On the 9th of January, I saw the prisoner, he was apprehended on that day; he was brought into the City; I charged him with stealing my great coat and umbrella. I asked him what he had done with my great coat; I gave him no encouragement, nor any body in my presence; he said he did not know what he had done with it. On my repeating that interogatory, he said he did not know what he had done with the coat, he was so much intoxicated immediately he was taken to the public office; I went with him to the public office, and stated to the magistrate; I stated to the magistrate what I have stated to you. Mr. Chapman, the master of the coffee-house, gave his evidence, he will speak to you. When I told the prisoner he was not intoxicated, Mr. Chapman was present at the time; he told the magistrate that Mr. Chapman told him to say so. He acknowledged taking the great coat and umbrella, and pleaded intoxication, and said he did not know what he had done with them; he only denied it when he first came before the magistrate. I have never found the great coat and the umbrella.

Q. How long did the prisoner stay in the coffee-room - A. About twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour; he went before me.

Q. Is the coffee-room part of the house - A. Yes, it is part of the house.

Prisoner. Where did you fall in company with me first - A. At the George.

Q. Did you, or did you not, go into Sadler's gin shop - A. I have no recollection.

Q. The landlord asked you to go into the back room - A. He did.

Q. And me also - A. He did.

Q. You left your great coat and umbrella in the front coffee-room - A. I did.

Q. On the 13th, you was not transacting your business at the Bank of England, were you - A. No. From the 11th to the 13th I was confined to my bed.

ROBERT CHAPMAN. I keep the Caledonian coffee-house.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner and Mr. Rickard being at your house in November last - A. Yes, I do, in the early part of November, I think about the 12th; the prisoner and Mr. Rickard came in together. The prisoner said he had brought in a gentleman to have a cup of coffee; the prisoner came to me again, and desired me to make him a cup of coffee, and a cup for a gentleman. I desired him to ask the gentleman to walk into the parlour; another gentleman was in conversation with Mr. Rickard, and while that gentleman and Mr. Rickard were engaged in conversation, the prisoner walked out through the coffee-room out of the street door. After sitting some time, Mr. Richard wanted to go, he asked for his great coat and umbrella; I said, I knew nothing about it. He said, he brought a great coat and an umbrella in? where was the man that came in with him; I said, I did not know; I did not see the great coat and umbrella; we went and enquired in the coffee-room; we could not see the great coat, nor the umbrella in the coffee-room. I never saw either of them; I had not an opportunity of seeing them. I found the prisoner one day when I was out, in Whitecross-street, about six weeks afterwards, I stopped him in the street, I asked him what he had done with the great coat and umbrella that he took from my house; I told him I was determined to take him to the gentleman. He asked

me if I was determined upon it; I said, I certainly was; I told him he had better tell the truth to the gentleman when he saw him,

Prisoner. Q. You told me the prosecutor would not prosecute me.

CHARLES RAYMOND . I live in Hackney-road. I was at the Caledonion coffee-house, in the early part of November, I remember seeing Mr. Rickard and the prisoner, they both came in together; I was sitting in the right hand box by the door. Mr. Rickard had a great coat on, and an umbrella; he took his great coat off, laid it on the bench, and the umbrella, he put on the right side of the room. After the two had been in company together a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, the prisoner came out of the inner room; he took the umbrella, and the great coat he folded up, and took it off the bench. That is all that I recollect, that I saw with my own eyes. I said nothing to him, I thought the gentleman might have sent him home with it. I never saw the prisoner before he came into the room that night.

COURT. to Prosecutor. What is the value of this great coat - A. Forty-eight shillings, it cost me seven pounds, the umbrella we will say seven shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the property, I can assure your lordship and the jury.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-6

273. SARAH PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , seven yards of printed cotton value 9 s. 6 d. the property of John Clively privately in his shop .

JOHN CLIVELY . I keep a linen-draper's shop , No. 1 Finsbury-place, Finsbury-square .

Q. Were you in the shop when the prisoner came to your shop - A. I came down to my shop soon after the prisoner came and saw her there.

JOHN JONES . I am a shopman to the prosecutor. I remember the prisoner coming into the shop between the hours of six and seven, on the 25th of last month, she and another woman came together, she bought a small quantity of muslin of the value of one shilling and ninepence. Mr. Clively came down in the mean time, and suspected them, and soon after they went out he followed them; I had not missed any thing at the time.

Q. to Mr. Clively. You followed the prisoner - A. Yes, I followed them home to her house; after they went in, in consequence of suspecting them, I went to the office, got an officer, and searched them. When we came back both the women were gone, the prisoner after some time came home.

Q. Did the prisoner see you when you first went there - A. No, not till I followed them. When she came home we searched the house, and found a piece of print, which I knew to be my property.

Q. When had you seen that print before the time that is was taken - A. I had seen it in the day; Jones had taken the print down just before they came in.

Jones, The print was on the counter at the time the prisoner came in; I never missed it until it was brought back to the shop; the shop mark was taken off, it was a fag end.

Q. How do you know it to be yours - A. It was on the counter when they came in; I looked on the counter and missed it; when the print was taken there was more in quantity: the fag end was taken off; when it was brought back it was seven yards, and when the print was taken it was fifteen or sixteen yards. I have no doubt.

Q. What is the value of it - A. Seventeen-pence halfpenny a yard; there is seven yards and a half of it now; that is the cost price.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-7

274. JOSEPH CURTIS was indicted for that he, about the hour of five in the night of the 19th of January , being in the dwelling-house of William Burghes , did steal a watch, value 10 l. two seals, value 10 s. a key, value 3 s. and one spy-glass value 1 s. the property of Jose Bonifacio de Arrarte ; and a great coat, value 10 s. the property of William Burn , and that he afterwards burglariously broke the said dwelling-house to get out of it .

WILLIAM BURN . I am a master mariner . I left my great coat in William Burghes's house three weeks before this happened. I can only speak to my coat when it is produced.

THOMAS BURGHES . My father's name is William Burghes ; my father is a publican , and the captain of a ship .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in his house - A. No, he had been a servant ; he had been discharged, I believe a month.

Q. Do you know of any property being lost - A. Yes they were missed after he was out of the house, on Thursday I believe; I had seen them in the house on the Saturday, the same day that the prisoner went away.

JOSEPH POWIS . I am a Thames Police officer. I only know I found a gold watch on the prisoner, a metal chain, two metal seals, a gold key, and a great coat.

JOSE BONAFACIO DE ARRARTE. I lodged in the house.

Q. Did you lodge in the house of William Burghes - A. Yes; I lost my watch out of the bedroom.

Q. When had you last seen it before you lost it - A. At three o'clock in the afternoon I last saw it.

Joseph Powis . I found this watch upon the prisoner.

Arrarte. It is my watch; I have had it four years; it is a repeater; I know it is mine from its general appearance.

Q. Are these seals yours, look - A. Yes, they were on it when I lost it, and the key. On the 16th of January I missed it when I went to bed.

Powis. I asked the prisoner how he came by the watch; he said, he took it out of the bed-room where he lodged.

MARY ANN BURGHES . I am the daughter of William Burghes . The prisoner was in my father's

service he had been discharged; it was on Thursday the 19th of January that this robbery took place. On the 19th at half past ten o'clock at night, I fastened my fathers door, the door has two bolts to it, and chain to it; I was not up first the next morning, the servant was up first.

Q. You do not know that the prisoner was in the house then - A. No.

REBECCA HARRIS , I am servant of the house, to Mr. Burghes; I was there that night, I was the first up the next morning, I went down stairs, I saw a light in the tap room, I went in.

Q. to Mary Ann Burghes . Was there a light in the tap-room when you went to bed - A. No sir, there was a fire.

Q. to Rebecca Harris. How did you find the door - A, I did not go to look, I saw a light in the taproom, I went and it my kitchen fire, I knew the man that was in the house his name is Peter Samerier .

PETER SAMERIER. I had no where to sleep I passed the night at Mr. Burghes's, I saw the door a little way open, I went in the prisoner was in the tap room; he said he lived in the house; in the morning about six o'clock he went out of the door, the door was a little way open.

Q. to Mary Ann Burghes. Was the door fastened the over night - A, Yes with two bolts, and a chain.

Q. Is there any body here to prove that the prisoner was in the house before you went to bed - A, No.

Q. to Mr. Arrate. What did you give for the watch - A. One hundred and forty dollars, I know it is my watch.

Powis. I asked the prisoner how he entered the house; he said, he had entered it for several nights when they were busy, and secreted himself away; he said he entered the house that night, and took the watch two nights before that, and the great coat he took out of the house that morning; he said he went into the house on the over night, and went out of the house before the servants was up; the gold watch he took two nights before, but he left the house that morning; I apprehended him with the coat on his back, I found the great coat on the prisoner's back, this is the coat.

Captain Burn . That is my great coat, I have had it three years.

COURT. The watch is out of question now, that was taken at another time; you will consider gentlemen of the jury the great coat now.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 19.

Tried by a jury of half English and half Foreigners before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-8

275. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for that he on the 20th of January , feloniously did make an asault upon Lydia Johnson , and her the said Lydia Johnson, against her will and consent, did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-9

276. BENJAMIN SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , thirty yards of ribbon, value 18 s. the property of Joseph Martin , privately in his shop .

MRS. MARTIN. I am the wife of Joseph Martin , he keeps a haberdashers and linen-drapers shop , in Bethnal Green . On Wednesday, the 11th of January, I was putting on my child's frock, all of a sudden, I heard a rattling at the window, I said God bless me, what is that. Afterwards I found the rattle was in the window, but I did not know it at the time; I ran to the door, I looked at the window, the glass was all safe then; it was a damp night; I did not miss the ribbon; the window was not hurt in the least; I missed nothing then. My little girl came home from school, she went to the window to double up the ribbons, she said mother, have you sold all the green ribbon; I said, not. She said the ribbon is all gone. I looked in the window; I could not see which way it could he gone; then I thought it might be taken at the time that I heard the ratling. I saw my empty rolls, but no ribbon. I missed a piece of green figured sattin ribbon, not a whole piece; I have them in in half pieces; a green figured sattin, and a piece of brown ribbon.

Q. What is the value of them - A. I cannot say. All my ribbons had been cut, nor can I say how many yards I lost; I cannot form any judgment to set any value at all upon them. When I missed them, I concluded they could go no way out but through the bolt holes that holds my shutters.

Q. Did you see them afterwards - A. No, never.

MARY JONES . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I have seen him before. Three boys came to me, I do not know what month it was in, the prisoner was one of the three boys, between eight and nine o'clock at night, they asked me to let them leave a bit of ribbon; I asked them why they did not leave it at their mother's, I knew their mothers, I did not know much of them; I believe Church was the boy that laid it down on the table; the mother of the prisoner took it away. I never saw any more of them. The mother of the prisoner and Mrs. Church took it away in about a quarter of an hour afterwards. I believe it was a bit of dark green ribbon. The boy Abbing came in half an hour afterwards, and asked me for the ribbon; I told him I had given it to Shaw's and Church's mother.

JAMES ABBING . Q. Be sure you tell nothing but the truth; Do you remember some time in January going down a street in Bethnal Green - A. Yes. I told Ben Shaw there were some pretty ribbons in Globe Fields; Ben Shaw told me to go, and get a bit of wire. I got a bit, I pulled it out of a bird cage. Ben Shaw took it away from me; this was between six and seven at night, I cannot tell what day of the week. Ben Shaw drawed the ribbon through the hole at Mrs. Martin's; I had seen the ribbon before. Ben Shaw took the ribbon, and put it through the bolt hole at Mrs. Martin's shop window; he drawed the narrow green ribbon through the bolt hole; then he brought the green ribbon to the other side of the way, and rolled it up; he gave me the ribbon to put into my pocket; then he took the wire, and went, and drawed the watch ribbon; he ran away with that as far as the Rising Sun, he thought he heard

somebody coming, he dropped that ribbon; then John Church shired the wire away; we could not find the wire again. John Church told me to go to the hedge and break him a bit of stick; I did, and gave it him, then John Church went and drawed the figured ribbon, he was alone; then Ben Shaw was not with him. Then we all three of us went to Mrs. Jones's; Ben Shaw took the ribbon from me, and asked Mrs. Jones if he might leave it there for an hour or two; Ben Shaw put it on Mrs. Jones's table, and left it there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home, he came, and called me; he went home and got the wire, and told me where the pretty ribbon was.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-10

277. BENJAMIN VINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a chaise harness, value 2 l. the property of Joseph Sandbatch .

WILLIAM WEIE . I am a watchman of St. Lukes parish. Upon the 30th of January, I was upon my watch, about a quarter before five in the morning, I stopped the prisoner, and another man; I thought the prisoner had property on him that did not belong to him; I stopped them both at first; they both made their escape; by springing my rattle, my brother watchman caught the prisoner, and brought him back; the prisoner was never out of my sight. I delivered the harness to the constable of the night, that I took from him. This is the harness.

HENRY WILLIAM SMITH . Mr. Joseph Sandbatch is my father-in-law; I live at Hormerton. On Sunday morning, I went down to his house at Hackney; Mrs. Sandbatch told me the harness was taken from the stable; I went to Worship-street, and saw the harness; I knew it to be his property.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-11

278. JOHN WALSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , two sheets, value 4 s. the property of Mary Barber , spinster .

MARY BARBER . I am a single woman; I take in washing . On the 17th of January, about five o'clock in the evening I heard myself called down by my opposite neighbour; I was up stairs hanging the clothes to the fire; I came down; my neighbour said there was a man gone out.

Q. From what place did you miss your sheets - A. From off the bed in the parlour; I had seen them there about twenty minutes before they were taken: I missed the sheets. I saw the prisoner walking along the street, I immediately called stop thief; he was stopped; he laid the sheets down; my neighbour took them up, and brought them to me. These are the sheets; they are mine, and the same that I lost. The prisoner was a stranger to me. I know the sheets are mine by my own work.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was even in the street; I came from the East India House at the time the alarm was.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-12

279. WILLIAM TINGAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , four yards of canvas, value 3 s. three bags, value 3 s. and one blanket, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Revill .

CHARLES REVILL . My father's name is Thomas Revil , he is a merchant , living at No. 30, High-street, Shoreditch. The prisoner was his porter , he was waggoner at the time of the robbery. In consequence of suspicion, we had two officers in waiting for the prisoner to take him, of the name of Armstrong; they searched him. We asked him if he had any property of my father's about him; he said no. On searching him, they found a bag concealed in his breeches; he said it was his master's property. He was taken to Worship-street office that evening, and brought up again on the Monday following. The officer searched his house. We asked the if there was any thing at his house that belonged to my father; he said no. We found at the prisoner's house eleven pieces of canvas, three bags, and one blanket. The prisoner was shewn them at the office; I know them to be the property of my father, and the prisoner said they were the property of my father. The prisoner told us where his house was, and at his house we found his wife and four children.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I found these things in the prisoner's room; I asked him how he came by them; he said he had been advised by the man that his master turned away to take them; he took them from his master, they were his master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. Only the bag and the blanket were shown me before the magistrate.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-13

280. GEORGE SPICER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of January , eight yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Hoare ,

ANN HOARE . I am the wife of Thomas Hoare , he keeps a linen-drapers shop , 92, High-street, Whitechapel . On the 25th of January, between five and six in the evening, the prisoner reached his arm into the shop, and stole out a piece of print; I saw him do it; he was pursued, and taken in about ten minutes afterwards. The cotton print has never been found; I can swear to the prisoner positively; when I saw him again, I was positive he was the person.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . On Monday night, the 23rd of January, it was not on the 25th, I saw the prisoner standing by the prosecutor's door; I walked a little way, about four or five yards, and turned round, I saw a mob, I enquired what was the matter, I was told, I asked the prosecutor if he should

know the man that came into his shop. I took the prosecutor into a public-house close by to see if he knew the man that came into his shop; the prosecutor pointed out the prisoner to me in the public-house; I took him back to the shop; Mrs. Hoare said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about the transaction.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 1 year , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-14

281. JOSEPH STONELY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a pair of breeches, value 12 s. the property of David Suggitt .

DAVID SUGGITT . On Sunday night, the 11th of February, I was taking my goods in; I just turned my back, I saw a man come in the passage, and take something from the shop door; I hallooed out immediately, ran after the man, knocked up his heels, he dropped the breeches as I ran after him. These are them, they are my property.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-15

282. GEORGE SCHOLAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of January , seven pair of worsted stockings. value 14 s. the property of Barrent Salomons .

BARRENT SALOMONS. I live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields . I was not in the shop at the time. I can only prove the property.

SOPHIA PRICE . I am a servant to the prosecutor; I was in the shop when the prisoner came in, and asked to look at some linen shirts; Mrs. Salomons told him she had not got any; he asked to look at some stockings, and directly Mrs. Salomons shewed him some stockings, he snatched them out of her hand, and ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been sixteen years on board a Man of War; I had only been six weeks on shore; the prosecutor did not swear to his property before the magistrate; I was not in distress; I was going on board an Indiaman. I am a Greenwich pensioner .

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-16

283. JOHN PURRIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , two table-knives, value 3 s. three razors, value 6 s. two clasp-knives, value 7 s. two pair of scissars, value 1 s. and half a pair of scissars, value 6 d. the property of William Barnard .

WILLIAM BARNARD . I live in Holywell-street, Shoreditch . On Friday, the 10th of February, about half past eight in the evening, I heard my errand boy cry stop thief; I went to the door; I saw the boy pursuing the man, and when I attempted to stop the prisoner, he presented a knife at me, one of the articles he had taken.

JOHN STEVENS . I was in the shop on the 10th of February. The prisoner made a violent rush into the shop; he snatched the articles off a chest of drawers in the shop; I cried out stop thief immediately.

Prosecutor. I am sure they are mine, they have my mark upon them; altogether they are of the value of seventeen shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-17

284. NOWARDIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , sixteen pair of trowsers, value 32 s. sixteen shirts value 32 s. two brass pots, value 4 s. one hundred and forty pounds weight of spice, value 10 s. and a 5 l. bank note , the property of Mahomet Casmet .

MAHOMET CASMET. I am a boatswain .

Q. Did you lose your property - A. Yes, on the 27th of January, from the East India Company barracks . I lost sixteen pair of trowsers, sixteen shirts, two brass pots, and about an hundred pounds weight of spice; I lost it out of my chest; the chest was taken away from my room, and broken open; I had seen my chest at ten o'clock safe before I went out. I was out of the barraks at the time it happened.

ALBIAN GOSE. Q. Where you in the barracks at the time of this robbery - A. Yes, on Saturday night, the prisoner went to Casmet's room, he asked for the prosecutors boy, the boy that had the care of the key of the chest, he did not find the boy. The prisoner drew the chest out of the prosecutor's room while the four other Arabs pushed it in his own room.

Q. Is the prosecutor an Arab - A. No, he is not.

MATALO. The prisoner came into the room, he asked for the serangs boy, the serangs boy not being found, he asked where the chest was; he found the chest, and sent for four men to assist him taking the trunk.

WESSE. Q. What do you know of this matter - A. I saw the prisoner come and enquire for the prosecutor's boy, saying what he would do with the chest.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I only know of apprehending the prisoner, he absconded four days; I was in pursuit of him four days.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in the barracks at the time. I know nothing of the transaction; the witnesses and the prosecutor have a spite against me, and they have brought me to this bar.

MARIA PEARCE . I live with the prisoner in Cornwall-street; he was at home on that Saturday night by eleven o'clock.

COURT. Q. to Whesse. What time of the night did he come to the barracks - A. After the gates were shut, the gates are never shut until after twelve o'clock at night.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-18

285. JAMES WALKER, alias DRIVER ; was indicted, and the indictment stated, that on the 3rd of April, in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign, he was tried and convicted of felony and burglary, and received sentence of death, and that afterwards his Royal Highness the Prince Regent, in the name and on the behalf of his Majesty, was graciously pleased to extend his Royal mercy to him, on condition of. his being transported to New South Wales, whereupon he was ordered to be transported accordingly. That he afterwards, on the 8th of December last, feloniously and without lawful excuse, was at large, at the parish of St. Mildred's, in the Poultry, in the ward of Candlewick , before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

HARRY ADKINS . I am an officer; I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, I got it from Mr. Shelton's office, I saw Mr. Shelton sign it,

(The certificate read.)

WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY. Q. Do you recollect the man at the bar being tried here in April, 1811 - A. I do, he was tried for burglary according to the statement.

COURT. You saw the prisoner tried here did you - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was he afterwards pardoned - A. Yes this paper contains his pardon, it has been in my custody ever since; the prisoner is the same person mentioned there

(The pardon read.)

Q. He was delivered over pursuant to this order - A. Yes I delivered him over to a file of soldiers, to be delivered at the Isle of Wight, on the 10th of August 1811.

WILLIAM GILLMORE . I am clerk in the accompting house of Messrs. Fry and company, Bankers, in St. Mildred's court, in the Poultry.

Q. Do you recollect the 8th of December last seeing the prisoner at your accompting-house; was he at large in your Banking house that day - A. He was; on the 8th of December, he was taken up on our charge.

COURT. Q. Did you know him before - A. Not in the least. He was taken at our house for presenting some notes that had been stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. With submission being deprived of my parents at the early part of my life, and left without a protector or adviser, I unfortunately deviated from the path of rectitude. On the report being made to his Majesty, he was graciously pleased to spare my life, and by the humane benevolent interposition of the Recorder of London, I experienced a further extenuation of Royal clemency, and was pardoned, on condition of serving in the army abroad. In the month of August, 1811, I quitted London for the Isle of Wight, where I served six months to the entire satisfaction of my superior. On my embarking for the regiment that I was attached to, I not only received a certificate of good conduct, but was permitted to take my wife with me to the West Indies, and on joining my regiment, no man could devote himself more chearfully than I did to my duty, for which I had the happiness of obtaining the good opinion of my officers, so as to be selected myself and wife for an important situation in the family of Sir Alexander Cochrane , who was then govenour of the Island. I unfortunately fell ill and was obliged to be removed to what was considered a more healthy situation; my constitution however would not bear the climate; and after four attacks of the fever, I was reduced to the very verge of the grave, and no hopes of avoiding speedy dissolution but by flight: I was tempted to desert to save my life, after having served most faithfully and zealonsly, as far as healt would admit. I returned to my native country, without friends or the means of existance, my character being gone, and fearing to shew myself where I could gain an honest livelihood.

COLONEL MAHONE. I belong to the regiment of Royal York-rangers. I was at Barbadoes; the prisoner was a private soldier in the Royal York-rangers nearly two years. I speak from recollection, I have no document, his conduct was that of a good soldier, I heard no complaint against him; if there had been I must have heard it, I had such an opinion of the man, that he and his wife were selected to serve in the Govenours house; the man and his wife conducted themselves with propriety, they merited every attentton. I could bestow upon them.

Q. Had he the yellow fever - A. I cannot take upon me to say, every man in that part has; I think it is more provable that he had, he was of a weak habit.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-19

286. JAMES STACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of February , a mare value 30 l. the property of Thomas Studwick .

SECOND COUNT. For like offence, stating the mare to be the property of other persons.

SOLOMAN STUDWICK. Q. Your father had a mare in his stable on the night of the 2nd of February - A. Yes a black mare, she was safe in the stable, I saw her about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 2nd of February. she was coming home from plough, she was a plough-mare. My father's name is Thomas Studwick , he lives at Capel near Dorking in Surry . We missed the mare, between four and five o'clock in the morning, the mare was kept in my father's stable; I went to the stable between four and five in the morning the mare was gone, the stable door was shut and latched; I am sure the mare was in the stable.

COURT. What sort of a mare was she - A. A black mare with a star in her forehead, and the near hind foot white, she was about three years of age, she was worth thirty pounds to any person.

Q. Have you seen her again - A. Yes, I saw her again in the same stable, to which she was brought back, and I saw her in London; I came up the same day, and saw her the next day in London.

Q. Whereabouts in London - A. I saw her in Smithfield, I saw the mare after the prisoner was taken in custody.

JAMES COLLISON . Q. Do you know the prosecutor Studwick the father of the lad - A. Yes, I know the mare; I live at Capel, near to Mr, Thomas Studwick I was sent to London to find the mare on Friday, it was the morning the mare was missed; I

found her in the afternoon; I enquired on the road, I came by intelligence to Town, I came to Smithfield about three o'clock in the afternoon I think, I cannot say exactly, it was a market day for horses; I saw her in Smithfield, and saw the prisoner, he is the man; I saw the mare I know her well; I asked the prisoner what he would sell her for, he had got her in his hand; he asked me seventeen pounds, I asked him where he brought it from, he told me he brought it from Capel; I told him he had taken it from a farmer of the name of Thomas Studwick ; he said he was to have eighteen pounds for her, he had her of a gentleman, he was to have a pound for himself I sent for a constable, and secured him. I knew the mare well, I knew her from a foal. I am a blacksmith, I was the first that ever shod her; I am certain it is Thomas Studwick 's mare, I am certain the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. I told him the mare came from Capel, that I had the mare to walk up and down the market.

Collinson. He said he had the mare from Capel, he told me he should be a sufferer by the mare, then after a little bit he told me he was leading it for a gentleman, I told him the gentleman would come forward and own the mare no doubt, he then discribed the dress of the gentleman.

CHARLES PHILLIPHS . I assisted in apprehending the prisoner, the mare was there also; I sent an officer to go and lock the mare up, the mare was delivered to the owner.

COURT, Q. to Collison. What do you think was the worth of that mare - A. The mare is worth thirty pounds to any farmer; the mare is now at Capel, at the prosecutors own farm, where she was foaled.

Prisoner's Defence, I was hired that morning to lead the mare up and down the market, when this man came and took me in posession.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-20

287. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of January one pound and eight ounces of Indigo, value 8 s. the property of the united company of merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am gate-keeper to the East India companys warehouse in Coopers-row .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was in the employ of the East India warehouse , on the 23d of January, as a temporary labourer in Coopers-row; I saw him about three o'clock, about the time of their leaving their employ. As the men pass by me, I rub them down; the prisoner fell shy of me I was going to proceed to rub him down, he passed me a few yards; I called him back to me, I laid hold of his collar and put him on one side until I had finished the rest of the men; when I had done that, I said to the prisoner what makes you so shy of me. from my experience I think you are a thief; he made me no answer, I searched him particularly close. I felt something in his breeches, I took him into the Elders accompting house, to search him, I searched him; I found seven cakes of Indigo in his breeches. I was told they weighed one pound fourteen ounces, I know he was at work on the premises, on what floor I cannot say; I knew the Indigo belonged to the East India company, when I saw it.

WILLIAM SOUTHGATE . I am assistant Elder to the company, I saw the prisoner searched, and found one pound fourteen ounces of Indigo in the prisoner's breeches, I delivered it to the warehouse keeper of No, 1. The warehouse keeper delivered it to the officer. The prisoner had free access to all the floors where Indigo is in, to get it ready for the sale next April; is was taken from a chest on the second floor, he has been only a temporary labourer, since the last fleet came in he has been employed.

CHARLES VAUGHN . I am an officer, I received the Indigo of Mr. Sonthgate.

MR. SOUTHGATE. The Indigo is the property of the East India company. It is worth eight shillings at least.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge the commission of the crime; I took the Indigo to dye my clothes on my next voyage, I hope you will pardon my crime.

GUILTY aged 44.

Confined 6 months and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-21

288. THOMAS BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , a sheet, value 10 s. and two window curtains, value 10 s. the property of Edward Litchwaite .

EDWARD LINTHWAITE . I keep a wine-vaults , in Bell-yard, Temple Bar . On Saturday evening, the 14th of January, the prisoner came into my house, about eleven o'clock at night, he asked me if I would let him have a bed; I first told him no, he was not a lodger I liked to take in I took in respectable people; I did not altogether like his appearance he said he had just come from the country; out of humanity to him. I thought he should have a bed as he was distressed; he gave me a three shilling piece to take for the bed. The next morning, the girl who has the management of the beds, told me to get up immediately, the man had robbed the bed of a sheet; when I came down, I saw the man surrounded by several persons in the parlour, who had assisted my girl in taking him; the prisoner begged me to let him go, he would never do such a thing any more. I said you do not deserve to be forgiven, you were not distressed. My girl went up stairs, she came down and said he had taken a pair of window-curtains.

SARAH COBB. On the 14th of January, the prisoner come to my masters house and wanted a bed and the next morning at half past seven heard the prisoner come down stairs; I ran up stairs to see if all was right, I ran down stairs and looked up Chancery-lane; I saw the prisoner, and saw a piece of the sheet hanging under his smock frock.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court. I am a countryman , I never was before a magistrate in my life.

GUILTY aged 32.

Confined 6 months and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-22

289. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January one thousand dollars value 250 l. the property of the United Company of Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, the property of Phillip Hughes .

MR. COBB. I am an assistant in the Bullion office, at the East India House ; the chief of the office died about six months since. The prisoner was a porter in the office; the Bullion office consists of an inner room, and a lobby, there are three doors to the lobby, two of which have strong locks, and one has a double key, of which I have one, and the prisoner another; no other person had the double key besides, there are two doors to the inner room.

Q. On Friday afternoon the 20th of January, was a parcel of dollars brought by Mr. Lee - A. Yes, they were brought there to be weighed by Mr. Lee, the purser of the Bridgewater; Mr. Lee, the purser of the ship, was present, and the prisoner; the dollars were weighed, each bag separate, and returned into the bags from which they were turned out, the seven bags were weighed separate, we weighed them by troy weight, seventy-two pounds weight, odd ounces, each bags, about sixty a verdupoise, and the odd bag weighed fifty pounds ten ounces: after the seven bags of dollars were all weighed they were put into the chests in my presence, and in the presence of the purser of the ship; four bags were put into one chest, and three in the other; the chests were made secure, and sealed; on Friday it was too late for shipping; they remained until the 21st, I saw nothing of them after the 21st, On Saturday morning I went to the office, I suppose it might be twelve; I found the prisoner in the crane room, which is opposite the Bullion office; the doors and windows appeared as I left them, there was nothing to excite suspicion. About two in the afternoon on Saturday the chests were removed into the crane room out of the Bulion office; the chests were weighed by the prisoner; I saw him weigh them. The chests were then lowered by the crane into the cart, that cart had been hired by the prisoner, for the purpose. I delivered to the prisoner the usual documents for the shipping of these chests, and he went away with them as usual with the cart; he returned in about an hour, or an hour and a quarter; he made the usual entry of the delivery of the chests of Bullion in the book.

Q. Where was the prisoner's desk - A. In the crane room; I was present when the prisoner's desk in the crane room was searched; I saw the Police officer take out some dollars, he counted them; I think he said, they were thirty-seven, and I saw the officer discover two melting pots under the desk, on some part of the floor. The dollars found in the prisoner's desk appeared to be the same as we had weighed and put into the chest by the prisoner. The prisoner had no use for these melting pots in his business whatever. I saw some metal in one of the pots, which had been melted. The chests were marked No. 1, and 2; No. 1, contained three thousand of Captain Hughes's dollars; the prisoner marked the weight on the outside of each; the book is here; the weight of No. 1, one hundred two quarters and twenty-seven pounds was the weight of the chest No. 1; No. 2, two hundred and twenty-seven pounds; it is in the prisoner's hand-writing; these entrys are all in the prisoners hand-writing; nothing else was found that I am aware of.

Q. Were there any chissels and hammers that lay about in the room - A. Yes, to open the chests,

Q. Were the chests securley sealed - A. They were, by two seals on the side of the chest.

Q. Do you know whether there were any appearance with respect to the top of the chest of any damages the chest had received - A. I do not know of it; the chest is here; this is the chest. The chest was nailed all round, and hoops came across. The prisoner put the Company's seal upon it, one at the top and the other at the bottom; the seal remained in my custody in the office, not in his.

Q. Now sir, when you saw this delivered the next day; if there had been any appearance of the seals being broken, it is a matter that would have struck your eye - A. It might or might not, it would have been subject to it certainly.

Q. If any body had broken the seals, it would have been subject to your eye; you saw it taken from the Bulion office to the crane room - A. Yes, and I saw it drawn by the crane to the top; I was in the Bullion office the moment he took it out; then I saw it in the crane room; I saw him drawing it, I was within half a dozen yards of it when he was lowering it down in the cart.

Q. You tell me there are two doors to the Bullion office - A. Yes, and only one has a lock to it; it is my usual practice to see that the door that is fastened by bolts is fast; I rattle it; I invariably do it, and I have no doubt I did it that day; I may do it a thousand times, and omit it once; I believe it is my invariable practice.

Q. On what day was it you first heard of there being any thing wrong respecting the dollars - A. On Monday. The prisoner said there had been an enquiry by some person wondering why the dollars had not come on board.

Q. After this, did not a person come up from on board a ship, saying, that they had received them, and that they were deficient - A. That was on Monday fortnight we received information that the dollars had been plundered; I informed the prisoner of the dollars being stolen, and another person was charged of the thing. The prisoner very readily went with me to the wharf.

JOHN JONES , I am a carman; I work for Mr. Keeves. On the 21st of January, I attended at the India House. Taylor put two chests of Bullion into my cart; he went with me to Somer's Key; we unloaded there by the crane; Mr. Coles people unloaded them; the prisoner stopped behind; I came away about my business. I delivered them as I received them.

JOHN JAMES HOWARD COLE. I am shipping porter to the East India House; I received two chests of the last witness; I took them from the cart; I placed them on the Quay, they might be there twenty minutes; I then shipped them on board

the Cotton Hoy at the East India wharf; they were then exactly in the same state as when I received them; I shipped them on board the Cotton Hoy for the Bridgewater.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a lighterman. The prisoner came down to the East India wharf on the 21st of January, we had then the Company's surveyor on duty on board the Cotton Hoy; the chests were lowered immediately; they remained there till the morning of the 28th, then they were delivered on board the Bridgewater; as we received them, so we delivered them.

THOMAS WEBB . I am master of the Cotton Hoy, she belongs to the East India Company. We received the two chests of treasure, they were stowed under the larboard wing under the other ships goods three or four baggages were over them. I continued on board from the time I received them until the time I delivered them, our hatches were secured down always locked with a cross bar over them with five locks; the Companys surveyor kept the keys; I watched the chest being delivered on board the Bridgewater; I was along side of the Bridgewater; they were delivered in the same state as we received them.

- BAMPTON. I was on board the Cotton Hoy. I remember the Bullion chest being put on board; they were stowed in the hold on the larboard side, with baggage on them, and after they were put in the hold the hatches were locked down, the surveyor kept the keys. They were delivered on board the Bridgewater in the same state as they were received, I can swear that. I never saw the contents of the chests.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I am an extra surveyor in the East India Companys service, on board the Cotton Hoy; I received the chests and the receipt of the prisoner on the wharf; the chests were corded, hooped, and sealed, in the usual manner, I saw no difference; they were stowed in the larboard side; I locked and unlocked the hatches; I kept the keys of the hatches all the time; nobody had the opportunity of getting into the hatches; there were other goods stowed upon them; it was impossible any body could get at them without my knowledge; to the best of my knowledge they were put on board the Bridgewater in the same state as received; I examined the seals and the cordage, every thing was perfect.

Q. Were you ever in custody upon this charge - A. I was, from Sunday until Tuesday evening; I was made a witness on the Friday following.

THOMAS WELLS . I was the Companys surveyor on board the Bridgewater. I was on board on the 28th, when the two chests were delivered; I took the account of the marks; they were taken in farely in the first instance, and afterwards put into the larboard hold; about three o'clock I came into the captain's cabin, the joiner, Mr. Hedley, and Piak, the midshipman, opened No. 1, contained two bags of dollars, each bag contained a thousand dollars, and a half hundred weight; I saw the two bags, they contained a thousand each; the bags in the chests had never been removed from the time I saw them.

THOMAS HEDLEY. I am joiner on board the Bridgewater. I was directed to open the chests of dollars; I opened No. 2 first, No. 2 was largest No. 2, contained four bags of dollars; when I opened chest No. 1, I thought from the appearance it had been opened before, on account of the lid being split; the chest 1, we found two bags of dollars, and a half hundred iron weight; I did not see it before I opened it,

JOSEPH MUNDAY . I was on board the Bridgewater on the 28th.

Q. Did you see there a box containing dollars - A. I saw it when it was opened; I saw two bags in chest 1, which I supposed contained dollars; instead of that, I saw a weight, which I supposed to be half a hundred weight; I thought there might be an enquiry about it, as the ship was under weigh, I put my seal upon the weight in conjunction with another gentleman; my attention was not called to the box until it was opened. I cannot speak to the weight of the box.

JOHN GETTY . I belong to the Thames Police office. In consequence of suspicion, I searched the prisoner; I understood he had a desk in the crane room at the East India House; I requested him to shew it me; he produced a bunch of keys, on which was a small tally mark of the Bullion office, and one of these keys he described to be the key of his desk. I also found in his pocket four one-pound notes, and a letter dated the 6th of January, 1815; it was written as he told me, acknowledging the receipt of ten pounds, he had borrowed of an officer at the Treasury House. I told the prisoner to leave me the keys, as I should have occasion to look at all his drawers, as well as his room in the India House. When I went to the India House, Mr. Cobb told me he had the key of the crane room. I sent to the prisoner for the key. I searched his house; in one of his drawers I found seventy-eight or nine duplicates, of spoons, tableclothes, and wearing apparel, that had been pledged. I returned to the India House; I met the messenger that I had sent to the prisoner for the key. When I returned to the office, I saw the prisoner at night, he told me he had not given me the key, but it was hanging behind the shutters in the Bullion office. The next morning I found the key as he described. I entered the crane room, opened his desk, and in his desk I found thirty-seven Spanish dollars rolled up in a piece of an old newspaper; by the side of the desk on the floor among a parcel of paper that was laying about I found these two new crucibles, or melting pots, and I found a piece of run down metal, which I believe to be grain tin. The prisoner told me the melting pots were given to him by a servant of Mr. Brown. who is a refiner to the Company, and in regard to this chest, the prisoner stated that he split the lid in driving in the nail; now it fits so close that it is hardly perceptible, and being so split, he said he observed it to the purser; the purser said it was of no consequence. The chest is sealed on one side, on the other it is not sealed, and being so sealed, the wider part takes off without disturbing the seals, and there is room to take dollars out, and to put in the weight. The nails to the hoop might

be drawn in half an hour and the dollars taken out and the weight put in; I know there is a great deal too much of that done on the River.

CHARLES HORTON . I am a waterman of the Thames Police. In consequence of directions from Mr. Gotty, I went to the prisoner; I asked him for the key of the crane room; he told me one of the fire lighters had got it.

JOHN JAMES WILSON . I saw the bags of dollars weighed; the bags of dollars weighed a thousand and sixty pounds of averdupoise weights with steelyards; I did not see them weighed with weights and scales.

EDWARD WILLIAM SYMMONDS . I am a clerk at the Thames Police office; I took down the account of the prisoner at the time he was under examination; he said the dollars are my own property, I bought them on Monday last; I expected to have some more to day, if I had not been here. People bring parcels to me when they have dollars to sell? He meaned persons about the India House; these who brought them up belong to the India House, I don't know their names, nor where they live; I buy and sell dollars for the purpose of getting two or three halfpence by them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of seeing persons coming to the Bullion office, and offering Mr. Cobb dollars for sale; it is more than twelve years past when Mr. Mead was in the Bullion office, that he used to find me with money to buy dollars; I gave what I liked for the dollars, and the surplus of the money I had a part of it; there are people coming to the Bullion office offering Mr. Cobb dollars for sale; when they attend I give them something to drink; I never know who the parties are, I generally give a halfpenny more than the silversmiths.

Mr. Cobb. Three or four instances have occured where dollars have been offered to me; persons have most assuredly come and offered dollars to me for sale.

The prisoner called twenty witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-23

290. THOMAS UPTON was indicted for that as on the 7th of October was servant to George Cross and employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his posession, the sum of one pound five shillings for and on account of his said master .

SECOND COUNT. For like offence, only stating that he received the money from William Bryant .

GEORGE CROSS . I am a stable keeper at Charing-cross , the prisoner was my servant, he drove a chaise for me, I entrusted him to receive monies for me. We had done work for Mr. Bryant, of the Hay-market, and when I delivered my account to Mr. Bryant, I found that the prisoner had received it, and had given his receipt for it. He received twenty-five shillings of Mr. Bryant.

WILEIAM BRYANT. I am a stable keeper in the Hay-market, I have been in the habit of having horses of Mr. Cross; I accompted to the prisoner on the 7th of October. I paid the prisoner one pound five shillings, for his master's use; the prisoner delivered this bill to me, I paid him upon it.

Q. to Mr. Cross, Look at that bill - A. This bill is my writing, I gave it to the prisoner to receive the money for me, on my account.

Q. Did you receive the money - A. No.

JURY. Mr. Cross. How long after the 7th of October did you find it out - A. Last Saturday was a week.

Prisoner's Defence. I did receive the money, I meaned to pay my master. I did not mean to rob him my wife offered Mr. Cross the money before I was taken, I wished to have made the money up.

GUILTY aged 25.

Confined 14 days and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18150215-24

291. JOHN LINDSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January a basket, value 1 s. an axe, value 2 s. and a whetstone, value 2 s. the property of John Newlyn .

JOHN NEWLYN . I am a carpenter . In the month of January last I was in the employ of His Grace the Duke of St. Albans, at Hanway , the prisoner was gardenner in his Grace's employ; I think he was dismissed before christmas; before I lost my tools on the 12th of January, I left off work at his Graces I put the tools in a basket underneath the bench in the shop; his Grace has a carpenters shop on his premises. I left my basket there on the 29th of January about dusk, it was a rush basket, I left in it a trying-plane, a jack-plane, a smoothing-plane, three chissels. an axe, a saw, a chalk-line, and a white fustain jacket.

COURT. There is no jacket in the indictment - A. The jacket was stained with paint a good deal, and also with pitch; I left these things on the evening of January the 12th about dusk. The next morning I went between seven and eight o'clock, the basket and its contents were gone; I have seen the axe and the whet-stone.

ELIZABETH FRANCIS . I live at Twickenham.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A, No, I have seen him, the prisoner left the basket he asked me to take it in.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do not you know him - A. No, I do not indeed, I cannot recollect the person of the prisoner at all, I was very busy at work; when he left the basket. I did not look at him at all.

Q. Was Mr. Parker with you at the time - A. Yes.

Q. Were you there when the basket was left - A. No, I only heard him go out, I do not know him.

HENRY BOWBRICK. On the 16th of January, I bought an axe of the prisoner, on Twickenham common; I was with two other young men, the prisoner offered me this axe for sale, he pleaded poverty as the reason of his selling it. This is the axe, he asked me two shillings for it, I gave him eighteen pence for it, James Moore was with me at the time the prisoner sold me the axe.

JAMES MOORE . On the 16th of January, I was with Henry Bowbrick , we met the prisoner; he sold the axe to Bowbrick, this is the axe, and the prisoner

is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave a shilling for the axe, at Hounslow, and a pint of beer for the stone.

GUILTY aged 29.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-25

292. MARY SHUTTLEWORTH alias BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a watch, value 2 l. a snuff-box, value 2 l. a seal, value 10 s. a locket, value 1 s. a gold-pin, value 1 s. a gold-broach, value 3 s. a gold-ring, value 3 s. a counterpane, value 1 l. a mantle value 1 l. the property of John Serress , in the dwelling-house of Lord Kennell .

JOHN SERRESS . I am servant to Lord Kennell I live in the house; the prisoner's mother was servant in the house. I lost some property out of my bedroom, I lost them out of a pair of drawers in my bedroom, I kept the chest of drawers locked I had the key with me. The last time I saw these things was in August, I missed them in December, in August, I went to Scotland, I left my property there, I returned to London on the 19th of December, the locks of my drawers had not been forced, they had been opened by false keys; I missed the snuff-box, upon coming to town, it cost me three guineas and a half, the snuff box was sold to a person, that is here. the watch, the prisoner's husband sold the duplicate likewise.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath

Reference Number: t18150215-26

293. HUGH FARRELL , JOHN HOLMES , and STEPHEN WEBB were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a watch, value 3 l. 3 s. and a pair of shoes, value 4 s, the property of George Spencer . in his dwelling house .

MARY SPENCER. My husbands name is George Spencer , we live in Brownlow street . On the 1st of February, a little boy came into the house, I came out of the parlour into the shop, to serve the least prisoner with a pair of shoes, the other two prisoners staid at the door; one of them said to the other, go in, he is gone in, Farrell was the boy, that came in first, about three o'clock, in the afternoon. Farrell came into the shop, and asked me to fit him with a pair of shoes, the other two stood still at the door; one said to the other he is gone in, go in. They came in, the three prisoner's are the three boys that came in. Stephen Webb set in the chair, then Hugh Farrell said you are fitting; Webb said yes, fit me with a pair, I got up on the steps, I missed Holmes, I looked and saw him in my parlour. I then looked up by the fire place and I missed my watch; I then got hold of him by the collar, I said you villian you have got my watch; I called Mrs. Chapman my lodger down; Holmes struck me, to get away, in the scuffle the watch was dropped in the parlour close to the door; Holmes got away from me, I ran to the door after him and called stop thief; my lodger afterwards found the watch on the floor, she delivered it to me, the prisoner was stopped by a gentleman coming by, I thought the prisoner had run out with the watch.

This is the watch, it is my husbands watch. The other two boys sat still, they never moved once, a pair of shoes was thrown in the kennel, I cannot tell how they came there. I was so frightened, when I cried out stop thief. Mr. Godfrey was at hand he ran after him; I detained the othe boys immediately, after I found Holmes had gone out.

MRS. CHAPMAN. I lodge in Mrs. Spencer's house, I came down stairs, and saw the shop full of people, I saw something lay between two chairs. I took it up, it was Mr. Spencers watch, I said Mrs. Spencer, here is your watch. The prisoner Holmes had gone away.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I was at Bow-street-office, I was fetched to Mrs. Spencers, in Browlow street; I searched Webb and Farrell. Webb had eleven shilling and nine pence and Farrell had nine shillings and six-pence; Godfrey brought Holmes in.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I heard the cry of stop thief, I found Holmes concealed in a privy in a yard in Shorts gardens; I took Holmes to Mrs. Spencer's, she indentified him as the boy that had struck her.

Holme's Defence. I was playing with the dog in the parlour, I went in to buy a pair of shoes, the other boys went in with me.

Q. to prosecutrix. What is the value of the watch - A. I cannot say.

HOLMES GUILTY, aged 14.

of stealing, to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

FARRELL NOT GUILTY .

WEBB NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-27

294. JANE GOLDSMITH , alias GOLDFINCH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a lace veil, value 3 l. the property of George Gibbs . in his dwelling house .

JANE GIBBS . I am the daughter of George Gibbs he lives in Whitechapel .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A, Yes she came into the shop, to buy some thread, which she bought, I had just entered the shop; I had a veil on.

Q. How did you loose it - A. I threw it off my face, I suppose it fell off, or she pulled it off, I do not know which, when I missed the veil, I enquired after it, the prisoner denied seeing it,, and went out of the shop; I followed the prisoner into the street; that was my veil, that was dropped.

Q. How old are you - A. Twenty.

MR. SHELTON. In the indictment, it is laid to be the property of George Gibbs .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-28

295. SAMUEL LUMLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 16th of January , forty one pounds weight of bacon, value 35 s, the property of William Dowlman privately in his shop .

WILLIAM DOWLMAN was called and not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Barron Richarde .

Reference Number: t18150215-29

JAMES SPENCER was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 6th of February , four candlesticks, value 10 s. the property of Robert Crombie .

ROBERT CROMBIE . I am a victualler , I keep the Queen's head Chelsea bridge . On the 6th of February the prisoner came to my house, he was billeted at the next public house; Mrs. Crombie called me out of the parlour, I went up stairs, and missed my candlesticks, I pursued the prisoner, and picked up four of my candlesticks they are such as I lost, they are worth ten shillings.

WILLIAM CAMPBELL. I was with Crombie in the parlour, Mrs, Crombie called Grombie out, I went after the prisoner, and on the foot of the bridge I saw the prisoner, with these candlesticks in his hand.

Q. to Prosecutor. These are your candlesticks, are they not - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home to my quarters, I met two men, they said, they had found these candlesticks, and while I was talking to them, this man came up and knocked me down, the man followed me, and took me in custody.

GUILTY aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-30

297. THOMAS STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Stephen Stephenson , a shirt, value 7 s. the property of John Stevenson .

STEPHEN STEVENSON . I am a boatman , belonging the Paddington canel; just before I came to the boat, I saw the prisoner there; I asked my own little boy what business he had there, and when I asked my own little boy, the prisoner put the watch on the top of the bed, I saw him do it; I told the prisoner to come out; he had a shirt in his hat, it fell out, I took the shirt away from him, and had him taken in custody.

Q. Whose shirt was that - A. My son s; John Stevenson 's, not mine, the watch was my own.

RICHARD GEE . I am a constable, the last witness delivered to me the watch, and the shirt. I produce them.

Prosecutor. The watch is mine, the shirt is my son's, John Stevenson ; he is thirteen years of age.

GUILTY aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-31

298. CHARLES PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , one fowl, value 11 s. 6 d. the property of William Nixon ,

WILLIAM NIXON . I am a poulterer , in Mary-le-bone-street, Piccadilly ; I lost a fowl on the 11th of February, about two o'clock at noon, I lost it from the front of the shop; from information I ran after the prisoner and took him with my fowl wrapped up in a bag, under his arm. I am sure it was my fowl.

GUILTY aged 68.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-32

299. GEORGE HIND was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of February , four fowls, value 12 s. the property of Charles Price .

CHARLES PRICE . I keep a cornchandlers shop , on the 3rd of February I lost four fowls. one of my witnesses and me saw the fowls taken into the necessary one at a time, at last, there were four taken, I saw it as I was crossing the yard; four fowls went into the privy one after another, one went in, and then the door was shut, another went in, and then the door was shut, the other four went in, in the same manner, at last the cock went in, and having a larger tail than the hens. his tail was shut in the door: me and my friend went into the place, and when we went into the necessary, the prisoner was pretending to ease himself; we found the fowls in the prisoner's pocket one he pulled out of his breeches, and threw it down the privy; my witness pulled him out into the yard, and took three fowls out of his pocket; they were my fowls I brought them up from chickens.

HENRY BRACKEN . I saw the fowls go in one at a time, as he has described; we went and took the prisoner out, I took three fowls out of his pocket, and one he threw down the privy.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first time I was ever before a magistrate in my life.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY aged 22.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-33

300. JAMES EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a piece of deal, value 7 s. the property of John M'Gill .

JOHN M'GILL. I am a carpenter at Kensington , I lost a piece of deal on the 30th of January, I had seen it safe about two or three days before it was taken away.

GEORGE LUCEY . I am a patrol; on the 30th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner, he had this piece of deal on his shoulder.

Prosecutor. The deal is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the deal at the middle of the road at Battle-bridge.

GUILTY aged 40.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-34

301. JAMES DONNOVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , seven sheets, value 2 l. ten shirts, value 1 l. 12 s. nine table cloths, value 2 l. four napkins, value 4 s. nine toilets, three cravats, value 3 s. a shift, value 1 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. and two pair of pillow cases, value 2 s. the property of Edward Allen .

EDWARD ALLEN . I live at Hanway, My wife is a laundress; on the 4th of February last I was coming to London in a cart, I had a great quantity of linnen in the cart; At the corner of St. James's street , I stopped my horse and cart right opposite of Mr. Cable's the corn chandlers ; the cart had the linen in it.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. Yes I saw the prisoner put the bundle of clothes on his shoulder, I got hold of him immediately, and took the clothes

off, close to the step of the cart. The constable came and took him to the watchhouse.

JAMES NEWITT , I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner; This is the linen.

Prisoner. Q. In the scuffle did you loose any thing else - A. Yes, an old great coat.

ELIZABETH ALLEN . I came to London along with my husband, in the cart; we stopped at Mr. Cable's door, I went to get another bundle of linen, I returned to Mr. Cable's house, I saw the bundle dragged from the cart; I only saw the head and arms of the prisoner; I went to the door-post and seized the prisoner by the collar, and with my other hand I seized the bundle. I said to the prisoner, you have robbed my cart; he said I was mad, he had put it in the wrong cart by mistake; I said it is no such thing, it is my bundle it was then exactly, as it is now in this sheet, in my cart; here are three table cloths with my marks on them, and the sheets have my marks on them, I can swear to them.

Prisoner's Defence. A man dropped the parcel I stood by it, to secure it, I did not know whether to put it in the cart again, or to take into a shop that the right owner might have it.

GUILTY aged 43.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-35

302. WILLIAM WAITHMAN was indicted for that he, on the 24th of December upon Joseph Hoyston , in a certain boat in the River Thames, did make an asault, and that he with a certain piece of wood called a scull, which he in both his hands then and there hold, did strike, push, and force, the said Joseph Hoyston from and out of the said boat, by means thereof he was suffocated and drownded, of which he died, and so the jurors say, you the said Joseph Hoyston did kill and murder , and also indicted for killing and slaying the said Joseph Hoyston .

JOHN HOYSTON. I am an apprentice to Captain Ellsworth. Captain of the ship Mariner ; I had a brother apprentice his name was Joseph.

Q. On the 24th of December last had the Captain ordered you to take the boat, and go with a message to another ship - A. Yes, about four o'clock in the afternoon, it was just dark at that time we pulled round the teer of ships on the Middlesex side by stone stairs, I and my brother were both pulling our oars, against the tide, we met the prisoner in a scull by himself; I told him to go on one side or the other, he made no answer but struck our boat, upon which my brother called him a nasty name; he then hit me upon my right arm; I asked the prisoner why he struck me, it was not me that called him that nasty name; our boat then was alongside of another boat, the prisoner run his boat on the tide, and came near us, he struck my brother on the shoulder, my brother run out into another boat, the prisoner took up the scull stretched it out at arm's length and hit my brother on the back, my brother had a guernsey frock on, it is a wooley thing, he set it against my brother's back. the scull held fast of the frock; the prisoner shoved him overboard, I am sure I saw the prisoner shove him overboard.

GUILTY aged 47.

Of manslaughter only .

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-36

303. WILLIAM BUCK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Harris Heal , on the 13th of January , about the hour of five in the afternoon, and stealing therein, ten yards of carpeting, value 50 s. his property .

JOHN HARRIS HEAL . I keep a carpet shop , No. 33. Rathbone-place . On the 13th of January. I came home between five and six o'clock, my porter had the prisoner by the collar in the shop when I came home; I had been out an hour and a half, I suppose the door was open when I left it, I usually shut my shop of a night, as soon as it is dark; the name of my porter is Scott, I asked Scott what he had the man there for, he said he saw him taking a piece of carpet out through the window; I found the window broken, and one piece of carpet gone, the other the prisoner had in his hand.

COURT. One pane broken - A. Yes, and one piece of carpet gone. the other piece of carpet the prisoner had in his hand.

Q. Where there broken panes large enough to take a carpet out - A. Yes, they are very large panes.

Q. When had you seen the carpet last - A. I saw it the same day, it was placed near the window.

Q. Was it so near that a person could take it out, without putting their hand through the window - A. No, they must have put their hand through the window; there was one carpet taken away, and gone entirely, it did not hang up it stood on its end. I do not think it was shut close.

Q. If it had been quite close it might be taken out without a person putting in his hand - A. No I do not think it could.

Q. Did you search the prisoner - A, The constable did, I was there when he was searched, he had a bag, and some duplicates, nothing else I did not see any instrument of any sort; I had observed the pane of glass that day, there was not a bit of glass gone; it was a simple crack across the top, in part of the pane.

ROBERT SCOTT . On the 13th of January, about ten minutes before five I took in a few rolls of carpet, that had been standing at the door, I shut the door, and lighted the lamps in the shop; I put up one rool of carpet in the window close to the side where this piece of carpet stood, I believe it touched the frames of the window. I bolted the shop door; this is the piece of carpet, I found the prisoner had hold of it stood up in the corner of the window, I fastened the shop door and bolted it, and went out at the private door for my tea, I left the young woman at work in the shop. About twenty minutes past five, I was returning from my tea. before I got to the shop. I saw the prisoner and another man standing at the corner of the shop window. I passed them, I thought they were after no good.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No, I never saw him before; I passed them, I passed the shop ten or a dozen yards, and crossed over the way I went under a gateway opposite of the shop; they seperated as I passed the shop. and returned again

I came from under the gateway; I walked about ten yards further on the right, because I could not see what they were doing of then; I observed one of the men with an umbrella keeping the light off another shop, and the prisoner stooping down pulling the carpet out; I ran across the way and laid hold of him while he was pulling the carpet out; the carpet was almost a foot out, he had shoved it down to get it out, he could not have got at it without putting his hand in at the window. I did not see him break the window; I seized him by the collar, and asked him what he was doing of; he said he saw something he did not see what it was; I asked him where the other man was; he said he knew nothing at all of him.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner; I found this bag under his coat. I found no instrument about him to out the window.

COURT. Q. To Prosecutor. What is the value of the carpet - A. Between thirty shillings and three pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. On my returning home it began to rain; I stepped on the steps of a private door, next to the carpet warehouse, I thought I saw a pane of glass out, I put my hand in unfortunately for me; I stepped on the door again. The porter has said he laid hold of me as I was pulling the carpet out of the window, which is as false as God is true.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-37

304. JOHN CHRISTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , two fowls, value 3 s. the property of Henry Chappel .

HENRY CHAPPEL. I am a pot-boy to Mr. Groobey at the Angel and Trumpet Stepney . On the 20th of January, I had some fowls; I kept them in Mr. Grooby's shed; I saw the fowls about nine in the evening; I missed them between ten and eleven at night. The prisoner is a dustman . When I missed the fowls I told my master; master took the fowls from the prisoner.

GEORGE GROOBEY . On the 20th of January, my lad had two fowls; he suspected the prisoner had got them. I searched the prisoner, and found the fowls next to the skin of the prisoner; I took the two fowls quite warm from the prisoner about five minutes after the boy missed them; they had their feathers on.

Prosecutor. They were my fowls.

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked my feet against something in the passage, I found it was these two fowls; I picked them up, and put them into my bosom; I was hungry, I thought they would serve me to eat the next day.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-38

305. ANDREW CORVETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , two pair of pistols, value 20 s. the property of Anthony Harding .

ANTHONY HARDING . I am a victualler . On the night of the 11th of January, the prisoner came late in the evening, he asked for a bed; my servant was going away; I accomodated him with the servant's bed; these two pair of small pistols lay in a chair close by the bed; I was up in the room, and saw them there. On the morning of the 12th, the prisoner got up early before me; I went up into the room; the pistols were gone. In the course of the day, the prisoner came into the tap-room with a beefsteak in his hand: he paid me for his lodging. I said, sailor, I have lost two pair of pistols, if you have them tell me, I will be favourable to you; he denied knowing any thing of them. Mr. Dickens, the officer, came down; he confessed to him of having stolen the pistols.

THOMAS BUCKLISS . On the 12th of January, about twelve o'clock at noon, the prisoner came into my house, he brought me this pistol, he said give me what you please for it; I gave him three shillings for it, and in the evening he brought me these three pistols; I gave him five shillings for them.

Prosecutor. The four pistols are mine.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of January, on the 14th I found the four pistols in Rosemary-lane, at Mr. Buckliss's.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no victuals for three days and nights; I took the pistols out of the room, and sold them for eight shillings. The prosecutor pledged his word he would not hurt me, he knew I was in distress.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined One Month , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18150215-39

306. JOHN BROMLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , two trusses of hay, value 4 s. the property of Benjamin Brooks ; and JAMES WARREN for receiving on the same day the same hay, he knowing it to have been stolen .

BENJAMIN BROOKS . I am a cow-keeper and farmer , in Roystone-place, Mary-le-bone . The prisoner had been my servant two years. On the 20th of January, I counted my trusses of hay; I missed them. On the 21st I marked the hay by cutting corners out of the trusses with a knife. I got up in the morning when he went out of the yard; I went into the loft to see if he had taken any hay with him; I missed one truss. and I conceived two more; I then followed the cart to the Old Mother Red Cap at Highgate; at the yard of the Old Mother Black Cap beyond Kentish Town on the North road; I jumped into the cart, and rid in the cart; he did not know I was in the cart; I got out of the cart; I backed on one side of the horses, and he on the other, until he came to the Green Man at Finchley Common; he stopped his horses there, pulled down his tail board, and pulled the hay out of the cart; he had got two trusses and three quarters in his cart; I saw it when I was in the cart; I considered

the three quarters of a truss he might want for his horses at the Green Man; he delivered the hay to a man with a white smock frock. Bromley delivered it into the stable belonging to the Green Man; I stopped a little time; I went to the bar window in the tap room; I saw Bromley drinking at the bar; I then went on to Whetstone to get my breakfast, he never saw me at all. I got my breakfast; I made general enquiry whether the landlord, or the ostler found hay on the road. I returned back to the Green Man at Finchley, and had a glass of wine and water; I saw the man to whom he delivered the hay to; I cannot swear that the prisoner Warren is the man.

JAMES HARRIS . I am an officer. I went down to the Green Man. I charged Warren on suspicion of having received stolen hay; Warren said, he knew nothing about the hay; he gave the carter liberty to put hay into the stable belonging to the premises; as to him, he did not want any hay.

Bromley's Defence. I had hay of Warren for my own horses; I told him I would bring him some to make him amends for what I had of him.

BROMLEY, GUILTY, aged 40,

Of stealing one truss only .

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

WARREN, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-40

307. SUSANNAH BREAKWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. a cap, value 2 s. and two one-pound bank notes , the property of Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS LEWIS . I live at the Nags Head livery-stables, Whitechapel . The prisoner was my servant .

MRS. LEWIS. I am the wife of Thomas Lewis . I found the property. On the 17th of January, I went into the prisoner's room; she was my servant; I smelled a disagreeble smell; I searched to see what it was if I could, and in looking between the bed and the sacking, I found a great bundle, which contained my childrens things, and a great many other articles, and in the prisoner's pocket I found a silver tea-spoon, two one-pound notes, two eighteen-penny pieces, and three pieces of copper; I know it was my own silver tea-spoon: I found the bundle by the side of her pocket; the bundle contained my child's cap, it has my own mark on it. The silver spoon was my mothers before I was married.

MR. LEWIS. One of the one-pound notes has the name of Foot upon it, Princes-street, Spitalfields, January 12th, 1815; I am positive that is my note.

JOSEPH SCOTT . I am a constable. I was sent for to examine the things found between the bed and the sacking. The prisoner told her master they were not his property. I said take your own property, and leave what does not belong to you; she would not claim it then.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-41

308. JAMES SILVESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a piece of woollen-cloth, value 12 l. the property of Septimas Wellington , William Overbury , and William Cartwright .

SEPTIMAS WELLINGTON. I live at 32, Cateaton-street ; I am a blackwell-hall factor ; the firm of the house is Septimas Wellington, William Overbury , and William Cartwright . On the 12th of January, I had occasion to remove this piece of goods to another ware-room, a room below that; I removed it from an upper ware-room to a lower ware-room, at No. 32, Cateaton-street.

Q. Is your door usually kept open in the course of business - A. Occasionally kept open. This was removed on the 12th of January, it remained till the 14th of January; on the 14th I ordered my porter to remove it to an other part of the same lower ware-house; I saw it myself on the 14th of January, about eleven in the morning; after the order had been given to the servant to remove it, we found it placed there according to the direction.

Q. About six o'clock you had some information - A. Yes; I looked, and found it was gone. I saw the piece of cloth at Thomas White 's, the officer; the prisoner was in custody.

Q. What is the value of the piece of cloth - A. It is twenty-one yards and a half, it is worth twelve pounds; I am quite sure it is mine. That is all I know of my own knowledge.

WILLIAM DONNEL . I live at 17, Whitecross-street. I am beadle of Cripplegate. On the 14th of January, as I was coming from Guildhall about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner carrying a large bundle in a suspicions manner; I challenged him where he was going to carry it to; he said, Drury-lane. I was sure he would never carry it to Drury-lane in the slovenly manner he had it, it was not packed up as if in the fair course of business. I asked him where he brought it from; he said the water side. I asked him whether he brought it from Mr. Maberleys. the clothier; he first said, yes, and afterwards he did not give me any direct answer, he said somebody gave it him to carry from the water side. I stopped him and took him before the sitting Alderman. This is the piece of cloth.

THOMAS WHITE . I received the cloth from Donnel. I made enquiry; it was claimed by Mr. Wellington.

Prosecutor. It is my cloth; I can swear to the cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from the West India Dock a man met me, he said, he would give me two shillings to carry this cloth to Finsbury-square; the officer stopped me, and took me to Giltspur-street Compter. If Dr. Box was in court he could relate the situation I am in; I have lost my sight since I have been in prison. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-42

309. ROBERT BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a musket, value 30 s. the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I live at No. 9, Red Lion Alley, Minories; on the 11th of January, I sent in 52 muskets from Mr. Thomson's workshop to the East India Company's military store room in Devonshire Square. I sent them by George Dibbeld the porter. On the 14th of January I went to the military store room with five muskets on my shoulder, that made fifty-seven. I counted the muskets, there was but fifty-six, that is all I know; the prisoner worked for me until the tenth, and after the 10th he worked for some other man for Mr. Johnson on the same premises.

GEORGE WILBRAHAM . I am inspector to the Honorable East India Company, in the military store room, Devonshire Square.

Q. Do you remember any muskets being deliver-there. A. I remember the prisoner taking one out on the 13th of January, about a quarter before one o'clock; it was taken out of Sir James Cunningham's office, he being head of that department. I was coming out of Sir James's office, I saw the prisoner with a musket in his hand; I know him perfectly well, he had a musket in his hand; being before the usual time to have the guns inspected, suspicion arose in my mind of something being uncommon. I knew he worked for Mr. Thompson, therefore I had no suspicion, only of his being too soon. The guns had not been inspected; we do not take them in as the property of the Company until they are inspected. I and my assistants inspect them for the company; until they have undergone inspection, they are the property of the makers.

Q. Did you see what he did with the musket. A. No, he took it out of the room where it was deposited; but wherever he went with it I do not know. On Saturday the 14th of January, Davis came down with some muskets on his shoulder; I do not know how many he brought, he put them down with the rest. On Tuesday or Wednesday I saw Davis, I said did you send Bird for a gun. I saw Bird when the constable had him in custody. Mr. Thompson told him he would forgive him if he would tell who he sold it to; the gun has been found, it is worth thirty shillings.

JOHN WILBRAHAM . I am almost thirteen years old, on the 13th of January, I saw the prisoner go into the military room about a quarter before one; we call it the view room, the inspection room; I had some swords on my shoulder; I went in after the prisoner; I saw him looking at Mr. Davis's guns that had been sent in for inspection. I came down, and saw him go out of the yard with a gun into Devonshire Square, where he went with it I do not know.

COURT. Q, to Davis. Were all these muskets in the view room of your manufactory. - A. His and mine together, he is a journeyman under me; I am answerable for all that are missing, if any are missing I am to make it good.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined fourteen days in prison , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-43

310. JOHN BENNET and GEORGE HOPKINS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , three pints of brandy, value 4 s. a pint of rum, value 3 s. a quart of geneva, value 4 s. two quarts of wine, value 6 s. eight bottles, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of Chrispher Smith , esq. Newman Smith , and William Petter Woodhouse , and a basket, value 1 s. the property of John Adnam .

GEORGE WHEATLEY. I am night constable.

Q. On the evening of Sunday the 15th of Januuary, where were you - A. I was in Union Street; I saw the prisoner John Bennet in Union Street, with this basket in his hand, and the contents, except this bottle. It was between the hours of seven and eight. I asked him what he had got there, he did not give me a satisfactory account; he asked me what it was to me. I asked him to go into some public-house with me to give me a satisfactory account; I got him to a public-house door, he put the basket down. The prisoner Hopkins then came up, and while we were talking, the prisoner Hopkins took up the basket, and run away; I had got hold of Bennet. Hopkins came by, and got hold of the basket; he ran about twenty-yards; I stopped him with the basket.

THOMAS CHILDS . I am constable of St. Saviours. I was at Union Hall when the prisoners were brought there, on Sunday, the 15th of January, I went to the watchhouse; I asked them where they lived; Bennet told me 223, Kent-street; they both lived together in one room; I found a pint bottle of brandy in a hamper; I found a letter in Hopkins's box, in that letter was

"send me a bottle of brandy for the old man, for he has nothing to drink but small beer.

WILLIAM PETTER WOODHOUSE . The names of the firm are Christopher Smith , Newman Smith, and William Petter Woodhouse ; we are wine and spirit merchants , Queen-street, in the City of London. The two prisoners were porters in our house; they were employed in the warehouse and the cellars. There are two pint bottles of brandy, one quart bottle of brandy, a quart of rum, and three of port wine; I can identify the bottle of brandy with the name on it, of which a pipe of wine was sent in our cart; this bottle is a sample of the pipe of wine; it appears to have been emptied and filled with brandy; I have every reason to believe it is all our property; we sent the pipe in the cart; the sample we keep ourselves as a check to the carrier, least there should be any change or alteration in the journey. The prisoners had full employment at our house from seven o'clock in the morning until eight at night.

Q. What is the value of each - A. About five shillings the quart, about half a crown the pint. I know this bottle to be our property.

The prisoners called four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

BENNET, GUILTY , aged 24.

HOPKINS, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one Year , and whipped in Jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-44

311. ELIZABETH MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , two sheets, value 7 s. two counterpanes, value 8 s. two blankets, value 2 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of William Lee , in a lodging-room .

SUSANNAH MARY LEE. It was near three years ago I let a ready furnished room to the prisoner and her husband, at four shillings and sixpence a week; the prisoner and her husband came together, and they were taken up together on the 4th of this month, the husband continued to lodge in the room with the prisoner until they were taken up.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I was officer of the night. On the 4th of February, I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the articles on the prisoner; the pawnbroker's are here.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-45

312. CATHERINE WELLS was indicted for that she, on the 10th of January , had in her custody and possession, a forged 1 l. note, she knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-46

313. CATHERINE WELLS was indicted for that she, on the 10th of January, feloniously did forge a certain back note for the payment of one-pound, with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-47

314. EDWARD JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a shirt, value 4 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and ten farthings , the property of Joseph Marks .

JOSEPH MARKS . I am a horse-keeper at the New Inn, Stanvel parish . On Tuesday evening, the 1st of February, the prisoner came in, and asked for a lodging, he slept in the same room with me that night; I got up about seven o'clock, I left him in bed; he was seen to go out of the house about half after nine o'clock; the house-keeper asked me if I had any thing laying about the room, as the prisoner had gone out with a bigger bundle then he came in with on the over night. I went up stairs to see; I found my things gone, and the box open. I saw the prisoner, and pursued him in the fields at the back of the house; as soon as he saw me he stooped down underneath of the edge, and where I saw him stoop I went, and found some of my clothes. The prisoner was stopped, and brought back to the house. I then saw a pair of worsted stockings in his possession of mine. I had fifteen farthings in my box, ten were found upon him. These are the stockings and handkerchiefs; they are mine, and one of the farthings I believe to be mine, I had such a farthing as that.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, I did it through mere distress.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined three months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-48

315. MARY REDERICK and SUSANNAH HOWARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , two blankets, value 4 s. two sheets, value 14 s. two tablecloths, value 14 s. a pair of drawers, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and two yards of cloth, value 6 s. the property of William Reeve , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM REEVE . I live at 131, Curtain-road, Shoreditch . Mary Rederick was my house-keeper , she was continually ill, she said, she wanted money to go to her doctor, she had more money of me than her wages. On the 25th of January, I missed two sheets, two tableclothes, two blankets, a counterpane, a pair of stockings, and a pair of drawers. On Saturday morning I sent for an officer; the officer came, and searched Mrs. Broderick. I missed an ironing blanket, that was returned to me at the office. Mary Broderick gave me a number of duplicates; I went to the pawnbroker's with the duplicates, and desired them to bring the things to the office, which he did. I found in Mrs. Howard's apartment some starch in a paper, with my own hand writing upon the paper, a memorandum of mine; I cannot swear to the starch; I had some starch, I have lost it all.

GEORGE GAROD. I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 8, Old-street, Shoreditch. I produce two blankets, sheets, tablecloths, and a towel, they were pawned with me by Mrs. Howard, she pawned them all in the name of Rederick; I had seen Mrs. Rederick before.

Prosecutor. These things now produced are mine, my name is in full length on the sheet; the tableclothes are marked W. R. I can swear to the whole being my property.

JOSEPH HARRIET . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a tablecloth, a pair of stockings, a remnant of linen, and a pair of drawers; they were pledged in the name of Rederick, by Mrs. Howard.

Prosecutor. These things are mine.

Rederick's Defence. I did not mean to defraud my master, I was in hopes he would not find them out until I got them back again.

Howard, was not put on her defence.

REDERICK, GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

HOWARD, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-49

316. JOHN BELLAMY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Hague , on the 19th of June , and stealing, a copper, value 1 l. belonging to James Hague ; the prisoner having no title or claim to that copper .

JAMES HAGUE. I live in Narrow-street, Limehouse . I have a house in Rose-lane; my servant lodged there, his name is John Gimer .

JOHN GIMER . This house is an out-house, adjoining the dwelling-house, where the copper was taken out; at one o'clock in the morning, I heard them go out of the back door, with it; I did not

get up; it alarmed me; I was afraid to go out among them. When I got up in the morning, the copper was gone.

Q. This was a long while ago - A. Yes, two years next June; between twelve and one o'clock in the night the copper was taken away.

Q. When did you hear that the prisoner had taken it - A. About ten days ago, or thereabouts, I heard he was taken; I heard that the copper was found that they took away; the copper was the property of my master, James Hague, a flour merchant; I work for him, and have so much a week and the house for my labour.

THOMAS PUGH . I am a brick-maker. John Bellamy and me were drinking at the Ben Johnson public-house; Bellamy said, he knew where to get Mr. Hague's copper out; it is a couple of years ago. He went to Mr. Hague's farm, he opened the door where the copper was with a crow; he took the copper out; I was with him all the time. He took the copper homes to his own house.

Q. What is Bellamy - A. A dust man. I gave information of this a week ago, I was taken for another thing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-50

317. MANUEL SOYA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a jacket, value 25 s. the property of William Curling , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM CURLING . I am a slop-seller ; I lost a jacket on the 4th of February, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, it was laying on a shelf behind the counter when I lost it; it was a jacket intended for sale; on that day I had occasion to leave the shop, and go into the parlour, and while I was there, I heard somebody call out shop; I immediately went into the shop, the prisoner asked me if I had a jacket and trowsers to sell; I told him I had; I shewed him one; we agreed for the price I was to have, He then said, I do not want it now, I will come again; immediately upon my looking round I missed this jacket off the shelf.

Q. Had he left the shop then - A. Not at that time; when he said that it gave me suspicion that he had something of mine. The jacket was then on his back, he had been over the counter, and taken it; he went to the street door to get away, I followed him; he pulled the jacket off, threw it down; I secured him. He went from the counter to go into the street; he threw the jacket into the mud; I secured him, and sent for an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought that jacket in the middle of the street. I asked him for a suit of clothes, he said that jacket is mine; I told him I never was in his shop in my life before, I was taken in custody, The ship I belonged to is now gone away, I have lost every thing.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-51

318. JOHN WATSON , WILLIAM PATRICK , and JAMES WALSH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Toy , from his person .

SAMUEL TOY . I am a journeyman Baker .

Q. You lost your watch, did not you - A. Yes, on the 21st of January last.

Q. Whereabouts were you - A. I was too far gone in liquor; I do not know where I was. I only know I had the property with me when I left my master's house; I was not intoxicated when I left home; I left home between five and six.

Q. To what public-house did you go - A. The Sun Dial, next door but one to my master's house, and there I got intoxicated; I do not know what past. I had my watch in my pocket, a five-pound note, and ten or twelve shillings in silver.

JOSEPH SHIERS . I work at the India House. I saw the prosecutor in Old-street, I was passing along. The prosecutor was quite intoxicated when I saw him. Watson took the watch from the prosecutor, he gave it to Patrick; Patrick went away with it. Walsh got hold of the prosecutor's legs. I went up to the patrole at Islington, I told him of it.

JOHN UPTON . I am a patrole of Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoners from the information of Shiers. I searched Walsh; I found no watch.

WATSON, GUILTY , aged 25.

PATRICK, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

WALSH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-52

319. FRANCIS PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , two pigs, value 1 l the property of Benjamin Freer .

BENJAMIN FREER . I live in Limehouse fields ; I lost two pigs on the 16th of January, I saw them on the over night at nine o'clock; they were gone by six o'clock in the morning; I never saw them afterwards.

JOHN BUTLER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; Pugh informed me who had stolen the pigs; the man that bought the pigs has absconded; I know nothing more.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. I know no more than Butler.

THOMAS PUGH . Q. You were guilty of stealing these pigs yourself - A. Francis Parker and me went and get them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards;

Reference Number: t18150215-53

320. FRANCIS PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , two pigs, value 1 l. the property of John Gumn .

JOHN GUMN . I lost two pigs, on or about the 4th of January, I had seen them the night before. I know nothing of the prisoner taking them; I never saw the pigs afterwards.

JOHN BUTLER . I know nothing more than the receiver has absconded in this case also.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-54

321. THOMAS FRENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of January , a loaf of refined sugar, value 8 s. the property of Henrietta Lawrence , widow Richard Henshaw Lawrence , Morton William Lawrence , and John Carlill , privately in their warehouse .

RICHARD HENSHAW LAWRENCE. My partner's names are Henrietta Lawrence , Morton William Lawrence , and John Carlill , we are sugar refiners .

HENRY SCHRODER . I am foreman to the prosecutor's. On the 3rd of February last, between ten and eleven in the morning I saw the prisoner coming out of my masters premises, I saw him through a loop hole, I saw him coming out, the prisoner came there to fetch the grains away,; I saw him coming out of the sugar warehouse, he had a basket on his shoulder, and a bag in it; the cart was at the door. He digged a hole in the grains, that were in the cart, and put the bag in it, and covered it over with the grains, and put the basket on the top, over the sugar in the grains; I came down immediately, took the basket off the grains, and uncovered the bag, and there I found a loaf of sugar done up in paper with a string round it, I taxed him with it, at first he denied it, at last he owned it, he said he was sorry for it. I know the loaf of sugar to be my employers property; I mark all the loaves of sugar, before they are tied up. I know it by the mark that I put on it.

JOHN HENRY STEVENS . I am servant to the prosecutors. On the 3rd of February, I saw the loaf of sugar at the office, I knew it to be my masters property, Schroder produced it at the office, I knew it by the mark.

COURT, Q. to Schroder. Where was the sugar - A. In the warehouse, for want of room they were there for safe custody.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-55

322. JACOB NETTLE was indicted for feloniously assaulting, Mary the wife of George Norton , on the 5th of February , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a veil, value 30 s. the property of George Norton .

MARY NORTON . On Sunday night, the 5th of February, I was crossing Weston's park , walking with my sister, she had hold of my arm, the prisoner snatched the veil off my head, and he run up Weston's park; he run into the patrols arms, the patrol took him; I stood still, my sister ran after him.

Q. Did he say any thing to you - A, No, he did not speak.

JOHN HUNT . I produce the veil. I am a patrol.

Prosecutrix. I know the veil is mine, this is the veil that the prisoner snatched off my head, nobody was with me but my sister.

ANN PALMER . I am sister to the last witness, I was with my sister on this Sunday night, when my sister screamed out I saw the prisoner run, I observed the prisoner, I did not see him do any thing; I ran after the prisoner, nobody was with me; when I overtook him, he was then in the patrols arms, when I saw him, I only saw his back then.

JOHN FURZEMAN , I am a patrol. On Sunday night, I was going past the Crown in Weston's park, I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner run into my arms, I held him, Green came up.

GREEN. I assisted in securing the prisoner; the sister of the prosecutrix came up, and said that was the man.

JOHN HUNT . I found the veil against No. 23, about thirty yards from where I saw the patrol with the prisoner in his arms.

COURT, Q. to prosecutrix. Were there many people in Turnstile where you lost your veil - A. I did not see any person but the prisoner, and my sister.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-56

323. WILLIAM WALLACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , four silver desert-spoons, value 2 l. and one silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. the property of James Grant Esq. in his dwelling house .

MICHAEL KENNEY . I am a servant to James Grant Esq . I had the charge of the plate, I had seen it in the pantry about an hour and a half before I lost it, on the 25th of January I had seen it about seven o'clock in the morning, I missed it about an hour and a half afterwards; I went into the garden, upon my return I saw the prisoner coming out of the pantry. at the bottom of the stairs. The prisoner is the man, I asked him what he wanted, he said he had a note; I asked him who he had the note for, he said Dr. Burnes. I do not know such a man in Welbeck street; I detained the prisoner, and called for my fellow servant, the prisoner would not be searched by me or my fellow servant.

Q. Was he searched at last - A. The prisoner called me into the scullery, told me he had got the things but he hoped I would not tell the constable. When my fellow servant came in I told the constable he had confessed he had taken the things; he kneeled down, and pulled out the things, they are here.

Kenny. They are my master's property, they are marked the same as the livery buttons.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to take them, I am innocent of it; as I was going to work I had a bundle to deliver for my mother, I saw two gentlemen talking together in Charles street, by their discourse they seemed as if they came from Portsmouth; they gave me a card, folded up in a piece of writing paper, they asked me to take it to Welbeck street, to Dr. Burnes and to leave my bundle at the house in Charles street; I proceded with the note into a public house in Welbeck street, and asked if they knew the gentleman's house next the musician; I knocked at a gentlemans door, I asked where the servant was, he made me no answer run up the area steps; I knocked at another door, I asked whether that was Dr. Burn's; he said it was not he asked for the note; the constable has the note, I begged his pardon if that was the wrong house, I begged him to let me go, as my mother was in great distress, she was living upon my wages, I have sent

my mother for the bundle, the bundle contained two waistcoats, and two pocket handkerchiefs.

GUILTY aged 22.

Of stealing the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-57

324. WILLIAM READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a broach, value 7 s. two tea-spoons, value 4 s. a silver-pipe-tip, value 1 s. and five pieces of silver, value 5 s. the property of Richard Thomas the elder .

RICHARD THOMAS . My father is not here his name is Richard Thomas , his shop is No, 3. in the Strand , the prisoner lived with us as shop boy ; since the 28th of May last, we discovered laterly, that money and other property was going at different times.

Q. On the 29th of January last did you and your mother search the bed on which the prisoner laid - A. We did, in a reces in the shop we discovered a paper under the bed, containing some pieces of silver, and two silver tea spoons; and on the bed labels of vials that contained spirits; the whole of which property we had taken about a week since in our business. On the 30th of January I went for Donaldson, he produced the boy the things found under the bed, and asked him if he knew any thing about them; the boy replied he did not; Donaldson then searched his person, and found in his pocket some keys. that would open a drawer in a pembroke table, in which my mother keeps her keys; the key of a wine celler a key of a cask of home made wine; I brought his box out of the kitchen, Donaldson searched it, we found the duplicate of a broach that he had pawned for three shillings, this he acknowledged to be his, and said he had found the broach, this broach I believe to be my fathers, I found a black jewellers case, that case contained several small pieces of silver; among them a silver pipe-tip belonging to my father.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am an officer. The evidence he has been given is all correct, I produce the keys that is the key which opens the pembroke table, this key opens the padlock in the cellar, and this is the duplicate I took out of his pocket; he admitted it to be his.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a pawnbroker, in June last I took in a broach, my duplicate tallies with the duplicate that Donaldson produces. This is the broach.

Prosecutor. I believe that broach to be my father's.

Prisoner's Defence, I stand before you, charged with the commission of an act, I trust I shall be found innocent. I consider the total stolen to be two silver tea spoons, two small pieces of silver, and a pipe tip; the articles in the indictment were found under my bed; they are stated to be the property of Mr. Thomas with whom I lived as errand boy; the articles were found under my bed; my bed place is in a recess in the shop; over which is a case containing silver articles; these articles might have fallen in; the gold broach was never the property of the prosecutor; I found the same in the street. near two years ago, the truth of which my father in law John Shears can testify, This is the first time in my life that I have been charged with committing a felony. I lived with Mr. Chambers in Watling street, two years, and with Mr. Fletcher, who is in court, to express his perfect readiness, to take me into his employ. Being early deprived of my parents, induces me to hope I shall be entitled to mercy.

GUILTY aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-58

325. HENRY NICHOLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a great coat, value 5 s. the property of Robert Edwards .

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am a green-grocer and fruiterer , I live at 23 Lower Shadwell. On the 7th of February, about half past six in the morning; I left my coat on the horses back; I was going to load my cart, I went away from my horse a quarter of an hour and when I returned I missed my coat; I know no more unless to prove my property.

JOSEPH CAMPBELL . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a great coat, the prisoner pledged it with me on the 7th of February, in the name of Nicholls, for four shillings.

Prosecutor. It is mine, I have had it four or five years, I am sure it is mine; I have seen the prisoner, he is a journeyman barge builder .

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going to my work I saw the great coat lay in the horse path, I picked it up, and took it home, and kept it at home untill I carried it to the pawnbrokers. I shewed it to a young man that is here.

THOMAS ATKINSON . I saw the prisoner bring in the great coat on his arm, about eight o'clock in the morning, it had the appearance as if he had picked it up in the road.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-59

326. ISABELLA LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , two pieces of foreign silver coin, value 2 d. and one eighteen penny bank token the property of John Blake .

JOHN BLAKE . I keep a public house , Rose street Ratcliffe , the prisoner was my servant . In consequence of suspicion. I marked a quantity of money on the 19th of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning. I keep the money up stairs in my back room, on the second floor, locked up in a chest of drawers; I went up stairs, and marked some of my silver.

Q. Did you mark two pieces of foreign silver coin - A. The eighteenpenny bank token I marked half an hour before it was taken out; I locked my drawer I always kept it locked. The prisoner was in the habit of making the beds at eleven o'clock in the morning; I frequently missed money, and before she came down again, I went and unlocked a drawer and missed an eighteenpenny piece; I went for an officer directly. The officer Patridge came and searched the prisoner's pockets; he found an eighteenpenny piece in her pocket and two small pieces of foreign silver coin; I will not swear to the two pieces of foreign

coin, I can speak to the eighteenpenny bank token, that is the only thing I can swear to; I searched the prisoner's room I found nothing else that belonged to me.

GEORGE PATRIDGE . I am an officer; I searched the prisoner, I found this eighteenpenny token upon her, and two bits of foreign coin.

Prosecutor. The eighteenpenny token is mine, I am sure it is my own, I put it in the drawer about twenty five minutes before I took it from her.

Patridge. I found four keys upon the prisoner, one of the keys opened this drawer.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own property, what the officer has it belongs to me,

GUILTY aged 31.

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-60

327. WILLIAM MILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January a pig, value 3 l. the property of John Mole .

JOHN MOLE , I am a jobbing carpenter ; I keep pigs, I lost my pig out of the stye in a pig yard belonging to me; I fed the pig at nine at night, and missed it in the morning, I saw the pig in Mr. Marriett's possession the next morning after I had lost it: I lost it on Tuesday morning. I saw it on Wednesday morning, in Mr. Marrietts posession; Marriett bought the pig at Redford market; that was the pig that I lost, I had the pig at about two months old, he was half a year old, and almost a full grown pig; I can swear to my pig.

JOHN MARRIETT . Q. You had a pig that was claimed by the last witness - A. Yes, I bought it at Redford market of William Miles , on the 24th of January, I gave him three pounds ten shillings for it.

CHARLES HUGHES . I apprehended the prisoner, I asked him about Miles's pig; he told us where it was and there we found it.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Mole told me if I would tell him where to find it, he would think no more about it; I gave him the money I had left of the price of the pig, three pounds seven shillings and three pence halfpenny.

GUILTY aged 40.

Confined one Year and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-61

328. GEORGE FRENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of January , a pair of boots, value 6 s. and a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of Peter Turnbull .

PETER TURNBULL . I am a labourer ; I lost a pair of boots and a pair of shoes out of a two pair of stairs room where I lodged, on the 23rd of January. My boots and shoes are in court. The prisoner lodged in the same room with me.

JAMES WALKER . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pair of shoes and boots pledged with me on the 23rd of January, both in one day; I took them in myself; I cannot swear to the prisoner.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at them - A. They are my shoes and boots.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday morning, a young man gave me them shoes to bind with silk binding, as they had run down at the heel.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-62

329. HENRY BARRENGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , the inside works of a dial, value 5 s. three bells, value 5 s. the property of John William Commerell , esq. and five hundred pounds weight of lead, value 20 l. his property, affixed to his house .

ROBERT DOWDELL . I am a labouring man, I live at Hanwell ; in the first week of February, I observed the prisoner with a person of the name of Carr; I saw them going along the road with something in a bag; it had the appearance of a roll of lead; I saw Barrenger frequently going backwards and forwards with something heavy; I saw Barrenger on Saturday morning as if coming from Mr. Commerell's house, about half past two; I saw him come back again, I watched him on the premises at half past two; I saw Barrenger go into Mr. Commerell's premises. I and several others got over the pales and searched for the prisoner; I found the prisoner in the privy; I took him by the collar and led him to a public house, and sent for Mr. Ross the constable. I found in the prisoner's pocket, part of a green blind; I sent to Mr. Commerell's house, I found another part of the green blind in the house where the bar window was broken; the two parts of the blind appeared to be one blind. Mr. Ross has got what I took from the house.

JOHN ROSS . I am a constable of Hanwell, I received the prisoner in charge of Dowdell upon the charge of robbing Mr. Commerell's premises; I searched the prisoner, and gave him into the charge of Davis at the Spencer's Arms Hanwell; I sent with with Dowdell, the last witness to inspect Mr. Commerell's premises; the outer door towards the brew-house was broken open: the window had been broken open at the kitchen; I found a considerable quantity of lead had been taken from the house, and gone; the case of a kitchen dial was carried into the wine cellar, the inside works of the dial was gone; the curtain of the library door had been torn away. I matched the curtain, Dowdell found it in the prisoner's pocket, it matched exactly. I then went back to the Spencer's Arms, where I had left Barrenger in custody; when I came there, I found he was gone. On Sunday I went to Hayes from information; I apprehended Carr there, he is the accomplice, the next morning Carr made a compleat disclosure of the whole transaction. I told the magistrate; he made the same confession to the magistrate, in consequence of what I learned from Carr; I searched Mr. Commerell's pond; we pulled out of the pound five hundred pounds weight of lead; it was lead that covered Mr. Commerell's house, I fitted part of it, it corresponded exactly. In consequence of information I went to Mr. Merrill's, a clock and watch maker, at Brentford; there I found the works of a dial, I fitted the works to the case

on Mr. Commerell's premises, it fitted exactly; I am a watch and clock maker myself. I left it in the care of Read the officer at Hatton Garden office.

MR. ROSS, This is the same dial, I marked it, the mark is on it now; I am sure it is the same; I apprehended Barrenger on Sunday fortnight, at a public-house, in Crown Court, St James's; I laid hold of him; I fastened him to my own arm, he endeavoured to make his escape, and jump out of the cart to drag me down; I took him towards Brentford.

THOMAS MERRILL , I am a watch and clock maker, at Brentford, on the 2d of January, the prisoner came to my shop and brought me the inside of a brass dial; I asked him where the remainder was, he said the weights were in the case, he said the hands were broken, and the case and pendulum was lost; he told me his name was Garney; this is the part of the dial that fits the case of Mr. Commerell's dial, I knew the case when I saw it.

JOHN WILLIAM COMMERELL, ESQ. Q. You have a house at Hanwell, in Middlesex - A. Yes, the house that my father lived in.

Q. Had you a dial in your kitchen - A. I had; I am perfectly well acquainted with the case; I never locked at the works so as to say that is my property.

Q. Do you find by inspection, that your house has undergone a considerable loss of lead - A. I have been there myself, I have seen that a considerable quantity of lead has been taken away; the lead has been taken away from the roof of the house.

WILLIAM CARR . Q. Now, say nothing else but what is true - A. I have known the prisoner Barrenger about seven weeks before this happened; I saw him on the 3rd of January, at the Waggon and Horses at Hayes; I had a little conversation with him there, he told me he had been at Hanwell, he had taken the inside works of a clock, and some lead, and some bells; the inside works of the clock he had sold to a clock-maker at the market place at Brentford; the bells he had sold to Mrs. Muckelow at Brentford. He asked me if I would go with him. The next morning we both went from Hayes to Hanwell, and took some more lead at Mr. Commerell's house; Barrenger said he had left the door open; he went in; then he shewed me a hole in the window, that he had broken to open the shutters to get in and unfastened the door; he shewed me a piece of lead on the stairs, about half an hundred weight; Barrenger took the lead up, and put it in this green stuff bag. He told me there was a copper down stairs, which he had removed from one room to another. He said he would take the lead if I would take the copper; I took the copper, and sold it to Mrs. Muckelow at Brentford; she gave me sixpence a pound, it came to twelve shillings; I took the copper in a sack. Barenger sold the lead at Mrs. Muckelow's; I do not know what he received for the lead. Mrs. Muckelow keeps a shop, buys old iron and rags. We went back again to Mr. Commerell's house; the next day we took three trips to the house, and took lead each time. We left a large quantity of lead in the pond, it was taken from the roof of the house, and some from the pump. I have told all I know, and no more than the truth.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the clock case - A. It has been taken out of my house; it is mutilated now to the best of knowledge; I positively swear it is my clock case.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to Dowdell. You told me you saw Barrenger and Carr together - A. I did, I saw them coming from Brentford, and going back again; I am a labourer; I live in the neighbourhood.

Mr. Ross. I produce three bells; I found them on Mrs. Muckelow's premises. I fitted the bells to Mr. Commerell's premises; they fitted exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I have never been with Carr since he and I worked together at Mr. Faggs at Bellfont; I happened to meet him as I was looking after work; I was never with him in the premises in my life; we have never been in a house together.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-63

330. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a bonnet, value 10 s. a spencer, value 2 s. a shirt, value 1 s. a bed-gown, value 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of James Jorden .

SARAH GORDEN . My husband's name is James Gorden; I lodge in the same house as the prisoner. On a Saturday morning in January last, the prisoner came into my room, and asked me to go for some rum for her; I went and fetched her a quarten of rum for her; I left her in my room; I was gone about half an hour. I found her in my room when I returned; I gave the prisoner the rum; she went into her own room; I was in my own room. She told me she would come into my room again; she did not come; I then had suspicion that she had done something wrong. I went to my bonnet box; my bonnet was gone; I had seen my bonnet in the box that morning. I saw my bonnet in the prisoner's room when the constable came; I went with the constable into her room; I found my bonnet and two handkerchiefs, they were found in a bundle that she had in her room on the table, two caps, two handkerchiefs, a pair of stockings, and two handkerchiefs, she had in her pocket; the bonnet, the velvet spencer, and two handkerchiefs, were in a bundle; all the rest were upon her, they were taken out of her pocket.

Prisoner. The handkerchief you lent me, and a ribbon, and different articles.

Prosecutrix. I lent you none of these things; I lent you a handkerchief I have in my pocket.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am a constable. I found the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs; I took these handkerchiefs out of her pocket; the prosecutrix owned them. I went up stairs; I found these things in a bundle; I was untying her clothes; I think she slipt this bundle under her; I did not see it in the chair when I went into the room; I pulled

her out of the chair; I found this bundle on the chair, how it came there I do not know; it was not there when I went into the room.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-64

331. JOHN BARRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a hat, value 6 s. the property of George Franks .

THOMAS LOCKEY . I am a journey man to Mr. George Franks . I lost this hat on Saturday, the 11th of February, about five o'clock in the evening, I was busy employed; a lad called in, and informed me a man had stolen a hat; I pursued after the man, he made a violent resistance, he bit my hand; I secured him. The officer has the hat.

BARTHOLOMEW WOOD . I took charge of the prisoner, and the hat. I produce the hat.

Lockey. The hat is my master's property; it was at the door hanging up.

Prisoner's Defence. Hunger drove me to do it; I had been two days and two nights without victuals.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-65

332. RICHARD GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a ream of paper, value 4 l. 4 s. the property of Joseph Sills , George Sills , John Sills , Thomas Ramsey , and Robert Gray .

JOHN DOUTHWAITE . I am porter to Joseph Sills and Co. I saw the prisoner bring the paper from the Three Crains wharf, at the bottom of Queen-street , on the 24th of January, a little after four in the afternoon; I saw him bring it from the wharf and throw it into a cart instantly; I stepped up to him, and asked him what that paper was; he told me it belonged to the carman. I enquired of the carman if that paper belonged to him; the car-man said he knew nothing about it; the prisoner was bye. I then took hold of the prisoner, and secured the property.

Q. Do you know whose property it was - A. It was in Mr. Sells and Company's care. I stowed it by for them myself; they must make it good.

RALPH WILSON . I am a porter. I saw the prisoner heave the paper into the cart, and before that he went into the warehouse unknown to me; I locked the warehouse door, and in five or six minutes after, I went to open the door, the prisoner came out; I said to the prisoner, I beg your pardon, I did not know you were there or else I would not have locked the door.

Q. Did you see him bring any thing out of the warehouse - A. No, he brought it from off the wharf and put it into the cart; I saw him threw it into the cart.

JOHN DUNN . On Tuesday, the 24th of January, I went with a load of wool to the Three Cranes wharf at the bottom of Queen-street; after I had unloaded it, I turned my cart round to draw off; I went away to my horse, one of Mr. Munn's bottle waggons drawed in, and stopped me; one of these porters said carman, do you know any thing of this paper; I said no, I have just unloaded; I had nothing in my cart; I know nothing about the paper.

THOMAS WHITE . I am clerk to Messrs. Sills and Company. I can swear to the property; it is the same paper that was entrusted into our care; I know it by the mark L. T. and a diamond, or a square; there were sixty-two reams of paper marked so in our care. This is one of them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-66

333. SOLOMON BANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a great coat, value 4 l. the property of Richard Clobury .

RICHARD CLOBURY . I keep a clothes warehouse , No. 100, Cheapside . I was absent when the coat was taken.

ROBERT WALLIS . I am a shopman to Mr. Clobury. On the afternoon of the 17th of January last, between the hours of four and five, I was engaged with a customer at the back part of the shop; on looking towards the shop door I saw two men, supposing them to be looking at the articles in the window, I stepped towards the door. I saw one of the men strip the coat off the horse at the door; I saw him give it to the other; on my approaching still nearer to them, they made off; I pursued them. They dropped the coat about a yard from the door. I pursued the prisoner, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped; he was brought to the shop again; I sent for a constable, and gave charge of him; I am certain he is the man; I followed the prisoner from the shop door, I was close at his heels until he was stopped, and never having lost sight of him until he was stopped; I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS SHAW . On my coming out of the next door to Mr. Clobury's, I picked up this great coat in the street. This is the great coat.

Wallis. This is my master's great coat.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-67

334. PETER PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , three loaves, value 2 s. 9 d. the property of William Gregg .

WILLIAM GREGG . I am a baker . I lost my bread on the 16th of January.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I received information that Mr. Gregg was robbed on different mornings; I went to Mr. Gregg's house on the 16th of January, about a quarter after seven in the morning, I saw the prisoner's wife go into the shop,

the prisoner gave her three loaves, she put the loaves under her shawl; I stopped her, and asked her what she had got there: she said it was bread, she had fetched it from the prisoner. I took her back to the shop again. She said it was given to her; I saw it given to her. Mr. Gregg gave charge of the man and the woman. The prisoner confessed it was the first time he had given loaves to the woman. I understood the woman was the prisoner's wife; the bread was taken before the Lord Mayor; it was ordered to be consumed.

Mr. Gregg. The prisoner was my servant , he lived with me four months. The bread that Forrester brought back was mine.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-68

335. NATHANIEL PENNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , in the dwelling-house of Henry Parker , seventeen one-pound notes, his property .

HENRY PARKER I keep a chandler's shop , No. 8, Leather-sellers-buildings, London Wall ; I am the landlord, and live in the house; it is in the parish of Allhalows, London Wall . On the 23rd of January, the prisoner came to my house, and wanted to know if I would give credit for what goods were sold in my shop; he said he received his money monthly of Mr. Holdsworth, at the Mansion House; I let him have what he wanted; from that time to the 6th of February, he had goods and money to the amount of two pounds nine shillings and eight pence; he then said, he should have twenty pounds on the Monday, and he would come and settle, had I got change; I said yes; I counted out seventeen one-pound notes; he looked at the notes, and took them up; he said take care of my pocket-book, he put it on the counter, and said he was going to Holmes's.

Q. What day was this - A. This was Monday, the 6th of February; the seventeen one-pound notes he took away with him in his hand, I was counting out the silver and the halfpence when he went away with the notes, he said he would be back in a minute. I found he did not come back; I looked in the pocket-book; I found some blank paper in the pocket-book, nothing else.

Q. Had he shewed you a twenty-pound note at all - A. He had a piece of paper in his hand, it looked like a piece of writing paper. Finding he did not come back, I went to Mrs. Holmes's after him, and then to his wife; his wife said she expected him in; I could not find him. I went and gave information at the Mansion House; I saw no more of him until he was brought to the Mansion House on the Monday.

JOHN HODSON . I am a City officer. I met with the prisoner last Saturday week; I had another information afterwards of some shawls in another indictment; I took him in custody.

MR. HOLDSWORTH. Q. You are the City Marshall - A. Yes. The prisoner has been employed by me indirectly, but never one of the police.

Q. Was he employed by you in January - A. He was employed by me in January. he was not constently employed; he had it in his power to give some information that was serviceble. I afterwards told him if he would continue to be useful I would give him a guinea a week; he never had any paper from me with my signature in my life; I never garranteed any debt; there never was more than thirty shillings due to him at any time; I never gave him a twenty-pound note.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-69

336. BENJAMIN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a lamp, value 7 s. the property of the Mayor, Commonality, and Citizens of London .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to belong to John Teague .

THIRD COUNT, stating it, to be a lanthorn, instead of a lamp.

JANE HOW . I live in Cock-lane; my husband keeps a shop there: he keeps a coal shed, and deals in the brokery line. On Friday, the 13th of January, the prisoner came, he brought with him a glass lanthorn for sale: he said, I kept a coal shed he was going past, and as we sold coals he thought the lanthorn would be of use in our shop; I did not know the value of it; I said, I would give half a crown for it; the prisoner went out, and said he would not take it; he returned, and brought it in, said he must take it; I then gave him half a crown for the lamp, he left it; on Saturday morning we cleaned it, and put it out for sale. Michael Whale the lamp lighter came, I delivered the lamp to him.

MICHAEL WHALE . I am a lamp-lighter; I trim the lamp for Giltspur-street Compter. On the 13th of January last, I trimmed this lamp about two o'clock in the afternoon; I left it there; I went to Ely-place. I missed the lamp when I came to light it at four o'clock. On Saturday morning at four o'clock, I saw it at Mrs. How's, a broker's shop, in Cock-lane; Mrs. How gave it to the street keeper in my presence. This is the lamp, I know it myself very well it is of the value of seven shillings.

JOHN TEAGUE . I am keeper of Giltspur street Compter . The lamp is the property of the Mayor, Commonality of the Citizens of London; we lost a lamp on the 13th of January, I believe this to be the lamp.

Prisoner's Defence. The lamp was given to me; I never was in that prison until I was taken there.

COURT. Q. to Mrs. How. What time of the day did he bring the lamp to you - A. About four o'clock.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-70

337. BENJAMIN HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , seventy-four yards of cloth, value 6 l. and a wrapper, value

1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS LEWIS . I am employed at the Bull and Mouth Inn , by Mr. John Willan . On the 9th of February, I had a truss put into my cart in a wrapper, I was to deliver it to R. S. Bousfield, No. 8, in the Borough, Southwark. I got as far as No. 7, in Friday-street , I had got a parcel to deliver; I took a parcel off the near side of the waggon, which I had to deliver at No. 7. The prisoner approached the waggon on the off side; I am sure the prisoner is the person; a person going by seeing me with a heavy load on my back, said is that your fellow servant on the off side of the waggon, he spoke softly; I immediately said no; I threw my load off my back at the door of No. 7; I saw the prisoner taking the truss off the waggon; I immediately pursued him. It is a truss of blue and white woollen cloth for aprons. I followed the prisoner, and never lost sight of him until he got into Gutter-lane; I stopped the prisoner. This is the truss.

THOMAS BAILEY . I am book-keeper at the Bull and Mouth Inn. On the morning of the 9th, this parcel was delivered to Lewis for the purpose of being carried to Mr. Brunsfield.

Q. On the prisoner's way to Newgate, had you any conversation with him - A. Yes; I neither threatened him or promissed him any thing; he met a man that looked like a smith. I asked him if he was a smith; he said, he had been. I told him it would have been better for him to have been working at his trade than doing what he had done; he said, he did not know, it hurt his hands; he should have only seven pennyworth; I understood seven years transportation.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-71

338. JAMES BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , twenty-eight pounds weight of butter, value 2 l. a cloth, value 6 d. and a basket, value 1 s. the property of John Edwards and William Watts .

JAMES ROGERS . I am book-keeper to William Watts ; at the Windmill Inn, St. John Street. On Friday morning I took the waggon belonging to John Edwards , to Newgate Market, in Newgate Street . I took a flat of butter off; the flats contained fourteen lumps, each lump two pounds, twenty-eight pounds. I placed this flat down on the pavement, with several others ready to deliver to the respective owners; about five minutes after I had so placed it, I missed this one flat or basket, and while I was looking for it, thinking it might be in a wrong place, the officer came by with the identical flat that I had lost I am positive the flat that the officer had is the same that I took from the waggon, and placed there five or six minutes previous to his bringing the man and the flat of butter back. This was about seven in the morning, quite light.

EDWARD ONEY . I am an officer, about a quarter past seven in the morning, I was standing in Newgate Street, opposite of Warwick Lane; I observed the prisoner running along with this flat of butter before him; I suspected him from the manner of his carrying it; it is not an usual manner of carrying butter; I immediately crossed the road, he turned down Warwick Lane; I followed him, he kept on a good jog trot; he went behind carts, he went into a door-way; he took a great coat from under his arm and begun to cover up the flat; I then went up to him and asked him whose it was, he said his, he was going to take it home; I asked him who he had it from; he said a person in the street; I took him back into Newgate Street; we passed several waggons, we came to a waggon where Rogers was unloading; I said Rogers have you lost a flat of butter, he said yes, he was that moment looking after it; as soon as he saw it, he said it was the identical flat of butter that he had lost; I took the prisoner to the compter. This is the flat that I had taken out of the waggon and, I missed it.

Prisoners Defence. A person met me and enticed me to take it.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-72

339. BENJAMIN HASTINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , nine pounds weight of bacon, value 3 s. the property of Edward Foster .

EDWARD FOSTER . I am a cheesemonger , No. 18, Old Street , I lost the bacon on the 27th of last month, on that day about nine in the evening the officer Barrett came in.

WILLIAM BARRETT . On the 27th of January, in the evening about 7 o'clock, I was in the Upper White Cross Street, I saw the prisoner in company with another, and knowing them when they passed me; I looked after them, I perceived the prisoner with something concealed in his blue apron in the front of him; I followed him into Lower White Cross Street, in the City; I watched them, suspecting where they were going with what they had, until they came to a receiving house. I stopped him when he was going in, the other made his escape at that time; I asked him what he had got, he replied nothing; I caught hold of the bacon; I perceived it was bacon; I asked him how he came by it; I told him it would save me a great deal of trouble if he would tell me where he bought it, if not, I should take him into custody, which I did; I locked him up at last, I went into the house of the prosecutor, I asked the wife of the prosecutor if she had lost any thing; she said she had, and she should know it if she raw it. This is the bacon, I have had it in my possession ever since.

Prisoners Defence. I kicked my foot against something in Chiswell Street; I picked up this bacon, I was not in White Cross Street; I was a little intoxicated.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-73

340. ANN BYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a sheet, value 6 s. and a bed curtain, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Stringer .

JOSEPH STRINGEN . I live at the Green man in Edgeware road . The prisoner came to me on the 3rd of February, and asked me for a lodging, she asked to sleep there a night or two she was very sober after a few hours I found her a little intoxicated; in the morning she came down, she had a pint of beer she went up to bed again, and between two and three in the afternoon she came down again; the maid went up stairs, and missed the sheet. Mr. Piall came into the house at the time she went out; we brought her back, Piall searched her, and found the sheet and curtain concealed under her stays and petticoats, wrapped round her.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PIALL . I am a constable this is the sheet and the bed curtain, the prisoner had it wrapped round her; I happened to be accidentally in the house; I searched her, and found a sheet and a curtain wrapped round the prisoner.

Prosecutor. This is my sheet and my curtain, they both were taken from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated with liquor,

GUILTY aged 19.

Confined six months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-74

341. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a shawl, value 3 s. the property of Sarah Simmons spinster , from her person .

SARAH SIMMONDS . I am a single woman, I am a stay maker ; I lost a shawl as I was going along Long-acre , it was snatched off my neck.

Q. Do you know who snatched it - A. Yes, the prisoner is the man. it was about a quarter after seven on the 9th of January, I was just turning the corner of Mercer street, he came on one side of me, and snatched the shawl off my shoulders, I had a momentary sight of the prisoner; I have never seen my shawl since, I am quite certain of the prisoner; I ran after the prisoner; William Roberts stopped the prisoner.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I stopped the prisoner, I saw no shawl about him; he was running when I catched hold of him. He said he was not the person that stole the shawl.

Q. Did you mention anything to him about the shawl before - A. No, nor no person without any body mentioned the shawl to him, he said he was not the person that stole the shawl. That is all I have to say.

MATILDA HANCOCK . I was in company with Sarah Simmonds , I saw him snatch of the shawl, the prisoner is the man that snatched it; I can swear to the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going after a truss of hay, I heard some people hollowing out stop thief, a man stopped me as I was running along with the people; that is not the gentleman that stopped me. The gentleman here came up and asked me what was the matter.

GUILTY aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-75

342. CHARLES BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th January of two blankets value 5 s. a pair of sheets, value 4 s. and a counterpane value 2 s. the property of Thomas Sheen .

THOMAS SIMMONDS . I am a patrole. On Saturday evening, the 14th of January, I saw the prisoner, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw him offering these things for sale, two blankets a pair of sheets, and a counterpane; he was just inside of a jews shop, I asked him where he had got the property. he told me he had brought it out of Church lane, from his own place; I was not satisfied, I sent my partner to Church-lane, in the mean while he he was gone, he told me he had given a false direction, he had brought them out of Rose court, Blue-anchor-yard; I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, I took these things upon him, I have had them in my care ever since.

ANN SHEEN . I am daughter of Thomas Sheen , he is an undertaker the prisoner lived in Rose court , he was a tennant to my father, my father has several houses; he lives at No. 4, my father has the house No. 3, besides, the prisoner lived at No. 3, the constable went to his room, I went to the watchhouse and saw these articles; these articles are my fathers property, they were taken from No. 3 , I went to No. 3, and found the door open. and the bed things gone off the bed, these are the very things that belonged to the bed in the prisoner's room.

JOHN SHAW , I am a constable. The patrole came and informed me that he had stopped this property; he described the room, I went to the room and saw the clothes off the bed.

GUILTY aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-76

343. THOMAS GENTRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , ten pound weight of beef, value 10 s. the property of John Maryon .

ROBERT MARYON . I am the son of John Maryon butcher, Osborne street.

Q. When did you loose your beef - A. On Saturday night the 21st of January, about ten o'clock in the evening. The prisoner ran up to the side of the stall and took the beef off the board; he took it, and run away with it, my father pursued him and took him with the beef upon him.

Prisonor's Defence. I am a poor man, I am lost for want of a friend to come and speak for me, I had no beef upon me, when I was taken, I never took the beef.

Robert Marryon . I am sure he is the same man, he had the beef in his possession; when my father took him.

WILLIAM GALE . I am a broker, the prisoner took the beef, and when he came to my door he threw the beef down; the butcher requested him to take it back he would forgive him; he said he would not carry it any further.

GUILTY aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-77

344. JAMES THOMPSON , RICHARD THOMPSON , and JOHN SCARDIFORD , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Doyle , widow , about the hour of six on the 8th of January ; and stealing therein, three pair of shoes, value 2 s. her property.

MARY DOYLE . Q. Do you keep a shop - A. Yes, an old clothes shop, they broke my windows, the windows are part of the shop, and the shop is part of the dwelling house; it was about six o'clock at night, it was dark out of doors; I could not discern the features of a man in the street. The shoes were placed so that they could not fall out, they must have been taken out.

EDWARD GREEN , I am a Queen square officer, at six o'clock I was it Tothill street, I saw the young lads, Sandiford and the two Thompsons, there were two others besides; I saw the three lads at the bar, in company with two others, I saw Sandiford drawing something out of the window; he drawed it out by his hands, in drawing these shoes the glass broke, and away he run, the shes were laid behind the others the other boys were with him. I took Sandiford, with his fingers bleeding and the blood running, I took young Thompson on the Monday morning, this was on Sunday evening, it is a shop where they sell old clothes, there was a candle in the window. On Monday, I apprehended James Thompson ; the three prisoner's, I have seen them at different times. The two Thompsons were present I did not see them do any thing, no further than being present with Sandiford, that is all I know. This is one of the shoes he drawed out, Margaret Smith saw the boys, as well as myself.

Prosecutrix. This is my shoe.

MARGARET SMITH . I saw the five boys. among the five were the three at the bar, I remember them standing round the window; I do not mean to swea to them two, I can swear to Sandiford.

Sandiford's Defence. We were altogether, all of us, before this window, a great chap came past, he gave us a shove; there is a celler, I went to save myself. and hit my arm against the window, the window broke, we run down Duck lane, we did not pull any of the shoes out, they must have fell out.

James Thompson 's Defence. Green the officer went and cut the glass after.

JAMES THOMPSON NOT GUILTY .

RICHARD THMPOSON NOT GUILTY .

SANDIFORD GUILTY - DEATH aged 13.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-78

345. JOHN SALT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , six trusses of hay, value 12 s. and three bundles of hay, value 3 s. the property of Matthew Melton ; and ROBERT ROGERS , for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods he knowing it to be stolen .

MATHEW MELTON . I am a horse dealer in Brick street, Piccadilly, I have also a farm at Finchley in the county of Middlesex, the prisoner Salt had been my servant about three months, he was employed in taking the horses provender backwards and for wards from the farm to London. On the 26th of-January, I went to Finchley, I looked in the cart house, there I found a load of straw, that he was to come to town with on the cart; he was particularly desired not to bring any hay to town; seeing this cart loaded with straw, I put myself behind the house to watch him, I saw him come out of the stable without his horses; go to the cart house where the cart was, there I saw him put six trusses of hay on the cart, and three bundles likewise on the cart, after he had put it on the straw, he brought his horses cut, put them in, and drove away; he could not see me all this time, upon his going away, I suppose he was gone half an hour, I took my horse to follow him; I desired him to go the Highgate road, I missed him I suppose he went the Hampstead road; I got to London first, I saw the cart brought in by the prisoner, I could not perceive any trusses of hay in the least; there was no appearance of hay in the cart; I had the straw throwed down in the yard, there did not appear any hay at all; we loaded his cart with dung and sent him about his business; he returned to Finchley with the dung, I did not acquaint him with what I had observed; in the course of the evening, I received information from a man of the name of Crane, in consequence of the information Crane conveyed to me, I got Foy the officer to watch him I was not there; the man was discharged from me.

Q. You discharged Salt - A. Yes, he got a warrant against me for an assault I then apprehended him.

Q. Were you present at the time that Rogers was apprehended - A. No.

Q. Were you in the habit of selling hay at all? - A. I never sell any, all the hay I grew at Finchley is for provision for the horses.

ISAAC CRANE . I am a green grocer, at Campden town. I keep a cart.

Q. Do you know the mother Red cap's - A. Very well, sir, at Campden town. On the 26th of January I was just past the horse trough of the mother Redcap's I saw the cart coming down the Hampstead road. I have often seen the cart upon the road with the name Matthew Melton upon it; the prisoner drove as near the yard gate as he could, and stopped as near the gate as he could, it was about twenty minutes past six, star light, a very sharp frosty morning; when he stopped the cart, I heard an alarm, the Red cap's gates were three parts open, he gave a hem, he got up on the near side of the cart, I saw him chuck six trusses of hay off the cart, one at a time on to the ground; Robert Rogers took them into Mr. Young's yard, he is ostler of the Red cap, he has been ostler there many years; there were six whole trusses and three bundles, afterwards Rogers put them into Mr. Young's yard, after they had stowed the hay away, I saw Salt drive on towards town; I did not hear a word that passed; as soon as Salt drove on, Rogers shut the gate; I communicated to Mr. Melton, what I had seen that same evening, about a quarter past six, I went to his house in Brick street Piccadilly.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer.

Q. In consequence of information of the robbery, did you apprehend Salt - A, I did, the prisoner Salt

came to the office, he had taken out a warrant on the Friday before for an assault; when I came to the office Mr. Melton was there he called me of one side, in consequence of what Mr. Melton told me, I detained Salt; in the afternoon, I went and apprehended the prisoner Rogers; I searched the hay loft, at the Red Cap, there were several trusses of hay in the hay loft, and some loose; Rogers was at home, he said nothing then; I brought Rogers to the office having left Salt there before; I told Rogers the charge I had against him coming along, for buying hay of Mr. Melton's carter; he said I was to do the best I could for him, he pursuaded me not to bring the cloth away I found in the loft I searched his house it was close to the Red Cap, coming cut of his house, he shoved a one pound note into my hand; and told me to use him, as well as I could; I told him I should do my duty, and produce the one pound note before the magistrate, which I did.

Rogers called six witnesses who gave him a good character.

SALT GUILTY aged 33.

ROGERS GUILTY aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

The prisoner Rogers was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his good character.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-79

346. JAMES JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a great coat, value 5 l. the property of Matthew Bowen Mends , in the dwelling house of Henry De Lemaine Esq.

MATTHEW BOWEN MENDS, Q. You lost a great coat, did you - A. Yes, from No. 26, Berner street , at the house of Henry De Lemaine ; I was a visitor there. On the evening of the 27th of February, I left my great coat and hat on a chair in the hall about seven o'clock, I then joined the family in the drawing room; I lost it about three quarters of an hour after seven.

Q. Is the great coat here - A. No.

Q. Do you know anything of the prisoner taking it - Q. Not direct.

MARY BOOTH . I am servant to Mr. De Lemaine. On Friday the 27th of January, about a quarter before eight in the evening, the prisoner rung the bell, he asked for a pair of boots, I asked him who for; he said he did not know the gentleman's name, he said he came from Fleet-street; I admitted the prisoner in, I went up into the drawing room and asked if a pair of boots was to be called for; when I went down into the hall, the great coat, and the man were gone, and the street door open.

Q. How long were you conversing with the prisoner - A. Not long; he was taken that night week, I am sure the prisoner is the same person, I let him into the house; when I saw him again, I was sent for into Charles street, Middlesex Hospital; I recognized the man when I saw him again in the hall; he was in company of the gentleman of the house when I saw him in the hall; I am positive to his person.

ANN NEALE . I was in the house when the prisoner was taken, at No, 24. Charles street Middlesex Hospital; he came to our house, and asked for a pair of boots, there was no gentleman in our house that had any boots, he was stopped.

Prisoner. Q. to Mary Booth . How can you swear to me - A. I know you again, I knew you again the moment I saw you, I know you by your person, I had a distinct view of you when I let you in, I know you again.

COURT, Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of the great coat - A. I stated it at five pounds, my taylor charged me six guineas, I had it about five weeks.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 25.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-80

347. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , one feather-bed, value 3 l. one bolster, value 10 s. and two blankets. value 10 s. the property of Lohens Opperman , in his dwelling house .

Q. to the prisoner. Are you guilty, or not guilty. (The prisoner stood mute)

Mr. Shelton, to the gentleman of the jury. You shall well and truly try, whether the prisoner stands wilfully and obstinately mute; or whether it is from the visitation of God.

COURT. Ask him again if he will plead.

M. Shelton . Q. to the prisoner. Will you pleade are you guilty, or not guilty. (The prisoner stood mute,)

LOHENS OPPERMAN. Q. What passed before the Justice - A. The prisoner was taken before the Justice for stealing a feather bed, the Justice asked him what he meant by it, he said somebody asked him to carry it.

WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY . How long has the prisoner been in your custody - A. He came to me on the 18th of January, I have never seen him myself.

MICHAEL DALEY. Q. Did you see the prisoner in Opperman's shop - A. I did not see him in the shop I saw him between three and four yards off the shop with a bed on his shoulder. I went and told Mr. Opperman.

COURT. Q. to Opperman. Did you loose your bed - A. No, I took it off the prisoner's shoulder, as he was carrying it; the Justice asked him why he took it, he said somebody asked him to carry it, he gave that answer.

COURT. Gentleman of the jury, you are to try whether the prisoner stands wilfully and obstinately mute, or by the visitation of God.

VERDICT OF THE JURY. He stands mute, by the visitation of God .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-81

348. JANE GOLDSMITH alias GOLFINCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a lace veil, value 3 l. the property of Elizabeth Gibbs spinster , in the dwelling house of George Gibbs .

ELIZABETH CIBBS. I live in Whitechapel Road , with my father, he is a haberdasher. On the 31st of January, between five and six in the evening, I entered the shop, Miss Johnson was with me, the prisoner came in immediately after, I threw the veil off my face, to speak to my mother.

Q, Was that the veil that you lost - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the veil afterwards - A. The witness missed it off my head, the witness said that I had not the veil on, I immediately looked round the shop, and asked the prisoner if she had seen it, she denied seeing it.

Q. What was the prisoner doing - A. She was standing in the shop, she purchased her articles and left the shop; from what the witnes said, I followed the prisoner and overtook her, a few doors from the house I asked her to return again and on her returning I saw the veil drop from under her cloak; my friend took it up, and took it into the parlour and laid it on the piano forte; I saw it on the piano forte before it was given to the officer; I know it to be mine.

Q. How could she take it from your head, without your feeling it - A. I had on a cloak at the time, I did not feel it.

SOPHIA JOHNSON . Q. Were you in the shop with Miss Gibbs - A. Yes, about half past five, she had a veil on when she came in the shop first; I followed the prisoner to the door after my young friend, I saw my young friend bring her back; I saw the prisoner drop the veil from under her cloak, I saw the veil, and know it; I delivered the veil to the officer.

WILLIAM HOLL . The lady delivered the veil to me, it has been in my possession ever since.

Q. to Elizabeth Gibbs . What is the value of this veil - A. I gave three guineas for it, about six weeks before.

Q. Is this shop part of the house - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up this veil, I did not know what it was, I did not see it fall from the ladies head.

The prisoner called two witnesses' who gave her a good character.

GUILTY aged 59.

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-82

349. GEORGE WHITTAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , forty two pounds weight of butter, value 2 l. a cloth, value 6 d. and a basket, value 1 s. the property of George Owen Glover .

GEORGE OWEN GLOVER . I am a fishmonger at Islington.

Q. Did you at any time loose forty-two pounds weight of butter - A. Yes on Saturday morning, at Newgate market, I collected the butter in town, and put it in my cart in Newgate street. The butter was lost about a quarter past eight in the morning from my cart, in Newgate street ; I was going to convey it to Greenwich. I put it in my cart myself, and I saw it taken; it was in a flat basket, the prisoner when I seized him, said a man had employed him to take the butter to a man, he was to give him a shilling for taking it, I saw him take the flat with the butter, from my cart. This is the flat basket that contained the butter, I am sure I saw the prisoner take it out of my cart,

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to take it for him he said he would give me a shilling.

GUILTY aged 57.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-83

350. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , twenty-nine yards of gingham, value 3 l. the property of William Brown and Thomas Farley .

WILLIAM COLE . I am shopman to William Brown and Thomas Farley . From information, I detected the prisoners.

RICHARD FERNEY . I am a butcher. Last Thursday week, I was walking in Ratcliffe Highway , about four o'clock in the afternoon, observing two young men standing at Brown and Farley's window; I had suspicion of them; I went on the other side of the way. I saw the prisoner take the print off the iron bar, and put it into the other young man's apron.

Cole. In consequence of information, I pursued the prisoner, and stopped him opposite Old Gravel-lane, and brought him back to the shop. This is the gingham; I took it from him; it belongs to Brown and Farley; it was over an iron at the window.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-84

351. ELIZABETH MARY TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a lace veil, value 3 l. the property of Ebenezer Rennie , in his dwelling-house .

JOANNA RENNIE . I am the wife of Ebenezer Rennie , he keeps a lace shop in St. Martin's-court . The prisoner came into the shop on the last day in January, between eight and nine o'clock; I shewed her some black lace veils; I saw her take one, and put it under her gown.

Q. Did you say any thing to her - A. Not at the time, I did not; I kept shewing her some.

Q. You observed nothing to her, but kept shewing her more - A. I did. There was no person in the shop; I expected the street-keeper to come to shut up my shop in a minute; I thought I would speak to him when he came, and when he came, I said to the prisoner, I was afraid there was none that would suit her; she said, she did not think that I had, she would call to-morrow along with her landlady. Then I told the street-keeper to take hold of her; I went round the counter, thinking she might drop it at the door; he laid hold of her; she came into the shop again; she asked me what I wanted; I told her she knew what I wanted, she had taken a lace shawl; I saw the lace shawl laying on the floor. A shawl and a veil is the same thing. When I said she had taken the lace shawl, I observed one laying on the floor; I said there was the shawl. She said she had knocked it off the counter with her elbow; then the street-keeper picked it up, he said he would go and get a regular constable, and deliver her and the shawl to him. My shop is part of the house; the shawl is worth above thirty shillings; the selling price is three pounds ten shillings,

ISAAC PIKE . I am a constable. I was sent for, I took the prisoner in custody; I searched her; I found no property about her but a halfpenny. She told me it was distress that made her do it,

Prisoner's Defence. I have no doubt I knocked

it off the counter with my elbow, but not with intention of stealing it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

[ The prosecutrix recommended the prisoner to mercy, on account that she had made strict enquiry into her character; her parents were honest, but poor, and they had a large family .]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-85

352. JOHN BARNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , eleven pair of childrens boots, value 12 s. the property of Robert Brand , privately in his shop .

ROBERT BRAND . Q. Are you a shop-keeper - A. Yes, 155, Ratcliffe Highway, in the parish of St. George's in the East; I keep a shoe-maker's shop . The prisoner came into my shop on Monday morning, the 16th of January, between nine and ten, he came in for some work, he was my journeyman ; I was called for some other business; I could not put him his work up; I went out; I left my wife in the shop with him; she was in the shop all the time he was there. In the course of the day, I fitted up his work, and after the prisoner was gone, I missed two pair of shoes out of the drawer; I missed many pairs, I cannot say the number out of the small drawers, where we keep the childrens shoes; I missed the shoes out of the drawers; I had put childrens boots in the drawers and marked them with my own name; I put them in on the Saturday night; I missed them on the Tuesday evening, and after the prisoner was gone out, I examined the drawer to see whether the boots were there; I saw a pair was gone. When he was brought back, I said Barnard, you have taken a pair of boots; he said he had the boots in his hand. This was on the Tuesday evening; I examined the drawer further; I found another pair was gone; I missed but one pair first; the prisoner had one pair in his hand, it was one of the pairs that I had put in the drawers marked. The next morning I went to the watchhouse, and asked him what he had done with the sixteen pair he had taken on the 16th of January.

COURT. That is not in the indictment, we cannot enquire into that - A. No. They were not marked.

NATHANIEL CROKER . I am servant to the prosecutor. I was in the shop the night the prisoner took the boots; I did not see him take the boots. Mr. Brand desired me to go after him; he went into a leather-cutters shop; I told him Mr. Brand wanted to speak to him; he came back with me, and when he came back Mr. Brand upbraided him with taking a pair of boots; he said yes, he had, and took them out of his coat pocket, and gave them to him. I was then sent for Mr. Jackson, the beadle; he took him into custody, Mr. Jackson searched him, and found a pair of boots in his pocket.

COURT. Q. to Prosecutor. What is the price of the two pair of boots - A. The two pair of boots cost me four shillings and two-pence. There are other boots that he took at different times, and pledged them at different times.

GUILTY, aged 56,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 2 d.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-86

353. TIMOTHY DESMAN , alias DESMORE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann Tenant , widow , about the hour of ten at night, of the 4th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a watch, value 2 l. a pocket book, value 1 s. a bank note, value 1 l.

SECOND COUNT. For making an assault upon Jane Southall , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, a watch, value 1 l. a pocket book, value 1 s. and a 1 l. note, her property.

JANE SOUTHALL . Q. Do you remember on the 4th of February any thing happening to you - A. Yes, I am house-keeper to Mrs. Tenant , at Bromley .

Q. Where is Bromley - A. Adjoining Bow, in the Conty of Middlesex . On the 4th of February, about half past nine o'clock, I was sitting in the housekeepers room with my mother, who was with me. I was reading aloud to my mother, my room is near the passage door; I heard the lock of the house door turn, and immediately came a man's foot into the passage; I said to my mother that I thought Mrs. Tenant's watchman had gone home to his supper. The instant I opened the door, a man ran upon me with a large stick in his hand, and a pistol; he said your money or your life. I told him I had very little money; I gave him a one pound note in the note book; he then said more money or I will murder you. I said I had no more money, I have a watch, I endeavoured to cut it from my side; I took a knife from the table and cut the watch off and gave it him also; there was a noise afterwards, a rattle sprang. To the best of my knowledge the prisoner is the man; his face was black to the best of my belief; I could entirely distinguish he was a dark complexion man with a prominent nose, his face was black, but I could see his nose.

Q. Were you ever acquainted with the man before. - Never, Sir, he said your money or your life, and then more money, or I'll murder you; I had no light, I had only fire light, I could not swear to the man.

HUMPHREY ASHLEY . I live in Grays-lane, Bromley; I am a carpenter. I know the prisoner.

Q. What is he - A. I cannot tell what occupation he is; I have known him for two or three years.

Q. Do you know the house of Mrs. Tennant - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear a rattle sprung - A. I was returning home with a bundle in my hand from marketing about twenty minutes before ten, in the lane before mentioned, when I drew within fifty yards of my own home, I heard a rattle spring; I stopped to listen. There is a dry ditch in the field, and a wet ditch. The prisoner came opposite me, he stooped down in the dry ditch, as though he would hide himself; immediately I hallowed out halloo there; he sprang out of the dry ditch, and stood upon the

bank, and as he stepped over the dry bank, he fell into the wet ditch, he said, oh, dear, he got out of the ditch, and proceeded on. I returned, about one hundred and fifty feet from that spot he would pass the house of Mrs. Biggs.

Q. Was that in his way home - A. I believe so.

Q. From the observation that you made of the person running, are you certain it was the prisoner at the bar - A. I did not observe his face, nor the colour of his clothes; I have no doubt from the body, the figure of the man. I returned home, and left my bundle. He continued his course, and passed the house of Mrs. Biggs.

Mr. Challenor. This passage where Mrs. Biggs lives is a public road - A. It is.

SUSANNAH BIGGS . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, have you known him long - A. Yes, a year and a half or two years.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the evening of the 4th of February - A. I really think it was him that I saw pass me, he was quite close to me almost; he was very wet indeed, the wet ran from him, he had his coat tucked up; he was running in a great hurry, extremely wet; he lives very near me.

Q. How near does he live to you - A. I could walk it in two minutes. I certainly think he is the person that passed me.

Q. Will you swear positively that he was the man - A. It was star light; I cannot say that I saw his face; I have no doubt at all that he is the person.

THOMAS EDWARDS. Q. You are a police officer - A. Yes; I in company with Smith, apprehended the prisoner; I went to see Mrs. Tennant's premises. After apprehending the prisoner, Smith and I conducted him to London. I went to examine the premises; I found the marks of shoes with large nails in them; I traced them from the stable to the orchard; I plainly distinguished one shoe; I thinking the prisoner might have shoes on with that description of nails in them; this was going from the garden into the orchard; the way that the man run was not a thoroughfare. At the office I examined the shoes the prisoner had on on the 10th in the afternoon, and seeing the nails in his shoes corresponded in the garden and the orchard, and seeing one nail was out in one of the shoes at the toe, we compared it to that part with the marks of the shoe, it corresponded exactly; to be more exact we made a fresh impression with the shoe, they were both alike.

Mr. Challenor. The 4th of February, was on Saturday; you took the shoe on the 10th - A. Yes, the man and the shoes.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-87

354. WILLIAM CONDAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Hoard , about the hour of eight in the night of the 10th of January , and stealing therein, a coat, value 5 s. his property,

HENRY HOARD . I live in Crawford-street ; I am a shoe-maker .

Q. Did you lose any thing on the 10th of January last - A. I did not lose it, because he was taken with the property. As I was sitting in the the back parlour room behind the shop, I heard a row at the front door; I instantly got up; I saw the witness Barnes with the prisoner before the parlour, and the person that was with me, he went out likewise, his name is John Couzens , he is here; he was with me in the back room behind the shop; he picked up my coat in the street.

Q. Whose coat was it - A. Mine. This is the coat; it is mine. He charged the watch with the prisoner. That is all that I know.

JOHN BARNES . I am a butcher; I live at 27, Crawford-street. I was walking up and down the door, about half past eight in the evening.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Hoard. What time of the night was it - A. About half past eight.

Barnes. About half past eight, I was walking up and down before my door; two little boys came up, and said, Jack, there is somebody gone into Mr. Hoard's shop; that drew my attention; I looked into the shop; the prisoner was then creeping along the side of the counter. The coat was on a chair at the end of the counter. He took it up, put it under his arm, and came towards the door; I met him, and asked him what he wanted; he dropped the coat on the sell of the door, half in the shop and half in the street; I took him into Mr. Hoard's shop. I did not see him go into the shop; I only saw him in the shop.

Prosecutor. The door was shut.

Q. What time do you usually shut your shop - A. About half past nine. I work in the inner room; I was doing nothing then. I left the shop door shut to with a hasp.

JOHN COUZENS . I am a plaisterer. I was with Mr. Hoard on this night, in the room behind the shop, I was sitting there with him; I was the last person that went into the shop before this boy came in; I might be five minutes in before him, not more; there was no one in the shop after me until the prisoner came in. I heard a noise shutting the door, the moment I heard the noise, I went out directly; when I came out, the coat was at the door, part in and part out. I was the last that went in, I shut the door after me, it is a common lock to the door, a glass sash door, with a spring latch to it.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of the great coat - A. Five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. A big boy told me to do it of the name of William Davis .

GUILTY, aged 11,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-88

355. JOHN HODGES and JOHN ALLCOCK were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Gray , about the hour of eight in the night of the 14th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein,

a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of William Gray .

ANN GRAY . I am the daughter of William Gray , my father keeps a shoe-makers shop , in St. John-street, in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell . This happened about seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Were you present when the glass was broken - A. Yes, I was in the parlour adjoining the shop, I did not hear the glass break; I did not know any thing of it until the patrole brought the boys into the shop, and said, they had been robbing of it. I lost one pair of shoes; the shoes were taken from the corner of the window; they were within the reach of a hand; the break in the glass was large enough to admit a boy's hand.

THOMAS THOMPSON . On the 14th of January, I was patrole of St. Sepulchres. I was in St. John-street; I had known Allcock to be a suspicious character; the two prisoners were loitering about there, and the one that made his escape, they were loitering about at every shop window until they came to the prosecutor's; the two prisoners were placed at the window, and the third over the way watching; the two prisoners committed the act, and the other was over the way upon the look out: I saw Allcock had some instrument in his hand that he cut the window with; he made a cut at it; he went on one way and the other the other way; the moment he drew up to the window, he gave it a cut; the second attempt he made he broke the window; one went one way and the other the other way; I apprehended the two prisoners, and took them both within the shop, searched them, and found the knife that would star the window. These are the shoes.

Ann Gray . These shoes are my father's property. I lost them.

Hodges's Defence. My father sent me up to Mr. Carthy, the cow-keeper, at Paddington, to see if he wanted any harness done; I was coming home through Jerusalem passage, and going up Wilderness-row, I met Allcock.

COURT. Q. to Thompson. What hour was it - A. About half past seven o'clock; it was dark then.

HODGES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

ALLCOCK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-89

356. JOHN VARNEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frederick Long , about the hour of nine in the night, of the 13th of February, and burglariously stealing therein, a looking-glass, value 2 s. three blankets, value 4 s. and a bolster, value 4 s. the property of Frederick Long .

ANN LONG . I am a married woman, my husband's name is Frederick Long ; he is a mariner ; I live in Bell-alley, No. 3.

Q. Where is Bell-alley - A. In St. Catherine's East Smithfield .

Q. On the 13th of February, you were gone out of your house, I believe - A. Yes; I left my little child in the house when I went out, her name is Rebecca Millwood ; I went out about eight o'clock in the evening, I went out to visit one of my neighbours; on my receiving the alarm that my house was robbed, I went to my house; the things had been picked up in the yard, and carried into the house when I went in.

Q. What were they - A. I cannot say, because I was not at home at the same time. That is all I know.

REBECCA MILLWOOD . Q. How old are you - A. Going of fifteen; I live with Mrs. Long, I am her servant.

Q Do you remember the night that this affair happened - A. Yes; Mrs. Long was gone out, she left me at home; I did not stay in the house all the time she was out; I went into Sarah Wynn 's room.

Q. When you went out of the house, did you leave the door open - A. No, I locked it; Mrs. M'Donald's daughter saw I locked it. I heard the house had been broken open; I went home to my mistress's house; the prisoner was creeping down the wall with the clothes in his arms; he was creeping down a wall in the court.

Q. What clothes were they, do you know - A. Yes; I saw them in his hand; I know them, they were Mrs. Long's clothes. Mrs. M'Donald was with me; she stopped him; I said stop thief, I was close behind him; I ran after him; I over took the prisoner; the patrole seized him. The prisoner is the man at the bar; he had not the clothes at that time, he left them on the ground where he threw them. The door was broken open; I am sure I locked the door, and took the key with me.

Q. After the man was taken, did you go and look at the clothes - A. Yes; they were tied up in a sheet sir. Mrs. Dyson took up the bundle; I saw the clothes afterwards; the constable took them to the watchhouse.

Q. Did the prisoner throw down the bundle before he was taken, or after - A. Before.

Q. Had he gone at all after he throwed the bundle down - A. Yes.

Q. What time was this - A. About half after nine at night.

Q. How long did you lose sight of him after he threw away the bundle - A. I did not lose sight of him after he threw the bundle down; he ran, and I ran after him; a soldier stopped him first, and then the patrole took him. He was in the street when I saw him; I saw his face on Tower Hill.

Q. The man that was carrying the bundle you never saw his face at St. Catherine's - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw Mr. Long, did you - A. No.

Q. What does Mrs. Long do - A. She takes in washing, and keeps very good hours.

THOMAS CANNING . I am patrole.

Q. Do you remember this night - A. Yes; I heard the cry of stop thief; as soon as I saw the man run by me, I ran after him, and took him; a soldier stopped him, and then I took hold of him.

Q. Was any body running after him - A. I took no notice; a soldier stopped him, and then I took him.

SARAH DYSON . I live at No. 5, Bell-alley, St. Catherine's. I know nothing of the man. I heard

the cry of stop thief, murder; I went out of doors; I found the clothes in the court under the wall; I tied them in a bundle; after I examined them, I carried them into Mrs. Long's house; I delivered them to the patrole. That is all I know, These are the clothes; I am sure of them; they are the property of the prosecutrix; she is a married woman for what I know, her husband is gone to sea, but I do not know any thing of him.

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

JOHN TURNBULL . On my going up East Smithfield, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw no property upon the prisoner; I took him to the watchhouse; this little girl came with me; I went down St. Catherine's-lane and enquired what was the matter. That is all I know.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in the public-house all the afternoon drinking, I was going to draw water; a man ran by me, I heard murder and robbery cried out; this man knocked at the woman's sisters door at the top of St. Catherine's-lane; among all the whores there, I lost sight of the man; I ran until a soldier stopped me; I am quite innocent of it.

Q. To Turnbull. Do you know Mrs. M'Donald - A. Yes; she was before the magistrate; she is prevented from coming here to-day, from what I do not know; she said her father and mother would not let her come, she did not say why.

COURT. Q. To Prosecutrix. You live in this house, do you - A. Yes, Mr. Barnard, is the landlord.

Q. You occupy a room there - A. Yes, the lower room.

Mr. Barry. There is a young woman lodges up stairs - A. Yes; I know nothing of her; this room is my room where these things were taken, and they were taken from my bed; this house is let out in different tenements.

Prisoner. Give my witness liberty to speak what he knows.

MICHAEL DUNN . The prisoner was in my company until this happened. This man was not five minutes from me at the public-house; I got out at the front door, and saw him running; I said, Jack, what are you up to; he was running, it was about ten minutes after nine. He was not absent from the five minutes altogether; the public-house to where the prosecutor lives is about fifteen perches as near as I can guess.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-90

357. ROBERT SMITH WAKEFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , thirty-five yards of sattin, value 25 l. seven hundred and twenty-five yards of sarsenet, value 50 l. six dozen crape hat-bands, value 9 l. eight pieces of crape, value 16 l. one pound weight of black sewing silk, value 1 l. two pieces of bombazeen, value 21 l. twelve handkerchiefs, value 8 l. twenty-eight shawls, value 40 l. thirty-eight yards of lustre, value 47 l. forty-two yards of Portugal sattin, value 9 l. forty-four yards of white sattin, value 20 l. nine yards of florentine, value 10 l. and six dozen plated buckles, value 9 l. the property of John Cook , senior , John Cook , junior , and John Townshend , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN COOK , JUNIOR. I am a warehouseman and silk manufacturer ; we carry on our business in Crown-court, Cheapside ; the partners in the firm are John Cook , senior, John Townshend , and John Cook , junior, myself; we have no other partner. The prisoner was our porter . On the 7th of January, I returned home at twelve at night, on Sunday night, I was informed the porters had been passing the day disorderly; I was determined to get rid of them all; Smith and Clinch were both in bed, in separate rooms; I desired them to deliver up their keys; Clinch gave up his keys regularly; the prisoner did not. I desired them to give up their keys as they were dressing themselves; my uncle, John Cook , was not at home at that time. I was up with Clinch to look for a pocket-book; Clinch opened his box in my presence, all was fair as far as I had an opportunity to see with him; when I returned the prisoner had left his keys in his chest, he had been at his chest during my absence, he was still in his room with his chest; when I returned, his key was left in his chest; he was still in the warehouse, where his chest was. I saw him take several papers from his chest, he went away with them in his hand, I did not stop him; I had been absent from the prisoner with Clinch ten minutes; my brother was with the prisoner, and saw what he was doing in the warehouse. Immediately upon the prisoner leaving the house, I saw a short length of white quilting, such as we dealt in, it was under the prisoner's packing counter; this piece of quilting could not have got there by accident.

Q. In consequence of something told you by your brother, did you go any where - A. To Mrs. Taylor, in Maiden-lane; I found a letter in his box

"addressed to Robert Wakefield , London"

"thanking him for his kind present, and they saying they had sent him a turkey." Upon a ring that he left in his box was three keys and a seal.

Q. What salary did you give him - A. Twenty-six pounds a year board and lodging.

Q. In consequence of this you made some enquires of Mrs. Taylor, I believe - A. Yes, on Sunday at eight o'clock in the morning, concerning Miss Birfield, a friend of the prisoner's; she directed me to her daughter, Mrs. Hawkins, in Wellington-street, City-road, and to William Page , as persons likely to give me information. I met the prisoner in Aldersgate-street after I had been at Mrs. Taylor's; I asked him where Sarah Birfield lived, the lady he kept company with; he replied, 8, or 9, Castle-street, Rotherithe. I went to Rotherithe; I could not find any such place as Castle-street, Rotherithe. The next day I found Castle-street, in the Borough, where Birfield did live. The prisoner came to our house on Sunday after I had been to Rotherhithe, he asked me to let him take some things out of his chest; I consented, and went into the warehouse with him; he put on his great coat, and took out a neckcloth, and other things. I told him

to call on the next day, when my uncle would be at home. I told him that Mrs. Taylor told me that he had given several presents to Sarah Birfield. On Monday, the 9th, my uncle was in town. The prisoner came in about eleven o'clock, my uncle and I were present. I told him that Mrs. Taylor told me that he had given several presents to Sarah Birfield ; he denied it.

Q. In consequence of what Sarah Birfield said, did you get a piece of sattin of her from her mother and father's house - A. Yes, and it tallied with the sattin in our possession. She told me that she gave the prisoner four shillings and sixpence or five shillings to purchase the sattin for her, and this was the sattin that he had brought for her. The prisoner denied ever having stolen the sattin from our premises at first; afterwards he confessed it; we neither promissed or threatened him; he afterwards confessed that he had stolen it from our warehouse, and by some means we found some of our property in the house of Mrs. Bellis; I saw her deliver it up to the officer.

Q. Did you show that property to the prisoner - A. I believe we did; it was black silk velvet and bandana handkerchiefs, to the amount of ten pounds, the different articles I have named, they are here. He acknowledged he had given them to Sarah Birfield , part was our property, and part the property of Mr. Sower and Hall, with whom he had lived before he came to us; he said that was all he knew of, nothing else. We found some trunks on a further discovery.

Q. How many trunks - A. Three boxes, and some paper parcels; these paper parcels had our private mark on the outside of them, and just done up as they came from the manufacturer, and more paper parcels were found in the boxes; the parcels were such as we had missed from our warehouse.

Q. Had you opened accounts with the prisoner - A. No, nothing of the kind.

Q. What was the value of the property you so found - A. Five hundred and eighty pounds of our own property, and about one hundred and forty pounds of Mr. Sower's; Mr. Sower has the pocket-book, and there is a letter addressed to Mr. Sawer.

THOMAS SOWER . Q. The prisoner, I understand was in your service, before he went into the prosecutor's service - A. He was, I recommended him and I believed him to be an honest man, when some boxes were produced from a house in Stampford street, at the Mansion house, I saw in one of them a pocket book, the hand writing of the prisoner, it is an invoice, a sort of a memorandum of goods, in it there is a statement of five different sums; in is hand writing. Box No. 1. delivered to Barnfield 300 l. Mr. Nalder produces the boxes at the Mansion house on Tuesday, in one of the boxes I found this book, box No. 2. 86 l. 16 s. 1 d. with the letter P. opposite to that P. I apprehend for page, P. box. 128 l. 13 s. 7 d. P. parcel, No. 4. I believe this to be the hand writing of the prisoner.

Q, After this the prisoner was committed into custody - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time receive a letter from the prisoner - A. I did.

FRANCIS NALDER . I have had the boxes and parcels in my custody, there is no number outside of this box, it was opened by Mr. Cook, with a key he had of the prisoner; the whole of these parcels were inclosed in this new flannel.

Mr. Cook. The greatest part of the property in this box, I can swear to. Forty-four yards of white sattin, that is our property, twelve yards of yard wide crape, one of the packages contains four pieces of yard wide crape, this is black silk mode, and black silk sarsnet, twenty-six yards of shot sarsnet, another piece of the same, nineteen silk tippets, five silk shawls; this parcel was sealed up, sealed with W. P. on the outside, W. & P. in large characters; all these except the crapes were inclosed in the flannel wrapper.

Q. to Mr. Cook. Do you mean to say all the articles you have spoke of, to be the property of you and your partner's - A. Yes, they are worth about fifty pounds, there are two other boxes, I believe the whole of the contents of them to be our property. they were produced before the Alderman at the prisoner's examination.

Q. What was the value of the whole - A. About five hundred and ninety seven pounds.

Q. to Mr. Sower. Did you receive a letter from the prisoner - A. I did while he was in the Poultry Compter.

(The letter read.)

"William Page has the service of the goods, he was my accomplice, he has removed the goods, he is the person who took them to the house; the Barfield's are innocent, they did not know they were stolen goods, they were told they were smuggled goods, there is no person concerned but him with me."

MR. NALDER. I found this box in Guildford street, over Black-friars-bridge.

MR. SOWER. I received this letter, after he was examined before the Alderman, I believe it to be his hand writing,

(The letter read.)

"Box, 2. has been removed by P. into some street, near Guildford street; he never told me the number The goods he had in his possession made one or two parcels, the remainder he fetched away from me, and meaned to destroy them. I never sold any thing to receive any thing for them, what I did give were for presents; if I can call to mind any thing else, I will write if Mr. Sower were to call to ask me any questions, perhaps I can recollect, better than to write."

HANNAH CUTTINGS . I live servant with Mr. Sampson, in Bennett-street, Stamford-street. On Sunday the 8th of January, Page came to me in Bennett-street, he did not bring the boxes, I recommended him to Mrs. Battley the same Sunday evening. Mr. Battley, lives at 39, Guildford street. The same evening he brought some parcels to me, I gave them up to Mr. Nalder.

Q. to Mr. Nalder. Are these the parcels that you produce, that this young woman gave up to you - A. They are, my name is on all of them, they are claimed by Mr. Cook and company.

Q. to Mr. Cook. Who lives in the house where you carry on your business - A. Myself.

Q. Does John Townshend reside in the house -

A. I am the only resident partner in the house, except when Mr. Townshend is off a journey, he resides then in the house. My uncle John Cook never resides in the house, his residence is at Finchley.

Prisoner's Defence. With the deepest contrition I confess I have done wrong to my employers. I was induced to give Page a roll of ribbon, I was then in his power. I was then induced by him to go on, until he got me into the dreadful situation I now stand; and what I have now done, he brought me into it.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-91

358. ROBERT SMITH WAKEFIELD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , two hundred and twenty pieces of ribbon, value 103 l. 3 s. 5 d. seven dozen pieces of silk, velvet, value 5 l. 10 s. five gross of pieces of galloons, value 5 l. 18 s. five pieces of lace, value 2 l. 10 s. three pieces of sattin galoon, value 15 s. one piece of handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 10 s. one piece of sarsnet, value 5 l. fifteen silk handkerchiefs value 2 l. 15 s. the property of Thomas Sower , and John Hall , in their dwelling house .

THOMAS SOWER. I am a silk manufacturer , I live at 20, Foster-lane , my partner 's name is John Hall, I only reside in the house, it is my partner's dwelling-house.

Q. Tell us what articles of yours are there - A. There are four pieces of sattin ribbon, and one piece of sarsnet, they were in them boxes, they were produced before the Alderman, they are worth five pounds, at the least value.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-92

359. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a coat, value 5 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of Needler Greenfield .

NEEDLER GREENFIELD. I am a butcher, a servant to my mother , on the 17th of February, about eight o'clock, in the morning my coat was in my cart and the gloves in my coat pocket, and the cart in Warwick lane , I was attending Newgate market, I never missed my coat, until the constable told me he had taken the coat from the prisoner; I suppose I had left my cart about half an hour, I had not seen my coat since I had left my cart; the constable told me he had put the prisoner into a place of confinement; upon my going back to the cart, I saw my coat and gloves were gone, the coat was worth five shillings, not more, the gloves sixpence. I never saw the prisoner before.

EDWARD TOWNSHEND WHITWORTH . I am a porter, I work at Newgate market, on the 17th of February, I saw the prisoner go up to this man's cart, he looked in the cart, and walked away, he took nothing then, he returned in two minutes and took the coat from off the horses back, I followed him, and stopped him, I told him I wanted him for the coat. He was gone about fifty yards, Mr. Oney followed, and took the prisoner into custody, the prisoner said a man hired him to take the coat, he was to have a pint of beer for it.

HENRY ONEY . I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner. This is the great coat, and these are the gloves.

Prosecutor. It is my coat, I have worn it many years, and the gloves are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A man told me he would give me a pint of beer, if I would take it to him.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-93

360. JAMES LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , three sheets, value 30 s. a pillow-case, value 7 s. and a bed-curtain, value 7 s. the property of John Ramsey in his dwelling house .

JOHN RAMSEY . I keep the Angel , in High street St. Giles's . On the 19th of January, the prisoner came to my house, he required to be accommodated with a bed for two nights; he represented himself as a carpenter from Uxbridge , and that he came to town for the purpose of buying timber; he made use of some peoples names who came from Uxbridge and who slept at my house when they came to town; he set in the tap-room untill ten o'clock, drinking ale, and smoking his pipe; the chamber maid then shewed him the bed, I heard nothing of him until eight o'clock on the morning of the 20th, I was then getting up. The prisoner slept in the room exactly over me, I heard him get out of bed, I was then dressing myself; I heard him unlock the door, and shut it, I followed him down stairs immediately, the servant maid was cleaning below, I heard her unlock the door, and let him out. I came down stairs and opened the house in the course of two or three minutes the chamber maid came down, and said he had stolen the things specified in the indictment. I pursued him, but in vain,; about five o'clock in the afternoon, a witness who is present and the prisoner, came into my house in a state of intoxication. I had him directly then taken into custody, I am certain he is the man, he set in my tap-room the whole of the afternoon.

Q. Were the things found - A. No.

FRANCES MOORE . I am a chamber maid, at Mr. Ramsay's I shewed the prisoner the bed in a double bedded room, and no other slept in the room but himself, I slept in the next room to the prisoner, I was getting up at the time he went down stairs immediately, I came down stairs, as I passed his door, I opened his door, I missed one sheet off the bed he slept in, and a pair of sheets and a pillow case off the other bed, I went down directly and told Mr. Ramsey the man and the property was gone.

MARY HALL . I am servant to Mr. Ramsey, the prisoner came down in the morning about eight, I was doing my work, I opened the door and let him out, he then told me he was going to return immediately I need not fasten the door, he never returned until the evening of the same day, about six o'clock he was apprehended.

CHARLES CLARK . I am a taylor. On Thursday the 19th the prisoner came into a public house where I was having a mutton shop in the evening, he had some dinner, and a woman with him, they dined at the same table; he dined there on the Friday. On Friday evening, as I was going home he asked me if I could reccommend him to any place where he could get a good lodging, it was in my road to pass the prosecutor's house; I told the prisoner they had very good beds there, It was a respectable house, as I thought. We then went into the parlour of the Angel Inn, he called for a pint of ale, the officer came in, and took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge, that is against me.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-94

361. PETER DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , sixteen handkerchiefs, value 1 l. the property of Edward Pike , privately in his shop ,

JOHN WILDER . I am shopman to Mr. Pike. On the 21st of January a lady informed me, that our goods were in danger at the door, and in less than three minutes after a man came in and said our handkerchiefs were gone from the door. I pursued after the prisoner, and overtook the prisoner, with the handkerchiefs under his arm; I brought him back to our house, he said, he picked the handkerchiefs up in the street, I said that was impossible, as the street was very dirty, and there was no mud on the handkerchiefs. I knew the handkerchiefs to be the property of Mr. Pike, I gave the handkerchiefs to the officer with the prisoner. The handkerchiefs were hanging inside of the door, near the door, there was great violence used in taking them.

Q. Did the other persons in the shop see the prisoner taking them - A. I should suppose so, because they said they saw the man dragging the handkerchiefs; there were three of us in the shop, they are not here.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer, I took the prisoner in custody, he said, an Irishman gave him the handkerchiefs.

Prisoner's Defence. An old woman met me, she said, look what is about my feet, I picked up the handkerchiefs.

GUILTY, aged 55.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined six months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards

Reference Number: t18150215-95

362. SARAH GREETRIX , and ANN ADLAND , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , five yards of printed cotton, value 8 s. the property of John Higginson , privately in his shop .

JOHN HIGGINSON . I live at 49, Cranbourn street I keep a linen drapers shop , I was in the parlour at the end of the shop, when the prisoner's came in.

Q, Did you see them come in - A. No, Mary Keith the witness saw them come in.

MARY KEITH . I am a neighbour to Mr. Higginson, I saw the two prisoner's go out of my neighbours house, I knew one of them to be a bad character, knowing Greetrix, I watched her, I saw her go into the prosecutors shop, she came out she went to the other, I thought she gave her something, Greetrix immediately returned to the shop door; I immediately went and gave the prosecutor information, he looked round directly, and missed a piece of cotton.

Q. to Higginson. Did you miss any thing - A. Yes, I missed a piece of cotton print from the door.

Q. What was the prime cost of it - A. Twelve shillings. I had put it upon the horse inside of the shop, between five and ten minutes before, on my receiving information from the last witness, I went with the witness, and met Greetrix. I took her into custody. I took her into the shop, and charged her with the theft, she denied it, I sent for an officer. Plank the officer came. When Plank came she told me where to find the print.

MR. PLANK. I took Greetrix into custody at Mr. Higginson's shop, I went with Greetrix to No, 2, Malborough-row, she told me the prisoner Adland was there in the kitchen, Adland was sitting there before the fire with something in her lap, I asked her what she had there, she said bacon, I took the bacon out of her lap, and under the bacon was this cotton.

Prosecutor. That is my own cotton, my own hand writing is upon it, in figures to the amount.

Greetrix's Defence. The gentleman searched me and found nothing, he asked me where I was going to, I said to Malborough row, and on our going there the officer found the cotton in her lap. I am innocent of it.

Adland's Defence. On my passing Cranby street, I had my apron on, a woman threw something into my apron, and instantly departed, it was dark, I could not see what it was, I had scarcely entered my home when a man entered my room, and owned the property I had in my lap, and took me in custody.

GREETRIX GUILTY, aged 39.

ADLAND GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined one Year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-96

363. JOHN TALBOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , four remnants of muslin, value 50 s. the property of Robert Hall , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT HALL . I live at No, 8, Featherstone buildings, Somers Town, St. Pancras . The whole of the house is my own upon a lease; the shop is part of the house, I am an haberdasher . On the 18th of January, in the evening at six o'clock, the man at the bar came in he advanced almost to the parlour door where there is a narrow passage for our own accomodation, he laid his elbow on the counter, he stood so that I could not pass him any way, he interrupted me so, I had three struggles with him before I could get him out of the shop, a woman came to him and took a bundle of muslin from him, the woman came so directly after him, that there could not be a second between the one and the other coming

in. I saw the woman take the bundle of muslin from him; he interupted me so, I could not take the woman, I saw the woman put the reel of one side he interrupted me, she run out of the shop; I had three strong struggles with the prisoner to get him out of the shop, he ran off, there was nobody in the shop but myself, he ran away; I called out stop a young man stopped him, and brought him back.

Q. What became of the woman - A. I never knew, I only saw her take the property from him, he prevented me from pursuing her.

GEORGE WHITEHAIR. On the 18th of January, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner runing, I stopped him, and brought him back and took him to the watchhouse.

PETER WHITEHAIR. I am a constable and watch-house keeper, the prisoner was brought to me on the 18th of January, charged with robbing the shop, I searched him, and found nothing particular, he denied giving any information who he was, or what he was, he said, he should leave that for another place.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running along, this man took hold of me.

Mr. Hall. I have not the smallest hesitation or doubt that he is the very man that was in my shop,

A. What is the value of the four remnants of muslin - A. More than forty shillings considerably.

GUILTY, aged 54.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined one Year , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards.

Reference Number: t18150215-97

364. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , three work boxes, value 3 l. 10 s. a shaving-box, value 19 s. eightteen razors, value 9 s. six knives, value 1 s. and nine pocket books, value 9 s. the property of Mary Morgan , in her dwelling-house .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-98

365. PETER BENIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , a dial, value 2 l. the property of George Skullicord , in his dwelling house .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-99

366. WILLIAM STALLARD , THOMAS GILES , and MARK BROWN , were indicted for that they, on the 12th of January , feloniously had in their custody and possession, without lawful excuse, two forged Bank notes, for payment of two pounds each, and having another Bank note for payment of one pound they knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner's pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-100

367. WILLIAM STALLARD , THOMAS GILES , and MARK BROWN , were indicted for feloniously forging, on the 12th of January , a Bank note, for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the Govenour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. For disposing and putting away a like Bank note with the same intention, and other counts for like offence, only varying in the manner of charging them.

Mr. Serjeant Bosanquet, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner's answer

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-101

368. ELIAS REBECK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of December , two coats, value 50 s. the property of John M'lliff in his dwelling house .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-102

369. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a cask, value 5 s. and six gallons of rum, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Venus , and William Venus .

WILLIAM GARDNER . I am a wine porter to Messrs. Joseph and William Venus , every thing I take out, I am answerable to them for it.

Q. Whose cask is this - A. Messrs. Venus's, the cask was to be returned to them after the goods were turned out. On the 13th of February, I had to call at the Crown and Anchor ; I had a cask of rum in the cart in the street, at the time I was in there the cask was stolen off the cart, when I went out to claim the property the prisoner knocked me down; this was about two in the afternoon.

Q. Did you ever see the cask again - A. Yes, the cask leaked with the man throwing it down; we were obliged to get another cask to put the liquor in. when I came out, my cart was there, and the prisoner was there. I saw the cask about two yards off the cart, the prisoner was taken into custody, I saw him next at the office.

JAMES GOOD . I was just gone into the public house; I was looking out of the window, I saw the prisoner with the cag upon his knees, he had his foot upon the wheel, then the prisoner was close to the wheel of the cart, I looked round in the tap room and said, there is a man wants help, I went out, and directly the carman claimed the cag as his property the prisoner instantly knocked him down, and before he could get up, he knocked him down again, and with an oath, he said he would knock his brains out, I pulled the prisoner off, the prisoner went from one to another, after that I took him before the magistrate. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I will tell you the truth, I was coming down Long acre , and when I came within a yard or two of the cart one of Mr. Delafield's drays ran against the wheel of the cart that made the barrell fall off, the man struck me, and I struck him.

GUILTY aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury; before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-103

370. JOHN LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , in the dwelling-house of Mary Shallhorn , widow, three one-pound bank notes, and one ten-pound bank note , the property of Samuel Smallhorn .

SAMUEL SMALLHORN . I live in White Lion-street, St. Giles's ; I live with my mother, she keeps an undertakers shop; I live in her house; I am not in partnership with her nor have I any payment from her.

Q. On Tuesday, the 17th of January, did you observe a box in your mother's room - A. On Monday, the 16th, I put my money into the box, three one's, and a ten-pound note, all Bank of England notes; I put them into a box, affixed to the accompting-house; I locked them up, and put the keys into my pocket.

Q. Is the shop part of the house - A. Yes; the accompting-house is in the shop, and the desk I had affixed to the accompting-house; it was on the Tuesday I found the box broken open, and all the four notes were taken out.

Q. How had the box been broken open - A. By part of the hinges being taken off, and the back of the lid was lifted up.

Q. You knew the prisoner before, did you - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever come into your shop - A. Yes, several times; he used to be a play fellow of my brother's.

Q. You have seen some of the notes since - A. I have; I saw the one-pound note at Mr. Surrs, a publican; I knew it was my own, by my own handwriting being upon it, the name of the person I took it off; I saw it at Mr. Surrs, where the prisoner had changed it.

Mr. Knapp. You cannot know that - A. I know the note to be mine, by my own hand-writing, of the name of the person I took it off. I saw the ten-pound note at Mr. Banton's, a pawnbroker, in Skinner-street, I saw it on Wednesday, and I saw the one-pound note on the same day; I missed it on Monday. On the ten-pound note was my own hand-writing, of the name of the person I took it of; I have not seen neither of the two other notes; the notes I have seen, they are my own property; I am sure of that.

COURT. When had you seen the prisoner last in your shop - A. On the Saturday prior to the Monday.

Mr. Knapp. You had not seen the prisoner since Saturday preceeding that you missed your property - A. I had not.

Q. What are you - A. I am an undertaker; in that business for my mother; I carry on the business for my mother; my mother pays the rent of the house.

Q. You living in the house, and she living in the house? What share have you in the business - A. I have no share, but only my keep; I do not receive any salary; I have a busines of my own besides that. I am a clerk to benefit societies; I manage the undertaking for my mother; I look for no pay of my mother, neither have I any of my mother.

Q. How long had you had the ten-pound note and the two one-pound notes - A. About a week; I always write on the notes the names of the persons I take them off.

Q. You have had a ten-pound note before, have not you - A. No, not for some time.

Q. Have you always said the property was yours - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not said at any time that the property was your mother's - A. It was mine.

Q. Upon your solemn oath, have you never said before justice, it was your mother's property - A. No. it was not my mother's property; I never said so; I mean distinctly to swear that.

COURT. Before the magistrate you said it was your mother property - A. I never did to my knowledge; I mean to say now that it was my own property.

Q. On the 21st of January, you said it was your mother's, before Mr. Leech - A. It is not so; it is my own; I know nothing what the magistrate took; I was sworn there.

Q. The clerk took down what you said in writing, I suppose.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I am an officer. On the 18th of January, I apprehended the prisoner in Gray's-inn-lane; I searched him, and found two one-pound notes, two three-shilling pieces, and a shilling; I did not find the ten-pound note on him. I went to his lodgings; there I found a gun, no money there.

THOMAS SLADE . I produce the ten-pound note; I received it on Tuesday, the 17th of January, between nine and ten in the morning, of the prisoner at the bar, I am sure of that.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. No, I did not; he came to me for a gun that he purchased, it came to five pounds, and he redeemed a watch.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that note - A. That is mine; I wrote Holfry on it, by the side of Britannia, that is the name of the person I took it off.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-104

371. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , ten pounds weight of brown paint, value 15 s. twenty pounds weight of green paint, value 2 l. two casks, value 1 l. and a stone bottle, value 2 s. the property of William Parkin , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 15th of February, I met the prisoner in Church-lane, Whitechapel, he had two pots of paint; these are them; they were tied up in this apron.

COURT. You can go into only one taking - A. I asked him what he had got there; I stopped him, and afterwards went to his house; there I found a stone bottle, and two wooden casks; I went to Mr. Parkin first with the paint. Mr. Parkin went with me to his house; Mr. Parkin claimed the casks and stone bottle. The prisoner said, he had bought the casks of a man he did not know, the stone bottle Mr. Parkin's young man had given it him, and the

paint he had had upwards of two years, that he had a horse and cart, and that he had worked at the Circus, he had left the paint in the cart, instead of delivering it at the Circus.

WILLIAM PARKIN . I am a oil and colourman, in Whitechapel, High-street. The prisoner formerly had been my servant. This took place on the Wednesday; I had discharged him on the Friday before, he never had been in my service after; he had only been with me two months.

Q. Did you know of his keeping a horse and a cart - A. I never heard of it.

Q. Now, supposing oil to have been in that paint, could it be in the state that was found - A. No, it would have dried up. The officer, Miller, brought the paint to me. I went with him to the Police office, and then to the prisoner's house; there I found two oil casks, and several other articles, which I could not exactly identify. The brown paint has my young man's mark upon it; I know that to be mine; I was present when he marked it.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Parkin was taking stock in the colour room; his foreman said this is a damaged bottle, he told me to go and break it; instead of breaking it, I put it on the dunghill; the next morning, I said to John I will take the bottle with me; I saw it would suit my purpose; I put a patch of pitch upon it.

Prosecutor. The bottle is not faulty; I could use it.

JURY. The bottle is faulty.

Prosecutor. There is my young man's mark upon the brown paint; I can swear to that.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 10 s. only .

Whipped in Jail , and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-105

372. GEORGE JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , two dozen knives, value 1 l. and two dozen forks, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Gloucester . privately in his shop .

THOMAS GLOUCESTER . I live in Bell-court, Gray's-inn-lane ; I am a cutler, and keep a shop in Bell-court. The prisoner came to my house on the 9th of this month, he brought a pair of shears to be ground, he brought them on the Wednesday, and on Thursday he fetched them away; I was not in the shop at the time they were given him, my apprentice, Charles Wright , was in the shop; he gave the shears to him; I saw him going out of the door, I had been out, and was just coming in; I saw nothing about him but the shears.

Q. Did you miss any thing - A. Not directly, I missed the knives the next day, and the forks, all with ivory handles; there were four dezen of them at least, knives and forks.

Q. Did you ever see them afterwards - A. Yes, the same evening, I saw many of them at the pawnbrokers; the pawnbroker is here. I knew the knives as soon as I saw them; the pawnbroker sent for me to ascertain whether they were mine or no; at Hatton Garden office I saw them all; I was sure they were mine; there were half a dozen more brought forward afterwards; they were brought to my house in the custody of my son.

Q. Did you find them all at last - A. No, we have not got hardly half.

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am shopman to the last witness. On Thursday the prisoner came into master'e shop for a pair of shears that we had to grind; I delivered the shears to him; there was only me in the shop; master met him at the door, just coming out. I was looking on the counter for the shears, and while I was looking, the prisoner was standing by the shelf that was behind the door, where the knives and forks were. He had his apron up when he went out; I suppose he put them in there. I suppose he put them in his apron while I was looking on the counter. I am sure I did not see him do any thing. I went with master's son to the pawnbrokers; I saw two small desert knives; I knew them; the prisoner's wife was offering them to pawn, and the prisoner's wife was waiting; the pawnbroker sent information to us.

Q. Was the prisoner at the pawnbrokers - A. No. I went out for an officer, and as I came back; I saw the prisoner at the door; I knew him.

THOMAS NICHOLLS . I am a pawnbroker, in Gray's-inn-lane. In consequence of information, I sent for Mr. Gloucester.

Q. Do you know the woman - A. No.

Charles Wright . The prisoner said at the office, the woman was his wife.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to Hatton Garden office by the constable, and these knives and forks by the pawnbroker. After the man was committed, I went, and searched his lodging. These knives and forks I found at his lodgings, in a box, covered over with rags; I found eight knives and a fork; he lodged in Fox-court, Gray's-inn-lane; him, and his wife, were both in custody at that time. These were brought to me by Mr. Gloucester's son, he told me he had them of the prisoner.

COURT. Q. To Prosecutor. Look at the knives and forks - A. The two small ones I am satisfield are mine, I know the make of the handle so well; I know they are mine; I put the blades to them myself; I have no doubt of the whole being my property.

CHARLES GLOUCESTER . I was sent for by the pawnbroker that is present now; I went, and stoped the woman in the shop. I delivered six knives and six forks to the officer; I got them from the landlady of the prisoner, she is not here.

Q. To Prosecutor. What is the value of the knives - A. The whole that I lost is worth more than thirty shillings.

Q, What is the value of these before you - A. These are worth more than a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning I went to the prosecutor's house between nine and ten o'clock; I went in the evening, and asked him his demand, he said, fourpence; I came away about my business with the shears. My wife went out the following morning; she brought the knives and forks home in brown paper, she said, she picked them up in Fox-court;

I examined the paper, it contained knives and forks.

Prosecutor. He told me he bought them at a sale.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-106

373. JOHN WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , one piece of timber, value 8 s. the property of Richard Nelson .

SECOND COUNT. For stealing the like property, the property of Richard Nelson , and Charles Edwards .

RICHARD NELSON . Q. You saw the prisoner take some property away on Saturday, the 4th of February - A. Yes, it was taken from an unfinished house, from the inside, I presume by his own confession: the floors had been affixed to the joists; this joist had been taken away; I saw it on the prisoner's shoulder; I charged him with stealing it; he owned to his taking it from the house, and said he was going to shore up a house with it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-107

374. EDWARD CLARK and JAMES HOOKEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a cask, value 5 s. and thirty-six gallons of beer, value 11 s. the property of William Clark and John Cox .

JOSEPH HAMPSHIRE . I am clerk to the prosecutors, William Clark and John Cox . They live in White's Ground, Bermondsey. They had a contract to perform with the parish of St. Ann's, Soho; the prisoners were draymen to Messrs Clark and Cox , they were entrusted to deliver six barrels of table beer; they set out and returned in the evening, and brought word that they had delivered six barrels of beer. I have the books here to prove it, and their own signature of their having delivered six barrels of beer. This is our day-book of St. Ann's workhouse. Delivered four barrels of best, two barrels of common, signed Ed. C. for Clark, he being the foreman, he comes and signs the book.

JOHN OVERY . Q. Do you know how many barrels of beer were delivered by the prisoners at the workhouse. - A. Five full barrels and an empty one; they were delivered by the two prisoners. I am sure it was these two; when they delivered, I gave the bills to the beadle of the workhouse, I am cellar man.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am clerk at the workhouse, I remember the last witness delivering me the bill of parcels; I know nothing of the prisoners.

JOHN FEATHENSTONE. I am clerk to Messrs. Clark and Cox, on the 13th of February, I went to a person of the name of Cormick M'Coy, in Duck Lane, he complained of the beer; on his complaining, I found that was part of the beer that we fur- furnish St. Ann's, in consequence of which the two prisoners were apprehended.

CORMICK M'COY. I live at St. Paul's, Shadwell, on the 11th of February, the two prisoners brought me a barrel of beer; I was to give thirty-five shillings for it. I paid them twelve shillings in part.

COURT. Had you ever dealt with Cox and Clark - A. I had; I have porter.

FEATHENSTONE. I called upon Cormick M'Coy, he said what kind of beer have you sent me in. I said you gave me no order; he said your men have left me a barrel, it is so bad, I cannot draw it. I went down into the cellar with him, he drew the bung, I tasted the beer. I told him not to mix it, if he did, it would spoil all his beer. I told him I did not know that any had come; he said our men had been there and left it; it was so bad he could not draw it. The prisoners had taken it there he said. I know they had no order to dispose of it there.

Q. Whereabouts was the value of the beer - A. The contract was eleven shilling.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoners; they told me they had taken and sold the beer at a public house, and that the publican's wife slipped out and told the collecting clerk unknown to her husband.

Prisoners defence. With true submission we now plead guilty, and it being our first offence, we implore the mercy of the Court

CLARK, GUILTY , aged 32.

HOOKEY, GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined six month , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-108

375. MARIA VANN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of December , four sheets, value 8 s, two table cloths, value 4 s. the property of Henry Mego .

HENRY MEGO . I am a Taylor , I live at No. 10, Lower Brook Street, Grosvenor Square . On the 25th of December, my house was left in the care of the prisoner. On my return in the morning of the 26th, she told me that the house had been robbed, and that she had called in the watchman; she related to me the various articles that had been taking away; I observed no violence any where to the house; I did not examine the house myself to see what was missing, I was in hopes I should discover it; I did not suspect her. In consequence of false charges coming in for articles that I never had, I discharged her. On the 4th of February, she left a band box behind her; in that box I found the duplicate of four sheets, and two tablecloths; I went to the pawnbroker where the duplicate mentioned, and took the property out; I knew them to be mine. These are them.

Mr. Challenor. I believe the prisoner is pregnant - A. So it was related to me.

WILLIAM BIRD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody; I searched her, and found nothing upon her. These things were delivered to me by the prosecutor. The pawnbroker attended before the magistrate, and said he could not say the prisoner pawned them.

Prosecutor. The pawnbroker is not here, he said before the magistrate, he could not say that the girl

pawned these things.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-109

376. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of February , two shirts, value 10 s. two pair of stockings, value 7 s. and one pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Jarvis Warwick ,

JARVIS WARWICK . I was a soldier, discharged from the 32nd regiment ; I was going home to my friends in Staffordshire.

Q. Where did you lose your property - A. In George-street; I lost my property out of a cook's shop: I came in, and paid for my lodging, and put my bundle and stick on the table in the lower room going in; it was about half past eleven o'clock, it is better than a fortnight age; I paid for my lodging, put my bundle and stick on the table, and sat by the fire to warm myself; a man came in, and called for a pot of beer in the same room; the landlord said he did not sell strong beer; the prisoner took my bundle and stick, and ran away with it.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after he was taken - A. Yes, in the watchhouse; the prisoner is the same man that took the bundle.

- M'CARTHY. The prosecutor came into my house for a lodging; he put his bundle on the table; a man came in, called for some beer; the man took the prosecutor's bundle off the table, and ran away with it; I ran after him, and called stop thief; the watchman took him in Compton-street.

GEORGE TURNER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought into the watchhouse that night in custody of the watchman, charged with taking this bundle. I produce it.

Prosecutor. This is my property.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-110

377. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , two hundred pounds weight of potatoes, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Speering .

THOMAS SPEERING . I am a farmer ; I live at Wanstead, in Essex. On the 11th of January, I sent thirteen sacks of potatoes to Elizabeth Dillone , saleswoman, at Spitalfields market; I put thirteen sacks into the cart; I always help to load my cart; I am quite sure of the number. The prisoner was the carter , he drove the cart away; I saw the prisoner again the same night, he said master, the man said he had but twelve sacks, and he had delivered thirteen. I am quite sure that I counted my sacks, there were thirteen.

ELIZABETH DILLONE . I keep a potatoe shop in Spitalfields market. I expected potatoes on the 11th of January, they always come thirteen sacks in a load; the potatoes did not come to my premises; I sold them some where else. On the 13th of January, the prisoner called to pay me for the sack of potatoes; I told him no, I had sent a letter to his master; he wished to pay for the sack of potatoes for fear he should lose his place.

Q. To whom had you sold the potatoes to - A. To Mr. Teele.

MR. TEELE. I live at Poplar; I bought the potatoes on the 8th of January.

Q. Who brought them - A. The prisoner, in the cart, there was only twelve full sacks, and an empty one at the bottom of the cart under some hay.

JANE WOOD . I came to town with the prisoner, on the top of the cart; a man rode with me to Bow Common.

Q. Was any thing done with the potatoes while you were there - A. No, nothing at all. At Bow Common, Gregory Haley came to turn the cart off to Poplar.

GREGORY HALEY . I am in the employ of Mrs. Dillone. I met this cart at Bow Common, the prisoner was driving the cart, and Mrs. Wood was sitting on the cart. My mistress sent my fellow servant after me. to tell me to go home, his name is John Cox .

JOHN COX . I was sent by Mrs. Dillone to tell Haley to go home. I got on the cart, and rode in the cart until it came to Mr. Teele's door; there were no alteration in the cart of the sacks of potatoes in any way.

Prisoner's Defence. What I received, I delivered.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-111

378. HANNAH PAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , nine pewter pint pots, value 9 s. and two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Williams .

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a publican , in Broad-street, Carnaby market. I lost the pots from No. 6, New-street ; the prisoner lived in the parlour; Mr. Curtis keeps the house, and lives up stairs; I served him with beer. The prisoner had not been served with any beer from my house for three months.

Q. The pots that you lost were found in the prisoner's lodging - A. Yes; the officer found them there.

SAMUEL PLANK . I searched the prisoner's lodgings; I found one quart and five pints in her drawers, in the back parlour, under her clothes, and four pints and one quart over her bed in the same room; the prisoner was present when I found them; she begged of me not to say where I found them.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-112

379. THOMAS NIX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 1 l. three brass locks, value 2 s, an iron range, value 50 s. and an iron stove, value 1 l. the property of the Rev. Evans Jones , affixed to a certain house of his .

REV. EVANS JONES. I am a clergyman , I have the lease of a house at Wilsdon , On the 19th of January,

it was untenanted; on that day, I was there in the morning, and saw the articles in the indictment affixed to the house, I was not present in the evening when the prisoner was seen on the premises.

MR. PHILLIPS. I am a son-in-law to the last witness. On the 19th of January, I went to the house in consequence of information; when I went into the house, I saw the kitchen range had been misplaced, it had been removed merely from the brick work. In consequence of what I then saw, I went again in the evening to the house; I went the back way, across the garden, there was a wheelbarrow standing at the back door, and the room door wide open; that door was fastened when I left it. I put my head, and one foot in the house, and then I saw the prisoner drawing the kitchen range along the passage; I am positive to the prisoner's person; I saw him quite plain, it was a beautiful moon light night; I went down the garden to get assistance. I returned, I saw the prisoner with the barrow; I catched hold of the prisoner; he struck me, but the next witness coming up, he gave over. I am sure the prisoner is the same man I saw with the barrow, and the same man I saw in the house, I swear positively to his person; the stove and the range were both standing down by the barrow.

BENJAMIN SMITH . I assisted Mr. Smith in apprehending the prisoner; the prisoner might be about twenty five yards from the premises when he was taken; I saw the man go out of the garden gate with the wheelbarrow; I saw the prisoner was the man; when I overtook Mr. Phillips, he had got hold of him by the collar with the wheelbarrow.

THOMAS TROYBECK . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered into my hands. I found upon him three door keys, a screw driver, and five small keys, and the plate of a brass lock.

Prosecutor. I tried the plate to the brass lock, it belongs to the brass lock; this lock was not removed, when I was there in the morning the plate and key fits the lock; they are my property.

WILLIAM REX . I keep a public house at Wilsdon. On the 18th of January, I saw the prisoner at my house, he put his hand upon my shoulder, he said he wanted to speak to me, he stood at the wash-house, he said the people had run away, and there was a parcel of people ransacking the house, and there was a nice little stove he would bring down to my house; I refused to let him, I said, I would not let him. I pursuaded him to go away, and if other people were rogues, I did not wish him to become one.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-113

380. JOSEPH MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a great coat, value 1 l. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a pair of gaiters, value 5 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and seven shillings and six pence in monies numbered, the property of Edward Laver from his person .

EDWARD LAVER. I am a taylor . On the 17th of January, I lost my property; I went into the Brown Bear, Covent Garden , and slept there with the prisoner.

Q. Had you your property when you went to bed - A. Yes. The prisoner got up about five o'clock in the morning; he told me he was going down into the yard, and after he was gone, I missed my things off my bed; I missed a pair of small clothes, a great coat, seven shillings and sixpence in money in my pocket, a pair of gaiters, and a large silk handkerchief. I was quite sober when I went to bed; it was late when I got in town, so I took up a lodging there; I live at Woodford.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I produce a pair of breeches, and a handkerchief; I found them on the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are my property; the breeches I made myself, I can swear to them.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up at two o'clock in the morning, in the dark, I made a mistake, and put his breeches on instead of my own.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-114

381. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a cloak, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Clark , widow .

ELIZABETH CLARK . I am a widow woman; I live at No. 14, New Tothill-street, Westminster . I lost my cloak on the 20th of January, from off a line in the passage , about four o'clock in the afternoon; I heard some thing pulling at the line; I went out, and saw it in the prisoner's hands; a soldier stopped him. This is the cloak; I value it at five shillings.

HENRY FRAMPTON . I belong to the 3rd guards. I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prosecutrix pursuing the prisoner; I stopped him, and took the cloak from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along with some of my friends; I was drunk; I belong to the 91st regiment ; I came from Chelsea to get my discharge.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-115

382. GEORGE GOODERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a wooden water trunk, value 10 s. the property of Richard Nelson .

THOMAS SMITH . I live in the King's Road Chelsea. On Monday the 30th of January, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon I perceived the prisoner going from the house across the garden to the garden wall with a water trunk that had been affixed to the house having been one stolen from the house before; it was nailed up to the upper part of the wall, it was properly fixed, hold fasts were driven into the wall, and nailed into the trunk; I pursued the prisoner, and before I got to him, he got over the wall and proceeded on towards Chelsea burial ground; I had seen the trunk the day previous affixed to the house

to receive from the leaden pipe, the leaden pipe had been stolen before.

COURT. It was affixed to the wall, it belonged to the Freehold.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18150215-116

383. GEORGE GOODERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , two gallons of wine, value 1 l. one yard of callico, value 1 s, a pocket book cover, value 6 d. three sheets, value 12 s. a piece of linen, value 1 s. and a napkin, value 1 s. the property of James Cathrew , Esq.

JAMES CATHREW , ESQ. I lost my property from Coney Hatch .

BENJAMIN HOGSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a sheet, the person that pawned it, called himself John Cook , I never saw the prisoner before, to my knowledge.

Prosecutor. The officer found the duplicates on the premises of the prisoner.

Q. Look at that sheet - A. That is my sheet, the prisoner's wife was in my service with the man at the bar, from the 1st of October, 1813, to the 1st, of November, 1814. The prisoner and his wife had the charge of the house at Coney Hatch; I was very seldom down there.

WILLIAM MOXON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two sheets, and a table cloth pawned on the 10th of October last.

Q. Are you sure it was not the prisoner - A. I never recollect seeing him before.

WILLIAM WALTERS . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a napkin, and a remnant of linen pawned on the 10th of December last.

RICHARD WESTBROOK . I searched the prisoner's lodgings, I found some duplicates of a napkin a remnant of linen, and a sheet, I found them in the prisoner's wife's box. The prisoner was in the room, he said he knew nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18150215-117

384. WILLIAM MUMFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , twenty two yards of flannel value 22 s. the property of William Howard ,

JOSEPH WICKHAM. I am porter to William Howard . On the 9th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, the flannel was standing in the flannel rack in the shop, I was behind the counter; I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and lay hold of a piece of flannel and run off with it. I immediately pursued him, and took him, with the flannel under his arm; this is the flannel, there is twenty two yards of it, it cost my master twenty two shillings prime cast. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and delivered him and the flannel to Alexander the constable.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I was constable of the night; Wickham brought the prisoner and the flannel to the watchhouse I produce the flannel.

Wickham. It is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the flannel of a man in Newport street.

GUILTY aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-118

385. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a coat, value 12 s. the property of James Pollard .

JAMES PELLARD. On the 21st of January, I lost my coat out of my shop; I came home about five o'clock in the evening I did not miss it until ten o'clock on the 21st of January, was Saturday, I saw it again on the Tuesday following at Nathan's a clothes shop, it was hanging up for sale, all I know, I lost my coat on a Saturday, I saw it again on the Tuesday following at Nathan's shop, it was worth about twelve shillings.

NATHANIEL NATHAN . I am a salesman in East Smithfield, the prosecutor came to me, and asked me the price of a coat that I had hanging up for sale at my door on Tuesday, he said, it was his, I bought it on Monday the 23rd of the prisoner; I gave the prisoner eight shillings for the coat, and two pence for a glass of gin; I apprehended the prisoner myself, and took him to the office; I am sure that he is the man, that is all that I know of it. This is the coat that I bought of the prisoner, and it is the coat the prosecutor claimed.

Prosecutor. This is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. A friend of mine gave me that coat.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-119

386. JAMES KEMP, alias KING , and JAMES RENNEY, alias SIMMONDS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , two tablecloths, value 8 s. two towels, value 4 s, five bed gowns value 5 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. a shirt, value 2 s. and a shawl, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Redkison , from the person of William Redkison .

WILLIAM REDKISON . I am eleven years old, I live with my father and mother, my mother takes in washing.

Q. Be sure you say not a word less than the truth or more - A. My father and mother lives at Chelsea Common, near the Red house. On the 8th of January, I was carrying things home that had been washed; I was to take them to Mrs. Hawkins, she lives in Couzen street, May Fair, at the back of Piccadilly.

Q. How far had you got, before any thing happened to you - A. In Piccadilly. I got to Piccadilly about eleven o'clock on Sunday the 8th of January, I had these things in a bundle; I was alone, in Piccadilly, Kemp came up to me and said, do not you live in Sloane street, I was in Piccadilly near Hamilton place; I told him I lived at Chelsea Common, near the Red house; then he went on a little further and he asked me my name, I told him where I was going; I did not tell him at first, he stopped me, and asked me my name, there was nobody by him then, he then said, which is the way to Piccadilly, I told him to go round the corner, and go up there, he was not gone two minutes, he came back again, he was still alone, he said, can I go across the Park

I told him if he would go a little higher, he would see a street where he could go across the park; I told him where I was going, he said he would go down Couzen street with me. Then this other gentleman came up to me, that is the prisoner Renney, he said, is not your name Redkinson, and said, are not you going to Mrs. Hawkin's. I had told the other prisoner whose house, and where I was going to before this; he came down as far as Harford street, he said he had got to go as far as Harford street, in Park lane; he said, he had to go there for Mrs. Hawkins he would call there as he came back; he went a little way down Harford street, then the prisoner returned and said, never mind, I will call as I come back. I had my bundle still in my own possession he went as far with me as the iron shop in Park lane, he said, you can deliver the message to your mother as well as I can, that was the prisoner Renney, the man that came up to me the second time, the other man was gone down Cozen street; he went strait on, Renney said, tell your mother to come up, and to bring a large basket on Monday morning and she will recommend your mother to some more washing; he took my bundle, the shawl that the things were in, and said, your mother can have the shawl on Monday morning; my mother had put the things up in her own shawl; he took the bundle from my arm, and said good bye, that is all.

Q. Did you look after him to see whether he joined the other or not - A. No.

Q. When did you discover that you had lost the things - A. I went back, and told my mother what had happened, and delivered this message, my mother immediately said, I had been robbed of them, I have never seen the things again.

Q. Have any of the things been found since - A. No, I am sure these are the two persons that accosted me on this occasion; I am quite sure of both the prisoner's; I think on the week following, I saw them again they were walking together in King's Road, nobody was with them when I saw them again; there was a race in an open place, upon what they call Chelsea Common; I pointed them both out to Mr. Pell, in Chelsea Common, he said run and fetch your mother, tell her to come directly, my mother got a constable, Mr. Pell watched them, he is not here. Mr. Rouse the constable took them in China-row, I pointed them out, he laid hold of them I was present when Mr. Rouse laid hold of them; I charged them with having done this on a Sunday; they said they never saw me in their lives; I am sure they are the two men who came up to me. My father's name is Thomas Redkison ; I said I was quite sure these were the men before the Magistrate, and I was sure of them when I saw them upon the Common; I have never said I was not sure of Renney, I was always sure of them both.

MARY REDKINSON . I am the wife of Thomas Redkison; that boy is my son. On Sunday the 8th of January, I sent my son to Mrs. Hawkin's, Sun court, May Fair; I sent him from my house about ten o'clock, he returned at about half past eleven, he told me what had become of the bundle; I have not found the things again; I am to pay for the things on Tuesday the 17th of January; I saw the prisoner's, I saw them in the King's Road, near us, my son pointed out the two prisoner's as being the persons that were concerned in taking the bundle from him; Mayhew kept the prisoner's in sight. while I fetched Mr. Rouse the constable, I was present when the constable took charge of them in China row. Mr. Rouse charged them with taken the linen from the boy, they said, they had never seen the boy before the boy pointed out Kemp as the person that first entered into conversation with him, and Renney who took the things away, I have never recovered my own shawl. I carry on the washing myself.

SAMUEL ROUSE . I am a constable, I took charge of the two prisoner's in China-row, the boy charged them with taking the bundle from him, they denied it; the boy said, the man who spoke to him first, had got entirely out of sight before the other took the things from him, he said, at the time that Renney took the bundle Kemp had got out of sight.

RENNEY GUILTY aged 33.

Transported for Life .

KEMP NOT GUILTY

Kemp to be detained, and to prefer a bill against him for being an accessary before the fact.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-120

387. EMMA STACHLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a watch, value 5 l. the property of John Cooper , in the dwelling house of John Carr .

JAMES METCALFE , I am a surgeon and apothecary. Mr. Cooper the prosecutor is deaf and dumb , I can interpret to him.

Q. When did you loose your watch - A. Last Saturday week, in Vine-street, he fell down, and they took the watch out of his pocket; he thinks it was a girl that took it.

Q. How many persons surrounded him - A. Two women.

A. Look at the prisoner does he know any thing of her - A. He thinks it was her, but he cannot swear to it.

Q. Ask him if he ever picked up any women - A. No, I understood him that he had been drinking with a clerk in the Treasury, it was not in the house that he had been drinking that he fell down; he says, it was in another house, he believes on the second floor; the two women took him to that house.

ELIZABETH PHILLIPS . I am one of the unfortunate girls; I live in the same house the gentleman lost his watch, in Newtoner's-court, Vine-street, the prisoner is an unfortunate girl too; the gentleman fell on the floor, I took out his watch for safety that it should not be broken, I put it on the table, I run down stairs for a light, and one of the girls run away with the watch, what became of it afterwards. I cannot say.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Q. to Phillips. How many girls were there in the room - A. Three besides me, I am the servant of the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-121

388. WILLIAM SEYMOUR was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 17th of February , the carcase of a pig, value 45 s. the property of Paris Stevens , in his dwelling house .

PARIS STEVENS. I am a butcher ; I lost my pig on Friday evening about twenty-five minutes before ten o'clock; I returned out of the shop into the back room in about five minutes; I heard the fall of a hook on the ground, I immediately returned to the shop, and missed the carcase of a pig, I went out, and met a man he said, he saw the prisoner run down King-street, a witness caught him, with the pig on his shoulders, in King-street.

Q. Where is your house - A. In Swallow-street , I run after the prisoner, and saw him with the pig at his feet; I took the prisoner into custody; the prisoner told me he picked up the pig at my door; I am sure it is my pig; it was hanging up in my shop.

JOHN SPYBEY . I am a baker, I was coming up Swallow street; I heard the dropping of a butcher's book which drew my attention; I immediately saw a man run across the way with a pig on his shoulder; I had suspicion he had stolen the pig; he run up King street; I pursued him, I asked him where he was going to take the pig to, he said, home; I collered the prisoner, he threw the pig down.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going up King street, a man got the pig, he asked me to mind the pig, and he would pay me, when he came back, he staid rather longer than I liked; I thought I would carry the pig home.

GUILTY aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined six Calender months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-122

389. HANNAH MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a bushel and a half of coals, value 2 s. the property of Mary Vyse , spinster ; and JAMES CRUTCHFIELD , for receiving on the same day, in the same parish the same goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM TOWLIN . I am a watchman. On Friday evening January, the 20th, I was going on my duty, I met the man prisoner with a large basket on his shoulder a little before seven o'clock; I saw he had a basket full of coals; I took him to the watch-house, he said cannot we make it up without going to the watchhouse, I said, no, you must go and give an account of yourself there; when I took him to the watchhouse, the watchhouse keeper told him he had brought them from No. 28. Douglas-place, at the boarding school, he said yes, the cook had been down to his house in the evening drinking tea, and if he would go with her and take his basket, she would give him a few coals, he said he did not much like the job, she told him there could be no harm in it, and now he said you see what I have brought myself to; the constable of the night sent me to the Rev. Mr. Tomkin's, and Mr. Tomkins took me to Mr. Vye's house; I took the cook up she was in the parlour fastened in; I threatened to break the door open; she came out; I took her in custody, and took her to the watchhouse.

Q. What quantity of coals was there - A. Near a bushel and a half, there might be more.

WILLIAM MAYBANK . When the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, I said to him, you have brought them coals from the boarding school, he said he had, Ann Morgan the woman prisoner had been drinking tea with him, she told him to bring his basket up, and it was the first time that he ever had any. The woman prisoner at the watchhouse said, it was the first time that she had ever given any away.

Q. What is the man - A. He is a carpenter, the woman did lodge with him before she lived with Mrs. Vyse,

JANE SMITH . I am the prisoner's fellow servant; I am house maid to Mary Vyse she is a single woman, I was out, at the time this happened; Miss Vyse if not able to attend, she is confined to her room.

Morgan's Defence. My mistress was out of town. I went to Crutchfield's house, he had been out of work three months, they asked me to give them a bit of coal; I gave him some, not near a bushel and a half.

Crutchley's Defence. I was not at home at the time, the cook was at my house, when I came home my wife said, if I would go up, I might get a basket of coals.

MORGAN GUILTY aged 37.

Confined one Year and fined 1 s.

CRUTCHFIELD GUILTY aged 65.

Confined three Calender months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-123

390. RICHARD EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , an iron vice, value 10 s. the property of John Steenhouse .

JOHN STEENHOUSE. I am a brass founder ; I live in Bond-street . The prisoner was my servant . I missed the iron vice on the 16th of October, he had left my service them, he had left me two months before I missed the vice. The officer found the vice at the prisoner's lodgings; the duplicate of the vice was found at the prisoner's lodgings; I knew the vice to be mine when I saw it at the pawnbrokers, it is worth ten shillings.

JAMES JENKS . I am a pawnbroker; I live at Mr. Benton's, 244, Holborn. I produce a vice, pawned by a woman, on the 1st of October, I advanced seven shillings upon it; it was pawned in the name of Mary Evans .

JAMES GILMAM . I am a shoe-maker; I live in Stanbrook-court, Piccadilly. On Sunday morning I heard a noise. I got up, and opened the window; I saw a man come out of Mr. Steenhouse's shop door, it way day light; who that man was I don't know.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I went to No. 1, Cross-lane, Newton-street, St. Giles's; I waited by the door until half past ten at night, on the 6th of February, I saw the prisoner come to the door of No, 1; I stepped up to him, and called him by the name of Evans; he said my name is not Evans. I told him I had a charge of felony against him for taking a vice from Mr. Steenhouse's shop; he denied it. I went up stairs with him to his wife in the back room one pair of stairs, and in a little bag by the side of the fire place, I found a

quantity of duplicates; I turned them over; the prisoner picked this one out of my hand; I took it out of his hand; it was this duplicate for a vice pawned at Mr. Benton's, in Holborn, for seven shillings, by Mary Evans , Newton-street, lodger. I produce the vice.

Prosecutor. That is my vice, I am certain.

Prisoner's Defence. The vice I bought two years ago.

JAMES JONES . I am an apprentice to Mr. Steenhouse. I can swear that vice is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six calender months , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-124

391. THOMAS COX , JOHN GIBBONS , and KITTY BELL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , eighty pounds weight of potatoes, value 4 s. the property of Martha Norris widow .

MARTHA NORRIS . I am a widow; I carry on business in Spitalfields market ; I have a warehouse there. Thomas Cox and Kitty Bell were my servants there. On the morning of the 31st of January, I came down stairs a quarter before six o'clock, the first that I asked them was, whether they had any custom, or whether they had sold any potatoes out of my warehouse, they both (Cox and Bell) said they had not sold any, nor had any customers been; I have no partner in my business.

RICHRAD GREGORY. I live next door to Mrs. Norris. On the morning of the 31st of January, about half past six o'clock, I saw the prisoners Cox and Bell close together in Mrs. Norris warehouse; I saw Gibbons go into the warehouse with a basket, and a sack in it; I saw the prisoner Cox empty two baskets into a sack, which the prisoner Gibbon's held in the basket; Cox lifted the basket on Gibbons's head; I followed Gibbons, and saw him take the potatoes to the Bunch of Grapes, public-house. This was before Mrs. Norris came down stairs. When Mrs. Norris came down stairs, and asked the servants if they had sold any, I went, and got the potatoes, and had the prisoners taken into custody.

THOMAS HUNT . I am a constable. The prisoners were given into my charge; at the watch-house I searched Cox; I found two one-pound notes on him, and some halfpence; nothing on the other prisoners. I weighed the potatoes; there was eighty-eight pounds weight, of the value of four shillings.

Bell's Defence. It is wrong of Mr. Gregory to say that Cox gave the potatoes in my presence, as if I was guilty; I never saw it done.

Bell, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

COX, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

GIBBONS, GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months , and publicly whipped .

BELL, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-125

392. MARY BURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , two pounds weight of pork, value 18 d. and one pound weight of bacon, value 8 d. the property of John Emms .

ELIZABETH CLARK . Mr. Emms lives in Shoreditch , he is a cheesemonger . On the 21st of January, I was in Mr. Emms's shop; I waited to bring some butter. The prisoner came and stood at the shop window; she took a piece of bacon and put it under her apron; afterwards she took a bit of pork, put it into her basket that she carried with her left arm. I told Mr. Emms.

JOHN EMMS . In consequence of what I heard from the last witness, I laid hold of the prisoner; I took out of her apron and her basket the things in this charge; the prisoner was a little in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out, I had a little drop of liquor given to me, which got into my head, and whether I paid for the bacon, I cannot say.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-126

393. PETER TUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , four sheets, value 1 l. and two table cloths, value 10 s. the property of James Francis Hobler .

JAMES FRANCIS HOBLER . On the 1st of February about a quarter past six, I went home.

Q. Where is your home - A. Queen's Row, Pentonville ; in a very short time there was an alarm that the clothes had been taken from the garden, that were hanging out to dry. On looking next morning I found the parties had got over the fence at the bottom of the field, there was one or two foot marks, one larger than the other, the clothes were afterwards found by the officer.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I went in company with my father and Limbrick with a search warrant to the prisoners house in Field Lane. On the 2nd of February, a warrant was taken out to search for other things; in searching, we found these sheets wet, we found two of them; the prisoner was in the same room where I found these two sheets up stairs. Limbrick can produce the other sheets. I produce one sheet marked and the other not marked. I told the prisoner I apprehended him on suspicion of stealing these sheets; he said he bought them; I saw two footsteps at Mr. Hobler's Garden, they appeared to have got in the back way.

COURT. How high were the rails.

MR. HOBLER. Nine feet high; with a ladder it is very easy to get over on the garden side, there are some shelves for green house plants; when they get to the inside, there is a ladder on purpose for them.

WILLIAM READ SENIOR. I was along with my son, I asked the prisoner how the sheets came to be wet; he said he had just moved them from the other house.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I found two table cloths and one sheet, with the mark cut out of the middle, I found them in the kitchen; I went up into the two pair of stairs, there I found another sheet wet on the

line, with the window open to dry it.

ELIZABETH REYNOLDS . I am servant to Mr. Hobler, they are Mr. Hobler's sheets and table linin.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been very bad with a bad leg; I had not been outside of the door for a fortnight.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-127

394. PETER TUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , four pair of womens shoes, value 18 s. the property of Sarah Hill .

SARAH HILL . I live at No. 12, Picket Street, York Place , Mary-Bone; I lost my property on the 26th of January, some time in the evening; about half past four I saw all my shoes safe in the window; the next morning I observed a piece of glass out of my window, and five pair of shoes and boots were missing; I do not know who took my shoes, I keep a shoe-makers shop.

WILLIAM READ . On the same day and in the same place as the last case, in the back room, I found these four pair of shoes in a drawer. Finding the name of Hill in them, my son took a pair of shoes and went to Mrs. Hill with them. The prisoner keeps a shoe shop , he said he dealt in boots and shoes.

Prosecutrix. My name is on the shoes, I know they are my property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-128

395. WILLIAM LYE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , eleven sheep, value 27 l , the property of James Fisher and Edward Wigan .

JAMES FISHER . I live at Highbury place, in the parish of Islington, In 1813 I and my neighbour had some sheep; Edward Wigan is my neighbour, he and myself had some sheep.

Q. What quantity - A. About forty, we considered them that they were joint property. I paid for the sheep, and since then General Wigan and I have had no settlement; I purchased them with that view; I lost them in August, 1813. I know no more than my man stating to me that eleven were lost the following morning.

CHARLES HENDEN . I am Gardner to Mr. Fisher, August 23d. 1813. In the evening I saw the sheep all safe in the field. When I came to the sheep in the field the next morning, there were eleven missing.

WILLIAM TAMBAY . I am an apprentice to an auctioneer. On Monday, the 23rd of August, 1813, I was standing opposite Mr. Fisher's field, at half past seven, two men came to me, and asked me whose sheep they were; I told them. They told me they were going to take twelve out the next morning. I told Mr. Eland of it, a sheep salesman, in Smithfield market. On the next morning I saw them take them; the prisoner is one of the two men, I am sure of that.

GEORGE PARRETT . I am a butcher. On Monday evening, the 23rd of August, John Snow brought me eleven sheep to kill for him; the prisoner was in company with him; the prisoner never claimed right to the sheep. John Snow claimed the sheep; I killed the sheep for Snow; the carcases were carried to Newgate market; John Snow brought the sheep.

Q. Was any body else in company with Snow and the sheep - A. Yes, the prisoner.

Q. You did not say so before the magistrate? Before the magistrate you said, you knew not whether any one else was with him - A. On Wednesday morning Snow called for the sheep, and took them away.

EBENEZER DALTON . On the 26th of August, 1813, I received information of a gentleman at Islington, losing some sneep. I took the prisoner in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-129

396. WILLIAM BOWERS was indicted feloniniously stealing on the 20th of January , one shawl. value 3 s. and a glass tumbler, value 6 d. the property of William Holmes .

MRS. HOLMES. My husband's name is William Holmes . He and I live in Coal Yard, Drury Lane . On the 20th of January last, my Couzen was coming from 22, Soho Square, the prisoner stopped him and asked him if the gentleman was in town, my Couzen said yes; the prisoner came home to my house with my Couzen, he saw the situation we were in; he said he would write a petition to a gentleman in Brunswick Square, for the gentleman to relieve me, as my husband had been ill one and twenty months, for the gentleman had given him a new suit of cleaths the day before and eight shillings; he made no doubt the gentleman would relieve me and my husband, he was a very humane gentleman; he then went out with my couzen, and returned at half past four, to write the petition, he said he could not write unless I gave him some gin; I told him I had not wherewith to do so. He said he could not write unless I did that. I fetched him in a glass of gin, and a sheet of paper, and as soon as I came into the room, I missed a tumbler off the press, I gave him the sheet of paper; he sat down and wrote it; he then wished me to go to this gentleman's house; he said, I should bring home some sheets and blankets, at No. 8, Brunswick-square; I refused going at that time in the evening, I was afraid he was no good, and my missing the tumbler I wished my husband to get up, that I might get the umbrella from him before I went out; I was afraid to say any thing to my husband, he being dangerously ill in bed. I got my husband up. The prisoner lifted his hand up, and took my shawl from off the line; my husband laid hold of him, and desired me to get a constable; my husband saw him do that; the prisoner twisted the shawl up, and put it in his pocket; I went down stairs, and fetched Mr. Broad up stairs; then the prisoner dropped the shawl close behind him; Mr. Broad took the tumbler out of his pocket.

ABRAHAM BROAD . I am a smith. On the 20th of January, I was standing next door to Mrs. Holmes's, and knowing her husband had been ill so many months, I went up stairs; I saw the husband asked have hold of this man; the prisoner begged I would not take him in custody. I saw the shawl behind him. William Holmes said, the prisoner had robbed him of a shawl and a timbler; I searched him, and the tumbler tumbled out of his pocket. The prisoner begged me not to hurt him, nor to take him to a cold prison, he had been transported before. I produce the tumbler and the shawl.

Prosecutrix. That is my tumbler, and my shawl.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-130

397. JOHN BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , seven cinder shovels, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Griffiths .

SAMUEL GRIFFITHS . I am a tin plate worker . I lost my shovels on the 27th of January, I was absent when they were taken from the shop.

GEORGE BAKER. I am a journeyman to Mr. Griffiths. On the 27th of January, between four and five in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in company with a woman pass the shop several times; at length the woman and this boy parted; I had suspicion of them; I went into the passage to watch; I heard the woman say to the boy come along; immediately the boy came leaned over the steps, and took the shovels now produced; I pursued the prisoner, and took him with the shovels on him; the woman was in a gateway, a few doors from our shop; I sent a man after the woman, they were both taken in custody.

THOMAS BARNAGE . On the 27th of January, I was with Mr. Griffiths at Hatton Garden. I took the prisoner in custody; the woman has not appeared; I received these shovels of Mr. Griffiths.

Mr. Griffiths. They are my shovels, they have my mark upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along from my work, about four o'clock in the evening, I met this woman as I came from my work, she said, she would give me a penny if I would take the shovels and bring them to her a little higher up; the gentleman came and took me; this woman ran under an arch way; the woman told me to deny that I knew her, which I did.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Whipped in Jail , and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-131

398. HARRIETT DEANE , and SARAH ANN SANDERSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , two pillow-cases, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Wright .

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker , No. 1, Mutton-hill, Clerkenwell-green . On Thursday, the 16th of February, the two prisoners came in to pledge a shawl; I had some things laying at the end of the counter; I was busy for some time; I had just marked them ready for putting into the window, and I was at the window putting some things in when the prisoners came in; I took in the pledge of them; they went away. After they were gone, I turned round to put the other things into the window; I missed two pillow-cases. I understood from their discourse that they were going up to the Sessions House; I immediately went there; not finding them there, coming from Clerkenwell green, I met a constable that I mentioned the circumstance to, he said he would give a look out. I knew the woman before; I am quite sure they are the two woman; the constable found them on them, with my private mark inside, the ticket outside.

THOMAS BARNAGE . I am a constable. On the 16th of February, I met Mr. Wright, he told me he had been robbed of a pair of pillow-cases at home. As I came up from Clerkenwell green, I met the prisoners coming down; I saw they had got something looking at under a shawl; I saw something under the shawl; they went up a passage; I went up the passage; they were looking at these things; I went up to them, and asked them what they had got there; Deane said she was going to purchase them. I asked them if they were hers; she said, yes, and after that, she said they were her mother's, she had just fetched them from the manglers. I catched hold of them, and asked them to let me have a sight of them as they were going to sell them. I unfolded them, told them it was the property I was looking for; I detained them on suspicion of felony. These are the pillow-cases.

Deane's Defence. I picked them up on Mutton-hill.

Sanderson's Defence. I know nothing of them; Deane said she picked up something, she went up a passage; I followed her.

DEANE, GUILTY , aged 17.

SANDERSON, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-132

399. RICHARD FINCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , two sheets, value 7 s. a pair of shoes, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 18 d. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and a cap, value 3 d. the property of John Bowden .

JANE BOWDEN . My husband is a day labouring man , his name is John Bowden . I lost these things on Friday morning, the 27th of January; at seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my bed room door, and asked for some water; I live at 22, Robert's-street, Commercial-road ; I sent him into my back room for some water, he was gone about two minutes, he came back again, and said he was going into Bishopsgate-street, and bid me good morning; near as quarter of an hour after; my eldest son came down stairs, he slept in the same room with the prisoner; he said mother, the man has robbed us; my son said he has got my shoes, stockings, and the sheets off the bed; I ran up stairs, he had taken the shoes from the same room by the bed side, and the sheets off his own bed; when I missed the things I came down stairs to my back room; there I missed a new shirt that was hanging up to dry.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I don't know; he had lodged in the house two nights.

JAMES GODDARD . I am shopman to Mr. Wilkinson, a pawnbroker, 88, Whitechapel-road. The prisoner pledged with me two sheets, on the 27th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning. These are the sheets; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOHN ASHTON. I am shopman to Mr. Stevenson, pawnbroker, 16, Whitechapel-road. I produce a pair of shoes, pledged by the prisoner at the bar, on the 27th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning; I am sure it was the prisoner, and these are the shoes.

EBENEZER DALTON . On the 27th, the prosecutrix came to the office, and said she had been robbed by the prisoner. I immediately went to the pawnbrokers, and stopped the things. On the next day I heard the prisoner was at the Nags Head, facing Whitechapel church; I went, and apprehended him. I found a black silk handkerchief, a night cap, and waistcoat on him; the prosecutrix said, they belonged to her.

Prosecutrix. The property produced by the pawnbrokers and the officer are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-133

400. DANIEL JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a piece of timber, value 3 s. the goods of the proprietors of the Regency Canal Company .

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am employed by the Regency Canal Company; I am a miner . The prisoner was employed in that work.

Q. On the day laid in the indictment, did you watch the prisoner - A. I did not particularly watch him; he left off work about eleven o'clock; I had nothing more for him to do.

Q. Did you see any thing of him afterwards - A. No; I saw the timber that was produced by Parsons, it is very much like our timber.

CHARLES PARSONS. I am a watchman. On the morning of the 14th of February, about half past one o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the lane leading from the small-pox hospital to Highgate, he had a piece of timber on his shoulder, and a lanthorn under his arm; I stopped him; I asked him what he had got there; he said, a small piece of timber, that was made no use off; he said, he worked at the Tunnel; I understood him at the Regency Canal; he said, I might have it if I liked; I replied it was no use to me. He offered to give me any thing to release him, I took him to the watchhouse. This is the piece of timber,

MR. LEWIS. I am acting manager for the Company. I have the care of these pieces of timber. I believe the piece of timber produced, to be the Company's timber; I cannot swear it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-134

401. JAMES SQUIRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , thirty-six steel spring purses, value 36 s. the property of Mary Ann Morgan , widow .

MARY ANN MORGAN. My husband died on Sunday, the 20th of January.

Q. There are two indictments against this man? why did not you put the two into one - A. I knew nothing about the purses.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-135

402. JAMES SQUIRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , one piece of leather, value 1 s. a work-box, value 10 s. and three steel spring purses, value 3 s. the property of Mary Ann Morgan , widow .

MARY ANN MORGAN . I live at 17, St. John-square, Clerkenwell : I am a pocket-book maker . The prisoner was my apprentice . I had an order for some boxes. I called the prisoner down for the keys, and asked him if he had any more work-boxes than what I saw in the cutting room; he denied any more boxes in the house. I asked him whose box that was; Squires said, it was his box, it contained nothing but his clothes; I pulled out an old coat, and under that coat was a lady's work-box, half a skin of morrocco leather, and three steel spring purses. Squires said they were his master's property; he allowed it was a wrong place for it to be in. We went a little further, and between the sacking and the bed of an old bedstead I found five skins of leather, as we have them from the leather dresser at Bermondsey, and some pocket-books of a large size.

THOMAS THISSELTON . I am an officer. On Monday I went to Mrs. Morgan's; in the top shop I found a work-box, and three steel spring purses. I found five skins in a room where there were some property concealed, and on looking a little further, I found as many materials as would make twenty large gentlemen's pocket-books, ready cut up, secreted under some clean paper; in the top shop was this box, those purses; the leather I have kept locked up ever since. The next morning I went to the watchhouse, I said Squires, I have got a box out of your box; he said, I know you have. This is the box.

Prosecutrix. This is the same box I found in Squires box, it is my property, and all the property now produced is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. My master in his life time gave me that box to finish one month before he died; my master told me to put a top pocket to it, and to keep it till he called for it; that box had been in my box a month before my master died; I did not place it in my box with any intention to defraud my mistress of it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-136

403. ALOES HATFIELD, alias THOMAS WILLIAMS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on

the 11th of February , one copper bowl, value 8 s. the property of Richard Ford .

RICHARD FORD. I am a scale pan-maker ; I live in Broad-yard, Turnmill-street .

Q. Did you lose a copper bowl at any time - A. Yes, on the 11th of February, about one o'clock in the day; it was a bowl that I made myself; I left my house about eleven, and returned at one; I saw the prisoner running down Broad-yard, with my bowl in his hand; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said he was going to sell it. I said, sell my bowl, you rogue; I snatched it out of his hand; he ran away; I after him; I catched him in Castle-street. This is the bowl; it is mine, I am certain of it, it is worth seven or eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY, aged 11.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18150215-137

404. RICHARD MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of February , one silver tea-spoon, value 4 s. the property of Lazurus Moses .

LAZURUS MOSES. I live at No. 2, Essex-street, Whitechapel ; I am an optician . The prisoner had lived with me about four weeks. I missed the silver tea spoon on Friday, the 3rd of this month. On the 4th I found the tea spoon at the pawnbrokers.

JAMES GODDARD . I am shopman to Mr. Christie, pawnbroker, 38, Whitechapel-road. The prisoner pawned this spoon at our shop, on the 2nd of February; I am sure he is the man; I advanced him two shillings upon it. This is the tea spoon.

Prosecutor. That is my tea spoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I am extremely sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined fourteen days , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-138

405. GEORGE PARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of January , a flat iron, value 6 d. a candlestick, value 1 s. a blanket, value 1 s. 6 d. and a bolster, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Perkins .

ELIZABETH PERKINS. I live at 55, Saffron-hill . In the beginning of October, the prisoner applied for a lodging; he had the front room on the second floor, that was let to him furnished; among the furniture was a flat iron, a blanket, pillow, and a bolster, he had these things to use in his lodging, he was to pay five shillings a week; he took possession immediately; he said, he was a writer . I never missed any of these articles until I found the prisoner and his wife had been gone from his lodgings nine or ten days; on the 11th of January, we broke the door open; the duplicates of the articles they left upon the mantle-piece; I went to the pawnbrokers, and found the things. I saw the prisoner afterwards at the workhouse in Gray's-inn-lane, he was attending for parochial relief.

WILLIAM THISSELTON , I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody, and the duplicates Mr. Perkins gave to me produced the property.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I produce a blanket, candlestick, a pillow, and a flat iron; the prisoner pawned them with me.

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called three witnesse, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-139

406. RICHARD JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a great coat, value 2 s. 6 d. and a pair of stockings, value 2 d. the property of William Ricketts .

WILLIAM RICKETTS I live at Hertford; I am a servant to my father , he is a farmer. On the 28th of February, I lost my great coat from off the cart; I was in the Basing House public-house having a pint of ale; I was coming from London with a load of sugar scum to go to Hertford; my coat was on the sugar scum.

Q. Did you see any body take the coat and the stockings - A. No. The ostler came and asked me whether I had a great coat in the cart; I said, I had. The stockings were in the coat pocket.

GEORGE CHATTLE. I am ostler at the Basing House. I saw the prisoner take the great coat off the cart; I stopped the prisoner, and asked him what he was going to do with the coat; he desired me to let him go. The constable took the coat.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I took the prisoner into custody. I produce the coat.

Prosecutor. The great coat and stockings are mine.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Whipped in Jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-140

407. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a coat, value 5 s. three basins, value 18 d. three cups and saucers, value 3 d. the property of Elizabeth Linton , widow .

ELIZABETH LINTON. I am a widow, I live at No. 3, Bowman's-place. I lost my coat, three basins, three cups and saucers, and a bowl. The prisoner came to me on the 3rd of February, she brought me some things to mangle; she said if I could accommodate her with a bed until the family came home; which I did. I missed the articles in the indictment, and then I told her to go away.

ELIZABETH WILDMAN . I keep a clothes shop in Monmouth-street. I bought a coat of the prisoner, I gave her three shillings for it; I delivered it to the constable.

Prosecutrix. The coat is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it out of distress.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-141

408. HANNAH MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a sheet, value 4 s. a table-cloth, value 4 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. a shift, value 2 s. a shirt, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. a gown, value 5 s. three aprons, value 3 s. and a towel, value 6 d. the property of Ann Webber , spinster .

ANN WEBBER . I live at 25, Doyle street, Sloane street, Chelsea; I keep a mangle. On the 26th of November, I had some linen to mangle, for 27 Douglas place; I made a mistake and took them to 28, and on Sunday morning the servant of No, 27 came to me for the cloathes; I said, I had taken them to 28; I immediately went to No. 28. for them; I rung the bell at the gate, the prisoner came; I told her I came for the clothes that I had given to the house maid in a mistake the afternoon before; I begged her to give them to me, that my mother was a very poor woman, that I should have to make them good through my mistake in delivering them wrong. She denied having them, and said, she had delivered them to a girl that described the things in the bundle she gave them to her; she said the woman that mangled for her had sent the little girl for these things; I enquired where this mangle was, she said in George street Union place; I went directly there; I asked the woman if she had sent any girl for the things, she said, no, she had not; I went to the prisoner, Hannah Morgan , and told her that the mangling woman had not sent any body for them, and that she had no children; I then left her, I saw her again on the Monday; I then told her, that she must produce this girl that she gave the clothes to, I enquired if the house maid, saw the girl; the house maid informed me that she had not, the prisoner told me two or three different stories; I then told the prisoner and her fellow servant, that I must take them to Queen-square office. I did; I took the cook and the house maid to Queen-square office, Mrs. Vyse came forward and gave her a good character, therefore I dropped it until I heard she was taken into custody, and as I had not found the clothes, I had to make them good; I got a search warrant, Gillmore the officer searched her box, and found an apron remaining, and a pair of stockings.

ANN STYLES . I keep a mangle in George-street, Union-place, there is another mangle besides mine in that street.

Q. Do you now mangle for this family - A. That week not before.

Q. Had you any occasion to send any body to Hannah Morgan at Mrs. Vye'ss for any mangling - A. No, the prisoner came in, with the mangling in her lap. On the 26th of November, she brought two gowns and other things to mangle, she paid me three-pence for mangling them. I never had a girl to send for the things.

ANN DUNN . I live at 27, Douglas-place. I took the clothes to Ann Webber , to be mangled, and on Sunday morning I went and told her she had brought them home; she said she had delivered them wrong, she went with me to No. 28.

JAMES GILLMORE . I searched Hannah Morgan 's box at Crutchfield's house, I found this apron, Jane Smith pointed out the box.

JANE SMITH . Q. Whose box did you point out to Gillmore - A. Hannah Morgan 's. On the 23rd of November last we sent a few things to mangle, and on the 24th, Webber brought some mangling home; I asked Webber what the money was, she said three pence, I paid the money; in a short time afterwards, the prisoner came home, she said, they were not our things; the prisoner went to our manglers and told her she had not sent our things, the Mangler delivered up our bundle, she paid her for them. On Saturday morning, a girl came for the things that had been left by mistake, the prisoner asked her what they were; the girl described them, the prisoner delivered them to her: Webber came afterwards, she was told they had been fetched away.

COURT. Are you quite sure a girl came to whom this bundle was delivered - A. Yes, I mean to swear that.

Gillmoor. This is the apron I found in Morgan's box.

Q. to Dunn. Is that the apron you gave to Webber to mangle - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

Webber. This is the apron I received from No, 27.

Smith. This apron the prisoner lent me, I wore it on August the 20th; I am sure this apron, I saw in the prisoner's possession, long before this took place.

COURT. Did you say that before the magistrate - A. No.

Q. to Dunn. Look at that apron, and describe what you know it by - A. I am positive it is my apron, I darned it here myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Mr. Vyse's on the 14th of October, on the 15th, my fellow servant borrowed it of me, I darned the apron myself, my fellow servant saw me darning it, that apron was made out of a petticoat, and one of my gores are in it now.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-142

409. ANN ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , two coats, value 4 s. the property of George Rhodes .

GEORGE RHODES. I lodge at Mr. Baverstocks, the Angel and Crown, White-chapel-road ; I lost my coats on Monday morning the 20th of January last; when I got up to dress myself, I missed my coats off the clothes pegs in the room; I went down stairs to see if I had left them there; when I went to bed in the evening I missed the two coats, I searched all about the room and could not find them; I did not see them afterwards until the next day, and then I saw them in the officer's possession at Whitechapel watchhouse.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I have seen her at Mr. Baverstock's house, I know nothing of her.

WILLIAM HORNBLOWER . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. On Friday the 20th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Osborne-street, with a bundle in her apron; I took her to the watchhouse to be examined by the officer of the night, and returned to my duty again.

JOHN BEAL . I was the officer of the night, the watchman brought the prisoner into the watchhouse I searched the bundle in the prisoner's apron; I saw

two coats, claimed by Mr. Rhodes, I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are my coats.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl, a sailor gave me them two coats.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one Year and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-143

410. MARY EMMOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of January , a bible, value 5 s. the property of Griffiths Bridges .

SARAH LONG RAWLINS . I am one of the pew openers at Hackney church , on the 22nd of January in the afternoon the prisoner came into the church, and while I was seating some ladies, she went into Mr. Bridges pew; I told her she must not sit there if the ladies came they would be offended. When service was over, the prisoner was the first person that went out; I went after her: I saw the prisoner searched, the bible was taken out of her pocket.

JOHN GARNAN . I apprehended the prisoner; I told her for what I stopped her, for taking the bible out of Mr. Bridges pew, she said, she had it not about her; going along she took the bible out of her pocket, and gave it to me. I produce the bible.

MISS KNAPP. I sit in Mr. Bridges pew at church, Mr. Bridges is my step father, he purchased this bible for me, it is my bible, it was left in my pew at church.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not right in my mind at times, I am in the habit of taking a bible with me to church; I did not take the bible away with intent of keeping it.

GUILTY aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-144

411. JOSEPH ADFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of December, one cheese, value 25 s. the property of William Barnard , and James Jones .

JAMES JONES . I am a cheesemonger ; I live at 204, High Holborn; my partner 's name is William Barnard , the cheese was lost on the 7th of December last.

EDMOND WILSON . I am an officer; On the 7th of December, 1814 , I was going down Holborn in the middle of the day about twelve o'clock; I saw the prisoner come against Mr. Jones and Barnards house, he passed the door and took a cheese; I saw him take it; I pursued him, he made his escape from me; I took his companion Joseph Williams as well as the property; the prisoner never came in the neighbourhood until the evening, when I apprehended, him, I have been after him to apprehend him ever since; I knew him before, I am positive to his person.

Q. What became of Joseph Williams - A. He was tried here las, Sessions and acquitted; I took the cheese from the prisoner.

Q. Were was the cheese when he took it - A. Just outside of the door, there were eight or nine of them piled one upon another.

Prisoner. I lived eighteen months in one place, that is how he came to know me; he cannot say he ever had me in custody before.

Wilson. I never had him in custody, he lived in a respectable situation in Broad street St. Giles's. This is the cheese.

GUILTY aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-145

412. CATHERINE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a Bank dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of James Cleland , from his person .

JAMES CLELAND . On Sunday the 5th of February in the evening, I was passing up the City-road ; I was accosted by the prisoner, she asked me to go along with her; I refused, she held me tight some time, and presently I missed a dollar: I gave charge of her to the watchman, she was searched and nothing was found upon her. The constable was going to lock her up. she said if he would not lock her up she would give bac the dollar she had throwed it away she put her hand down by the side of the watchhouse, took up an orange, it contained the dollar.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150215-146

413. EMMA WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a gold seal, value 5 l. and a snuff-box, value 1 l. the property of Neal Campbell .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-147

414. JAMES WITHEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , five sheets, value 1 l. the property of James Dudley .

MARY DUDLEY . My husband's name is James Dudley ; I take in washing. I lost the sheets from Little Chesterfield-street, Mary-le-bone ; the sheets were hanging out in the yard to dry, four of them; the yard is fenced in by a wall; they were taken on the 19th of February; I saw them safe between two and three o'clock in the afternoon: about five o'clock I sent a person to take them in; they were missing. From suspicion, I took a constable with me, we went to Perkins's-buildings, No. 5; the same evening that I missed them; I got to No. 5, Perkins's-buildings, between seven and eight; I and the constable went into the prisoner's room; we found the sheets. The prisoner was in the room with his wife; he said, he was very sorry he had taken them, it was distress that had drove him to do it, he had been a long time out of work. I found five sheets in all in the prisoner's room. I missed four from the yard, and one out of the back room.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am a constable. I went with Mary Dudley to the prisoner's room; I found these five sheets there. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. The prisoner said he did it through distress, he had been out of work a long time.

Prosecutrix. They are my sheets i they are worth

four shillings a piece.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the sheets, and when they came for them I delivered them up.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character,

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-148

415. THOMAS EDMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , fifty pounds weight of potatoes, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Broad .

ELIZABETH BROAD . I am the wife of Thomas Broad ; I keep a potatoe shop, in Whitecross-street, 181. On Saturday afternoon, I lost fifty pounds of potatoes, and a white wicker basket; I was backwards at the time they were taken; I had no person in the shop; I did not see them taken. I found the prisoner in Chequer-alley with the basket and the potatoes; he was in the constables possession.

Prisoner's Defence. It was done out of a frolick; I and the prosecutor had been drinking all the day at a public-house together; I did it to win the wager; the prosecutor cannot deny it.

COURT. Q. To Thomas Broad . Where you sober enough to know whether you laid any wager with the prisoner - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-149

416. SAMUEL LAKE and SARAH WHITTAKER were indicted for that they, on the 13th of February , about the hour of one in the night, one hundred and twenty brockilow plants, value 5 l. feloniously did spoil and distroy , the property of Thomas Potts .

THOMAS POTTS . I am a gardener; I have some land at Turnham Green ; the garden ground is enclosed; I had brockilow growing there; I missed a great quantity of it in the night as well as other articles were taken at the same time; I principally missed them in the night.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. Very well; the man as a labouring man in that neighbourhood, the woman as his wife . In consequence of information, I left my house at Acton, and came to Turnham Green on Tuesday morning; I had been there at six o'clock on Monday night, I had seen my brockilow all safe on Monday night, it was dark then, we were obliged to watch all hours. When I returned on Tuesday morning, I found three parts of one piece of bockilow gone, in that part there were one hundred and sixty-nine heads gone; on the over night the heads were there; I had a man to watch all night, his name is Watson.

Q. Is that man here - A. No.

COURT. Gentlemen of the Jury; the indictment must be made out with satisfaction to you, that it was done in the night, at the time that Mr. Potts came to the ground there had been day light some time; by the evidence it is impossible for you to say when it was done; it is for you to determine.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-150

417. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a pair of glass salts, value 4 s. the property of Paul Wyman .

PAUL WYMAN . I keep a broker's shop , in Compton-street, Goswell-street .

Q. Did you lose a pair of salts any time - A. Yes, yesterday afternoon, about four o'clock; they were on a table in the shop; they were worth four shillings. I was backwards, and a person in court came running, and telling me that the salts were gone; I went, and found the prisoner up a gateway; the prisoner was putting the salts down his pantaloons, he had got one down to his ancle; he appeared as a working man then, as he does now; I should not have had any suspicion of him; he pleaded so much distress, if he had delivered them up, I should have forgive him, but he swore he had not the other so many oaths, that I would not forgive him; he never was out of the constable's sight I believe.

JESSE PHILLIPS. I am a constable. I was going by the prosecutor's house on the opposite side of the way; I saw the prisoner take the salts off the table; I called Wyman out, and told him he was robbed; Wyman followed the prisoner across the street up a gateway, and took the salts from him one at a time; the prisoner denied that he had taken the other; he gave up one, and kept the other; Wyman found the other at the bottom of his pantaloons. These are the salts.

Prosecutor. They are my salts.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-151

418. JOHN TURBIT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , four pounds weight of beef, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a butcher , 97, St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On Thursday last, the 16th of February, I lost four pounds of beef from my shop about eight in the evening; I had been out; on my return home, I saw the prisoner in company with another man near my shop; I went in doors, and desired my young man to watch him through the window, while I went in the passage; in about two minutes my young man called out he has got it; I went to go out of my private door; I did not get out quick enough to see his face; I only suspect it was the prisoner; I cannot swear to him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-152

419. CHARLOTTE EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a sheet, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Adams .

ANN ADAMS . My husband's name is Joseph Adams . I lost a sheet on the 13th of February, I lost it from my dwelling-house, No. 10, Field-lane ; the prisoner's husband lodged in the house; the

prisoner did not live with her husband. This sheet was taken from the room in which the husband lived; she never lived with her husband, or ever came to see him; I did not see it taken, or in the prisoner's possession; on the 13th I missed it, and on the 13th in the evening, I delivered to the husband a pair of sheets clean to the bed; I afterwards saw them at Hatton Garden office.

MARGARET ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker, No. 2, Turnmill-street. On the 13th of February, I took in one sheet of the prisoner; I am certain she is the person that pawned it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-153

420. WILLIAM LACON was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JOHN RAY. On the 18th of January, I observed the prisoner in High-street, Aldgate; I watched him; I saw him go into Mr. New's, a stationer's shop; in a little time he came out; I went in, I made some enquiry of Elizabeth Church; she produced me a shilling. I followed the prisoner, and took him into the Blue Boar Inn; I found three counterfeit sixpences.

Q. Do you know much about money - A. I do. In his coat pocket I found sixteen pennyworth of good copper, and three good sixpences; these three counterfeit sixpences were put in a pocket by themselves; in his other pocket I found a quantity of good silver, about twelve or fourteen shillings; the good money I returned to him, that he has had; there was a small quantity of tea and about twopenny of soap.

ELIZABETH CHURCH. Q. You live at Mr. New, the stationer's - A. Yes.

Q. You remember the prisoner coming to your shop - A. Yes, I do; he came for two sheets of brown paper and a pen, he put down a shilling; I gave him ninepence change; Ray came in, and asked me what the man had changed; I produced the shilling; he desired me to mark it; I gave the same shilling to Ray, that I am sure I received of the prisoner, and no other. This is the same shilling.

Prisoner. I certainly did change a shillings with her.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I am clerk to the solicitor of the Mint.

Q. Look at that shilling - A. It is a counterfeit; it is merely washed, it is quite fresh.

Q. to Ray. Hand over the sixpences - A. These are them.

Mr. Sewell. They are all counterfeits; they are quite new.

Ray. The sixpences were in paper, and the paper folded over each of them to prevent their rubbing.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of paying money at the Excise Office for brokerage, and in the habit of paying money at the Chronicle Office, and the Star Office. I always look, over the money; I am very cautious what money I take; I thought they were three bad sixpences, I put them in paper not to offer them to any person; the reason of my putting them in paper was not to offer them to any body; I put them in my coat pocket; the shilling I thought was a good one. I wanted to buy two fish at the corner of Petticoat-lane to send to Ilford, I went back to this lady's house to get two sheets of brown paper to put them in, and likewise a pen to put the direction on the paper; when I came out of the shop with the paper, this gentleman went in; I went away; I was gone no great while, I had not reached Petticoat-lane, this gentleman beckoned me; I voluntary went back. He searched me, and returned me the bag, containing three dollars and two three-shilling tokens; I considered these three sixpences doubtful; I would not offer either of them for the paper; I knew I had halfpence, but it was extremely difficult for me to get at them; I am an old man. When I went back to the lady, I said I was very sorry for giving her the shilling.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined one year in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for two years more at the end of that year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-154

421. JOHN ABRAHAMS was indicted for a fraud .

The plaintiff was called, and not appearing in court, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-155

422. MICHAEL DONNAHOUGH was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

No evidence being adduced, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-156

423. JAMES ROACH was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

No evidence being adduced the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150215-157

424 MARY HUDSON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

No evidence being adduced the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: o18150215-1

The Opinion of the Judges on the Case of William Bennett and John Turnwell , was delivered by Mr. Justice Heath, as follows:

You have been convicted of breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Frampton,

at the 18th of November with intent the goods and challes in the said dwelling house there being feloniously and burglariously to steal. The opinion of the judges is, that this gate was no part of the dwelling house; the learned Recorder who tried this case, reserved the judgment to the opinion of the judges, the judges have considered this in to much at the gate that was broken and as not within the cartilage of the dwelling house, they are of opinion that you are not guilty of the burglary.

To be discharged.


View as XML