Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th January 1815.
Reference Number: 18150111
Reference Number: f18150111-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 11th of JANUARY, 1815, and following Days

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Robert Dallas , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas, Sir Watkin Lewis , bart, Sir John Eamer knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart, Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. Christopher Magnay , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Searjent of the said City, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London jury.

Thomas Sanderson ,

James Moody ,

Samuel Miller ,

Thomas Sorrell ,

Paul Miller ,

Frederick Hopkins ,

John Buckley ,

Joseph Wood ,

Edward Hickson ,

Joseph Cordingly ,

William Skillbeck ,

Charles Jenkins .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Giles ,

Joshua Robins ,

Ranam Smith ,

Thomas Borer ,

Richard Lovelage ,

Edward Bradley ,

John Ford ,

William Hales ,

George Shelly ,

James Capon ,

John Smith ,

Robert Jury .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Atkinson ,

William Sarridge ,

Richard Scarr ,

John Dowlar ,

William Moxey ,

Edward Stubbs ,

Thomas Boone ,

William Deeson ,

James Wilford ,

William Ashcroft ,

Thomas Freelove ,

William Hill .

Reference Number: t18150111-1

122. ANTHONY MILLBANCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , in the dwelling-house of John Bynner , four 1 l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN BYNNER. I am a grocer . The prisoner was my porter . I live at No. 3, Tothill-street, in the parish of St. Margarets Westminster ; I have a dwelling-house there.

Q. Did you miss any bank notes - A. I have lost bank notes at different times; I do not know who had taken them; I rather suspected the prisoner that he was spending more money than was his own. One day I saw the key in his box; I opened it; I saw some one-pound notes in it, with my own hand writing upon the notes, I can say no further then on four one-pound notes, there was my own hand writing upon them; the name of the person I took them of, and the date; I left them in his box, and sent for an officer; the officer came, and took him in custody. I put my notes in the till after I have endorsed them, my till is not locked, it was left open. I can swear to my having taken these notes since I paid the prisoner any money. I send all my notes to the bankers two or three times in a week.

Q. Had you paid these notes to the prisoner - A. Not to the prisoner I did not; I cannot say whether I paid them to any body else, or whether they were taken away. I knew nothing of the notes until I saw them in the prisoner's box, and that I had taken them.

Mr. Arabin. It is possible you might have paid them to persons that you paid money to - A. It is.

Q. What is the number of the other young men that you have in the shop - A. I have four or five; I occasionally keep five persons.

Q. For what you know, you might on the 24th of November have paid these notes to Edward Rogers - A. On the 24th of November, I paid Edward Rogers three one-pound notes about that time; I am not certain of the day.

Q. You say your till is always kept open, consequently other persons might if they were so disposed go to the till in your absence, any one in the shop might - A. Yes.

Q. And the notes if stolen, they might be taken one at a time - A. They might.

Q. Had you a character with the prisoner - A. Yes; I was satisfied with his character; it was a four years and a half character.

Q. You found seven one-pound notes in the prisoner's box, only four of them with your mark - A. No, only four.

JAMES GILLMORE . On the 19th of December, I took the prisoner into custody; I searched his box, I found in his pocket-book seven one-pound notes, twelve half-crowns, two dollars, six three-shilling pieces, seven shillings, some sixpences, and a ten-pound promissary note. I asked him how he came possessed of so much money; he told me he wanted to speak to his master. I told him I should not allow that, I should take him before the magistrate; I did, and Mr. Bynner picked out four of the notes that he had endorsed. After the examination, I locked the prisoner up, I then asked him again, how he came possessed of so much money; he said, he took from the till a few shillings at a time, and when it amounted to a sum he changed shillings for notes, sometimes he got the notes out of doors. I told him he had four that had Mr. Bynner's hand writing upon them. I asked him if he could account for that, he said, he would give no account for that. I produce the notes.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the notes - A. These four notes have my hand writing upon them, they are all marked in the front; my writing is the name of the person I received them of; there is one Ellis 3rd of August.

Mr. Arabin. This note has on it the 33rd of August, it is 33 August, that is an inaccuracy - A. It is for the 3rd of August.

COURT. You say you do not remember paying them to any body - A. I remember nothing of them until I saw them in the prisoner's box.

Mr. Arabin, If these notes were stolen, they might be taken before the 24th of November - A. On the that day probably.

Q. The prisoner knew it was your habit to mark each note - A. He did.

Q. You never found the notes until the 19th of December - A No.

Prisoner's Defence. I came honestly by the notes.

EDWARD ROGERS . Q. I believe you lived with the prosecutor at the time the prisoner lived there - A. I did, it was upwards of three months.

Q. At any time did you receive any wages of your master - A. Not till I left him, on the 24th of November master paid me five pounds, three one-pound notes; I paid two of the notes to the prisoner.

Q. They had your master's writing on them - A. I cannot say. I was indebted to the prisoner's brother; his brother authorised him to receive it; I paid the prisoner four pounds, two of the four in one-pound notes that I had received of my master.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-2

123. MICHAEL alias PETER WELCH was indicted for that he, being in the dwelling-house of George Smith , on the 22nd of December , feloniously did steal therein, two coats, value 6 l. the property of George Smith ; that he about the hour of six in the night of the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the same .

GEORGE SMITH . I am a taylor ; I live at 11, King-street, Holborn ; I keep a shop and a kitchen. the house is in the parish of St. George the Martyr . I live and sleep in the shop, the shop is on the ground floor.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he worked

for me from Tuesday until Friday morning, he slept in the house three nights, with my apprentice boy and my son in the kitchen.

Q. When did the prisoner quit your house - A. On Friday morning.

Q. Who shut the shop door on the Thursday night - A. I did, myself: I bolted it and locked it. I was the last person up that night; it was dark when I got up, I arose the next morning at six o'clock; I slept in the shop. I got up to let my apprentice in, the prisoner told the boy to bring him a light down into the kitchen.

Q. What did you find when you arose in the morning - A. I told my boy to strike a light; he did, and lighted the candles on the shop board; he took the prisoner a light down stairs; the boy went to wash him, he had the coats afterwards in his hand; they were on the shop board. one was a new superfine coat, the other was an old superfine coat. These coats were on my shop-board just going in at the door; the boy had them in his hand, when he shifted the candle block they were in his way, he put them out of his way; he put them down again; the boy told Welch the candles were ready to go to work; my boy shut the door after him; the shop door I opened in the morning to let him in. There is another door that goes into the street. The boy heard the shop door open, expecting him to go to work; then after a little time the boy heard the street door open; it was shut then that morning; I was the first up in the house. I heard the street door open, I did not know who was going out; the door was shut then, it was fastened the over night. I heard the street door open soon after the boy went to wash him, and then when the boy came out of the yard, the boy said, master, the coats are gone, and Mr. Welch is gone. I sent the boy down into Holborn where I was informed he was gone. Whoever it was could not go out of the yard door, they must go out of the street door. I heard it open. One of the coats comes to four pounds ten shillings, for the other coat the man charges me two-pounds.

Q. Now, was the prisoner to have left you that morning - A. No.

Q. Did he ever return - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see the coats after - A. No. I tried to find them. but I could not any where.

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended - A. On the 3rd of January; I was present when he was taken; he was found at the Red Lion, Seven Dials. A young man saw him the night before, he watched him; the prisoner tried to get away; the young man watched outside of the house, he catched him. There are other lodgers in the house, we all go in at one street door.

Q. Who keeps the house - A. William Cox , he does not live in the house.

JOHN FISHER . I am an apprentice to George Smith , a taylor. I know the prisoner; he slept with me on the 2nd of December.

Q. What time did you get up - A. At about half past five o'clock. I left the prisoner in bed; he asked me to bring him a light down stairs, which I did; then I went up stairs again, I lighted the candles on the shop-board.

Q. Did you see any coats - A. Yes, two, they were on the edge of the shop-board: I moved them. The prisoner came up stairs after me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the shop when the coats were there - A. No, I did not see the prisoner in the shop,

Q. Do you know any thing of his going out of the shop - A. No.

Q. You went out into the yard to wash, did not you - A. Yes; the coats were on the shop-board when I went out; they were not there when I came back; I was not gone three minutes. I am sure I did not see the prisoner in the shop. That is all I know.

GEORGE SHAW . I apprehended the prisoner in a kitchen, in a corner house of Red Lion-street, Seven Dials; there were two ways to get out of the kitchen, he went out of the back way, he pulled the door sharp after him; I opened it; a young man stood in his way, he could not pass; I took him in custody, and took him before the magistrate. I did not find the coats.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a coat and a waistcoat to make for myself; he has a large shop-board where four or five can sit and work; I asked him to let me come and make a garment or two for myself; when my waistcoat was made we pledged it for twenty shillings, the money was all expended; he said when my coat was made he could pledge the coat for more money than I could; I said to him my friend, I will give you a couple of days lift. When he took me up the constable said, I was a fool if I did not take my wages; he told the magistrate he owed me three days wages; I said he has perjured himself. He then said I gave him my work; he then told the truth. It was day-light when I went out, I could see it was a foggy morning; the street door was open; Mr. Smith was jawing the boy. I wished him good morning. He was with me yesterday, he said if I could give him a little towards the clothes, he would not prosecute me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-3

124. JEFFREY BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a waistcoat, value 7 s. eight pair of stockings, value 30 s. thirteen pair of drawers, value 30 s. three night-caps, value 3 s. and eight pair of gloves, value 8 s. the property of William Cook , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM COOK . I am a hosier in the Strand .

Q. Some time previous to the 12th of December, had the prisoner been your porter - A. Yes, for five years; he was in my employ on the night in question when I found he was taken up.

SAMUEL JAMES WOOWARD . I am a pawnbroker in Greek-street, Soho. On Monday evening, the 12th of December, the prisoner came into my shop, he offered two pair of stockings to pledge, he was some time fumbling in the box, he came in at

the private door; I heard him fumbling in the box, I discovered he had a bag. He said, he wanted to pledge some stockings; then I fastened him in the box; he offered me two pair to pledge; he had a bag. I questioned him how he came by them; I told him I thought he had robbed some manufactory or warehouse; he said he had not, they were his son's stockings. I said, let me see what you have got in your bag, I opened the bag; I pulled out one parcel, and found stockings. I told him I should send for a constable; he said, he hoped I would not hurt him; I told him I would not. I told him, he had better tell the truth; he told me if I would let him go, I should have the two pair of stockings, he would say no more about it. I kept him in custody until the officer came; I told him he condemned himself; the two pair of stockings he offered me I gave to the constable.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am a constable. I was sent for on the 12th of December, I took the prisoner, the bag, and the stockings. These are the stockings.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am a Marlborough-street officer. The prisoner was brought to our office, I searched him; I found three pair of stockings, and one pair of gloves; I afterwards searched his lodgings, and then I brought him back to his master, and then I searched his person again, I found a pocket-book on him, containing two five-pound notes and four one-pound notes. On the next day, I went again to his lodgings, and made a fuller search; I found thirteen pair of drawers, three waistcoats, eight pair of stockings, and an odd stocking, three night-caps, and eight pair of gloves.

ANN ALLEN . I am Mr. Cook's shopwoman; I have examined the stockings, the first two pair of stockings produced by the officer, are Mr. Cooke's property, all the articles with the private mark to them I know to be Mr. Cook's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the drawers and stockings twenty years ago; the two pair of stockings actually belonged to myself.

Prosecutor. The pair of stockings the prisoner speaks to, had been in my shop fifteen days before.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 57.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-4

125. EDWARD ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Cranfield in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, five three shilling bank tokens, and thirteen shillings in monies numbered , the monies of William Cranfield .

WILLIAM CRANFIELD was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-5

126. RICHARD MOORE was indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain open field, near the King's highway, upon Thomas Partridge , on the 12th of November , taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. a chain, value 1 l. two seals, value 1 l. a watch-key, value 1 s. and sixteen shillings in monies numbered , his property.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-6

127. CARL PLUMBUCK was indicted for that he, on the 26th of December , being in the dwelling-house of Henry Harris , feloniously did steal therein, two watches, value 2 l. 13 s. the property of Henry Harris ; that he afterwards burglariously did break the said dwelling house to get out of it about the hour of two o'clock on the night of the same day .

HENRY HARRIS . I live at No. 4, Cable-street, in the parish of St. Mary Whitechapel ; I am a slop-seller, and keep a house there.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he is a sailor . On the 25th of December, about three o'clock my shopman was standing at the door; the prisoner passed him; my shopman asked him if he wanted to buy any clothes; he said, yes, but he had no money, he was to get an order from the captain to the owner of the ship, then he should want to buy a good many clothes; my shopman asked him to walk into the shop; I then came into the shop, and asked him his pleasure; he said, he should get an order in an hours time, and then he should want a good many clothes. I asked him if he would walk into the parlour; he said, he should be obliged to me, he stopped till about four o'clock, then the prisoner went out of my house with my shopman, and went to the top of the street, and returned in an hours time; he then remained in my house, and lodged there that night, this was on the 25th of December. The next morning, I got up a little after six o'clock, and when I had dressed myself I went to put my gold watch into my pocket; my gold watch and my silver watch were both gone; I ran down directly into my parlour.

Q. When had you last seen them - A. One I had in my pocket, the gold one I had in my pocket; the silver one hung up at the fire-place; before I went to bed, I wound up my gold watch; I took the silver one from the fire-place, and took them up into my bed-room. When I missed them, I ran down into the parlour to see if the doors were all secure as I left them at night; when I looked at the bolts, the yard door was unbolted, and the door shut to. I am positive the yard door was bolted the over night; a young man that lives with me now bolted it. I went down stairs to see that it was bolted, but the bolts were not shoved quite home; I shoved the bolts quite home. The next morning the watches were gone; when I found the door unbolted, I ran up to the prisoner's room; I put my hand to the bed; the prisoner was gone from the bed and the bed quite cold.

Q. Who has got the two watches - A. The officer has got one, and the pawnbroker the other.

JOHN BUTLER . I am an officer. I produce the watches. The prisoner had left the watch with one Steckholm, if it went well he was to have one pound sixteen shillings for it. I produce a gold seal, I received it of a foreigner of the name of Jacob Woltman , he said, he gave the prisoner three shillings for it.

MR. SALTER. I am a pawnbroker; I live at Ratcliffe Cross. On the 27th of December, the prisoner came and offered a gold watch for sale; Butler the officer had been with me and informed me that two watches had been stolen a gold one and a silver one. I sent for an officer to apprehend the prisoner; I secured the gold watch; I have kept it in my possession ever since; this is the gold watch.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the watches - A. I am certain they are my property, the seal is mine; the gold watch I wore myself, and the silver watch was for use at the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention to take them; a poor man went with me to buy clothes; I had no occasion in the house; I am a stranger here.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-7

128. JOHN PAUL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Smith , about the hour of seven in the night of the 6th of September , and stealing therein, sixty silk handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 4 s. the property of Thomas Smith .

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . Q. You are an acquaintance of Thomas Smith - A. Yes; he lives at 104, Ratcliffe Highway, in the parish of St. George's , he is a haberdasher , he has a shop there, that is part of his dwelling-house. On Tuesday, the 6th of September, about half past six in the evening, I was at Mr. Smith's shop one hour; I saw the prisoner come three different times to the shop window, he came to the shop window, and broke the glass that had been cracked before; I saw him put his hand into the window, and move some stockings; he took two parcels of silk handkerchiefs; these are them. I pursued the prisoner and when he saw me ran, he ran; I cried stop thief; the prisoner threw the stockings behind him; I saw him do it; the patrole stopped him; I told the patrole to keep him in his charge, while I went to find the property; I found the property at the place where I saw him threw it. I have had them in my custody ever since. I produce the handkerchiefs; they are the property of Thomas Smith , they are worth thirty-eight shillings.

GEORGE HENLEY . I am a patrole. I heard the last witness call stop thief; I saw the prisoner running very fast, I stopped him; I took him to Mr. Smith's shop; the last witness took up the goods. I searched the prisoner; I found this wire in his pocket; I suppose it is to draw goods out of windows.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing to the value of 38 s. not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-8

129. ROBERT HOLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of December , a gelding, value 30 l. the property of John Pentalow , the younger ,

JOHN PENTALOW , JUNIOR. I am a farmer at Raines, near Higham Ferry . On the evening of the 2nd of December. I had a bay gelding in my stable, rising three years old; he was put in the stable, standing with a pole behind him, to keep him in.

Q. What was the value of the horse - A. Between twenty-five and twenty-six pounds; the prisoner lived with a cousin of mine; he knew my farm.

Q. How long had you had this horse - A. About a twelvemonth; I knew him particularly well; he was taken by the description I gave of him. I saw the horse in the custody of Mr. Smith, of Higham, near Barnet; it was my horse; he was taken by the description I gave of him in my hand bill. The horse that I saw at Bow-street answers the description I gave of him; it was my horse; I came up to Bow-street, and saw the horse.

GEORGE COKETY . I keep a public-house at Olney, in Buchinghamshire.

Q. On the morning of the 2nd of December, did the prisoner come to your house about two o'clock - A. He did, he was guiding the horse with a broken halter; it was a little bay horse, black legs, and mane; I have seen the horse since with Mr. Pentalow, that was the horse. He called for a pint of ale; the girl drawed it; he said, can I put the horse in, and give him a little bit of hay; I said, yes. He said, he was going to St. Albans. He saw a bridle hanging up in the stable, he said can you lend me a bridle, I will bring it back to-morrow; I lent him the bridle; he left behind him the halter.

SAMUEL SMITH . I live at Whetstone. On Saturday, the 2nd of December, I overtook the prisoner at Barnet, he was walking and leading the horse, a little bay horse with black legs. I said, my friend it is very dark, why do not you ride the horse; he said, he was going to Windsor for some horses. I said how came it you have not a saddle; as we were going along, he said, he had the horse to sell, if I can get money to satisfy my master and some for myself. I asked him what he wanted for it; he said twenty-five guineas for it. I said, will you take twenty pounds for it; he said, no. We came into the County of Middlesex; he said, he would take twenty-five pounds. I saw the patrole; I told him what I suspected. He agreed to take twenty pounds if I would treat him with a bottle of wine. I took him into custody. I have since given up the horse to Mr. Pentalow. As I was taking the prisoner to the cage, he confessed that he had stolen it; he was taken to the Justice and committed.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-9

130. JOHN EGGLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a ring, value 35 s. the property of Sarah Burrow widow, privately in her shop .

JAMES SMALLBONE . I am shopman to Sarah Burrow 47. High-street St. Giles's , she is a pawnbroker . On the 5th of January, the prisoner desired to be shewn some guinea gold rings; they were in the tray, I shewed him them, he chused one which was priced nineteen shillings; he offered me fifteen shillings, I refused it, he went out of the shop as soon as he was gone, I missed a ring off a card that contained eight rings; I had seen the card two minutes before that. I saw eight rings then; I was serving another person with rings at the time; he went out first, I went out after the prisoner, I desired him to come back, he came back I seized his hand. I found the ring, this is the ring I now produce; when he went out I instantly missed the ring off the card, when he came back I seized the prisoner's hand and found it in his hand. It cost one pound fifteen and eight pence, this is the ring, it is the property of Sarah Burrow widow.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had intended to steal the ring, I could have throwed it away, and not let it been found upon me; It was not my intent to steal it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his youth

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-10

131. JOHN KEAF and WILLIAM MURRAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , four handkerchiefs value 6 s. the property of William Pitt , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM PITT . I am a linen draper , Slone square, chelsea .

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer of Chelsea. I was walking down Sloane-street on Saturday the 17th of December in company with James Cox , as I was going by out of Mr. Pitts shop. I then said if you will stop a minute or two, you will see something done, and before I had done speaking it to Cox, Keaf took the handkerchiefs down, I saw him take them down; Murray was in company with him, they were both together at the time. I apprehended both the prisoners by the assistance of Cox; I took Keaf, Murray stopped at the door untill I came. Keaf got above twenty yards from the door; I apprehended both the prisoners by the assistance of Cox, I took Keaf; Murruy stopped at the door until I came back; I went up with Cox to him and took him to the watchhouse. I observed the two prisoners talking together before they look the handkerchief down.

Q. After you had got Keaf you went up to Murray - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the handkerchiefs upon Keaf - A. He dropped them down from under his coat.

Q. Were the handkerchiefs hanging inside of the door - A. They were inside of the door upon a rail; I saw Keaf take the handkerchiefs down, Murray had nothing to do with it.

JAMES COX . I was with Maybank on the 17th of December, I saw the two prisoner's standing together. against Mr. Pitts shop window; I saw Keaf take the handkerchiefs down from off the door way, after he had taken it down, he rolled it up, and put it under his jacket. Maybank said to Keaf you have got it; he turned round and dropped the handkerchiefs, Maybank picked them up.

Maybank. These are the handkerchiefs.

Prosecutor. They are my property, they were in my shop when I left it, about nine o'clock on Saturday morning; these very handkerchiefs were in my shop, I value them at ten shillings.

Keaf's Defence. I was coming along at the end of Sloane-street, I saw the handkerchiefs hanging at the door, almost blown off with the wind; I took them off the door and ran away with them, a gentleman stopped me.

Murray's Defence. The constable took the young man, the constable took me, he said I was in company with him.

KEAF GUILTY, aged 17.

MURRAY GUILTY, aged 25.

Or stealing but not privately in the shop .

Confined 1 year and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-11

132. STEPHEN REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of January , ten pair of stockings, value 25 s. the property of John Ride , privately in his shop .

JOHN RIDE . I live at New Brentford , I am a hosier .

Q. Did you loose any stockings from your shop on the third of this month - A. I did ten pair of worsted stockings on the third of January. About five o'clock the prisoner came to my shop, I was in my room at tea, he did not come in the shop he was on the sell of the door scuffling with John Brown; I came to the door, and saw them scuffling on the pavement. I can prove my property.

JOHN BROWN. I am a smith at Brentford, on the 3rd of January about five o'clock I saw the prisoner on the threshold of Mr. Ride's door; he was reaching this bundle of stockinge from the window board. I saw him take his hand away from the window board and the stockings in his hand; no one being in the shop. I supposed he had stolen them; I took the stocking' from him; I called Ride, I threw the stockings down in the shop, and caught hold of the prisoner's great coat tail, he attempted to throw off his great coat, and ran away from me; I closed with him, and threw him down, and at that time Mr. Ride came to my assistance, I delivered him into his hands; we took him to the constable's house that night, and took him before the magistrate the next morning. The prisoner said I pushed him up against the window.

JOHN KING . The prisoner and the stockings, were delivered to me,

Prosecutor. They are my stockings, these stockings were in my shop window, they are worth three shillings a pair.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no lights in the shop; I pushed the door open, Mr. Brown called Mr. Ride to bring him a light; he told Mr. Ride he found

a bundle of stockings on the ground. I was out of employ and in great distress, having a wife and four small children, Mr. King knows me and my affairs.

Mr. King He has a wife and four children and has been in great distress; I believe he has been out of work some time.

GUILTY aged 41.

Of stealing but not privately .

Confined 1 month and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18150111-12

133. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , portmanteau, value 10 s. six corks, value 2 s. an apron, value 1 s. and fourteen bottles, value 3 s. the property of William Macclesfield .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a watchman of St. Andrew's Holborn, On Saturday morning, about a quarter before three o'clock, I stopped the prisoner, in Holborn on the opposite side of the church; I asked the prisoner what he had got; he answered a trunk he said it was going into Essex, he was going to take it to the coach, I told him I would not let him go without seeing the box; I found no direction on the box; I took him to the watchhouse. He burst out crying; he said for God's sake do not stop me, I have got a good master. He had been three years and a half in his place, he put his hand into his pocket; he said here, my friend, there is a bottle of good old wine; let me go. I said he was my prisoner he could not go; I delivered him up to the constable of the night at the watchhouse. I saw the portmantau contained twelve bottles of wine, five new napkins an old glass cloth and the butlers apron, he had a bottle in each of his coat pockets; he said his master lived at No. 22, Montague-street Russel-square.

- SMART. I was constable of St. Andrew's last year, The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Chapman; he delivered to me a portmantua; I have had it ever since, the contents were twelve bottles of wine, five towels, an old glass cloth; he had a bottle in each pocket, The prisoner told me the wine was his perquisites the clothes belonged to his master. He seemed very much troubled about leaving his place. I told him it was my duty to keep him in custody.

WILLIAM MACCLESFIELD , I reside in Montague-street Russel square; the prisoner was the last person I should have suspected, I saw the things before the alderman; the corks and the portmantua were mine; the wine I could not swear to, I had such wine; but the corks, and the portmantua I have no doubt of.

GUILTY , aged, 28.

Fined 1 s. and confined 6 calender months in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-13

134. MARGARET M'CARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , a coat, value 3 l. the property of George Selson , in the dwelling house of George Drinkald seniour .

GEORGE DRINKALD JUNR . On the 31st of December, I met the prisoner coming out of my fathers house. I perceived she had something in her apron: I had no doubt of it was a great coat I immediately sent for a constable, he examined her apron; it proved to be a great coat, the great coat was taken from her; she must have taken it from the back of the accompting house, about three or four minutes before I saw her in the back part of our premises, we had lost a great many coats.

GEORGE SELSON . I am clerk to Mr. Drinkald, the coat is mine, produced by the constable. I saw the coat taken from the prisoner's possession which coat is mine,

GEORGE SPENCE . I am a constable, I found this coat in the prisoner's apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to be in distress I took the coat up in the passage and put it into my apron. I met the gentleman with it.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-14

135. CORNELIOUS DAVENPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , three skins, value 30 s. the property of John Blenkarn Matthias Prime Lucas , John Drinkald Joseph Barber and Robert Smith .

JOHN BLENKARN . I am a wharfinger , my partners names, are Matthias Prime Lucas, John Drinkald , Joseph Barber , and Robert Smith . I lost these skins off Woolkey ; we had a stack of skins and hydes laying for shipping. On the 15th of December, I was standing about three or four yards off the place were these hides and skins lay, I saw the prisoner come across the quay, with a bundle of skins suspended on his shoulder by a string, it being an unusual way of carrying wet skins. I considered he had not come honestly by them. I stopped him, and on examination, it turned out to be three calf skins; they were given over to the constable.

JOHN MOORE . I am one of the workman at the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner take up one of the bundles of skins. There was a whole lot of skins and hides laying together on the quay three in a parcel; he took one of the parcels up and walked off with it.

Q. Look at the prisoner is he the man - A. Yes I called to the prisoner, master was coming along, he stopped him with the bundle on his shoulder.

GEORGE SPENCE . I am a constable, I took the prisoner into custody; the skins were delivered to me; I produce them.

Prisoner's Defence. I had only one to throw down.

MOORE He had one parcel; it was three skins he took them off the quay.

GUILTY aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-15

136. JAMES REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of December , one hundred ounces of tea, value 2 s. the goods of the united company of merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, For like offence, the property

of persons to the jurors unknown.

JAMES BAZIL . I am a labourer at the India warehouse, Fenchurch Street ; I worked in the same warehouse with the prisoner. On the 3rd of December last there were tea chests there with them. I saw the prisoner put his hand into a chest; he took something out: it must be tea, he put it into his breeches. I informed John Brown the commodore.

JOHN BROWN. I am a commodore of the labourers in the East India warehouse, in consequence of information, I searched the prisoner; I found a bag containing about ten ounces of tea in his breeches. He said before the Lord Mayor, that he did it through distress.

JOHN RICH . Q. Where abouts is the value of this tea - A. Two shillings. The prisoner had eighteen shillings a week for working from eight till three.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it out of the chest, it was laying on the ground.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY aged 36,

Confined 3 months and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-16

137. JOHN STEPHENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , five skins, value 18 s. the property of Thomas Pickford Junior .

THOMAS ELLIOTT . I am a traveller, employed by Thomas Pickford junior, he is a sadlers ironmonger , in St. Martins-lane, Cannon street, he has no partner. On Tuesday the 5th of December, I purchased four dozen of bazil sheep skins, of Mr. Turner in the leather market, Leadenhall market , after I purchased them, they were weighed in the public scale, and booked by the clerk of the market. I left them in the warehouse, and afterwards took a porter to fetch them away; that is the usual course of trade. In about two hours, I went there with the porter; and counting them over, there were five skins short of the number, I weighed them again, and found a deficiency of eighteen pound in weight.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of them - A. About eighteen shillings; I have seen the skins since, I have not the least doubt they are the skins I purchased; they agree exactly in weight. I have not the least doubt they are the same skins.

JOSEPH HOWLETT TURNER . Q. You are the person the last witness bought the skins of - A. I am. I live in Long lane, in the Borough, I am a leather factor and tanner of skins. I sold to Elliott four dozen of bazil skins. After they were weighed I considered them ae the property of Mr. Pickford after that, in the afternoon. Elliott came and told me there were five skins missing, I said I would enquirs into it, I mentioned it to the warehouse keeper that such a loss had been sustained, after I went home in the evening, to my house, he sent me a note, that Stevens had got them. I went to Steven's house in Long lane Bermondsey street; I told Stevens what I had come for; he gave me the skins; they have the same duty mark, and of the same weight. I have no doubt they are part of the skins I sold to Elliott. The prisoner said he was sorry for taking them away.

WILLIAM SARGE . I produce the skins.

Prosecutor. They are the skins.

CHARLES MANN . I am a tanner. I saw the prisoner in the warehouse, in Leadenhall-market; he was looking at some bazil skins at the dinner hour, when there was nobody there.

GUILTY aged 44.

Confined 1 month , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-17

138. DAVID OLIVER was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the 7th of December , in a certain open street, in the King's Highway, upon Henry Bond Kerridge ; putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a watch; value 25 s. a seal, value 15 s. and a ribbon value 1 d. his property.

HENRY BOND KERRIDGE . I am collecting clerk to Messrs Button and Whitaker ; they are in the musical line. This happened to me on Wednesday, the 7th of December, a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening. I was opposite of Mr. Ross's Fish-warehouse in Lombard-street . I was surrounded by five men; some of them pulled me violently by the collar of my coat, and struck me a violent blow on the head; while the prisoner snatched my watch from my fob. I immediately seized his arm, with the watch in his hand. He got his hand from me. and put it behind him. I then demanded my watch he said, he had not get it, he knew nothing at all about it. I asked for a constable; I could not find one; a man said he would take him into custody for me, I still kept hold of him by the tail of his coat; he took him, as far as the corner of the Mansion-house, when the man let the prisoner go free; I followed him and never lost sight of him. When he got to the corner of the Mansion-house, he ran against some iron railings, and fell back into a gentlemans arms, the gentleman then took him to the compter; I had got held of his coat until he came there, I am sure the prisoner is the man. I saw his hand take my watch.

WILLIAM PENNANT. I am clerk to a notary, on the evening of the 7th of December, I had some buisines that called me to a notary's in Lombard-street, I observed a mob collected at the door of the house to which I was going. I saw young Henry Kerridge holding the prisoner by the collar of his coat, demanding his watch, he said, give me my watch repeatedly, you have stolen my watch, I can take my oath you are the man. I went into the house then. I had property to leave. I came out again, I found them at the door still. There was a tall man and a short man which I supposed to be companions of the prisoner, one of them undertook to take the prisoner to the compter, my curiosity led me to see the end of it, I got as far as George street by the Mansion house, when the man that pretended to have him in custody, let him go from him, saying off or go it, I immediately run and called stop thief, this man that had him in custody ran along side of me, saying, let me get before you, I will catch him

first, I said as I was first I would have the first chance of him; he ran down George-street, as far as the back of the Mansion House, where some iron rails were: I suppose he ran against the iron rails; I was about a pace or two behind him; I made a prisoner of him; I took him to the Compter myself, there was no constable or officer about there.

THOMAS DENNIMORE. I am a clerk to a tea-dealer, in the Poultry. On Wednesday, the 7th of December, a quarter before seven at night, I saw a crowd of people, and the prosecutor taxing the prisoner with stealing his watch, he said he had stolen his watch, and he could swear it before any magistrate; he called out for an officer to take him into custody; some person laid hold of him with intention to take him to the Compter, and opposite of George-street the prisoner ran off; I ran the other way of the Mansion House, and when I came to the other corner Mr. Pennant had got hold of him. I laid hold of the prisoner likewise, and assisted in taking him to the Compter. I am sure he is the same man that the prosecutor taxed with having stolen his watch.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On Wednesday evening, the 7th of December, being in Cornhill, I was informed there had been a robbery committed in Lombard-street, and the prisoner was taken to the Compter; I directly ran to the Compter, and found the prisoner Oliver there; in one minute a youth came, and brought me the watch, saying that is the watch that I picked up. I locked the prisoner up, and the next day I took him before the Lord Mayor. I took the address of both the witnesses.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Lombard-street by myself; I told the young man I had not got his watch; I then went to the Compter.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-18

139. JAMES WYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , three pair of pantaloons, value 14 s. the property of John Dewd , privately in his shop .

JOHN DEWD. I live at 48, Golden-lane, in the parish of St. Lukes ; I am a clothes dealer ; I keep a shop .

Q. Are your goods outside of the shop - A. Yes, they do some times. On the 8th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I lost three pair of pantaloons, they were inside of the door of the shop, they were on a railing inside of the shop for sale; I was in the shop; I heard a scuffling in the shop; upon looking down, I saw some pantaloons fall down off the railing on the shop floor which gave me suspicion there was something going on wrong, and upon running out into the street at the corner of Play-house-yard, I saw three men standing together, one of the three had the pantaloons.

Q. Was that the prisoner - A. No; I said to the man that had the pantaloons, them pantaloons are mine, and when I came up to the man, the prisoner was taken in custody by two officers, Prince and Lewless. I heard the noise in the shop, and saw the pantaloons fall down, it gave me a suspicion; I ran after the prisoner from hearing the noise in the shop.

Q. At the time you did see the prisoner, the officers happening to be at Play-house-yard, Golden-lane and saw him running with the pantaloons - A. When I came up to him he was taken by the officers, Prince and Lewless are the officers that had got the pantaloons when I came up.

Q. Did you hear any body snatch any thing from off your rails - A. Yes, I did; that gave me suspicion.

Q. Immediately upon that, you ran out, and saw three men - A. Yes; the prisoner was stopped by Prince and Lewless.

RICHARD LEWLESS. I am a constable. I was in company with Prince; I saw Prince take these three pair of pantaloons of the prisoner.

Q. What was the prisoner doing - A. He was running; he ran right against me, Prince and Dewd was following him.

JOHN PRINCE . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner, as he was running from Mr. Dewd; it might be four or five yards from his shop where I stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence I did it through distress, and starvation.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 1 month , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-19

140. JOHN NEAL and JAMES THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , sixty pounds weight of beef, value 30 s. the property of John Hall , privately in his shop .

JOHN BROWN. I live in White Horse-street, Stepney; I am a carpenter. On Saturday evening last, about seven o'clock, I was coming up Ratcliffe Highway, I saw the two prisoners at the bar; they were carrying beef, one had one piece of beef, and the other the other, I knew Neal before; I had suspicion; I stopped them; I asked them how they came by it; they said, they got it on board a ship. I took the prisoners and the beef to the office, and gave information where I met with the prisoners; it was exactly seven o'clock when I met the prisoners.

JOHN HALL . I am a butcher ; I live at Lime-house-hole, in the hamlet of Poplar and Blackwall, in the parish of St. Dunstan's Stepney .

Q. On Saturday last about half past six were you in your shop - A. Yes; the beef found upon the prisoners was taken to the office; I swore to it; it was returned to me. It was in my shop at half past six.

Q. Did you miss any beef - A. The beef that was taken to the office, I saw in my shop at half past six; afterwards I missed it from my shop. The beef that I saw in the office was the beef that I had seen in the shop. The officer came to my door, and asked me whether I had lost any beef; I missed the beef. I went to the office, and saw the beef

there: it was my beef; I swore to it. It was beef that was in my shop for the purpose of sale. I saw no one take it out of my shop.

Q. Had you left your shop - A. I did not quit the shop at all; my wife was in a little room partitioned off. I sat at the door-way, on purpose that I should have an eye over the shop and the meat. My wife reached me a cup of tea and a bit of toast; I reached out my hand to take it, and when I sat up, I missed a piece of beef; that was about half past six. I said to my wife, we have had a d - d good customer; she said what; I replied the piece of beef is gone.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

THOMPSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

NEAL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-20

141. GEORGE SMITH , alias THOMAS TYLER , was indicted for that he, on the 15th of March , feloniously and unlawfully had in his custody and possession a forged bank note for the payment of 5 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-21

142. GEORGE SMITH , alias THOMAS TYLER , was indicted for feloniously forging a 5 l. bank note, with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away a like forged bank note, he knowing it to be forged.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-22

143. JAMES MORDANT was indicted for that he, on the 2nd of December , feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession a forged bank note for the payment of 2 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-23

144. JAMES MORDANT was indicted for feloniously forging on the 2nd of December , a bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

Mr. Knapp, councel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-24

145. JAMES MORDANT was indicted for that he, on the 2nd of December , having in his custody and possession a forged 2 l. bank note, did swallow and destroy a certain part of the said bank note, whereby the said forged bank note became truly lost .

AND OTHER COUNTS, for a similar offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Knapp, councel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-25

146. MARY WATSON was indicted for that she, on the 20th of December , feloniously and without lawful excuse had in her custody and possession a forged bank note for the payment of 2 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-26

147. MARY WATSON was indicted for feloniously forging on the 20th of December , a 2 l. bank note .

SECOND COUNTS, for disposing of and putting away a like forged note,

Mr. Knapp, councel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-27

148, JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , two pewter pint pots, value 3 s. the property of James Lawrance .

JAMES LAWRENCE . I am a publican ; I keep the Bull at Poplar . On the 21st of December, the prisoner was drinking in the tap-room about two hours, on his going out of the door he fell down; there was one pint pot in his hand, that fell down; on heaving him up, we found another in his pocket; he had two of my pots, one in his pocket of mine, and another in his hat, and he had another belonging to another publican. These are my pots; one he had in his hat, and the other in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The pots were found on me they must have been put in my pocket by somebody else.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-28

149. JOHN LAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a shirt, value 6 s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a waistcoat, value 15 s. the property of Daniel Coles ; a coat, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. and fifteen shillings in monies numbered, the property of James Lee , in the dwelling-house of the said Daniel Coles .

DANIEL COLES . I live at 51, Baldwin's-gardens, in the parish of St. Andrews . The prisoner was a lodger in my house; he slept in the two pair of stairs back room, my apprentice slept with him.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner getting up on Wednesday, the 14th of December - A. Yes; he got up and went into his room; he slept that night in

the two pair front room with a lodger of mine; he got up at eight o'clock, and went into his own bed, and slept there all day; he got up at four o'clock in the afternoon, and went out of the room. I did not miss any things until ten o'clock in the evening, when I went to bed myself, a waistcoat, a shirt, and two handkerchiefs; the breeches I missed the next day; I did not search particular for any thing that night; I knew they were gone; about ten o'clock I went to sleep in the bed where Lawson had been. The next day when I got up, I searched, and found the things gone. I sent the apprentice lad to see if any thing of his were gone also he missed his coat, waistcoat, and fifteen shillings in money, that was the lad's property. My coat, waistcoat, shirt, and two handkerchiefs were gone from me; upon missing the things I went in search of the prisoner; I was all day seeking for him, I could not find him until late at night, I found him at Barnet; he had my shirt and handkerchief with him; that is all he had. He had my shirt and handkerchief on; I only found a shirt and a handkerchief, they were worth eight shillings; I did not expect the prisoner to leave my lodgings, he owed me about three weeks rent.

Q. When had you last seen this shirt, handkerchiefs, coat, and waistcoat - A. In the morning when I last got up.

JAMES LEE . I am an apprentice to the last witness. The prisoner used to sleep in the same bed with me.

Q. Do you remember his sleeping in the front room on the morning of the 14th - A. I remember he came into the house about one o'clock in the morning; he went into the front room; I was in bed.

Q. Why did not he come to his own bed - A. On account of mistress being ill, master slept along with me; then after master got up he came into his own bed, about eight o'clock; I was up, I was on the stairs when he went into the room; I went into the room about ten minutes after he went in, he was in bed then, I did not stay long in the room. I left him there; I saw him again about three o'clock in the afternoon, he was laying on the bed still, I left him there; I did not see him any more until I saw him at Hatton Garden office. He must have left us about four o'clock; I went up into the room, and saw he was gone. The things were all there about three o'clock when I went up, a shirt, waistcoat, and handkerchief; I saw them about three o'clock in the afternoon of masters, they were laying on the drawers in the room; when I went up about four o'clock the prisoner was gone.

Q. Did you observe whether your master's things were gone - A. No, I took no notice. A coat, waistcoat of mine, and fifteen shillings in money I found were gone the next day; my coat was worth thirty shillings, the waistcoat five shillings, and fifteen shillings in money.

Q. Did you ever find your property again - A. No.

Q. to Prosecutor. What was the value of your waistcoat - A. Fifteen shillings.

EDWARD COLES . I am cousin to the prosecutor. I went with the prosecutor to Barnet, we found the prisoner there; the shirt and handkerchief were found in my presence, nothing else. The prisoner said he had not taken the things at first; I brought the shirt and handkerchief with me to town; that is all that I know. I gave the shirt and handkerchief to the constable.

GEORGE TINDALL . I was constable of the night. Coles brought the shirt and handkerchiefs to me; I produce them. The prisoner said he took the shirt and handkerchiefs to get them washed.

Prosecutor. That is my shirt and handkerchief; I did not find the waistcoat; they were all laying on the top of the drawers together.

Prisoner's Defence. I started from the prosecutor's house at nine o'clock in the morning, to go to work for Mr. Collet at Barnet; Mr. Coles came to Barnet just about eight o'clock, as I had left work; he said he missed his things; I told him I knew nothing about it, I shewed him every thing I had; I said if I have got any thing of yours you shall have it; the shirt and handkerchiefs I had, I put them on on my going out in the morning; I told him I had the shirt and handkerchief.

Prosecutor. He said the shirt and handkerchiefs were not mine; he bought them in Monmouth-street.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing to the value of 8 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-29

150. ELIZABETH LOADEY , alias KEMP , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of December , a feather-bed, value 2 l. and two sheets, value 8 s. the property of James Lacey , in his dwelling-house .

MARY LACEY . My husband's name is James Lacey , he lives at No. 11, Little Earl-street, in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields , he is a housekeeper there. I let a lodging to the prisoner, she came on the 25th of December, 1813; she took the lodging by the week, a ready furnished lodging.

Q. Did you at any time miss any thing - A. Never before I missed the bed; I missed the bed, and the two sheets on the bed; they were let to her to use with the lodging-room; I missed them on the 12th of December.

COURT. There is no pretence for making this a capital offence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-30

151. ROBERT COOLING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Peaty , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 7th of December , and burglariously stealing therein two tea-cadys value 4 s. a sugar bason value 6 d. and a steal pen value 2 d. the property of William Peaty .

SUSANNAH PEATY . My husband's name is William Peaty , we live in George yard Hatton wall , my husband is a coachman . On Wednesday the 7th of December, my husband came home between twelve

and one o'clock in the morning, he had his coach and horses to put up, I went out to assist him, I latched the door after me and left no one in the house; there is but one door to the house, I am sure I latched the door after me, I did not lock it I am sure, I latched it; I entered the stable, I staid there about a quarter of an hour; when I returned I found the door latched, and when I went in, I missed two caddys off the dresser; when I came out there were two caddys on the dresser, and when I returned, I missed them, that was on the ground floor; there was a small gold broach in one of the caddys, a silver caddy spoon, a steel pen, and a red case.

Q. Did you miss both the caddys - A. Yes, they were on the dresser when I left the house, I am sure of it, the other caddy was full of bills, receipts, and papers.

Q. What might they be worth - A. I will say six shillings for all together; I would not wish to value too much. The officer has them, I have seen them in the hands of the officer. I did not see the prisoner take them; I am sure I latched the door I tried the latch, and I am sure it catched, it is a common latch.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer; on Friday the 9th of December, I was in White-cross street, looking about there, I am generally there of an evening about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner with these things under his arm, he was in company with a tall man, I asked him how he came by the property; he told me he took them from his father, his father lived at Islington, he was going to take them to a brother of his in Crown Street Soho; he would not tell me any more. I then said to him, if he was going to Crown street Soho, he was in the wrong direction, he was making for lower White-cross street, and within a few doors of it, that lies south of the place, and Soho lies westward; I then took him to Hatton garden office; I took the caddys and him into my custody, I asked him who was along with him, he said, he did not know the name of the tall young man, he did not belong to him; I then took him to the office, he told the same story nearly to the magistrate; the magistrate asked me if I had any thing else against him. I could not say although I suspected him. The magistrate said, if he would bring his father the next day he would liberate him. He was ordered to bring his father, the next day the father came, but nobody came forward to own the things, a carpenter came into the public house and said he was going to put up some iron bars to a house that had been robbed; I took the prisoner to the Shears public house, the parties came forward and swore to the articles, he was committed for trial, These are the caddys, I took from the prisoner. The prisoner had just been discharged from the New Prison when I took him; I never had him in custody before.

Prosecutrix This tea-caddy is my husbands property, I know both the caddys, this is the key of one of the caddys, I lost the key of the other caddy some years ago, I have brought the key of one of the caddys, I had it up stairs in my bed room. I have brought the key with me now, it will lock, and unlock it both. The caddys were unlocked.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutrix on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Barron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-31

152. JOHN TAYLOR and ELIZABETH RINGROSE were indicted for that they, on the 13th of September , being in the dwelling house of Henry Price Martin , feloniously did steal, one ring, value 5 s. two pictures, value 5 s. and one bank note, value 59 l. his property, that they, about the hour of three in the same day, feloniously did break to get out of the same .

HENRY PRICE MARTIN. I live at 19, Market-lane, in St. James's Parish , I am a house keeper there.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes, the prisoner Taylor lived with me twice, the last time he lived with me about two months, he lived with me the first time about a year and a half; the first time he left he was absent two or three months. I cannot say which exactly, and then he returned; he then continued with me about two months, before I missed anything, Elizabeth Ringrose left me about, nine months ago, she never returned.

Q. On the 13th of September last, was the prisoner John Taylor in your house - A. Yes, he slept there.

Q. Were all the doors made fast that night - A. Yes, all made fast; I went to bed at half past nine or ten, I cannot say which.

Q. Who fastened the street door - A. My young woman that is here now; I was awoke in the morning by the opening of the door, the bolts lock and chain were all sound when I came down, and the door open, and likewise the kitchen door was open that leads into the passage, to the street door.

Q. What o'clock was this - A. About half after six, it was rather dark.

Q. It was not light enough to see a man's face was it - A. It was hardly break of day, I could not see a mans face at that time of the morning, without I was very close to him. My servant girl came down, she let me know that the bureau had been broken open, and that the house had been robbed.

Q. What did you miss - A. I missed a fifty pound bank note from out of the bureau, I had seen it on the Thursday evening before.

Q. What day of the week was this - A. Wednesday morning that I missed it, I also lost a guinea a gold enameled ring, and some silver, nothing else except a pocket handkerchief, and such like wearing apparel.

Q. That is not in the indictment - A. No, I think it is not.

Q. What silver did you loose - A. About ten or twelve shillings, and there was a bad seven shilling piece that was put in a piece of paper.

Q. What is your servant girls name - A. Jane Banks .

Q. Upon missing this did you search to see whether Taylor was in the house - A. He was in the

house untill the afternoon; he was in the house when I heard the noise of the door opening.

Q. Did you see him afterwards - A. I saw him in the afternoon; he quitted my house when two officers came for him; at my house, the same day they took him in custody.

Q. When did you next see your property or any part of it - A. The same evening I saw some handkerchiefs that was taken out of a box at the lodgings of the woman prisoner, and I saw some currants, and some plumbs that was going to be sent into the country, they were likewise found in her box.

Q. When did you see the fifty pound note - A. On Thursday evening.

Q. When did you see the fifty pound note again after you lost it - A. On Wednesday a gentleman called upon me, and told me the fifty pound note was in the officers hands that had taken the woman prisoner. Not knowing the number of the note. I went to the bankers where I took the note, to get the number.

Q. Did you know the note by any mark upon it - A. Not particularly. They gave me the number of two notes; I had two fifty pound notes, on Wednesday I went to the bank and stopped payment of this fifty pound note, which I had lost.

Q. What is the value of the property that you lost except the bank note - A. The guinea and the ring, I do not know the value of the other things.

Q. What was the value of the ring - A. I do not know, it might be ten shillings.

Q. Is that all you know about it - A. Yes.

Q. When did the officer take Taylor - A. In the evening, nothing was found upon him as I know off.

CHARLES STURCHER . I am clerk to Currie and company.

Q. Did you pay a fifty pound note to Mr. Martin - A. Yes on the 17th of August there were two fifty pound I paid him No. 2318, and 1043, they were other notes, those were paid to him on the 17th of August.

MR. EYRE. I am a hosier. The prisoner Ringrose came to my shop on the 14th of September; about eleven o'clock, and bought some Angola stockings, flannel, and silk handkerchiefs, for which she offered in payment a fifty pound note; thinking it was a forgery, I sent my young men to the Bank of England to get it changed, there it was stopped, a gentleman and a Bow street officer came from the Bank and took the prisoner into custody at my shop. I took her address, it was not a true address, 26, Berwick street; she said she had the note of a servant who was going abroad; I endorsed my name and I believe the name she gave me, on the back of the note.

JOHN HOLIWELL . I live at No, 1, Little George street, Hampstead Road, I keep a house there the prisoner Ringrose lodged in my two pair back room, with a soldier of the name of Ringrose as I was informed.

Q. Do you remember Wednesday morning, the 14th of September - A. Yes, I heard of this robbery that morning; I got up about seven o'clock, I was walking up the street, I met the prisoner Ringrose she said I am a pretty one to be up all night, smiled and past.

JOHN LEE 'S. I am one of the inspectors of the Bank of England. The note was stopped at the Bank I produce it from the Bank; I received it of Mr. Hayes, the chief cashier of the Bank, the note is endorsed by Mr. Eyres.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I searched Ringrose's lodgings; I found some plumbs, currants, two handkerchiefs, and two pictures, that had been stolen out of the parlour; I in company with Plank we went to the prosecutor's house; when we came to the house we took the man prisoner into custody, on suspicion. On the next day, at the examination, Ringrose said the man had let her into the house; no threat or promise of favour had been made use of to her before the woman said this; she said it frely of her own accord; she said it to his face, he denied it.

Mrs. Martin. The two handkerchiefs, two pound of plumbs, a pound and a half of currants, two half ounces of ground spice, two ounces of candied lemon, orange-peel, and two pictures, are mine.

Q. What is their value - A. A shilling, and the handkerchiefs one shilling; six shillings they cost me.

COURT. The other articles are not in the indictment.

Q. to Prosecutor. I think you told me you had two notes of fifty pounds each - A. Yes; one fifty-pound note I had changed some time before, and the other remained in my possession on the night in question; I received them at my bankers; I don't know it by any particular mark; I only know it by being told by the banker that was one of the notes paid to me; I received it myself at the bankers.

MR. STURCHER. I only know the note was paid to Mr. Martin by reference to the book; this is one of the notes I paid to Mr. Martin; I know it by refering to the book.

Q. to Prosecutor. Had you any note of fifty-pound in the house except what came from Currie and Company - A. None.

Taylor's Defence. I got up at the same time in the morning as usual to dress my goods; I went on to work the servant came down stairs.

Ringrose's Defence. On Tuesday evening about half past eight o'clock, I met this man coming out of the house; I seemed surprised, I thought he had been away some time; he said, he would give me a bit of suet if I would wait until our people were gone to bed, he would let me in; he let me in about half past twelve, he said, he would let me out about half past six; the bundle was tied up, he told me there was a note, he did not tell me where it came from. I asked him what it was; he said, go to a shop, and get it changed, and get some things there to get change; he said, he should come and see me on Sunday, he did not say he should see me before.

Prosecutor. This instrument I found by the side of the bureau in the morning; I imagine it is what broke the bureau open.

Ringrose called one witness, who gave her a good character.

TAYLOR, NOT GUILTY .

RINGROSE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18,

Of stealing in the dwelling-house to the value of the several articles in the indictment, Not Guilty of breaking out in the night time .

[The prosecutor recommended Ringrose to mercy, believing the man was the aggressor; the gentlemen of the Jury recommended Ringrose on the same ground]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-32

153. JOHN SMITH was indicted for that he on the 31st of December , upon James Lloyd , a subject of our Lord the King, did make an assault and with a certain sharp Instrument did cut and stab the said James Lloyd in and upon his right arm and thumb, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT. For like offence, only stating the intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT. That he with a certain iron crow did stab and cut the said James Lloyd in and upon his right arm and thumb with intent to do him some grevious bodily harm.

JOHN LLOYD . I live at 26, Old street Road, in the parish of Shoreditch; I am a broker and auctioneer , On the last day in December, I went to a house in Ratam's-buildings, in Shoreditch ; I had information that the house was being broken open; the key of the house was in my possession; I took the key and put it in the door; I found the door was bolted on the inside at the top; I had a candle and a lanthorn in my hand; I held it to the side of the door; I saw there was the impression of a crow on the door post. I pulled out the key out of the door, and put my ear to the key hole; I heard footsteps running up and down stairs, I could not tell which; there was a lad going past; I desired him to go to the public-house about twenty yards distance, to get me assistance for there were thieves in the house; the lad went a contrary way. I was returning back to go and get assistance myself; I heard the door unbolted; I immediately returned back; I met two men coming down the steps of the door way; I held the lanthorn up to their faces, and asked them what business they had there The first that came out was not the prisoner. I immediately seized him by the collar; the prisoner drawed off to my left hand side; he took something out from under his coat, I thought it to be a pistol, it turned out to be an iron crow, it had green baise cover over it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-33

154. RICHARD WORLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , twenty-one sheep, value 50 l. the property of Archibald Paris esq.

JAMES DUCKWELL. I a bailiff to Archibald Paris, esq. he took possession of a field in Tottenham ; he put ninety-nine sheep into the field, they were put there in the month of November, three weeks before they were lost; I saw them there either on the Monday or the Thursday before they were stolen.

JAMES BEAL . I am shepherd to the prosecutor. He had some sheep at Tottenham. On the 1st of December, I saw ninety-nine; I saw them on Thursday, the 1st of December, all safe in the field; there were three gates to the field; when I saw them they were all secure. On Saturday I went to the field; I counted them, and found twenty-one missing. I gave Mr. Duckwell information. I came to London on the Sunday week; in consequence of information I received at Smithfield, I went to Bow-street.

Q. Did not the officer conduct you to the prisoner's house - A. Yes, Thomas Hooker ; when I came to the prisoner's place in Mary-le-bone, it is a sort of a shop and a slaughter-house, almost under ground. Mr. Hooker took me to his house; there I saw twenty-one skins; I knew the marks on the skins; they were my master's skins; some of the sheep were bred by master, and some that he had bought; the sheep had two marks.

Q. You have marks for those he rears, and other marks for those he buys - A. I saw a part of the marks, a part was cut out, but enough left; I could ascertain it was my master's marks.

Mr. Gurney. I suppose you have those here that have the best remains of the marks - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see them safe the last time - A. At ten o'clock on Thursday morning.

Q. You are the shepherd - A. Yes.

Q. Do you usually leave sheep forty-eight hours without seeing them - A. Yes.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer of Bow-street. In consequence of information that I received, I went to Mr. Buckley's house in Virgil-place, Mary-le-bone; they are very small houses, this house consisted of two rooms, a shop, a room above it, and another place as a slaughter-house, that was at the back of the premises; the slaughter-house was behind the shop, and a room above. When I went there, the prisoner was not at home; I searched the shop, and found twenty-one skins; them skins I afterwards produced at the office; the skins were most of them in a very putrid state; there was the appearance of slaughtering by the congealed blood, and plucks hanging up, as though sheep had been recently killed there. I took the skins to my own house. I apprehended the prisoner on Friday the 9th of December, at the house of John Taylor .

Q. Did the prisoner live in Taylor's house - A. No; the prisoner lived next door. Taylor keeps a horse and cart; the prisoner was his next door neighbour.

COURT. When you went there the prisoner was not at home; you searched the shop, and found the skins - A. Yes. I apprehended the prisoner about a quarter of an hour before twelve on the 9th of December, I told him I apprehended him for having stolen some sheep; I took him to the shop where the skins were then deposited, and asked him how he came possessed of the property; he said, he bought twenty-one sheep of a man in Oxford-street on the Thursday week previous to his apprehension, he said he gave forty-two pounds for them, he had no receipt, nor did he know the man he had purchased them off.

Q. That is the day they were lost - A. Yes. The putrid state the skins were in I was ordered by the magistrate to keep as many as were sufficient; I have kept four; I shewed the bailiff and shepherd the skins. This is one of the skins.

Q. to Duckwell. Look at that skin, does the mark answer - A. Here is the letter P on the near side; this is the brand. The mark on the skin answers to this brand; this is one of our own breeding, it is a half bred merino.

(The skin and the brand handed to the Jury.)

Mr. Alley. The mark of the brand and being a half bred merino, you have no doubt of it being your master's sheep, have you - A. No, I have not. This is another of the skins; this one I bought of Mr. West in Smithfield, it is marked with O on the shoulder, with red ochre, and over the loin, and on the hip with ochre, and it has a mark on the head that I gave it at the time myself. I bought five of Mr. West; the other four remained in the field.

Mr. Adolphus. Mr. Duckwell, were you always equally clear to the marks of these sheep, were not you asked at Bow-street about these skins - A. Yes; I was then as positive to the marks as I am now.

Q, You found four that you bought of Mr. West in the field, and therefore you think that is one of your sheep that you lost - A. I am certain it is.

Q. Have you sold none of the half bred merinos - A. Yes, some, not lately.

Mr. Alley Did you find any one with particular horns on one of the sheep skins - A. Yes; one that I could swear to out of forty thousand; it is a circular horn that I bred myself.

Mr. Adolphus. Were is that horn now - A. The skin was in a putrid state.

Q. The horn it not is it - A. No; it is not worth while bring the horn without the skin.

James Beal . I have examined the skins; I am sure of nine of their skins, and among the nine is one of these four.

Mr. Gurney. Which is the one here you speak to - A. The one with the P on.

Q. You speak to one of the four - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know the other three, do you - A. Yes, I can swear to two of them; I believe them all to be my master's.

JAMES BUCKLEY. I lodge at No. 6, Virgil-place.

Q. There was a shop underneath where you live - A. No, there were two rooms.

Q. Who occupied them two rooms - A. A person that went out of them last; the prisoner took them rooms; when he took them, I cannot say, but the shop and slaughter-house he had.

Q. Did he occupy them on the 2nd of December - A. That I cannot say. On Friday morning the sheep disturbed me of my rest, they awaked me out of my sleep about a quarter before three o'clock; there were no sheep when I went to bed about ten o'clock, they were not there then; the first I heard of them was about three o'clock in the morning; I never saw them. That is all I know of them.

AUGUSTNS READ. I am a pig-killer. I know the prisoner; he came on a Saturday to me, I can hardly say when it was; he asked me if I would assist him in killing a few sheep; I told him I was but of little use to him; I said, sheep killing was a thing I did not understand; if it was any thing in the Pig killing line I could help him. He told me he bought I could do a little towards it; I did; I helped kill nine sheep and took the fat off them; the prisoner and me were together; I killed them underneath the apartment of the last witness, next door to where I live.

Q. There is a person of the name of Taylor lives next door - A. Now he lives up at the corner. The sheep that I killed was afterwards carried to market twelve of them. I never saw any more than twelve; Taylor took the twelve to market.

Mr. Gurney. Where did you see these twelve - A. In the place where I killed them, and I saw but twelve.

JOHN TAYLOR . I live at No. 1, Virgil-place. The prisoner applied to me to carry the carcases of sheep to market on the 2nd of December, I carried five on Saturday morning; on Tuesday the 16th. I carried thirteen carcases to Newgate market.

Q. to Mr. Duckwell. What might be the value of the sheep - A. I should be sorry to take less than fifty pounds for them if I had them to sell.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of every thing that is laid to my charge; on Friday evening at half past seven o'clock, I met a person (now in court) on London-bridge; I remained with him in a house until about nine at night; I then went to where my wife was laying in; I remained there untill about half past ten; then I went to Greenhill-rents; I remained there until seven in the morning.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dullas.

Reference Number: t18150111-34

155. ALEXANDER STEPHENS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Wynn in the King's highway, on the 24th of December , taking from his person and against his will, a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of George Clubb .

GEORGE CLUBB . I am a smith ; I live in Collingwood-street, Chelsea. On Christmas Eve, I went to Chelsea Hospital public-house , William Wynn , my shopmate , was with me, he is a smith . When I got to the door I gave William Wynn my coat and waistcoat to hold for myself, to knock at the door to get something to drink. When I knocked at the door, the door opened, and out came some soldiers; one of the soldiers struck me on the head with a stick, and knocked me down. I got up again, and ran away; they followed me.

Q. How many - A. Two; they knocked me down again; I got upon my hands and knees, and run away again as well as I could, I was quite blind with the blow, I could not see; I run against the wall; I turned round, and went up to Wynn, I asked him for my coat and waistcoat; he said they were gone. There were two soldiers in the road, the same two soldiers that followed me; I began asking them for

my coat and waistcoat; they started after me with their sticks to hit me; they both had sticks: I kept out of their reach; they tried to strike me several times, but they could not catch me.

Q. How did you avoid it - A. I kept running away from them. Wynn went home. I asked the biggest soldier for my coat and waistcoat, he said, by Jesus, he would give me my coat and waistcoat, I slipped round the corner, and missed the blow that he aimed at me. John Williams , the patrole, came up to me, and asked me if I had lost a coat and waistcoat, he had my coat and waistcoat under his arm; I owned it directly, and told him the marks of them. He told me he had the soldier in custody that he found them on.

Q. Who was that soldier - A. The prisoner; Williams had got the prisoner with him; him and me took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and lodged him there.

Q. Was he one of the men that came out of the house - A. I cannot say that.

Q. Were they all dressed in soldiers clothes - A. Yes; I saw two, there might be three.

Q. You do not recollect seeing the prisoner until Williams, the patrole, had him in custody, do you - A. No; I only saw two soldiers.

WILLIAM WYNN . Q. Did you go with Clubb to this public-house - A. Yes, I did; he gave me his coat and waistcoat to hold while he went up to knock at the door; when he knocked at the door, I cannot say how many soldiers came out; when they scuffled with me I cannot say whether I was knocked down or shoved down, as soon as the door was open I was down.

Q. Was there more than one person - A. Yes; I cannot say how many; at the time they came out of the door, I was down upon my hands and knees, with the fall I scratched my face, and when I was down the coat and waistcoat was taken from me; I cannot say how. Clubb came, and asked me for the coat and waistcoat; I told him they were gone, what became of them I did not know.

Q. How was the people dressed that came out of the house - A. They were dressed in soldiers clothes, they had on such clothes as the prisoner.

Q. Can you say the prisoner was one that came out of the house - A. No, I cannot; I made the best of my way home. When Clubb asked me for his coat and waistcoat, I saw two soldiers. Then Clubb asked the soldiers that were standing about there, where his clothes were. Clubb ran away, and they ran after him; then I went home; I saw no more of it.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the two soldiers - A. I cannot say.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a patrole of St. Luke. Chelsea: about five or ten minutes after twelve, I got to the bottom of Hinman's-lane; I met the prisoner full butt, I cannot tell whether he was running or walking; I said to the prisoner, halloo, my fellow what have you got there; he said, his brother had stripped to fight at a house below, he gave him the things to take care off, he said, he was going away to take care of them; I told him he must go back, and show me his brother; he tried to get past me; I took him by the collar, and shoved him against the wall, and took the coat and waistcoat from him, and going along Jew's-row I saw a soldier ran up to Clubb with a stick, and Clubb turning short round the house the blow missed him. I asked Clubb what he had lost; he said his coat and waistcoat; he said I had them under my arm. I asked him where he had lost them; he said, he was knocking at the public-house door, (pointing to the Royal Hospital public-house,) three soldiers rushed out and knocked him down. I then took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and Clubb went with me. The prisoner begged me to take him to his officer; he said, he bought the clothes with his clearance money, of some boy in the street, he gave nine shillings for the coat and waistcoat, out of his clearance money; I went to his pay serjeant, the serjeant said his clearance money was only five shillings and four-pence altogether. I do not know what became of the other two soldiers; I have made all enquiries after them, I could not find them. I produce the coat and waistcoat.

Q. to Clubb. Is that your coat and waistcoat - A. Yes, this is the coat and waistcoat that I gave to Wynn to hold on Saturday the 24th of December, Christmas Eve.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-35

156. BENJAMIN HOLLINGSHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a watch, value 30 s. a seal, value 10 s. and a watch-key, value 3 s. the property of Charles Carrol , in the dwelling-house of Vincent Sims .

CHARLES CARROLL . I am a printer : I live at 103, Golden-lane; I work for Mr. Bluck, No. 2, Paternoster-row .

Q. Do you know the prisoner Hollingshead - A. He worked there with me at that time; I was at work there on the 29th of September, I had a watch with me it was on my case in the frame.

Q. What frame - A. We each of us have a frame to work in.

Q. You said the prisoner was there, were any other persons there on that day - A. There were several others; it is a large double house.

Q. You do not know that they are Vincent Sim 's premises, do you - A. I have seen Vincent Sims apply to my employer for his rent.

Q. Do you know what parish it is in - A. No.

Q. What became of your watch - A. I left it there when I went away at night; the next morning it was gone.

Q. When did you see it after - A. I did not see it for a fortnight afterwards; there was some suspicion that the prisoner had taken the watch; we were busy, no notice was taken of it: a young man in court questioned him; he confessed of having taken the watch.

Q. What was there to the watch - A. A seal and key; the watch was worth about thirty shillings, the seal ten shillings, and the key three shillings, it was a gold key. I received the duplicate of the

watch of the prisoner, and I have seen the watch in the hands of the pawnbroker.

RICHARD DUGGIN . I am a printer; I work in the same office as the prosecutor. The prisoner told me he had pawned the watch in Holborn; I persuaded him to give the ticket to Carrol.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. Winfield, pawnbroker, Broad-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner pawned the watch with me. I produce it.

Prosecutor. The watch, seal, and key, is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor promised me if I would give him his watch again he would take no more notice of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-36

157. JAMES WALKER , alias DRIVER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , five promissory notes for payment of 20 l each, thirty other promissory notes, for payment of 10 l. each, thirteen promissory notes for payment of five guineas each, and one hundred and forty-two promissory notes for the payment of 5 l. each, the property of William Foreman , Richard Fothergill , and Matthew Markhouse .

CHARLES KING . I am clerk to a country bank at Newport in Monmouthshire; the names of the partners that compose that firm are William Fore man, Mathew Monkhonse , and Richard Fothergill , no more. On Wednesday, the 2nd of November, I made up a parcel for London containing country bank notes, to be transmitted to Messrs. Down and Company, bankers, in London; notes and bills to the amount of one thousand three hundred and fifty-seven pounds seven shillings and sixpence; I copied the numbers and the particulars of the notes that went into that parcel, (The numbers and the particulars of the notes read.) which I made up in a box, directed to Messrs. Down and Company, bankers in London.

Q. What did you put there in first - A. I put a piece of string round them first when I made them in the first parcel, and then I made them up with cartridge paper round them, directed to Richard Fothergill, Joseph and Thomas Sheys , merchants, Lawrence Poultney Hill, London; that is all I did to it; I tied it up, I tied it round with string, and sealed it up; I delivered it to William Leigh . The inner parcel was intended for Messrs. Down and Company.

WILLIAM LEIGH . I am guard of the Swansea coach. I received the parcel of the gentleman, the last witness; I was directed to deliver it at the Bush inn, and book it there; I paid two-pence for booking.

COURT. It was a paper parcel - A. A paper parcel: I am positive of having it, and delivery of it; it was entered in my way bill entered at Bristol, at the Bush coach office; I received it on the morning of the 3rd of November, I have no doubt I received it on that day.

JAMES WATERS . I am porter to the Bush Inn, Bristol.

Q. Do you remember the last witness early in November, delivering a parcel to you - A. No; he delivered it to the clerk, in my presence; I saw him deliver the parcel to the clerk, it was directed to Mr. Fothergill Lawrence Poultney Hill; it is marked in the way bill entered at Bristol, at the Bush coach office.

Q. Do you particularly remember the delivery of that parcel - A. I do: about fourteen months age there had been a former robbery, made me take particular attention to a parcel directed to Mr. Fothergill.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Leigh paying for the parcel - A. I cannot say as for paying; I saw him put the parcel down on the counter. I particularly remember taking that parcel to the mail, I put it in the back seat of the coach.

Q. How soon did you hear of the loss of that parcel - A. On the next day but one, on the return of the London mail the next day but one; I remember it being received, and I remember putting it into the coach.

HENRY LEWIS. I am clerk at the coach office, the Swan with two Necks, Lad-lane. The coach came to me; the parcel was in the way bill, I found the parcel missing; in consequence of that I gave notice at the bottom of the way bill going out of this parcel being missed.

DANIEL DUNN . I am clerk to Joseph and Thomas Sheys .

Q. On the 4th or 5th of November, did a parcel arrive at your house directed to Mr. Fothergill - A. No, sir.

JAMES BALL . I am a ticket-porter at the Royal Exchange.

Q. Were you employed at any time to carry a parcel to a banking-house, on what day - A. On the 12th of November, I was at the Royal Exchange. I heard a voice call porter, a gentleman gave me six five-pound notes, I went up to a gentleman dressed in a rough great coat, as if coming from a journey, I thought so; he gave me six five-pound notes, and two five-guinea notes; the gentleman told me his name was Ward; I was to take the notes to Esdailes in Lombard-street, and to get forty pounds in bank notes, and two shillings; I went to Esdaile's and when I presented the notes, they were stopped, and one of the clerks of the house accompanied me back to the Royal Exchange, and when I returned to the Exchange, I looked all round, I did not find my employer.

Q. Look round, and tell me whether you believe the prisoner is or is not the man that employed you - A. I believe him to be the man.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Esdaile and Company. I produce some notes that I stopped there, in the hands of the porter; they have been in my custody ever since; No. 660, Abergavenny bank five guineas, dated 20th of January, 1814; 7869 3rd of March, 1810, another five

guinea. two five guinea, 9401, 28th of May, 1810; 26th 15th 12th of October, 1793; 26th 15th 7th of February, 1814; these are the numbers and dates of the notes I stopped, and 8,59, 15th of March, 1809, five pound notes.

Mr. King. Them notes were part of the parcel I made up, directed to Mr. Fothergill.

WILLIAM FINMORE . I am a clerk in the house of Messrs. Fry and Company. bankers, Lombard-street.

Q. On the 8th of December, do you remember any bank notes being handed to you by a person for payment - A. I do, seven Ross notes, and one Brixton and Torbay note they were tendered to me by the prisoner, between ten and eleven in the morning at that time we had notice of the robbery and the numbers of the notes; in consequence of their being presented, I stopped them I took the prisoner into a room, and left him in the room until I went to Messrs. Down and Company, and communicated the circumstance to them. When I returned, I asked the prisoner where he had got them from; he stated that he had got them from some place in the country, I do not recollect the name of the town, for a one hundred pound note; he did not say when as I recollect, I asked him his name; he said James Walker ; I wrote it down; he gave me a reference to Mr. Obey, a shoe-maker, in Piccadilly: he was afterwards given into the custody of Drinkwater the officer.

- DRINKWATER. I produce the notes the last witness gave to me.

Finmore. These are the notes I gave to Drinkwater, there are seven; No. 8896, one of the Brixton and Torbay bank; No. 339, five-pound; No. 1425, ten pound note; No. 6908, Ross bank, 1812, ten-pound; No. 1816, Ross bank, ten-pound; and another of the Ross bank, ten-pound; these are the notes I stopped.

Mr. King. I have the numbers and dates of these notes also in my entry; these notes were put in the parcel I delivered to Leigh; directed to Mr. Fothergill

FRANCIS HOBLER . I am clerk to the Lord Mayor. I was present at the examination of the prisoner.

Q. Look at the examination on the 8th of December - A. The examination before the Lord Mayor of James Walker , memorandum, he said he took them in Salisbury in change for an hundred pound note; I am a seaman, I have been super cargo; changed them at a house in Salisbury, a haberdasher and linen-draper; I received the one hundred pound note in course of trade, I cannot say of whom, I got it in the course of trade, I brought it from the Havannah, I laid out nine pounds at the shop, I do not know of whom; I have no particular residence, was at Deptford, in the Broad Way, at the Spread Eagle; I hope you will excuse me answering. These are the answers; I have not got the questions.

HARRY ADKINS . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do.

Q. What is his name - A. James Driver .

COURT. Have you known him long Mr. Adkins, - A. Three years,

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I am entirely innocent of the crime imputed to me. I received the notes at a gaming table where I lost some of my own. I believe it was in Oxendon street, or some of the streets at the west end of the town; being lately out at sea. I am not perfectly acquainted with the streets; I was ignorant that they were dishonestly come by; I took them for payment I trust that your lordship and the gentleman of the jury must be satisfied of my innocence. Had I stolen the notes, or known them to have been stolen, is it possible to suppose that I should go and offer them at the very bankers where they were advertised to be stopped, surely no guilty man could not act so; he must have known they would not be paid, and that himself must be brought into trouble. I have recently returned from abroad, I have no witnesses.

GUILTY, aged 31,

Judgment respited .

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-37

158. MICHAEL SCAYSBROOK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Willan, about the hour of two in the night of the 24th of November with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one time piece, value 2 l. the property of John Willan ; two coats, value 4 l. three waistcoats, value 2 l. a pair of breeches value 14 s. a jacket, value 10 s. a pair of overalls, value 12 s. thirteen shirts, value 7 l. three neck handkerchiefs, value 5 s. and one other handkerchief, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 5 s. and one hat, value 1 l. the property of Samuel Smith ; and two pounds, fifteen shillings in monies numbered the property of James Greenwood .

THOMAS BAILEY . I am a book keeper to Mr. Willan, he keeps the Bull and mouth , in Bull and Mouth street ; the house is situated in the parish of Christ's church, and Alsop in the parish of St. Ann , in this house there are many apartments in which many of Mr. Willans servants reside, and also Mr. Willan resides himself: there are two outward gates one which the coaches go in at and the other the waggon horses; that is the upper gate where the waggon horses go in, that is in the parish of Christ church.

Q. At what time of night did you see this before it was broken open - A. Between eight and nine o'clock at night on the night before; in the morning I found the bar raised, and a crooked hole cut in the gate; a person could get at the bar to raise it up, by means of that hole, by cutting away the gate: the hole appeared crooked as if cut with a knife; the knife I believe was found in the prisoner's box; the gate was cut with a knife, the hole was big enough to put a hand in; that I saw between eight and nine in the next morning; I went into the waggon office and saw Mr. Greenwood looking over his papers in his desk. I found his desk had been broked open.

Q. How could the person get at the waggon office - A. By breaking away some brick work and forcing some boards down; a partition divided the waggon office and stables, that partition was made of wood, there is some brick work at the top of that, there had formerly been a door there, and on the

top of that brick work, the brick work had tumbled down, it appeared to be tumbled down by a dung fork the point of the fork was bent. Mr. Greenwood also observed there was a box broken open.

Q. Whose box was that - A. It belonged to the witness Smith, and the things were taken out, and on looking down by the side of the box, I found an iron pin that was used in binding the waggon, that iron pin appeared to have opened the box and the desk; there were marks on the box and the desk that corresponded; then I went into the accompting house, and compared the pin with the desk, it had been used as an iron crow to the desk; the marks in the desk also corresponded with the pin; some money was taken out of the desk, how much I cannot say, the time piece was laying on the desk in the accompting house, that was gone also; from knowing the situation these things were kept in, I knew the robbery must have been done by some persons well acquainted with the place. I knew that the prisoner had been in Mr. Willan's employ. and was out of work, and having seen him in different company, my suspicion fell on the prisoner on the Sunday following I understood he had gone down to Marlow; I went down to Marlow after him.

Q. Did you find him at Marlow - A, Not at that time, I found him at last at Bisham it adjoins Marlow; I saw the prisoner there at Bisham, he was very bad in bed with the small pox, his box was in the house with him; Clark the witness got the key of his box from Mrs. Creswell, in his box there were several shirts and a great quantity of wearing apparel, which wearing apparel turned out to be the property of Smith, the witness in court. He was ill, we did not remove him then: when he got well he was brought by Clark to London. The prisoner confessed to having done the whole thing himself, it was perfectly voluntary on his part; he said he had broken open the place himself, he was distressed for money it struck him he might get some money out of the waggon office to take him home to his friends, I asked him whether he did not expect at that time there was one of the bankers boxes of silver; he said he did, he knew very well they frequently came there by the coaches, he said he did expect that. On the last day of his examination, I took the shirt off his back, it turned out to be Mr. Smith's. marked S. S. No, 4; I have the shirt here; he broke through the gates into a stable.

Q. He broke through a door way - A. Yes; that door had been railed up some time, he got over the door way into the waggon office in the door way: there is the coach office on the right, and on the left hand the waggon office, they are all fenced in with a fence.

WILLIAM ROW . Q. At what time in the morning did you discover this gate had been broken open - A. Between six and seven in the morning.

Q. What day was it - A. I cannot recollect what day, it was the morning after it was broken open at night.

ANN CRESWELL . Q. You live at Bisham - A. Yes, the prisoner lodged at my house, and was up at my house; I gave the key to a person of the name of Clark, the key opened the prisoner's box I found that key in the prisoner's breeches pocket, I gave it to Clark.

RICHARD CLARK . I live at great Marlow. I am a constable; I went to this house at Bisham, Mrs. Creswell delivered a key to me, I opened a box, I saw the prisoner in bed with the small pox; I opened the prisoner's box, it contained a parcel of wearing apparel, I took the wearing apparel away; after the prisoner was well he told me it was his box; I gave Mr. Bailey the key. the box has been in my possession ever since, and the goods.

SAMUEL SMITH. Q. Had you a box at the Bull and Mouth - A. Yes, it was broken open, I know the things it contained.

Bailey. This is the shirt I took off him.

Samuel Smith. That is my shirt, it was in the box on the night the robbery was committed; I can swear to all the things.

RICHARD GREENWOOD . Q. Did you loose any money out of the desk - A. Upwards of two pounds in copper and silver, and a time-piece off the desk.

JAMES BINFIELD . I am a ostler, I bought a time piece of the prisoner.

Bailey, This is Mr. Willans's time piece.

JAMES JONES. I am a pawn broker, I produce a waistcoat and five shirts, I cannot say of whom I took them in pledge; this jacket is in the name of Skaysbrook the man is so much altered I cannot speak to him.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, with humble submission to this honourable court, I beg leave to state in November 1814, I was going down Bull and Mouth street, in distress, I went into the stables in Bull and Mouth street, I was tempted to do the offence I am charged with; I have lived with Mr. Willan, I took a box of wearing apparel; I was taken into custody at Bisham and committed to take my trial this is my first offence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-38

159. MARTHA MATILDA WHITTAKER , alias WHITARE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , in the dwelling house of William Bloomfield , a twenty pound Bank note , his property.

SUSANNAH BLOOMFIELD. I am the wife of William Bloomfield , he lives at No, 1. Queens head court Gilt-spur-street , he is a bricklayer , I take in washing; I employed the prisoner to assist me in washing I had employed her about five or six months.

Q. On the 17th of September, do you recollect any person coming to your house and asking for the prisoner - A. Yes; John Chill called the prisoner she went out, and came in again in a few minutes; she said she must go out a little way with a gentleman about a little business; I said she could not go, as it was Saturday I was very busy; she said she must go, but would not be gone more than twenty minutes, or half an hour at the outside, the gentleman waited in the passage for her.

Q. Do you know who that gentleman was - A. Mr. John Chill . I saw no more of her then, she took the child with her, untill I saw her in custody; she said

she should be sure of returning, by taking the child with her I might be sure she would not stop; it was about twenty minutes after one.

Q. When was it you missed any thing - A. I missed a twenty pound bank note at four o'clock. The twenty pound note had been in a little box in a corner of a drawer in the chest of drawers; I had seen in the morning of that day in the chest of drawers, about nine o'clock.

Q. Had the prisoner the means of getting at that drawer if she pleased - A. Yes, she had; I went into Warwick lane at twelve o'clock, I left the keys in the drawer, and left the prisoner in the room, and no one else at four o'clock I missed it. That is all I know about it.

WILLIAM BLOOMFIELD . Q, Do you know the prisoner washed for your wife - A. I do, on the 17th of September, I returned at twelve o'clock to home to my dinner; I found the prisoner there and nobody else.

JOHN CHILL. I am a servant.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; she has washed for me some months before September, and up to September. On Saturday the 17th of September I went to her, at Mrs. Bloomfielda, I saw the prisoner mangling, I asked her for the things of mine that she had a week or ten days before; she said, they were wet and dirty, and not washed; I said she had had them a considerable time I would rather take them with me; she went back again into the house directly, she then came to me again, said she had received a twenty pound note of a lady that had come from her husband in the country, that her husband had left to him a considerable property, that her husband's father was dead, her husband had sent her up a twenty pound note by a lady that lived in Gough square; she then went to the Birmingham coach at the swan and two necks; I saw her go off.

MR. FARREW. I live a clothes shop in Fleet market, at Mr. Turner's. On the 17th of September as Mr. Chill came to my shop a woman accompained him, they bought some articles with a twenty pound note; I took down the name and address, I have forgot the name, I went and got change for the note in the market.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am chief constable in Birmingham, I was so in September last. On the 18th of September, in consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner; I first said to her you have robbed Mr. Bloomfield of a twenty pound note, in Gilt-spur-street, London; she made no reply; she put her hand into her bosom and pulled out seven one pound bank notes, she said these are all I have got left of it; she said she had changed it in London, I do not recollect she said at what place. I then asked her how she accompted for the difference there was thirteen pounds deficient; I searched her pockets, in her pockets there were eighteen shillings that I gave her back again; I asked her again what she had done with the remainder; she said she had paid three pounds at the swan and two necks Lad-lane for herself and child, and she had paid two pounds more at the coach office Birmingham, to carry her down to Warwick; and she said on coming down from London she had supped, and had given a five pound note instead of a one which she had not discovered untill afterwards; and she had bought some things amounting in the whole to seventeen pounds, she accompted for the whole, with the seven pound I had got; to the amount of seventeen pounds; I told her I had got a warrant to detain her, she wished to go to her husband in Lancashire, no doubt she said her husband would advance the money and the prosecutor would forgive her.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the money nor touched it, the money I had was my own property I had it gave me, I thought it was a one pound note when I came to look at it, it was a twenty pound note.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of her children .

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-39

160. STEPHEN STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of October , a gold chain, value 20 s. a ring, value 1 s. 6 d. and one pin, value 6 d. the property of Alexander Levi and George Levi .

ALEXANDER LEVI . I live in Bennet Street, St. Mary Axe , my partners name is George Levi ; I lost the gold chain on the 28th of October. The prisoner was my servant , he lived with me since June last. On the 28th of October we received a package from Wales, in which the gold chain was inclosed; the 28th of October being Friday, we are in the habit of setting our accounts in the accompting house early in the afternoon, it is the prisoners department to shut up the shutters. On Saturday evening he came into the accompting house again, and the chain was left on the desk; on Friday we looked for the chain it could not be found; the prisoner had been applied to whether he had found such a thing, he said no, he had been looking among the dirt and could not find it. Some weeks after a gold broach, ring, and pin, had been sent in by one of the workmen, was missing the prisoner received them of the workman that brought them he always brought word that the workman had brought them in and when the prisoner was asked for them; he said he knew nothing of them From these suspicions we were induced to have the prisoner searched, in his box we found duplicates of these articles.

Q. Where was his box - A. In the kitchen in my house and in his box we found several duplicates the officer has got the duplicates.

JOHN HODGSON . I am a constable, I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; in his box I found the duplicates of the articles in the indictment; a gold chain, ten shillings at Mr. Reeves; a broach ring and pin at Mr. Perkins nine shillings.

MR. REEVES. I am a pawnbroker; this is my duplicate; I produce the gold chain pledged by John Stokes .

ROBERT PERKINS . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a broach ring, and pin pawned by John Stokes.

Prosecutor. The whole of the articles are our property.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time that I took these things my wages were becoming due; I meant to replace them when I got my wages. This is my first offence, I never was in confinement before in my life.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-40

161. JOHN DYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , five bushels of linseed value 1 l. the property of William Evans Everett .

RICHARD ALLWRIGHT . I am foreman to William Evans Everett, he is a grower of linseed , at Endfield he is a farmer , and the only grower of linseed in that parish. The prisoner was his labourer . On the 17th of September, I went with the constable and a search warrant to the prisoners lodgings; in his bed room, I found two sacks of linseed, one of the sacks was marked with masters mark.

Q. Had he any business to take the linseed home to his own house - A. No, it was undressed; it ought not to have found its way out of my master's posseson, it was not saleable. I took the sacks and the linseed; the two sacks contained five bushels of linseed; the sacks I delivered to Charles Doe , the constable, to bring here; these are the sacks, and this is the sort of linseed that master grows; I have no doubt but the sacks and the linseed belongs to my master; it is worth twenty shillings. The prisoner said he brought the linseed home in his shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I had linseed in my premises which belonged to my master; I used to clean linseed for master, and that is the way it came in my shoes, and one wet night I put a sack over my shoulders to keep me dry as I went home.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-41

162. JOSEPH AKERMAN was indicted for killing and slaying John Southcombe , on the 22nd of October .

THOMAS HALE . I am the guard of the Bath mail coach.

Q. Who is the driver of that coach - A. Joseph Akerman .

Q. What time did you set out at the General Post office - A. Ten minutes past eight.

Q. What was the day the accident happened - A. I do not recollect what day of the month it was, it was in the month of October; I believe we left the Post office about ten minutes past eight; the Bath mail coach was drawn by four horses, and when we came to the two mile stone or thereabouts I heard a crush; I then looked of one side, and saw a man laying in the road; I looked of one side at Hammersmith; I saw a cart with the shafts broken, and a man laying in the road.

Q. Did the mail coach go over the man - A. I cannot say it did.

Q. Where was the man that you saw laying - A. He was laying between the cart and the coach.

Q. Was he near the wheel of your coach - A. He might be two or three inches off; I looked on one-side; I saw the man laying in the road; I desired the coachman to stop. I have every reason to suppose he stopped as soon as he could, considering the rate the horses were going, he pulled up as soon as it was in his power, and sent somebody back to help the man.

Q. When you called out to him to stop, how far might he be from the man - A. It might be an hundred yards off the man.

Q. After you had passed, he pulled up, did you tell him why you desired him to stop - A. I said Akerman, pull up, I believe you have run over this man.

Q. Did you believe he had run over this man - A. By seeing the man lye in the road I thought that he had, I cannot swear that he had.

Q. He had got an hundred yards past the man, you called out to him to stop the coach - A. He stopped at the Hand and Plower, and sent a shopkeeper at the next door to the Hand and Flower to the man's assistance; I did not get off my box; I had two foreign mails on the top of the coach.

Q. Were any other mail coaches before yours - A. Yes, two; the Exeter first, and the Worcester second, and our coach behind; we were as close to the Worcester as we could go, without running foul of her; it was a dark night, we were obliged to have all our lamps a-light.

Q. What was the crush that you heard - A. I suppose it must be our coach that ran against the cart, I cannot say.

Q. And upset it - A. I have every reason to believe our coach ran against the cart, I cannot say upset it, the cart stood in the road, and no shafts; I saw the body.

Q. Which side of the road were you - A. The near side, about eight feet from the path.

COURT. You were on the left hand side of the road when this accident happened - A. Yes, when I heard the crush our near wheel was about six feet from the path.

Q. Where was the cart standing - A. On the opposite side.

Q. How far was the cart on the off side of the road - A. The cart was more on the near side then on the off; the man appeared to me laying about two or three inches from the wheel of the mail coach.

Q. You were going on the near side, how happened it to touch him - A. The man that was run over was on the off side, if any wheel run over him it must be the off wheel; the man was more on our side than he ought to be.

Q. You do not know the man's name that was run over, do you - . No.

Mr. Gurney. You were going about eight miles an hour, that is a common mail coach pace - A. Yes, the road was very heavy, we were going a steady trott; we were following the Exeter mail and the Worcester mail.

Q. Were you running a race with one-another - A. We were keeping steadily behind them; we driving

on the near side of the road, about six feet from the bank; the road at that part is about sixty feet wide, the middle of the road was fresh gravelled; our off wheel ran over the edge.

Q. Your lamps were lighted, had the cart any lamps - A. No; the cart might see our coach, we could not so well see them. I am sure we were following in the same track as the mails before us; the other mails had their lamps lighted at Lad-lane, there can be no better lights than the mails have, they have the best oil.

MR. WHITE. I am the coachman of the Exeter mail.

Q. Can you tell how this accident happened - A. No, I cannot; I only know I was first coach, and it was on a Saturday evening, I do not know the day of the month.

Mr. Gurney. It was on the 22nd of October - A. I was before the Worcester coach, I might be twenty yards off the Worcester coach; the Bath coach was just behind the Worcester; the Worcester and the Bath coaches were following me; I was on the left hand side of the road. I neither heard or saw any thing of the accident.

Q. Were there any other carriages on the road at that time - A. I did not see any other carriages; I did not see the cart.

Q. Was it a dark night - A. Particularly dark, we all had our lights, all of us three coaches had lights; we went our usual pace, about seven or eight miles an hour, perhaps not quite so fast, the roads were bad and heavy.

Q. Was there any gravel upon the road - A. Yes, rather more on our side of the road than on the other, which kept us more on our side of the road.

Q. What distance were you from the foot-path - A. The off wheel from the foot-path was about four yards; I was on the left hand side of the road, the coaches were all following us.

Mr. Gurney. I have had the road measured, it is fifty feet mide - A. It is.

THOMAS SOUTHCOMB . Q. You are brother of the deceased - A. Brother-in-law.

Q. Where did your brother live - A. In Devonshire.

Q. On this night were you in the chaise with your brother in the Hammersmith road - A. Yes, I was in a chaise cart, we were coming towards London, we had one horse in the cart.

Q. Now, tell us what happened to you coming on the Hammersmith road - A. We met three mail coaches; we hailed in on the near side of the road to let them pass; we were on the left hand side coming to town: on seeing them we pulled nearer in on the left hand side.

Q. How far were you from the center of the road - A. I think we were about six feet from the center of the road our right hand wheel; the coach coming in contact with our wheel, the violence broke both our shafts off, the horse went off with the shafts, and run away; the horse was not hurt; the body of the cart directly fell down; I and my brother fell out my brother fell on the right side of the cart, the wheel of the mail coach went over his body, he was then laying on the left hand side of the road, about six or seven feet from the center of the road, on our own side; he fell nearer the mail coach than me; my brother called out when he saw the mail coach coming over him, it was too late to call them; he did not call until the mail coach came upon him, the mail coach did not stop.

Q. Do you know whether any of them heard your brother or not - A. I cannot say. The jerk of the mail coach coming against our cart was so sudden, I should think they could not be of hearing.

Q. Was there any gravel on the road - A. I believe not; I did not see any gravel on the road where my brother was laying; I think our near wheel was about four feet from the ditch, and about six feet or more from the center of the road.

Q. Are you able to say whether the mail coach was on its proper side of the way when it run over your brother - A. No, the mail coach was rather on the wrong side of the road.

Q. Which side of the road was the mail coaches when you saw them - A. The first mail coach was a considerable distance to the right, the wrong side of the road, we did not notice the hind mail coach; we got out of the way as fast as we possibly could.

Q. What distance was your brother thrown from the cart - A. Perhaps one or two feet, I don't think more; it was a moon-light night, rather a cloudy night. My brother was taken up, and taken to the Hand and Flower; Mr. Weston was one of the gentlemen that helped to take him.

Q. What was the name of your brother - A. John Southcomb .

Q. You have brought an action against the proprietors of this mail coach for damages done to this cart of yours - A. Yes. I myself was thrown out of the cart, and hurt also.

Q. How long was it before any person came from the Hand and Flower to pick your brother up - A. Within three minutes, there was a gentleman passing by assisted my brother up before I could get up; we were quite sober; we had been to Windsor; we dined at the market-place, we drank a glass of gin and water at the Cricketers; we did not stop any where between Windsor and Hounslow; as we were going through Hammersmith we met these coaches, we were going a steady and quiet, quite a gentle trot about five miles an hour, the horse will not go more than six miles an hour; the road is wide at that part; all the three coaches were on the wrong side; we were on our proper side; I think the first mail coach was on its proper side, I will not take upon me to swear the second coach was on its proper side, the last mail was driving completely on the wrong side; the second and last coaches was over the center of the road.

Q. Did the last drive steady in a strait line - A. I do not believe it did.

Q. You think he drove against you for the purpose - A. No, I do not mean to say that.

COURT. When you saw the coaches coming, why did not you pull out of the way - A. We pulled in, and made sufficient way for them as soon as we saw the first coach.

THOMAS WESTON . I live at Hammersmith.

Q. Were you sitting on this Saturday night at the Hand and Flower public-house - A. I was, when the mail coach stopped there, the coach stopped at the chandlers shop below the Hand and Flower.

Q. Who kept that shop - A. Mrs. Cannon; Mr. Cannon was in company with me, his boy came in, and informed us of the accident; I and the landlord Mr. Atkins went to the assistance of the man, I found the man laying in the road, one side of his face was bloody, he was quite speechless, and insensible, and quite lifeless, he lay on the right side of the road coming to London, about six feet from the center of the road, and four or five yards from the edge of the right side of the road; he laid lengthways, I do not think he moved hand or feet until he was taken up; I put my face to his face to see if I could find breath; a mail coach was coming along I jumped up behind, and went to the Broad Way Hammersmith for a surgeon; Mr. Bewlin the surgeon came with me; we found the deceased at the Hand and Flower on our return. Mr. Robinson and Mr. Hollis was up to the deceased before me, the body had not been touched by any one; I think then the deceased's brother was there.

COURT. Do you know whether there was any fresh gravel there - A. No gravel but what had been crossed by coaches, there might have been some laid there about a week or a fortnight before. The landlord of the Hand and Flower went with me, he had a lanthorn and a lighted candle; the body was laying on the center of the road.

JOSEPH ROBINSON . I was on the Hammersmith road at the time this accident happened, I was coming from Hammersmith to Kensington. The mail coaches were apparently upon the center of the road at the time of passing me; when the last coach had passed me six or twelve yards, I heard a loud crush, it appeared to me as if it was a collision of two bodies, it drew my attention of course, I immediately looked towards the road, I saw a horse with the shafts of a cart dangling behind him, coming from behind the mail coach, the horse proceeded towards London, walking with the shafts dangling behind him; the mail coach proceeded two or three yards at a slower pace, and stopped about three or four yards from where the accident happened, it stopped for a few seconds, when a voice exclaimed from behind the coach, drive on, never mind; upon which the coach proceeded on its way; I was fearful that some accident had taken place, I went immediately over to where the cart was, and the cart was standing on its hinder end, with the bottom turned towards the north edge, without its shafts, its shafts being torn away; the body of the deceased was laying obliquely in the track which the coach must have passed going along, his face was bleeding; he growned very deep, and appeared to be in the greatest agony; I said he ought to be taken to the nearest public-house, directly he was taken to the public-house, I do not know the names of the people that took him; Mr. Hollis was with me; Mr. Southcomb, the brother of the deceased, was there. When I first came up the deceased was quite speechless and lifeless, the body was laying about half a yard from the center on the North side.

Q. Was the road new gravelled - A. I don't think it was; it was new gravelled about a week before.

MR. BEWLIN. I am a surgeon; I was sent for; I went to the Hand and Flower; I saw the deceased on the floor of the parlour at the Hand and Flower, he had a wound on the right side of the head, it was about an inch long, quite to the bone; the right collar bone and the three first ribs were broken very much; I bled him, but he died in about five or ten minutes. By the desire of the Coroner, he was afterwards opened; we opened the brain, in the brain there was a small quantity of extraversated blood; the collar bone broken in several places, and the three first ribs were broken very much, a large blood vessel had been torn in the cavity of the chest in the right side; the extraversation of blood in his chest was the immediate cause of his death.

Q. Might a wheel of a heavy coach passing over him occasion these appearances - A. Certainly.

WALTER MANSELL , ESQ. I reside at Woodbine, in Oxfordshire. On Saturday night, the 22nd of October, I was outside passinger on this mail; I sat upon the roof in the front; we were following two other mails; I think we were about fifteen yards behind the Worcester mail, and the Exeter mail about the same distance from the Worcester. I first discovered the cart passing the Exeter mail, I saw distinctly the cart was upon the n gravel; I saw the cart pass the Worcester mail, the cart run very close to the Worcester mail: afterwards the cart came in contact with the Bath coach.

Q. Before it came in contact, did any person in the cart call out or say one single word - A. I did not hear any one until the crush. The prisoner appeared to drive in a strate line to the other coaches. I think the accident happened by the driver of the cart pulling the wrong rein. We stopped at the Hand and Flower directly, and sent back assistance. I think the prisoner was neither careless or negligent, I saw nothing that he could have done to prevent the mischief.

REV. HENRY BURTON . I am a clergyman. I was travelling by the Bath mail on the night of the 22nd of December last, an outside passenger, there was two mail coaches before us; I observed the cart just as it passed the second mail, when the cart had passed the second mail, it appeared to come towards our horses; I heard a loud calling out by the coachman, the coachman called to the man in the cart, the cart came very near our front horses, it appeared to have struck the bar by which the leaders drew; I am sure the cart struck against some part of the coach; the cart was dashed to pieces; I heard the boards of the cart crack,

COURT. You had an opportunity of observing the prisoner's conduct, was there any blame in the coachman - A. I did not perceive any in which his conduct was blameable at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-42

163. HANNAH JOHNSON was indicted for that

she, on the 14th of December , feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in her custody and possession a certain forged 1 l. note .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-43

164. ROBERT PENTON was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann Penton on the 4th of December , and also stood indicted upon the Coroner's Inquisition with killing and slaying the said Ann his wife .

MRS. ROOD. I am the wife of William Rood .

Q Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. Yes, I knew his wife and child, and I have known him these eight years; he lived in Featherbed-lane Fetter-lane .

Q. Did you and your husband go to see the prisoner and his wife on the 4th of December - A. Yes; after tea a gentlewoman and a gentleman came to tea with Mrs. Penton; she wanted to break the things on the mantle piece: in consequence of some difference between Mrs. Penton and Mr. Penton, Mrs. Penton took the crumpet out of the gentleman's hand, and she knocked it about the prisoner; she throwed the crumpet and the knife at Mr. Penton.

Q. Did it hit him - A. It went on one side; then she took the kettle off the fire, she said, she did not like it.

Q. Like what - A. I do not know; that is what she said. She lifted up her hand and went to sweep all the china off the mantle-piece, and said, I will break every thing here; she did not break it, Mr. Penton stood up, and then went down stairs, and then I said to Mrs. Penton do not break the things, she then said she would break every thing in the house; she said I do not care for it, there is nothing will vex him more; then my son followed Mr. Penton down stairs, and then I went to see what kept my son, I went over the way to the public-house; Mr. Penton was there abominably drunk, he was in liquor. After supper my son brought Mr. Penton up stairs out of the public-house; I was going home, I said to Mrs. Penton do not say any more to him that night, and then I said to Mr. Penton if Mrs. Penton says any thing to you to-night, do not mind her; he said, no, I will go to bed; then I bid them good night, and left them; I know no more.

Mr. Alley. A pretty sort of a Christmas party you had - A. Yes, sir.

Q. The poor man, his wife did every thing that was unkind to him, she threw the knife at his head - A. Yes, it went of one side.

Q. Was James Moore of the party - A. He was.

Q. Do you recollect that she said she had made free with James Moore , and she would as often as she could, she said every thing to irritate the poor man - A. Yes.

MR. HUDSON. I am resident surgeon of St. Bartholomew Hospital. The deceased was brought to the Hospital on Monday, the 5th, she was accompanied by another woman, I do not know the name of the other person. She had a fracture on the let arm: I used proper means for the recovery, and ordered the sister to put her to bed; she complained of a slight pain in her right side; I offered to examine it, she stated that the pain was not very acute, she begged that I would examine her in the morning; accordingly on Tuesday morning I came about ten o'clock, and on examining her, I ascertained there was a fracture, I cannot state the number of ribs that were broken; I treated her as a fractured rib; I used proper means also for it. She grew worse, and complained of pain very much, at the same time the inflamation increased, very much blood was taken from her arm. On the same evening I saw her again, and the inflametary symptoms encreased. Mr. Wheeler, the apothecary, was called in, he thought proper to take more blood from her. On Wednesday morning she was seen by Sir Ladbrooke Harvey, he thought it advisable that the woman should be bled again; she was bled again. I saw her the same evening, she told me she was much relieved by the bleeding. I saw her again on Thursday morning, on finding her much worse, I called in Mr. Wheeler, the resident apothecary, he thought it advisable that more blood should be taken: On Friday she complained of being low spirited, she seemed to state that she was in great danger; I saw her again the same evening, she told me she thought she was going to die. On Friday morning she was visited by Sir Ladbrooke Harvey, he thought her if any thing better. I saw her again, the inflamatory symptoms encreased. He saw her again on the Saturday evening, he saw there was actual inflamation, he ordered me to bleed her copiously. On Sunday morning the inflamation was much encreased, and twelve o'clock at night she died; she was opened in the presence of Mr. Lawrence and myself, and the appearance was as if the lungs were much condenced through actual inflamation; on further examination we found that five or six true ribs were broken, of which the sixth rib peferated the plura, and pressed against the lungs; that was the only appearance inside; outside she was much bruised on her hips and shins.

Q. What might be the occasion of her death - A. She died of inflamation from the injury; the injury had caused the inflamation.

Q You do not know but it might have been done by a chair being throwed against her, might it not - A. Yes; she told me it was on account of jealousy.

Q. At the time she told you was she in a dying state - A. No. When she was in a dying state she told me she was in great danger, nothing more.

Mr. Alley. The husband used to visit her - A. He did; I was not present; he came once or twice.

ELEANOR GALE . Q. What do you know about this matter - A. I know nothing of the circumstance, no further than I lived in the same house with them some years.

Q. Did you see the prisoner ill treat her - A. No. On Thursday morning, I visited her at the Hospital, she told me she was very ill, she said, she was

afraid she should die; she said her and her husband had some words; she said, it was all her own fault, and she was sorry for what she had said about her husband breaking her arm; she said, it was all her own fault; she said, nothing more

MARY HOLDER . Q. What do you know about this matter - A. I live in the house. On Sunday they had company to dinner; they went away about eleven o'clock at night; that is all I know. I heard a little noise afterwards, nothing more than usual. Mrs. Penton when she had a little drink she would dance and stamp about. The last time I saw her was on Friday evening; she said, she was very ill. She always said it was her own fault, her husband would never say nothing to her if she did not begin it first; that was really the case; he was a very quiet indulgent man. When she was tipsey she was very quarrelsome, and very aggravating. I know what was the matter with her before. The woman went with her to the Hospital. She never told me who broke her arm; I do not know that she knew herself; she might have tumbled down. The man was a good husband as could be; she was always tormenting him.

JAMES BRAY . I am a servant at St. Bartholomews Hospital, and a constable. On Friday, going round with Mr. Hudson, the house surgeon, he called me of one side, and said the woman was in a bad state, she was labouring then very hard for breath; the surgeon said, Penton, the husband, should be taken into custody. I went then directly, and asked the woman if she thought herself in danger; she said, she did; she said, she had a few words with her husband, jealousy took place; he up with the chair, and broke her arm, and her ribs; she said they both were very much in liquor; she did not say any more. I then spoke to the surgeon, and apothecary they ordered me to take the man into custody; I went, and waited at a public-house opposite where Penton lived; between nine and ten Penton came in, he said, is that you Mr. Bray; I said, yes. He said, I know what you have come for; is my wife dead; I said Penton, she is in a very bad state, and you must go with me; I then took him to a public-house, and left him in the care of another officer while I went to search the premises to see if there was a chair broken; we searched the three pair of stairs that he worked in; there was no chair broken there, but in the one pair I found a chair broken; I then came and spoke to the prisoner; he said jealousy was the occasion of it.

Mr. Alley. I suppose she said to you as she did to the others, that it was all her own fault - A. I have known the woman eleven years, she was a woman very much addicted to drinking.

The prisoner left his defence to his councel.

GUILTY, aged 42,

Of Manslaughter only, not of the Murder .

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-44

165. CATHERINE TEWNER was indicted for the wilful murder of an infant female child , and also indicted on the Coroners Inquisition.

MATTHEW PENDERGRAST. At the time that this happened, I belonged to the 77th regiment of foot, now I am a taylor.

Q. Where did you live on the 7th of December last - A. In Robinson's buildings , with Mr. Rhodes. On that day between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I had occasion to go to the necessary; I went into the necessary, and sat down upon the occasion I went for, another necessary joined with it, a partition separated one necessary from the other; I heard the door of the other necessary open, and a person come in; I heard a moving as if in great distress; the moving lasted between four and five minutes.

Q. You do not know who the person was - A. No. The next I heard was the cries of a child two or three times; the next I heard was the drop into the cesspool; I cannot say exactly it was it; I supposed it, and then a faint cry, and a snuffling, as if it was getting short of breath; upon which I went out, and went to a railing that separated the two back yards, it being too high for me to get over, I put my head over; I heard some thing wiping the floor of the necessary house, it seemed to me as if with a cloth; with that I came into the man that I lodged with, his name is Rhodes; I told him what had happened, and asked him what house that privy belonged to, it belonged to the next house. I went there along with Rhodes; I saw a good many women there, and a mangle; I asked the women which was the woman that had delivered herself of a child, the prisoner was present; one of the women said the prisoner was the person. I asked the prisoner what made her put the child into the privy; she denied putting it in herself, but that it went into the privy, and said that it was in the privy. I desired a nightman to be sent for, and the child got up; a nightman was sent for, he is here; I saw the child found, it was dead.

JAMES FORDELL . I am a labourer; I went down to spend the evening with Prendergast. I discovered Catherine Towner in the privy; I asked her the reason of her throwing her child into the privy; she denied it. I took her by the arm, and brought her out of the privy, and led her to her house, and discovered what she had been wiping the privy with, I conducted her into her mother's; she dropped the cloth by the side of her; I picked it up, and tied it up in my handkerchief, and kept it until the officer came; I gave Mr. Pace, the officer, the handkerchief and cloth. I assisted Pendergast: we tore up the privy to get the child out; I gave all the assistance I could to find the child; we did not find the child; we sent for a nightman; he came; I saw the child found.

GEORGE NICHOLLS . I am a bricklayer, and nightman; I was sent for by a man, he told me there was a child down in the privy; I immediately stripped, and went down; I dragged seven times, and the eighth time I brought a female child up; that is all I know. A child that fell from its mother could not have gone down so low, without it had been poked down with a pole it could not.

MR. OLIVER. I am a surgeon. I saw the infant

immediately after it was taken out; the infant was quite dead, a female child; it was a full grown child.

Q. Supposing the child to have been born alive, would it found in that situation, would that have been the cause of its death - A. I understand the child had been down an hour in the privy, certainly that was the cause of its death.

Q. At the time of a woman's delivery, the difficulty is greater with the first child - A. Certainly it is.

Q. I beg to ask you from the knowledge which you have acquired upon this subject, whether it is by any means uncommon for a child to drop from its mother without a moments notice - A. No, it often happens they often come all at once, and drop on the floor.

Q. Might not a person who went to a privy for the ordinary purpose, be surprized with labour, and the child drop from her in an instant - A. No doubt of it. On examining the child, I found no marks of violence upon the child, the navel string was broken as it would be by falling from its mother. It is common for a woman to mistake labour pains for a pain in the bowels.

EDWARD CLARK . I produce the things I found in the prisoner's apartment to put the child in.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. On this Sunday evening I was sent for, a man came and told me that a woman had murdered her child; when I went there I saw the child, it had just been taking out of the privy.

CATHERINE EAGLE . I live next door to the prisoner's mother; I and the other neighbours knew that she was in a state of pregnancy: there was no secret that she was with child, not the least in the world; it was intended that she should come home to her mother's for the purpose of her lying in.

MARY RHODES . I am next door neighbour to the prisoner. I never knew a better tempered or more humane girl in my life.

Q, At the time that this happened, did you know that she was pregnant - A. I knew it; it was well known in the neighbourhood. After the alarm of the child being in the privy, I went into the house; I said, Kitty, my dear girl, what have you done to your child: she said it is in the privy, Mrs. Rhodes it is indeed, I could not help it; I have had the case in my own house. I have delivered two women of children in my own house, or else the children must have been lost; the prisoner had been at work that very day at mangling, that work caused the labour speedily to come on.

COURT, Q. TO THE JURY. The only question know, is whether she concealed the birth of the child it does not appear to me that she concealed the birth of the child.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-45

166. JAMES DIGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of December , a coat, value 10 s. the property of Robert Davey .

JOHN DAY . I am foreman to Baldy and Weston, coal merchants, Bell-alley, Coleman-street. Robert Davy is a carman to Mr. Carter, the corner of Bell-alley.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. On the 5th of December, a quarter past six in the evening, I saw the prisoner and Barney Short . Davy's coat was on the side of the cart. I saw the prisoner and Barney Short loitering about the cart; I watched them a quarter of an hour; the prisoner at last went up to the cart, and took the coat, he gave the coat to Barney Short in Bell-alley, they both run into London-wall; I there catched them both, I took them back to Mr. Carter's warehouse, and sent for Cartwright. This is the coat.

ROBERT DAVY . It is my coat; it was taken from my cart as I was unloading it; the coat is worth ten shillings.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-46

167. GEORGE BEDWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , ten pieces of leather, value 10 s. the property of John Tery .

MR. MASSEY. I live at No. 1, John's-court, Somerset-street. I had a master shoe-maker lodge in my house. The prisoner used to come backwards and forwards to this master-shoe-maker.

Q. Where is that master shoe-maker - A. He has left my house, we cannot find him. The prisoner one evening brought eight pair of soles; he said they were a shilling a pair. The shoe-maker that is off took thirty-three pair of soles away with him.

MR. TERY, There is none of the leather here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-47

168. GEORGE BEDWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a pair of boot-legs, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Harris and John Tory .

THOMAS HARRIS . I am a currier ; I live in Ratcliffe Highway; my partner 's name is John Tory . I can only identify the legs, that is all; I never missed them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-48

169. HANNAH JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 14th of December , a one pound bank note, with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like bank note with the same intention.

AND SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, the same as the former, only varying the manner of charging it.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-49

170. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a carpet, value 10 l. the property of John Charrington , John Pettit and John Oliver .

JOHN OLIVER . I am an upholsterer , John Charrington and John Pettit are my partners ; our shop is No. 11 and 12, Moorfields.

THOMAS SAPWELL . On the 10th of December between six and seven in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of No. 2, Swan yard Bishopgate street, I saw he had this carpet on his shoulder, that is about three or four minutes walk from Brokers-row; he crossed the street and went up New street. I followed him through suspicion; and when I came into New street, he crossed to a house to look for a name as I supposed; he then went to the next house and looked as if to discover the name; I then asked him what name he wanted he said Mr. Mason; I asked him what he had got, the carpet was covered with a mat, he said a brussels carpet, I told him I believed there was no such name as Mr. Mason there; I said we will go into the Magpie public-house and there enquire; I took him into the Magpie, I asked him whose porter he was, he said Mr. Olivers in Brokers-row; he then begged hard for mercy, he said you know my wife very well, I have four children; he has a wife and four children I took him to the watchhouse. I then went to Mr. Olivers and informed him what I had done this is the carpet.

Q. Now Mr. Oliver. is that your carpet - A. It is the property of one of my partners, I had not given the prisoner any direction to take the carpet to a Mr. Mason. I saw the carpet at the watchhouse; it was matted; it would not have been matted unless intended to be sent out, I value the carpet at ten pounds.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-50

171. JAMES KETTLE , and JOHN REEVES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Benjamin Hughes , about the hour of six in the night on the 31st of December , and stealing therein two shawls, value 17 s. his property.

BENJAMIN HUGHES. I am a linen draper , No 8 Holborn bridge , I rent the whole of the house; it is in the parish of St. Sepulchre . On the 31st of December about six o'clock, an officer came in and asked me if I had lost any shawls; I then looked at the window directly; I went out and saw the boys about the window. I saw three boys, these two boys, and another. I am quite sure the two boys now at the bar were two of the three boys.

Q. In consequence of any suspicion that you had did you watch - A. I watched: I went behind the two boys and stood behind a waggon. I was in a situation that I could see what any person did at my shop window. I saw the two prisoners go to the window, both together taking hold of the clothes, with their hands both in the window, lifting the clothes up; they were both taking a part in it; I went behind them both, and catched them both by the collar.

Q. You laid hold of them - A. Yes this was about six o'clock, on the 31st of December, When I laid hold of them I brought them to the shop. James Kettle dropped a shawl at the door, a lady in the shop picked it up. I brought them both into the shop, I am sure it fell from Kettle.

Q. What was the worth of that, do you think - A. Eight shillings and six pence; I saw it fall from Kettle.

Q. Did you see any other of your shawls in the possession of the other boy - A. The officer took a shawl from his breast, I saw the officer do it. The officer took a shawl from Reeves he had it in his breast; that was worth eight shillings and six pence.

Q. Did you examine your window to see how they got these shawls - A. Yes I did afterwards: the window had been cut or broken, and the glass removed; they could take any thing out of the shop window.

Q. How lately before that had you occasion to turn your eye towards the shop window, to know whether it was safe or not. A. Another officer came at five o'clock; I went out then and examined the window; there was a small piece out of the window at the bottom, but not big enough to take any thing out.

Q. Were you by that part of the window which had been broken at five o'clock - A. Yes; that was not big enough to take the goods out; it was cut in a fresh place, large enough to take any thing out at six o'clock. At five o'clock it was only cut a little at the bottom; that is all I know, I know the goods to be mine.

Q. Have you any partner - A. No.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a constable. On the 31st of December I was at Mr. Hughes's shop about six o'clock. I saw the two prisoners at the window; there was another with them a few minutes before, I was close behind them, I heard the glass break.

Q. You mean the glass of Mr. Hughes's window - A. Yes; the two prisoners stood close against the window when I heard the window break nobody else was nigh it.

Q. Does that window come low down - A. Yes; the glass is about two feet from the pavement. I kept my eye upon them; I saw Kettle take the shawl out; he came just round the corner he put it inside of his waistcoat. I went into the shop, and told the gentleman of it; I told him there was some things taken out of his window; and when I came out of the shop, they were both at the window again when this shawl was taken out they both had hold of this shawl, they took out this shawl, they both had their hands in the window. I was just going to lay hold of them but Mr. Hughes laid hold of them before me; I did no know that one of the shawls was dropped by Kettle, at the shop door before they were taken into the shop I searched them; on the prisoner Kettle, I found the shawl underneath his waistcoat, Kettle dropped one and the other was taken from him.

Mr. Hughes. I think the constable took that

shawl from Reeves.

Carlisle. I took it from Kettle; it is a mistake of Mr. Hughes; I found a second piece upon Kettle they had got hold of a piece of cloth that laid against the window; they had got hold of that, that would have made a third piece; but they could not take it out.

Q. to Mr. Hughes. Were these goods laying near the window - A. They were belonging to my shop.

Kettle. Said nothing in his defence.

Reeves's Defence. I had been driving beast in Smithfield; I was making the best of my way home I met this boy, he said here is a pretty shawl should you like to have one.

KETTLE GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13,

REEVES GUILTY - DEATH , aged 11.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-51

172. RICHARD JONES , and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , two seals. value 4 l. the property of Edward Taylor , privately in his shop .

EDWARD TAYLOR . I am a jeweller No. 25. in Leadenhall-street . I sell seals in my business I have no partner.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar - A. Yes; I saw them in my shop on the 29th of December between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning; they came there they said they wanted to look at some seals. I was in the parlour; I came out immediately; my nephew was in the shop, at the time they entered.

Q. What is you nephews name - A. Charles Cook Taylor. I joined my nephew in the shop, the prisoners William and Richard were in the shop; and Richard Jones had got a seal in his hand; he asked me the price of it, I told him two pounds and the other was close by him, at the time a carriage drew up to the door, at that moment I went out to the door I went out to the carriage leaving them in the shop; my nephew was in the shop on the other side of the counter attending to them. I returned immediately from the carriage into the shop and went behind the counter then William Jones took up one or two seals, and asked me the price of them, untill that time he had not meddled with any of the seals, that I saw; I told him the price, he thought them too dear; the other Richard Jones then took up the seal which he had before in his hand and said he would give me thirty five shillings for it as I was anxious not to keep the ladies at the door; I said he should have it; there were two or three ladies in the carriage; upon which he agreed to it, and left a three shilling piece deposit, saying he would call as he returned from the Hay market and pay the remainder and take it. He left the seal with me; they both left the shop. I sent my nephew and a little boy to watch these men to see if they went into any of my neighbours. I sent my nephew and errand boy to watch the prisoners my wife was left to examine the tray.

Q. At the time the prisoners were in the shop who was serving them - A. My nephew was serving them. My wife was in the parlour; not in the shop,

Q. Was the errand boy in the shop - A. No he was not. I went after the prisoners, I found my nephew watching them. I went into Mr. Blissets two doors lower down thinking they might come in there; they did not come into Mr. Blissetts; as they came by, Mr. Blissett being a constable, I asked him so pursue him.

Q. How far was Blissets from your house - A. About two hundred yards, I waited a little time at Mr. Blissetts untill he came back and told me where they were gone.

Q. When did you ascertain yourself that your seals had been taken - A. My lad brought me the fellow seal, I then ascertained I had lost a seal; they were searched and the property found upon them, before I went home.

Q. Were you present when they were searched - A. I came in directly afterwards.

Q. Where were they taken when you saw them - A. When I saw them. they were taken at Mr. Hunters a jeweller in Fenchurch-street.

Q. You did not see them searched did you - A, No, I saw my property after they had been searched, it was two seals; I saw the two seals laying on Mr. Hunters glass; I knew them to be two seals that I had in my tray.

Q. What might be the worth of these two seals - A. Four pounds.

Q. Did they say any thing after they were searched in your presence - A. They said they had not stolen them.

Q. You had not sold them any seals had you - A. The seal they bargained for they left in the shop.

CHARLES COOK TAYLOR . I am a nephew to Mr. Taylor the last witness. I was in the shop when the two prisoners came in; they came in together, they appeared to be companions, as if they knew each other; they asked to look at gold seals I first called my uncle from the parlour; and as soon as I saw him coming I took the tray from the window; the seals were contained in that tray; no seals had been sold that day.

Q. Did either of the prisoners buy any of the seals from that tray - A. No; Richard Jones bargained for one; my uncle asked him two pounds for it, he said he should like it if my uncle would take thirty five shillings, my uncle agreed, after he came from the carriage to take the offer of thirty five shillings.

Q. Did he take it away with him - A. He did not he had not sufficient money I suppose; he left three shillings deposit he said he would return, and make up the money; he was going to the Hay market, my uncle went out to the carriage: he came up to the other Richard Jones he took up one of the seals and as I told him the price, Richard took up another seal not the same seal he bargained for them each of them took up seals, and asked the price too quick, it was impossible for me to tell them Richard said, he would give thirty five shillings for the seal; whether it was before or after my uncle came from the carriage I am not certain; I think it was after. He left a three shilling piece deposit;

they left the shop, and went away together; I followed them; they went to Mr. Gray's a jeweller, lower down in the street; I sent the errand boy to let my uncle know they were at Mr. Grays.

Q. You did not suppose at the time they left the shop that they had stolen any thing, did you - A. No, I did not.

MR. BLISSETT. I am a jeweller, and I was a constable at the time this happened. I saw these men go by my shop together; I followed them to Mr. Fairbrother's, a jeweller's, at Aldgate; I stood by the window while they were in there; from there they went to another Mr. Taylor's, a jeweller, in Fenchurch-street; I then followed them to Mr. Hunter's; as they were going along I saw them take some thing out of their pockets. I apprehended them at Mr. Hunter's, an engraver and jeweller; I searched them both at Mr. Hunter's shop; I found three seals upon the prisoners, and two out of the three were claimed by Mr. Taylor; I found upon the younger Richard, and two upon William Jones , the two upon William was claimed by Mr. Taylor; the one found upon Richard was not claimed by Mr. Taylor. I asked the prisoners how they came by them; they gave me no answer. I found a few halfpence, and a knife upon them.

Q. Who had the knife - A. I cannot recollect that. I have the three seals here; I have kept them ever since; these are the two seals that Mr. Taylor claimed; I produce them.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Taylor. Can you say these two seals were taken from your shop that day - A. Yes; they are gold seals. When I saw these two seals, I knew them to be mine; I marked the stone upon which the seal is engraved; I am quite sure I never sold one of this pattern; they are of the value of four pounds.

Richard Jones's Defence. At the time I was searched, I had a twenty-pound note in my pocketbook.

William Jones's Defence. I bought the seals up in Edgeware-road, I gave three pounds for the two seals.

Mr. Blissett. I searched Richard Jones , I found no pocket-book upon him at all.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

RICHARD JONES , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

WILLIAM JONES , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-52

174. JAMES DONNAHOE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Francis Gibbons , about the hour of seven in the night, on the 31st of December , and stealing therein, half a yard of cloth, value 8 s. his property.

FRANCIS GIBBONS . I am a woolen-draper , 183, Fleet-street ; I rent the whole house, the house is in the parish of St. Dunstan's in the West . On Saturday, the 31st of December, I came home, and found the prisoner in custody in the shop; I left the shop about four o'clock; I returned about half past five, or rather better; I am the only proprietor of the shop, I have no partner.

THOMAS PALEN . I am shopman to Mr. Gibbins. On Saturday, the 31st of December, somewhat better than half past five in the evening, about half an hour after I lit the candles, I was at the desk, and heard a noise at the window, some thing similar to an umbrella going against the window; I took no notice of it at first, until it was again repeated; I then went to the window, and saw a persons arm in the window.

Q. Had the window been cracked - A. It was a little cracked about ten minutes before; it was a large square, and two large pieces were taken out, the two pieces were taken clean out, and another strait cut down the center of the glass remaining, it did not appear as if broken, it appeared cut, half of it appeared to have been cut.

Q. Upon seeing the arm in, did you make to the party, and seize the party - A. Yes, I seized him in the act of taking the cloth in his hands; that person is the prisoner now at the bar; I took him into the shop; the cloth was in his hands, which I took from him.

Q. Was the cloth removed - A. Yes, it was out of the window, whether the whole of it was out of the window I cannot say, but the most part of it was clearly out of the window; it had been removed from the spot where it lay; that I am clear in.

Q. How far do you think it laid from the window - A. We have a show board, the cloth was laid out spread on the show board, it laid away from the window, it could be got no way but by putting the arm in; he could have got it by putting the arm in about seven inches I should suppose. I sent for a constable, and had him secured.

Q. You seized him outside of the shop, of course - A. Yes; at that time the light was quite gone; there was light enough from the shop window to discover the countenance of a man, but not day-light; day-light had been gone some time. I delivered him over to the constable; he was committed. This is the piece of cloth, I have kept it ever since; it is worth eight or nine shillings.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing when you laid hold of him - A. No, not till I brought him into the shop, the substance of what he said was to let him go, he would not run away. The cloth is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of the crime that is alledged against me; I went up to Mr. Pollto's, it took my whole attention to look at the gass-light; a young man said, he should like a piece of that scarlet cloth; two little boys came running along, and throwed my arm in the window; I am quite innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-53

175. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a looking-glass, value 2 s. the property of Sir Morris Ximine ; a whip, value 6 s. and one book, value 6 d. the property of Miss Mary Ximine .

JOHN SNELL . I am coachman to Miss Mary Ximine , Miss Ximine and Sir Morris lived together; I left the rooms locked on the 15th of October, and on the 15th of November, my master received

letter, saying, the stable had been entered by some, person and that man had taken the looking-glass; I do not know of his stealing of it, only this is the duplicate found in his breeches pocket.

BENJAMIN CLARK . I am a labourer to the East India Company; I had the care of the house No. 40, Glocester-place, Portman square . On the 11th of December, I took the key of the stable; I went into the stable; I found every thing in the stable right; I then went up stairs into the chambers, on opening the door, I heard a noise on the boards; I opened the door, and found the prisoner standing behind the chamber door; I asked him what he wanted there; he asked, me the same, and said if I did not go he would let me know who he was. I caught him by the collar, he then said, he was a poor man, he got in out of the rain. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. I took from the prisoner a duplicate of a glass, and a whip in his breeches pocket; he said, it was his.

- . I am a pawnbroker. This is my duplicate of a whip found on the prisoner; I believe the prisoner to be the man that I took the whip on. This is the whip.

ROBERT PALMER . I am a pawnbroker, in Berwick-street. I took in a looking-glass; the duplicate found on the prisoner corresponds with the other. I do not know the man. This is the looking-glass.

John Snell . The whip is mine, and the looking-glass was for the use of Sir Morris's coachman and me, I know it well.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of them in the World, I never saw them before I saw them at Marlborough-street office.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-54

176. WILLIAM NEIGHBOUR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December, one pistol, value 30 s. the goods of our Lord the King .

AND OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only stating it to belong to different persons.

HENRY BARTON . I am a soldier in the 3rd regiment of Guards. The prisoner belonged to the same Company as I do. On Thursday, the 22nd of December, I was on drill on the Parade in the Tower . I saw the prisoner, he was going round the Tower; I saw him go into the Armoury with the Company, and I saw him come out with a pistol under his coat, I saw the head of the pistol, it appeared to be a brass pistol; as soon as the drill was over, the prisoner asked me to take a walk with him, I went with him to the top of Rosemary-lane, I then left him, and went back to the Tower.

JOHN BOWDELL . I am a constable. On the 22nd of December, I was in Rosemary-lane, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running: he turned up Haye's-court, where there was no thoroughfare, there I took him. I searched him; he had these three pistols under his coat, which I now produce. I asked the prisoner where he got the pistols; he said from the Tower. I took him to the watchhouse. I produce the pistols; I have had them ever since.

MR. BELLIS. I am a master furbisher of the Tower. I have the care of the Amoury in the Tower. When I came to look at the Amoury I found four pistols gone. This is one of the pistols belonging to the Amoury in the Tower. I believe they are the property of the King; it has the King's mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty, therefore I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-55

175. THOMAS HARRISON was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of November , had in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 60 l. that he on the same day, did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and endorsement upon the said bill of Exchange, to wit, Edward Coughland, with intention to defraud Edward Hunt .

AND OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, to defraud different persons.

EDWARD HUNT. I reside at Liverpool; I have a brother of the name of John Hunt, resident of London.

Q. On the 17th of November last, had you occasion to transmit any bills to your brother in London - A. I had, I made them up into a letter.

Q. How many bills did you transmit that day - A. Three bills of Exchange, and two bank notes.

Q. Is that one of the bills that you transmitted that day - A. It is.

Q. Look at the endorsement, you see the endorsement of the name of Coughland; was that endorsement on the bill at the time that you enclosed it - A. It was not, that endorsement was not on the bill at the time I lost it.

JOHN ROBERTS. I am a clerk to Mr. Hunt. On the 17th of November last, Mr. Hunt gave me a letter to put into the Post office at Liverpool; I lost that letter out of my pocket when I came to the Post office it was gone; I lost it before I got to the Post office.

GEORGE GALL. I am clerk in the house of Jones, Lloyd, and Company, bankers. On the 22nd of November, the prisoner called with this bill, he left it for acceptance; on the 23rd he called again, I asked him if he was the person that had left it; he said, he was. I asked him to accompany me to a person in Finch-lane, as there was some difficulty about the bill, which we must get rectified before we could accept it. I took him to Finch-lane, he accompanied me, and when we came to the door, there was another person joined us. The prisoner asked me if the bill was stopped; I evaded to answer him direct, and when we came to the house in Finch-lane, he desired the other person to go into a public-house, and to wait until he returned. We then went to Mr. Hunt's accompting-house in Finch-lane, that is Mr. Johan Hunt 's, the brother of the gentleman at Liverpool. I then introduced the prisoner to Mr. Hunt,

as the person that called for the bill. Mr. Hunt asked him how this bill came originally into his possession; he said, he had received it of Edward Coughland , the last endorser, to whom he had paid sixty pounds, the amount of the bill, he pretended, he said, he was a respectable man at Liverpool, an agent he called himself, and he had commercial transactions in London, and at other places; the answers to the questions which were put to him by the prosecutor's brother and myself left the impression on both of us that he was an imposter, he did not satisfy us that he was the man he represented himself to be. Mr. Hunt gave him his opinion, that that man had the other part of the property that was lost, or connected with the people that had it. I refused letting him have the bill; he said, he would sue me for the bill. He stated that Coughland was a pedlar, and he believed he was gone to Ireland, he could not tell where he was.

Q. Was any body sent to the public-house after the other man - A. We took the prisoner into custody, and searched him; on him was found the memorandum of this bill in the name of Brown, Cobb, and Company.

Edward Hunt . The bill was drawn by Mr. Greenwood; upon Brown, Cobb, and Company.

Q. Have you made enquiries at Liverpool after the prisoner - A. I have; I believe he is no trade there; I am a resident in Liverpool.

Prisoner's Defence. I keep a boarding-house for seaman, at Liverpool; Coughland, of whom I took the bill, I had known him some time, I cashed this bill for him; I have got a witness to prove it; I took this bill knowing the man, I supposed it to be correct.

NOT GUILTY ,

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-56

177. CHARLES WELLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of October, in the 53rd year of his Majesty's reign , four promissory notes for the payment of 20 l. each, thirteen promissory notes for the payment of 10 l. each, seven other promissory notes for the payment of five guineas each, and eighty-eight 5 l. notes , the property of William Foreman , Matthew Monkhouse , and Richard Fothergill .

CHARLES KING . I am a clerk to the prosecutors, they carry on the business of bankers , at Newport, in Monmouthshire; their names are William Foreman , Matthew Monkhouse , and Richard Fothergill . On Saturday, the 3rd of October, I made up a parcel of country bank notes, checks, and bills of exchange.

Mr. Knapp. You are looking at an entry - A. Yes; I made it at the time; it is my own entry of the parcel; I made up to the amount of two thousand pounds, and upwards.

Mr. Gurney. Among these were there one of the Brixton bank of five guineas, No. 2257 - A. Yes.

Q. Was there two of the Abergavenny bank of five-pounds each - A. Yes, No. 130, and 132, one is dated 21st of September, 1813, letter A. these both are entered in my book.

Q. Who was that parcel directed to when made up - A. Down and company, Bankers London, it was enclosed in another cover. I then put it into a wooden box, directed to Richard Fothergill at Messrs Sheys, Merchants, Lawrence Poultney Hill, London. That box was put into a bag, the bag was directed the same; to Richard Fothergill , we sent it to the mail, by one of the clerks. I did not go myself.

DANIEL DUNN . I am a clerk at the house of Messrs. Sheys.

Q. On Monday October the 4th, 1813, did the parcel described by the last witness, come to your house by the mail - A. I took it in myself of the porter, the box came directed to Mr. Fothergill as he has had it formely exactly. I kept it in my custody untill Mr. Fothergill came in; I handed it to him; I saw it opened, upon it being opened there were no notes, checks or bills of exchange in it; nothing in it but s letter.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer.

Q. Upon receiving intelligence of this parcel being stolen did you go down to Bristol in the year 1813 - A. I did, I saw the prisoner I learned from him that he was the guard of the Swansea mail, I asked him whether he had received the parcel in question, he said he had received it, at the King's head at Newport, that he had brought it safe to the other side of Newport, that he then shifted the coaches and sent it on to Bristol; he accompanied it to Bristol and delivered it at the Bush coach office at Bristol, in the usual way with the other parcels.

Q. Did you discover any notes had been circulated at Bristol - A. I found one note had.

HARRY ADKINS . I apprehended the prisoner at Jacobs's house, in Dukes place London. He was committed to the house of correction for examination.

Q. While he was in the House of Correction, did he say any thing to you - A. He did; I made him no promise or threat, On the 12th of December, the prisoner came to me; he wanted to know, whether he could relieve himself of the charge, by giving information against the person who had received the notes of him, I told him I could not answer that; but what he thought proper to say to me I was bound to hear; he then said, he had committed the robbery between Newport and Bristol; by taking the parcel out of the box, directed to Down and Company. He then made up the box, in the bag, in the same way as when he received it, and then he forwarded it by the Bristol mail to London and the bills and notes he gave to Mrs Hinchesman the night or the day after the robbery. I am not certain which, he had advised Mrs. Hinchesman to negotiate some of the bills before the robbery could be known at Bristol; it could not be known there till the return of the mail, She did circulate several, it was then known at Bristol, and she had absconded she was afraid of being taken into custody, he said, she went to Bath.

Q. Did he tell you what had been done with those that had not been circulated - A. The prisoner and Mrs. Hinchesman had brought them to some part in Golden-lane; he said they remained in Golden

lane untill July last, that they were in a damaged state when he brought them to London.

Q. Did he say to whom he gave them, when he came into London - A. He was recommended, by a relation of Mrs. Hinchesinan, to a man of the name of Porter, living at Merlin's cave, in the Spa-fields, Middlesex, he said Porter had to the amount of three hundred pounds; and that Mrs. Porter had passed three of the notes; and one hundred and twenty five pounds was got from him by men of the name of Marsh and Edwards that he had received no benefit of.

JANE HINCHESMAN. Q. In the month of October 1813 did you live at Tetterdown - A. I did I know the prisoner was guard of the Swansea mail. In October 1813 he gave me a quantity of notes and bills to the amount of seven hundred and fifty five pounds.

Q. Did you pass any of them at Bristol - A. I did in about three weeks after that, I heard an alarm of the coach being robbed. I went to Bath, the notes then that I had not passed, I made up in a parcel, and put it into the ground, nobody but myself and daughter made up the parcel and put it in the ground. I went to Bath last July, I took them up, after I returned to my house I took them up, the prisoner came to my house, I gave them to him; he came to London I came after him.

Q. Did you go to Porter's house; Merlin's cave, Spa-fields - A. I did.

Q. Did you see any notes or bills there - A. I did.

Q. Did the prisoner tell you how he came by these notes and bills - A. Yes he said he took them from Mr. Sheys's box; that he had to deliver at the coach office Bristol, to come to London.

SARAH PORTER , Q. Do you live at Merlin's cave - A. No, I did live there, in the course of last August, the prisoner brought a great many notes to our house; I cannot say how many.

Q, Did you by his desire put off any country Bank notes - A. Two. I gave to Mr. Syree, a linen draper, in Islington Road; and a third I put off to Mr. Gregory, a linen draper in Sun Street. I received them of the prisoner at Merlin's cave, that I so put off, that is in the County of Middlesex.

ROBERT SYREE . Q. Do you know the last woman that has been examined - A. Yes she came to me in August last, and offered me a five pound Abergavenny note, she bought something of me. I live in Old street Road. I gave her change for the note the goods she bought amounted to one pound, three or four shillings, it is an Abergavenny note, letter A 132, dated the 21st of September, 1813; from the appearance of the note it had been in a damp state. She came again in ten or twelve days after, and offered me another Abergavenny note, and took the change as before; that is 130, and the same date, a five pound note; I wrote her name and address, both times, on the notes; I recollect her person.

WILLIAM GREGORY . I live in Sun street, in the latter part of September, Mrs. Porter came to me, she offered me a five pound five shilling note; I know that is the note, my young man wrote his name upon it; I can swear to the writing.

Q. to Mr. King. Look at these three notes; are these three of the notes that you so put up in the parcel, look at your notary - A. They are.

GUILTY aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-57

178. THOMAS WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , a looking glass, value 35 s. the property of John Goring , and ETIZABETH PARKER , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the said glass, she knowing it to be stolen .

JOHN GORING. I keep a brokers shop . On Thursday, the 29th of December about half past four in the afternoon. I lost a looking-glass out of the shop.

Q. What was the value of this looking glass - A. Thirty five shillings. I saw the glass the next day at Bow Street.

Q. Who shewed it you there - A. Mr. Jacobs's; that glass that I saw at Bow Street was the glass that I had taken out of my shop.

JOHN JACOBS . I am a cabinet maker. On the 29th of December, at half after eight o'clock, the woman prisoner knocked at my door, and asked to speak to Mr. Jacobs; the servant answered at the door she is within; I said walk in; when she came in, she said she had brought a glass to sell, for a woman that was very unwell; I asked her how long she had had it; she said she had it a twelvemonth; I then said this glass has not been compleatly finished a month; she replied if I did not like to buy it to give it her back again; I said the glass had not been hung up a twelvemonth, glasses that have, have always dust on the back of them. I then asked her how she could knock at my door, and ask me to buy a looking glass; she said that she was sent by a person at Temple bar, that said I was in want of a looking glass; I detained the glass. I went myself to the office; I told her to bring the person who belonged to it, and while she was gone I went to the office; I brought Mr. Upton the officer, home with me, he had not been in doors above half an hour when a knock came to the door the door was opened, and in came the woman, with an elderly man; she said this is the man that belongs to the glass; I said do you claim it as your property; he said he did, the officer told him it was stolen property, he then said it was not his property, he was authorized by the woman to come and claim it, and then he should have it; he then said it was not his, he knew nothing about it, he was to come and claim it as his property. Being an elderly man, the officer asked him how he came to claim it; he said he was employed by the two prisoners to come and claim it; the woman prisoner said she would point out the two thieves. We lodged the pie-man in the watchhouse; the officer and I went with the woman, into Charles-street, Drury-lane, there she pointed out two little boys; one of these little boys went with the officer, to shew him where the thief had done the robbery; I knew nothing about the prisoner Wells.

JOHN UPTON . I received the information of Jacobs,

I went to his home, and waited near half an hour; his evidence is correct.

THOMAS BURTON . I am a printer, I live with Mr. Stone, in Berwick-street; I am thirteen years old.

Q. Do you remember the 29th of December last - A. Yes; I met Thomas Wells in Earl-street; he said he was going of an errand for his master, it was about five o'clock; he asked me and John Smith to go with him; I went with him to the corner of Litchfield-street on his master's errand, and when he returned he brought this glass with him.

Q. Now, look at the glass, is that the glass that he brought with him - A. It is; he said his mother was ill, and he wanted to dispose of it; he said he knew a place where to sell it, if we would go with him; we went with him into Charles-street, Drury-lane, and then he and the woman at the bar went out with it. That is all I know.

JOHN SMITH . On the 29th of December, I was with the last witness, we met with the prisoner Wells; he asked us to go with him; we went with him, he left us, and when he returned he brought this looking glass with him. I afterwards went into Charles Street, Drury Lane; I saw him go out of a house with a woman with the glass.

Well's Defence. He is telling false.

Parker's Defence. He brought the glass to me; he said his mother was ill; and wanted to dispose of the glass; he asked me to sell the glass for him, and he would shew me where to sell it; I ignorant of his character, and unsuspecting, out of good nature, took the glass to sell. I have been drawn into my present situation by Wells; he told me his mother was sick and destitute; I consented to sell the glass; I did not know it was stolen.

Wells called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Parker called one witness, who gave her a good character.

WELLS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

PARKER, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-58

179. JOSEPH KING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the Honorable Mary Broderick , about the hour of four in the night of the 16th of September , with intent the goods and chattles in the said dwelling-house then and there being burglariously to steal .

WILLIAM MORLEY . I am butler to the Honorable Mary Broderick .

Q. Do you reside with the Honorable Mary Broderick - A. Yes, I do; her christian name is Mary.

Q. On the 17th of November last, when you were in bed, did you hear any noise in the night - A. I did, it appeared to be over my head, in the back parlour, it appeared as if the footman was either rubbing the tables or some furniture moving. I got up, and opened the window to see if it was light, I found it quite dark; I listened a little time, and returned to my bed, not hearing it again; I listened again when I got into bed, I heard the same noise again apparently; I got out of bed, and loaded a pistol, which I had close to my bed side; I went into the lower part of the house first, to see if it was all safe; I found all safe below, and the doors all shut as I left, them when I went to bed, and I saw the doors fast before I went to bed. After I had loaded the pistol, I went up stairs, I got into the passage leading to the room where I heard the noise, I then found a light coming upon me, I could not be certain whether it came out of the parlour or coming down from the drawing-room; I went back on to the top step of the kitchen stairs, before I could conveniently turn round the prisoner was looking at the clock, about six yards off me; I could see him particularly with a wax-light in his hand looking at the clock, standing in the passage, standing between the two parlours he had a wax-light, he took it out of the back parlour; he looked very deliberately at the clock, while I could tell half a dozen, and I looked at him; he then squatted himself downright to look at the key-hole of the clock, he could not stoop properly forward, he squatted, in that act I shot at him with the pistol, he jumped or fell immediately, I could not tell which; he fell against the door; the candle went out; I could see no more. I heard him make a noise. I was a little alarmed myself, fearing there were more. I heard a noise of getting out, he went out at the street door; I called out thieves and murder; I was on the top of the stairs; I called out thieves and murder, for him to be stopped at the door. The servants heard the report of the pistol, they called out thieves and murder; the watchman came up to the door, and the patrole. I desired the patrole to stop outside, they had their lanthorns; the watchman came in; I took the watchman to the place where I shot him; I found the blood had already spurted from the prisoner about two feet from the side of him; I traced it along the passage down the steps to the pavement, a vast quantity of drops of blood. When I got down the steps, I found a lamp-lighters ladder, apparently, reaching to the balcony. I took the watchman then up stairs into the drawing-room; the windows were all secure, apparently as I had left them the day before; I went twice or three times round the drawing-room; I said I would open the windows to see how he could get in; I thought he might get the ladder into the the balcony, and so get in at the second floor; at last I found the middle window a little dirty; I said I would open that first, which is the middle of the three; on opening the shutters I found they were divided into three folds, the bottom part fell out upon me, which had had six screws fastened to it at the side; they were all found out; the middle shutter was fastened; that fastening had been broken off then; I saw marks on the cloth under the lower shutter, because the floor was clean, there were the marks of his fingers; then I was convinced he must have got in that way. I went down-stairs, I saw a shoe and a hat, between the place and the door where I shot him. Then I went to the back parlour where I first heard him; I found two drawers had been broken open, which had always been kept locked; I did not miss any thing, nothing has been missed; there was only these two

drawers broken open; all the things and furniture in the drawing-room has been looked over, because I saw the marks of dirty fingers; the goods were all covered over with sheets, and there were marks of fingers.

Q. Had you a fair sight of the prisoner, so as to know him again - A. A very fair sight; he had a wax-candle in his hand, I perceived that distinctly. In the morning I went to Bow-street office, and gave a description of the prisoner; I said he was about six feet high, dressed like a lamp-lighter; I thought about thirty years of age, dark whiskers, and shot on the right side.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you are certain that he is the man - A. I am quite clear that the prisoner is the man; I have no doubt about it; I never saw him before as I know of; he never lived in that house; he has been formerly a workman there.

Q. What parish is Mrs. Broderick's house in - A. In the parish of St. George's Hanover-square. I shot him exactly as the clock struck five, it was quite dark; it was quite dark when I first heard the noise.

Q. What time was it when you first got up - A. About twenty minutes to five.

Q. What was the man doing when you first saw him - A. He was looking at the clock, and he was squatting down when I shot him; I had a full side view of him.

Q. Did you ever see the man before - A. No; nor never after until I saw him at Bow-street; he was dressed in a dark coat, rather short for him; I think it was something of a jacket.

Q. Had he on breeches or pantaloons - A. I will not swear to that.

Q. And yet you will swear to the man - A. I do not swear to the lower part of his dress; I found a great deal of blood in the passage, and the watchman traced it all the way to Grosvenor-street; I only traced it down the steps.

JANE DUNKLEY. I live at the White Horse, public-house, Little Britain,

Q. How far is that from St. George's Hanover-square - A. I do not know. I know the prisoner; he lodged in the same house with me; he has lodged there since May.

Q. What is his business - A. He is a carpenter,

Q. Do you remember his coming home to his lodgings on the 17th of November - A. Yes, it was on the night of the 16th, and the morning of the 17th, it was about six o'clock, it was dark; he came to his lodgings; I let him in; he went up stairs directly; I lodge on the first floor. I opened the door, and left him to shut it.

Q. How was he dressed - A. He had a short jacket on, he had no hat on I believe, and I think his jacket was a blue one, I will not be sure, and I believe he had no shoes on as he passed my room door. I never saw him afterwards until I saw him at Bow-street; he quitted his lodgings on Friday evening, or Saturday morning; I never saw him afterwards there. This was on Thursday.

OWEN GRIFFITHS. I am a surgeon; I was sent for to the White Horse public-house, Little Britain, on Thursday, the 17th, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon; I found the prisoner in bed; I looked at the man as he lay in bed, and examined him.

Q. Did you ask him what he sent to you for - A. I went to examine his face; no words passed as I can recollect. I examined his face; I found him wounded in three places in his face. I got some water ready to dress him; I dressed him. He shewed me his thigh and arm; I extracted a few small shots from the thigh, and asked him how he came so much injured; he said, he was shot at in Lincoln's-inn-fields, and he fell down, which was the occasion of the wound in the forehead; he was faint. I desired him to lay down, seeing no means of his being taken care of, I recommended him to go to the Hospital; he promissed so to do. I ordered him to take the medicine that I sent, and I sent him a lotion to wash the part with. I called the next morning, the landlord told me he was gone away; that was Friday. He had one shot in his right cheek; that is all in his face. The other shots were in the arm and thigh, one shot in the left arm, and some in the right; the wound had been recently done; he did not tell me when they were done.

Q. Did you keep any of the shots that you extracted - A. No.

HARRY ADKINS . I am an officer. From information, I was sent down to make enquiries upon it; on going into the house, in the passage, near the place where the blood was, on the 17th of September, I found the hat and shoe; I went to the window, where it was supposed he entered; I found it broken open in the same way the former witness has described; after getting as good a description of the prisoner as I could, I inserted it in the newspapers; there were many spots of blood close to the clock, and on the wall near the street door was the mark of a man's hand smeered with blood. On Friday the advertisement was inserted; on Saturday I received information of the prisoner; I went to his lodgings, I found he had left them on the Friday. I then went to every Hospital in London; I could hear nothing of him.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am high constable of Birmingham. On Saturday, the 6th of November, I sent a man to the Hospital for this man; the surgeon of the Hospital waited upon me, saying, he had a man then in the Hospital under suspicious circumstances, he was brought to me in a bad state at that time with very great difficulty he walked, he was a long time coming; I did not say any thing to the prisoner that night, not till Sunday morning; I put him in a good bed up stairs; I sent for a surgeon to examine him on the Sunday, I was informed he was in that state that it was not proper to move him; Mr. Cox informed me that he ought not to remain in my prison; he desired I would send him to the Hospital in the workhouse; I sent him to the Hospital at the workhouse. I told the prisoner I believed he was the man that committed the robbery at Mrs. Broderick's house; he said no, he committed no robbery; he said he had got into the house through the window, and as he had taken nothing, he hoped they would do nothing to him. I believe I have told

every word that passed between him and me, I made him no promise or threat.

William Moiley. I produce some of the shots the same as I loaded the pistol with.

Q. to Mr. Griffiths. Are they such sort of shots as you extracted - A. Yes, they are about the size.

Prisoner's Defence. It appears from the evidence that the man shot in Grosvenor-place lost a great deal of blood; the blood was even traced to the White Horse, Piccadilly; I can make it appear that I bled none, not even the sheets that I lay upon.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18150111-59

180. MARY ANN MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , three pair of silk stockings, value 36 s. the property of James Murray Lacey , privately in his shop .

JAMES MURRAY LACEY. I am an hosier . I live in Clement's Inn, in the parish of St. Clement's, Danes . On the 16th of December, between one and two o'clock, I left my shop to go to a house to have my dinner. I had been gone but a few minutes. when a neighbour came to tell me that Mr. White, a linen draper, had sent for me; that a suspicious person was in my shop, and wished me to come home. I came out, and went to Mr. White; he told me to go home and finish serving this woman; she had been in his shop, and he had no doubt she was a thief. I then went to my shop, the prisoner was sitting on a stool in my shop, and a number of silk stockings were opened, and on the counter. I went on serving myself; she had previously looked out six pair of silk stockings, she then looked out four pair of worsted stockings, and told me to send them to Mr. Brown's, 45, Lincoln's-in-fields. Mr. White was waiting to follow the prisoner, which he did. I looked at the papers of stockings, I missed two pair, and I thought three, but two pair I was certain of. After that I went to Mr. White's house, and by that time he had brought the prisoner back to his house. I went up stairs into a room where she had been taken to, and on the table in the room I saw three pair of black silk stockings, two pair of them I knew to be mine; the prisoner confessed of having taken them from my shop. She was delivered to the constable.

MR. WHITE. I am a linen draper, at the corner of New castle-street, in the Strand. On Friday the 16th of December, the prisoner came into my shop; my young man was serving her. I afterwards served her. She bought fifteeen yards of flannel, and a silk shawl, and desired me to send it to the Reverend Mr, Rigby's, 15, Lincoln's-in-fields; I suspected it was a false address; I followed her until she went into Mr. Lacey's shop. I sent a person to give information to Mr. Lacey of her, and afterwards followed, and took her to my own house. I told her I suspected she had stolen something from me; she said she had not. She delivered to me three pair of stockings she said stolen from Mr. Lacey; these are them.

Prosecutor. They are my stockings, I know them by a B 4 3 in the velt in the feet; these stockings have the other B 4 3 in the feet.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18150111-60

181. WILLIAM RICE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann Jackson , and Cary Maria Jackson , and stealing therein three hundred yards of lace, value 100 l. their property.

CARY MARIA JACKSON. I am in partnership with my sister , Ann Jackson . We have no other partner. We are haberdashers and milliners , 27, Cannon-street, in the parish of St. Mary Bather, in the ward of Aldgate . We live together, and jointly pay the rent and taxes out of the profit of our joint business.

Q. On the evening of the 11th of October, did you see the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, he came into our shop with a young man of the name of Jones, as I am told. When they came in, Jones, the other man, spoke; he said he wanted to see some fine broad lace, to him a dress for his sister. I shewed them a box of lace, the prisoner looked at it with him, and he spoke about it with him. We had four or five candles in the shop, there was a good light, it enabled me to see the prisoner and to observe the persons of the two men. While they were there, a gentleman came down stairs, I think, from recollection, a person came down stairs. Jones told me it was not precisely the lace that his sister wanted. The prisoner said, the the lady, or sister, had better come to the shop. Upon that they left the shop.

Q. How long did they stay in the shop - A. Some minutes, I took no particular notice.

Q. The prisoner said she had better come herself, and quitted she shop - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of the 14th, did the same men come again - A. Yes, about half past seven; I believe both the same persons came again on the 14th; before they came in, the door of the shop was shut, one of the prisoners opened it; it was shut upon a spring latch, they come in together as close us possible, and one of them opened it. I am quite positive the door was quite close, and the latch had fastened in the catch.

COURT. Is there any thing particular in that circumstance the latch is always shut, of an evening is it not - A. I am sure it was shut, I was standing at the end of the counter, about four or five yards from the door; they spoke to me when they came in; the other one said, I was so good as to shew them some lace the other morning. Jones said that I took down the box again; I knew them to be the same persons again. The box had some paper folded over the lace; upon my taking the lace out, the lace was folded on cards. I removed the paper with intention to expose the lace; two cards of lace laid on the top; I was taking the two cards of lace out when the other young man laid hold of the lace and run out of the shop. I cried stop thief immediately; Rice let him pass by him, and stood by him so as nothing could go after Jones without passing by him. My

youngest sister got out of the shop first, immediately after him. I run out of the shop as quick as possible, and just as I turned my own door, some man laid hold of me; he said, where are you going, my dear? I returned immediately; my youngest sister had gone to make the pursuit.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner - A. In December I saw him again; this was on October the 14th. I saw him again on the 19th of December in Bow-street Office.

Q. Did you know him again - A. The moment he came in at the door; I am certain he is the person.

Q. What was the value of this lace - A. One hundred pounds; I have seen three yard of it again at the pawnbroker's, it was brought to Guildhall; I saw it first at the pawnbroker's.

MARY PHILLIPS . Q. I believe you are the half-sister to Miss Jackson; sister by another father - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the shop when the prisoner and another young man came in on the 11th - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the two - A. Yes, he was; I saw him look at the lace on the 11th of October. The young men came in and asked to look at some thread lace; I was then in the shop by myself. I rang the bell for my sister to come, she shewed the lace to them.

Q. Are you quite sure the prisoner is one of the said person - A. I am, I recollect him perfectly. When they came again on the 14th, my sister shewed the lace net to the prisoner; one of them put his hand into the box, and took out two handfuls of lace, and immediately ran out of the shop, I pursued the one that took the lace and lost sight of him; the prisoner followed him.

COURT. Did they take the same course - A. I do not know.

Mr. Gurney. Where did you first see him again - A. At Bow-street, I knew him as soon as I saw him.

Mr. Knapp. Jones was the man that put his hand into the box - A. Yes, and ran away with it, and the other man went out of the shop.

Jury. Were you the only person in the shop when they came in on the 11th - A. I was, and Cary Maria Jackson was the only person in the shop on the 14th.

JAMES HARVEY. Q. Recollect the situation you are in; tell us the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; do you know the prisoner - A. I do, I have known him about four months.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the evening of the of 14th October - A. He was at my lodging on that evening, in company with James Jones and Shenston. I lodge in a court in Clare Market, the name of of the court I cannot call to mind. We all four went out together from my lodgings; we had agreed before then where we should go to; it was to this house in Cannon-street. I had been there on the Tuesday before with the same party; nothing was done on the Tuesday. On the Thursday we agreed to go again, for the purpose of taking this lace. When we got there we waited, we all four looked at the shop, and looking in, and seeing three ladies, we thought that was too many to do business. We waited a quarter of an hour, we made the proposition to get one of the ladies to leave the shop.

Q. What was the means - A. We thought of taking a neighbour's name that the Miss Jacksons might be acquainted with. We observed the name of Wrigglesworth. Then Joseph Shenstone went into the shop, saying he came from Mrs. Wrigglesworth, she had got a friend come from the country, and wised to look at some laced caps, and begged the lady would step down immediately with a sample- Shenstone went in, and came out again to the door; we watched him in, and saw one of them go up stairs. Then James Jones and William Rice went into the shop, what they said I cannot tell. I saw one of the ladies, there was a strong light, and three or four candles in the window. I stood on the opposite side of the way, we saw one of the ladies pull down a box of lace, I walked about two yards from the door; as we turned our heads, we saw Jones come out of the shop with a hand full of lace. Rice followed, and a lady followed and cried stop thief. Then me and Shenstone followed towards St. Paul's Church-yard; we had agreed where to meet; we met in a sort of a Brood way, at the back of the Blue Last, and when me and Shenstone came there we met Rice and Jones, they said all was right; we went to a public house in a court in Drury-lane, nearly opposite the Pavillion, and sent for a person to buy the lace. The lace was not produced, they did not agree to the price. I saw the lace in Jones's hands, it was sold for eleven pound to the best of my knowledge, to a man in Fleet-lane, of the name of Green. We all four went to his house, and measured the lace; I believe the man lives there now; he has a lodging in the two pair, at a muffin shop.

COURT. Should you knew him again if you were to see him - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. I believe you were not taken up? without being taken up you made a disclosure of this - A. Yes, and some other offences, without ever being taken in custody.

Mr. Knapp. You never were taken in custody, were you - A. No, sir, no, not even charged, I never was in my life: I engaged in this business.

Q. And not only in this business - A. There might be some little things before that I cannot call to mind.

Q. Such little things as other felonies - A. No, I have been with people, I did not steal then, nor lend any assistance.

Q. Other people were to thieve, and you were to share the profit, that was the case then - A. To be sure.

Q. How many more things have you been concerned in besides the present - A. One more.

Q. In what was that, stealing from some body else - A. Yes.

Q. Come, out with it? Of which you were to share a part of the plunder, were not you - A. Only once.

Q. Try and recollect yourself - A. I have once or twice.

Q. If you would recollect yourself Mr. Harvey, you might give us another time, three times, this and two others - A. Yes, very good.

Q. No, I think not, I think very bad - A. It might be three.

COURT. Was it not so - A. Yes, I can recollect three.

Mr. Knapp. Upon your oath, have not you been engaged in so many transactions, that you cannot recollect what the transactions were - A. I cannot say that I can.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday the 19th of December, from the information of Harvey, he gave it me voluntary. I knew nothing about it whatever, but from his voluntary information.

Mr. Knapp. Upon any examination of the prisoner were you at Bow-street - A. Yes, I was, sir; the prisoner was put to the bar; I was in company with Avory. He was first apprehended for some silk handkerchiefs; a person was there prefering the charge; the prisoner was upon another charge when Miss Jackson was there.

Q. Now, I ask you was not the prisoner told to put his hat on - A. I do not know any thing of the sort. I never saw his hat on.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

CHRISTOPHER HINDE . I am clerk to a furnishing ironmonger, in Fleet-street. I was at Bow-street office when the prisoner was under examination. The magistrate asked if she could swear to the young man, one of the ladies answered she could not; which of them it was I cannot say. I am sure one of them said she could not say he was the man.

JAMES TABBERT . I am a farmer; I sell milk, and keep horses and carts, and gravel the roads.

Q. Were you at Bow-street at the examination of the prisoner - A. I went to Bow-street with the last witness.

Q. Did you hear what the young ladies said about it; tell us all what you heard; there were two ladies there - A. I am sure I saw one.

COURT. You tell whether you saw two ladies or not - A. I saw one, the other was behind; he was ordered to put his hat on; the lady could not swear to him; the lady said she could swear to a person that was not there, but she could not swear to the prisoner, she believed him to be the man.

Mr. Gurney. You are a farmer, how much land have you - A. I keep cows, pigs, and fowls; I have about eight or nine acres of land.

Q. Are you an acquaintance of the prisoner - A. No.

Q. You have no acquaintance with the prisoner - A. None whatever.

Q. What made you go to Bow-street with your friend, how near were you to Hindes - A. Hindes and me went to Bow-street together; I do not know which got into the office first.

Q. Were you in before Hindes - A. I do not know, nor do I know which was out first.

Q. So he was ordered to put his hat on, every body must see that - A. I do not know that; I paid that attention I saw it.

Q. Was Hindes in the office at the time - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you go to the examination before the Alderman - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. How near where you to the prisoner - A. As near as I am to that gentleman.

Q. Have you any doubt whether he had his hat on or not - A. I have no doubt.

COURT. If the magistrate asked any questions before he put his hat on, you must have heard it, must not you - A. No, I did not; I saw him with his hat on and off.

Q. Who was the person that was taking the examination - A. I do not know.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-61

182. JOHN JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , two seals, value 4 l. the property of Thomas Bowden , from his person .

THOMAS BOWDELL . I live with my father, he is a basket-maker; I lost these seals at Brook Green Fair, on the 2nd of May; they were cut from my ribbon. That is all I know of it.

THOMAS GOLDING . I am a pawnbroker; I live at Mr. Nicholls's in the City-road. I took in pawn these two seals of the prisoner James, on the 3rd of May.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned the seals; I did not know how the person got them that I pawned them for; I cannot produce the persons because I do not know where they are; all that I had for pawning them was one shilling.

Q. Produce that person - A. I cannot.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-62

183. AMELIA ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Mary, the wife of Joseph Ward , on the 6th of January , putting her in fear and taking from her person and against her will, a shawl, value 10 s. a bonnet, value 10 s. a cap, value 2 s. and one ear-ring, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Ward .

MARY WARD . I am the wife of Joseph Ward , he is a seaman .

Q. When did this happen to you - A. On the 6th of January, at Mr. Gray's door the sign of the Crown and Pistol, Tower-hill, at the outside of his house ; I saw the prisoner, it was eight o'clock at night when first I went into the house, with a friend, the prisoner followed me into the house; I called for something to drink, and being more than I wished to take myself, I asked the prisoner to partake of a glass of gin; I had a friend with me, I called for half a pint of gin; I took only one glass myself, and a little drop out of the beer; I was nothing the worse for liquor; I was going home; I was a great distance from my house; the prisoner followed me, knocked me down, she took from me a bonnet, a cap, and one ear-ring.

Q. Where was your friend - A. He went on.

Q. Was not there any jealousy between you - A, No, I never spoke to the woman until she knocked me down.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-63

184. JOSEPH TREADNAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , two watch seals, value 20 s. and one watch key, value 6 d. the property of John Green , from his person .

JOHN GREEN . I live in Gravel-lane in the Borough, I lost my two seals from my watch this very day at twelve o'clock, in Leadenhall market . I missed my seals; I laid hold of the boy, thinking that he had taken my watch. I found the watch in my pocket. I then took the seals out of the prisoners hand; he said a boy had given them to him. I observed no other person with him; a pair of scissars was picked up close by him off the ground. I produce the scissors; I got a constable, and the prisoner was taken before the Lord Mayor.

BUSHBY DRAPER. I took the prisoner into custody; the seals were given to me before the Lord Mayor. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are my seals. I value them at twenty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing close by; a tall boy put these seals into my hand.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

London Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-64

185. WILLIAM HALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of December , one watch, value 2 l. two seals, value 50 s. a watch key, value 6 s. and a ribbon, value 6 d. the property of John Kennard , from his person .

JOHN KENNARD . I am a baker . I live in Shoe lane, Holborn. On christmas day I lost a watch, two seals, a key, and a ribbon, in Long-lane , about eleven o'clock at night, I was rather intoxicated; I was sensible. In Long lane three men surrounded me. As soon as they surrounded me I put my hand to my watch, it was gone, I took notice of the man in front of me, I believe the prisoner to be the man, but I do not speak with certainly. I followed them into Aldersgate street, when they run I lost sight of him before he was stopped by the watchman; I wished him to give me my watch before he was charged; the watch was not found upon him.

JAMES HERBERT . I am a watchman; I saw the prisoner running in Aldersgate street; he turned, and run the other way, as if he was going to Islington. I catched him; the prosecutor was near; he said he believed he was the man. I took him to the watchhouse; the constable searched him, nothing was found upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from my masters in Holborn, to my lodgings in Mitchell street, Old street. I was running, fearful I should be locked out. There was a cry of stop thief; the watchman stopped me; the prosecutor came up and gave charge of me because I was running.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant,

Reference Number: t18150111-65

186. JOHN TREBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , two knives, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of William Benjamin Smith .

WILLIAM BENJAMIN SMITH. I live at No, 86. in Lombard Street .

Q. Did you at any time lose any thing from your shop - A. Yes. On the 9th of November, I left the shop at four o'clock in the afternoon; I left the property safe. I did not come back till the next morning; and when I returned the man requested that I would look over the goods, he had lost two knives, there were three deficient valuable knives, one of them with twelve blades; a pocket knife, mounted with silver, and pearl handle; the two knives would cost me fifty shillings to manufacture them in my own house,

JOHN ROBINSON . I am shopman to Mr. Smith, the prisoner came into my master's shop on the 9th of November, between six and seven in the evening; he first of all asked to look at some oyster knives, which we had none; there was nobody in the shop but me, I was the only person that had the care of the shop at that time. As we had no oyster knives, he wanted to look at some pocket knives, I opened the glass case upon the counter, and shewed him what knives there were. There he examined them, he had another person with him, he and the other person was companions together. They examined the whole glass case there were a great many knives in the glass case. After they had looked over the glass case, they wanted to see some other knives, which I shewed them; sporting knives they were with horse pickers, and different kind of instruments, he overlooked the sporting knives, and none of them suited, after that the prisoner said he must have a common knife to cut his nails with. I pulled out a drawer, and took out a paper of common knives; when I opened it to shew him, one of which he purchased. I asked him for the paper which he had taken out of the drawer; he returned it to me, the paper which he took up contained common knives; he returned that to me. He bought a knife at eight teen pence, and then they left the shop. From their behaviour, they caused me to suspect that something else might be gone, I did not see them take any thing. After they were gone, I looked over the glass case, two valuable knives were in that case; the two knives were missing from that case, the two knives were worth two pounds ten shillings.

Q. How long after these persons had left the shop was it that you missed these knives - A. In less than five minutes. I am sure these two valuable knives were in the glass case at the time the prisoner was there, no other person was in the shop before they came in, and I was in the care of the shop all that day.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. When the officer took him in custody. I think the 24th of November.

Q. Have you ever seen your knives since - A. No, when the officer met him and charged him with this, he said he was at Oxford at the time.

Prisoner. I did not deny being at your shop.

Robinson. You did, you said you were at Oxford at the time, it was on Lord Mayor's day, when you came.

COURT. Q. to Robinson. When you saw him in custody of the officer, were you certain of his person

then - A. Yes, I was.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a constable; I took the prisoner in charge on the 20th of December. I took him on another charge.

COURT. Q. to Robinson. I understand you to say you saw him in custody on the 24th of November - A. That was a mistake; it was on the 20th of December.

Matthews. Robinson said he was the man that robbed the shop on Lord Mayor's day, he was one of them he said there were two together; he and another. The prisoner said he was in the country at the time, I do not recollect at what part of the country he said. I searched him, and found no knife of any sort upon him.

Q. Do you know this cutlers shop - A. Yes, there is a good light in this shop, to know a mans person again.

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly declare I know nothing of the knife I am charged with stealing. I acknowledge I was in the prosecutors shop; I did not take any thing from the prosecutors shop but the knife that I bought and paid for. I am quite innocent.

JURY. Q. to Robinson. Before the prisoner came to the shop - A. Before the prisoner came in the shop I looked at these two knives they were in the case and almost immediately after they left the shop they were missing. I am positive they were in the glass case all the day; they were in the glass case when Mr. Smith went out at four o'clock in the afternoon; and after he was gone the glass case was not opened until the prisoner came in.

Q. to Prosecutor. What made you recollect these two knives in the glass case - A. Because there were only two of the sort; one of the knives had a pair of the scissors at the end of it.

Q. to Roberts. Do you swear to seeing these two knives being there - A. I do; we had no more knives of that description; the glass case was not opened from the time that my master went out, untill the prisoner came in.

COURT. Q. to Prosecutor. How long had Roberts been in your house - A. Twenty five years, I served my apprentership after he was there.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-66

187. BENJAMIN PASKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , one pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. one coat, value 4 l. two waistcoats, value 30 s. one hat, value 5 s. one jacket, value 5 s , the property of Henry Downer Esq.

HENRY DOWNER ESQ . I live near Canterbury.

Q. Did you lose any clothes at any time - A. I did, the prisoner was a servant of mine; I missed these clothes on or about the 16th of November last; the coat was my own; I had never worn it above six hours. I went out to dinner, and on my return I found the prisoner had left my house without any warning, I missed several things, among which were these in the indictment.

DICKENS. I apprehended the prisoner. On the 18th of December, I told him the charge I had against him, he denied it; and afterwards he confessed it. I found this new coat, and his master's shirt, on his back, and the other things I found at his lodgings.

Prosecutor. I believe them all to be my property. I have no doubt of it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-67

188. MARY BLAKE , ELIZABETH SMITH , and ELIZABETH LAMBERT , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of January , sixty-three yards of printed cotton, value 4 l. the property of Edward Davis , and Amos Bottomly , privately in their shop .

To this indictment the prisoner Elizabeth Lambert pleaded

GUILTY.

WILLIAM CATON . I am shopman to Edward Davies , and Amos Bottomley , linen-drapers , 156, Ratcliffe Highway . On Tuesday, the 3rd of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, Mary Blake and Eleanor Smith came into the shop, and asked to look at some prints.

Q. Which of the two - A. Blake; I took them to the top of the shop, and shewed them many pieces, they did not approve of them. I said, I did not believe they knew what they liked. Mary Blake said, she wished to look at some blue prints; I then went to the other end of the shop; Blake followed me. After I had shewed them some blue print Elizabeth Smith went to the other end of the shop, she had on a very large cloak, and stood by where several prints were folded on the counter, just as you come into the shop, that I had shewn them. She afterwards came to her friend, Mary Blake , and asked me to reach down a certain print, that she had made choice of in the shop. I reached it down, she did not approve of that, which caused me to reach down another. I had then to get on the counter, it being out of my reach. They then fixed on a piece of blue print, three yards and a half in quantity; after I had wrapped it up, Eleanor Smith went near the door, Blake paid me for it. They then went away, I saw no more of them until the evening, and in the evening, about six o'clock, two officers came and presented the blue print, and asked if any one knew the pattern; I said it had been my employer's, I had sold it to two women. They then opened a bundle, and shewed me three pieces of print; I knew them three pieces to be my master's property. I had seen them on the counter that day, ready to be put on the shelf.

WILLIAM BARRATT . I am an officer. On the 3rd of January the three prisoners passed me in Holborn; knowing them, I followed then to West Smithfield, and there I saw my brother officer, Bray; he joined my company. We then followed the prisoners, they went into two or three gin-shops; we followed them into Ratcliffe-highway, and at the bottom of Prescot-street they had a conversation together. Blake and Smith went to the shop of Davis and Bottomley, leaving the old one, Lambert, behind. Lambert stood in the road, opposite, about twelve or thirteen yards off the prosecutor's house. I saw Smith and Blake go into the prosecutor's shop,

and when they came out of the shop, Smith had this print; they then proceeded to Prescot-street, Blake then appeared to have something bulky under her shawl. We followed them until they come to Fore-street, we then took them into custody, and took them into a wine-vaults, all three of them; in Lambert's lap we discovered these three pieces of printed cotton. Lambert had likewise the piece of blue cotton that was purchased by Blake and Smith.

JAMES BRAY . I am an officer. I know no more than what Berratt has stated.

Q. to Caton. Look at these pieces - A. These three pieces of print belong to my master. They are of the value of four pounds.

The prisoners Smith and Blake called four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

LAMBERT pleaded GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

BLAKE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

SMITH GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-68

189. DAVID KELLY was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Edward John Bowyer , on the king's highway, on the 25th of November , taking from his person and against his will, twenty-six silver watch cases, value 26 l. eighteen silver watch boxes, value 4 l. the property of Matthew Govet .

EDWARD JOHN BOWYER. I am eleven years old last Wednesday. I live with Mr. Govet; he sent me on the 25th of November, about five o'clock, to the Hall, to fetch twenty-six silver watch cases, and eighteen boxes; they gave them me at the Hall, and as I was coming home to my master's house. in ironmonger-row , the prisoner stopped me; Kelly held me by my two shoulders, while another took my bag with my with the watch cases and boxes from under my arm. I am sure Kelly was the person that held me; he was not the man that took them from me. I have not seen the man again that took them from me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge. I know nothing of it; I was at work at my father's at the time the robbery was committed.

Q. to Bowyer. Did he strike you - A. No, Sir, he held me by my shoulders while another person took them from me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing from the person, but not violently ,

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-69

190. FRANCES LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , in the dwelling-house of William Brown , a pocket-book, value 3 s. two pounds fifteen shillings in monies numbered, and two 2 l. bank notes , the property of Elizabeth Bartlett .

ELIZABETH BARTLETT . I am a single woman , I live at No. 41, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell . On the 10th of December, I went to Mr. Brown's, a Cheesemonger, to buy some butter. I pulled out my pocket-book, and gave a one pound note out of it to get change, the prisoner came and stood at the right-hand side of me; and took the pocket-book up; and as soon as I received my change, I turned round to look for my pocket-book, it was gone.

Q. Why do you accuse her of it - A. There was nobody in the shop but her and myself; I gave the prisoner in charge of the watchman; as she said she would not be searched but by a proper officer. The watchman found the pocket-book upon her; his name is Ripshaw.

JOHN RIPSHAW . I was the watchman; the prisoner was given in my charge; as I was taking the prisoner to the watchhouse, she took the pocketbook out of her bosom. I took the pocket-book out of her hand; this is the pocket-book.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book; the notes and the money is in it.

GUILTY, aged 33,

Of stealing only, not in the dwelling house .

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-70

191. EDWARD KEY EDWARDS and EDWARD WATTS , alias MARSH , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Smith , about the hour of nine in the night of the 20th of November , and stealing therein a watch, value 5 l. a silver table spoon, value 10 s. and two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. his property.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a butcher and porter ; I live in Bowling-street, Turnmill-street, in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell . On the 20th of November I went out a quarter after six; I returned home at nine. The watchman informed me he found my door open; I left nobody in the house; I have only my wife and myself. I went into the house. I saw the tea chest open; I missed two tea-spoons from the tea board; my watch was gone from the mantle piece. I then missed a table spoon off the dresser shelf; the milk pot, a counterpane, and a great many other things. None of the property has been found again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-71

192. WILLIAM KILMINSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of December , two watches; value 5 l. one hat, value 1 s. the property of John Botten , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BOTTEN . I live at 54, Holywell-street . I lost my two watches on the 2nd of December; the prisoner came to me about one o'clock on that day, begging for charity; I being in want of an errand boy, I took him in as an errand boy; he said, he had no father, nor relation in the world, he had an uncle, he did not know where to find him, he came from Wiltshire to find him in great distress. At five o'clock in the evening I was obliged to go out; I left the prisoner with my wife. I came home at seven o'clock, my wife told me the boy had run away. I went to Covent Garden, I saw the prisoner, he was playing with some more boys; I gave him into the custody of Lack the officer; he then said, he gave the watches to a boy he was with; he shewed us where they were pledged, the six guinea

watch was pledged for nine shillings, in Fetter-lane, at a pawnbrokers; the pawnbroker said he had fetched it out in an hour afterwards; the other watch was pledged for five shillings in Fleet-market; my hat he had on his head.

THOMAS THOMAS . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, Fleet-market. I took in this old fashion metal watch of the prisoner for five shillings. The prisoner said he lived at the New Inn, in the Old Bailey. I produce the watch.

Q. Mr. Botten. Look at the watch produced by Thomas - A. This is my watch.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-72

193. HENRY PENMAN and JOHN TISLEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Loader , about the hour of nine in the night of the 2nd of January , and stealing therein, three pair of shoes, value 15 s. and a looking-glass, value 10 s. his property.

SAMUEL LOADER . I live in Pope's-head-court, Quaker-street, Wheeler-street, in the parish of Christ Church Spitalfields . I left my house between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; I heard my house had been broken open at nine o'clock at night, and that the property was taken out of it.

MARTHA LOADER . I am the wife of Samuel Loader; I am a fancy trimming maker; I left my house between seven and eight o'clock; I locked the door after me. On returning home, near nine o'clock, my little boy came and told me the house had been broken open; I went home, and saw the staple bursted off the door; I missed a looking-glass, a silk handkerchief, a small quantity of my master's work; and three pair of shoes of my husband's.

SAMUEL PRICE. I am a watchman. The two prisoners came to me, and asked me to purchase what they had got in the bag.

Q. When was it - A. Last Tuesday was a week. I asked him to let me look at them; they shewed me a tea-pot, a milk-pot, a sugar-bason, and a looking-glass, they wanted twenty-five shillings for the whole; I offered sixteen shillings for them; they went away. Tisley came back, and said, I should have them; he said, he came from Penman. I am sure the two prisoners are the men.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Monday, the 9th of January, I went in company with Gleed at a house in Turk-street, Bethnel Green, I knocked at the front room door; I was answered by a woman; I told her if she did not open the door, I would break it open; I found a trap door under the stairs; I got a light, and went down, there were no stairs, and in the third cellar, I found the prisoner Tisley, I asked him his name; he said, his name was James Thomas. I told him I took him in the name of John Tisley, on suspicion of robbing some people in Quaker-street, he then said, it was no use denying his name, it was Tisley. I then brought him to the office; I took a pair of shoes off his feet, which are here. I left him in the custody of my father. I found nothing but a pair of shoes on Tisley's feet.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Saturday, the 7th of January, Gleed and I watched the house where Tisley lived, but did not find him. On Monday, the 9th, I received charge of Penman, from another officer, and on Thursday the 12th, I received charge of this looking-glass, and this pair of shoes, which I have had locked up in my care ever since; this looking-glass was brought by Mrs. Loader to the office, and Mr. Loader swore to the shoes.

THOMAS ROBERT LOCK . On the 7th of this month, I took in custody Penman at a pigeon shop on a charge of stealing pigeons; I took him to the office.

JOHN WILLIAM FENTON . I am a cabinet-maker, and looking-glass frame maker. Last Monday week about half after four in the afternoon. I was in company with Penman at the Spotted Horse public-house, Shoreditch; John Tisley came into him, they went out together, and talked together. Penman came in, and asked me to take a walk with them; we went over Friars Mount; when Penman came to Loader's house, Penman burst the door open, with his arms, he had no crow with him; it was about half after six; when he went into the house Tisley followed him.

Q. What became of you - A. I was at the corner, I was to look out, and to inform them if any body was coming. Penman brought out of the house a looking-glass, and three pair of shoes; nothing else as I saw. Tisley had one pair of shoes; they said I was to have one pair of shoes, but I had none; they gave me only four shillings and sixpence for my share.

COURT. Q. to Loader. Look at these shoes - A. They are my shoes, and the looking-glass is mine.

Penman, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

PENMAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

TISLEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-73

194. JAMES WILLIAM BOTTWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , five quarts of vinegar, value 7 s. three pounds of pepper, value 1 s. one pound of allspice, value 5 s. four quarts of oil, value 10 s. ten quarts of mustard pickle, value 15 s. two quarts of soy, value 1 l. four pounds of mustard, value 8 s. one pound of ginger, value 1 s. 6 d. a ball of end, value 6 d. one key, value 1 s. 6 d. and sixty bottles, value 1 l. the property of Alexander Sinclair Gordon , and Walter Emmett ,

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY, aged 30.

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-74

195. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , from the person of James Cleaver , a pocket-book, value 7 s. and two bank notes for the payment of 10 l. each, and two 5 l. bank notes , his property.

JAMES CLEAVER . I live in Wellington-street, on

the Hampstead road; on the 28th of November I lost my pocket book, containing two ten pound bank notes, and two five pound bank notes. I had not been at the Corn Exchange five minutes, before I missed my pocket-book; the bottom of my inside coat pocket was cut at the bottom, sufficient to let the book fall out. I had taken the notes that were in my pocket-book at Child's the banker's, for a check. I did not know the number of the notes, until I lost the pocket-book. I then went to the bankers; they gave me the number of the notes, from the bankers I went to Bow-street Office, I also went to the bank, and stopped the notes.

WILLIAM FULLER . I am one of the firm of Child and Company. On the 25th of November, I paid him a ten pound note, No. 8880.

DANIEL BISHOP. I am an officer. On the 28th of November, I saw the prisoner in Allen-street, leading into Finsbury Market. I heard the cry of stop thief; upon that I took the prisoner into custody.

JOHN LEES. Q. You belong to the Bank - A. I do. I produce a ten-pound note from the Bank 8880, date 13th of July, 1814.

Bishop. That is the same note I took from the prisoner and carried to the Bank; I put my initials on it before I parted with it; that is the same note, it is dated 13th of July, 1814, a ten-pound note.

Q. to Mr. Fuller. Is that the same note that you paid for Mr. Cleaver's check - A. There is no mark upon it that I know I paid it,

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mr. Cleaver. Did you make any marks upon it - A. I did not; I cannot swear that is the note I had in my pocketbook.

Mr. Fuller. I took the number down and the date.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-75

196. ELIZABETH MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , two blankets, value 5 s. two sheets, value 2 s. and two flat irons, value 1 s. the property of John Jaquiery , in a lodging-room .

CHARLOTTE JAQUIERY . I am the wife of John Jaquiery . The prisoner took a lodging in my house in December last Year, she came alone for a lodging; I let her one room, one room on the third story furnished, among the furniture in the room that I let her, there were two blankets, two sheets, and two irons; she was to pay me four shillings a week; she continued in the lodging until the 12th of December, she left me without giving me notice. On Tuesday morning, I went up to her room, I found the door locked; I got into the room; I missed two blankets, two sheets, and two flat irons She never came back to her lodging.

GEORGE MOBB. I am a pawnbroker's apprentice, at 23, Great Surry-street. On the 1st of August, I took in two sheets; I advanced four shillings upon them to the prisoner.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. I found on her the duplicates of the articles in the indictment. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-76

197. SARAH DALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of December , a sheet, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Boys , in a lodging-room .

ANN MORRIS . Q. Do you know Thomas Boys - A. Yes, I sleep in his house. I belong to the galleries; his house is the Cross Keys Inn ; his name is Thomas Boys . The prisoner slept at our inn on the 21st of December, and the 22nd. She came in and asked for a bed; I let a bed to her, she was to pay eighteen pence a night; she said she should stay three nights. She staid two nights and went away. I did not see her again until I saw her in custody on the Monday following. I saw the sheet before the Lord Mayor; I was quite sure it was Mr. Boys's sheet, It is marked Cross Keys Inn, in full length.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer; I took the prisoner into custody on the 24th of December, at the Saracen's Head, Aldgate, on a charge of stealing two sheets. The mistress of the Saracen's Head gave me the duplicate of Mr. Boys's sheet.

ELIZABETH BERRY . I am chamber-maid at the Saracen's Head Inn, Aldgate. On the 24th of December the prisoner dropped a pocket-book, I picked it up; there were seven duplicates in that pocket-book; the charwoman went to the pawnbroker's for the sheet that Mrs. Morris claimed; my mistress delivered it to her.

ALEXANDER MILLS . I am a servant to Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, in Newgate-street. On the 23rd of December, in the evening, the prisoner pledged this sheet with me for six shillings, in the name of Sarah Williams. I am sure the prisoner is the person that pawned it.

Mrs. MORRIS. This is the sheet belonging to me. It is Mr. Boys's, I missed it when Mr. Brown came and asked me.

Prisoner's Defence. I did sleep there two nights, I do not remember saying I should sleep there three nights.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-77

198. JOHN FENN , and WILLIAM STEWART were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , thirty nine yards of lace, value 3 l. two pieces of bombazet, value 5 l. sixty-four balls of cotton, value 3 l. a gross of buttons. value 18 s. thirty pair of stockings, value 50 l. and eight dozen pair of gloves, value 5 l. the property of Robert Oliver .

GEORGE DUBOIUS . I am a merchant; I live at 83, London-wall. On the 23rd of December last, I made up a package to send on board a spanish vessel. I put in that case the articles in the indictment; I packed it up myself; the case was marked J. M. 77. I delivered it safe to one of Baileys carts

I saw it afterwards safe landed at the Custom House quay. It was as safe from security at the Custom House as it was in the cart, I had an iron hoop put round it by a porter at the Custom-house quay. I afterwards saw the case on board the ship; it had then the hoop round it; the hoop had been raised, and the nails that were originally clinched, were drawn up, and the top of the case had been raised up as if by a crow, and some of the articles had been taken out.

JOHN WATTS COOPER. I am porter to John Oliver, a Lighterman. I received this case, at the Custom house quay. The case was so full that it bursted out and started the nails. I sent for Mr. Dubious; I told him I thought proper to put a hoop round it, to make it secure; he told me to do it; the bottom of the case bulged; I sent for a cooper and had it done. I paid two shillings and two pence for doing it; he put an iron hoop round it in my presence; I saw it in the lighter, and afterwards in the ship.

Q. Was it secure when you saw it in the Lighter - A. It was put on board the Martha lighter, a deck lighter, belonging to Mr. Robert Oliver ; the hoop was put round the middle; where it had bulged, the ends were secure.

BENJAMIN WALLER . I am foreman to Robert Oliver. I was at the wharf when the package came and I was present when it was put into the Martha lighter, a Deck lighter with lock and keys, Stewart had one key and Fenn the other, every man on board a lighter has a key of the Deck; the two prisoners only has the charge of the Deck; the lighter went away from the Custom house quay between two and three o'clock on Tuesday morning. After they had delivered the goods both of them returned about one o'clock; they came on shore; I asked them whether they had got the receipt for the goods he said the mate would not give him the receipt, because he had not a duplicate. I made out a duplicate on the Wednesday; he went to the ship again; Fenn did; I gave the duplicate to him, he and Stewart returned; I asked him for the receipt, he said the mate refused to give him the receipt, because one of the cases was a little broken.

Q. Who is the proprietor of this lighter the Martha - A. Mr. Robert Oliver .

WILLIAM MILLER . I belong to the ship the Amelia; I was on board on the 27th of December, when the two prisoners came with the Martha lighter.

COURT. What time did the lighterman reach the ship - A. Some time in the forenoon. I went into the lighter to bear the case off from knocking the sides of the ship; when I come out of the lighter, I went on the Deck; I saw the case in slings; Fenn and Stewart both assisted in unloading, they were both in the hold. I saw them strike the case once or twice with a mallet, or something of that kind; he gave it a harty blow two or three times. I took particular notice it was along the side of the case, the boatswain of my ship asked me what we were doing, the boatswain heard the knocking; the package was afterwards brought, and the whole contents of the lighter was brought on board our ship, and the lighter rowed away. The boatswain observed a hole in this package; I called to the man; I am sure they heard me; they answered me. They did not come back, they asked me what I wanted with them, I said the boatswain wanted to speak with them; they said he should have spoken before.

DOMINE DEHOURST. I am a boatswain of this vessel. I recollect the case coming on board on the 27th of December; I heard a knocking in the lighter, and this case afterwards was brought up, and as soon as this case was brought up I had it placed on the Deck. I observed a piece broken off the corner. I and Miller hailed the lighter, the men in the lighter did not return on our calling them, I told them to come on board, one of the cases was broken, I shewed the mate the condition of the case, these goods was put on board the ship on Tuesday; on Friday I saw Stewart at the office; Fenn came on board our ship on Thursday: I shewed him the case, he said the case did not come on board our ship in that state. I asked Fenn for a duplicate, when first I took the things in, he said he had got none it always was customary to have a duplicate; and then the mate given a receipt.

Q. to Dehourst. Were you present when this case was opened - A. I was, the carpenter and master opened it. I looked into the case, there were a deficiency in it; there were a vacancy inside, near the place where it had been broken open, the case remained in that situation until Mr. Dubious had seen it; we had fourteen men on board, all the men saw the case had come on board with a crack in it; the case was always kept in the hatches, none of the men could get at it, the hatches were locked.

MITCHEL, The case was opened in my presence in the ship, and at the police office, a great part of the things were missing.

Mr. DUBOIUS, I examined the case; when I packed the case it was quite full, so much so that it bulged, and when I saw it at the office, there was a vacancy; all the articles in the indictment were missing, and the articles had been replaced; I had balls of cotton like them in the package.

Mr. MITCHEL. I took Stewart into custody; I went with him to his house; below, in the front room, on a table, I found this ball of cotton; and up stairs, in this paper, in a bag hanging up, I found these balls of cotton, eighteen balls of cotton, and in another bag, fourteen balls of cotton. Jennings found these pincers; I compared these pincers to a mark on the inside of the case; one end of the pincers is bent, as if used in raising that part; the pincers exactly fitted the hole in the corner of the case.

THOMAS JENNINGS . I am an officer. I went in company with Mr. Waller to the Martha lighter, on Friday the 30th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning; I waited there until Stewart came; I asked Mr. Waller for the key of the lighter, he gave him the key; I, in the presence of Waller, searched the lighter; I found these three boxes of cotton among some rubbish, covered over with two or three handspikes, tied up in this paper, and a pair of pincers in the

locker. When Stewart came, I took him to the watchhouse. These are the pincers that Mitchell examined. (The case shewed to the Jury.)

ROBERT OLIVER . I am the owner of the Martha lighter.

Stewart's Defence. After I had the order to watch the lighter, I set off home to get my supper before the lighter went off to the ship. I had a friend or two at home, when I stopped longer than I should. When I returned to the lighter, the lock was unlocked and the locker; it being dark, I could not know that was the cotton now produced; my wife bought it; I know nothing of it.

Fenn's Defence. It was not my place to be in the lighter all night.

FENN - GUILTY , aged 21.

STEWART - GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-78

199. WILLIAM PAYNE was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 28th of December , upon Charles Day , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. a seal, value 10 s. a key, value 1 s. and a ribbon, value 1 d. the property Charles Day .

CHARLES DAY . I live with Mr. Reeve, junior, in St. Paul's Church-yard. I was seventeen years of old last June.

Q. Did you lose a watch, seal, and key, at any time - Q. Yes, on Wednesday, the 28th of December, I was under Temple Bar ; at the time I was going home; I had a watch with me in my fob, and a seal, key, and ribbon, it was just before ten o'clock. As I was going under the bar, the prisoner and another man hustled me; the prisoner came behind me; the prisoner held me while the other man snatched my watch.

Q. Now, do you know whereabouts you where when the watch was taken from you - A, I was about in the middle of the passage under Temple Bar; I am sure the prisoner was the man that held me while the other man took the watch; after the other man took the watch away, I cried stop thief. The prisoner held me, he got me into the middle of the road, because I should not run after the other man, I struggled with him until he got me into the middle of the road, I then saw his face plainly: he knocked me down, he threw me down in the middle of Picket-street, on St. Clement's Church side; he ran away; I got up and ran after him, until he got into a crowd of a few people, and a watchman, when I got up to him; I got up to him for a moment, I cried stop thief all the way I run; I am quite sure the prisoner is the person, I charged the watchman with him, and when I came up to him the prisoner charged Mr. Bennet. I could not swear to the other person; Mr. Bennet was dressed something like the other man; the other man was running towards St. Clement's Church. The prisoner gave charge of Mr. Bennet as the man who had taken the watch. I gave charge of the prisoner; I have never seen the watch again. I said the prisoner was the man that held me while the other man took my watch.

BENJAMIN BENNETT . I live at 24, Wood-street; I am a wholesale hosier. The prisoner gave charge of me on coming from the Strand; I was within six yards of Temple Bar; when I first saw the prisoner the prisoner had fast hold of a youth, round the body of the boy; the other man made a snatch at the prosecutor's watch, he ran away; I saw him make a snatch, I ran after the man whom I supposed had taken the watch, I saw him only make a snatch, I did not actually see him take the watch. I thought he had robbed him, therefore I ran after him, I pursued that man as far as the second house in the Crescent, as far as St. Clement's Church. The prisoner came up to me; there was no watchman there at that time; the prisoner took hold of my collar, and with great violence threw me against the shutters; two watchman came up, he gave me in charge of one of the watchman as being the man who had robbed the youth; he then looked me in the face, and begged my pardon; the prosecutor came up, and said the prisoner had held him while the other man man robbed him, I then laid hold of the prisoner.

THOMAS DOBEY. I am a watchman. I heard the cry of stop thief, I made up directly; the prisoner came up, and Mr. Bennett, I and another watchman took them both to the watchhouse. Day came up soon after, he said the prisoner held him while the other man robbed him.

COURT. Q. (to Day) What was your watch worth - A. Five pounds.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-79

200. ANNE BOURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of November , six yards of ribbon, value ten shillings, two knives, value 3 s. one snuff box, value 1 s. and a pair of earring, value 4 s. the property of Joseph York Hatton .

JOSEPH YORK HATTON . I live at 127, Lower Thames-street , The prisoner was my servant . I believe she has lived with me about four months; a circumstance occurred in the family, I will not state the circumstance. It induced me to go into the kitchen, and speak to the prisoner. The kitchen is divided from the parlour by a partition; I said to the the prisoner, Ann, your conduct during the time you have been in this house has been much to my satisfaction, but Mrs. Hatton has made communication to me, which, if true, will lessen you very much in my opinion. Now, if you will let me look into your pockets, I shall consider you know nothing of it, and that Mrs. Hatton is wrong in what she has stated to me. She refused to be searched; she said no, if you want to look into my pockets, you must send for an officer, then you may look in my pockets or my boxes, as long as you please. I said if that is your wish, I will certainly send for an officer. I called for the errand boy, to send for an officer; she then begged that I would not send for an officer, she consented to be searched. In searching her pockets I found as many of notes as applied to the business I wanted to find out. I searched the notes and letters that applied to the business; we found

six yards of ribbon in her pocket, and a pair of patte ear-drops, which I have had ever since the ribbon is in possession of the constable. We also found a little snuff box on the table, I value that at a shilling; a top of a silver cannister that had been brought into the shop as old silver, worth about two shillings. I am a watchmaker and jeweller; I found a silver knife in her possession, and another silver fruit knife; the silver knife has my private mark upon it. We deal in such things in the shop. I gave the prisoner in charge. These articles were left with me.

COURT. What things were left with you - A. The top of the cannister, a box, and a pair of ear-drops, all but the ribbon.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-80

201. THOMAS ROACH was indicted for that he, on the 14th of December , eleven pieces of false and counterfeit money, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, unlawfully did put off to Thomas Dobson at a lower rate and value than what they were denominated to made for, that is to say, for the sum of three shillings .

AGNES DOBSON . I am the wife of Thomas Dobson , my husband is a taylor ; we live in Crane-court Holborn.

Q. In consequence of information you received respecting the prisoner, did you go and see Burton - A. Yes, he is an officer; and what I afterwards did was in pursuance of his directions. On the 14th of December, I went to the George in West Smithfield, about one o'clock; my husband went with me; the prisoner was there; we entered into conversation together; my husband told him I was his wife, and if he had any to dispose of I would look at some as well as himself, my husband said, I could pass money as well as he could, the prisoner told us if we went to Whitechapel, he could get us what money we wanted. We then went to Dickson's public-house, in Essex-street. When we got there, the prisoner talked about Jacobs; he said he was going to Jacob for the money. He left us and went away; he returned, Jacobs followed him. The prisoner gave me ten counterfeit shillings; I gave him three shillings; he said they were good ones indeed, my husband's money was. After this Jacobs said he would give no money in that house. He proposed to go to the Rose and Crown, in Essex-street. We all went to the Rose and Crown, into the parlour. Jacobs came in; Jacobs put his hand into his right fob, and took out a great many counterfeit shillings. He said he would not give any body counterfeit money but the prisoner. He said if my husband was a trap or, an officer, he did not care for him, he could have but a twelvemonth; he would save the money for buttons for his coat. Jacobs went out the prisoner followed him, and immediately the prisoner returned in and gave my husband eleven shillings; my husband gave him three shillings in value; the prisoner said he had, used my husband well. He gave him eleven shillings; he had given me but ten; I was to go down the following morning to get some eighteen-penny pieces and three-shilling tokens; I was to have them on the 15th of December.

Q. What money did your husband give him for the eleven shilling - A. A three shilling piece; I know it was three shillings in value; we came away, we had been in the public-house about two hours together.

Prisoner. She swore at the office, that her husband paid me three shillings, now she says a three-shilling piece; now she says she purchased on the 14th, at the office she said on the 15th.

Mrs. Dobson. I always said on the 14th; I am sure my husband paid three shillings in value.

THOMAS DOBSON . I am a taylor; I live in Crane-court, Holborn, No. 4. I know the prisoner personally.

Q. When had you the first conversation with him - A. On the 13th of December; we met at the George public-house, West-street, Smithfield; we met afterwards at the Rose and Crown, Essex-street; Whitechapel; we met on the next day, the 14th, in West-street, at the George again; we went from there to the Rose and Crown again, the prisoner was present, and Payne, and Tahoy, and a many more of these people at the Rose and Crown.

Q. You went from Smithfield to Whitechapel - A. Yes; we went into the back parlour; the prisoner asked me what I should like to have; I said tokens. He said, the tokens were not ready, if I liked to have a few shillings, I might; accordingly he produced ten shillings, he counted over, and found them eleven; he counted them over again; he gave me eleven shillings. I gave him three single shillings for them.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer. On the 14th of December, the last witness and his wife gave me information against the prisoner; I apprehended the prisoner in Whitechapel, on the 24th of December; I told him what I apprehended him for; I took him to the Coach and Horses, and searched him; I found nothing upon him. I took him afterwards to Marlborough-street office; Mrs. Dobson was present at the apprehension of the prisoner; the prisoner said, she was a particular friend of his; her husband had fetched him to a friend in Giltspur-street Compter. I received this money of Thomas Dobson.

GALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the solicitor of the mint, and are well acquainted with coin; look at the eleven shillings uttered to Thomas Dobson - A. They are all counterfeits; they are fresh, and have never been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw Burton, the officer until I saw him at Marlborough-street office; the three witnesses against me are notorious offenders in illegal insurances, and utterers of counterfeit money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

202. JOHN ROACH was indicted for a like offence, on the 15th of December ; and also for a similar offence, on the 14th of December .

There being no evidence adduced the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-81

203. THOMAS BRITNELL , WILLIAM COOPER , and CHARLES FOXALL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , twenty-five pounds weight of pepper, value 20 s. the property of our Lord the King .

AND OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-82

204. JAMES MAYBANK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , twelve bushels of coals, value 1 l. the property of Edward Wood , Richard Wood , William Wood , Thomas Hern , and Leonard Phillips : and BENJAMIN HILL for receiving the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

BENJAMIN HODGES . I am a coal-metre.

Q. On the 19th of April last, did you measure any coals to be delivered at the palace - A. Yes, I did not know where they were to go to: I measured eighteen sacks to go to Mr. Marrabone, out of Mr. Wood's stock; James Maybank was the carter to convey these coals; he drived the team, his name was inserted in the ticket as the carman; I saw him drive out of the dock.

Q. Do you know Fox - A. Yes; he is the backer of the gang, he assisted in loading; it is common for other men to go with the waggons in the course of the day, and only the carman's name is inserted in the ticket. On that day I saw Maybank drive out of the dock; I did not see him in the street, whether he went with the waggon I do not know, nor whether any other man went for him; his name was in the bill as the carman. I gave Maybank this ticket in his hand, he drove out as the car-man.

GEORGE LOCKETT . I am clerk in the house of Wood and Co. the names of the partners are Edward Wood, Richard Wood , William Wood , Thomas Hern, and Leonard Phillips , they are all the partners in that firm. I produce the book with the entry of the coals; the carman took out eighteen sacks to the stable-yard, St. James's, and twelve sacks to Burr-street; I have also it signed by Maybank, as the carman, his charge is eighteen-pence for shooting; he worked until the 22nd, and then he absconded. On the day the coals were taken out, they were five shillings and sixpence a sack; this sort of coals were sixty-six shillings a chaldron; they were the best coals the carman's name is signed on the ticket, he afterwards signs the book; we send one man, he may take another. Fox was a backer; we owed the prisoner one pound for shooting when he absconded; he never called for it.

JOSEPH AMES . I have an apartment in St. James's Palace; Mr. Marrabone lives next door to me. On the evening of the 19th of April, I recollect seeing a coal waggon come into the stable-yard, it was near six o'clock; I happened to be looking out of the window; I saw the coals unloading; there were two or three sacks emptied; I saw the man moving the sacks from the front to the tail, he knocked two sacks down, and the coals fell into the street; he put some empty sacks down in the street; I cannot say how many; I then thought there was something wrong, and I watched the counting of the sacks; they counted eighteen, part of them were empty; I watched the waggon; they drove to Maddox-street, they stopped at Mr. Hill's door, in Maddox-street, it is a cook's shop, in Maddox-street, and a private house in Swallow-street, it is a corner house; the waggon pulled up to the private door; I thought the man in the waggon suspected me, I went two or three doors further; they went into the house with two sacks; I saw them come out as if they had taken more; the waggon moved on towards Burr-street, Golden-square; on my seeing Hill in his house. I went, and asked Mr. Hill if Messrs. Wood, were his coal-merchants; he said, no. I said you have had some coals in; he said, he had four sacks out of the waggon, Mr. Wood was not his coal-merchant; he said, the man came into his shop, and said he had some coals to sell, he bought four sacks of him. I told him he had done a wrong act, and he would get into trouble about it. The next day I told Mr. Marrabone of it, and afterwards Mr. Wood was acquainted with it; Mr. Wood sent the metre to measure them; they measured only fourteen sacks, instead of eighteen; they were four sacks deficient, including them that had been burned. I cannot tell who the carman was, whether it was the prisoner or any other man; this happened on the 19th of April.

MR. M'CALLAH. I am one of the Westminster coal-metres. In April last, I measured some coals in Mr. Marrabone's apartments. I saw his servant, she told me how many she had used; they turned out to be fourteen sacks, and no more.

THOMAS PACE. I am an officer. I apprehended Maybank on the 25th of November; there was a warrant against Hill, he came directly to the office; he was bailed out, and surrendered to day.

ELIZABETH WALL . I am servant to Mr. Marrabone. I remember the coals coming in; soon after Mr. Amos told my master something, or else he would not have known it; I used no more scuttles of coals than four only; the scuttle is about half a bushel; I told the metre how many I had used.

Maybank's Defence. I was very ill, I employed a man to do my work, and that is the occasion of this happening; I was not able to do my work; I signed the book, and got another man to do my work.

Maybank called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hill said nothing in his defence; called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

MAYBANK, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

HILL, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-83

205. JOHN PETERSON was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 1st of December , a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. a jacket, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. and a three shilling bank token , the property of John Barras .

JOHN JAMES BOZIE. I am cook and seaman of the ship. On the 1st of December, somebody pulled at my watch as I lay in my hammock, about one o'clock in the morning, I thought it might be one of the ships company that wanted to know what o'clock it was; I recollected there was no light on the half deck; I then thought they could not want to know what it was, there being no light there; I found a pull at my watch a second time; I instantly seized the person by the wrist; he pulled me out of my hammock; I sung out for assistance, and held him fast until assistance came, and then I gave the prisoner into the charge of the ships company; the prisoner said his name was Peterson, he did not belong to the ships company; I never saw him before. When we got a light, John Barras missed his clothes. I searched the prisoner, and found two knives upon him, a three-shilling token, and three-pence halfpenny, that he had taken out of John Barras 's pocket; his clothes were on the forecastle packed up, ready to be taken away. I went on deck and found the prisoner's shoes and stockings, he had pulled them off to make him tread soft. I stood centry over him while the people went and found Barras's clothes. These are the clothes that were found on the forecastle.

JOHN BARRAS . I am a seaman on board this ship. I lost my jacket, trowsers, waistcoat, a three-shilling piece, a tobacco-pouch, and a knife; they were all found again. These are them; the ship laid off Kidney stairs, Wapping .

Prisoner's Defence. It was distress that drove me to it.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined 2 months , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-84

206. WILLIAM PARKER , CHARLES HUNT , JAMES LOADER , and JOHN SIBBALD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , ten bushels of coals, value 20 s. the property of John Pearson .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a City constable. On the 11th of December, I was in company with Johnson and Harrison, I was in Upper Thames-street ; I went down first to the wharf of Mr. Pearson ; I saw the prisoners Loader and Sibbald; they rowed up to the barges; then the other two prisoners rowed up to some barges, the same as the others had done. They got into the barges, they brought baskets out of their boats, and took them into the barges; they put coals into the baskets, and emptied them into their boats; they were ten minutes in this operation; the names of the barges where the coal were taken from were the Mary and Frances; after they had helped themselves to as much as they chused, they rowed away between two barges, and got out of sight; I followed them between the empty barges that laid in the river; Parker and Hunt went in the barges, and took the coals. We took them all four; we drew our cutlasses, and handcuffed them together, and took them to the Compter. We found ten bushels of coals in the boats. The wharf is Mr. Pearsons; the barges were on the London side.

ANTHONY HARRISON. I am a City constable. I saw exactly what the last witness has stated; we followed them, and took them all.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. The account the other witness has given is correct.

JOHN PEARSON . I am a coal-merchant, at Rutland-place wharf. The barges there are mine; the coals in the Mary and the Frances were my property; the coals are worth more than twenty shillings. The Mary and the Frances were my own, and the coals in them were my property.

PARKER, GUILTY , aged 21.

HUNT, GUILTY , aged 23.

LOADER, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

SIBBALD, GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-85

207. ROBERT WILLIAM FELTON LATHROP was indicted for that he on the 12th of June, in the 37th year of his Majesty's reign, at Londonderry, did take to wife one Alicia Marshall , and to her was married. That he on the 25th of August, in the 45th year of his Majesty's reign did take to wife one Catherine Clerk ; spinster, his former wife being then alive .

REV. DR. BLACK. I am a presbyterian clergyman. at Ulster; I was so in the month of July, 1787.

Q. Did you know the young lady of the name of Alicia Marshall - A. I did, her family were members of my congregation.

Q. On the 12th of July did you celebrate the marriage between her and the prisoner - A. I understood he was captain of the Royal Mantz Fencibles ; they had been quartered at Londonderry.

Q. Had you seen him upon different occasions at your usual place of worship - A. I had seen him there more than once.

Q. Who was present at the marriage - A. Her father presented her to be married; he gave her away and her two sisters were present, and alderman Lichley it was a public marriage, as public as any other marriages; no circumstance of concealment whatever. He afterwards left Londonderry for England. Mrs. Lathrop continued to live at Londonderry; I saw her on the day I left Londonderry, on the 27th of December.

GEORGE BOLTON . I am clerk to Mr. Moore, a Procter, in the Commons. I produce the book of the affidavits in the month of August. 1801; this is the original affidavit upon which the licence is granted,

RICHARD MEAD , I am clerk to Ucther and Wiltshire, attorneys, in Angel-court; I have seen the prisoner write. Our office has done business for him.

Q. Look at that signature, and tell me whether you believe that is his hand writing - A. I am more inclined to think it is his writing more than that it is

not.

REV. WILLIAM LEE . Are you the clergyman of St. Mary-le-bone - A. I am.

Q. Have you the register of the marriage of Robert William Felton Lathrop and Catherine Clark - A, Yes. " On the 25th of August,1801, Robert William Felton Lathrop , of Felton Hall". and Catherine Clark , of this parish spinster, were married in this church by licence, this 25th day of August in the 1801. The affidavit read.

JAMES REEVES . I am chief clerk at the office Union Hall; I was present at Union Hall on the 9th of January, when the prisoner was brought to the office on this charge; what he said, was not taken in writing; a copy of a register was produced and read, I cannot say it was this. The conversation that took place was in the presence of Dr. Black, the Magistrate and the solicitors on both sides.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about the marriage to Dr. Black - A. He admitted there were two ceremonies that took place; he denied the legality of the first; he admitted to his marrying Miss Clark he denied the legality of the marriage, with Miss Marshall. Dr. Black was present at this conversation, and the prisoner's own solicitor was there, myself and Mr. Pickering, a merchant in Mark-lane,

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Dr. Black. We have learned from Mr. Reeves that you were present at the examination at Union Hall - A. I was.

Q. Was the copy of the register of the marriage produced - A. There was a paper produced.

Q. Upon that did the prisoner say any thing of the marriage by you to Alicia Marshall - A. The prisoner said he had no wife in the world but Catherine Clark in Seymour place; with respect to Alica Marshall he did not deny but that he had been married to her, but that he was a boy, under age. I gave my opinion that he was an adult; he said he had got a compensation for the father for the injury he had done to him, and whatever Dr. Black pointed out to him he would do. I said, sir, I have no respect for you; I will do nothing for you.

GUILTY aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr, Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-86

208. JOHN FLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of December , a pint of oil, value, 1 s. 6 d. and a quart of pickles, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Alexander Sinclair Gordon , and Walter Emmett .

CHARLES SINCLAIR . I am foreman to Walter Emmett and Alexander Sinclair Gordon. They are oilman , in Lawrance Poultney lane. On the 31st of December I left the prisoner alone in the warehouse I had taken an inventory of all the articles there. I afterwards missed a bottle of ketchup, and on the same day I missed a pint bottle of sallad oil; and I missed two quarts of oil from the kitchen, and after he was gone to tea, I missed two bottles.

WALTER EMMET . In consequence of suspicion on the 31st of December we had the prisoner taken into custody; he was in the warehouse at the time in his breeches pocket the officer found a quart square bottle of pickles; in his coat pocket was taken out a pint of salled oil.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-87

209. THOMAS WINTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Douglas , and William Douglas , on the 29th of November , and stealing therein, a coat, value 3 l. 10 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. the property of Vincent Cousse ; a waistcoat, value 1 s. the property of Charles Walford .

MARTIN MAXWELL STEWART . I live in the house of Henry and William Douglas , they are merchants , in Broad street ; the accompting house is in the house; I live above the accompting house; I know they pay the rent of that house; they both pay equally alike for the houses, and it equally belongs to them: the landlords name is Hollingsworth I paid the half years rent for them the other day.

Q, When was it these things were lost from your house - A. On the 29th of November, between one and two in the afternoon. On Sunday the 27th of November, the prisoner opened the door, and come in and asked for a name that I did not know; I told him there was no such name in the house; he went from the door, and in about three minutes, I heard a foot go up stairs, I looked, and saw the prisoner go up stairs; he ran down stairs. On Tuesday I was told there was some things stolen from the house; suspicion fell upon the prisoner.

VINCENT COUSSE . On Tuesday, the 29th of November, Mr. Stewart asked me if I had lost any thing out of Messrs. Douglas's house; I said, yes, a coat and pantaloons from the third story.

Q. What are you in the house - A. A valet de chambre to Mr. Stewart's brother.

Q. Do you know whether your room door was locked or not - A. It certainly was.

Q. How long before you lost them, had you seen them - A. I had seen them the same morning, at a hour or two before I missed them.

Q. What time of the day did you find they were gone - A. Between two and three o'clock they were gone. On Sunday, the 6th of December, I saw them again in the possession of Hawkins, the officer, I know them to be mine.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am one of the marshelmen. On Sunday, the 6th of December, about a week after I received the information of Mr. Stewart, I took the prisoner in West-street, West Smithfield; I found on him the coat, waistcoat, and pantaloons, that he is indicted for; I took the clothes away from him, and secured the prisoner; he denied that he took them. I took him to Mr. Douglas's, in Broad-street. I produce the coat, waistcoat, and pantaloons.

Stewart. That is my riding coat and pantaloons; I value them at six pounds together.

CHARLES WALFORD . The waistcoat is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought these clothes in

Petticoat-lane.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-88

210. ANN STARKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , two clothes, value 1 s. three caps, value 6 d. two napkins, value 6 d. and two half handkerchiefs, value 6 d. the property of Frederick Frances Newstadt .

MARY NEWSTADT . My husband's name is Frederick Frances Newstadt; he is a commodore at the India warehouse . The prisoner was my servant . These things were taken on the 20th of December; my husband found a gown of mine under her bed; I then suspected she might have the one pound note that I lost, and likewise a silk handkerchief; I told the prisoner I had no further occasion for her; I insisted upon seeing her box; she opened her box; in her box I found a fril and a shawl.

Q. There is no frill or shawl in the indictment - A. I found three caps, that I know to be mine, worth about a shilling, two napkins, worth sixpence, I found a half handkerchief, worth threepence, and two damask clothes; she claimed them as her's; I never mark any of my things.

ANN CHAPMAN . I am a servant to Mrs. Newstadt; I was present when the gown was found under the bed; I saw these things found in her box; I know them to be my mistress's I washed them the first week I came into the place.

SAMUEL PORTER . I took charge of the prisoner on the 5th of January. The prisoner applied for a warrant of the Lord Mayor for her mistress detaining her box; his lordship ordered me to go with the prisoner. I went along with the prisoner to Mrs. Newstadt for her box. I told Mrs. Newstadt my business; Mrs. Newstadt insisted upon seeing what was in her box; the prisoner unlocked it. Mrs. Newstadt saw the articles mentioned in the indictment; she claimed them as her own.

Mrs. Newstadt. The prisoner went away, she was not sent away; in the prisoner's box I found three caps, I know to be mine, and this night gown is mine, all the articles are mine.

Q. Was there any wages due to the prisoner - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I sent for a coach; she said, I should not have the box until the box was examined; my master told me my wages was safe, and if I died my child should have it. Gentleman, my mistress looked over my box, and found nothing but my own property. I missed a little tin box that contained three one-pound notes, and a two-pound note; I had a cloak, my mistress took a fancy to, and tried it on, and pursuaded me to move it from that box to one where it might lay strait, and when different people came for money my master used to write a note, and I was pretended to be sent for the money, and to come back and say the people were not at home.

COURT. to Prosecutrix. Did you ever try on any of her clothes - A. Yes, a black Mode cloak; that is not in my house now.

Q. to Porter. Did she relate the circumstance of her money in her box - A. She did.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-89

211. THOMAS REYNOLDS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Satchell , about the hour of ten in the night of 25th of December , and burglariously stealing therein, two bolsters, value 7 s. two blankets, value 4 s. and four coverlid's, value 20 s. his property.

THOMAS SATCHELL . Q. Do you rent a house - A. Yes. No. 3, Honey-suckle-court, Grubb-street, in the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate without, in the City of London .

Q. Was your house broken open at any time - A. Yes; it was broken open on Christmas night; I had left it myself about two o'clock in the day, I left a lodger, Henry Shorter , in the room at home on Christmas Day, I told him to be quick and come to dinner; my lodger came to me in about half an hour after, to No. 22, in Grubb-street; I was to go to dinner at No. 22, in Grubb-street. I went home first, it was about half after ten at night when I came home.

Q. Had Henry Shorter the key of the street door - A. That is in general left open when I came home. I am not a married man. I returned a little after ten; I found the street door open.

Q. In what state did you find the door of your room - A. Locked, as I expected it to be.

Q. When you got into the room, did you find the things as you expected them to be - A. No, the covering of two beds were tied up.

Q. Were there two beds in that room - A. Yes, and the covering of the two beds were tied up; it was all level upon the bed when I went out.

Q. Did you find any body in the room; is Shorter here - A. Yes.

Q. Whoever had done this, had they taken any thing away with them - A. No, only removed them, and tied them up. One of my lodgers came, and informed my sister that my room had been broken open; I run off as hard as I could; this was half after ten that I received the information. This room that I left at two o'clock, I slept in, and worked there; I did not go into the room until I had the information, and instead of going up stairs, I went to the side front window of the one pair; I could see the window was shut of the one pair. My sister cried out to me Tom, he is coming out of the window; I saw the prisoner about half out of the window of that room that I found my things tied up in.

Q. Did you perceive any body in that room when you found the things tied up - A. I saw the prisoner come out of the one pair of stairs window; he slid all the way down on the tiles, and when he came down, he fell on the stones; I and my brother run up and secured him before he could rise off the stones.

Q. Did you afterwards go up to your own room door, and see how your window was - A. Then I went for an officer; when I went for the officer the officer was not at home; and when I came back the prisoner was rescued, and had got into his landlord's house opposite.

Q. Did you know the man before - A. Yes, he is a bootmaker, and in the course of ten minutes or of a quarter of an hour, we got him again. I think he went into the room with a false key, the lock was not injured at all.

Q. What was the value of the bedding altogether - A. About thirty-eight shillings.

HENRY SHORTER . Q. Do you live in this room of Satchell's - A. Yes, I paid him two shillings per week for sleeping there.

Q. Were you left there on Christmas-day when Satchell went out - A. Yes, I was left there about half past two; the prosecutor left the room about two, I left it at half past two. I went to spend my Christmas at the same place with Satchell. At five o'clock I returned to the room, I found every thing safe. Then the bedding was in its proper place, it was dark at that time, there was no day-light.

Q. When did you hear that any thing was amiss in your room - A. At half past ten, at the same time that Satchell did. When I came there the bed clothes were tied up in one bundle on the ground, and the other bundle tied up on the bed. When I left the room at five o'clock, the bed was laying as it would do as I left it at half past two o'clock, it was not tied up in a bundle then, that was done by somebody without my knowledge.

Q. Did you search the room to see if there was any body in it - A. No.

Q. Was there any closet that would conceal any thing - A. There was a cupboard where rabbits were kept. I never saw the prisoner until he was in custody; I did not see him come out of the window.

ABRAHAM SATCHELL . I am brother to Thomas Satchell . I am a lodger to my brother; I saw the prisoner come out of the window; he slid down upon his bottom, he slid down the tiles on to the ground; as soon as he came to the ground I saw him, I knew the man before that.

Q. You had not seen your brother's room before that, had you - A. No, I did not go into my brother's room until the officer came. I saw two bundles, one on the floor, and one on the bed.

SOPHIA GILL . I am a lodger to Mr. Satchell, I lodge in the two pair, in the room over my landlord. About half past nine I was sitting quiet by the fire, I heard a key go into Mr. Satchell's door; my door was a-jar. I heard a noise as if a key was going in his lock, I heard the key go in a very slow manner, I took my candle, and called at the top of the stairs. I went out on the landing, and called out who is there? Nobody answered, I saw nobody, nor saw no light. The key had been put in more gently than ever I heard Mr. Satchell put it in. About ten oclock I had occasion to go out to the chandler's shop, and on my returning, going up stairs past my landlord's door, I heard a latch go up, whether it was up stairs or down stairs I cannot say; it was within side of my landlord's room, I thought it was within side of my landlord's room, I thought it was an old man; I knocked at the door, and said, who is here? No answer was given. I said to the old man, as I thought it was, you are not so deaf but you hear me, I tried the latch, and the latch seemed forced against me. I then know there was some one in the room that had no right to be there. I knew there was a dog in the room; I said to the dog, you mind! I run out of my landlord's house, and gave information. I saw the prisoner sliding down the tiles when I returned from giving my landlord the information.

ANN SATCHELL . I live at 23, Grub-street. I saw the prisoner come out of the window, and slide down the tiles.

CATHERINE MILLWOOD . I went to the court, and saw the prisoner come out of the window.

JAMES WYNNE . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner. I found the bundles tied up in Satchell's room.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor when this happened. On Christmas morning my master sent me a pair of shoes to do; I promised my master I would get them done on the day following; he told me to borrow a last of Mr. Shuter, I drank freely indeed that night with an acquaintance, I was very much intoxicated; I did not lose my recollection; I knew I had these shoes to make; the liquor took that effect on me, I knew it would make me ill on the day following. I considered I should not be able to make the shoes, I thought of getting Shuter to assist me in making the shoes against the next morning. I went up to the room, and knocked at the door, the door was opened by an old man; I asked him if Shuter was at home; he said, no, if I wanted him he would go and fetch him. The man went out, and whether he locked the door or no I cannot say; I went in and fell asleep; how long I was there I do not know; when I awoke I knew where I was. I really thought Shuter locked me in by way of a joke. I went to the door for the purpose of coming out; I raised the latch for the purpose of coming out. I felt the lock, there was no key in it. I then thought I would get out of the room as well as I could; as for entering the room for any robbery, I am as innocent as a child unborn. My prosecutor has worked for the same shop that I have worked; it is out of his power to say he ever knew any harm of me.

JURY. Q. (to Shuter.) Did the prisoner come up to you that day to borrow a last - A. He did, about eleven o'clock, he was perfectly sober.

Q. to Prosecutor. When you went into the room about half past ten o'clock, had you a light with you - A. I did not go into the room myself, until after he was gone to the Compter, and when I went into my room, I found the things tied up, nobody had been in the room before me. There was no person in the room when I went in.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 28.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-90

212. FRANCIS COSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of January , a jacket, value 2 s. four shirts, value 8 s. one pair of trowsers, value 18 d. a book, value 3 s. a razor, value 2 s. and one glove, value 3 d. the property of Francis Waller .

FRANCIS WALLER . I am a sugar-baker . I work for Mr. Bloxam, in Rupert-street, Lemon-street. I lodge at a public house, and the prisoner lodged there. On the 2nd of January I lost my things from my bed-room; the prisoner lodged in the same house with me. I left my bundle in my room, and left the room at nine o'clock in the morning, and the day before the landlord turned the prisoner out of the house. I returned at seven o'clock, and missed my things.

LYON BENJAMIN. I am a salesman, 5, New-road, Wellclose-square. On Sunday, January 8, between two and three in the afternoon, two black men, I believe the prisoner to be one of them; the prisoner sold me a red flannel shirt, a pair of old trowsers, and a pair of worsted stockings. The prosecutor came the day I bought them, and asked me if I had bought them; I said I had. I delivered them up to him.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of January. I told him what I apprehended him for. The prisoner told me he had taken the things from Coster's room, and sold them to Benjamin.

Prosecutor. They are my things, I know them well; I had worn them for a long time.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-91

213. FRANCIS BODENHAM was indicted for that he, on the 18th of February, in the 52d year of his Majesty's reign, did take to wife one Amey Pattey , and to her was married; that he afterwards, on the 5th of June, in the 53rd year of his Majesty's reign, did marry one Eliza Keattch , his former wife being then alive .

HENRY PEARSON . I am the parish clerk of Kingston upon-thames. I produce the register of marriages.

"18th February, 1812, Francis Bodenham. of this parish, and Amey Pattey, of this parish, were married by me, John Kendall , curate." I saw the parties sign this register, Francis Bodenham . I believe the prisoner is the man. I cannot positively say he is.

AMEY PATTEY. I live at Mortlake, my daughtor's name is Amey. On the 18th of February, 1812, my daughter was married to the prisoner; in about a month after she was married, she came home and brought her husband with her. They lived in my house as man and wife together. My daughter was alive on the first of June; this is her second child by the prisoner. He left my daughter.

JOHN VINCENT . I am parish clerk of Heston, in Middlesex. I produce the register of marriages.

"5th of June, 1813 . Francis Bodenham and Eliza Keattch, both of this parish were married by banns by H. S. Trimmer, vicar, Francis Bodenham and Eliza Keattch." I think the prisoner is the man.

ELIZA KEATTCH . I lived with Mr. Lewis four months; the prisoner came courting to me; he said he was a single man; he had been married, but his wife died in child-birth. I was married to the prisoner on the 4th of June, 1813, at Heston, in Middlesex.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-92

214. JOHN GATES and HANNAH GATES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , a dress, value 1 l. a spencer, value 10 s. three handkerchiefs, value 10 s. a silk body of a gown, value 4 s. a bonnett, value 15 s. a shirt, value 20 s. two handkerchiefs. value 15 s. two pair of stockings. value 20 s. and a box, value 2 d. the property of William Furnell .

WILLIAM FURNELL . I am a tanner . On the 13th of December I lost all the articles in the indictment. I got into a coach at Tom's coffee-house, on the 13th of December I put the box with the articles in the coach, I told the coachman to drive to No, 3. York-place City-road. I came out of the coach, and left the box in the coach, the coachman drove away; I do not know the prisoner is the coachman.

URANIA JAY , I am sister to Mrs. Furnell. I placed the things in the box myself; all the articles in the indictment I have seen the articles since at Hatton garden office; they are the same I packed in the box.

PRIOR BANKIN. I am a pawnbroker, 14, Skinner street. On the 26th of December Mrs. Pike brought a shirt to pawn, from its quality I suspected it was stolen; I sent her out for the person she had received it of, she returned with Hannah Gates , on questioning Hannah Gates how she came by it, she said her husband was a hackney coachman, he found it in his coach I sent to Hatton Garden for an officer, Lee and Limbrick came; I went with them to the office; the shirt was produced at the office Mr. Furnell claimed it.

HANNAH PIKE. I live at 23 Fleet lane, the two prisoners lodged in my house, John Gates is an hackney coachman.

Q. Did you take a shirt to pawn in Skinner street - A. I did, I received that shirt of Hannah Gates , she said her husband found it in a hackney coach.

JOHN GATES GUILTY aged 37.

Confined 3 months and publickly whipped .

HANNAH GATES , NOT GUILTY ,

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-93

215. JOHN COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , three printed bound books, value 9 s. and one printed book, value 1 s. the property of William Read King .

JOHN PARSONS . I am a bookseller in Fleet street. On the 7th of January the prisoner offered me these books for sale, Ellis's Practical Remarks. Philip's on Law Evidence and Saunder's Essays; he offered these four books for sale he asked nine shillings and sixpence and some writing paper for them I am quite sure of his person. I had not got change I sent my servant out to get change; and while the lad was gone for the change the constable returned with my lad, I delivered the books to the constable.

JOHN FAIRBERRY . I am a constable I was sent for by a servant of Mr. King's, I went to Mr. Parson's and took the prisoner in custody. Mr. Parson's delivered me the books; they have been in my possession ever since, I searched the prisoners lodgings I found this key there. I produce the books.

WILLIAM R EAD KING. I reside in Serjeants Inn, the prisoner was my clerk . At the time of the discovery I was in Gloucestershire; I left the prisoner in my employ. The books produced by the constable are mine,

GUILTY aged 43.

Confined 3 months and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-94

216. EDWARD FAIRBROTHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a bag, value 2 s. the property of John Butts, a square, value 1 s. and a rule, value 1 s. the property of William Thorn ; two planes, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Smith .

WILLIAM THORN . I am a millwright , a servant to John Butts . His premises are at Twickenham . The prisoner was his servant also. On the 10th of December I lost a rule from off the workbench. I found it in the prisoner's box, at his lodging, the constable found it there. His name is Ford.

GEORGE FORD , I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's premises with a search warrant on the 10th of December. I found all the articles in the indictment in his box, he said he found them. I never know any thing against him until this time. We all thought him to be an honest man; he had worked for Mr. Butts a long time; the prisoner said he found the plane before the magistrate. I took him on the 10th of December.

Prisoner's Defence. I was charged with having some carpenter's tools in my lodging I worked at Hounslow Powder-Mills. I was taken in custody. The tools I found in the bag one night, as I was going home. I have always borne a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-95

217. SARAH STONE was indicted for that she on the 14th of October , a certain child, of Matthew Cremer , and Catherine Cremer , maliciously by force did take and carry away, with intention to deprive the said parents of the said child ; second count, for like offence, only stating the child to be taken by fraud; and another count, with intent to steal a bed gown, value 1 s. a cap. value 6 d. the property of Matthew Cremer.

CATHERINE CREMER . I am the wife of Matthew Cremer . I have got four children besides the twins, six in all I have had. The twins were born in the week after Bartholemew Fair, in September, and then I had four children alive besides them. I lost one of my twins. One day I was sitting in St. Paul's Church-yard; the prisoner came up to me; I only had sit there two days, She came up to me, and gave me a penny; she said, poor woman, you have got two fine babies. I said yes; she then said, you do not seem to get much money here; if you will go along with me. I will take you to a fine lady that will give you half a guinea. I walked with her, I took notice of her person; I saw there was a tooth out on the right side of her upper jaw, pock marked, and dark eyes. She had a reddish spotted gown on. I walked along with her, I was carrying both the twins; in Cheapside, the wind blew my cloak off the babies, my child of five years old was following me, I asked the prisoner to put the cloak over the babies, for fear they should get cold, She offered to carry one of them; I yielded to give her the biggest of the twins into her arms. We went into the Commercial road, and she kept close to me all the way, until I got to the Commercial road at the corner of a public house. She put her hand into her pocket, and gave me three pence, and told me to get a pint of beer; I told her I did not want beer or gin, I wanted to see the lady. She said, my dear woman, I'll not be long from you, I will go and shew this fine lady this twin. I followed her up a court, I kept sight of her until my child of five years old fell over a heap if bricks. I turned round to see whether my little girl was coming after me, I went and picked up my child, and when I turned back again, the prisoner had turned the corner out of my sight directly, I did not see her again for six weeks. This happened on the 14th of October, about three o'clock; then I screamed out; I searched about for my child from three o'clock in the afternoon until seven. When I lost the child, the child had on a striped cotton bed gown, a shirt, a flannel cap, and a cotton light bonnet. When I saw the prisoner again, I knew she was the woman that took the child from me; I saw her on board a ship; I wanted to have a kiss of my child; the sailor that was with her would not let me kiss my child; the sailor is here to day; the officer took tho child and the woman into custody. My child had not on the same clothes as I left with it; I undressed the baby at the public house for the first time again; I found my piece of flannel on it. I told the prisoner that was my piece of flannel. I claimed it in the hearing of the prisoner and in the hearing of the officer. I had handbills printed; I gave description of the baby and the prisoner, and I went to Lambeth-street office.

EBENEZEE DALTON. I am an officer: in consequence of the information given in the handbills, I searched after the prisoner and the child; I first saw the prisoner on board the Hugh Inglis East Indiaman, laying at the Northfleet, it was going out. I knew the prisoner by the description given by the handbills; I supposed her to be the person that had stolen the child.

Had you any information given you at your office - A, The person that gave the information did not know where she was; he said she was gone on board of this ship; the ship was laying at Graves-end. I did not see the prisoner until I saw her on board the Hugh Inglis . I first saw the prisoner on board the Hugh Inglis East Indiaman, in company with Swain, a sailor, belonging to that ship. I asked for Swain first when I came alongside of the ship, and then I saw the prisoner and the child. I told the prisoner that she was charged with stealing the child, that it did not belong to her. I said it was stolen from Mrs. Cremer. The prosecutrix was in a boat along

side of the ship. The prisoner seemed very much confused; said it was her own child; that when she came to London she would shew me the room where she was delivered on a Friday, six weeks before that very day. On the 26th of November she had been taken bad in the Minories, a young woman came by and took her to her room, where she was delivered, the young woman took her to her room in White Rose Court, Rosemary Lane. She said her name was Mary or Sarah Brown . She said the young woman's apartment was in White Rose Court, Rosemary-lane, and that Mary Brown would be able to show me where the doctor that delivered her. She said it could not be far; she was not gone above two minutes. The prisoner said she lived in Bly's buildings, Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street, that she went out of her mother's room at three o'clock, and went home to her mother at five o'clock the same day. She went home in a coach; she lived in the same house with her mother in the room above her; she said the name of the father of the child was Swaine. I assisted Mrs. Cremer up the side of the ship; she said that is my child before she saw it. I heard the child cry likewise as well as Mrs. Cremer. She said before she saw it that is my child. When Mrs. Cremer saw the prisoner, she would have struck her had not I interfered; she said that is my child, and that is the woman that stole it. The description in the handbill corresponded with the prisoner very much but as to age. On the next day I went to White Horse Court, Rosemary Lane; there is twenty houses or more in the court. I enquired for Mary or Sarah Brown ; no such person lived there. I brought the prisoner in a chaise to town with me. I went and told the prisoner I could not find Mary Brown ; she said if she went with me she could point it out; she took me to Johnson's Court, Rosemary-lane, she pointed out a house; she said she was sure that was the house, and she was delivered up in the one pair of stairs. Miller, my fellow officer, went and fetched the young woman down. It turned out to be Elizabeth Fisher , she is here; I asked Elizabeth Fisher if she knew this young woman; she said no, she never saw her in her life before. I asked the prisoner if she was sure that was the house; she said she was. Elizabeth Fisher said she had lived there three or four years. The prisoner was committed.

(The handbill read.)

ELIZABETH FISHER . I live in Johnson's-change, No. 5, Rosemary-lane; I lodge in Mrs. Aaron's house, a front room up one pair of stairs; I keep the room to myself.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time in October come to your house, and was she delivered of a child - A. No person was delivered of a child in the house about that time; I was called down to look at the prisoner; somebody called Brown; I answered; my name is Elizabeth Fisher ; that is my real name.

ISABELLA GRAY. I live at No. 3, in Bly's-buildings, Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street. Sarah Stone and Ned Swaine lodged in our house; I remember the day perfectly well that she went out without a child, and returned with one; I saw her go out that day at half past one, she passed my window, she had on a light gown, with a pink spot, a dark blue apron, a whitish shawl, a faint blue flower, and a painted border; you could hardly perceive the colour, the colours in the shawl had all been washed out; I did not see the prisoner come home; I came home about eight o'clock; I went up stairs, and unlocked my apartment, I went in the prisoner's mother's room, asked for a light; the prisoner was in bed; I saw the child; I thought it looked more like a child older, than a new born infant. Before the prisoner went out, she had the appearance of a pregnant woman. I did not know but Swaine and she were married. On Sunday morning, she told me she gave the child the breast; I never saw her do it. I said to Ned Swaine , is that your child; he said, so they tell me. On Monday morning between twelve and one, the sailor and the prisoner had a few words; he took up his hat, and went away; the prisoner enticed me to go and bring him back; I fetched him back, then as we were coming home, we met her in Sun-street, she had no stockings on; she was then in Sun-street, about three minutes walk from our house.

CRASE BROWN. I lodge opposite of the prisoner. I saw her come home that evening, at five o'clock; she had been big for ten months, she appeared lesser that morning than she had been for ten months before; when she came home that day, she had something in her lap; she walked up the court with a firm steady step, she had no appearance of having been recently delivered, she had the appearance of being pregnant for ten months; she was as big in the third month as she was in the morning of the day that she said she was delivered.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I was present when the child was undressed, in the presence of Mrs. Cremer; Mrs. Cremer claimed the piece of flannel as hers, and snatched it from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no money, I was very poorly indeed; I took a cap and tippet to sell in the Minories, as Swaine would not get his wages on board a ship until Saturday; I went to sell them until he brought me some money home on Saturday night, and when I got into the Minories, I was taken very ill; Mary Brown , the woman in the green bonnet, that says her name is Fisher, she met me, and asked me what was the matter; I told her I was going to be brought a-bed; she said, no, nonsense, come along with me, I will give you a glass of liquor; I went; she gave me a glass of liquor; it made me worse; she took me to her room, and desired me to set on her bed; she fetched a doctor; I was delivered there. The doctor carried me down stairs, and put me into a coach; I went down the steps of the building as well as I could. My mother said I had been gone long; I said I had; she gave me a glass of brandy, and put me to bed.

MARY CADWELL . The prisoner gave me twopence a week for three weeks to draw her breasts, at first it tasted sweetish, like milk.

JANE MILLWELL . I am the mother of the prisoner. My daughter had the appearance of being pregnant when she went out at half past one; she returned at five o'clock, she was quite different when

she came home; I perceived that she had a child; the infant had the appearance of a new born child, it had a bit of flannel round it; I sat up with her that night, and Isabella Gray, the child had an old shirt on, and an old cap; she was nursed about a month all but two days, and then she went to Church, Isabella Gray went with her; she said, the young woman had given her the things that the child was dressed in, her name was Mary Brown.

Q. You called on Mary Brown that had been so kind to her - A. No I did not; she told me she lived some where in Rosemary-lane.

Q. You are quite sure that she never went out until she went to Church - A. Not as I know off.

Q. Is it true that she quarrelled with the man that she lived with, and went out after him - A. Isabella Gray and me led her home; she took the child with her.

Q. You forgot that - A. Yes. She went out no more that night.

Q. What did you do with the child's shirt after it was brought home - A. I think I made tinder of it; it looked like a poor persons shirt; I did not keep it.

EDWARD SWAINE . I am a sailor; I cohabited with the prisoner in Bly's buildings; I had every reason to believe that she was pregnant. When I returned home, she told me that she was taken ill in the Minories. I now think it was her own child.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-96

218. MARY ELLIS , alias HALEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , four spoons, value 8 s. the property of Charles Thomas Pratt .

CHARLES THOMAS PRATT . I live at No. 9, Coldbath-square . The prisoner was a milk carrier ; she used to come with milk to my house. I missed these spoons first on the 12th of December; they were kept in the cupboard, in the parlour, along with the other spoons: I had the prisoner apprehended on the 13th; I was present when the duplicate and the affidavit was found. The prisoner said, she never was in my house.

Q. Were you present when the spoons were found - A. I was present when the duplicate and affidavit were found; the spoons were pledged in Fleet-market, at Mr. Guest's.

JOHN FLOWER . I am a servant to Mr. Guest, a pawnbroker, 63, Fleet-market. I produce four spoons, claimed by Mr. Pratt, they were pledged on the 5th of December; I am sure the prisoner pledged them; I advanced eight shillings upon them. She came again on the 7th, and said, she had lost the ticket; I gave her the form of an affidavit; she went to Hatton Garden office, got the affidavit signed, she came back, and sold the spoons out, and out I gave her eleven shillings for them. On the 15th of December, these spoons were claimed by Mr. Pratt. I produce them.

Prosecutor. These are my spoons; they are my own initials upon them.

MARY PARDEN . I am a relation to Mr. Pratt On the 12th of December, I saw this woman inside of the house; she used to come to sell milk. I told my uncle that she came in the house, and then he missed the spoons.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I received charge or the prisoner by Mr. Pratt.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 Calender months , and fined 1 s.

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-97

219. JOHN FREDERICK MYERS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Robert Hodson , on the 11th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a pocket-book, value 6 d. and eight one-pound bank notes , his property.

THOMAS HODGSON . I am a seaman ; I live at South Shields. On last Wednesday morning, I was in Wapping, near the Dundee Arms, I cannot tell the name of the street where it is, between seven and eight at night, on last Wednesday, I asked the Captain leave to go to Mr. Abbott, of Clement's inn; I went there, and got my prize money; on my return to Wapping, I bought a suit of clothes of a jew; on my coming out of the sale-shop, I saw a friend of mine; he and I went, and had several pots of beer together at a public-house; I had my bundle of new clothes with me; the prisoner came and sat at the same table in the public-house; I put seven pounds out of my pocket-book, out on the table, and a one pound note; I had them in my pocket-book; I said, I was going to Ratcliffe Cross; the prisoner went with me, he said, he would carry my bundle; after that, the prisoner and I went into another public-house, we had some more beer. We came out of the public-house together; the prisoner stepped back, I received a violent blow at the Dundee Arms, I fell directly, then I felt his hand under my jacket, and when I went home I missed my pocketbook; I made an alarm that I was robbed; I went to go into another public-house, they would not let me come in for fear I should say I had been robbed there.

Q. You were so drunk - A. I was fresh. On the next day I met the prisoner again near St. Catherine's bridge, he turned from me; I ran to him, I asked him where my bundle was, my pocketbook, and money; he said he had my bundle at home; the pocket-book and money he knew nothing of; if I would go home with him I might have my bundle of clothes. I was very intoxicated when I lost my bundle of clothes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-98

220. MARGARET HURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a swan skin, value 6 s. the property of Simon Leavy .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-99

221. MARY HARWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a trunk, value 5 s. eight habit-shirts,, value 30 s. six caps, value 10 s. one piece of lace, value 10 s. one head-band. value 5 s. and a gold pin, value 1 l. the property of John Jones , in the dwelling house of John Carr .

ELIZABETH JONES. My husband's name is John Jones, he is a jeweller .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know; she does not live in the house; my trunk was in the bed room up three pair of stairs; she took it, it contained all the articles she is indicted for. I did not see the prisoner until she was going out of the street door.

ANN CARR. My husband, John Carr , keeps this house in Charles-street. On Tuesday, the 10th of January. as I was coming in my house, the prisoner was going out, I met her on the second-floor staircase, with Mrs. Jones's trunk in her hand; she was a perfect stranger to me, I asked who she wanted; she said, the Lady up stairs; I called Mrs. Jones down, I told her a stranger was coming down stairs with her trunk, as I thought; Mrs. Jones immediately recognised the trunk to be her's; I sent for an officer, I gave the prisoner and the trunk into his custody.

JOHN HUTT. I am an officer, I took the prisoner into custody; I produce the trunk and the articles in it.

Prosecutor. The trunk and the articles in it are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated I knew nothing of the trunk, nor did I ever see it until I saw it at Hatton-garden-office.

GUILTY, aged 29.

of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined three months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-100

222. ELIZABETH THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , four pounds weight of bacon, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Mickelson .

THOMAS SORTON . I am a servant to Thomas Mickelson, cheesemonger , the corner of White Lion-street, Whitechapel . On the 23d of December, about half-past eight in the evening, I was sweeping Mr. Mickelson's door, I saw the prisoner go to the bench in the shop, she came away with a piece of bacon; when the prisoner came out of the shop with the bacon, I took her back into the shop with the bacon; this is the bacon; it is my master's property.

GUILTY aged 50.

Confined 1 month , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-101

223. PATRICK LEESON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , thirty-five copper penny pieces, and twenty-six halfpence, value five shillings , the property of John Gable .

JOHN GABLE , On the 22nd of December, I lost a five shilling paper of penny pieces and halfpence they were in my pocket, I put my basket down at he public-house door; I took the last fowl out of my basket to carry in doors, two persons followed me in, they turned out, one of them went to my basket and took out the five shilling paper of copper, out of my basket, and then kicked it upside down; I pursued him, and took him; a paviour at work in the street, when I came into the street, said to the old man that man has robbed your basket; I said, yes, I saw him; the paviour went, and where the prisoner stooped down he found my five shilling paper of copper money; this is it, it is mine.

- I am a paviour, I saw the old man set his basket down at the public house door; the prisoner and another man followed him in, the prisoner came out, he took a five shilling paper out of his basket. I kept my eye upon the prisoner, I saw him stoop down at a fence, I went to the spot, and took up the five shilling paper of halfpence.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 6 months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-102

224. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the, 12th of January a chissel, value 3 l. a bad-winch value 1 s. and a key-hole-saw value 10 d. the property of Robert Pugh .

ROBERT PUGH . I lost my tools out of Bath-buildings, Goswell street road . I left the building between four and five, I returned again between five and six; when I unlocked the door I heard the shavings rattle, I looked, and under the bench I saw the prisoner, I asked him what he wanted there; he said a nights lodging; I told him he was after my tools, I stopped him, and sent for an officer; he had got my tools in his pocket, he took them out of my basket. These are my tools, he had them in his coat pocket,

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the building to lay down. The tools he took from me were mine.

GUILTY aged 42.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-103

225. PETER HOFERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , three chissels, value 3 s. two guadges. value 1 s. three augers, value 3 s. the property of Richard Pearce .

RICHARD PEARCE, I am a wheelwright ; all I know I lost my tools out of the shop in the commercial road, and they were found at an old iron shop.

MR. HATWELL. I keep an old iron shop in White chapel. On Tuesday the 13th of December, I bought these tools of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are my tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tools of a man in Whitechapel.

GUILTY aged 61.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-104

226. JOHN HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a coat, value 5 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Edward Martin from his person .

ROBERT SALKALD . On the 5th of January I was in Mary-le-bone , I saw the prosecutor at work,

mending pailing, he hung his coat on the paid; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his coat pocket, he took the coat off the railing and tied the coat up in it, I went and took the coat and handkerchief from him and took him in custody this is the handkerchief and coat.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief and coat.

GUILTY aged 27.

Confined 1 month and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-105

227. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , three pewter quart pots, value 5 s. and one pewter pin pot, value 1 s. the property of George Busson .

GEORGE BUSSON . I am a publican , I lost my pots on the 1st of December from off the rails, at 62, in Paul street ; the witness brought the pots to me and the prisoner.

JOHN STOKES. I am a dustman, I was at work in Wimpole-street, I saw Mrs. Jones take a pint pot, and directly she took a quart pot, I asked her what she was going to do with it; she said to take them home; I took the pot from her, and took her and the pots to the landlord. These are the pots.

Prosecutor. They are my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor at the time.

GUILTY aged 52.

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-106

228. THOMAS NOTT , alias CHARLES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a counterpane, value 10 s. a tea spoon, value 2 s. two blankets, value 30 s. three dishes value 18 d. seven cups and saucers, value 18 d. a decanter, value 3 s. six knives and forks, value 3 s. and four pounds weight of feathers, value 3 s. the property of John Bishop .

MARY BISHOP. My husband's name is John Bishop , I lost these things on the 10th of December from my house in Han's-place ; I let the prisoner a house in Han's-place, No. 41. Sloane street, Chelsea ; on the 26th of October I let him the house for twelve months certain, it was furnished, the rent was two hundred guineas a year; he went into it on the 27th of October, he said he was a land surveyor you, at Stamford. in Linconshire, that alderman Newcomb was his father in law, and that his mother in law was in ill heath, he took the house for the benefit of his mother in law, that she would be there in a few days that he wished to take possession of the house as soon as it was clean; and fit for his reception. if I approved of the reference.

Q. What reference did he give you - A. Mr. Patton Cliffords inn, and Mr. Carby in Silver-street, Golden-square; he was a bookseller, I did not go myself, I sent my son, Mr. Carby sain he knew him very well; I was satisfied with the reference. Afterwards I heard a bad character of him, I heard he was taking the things out of my house, I was told so. I went to the pawnbrokers, and saw some of my things there; I saw my silver spoon at the pawnbrokers. I entered the house with a smith and a watchman; I missed all the articles in the indictment; the feathers were taken out of my bed; I found the bed stripped of feathers.

RICHARD MAYBANK. I am a constable. On Saturday, the 10th of December, I entered the house with Mrs. Bishop, and in going over the house with her she missed all the articles in the indictment; she had a smith to open the door; the house had been shut up two days. Two beds and a bolster were partly empty and a breath of carpet cut off. I received information of four other lodgings the prisoner had, and of a counterpane being pledged; the pawnbroker is here with it.

JAMES GILLMORE . About the 13th or 14th of December, I apprehended the prisoner. I searched his lodgings; I there found a quantity of feathers, knives, and forks, sheets, and crockeryware. I then discovered that Mr. Nott had another lodging; there I found some ale that belonged to a brewer. I found at another lodging of the prisoner, there I found some cards of Nott's addressed to ladies, concerning fortune telling; I searched three lodgings of the prisoner's, and found Mrs. Bishop's property in them. I produce the property, all but the crockery-were; I have not brought that for fear of breaking them.

JAMES COURTNEY . I am shopman to Mr. Wright, pawnbroker, Tothill-street. I produce a counterpane, pledged on the 13th of December, by the prisoner, for twelve shillings.

Prosecutrix. That counterpane is mine; I let it to the prisoner with the house; the table cloth is mine, and the knives and forks are mine; the teaspoons is pledged in Fleet-market, it is not here; I have not got it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 26th of October, Thomas Nott engaged a lodging-house in Han's-place, Chelsea, of Mrs. Bishop, for two hundred guineas a year, and had a written agreement; this agreement was taken out of my pocket by Gilmore, the officer. On Monday the 5th of November, I was arrested; Mrs. Bishop let me this house, and before the the rent was due, she took possession of the house without my knowledge. What things I took out of the house was done with no fraudulent intention, only for my use while I was in confinement. I consider myself in possession of the house. I having left a cat, a living creature of mine, in it. Mrs. Bishop refused me admittance. I left a quantity of wine and a pair of boots there. My housekeeper can prove Mrs. Bishop refused me admittance; my housekeeper's name is Louisa Smith .

LOUISA SMITH. I was engaged as a servant to Mr. Nott, the day before he took the house in Han's Place. I had the care of the house to do everything there was to do. He sent for a few things out of the house while he was in Newgate. I do not think he did it with any dishonest motive.

Q. How came the feathers out of the house - A. The feathers were never in the house; there were no feathers taken out of the house as I know of the beds in the garret had a great many holes in them, and were pinned up on one side. I left the house on Monday the 5th of December; Mr. Nott sent a bed back from Newgate, because he would not dirt

it, I lived with Mr. Nott in Park Place as his mistress; but I parted with him, and became his servant in Han's Place.

Gillmore. I have brought a sample of feathers from Mrs. Bishop's bed they correspond with the feathers I found in the prisoner's lodging.

Prosecutrix. I have compared the feathers; they correspond; they were taken out of two of the best beds; they are goose feathers; the beds in the garret had no holes in them.

Prisoner. These feathers were never in Mrs. Bishop's place at all.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-107

229. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of December , twenty-eight pounds weight of sugar, value 20 s. the property of George Morgan , privately in his shop .

GEORGE MORGAN . I live at 281, High-street, Poplar . On the 23rd of December last, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I passed through the shop into the parlour; I saw the sugar on the counter; in about ten minutes afterwards, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a great mob taking the thief to the watchhouse; I ran to the watchhouse, and saw the prisoner.

ZACHARIAH WALLIS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me at the watchhouse, on the 23rd of December, two sailors had stopped him, one brought the prisoner, and the other the sugar; I have heard nothing of them since.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-108

230. THOMAS BELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lydia Walker , widow , about the hour of twelve in the forenoon, of the 12nd of December and stealing therein ten time pidgeons, value 20 s. the property of John Robert Walker .

LYDIA WALKER . I am a widow woman; I live in Wheeler-street. Spitalfields, in the parish of Christ Church , the house it let out in tenements, the landlord does not live in the house; I occupy the garret, and my son keeps pigeons in the loft; my son kept nineteen pigeons; he had ten stolen. I left my room about eight o'clock in the morning, and returned between twelve and one; when I went out I locked the door, and took the key in my pocket. My son came home first, and found my door open, and when I came home I found the pigeon loft door open.

JOHN ROBERT WALKER. On the 2d of December, I left the house before my mother; I returned at half past twelve; I found my mother's door open, and the loft door open. I missed ten pigeons: I saw my pigeons again at Mr. Preston's, a pigeon-shop; I found the whole ten.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-109

231. WILLIAM BADSEY and JOHN TRINDER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , the carcase of a deer, value 1 l. the property of his Grace William Spencer Cavendish Duke of Devonshire .

JOSEPH JUSSEY . I am bailiff to his Grace the Duke of Devonshire. The deer got his leg broke; I shot it, and skinned it in the slaughter-house; the slaughter-house is in the yard, and all the premises are within the Park fence. Badsey is a labourer employed on the premises. On the 21st, I went into the slaughter-house, and missed it. The officer found part of a deer at Mrs. Crystall's, the hind quarter; I knew that part of the deer, where the accident happened, because there was a deal of concealed blood on the part where the leg was broken; I knew it again, because I dressed it; the body was worth ten shillings.

ELI STEADHY. I went to Mrs. Crystall's house, just at he back of the Pack horse, Turnham Green, where the prisoner lodged, about a mile from the Park; I there found haunch of venison. On the 27th of December, I apprehended the two prisoners at Acton, in Middlesex; I took them up on suspicion of stealing the carcase of a deer, and when I found the deer; they came in the house, they said, they were not guilty of any thing of the kind; they said they were innocent.

ELIZABETH CRYSTALL. Q. Do you remember part of the carcase of a deer being found at your house - A. Yes. I live at Turnham Green. William Badsey is my brother; he gave me part of the carcase of the deer; he said, he picked it up by the Five mile stone Turnham Green, in a sack, in company with John Trinder ; he brought it me on Christmas morning, he said, he picked it up on the evening before in a sack.

Prisoners joint Defence read. We beg leave to state the following particulars as our defences. On Christmas Eve, 1814, between eight and nine o'clock at night, William Badsey and John Trinder were going to the Pack-horse, at Turnham Green, we saw something laying in the road; Badsey went to see what it was, and what should it be but a leg of vension; Badsey instead of giving Trinder half gave him four shillings and sixpence. We are innocent of stealing it.

BADSEY, GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in Jail , and Discharged.

TRINDER, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-110

232. DAVID DAVIS , EDWARD CARR , JOHN AKEN , and JOSEPH SCARDEFIELD , alias BLACKMORE were indicted for feloniously stealing, one hundred and fifty pounds weight of opium, value 20 l. the property of the London Dock Company .

AND OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varing the manner of charging them.

THOMAS SMITH. I am chief mate of the brig Commence; John Mudie is the master; the ship was delivering her cargo at the London Dock. On the 14th of December last, Davis was a seaman delivering the cargo on board: about half past twelve at noon, I was upon deck, I was looking down the hatchway, I saw Davis between the decks

where he chest of opium lay; I went down towards where he was; I saw him stoop of one side; he appeared to be secreting away something, and their I asked him what he was doing there; he told me he was looking for a ball of spun-yarm; he came out with a ball of spun-yarm in his hand, and went upon deck; I immediately went to the same place that he came from, and found a ball of opium; I looked at the case of opium; it appeared to have been fresh broken, about a yard off from the place where Davis stooped down, and there was one ball of opium taking out of that case; he was stooping at that very ball where I found the opium. I compared the ball of opium I found under the sail, to the balls in the chest; that ball appeared to fill up the vacancy in the chest, which I saw had been plundered.

Q. What quantity of opium that you found - A. About a pound and a quarter; the ball of opium is not here; I put in the case again.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-111

233. ISAAC LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a watch, value 50 s. the property of Henry Barnett .

HENRY BARNETT. I live in Bell-lane, Spital-fields ; I buy old clothes . I lost my watch on the 29th of December; I was not at home when the watch was taken.

HANNAH BARNET . I am the wife of the last witness. On the morning of the 29th of December, I heard two strange voices on the stairs; I live on the first floor; I go out of bed, and asked who was there; two men answered me. I asked them what they wanted; one of them answered that Mr. Barnett had sent them for his watch; I opened the door a little a jar, and gave the men my husband's watch; the star case was dark; I cannot speak to either of the two men.

Q. Do you know the prisoner by sight - A. Yes; I cannot swear that he was one of the two men.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-112

234. GEORGE DEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a shoe-makers cutting-board, value 7 s. the property of Richard Pearcy .

RICHARD PEARCY . I am a last-maker for shoe-makers , 99, St. John-street, Smithfield . I only know the cutting-board to be mine.

JOHN CARLISLE. I am an officer. On last Wednesday week I happened to be at the watchhouse in Coweross, the prisoner was brought in on suspicion of stealing a barrel. The next night I saw the prisoner, by Peter's Lane. I tapped at the watch-house, asked the officer how the man got on that was in for the barrel. He said he got off. I said, He goes, with a piece of wood on his shoulder. They came out of the watch-house, and went after. He asked him where he got that; he said he it. The officer took him to the watchhouse, and or three minutes Mr. Pearcy came into the watchhouse and claimed the piece of wood. He said it was for a shoemaker's cutting board.

- HUDSON. I was officer of the night. I went out and apprehended the prisoner with this board on his shoulder; he told me he bought it of a man in the street. I said that is the same story you told me last night. He said yes, he bought this board and the barrel in the same way. This is the cutting board. Mr. Pearcy came to the watchhouse, and owned it.

Prosecutor. The cutting board is mine; this is my mark on it.

GUILTY , aged 23,

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-113

235. MARY BARKER and SARAH MARTIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , twenty-seven yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Pearson .

GEORGE SMITH . I am shopman to Thomas Pearson, Linen draper , No. 20, Grace's Alley, Wellclose-square . On the 21st of December, about the hour of twelve at noon, Sarah Martin , the oldest of the two prisoners, took from the door a piece of print. At the moment she was doing that, Mary Barker came in and asked for the smallest quantity of muslin that we could make her. She at last said she would have half a quarter; and before we could serve the young one, the officer brought in Sarah Martin , that had stolen the print, and laid the print on the counter, saying, this is your print; I said yes, I can swear to it.

WILLIAM BARRETT . On the 21st of December I was in Holborn. The two prisoners passed me. I followed them to the prosecutor's shop; they stopped twenty yards off the prosecutor's house, and had some conversation together. The young one went into the prosecutor's shop; the old woman made up to the print at the door; she drawed the print from where it was placed, and put it underneath her cloak. I let her come away about forty yards from the prosecutor's door, and then I took her. I asked her what she had got; she said nothing; I said, yes you have, under your cloak, and took it from her. I took her and the print into the prosecutor's shop; I shewed George Smith this print, he said it was his master's property.

Smith. This print is my master's property.

BARKER, GUILTY , aged 32.

MARTIN, GUILTY , aged 92.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-114

236. CHARLOTTE CAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a lady's hair braid, value 7 s. the property of John Smith .

HESTHER SMITH . My husband's name is John Smith ; he lives at 138, Oxford-street . On the 30th of December the prisoner came into the shop, and asked me to shew her a piece of hair. I shewed her a braid, she then asked me to shew her another, and in the mean time I was serving her, she took this braid. I accused her of taking it; she denied it;

I called my husband down, she threw it on the counter.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am a constable; I took the prisoner into custody; I produce the braid; it was found on the counter.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not have the hair belonging to any person whatever. It was found on the counter.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good honest character; and said she was a little deranged.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-115

237. JAMES ALLNUTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a jacket, value 15 s. the property of Sarah Barry , widow .

Mr. NEIGHBOUR. I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of December I was in Mrs. Barry's shop, No. 46, High-street, St. Giles's . I heard a voice cry out a man has stolen a jacket; I followed the prisoner; he threw down a jacket; I picked it up.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I was coming along; I took the prisoner into custody. I produce the jacket.

WILLIAM HAMAN . On the 8th of December, the prisoner came into the shop, went up to the window, and took the jacket down. Mrs. Barry is a widow; that is her jacket.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-116

238. JOHN PARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , eighteen pound weight of last rope, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Blagdon .

THOMAS BLAGDON . I am a timber rafter . I lost this rope on Saturday morning.

PETER JOHNSON . I am a timber rafter. On the 9th of January I was at Black-wall. I went through the Folly House; and on my going through the upper gate, I saw the prisoner on the timber. As soon as he saw me, he put his bag on his shoulder, and walked off; I walked up on the timber, and missed a piece of rope; cut off. I asked the prisoner what he had got in his bag; he put his bag down, and said he had only got a few pieces of rope that he had picked up on the timber. I said, I was look as it. I opened the bag, and found the rope cut in short pieces. I then said you have cut the rope off the timber; he said, I have not shoved any of your timber knife. I took him into the Folly-house-yard, and sent Mr. Bilgdon's son for an officer. This is the rope, it is all cut in pieces.

Prosecutor. It is my rope.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a Dane, I did it through distress.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-117

239. MARY RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Larst , widow .

ELIZABETH LARST . I am a widow, I live at 24, West-street, Soho . I lost my gown on the 14th of December, I had just hanged it out in the yard to dry; I hung it up over two lines to dry in my own yard; I ran into the parlour to fetch another, and before I returned, the prisoner had stolen this.

RICHARD HATHAWAY . I lodge in this house. On the 14th of January, I saw the prisoner, come into the yard, and take the gown off the line, she rolled it up, and made off with it.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-118

240. RICHARD MORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , two beehives. value 3 s. and ten pound weight of honey, value 1 l. the property of John Nicholson .

JOHN NICHOLSON. I live at Duval's-lane, Islington ; I had two bee-hives on the 6th of December, I missed them on the morning of the 7th, at ten o'clock the same morning two patrols called on me, saying they had taken the prisoner, with two hives. I saw the two hives afterwards, I know they are mine. The prisoner had been my gardener .

JOHN UPTON . I am one of the Bow-street patrols; on the 6th of December, about half-past six at night I and Dickens were walking through Islington, we met the prisoner; I saw him with a bag on his back I asked him what he had got, he said, what he had got, was his own; he said he had got three quarter loaves and some potatoes. I thought it was a large bulk for that; I took him into a green grocers shop there, Dickens followed him in, I holding of the prisoner and when he turned out the bag I saw two bee-hives; we handcuffed him and took him to the office. Dickens and me went to Mr. Nicholsons; we saw the garden were they were stifled with brimstone.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I produce the thing they used for killing the bees. I found these things upon the the prisoners person, a tinder box, and matches, and the saucer that fed the bees; I took them things out of the prisoners pocket, this saucer was in among the honey. and here is the brimstone, and the bees upon it dead.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that your saucer - A. It matches a set we have, it stood upon a bench with sugar in it to feed the bees.

GUILTY aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-119

241 CADET PEQUE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a jacket, value 16 s. the property of James Howard .

JAMES HOWARD , I lodge at Mr. Young's, Nightingale lane , I am a sailor , and the prisoner is a french sailor , he lodged in the same that I did. I lost my jacket on the 6th of January, my jacket was found on the prisoner

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am constable the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse by the prosecutor. he said he brought to the jacket on his back; the prisoner said he sold his own jacket in Rosemary-lane.

I found this jacket on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-120

242. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , one cheese, value 1 l. the property of William Barnard , and James Jones .

JAMES JONES . My partner's name is William Barnard . I can only prove the property.

ROBERT CAVE. On the 7th of December, between twelve and one at noon, me and my brother officer were coming down Holborn; we observed two men standing at a door or two off a cheesemonger's shop; they stood there about two or three minutes; one of the men took the cheese, put it under his apron, and ran off; Wilson ran after the man with the cheese; the man dropped the cheese, I picked it up with one hand, and took the prisoner with the other.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Holborn; a man came and asked me where Brownlow-street was; I told him. This gentleman came and took me; the cheese I never lad in my hand, nor did I see it until I saw it in the gentleman's hand.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-121

243. DANIEL ROBINSON and JAMES BATES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a great coat, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of John Harvey .

RICHARD WESTBROOK. On the 10th of December, I had been into Tottenham-court-road; as I was returning home, I saw the two prisoners at the top of High-street; I heard Bates say if it had not been for these two men, we should have had it; I walked towards the church; Bates followed me. I saw the two prisoners look into Mr. Harvey's shop window; I saw Bates come down to Mr. Harvey's shop window another man came up. Bates then went to Robinson at the top of the street. Bates came down to the shop again, unhooked the coat; the other, Robinson, came and took the coat away. I then went and apprehended the two prisoners. This is the coat.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the coat being my property, it is worth twenty-five shillings.

ROBINSON, GUILTY , aged 16.

BATES, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-122

244. HENRY DORMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , a silver table-spoon, value 8 s. the property of William Maddison .

MARGARET MADDISON . My husband's name is William Maddison . I lost my table spoons out of my yard. The prisoner is a dust boy ; he came in my yard on the 22nd of December, to take my dust away; I opened the door to let him in; I had made use of the spoon about half an hour before the boy took it away. It was in a saucepan that stood in the yard. I missed the spoon between nine and ten in the morning; I saw my spoon again on the 8th of January.

SAMUEL ROUS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner. I took him for stealing a spoon out of Mrs. Maddison's saucepan in the yard; he said, he did take it, and his mother sold the spoon. This is the spoon.

JOHN MORRIS . I am a watch-maker; I purchased this spoon of the prisoner's mother; I gave eight shillings for it.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-123

245. RICHARD KEITH , ROBERT KEITH , and GEORGE TAYLOR , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , two pounds weight of hairs, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Penton and Thomas Bliss .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, delining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-124

246. JAMES CHAMBERLAIN and JOHN DISTANT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , one pound weight of hairs, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Penton , and Thomas Bliss .

EDWARD BAKER . I am a brush-maker, in Clerkenwell. Chamberlain came to me on the 24th of December, and asked me if I wanted any hairs, he had got some to sell; he said his master was a shoemaker, they were his hairs; he would go and ask his master whether he would take it; he came back and said I should have them at two shillings and sixpence. I detained the hairs, and said I suspected they were stolen.

Distant's Defence. I made a pair of shoes for a brush maker's wife; he proposed paying me in bristles; I made the shoes, and took bristles for payment of them; the man was a stranger to me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-125

247. MICHAEL GOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a mahogany chair, value 15 s. the property of George Mitchell .

GEORGE MITCHELL . I am a broker , 28 Wilson street, Finsbury-square . The chair was taken from my door on the 14th of December, I saw a man pass my window with the chair; I came out, and overtook him, about twenty yards down the street; I stopped him; and took the chair from him. I know it is my chair. The prisoner said, he was employed by a person to carry the chair for them. I did not see the prisoner take the chair; I am sure it is my own chair.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a butcher; I was selling meat that day; a man asked me to carry that chair to a grocer's shop.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-126

248. MICHAEL COSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , from the person of Patrick M'Donald , a watch, value 2 l. a five pound bank note, and a one-pound bank note , his property.

PATRICK M'DONALD. I have been a seaman . On Monday after Christmas Day I was out drinking, it was between one and two at the public-house; I fell down going home; I felt the prisoner draw a watch out of my pocket; I was so intoxicated. I could neither stand or speak; I knew he is the man that took my watch, he pawned the watch the next morning, and somebody took the watch out the next morning; I have not been able to find out the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-127

249. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , a hair trunk, value 16 s. the property of Samuel Pratt .

SAMUEL PRATT . I am a trunk maker , 119, Holborn Hill . On the 5th of December, I lost a trunk from the inside of my shop: Mr. Church informed me the prisoner had taken it.

WILLIAM CHURCH . I was standing near the prosecutor's house, on the 5th of December, I saw the prisoner take a trunk out of the prosecutor's shop; I told the trunk maker.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. I pursued the prisoner; I took him and the trunk back to the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry the trunk, he said, he would give me sixpence for carrying it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-128

250. SARAH WHITTAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , from the person of John Foster , a pocket-book, value 5 s. and five bank notes, value 5 l. each, the property of John Foster.

JOHN FOSTER . I am a seaman . On the 4th of January, I met the prisoner in the street, I took her with me into the public-house; I got very groggy, and then I went home with her, and went to bed; when I awoke, I missed my pocket-book, It contained five; five-pound bank notes. The prisoner's landlord searched the prisoner, found on her my pocket-book, and the money. I was so drunk, I do not know whether I gave it her to keep till the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-129

251. JOHN SHEFFIELD , WILLIAM CLARK , DAVID KELLY , and JAMES BOOKER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a pair of gaiters, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of William Scales .

JERRY SMALL . I am an headborough of Islington parish, on the 1st of December, between three and four in the afternoon, I was out of an errand, I saw all the four prisoners together; I had suspicion of them; I went home with the article that I had gone out for, and then returned and watched them: I saw Sheffield take a pair of gaiters from the prosecutor's window; the other prisoners stood forty or fifty yards distance. After he had taken them off the hook, he went up to the other prisoners. I went to apprehend the prisoners; I apprehended Sheffield, the other three of them, run away from me. When I apprehended Sheffield, he shoved his hat off his head; one of the other prisoners took his hat up, and ran away with it, with the gaiters in his hat. When the other three prisoners were pursued, one of them dropped the gaiters; we picked them up. These are the gaiters.

WILLIAM SCALES . I am a shoemaker ; I live at Islington; I deal in gaiters . I only know the gaiters are my property.

Jerry Small . The other prisoners were apprehended afterwards. I am sure the four prisoners are the four men; I only saw Sheffield take the gaiters.

SHEFFIELD, GUILTY , aged 19.

CLARK, GUILTY , aged 19.

BOOKER, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in Jail .

KELLY, GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-130

252. MARY EXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , two sheets value 1 l. a pair of shoes, value 4 s. handkerchief, value 1 d. and a frill value 6 d. the property of William Godden .

SARAH GODDEN. My husband's name is William Godden , he is a painter and glazier ; I live at No 3, Mould makers row, St. Martins-le-grant . On Sunday night I lost the things in the indictment; a week before Christmas day, Mary Exton came to my room backwards and forwards; she took her box away and took a sheet of my bed, and one out of the wash tubs, a pair of shoes of my husbands; a cambric frill, and a silk handkerchief; and on Monday morning, I went to look for her, I found her in Fore street; the officer has got my things, he found them in her box.

JOHN MASON . I am a watchman, I took the prisoner, and the box to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM PATRIDGE . I was officer of the night The prisoner and the box was brought to the watch-house, the prisoner gave me the key of the box; the next morning, the prosecutrix came for the box, she told me the prisoner had robbed her. In the prisoner's box I found the things in the indictment, one sheet wet and one day.

Prosecutor. The articles are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them with intent to keep them.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 14 Days , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-131

253. WILLIAM ROBERTS alias DOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a pair of sheets, value 6 s. a blanket, value 2 s. the property of Dennis Mullen , in a lodging room .

MARGARET MULLEN . I live in Pickeridge street St. Giles's ; the prisoner lodged in my house, he lodged with me one night, and paid me for that night then he was to stay for a week; he had a pair of sheets and a blanket with his bed, it is eleven weeks ago to night since he left me he took with him, a pair of sheets and a blanket.

Q. How do you know he took them - A I did not see him take them; I gave him the key and the candle to go to bed, there was not a soul in the room but him I have never found the blanket, and since I am sure the blankets and sheets were there when he went into the room.

GEORGE SQUIBB . The prisoner was brought into the watchhouse charged with robbing her room. Mrs. Mullen came in the watchhouse. she said she had lodged the same man, and he had robbed her; I said to the prisoner, Doyle here is somebody wants you; Mrs. Mullen directly she saw the prisoner said that is the man that robbed me of a pair of sheets, and a blanket; the prisoner denied that is name was Doyle, he said it was Roberts.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the property nor did I lodged in these peoples house; I came up to London exporting to receive some prize money, I had not sufficient money to find myself in a lodging, For three nights past, I slept in a hay-stack. just by the New-cut.

GUILTY aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18150111-132

254. WILLIAM SHACKLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , from the person of Thomas Mattinson , a watch, value 1 l. 10 s. a knife value 6 s. nineteen shillings in monies numbered and six one pound bank notes , his property.

THOMAS MATTINSON . I am a seaman , on the night of the 4th of January, I fell in the prisoner company, at the sign of the Mansion House, he told me he would get me a lodging for the night. I went with him in a coach, to a public-house in Golden-lane, and a short time before I got to Golden-lane, I found my pocket was picked; I kept my watch knife and snuff-box in my left hand pocket; I gave the prisoner in charge of the watchman, and my property, was found on him at the watchhouse; I had been drinking freely, I was not stupid drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I denied robbing him not of having his money; he gave me his money to pay for drink and coach hire.

Prosecutor. I never gave him my money to take care of.

GUILTY aged 30.

Confined 6 months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-133

255. FRANCES SAMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , one yard of printed cotton, value 20 d. the property of Charles Thomas Brooks .

JOHN GIFFORD. I am shopman to Charles Thomas Brooks , linen draper ; 47, Duke-street, Manchester-square . On Monday, the 9th of January, I was serving a customer in the shop, I heard something tare at the door, inside of the shop; I looked, and saw the prisoner tare this piece of print from a piece that hung inside of the shop, it was a couple of yards within side of the door; I jumped over the counter, pursued the prisoner, and brought her into the shop; she then said, a soldier was coming by, he asked her to held it while he tore it; I positively saw her tear it herself. I am sure of it. This is the yard of print; it is Mr. Brook's property.

Prisoner's Defence. A soldier tore it off, and gave it me.

GUILTY aged 32.

Confined 3 month , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr, Recorder.

Reference Number: t18150111-134

256. JAMES KENTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , seventy pounds weight of lead pipe, value 15 s. the property of Samuel Hill , affixed to the dwelling-house of Richard Goodhugh .

THOMAS DEXTER . I work an engine at Bays-water. The lead pipe was affixed at Mr. Goodhugh's house. I examined the house after the prisoner was taken up; there had been some lead pipe taken away. I helped to put up the pipe two years ago, it belonged to Samuel Hill.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PIALL. I am a constable. I know the house that Richard Goodhugh inhabited in Seymour-place, Edgeware-road . I was constable of the night on the 17th of December; between one and two o'clock the prisoner was brought into the watchhouse by Bartley, the watchman, he charged him with having this sack at his back. I opened the sack, and found it contained pipe lead; the lead had the appearance of being fresh cut off. I matched this pipe with the pipe; it appeared to be cut off at Mr. Goodhugh's; it matched exactly. Mr. Hill said he paid for the pipe that had been fixed there. The lead is worth fifteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night of the 17th of December I was in the Edgeware-road, a man asked me to carry this bag to York Mews; he said he would pay me for carrying it there. The watchman took me and the bag to the watchhouse.

GUILTY aged 20.

Confined 14 days and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-135

257. JOHN KEITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a pillow, value 3 s. and a pair of stockings, value 18 d. the property of Mary Burton .

MARY BURTON. I live in Greenwood-court, Nightingale-lane. I met the prisoner in Sun-yard ; he began

to pull me about. I had the duplicate of the pillow and stockings in my hand; he took it; I did not miss it till the next day; and when I sent for them the next day at the pawnbroker's they were taken out. He did not take the pillow and stockings from me, but the duplicates.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-136

258. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , five main braces, value 10 s. and two chariot springs, value 1 l. 1 s. and one hook, value 6 d. the property of John Scoles and John Davis .

WILLIAM KING . I am clerk to John Scoles and John Davis , coach-makers , 216, High Holborn . The prisoner was their labourer . On the 11th of January the bell rang at one o'clock for the men to go to dinner, the prisoner remained in the yard. On his perceiving me, he went into the stable. I asked him what business he had there. He made a frivolous excuse, and went out of the gateway. I perceived he walked aukwardly; I went after him, and brought into the yard, and told him to go into the accompting house. On his going up the accompting house steps, I perceived him move aukwarkly; he had something concealed in his breeches that he was going to throw away. I laid hold of his arm, and prevented him. He had this main brace concealed in his breeches. I secured him; my employers sent for a constable; his lodgings was searched, and the other property found there.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I was present at the prisoner's lodgings being searched; the prisoner's wife was there; she said it was his lodging. We found four braces there, and two chariot springs; they are worth thirty shillings altogether, I produce them. The prisoner's wages was twenty-two shillings a-week.

THOMAS LLOYD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Scoles and Davis. I know the whole of the property to be my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-137

259. JOHN NEWBERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , one gown, value 16 s. the property of Richard Bingley .

RICHARD BINGLEY . I keep a public house in Shepherd's Market . On the 12th of January, the prisoner came in and asked if we wanted any onions. Mrs. Bingley was in the bar, and purchased the onions. She called Sarah Moreman , the servant, to take them up stairs; the servant came, and said she saw a person come out of the kitchen. The prisoner then came to the bar and asked for a pint of porter. I took the pint of porter and the prisoner into the tap room. The servant came and asked the mistress if she had taken a white gown off the horse in the kitchen. Her mistress said no; the servant then said, it must have been stolen. I asked the prisoner if he had got the gown; he said no. I sent for a constable; he came and searched the prisoner, and found the gown in his hat. This is the gown, it is my wife's gown.

ALEXANDER BALL . I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, and found the gown in his hat.

SARAH MOREMAN . I told the prisoner he had got the gown; I saw him come up the kitchen stairs; I am sure it is my mistress's gown.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one year , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-138

260. JOHN COFFEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , fifteen pound weight of whipcord. value 3 l. nine dozen of harness buckles, value 11 s. 3 d. and four balls of sewing hemp, value 11 s. the property of Isaac Armstrong and Richard Millson .

ISAAC ARMSTRONG . Richard Millson is my partner ; we live in Cow-lane; I am a sadlers' ironmonger . The prisoner lived with me as porter for or three years. He left me and took a public house, the Red Lettuce, in Charterhouse-lane , that is near Cow-lane. On the 12th of December we got information of Mr. George Hodges . I agreed that he should go with me, Matthews and Wood, the two officers, to the prisoner's house. Mr. Hodges went in first; Matthews and Wood followed. I went in after the officers. When I went in I saw Matthews the officer with a basket of articles; he was stopping a little girl with the articles close to the parlour door; I looked at the property in the basket, I knew it to be mine. I told the prisoner he knew it was my property, there were my marks upon some of them. The prisoner replied, yes, master, I know it is your property, I know your marks as well as yourself. He stated that a man left them there that owed him a score; I said, what a pretty rascal you must be not to let me know of it. I asked him the man's name; he said the the man would no disclose his name, he lived some where over in the Borough. We searched the house, and found nothing else than what was in the basket.

GEORGE HODGES. I live at Petonville I have been a sadler and a harness maker. On the 12th of December I called at the prisoner's house to enquire after the former landlord that kept the house. I never had any knowledge of the prisoner before.

Q. When you came there did you find any whipcord - A. The prisoner told me if I was in the trade he would let me have some reasonable, and some sadler's nails and bridle buckles. He offered me these things for sale. He asked me three shillings a pound for the whipcord, the buckles and nails he left entirely to me to fix the price. This raised a suspicion in my mind; I afterwards went to Mr Armstrong's shop, and told him what had taken place. It was agreed that he and I should go there on the following Thursday, with some officers. This was on Sunday. On the Thursday I went there with Mr. Armstrong. I went in first for an introduction for the property to be produced. He told me if I would wait he would produce the property. A few buckles in a basket were brought forward; he called me in and said, he would go up stairs and fetch more. Then the officers and Mr. Armstrong came in, and the little

girl with the basket. I never had seen that basket before. It contained whipcord, buckles, sewing hemp and nails; the basket was shewn to Mr. Armstrong. Mr. Armstrong said to the prisoner, John, they are my property, and you know my private marks. The prisoner said he knew the private marks as well as he did; and that a man who lived in the Borough had left them there for a score; he said he did not know his name.

JOHN MATTHEWS . Q. Do you know the situation of the prisoner's house - A. Yes, it is in the county of Middlesex. On Thursday, the 17th of December, Mr. Hodges sent into the prisoner's house first. I and Wood, and Mr. Armstrong, followed in a little time; I found the prisoner and Mr. Hodges in the parlour; I went into the parlour; Wood went up stairs to search the house. While I was in the parlour I saw the prisoner's daughter coming out of the bar with this basket; I seized the basket and took it from her just as she got to the back door. I have kept the basket and its contents safe locked at the offices; it contains whipcord, buckles, and sewing line, and sadler's nails.

Mr. ARMSTRONG. The whipcord in the basket has the writing of the manufacturer; the loose buckles have my own writing upon them. The whole of the property I have no doubt is mine; there is fifteen pound of whipcord, at six shillings a pound, and the value of the buckles is three pound twelve shillings. The property there altogether is worth eleven pounds.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-139

261. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , one coach glass, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Dyke .

JOHN COLE . I am coach man to Thomas Dyke . He has a county house at Battersea. On the 10th of January I drove my master to Mr. Wright's at Stockvell; I afterwards went to the Falcon public house, with my fellow-servant. At night, as I was backing the carriage, the door flew open, and I went to look at the door. I saw one glass was gone. I have seen the glass since. I am sure it is my masters's glass. The lace and the lining is the same; a coachmaker would charge two guineas for the glass.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Wednesday the 11th of January, in the morning, I saw the prisoner opposite to the Admiralty. He went to Cockspur-street; he then turned back, and went down Spring Gardens into St. James's Park. I went up to him, and asked him what he had got there; he said nothing. I took it from him; I said it appears to be a coach glass; he said it was, he was going to make a shilling or two for himself, being out of work. I took him to Bow-street office. I asked where he got it from; he said a man gave it him that morning, four miles this side of Croydon he said he did not know the man that gave it him, I have the glass ever since. This is the glass.

Cole. I am sure it is my master's glass, the lace and the lining are the same.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-140

262. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , a coat, value 10 s. a watch, value 1 l. and two seals, value 12 s. the property of James Jones .

JAMES JONES . On the 2th of December, about twelve o'clock at night, I was going down Drury Lane to seek for a lodging; I work at groundwork .

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes, the prisoner came up to me, she said, she would take me to her lodging in Charles-street, Durry-lane . I took a candle up with me: there was nobody in the room but she and me. I laid down and went to sleep, my cloaths were on me except my coat, that I put under my head. I think she was drawing the coat from under my head that awoke me. I went to sleep again; I awoke about one in the morning, and found my coat and watch gone; and when I awoke again, the prisoner was gone, and the watch and the coat with it. This is the coat I have coat on, and the watch I have seen since at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM MGLESWORTH. I am shopman to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, Brydges-street. I produce a watch pawned by the prisoner, and a coat pawned by another person.

Prosecutor. That watch is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me his coat to pledge. I pledged it for ten shillings; he had four shillings out of it.

Prosecutor. She robbed me of my coat. I did not give it her.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-141

263. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , a shirt, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Goddard .

JOHN GODDARD . I am a post-boy , I drive for Mr. Ballad in South-street ; I left these things behind the stable-door, in South-street, I was at a public-house at dinner at the time they were taken; I had seen them behind the stable door about an hour before I missed them.

THOMAS RICE . I am a job coachman in these stables; I saw the prisoner come out of the stable with his pocket bulging out, I pursued him, and took him and brought him back with the things in his pockets; Goddard claimed the things, these are them.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

GUILTY aged 23.

Publickly whipped and discharged

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-142

264. THOMAS WATKINS , JAMES JONES and JAMES ROBERTS , were indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 11th of January , three pewter quart pots, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of John Young .

HENRY HODGSON . I keep the Lord Wellington public-house, Thornaugh-street. Mr. Young keeps the red cap at Camden-town , on the 11th of January the three prisoner's came into my house, and had a pint of porter, when they were gone out, a man in the tap room said, they had taken a pint pot with them; I followed them to Mr. Young's house, they went into Mr. Young's house, I saw Roberts come out of the house with a quart pot under his coat; when he came out, the other two were waiting on the outside they had been in the house, but they went in one at a time; they all three went into his house, but they went in one at a time. Mr. Young and I went after Watkins we found him in a field, with two of Mr. Young's quart-pots and my pint pot tied up in a handkerchief, and one of Mr. Young's quart pots on Roberts; we secured them all three; these are the pots; this one is mine, and the three quarts are Mr. Young's property.

MR. YOUNG. The three quart pots are mine.

WATKINS, GUILTY , aged 22.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 23.

ROBERTS, GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-143

265. CHARLES TILLEY and RICHARD JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of William Pile .

SUSANNAH PILE . My husband's name is William Pile . I keep a linen draper's shop at Somer's town. On the 6th of December these two boys came into my shop; they told me they wanted to look at some handkerchiefs; they were not so well dressed then as they are now. Tilley pointed to a particular sort of handkerchief: I got up in a chair to reach it down; that handkerchief was above my reach, and when I got down off the chair, he ran out of the shop. Jones staid in the shop; I said to Jones, the other boy has got something that he ought not to have. He replied he was not that kind of a boy; I said, what could he run out of the shop in that ridiculous manner for. He said that was the nature of him; and while I was standing looking at the door, Johnson the officer brought the other boy back, until the officer brought him back I did not know that I had missed any handkerchiefs. The officer searched them, and found two handkerchiefs on each of them.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. On the 6th of December I was at the Seven Dials were a gang of these boys meet and set off from there; I followed Tilley and Jones to Tower-street, Sommer's town; Tilley took off his apron, and Jones put it on him. I knew them, they were going to do what they call work. I saw them both go into Mrs. Pile's shop; and, as Tilley come out, he was tucking something up under his waistcoat. I stopped him; he asked my pardon, he knew me well. I took him into the shop; I searched them, and found two handkerchiefs on each of them; these are the handkerchiefs. They had no money about them, not a farthing.

Prosecutrix. They are my handkerchiefs, the are worth a shilling each.

TILLEY, GUILTY , aged 13.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-144

266. MICHAEL JOSEPH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Hunter , about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 30th of November , with intent to steal, takeup and; carry away, the goods the property of Jane Hunter .

JANE HUNTER . I live at 21, London Wall, in the parish of St. Michael Basishaw . On the 30th of November, about three in the afternoon, I was in the three pair of stairs room; I thought I heard a noise in the next room; I opened the door, and went in, and saw the prisoners standing facing the drawers; I called to him, and said, you man, you have no business there; he turned his face; on my opening the door, I saw his face very bad; he tried to screen himself behind the linen that was hanging to dry; directly when I called to him he passed me, and went to down stairs. My shop is a mason's shop. My sister saw him on the first floor and tried to lay hold of him, he passed her, and got into the shop, and then he pushed her down, and got into the street, and was taken immediately. I am the sole owner of the house; my sister is not in partnership with me; I have a lease of the house; it was my mothers's trade, it has come to me; I have the whole property in the house. Nothing was taken away. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

ABRAHAM JACKSON . On the 30th of November, I was coming along London Wall; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner coming out of the house, I stopped the prisoner, and took him into Mrs. Hunter's house directly; she said, he was the man.

SARAH HUNTER . Q. Did you see this man in the house - A. Yes; I attempted to stop him on the landing-place.

Q. Had you seen the drawers before - A. Yes, about an hour before he was taken; they were shut then close, but not locked; the prisoner was in the three pair of stairs.

Mr. Knapp, addressed the Jury, in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18150111-145

267. THOMAS GILHAM was indicted for unlawfully obtaining by false pretence the sum of nineteen shillings and sixpence, and nineteen shillings and three-pence, of Edward Brown , clerk of John Peters , the monies of John Peters .

EDWARD BROWN . I am clerk to Mr. John Peters , he lives in Friday-street, he is the proprietor of the Milford waggon ; the Milford waggon sets off from Friday-street, he is the owner of the waggon. The prisoner was his servant to drive the horses of

that waggon. On the 4th of December, I delivered to the prisoner five-pounds for expences of the horses and the waggon on account of necessary expences; he went on the 4th, and returned on the 11th; on his returning, I settled with him his wages, one pound eleven shillings and sixpence, there is charges of money paid nineteen shillings and sixpence, and nineteen shillings and three-pence for five trusses of hay, on the date of the 10th of December; the bills appear to be made but as if by Mr. Ever.

JAMES EVER . I live at Milford. I supply Mr. Peters's horses with hay. On the 6th of December, I received of the prisoner sixteen shillings and threepence.

Q. Now look at the two bills that purports to be yours - A. Neither of them bills are mine.

Q. How much did he actually pay you on the 6th - A. There is three shillings more than he actually paid for. He was not at Milford on the 10th; I let him have four trusses on the 9th; that was paid for on the 12th.

Q. Look at that bill dated the 10th - A. That is not my hand-writing; nor any part of the two bills; this hand writing is not the hand writing of any person that makes out my bills.

Q. to Mr. Brown. When the prisoner gave you these bills, did he say they were Mr. Ever's receipts - A. I did not ask him; they appeared to be receipts of Mr. Ever.

Mr. Ever. He never had any hay on the 10th, and the hay the horses had on the 9th, was paid for on the 12th. The prisoner never had any bill of me on the 10th.

Brown. He charged sixteen shillings and threepence for hay the horses never eat, and there was a forgery in the next weeks bill.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: o18150111-1

The opinion of the Judges upon James Hugh Edwards , alias Charles Hugh Edwards , delivered by Mr. Baron Wood , was as follows;

James Hugh Edwards , alias Charles Hugh Edwards; You have been convicted of the crime of bigamy; the charge was, that you had taken to wife one Hannah Timson , and to her was married, your former wife being then alive; throughout the trial of this case, the evidence of this case brought the very thing theme to you; it was proved the person to whom you last married under the name Hannah Timson, her maiden name was not Hannah, but Susannah; the Learned Common Serjeant, who tried you, had a doubt of the form of the indictment; therefore received it for the opinion of the Judges. The Judges are of the opinion you were rightly convicted; they are of the opinion that as you married this woman under the name of Hannah Timson , it is not for you to take the objection of the name of the person you married; you married her by that name, and adopted her by that name; and they are of opinion that your conviction is right.


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