Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th November 1814.
Reference Number: 18141130
Reference Number: f18141130-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY. FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLSEEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 30th of NOVEMBER, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SAMUEL BIRCH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, CARTHUIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable SAMUEL BIRCH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Vickery Gibbs , knt. Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas, Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench, Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Domville , bart. Harvey Christian Coombe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Robert Albion Cox , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowles , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Romanis

Zachariah Hardman

Humphrey Gregory

Charles William Chapman

Rowley Kent

Ralph Warmington

John Addles

Joseph Adwin

John Thomas Rigg

Samuel Pope

John Robins

James Windel

First Middlesex Jury.

William Roe

Robert Adland

William Brown

William Pike

Christopher Welckey

Robert Piper

Joseph Thomas

Robert Table

John Ash

Peter Howle

William Marshall

William Peters

Second Middlesex Jury.

George Cook

Robert West

Richard Harris

Thomas Maidstone

John Kews

John Watkins

John Millwood

William Chapman

William Davis

James Gobb

William Bird

John Eaton

Reference Number: t18141130-1

1. MARY RUSSELL was indicted, and the indictment stated, that at the General Delivery of the Goal of Newgate, holden for the City of London, she was tried and convicted in July Sessions, and was sentenced by the Court to be in jail one year and to find sureties for two years more, and the indictment stated, that you having been before convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money, afterwards one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, unlawfully did utter to one Henry Davies , you knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-2

2. JONATHAN CLARK was indicted for that he, on the 12th of October, in the 34th year of his Majesty's reign, did take to wife one Diana Smith , spinster , and to her was married, that he afterwards on the 20th of September, in the 49th of year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of Northwood, in the Isle of Wight , feloniously did take to wife one Ann Hayes , spinster , and to her was married, and that he afterwards on the 24th of October last, at the parish of St. Pancras in the County of Middlesex, was apprehended for the said felony .

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Somers Town, in this County.

THOMAS MARTIN. I am clerk of the parish church of Whitechapel. I was so in October. 1794. I produce the register book of marriages. (Read.)

" Jonathan Clarke of this parish, and Diana Smith spinster, of the same, were married in this church by license, by me, Edward Roxby, curate; this marriage was solemnized between us, Jonathan Clark , and Diana Smith ."

Mr. Alley. Have you any recollection of the person - A. Impossible; I saw the persons that were married did come, and sign the book

BENJAMIN HAYES . I am a tailor; I live at the Isle of Wight.

Q. Look at the book, are you acquainted with the prisoner's hand-writing - A. Yes; this signature of the marriage book of Whitechapel, is his signature.

Q. Do you know the first wife - A. Yes; I have seen her to-day.

Q. You live in the Isle of Wight - A. Yes. I know Ann Hayes ; she is a cousin of mine. On the 20th of September, 1808, I was present at her marriage at Northwood, in the Isle of Wight; she was married to the prisoner there; they afterwards lived as man and wife together.

Q. The prisoner had lived in the Isle of Wight a long while - A. Yes, and his first wife lived in the Isle of Wight.

Q. Do you know the condition and state of health of that first wife - A. Yes; I know she was extremely ill; I know she left the Island, and he went away with his first wife, and came to London; after some years, he returned to the Isle of Wight again, and lived there again.

Q. You said that Ann Hayes and he cohabited together after her marriage - A. Yes, and they cohabited together, it might be six months before their marriage; her friends were very importunate with him to marry her. I did not know but the first wife was dead.

JOHN SMITH . I am brother to Diana Smith , the prisoner's first wife. She is now living at Uxbridge; I saw her last Monday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. It would ill become me to attempt to justify my conduct. After our removal to the Isle of Wight, I was absent upon a voyage to the South Sea; upon my return, I found my wife connected with a gang of smugglers; she had taken to drinking, and was in a deseased state; I did every thing to recover her again; it was ineffectual. I placed my wife with Mr. Pearce. I went down to Rye; where I formed an inproper connection with my second wife; her friends were very inportunate with me to marry her; I offered to give a bond of five hundred pounds to marry the second wife upon the death of the first. I obtained no property by either of my wives; I have neither deserted my first wife, or any of my children, to be sure, about a twelvemonth back, my means would not afford me to do as much for them as I had before. I entreat the merceful consideration of the court.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined 1 month , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-3

3. CHARLOTTE STANLEY , alias MILLER , and MARY LUSCOMBE , alias MATILDA MILLER , were indicted, and the indictment states, that at the General Sessions of the Piece of our Lord the King, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 17th of September, in the 50th year of his Majesty's reign, the Prisoner Charlotte Stanley , otherwise called Charlotte Miller , together with one Greenslade, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false money, and was sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction one year, and to find sureties for two years more; and the indictment further states, that on the 10th of July, in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign, the Prisoner Mary Luscombe , otherwise called Matilda Miller , with another, was tried, and convicted, and sentenced to be in Goal for one year, and to find sureties for two years more, and that each of them, on the 22nd of November last, one piece of false counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a piece of good and lawful money, called a sixpence, unlawfully

did utter to one Joseph Spencer ; they knowning it to be false and counterfeited .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I am a clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Charlotte Stanley , alias Miller; I got it from the clerk of the piece office, Clerkenwell. I also produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Mary Luscombe , alias Matilda Miller; I got this at Mr. Shelton's office, in the City of London; I examined them; they are correct copies.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am the keeper of New Prison, Clerkenwell.

Q. Look at the prisoners, do you know them - A. I know both of them.

Q. Were you present at the conviction of Charlotte Stanley , otherwise Charlotte Miller - A. I was, in September sessions, in the year 1810; she was tried with another person of the name of Pemberthey; otherwise Greenslade; she was tried, and convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money; she was ordered to be in the House of Correction for the County of Middlesex for one year, and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for good behaviour for two years to come.

WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY. I am clerk of the papers at Newgate.

Q. Look at the elder prisoner, do you know her - A. I do; she was convicted in July sessions, 1811; she was tried along with Mary Russell , I think it was; she was tried, and convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money; she was sentenced to be in Newgate one year, and to find sureties for two years to come.

Q. Were you present in July sessions - A. I was; the prisoner Luscombe, who was tried at that time.

Q. to Mr. Beeby. Were you present at Clerkenwell sessions when the other prisoner was tried - A. I was; the prisoner Charlotte Stanley is one of the persons that were tried at that time.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. I know the young one, Charlotte Stanley ; I saw them together in Bond-street, on the 22nd of November, between one and two o'clock in the day; Plank, another officer, was in company with me. In consequence of my seeing the two prisoners together, I watched them into Bond-street; the girl, Stanley, went to the shop of Mr. Ward, a confectioner, in Bond-street; the other prisoner passed on a little way, looking in the shop windows, apparently as if waiting for her coming out, and when Stanley came out of Mr. Ward's shop, she went to Luscombe; from Bond-street, they both turned down Stafford-street; there Stanley went into a shop; I was not sure which shop she went into; as I was passing along, I saw Stanley come out of a stationer's shop with a sheet of paper in her hand.

Q. When she came out of the stationer's shop, did she join the other woman then - A. Plank will speak to that. I went into the shop; I ascertained she had been changing some money there; I saw Mr. Kirby, and found she had passed a bad sixpence there. When she came out, she went into Albemarle-street, into a pastry-cook's shop, and the other woman walked on two or three doors following, waiting for her. At the pastry-cook's shop she uttered a shilling; she came out. I went into the shop to make enquiry, and when I came out, I lost the two prisoners, and Plank to. I kept strait down Piccadilly, thinking I should meet them, and when I came back again, I saw the two prisoners, and Plank following them, I joined Plank. Charlotte Stanley went to the lodge at Hyde Park; the other went through the posts at Hyde Park gate, and there remained waiting for her daughter. Charlotte Stanley came from the window, and joined her mother. I then went into the lodge. From there, they went to a baker's shop, at Knightsbridge, the young one went into the baker's shop, and the elder one passed on two or three doors; the baker's name is Joseph Spencer ; I went into Mr. Spencer's shop; I discovered that some money had been changed there. The young prisoner was in the shop, she had got a large shawl on, and had got a loaf or a roll in her hand. Mr. Spencer was in the act of taking some halfpence out of the till to give her change; I laid hold of the prisoner's hand; I then desired Mr. Spencer to look at the money he had taken; I told Mr. Spencer that she was a common utterer, to be particular in marking the money he had taken of her. I told the prisoner that she had got something in her hand; she was scuffling with me; she dropped something from her hand upon the floor; it was money; I picked it up from the floor, and put it in my hat, and what I found upon her; I also put into my hat three shillings and two-pence in copper, that was the money that dropped down, and what I found in her pocket together; I had mixed them; there is one shilling bad; the others I believe are good, a three-shilling bank token, two good shillings, a counterfeit shilling, and two-pence in copper. The other prisoner was brought in by Plank. I searched the old woman; in her right hand pocket I found three shillings and two-pence three farthings in copper, in the same pocket eight good sixpences; I believe they are good. I then asked her in the presence of the other prisoner, if she had any counterfeit money on her person; she said, she had not. I searched her further; I found forty sixpences; thirty-nine of them appear to be counterfeit, and one good. I have them here. I spoke to both the prisoners; I asked them if they knew each other; they denied having any knowledge of each other. This is the shilling found upon the old woman; I looked at the sixpence uttered to Mr. Spencer; I desired him to mark it; he did, and delivered it to me. I have had it ever since, and have it now to produce.

JOHN NICOLL . I am one of the moniers of his Majesty's Mint.

Q. Look at that sixpence uttered to Mr. Spencer - A. It is a counterfeit, and it is likely to impose upon any body, and the thirty-nine are all counterfeits something like the other of the same materials.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to Foy. There was a shilling you had from the other - A. This is it.

Q. to Mr. Nicoll. Look at that shilling; is it a good one - A. There is one bad here, and two good.

COURT. Are the thirty-nine and the one you spoke to before; are you able to say they come from the same manufactory - A. It is impossible to say.

Mr. Knapp, Q. to Foy. Did they continue to say all through they did not know each other - A. No, the young one said she had given the sixpences to the old woman, she having found them, meaning the thirty-nine: they then said they had been together.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I was in company with Foy on Tuesday the 22d of November, in Bond-street. I first saw them in Oxford-street; they were together walking and talking. I saw the young one go into several shops. I saw her go into one shop in Oxford-street; the other waited for her coming out, two doors off; they joined immediately; they crossed Hanover-square into Bond-street. The young one went into Mr. Ward's shop, the other remained a short distance off as before; she did not stay a quarter of a minute in the shop. Immediately she come out the two prisoners joined; they went down Bond-street. When they came to the corner of Stafford-street, the young one went into the shop at the corner of it. The young one turned to the left into Stafford-street, and the old one went town into Albemarle-street. I kept my attention to the old one. I saw the young one come down towards her in about two minutes; the elder waited for her; they joined company immediately; the younger one gave the other some money; what it was I do not know; by the whiteness it was silver. They conversed a minute together or so. I saw the elder receive something from the younger; they stopped at the White Horse, and close to that there is a confectioner's shop. The young one went into it; she come out very quick, and was eating of something; and she delivered something from her hand to the other prisoner.

COURT. Could you see what it was - A. No; I did not go near enough for fear of being known; they then passed on together. I told the last witness to go into the shop; they passed on towards Hyde-park corner. There is a pastry-cook's shop in Piccadilly; they passed the pastry-cook's shop; they stopped and consulted together; the old one gave the young one a piece of money what it was I do not know. I was on the other side of the way. Stanley then went to the shop window, took up a cake, and gave something into the hand of Elizabeth Mansfield ; the shop-woman, she is here. I stepped into the shop; Elizabeth Mansfield delivered the sixpence into my hand; I returned it to her, and desired her to keep it in paper until I called for it.

Q. What day was this - A. Tuesday the 22d of November. On the Thursday following I called again; I received the sixpence of her which I had desired her to mark before she gave it me. I have had it ever since. On the Tuesday after I came out of the shop, I immediately pursued the prisoners; they went on towards Hyde-park. Foy was in company with me. I had just met with him. I kept near the prisoners; they passed on until they came to that gate; the young one received something of the elder prisoner again, I could not see what it was; she went to the lodge; I saw her take up some curds and whey at the window; she gave some money to a child at the window within the shop, that child is not here. The child gave her some change, I supposed it to be some halfpence, I was not near enough to distinguish; the other one was walking just round the corner, close to the lodge. The young one then delivered something to the old one; they passed on down the right-hand side of the road to Knightsbridge. When they came near to Mr. Speneer's shop, the baker, the elder one passed on about two doors past the shop, and the young one went in. Foy and I went into the shop after her. In about a quarter of a minute the elder one stepped and looked back. I went on to the elder prisoner; she was standing with her right hand in her pocket, and her left was closed. I went behind her, and took hold of the wrist of her right hand and drew it out of her pocket, and at the same time I took hold of her left hand, and with some difficulty, I opened her left hand. In it I found these two counterfeit sixpences. I took her back into Mr. Spencer's shop, where I found Foy and the other prisoner. I held her hand while he searched her; I heard Foy ask the question which he has stated; each of them denied any knowledge of each other. I never heard them acknowledge they were relations.

ELIZABETH MIRFIELD . I am shopwoman to Mr. Bridgman, a pastry cook, Piccadilly.

Q. Do you remember, on the 22d of November, a person coming to your shop window - A. I recollect a person; I do not know the person; she asked me at the window for a penny almond cake; she gave me a sixpence; I took the sixpence and gave her fivepence change. I put the sixpence into the till; there were two other sixpences in the till, and three or four shillings in the till.

Q. Had you observed the two other sixpences before that - A. I know the two other sixpences that I before had taken were different from this other. I knew the two sixpences in the till by being large sixpences, and much battered. Plank came immediately to the shop window, after I had served that person. I shewed him that sixpence I received of that person. I am sure the sixpence I received from that person I shewed to Plank. He desired me to put it by, for I should be called on again. No person had come to the window between the time I took it and the time I shewed it to Plank. I rolled the sixpence in a bit of paper, it was put into a box in the parlour. On Thursday afterwards Plank came to me, I delivered him the sixpence; he desired me to mark it. I did so; this is the sixpence to the best of my belief; I put a cross upon it; that is the sixpence I received of the young woman that came before Plank.

COURT. Look at the prisoners; might it not be one of the two - A. It might be, I cannot swear that.

Mr. Nicoll. It is a counterfeit sixpence, like the one produced first with the same mark; there is a figure of 8 upon it.

Q. That was the sixpence uttered to Mr. Spencer A. Yes; the two sixpences produced by Plank are

counterfeits, with different marks upon them, like some of the thirty-nine.

JOSEPH SPENCER . I am a baker at Knightsbridge. On the 22d of November, the young prisoner came into my shop, she asked for a twopenny loaf. I served her; she gave me a sixpence, I gave her fourpence change; no person came in after before Mr. Foy; he came in in the space of a minute or less; he said this is an utterer of base and counterfeit money, I should be glad to look at the sixpence. I turned round to get the sixpence; I had put it on a bit of paper in the bowl of money, it was mixed with no other sixpence. I shewed Foy the sixpence, and by his desire I marked it. I gave it Mr. Foy. This is the sixpence, I marked it at the edge with a knife. In the scuffle the fourpence and the loaf were put on the counter both; some customers came in, and there was a confusion.

Stanley said nothing in her defence.

Luscombe's Defence. I never went into any shop to utter. I never had any charge to the officer Foy, if he asked me any questions, I told him I had nothing to say.

STANLEY, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 17.

LUSCOMBE, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 44.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-4

4. JOHN M'GAWLEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Larkum , on the 7th of October , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two shirts, value 10 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and one hat, value 4 s. his property.

JOHN LARKUM . On the 7th of October, I was coming from Sloane square, between seven and eight in the evening; my way lead near the Five Fields ; it was past the chapel near town . After I had passed the chapel, I met the prisoner, I am quite sure of the prisoner. I met him, I was alone, and he was alone; as far as I saw he was dressed as a military man, but not quite so well as he is now. As soon as I passed him, he fetched me down immediately. He gave me a blow with a stick that he was walking with; he hit me upon my head, that blow knocked me down; a very little thing will knock me down, I am in years, I was perfectly sober, I had taken nothing to drink since I had porter at my dinner. When I was knocked down he kept hitting me; I was sensible. I got hold of his stick. I said to him, now what use is your hitting me, when you have got all my property. I had a bundle in my hand.

Q. Who took the bundle out of your hand - A. I fancy when I was knocked down the bundle fell out of my hand, I did not see my bundle again after I had been knocked down. When I laid hold of his stick and said, what use is it of your using me ill, when you have got my property, he made me no answer, he got the stick away from me, and hit me two or three times on the head after that; I believe somebody came by, he went away.

Q. Did any person assist you to get up - A. Yes, that person is here. I was so disordered I could not speak; that person is here; he took me to a Mr. Marr's, a green-grocer, in Five-field row. When the prisoner was with me, I could see this house by the light of his shop; it was not a light night, there was a moon, but it did not shine; he took my hat away too. The prisoner took my hat; he said I will have his hat, I saw him take up my hat.

Q. After the prisoner came up, did you look about on the ground for your bundle - A. No.

Q. Did your hat fall off when you fell down - A. Most likely; at the green grocer's a constable came in by chance; I was taken to St. George's Hospital. I continued in the hospital a fortnight; after I was taken to the hospital, the prisoner was brought in the next morning; then I could not speak at all through the blows I had. Before this happened I had a good speech; I could speak better than I can now. When he came to me my sight was perfect; I knew the prisoner perfectly well; I am sure he is the man. I was so bad from the blows I could not speak.

Q. When this happened, was there light enough to distinguish the countenance of a man - A. I certainly did take notice of the man, he met me, I was going one way, and he the other. There was light enough for me to be quite sure of him. I saw him once or twice in the hospital; I continued to be certain he was the man.

Q. How soon was you able to speak that he was the person? - A. The nurse at the hospital is here, she can tell you better than I can.

Q. What had you in this bundle - A. I had two shirts, two white neck handkerchiefs, and two coloured ones, and a pair of stockings.

Q. What business are you - A. I have been a hatter; my eyes will not let me work at my business, I now live at home with my family in Jermyn-street; I have not seen any of my things since; I always said I was satisfied he was the man.

JOHN BAKER . I live at 24, Sloane-terrace, Sloane-street, Chelsea. On the evening of October the 7th, between seven and eight, as I was coming over the fields, I found Mr. Larkum in the road lying; there was a person by him like a watchman; Mr. Larkum held out his hand to me; he could not speak; I lifted him up, and led him to Mr. Murrell's, a green grocer; I was coming towards London, the same way as Mr. Larkum was, until I came up to him; I met nobody at all; I found him bleeding; he was not able to speak. I took Mr. Larkum to the house of the green grocer, and there I left him. I did not go to the hospital with him; I had no thought of a robbery until I got him into the green grocer's; he was not able to speak; he had a pen and ink, and wrote what he had lost; that is what he has already stated here; that is all I know. I observed the bruises upon his head, a blow behind the ear, and a violent blow on the temple. It was near eight o'clock when I first saw Mr. Larkum; he had no hat on, nor did I see any hat on the ground.

MARY HENDERSON. I am a nurse in St. George's hospital; I saw Mr. Larkum when he was first brought into the hospital. On Friday evening, a quarter past ten o'clock, he appeared to be very bad indeed about the head; there were three violent blows about the head; he could not utter a word; he continued several days so as not to be able to speak, so as to understand what he said. On Saturday morning the prisoner was brought to me for him to look at;

Larkum saw him; he could not speak a word at that time that I could understand of him; he did not wish to be bothered; he snook his head, and appeared not wishing to be troubled, and the man was taken away. I saw the man brought; there the second time. I believe the next Wednesday; he was a little better; he was perfectly sensible the whole of the time; he could speak then, but not perfectly; directly the man came into the room, he said that was the man. Larkum was in the hospital a fortnight.

EDWARD CLARK . I am a constable. On the 7th I was out on duty; I went to the green grocer's, and there I found Mr. Larkum; they were rubbing his head with brandy. I went to the York hospital for a doctor; I could not see any. I then got two men to carry him to St. George's hospital; I did not go with him; I went to look for the man that had robbed him; I went all round the Five Fields; I found nobody that night. The next morning I went to St. George's hospital; at that time the prisoner was brought into the hospital by one of the Bow-street officers; he had some books in a green bag and a hat; the prosecutor was asked whether that was his hat, and he was asked whether he was the man; he shook his head, and made no reply; he held his head down the whole time. On the 18th I received information that Mr. Larknm was going to leave the hospital, and that he wished to see the man that had been brought in before. On the 19th I went to the York barracks, Chelsea; I asked the colonel to let me have him; he granted me liberty; I took him to St. George's hospital.

Q. How long was that after the first time - A. The first time was about the 8th he was taken; this was on the 19th, twelve days after. Mr. Larkum was sitting by the fire; he turned round and saw the prisoner, and exclaimed, that is the man that robbed me, and nobody else. I then took him to the watch-house, and from there to Marlborough-street; I told Mr. Larkum there were many men alike; he was positive to the man; Mr. Larkum did not come to Marlborough-street office for a week or ten days afterward,

JAMES MAYS . I am a patrol of Bow-street office. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday the 8th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I saw him in the Five Fields, Chelsea, near the Crown and Anchor; it is called Chelsea, but it is in the parish of St. George's; he was coming to town. I knowing him to be a soldier in the 21st regiment of foot, and seeing him in a state of intoxication, I asked him where he had been, and why he was so far from his barracks; he said he had been to town; he had a green bag in his hand; in the green bag was a dictionary, grammar, and school books; he had also a hat in his hand, besides the one he had on his head; I recollecting what had happened on the night of the 7th, I took him in custody. That hat was shewed to Mr. Larkum in the hospital; he signified that was not the hat, nor was the prisoner the man; he could not speak so plain that I could understand him; but by the motions of his hand, by all his motions, I understood that he was not the man, and that the man was taller than the prisoner, I know that night was a very dark night; I can hardly recollect a darker night.

Prisoner's Defence I had neither art or part in robbing that man; he might as well swear against a man in France as to swear against me; he has sworn false. My regiment is in America; I have been between four and five years in a French prison.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-5

5. WILLIAM GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of October , two sheets, value 10 s. the property of Richard Jackson ; and ELIZABETH BRANNEN for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of October, the aforesaid goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH DAVIS. I live with Mr. Jackson, at Hendon. On the 18th of October last, we lost a sheet from out of the house; it had been left in the out house. Mr. Jackson has two maid servants; the prisoner was footman to Mr. Richard Jackson . I missed the sheets on a Tuesday in October; I cannot say when I had seen the sheet before it was missing I saw it again at Hatton Garden office about a fortnight ago; it was in the custody of the pawnbroker.

JOSEPH GRIFFEN . I produce the sheet.

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I know it is my master's sheet; I know it by being rounded at the corner; I noticed it before it was lost. I saw it on Tuesday the 18th of October under the bed; that was the day it was stolen. The prisoner lived in our house; he took it out in the night.

JOHN ALLEN . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, pawnbroker in Jermyn-street. On the 19th of October, I took in two sheets of Brannen, with a coat, in pledge; one was a large fine sheet, and the other coarser. They remained with us till the 24th; the prisoner Brannen came and took them out, and paid for them with the coat.

MOSES CLIFFORD . I am shopman to David Cameron , in the Strand, pawnbroker. On the 24th of October, I received these two sheets of Brannen for one pound five shillings, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I have had them ever since in my possession.

ELIZABETH JACKSON . I am the wife of Richard Jackson ; I had left my house in the charge of Elizabeth Davis , and the other person. I left my house on September the 5th; I left this linen in the house. I can speak to both the sheets. I left three maid servants in the house.

Q. Did you leave any man servant there - A. No; he was in London at the time. He went down to our house during our absence. The sheet is marked G. S. No. 2; by that I can speak to it. Gregory acknowledged that he had taken a pair of sheets; William Read heard him say that.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I had Gregory in my custody. I asked him how he came to take these sheets; he said he did not know what possessed him to take them; he did take them, and they were pledged in Jermyn-street. I apprehended Brannen in Pie-street, Westminster; I took Brannen out of bed; she said Gregory brought her the sheets; she thought they had been his own.

GREGORY GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined one year and fined 1 s.

BRANNEN NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-6

6. MARY HARRIS and MARY REVELET were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Samuel Pettigrones , in the King's highway, on the 31st of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a 10 l. bank note, his property .

SAMUEL PETTIGRONES. I am a coal porter . I was robbed on the 31st of October, between eleven and twelve at night, as I was coming along the Strand. The two prisoners came to me, and asked me to give them something to drink. I told them I could not; I could not get change for a ten pound note. They followed me into Buckingham-street; we all three went into a public house; I stood with my note in my hand; I offered it to the landlady; she said she could not give me change; they followed me from there into the Strand ; I begged them to let me go; they both had hold of me, one by each arm; they wanted to force me up a court in the street where the men were murdered, up in Union-street; they said they could change there. I would not go up; they began to hustle me, and I was trying to get from them; Mary Harris got her hand into my right hand breeches pocket, and drawed the ten pound note out of it; she gave it to her corarade; her comrade ran away with it. I kept hold of Mary Harris until the watchman came; he took her to the watch-house; my ten pound note I have never seen again.

Harris's Defence. I never saw the note.

Revelet's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor until I was at the office at the first hearing. It is a thorough mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-7

7. WILLIAM REMINGTON and ROBERT BARNFIELD were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Pittman , in a certain open place near the King's highway, on the 29th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a musket value 1 l. and a bayonet value 1 s. his property.

WILLIAM PITTMAN . I live at Bromley with Mr. Alexander Duthey . On the 29th of October my master sent me out to watch; some people had been breaking his fence. I was armed with a musket and a bayonet; I heard some people breaking his fence about eleven o'clock; I pursued them, and overtook them; I saw two men at the near the end of the field; I saw Remington with some fence under his arm; he was one, and Robert Barnfield was the other; Remington had the fence under his arm; I charged him with having part of the fence; he threw it over into another man's garden, then he came up to me; Barnfield seized my musket; he got it at one snatch; I have never seen it since. I saw Barnfield the next morning at Bromley; I asked after my musket; he said he fancied I was in a dream; he went off.

Q. Were there many people by at the time he took the piece from you - A. No; I did not follow him. On the Wednesday following I had him taken up.

Q. Before Barnfield got the musket from you, had you threatened him at all - A. No; I charged Remington with having part of my master's fence, that is all I said.

ALEXANDER DUTHEY. I sent out my man with his musket; he returned without it.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I went after the two prisoners on Wednesday; I found them in the outward bound East India Dock. Pittman pointed out the two prisoners to me; they did not offer to run away. I told the prisoners the charge as we went along; they said they knew nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-8

8. PATRICK NOWLAN, alias DOWLAN , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Barter , about the hour of ten in the night, on the 12th of November , and stealing therein, a gown, value 10 s. the property of Ann M'Intire .

ANN M'INTIRE. I live with Mr. Barter, in Jews-row, Chelsea ; I am servant to him. I lost my gown on Saturday night in this month; I cannot exactly say the day of the month; I lost it out of my bedroom in the two pair of stairs; I missed it about ten o'clock at night; when I went up to bed the sash window was open, and the looking glass was thrown down and broken. I had been up in my room about an hour before; when I left the room the window was shut, and the gown in my box; and when I went up at ten o'clock the gown was gone, and the box was open. I then locked the room door, and brought the key down stairs, and put it in the bar; and when I went up to bed, I took the key with me; and on unlocking the door, and going in the room, I found the window open; it was shut down an hour before, when I left the room. When I saw the window open, I looked about the room; I found the blanket taken off the bed, and hanging half way out of the window; I looked out of the window, and saw the ladder right up against the window.

Q. Were there any repairs doing at your master's house - A. Yes, they were white washing the staircase, and the ladder was in the yard.

Q. When you locked the door and come down stairs, was it dark? Was the day gone - A Yes, it was about nine o'clock. When I had been in my room before, I took a candle and looked out of my window; I saw a man laying under the ladder in our yard; I went down into the yard, and saw my gown in the yard.

THOMAS BARTER . I keep the public house; it is in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. When my servant went up stairs, I was in the bar. It was on Saturday November 12th; she went up stairs between eight and nine to carry her gown up, after it was dark some time; when she came down the key was brought into the bar to me; she went again between tween ten and eleven. I sent her up to bed; in about two minutes she came down again; she came to me; she said somebody had robbed the room; then I went directly into the yard, where I saw the prisoner laying in the yard, under the ladder, on his back, with the gown under his arm, without a hat on. I lifted him up and took this gown from him, and took him into custody. I asked him how he came in the yard; he made me no answer; there was nobody with him as I saw. I got some man to take him to the guardhouse.

There was a ladder in my yard; my house was under repair; I had not seen him in the house that night. This is the same gown, I took it from him myself.

ANN M'INTIRE. I am sure it is my gown. He was laying down in the yard with this gown under his arm.

- CLARK. I am a constable. I took the prisoner to the guard-room; the gown was given into my charge; I produce it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was quartered in the house twice before. I being in liquor, I met with this in the yard. I slept in the yard an hour, I dare say.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-9

9. THOMAS COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , 8 lb. weight of bees wax, value 20 s. the property of John Blenkarn , Matthias Prime Lucas , John Drinkeld the younger , Robert Smith , and Joseph Barber .

JOHN BLENKARN . I am a wharfinger and warehouseman at Customhouse Quay . My partners are Matthias Prime Lucas, John Drinkeld the younger, Robert Smith , and Joseph Barber . This bees wax being loose, it was in our wharf, and in our charge and custody.

DAVID WRIGHT . I am clerk to the prosecutors I was in the act of weighing the bee's-wax; I ordered the prisoner off. Mr. Blenkarn was by he asked him what he had got. He said nothing. I went up to him, and took between two and three pound of bee's-wax from his pantaloons. I had ordered him off two or three times before; in his breeches I found two or three pieces of bee's-wax; he said he had daily put a little bit in his breeches to clean a hat. He hoped I would not send him to the Compter. It weighed eight pounds and a half; it is worth three shillings or three shillings and sixpence a pound.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a constable; I took the prisoner to the Compter. I received the bee's-wax of Mr. Wright.

Prosecutor. It is the bee's-wax that was upon our wharf, in our charge and custody,

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined three months , and publickly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-10

10. ROBERT CRONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , seven pair of worsted stockings, value 10 s. the property of John Blenkarm , Matthias Prime Lucas , John Drinkeld , junior , Robert Smith , and Joseph Barber .

JOHN BLENKARM . I am wharfinger and warehouseman . I have some warehouses in Thames-street. On the 16th of November, the prisoner Crone took seven pair of stockings out of the bale, in our warehouse. Our warehouses are in Wycherley's Yard, Thames-street . My partners are Matthias Prime Lucas, John Drinkeld , junior, Robert Smith , and Joseph Barber .

WILLIAM WATSON . I am warehouse-keeper under the firm as before. On the 11th of November, I received six bales of worsted hose into the warehouse. On the 16th I received information against the prisoner, that he was committing a depredation. I was in the accompting-house. I went from the accompting-house into the yard. I found seven pair of stockings upon him; he begged forgiveness. I would not allow it. These were the stockings I took from him. They are the stockings we had in the warehouse.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined 3 months , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-11

11. CHARLES BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , two table spoons, value 1 l. 6 s. the property of William Jordan and John Laming .

WILLIAM JORDAN . I keep a chop-house in Finch-lane ; my partner 's name is John Laming .

WILLIAM CUMMINGS . I am waiter to these gentlemen. On the third of November the prisoner came into the bar. He ordered a rump-steak and sauce. I missed a spoon. On the 4th the prisoner came; he ordered a lunch; he had it; he came in again at four o'clock, and had liver and bacon. I handed him a spoon. After dinner the prisoner ordered half a pint of porter; I cleared the dishes away, and took it directly. I took the spoon away from the plate, and put it into the tub that we wash the plates, glasses, and spoons. The prisoner had the half pint of beer which he had not paid me for. I was called down stairs to bring up a steak. On my returning up, I met the prisoner on the stairs. I told him he had not paid for the porter. He took some halfpence out of his pocket, and paid me; he let some of the halfpence drop on the stairs; I took the steak up stairs; I looked in the tub, and missed the spoon. I followed the prisoner, and caught him in Bartholomew-lane. He asked me what I wanted with him. I told him I suspected he had got a spoon. He said he had not got any thing of the kind. was welcome to search him. I told him to come back to my master; he came back with me; he then took the spoon out of his pocket, and gave it me.

Q. Did you find the one that was lost on the third - A. Yes; this is the one that was taken on the fourth; know it to be my master's property.

FRANCES SEAL . I live in High-street, in the Borough. My husband is a silversmith and jeweller. I attend the shop in the Borough. The prisoner brought this spoon to me to sell, on the 3d of November, in the after part of the day; thinking the spoon was his own, I gave him thirteen shillings and ninepence for it.

CUMMINGS. That spoon is also my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I plead necessity. I am very sorry for what I have done. It is the first thing I have been guilty of.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-12

12. HANNAH MARTIN and ELIZABETH MALLARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a watch, value 2 l. and a watch-key, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Brown , from his person .

THOMAS BROWN . I am a clerk in an attorney's office . I lost me watch at about half past twelve at night in Shoe-lane . I met the prisoner against St. Andrew's watchhouse. The prisoner Mallard caught hold of me by the arm; she wanted me to go with her to a house in Shoe-lane. I told her I could not conveniently go with her. She had then hold of my arm; she dragged me towards the end of Shoe-lane, and the other prisoner followed. The watchman was going the half hour after twelve. I told them I could not go with them; then the watchman coming at the time, was the consequence of my walking up Shoe-lane with them. When we stopped I told Mallard I had no money in my pocket, it was useless to stop me. She shook my pocket, and said, here is some halfpence here in your inside waistcoat pocket, give me them to get something to drink; and while I was feeling for them, I gave her three halfpence. I felt my watch drawn out of my fob. I immediately charged Mallard with taking my watch, and that he had given it to the other girl; that moment I charged her with it. I saw her shuffle her hands to the other prisoner, who was standing on her left-hand side. I insisted upon her giving me the watch, or she should go to the watch-house. She said she had not got it. I was confident she had. I took hold of the prisoner's hands; the other prisoner, which I supposed had got it. She said, Oh God, you have dropped it. I said, it was not likely I should drop the watch, I never dropped a watch for seven years. She said, go back and search for it. I said I would not go back, without they both went back with me. I saw the prisoner which I supposed had got the watch stoop and look down an area. They did not find the watch. I gave charge of them to the watchman; they were taken to the watchhouse, and there searched; the watch was not found on them. The constable went out to look for the watch, and found it in a hole in the wall where we had been standing; he found it in the hole in the wall by taking a brick out of the wall.

JOHN SMITH . I am the constable. I am the man that found the watch. In consequence of the charge being brought into the watchhouse, I searched the prisoners, I did not find the property on them. I then enquired of the prosecutor where he was robbed of his watch; he told me the place; I took the watchman along with me, and searched for it; I found it in a hole in the wall, where a brick had had been taken out; I brought it back to the watchhouse; this is the watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

JURY, Were you sober? - A. Yes, as I am now.

Martin's Defence I was standing three or four yards off; I never saw the watch till I saw it in the watchhouse.

Mallard's Defence. I never saw the watch till I saw it in the watchhouse.

MARTIN GUILTY , aged 19.

MADLARD GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-13

13. JAMES CORRALLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a trunk, value 10 s. a pelisse, value 3 l. four gowns, value 4 l. four pair of stockings, value 8 s. and a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of James Wilkinson .

JAMES WILKINSON . I am a clerk to Mr. William Humphrey . I lost this trunk on the 22nd of October.

Q. How did you lose it - A. I sent our porter to Mr. Barber, where the trunk was left with a letter; when he went there, Mrs. Barber said Mrs. Wilkinson had been there, and the trunk had been taken away.

JOHN RYAM . On the 22nd of October, Mr. Wilkinson sent me with a note to Mr. Barker's, No. 25, Little-saint Thomas Apostle ; I saw the prisoner in the street, I asked him to shew me No. 25; he shewed me the house. I shewed Mrs. Barker the note; I said, I would call on my return. I had a great many parcels to deliver at different parts of the town, and as I returned, I called at Mrs. Barker's for the trunk; she said, the little man that was with me had called for the trunk; he said, he would take the trunk over to the wharf. When I went home I enquired, and found nobody had been with it to Mr. Wilkinson. I looked out for the prisoner; the next day I saw the prisoner in College-street, Westminster, I collared him, and told him he must go with me; he walked quietly with me; I took him to Mr. Wilkinson, he ordered me to take him to Mrs. Barker. I am sure the prisoner is the identical man that shewed me the number of the house.

Q. What time Ryan was it - A. A few minutes after five when the prisoner shewed me the house.

MRS. BARKER. I live at 25, Little-saint Thomas Apostle . I remember Ryan coming to my door, it was about five o'clock; Ryan, the porter, put the note into my hand; I said, did not you meet Mrs. Wilkinson; he said, no; I said if you are coming back, you may as well take a small trunk to her, she will want it early in the morning; Ryan said aye mistress; then they went away together, down the street; I stood at my door with my child in my arms, and saw them both go down the street. About half an hour after the prisoner came back, he rung the bell, he said, Scotch Jack had sent him for the trunk, he said, he was going further than he expected, and will be late before he comes back, he was going back to the wharf, Mr. Wilkinson desired he would take the trunk.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes, I am; I know him by his voice, person, and dress, and every thing. Ryan, the porter, came at eight o'clock; he asked for the trunk; I told him the little man that he sent for it, had taken it away; Ryan said, he had sent no man.

Q. to Ryan. You had never seen him before, had you - A. I did not know him; a great many call me Scotch Jack, perhaps he might catch that. I am quite certain the prisoner shewed me the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw Scotch Jack until he laid hold of me, and took me before the Lord Mayor. I can prove that I was in another part of the town if my witnesses were here.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-14

14. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , a wrapper, value 6 d. and eleven printed bound books, value 20 s. the property of William Waterhouse .

WILLIAM WATERHOUSE. I am a coach master at the Swan and Two Necks . This parcel came from Liverpool by my coach, it arrived in London on the 7th of this month, and was sent out with other parcels; it was stolen out of the cart in Bishopsgate-street .

JOHN WELLS . I go with the cart, and mind the cart when the porter is gone away. On the 7th of November, about eleven at noon, when I came to the Flower Pot , Bishopsgate-street, I met the porter there; the porter took two parcels out of the cart to deliver. I stood against a house opposite of the cart. I saw the prisoner take a parcel off the cart; I hallooed out stop thief; the prisoner looked round; as soon as he saw me, he ran through Crosby-square; I ran after him; he was stopped. I am sure he is the same man; he was brought back in about five minutes, or a little better; I am sure he is the same man.

JOHN STEVENS . I am an officer. I heard the lad call out stop thief; I was near the spot at the time. I pursued him, and took him. This is the parcel; I produce it.

Prosecutor. That is the parcel.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-15

15. HENRY GREENWOOD , alias CASEY , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Griffen , about the hour of nine in the night, of the 25th of November , and stealing therein, fifteen pencil-cases, value 2 l. 15 s. the property of Charles Griffen .

CHARLES GRIFFEN . I am an hair-dresser ; I sell perfumery ; I live at 48, Skinner-street, St. Sepulchre's ; I keep the house. This happened on Monday last, the 25th of November, about nine o'clock, I perceived the prisoner at the window some time before he broke it; he smashed it, and then put his hand into the window; he did not go from the window before he did it with his hand; I was in the shop, and within three yards of where it was broken; I heard it break; it was broken with his hand; when his hand was in the window, he laid hold of some pencil-cases, and dropped one near the window that he had broken. When I heard the glass break, I looked at him; he put his hand in coolly, catched some pencil-cases up, and run off; when he ran away, I went into the shop, put my coat and hat on, and went out on Snow-hill; I saw one of the patrols, I told him I had been robbed; I told the patrol to watch to see if any person came again. I pulled off my coat and hat, and go to my business. I then perceived the window was broken as I passed along; I had heard it break; you might have heard it all along the ground floor. I went into my own shop, and went to my business; in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, I perceived a hand in the window again; I ran across the shop out into the street as fast as possible, the patrole had got him when I came to the door; he then dropped the pencil-cases; I saw them drop; I picked up ten pencil-cases, which I saw him drop. I said, this is the second time you came.

JOHN WOOD . I am a patrole. Mr. Griffen informed me he had been robbed, and he had his window broken; I watched in the front of the broken window; there was a strong light in the window in about a quarter of an hour; the prisoner came down as if from St. Sepulchre's church; he put his hand inside of the window; he pulled his hand out of the window. I instantly laid hold of him; Mr. Griffen came out of the shop: I took the prisoner to the watchhouse; something fell from the prisoner, it sounded like glass, what it was, I cannot say; I had enough to do to take the prisoner to the watchhouse. I searched him; on him I found a silver watch, and some money.

EDWARD LINDER . I am the other patrole. I came up just as Mr. Griffen came out of the shop; Mr. Griffen was picking up some pencil-cases off the ground; Mr. Griffen delivered me the pencil cases he picked up. These are the pencil cases.

Mr. Griffen. These are my pencil-cases; they were in my window.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-16

16. JOHN HATFIELD was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of October , unlawfully had in his custody and possession, a forged bank note for the payment of 2 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-17

17. THOMAS HATFIELD was indicted for that he, on the 14th of November , feloniously and without lawfull excuse, had in his custody and possession two forged 1 l. notes each .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-18

18. JOHN HATFIELD was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 22nd of October , a bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intent to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, For disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

AND SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, only varying the charge.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-19

19. THOMAS HATFIELD was indicted for feloniously forging a bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-20

20. WILLIAM RICE and HENRY CHAPMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , one handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of Edward Dundee , from his person .

EDWARD DUNDEE . I belong to the army . On the 28th of November, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Holborn , in company with a friend; a person ran up, and enquired if I had lost my handkerchief; I felt in my pocket, and found my handkerchief gone; the person begged me to wait a few minutes, and he would see for the person that picked my pocket; we waited about five minutes, he returned with the two prisoners in custody, holding in his hand a handkerchief, which bore a strong resemblance to the one I had in my pocket. We went to Marlborough-street; the handkerchief was produced there; I knew it to be my own by the marks; I know nothing of the robbery.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On Monday afternoon, the 28th of November, I was going up Holborn, I saw the two prisoners in company with another man; knowing their persons, I followed them about an hour, and there they followed every genteel person almost that was walking up and down Holborn; I followed them into Turnstile, and there they followed the prosecutor and another gentleman; the one not in custody, pulled the handkerchief out a little way, the two prisoners immediately closed the gentleman, and the prisoner Chapman took the handkerchief out, and put it in his pocket. I apprised the gentlemen of his loss, and told him to wait there until I returned with the prisoners; they went down Coal-yard, in Drury-lane, and I met them at the other end of the Coal-yard; when I got in the Coal-yard, the prisoner Chapman had got it in his hand wiping his nose with it; all three when they saw me coming down the Coal-yard, were making away; directly they saw me coming down the Coal-yard, they all set off running as hard as they could ran; I laid hold of Chapman, and Rice was catched in Drury-lane, and brought to me there; I am sure Rice is the other man; I am quite sure of the two prisoners. I searched Chapman, and found the handkerchief in his coat pocket; he put it in his coat pocket directly he saw me come down the Coal-yard. This is the handkerchief.

Q. to Mr. Dundee. Look at that handkerchief - A. It is my own handkerchief; the initials of my own name are on it.

Chapman's Defence. A young man came up to me, and asked me to purchase a handkerchief; I told him I had no money.

Rice's Defence. I was coming from the India House, I met Chapman and a young lad with him asking him to purchase a handkerchief; Johnson came and took me into custody.

CHAPMAN, GUILTY , aged 17.

RICE, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-21

21. PETER ELDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , two pieces of leather, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of John Kinsey and Thomas Kinsey .

JAMES HARDWICK . I am a servant to Messrs. Kinsey, coach builders , 12, and 13, Whitechapel-road , and in the New-road, the shop goes both ways. On the 24th of November, I was sent for at the accompting-house by Mr. Thomas Kinsey , he desired me to fetch an officer, as he suspected Peter Elder was going to take some leather; I fetched the officer to be there at nine o'clock, at the time that Elder went to breakfast; he went from the premises, I saw him go out of the shop. The officer on searching him found this leather in his hat; I believe it to be the property of Messrs. Kinsey.

Q. Is Mr. Kinsey here - A. No; he is a quaker , I can swear that is the leather taken from the prisoner.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I took the prisoner into custody, and found the leather in his hat; Elder said it was the first time.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-22

22. JOHN BIRD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Arnold and William Arthur , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 23rd of January , and stealing therein, eleven pair of boots, value 20 l. and seven odd boots, value 7 l. their property.

WILLIAM ARTHUR . William Arnold is my partner; we are boot and shoe-makers ; our shop is in Wigmore-street, St. Mary-le-bone , we keep the house jointly, and the shop.

Q. Was that shop robbed at any time - A. Yes on Sunday, the 23rd of January; I left the house between seven and eight o'clock, leaving the door upon the spring lock; it was dark at that time of the year; I shut the door after me, and pushed the door to see it was fast. After I shut it, I left no one in the house. I returned to my house about half past ten; when I came back, I found my door nearly closed, but not locked, so that I could push it open; I went in; I found eleven pair of boots missing, and seven odd ones; they were all new boots, and were in the shop when I left it that morning, I am sure of it.

Q. Did you find any violence done to your house - A. No, except the door was open: there was no other

violence then that. My partner was out. I was the last that went out; there was nobody there but myself when I left. There is nobody lives in the house but me and my partner; there is no family. On the Monday morning we gave information at the police office, Marlborough-street, and Foy afterwards discovered some of the boots.

Q. When did you first see any part of your property that you missed - A. It might be three weeks afterwards. They were brought to the police office. That is all I know about it.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner Bird - A. No, he was a stranger to me.

JOHN FOY. I am an officer. In consequence of the information that Mr. Arnold gave at our office, on the 14th of February last, I took in custody a person of the name of Clarke, who had offered some boots to sell, which afterwards turned out to be Mr. Arnold's; he was committed for re-examination; in consequence of his being apprehended, I took Joseph into custody.

SAMUEL JOSEPH . I am a clothes dealer. On a Monday in January, I believe, I bought eleven pair of boots of Jack Clements, at his house in Mary-le-bone-lane, between twelve and one o'clock at noon; Jack Clements is a jeweller. There were two persons present when I bought them, one was his brother, his name is Clements.

Q. And who else - A. I believe the prisoner; I have got some knowledge that he is the man; he was the man I am sure of it.

Q. He was the other person - A. Yes.

Q. Who had the boots in their custody - A. Clements.

Q. What part of the transaction did the prisoner take - A. He was by, he was in company with them at Clements's house; I bought the boots of Clements, and paid Clements eleven pounds ten shillings for them; they were new boots; Bird was in the room; I never saw Bird after that.

Q. Have you been in the habit of buying boots of a jeweller - A. No, never before.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I am an officer. I apprehended Becket Cloments; in his lodging I found thirty or forty picklock keys. I knew nothing of Bird myself.

JOHN BROWN. I am a publican. I have seen Clements in company with the Jew, Joseph. I never saw Bird in my life.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I apprehended Bird on Tuesday, the 1st of November, at Paddington. I found nothing upon him, only knowing he stood indicted upon this charge; I apprehended him. I have seen him in company with Clements, but not at the particular time of the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-23

23. SOPHIA LYNN SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of November , six yards of lace, value 2 l. and one yard of ribbon, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Moses , in his dwelling-house .

JOICE MOSES. I am the wife of Joseph Moses ; he is a housekeeper , in Lower East Smithfield ; he is an haberdasher . I missed the ribbon and the six yards of lace last Wednesday night. The prisoner went out to buy some bird seed, and then she bought a pair of ear-rings.

Q. When did the prisoner leave you - A. Not till she was taken up last Friday morning.

Q. Was any of your property found upon her - A. The lace was found at a friend of her.

SARAH MOSES . I went with Mr. Griffiths, the officer; he searched Mrs. Charrington's room, an acquaintance of the prisoner.

Q. Did Mrs. Charrington ever came to your house - A. No.

Q. How do you know Mrs. Charrington was a friend of the prisoner - A. Because that she lived with her; I know that of my own knowledge.

Q. Was the prisoner there at the time that you made the search - A. No. The officer has got the lace. I saw Mrs. Charrington take it out of her pocket, and put it on the table, under a pair of trowsers.

Q. You saw her, did you - A. Yes. The officer went to search: I took the trowsers up, and shook it, and out tumbled the lace; I said, here is the lace; the officer took it.

Q. How do you know that the prisoner took it there - A. Because she owned it before the Justice.

Q. Was what the prisoner said to the Justice taken in writing - A. Yes. That is all I know about it.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I searched Mrs. Charrington's room along with the last witness. When I was beginning to search on the left hand side of the room, the last witness called me, and said, here is the lace, Mrs. Charrington has taken it out of her pocket, here it is; Mrs. Charrington denied knowning any thing of it; she said, she did not pull it out of her pocket. In searching Mr. Charrington's place, I found a yard of ribbon; I have had the lace ever since.

Q. to Mrs. Moses. Look at the lace that Griffiths produces - A. I know it to be mine; there was five yards of it, there is but two yards now left; I know the lace to be mine by the pattern; part of the piece was taken away, and part left; I have got a pattern of it here. This is the pattern.

JURY. This piece that Mrs. Moses has produced appears half an inch wider.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-24

24. JOHN DAVIS and JOHN LEARY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , one watch, value 13 l. a chain value 1 s. a watch ribbon, value 2 d. and two tea spoons, value 5 s. the property of Charles Robert Princep in his dwelling house .

CHARLES ROBERT PRINCEP . I live in Crown-office Row, In the Inner Temple ,

Q. Did you lose a watch with a watch ribbon, key, and two silver tea spoons from your chambers - A. I did on the 10th of October, in the morning; I perceived the loss about eleven o'clock in the the morning; about ten o'clock in the morning,

opened my street door, it being a fine morning: I left both outer door and inner door open; I left my watch on the breakfast table, and two silver teaspoons; my chambers consist of a front and back room on the same floor, the kitchen is below. I retired for something less than a minute to the back room; I remained in the back room but a short time; I perceived by the sun that came into the passage, the shadow of two persons that lottered in the chamber, or at the door; I came to see what they wanted, and found the two prisoners in the passage, within the chamber; that is, I found Leary, and the other I will not positively swear to the face of the other; I found two persons, of which Leary, the younger, is one of them; I detained Leary; the other made off. I asked Leary what business he had there; he gave me an answer, that he wanted Mrs. Jones, or some such person, whose name is printed on the top of my chamber. The precipitation which one had ran off, I thought it was not right; I looked on the table; the watch, and tea-spoons were gone; I immediately called after Leary, who was making after his companion, he was going towards the gateway, the gateway into Middle Temple-lane, where his companion was waiting.

Q. You said, you were less than a minute in your back room - A. Yes.

Q. Was it possible that any other person should come and take these, unless they were companions of this party - A. Impossible; the room was very small. I was gone scarcely half a minute.

Q. You told us that two or three boys were waiting in Middle Temple-lane; can you be certain that the other prisoner was one of these boys waiting - A. I cannot positively swear to his face; his height and appearance exactly answers to the description of the boy. He was taking before the sitting magistrate at Guildhall.

Q. Was Leary searched in your presence - A. Not in my presence; nothing was found upon him whatever.

Q. Have you ever found your watch and tea-spoons since - A. I have found part of the property; he was detained five days; I was not able to get sufficient evidence of the property, and the property not being found, Leary was discharged. About a fortnight afterwards he was taken up upon some other occasion; his youth and humane interposition got him a place in the philanthropic reform, where I heard he made a confession.

Q. Did you, or any person in your hearing, tell him it would be better for him to disclose who were his accomplices - A. The confession was voluntary on his part, I heard no promise of favour, or threat of punishment. I heard by accident that he was in this society; I called; he confessed that he, and one Harry, in company with two boys, called Jack Hill and Mackey, had been that morning on a party of plunder; that he and Harry had entered the chambers, my chambers; that he had waited in the passage while Harry went and took the property. He charged the lad Harry, that Harry told him in going out, that he had taken a thimble, meaning a watch; Leary explained it as a cant word, meaning a watch, and after he had been discharged on my account, he had received one pound seven shillings and sixpence of one Kelly as part of the plunder, as part of the produce of the watch and spoons; he mentioned the spoons, and having been disposed of to Kelly for one shilling each.

Q. Did he say where this Kelly lived - A. He keeps a public-house in Rose-street, near St. Martin's-lane, and on the evening of the day, on which he had been discharged, he, Kelly, had shewn him this same watch which he had not before seen, and said, this is the watch I bought of Harry for five guineas; Leary gave me a description of the watch, which was a peculiar watch which answered to my watch; it was a very peculiar watch indeed, he described my watch accurately; he stated moreover, that the chain had been concealed by Mackey, by one of the four, under the floor of a certain coffee shop in the Seven Dials, a steal chain covered with ribbon my watch had; he had concealed it through a hole in the floor, and that this Harry was in the habit of wearing the ribbon and the key of my watch. I was anxious to ascertain the truth of this story, and to bring the receiver to Justice. I asked him if he could lead me where it was likely to find the other parties, and assist me to find out this Kelly; for that purpose I took him out of this society by the leave of this society; he was in the reform part of the institution; he went with me to Bow-street; we went to the coffee shop, where we found the ribbon as described; we found the chain exactly where he had described it to me; he was with us at the time; it was under the floor as he had described. We next proceeded after Harry; he took us to his place of residence, he was not there; he took us to his mother. This Harry was recognised by Leary, and at last we found the person that he called Harry by the mother in Clerkenwell prison; Harry is the boy now charged in the name of John Davis .

Q. Did Leary charge John Davis with having been concerned in the theft - A. He only charged Harry. I produced John Davis and Jack Hill at Bow-street.

Q. You took Harry by the name of John Davis - A. Yes, and with Leary we took John Davis and Jack Hill; they were taken to Bow-street, where they were identified by other evidence, as being Harry and Jack Davis .

Q. Did John Davis say any thing in your hearing respecting this charge - A. He did not. We brought him up to endeavour to discover this transaction.

Q. Have you ever found your watch since - A. No. This Leary we had him only yesterday, and confronted him with the two parties, who answered to the description; I confronted him before Davis, before the magistrate at Bow-street, he entirely denied ever having seen him, although Leary swore positively to him.

JOHN HITCHEN . I am porter at the Inner Temple.

Q. Do you recollect the fact of Mr. Princep complaining of his having a watch stolen from the Temple - A. I was in the King's Bench-walk when I first heard of it; I heard this about eleven o'clock.

Q. Before that time, had you seen either of the prisoners in Crown-office-row - A. No. I went to his chambers; I found Leary there, he was then sitting down in the chambers. I took him before the magistrate; he was discharged because the property was not found. I was present when he made the confession; what the boy said, was perfectly voluntary.

Q. You have heard Mr. Princep give Leary's account of the transaction - A. I have heard it; I agree with it. I know no more of it. Leary described the watch to be a gold watch.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer of the Justice room, Guildhall. I first went with Mr. Hitchen to Dyet-street to see if I could find out the two boys.

Q. Did you find them - A. No; Leary described the lads that were with him; he told me where the chain was; I found it in the place he described, in the coffee shop in the Seven Dials.

Q. to Prosecutor. Have your chambers any connection with any others - A. No; they are perfectly independant. I stated to Leary that he must not trifle with me; I told him what he said before the magistrate he must take care, the magistrate would not suffer him to trifle.

Q. to Herdsfield. You found that chain in the coffee shop as he described - A. Yes; Leary was by at the time; it was taken out of the floor.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer of Bow-street. In consequence of information, I went with Leary and the other witnesses; he pointed with his foot where the hole in the floor was; I sent for a carpenter, and had the board taken up in the presence of the prosecutor and the other witnesses.

Q. Did you take the other prisoner - A. No. At the time I took the chain up, I asked him what he had done with the thimble, meaning the watch; he said, Harry had sold it to Kelly, that keeps the Rose public-house in Rose-street, Long Acre; he sold it for five quids. In searching the place in the floor, I found another chain, which he said, was dropped there by Harry.

JAMES BELL . I am a servant belonging to Mr. Cobell, at the Seven Dials coffee shop. I know Leary by his coming there to have breakfast there of a morning.

Q. Do you know the other prisoner - A. Yes, he also used to come and have breakfast there.

Q. Were you present when this was found under the floor - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know before that, that any thing had been put under that floor - A. No.

Q. Do you know when it was put there - A. No.

Q. to Prosecutor. What was the value of your watch - A. More than fifteen pounds.

Leary's Defence. What was done was done by myself; there was nobody else along with me.

Davis was not put on his defence.

LEARY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 11.

DAVIS, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-25

25. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , five pounds in monies numbered, the property of Ann Darnell widow , in her dwelling-house .

ANN DARNELL . I am a widow; I live at Potters Bar ; I keep a small public-house there, it is in the parish of South Mims . On Saturday, the 5th of November I went to my bed-room about eleven o'clock in the morning, on my going into the room I observed William Green, the prisoner, under my bed, I saw his legs under the bed; I gave an alarm; I called down to my servant; I was outside of the door; I called my servant up, my witness came up James Styles.

Q. Before James Styles came up, had the person came from under the bed - A. No, he had not moved.

Q. I suppose when James Stiles came up, then you and he went into the room - A. Yes, I went up for some change; I missed the box, and five pounds in silver. Styles asked him what he did there; he said, nothing. He got from under the bed; my witness Styles rather pulled him from under the bed; I believe he pulled him from under the bed; I saw his whole person; I knew him, he had lodged in my house a month or five weeks. My box of silver was under the bed where he was laying; I took the box up.

Q. Where did you use to keep that box - A. In my drawer, in my bed-room.

Q. Was that drawer locked - A. I don't know; I sometimes locked in; I cannot say whether it was then locked or no.

Q. Do you recollect when you last went to that box, and saw it in that drawer - A. On Saturday morning, about ten o'clock in the day; I counted five poundsworth of silver in the box that morning; at ten o'clock I left the box in the drawer; I went up at that time for some change.

Q. At the time that the prisoner was taken from under the bed, did you look at the drawer, and see whether it was open or any keys in it - A. The drawer was a little way open.

Q. When you found this box under the bed, was any thing said to the prisoner about it - A. I found the money in the box as I left it; my witness searched him, and found no property on him, but the box under the bed where he was laying; the box was shut with the money in it; the money had not been taken out of it. I don't know whether I said any thing to the prisoner about the box and money. This is the box, it is a screw box; it holds five pounds; it was shut as it is now. I lost nothing at all; the prisoner always conducted himself well before, and he had been ill about ten days, and had not worked.

JAMES STYLES . I am a blacksmith, at Potters Bar. I was alarmed by Mrs. Darnell; I was at work in my shop, there was a great alarm; I ran out, and up stairs immediately. When I went into the room Mrs. Darnell stood at the door; I asked what was the matter; she said, there was a man in the room. I looked, and saw part of a man underneath the bed; I catched hold of him, he immediately came from under the bed. I asked him what he did there; he said, he did not know. I asked him

whether he had got any money, and what he had got about him. I searched him; he had only three or four halfpense about him. I found nothing about him; I looked under the bed, I saw a box; I called Mrs. Daniel, and told her the box was under the bed.

Q. Had the box been missed before that - A. Not to my knowledge; she took the box up from under the bed; I asked the prisoner whether he put it there; he said he did not know that he did, that is all that passed. I took him in custody, and took him before a magistrate. Mrs. Darell opened the box in my presence; she said all the silver was right, five pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I was quite fuddled; I went up to go into my own room. I had been drinking a great deal, I made a mistake and went into her room.

GUILTY, DEATH , aged 18.

The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-26

26. GEORGE ALFREY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of November , four yards of long lawn, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Cootes , privately in his shop .

THOMAS COOTES . I am a linen draper . I keep a shop in Oxford-street , No. 134. I have another shop in the same street, on the other side, No. 129. I attend at one shop, and William Wells at the other; he attends at No. 129; the prisoner Alfrey boarded and lodged at 129; he was my porter two years, and chiefly at No. 129.

Mr. HALL. I am a pawnbroker in High-street, Mary-le-bone. The prisoner pledged at my shop four yards of lawn for thirteen shillings; he said it was his own, he had purchased it in Oxford-street, for his sister; I told him I doubted his statment. He then said, he lived at 129, Oxford-street, it was his master's property. I delivered the lawn to a constable of Mary-le-bone; I requested him to take him to 129, to ascertain the fact; I delivered the prisoner with the lawn; this is the long lawn, I marked it, it is the same.

WILLIAM WELLS . I am shopman to Mr. Cotes. I have I the charge of the shop, 129, Oxford-street.

Q. Look at that piece of lawn; do you know any thing of it - A. Yes, I do; it is a remnant of long lawn; there is a mark upon it of my own; I know it to be my master's property; it is worth about fifteen shillings, there is four yards of it. I never authorised the prisoner to take it, or have sold it; the officer brought it me on the 5th of November, I have had it in my possession ever since.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I am an officer; the prisoner and the lawn was put into my charge; he said he took it from his master's shop; he did not say the particular time.

Prosecutor. That piece of long lawn, that piece of of lawn has Wells's writing upon it; I can swear to it.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-27

27. CATHERINE FREAR and ELIZABETH DENHAM , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November , a shawl, value three pounds two shillings, the property of Joseph Drakes , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH DRAKES . I am a linen draper in the Strand, in the parish of St. Clement's Danes . On the 9th of of November, the two prisoners came into my shop, they asked for some cotton handkerchiefs; I was not attending; the young man, he is not here, was attending to them; they said, they wanted some cotton handkerchiefs; I heard them ask and saw them shewn to them; some customers came in the shop before they went away. I saw him shew them several; there was nothing suited them. As soon as I had done attending to my customers, I heard one of them say, there was nothing would suit them; then they went away; I walked up towards the window; I saw the worked shawls were put out of their place After they were gone I missed a shawl, I ran out and pursued them; I overtook them about five or six doors down Milford-lane; they were in a yard that leads up to a house door; they were both together there. I asked them if had been in my shop; I named the shop to them; I laid hold of Catherine Frear 's arm; she denied having been at my shop; Denham heard my question, and her answer. I began to shake her by the arm, and said I would search them. I stooped down, and perceived a shawl under her; I perceived something move as she was standing upon the ground; I took up the shawl from underneath her gown, and took it into my shop; my shop is only two doors from Milford-lane; I took them both there, and sent for a constable, they made no resistance at all; the shawl is here; there is my own writing upon the shawl, that I had put within ten days. I am certain it is my shawl; I saw the shawl five minutes before it was taken. My nephew is my shopman, he did not see her take it; the magistrate did not bind him over to appear; he is not here.

Q. What is the value of the shawl - A. It cost me three pounds two shillings within a fortnight before.

DAVID SIDEY . I was not in Mr. Drake's shop until after the prisoner's were taken there. The prisoners came to me at Mr. Dawson's, my employer's door, and asked me for a drink of water; I did not give it twem. They abused me; I saw them go down Milford-lane; Mr. Drakes enquired of me after the the prisoners; I went with him, and shewed him them at Mr. Wingrove's yard; he charged them with offence; Catherine Frear denied it.

Q. What did Mr. Drakes say to them - A. He asked them, whether they had been at his shop? Frear denied it; he laid hold of Catherine Frear by the arm, I saw her drop the shawl, that is all I know.

Q. to Prosecutor. You did not see the prisoner take the shawl, did you. - A. No; and there was not an alarm by any body; we did suspect them at at all until I looked and missed the shawl; the shawl was taken from within the shop.

Frear's Defence. I went in to purchase a pocket handkerchief for this young woman; I knew nothing of the shawl until it lay on the stones; a person of my appearance could not purchase such a

shawl as that. I never saw it till it lay on the stones.

Q. to Sidey. You see it dropping from her - A. I saw it dropping from under her clothes.

FREAR GUILTY , DEATH , aged 42.

DENHAM, GUILTY, DEATH , aged 14.

The prisoner Denham was recommended to mercy on account of her youth .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-28

28. MARY WELCH and ANN GALLOWAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , twenty-one pound weight of bacon, value 10 s. the property of James Gosling , privately in his shop .

JAMES GOSLING . I am a cheesemonger , No. 21, Belton-street, Long Acre . On Saturday last, the 26th of November, Mary Welch came into my shop, she enquired the price of bacon; I told her; she was not satisfied with it; she went away.

Q. Did you see her any more in your shop that day - A. No; she was alone when she came into my shop; we were busy, taking in two bags of biscuits. My brother in law, father in law, and a ship lad were in my shop. While we were taking in the biscuits, a boy came in, and told me we were being robbed; about half an hour afterwards Mary Welch came into the shop; I asked the boy by who, and where, and immediately went into the street. I saw no person; I asked him by whom I was robbed; he said by two women, they had broken a pane of glass, and had taken the bacon out. He pointed to the other side of the way, saying, the two women were in conversation together; the boy is here. I went across the street by the boy's direction; one of the women had a great coat on, I saw her walking towards Long Acre; her name is Ann Galloway . Seeing that she had nothing suspicious about her, I walked towards St. Giles's, and while I was looking about, Mary Welch passed me in Vinegar-yard; I observed something in her apron; I said to her, you have something here I believe, it is my bacon; I told her I had been robbed of sixty pound of bacon; she said she hoped not, she bought the bacon in her apron in the street, she gave two shillings and sixpence for one bit, and fifteen pence for the two others. I brought her back and sent for the parish constable.

Q. Did you see the bacon in her apron - A. Yes, it is the sort of bacon I had in my shop; there was nothing in to distinguish it from other cheesemonger's bacon.

ALEXANDER BRADEY . I am fourteen years old.

Q. Do you know Mr. Gosling's shop - A. Yes, it is in Belton-street. I was in Belton-street between six and seven in the evening talking to some of my playmates; and while I was talking, a boy came up to me and said this woman had broken the window and taken out some bacon; I did not see it; the boy that told me is not here; I said I would stand a little time, and see if she would do so again. I saw a woman with a great coat on go to Mr. Gosling's window; she seemed to stand a little time with her face towards me, and then she turned her face towards the window; she stopped there about half a minute, and came away with one piece of bacon in her hand, under her coat, with the other arm across, holding the great coat over it; she crossed over the way to another woman that she joined, and they both went to a passage together, they seemed to come out of the passage nearly together; this woman with the great coat on walked up a little towards St. Giles's; she came back again and walked across the way to the window again, and came from the window in the same manner. A little time after I went up Belton-street with the lad, and gave Mr Gosling intelligence; we then saw the same two women in conversation together, that is all I saw. I told Mr. Gosling.

Q. Did you observe the women so as to know them again - A. The woman with the great coat on now is the woman that went to the window; her name is Ann Galloway , as she gave in her name, and the woman that she crossed over to is Mary Welch , I took notice of her.

Q. Did you go afterwards to see whether the window was broken or not - A. Yes, it was broken, the window that she had been at.

RICHARD SAINT JOHN. I am constable of St. Giles's; I took these women into custody; Mary Welch had a quantity of bacon in her apron; this is the bacon.

Q. to Gosling. These are the same women that the boy Bradey pointed out to you; are they not - A. He told me they were the two women; he did not point them out, he said two women, I had no clue at the moment.

Q. Was the window of your shop broken - A. The glass was cracked, probably there might be a hole for a finger and thumb to go in; there was not a whole big enough to take bacon out; the pile of biscuits were piled up, so as to screen the window from my sight; afterwards when I took the women, almost all the glass was cut; I found the bacon was gone, and then I found the glass was broken. I examined, with Saint John the constable, and my father; my bacon laid near the window that was so broken.

Q. Look at the bacon the constable has produced - A. The bacon that I had in the window looked like this bacon; this bacon answers to the description of my bacon; I am confident it was taken through the window; the window was broken on purpose to take it out.

Galloway's Defence. I work for a woman that lives up at Mr. Gosling's house, in the army clothing; when I was stopped, I had no bacon about me.

Welch's Defence. In going through Belton-street a woman asked me to buy a bit of bacon cheap; I gave her half-a-crown for a large bit of bacon, and fifteen pence each for the other bits.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-29

29. JOHN HEDGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , six silk handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Joseph Drake , in his dwelling house .

JOSEPH DRAKE . I am a linen draper in the Strand, in the parish of St. Clement's, Danes .

Q. On the 17th of November did you lose any

handkerchiefs - A. On the evening of the 16th I lost some handkerchiefs, how many it is impossible for me to say; several I lost, I do not know how many.

Q. From what part of the shop - A. From off the counter. The prisoner and another man came into my shop on the 16th, about ten minutes before nine o'clock, and asked the see some silk handkerchiefs; the prisoner was looking at some silk handkerchiefs as well as the other.

Q. Did the prisoner say he wanted to see silk handkerchiefs - A. Yes, he asked as well as the other; I heard him speak; I was in the middle of the shop; I went up to the top of the shop; I saw his companion take the handkerchiefs off a bundle, and put them under his coat, and run out of the door; I immediately called and said, stop thief. I laid hold of Hedger; I said stop, your companion has stolen some handkerchiefs,

Q. Had the prisoner Hedger offered to run away - A. He had offered to run away, his back was towards me; the other saw me coming. Hedger just made a move nearly before I seized him; he had not got one pace, he had only just made a move. I told him his companion had stolen some handkerchiefs; he was as bad, he had some handkerchiefs about him. He had none when the officer came in and searched him. He had been there a week before with his companion; I had seen him there. I suspected him the week before, they bought nothing. We were very busy; then they said, there was nothing that suited them. They had not an opportunity of suiting themselves, I suppose.

Q. Did he make any answer to you when he said he was as bad as his companion - A. He said he did not know him, he was a young man that he had met by chance, unfortunately he said, that evening somewhere at the west end of the town. I asked him what he was; he said, a chair stuffer. I went in pursuit of him, it was dark, I could not find him. I missed several handkerchiefs from the parcel; I am sure he took some handkerchiefs, I missed two pieces, one with four handkerchiefs in it, the other I do not know how many.

Q. Did you examine them before they were lost - A. I had not counted them.

Q. The man who took the handkerchiefs escaped - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner had nothing upon him - A. He had not; his companion, when he went out, said to him, I shall see you in the morning.

Q. You did not, count the single handkerchiefs, did you - A. No, I did not; I am certain I missed two pieces, one had four, and the other not less than two.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-30

30. ELIZABETH PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , in the dwelling house of Robert Denham , a bank note, value 10 l. his property.

ROBERT DENHAM. I am a coal merchant . I live in Broad-street, Carnaby Market, in the parish of St. James . The prisoner was my servant . She had lived with me about seven months. I missed the ten pound note the day after I received it. I received it on the 5th of September. I received change of Foster, Lovett, and Company, change of a check of forty-seven pounds, five shillings in four ten pound notes, a five pound, and a two pound.

Q, Had you taken account of the numbers - A. I had not. When I first received them I folded them together, and placed them in the middle of a pocketbook, which I put into my pocket; they were separate from other notes. On returning home it was rather late; in the afternoon I was going out, I placed the pocket-book in the iron closet, with the contents exactly as I received them, without opening the pocket-book, or examining it. The iron closet is in a room in the house; I locked the iron closet, and put the key in my pocket. I went out that evening, in a few minutes afterwards I came home, near twelve at night. I did not open the closet that night, I went to bed; the key of the iron closet I am certain was in my pocket when I went to bed. When I returned home, I found one of my children was not well, and when I went to bed I laid my coat down in the children's room, with the key in my pocket. The prisoner slept in a room beyond the children; she must pass the children's room to come out. About nine o'clock the next morning, I took the pocketbook out of the closet, and replaced it in my pocket. I found my coat in the children's room in the place where I put it. I found my coat in the same situation I had left it. I took the key out of the pocket about half an hour before I took the pocket-book out of the closet. I afterwards opened the iron closet with the key I found in my pocket. I put the book into my pocket, without examining it; I went out a little before eleven o'clock; I left the putting the bankers names on the notes; then I took out my pocket-book; I was at the lottery office, Somerset-house. I opened my pocket-book for the purpose of endorsing the notes with the bankers names. Immediately I took the notes in my hand, I perceived they were not folded up in the same way that I had left them. When I received them, I folded them altogether across, and then back again, to make them in a small compass. When I took them out at Somerset-house, the centre one was separate, folded by itself. The different position struck me; and I counted the notes instantly, and I found there were but thirty-seven pound instead of forty-seven pound. There were three tens, I had four tens. I returned home, and made enquiry of my wife, and also of the prisoner; I asked the prisoner particularly if she had seen or had got any thing of the kind of the ten pound note. She pretended total ignorance of the thing; she said she had not any thing of it. She then went down stairs to search about the sweepings of the room, to see if by chance it might be dropped there. She returned and said she saw nothing of it. As I had not counted the notes over, I was uncertain which way it could be taken; I had not counted them with my finger, I merely followed the cashier with my eye. With that I went to the bankers, Messrs. Foster and Lovett, to ascertain the

number of the notes. The cashier who paid me is here. He gave me the number and date of the note. I stopped payment at the bank; after that I took no further proceedings. When I went home I pressed it more closely to the prisoner the same day, I believe it was, I am not certain whether I charged her with taking the key out of my pocket. I think I charged her as closey as that; she so solemnly denied it. I felt I was doing her an injustice to suspect her at that time. I heard nothing of the note, and gave up all suspicion that it was her. On Tuesday, the 8th of the present month, it was in September I lost the note; she continued in my service. On the 8th of November a piece of a key was discovered in one of my drawers; the prisoner was out at the time I made the discovery; when she came home I asked to look at her keys, to see if it was any of the keys belonging to her. I was then determined the prisoner should leave my service. That circumstance induced me to give her warning. On the Saturday following she had warning to quit as soon as she could, or otherwise. On the Thursday following she was sent out on an errand in the evening, and I had business which led me out a few minutes afterwards. On my going out I found the prisoner instead of being in her errand, I found her in conversation with the witness Starr, he is a cobler that keeps a stall. I stopped to listen to their conversation. I thought I heard the witness Starr say, what can they do, unless they find it out. Her answer I could not make out, but I heard again, you must get a new ward to it. I then said to the prisoner, now do not idle your time here, I have heard all your conversation. She said she was speaking about boots; I said, boots do not want new wards.

Q. How long were you there - A. About three quarters of an hour; I went to Wigmore-street, and waited some time there, not more than three quarters of an hour; certainly I returned home, and found Starr and his wife standing at my door; I know no more. The prisoner was my only servant, she attended in the morning to get up the children, and to do what was to be done.

WILLIAM STARR . I am a shoe-maker; I have a stall about an hundred yards from Mr. Denham's house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I know she lived servant there, and I have worked for her.

Q. Do you remember her coming and leaving any thing with you - A. Yes, next Wednesday three weeks, I believe it is, I do not know the day of the month, between six and seven in the evening I believe it was, she came and rang the bell of the house where I live, and asked permission to come up stairs into my room; I met her on the stairs; she came into my room; my wife was there, no one else there; she said, she wanted to speak to my wife; she presented a little parcel tied up in a rag or silk, I do not know which; she said, it contained pawnbroker's tickets, and requested her to take care of them for her; I said to my wife take them, and take care of them for her; she said, her mistress made a rule to overhaul the servants boxes before they went away, she was going away on Saturday; on the next day she came again, she asked me to lend her eighteen pence, she came to my shop; I lent her the eighteen pence reluctently; she said it was to pay a score over at the public-house. I then requested my wife to look at the packet of tickets to see if they were worth the eighteen-pence; my wife opened the parcel in the evening; my wife told me there was a ten-pound note in it. I desired her to go, and fetch the girl directly; she went and knocked at the door; I saw the prisoner about half past eight o'clock, she came to me that same evening to where I was at work; when she came I said why did not you come sooner, I have lost these tickets, you must go with us, and stop the these things; I saw the girl was confused, and immediately somebody spoke to her at the door, whether it was Mr. Denham I cannot say. The girl said, if it was lost she must find it again, that is all the girl said. I said to the prisoner if there is any thing valuable in it, you must offer a reward. My wife went down with the packet to Mrs. Denham, and Mrs. Denham cut the note out; I never saw it opened.

MARY STARR . I am the wife of the last witness the shoemaker. I did not know the prisoner until a week before this accident, that is the first time I saw the girl. On the 9th of this month, she brought this packet, on that day she brought me a parcel, she said, she wished me to take care of it for her until Saturday night; she said, they were pawnbroker's tickets; she said she was going to leave her place on Saturday night, and her mistress looked over the servants boxes, she did not wish her mistress to see it.

Q. Did she produce the parcel to you - A. Yes, it was sewed up in a piece of linen cloth; I kept the parcel without examining it until Thursday evening, I examined it then by the request of my husband, he desired me to open it; on opening it I found a few pieces of paper, apparently a letter cut up as pawnbrokers tickets, there were no pawnbroker's tickets in it; on opening the linen further, I found a bit of whity-brown paper, and in that a ten-pound note; I directly sewed it up as near as I could to what it had been before. I went down, and acquainted my husband of it; he desired me to fetch the girl; I went and knocked at the door; the girl told me she could not come just then, she would come in half an hour. She came in half an hour after that; my husband told her he had lost the parcel; the girl appeared to be flurred. My husband asked me to go to her mistress, and ask her if she had lost any thing; the girl was gone then. I went to her mistress, and on getting to the door, I met the girl; she desired me not to leave the parcel with her master; I told her I wished to speak to her master and mistress. She again desired me not to shew it to her master; I said, how can I shew it him when I have lost it. I went the second time, the first time she was engaged, and could not speak to me; the second time I went into the parlour, I shewed the parcel in the presence of the girl, the mistress' father and mother; the mistress requested me to open it she gave me a pair of scissars to cut it open; the ten-pound note was in it. The mistress' father, told her she should go to the watchhouse directly;

her mistress took the note out of the parcel. The girl begged they would not send her to the watch-house, but to send her home to her own mother. That is all I heard pass. Mrs. Denham took the ten-pound note out of the rag herself; the patrole had it. That is all I know.

JOHN ROWTON . I am the father-in-law to Mr. Denham.

Q. Where you at Mr. Denham's house when Mrs. Starr was there - A. I was; I saw the parcel opened, and I saw the ten-pound note taken out by my daughter; she fainted away when she saw the note, she was surprised at the prisoner having it. I took the note afterwards, and then I called the patrole and delivered the note up to the patrole.

Q. Are you sure the note that you delivered to the patrole was the note that was taken out of the parcel - A. There was every probability of it. My daughter fainting, there was a deal of confusion; it was a ten-pound note to the best of my knowledge; my own daughter dropped it, Mrs. Denham, Mrs. Rowton took it up, and gave it me, to the best of my knowledge I gave the same note to the patrole, I saw no other; the note was looked at by the different people; the note was first in Mrs. Denham's hands, she fainted away, and dropped it, Mrs. Rowton took it up and I had it, and gave it to the patrole, it is the same note; I heard the patrole, I called him in.

WALTER KENNEDY . I am a patrole of St. James's. On the 10th of November, at half past eight in the evening, I was called in at Mr. Denham's to take charge of the prisoner. Mr. Rowton gave me the note, and the parcel; I delivered it to Mr. Hall, the constable.

MR. HALL. I am a constable. I received the parcel of the patrole; it is in the same state now as when delivered to me.

MR. DALTON. I am cashier at Foster, Lovetts, and Co's. banking-house. I have got the book here; I can speak nothing but from the book about this note; the entry in the book is my hand-writing. On the 5th of September last, I paid a draft of forty-seven pounds five shillings, drawn by a Mr. Ward to the name of Denham four tens, a five, a two, and five shillings, the first ten is No. 14403, the next 15299, the next 14464, 10288, in this book there are only the numbers; the dates are in another book; the enter of the dates are made by somebody else; I cannot speak to that myself.

Q. Look at the note produced by the constable - A. This appears to be one of them, it is the same number.

Q. What number - A. 15299, I can only speak to it by the number from the book; it was paid by me.

Q. to Mr Hall. What is the date of that note - A. 31st of May, 1814.

Q. to Prosecutor. You had not yourself looked at the numbers - A. No, I had not; I cannot say it is the note by any mark whatever.

Q. Now, the number of the notes in your pocket book, are they the numbers that Mr. Dalton has spoken of - A. Yes, 14493, 14464, 10288.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the note up when my master was at the play; my mistress told me to go into the parlour and pick up the bits of paper in the parlour, and under the chair where my master sat I picked up a note; a person came to the door, and asked me what I had in my hand; I said, a one-pound note; I did not know it was any more than a one-pound note, she had taken it out of my hand; she said you fool, it is a ten-pound note, keep it; I said no, I will return it to my master.

Q. to Prosecutor. What age are your children - A. The eldest is between six and seven.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and prosecutor, on account of her youth .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-31

31. THOMAS BALLS and JAMES SEAGRIM were indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain open field, near the King's highway, upon Thomas Partridge , on the 12th of November , taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. a chain, value 1 l. two seals, value 1 l. one watch-key, value 1 s. and sixteen shillings in monies numbered his property .

THOMAS PARTRIDGE . I have a little vessel of my own , called the Nancy, from Brighton to London. I am the master of her now, On the 12th of November I was at Mr. Street's. I left that to go home to No. 11. Popham-place, Islington. I came from Sun-street; I was going home. As I passed the Shepherd and Shepherdess , to go across the fields, that is my direct road home. When I came to the top of that place, there are five posts, and when I came up to a small house, I heard these people, they were going the same road as I was. There are two roads, one a gravel road, and the other not. When I came into the middle of the field, a tall man came from the right hand; he passed me; I looked at him; I did not like the look of him; he knocked me down; I up with my umbrella I had then to keep him off; I was not afraid of one man; before I could get my arm to strike him, I was pinioned by two more men. Seagrim, the man at the bar, put the pistol up to my head; he is one of the two men now at the bar.

Q. While you were pinioned by the man, what did that man to you - A. There were two men, that pinioned me; this was one of them, and that slapped the pistol at my head.

Q. Of the two men that pinioned you, Seagrim you, say was one - A. He was one.

Q. He held the pistol at your head - A. Yes; the other man who has has since got away, he came to me and demanded my money and my watch; I hesitated about it. When the man, who is now away said, damn you, none of your airs, if you do not deliver up your money immediately, you are a dead man. The man who has got away took my money, and this pistol this man kept at my hand the whole time. They tried to get the watch out; the chain broke.

Q. What money did they take - A. A half guinea in gold, a three shilling bank token, and an eighteen penny piece and a shilling, to the best of my knowledge. I lost my watch too; when my watch

chain broke, one of them said, damn him, out with it, or you are a dead man.

Q. Which of them said that - A. I think Seagrim mentioned that. I immediately unbuttoned the waistband of my pantaloons that I had on, in order that they might take the watch. They got at my watch: they did not leave me. I entreated of them not to hurt me. I told them I was a man of a very large family. A bludgeon then came over my head; I was knocked down; after seeing the bludgeon at my head, I forgot the pistol, and made a plunge and got away. I was knocked down.

Q. That was not Seagrim that knocked you down, was it - A. No, not Seagrim that knocked me down; than they left me on the ground.

Q. From first to last, how long might they be with you - A. I suppose ten minutes nearly, I cannot exactly ascertain the time.

Q. Did Seagrim stand behind you, or in the front of you - A. In the front of me.

Q. Was it dark or not - A. It was not moon light, nor it was not very dark.

Q. Had you been out long - A. I left my home in the morning; I came direct from Sun-street at ten o'clock.

Q. What distance was it from Sun-street to were this happened - A. About three quarters of a mile; it was not so dark but what I crossed out of a little puddle that laid just in the field.

Q. Did you make such observations of Seagrim as to be sure of him - A. I am certain of Seagrim, I am confident of him; I cannot identify the other man. I only know that there were three of them.

Q. Have you seen any of your property since - A. Yes; here are the seals in the hands of the pawnbroker.

JAMES GODDARD . I am a pawnbroker. I produce the seal.

Prosecutor. This is my seal, it is one of the seals that was on my watch that night I was robbed; the other seal I lost I had a good while, this four or five months. I am quite sure it is mine; it is a plain seal, and I have seen the key since; I believe one of the patrols has got it.

JOHN AVORY . I produce the key.

Prosecutor. I can swear to this, because it is broken; it has been broken some time, I have had it this twelvemonth, that was to the watch that night; I have seen no other part of the property.

Mr. Knapp. Then I am to understand from you, this seal there is no mark upon it that you know it by, it is a common seal with no impression at all - A. It is so common that I know that is the seal; I do not recollect that ever I saw such a seal.

Q. Now, the key you say, that is broken - A. I can swear that is my watch-key.

Q. I take it for granted, that you never saw these three persons before that night - A. No, I did not.

Q. This was about ten o'clock - A. It was about half an hour after.

Q. You tell me, it was light enough to see the person of a man - A. It was light enough to see a pistol at my head, and therefore I could see a man.

Q. You had no opportunity of knowing either of the men before - A. I never saw them before.

Q. Upon your solemn oath, can you take upon you to swear to a man you never saw before at ten o'clock - A. I saw a puddle of water so as to get out of the way; I could see a man to be sure; I could see water three or four yards before me.

Q. From the circumstance of your being able to discover a puddle of water, therefore you could swear to a man you had never seen before - A. I believe upon my oath that is the man that put the pistol to my head; I am certain I could see the man's face.

Q. Have you always been of that opinion that you could swear positively to the person of the man - A. I have, from the first time I saw him.

Q. Upon your oath, did you say so before the magistrate - A. I think I identified Seagrim; I do not pretend to identify the other. I think I said to the best of my recollection Seagrim was the person that held the pistol at my head.

Q. Upon your oath, before the magistrate, did not you say that you believed that he was the man - A. I said, I believed he was the man; I never deviated from that man, from the first time I saw him, I had no doubt at all of him.

Q. Am I to understand you that you never before the magistrate said you believed, and believed only he was the man - A. I do not recollect I said so; I am confident I never deviated from that man, from the first time I saw him.

Q. Did you say that you believed, or swore positively; did you use the term you believed him to to be the man - A. I had no doubt of his being the man; I never doubted of his being the man at the first onset before the magistrate, I said he was the man.

Q. How soon after the robbery was it that you were before the magistrate - A. On the Wednesday evening I think they were taken, and I think on the Thursday, the day after they were taken before the magistrate; the robbery was on Saturday; on Wednesday evening they were taken; I believed him to be the man when the officers took him in custody; I said before the magistrate that he was the man.

COURT. Partridge, looking at him now, have you any doubt of his being the man - A. I have no doubt at all of his being the man that put the pistol at my head.

JAMES GODDARD . The seal that I produced I took in of a man in pledge on the 16th of November.

Q. Are you right as to the day - A. Yes; it was neither of the prisoners that I took it in of; I gave the man that I took it in of a duplicate; the duplicate is here. I delivered the duplicate to the man who brought it.

John Avory . I produce the duplicate.

Mr. Goddard. This is the duplicate I delivered to the man who brought it.

Avory. And I produce a key; I took it out of Seagrim's right hand breeches pocket. I apprehended Seagrim in the middle of the Shepherd and

Shepherdess Field; William Wainwright was with me, on Wednesday the 16th of November, about a quarter past seven o'clock that evening, there were two others with him; I searched him; I found that key upon him; the key was in his breeches pocket, it was not fastened to a watch; I found a knife, combe-case and that pistol, loaded, in his left hand pocket, with powder and ball: I took the duplicate out of his breeches pocket also with the key to the best of my recollection; I have had the duplicate and the key in my possession ever since.

COURT. Now let Partridge stand up again. What kind of a pistol was it he held at your head, was it a pistol like that - A. Yes, it was.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I was out with John Avory . I took Balls in custody that same night, I took him to Somers Town watchhouse. I told him he must know who the other man was that run away out of the watchhouse; I asked him to tell me who that man was.

Q. You took Balls into custody - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make him any promise or threaten him at all - A. When I first apprehended him, I threatened him if he made any resistance I would shoot him. I said it would not make it the worse for him if he would tell me who the other man was, as I was confident he knew,

THOMAS MEYMEW. When I returned home, I understood one of the men had made his escape. I saw Balls, he asked me if I would have the goodness to fetch his wife. I asked him who the third man was; he said, he lived at No. 2, he said, he had held the man behind. I made him no promise or threat. I had left Wainwright about fifteen minutes. I had this conversation with Ball about twelve at night.

Q. to Wainwright. What time of the night was it you told Ball it would not be worse for him to tell you who the other man was - A. Nearly eight. There are two material witnesses here now.

GEORGE HODGES. I am a post-boy at the Westmoreland Arms, Westmoreland-place, City-road.

Q. Do you know any thing of the robbery - A. No. I do not.

Q. What have you come here to say - A. There were three men that looked like bakers that had beef steaks at our house; it was last Saturday fortnight.

Q. What time did they leave your house - A. About ten minutes after ten; the two prisoners were at our house about ten minutes after ten, they went away after that time with the third person. That is all I have to say.

WILLIAM NOON . I saw the two prisoners at the Westmoreland Arms; I went in there about nine o'clock, and took some steaks; them two men and another stouter was in there. I asked them if they knew any thing of the fighting men; they said, they did, and they knew the black fighting man. I went to my partner, and said, there were three men in there that I did not like.

Seagrim's Defence. I bought the pistol about six month ago; the landlady used to keep the pistol below stairs, we used to use it; by that means I kept the pistol up stairs. The week before I was robbed of fifteen shillings in mile End Road, on Wednesday evening, when these gentlemen took me, in consequence of my being robbed the week before, I put the pistol into my pocket, and when I came to Clerkenwell, the person that was to meet me there was not there. I went to Sadler's Wells; it was closed for the season; from thence I was coming home, and on my coming from Sadler's Wells I passed a person I never saw before to my knowledge. I asked the nearest way to Whitechapel. He said he was going to Hoxton; he would shew me the Rosemary Branch . We went across the fields; whether there was a path or not I cannot say; he took us to a gateway; in our going there these gentlemen immediately rushed upon us; and on the same day I was taken I met a person, he asked me if I would buy a bargain; he shewed me this seal and key; he told me I should have them for fifteen shillings; I said I had no such money in my pocket, I had only ten shillings. I gave him ten shillings for them, at the same time I was short of silver. I sent a person to pledge this seal for seven shillings; the person that I bought it off appeared to be in a sailor's dress.

Balls said nothing in his defence.

BALLS, NOT GUILTY .

SEAGRIM, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-32

32. JOHN MURPHY , alias GALE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , three hundred and twenty yards of woollen cloth, value 140 l. the property of Samuel Sutcliffe , in the dwelling house of Michael Guest .

SECOND COUNT for a like offence, the property of different persons, in the dwelling house of Michael Guest .

SAMUEL SUTCLIFFE. At the time this robbery happened. I was legat to Edward Oxsly , John Sutcliffe , and George Sutcliffe ; they are merchants; they live at Acton, in Yorkshire; their accompting-house and warehouse is in Basinghall-street, in the dwelling-house of Michael Guest , No. 49, Basinghall-street, in the parish of St. Michael Bassishew ; their warehouse is the ground floor of that house. I lost these things on the 15th of March, in the year 1813, the goods were taken out from there; I was not present at the time the lock was picked as I understand the porter secured the premises the over night; the porter is here. The goods were taken out; there were ten pieces of woollen cloth; the goods were taken out on the morning of the 15th of March, between the hours of seven and eight; the warehouse was secured on the Saturday night.

Q. Were you examined the last time - A. No, only as the prosecutor.

AARON BROOKS . I am porter to Mr. Sutcliffe. On the 13th of March, 1813, I locked up the warehouse on Saturday night; I left the warehouse about six o'clock at night. On Monday morning the 15th, I returned to the warehouse about half past eight in the morning, I found the warehouse door opened; I went into the warehouse, and saw ten pieces of cloth gone. I was in the warehouse when Harrison, the constable, came to me, and asked me if I had lost any pieces of cloth, he said if I would go with

him he would shew me where it was gone to. I went to a baker's shop in Grub-street, and in the one pair of stairs room there were Williams, Holmes, Hands, and the prisoner now at the bar, all four in the room; Harrison and me entered the room; Williams opened the window, and jumped out; Murphy followed him.

Q. Are you sure it was Murphy - A. Yes; I ran down stairs, and ran after Williams up Grub-street, and down a court, Williams fell down, and before he could get up again, I catched him; I got hold of the prisoner Williams; Murphy came past me in the court. I brought Williams back to the house, where I found the cloth. The other man escaped. Then Williams said he knew nothing about it. The property was secured afterwards. That is all I know about it.

Q. What were they doing with the cloth - A. Cutting it up; here are the ends here that they cut off. I know it was my master's property; it was worth about one hundred and forty pounds.

Mr. Knapp. Upon your oath sir, did you say whether you knew any of the other persons upon the last trial, when you was asked, did not you say no - A. I cannot say whether I said no or not; I rather think I did not say no.

Q. Did you ever know Williams before - A. No.

Q. Then you did not know Murphy was one of them at that time, you did not say any thing about him - A. I did not.

Q. How long is this ago, 15th of March, 1813, next March it will be two years - A. Yes,

Q. How long a time had you of observing the prisoner; you had never seen him before - A. No.

Q. So you mean to sware to the prisoner, you never having seen him before - A. Yes, because I saw him in the room, and I saw him afterwards.

Q. I ask you again, are you sure he is the man - A. Yes.

JAMES BARLOW . I am a porter. On Monday morning, the 15th of March, I was in Basinghall-street between eight and nine o'clock, I opened my employers warehouse, Mr. Yatherd and sons, it is near Mr. Sutcliffe's. I saw four men loitering about the street; I saw Holmes and Williams standing opposite of the warehouse where I live in discourse together, there were two more with them, but them two I could not get a clear sight of that; I cannot swear to either of them; the other two Holmes and Williams I did swear to.

Q. Look at the prisoner - A. I cannot speak to him. I saw Holmes with a blue great coat on; I saw Holmes pull the great coat off his back, and another man put it on; the man that put the great coat on was the man that first went into the warehouse; he came out with the cloth upon his shoulder; Holmes followed that man, and brought out cloth likewise; another man went in, a third; the fourth man went in while Williams he came out, and did not bring any cloth, Williams did not. The man that put the great coat on, had returned with the great coat off; he went in again, and brought out another piece of cloth. Harrison took the great coat in the room they went up afterwards, and he left the great coat in the room. They then left the street; I saw Harrison coming up the street; I called him over, and spoke to him; I told him that Mr. Sutcliffe's warehouse had been robbed. He went and found it had. Harrison went up into the room in Grub-street; he took Williams and George Hands . I identified Williams; I did not know George Hands . Holmes was taken shortly after; I knew him.

- ELKIN. I am a painter; I lived in Grub-street on the morning of the robbery. On Saturday, the 15th of March, I saw two men carrying cloth from Basinghall-street to Moor-lane.

Q. How many men - A. There were four to the best of my remembrance. I followed them after they passed me; they seemed to be in a great bustle; they went into a house in Grub-street, where they took some of the cloth in; the men carrying the cloth were Williams, Holmes, and Gale.

Q. Look at the prisoner - A. That is not the man Gale that I saw went into this house. Before I went into the house, I went to Harrison, he was not up; he said, he would come presently. I said, it was a business of consequence, you must come directly. Harrison got up, went with me; I shewed him the house, where the property was, and he went into Basinghall-street. Then we came back to the house in Grub-street; Harrison went first into the house in Grub-street, and Brooks; by the time I got up stairs two men jumped out of the window; Brooks ran down stairs, and I followed after him; we took Williams.

Q. How came you to know Stiles's name - A. I knew him by being at the house where I live; he did live in the same house with me.

Q. How long have you lived in that house - A. No length of time, more than a week, not so much as a month.

Q. You must know his person - A. I should know him if I was to see him.

Q. Then is not the prisoner the man - A. No; the man that jumped out of the window was a taller man.

Q. The man that you saw with the cloth one of them lodged in your house, that was Gale - A. Yes; that was not the prisoner.

Q. The man that you saw on the 15th of March in company with Williams, was a man of the name of Gale, who lodged in the same house with you - A. Yes.

Q. Now where did you both lodge - A. I lodged at the upper part of the house No. 16, Butler's-alley, in Grub-street.

Q. What is your landlord's name - A. Guillim; he keeps the Weavers Arms; the house is let out in tenements.

Q. On the 15th of March, did Gale lodge in that house - A. He did.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, do you mean to say the prisoner is not the man that lodged in that house - A. No, he is not.

Q. You know that man well - A. Yes, I know him well if I was to see him; when I came into the room up stairs in Grub-street, one of them had jumped out, and the other was in the act of jumping

out when I went into the room, and therefore I am sure the prisoner is not the man; the shop where these people was found was a baker's shop.

Mr. Knapp. You know nothing of the prisoner - A. I do not; I never was in company with the prisoner at all at no time.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am an officer. On Monday morning, the 15th of March, the last witness came to my house and called me; he told me there was a person of the name of Gale, and three others, carrying cloth through Honeysuckle-court, they brought it from towards Basinghall-street, and they took it to a baker's shop in Grnb-street. I went to Mr. Sutcliffe's, and found the warehouse had been broken open, I saw Aaron Brookes . I told him if he would go with me I would shew him where the property was. I went to the baker's shop where I saw Williams, Holmes, Murphy, alias Gale, and Hands, and another man. There were five in the room altogether. I laid hold of Williams; he pushed me from him, he jumped out of the window, and the prisoner Murphy followed him. Murphy is his right name. I cried out stop thief, and laid hold of Hands. Aaron Brooks ran out of the room, pursued, and in a little time he brought Williams back into the room. I searched the room; I found nine pieces of cloth in the room by the side of the bed; under the shop-board I found some paper and some string; and under the bed, between the mattras and the sacking of the bed, I found these pieces that had been cut off, and two great coats. I secured them; and on April the 7th, I apprehended Holmes. In April sessions, they were tried and convicted, and Murphy stood indicted. Holmes, Williams, and Hands, were tried together, and Murphy stood indicted. On Tuesday the 25th of October, I met the prisoner in company with a man of the name of Hunt, in Rose-lane, Spitalfields. I said to Hunt, how are you? The prisoner ran down Rose-lane, I ran after him. I said halloo, Jack, is that you; he said my name is not Jack; Johnson was with me. We took him in custody; he is the man that stood indicted.

Q. Are you sure that man you saw in the room is the prisoner at the bar - A. I am sure of it; I knew him before; he is a known thief. I am sure he is the man that was in the room; he has been to India since he lodged in Butler's-alley where the last witness stated. I am sure of him; I know the man well; people have been to me, offering me money to put it on one side. I have kept these pieces ever since; the whole of the property I gave up to the prosecutor.

Mr. Knapp. You said not one word about Murphy in the last trial. - A. I kept the secret to myself. I have looked for Murphy since,

Q. Have you never seen him since - A. Not to my knowledge, if I had I should have known him before.

Q. to Samuel Sutcliffe . Look at your property; - A. These were cut off the ends of the pieces; I measured them over and compared them; they agree with the original length of the pieces, I had the care of the goods; I was agent and salesman; I had them in my custody; the proprietors are in Yorkshire; these were all the ends of the goods; the value was about one hundred and forty pounds,

Mr. Knapp. Was this warehouse any part of the house - A. Yes, it was; Michael Guest lived there at that time; he is since dead. He was living there at that time; the warehouse is a part of his house, Mr. Guest lived over the warehouse; our accompting house is behind, and the warehouse is the bottom part of the house; they are the property of Edward Oxsley , John Sutcliffe , and George Sutcliffe , they were under my protection, and sent to me to he sold.

COURT. Q. to Brooks. You said you fastened the warehouse on Saturday night - A. Yes, the lock had been picked; by what I could see it was not damaged any.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of it as a child; I declare I know nothing at all about it. At the time this robbery was committed, I was on board an East Indiaman. I cannot say it was at the time, it was either before or after I was on board the Carnatic. When I returned home I heard I was indicted; I have seen the gentleman that took me in some of the public houses, and drank out of the same pot with him. He says I run away, he took hold of me by the collar, and called me Murphy; he said I was his prisoner, I went along with him.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 26.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-33

33. ANDREW CONOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , one pig of lead, value 15 s. the property of John Blenkarn , Matthias Prime Lucas , John Drinkeld , junior , Robert Smith , and Joseph Barber .

JOHN BLENKARN . I am a wharfinger at Custom-house Quay . On the 25th of November we had some pigs of lead upon the premises; I believe the quantity was twenty-nine pigs of lead of that description. My partners are Matthias Prime Lucas, John Drinkeld , junior, Robert Smith , and Joseph Barber .

JOHN BROWN. I am am officer. On Friday the 25th, about half past five, I was going down Thames Street; I passed the prisoner. He had something rolled round with a piece of canvas on his shoulder. I asked him what he had got; he told me a piece of wood; I told him I must see it. He took me to the public house the corner of Water-lane, and putting it down, said it was only a bit of lead; he said he found it in the street. I took the lead and left it in the bar, and the prisoner I took to the Compter. The next morning I went down to the prosecutor; it proved to be Mr. Blenkarn.

MR. BLENKARN. The lead is similar to what we have now on the premises; it was under our care. prisoner was an extra labourer to us.

Prisoners Defence, I picked it up in the street; I intended to leave it at the public house till morning to see if any body owned it.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined 3 months , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-34

34. MARY COOLEY was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 13th of September , is the dwelling house of Margaret Dunnally , twenty-eight pounds in monies numbered, a 5 l. bank note, and a 2 l. bank note , her property.

MARGARET DUNNALLY . I am a widow , I keep the Coach and Horses in Ray-street, Clerkenwell, in the parish of St. James's . I have been obliged to let my house, to pay my creditors.

Q. What was the prisoner, a servant of yours - A. She was a servant to me. I took her on the 30th of June last. On the 13th of September I called her up to do her domestic work, about seven o'clock; and while I was making the breakfast for the customers, she went up to make the beds. After I had made the tea for the customers, I called her to come to breakfast; she answered me she was coming. I waited a considerable time; I thought she was gone out after the pots. I put her breakfast on one side, and wondered why she went out. I went up in the servant's bed-room; I saw that her clothes were all gone. I ran down to the first floor; I said, Oh, Mary has run away, her clothes are all gone; I hope she has not robbed me. About an hour after that, I went up into my bed room, and when I got into the bed-room, a key that I had lost three weeks before was in the closet, and the closet door open; the key of the closet was is the door that I had lost three weeks before. The night before I had put all my money in the box in this closet, every pound that I had in the world, in a mahogany box in the closet; all the notes were taken away.

Q. How much money had you put away - A. I cannot tell exactly to one note.

Q. About how much money had you in the whole - In the first place. I think there was near forty pounds in the whole. I think there must be eight or ten pounds in silver.

Q. What number of bank notes were there, do you know - There were twenty-six one pound notes that I put by the last time, and a two pound note.

Q. How many had you put by before - A. I don't know. In the whole there was near forty pounds and eleven shillings, to the best of my belief. I sent directly for Read the officer; he found her mother that night; she had been out with her mother that day; she was not found for near two months after, and then my money was all gone; she had passed two notes in St. John's-street.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a linnen draper in St. John's-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner came to my shop to purchase some goods on the 13th of September. She purchased goods to the amount of twenty or thirty shillings; she offered me a two pound note in payment; she paid me in two one pound notes, I gave her the change; I gave the notes to the officer that night.

WILLIAM READ . I took the prisoner in custody on the 15th of November. I made diligent search after her, at last I found her in Dyot-street, St. Giles's. I questioned her what she had robbed her mistress of a large amount; she said she had taken only twenty pounds in notes, and about three or four pounds in silver. She said she gave one Freer half of it, she had none left. She had spent it all. Ann Freer was out of the way as well as the prisoner, until after I apprehended the prisoner. After that I apprehened Ann Freer , I took her to the office, I then asked the prisoner what she had been down to Bristol for, and what she had done with the notes. She said she had spent them all, and that all the money was gone. She said she was going to bring it back to her mistress, but Ann Freer told her she would not fare the better for returning it, so she kept it all. I was in search after the prisoner near two months; the prosecutrix was greatly distressed, and was obliged to leave the house. These are the two one pound notes I had of Mr. Hughes at the office.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Are them two notes yours - A. The notes are of my children's endorsing. These notes have been in my hands; they were locked up in the mahogany box; one is indorsed with the name of Richardson by my daughter, and the other is my daughter's indorsing with the name of Knowles; these notes were in my box.

Q. Now what time in the morning was it when she left your house - A. About half after eight.

Mr. HUGHES. She was with me on that day about half past eight in the evening.

Q. Are you sure she is the woman - A. She has got but one eye.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 14.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-35

35. JOHN CARROGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a pint and a half of Hollands, value 4 s. four pints of wine, value 12 s. and four bottles, value 18 d. the property of Edward Bland Carney and Thomas Carney .

THOMAE CARNEY. My partner's name is Edward Bland Carney . The prisoner was an occasional porter . On the 7th of November a little boy took a candle to look into the privy to find by what means the cat had escaped. He there saw a shelf under the seat of the privy, and ten bottles on the shelf. He came into his mother, and said there is a robbery going forward, and Mr. Carney ought to be acquainted with it. The prisoner came on Monday the 14th of November, to ask if we could employ him, and the man said there was no work to do. The prisoner then went to the privy; the housekeeper then discovered two bottles taken away out of the privy. We engaged him to work on Monday the 21st of November; that day passed without any bottles being taken away. On Tuesday evening he was observed to go to the privy about eight o'clock. On his return I called him into the accompting-house; the woman brought in word there were two bottles missing out of the privy. I sent for a constable; the constable took one bottle out of his pocket, and two out of his breeches. I had taken one out of his pocket previous to the constables's coming. One of the bottles contained Hollands, two red port wine, and one white wine, all drawn from the casks on tap.

- I am a constable. I produce one bottle of Hollands; there are four bottles in all; three out of the four I took from him; one out of his pocket, and two out of his breeches; down before him he had a leather apron on.

Prisoner's Defence. My master asked me what I

was going to do with the bottles; I said I was going to take them to the warehouse. He sent for a constable. I never intended to take them off my master's premises.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-36

36. JOHN PATTERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , one hundred and three yards of calico, value 8 l. and eighty-eight yards of calico sheeting. value 15 l. the property of Thomas Atkinson , George Delwyn , Edward Marley , George Mosely , and William Atkinson .

THOMAS ATKINSON . I live in Corbett's-court, Gracechurch-street. My partners names are George Delwyn , Edward Marley , George Mosely , and William Atkinson . I can only prove the property to be mine and my partners.

JOSEPH CUMMINGS . I am porter to Messrs. Atkinson, Delwyn, and Company. On the 26th of July, I took the package to the Custom-house to be sent by the Aberdeen packet. The Captain of the packet there refused to take it; he told me to take it to Chester Quay, and to put it on board the regular packet. The throng of carts being great, I could not go down to the quay; a cart stood in the street. I asked the man if I might put the bale in his cart for a few minutes. I then went down Chester Quay , to know the ship's name and the Captain's. I returned in a few minutes, and the truss was gone, that is all I know.

MATTHEW YATES . I am a carman. Cummings pitched the bale at the tail of my cart. He went down the gateway; and when he came back the truss was gone. I told him I did not know. Patterson had been walking about there, and several more.

MATTHEW COLNET . I am a potboy at the Ship-on-ground public house. I was down in the cellar at the Ship-on-ground, in Bear-lane. Patterson brought a parcel there, about half past nine o'clock in the morning; he told my master had given him leave to bring it there. He cut off the wrapper and gave me the wrapper, to make an apron of; he asked me if I could put the truss into the other cellar; one is a beer cellar, and the other a spirit cellar. I locked the cellar up, and mislaid the key somewhere. About half an hour afterwards I informed my master that it was smuggled goods; he did not seem to take any notice of it. It passed on until nine o'clock at night; two men came in and asked if Patterson had been there. I said no; about half past ten o'clock Patterson came in; he called for a pint of beer. I drawed it him; he asked me to go down and get the parcel in brown paper. I did; he walked out with it under his arm, he did not say any thing more to me till the next morning; he came into my bed-room, and asked me what I thought of the parcel; I said I thought it was stolen or smuggled goods, that is all I know about it.

Q. What became of the goods - A. Mr. Atkinson has got them; the wrapper went back with the things. When he gave me the wrapper, I cut off the marks and burnt them. I did it without a thought; there were the marks upon it.

WILLIAM COLTON. On the 26th of July, about five minutes after ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my house with a small truss; he asked me to let him leave it. I did. At about half after ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came again; he went into the tap-room, and called for a pint of beer, my lad drawed it him. He said he wanted one of those pieces in the spirit cellar. I took the key and went down with him; this parcel was open with several large paper parcels. I had no doubt then they were stolen. I thought it would be best to let him have one of these pieces then, and make an appointment with him to come the next morning. The next morning he was to come at six o'clock; I got up at four o'clock; I went to get a constable, I could not find one. I found the truss belonged to Atkinson and Delwyn, Corbett's-court; Mr. Delwyn found the truss first.

ANTHONY HARRISON . On the 29th of October I took the prisoner into custody. I found this bale in Mr. Golton's wine cellar; one piece in the truss had been taken out; the wrapper we had of the pot-boy; he said he burnt the piece that had the name on it.

Mr. Atkinson. I know the goods to be our property, every thing but the wrapper; I cannot swear to that particular, because the marks are cut out. There is one piece of the bale missing.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-37

37. WILLIAM PERRY and HENRY WESTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November a box coat, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Thomas Jarvis , esq.

RICHARD HORLEY . I am coachman to Thomas Jarvis , esq. he resides in Russel-square . On the 9th of November, I put up the carriage in the coach house; I left the box coat on the box; the coach doors were not shut too; I saw the box coat about half past one; I missed it a little before three from off the box of the carriage. I saw the coat again the same night, it was brought to our house.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer. On the 9th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Compton-street, I there saw the two prisoners and a Jew with a pocket-book in his hand, it appeared to me he had a bank note in his fingers, he was just taking a note out of his pocket-book, and by the side of the jew I saw a large bag twisted up, and a great coat laying by the side of that, it was laying between the prisoners and the the Jew. I knowing the prisoners, I asked them what they were doing with the Jew; they replied, they were buying a jacket of the Jew; by that reply, the Jew shut up his pocket-book, and put the bit of paper in his pocket-book what he had in his fingers, and put the pocket-book in his pocket; he took up his bag, and put it on his shoulder, without saying a word. I asked him whose

great coat that was, that he was leaving behind; he said, that coat the two prisoners offered him for sale; he said that five or six times in their hearing, he was about purchasing it; they denied the great coat. The Jew said it was a bad lot, he would have nothing to do with it. I took the two prisoners to Bow-street office, and the coat. By enquiry I found the coat belonged to Mr. Jarvis.

JAMES JOYCE . My father lives in Compton-street, nearly opposite of the spot where this transaction took place. I observed a Polish Jew walking by my father's house; behind him were the two prisoners, one of them had the coat on his arm, and when I got to the door, I saw the officer having the coat; when he had got the coat, the prisoners said nothing, neither of them. I am sure the prisoners are the same men.

Perry's Defence. I saw this Jew with the his bag on his shoulder; I asked him if he had got a fustian jacket to sell; he said, he had a velveteen jacket, he could shew it me, he put his bag down in Compton-street, he put the coat out of the bag; he said come a little further, carrying this coat when Godfrey came up; I told him to take the Jew; I had never seen the coat before.

Weston's Defence. I was coming by when the Jew and this man had conversation together. The officer took me as well as Perry.

WESTON, GUILTY , aged 28.

PERRY, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-38

38. CORNELIUS CRAWLEY was indicted for that he, on the 20th of August , upon George Dixon , feloniously did make an assault, and that he with a certain iron poker, him, the said George Dixon , with malice aforethought, did strike and beat, thereby giving to him in and upon his head one mortal wound, and fracture on his scull of which he languished until the 22nd of September, and then died, and so the Jurors say, that he, Cornelius Crawley , the said George Dixon , did kill and murder .

CATHERINE RAINE . I am the wife of Edward Raine ; I live in Vine-street, at the back of Chandois-street . Catherine Hall lodged at my house; the prisoner cohabited with her.

Q. On Saturday night, the 20th of August, did you observe any persons come home - A. Yes, I did not see them; I heard the feet of two people going backward. Catherine Hall lodged in the one pair back room. I heard two people go through the house to the back part. Shortly after I saw Crawley come home; I only saw him go through the passage, and by the time that he had got up stairs, I heard a great noise; I listened at the noise, and very gently; I heard the voice of Catherine Hall cry out, pray do not; I heard her voice plainly, though I was in another room; I called my husband; I went towards the stairs, with intent to go up the stairs; I found the deceased about two or three stair up; he appeared as if he had just fell, or had been thrown down; I cannot say which; he seemed to be coming forward then; when I came to him he complained of his right arm. I saw him bleeding on the right side of his head; he got hold of my hand, and while I was attending to the deceased, the prisoner Crawley came down stairs, and seemed desirous of passing; the stairs being narrow, he could not get down without stepping over the young man; I looked up, and said it is you that has done this; he went away as quick as he could, and never offered any assistance; there is but one access to the house; he went out the way that he came in. I called to my husband to secure the door, and not to let him out. When my husband came, I said, do not let Crawley out; I believe he has killed the young man; my husband secured the door.

EDWARD RAINE . I am the husband of the last witness.

Q. Did you observe these persons come home before Crawley come home - A. I could not. I heard the noise up stairs. I did not hear Crawley come home.

Q. Where were you when you heard the noise - A. In the front kitchen; the noise was at the back of the house. My wife was in the room over my head; she ran backwards and alarmed me, by saying that Crawley was doing some violence, and desired me to secure the street door; I ran to the street door with the light in my hand, and bolted it; I ran to my wife at the back of the house.

Q. Had Crawley escaped before you had fastened the street door - A. I cannot say; we did not meet. When I got to my wife, the deceased was in the passage upon his hands and knees; he was bleeding on the left side of his head. I immediately enquired where the prisoner was, and finding he was out of the house, I ran up stairs, and saw no one in the room; Catherine Hall was not in the room. I never found her until after she was taken. By this time the street door was opened; the watchman and I took the young man to Mr. Morris, the surgeon, in Chandois-street; I never could discover how Crawley got away; I never saw him that night at all. I afterwards went into Catherine Hall's room; I found the poker on the floor; there was a quantity of blood on the floor, and among the blood was the poker broken in two pieces. This is the poker; I gave it to Clements, the constable; he now produces it; I took the poker from the blood; I did not examine it; it must have been bloody.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mrs. Raine. After you had found the deceased, did you see Catherine Hall - A. Yes, I went up to her; she was sitting upon the bed in her room.

Q. Was that after your husband took the young man to the surgeon - A. I cannot say; she wanted to stop in the room; I obliged her to go away.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I was constable of the night. That poker was delivered to me; it has been in my possession ever since. I produce it here to day.

JOSEPH HEDLEY . Q. You are an assistant to an apothecary - A. Yes, to Mr. Morris, No. 8, Chandois-street, Covent Garden. On the night of the 20th of August, the deceased was brought to our house, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the man appeared in a state of stuper; I conceived at the time proceeded from a blood vessel being broken.

I examined the head, and found a wound about two inches in length on the right side of the head.

THOMAS DIXON . I am the father of the deceased, his name was George Dixon . On the night of the 20th of August, he was brought home to my house, he was not very sensible; he made no answers when I spoke to him; there was blood running from him at the time; he appeared to be dreadfully wounded; this was done on Saturday, and the next Friday he went to St. George's Hospital; he died at the Hospital. I live in Charles-court, about a mile and a half from Vine-street.

SYDNEY CHOPPING. I am a surgeon; I attend at St. George's Hospital. The deceased was brought to St. George's Hospital on the 26th of August, in the afternoon, I examined his head; I found a contused wound, about three inches in length: it appeared to be done by a blunt instrument; he continued in the Hospital a month; his symtoms were at one time relieved; it returned with a considerable violence, his head was examined two or three days after he came in, an inscission was made through the wound to the bone to examine the scull; I found the scull was fractured; the bone was deprest over the brain.

Q. How long did he continue before he died - A. In the space of a month an inflamation ensued from the violent contusion given to the scull; he died in consequence of the violent contusion which gave the fracture. I opened the head, the abscess was found in the substance of the brain; during the time he was in the Hospital I saw him every day; I did not communicate to him that he was in danger. I should suppose he was expecting his dissolution by the violence of his symtoms.

Q. About what time did he consider himself in danger - A. He was in great danger of losing his life when he came into the Hospital.

ELIZABETH DIXON . I am the mother of the deceased.

Q. How soon after your son was brought home did he recover his senses so as to talk to you rational - A. The next day; he remained to talk rational until he was to the Hospital.

Q. Do you know from any thing he said to you, whether he was then expecting to live or to dye - A. He was in hopes he should live then. I visited him every day after he was taken to the Hospital.

Q. At any time did he express to you that he should dye - A. He said the violence of the blow would be his death; he often said, he never should get through it, after the first three weeks.

Q. Did he converse with you about the manner in which he had received his hurt - A. Yes, he told me only once, that was the day after it was done.

ANN HANSON . I am one of the nurses of St. George's Hospital. I had the care of the deceased.

Q. Did you ever learn from him in what manner he came by his hurt - A. Yes, sir; the last time he informed me was a week before his death; he repeated it several times to me.

Q. When he repeated this to you, did he consider himself a dying man - A. He did, more than once or twice.

Q. How do you know he considered himself a dying man - A. He frequently said he knew he should never recover it; that appeared to me to be the impression of his mind from my constant attending him when he first came in the Hospital; he said, nurse, I don't think I shall trouble you long; he was in his perfect senses when he said this, and after the inscission was made in his head, he continued in saying he should never recover; in about a week he satisfied me clearly that he expected he should dye; it to be the settled conviction of his mind from the first time of his coming in to his death; he told me he was going home. He told me he met Catherine Hall as he was going home, she asked him where he was going; he told her he was going home. She said, do not go home, come with me; he said, he would rather not. She prevailed upon him, and he went; he had not been in the room but a short time when Crawley came in; Crawley as soon as he saw him, took up the poker, and struck him a blow, and the blow knocked him down; when he recovered himself, he found himself on the stairs; from that he was taken to the surgeons, and remained at home for six or seven days, then he was brought to St. George's Hospital. I asked him whether he had given Crawley any blow, or had any words with him; he told me no, he did not give him time to do it.

Q. On what day did he die - A. I cannot say the day of the month; he was a month within one day at the Hospital. He told me he had not drank any thing.

THOMAS CAVE . I am an officer. I and Solomon apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of November, at Perkins's Rents, Pie-street, Westminster. He was in bed with Catherine Hall, about eight o'clock in the morning. I afterwards took him in a coach to Bow-street Office. As we were going along, he said the hand-bill was a bad description of him; it was right only in the age.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

CATHERINE HALL . In August last, when this affair happened, I lived in Vine-street. I met the deceased in the Strand. The prisoner at that time entirely lived with me. The deceased knew me before Crawley knew me. When I met him, he asked me if I would go and drink; I told him yes, and thanked him. We went to Mr. Davis's in the Strand, and had a glass of rum apiece. As we came out of there, he said will you go and have any more. I said I thank you, George. He said we will not go into Davis's, we will go into Monday's, the Scotch Arms, in Round-court. We went there, and had a glass of rum again. When we came out of there, he said Kit, I shall go home with you; I told him it was a thing I was not allowed to do to go with any one that knew Crawley.

Q, Did he know Crawley - A. Yes, he knew from the time that I first lived with him.

Q. Did he know where Crawley was - A. Yes, he said he said he could go home with me, Crawley was not at home, or else I should not have been out.

Q. How long had you been in the room before Crawley came in - A. Not a moment; Crawley came home immediately. When Crawley came in, the door was not fastened. Crawley said to Dixon, what do you here; go down stairs. Dixon said, I shall not; what for? Crawley said, I will tell you what for; Crawley struck Dixon with his fist, and knocked him towards the fire-place. Dixon, on getting up seized the poked, and immediately struck Crawley on the head, or the back part of the neck. Dixon struck at him again with the poker; Crawley avoided the blow; Dixon with force only struck the wainscot, and the poker fell out of his hand. I picked up the poker, and laid it on the table. Crawley catched hold of the poker, and struck Dixon back handed at the back part of the head as Dixon was making out of the door; I said then, pray do not, endeavouring to part them by speaking. Dixon directly went out of the room; I never saw him after. The landlord and landlady said Crawley should not stop there, and then he went away; I staid until I took out my things that I had there, and then I went out of the room. Mrs. Raine told me to go away, she said, she had no objection to me, but Crawley would come where I was, and then I went away. When Crawley was taken, he was with me in Perkin's rents, Pie-street; I went before the magistrate and was examined.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him the character of a mild disposition.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-39

39. WILLIAM SMITH and STEPHEN CURRAN were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 25th of November , in the King's highway, upon Richard Herler , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a pocket-book, value 2 s. his property.

RICHARD HERLER . I live at North Fleet, in Kent; I am a lighterman and waterman .

Q. Do you remember being at a public-house below east Smithfield on Friday night the 25th of November - A. Yes, I was by myself, no person was in company with me, there was one companion when I first called in a captain of another vessel, his name is John Nowland .

Q. How long did he stay - A. About a quarter of an hour, then he left me. I took no notice of any one in the public-house.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoners before - A. Yes, I know them both. They followed me about ten yards from the public-house, I did not notice them in the public-house; I did not see them sitting in the tap-room. They followed me about ten yards from the public-house; they came and hustled up against me.

Q. Had you missed any thing - A. No, not at that present time.

Q. When was it you first missed your pocket-book - A. After they passed me a minute had elapsed when I missed my pocket-book; I had felt my pocket-book after I got out of the public-house, before these men came up to me.

Q. Had the men entered into conversation with you - A. No.

Q. You gave a very extraordinary account upon a former occasion? You talked upon a former occasion that you entered into conversation with them for several minutes? Were you tipsy - A. No.

Q. They followed you out of the public-house - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see them come out of the public-house - A. I did, they came out of the public-house.

Q. I believe you stated before, you observed them sitting in the tap-room, when you went out they followed you? You give a very different account now to what you did before? Did you observe them in the tap-room - A. I cannot say; I saw them come out of the public-house.

Q. Did they enter into conversation with you upon different subjects - A. They did.

Q. You never said a word about their husting you in the deposition to the magistrate, you observed you missed your pocket-book after they jostled against you - A. Yes.

Q. Then they had been in conversation with you had they - A. Yes.

Q. And then they jostled by you - A. They did.

Q. That is all you observed - A. Yes.

Q. And then you missed the pocket-book; and after you missed the pocket-book what then - A I followed them to Virginia-street, it is about twenty yards from the house; when they got to Virginia-street, I challenged them with having my pocketbook; they denied it with abuse, and one of the two prisoners knocked me down.

Q. Which of them was it - A. I believe it was the prisoner Curran, and then they ran away. I came up to them again at the lower part of Virginia-street, one of the two prisoners cried out give it him twice; they turned round, and knocked me down again the second time.

Q. Were they acting together - A. They were both concerned together.

Q. Do you know who struck you this second time - A. I believe it was the prisoner Curran.

Q. Then it was Smith that said give it him - A. I believe it was.

Q. You found Smith afterwards in the watchman's custody - A. Yes, after I got up the second time; I called out watch I found Smith in the custody of the watchman.

Q. What was there in your pocket-book - A. A brigs register, and other papers not of any value.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a watchman. On the 25th, between ten and eleven, I heard the rattle spring; I saw the prisoner Smith running; I pursued him, and took him; when I secured him, he said, do not stop me, I have not got it, I have done nothing. I said why do you run if you have done no harm; the prosecutor came up, and gave charge of him. The prosecutor went with me to the watch-house. I asked Smith if he was sure the other prisoner

had got the pocket-book; he said, yes he had got it, he saw him take it; he told me where he might be found.

JOHN STIRLING . I am an headborough, I was in the watchhouse. Smith said he was innocent of the crime; the other person had got the pocketbook, he called him his shipmate; he said to Jackson my brother officer, you will find him at the Brown Bear in East Smithfield; I went there. We came back to the watchhouse, and interogated Smith where Curran lodged; he said in Well-street, Wellclose-square; we went there, and found him in bed; we accused him of the robbery; he denied it; we searched the room.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an headborough of St. George's in the East. I was in company with Stirling. The account he has given is correct. Smith said he did not take the pocket-book, nor knock the gentleman down, it was Curran that knocked him down, and had got his pocket-book.

COURT. Q. to Prosecutor. What was the value of this pocket-book - A. Two shillings.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 17.

CURRAN, GUILTY, aged 21.

Of simple larceny .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18141130-40

40. GEORGE M'MANUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , eighty-seven yards of woollen cloth, value 8 l. the property of James Brown , privately in his shop .

JAMES BROWN . I am a slop-seller , in the Hamlet of Ratcliffe, in the parish of St. Dunstan's Stepney . I lost a piece of cloth containing eighty-seven yards; I missed it about five o'clock on the afternoon on the 14th of November.

Q. When had you seen it before - A. About two or three hours before, it was at a distance from the the door of nine or ten feet within the shop, on a bail of cloth.

Q. How soon did you see it again - A. We did not learn of it being stopped until the next morning, and in possession o! one of the officers, his name is James Simmonds ; it is here.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner in your shop - A. No; I was out the early part of the morning; I went out between the time I saw the piece of cloth and the time I missed it; there are always three or four people in the shop, the shop is never left.

Q. Look at that piece of cloth, are there any marks upon it that enables you to speak to it - A. Yes.

JAMES SIMMONDS . I am a patrole of St. Botolph Aldgate. I stopped the prisoner in King-street, Tower Hill, about half after seven in the evening, I asked him what he had got; he said, a piece of cloth. I called another patrole to lay hold of him, while I took the bale of cloth; he got away from me; I saw the prisoner get away, he ran, but not far before he was taken again; he ran apparently as fast as he could; I saw him taken, and brought back; I am sure the man that my partner brought back, was the same person. At the watchhouse, the prisoner told me he picked it up in Blue-coat-fields.

Q. How far is the place where you stopped him to Mr. Brown's shop - A. About a mile and a half. In the watchhouse he told me a man asked him to carry it for him, he could not tell me who the man was. When I stopped the prisoner there was another man in company with him; when I stopped the prisoner that man made off, he ran off directly I stopped the prisoner with the load.

Q. It is a heavy load, is it not - A. Yes. it is a pretty good load.

Q. to Prosecutor You had not seen the prisoner about your shop at all, had you - A. No.

Q. What is the value of the cloth - A. Between nine and ten pounds; there is my shop mark upon it; I can swear positively to it being mine.

Q. It is very bulky? Could it be taken out of your shop without your people seeing it - A. I suppose it must be taken from the shop when there was a crowd of people in it; we had several bales opened that day. There are two cutters continually in the shop. The piece of cloth was missed by my brother, I was up stairs at the time.

Q. Have you any reason to suppose that any of the people in the shop saw it taken away - A. No, I am convinced it was not seen to be taken away.

Q. It is bulkey and weighty; if any of your people had seen it they must have been able to overtaken any body that had taken it - A. Yes, they must.

Q. Is the bulk and weight such that one man in the way it was folded up might take it - A. He might take it himself; it was heavy; he might take it under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up from the West India Dock, a man asked me to carry it; I was stopped by the patrole; that is all I know about it; the man was to give me eighteen-pence for carrying it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-41

41. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November . in the dwelling-house of Ann Young , widow, two shirts, value 5 s. a 40 l. bank note, and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of John Bennett .

JOHN BENNETT . I am a seaman ; I lodge at No. 3, Redcross-street , at Mrs. Young's, she lives and sleeps at No. 3, and she occupys No. 16.

Q. Has she any apartments for herself at No. 16 - A. That I do not know.

Q. Do you remember at any time missing any of your property from No. 3 - A. Yes, on the morning of the 11th of November, I missed forty-five pounds in notes, between seven and eight in the morning; my box was removed from my room, and taken into the yard; I found the box again in the yard, there were some notes and some clothes left in the box; two shirts were missing from the box, there were taken out of my box forty-five pounds, and two shirts.

Q. Do you know the number of any of the notes - A. Yes, I do.

Q. How do you know the number of the notes - A. I received the notes in Lombard-street, two forty pound notes and a five-pound note a day or two before; I had also the numbers on a piece of paper.

Q. What were the number - A. 40865; I wrote this at the bankers.

Q. Since you lost them, you went to the bankers and enquired - A. Yes.

Q. You did not know the numbers until they told you - A. No.

ANN YOUNG . I am a widow.

Q. You occupy some houses, which you let out in lodgings - A. I have, No. 16, and No. 3, in Redcross-street, at No. 3, I have four rooms I rent; I sleep in one myself; the house is let out in different tenements.

Q. Is there a separate entrance - A. Yes, it is like a double house, I have got two lower rooms, and two one pair rooms. I have two rooms on each side of the house; the man that lives next door to me has the two upper rooms. I let out these rooms to seamen; in one room I have got a man and his wife, there is a passage and a pair of stairs; there is separate doors to the rooms on the staircase. They do not go through one another's rooms, they all go separate. I let out three of the rooms, and one I keep for myself for my bed-room. The room that I let to a man and his wife, they find their own goods. I let that room by the week, and lodgings by the week, or by the night. Bennett lodged in one the lower rooms, and paid me weekly.

Q. Had he the whole room - A. No, I had two beds in it. Two men slept in each bed. Bennet slept with another man, and paid me so much weekly.

Q. Were you at any time alarmed that any of the lodgers had been robbed, - A. Yes, on the 11th of November, between seven and eight in the morning I heard one of my lodgers say to Jack, you went out at one o'clock in the morning, and left the door upon; I had let him in at two o'clock in the morning, I said let me see what you got. One of the men said, we have got a robber, I sent for an officer; I said, see what this man has got. I give charge of him to you. I took one shirt out of the prisoner's hand, and one from under his arm. I sold these shirts to Bennett when he came from sea; I am quite sure of this shirt. I had washed it for seven years.

Prisoner. When I came into the passage, she picked up these shirts; she said, these shirts, you rascal, were under your arm. - Mrs. Young. - A. No, the white shirt I took out of your hand, and the coloured one from under your arm.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable, On the 11th I was sent for to Redcross-street; the prisoner was given in my charge. I searched him, and found nothing upon him. Forty-five pounds was given to me by a man that is here; a forty pound note and a five pound note. The man said he took them out of his hand. Laws took them out of his hand.

DANIEL LAWES . I live in Redcross-street, No. 17. I was alarmed about half past seven in the morning. I came down stairs; I heard there was a robbery. I went to No. 3; I thrust the door open, and found the prisoner in the passage. I took out of his hand a forty pound note, and a five pound note. I gave them to Tunbridge the constable; the prisoner said he had no notes at all; me and another man forced his hand open, and took the notes out of his hand.

TURNBRIDGE. These are the notes.

- Bennett. I lost a forty and a five pound note. They were such notes as these. I am certain of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I came into the house with three or four other lodgers. We had been down to the Dundee Arms; the others went in; I went to the Bee-hive; I remained at the Bee-hive until three o'clock in the morning. One of the lodgers said to me, Jack, what did you leave the door open in the morning? I said I did not; there were two shirts in the corner of the passage. She said, I was the man that robbed the chest, and took them out. Laws just entered the house. I had not been there all night. I am a stranger in London.

Q. to Mrs. Young. What is the value of these shirts - A. Five shillings; they are worth more than that.

Q. What parish is this house in - A. St. Botolph , Aldgate, in the lower precinct.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18141130-42

42. JOHN ANGLER and JAMES BURRELL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Sadd , about the hour of three in the night, of the 19th of October , and stealing therein a copper boiler, value 2 l. a pair of plated candlesticks, value 2 l. a pair of snuffers, value 7 s. a snuffer stand, value 2 s. a shawl, value 2 l. a pair of boots, value 10 s. a pelisse, value 2 l. a carpet, value 10 s. two petticoats, value 10 s. two gowns, value 10 s. a table-cloth, value 5 s. a cheese, value 3 s. two waistcoats, value 5 s. and a towel, value 3 s. the property of James Sadd .

JAMES SADD. I live at 89, Norton-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone .

Q. Were you alarmed any night - A. Yes, by the barking of the dog on the 20th of October. I heard the clock strike four, when the noise subsided.

Q. You did not get up at the barking of the dog. did you - A, No, I got up at six o'clock: it was then break of day only. Upon my getting up, I came out of the two pair room, where I lodged. I found my door open, the window thrown up in the area, and a pannel in the shutter cut out. I observed the area window the over night; it was fastened by a centre bar by myself. The window was thrown up; a pannel of the shutter cut out, and the shutter loose. I lost a pair of plated candlesticks, snuffers, a Stilton cheese. On coming down stairs I missed a carpet out of the room, a table-cloth from the kitchen, and other things.

Q. What day was this - A. Thursday the 18th of October. On the Sunday following I saw some of the things at the Giles's. I saw the prisoner Angler in custody on the the Thursday following after the robbery. He told me he understood I was the person

he had robbed; he begged me to shew him mercy; he cried, and told me voluntary, what I will tell you. I said nothing to him by way of promise or threat. He said, Mr. Sadd, I throwed your house open. I quieted your dog, but did not hurt her. I saw your parrot's cage go over. I did not molest the bird. I also laid my hand on your son; I did not hurt him, I only frightened him.

Q. Was your son in the house at the time - A. Yes, sleeping in the parlour. He told me what room my son slept in. He also heard, he said, a gentleman call my son up a four. I did not get up. I said my dog was in the habit of barking. I was not well; I would not get up.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am a constable. On the 20th of October, in the evening, Chipnell the watchman was standing at the top of George-street, Bloomsbury, and about one o'clock in the afternoon, James Burrell came and said. Furzeman, I want you to go with me.

Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes; he said he knew where there was a copper, candlesticks, and other things. As we were going along he said, I will tell you more of it. I have left a young man in care of them until I come back with an officer. As he was going going to where these things lay, he said Jack Duelay , meaning the prisoner Angler, was the man that robbed the house, but he did not say what house. We went on until we came to Burton Crescent, in Bloomsbury, and when we came to Burton-street, I saw the young man he had put in possession of the goods until he came. I went down the area of an unfinished house, where the things lay. A young man was there in the vault of the area. I found a carpet covered over beds, candlesticks, and other things. I took possession of the things, and brought them away. Burrell assisted me in bringing the things to my house.

Q. Who is the other man - A. His name is Chipnell, a man who is not apprehended; the things are here, I have kept them ever since. After I had got the things home, I went in search of the prisoner Angler, and the house that had been broken open. On the Wednesday morning the patrole took Angler and brought him to the watchhouse. After he was locked up, I went to him and asked him what he thought of himself? He said he did not know. I asked him whether any body was with him. He said nobody. I asked him who put his hand over the child's face? he said he did himself; he said he brought the swag (meaning the things out of the house) himself, and brought them to a public house in Dean-street. Then he said, they wanted to do him out of the whole. I asked him who he meaned by they? He said, Burrell and Chipnell. That is all I know.

COURT. When Burrell came and told you, did he tell you any part he took himself - A. No, he did not.

Mr. Alley. Did not he tell you, who the true owner was, in order that the true owner might have them; Burrell was at liberty for a week after he gave the information, was not he - A. He was; I saw him several times. I am of opinion he had not any hand in it.

Q. Have you any reason to suppose that Burrell did more than give you information, he supposing Angler had done wrong - A. I never heard any thing against Burrell in my life: I have known him a good while.

WILLIAM LANE . I am a publican, in Dean-street. On the 20th of October Angler brought a bundle to my house, about a quarter past six in the morning. I shewed him the porter's block; instead of his putting it on the block, he put it under my window. He asked my wife to let him put it into my house. He left it there; they were fetched away when I was absent. Angler desired to leave them at my house, until he had an opportunity of taking them away.

Angler. A person of the name of Jack put it on the pitching-block and ran away.

Lane. Angler brought it there himself.

- CHIPNELL. When Burrell came, and gave me information I was at Swallow-street, Burrell requested me to call upon Furzeman; he said, I am afraid I shall be transported; I said why should you be afraid of being transported when you had nothing to do with it; he said Darkey, the blind man, robbed the house. Burrell is a watchman; he was not on duty that night.

JOHN FURZEMAN , JUNIOR. When John Angler was taken in custody; I saw my younger brother talking to him; Angler said, Burrell, the watchman, wanted to hang him, he said, d - n my eyes, if I do not tuck and spring them; then I went and spoke to him, he said to me for God Almighty sake ask the magistrate for me to turn King's evidence. I asked the magistrate whether he would grant him that favour; the magistrate had him into a room by himself; I do not know whether he granted him that favour or not.

BENJAMIN WYATT . I took Angler myself; I knew him by living in the neighboured, and when I saw him I took him to the watchhouse.

Furzeman. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. Among the articles I found my wife's wearing apparel, I know it to be hers, the two gowns were in my house that night; these two plated candlesticks I know to be my own property, they were in the first floor upon the mantle-shelf; this is my wife's boot; they took one, and left one, a snuffer and tray, I believe to be mine, I had such a one; the copper is mine; it formed part of the machinery in my business; I am a soda-water manufacturer, and the other things are the description of the things that I lost.

Angler's Defence. About a week before this robbery happened, this Jack had a jack ass and hampers, he said, he went up to a door, he saw a person put a stone bottle with some brandy in it, into a hole in a wall, he said, he would go and get it, he went into the vault; he found this bottle, instead of brandy, it was oil of vitriel, and when he got into the house there was a bird in the house, that frightened him; he said, he believed it was a thrush; he came home, and went out again about four o'clock; he then went into the house of Mr. Sadd; he said the dog barked in the kitchen; he hit the child over the face. I never was in the place; I have been stone blind four years and a half, and

just come out of St. Luke's workhouse.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Sadd. What he told you was it in the watchouse - A. That was in Marlborough-street.

Q. Did he speak of having done these things himself - A. He told me he did it himself when my house was robbed.

ANGLER, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 37.

BURRELL, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-43

43. THOMAS TASSELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Baker ; about the hour of twelve in the night of the 3d of November , and stealing therein a towel, value 3 d. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. a shift, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a shirt, value 3 s. a sheet, value 3 s. a wrapper, value 6 d. nine books, value 9 s. seven razors, value 2 s. and a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of William Baker .

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a carrier . I live at Valence Common, in the parish of Finchley .

Q. On the 3d of November, were you the last person up in the house - A. Yes; I never heard of the breaking of the house until I got up in the morning between five and six o'clock. I saw the window open when I came out in the road. I saw the lower window of my house open; I am certain it was fastened the night before, it was a casement window. The casement fastened with a hasp that turned down.

ROBERT CHARIDGE . I am a farmer. On the 3d of November I met a person going up the road.

Q. Do you know whether that person was the prisoner - A. No, I do not.

JOHN HENSON . I am constable and serjeant of the sight at Kentish Town. I apprehended the prisoner in Kentish Town, it is the direct road to Finchley; he was coming towards London. The prisoner is the man; he had got a fustian jacket on; he was in the same dress as he is now; he had a bag on his shoulder; I went and met him in the road. I asked him what he had got; he said his own; he said the two bundles he had in his bag he had found the other side of Finchley. I asked him where he was going to; he said to Guy's Hospital; I said it was too early to go there; I took him to the watchhouse. When I came to the watchhouse I searched the bundles. I produce them. I have had them ever since.

Prosecutor. The razors in the bag are mine. There are six razors, they are all mine, and what is laid in the charge is mine. I had seen the razors in the case on the Sunday. This is my dictionary; here is another book mine; the books are all my own, they were in my house on the night of the robbery; here is a pair of gloves mine; all the things I have named are my property. They were in the house the night before the robbery; I fastened up my house myself on the night of the 3d of November, about eleven o'clock at night; I tried the window the very last thing; I am certain it was fast. When I fastened it up there was no pane of glass broken, nor no pane taken out at the time; when I got up the next morning. I found one pane out; and the window open.

Q. Had any body been up in the house between the time you got up and saw too window open - A. No, all the other fastenings were safe; I unfastened them in the morning.

A. When that window was open, it would admit any person to go in, would it not - A. Yes, it was on the ground floor.

JAMES LARRARD. I am a tailor.

Q. Look at the breeches and waistcoat - A. These are things I delivered to Mr. Baker on Tuesday; they were for John Mayhew , at the sign of the White Lion, at Finchley Common. Mayhew is a customer of mine. I delivered them to Baker, he being a carrier, to carry them to Mayhew, at Finchley; I know them by my own work.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the bundle on the other side of Highgate. I do not know such a place as Finchley. I had a witness to prove my finding them. That witness I have lost; I do not know where to find him.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 31.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-44

44. SAMUEL ELLIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Harris , about the hour of seven in the night of the 14th of November , and stealing therein twenty-nine yards of flannel, value 2 l. 2 s. his property.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I live at 81, Charlotte-street, Fizroy-square, in the parish of St. Pancras . I was absent at the time of the robbery. I can identfy the property.

EMILIA HARRIS . I am the wife of the last witness. My husband is an hosier.

Q. On Monday evening, the 14th of November, how late were you in your shop - A. About seven o'clock the candles were lighted: I have a room behind the shop; I had occasion to go from the shop to that room; I returned to the shop; I thought I heard a noise in the parlour; I looked into the shop. I saw all was safe; then I went into the parlour again; I heard a pull at the flannel. I went in, and the flannel was gone; when I heard this pull at the flannel, I went into the shop.

Q. Was your window shutters up - No; a door opens from the shop into the street; that door was shut with a catch and a handle; the window does not open; I missed the flannel.

THOMAS CAVE . I am an officer. On the 14th of November I and Wilson were on duty; we were going out; we saw the prisoner and another man coming down Tottenham-court-road by Pierey-street; he that is not in custody came and nudged the prisoner on the shoulder; he dropped the flannel; it was covered over with a great coat; I fitted the great coat on; it fitted the prisoner; I ran after this man; and apprehended him at the bottom of the street.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that flannel, is that flannel yours - A. Yes; I now hold a part of it in my hand; there is the remains of the mark which I am in the habit of making on the flannel. This is the flannel that I lost, I am sure.

Q. What is the value of that piece - A. Two pounds nine shillings and two-pence; there are twenty-nine yards and a half.

EDMUND WILSON. I picked up the flannel; it is the same flannel that the prisoner had; it was covered over with a great coat and an apron.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only, not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined 6 months , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18141130-45

45. WILLIAM BENNETT and JOHN TURNWELL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Alexander Frampton , on the 15th of November, about the hour of eleven at night, with intent the goods and chattels of William Alexander Frampton therein burglariously to steal .

SECOND COUNT, for like burglary, stating the intent to be, to steal the goods and chattels of Harriet Frampton and Thomas Day Frampton .

AND OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only stating the intent to be to steal other persons goods and chattels.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER FRAMPTON . Me and my partners carry on the business of wholesale grocers , my partners are Harriet Frampton , Thomas Day Frampton, and myself, William Alexander Frampton .

Q. Does that plan describe your premises - A. Yes, very correct; one part is in Leadenhall-street, and the other part in Billeter-lane; the gate in Billeter-lane is in the parish of St. Catherine Creed in the Ward of Aldgate; that is a close gateway to our own warehouses.

COURT. Is it an arched gateway - A. No; our warehouses are over it; when they are shut our premises are compleatly inclosed; it is compleatly enclosed by the lower warehouse.

Mr. Gurney. When you enter in the gateway, there is an access into the stable - A. There is.

Q. When you get into the covered way, there is a gate there which goes into the open yard - A. Yes; one side of which is the warehouse, and the other the dwelling-house; our door to the dwelling-house is in the yard, which door is never kept fastened, having entered into the yard any person might walk into my house any where; we consider ourselves secure by the outward gate; that door comes into the back of the house; the front of the house is in Leadenhall-street.

Q. On the night of the 15th of November, did you receive any intelligence of your gate being broken open - A. I was called up.

COURT. What is over the stable - A. Our warehouse, that is over the stable, and over the gateway, took in the open yard there is a shed.

Q. What is there between the dwelling-house and the warehouse - A. The wooded shed, where we keep turpoulin in, which shed communicates with the house, and the ware-house. I reside in the dwelling-house, and my family. On the morning of the 16th of November, I was called up by the patrole at half past two, and from the information they gave me, I went to my gate; the inner gate was fast; the outer gate had been shut before I got there, by the officers, they told me the prisoners were in custody; there were some keys found in the yard inside of the outer gate in that gateway, between the inner and outer gate; I picked up one key, and another person the other; the officers have them both.

Mr. Knapp. These are large premises - A. Yes.

Q. From the house in Leadenhall-street to the gateway is a long distance - A. About thirty five yards. My house is in a different parish to the gateway; my dwelling-house which I reside in is in St. Andrew Undershaft , and the gateway in St. Catherines Creed.

COURT. Both in the City of London - A. Yes, and both in the Ward of Aldgate .

Mr. Knapp. The warehouse is over the stable - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any communication between the warehouse over the stable and the dwelling-house - A. You can go round the corner of the warehouse, come down stairs, and go into the yard; there is an entrance into the house in that yard; there is a loop hole over the gateway, and a crane is there; there is a trap-door over the gateway, through which we convey our goods in wet weather, we call it a loop hole.

COURT. There is a crane over the gateway that takes goods into the warehouse; (do I take you right) and a trap door in the covered way that takes goods in in wet weather; is the other warehouse in the yard -

Mr. Knapp. Do you call them two warehouses - A. No; they are one, and the same warehouse; the way to the warehouse is through the lower warehouse.

Q. Be the persons whoever they would that committed the offence which is imputed to them, they had not entered into the inner yard, had they - A. They had not entered.

ROBERT OAKLAND . I am carman to Messrs. Frampton.

Q. On Tuesday the 15th of November, did you secure the gate in Billeter-lane - A. I did, I secured it with two iron bars inside, and it was locked.

Q. I suppose you bared one half and locked the other - A. The wicket is secured by a lock only; if a man enters we open the wicket only; I locked the gate at a quarter past seven o'clock.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. On the night of Tuesday, the 15th of November, I was in Billeter-lane, about two o'clock when I was there, in company with Bray; I saw the two prisoners in company with two other men; I knew them perfectly well; I observed their conduct; I was about sixteen yards from the premises. I saw three of the men make up to Mr. Framptons' gate, and one was patroling the street; one left the four, and three went to the gate; one patroled the street; I heard the rustling of some keys, apparently at the gate, as if they were sorting them out, as if they were handling a bunch of keys; I heard one enter the lock; I was

then so near, I could hear that; the morning being still and no person walking in the street at the time; I heard the lock open with some difficulty, as if the door stuck, it sounded when opened; I saw the two prisoners enter the premises, with another, and after they had been in ten minutes, one came out, thinking they had been disturbed by the family, I thought with Bray to secure each side of the gate; Bray instantly made up to the gate; I was close to him: just as we got to the gate, he cut down the prisoner Turnwell, he apparently fell; Bennett rushed out of the gate. I cut at him with my cutlass; I missed my blow; he instantly struck me on my cheek-bone, which caused me to fall, he struck me with that double crow, what they call a jemmy, it did not stun me his striking me on my cheek-bone. I perceived the prisoner stumble nearly across the road before he recovered; I got up, and went after him, crying out stop thief; he ran down Billeter-lane, he turned on the right hand in Billeter-square, in turning the corner of Billeter-square; he turned short; I saw the watchman laying on the ground, that was Curtain, the watchman; I thought he was murdered; I found he was wounded; I jumped over the watchman at the time, He proceeded to the right of Billeter-square, where there was no thoroughfare; at that time, I could not get my pistols out, I meaned to shoot him, and when I came to him, I aimed a blow at him with my cutlass, and missed my blow again. He ran down Fishers-alley, into Fenchurch-street, then he crossed into Mark-lane; he threw himself up against a house in a dark part, there was not a lamp near the place, that I might over run him; I cut him across the head; he had a hat on; I collared him, and took from his right hand the crow that he struck me with; he said, do not murder me. I brought him back again to the premises of Messrs. Frampton. there I found Bray with the other prisoner, close to the gate; we then took both the prisoners to the watchhouse. I searched Bennett; I found on him a phospherous bottle, a small bunch of matches, two pieces of wax-candle, and a piece of candied horehound. After we secured the two prisoners in the watchhouse, I came back again, and found this green bag rolled up in the gateway, and a cord round it. We then alarmed Mr. Frampton. We found these two keys; I believe Mr. Frampton picked up one; they are skeleton keys; they were about three yards inside the premises, by the gate; at that time we desired the watchman not to shut the gate, but one of the watchmen shut the gate.

JAMES BRAY . I am a constable. I saw the man enter the gate: I knew them perfectly well. Three went in, and one stood outside; one came out that made his escape. Turnwell was just coming out, I sprang over, and cut him down with a cutlass, that is Turnwell, be dropped this green baize bag, he dropped these keys; they were wrapped up in the green baize bag. I immediately called to my partner, I have one; Bennett rushed out, and hit me on my arm with the crow; I thought my arm was broken; my partner cut at him. I never quitted Turnwell; I cut him down as he was coming out of Mr. Frampton's gate. I staid till morning, and found this key close to the gate.

WILLIAM CURTAIN. I am a watchman; my stand is at the entrance of Billeter-square. On the night in question, I heard the cry of stop thief; I went out of my box with intent to lay hold of him; before I could lay hold of him, I received a violent blow from the man that I was going to lay hold of: the blow knocked me down, and deprived me of my senses, and knocked some of my teeth out. I received the blow from a man that was running at the cry of stop thief.

BENNETT, GUILTY , aged 26.

TURNWELL, GUILTY , aged 26.

Judgement respited, for the opinion of the Judges .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-46

46. GEGRGE WHITE COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , twenty-five reams of paper, value 40 l. and fourteen calf-skins. value 30 l. the property of James Fielding Street , and William Street ; and JOHN STRATCH and JOHN GRIFFITHS for receiving the said goods, they knowing them to have been stolen ,

JAMES FIELDING STREET . I am in partnership with my brother, William, we are wholesale stationers in Bucklersbury . I left the house for the purpose of going into the country on the 9th of September last. Coleman was my porter . I left him as my porter, to open and shut the shop, and sweeping the warehouse out. I returned to town either on the 24th or 25th again. In consequence of information, I went to Mr. Rolley's, a bacon factor, in Wood-street, on the 26th of September; he accompanied me into his own loft; I found twenty five reams of paper there, overed over with hurdles, straw, and bagging; some of the reams of paper were in wrappers, the whole of it was concealed; not a ream to be seen, there were twelve reams of thick post five reams of large yellow wove post, and a ream of imperial, making altogether twenty-five reams of paper. I am certain I have missed as much again.

Q. Look at that paper, and say whether you believe it to be your's. - A. certainly I do.

Q. What is the value of the twenty-five reams altogether - A. About fifty pounds.

EDWARD HIXON I am a stationer; I live at 14, Lawrence-lane.

Q. On what day in October last did either of the prisoners come to you - A. Yes, the prisoner Griffiths came and brought a ream of thick yellow wove post on Wednesday, the 26th of October; this is the ream; he said he brought me that ream of paper to look at; a friend, an acquaintance of his, had a quantity to dispose of, if I would go and look at them. I asked if they were at his house; he lives in Phillip-lane, London-wall; he said no, they were at a warehouse just by, if I would go with him to the warehouse, he would shew them me. He said he did not know who they belonged to; he said the man took them for a bad debt; he said he did not understand the paper, if they were eggs, he could tell what to do with them. I said Griffiths, if it is not all right, it will not be worth your while to get into trouble for the sake of a few reams of paper; he said he knew nothing about it. I told him I could not go then, I would come on the next morning; on the next morning I

went to Griffiths's house, No. 17, London-wall; Griffiths took me to Mr. Rolley's warehouse, a bacon factor, in Wood-street; we went into the yard; we saw the prisoner Stratch; Griffiths said to Stratch, this gentleman is come to look at the paper; we all three went into a two pair of stairs to a sort of a loft; which is over the yard that we entered by; the floor was covered with straw; Stratch pulled some wrappers or bags off a quantity of paper in the disordered state I saw it lay; I was convinced it was not come honestly by; I asked Stratch if it was his; he said no, it belonged to an acquaintance of his, he would be there presently; Coleman came in; soon after I asked Coleman if it was his property; he said yes; I then said, provided I buy it of you, you will deliver me a regular bill of parcels; he said yes, certainly. I asked him what he asked for it; I think he said forty pounds. I said that is too much; he then said thirty pounds. I said I would consider of it. I went to Mr. Street immediately afterwards and stated to him what I have seen; I consulted with him; we laid future arrangements. On that Griffiths called at my own house, at twelve o'clock; he said first, he thought I had not asked so many questions about the paper as I might have done. I told him that Coleman had promised to send me a regular bill of parcels, that was all I required; I asked him if he thought they would not take any thing less for it; he said he did not know, perhaps they might: he denied any interest in it himself whatever, he should not get any thing for his trouble.

THOMAS WHITE. I am an officer. On the 29th of October I went to Griffiths's house. I saw Griffiths there; I told him he must account for some paper that I understood had been stolen. At first he said he knew nothing of it. I told him he had offered some for sale, and from information it was stolen property; He said, he would take me to the man he had it of; he then took me to Mr. Rolley's yard; I saw Stratch there; I told Stratch I understood there was some paper there: he said, he knew nothing about it. I told him it was very strange that he should have property in his master's premises and not know any thing about it; Stratch is a servant to Mr. Rolley. He then said, there was some paper there, a man brought it there is a cart, he said he did not know the man. I told him he must give me a better account than that, or else I must take him in custody. Stratch then went with me to a public-house, a door or two from Mr. Rolley's warehouse; we had not been there half a minute before Coleman came in; Stratch said to Coleman, this man has come about the paper. Coleman turned very pale, and said in a faint voice, that he would tell me; he said, he had it from a man in the country, he did not know his name. I took the three prisoners into custody. I took the paper and skins out of Mr. Rolley's loft.

JOHN ROLLEY . I am a bacon-fastor; I live in Wood-street. Stratch was my porter.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Street coming to your premises - A. I do.

Q. Do you know of any paper being on you premises - A, Not at that time; the paper I found up in my store lost, it was perfectly unknown to me that such an articles was there.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that paper - A. I have examined the whole of the paper; most undoubtedly it is my property; it is worth seventy pounds.

COLEMAN, GUILTY , aged 24.

STRATCH, GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

GRIFFITHS, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-47

47. WILLIAM BROWN and MARY BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of November , a sheet, value 3 s. and a blanket, value 2 s. the property of William Clowes , in a lodging-room .

MRS. CLOWES. I live at 124, Golden-lane ; my husband is a shoe-maker , his name is William Clowes . I let the two prisoners a ready furnished room, in the middle of the summer at four shillings and sixpence a week; they staid in our house until last Monday was a week. I went up about an hour afterwards; I found the door open; I missed a sheet and a blanket,

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 23rd of November, I went with William Clowes to a house in Saffron-hill, where the prisoners were. William Clowes said to them, where is my sheet and blanket; Ann Brown took us to a house, where the sheet and blanket were produced; the other sheet and the flat iron she said her husband had pawned it; the other sheet and the flat iron were sent to Mr. Clowes's house. This is the sheet and blanket I found.

Prosecutrix. This is my sheet and blanket; the other things were brought home to me.

William Brown 's Defence. I told Mr. Clowes I meaned to pay him all the money; my daughter took the sheet and the flat iron home to him.

WILLIAM BROWN, GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined 14 Days , and fined 1 s.

MARY BROWN , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-48

48. GEORGE WHITE was indicted for that he, on the 2nd of August , had in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange for 35 l. 10 s. that he did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, an acceptence to the said bill of exchange, with intent to defraud Joshua Russell .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a like acceptance, with intention to defraud Charles Larking .

JOSHUA RUSSELL . I lived then in Bryanston-square, in the New-road. I know the prisoner, he has been a farmer , near Rochester.

Q. In the month of July last, did he mention an acceptance to you - A. Yes.

Q. What was the first he said about it - A. He made some application respecting an acceptance of Mr. Larking, he said that Mr. Larking had given him an acceptance in compensation of excessive damages of a levey; that was in July last, he applied to me. He said, he wanted thirty-nine pounds ten shillings, for

a particular occasion to pay to the Gravesend Bank; he said, he had the bill at home on the 23rd of July, and he had omitted to bringit up with him. I then gave him a check upon Mr. Collins to the amount of thirty-nine pounds ten shillings, upon his putting Mr. Larking's bill into the post for me, addressed to me.

Q. Did he come to you on a subsequent day, and bring this bill to you with the acceptance of Mr. Larking - A. I believe he came on the 4th of August. I said to the magistrate I believed on the 2nd of August; I know now it was on the 4th; I lived then in Ely-place, in the County of Middlesex; he came to me, he brought to me this acceptance.

Q. Look at that - A. That is the acceptance he brought, exactly as it is now; he brought this to me on the 4th of August; in consequence thereof, I then gave him a draft upon Brown and Co. of thirty-nine pounds ten shillings; the first draft was not paid. I afterwards handed that bill over to Mr. Collius on the same day, I put a mark upon it before I parted with it; October 3rd, that is the day it became due; I put on it before I parted with it October the 3rd.

Q. On or about the 5th of October, did you receive a letter from the prisoner - A. I believe it was on the 6th. That is the letter.

COURT. The date, October the 3rd on the top of the bill, is your hand-writing - A. It is.

Mr. Gurney. On the 6th of October, did you receive these two letters - A. I received this letter on the 6th, by post; it is dated the 5th; it is addressed to me at Ely-place. I have seen the prisoner write. I have no doubt it is his hand-writing.

Q. At this time had you been apprized of the dishonour of the bill - A. I had.

Mr. Knapp. Had you seen him write several times - A. I should think I had seen him write frequently.

(The letter read.)

"Signed G. White, dated October 5th, 1814,"

"addressed to Mr. Joshua Russell , No. 18, Ely-place, Holborn, London"

"DEAR SIR, I have seen Mrs. Larking, Mr. Larking is not at home; Mrs. Larking will send me tomorrow; pray stop proceeding; I think I can get your bill done, I shall write and let you know,

G. WHITE."

Q. Did you on the same day, or the day after, receive another letter from him - A. Yes, I think it is dated the 7th; there are three letters from White. This is it; I believe it to be his hand-writing; it contains a remittance of a bill.

(Read.)

"Signed G. White, dated Poole, October, 7, 1814."

"addressed to Mr. Joshua Russell , at Messrs. Collins and Wallers, No. 33, Spital-square, London"

"I hope you will stop Mr. Collins from proceeding in Mr. Larking's bill, for Mr. Larking is not at home, and Mrs. Larking has not got the money until Mr. Larking comes home, and immediately he comes home the money will be sent to Mr. Collins. I think I can get your bill done in a little time, but I fear I shall get in trouble through the other; if you can send me the money, I will send you the bill."

Q. Did you receive another letter - A Yes.

Q. Do you believe that to be the prisoner's handwriting too - A. Yes, sir, no doubt. The post mark is the 8th of October.

Q. When did you receive that - A. I have marked it; I received it on the 13th of October.

(Read)

"Signed G. White, and addressed to Mr. Joshua Russell , at Mr. Collins's, 33, Spital-square, London"

"DEAR SIR, I received your letter about Mr. J. Smith's bill; I hope I shall be in town to-morrow morning by four o'clock. I hope you will get the bill renewed. I could not do any thing with your bill, but Mr. Larking has given me the thirty-five pounds ten shillings, and I have made use of it in some way; I hope you will keep the bill, as I could not get your bill done; I will be there to-morrow. P S. Pray do not proceed against Mr. Larking for the thirty-five pounds ten shillings.

Q. I believe you shortly after received some information concerning this by way of Mr. Larking himself, you had seen Mr. Larking - A. Yes; Mr. Larking accompanied me to Mr. Collins's on the 16th of October.

Q. After you had seen Mr. Larking, did the prisoner call upon you at your house in Ely-place - A. He did; I had him into the parlour.

Q. Before the prisoner said any thing, did you tell him it would be better for him to tell you any thing, did you make use of any promise or threat - A. None whatever. I told him his life was in my power, and that Mr. Larking had been with me, and had stated that the acceptance on the bill was not his handwriting. He confessed that it was not Mr. Larking's hand-writing, but his own.

Q. Did he make any request of you about the prosecution - A. No, sir.

MR. COLLINS. Q. On or about the 4th of August, did you receive the bill in question of Mr. Russell - A. I did, sir, at the time it became due; it was at my bankers.

Q. Upon receiving some notice that is was not paid did you write that letter to Mr. Larking - A. No; I caused it to be wrote to Mr. Larking.

Q. Is that letter written by your order - A. It is written by one of my clerks.

GEORGE MITCHELL . Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Chatteris and Company, Lombard-street, No. 5 - A. I am.

Q. Did you present that bill at the George Inn in the Borough - A. No; the notary presented it for us.

JOHN HINTON . I am clark to Mr. Newton, the notary. On the 3rd of November, I presented this bill at the George Inn in the Borough; it was not paid.

THOMAS EDWARD HELKS. I am a banker at Rochester. Mr. Larking banked with me.

Q. Are you well acquainted with his hand-writing - A. Perfectly.

Q. Look at that acceptance, do you believe that acceptance to be Mr. Larking's hand-writing - A. Certainly not; I have had frequent opportunities of observing his hand-writing.

Q. I believe you superintended the execution

the prisoner's house - A. I was there; I found that letter in the prisoner's house myself; I found it in the desk that was sealed by Mr. Russell; that is the letter from Mr. Collins to Mr. Larking.

Mr, Knapp. Did any body live in that house but himself - None but the prisoner and his family.

CHARLES LARKING . You are an auctioneer at Rochester - A. I am.

Q. Look at that letter, and look at the address; did you ever receive that letter from Mr. Collins - A. No, I have seen the letter (read) signed Collins and Waller, 33, Spital-square, dated the 4th October, 1814, addressed to Mr. C. Larking, auctioneer, Rochester, Kent.

"Sir, Your acceptance of thirty-five pounds ten shillings, drawn by G. White, is returned dishonoured; and unless the amount is repaid to us by return of post, we shall proceed to enforce the payment thereof without father notice."

(The bill of exchange read).

Prisoner's Defence. I stand here charged with a crime that I am innocent of. I do not know any thing about writing that acceptance, or know who did. On or about the 20th or 25th of August, I was in great distress for money; I had a consultation with my wife for the payment of some money to the Gravesend Bank; the time of payment was about the 22d of August; this bill on Mr. Larking my wife said she would take to her for acceptance; I came to London; I told Mr. Russell that I had the bill, I would send it. About the 3rd of August, I carried the bill to Mr. Russell; Mr. Russell gave me a draft upon Brown and Co. for the sum of thirty-nine pound ten shillings, and a little time before the bill became due, my wife asked me to get the money to take this bill up, I could not get the money; my wife was very uneasy; I have not got my witnesses here that heard what my wife said, they were here the day before yesterday. I do not know for what reason they left London, nor do I know any thing of the forgery.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 25.

of uttering, knowing it to be forged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-49

49. MANUEL JOHN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , in the dwelling house of Francis Comitivio , a 50 l. bank note, a 30 l. bank note, four 20 l. bank notes, a 5 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note , his property.

FRANCIS COMITIVIO . I live at No. 41, Parson's-street, Ratcliffe-highway ; I rent the house and live in it; I knew the prisoner about three or four days before this.

Q. Did you miss any property and what, on the 4th of October - A I missed a fifty pound, one thirty, four twenty, one five, and one one pound notes, out of my box, in my bed-room.

Q. Had the prisoner any access to that room - A. Any person might go up to that room, and I know nothing about it; I went out on the 4th of October, the notes were safe in the box; when I went out the box was locked, with the key in it; I saw my money, and had the money in my hands; they were all secure when I went out, I went out about eleven o'clock in the morning; I returned about seven o'clock in the evening; about nine o'clock I had ocasion to go up for some money; I wanted to take out of my box a five pound note and a one pound note, the pocket book and all the notes were gone. I advertised the notes, and offered a reward.

Q. Do you recollect the number of any of the notes - A. None but the twenty, No. 14788; I remember that one, and advertised the number after I I had stopped payment at the bank. I had bills printed.

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended - A. On the 26th he was apprehended at Deptford.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner at your house on the 4th of October - A. I do not remember that day; he was in my house almost every day.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am a clerk in the bank: I produce a twenty pound note as coming from the Bank of England, No. 14778.

Q. Are there other notes of the same number - A. There may be of the same number, but not of the same date.

RACHAEL BASSUM . I know the prisoner; it is about ten weeks since I first saw him; he employed me to change a ten pound note; it is now about three weeks ago; before he was taken he desired me to get change of a note; he called it a ten pound note. I went to Mrs. Barrett, that keeps the Lord Nelson, and asked her for change of a ten pound note; she told me it was a twenty pound note. I went to Mr. Cooper. at the Dog and Bell, at Deptford Docks; I saw Miss Sarah Cooper , she gave me change, I gave the twenty ones to the prisoner. I left the note with Miss Cooper.

SARAH COOPER . I live at the Dog and Bell. I remember Rachael Bassam coming to me about a month ago; I cannot say the day of the month; she came for change of a twenty pound note, I took the note from her, and gave her twenty one pound notes; I wrote on the note my aunt's name, Barrett, Lord Nelson. I put it away with other notes, and paid it away to the brewer. This is the note, the number is 14778. This is the note that Rachael Bassum gave to me.

JANE EVANS . I live in New-street, Deptford. The prisoner lodged with me. He is a seafaring man; he lodged with me about ten days; he came from abroad. He had always notes about him; I remember his changing notes. I was with him; he changed a thirty pound note about three weeks before he was apprehended. After the thirty pound note he changed a twenty pound; on the same day I was with him he received some dollars and doubloons.

Q. Prisoner did not, with another man, give you them notes - A. There was a man came to you from London, I do not know his name, the man came to my house after the notes were changed; and the man was at my house five or six days before the notes were changed.

THOMAS CROUCH . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner at Deptford on the 26th of October.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that twenty pound note and tell me whether that is the one you lost - A. Yes. it is; I know it by the number, and by the Captain's name; the Captain is not here.

Prisoner's Defence. This note I certainly did get change of it. I gave the change to the man that gave me the note. I never have seen the man since.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-50

50 JAMES MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a trunk, value 1 l. ten shirts, value 2 l. six pair of silk stockings, value 3 l. two waistcoats, value 10 s. a pair of buckskin breeches, value 1 l. six cravats, value 1 l. 6 s. the property of William Hern .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am porter to the Brighton coach; it inns at the White Bear, Piccadilly.

Q. Do you know William Hern - A. Yes, he is my master, he is sole proprietor of the Brighton coach .

Q, Do you know whether that trunk was lost from that coach on the 25th of October - Q. I was on the coach-box with the coachman for the purpose of taking care of the luggage; and as we were coming along St Paul's Church-yard , the trunk was on the roof of the coach between two irons, and a strap over it. I cannot say whether the strap was fastened or not; the trunk being between, the two irons would keep it from tumbling off the roof. I saw the prisoner upon the rumble-tumble as we call it; I cast my head round, and saw him with the trunk, I am positive he was not a passenger in the coach; we had set the two last outside passengers down at the Cross Keys, in Wood-street. I cast my head round, I saw the prisoner behind the coach; he had got hold of the trunk; he lifted it from the two irons; he was pulling it down; he had got it from the irons; it was slanting on the roof crossways upon the roof, and when it was fixed it was lengthways; and when the prisoner got hold of it it was crossways. I told the coachman to stop, there was a thief behind the coach. As soon as I said that, the prisoner jumped down, and I jumped after him; Stephen Barker saw him jump down; he pursued him, I fell down in jumping down; it was not a minute before I saw the prisoner in hold. I knew him to be the same man I had seen jump down. I asked him what business he had there? He said he got up to take a ride to Piccadilly. I asked him if he made it a rule to take a trunk? He was asked a second time; he then said, he got up to go with the coachman to Brighton. The trunk is here; it contained the articles mentioned in the indictment. The trunk belonged to William Lewis ; William Hern is the sole proprietor of this coach.

STEPHEN BARKER . I am a porter; I was in St. Paul's Church-yard, I saw the prisoner jump off the coach. I and Clark jumped after him, Clark called out stop thief; I pursued the prisoner; the lamps were lighted; I never lost sight of the person who jumped off the coach, until Mr. Elliott stopped him. I saw him stopped, he was taken to the watchhouse; I am quite sure that the man who I saw stopped was the man who jumped off the coach. I never lost sight of him.

JAMES ELLIOTT . I am a grocer; on Tuesday the 26th of October last, a little after six in the evening, I was in my accompting-house in Old Fish-street-hill, Doctor's Commons, it faces the Old Change. I heard a vehement cry of stop thief. I ran to my door, I saw the prisoner running violently, and Barker running after him. I stopped him, and when I had got hold of him Clark came up, and charged him with robbing the Brighton coach in St. Paul's-churchyard, The prisoner said he had done nothing; he then said he had got up to take a ride to Piccadilly.

Prisoner's Defence. All I have to say against this charge, I was passing through St. Paul's-churchyard to go to Richmond. I saw the Brighton coach go along, which goss to Piccadilly; the trunk was on the top; it was not moved by me; it was placed as Clark has stated he turned round and accused me of attempting to take it away. My intention was never attempting to steal. I got on the coach without asking the coachman leave to be sure; the trunk was never moved by me.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-51

51. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , nine pigs, value 18 l. the property of John Fitch .

JOHN FITCH . I live at Highgate; I am a baker . I lost nine pigs on 25th of November from off Highgate Common .

THOMAS FITCH . I met the prisoner and the pigs in Holloway. I did not know that the pigs were lost until I got home; and when I got home I found the pigs were missing. I pursued the prisoner and the pigs; I saw them afterwards, and I knew they were our own pigs; there were nine in number; I saw them in a yard in Church-street, Bethnal-green; I am sure they are my brother's pigs.

EDWARD BOSWLLL. I am a butcher in Church-street, Bethnal-green. On the 25th of November the prisoner brought nine pigs down Church-street, Bethnal-green. He said he bought them in Smithfield. I have known the man two years by buying meat at my shop. I did not buy the pigs; the prisoner asked me the liberty to put them in my yard, until seven o'clock in the morning, he put them in my yard without my assistance. Mr. Fitch looked at them they were the same pigs.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know; I thought he was in the pig-jobbing line.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Friday the 25th of November, I met my son and Gleed at the end of a lane. I went with them, and a man, who is a neighbour of Mr. Fitch, to 147, Church-street, Bethnal-green; the man at the bar brought these pigs down Church-street, Bethnal-green, about a quarter or twenty minutes after seven o'clock. I went into the butcher's shop; I asked a man, whose name is Boswell, mine, said a man; I then said, you have had brought here to night nine pigs; who brought them? The prisoner was there. He said this man; I then secured the prisoner, and said to Boswell and my son, shew me the pigs. I said to the prisoner, where did you buy these pigs? He said he bought them in Smithfield this afternoon. What did you give for them? that is not a fair question. He did not answer, he

did not answer. I sent for Mr. Fitch; I and Gleed staid in the yard. Mr. Fitch came, and owned the nine pigs. We took them in the cart to the office, and locked them up until the brother came, and swore to them.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . After I told the prisoner that he had stolen the pigs; he said, it was of no use denying it, he stole the pigs off the common.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-52

52. SAMUEL ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a great coat, value 1 l. the property of Robert Burn .

ROBERT BURN . I am a tailor ; I live at 22, Knightsbridge . On the 5th of November, a little after nine o'clock in the morning, I was standing at the door; a woman came past me, and asked me if I had not lost a coat; I looked at the door, and missed a coat; she pointed to the man that had got it under his arm; I ran, and overtook the man, and another man had got it on; the prisoner had sold it for fifteen shillings; the man that bought it told me so, he was just going to pay him for it when I got up. I had lost the coat for five minutes I suppose. I brought the prisoner back, and gave him in charge of a constable.

Q. Are you sure that he had the coat - A. Yes, he is the man that had it; I did not see him take it, nor in his possession. The woman told me that he had got the coat.

Q. Is the woman here - A. No.

Q. Then I cannot hear what the woman said? What did the prisoner say when you came up to him - A. He wished me to kick his backside, and let him go.

HENRY CLARK . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. I asked him how he came by the coat; he said, he took it from the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the coat off the pavement; a man met me, he said, he would give me seven shillings for it; I said he should not have it.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined 14 Days , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-53

53. JANE CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , two 20 l. bank notes, two 10 l. bank notes, and two 1 l. bank notes, the property of the Hon. Alexander Murray , in the dwelling-houss of William Miller .

HON. ALEXANDER MURRAY . Q. On Monday the 14th of November, had you paid any bank notes to Mrs. Murray - A, I had; two twenty's and four ten's, it was part of change of a one-hundred pound note; there were marks upon them, which I can swear to; I gave them to her,

JANET OLIPHANT MURRAY. Q. On the 14th of November, did you receive from Mr. Murray some notes - A. I did; I put them into my pocket-book, and my pocket-book into my ridicule. At this time I had lodgings at Mr. Miller's, in Charles-street. The prisoner was a servant in Mr. Miller's house.

Q. On the evening of the next day, were you employed in putting your clothes away - A. I was.

Q. Where was your redicule at that time - A. Upon the bed. The prisoner was in the room assisting me in putting my clothes away; she took them from me and put them upon the bed; she asked me if she could assist me any further; I remarked that she stood along side of the bed where the redicule was; I had suspicion of her. About an hour after she was gone, I looked into my redicule, and the pocketbook was gone. I enquired after the prisoner, she was not in the house; I found she had left the house immediately after she went out of my room. That evening I went to the office in Bow-street, there I heard the prisoner had been taken up on suspicion: I saw the prisoner that evening about eleven o'clock. I know that the notes that I lost were the notes that Mr. Murray gave me.

JOHN MORRIS . I am a linen-draper, in Piccadily. On the evening of the 15th of November, the prisoner came to my shop to purchase some articles; she offered in payment a twenty pound note; I gave the note to Mr. Nicolls. In consequence of suspicion I apprehended her.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to Bow-street office by Mr. Morris, she opened her hand, and gave me the notes, and I have one Mr. Morris gave me, this twenty pound note. On the prisoner was a twenty-pound note, two ten's, and eight ones, and silver to the amount of twenty-two shillings. I asked her how she came by the notes; she said, she received them of Mr. Morris the linen-draper, in change of a twenty-pound note. I said, that could not be, there was more than twenty pounds; these notes I took from her hand. She said, Mr. Morris gave her them. She sent for me in Bridewell, she wished me to advise her how she was to act; I told her I could not tell her. I asked her what she had done with the pocket-book; she said, she threw it out of the coach-window as she was brought to the office.

Prosecutor. This is one of the twenty-pound notes I gave to Mrs. Murray; I am positive to it. These two ten-pound notes I can swear to, having the name of Garland upon them.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-54

54. JOSEPH HOAR , alias WATERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Freeman , widow , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 28th of November , and burglariously stealing therein, two guineas, and a five-pound bank note , her property.

MARGARET FREEMAN . I am a widow; I live at No. 5, Cable-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone ; I keep the house; I take in washing ; I went to bed on this night between ten and eleven on Monday night last: I really do not know the day of the month.

COURT. That is the 28th of November - A. I locked the door, and bolted it; I was the last up; I

went to bed. I got up between six and seven, and all my doors were open, and my two boxes were in the passage, and the locks were broken; the back door and the front door were both open.

Q. Which way had the persons come in - A. I rather suspect the back way they came in; both my boxes were in the passage, and all my property gone; the box was broken open, and all the property was taken out: some of my linen was taken away, that said in the front room, that I had not taken some.

Q. Did you lose any money - A. Yes, I lost a five-pound note, eleven one-pound bank notes, two guineas, three seven-shilling pieces, and two Spanish its of gold, of the weight of seven shillings each.

Q. Now, where were all these things - A. In the back parlour, in a box. They there found the articles of wearing apparel; there was a gold watch, I have found nothing but the five-pound note.

CHARLES NEWHOUSE PRINCE . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. On the 25th of November, I said for two warrants in the name of Margaret Freeman, eight pounds seventeen shillings and fourpence, the five-pound note, three one-pound notes, and seventeen shillings in cash; that I paid in the name of Margaret Freeman . I saw the note before the grand Jury on Saturday. That is the five-pound note; this is the note I paid to Mrs. Freman.

RICHARD HATFIELD. I am a shopman to Mr. Chambers, he is a clothes-saleman, at the corner of Middle-row, Broad-street, St. Giles's. On Tuesday 1st, about half past two o'clock, the prisoner came to my master's shop, he told me he wanted to buy me clothes; he gave me a five-pound note; that is e five-pound note; I can swear positively to the note; that is the only five-pound note I took that day. I gave it to Mr. Chambers. I gave the prisoner one pound ten shillings out of it. I am sure the prisoner is the man that gave me that five-pound note.

WILLIAM CHAMBERS. I am a clothes-saleman, at the corner of Middle-row, Broad-street, St. Giles's. I received a five-pound note on Tuesday evening of my shopman. The officer brought the number of the five-pound note I had taken; I found the note; I put the initials of my name upon the note immediately the officer came into the house. I have no doubt it is the note I received of the prisoner.

MARTHA MITCHELL . The prisoner came in about four o'clock in the morning; the prisoner lodged in Cable-street, No. 7, I lodge in the next room to the prisoner.

Q. What is Mrs. Freeman's number - A. No. 5. The prisoner lodged in the next room to me; he came home about four o'clock in the morning.

Q. What is he - A. A day labourer; I do not know what he does. I am sure he came home about four o'clock in the morning.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN . I am an officer. From information in the neighbourhood, I waited until the prisoner came home, and when he did come home, I went up into the room; I found him in bed; the woman that was in bed with him came out of the room and spoke to a person in the house. I asked her who she had in bed; she said, my husband; this was at No. 7, Cable-street. I awoke the prisoner; he said, you will find nothing here, I heard of your being here. While he was dressing himself I proceeded to to search the room, and in a box in his room, I found this jacket, waistcoat, and breeches. I asked him how long he had them; he said about a twelvemonth, they were to be his wedding suit, though they were not married, they were to be married. I searched him; I put my hand into his breeches; I took out this card of Mr. Chambers's shop. I then said, it appears you bought these new clothes there, you have not had them a twelvemonth. I took the clothes out of the box, and tied them up. These are them. The next morning I went to Mr. Chamber's shop, and asked Hatfield if he remembered any person yesterday coming, and buying clothes; yes, he said, he took a five-pound note of him.

Q. Now Hatfield. Look at them clothes - A. They are part of the clothes he brought of me.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I was in company with my brother. I found this chissel in the cupboard in the prisoners room. I tried Mr. Freeman's boxes; I saw a mark on the box such as this chissel would make.

Prisoners Defence. In the morning a little before six o'clock on this day, I went to seek for work, going along I picked up the five pound note; I put it in my pocket, and returned home between nine and ten. I said to the young woman that I live with I have picked up a five-pound note. She said Joseph, as we want things, let us go and buy some, and appear decent among our friends. The chissel I have had in my possession five or six months. I was in bed all night at the time this offence was committed.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-55

55. RICHARD CHAPMAN , alias WATTS and THOMAS SAW were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , five turkeys, value 25 s. the property of Joseph Allen , junior .

WILLIAM PERRYMAN . I am a farmer, residing at Yousley, in Middlesex; my farm is close to the Canel. On Sunday, the 20th of November, I perceived my hay had been taken away; I traced hay all the way down the lane to the barge, that lane leads to the house of Mr. Allen; I tracked hay and feathers from the lane to Horton-bridge, where the barge was; there was a load of dung on the barge, hay, and feathers; we fetched a constable; we went into the barge, we saw Chapman, alias Watts, and Saw; we took the prisoners away from the barge. Chapman was very obstroperous, he tried to hit the constable; he kicked one mans shins. We met Mr. Allen; we returned to the barge again; we found a turkeys neck and a gizzard burning in the fire. We searched all round that part of the country, among a clump of bricks we found a sack, containing four turkeys, about fifty yards from the barge.

JOSEHH ALLEN. On Sunday morning, from information, I looked for my turkeys. I missed five. I went to the magistrate, got a warrant, and took Chapman and Saw into custody. The constable went

on board the barge; the constable put his hand into a sack, and pulled out part of a turkey. I saw the turkey's neck and gizzard. I saw four turkeys concealed in a sack in a brick-kiln about three hundred yards from the barge. Saw had some blood on his shoes, stockings, and breeches. Saw said, do you suppose there is no other blood besides turkey's? The four turkeys I found in the sack were my own. The cock turkey in the sack I had brad a great many years; I knew him by his feathers.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable. I knew Chapman before; I thought he was a returned transport. On Sunday morning I saw the two prisoners together, at the Bell public-house at Drayton, within half a mile of Mr. Allen's house. After I heard of the robbery, I went on board the barge; and apprehended the two prisoners. I saw a turkey in a dish in the barge; it was either a turkey or a large fowl; the head was off, and burning in the fire.

CHAPMAN, GUILTY , aged 30.

SAW, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-56

56. RICHARD CHAPMAN , alias WATTS , and THOMAS SAW , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , half a truss of hay, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Perryman .

WILLIAM PERRYMAN . I am a farmer , residing at Yousley, near the canal . On Sunday morning I went into my rick-yard; I missed some hay about eight o'clock in the morning. I tracked the hay out of my rick-yard all the way to Chapman's barge. I went to the barge, Chapman and Saw were in the barge. I observed hay in the barge; the hay corresponded with mine. There were tares in my hay, and tares with the hay in the barge. I tracked the mark of a shoe all the way; the mark corresponded with Saw's shoe. The constable took them into custody; Chapman attempted to escape.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable; I apprehended the two prisoners.

CHAPMAN, GUILTY , aged 30.

SAW, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-57

57. THOMAS PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , from the person of William Hull , a purse, value 1 d. and four 1 l. bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM HULL . I am a soldier in the third regiment of guards . I lost my purse on the 17th of November, at the Red Lion at Hampstead . I lost it out of my right hand pantaloons pocket, near five o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner sat alongside of me; I did not see him take it of my own knowledge, I do not know who took it.

ROBERT ADWIN HAMILTON. I am a serjeant in the third regiment of foot guards. I was in company with Hull on the evening of the 17th, between four and five o'clock. Hull put his hand into his pocket to take out his purse, to take a piece of money out. After that I saw Hull put his hand into his pocket again to take out his purse. He immediately said his purse and his money was gone. He sit upon the table a little bit, and then went and told the landlord. The prisoner Price went to the landlord, and desired him to send for a constable. The prisoner and Hull came from the bar into the tap-room. Hull then said in the tap-room, if any person had got it, and would deliver it up to him, he would say no more about it. A few minutes after that, suspicion aroso among the people in the tap-room, that Price had got the purse and the money. I went and asked the landlord if Price had been out of the house. He said, No. Price was then standing by the bar. I pushed Price backwards, with his back against the hatchway that led down into the cellar. I told Price that he was accused of being the man that had taken the money, if he had got it, he had better deliver it up. He denied knowing any thing of it. I kept my eye upon him all the time. I observed him raise his right hand and reach it over the bar-door leading down into the cellar. I said, Hull, watch Prices's right hand that is over the half-door. Hull stepped up, and laid hold of Price's wrist, and drew his hand over the half-door; in his hand we found the purse and the four one pound notes. I saw them. Hull took the purse, and shewed it all the people in the tap-room. Hull asked him if he was not a rogue for taking his money; the prisoner said it was done out of a joke.

Q. Had they been joking together - A. Not as I saw; they had been drinking together.

Q. to Hull. How long have you known the prisoner - A. Two months; we had been drinking together near two hours.

Q. You found the money in his hand, did you - A. I did; this is the money, and this is the purse.

MR. ADAMS. I am the landlord of the Red Lion. When I heard of the loss of the purse and the money the prosecutor and the prisoner came to the bar. Hull said he had been robbed; Price seemed very much hurt at the man losing his money. Price said it was hard for one man to sit by another, and to be robbed of his money; they went into the tap-room. I heard Hull say in the tap-room, if any person had taken his pocket-book, and would deliver it up to him, he would say no more about it. Price said to Hull, recollect what company you have been in; suspicion arose upon Price; the serjeant insisted a constable should be sent for. I saw Price's hand catched hold of by Hull; he took the purse out of Price's hand and throwed it into my wife's lap; he said, if my money is in the purse, it is four one pound notes. My wife opened the purse and it contained four one pound notes. Kennedy the officer took the prisoner into custody.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A pipemaker .

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-58

58. MARY ARKING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , two gowns, value 6 s. a petticoat, value 18 d. a child's frock, value 1 s. and a table cloth, value 2 s. the property of Patrick Enwright ,

BRIDGET ENWRIGHT . I am the wife of Patrick Enwright , he is a bricklayer's labourer . I lost these things on the ninth of November from No. 26, Pall

Mall Buildings, Mary-le-bone , from out of my room. I am only a lodger in the house. The prisoner lived with me; I agreed with her for a shilling a week and her victuals and lodging; I am only a poor milk carrier. On Wednesday the 9th of November; I left her in care of my two children; and while I was gone she picked a lock in my room, and took out two gowns, a petticoat, a child's frock, and a table cloth. She pawned them, and left my children in the care of another child. She also took from me a shilling out of fourteenpence, that was in my drawer. I went to the drawer to take out a penny to get a penny candle, I found my money gone. She pawned these things at Mr. Neade's, in Duke-street.

JOHN NEADE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gown, petticoat, child's frock, and a table cloth, pawned by the prisoner on the 9th of November, about two o'clock in the afternoon.

ELEANOR DAVIS. I produce the other gown; the prisoner came to lodge with me; she paid me for one night's lodging; she left me some duplicates. I took this gown out of pledge for a shilling and a halfpenny.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-59

59. GEORGE LUKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October, twenty-five pound weight of lead, value 25 s. the property of John Spencer and Peter Spencer , affixed to a house of theirs ; and Anthony Hunter , for feloniously receiving the same lead, knowing it to be stolen .

JOHN SPENCER . I and my brother Peter Spencer have some houses in Mecklenbourg square ; from information I went to the house there, and found I was robbed; all I knew is that the house belonged to me, and the lead was gone.

DENNIS CAREY . I am twelve years old. I and Luker went to Mr. Spencer's house in Mecklenbourg Square, on the 28th of October in the morning, a quarter before seven. We took the lead off that house the day before; we went up the joists and got on the roof; we cut some lead from the skylight; we chucked it down in six pieces; we went and sold it to Hunter, in Bell Court, Brook Street, Holborn.

Q. What did you sell it for - A. I think it was half an hundred weight; he gave seven shillings for it; Luker sold it: he told us to bring more, there was not weight; he gave the money to Luker. This is the lead.

GEORGE HAY . I live at No. 20, Mecklenbourg-square; on Tuesday the 25th of October I missed lead from off the house; it rained, and the rain came in; I waited until the 28th, and then I went on the house and examined it, and at No. 28 I saw two boys at the top of the house, Luker and Carey, and with assistance I took the two boys. The watchman went to the top of the house, he saw Carey in the chimney; and when he came down, I took him into custody; the watchman took Luker; we took them to the watch-house, and from the wathhouse to Hatton Garden office.

JAMES HANCOCK. As soon as the two boys were brought to the office, I and Limbric went with a search warrant to the prisoner Hunter's house, there we found this lead. I went with Partridge, and fitted on one piece to the top of No. 16, and they fitted the rest, it fitted completely. I and Limbric found this lead in Hunter's shop.

George Hay. This lead matched with No. 16, that house belongs to Messrs. Spencer's; there was lead taken from different houses.

Luker said nothing in his defence.

Hunter's Defence. On the 24th of October, Luker and Carey came into my shop, and said, do you buy lead; I said, where is it? Luker said at his father's; he said his father bought the lead of old houses. I gave him three halfpence a pound for it; I can only make twopence a pound of it myself. On the 25th he came again with some more lead; I bought it at three halfpence the pound, that is the market price. I thought the lead was the boy's father's; he said his father lived in Gray's-in-lane.

Hunter called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

LUKER, GUILTY , aged 16.

Judgment respited .

HUNTER, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-60

60. THOMAS BRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a watch, value 1 l. a seal, value 5 s. a shirt, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 4 d. the property of James Hodges .

JAMES HODGES . I am a Custom-house officer . I lost my property on the 16th of November. I was an officer stationed on board the Captain Burton, bound for Jamaica . When I came out of my hammock and dressed myself, I felt for my watch, it was gone. I examined my hammock, I could not find my watch; I afterwards missed my handkerchief and my shirt, my box was broken open. I went into the office and informed the officer, and asked if he had been out of the dock with a bundle. He said no. I immediately went to the south gate, and enquired of the officer of that gate, he said no; and on the north side I saw the officer with the prisoner, and the prisoner with a bundle under his arm. The officer took the bundle from him, and my watch.

Q, Did he work on board that ship - A. No, I never saw the prisoner before that morning.

EBENEZER HORTON. I am a constable at the West India Docks. I was stationed at the outhouse of the Export Dock; I received information that person had lost his watch, shirt, and handkerchief; immediately after I saw the prisoner with a bundle. He told me he had some things belonging to the mate of the Phoenix. I asked him for his pass, he could not produce any. I then looked in the bundle, and saw the articles which this person claimed as his own; the watch and seal were concealed in the prisoner's trowsers. The prosecutor and I examined the prisoner, and found the shirt, handkerchief, watch, and seal. I produce them.

Prosecutor. The shirt, handkerchief, watch and seal, are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the watch of the gentlemen

that belonged to the clothes he gave me his hammoc to take away. I was to have two shillings for carrying the hammock; the officer stopped me and asked me what ship I came from. I said the Fanny, he took the watch from me and all the clothes The man that gave them me, I do not see in Court. his name is Thomas Young .

GUILTY aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-61

61. JAMES KUSICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , a watch value 3 l. the property of Daniel Kelly . in his dwelling house .

DANIEL KELLY . I live at the Rose public house in Rose-street, Piccadilly ; I am the house keeper ; I pay rent and taxes for the house; my house is in the parish of St. Martin in the fields . On the 15th of October, the prisoner came to my house, in company with another man, between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I was in bed. I first saw him at my bed, at my bed room door, where I sleep. My wife and two children were in bed with me, They knocked at the door; there was a man in my house; his wife was in labour, we have no outlet that man went down to throw some dirty water away; that is how the house door came open, They came in that way, and they knocked at my door. I opened the door. I saw the prisoner and another man standing at the door. I asked them what they wanted the prisoner Kusick said, he was a Bow Street officer; he had come to search my house for one Frank Riley . that robbed a man in Tottenham Court Road. I opened the door; he walked in; he shewed me a piece of paper I saw the Kings arms on the top of it. I thought it was all right; he called it his authority only Kusick came into the room; the other man staid at the door; he looked under the bed, and pulled the clothes off my wife that was in bed. I was in my room all the time he was searching it, he went to the next room; then I stood by the door, when they had searched the next room. I begged and prayed that they would not go up stairs, because of the woman that had been in labour all that night. With a great deal of persuasions, they did not go up and search the other rooms they then said I must treat them with something to drink. I went down stairs, and gave them a quarten of gin which they did not pay for, and then they went away. I had no such person as Frank Riley lodged in my house. When they went away, Kusick said Kelly I will be here again at half past ten o'clock pray do not say any thing of our being here; for this man we want, and must have him. As soon as they were gone, I went up stairs because I was naked, as soon as I entered my bed room, I missed my watch from off my table; I wound it up the over night, and laid it there. that I might see what o'clock it was; I always lay my watch there, I have never seen my watch since.

EDMUND WILSON . I am a Bow Street officer.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Kusick - A. Yes I have known him between seven; and eight years.

Q. Is he an officer of Bow Street - A. No he is no officer whatever he has been waiter at a tavern.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Frank Riley - A. I do not. I took him into custody in Charles-street Drury Lane. I told Kusick what I took him in custody for; he said he knew nothing of the watch, he said he had been at Kelly's house, to find a man of the name of Riley; as to the watch he knew nothing about it, I searched him and found nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me, I went to Kelly's house to for Frenk Riley. Mr. Kelly said come up stairs and see he said he was not there; I came away. When I got home I was met by three of the gang; Oh said they you have been to Kelly's, I said yes they said you had better not go there again they called me a nose. I am innocent of the charge. My wife had been robbed of her shawl, I went there to find the man that had taken it from her. I thought I had better put up with the loss then go there again.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-62

62. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted, for that he, on the 13th of November , upon Richard Lloyd Jones , a subject of our Lord the King feloniously, and with malice afore thought, did make an assault, and that he with a certain sharp instrument, did cut and stab the said Richard Lloyd Jones , with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT. For cutting and stabbing him, in like manner, with intent to disable him.

RICHARD LLOYD . I am a publican ; I live in Chequer-alley, Bunhill Row .

Q. Was the prisoner at your house on the 13th of November - A. He was. I cannot say exactly the time he came; a little after eleven o'clock I received the injury.

Q. How long had he been there - A. I understood by my wife, he had been there better than two hours. I had seen him better than an hour.

Q. A little after eleven what happened - A. I make it a rule to clear my house at eleven o'clock; and the company had all gone, except four persons, and my two friends, I had got in my bar.

Q. Was the other three persons in company with the prisoner - A. They had been prior to the time that this happened. The prisoner placed himself against the bar at my house; and used very abusive language. Before he used that language, I had desired him to go, the other three requested to have another glass, it was past the hour I said, I would serve them no more; the lights I had taken out of, the tap room. They stood at the tap room door to have another glass; and by the request of my wife, I let them have another glass. The prisoner requested to have some, he said he had no money except three farthings; but he would be damned if he would not have it. I told him he should not, nor any one else should have more; and if he would not go out, and the others I must be under the necessity of putting them out" why you b - r, said the prisoner

"which way will you do it" I had no anger on my part; he is but a little man. I took him up in my arms from the place where he stood, I carried him about three yards, immediately I found I

found I was wounded in my side, I called out I am stabbed; and secured his arms directly, my neighbour had his eye upon him the whole time, he is here; he jumped to my assistance, he pulled the prisoner up to the bar. I said examine his hand; he has got something in his hand, he extended his arms from his body; we found nothing in his hand, and the party that was there, said, it was only the prick, of a pin.

Q. Did you find any knife afterwards - A. My neighbour did. I said it is some sharp instrument; I am afraid it is broken in me; my wife sent immediately to the watchhouse the constable of the night, sent several watchman down they came and secured him, we all looked on the floor where he stood I saw Mr. Hodge pick up the knife within a foot of where I was stabbed; he was taken to the watch-house the constable was bnt a young officer, he sent a watchman down for me to come to the watch-house I hesitated about going and while I was at the watchhouse the prisoners party nearly rescued him.

Q, Have you given the whole account of every thing that happened, before you received the wound - A. Yes; the constable has got the knife; he has had it ever since.

Q. You carried him three or four yards - A. Yes; to put him out, that was towards the door I carried him. I carried him that way for the purpose of putting him out of the house and for no other purpose,

Q. Had he frequented your house before - A. I have seen him several times before.

THOMAS BATTS HODGE. I was at this public-house on this night. I went in about nine o'clock, I did not see the prisoner then, I saw the prisoner some time afterwards, in the passage; Mr Jones said it was a rule to clear his house at eleven o'clock; there were three more in company they wanted some rum and water. Mrs. Jones said she would have no more drawed for any body. They made some disturbance Mr. Jones said to his wife, I will let them have another glass, if they will go quietly. They went out into the passage; the prisoner stood with his back against the bar, opposite of the street door; I was in the bar myself. Mr. Jones stood in the passage, he said to the others come now you have had your glass it is time for your departing, it is a late hour, I will have my doors fast. The prisoner used foul language and said he would not go, until it suited himself. Mr. Jones said if he did not go qusetly, he should be under the necessity of putting him out. He abused Mr. Jones. Mr. Jones said, it is of no use I will have my doors shut. Mr. Jones laid hold of him round the body, to carry him out; and when Jones got by the door he called to me that he was stabbed. I went to his assistance, and laid hold of the prisoner, and drew him up to the bar door, Mr. Jones opened his waistcoat; he bled a great-deal. He said he did not touch him, there is something broken in it. The other men said it was only the scratch of a pin. I picked ue the knife at the very spot where it was done. The knife was partly open, there was no blood upon it when I picked it up.

Q. Now on what part of Jones's body was it where he was struck - A. On the left side; just by the bottom rib bone.

Q. Is the surgeon here - A. No his wound was dressed by a surgeon.

Prosecutor. The knife hit against the rib otherwise it might have been mortal.

JOHN COLLIVELL . I am an officer. I was called to take the man into custody that stabbed Mr. Jones. I went with some watchman. I searched him, and found no knife.

Q. to Prosecutor How long did you continue ill with that wound - A. I did not feel any great effect of it until Wednesday morning. A surgeon did not see it until this happened on Sunday night eleven o'clock, a surgeon saw it on Monday Dr. Smith attended me he told me it was very fortunate that it hit upon the rib no harm would come of it. If it had not hit there it might have been fatal.

Q. How soon afterwards did you get well - A. The next morning I felt a very little uneasier; except I breathed hard if any body came near me, I was in fear from it.

Prisoner's Defence. There was an uproar in the house, when I went into it. Mr. Jones was running out of the bar with his chopper, and striking a man on the head. His head was all of a gore of blood. I sat drinking in the house until eleven o'clock and then I was more drunk, he charged me with stabbing him. There were seven or eight followed me into the watchhouse, and took my part.

Q. to Hodge. Did the prisoner appear to be in liquor - A. No; he had not had but one pint of porter in the house.

(The prisoner called two witnesses; who gave him the character of a quiet humane man.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 37.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of his good character .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-63

63. SARAH NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a 1 l. bank note , the property of Edmund Pye .

EDMUND PYE . I am a comb-maker . I lost the note either on the 27th or 28th of November. I will not be certain of the day I lost it. I gave it her to go and get change. The prisoner was a servant of mine; I gave it her on a Thursday; I did not see her again till the Thuesday following. One of my men met her in Whitechapel, and brought her to my house. The prisoner never brought me the change.

Q. How long had she lived in your service - A, She came on the Monday; I was to pay her five shillings per week, and tea twice a day. I sent the prisoner with a one pound note to Mrs. Penn, at the public house. to get change. The prisoner owned that she got the change, before the justice.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the note; I spent it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 14 days , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18141130-64

64. JAMES CROOKS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November , twenty pound

weight of bacon, value 21 s. the property of William Barnard and James Jones .

JAMES JONES . I am a cheesemonger ; my partner 's name is William Barnard . I live at 204, High Holborn .

ANTHONY HANBY . I am a journeyman coach-maker. I live at 136, High Holborn. On 4th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing in Holborn. waiting for a friend. I saw the prisoner take a piece of bacon from the prosecutor's shop. He held it with both his hands and ran across the road with it into Bloomsbury-court. I pursued him, and laid hold of him in Bloomsbury-court with the bacon; he made no resistance; said he hoped I would forgive him; it was his first offence.

Q. Whereabouts was the bacon - A. Just within-side of the shop. This is the bacon.

Prosecutor. It is my bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court and the jury.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-65

65. PETER NORMAN was indicted for that he, on the 7th of November , was servant to William Hitchman , and employed and entrusted to receive money for him; that he being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 1 l. 15 s. and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-66

66. TRUEMAN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , twenty-four pounds weight of paper, value 6 s. and twenty-one pounds weight of tea, value 3 l. the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am an officer. On the 27th of October, I met an old woman in the Commercial-road, I stopped her, and searched her; I found upon her concealed under her petticoats in a little bag a small quantity of tea, and some India paper, and in consequence of what the woman said, I went to No. 3, Trafalgar-square, Stepney, to the house of Trueman Wood, the prisoner; Walter Griffiths and Walker was with me when I went there, and up stairs in a chest in the bed-room, I found this jar of tea, and on the top of the chest of drawers, I found these two jars of tea; I found nineteen pounds weight of tea in different parcels; in the same room, I found the paper now produced, it is what I call India paper, and in a pigeon-hole were these two caddies with tea in them, and in this tea-chest which was locked up was one jar of tea, and wrapped up in this bag was one hundred pounds in notes, four guineas in gold, and in the drawer there were different bags with silver.

Q. Was Wood then at home - A. He was not; he came home at half past six; upon his coming home, I stated what I found. He knocked at the door; we opened the door to him. I told him it was our duty to search him; we searched him, and found upon him paper of the same description as the other. He told us to take the tea and the paper, and say nothing about it. We told him it was our duty to take him before the magistrate. He said, cannot you take the money and the tea, and say nothing about it; he said, if it comes to the Company's cars it will be the ruin of me, and in going along in the coach, I asked him where he got it; he said, he bought it of a man in the Commercial-road, about five months ago, he bought it by the lump, he gave two-pounds for it, in the street, he said, he bought it in the day time; he should know the man again if he was to see him. When he was before the magistrate, he said, the paper was his perquisites, that he was allowed it by the East India Company, he stated to the magistrate that he got the tea as before.

JOHN WALTER GRIFFITHS . I have heard Edwards examined; his account his correct. The prisoner said for God's sake take all the money you have seen, and the tea; for if it comes to the Company's ears it will be the ruin of me.

THOMAS WALKER . I was on duty with Edwards. I found two jars of tea, and a tea-chest; they had got tea in them.

JOHN JONES . I am an elder in the East India warehouse.

Q. Is that the sort of paper used by the East India Company - A. It is.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. A labourer, in Haydon-square warehouse; at that time his wages was nineteen shillings and sixpence a week, from seven till three in the afternoon. This paper is kept in the warehouse: the paper is demaged.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-67

67. GEORGE WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a box, value 1 s. and sixty-four pounds weight of grits, value 1 l. the property of Sophia Osmonds , widow .

JOHN WATSON . I am porter to Mrs. Osmond, 14, Piccadilly, corn-chandler and seeds-woman . On the 15th of November, I received of James Westwood three boxes for Mr. Bailey, of Barnet, a grocer; I was directed to take them to the Swan Inn, Holborn-bridge; I was going there with them; at the same time, I received several other parcels, which I had to deliver between our house and Holborn-bridge, the first place that I had to deliver my goods was at Mr. Kirkman, the brewer, Broad-street, St. Giles's; I left my cart at their gate; I went into Mr. Kirkman's with two small parcels, leaving the cart outside of their gate, with three boxes and other things in the cart; I stopped near a qarter an hour at Mr. Kirkman's for the money, and when I came back to the cart; I missed the box out of the cart; it is the same box by the direction on it; this was about five o'clock.

JAMES WESTWOOD . I am shopman to Sophia

Osmond, widow. This is the box what I gave to the porter; I directed the box, and delivered it to the porter myself.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going from my work I was met by a man at the top of Drury-lane, he asked me if I would carry the box for him, if I would put it on my shoulder he would overtake me, and when I got into Long Acre, I was stopped by the officer.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-68

68. MARGARET MEGEARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , two window curtains, value 30 s a coal-scuttle, value 5 s. an earth-rug, value 5 s. six cups, value 6 s. two petticoats, value 5 s. four blankets, value 4 l. two pillows, value 6 s. a carpet, value 5 s. the property of Hatton Wood , esq.

NANCY MATILDA WOOD . I am the wife of Hatton Wood, Mr. Wood is one of the clerks in the Exchequer ; our residence is No. 1, Staphes-inn , and we have a country house at Dalston, where we reside occasionally.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. A yearly servant to keep the house .

Q. What time did you leave your chambers to go into the country - A. About the latter end of July; we left the prisoner in care of the chambers, and the care of the different articles there. I returned to town on the 31st of October, I found the chambers in disorder; the prisoner was not there; my property was scatered about, and a great deal of it gone.

Q. Did you find any body in care of that property - A. A strange woman; the prisoner had employed a strange woman to elean the chambers for our reception. I saw the prisoner on the Friday, she was taken up; she had lived with us near four years.

JOHN SCOTT. I am shopman to Mr. Lee, pawnbroker, 93, High Holborn. The prisoner pawned thirteen pledges with me. I produce them.

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am a shopman to Mr. Harris, No. 11, Brook-street. On the 18th and 19th of July, the prisoner pawned two pillows with me. I produce them.

JOSEPH JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Benton, High Holborn. I produce a coal-scuttle, the prisoner pledged with me.

WILLIAM THISSELTON. I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge, and a quantity of duplicates.

Prosecutrix, The articles are all mine.

Prisoners Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court; I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-69

69. GABRIEL MYERS and JOHN ABRAHAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a piece of cotton nett, value 4 s. the property of William Mayhew .

HANNAH MAYHEW . I am the wife of William Mayhew ; I live at No. 30, New-road, St George's in the East . I lost my property on the 16th of November, between five and six in the evening, the prisoner Myers took the piece of cotton nett out of a window where the pane of glass was broken in the inside sash; the prisoner Myers took it out, and put it into his pocket.

Q. The glass was broken before, was it - A. Yes, I saw him put it into his pocket. I went into the next door, there was no one with me at that time. The prisoner Abrahams had been in the shop a minute before, and had left the shop before Myers came in, and took it; Abrahams came into the shop before Myers, he asked to look at some handkerchiefs. In about a minuate after Myers came in; I called my husband, and while my husband turned his back to take some stockings down, I saw Myers put his hand into the side sash, and took the cotton nett; my husband came round to assist me; he threw the cotton nett down: I laid hold of Myers' coat.

Q. Where was Abrahams all this time - A. I believe he was standing some where about the door; the two prisoners were never in the shop together; Myers denied taking the cotton nett, and after he took it out of his pocket, he said, he meant to purchase it; this is the cotton nett; it is my husband's property.

MYERS, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

ABRAHAMS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-70

70. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , two sheets, value 5 s. a quilt, value 7 s. two pillows, value 4 s. and one pillow-case, value 1 s. the property of Abraham Butler , in a lodging-room .

MARY BUTLER . I am the wife of Abraham Butler ; I live at No. 18, Philip-lane, Cross-street, St. George's in the East . On the 7th of October, I let a lodging to the prisoner and his wife, a room ready furnished at four shillings and sixpence a week, they continued with me until the 29th of October; when I found my property was gone, I went into the room on Saturday the 29th, and asked for the ironing-cloth; the wife was present. I took the ironing-cloth. I saw a blanket on the top of the bed instead of a quilt. I overhauled the bed; I found a pair of sheets were gone, a pair of pillows, and one pillow-case, that is all I missed; those things I let to them with the room for their use. I asked the wife what they had done with my property; she told me she knew nothing at all of it, I must ask her husband, she knew nothing at all of it; he was a lazy man, he would not work. When the prisoner came in I sent for an officer, and had him taken in custody. The pawnbroker produced my things at Shadwell office.

MR. BRADLEY. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pillow pledged by the prisoner on the 13th of October. I had another pillow, I delivered it to the prosecutrix.

JOHN RICHARD LOW. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet, pledged by the prisoner on the 11th of October.

FRANCIS JACKSON. I am an officer. On the 29th of October. I took the prisoner into custody. The property is all here.

Prosecutor. The whole of the property are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not mean to deny the offence; I pledged the articles in the indictment.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-71

71. JOHN TEIRNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a truck, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Ganer .

THOMAS GANER . I am a labouring man . I lost my truck on the 24th of November; I only know that I lost my truck out of Covent Garden market, I tied it to a post, and left it there.

ROBERT DOBEY . I am a watchman. On the 24th of November, a quarter before one o'clock, I saw the prisoner bring this truck with a sack of potatoes on it at No. 6, Clear-street; I came up to him, he said, you know me; I said yes. He said, I have bought a sack of potatoes of a man; I have been drinking; he called for his wife Mary; in two or three minutes she came down with a candle and opened the door; he took the potatoes off the truck and put them at the side of the door; he moved the truck about three yards off the door; he went into his house with the sack of potatoes. I took the truck to the watchhouse. The prisoner was not sober,

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-72

72. MARGARET RAMSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , from the person of Colin Campbell , two 5 l. notes, the property of Colin Campbell .

COLIN CAMPBELL. I lost my notes on the 4th of November, I was walking in East Smithfield , between eight and nine at night, I met the prisoner, she asked me to go with her, and while I was getting some silver to give her to get something to eat and drink; she put her hand into my pocket, and took out my pocket-book with the notes. I gave her some money to get something to drink. In about a quarter of an hour, I went home; I went to pay my landlord some money, and my pocket-book and notes were gone; I went out with intent of searching after the prisoner; it was so dark, I could not find my way. On Sunday morning I went out, and by chance I saw her go into the house with another woman; I told her I would get her taken up on Monday; on Monday morning. I got an officer to go with me to the house; I pointed her out to the officer.

Q. Did you find your property - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I don't know the gentleman; I am innocent of the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-73

73. DAVID GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , one pla spoon, value 18 d. the property of Humphrey Wood .

HUMPHREY WOOD . I am a publican , I keep the Bull and Gate , at Kentish Town .

JOHN HENSON. On the 31st of October, this man was coming along Kentish Town with his onions to sell; he sold me a bunch of onions; in my room he let this spoon (I now produce) fall out of his pocket while I was paying him for his onions. This is the table-spoon that fell out of his pocket. I took the prisoner into custody; I searched him, and found this silver spoon.

Prosecutor. There is no mark to the spoon that I can identify it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-74

74. JOHN TYLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September, 1812 , seven pound weight of copper, value 7 s. the property of Almond Hill and James Hill .

RICHARD COLLIER . I am fireman to Almond Hill and James Hill. They are shipwrights .

Q. Did you lose any copper at any time - A. Yes, on the 14th of September, 1812. I lost it out of a warehouse; our warehouse is situated in the yard, at Limehouse-hole, in the parish of Poplar. On the 18th of September, 1812, two copper bolts I locked up in the warehouse about one o'clock. After two o'clock I looked for the bolts, they were gone; I had the key of the warehouse in my pocket all the time. I never saw the bolts afterwards until the 18th of the same month, 1812. About seven o'clock in the morning I was told the prisoner was near the premises. I went and looked over the pales; there I saw the prisoner with one of the bolts in his possession; upon his seeing me he endeavoured to put the bolt under his jacket. He went into a privy just by, and shoved the bolt into the soil; then I called Mr. Dalton, he was near at hand. I called him to come to take him; he did, and then a lad took the bolt out of the soil; I saw it to be one of the bolts that I lost, the other bolt I never saw again. We secured the prisoner, and took him to the Thames Police office, that is all I know about it.

Q. How come you not to prosecute before - A. He was committed: he broke out of the lock-up place, at the Thames police, the morning after he was committed. I am sure he is the same man. I have seen him many times before; I have no doubt at all he is the same person.

JAMES DALTON. I am a fireman also to Almon Hill and James Hill. I have known the prisoner Tyler for some years; the bolt that is now in court I ordered one of my boys to take it out of the soil. I took the prisoner with the bolt to the Thames Police Office; he was committed for further examination; he broke out of the look-up place. Afterwards he was taken for stealing some tripe at Bow; he was sent to the Thames Police to be tried upon his former commitment.

WILLIAM WHEELER . I am a ship-breaker. I first saw the prisoner in my yard; he was sitting

down as if to ease himself, he had this bolt; I am sure he is the same man. This is the bolt. I can swear he is the man.

ROBERT EVANS . I am an officer of the Thames police office. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 18th of September, 1812. I have had the bolt in my possession ever since. He got out of our lock up place some how or another. I am certain he is the man; I should know him among a thousend.

Mr. Dalton, I am not mistaken of the man, nor of the bolt; it is the property of Messrs. Hill.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the man they say I am; I can take my oath I am not that person; I was out in the West Indies.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-75

75. DAVID GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a silver desert spoon, value 10 s. the property of a certain person to the Juors unknown.

JOHN HENSON . This silver spoon I took out of his pocket when I searched him; that is what I took him into charge for; I do not know whose it is.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-76

76. MARY BACON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , three pair of shoes, value 11 s. the property of John Thomas .

MARGARET THOMAS . My husband name is John Thomas , he is a shoe-maker , at Hackney.

Q. Did you lose any shoes at any time - A. Yes, at the latter end of October I missed a pair of shoes, and on the second day that she was in the house, I missed another pair of shoes. When my servant went away, the prisoner was recommended to me during her absence; and on the 22d of November, I missed another pair of shoes. I then suspected the prisoner; she left my house on Monday evening; she left my house and went to her lodging; my servant had returned. I immediately went to the prisoner's lodging, suspecting that she might be the person that took the shoes. I begged her to give my property up; she denied having it; an officer was fetched; the three pair of shoes was found in the cupboard; these are the shoes; they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-77

77. ANN BISHOP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , from the person of John Brooks , six bank notes for the payment of five pound each, and one 1 l. note.

JOHN BROOKS . On the 7th of November I missed my bank note. I had been to Blackwall upon some business to a ship there. I met the prisoner at the George, in St, Martin's-le-grand. I was tipsy; I slipped my foot; the prisoner ran up, and catched hold of my arm; she said she would see me to my lodgings. I told her to go along; she took me to Charles-street, Drury-lane . I laid down on the bed; in the morning when I awoke, I was alone, my pocket-book was in my pocket, and the notes taken out to the amount of thirty-one pounds. I am sure the prisoner is the women.

Q. Are you sure you had the notes in your pocket-book - A. Yes; I looked at the notes after I returned from Blackwall. On Friday morning I and John Furzeman searched after the woman; on Monday evening we found her by Leicetser-square. John Fruzeman took her into a public-house: she fell on her knees; said she had taken my property; she had given it to two other women; she entreated me to forgive her.

JOHN FURZEMAN . I am a patrole, I took the prisoner into a public-house, searched her, and found nothing; she said, she had taken the purse out of his pocket, took the notes out of his purse, and put the pocket-book in his pocket again. The prisoner tendered a five-pound note to my wife; my wife gave it her again; I saw my wife return it to her.

MARY WILLIAMS . I saw Ann Bishop pull out of her stocking a five-pound note; she sent Ann Barton to get it changed.

ANN BARTON . The prisoner came up to my room on Saturday night, and asked me for a drink of water; I gave her a cup of tea. I got the five-pound note changed for her at Mr. Kelly's, in Rose-street, Long Acre; he gave me change, and stopped ten shillings.

WILLIAM KELLY . I keep the Rose public-house, Rose-street, Long Acre. Two girls came into my house, and said, they wanted change for a five-pound note for Mrs. Crookshank, who is a good customer of mine; they said, Mr. Kelly, I owe you five shillings, take that; I never stopped ten shillings in my days.

COURT. They say you did - A. I cannot help that.

Ann Barton. I never owed him five shillings; he stopped ten shillings.

Q, to Kelly. What did you do with the note - A. I paid it to my ale brewer.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-78

78. JOHN SHIRLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a box coat, value 2 l. the property of John Jones , esq.

FRANCIS HOSKELL. I am coachman to John Jones esq. I lost my box coat on the 10th of November, at half past nine in the morning, it was on the coach box; my carriage was in the coach-house, No. 2, Hunter's-mews, Henrietta-square ; I had a dog; it made a terrible noise; I looked into the coach house, end missed the coat from off the carriage, and on my looking up to the gate, I saw the prisoner with the coat, he ran off seeing me; I called out stop thief; a man of the name Butler stopped him; he dropped the coat before he was taken; I never lost sight of him.

JOHN BUTLER . On the 10th of November, I was

coming along Hunter-street; I heard the coachman cry stop thief; I stopped the prisoner coming out of the mews with a coat on his arm; he dropped the coat, and I stopped the prisoner. This is the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing by the gateway, a man came and asked me to hold the coat, which I did ten minutes; I put it down, and went to look for the man; I could not find him.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-79

79. REBECCA BARBER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , one shirt, value 7 s a blanket, value 7 s. a pillow, value 2 s. a chair-cover, value 1 s. a tablecloth, value 5 s. two pillowcases, value 2 s. a silver punch-ladle, value 3 s. two night-caps, value 1 s. and a silk bag, value 6 d. the property of Bancram Simone .

BANCRAM SIMONE. Q. What age are you - A. Eighty-three.

Q. How long have you been in this country - A. Near forty years.

Q. Where did you live last August - A. In Sparow.

Q. Did Rebecca Barber live in your house as a servant - A. Yes; her sister was my house-keeper; she was my servant up to August last; the prisoner's sister was ill, she said, give me a bed, I will go and live some where else.

Q. After the prisoner left your house, did you miss any of your property - A. Yes; I missed all the things the officer has in his possession; I missed them in August. The prisoner and her sister were in my service, and I missed a number of articles more than is here.

Q. The prisoner's sister had been with you some time, had she not - A. More than ten years.

Mr. Knapp. She had a child, had not she - A. That is a year and a half or two years ago; she went to Hatton Gardon office, and swore that to my son; she could not put that on my shoulders; I am eighty years old.

Q. Now, at the time that she went away, were you called to see the things that she took away - A. She called me to see her box; I said, I did not want any thing in the box.

Q. At the time she went away, did not you say, you was very well satisfied, that she was very honest - A. I said so, because I thought they would remove the goods else where.

Q. Did not you go to see the prisoner's sister, the house-keeper, and keep to company - A. No, never, not at anytime, I went with Dr Taylor to see her, only once; her sister said, my sister does not like to see you; the sister liked me, but the prisoner did not; that is a good while ago I went with Dr. Taylor; I gave the prisoner's sister a one hundred and twenty pound note, and hoped she would live to come back again.

Q. Why you wished the prisoner to come back again - A. No, I never asked her.

Q. Did not you offer to pay the rent of a house to the amount of eighty pounds a year - A. No, never that is all a falsity.

Q. After you had charged the prisoner with stealing these things, did not you invite her to come and dine with you - A. No.

MARY EMMITT . I live in Pentonville, and have done so twenty years. On the 1st of September, the prisoner's brother brought some boxes to my house.

Q. Whose boxes were they - A. Mary Barber 's boxes.

Q. That is the prisoner's sister, the house-keeper of the prosecutor - A. Yes; she is dead. They both lodged with me, Mary and Rebecca Barber ; they remained in my place; Mary Barber died on the 24th of September; the prisoner remained with me till the 10th of October, when she went away she said Mr. Simone would call, I was to deny having the boxes, and say she was gone to Yarmouth; I was to keep the boxes in my possession until she returned, she then would make me a present of a new gown. Mr. Simone came with the officer, and requested I would deliver up the boxes; which I did; I told him the prisoner told me to deny the boxes, and to say they were gone to Yarmouth.

PETER PERRY . I am an officer. On the 15th of November, I searched Mrs. Emmitt's house. I took this property which I now produce.

Q. Was the prisoner present when you took the property - A. No; I went to her uncles in Gray's-inn-lane; I apprehended her in the garret at her uncle's house; I told the prisoner she must go with me; she said, if she must, she must. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. All the property is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The property was my sister's, I was not in Simone's house; at her removal I ran away out of it somedays before; I am innocent of the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-80

80. WILLIAM TOWNSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a jacket, value 3 s. a pocket-book, value 1 s. and seven 1 l. bank notes , the property of Emanuel Anthony .

EMANUEL ANTHONY . I lost my things from on board a ship off Union stairs ; I missed them on the 31st of October; I saw them and the prisoner at eleven o'clock at night. and the next morning I missed them, the prisoner was gone then. I have seen my jacket, and my pocket-book since, but the notes are gone. The next day I saw the prisoner in St. Catherine's-lane, at Mrs. Gilbert's; he had my jacket on; the pocket-book was in the jacket pocket. I asked him to give me my jacket; he said, it was not my jacket.

MARY GILBERT . I keep a room at St. Catherine's lane. I first saw the prisoner on the night before he was taken up, he came to me about twelve o'clock at night; he staid there all night; he had a sailor's jacket on; he had a pocket-book with bank notes in it; he changed one, and gave me five shillings; my room is on the ground floor. The prisoner was in

by room, when Anthony came by, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the forepart of the day, Anthony claimed the jacket he had on his back; I saw the prisoner in custody the next day at the office; he had no jacket on then.

JOHN SHAW . I took the prisoner into custody. I searched him; this is the jacket and the pocketbook, there are no notes in it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was about ten o'clock when I went on board; I asked for his jacket; he was asleep. I took it, and was going to pawn it; I saw there was a pocket-book in it; I made free with the notes.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-81

81. JOHN BROCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , eighty-four pounds weight of candles, value 4 l. the property of Bennett Davis , widow .

BENNETT DAVIS . I am a widow. I live at No. 62, High Holborn. I keep an oilshop . On the 23d of October I received a note by a boy, (the note read.)

"In addition to these articles received on Saturday, Miss West requests Mrs. Davis to send early on Monday morning, four dozen of candles for the house, and two dozen of moulds; to be left at the same place. Miss West thinks the mustard dear; would request Mrs. Davis to be reasonable in her charge of the articles." This is the note I received before

(read.)

" October 22, 1814. Miss West requests Mrs. Davis one pound of black pepper, and fourteen pound weight of soap, directed to Miss West, Hampstead, to be left at the same straw hat shop, Tottenham-court-road."

Mrs. DAVIS. I directed the quantity of candles to be made up.

Q. Did you know such a person as Miss. West of Hampstead - A. No, I directed an enquiry to be made; I could find no such person,

GEORGE GRIGG. I am shopman to Mrs. Davis; I packed up the candles in a box, and weighed them, five dozen, and two dozen pound of moulds, that is eighty-four pounds. They were afterwards taken to the house of Mrs. Smith, 204, Tottenham-court-road. I directed the box for Miss West, Hampstead, to go by the Hampstead coach. I ordered them to be left at Mrs. Smith's, 204, Tottenham-court-road.

HENRY TWITE READ. On the 23d of October last I carried a box of candles to 204, Tottenham-court-road, and left them there as I was directed.

ROSETTA SMITH . I live with my mother, 204, Tottenham-court-road At our house we take in parcels to be taken by the Hampstead coach. I took in a box directed for Miss West of Hampstead; when the lad brought the box, I desired him to send somebody; in consequence of which Mrs. Davis came, and after that Grigg came; he went to a neighbour's house until I sent for him; in about half an hour after that, the prisoner came; he said I have come for those things for Miss West. I said to him, it is a box; he said it is a box; he asked me where it was; I said it was in the parlour, if he would come and take it. He came, and lifted the box up by the rope from where it was into the middle of the room, and at the time Grigg came into the room.

Q. Did he move it completely from the place where it was before - A. Yes, he moved it about a yard; I had sent for Gregory, and Gregory came in and laid hold of him.

Prisoner. I never moved the box at all.

MISS SMITH. I am sure he moved it full a yard from where it was before.

Q. to Grigg. You were sent for by the last witness to come over - A. I took him; he confessed the two notes were written by him; I shewed him the two notes; he said they were his own writing; I took him into custody; he was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. to Mrs. Davis. Do you know the prisoner's hand writing - A. I think the notes are his handwriting.

Q. What is the value of these candles - A. Four pounds is an under value

Prisoner's Defence. It was necessity made me do this.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-82

82. RICHARD BLOOMFIELD and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing two glazed sashes, value 7 s. the property of William Barber .

WILLIAM BARBER. I lost the sashes from No. 51, Broad-street . When they were taken from me, they were in the one pair back room. I was the leaseholder of the house at this time; they were affixed to the house; they were taken down, and taken away all at once,

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr, Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-83

83. CATHERINE RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , four three shilling pieces, six eighteen penny tokens, two shillings, four penny pieces, and seven halfpence, the monies of Quinton Wilkins , from his person .

QUINTON WILKINS . I am a labouring man . I work at the waterworks . On the 26th of November I saw the prisoner in the street. I lost twenty-three shillings and sevenpence halfpenny; four three shilling pieces, six eighteenpenny pieces, two shillings, and sevenpence halfpenny in copper. I lost it about one o'clock in the morning; it was last Sunday morning was a week. I had worked late, and I was paid late.

Q. Where was you when you saw this woman - A. In Carey-street, St. Giles's . She asked me where I was going to. I said home, at New Inn Yard, Tottenham-court-road. I felt her pulling her hand out of my pocket: I attempted to lay hold of her; she kicked up a row in the street; I called the watchman; the watchman let her go; the watchman's name is David Maloney ; the same morning I found out where the prisoner lived; I got Lea the officer to take her up.

Q. How long had you been with her - A. Not two minutes; she took hold of me by the breast; I did not consent to go with her; this happened as I was passing along the street.

Q. Did you find any of your money again - A. No, she dropped a penny piece. I could not speak to the penny piece.

MICHAEL LEA. I am a patrole; I took the prisoner in custody between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, at the Hare and Hounds, the corner of Puckeridge Street, he said she robbed him; she denied taking his money.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this man between one and two o'clock in the morning; he pushed me into a passage; the men came into the passage; they all began fighting; I knew nothing about the man or the money.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-84

84. ELEANOR TRADGELEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of November , a gown, value 2 s. the property of Lucy Storey .

LUCY STOREY . I live in Nag's Head Court, Drury Lane . I have the lower room in the house; I lost my gown last Monday night was a week; it was taken out of my room; the gown was safe in my room at at four o'clock, it was hanging up in the room; I left my room locked about four o'clock in the afternoon; I returned a little before eight.

Q. Did you know this woman before - A. Yes, very well; she was a next door neighbour to me. I went to the prisoner and accused her of taking it; I asked her whether she had not been at my place; she denied having of it. I saw my gown on the next day at the pawnbrokers. I value my gown at two shillings.

GEORGE GILLET I am a servant with my mother, 36, Old-street; I took in pledge this gown of the prisoner, on Monday evening, the 28th of November, I lent her eighteen-pence upon it, I am sure the prisoner pawned it. I had seen her before; Mrs. Storey came and claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated in liquor, I pushed open the door and took the gown,

GUILTY aged 34.

Confined one year and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-85

85. ROBERT TAINBULL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of November , a wooden chest, value 2 s. and twenty nine pounds weight of tea, value 7 l. from a wharf adjacent to the navigable river Thames ; the property of Henry Chawner .

JAMES SIMMONS I am a patrol of St. Bolthop Aldgate. On the 7th of November, about half past seven, I stopped that prisoner in East Smithfield, he was carrying the tea in a leaden chest; he had taken the wooden chest off it. I asked him where he got it from, he was carrying it on his shoulder. He said he brought it from the Lord Nelson, a ship, laying off the London Dock, going out, laying off the London Dock; he said he was going to take it to the Captains house, I put the tea in the watch-house, and sent my two partners with him, to find out the Captains house. My partners came back very soon, with the prisoner. The tea remained with me, he told me, that he had stolen it. My partner told me so, I asked the prisoner where he had got it from, he said he had stolen it from the Lord Nelson, We went to see if there was any such ship there was no such ship laid there.

Q. Did you tell him that you could find no such ship - A. Yes; then he told us he stole it from a wharf, he did not tell me what the name of the wharf was. I asked him if I took him with me, could he find the wharf; he said yes. I took him with me, in company with John Bull , and Turnbridge the officer he shewed me Mr. Hoare's wharf at St. John's, Wapping. I have had the tea ever since.

Q. Did you ever find the case - A. Yes, we found the case that same night, about three hundred yards from where he had stolen it, from Hoare's wharf. We found it between some stones, where they are ma- ing an entrance to the London Dock. The prisoner shewed me the place where he put the chest,

Q. Who was your partner you sent to find out the Captain - A. John Bull .

JOHN BULL . I am a patrol. After Simmons had stopped the prisoner, I went to find out the Captain the owner of the tea; I was sent by the other patrol. I questioned the prisoner going along where he got the tea; he still said he got it from the Lord Nelson laying off the London Dock quay. I asked him where the Captains house was; he said is was no use flattering me; he had stolen it; that is all he said to me. I went down to Wapping to find the ship, the Lord Nelson, I could find no such ship in the dock.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE. I am a constable. I went to the watchhouse and found this prisoner in custody; I asked him where he got the tea; he said he did not know the name of the place, he would shew me, I took him with me and the two patrols. He shewed me Hoare's wharf, that is in Wapping; he afterwards shewed me where the chest was between some stones at the bottom of Nightingale-lane, where they are making a new opening to the Dock, I produce the tea,

WILLIAM HOARE . The wharf is the property of Henry Chawner , he has the lease of it, he receives the profits of the wharfage, and, is answerable for the losses of it. I carry on the business. The wharf is in the parish of St. John of Wapping.

Q. Do you know any thing of receiving that tea - A. By refering to the book I find there was such a chest of tea received ot our wharf; Jones marked it and packed it.

HUGH JONES . I am a ticket porter.

Q. Look at that chest do you know any thing of it - A. Yes, there is my mark on it; It is my marking I marked it and sent it by a man to Hoare's wharf he brought me back a receipt signed by Mr. Hoare's clerk. This marking shews that I sent it to the wharf. I never saw it at the wharf; I saw it before, and sent it there; I knew It was there, by having the receipt back.

Q. You do not know the quantity do you - A Yes twenty nine pound weight, it is about seven shillings the pound; here is the permit in the chest which specifies the quantity; it was given to a man of the name of Garrett of Aberdeen; this was in the chest and was among the stones.

John Bull. I found the permit between the stones

where the chest was.

(The permit read.)

John Garrett, Aberdeen, to receive twenty nine pound weigh, of tea from the stock of the East India company.

Q. to Mr Hoare. Does the Aberdeen vessel go from your wharf - A. Yes; the chest of tea answers to the permit the gross weight; the tea is of more value then I have set upon it. I have set upon it seven pounds for the loss of it, we should have been answerable for it. It was through the prisoner we found it out; having the case knocked off, although he was stopped with it, we had nothing to prove it.

GUILTY, DEATH , aged 18.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of his appearing to be a poor object .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18141130-86

86. HENRY JOHN WESLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , two bottles. value 6 d. a pint of brandy, value 2 s. and a pint of gin, value 1 s. the property of John Morris and John Cross .

WILLIAM MORRIS . John Morris is my brother; he is a wine and brandy merchant ; John Cross is his partner . The prisoner was in my brother's service about two years and a half; I had suspicion that the prisoner robbed my brother. I secreted myself in the spirit cellar about five o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner near seven o'clock come and draw off brandy from the vatt into a stone bottle; he left the cellar, returned, and drew off a pint of gin into another bottle, and put it into his coat pocket as he had done before. He went then above stairs; I came from the place where I was secreted; I went to Bow-street, and returned with two officers, Wilson and Cave. The prisoner had left the premises; I found him in his way home in Northumberland-street. The officer took the two bottles out of his pocket; one of the bottles had my mark upon it.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. I believe you searched his lodging, and found nothing - Q. There was found brandy, rum, and gin, in bottles.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON. I apprehended the prisoner in Northumberland-street; Cave was with me; on his person we found these two bottles; one had brandy, the other gin.

Q. What would be the value of the brandy and gin - A. The brandy two shillings, and the gin one shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a complaint upon me.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-87

87. SAMUEL FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , ten books, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Wildman Goodwin .

THOMAS WILDMAN GOODWIN . I only know the books are mine.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant of yours - A. No; the books were left in my house when I and my family left town. A woman of the name of Foster was left in care of the house; the prisoner is her husband.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. Mr. Goodwin informed me of the robbery; he desired I would find the books. I went to the pawnbroker's, and found some of the books; Freeman apprehended the prisoner.

JOHN VAUHAN . I am a journeyman pawnbroker, at Whitechapel.

Q. Did you take any books of the prisoner - A. No; I bought them in July or August; I bought these of him in June; I gave him seven shillings and sixpence for them; he told me they were his own, and being reduced, he was obliged to sell them. I bought them on my master's account: I cannot say when the last purchase was; we make no entries only of pledges; I bought I know of him again; I do not know what books they were exactly; they were some poems; I gave him about two shillings and sixpence a volume.

ROBERT DRAKR . I am a shopman to Mr. Peatt in Whitechapel. The prisoner brought me some books; I bought them; he came again, I bought more; these three books instead of five volumes. I stopped him; I asked him if could bring the two other volumes; he said yes; he would go and fetch them. I followed him, and lost him in the Commercial-road. The next morning at noon he brought the two other volumes; he said they were his master's property. I asked him whether I could step and ask his master whether he was correct; he said yes; and he was to call in the evening. I never saw him any more until he was in custody. These are the books.

Prosecutor. They are my books; I lost thirty two in all.

Prisoner. It was distress made do it.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-88

88. ROBERT CRAWFORD , alias WILLIAM CLEMENTS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , ten pair of upper leathers, value 12 s. and one upper leather, value 1 s. the property of Mary Hoppy , widow , and Joseph Tanner .

JOSEPH TANNER Mary Hoppey is my partner ; the prisoner worked for us. I only know the property is mine.

GEORGE TINDALL. I am a shoemaker my shop is on Saffron-hill On the 31st of October the prisoner brought me ten pair of upper leathers, and one odd upper leather to sell. I asked him what he was; he said, a shoemaker. I said it was unusual to have work in an unfinished state to sell; he said it was of no consequence, if I did not like to buy them, I might return them to him; I asked him again: he said he had them of Mr. Price, in the Minories; I asked him on what account he had given them to him? he then said his clerk gave them to him, which was all the same. He afterwards said Jessop in the Minories gave them to him; I being an officer, him, and took the prisoner before the magistrate. At the office the prisoner said they were the property of Mr. Tanner; I sent for Mr. Tanner, and on the following day he saw them, and claimed them. These are the upper leathers.

GEORGE TALLIDAY . I am clerk to Mr. Tanner

and Mrs. Hoppey. I know the upper leathers to be the property of my employer.

Q. Did you deliver them out to the prisoner - A. I cannot say.

Q. What would they be given to the prisoner for - A. To be made into shoes; the prisoner worked for Messrs. Tanner and Hoppey.

Q. The leather was delivered out to him to work upon - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-89

89. SARAH BONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of November , from the person of Thomas Shuttleworth , a bag, value 1 d. three three-shilling bank tokens, four eighteen-penny tokens, one shilling, a 10 l. bank note, a 5 l. bank note, ten 2 l. bank note, fourteen 1 l. bank notes , his property.

THOMAS SHUTTLEWORTH . I am a grocer ; I live at Hornby, in Essex. I lost my purse on the 23rd of October, I met the prisoner in George-yard, Whitechapel, about half past seven in the evening; I went home with her; I was with her about five minutes, not more; the prisoner sat upon my knee, and the moment she sat upon my knee, I lost my purse.

Q. Did you feel her take it - A. No. I staid by the door until an officer came to me. As soon as the prisoner sat upon my knee she got up, and went to the door, and called her companions, and she and some of her companions went into the next door. I sent for an officer, and staid by the door until the officer came.

Q. Are you sure you had your purse when she sat upon your knee - A. Yes, I am; there was nobody else but she to take it. I came to London to pay some people.

Q. Had you ever seen her before - A. No, and then I was in company with her five minutes, not more.

WILLIAM HOLL . I was sent for by the prosecutor to come to this house after this girl. He described the girl to me; the next morning I found the girl in bed in Rose-lane, Spitalfields. I never found the bag, or the notes, or money.

Q. to Prosecutor. Are you sure she is the woman - A. The officer brought three to me; I pointed this woman out as the woman that sat upon my knee,

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18141130-90

90. ANN ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a watch, value 3 l. the property of John Hicks , from his person .

JOHN HICKS. I am a painter . I lost my watch on the 11th of November, I was in Piccadilly ; the prisoner stopped me at the corner of Belton-street, she said, I should go with her for three shillings; I told her I thought she was a shilling ne. She shoved me against the railings to stop me; I felt her hand at the waistband of my breeches; she pulled the watch out of my breeches; she sprang from me, she said, I was no good; I felt something slip from my breeches; I put my hand down, and found my watch was gone; I pursued her into Stratton street, where there was no thoroughfare; I got up to her; I accused her of taking my watch; she denied it. I took hold of her; the watchman came and took her in custody; another girl came, one that I was in company with when I first met her. The watchman took the prisoner, and I the other woman, we took them both to the watchhouse; I gave the prisoner into the charge of the constable of the night; the constable searched both of them, and found nothing. The watchman and I went to the place where I took them; I found the watch on the area steps.

WILLIAM SHARPLEY . I am the watchman. On the 11th of last month, I saw the prisoner running down Stratton-street, where there is no thoroughfare; I saw the prosecutor stop her; I walked up to them, and laid hold of her. The prosecutor accused her of taking his watch. I took her to the watchhouse; she was searched, and nothing found upon her. We thought she had dropped the watch some where about the place were we took her; I went back, and found it.

MR. GREEN. I am the constable. There were two women brought to the watchhouse; I searched them, and found nothing. I sent the watchman and the prosecutor to go and look for the watch; they came back with it, and said they found it on the area steps. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the watch, or knew he had one.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-91

91. ISAAC JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , three hundred and eight pounds weight of lead, value 2 l. the property of Philip Price , affixed to a building of his .

PHILIP PRICE . I am a victualler , in Sidmouth-street, Gray's-inn-lane. I was assignee to the estate where this lead was lost. On the 6th of November, the watchman heard a noise in the house. I can only swear to the lead.

PETER BLOUD . I am a watchman. On the 6th of November, I heard a noise between one and two o'clock in the morning, I went to discover the noise, I could not discover the noise, I went into Sidmouth-street , and in the new houses there I heard people walking and talking; I then returned to the watchman at the end of the street to come with me into Gray's-inn-lane; we went down, and discovered three men; we took one out of the three.

Q. Is the prisoner the man that you took - A. My partner took him; I cannot swear to him.

JEFFERY COOK. I am the other watchman; I was standing at the corner of Sidmouth-street, I went with Blond to the new houses; I saw the prisoner up in the building, in the two pair of stairs: I took hold of him, and took him to the watchhouse, and delivered him to the watchhouse-keeper; there was another man with him, he made his escape.

Q. How did they get into the house - A. There was no fastening to the vault, they got in that way.

We searched the house from the top to the bottom; we found this lead in the attic story; they had cut it off the roof; the lead was wet; there had been rain that night. This is the lead.

- BRANSCOMBE. I am a patrole of Gray's-inn-lane. I met Dowland and Cook with a man in custody; Dowland told me they were stealing lead in the new houses. I went back with one of them; we searched the house from the top to the bottom; in the attic story we found this lead, it looked as if it had been taken from the room; the lead was wet; there had been rain that night. This is the lead.

- JONES. I am a watchman. I went into Sidmouth-street with Branscomb; I assisted in searching the house; we found the lead in the attic story.

JOHN BAXTER. I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to me on the 6th of last month, between two and three o'clocke in the morning, and this key and this hammer; I have had them ever since.

RICHARD BEST . I am a patrole. In the morning, I and some of the watchmen went and fitted on the lead to the roof of the house where it was taken from; it matched exactly to the gutters; it is all gutter lead, and fitted the roof; she roof was snipped intirely of all the gutter-lead.

Prisoner's Defence. I was without any money; I went into this house to lay down, I went up into the two pair, and laid down, and went to sleep; I did not hear any body; I thought it much better to lay on the boards up stairs, than on the cold stones below stairs.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-92

92. MARTIN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , two loaves of bread, value 2 s. the property of Robert Roberts .

ROBERT ROBERTS. I am a tailor ; I keep a chandler's shop , 13, Wardour-street, Clerkenwell . I lost two loaves of bread, I am not certain to the month, it was Saturday week. I was in the room at the back of the shop: a woman came in, and asked me if I had sold two loaves of bread to a sailor : I said, no. She said, a man has gone out of your shop with two loaves, if you will go after him, you will catch him; I went, and missed him.

MARTHA CROWLEY . Q. Did you on the 26th of November, see the prisoner - A. I was coming past the chandler's shop; I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with a loaf under each arm.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner, did you see his face - A. He was dressed as the prisoner is; they were two quartern loaves. I looked through the window; I went in, and asked Mr. Roberts if he had sold two loaves to a sailor; he said no. When I looked in the window, I saw nobody in the shop; I went and gave the information. I saw the prisoner again at Hatton Garden office; I knew him to be the same man, only by his clothes, he was of the size, height, figure and shape, I can swear to the clothes, not to the man; they were the same clothes he has on now.

Q. to Roberts Q. You pursued after the man, and lost him - A. He went to Mrs. Gibbon's shop to sell the bread.

Mrs. Gibbons. I keep a chandler's shop directly opposite of Mr. Roberts.

Q. Did you on the 26th of November, see the prisoner - A. Yes, he came to my door between five and six.

Roberts. That is the time I got my information.

Mrs. Gibbons. The prisoner asked me if I would buy the two loaves of him; I asked him how he came by them; he said, a gentleman had given them him, he asked ten-pence for them. I said I would buy them, but I thought he had stolen them. Mr. Roberts came over to me. The man owned that he had taken them.

Q. to Roberts. Are you able to swear to bread - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to your mercy, and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18141130-93

93. MICHAEL DONNALLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , two shovels, value 5 s. the property of Daniel Sullivan .

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I am a labourer . The prisoner is a labourer ; I live at No. 3, Frogwell-court Charter-house-lane, Smithfield.

Q. Did you lose two shovels any time - A. I did on the 25th of last month, at the new river house, as you go to Hampstead. I had them about a quarter after five in the afternoon, as near as I can guess I was at work at the Regent's lock ; we left work at a quarter after five, and left the shovels under the straw in the River lock up house . Donnally the prisoner worked in the same place under another employer; he left us about a fortnight. I saw him the day before walking about the Canel, I thought he wanted a job; he did not ask for any. I went to the lock-up house; both my shovels were gone. I found my shovels at Marborough-street office, on Tuesday I saw the prisoner at Marlborough-street office, and I saw the two shovels there that I lost; I was sure they were mine.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PIALL . I produce the shovels, I was constable of the night. At the watchhouse, the watchman brought the prisoner to me, and the shovels. I questioned the prisoner; he told me he had stolen the two shovels, one of the three were his own.

Prosecutor. This is my own shovel, the other is my nephew's that I borrowed.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself. I took the shovels, and after that the watchman took me.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18141130-94

94. WILLIAM MAHON was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 28th of August , a watch, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Bourn .

THOMAS BOURN . I am a watchman in Islington parish ; I lost my watch on the 28th of August, at two o'clock in the morning. I hung my watch up in the box; I went out to ease myself; then I went my beat; and when I returned, I sat down; I went out and walked about; and when I came back again my watch was gone.

Q. Did you know William Mahon - A, Yes, I knew him.

Q. Had you seen him that night - A. No, I saw my watch again about a month after I lost it; Henry Brooks produced it in How the watchman's house; he left the watch in How's house. I took Brooks to Hatton Garden Office; I saw the prisoner about a month afterwards; I had Mahon apprehended.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I am an officer; about six weeks before I apprehended the prisoner. I saw How and his wife in a court in the City-road; I saw the watch there in the possession of Mrs. How; I took possession of it after Bourn claimed it. I then went and took Brooks up; I understood he had bought the duplicate; I took him before the magistrate; he there said he bought the duplicate of Mahon. Afterwards I apprehended Mahon; I produce the watch.

HENRY BROOKS . I am seventeen years old. I am pot-boy at the Emperor of Russia, Islington, at Mr. South's.

Q. How came you by a watch that was claimed by Brown - A. On the 3rd of September, I believe it it was the day Bartholomew fair was on, Mahon came to me, and asked me if I would buy the duplicate of a watch; I said I did not exactly want one. He asked me two or three times; he wanted five shillings for the duplicate; I borrowed two shillings of the waiter and gave it him; he was to come for the three shillings another time; he delivered me the duplicate, and called again on the Sunday after the fair for the three shillings, and I went to the pawnbroker, and paid for changing the duplicate into my own name; and on the Tuesday following I redeemed the watch. After that I went with Beer to How the watchman; he asked to look at the watch; I let him look at it, he said it was a nice watch; the next day when I went to How's with Beer Brown was there, he asked to see the watch; I shewed it him, he claimed it; I left it there.

Q. How far is Brown's watch-box from the Emperor of Russia - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. Did you know Mahon's name - A. No; a young man was standing at the public-house door when he sold me the duplicate; he told me his name was Mahon.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18141130-95

95. MARTIN, alias PETER THOMPSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a blanket, value 5 s. the property of Emanuel Antonio .

EMANUEL ANTONIO . I am a housekeeper , at 57, Anchor and Hope Alley, Wapping .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he is seaman ; he lodged in my house nine weeks; I lost a blanket at six o'clock in the morning, about a week ago; I do not recollect the day. The police officer came to me; the prisoner lodged with me on the same day the officer came, and shewed me a blanket, it was mine; I had seen that blanket the day before in the prisoner's room.

Q. Was the prisoner at home when the officer came to you - A. No, he was at the office; I make the beds myself; I know it is my own blanket,

JOSEPH PARIS . I am an officer; I saw the prisoner going into a slop-shop in Little Hermitage-street; he had a blanket with him; it was on the 14th of last month, about half past six in the evening, he offered it for sale; I followed him into the shop: he did not sell it there; the people on seeing me told him they would have nothing to do with it; I then interfered; I asked him where he got it; he told me he brought it from the John West Indiaman, laying in the West India Dock; he said it was his own; he said he brought it up to raise a little money; this is the blanket.

Prosecutor. It is my blanket.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18141130-96

96. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , in the 53rd year of his Majesty's reign, a chaise, value 40 l. the property of John Large .

JOHN LARGE . I am a coachmaker , in Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields; on the 21st of August, 1813, the prisoner came to my premises; he said he wanted a single horse chaise; he looked over the chaises I had in my shop; he saw one he said he though would suit him. He had an old one he wanted to be repaired, if I considered it to be worth the expence of repairing. I went to the Black Horse Yard, in Gray's Inn Lane, to view the old chaise. I told him the old chaise was not worth repairing; he said he would take the old one he had seen on trial; he thought it would be too heavy; if he found it so, he would have a new one built: in either case, I was to make an allowance for the old chaise. Six pounds he sent the same afternoon, and took the chaise away. In about a week or ten days afterwards, he called again to say the chaise did not suit him; he called at my shop and gave an order for a new one; I agreed to let him have the old chaise until the new one was made. On the 15th of September I received a note from him to hurry the completion of the chaise.

"Mr. Lloyd's compliments to Mr. Large, wishes to know if the chaise will be ready on Wednesday evening.

"10, Symond's Inn, 1813.

On Saturday I went into the country, and left the chaise unfinished. On Monday the 10th of September, 1813, he sent a person from the stable yard, as I understood, saying, he wished to have the chaise on the following morning. I had left no order to detain the chaise, consequently one of my men delivered it in my absence, that was the new chaise, the old one was to be returned, but was not. I made no enquiry; about three weeks or a month afterwards

I met a person in Chancery-lane, I enquired Mr. Lloyd's character. I heard something which gave me suspicion; I went and found the chaise I lent him in Mr. Paste's yard; I seized the chaise and took it home. On the next day a man of the name of Flack and Mr. Paste the keeper of the yard came and said they had purchased the chaise of Mr. Lloyd.

Q. Where is the chaise - A I seized it as my property, it is in my possession now. Mr. Paste and Flack threatened to bring an action against me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-97

97. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , two pieces of Portland stone, value 2 s. the property of John Renshaw .

JOHN RENSHAW . I am a mason . On Tuesday the 22d of November, I lost two pieces of Portland stone from out of my yard.

JOSEPH REHSHAW . I am the son of John Renshaw . On Tuesday the the 22d of November, I was out sliding, it being a frost, I saw a man go into the yard, who was not one of my father's men; I went behind the bricks, and watched him; he took one of the stones just at the corner of Collingwood's factory gates; he came back and fetched the other. He took the smallest into Doughty Mews: I saw a green grocer's boy I knew; I told him to go and inform my father's man. Immediately the prisoner went back to Collingwood's gates, took up the largest stone, and took it into Guildford-street. I saw my father's man coming, I pointed out the prisoner to him, then I went to Hatton Garden office for Mr. Read, the officer, and when I came back with Mr. Read, the prisoner was not there. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM COLES. I am servant to Mr. Renshaw. On Tuesday the 2nd of November I was at work in the shop, in my master's yard, a lad came and said Joe is watching a man that has taken some of his father's stones. I went to look after Joe, I saw Joe in Guildford-street; he beckoned to me; I went up to him; he said, Coles, there is a man has got my stones. The prisoner had the biggest of the two stones with him; he put it down in Lamb's Conduit Street, and then he went back for the other one in Doughty Mews. He took the stone on his shoulder again, and then I collared him; he said, do not coller me, I will not run away: in the mean while up came a mob, and hustled me a considerable way down Guildford street. I walked with them into Russel-square to the end of Bedford-place; he said he lived in St. Giles's. I did not chuse to follow him into St. Giles's. I expected to have an officer to assist me. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I an officer. On the 22d of November I was sent for into Guildford-street, I then understood from the last witness that the prisoner was rescued from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of this crimn.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined 3 months . and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-98

98. SARAH MERTON and HARRIET LUTTERLOW , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a broach, value 15 s. a sent bottle, value 2 s. two knives, value 3 s. two keys, value 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a purse, value 1 s. fifteen remnants of lacs, value 1 l. the property of Elizabeth Ann Aldhouse , widow , a pair of bracelets, value 3 s. and three keys, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Ann Aldhouse , spinster .

ELIZABETH ANN ALDHOUSE. I am a widow; the prisoners were both in my service; Merton was cook and Lutterlow housemaid . On the 9th of November I discovered the robbery; on the 4th of October Merton left my service; she left a box at my house she said for the use of Lutterlow. On the 9th of November I opened Merton's box, in the presence of Lutterlow; in that box I found a broach, fourteen remnants of lace, a habit shirt, and two knives, in Merton's box, and two keys, they belong to me.

Q. Was there a purse there - A. I cannot say whether the purse was in Merton's or Lutterlow's box; I afterwards found some things in Lutterlow's box in her bed-room. I knew that box to be her's. In Harriet's box I found a scent bottle, and more than a yard of lace, and a penknife, the knife is mine. I also found two pair of stockings which I knew to be mine.

MERTON, GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 6 months , and fined 2 s.

LUITERLOW, GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined 1 s , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-99

99. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , one cheese value 5 l. the property of Thomas William Hodgson .

THOMAS WILLIAM HODGSON . I lost my cheese on the 11th of November; the witness saw the prisoner came out of my shop with the cheese in question.

FRANCIS CURTIS . On the 11th of November I was coming along Drury-lane , about eight o'clock in the evening; I was going by Mr. Hodgson's door, I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Hodgson's window inside of the shop; he took the cheese and came out of the shop with it. I asked the prisoner if he belonged to the shop, he answered yes; I suspected him and followed him, and told him to come back, if he belonged to the shop, he did come back to the stone post by the shop door, and dropped the cheese behind the post in the street; Mr. Hodgson came to the door and I told him that the prisoner took the cheese out the shop; I gave the prisoner into his custody; I never lost sight of him.

Prosecutor. This is the cheese, I marked it directly; I am certain it is my cheese.

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-100

100. ELIZABETH HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of November , two gowns, value 6 s. five petticoats, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 3 s. and two frocks, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Roberts .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I live at 17, Parkins-street, Carnaby-market .

Q. When did you lose your things - A. On the

3rd of November; I believe this child saw the prisoner come out of the house with the things.

ELIZABETH ROBERTS . I am eight years old last February. The things were taken out of the yard by Elizabeth Harvey ; I saw the prisoner coming out of the yard.

Q. Is the prisoner the woman - A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you see what she had got with her - A. I saw she had a lap full of things. I told my mother; my mother went into the street after her, and could not find the prisoner. Mother asked me which way she had gone; I said, that way. Mother brought her back with the things in her lap.

CHARLES JEFFREYS . I am an officer. I produce the property.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming up Carnaby street, a man asked me how I did; he said hold these things while he went and fetched his wife. I told them I was not the owner of the things; I did not know of the property being stolen. I am innocent of stealing, these things; I never saw the child until I saw her at the office.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-101

99. GEORGE AYRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a watch, value 1 l. and a seal, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Tipper .

THOMAS TIPPER . I am a butler to Mrs. Francisco . On the 19th of October, the prisoner drank tea with me and my wife, at 23, Hollis-street . I lost a watch out of a drawer in the kitchen; it was in the kitchen the prisoner drank tea with me. After tea we went to the Crown public-house, the corner of Cavendish-street; leaving my wife at home. The prisoner left me at the Crown, he complained of a violent pain in his face, and a sore throat; he said he would go and get my wife to put a bit of flannel to his throat, as he had a violent cold and sore throat; he went, and while she went up stairs to get a bit of flannel, he left the house. When my wife returned down stairs into the kitchen, she missed the watch, and sent for me. The prisoner never came back. On the next morning, I found my watch at Mr. Dobree's, the pawnbroker; that was my watch that I had left in the drawer in the kitchen; when it is produced, I shall know it.

MRS. TIPPER. I am the wife of the last witness. I remember the prisoner drinking tea with me and my husband, and after tea, he and my husband went to the public-house; in about ten minuates after they went out to go to the public-house, he came back, he said, he had a violent pain in his face, could I give him a bit of flannel; I produced a piece of new flannel; he said, it was not broad enough, I said, I had broader, but it was old, and it was up stairs; he asked me several times to go up stairs for the flannel that was broader. I went up stairs, and coming down, I heard him go out, and on my coming into the kitchen, I missed the watch from the drawer; this was about five o'clock.

JOHN EDWARD BAGALIN . I am a servant to Dobree, pawnbroker, Oxford street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. I saw him on Wednesday, the 19th of October, near seven o'clock in the evening, he pawned this watch and a seal; I was not the person that took it in; I actually saw him give that watch in pledge; he pressed very much for a pound note; he mentioned his coming from Walworth. I knew the prisoner previous to his pledging the watch, he was frequently in the neighboured; I knew him by seeing him at Morton's, a grocer there; I have been two or three times in the same room with him at Moreton's. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch, I am sure of it; the seal has my wife's initials on it; the watch is worth one pound, and the seal a shilling.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 3rd of November, at the Dover Castle, Marsh Gate Lambeth, he had a midshipman's dress; I observed to him, that he had been to Sea; he said he had. I asked him if his name was Ayre; he said, yes. I then said, you are the hare that I am looking after. I told him I had a charge against him for stealing some watches. I took him into custody. He confessed to me that he had stolen the watches, nothing but distress made him do it. There were four watches, three of them have been given up by the pawnbrokers, the value of them altogether is about twenty pounds. I asked him what he had done with the duplicates; he said he burnt them.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a in alicious prosecution against me; by my friends it appeared there were two spoons taken away by some person, they may probably have taken the watch.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-102

100. GEORGE PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , four pieces of timber, value 10 l. the property of John Hinde ; and BENJAMIN GOULD for feloniously receiving the same timber, he knowing it to be stolen .

JOSEPH WYNNE . I am a waterman, in the employ of Mr. Hinde; he is a timber-rafter . On Monday, the 9th of November, I rafted the timber from the ship named the Wilson , the Wilson was laying at Limehouse hole, on the Middlesex side of the River , and on Monday the 7th of November, a little before five o'clock, I left it all safe afloat at the stern of that ship, just before dark. The next morning about eight o'clock I went to my work; I looked over the raft of timber; I found four pieces had been taken out of the stern of that raft; I examined to see how they were gone; they were cut. I am sure the rope had been cut.

Q. How soon did you see those four pieces again - A. It might be two or three days afterwards, I saw it on Tuesday at the Thames Police office on a timber carriage. I had marked them myself before I lost them; I put W N the first and last letter of the ships name, and J. H. for Mr. Hinde. These marks were on them at the Thames Police. I am perfectly sure they were the four pieces of timber that I lost, there is no doubt of it.

BENJAMIN BAYLISS . I am a waterman's apprentice. Parker is the same; I have known Parker

about six years. On Monday, the 7th of November, he came to me at Limehouse-hole, he said he knew a person that wanted a piece or two of timber; he told me to meet him at the Lord Hood at five o'clock in the evening, near the Commercial-road; I do not know the name of the street. I met him there at the Lord Hood public-house; we had a pint of porter and a glass of rum and water; we staid there about half an hour, he and I then walked down to Limehouse-hole, when we arrived at Limehouse-hole, it was dark, it was past six o'clock; at Limehouse my own boat was a ground. Parker told me to get a boat, and row up to the shore, and to take him in; I took William Epthorp 'e boat and took him in; we then went down in that boat to the timber to Mr. Hinde's timber, at the stern of the tier.

Q. Did you know Mr. Hinde's timber - A. Yes, I knew the rafter; I served my time in the timber trade, and Parker the same. When we got to the timber, Parker got on the timber, and cut out four pieces; he cut the head rope with his knife; the four pieces were turned a drift; the tide was then running up; we rowed a little bit, and came up to them; we took them in towards Stone-stairs, that joins Mr. Rayner's wharf; Stone-stairs is in Shadwell, in the parish of Ratcliffe; the tide was not high enough; we made the timber fast to the boats that were put there.

Q. Did Parker say any thing how it was to be fetched away - A. It was to be put on Mr. Rayner's wharf as soon as the tide would permit; Rayner's wharf is under the crane. We then rowed home to Limehouse-stairs; in my way I put him on shore at Kidney-stairs, I made Epthorp's boat fast to where I took it from, that was about seven o'clock.

Q. Before you parted, had you settled where to meet again - A. We then met at a new public-house in Solomon's-lane; William Hall was there, Parker and me, Parker was there when I got there; Parker said with me until ten o'clock; we then went to put the timber under the crane at Stone stairs; we took the boat of the man that had to watch there, he was on duty; the man that had to watch, called out halloo, who has taken the boat; Parker said, we will bring her back in a minute or two; I got on the timber, and made the timber fast to the boat; Parker shoved back to the wharf, and took me in again.

Q. How many yards is Stone stairs to the wharf - A. Stone stairs joins the wharf. The man of the watch asked him what he had been looking after; he said the skiff, and he supposed the boy had taken it home. We then went to the Davids Harp at Limehouse-bridge; we stopped there until about half after eleven.

Q. Do you know two men of the name of Monet and Sharpe - A. Yes; they were there at the time; we left the house at half after eleven, and went home. Parker said he knew a man that would buy any timber his name was Gould, he supposed ten pounds might be got for the timber. I was taken into custody on Wednesday morning, until I was taken into custody I told nobody of this business; I was taken before the magistrate, and admitted an evidence; I came here from Cold Bath Fields as a witness.

SARAH CORDELL . My brother keeps the Lord Hood public-house, Brook-street, Limehouse.

Q. On the afternoon of Monday the 7th of November, do you remember seeing the prisoner Parker there - A. Yes; he came in about five o'clock, he came in about a quarter of an hour before Bayliss; they joined company together; they drank together the pint of porter, and after they had sixpennyworth of rum and water; they left my house together, and paid me at the bar.

JOHNSON HEWS . I am a shipwright.

Q. On the evening of Monday the 7th of December were you at a public-house in Solomon's-lane - A. I was, about a quarter past eight; when I was there I saw the prisoner Parker in company with Bayliss; I knew Parker and Bayliss both before. They were in company together about an hour and three quarters, they went away together, very near ten o'cloch.

JOHN BIGGS. I am a waterman; I ply at Stone-stairs.

Q. Were you one of these who had the watch on Monday evening the 7th of December - A. I was.

Q. When you were on watch that night, was any boat taken away - A. Yes, my boat; I called out who is got my boat; I was answered as I thought by Parker; I knew Parker before five or six years. Parker answered he would bring the boat back in a few minutes.

Q. Finding it was Parker's voice, you were content with that answer - A. I was; the boat was brought back in a few minutes; if it had not been a voice that I knew, of course I should have looked after it. After it was brought back, I heard more than one; they told me, they had brought my boat back. I said very well. I think there were two by the footsteps up the alley.

WILLIAM MONET . I am a shipwright. On the night of the 7th of December, I was at the David's Harp public-house at Limehouse; I went there about eight o'clock. I came away about half after eleven.

Q. Do you know the prisonor Parker - A. Yes, and Bayliss; they came in together about half after ten o'clock; they drinked together; they staid about an hour, and then went away together.

JOHN RAYNER . Q. You are a proprietor of a wharf at Ratcliffe - A I am.

Q. On the morning of the 8th of November, did you observe any timber on your wharf - A, I did, four pieces, as soon as I went to the wharf.

Q. Had you any notice of their coming - A. None; at the moment I saw them I did not know who they belonged to.

Q. In the course of that day, did you see the prisoner Gould - A. I did, he came to my wharf. After I had seen these pieces, I went down to Woolwich, and did not return until Gould was in custody. George Richardson is my foreman.

GEORGE RICHARDSON. I am foreman at Mr. Rayners.

Q. Do you remember seeing these four pieces of timber under your crane on Tuesday the eight of November - A. Yes, about seven o'clock when I saw them.

Q. In the afternoon of that day, did the prisoner

Gould come - A. Yes, with a timber carriage; I saw him, and I saw the timber upon the carriage.

Q. In consequence of any thing said to you did you ask the prisoner Gould to pay for the landing and wharfage - A. Yes; she said if I would make one the paper he would pay me for landing and wharfage. I turned to make out the bill I met Mr. Rayner; and acquainted him with it. The officer came and detained the carriage, and took Gould into custody.

JURY. Q. Who applied to you to have the timber landed - A. There was a man on our wharf, he said his name was Gould; it was not the prisoner Gould himself.

JAMES EVANS . I am a Thames Police surveyor.

Q. On the afternoon of Tuesday the 8th, did you go to Mr. Rayner's wharf - A. I did, about four o'clock; when I came there I saw a timber carriage with the name of Mr. Planket, a respectable timber-merchant in that neighbourhood, and two horses to it, and four pieces of timber upon it, marked W N I H. I saw he prisoner Gould, he had hold of the fore horse; he had a whip in his hand; he appeared as the driver. I went up to him, and asked him where he was going to take that timber; he said he was going to take it to Limehouse; he said he did not know the person he was to take it to. I then told him the timber was stolen, and that I was a police officer; that it behaved him well to tell me where he was going to take it, otherwise I must take him into custody; he then said he did not belong to it, he was not the driver. I told him I should take him into custody; he then said, what is to become of my horses, he would shew me where he was going to take it. He said he was going to take it to his own yard in St. George's in the East; that it was to remain in his yard all night, the next morning the person was to come that had engaged him to carry it, he was a sailor-looking man. I took him into custody; that account did not satisfy me; Mr. Wynne and Mr. Hindes both saw the timber, and claimed it.

Mr. HINDES. Q. What is the value of this timber - A. They are worth twenty-eight pounds.

Parker's Defence. I have nothing particular to say; whether I cut the rope or did not; it has been stated at the time it was dark.

Baylis. Parker got on the timber and cut the head-rope.

Gould's Defence. On the 8th of November John Gould , my brother, came to me about seven o'clock in the morning; he said, are your horses at home; I said. they are not; he asked me what time they would be at home; I told him I could not say, it might be two hours, it might be more; he said they had four pieces of timber at Mr. Rayner's wharf; they wanted me to go with to Limehouse, to whom I do not know. He said the person lived at Limehouse: he gave a namo, I do not recollect it; I said, the expence of carriage for two days would be great; they had better let it lay at the wharf. Parker said what is the expence of a carriage for two days: I told him I paid five shillings a day for the use of it. Parker said, never mind the expence of the earriage, I will pay for it; he wished me to bring it to my own yard and there let it lay until the next morning. John Gould said, you were saying you wanted a piece of timber for your waggon; I said yes; he said you may have one of these, if they suit you; I said I had no objection for one or two, provided they would give me credit, I had no money to pay for it. He said, that will not do for us, what we buy to day we must pay for tomorrow night. Nothing further passed at that time; I was just going home; it was a quarter past seven o'clock in the morning. John Gould went towards London, and George Parker went down towards Limehouse; he particularly requested me to send down to Rayner's wharf for it as soon as I could, and I promised I would; the horses never came home that day until twelve o'clock in the day; Jarvis, my man, put the horses into the stable; I told him to go home. and get his dinner, and when he came back, I told him to go to Mr. Plenket's in the Commercial-road to borrow his timber carriage for the next day; he went there about one o'clock, he had not been gone more than a quarter of an hour before William Wood came from Rayner's wharf, he came and asked when we were coming down for the four pieces of timber; I told him the man was gone after the carriage, I expected he would be down directly. The man never came back with the carriage until ten minutes to three o'clock; I told him to go forward to Rayner's wharf, I would follow him with the rope, and when we came there, we turned the carriage round; Mr. Rayner's man, myself, and Jarvis, loaded the carriage with the timber; as soon as we had loaded, I sent Jarvis for a sack, and some time after Jarvis was gone, Mr. Evans, the officer, came down to me; I was then going to see whether the horses would draw it, one of the horses I had not had many days, he could not draw it. Mr. Evans asked me where I was going with the timber; I told him to Limehouse, I did not know the name of the person it was to go to. He asked me to whom did it belong to; I said, I could not tell, it was a tall genteel young man. I had never seen Parker before but twice to my knowledge. Mr. Evans asked me if I would shew him where it was going to; I said, I would; I took him into Ratcliffe Highway, there I told him I was going to take it to my own yard, and in the morning I was going to take them to Limehouse. I did not know at the time it was stolen timber; they employed me as a carman only; I had no mistrust that it was stolee property.

Parker called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Gould called twelve witnesses, who gave him a good character.

PARKER, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

GOULD, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant,

Reference Number: t18141130-103

103. ELIZABETH GREEN and ANN WALKER were indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , four waistcoats, value 6 s. and 6 d. the property of Levy Hart privately in his shop .

LEVY HART . I am a shop keeper at Monmouth court , on the 30th of November last the two prisoners came into my shop, I was in the house and was

going out. I saw them come in, there was nobody in the shop, I was in the passage. Elizabeth Green asked me if I had got a shift; I shewed, her a shift, that would not do; she then asked me if I had got any stays; I shewed her some, they would not do; then she asked me if I had got a piece of keyseymere, to mend small clothes, I fetched her some that would not do; I looked round and missed some waistcoats out of the window. I told them I had got nothing that would suit them; they went out, they moved very slowly, I pursued one of them; I saw Elizabeth Green drop a waistcoat from between her clothes. I took them both back into the shop, they dropped three more. I cannot say which of them dropped the other three. These are the waistcoats, they are my property; they cost me six shillings and sixpence by the marks. I sent for an officer and had them taken into custody. I never left the shop, I sent for the things as they called for them; I had an eye upon the window, I saw the waistcoats moved out of the window. There was a time when the prisoners were in the shop that I had not my eye upon them.

GREEN, GUILTY aged 17.

WALKER, GUILTY aged 17.

Transported For Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18141130-104

104. RICHARD AYRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a seal, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of Robert Griffiths , privately in his shop .

SARAH GRIFFITHS . I live with my brother, John Griffiths , he is an engraver and Jeweller ; his shop is No. 129, Oxford-strett . On Monday the 27th of October the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a seal; he pointed out the one I shewed it him, he asked the price, I told him three pounds, he took it in his hand and weighed it; he kept it in his hand and ran out of the shop with it; I did not leave the shop to pursue him, my brother did, he was in the parlour. I saw the seal afterwards in Marlborough Street.

ROBERT GRIFFITHS . I keep this shop; I was in the parlour, I saw a man in the shop, he was looking at a seal; I saw him run out of the shop as hard as he could, I followed him as fast as I could; I saw the same man that had been in the shop, about two or three doors off, a man said to me what is the matter; Sir, I said, that man has stolen a seal and I am so ill I cannot run after him; he said Oh, then I'll catch him; he ran after him; I saw him when he was brought back. I am sure he is the same person that ran out of the shop with the seal in his hand. He was taken to Marlborough-street office; and the man that took him, brought the seal to the office; the value of the seal is three guineas.

CHARLES DUNHAM . I was standing at Mr. Griffith's window at the time the prisoner ran out; I saw the prisoner run out; I am positive he is the man; he came out as swift as ever he could; my wife was with me, he parted us. Mr. Griffiths said he had robbed him; I pursued the prisoner, and took him; a boy picked up the seal, and brought it to me, about a minute after I laid hold of the prisoner. This is the seal.

GUILTY aged 22.

Confined 6 months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Le Blance.

Reference Number: t18141130-105

105. WILLIAM DAYNE was indicted for that he on the 10th of June was clerk to William Forrester and John Keene , and employed and intrusted by them to receive monies for them, and being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 5 l. 8 s. for and on account of his said masters, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secret, and steal , the same.

EDWARD JOYCE. Q. In the month of May or June, were you debtor to Messrs. Forrester and Keene - A. I was in one account Forty pounds; and another five pound eight for Forrester and Keene. I have the draft in my hand; I believe my clerk paid the money.

JAMES ROUTING . I am clerk to Mr. Joyce: I paid the payment to the prisoner for Messrs. Forrester and Keene of five pound eight shillings: this is the receipt he gave me for it; I paid him in a five pound note and eight shillings in silver.

JOHN KEENE . I am in partnership with William Forrester we are merchants and insureance brokers ; the prisoner was our collecting clerk , it was his duty to receive money for us, and to accompt it to me or Mr. Forrester; he never accompted to me the payment of Mr. Joyce; he said he had called repeatedly and could not get it; I told him what Mr. Joyce had said to me that he had paid it to him; he abseconded from my service. I had him apprehended he never brought the five pound eight shillings to accompt to me.

WILLIAM FORRESTER . Q. Did the prisoner ever accompt to you for this sum of five pounds eight shillings - A. Never.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 1 Year and fined 1 s.

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-106

106. JOHN PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of November , a trunk, value 7. five pair of brace-lets, value 10 s. a pair of ear-ring, value 10 s. a finger-ring value 10 s. a lace veil, value 1 l, ten handkerchiefs, value 10 s. twelve towels, value 12 s. a pair of stays, value 5 s. a pellise, value 1 l. ten dresses; value 10 l. two slips; value 10 s. two pair of gloves, value 3 s. a shawl, value 10 s. a pair of boots value 10 s. and a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of William Swiney .

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am an hackney coachman. I drive No. 177. This trunk was stolen out of my coach; I took the trunk into my coach from a stage coach, and a lady at the bricklayers arms. I do not know the lady, I was to take the lady to Gracechurch Street.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-107

107. GEORGE PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of November , one piece of timber, value 40 l. the property of Elizabeth Sharp widow, and BENJAMIN GOULD and GWIN TURNER

for feloniously receiving on the same day the th goods, she well knowing it to be stolen .

MR. BECKWELL. I superintent the timber at Mr. Mill's Dockyard; at the Isle of Dogs; I did not miss the timber until it was found. This piece of timber was shewed me by the officer Evans; upon examining, I found it was missing; the value of it, when lost, was more than found; the worth of it is forty pounds. The marks were F P for the ships name and M for Mills. It was formerly one piece, it is now cut the mark remained. I knew it directly I saw it, it was not defaced in any way. It was fifty six feet and a half long.

THOMAS MILLS . I am a waterman; I ply at stone stairs, just by Rayner's wharf; I went on shore, with some passengers. I saw Parker on the wharf, I did not know his business: the next day the 4th of November. I saw it in the morning moved to Rayers wharf; Parker was upon the timber he was assisting in craneing it. I came out in the morning about seven o'clock; I saw Parker and several working men the timber was brought before I came out in the morning they were heaving it up on Rayner's wharf; I saw no more until I saw it sawed, I think that was on the same day I will not be sure; I saw it sawed at a little after seven o'clock. I saw it being sawed by two men, as I was going off with a fare.

JAMES TWEESEY . I am a waterman. I saw this piece of timber on Mr. Rayners wharf on Friday the 4th of November; I saw Parker assist in craneing of it. I came out, it was heaving up a slip that was made on purpose for heaving of timber.

JOHN FORD. I remember this piece of timber being brought on Friday morning the 4th of November, Parker and the others said it must be landed on the wharf; they said they had permission of Mr. Rayner on the over night. I went to borrow a rope of Mr. Pallister, Mr. Rayner was by, I got the tackle ready, and it was brought on the wharf.

Q. In the course of that day afterwards did Turner come - A. Yes; he came down and cross-cut this piece of timber; he brought a saw with him, and cut it in two. I assisted him, after he had cut it in two he said, he believed Mr. Gould was coming to draw it.

Q. Who paid you for wharfage and landing - A. Mr, Turner, and he paid me for the cross-cutting of it.

Q. How much did he pay for the wharfage and landing - A. I cannot say; after it was put by till Monday; the prisoner Gould came, Gould brought Mr. Planket's timber carriage; with three or four horses, I fancy his own horses he took it away, he did not say where he was going with it as I heard.

JOHN BAYNER. Q, Do you remember the timber coming to your wharf - A, I remember a person applying to me, on Thursday evening; I saw it on Friday morning landed, about eight o'clock. About eleven o'clock, I remember the prisoner Turner coming, he was looking at the timber; I think he mentioned something about having it up, I said to him, what, does it belong to you; he said, yes; I said, another person had applied to me, the night before, but if it belongs to you, that is very well, he said, yes; it belonged to him, he could pay the wharfage and labour; I asked him the contents, he said two hundred and sixteen feet. I asked him why he did not send for the timber, as he had promised; his reply was that the carriage was broken down, that they would come for it on the Monday following; the carriage came on Monday, the prisoner Gould came; it was loaded, and taken away by Gould, Gould assisted in loading it.

THOMAS JARVIS . I am a carter to Benjamin Gould .

Q, Did you go with Mr. Plinket's timber carriage for these two pieces of timber - A. Yes; I took it to Mr. Freland's. Cumberland-street, Shoreditch; Turner there came to me and assisted me in putting one piece on the saw pit.

- BIRCH. I am a sawyer.

Q. Do you remember meeting Turner - A. Yes, on Monday, the 2nd of November, he said, he had a large piece of timber he wanted sawed if I would cut it, I should do it; I said, I had no objection. On the Monday following, I saw a strange carman; I asked him what he wanted, I suspected he was the carter of that timber, and while we were unloading it Turner came, Turner marked the piece on the saw pit how I should cut it; I asked master the proper place to put it for conveniency; master said outside of the yard; Turner said let it remain in the yard: Turner seemed careless whether it was in the yard or no; it laid outside of the yard, and there it remained until Evans the officer came.

JAMES EVANS . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On Wednesday the 7th of November, I went to Mr. Ireland's yard, I there saw the timber; it appeared to me to be all one piece before it was out, it was marked M at one end, and F B on the other end 216, the quantity, the ships name the Friend; I shewed Mr. Beckway the same pieces; he identified it. In consequence of information, I went to the house of Turner in John-street, Curtain-road, he was not at home the first time I went; I went the second time, and found him; I told him I had come to make some enquiries respecting a piece of timber he had cutting at Mr. Ireland's. I asked him who he bought it of; he said a person living some where about Limehouse, he did not know the person. I asked him what he was to give a loud for it; he said ten-pounds, he had paid seven pounds on account, he was to pay the remainder in two months. I asked him if he had a bill of parcels; he said, no. He said a person came there at two o'clock in the morning, which he believed to be the man that he had bought the timber of, he said he had the appearance of a sailor. I told him he must go to the magistrate to explain the matter; he very readily went there.

PARKER, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

GOULD, NOT GUILTY .

TURNER, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-108

107. ANN MORMAN alias MEREMAN was indicted

for felouiously stealing, on the 26th of November , a gown, value 2 s. a tippet, value 1 s. the property of Ewbank Leaf ; a gown, value 2 s. two caps, value 1 s. a habit shirt, value 6 d. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Sophia Remnart , widow .

EWBANK LEAF. On the 26th of November, I had gone to bed, being a little indisposed; I went to bed a little before eleven o'clock. Mrs. Leaf was following after me; she told me one of the children was indisposed. I recommended her to to burn the night lamp; in getting the lamp, she perceived the lamp part was wanting; she went to see for the night lamp, not finding it in the room where we were, she went into the room adjoining; I heard her in very great distress. I jumped out of bed, and went into the room where she had gone into; I there found the prisoner at the bar; my wife told me she discovered her in the fire-place. I seized her, and asked her the reason of her coming there. She said she come to the house between seven and eight o'clock, and thought of asking for relief, as she was in great distress; and having formerly been our servant, she was sure I should relieve her. We then discovered a bundle of clothes in the fire-place. The fire-place had a chimney board before it; it had seen removed when I came into the room. Mrs. Leaf handed this bundle out to me; she asked the prisoner how she could be such a bad girl; she begged for mercy, and hoped we should forgive her, and overlook it, I was much alarmed lest there should be accomplices in the house; I armed myself; I then took her down stairs, and sent my present servant for the watchman; the watchman was too feeble, in case a rescue should be attempted; I sent for another one; he came took her to the watchhouse; we did not discover any accomplices; we thought we heard a watchword in the night. The watchman and myself searched the house before I went to bed, and found nobody.

Q. Had you any idea how she got into the house - A. Not the slightest; I think she must have got over the area rails, and got into the kitchen; from the kitchen there is access to the room that she was in; I told her to empty her pockets; she took from her pockets a pair of shoes, she had no shoes on. The constable of the night searched her.

ELIZABETH LEAF . I am the wife of the last witness. About a quarter before eleven at night; I went into a room adjoining where the servant always slept, and a young child of my own; the room was adjoining of my own. I went into that room, and found part of a night lamp I went to the fire-place, and removed a chimney board, and behind the screen I discovered a woman. I immediately screamed for assistance, and went into the front room, and fetched my husbnad directly; he came and seized the prisoner, and asked her why she got into the house; she said she was in a state of starvation, and came to the door between seven and eight o'clock, in tending to ask for some relief, finding the door a-jar, she came in, and thought she would stay till the morning I told her that was very improbable. I turned round and looked at the place of her concealment. I saw a bundle lay; I then asked her if she had brought her clothes there, she said Yes, she turned herself from me, then took up the bundle, and unrolled it; it contained a gown of my own, a fur tippet taken to the front room closet, and also some articles from wearing apparel of my servant's, a gown, a habit shirts, two caps, two handkerchiefs, and an pron. Remnant was my servant then. Mr. Leaf desired her to turn out her pocket. She turned not her shoes, she had none on; she said she meant to take nothing.

Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you - A. About nine months: She ran way, without giving any warning; she went out for some porter for supper; she went away and took the money with her, never brought the porter, and never returned.

THOMAS - . I am a constable of the night at Islington. On Saturday night, the 26th of November, the prisoner was brought to me by two watchmen; they said a gentleman, at No. 27, Charlton-place, had given them charge of her; I searched the prisoner; in her pocket I found this pocket-book, with seven duplicates, a flint and steel; a bit of tinder, and a match wrapped up in a bit of rag; she had nothing else about her. I produce the bundle.

Prosecutrix. This preperty is mine.

SOPHIA REMNANT . These things were all found in the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor: I do not know by what means I got into the house; I beg my master and mistress's pardon.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-109

108. SUSANNAH WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a decanter, value 3 s. and a quart of rum, value 5 s. the property of John Haigh .

JOHN HAIGH . I keep a small public-house in Cartwright-street, Rosemary-lane . On the 11th of last month my wife called me out of the parlour.

ELIZABETH HAIGH . On the 10th of November, the prisoner came in and called for a quartern of gin at my bar; I immediately served her, it was between eight and nine o'clock at night; after I had served her, she put down two-pence, I told her twopence would not pay four-pence for the quartern of gin. She then said, I must give her credit for the two-pence; I said, I had better give it her; a customer came in, and called for sixpennyworth of rum and water; the decanter had no rum in it; I filled the decanter; I then turned round to get a glass, and when I turned back again, the decanter with the rum was gone; there was not a soul at the bar but the prisoner. I exclaimed to my husband, the decanter was gone, he had better go to the prisoner's lodgings after the prisoner. Mr. Haigh and I followed the prisoner to her lodgings; I found her at her lodgings; I asked her for the decanter and the rum; she said she did not know what I meant. I said to her you may as well bring it out. I went up to the fire-place, I took up the decanter; the neck was broken off. I took it home. This is the decanter. Afterwards the patrole went and found the broken neck, This is it.

JOHN SHAW. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. She seemed very sorry for

what she had done; she said if the prosecutor would forgive her, she would make any recompense the prosecutor would take.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the decanter until I saw it at the Magistrates.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18141130-110

109. JOSEPH POWELL was indicted for that he, having at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 10th of October, in the 48th year of his Majesty's reign, been adjudged an incorrigible rogue, within the intent, and meaning of a certain statue made and passed in the 17th year of his late Majesty, King George II, for having made use of a certain subtle craft, pretending to have skill in Astrology, to deceive and impose upon James Weston , to tell future events that would happen to him, having been before punished as a rogue and vagabond, and ordered to be imprisoned in the House of Correction one year and to be openly whipped at the carts tail from the end of Mutton-lane to the end of Aylesbury-street; that he afterwards on the 13th of October last, did offend again in like manner, to deceive and impose upon Benjamin Smith .

MR. ALLEN. I produce the original records of the conviction of Joseph Powell . I am a clerk in the County office of the Peace.

(The records read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am keeper of the New Prison Clerkenwell; I was formerly assistant to Mr. Newman, the late keeper.

Q. Is the prisoner the person to whom these convictions applies - A. I was present at the convictions the prisoner is the person that was convicted at both times; I was present each time.

BENJAMIN SMITH . I am a shoe-maker, I live in Bullen-court, in the Strand.

Q. On Thursday, the 13th of October, did you go to the house of the prisoner - A. I did, to 64, Queen-street, Soho; I knocked at his door; he let me in himself. I told him I wanted to speak with him; he told me to sit down. I told him I wanted to ask him a question in consequence of my wife having left me some time; I should be glad to know his opinion whether she would ever return.

Q. Now, in order to induce him to give answers did you give him any thing - A. He answered first; I gave him two shillings and sixpence after the answers, I paid him. He then took a slate, and drew some figures on the slate, and when he had drawed the figures, he signified I might possibly see my wife on the 1st of November; if I did not see her on that day, he thought I should see her at the latter end of that month: and if I did not see her at the latter end of that month, he thought I never should see her again. When he had answered me them questions, I gave him two shillings and sixpence; he gave me a hand bill to recommend him customers. This is the hand bill.

(Read.)

POWELL, late Professor of Astrology, & Physic.

"Respectfully informs his friends and the public, that he now sells the invaluable articles, viz. a liquid that is a certain cure for the scurvy in the teeth and gums, being only used with a brush it makes the blackest teeth clean, and white in a few days; an eye-water which has restored the sight when almost lost; a tincture for curing the torturing pain of the tooth-ach, at two shillings and sixpence per bottle. Also the scurvy, rheumatism, consumptions, old coughs, colds, and various other diseases safely and speadily cured, on very reasonable terms; any commands by letters (post paid) will be punctually attended to at No. 64, Queen-street, Soho, near Greek-street, first doors up one pair of stairs.

(No questions asked.)

"A Penegeric on the Starry Systom,

"How great the Glorious of the Skies,

"The Sun, the Moon, the Stars likewise;

"The frame of Heaven transpend out spread,

"With brilliant beauties spangled;

"Without these orbs past all relate,

"Here's no light, nor life, nor state,

"If they give life and wealth create,

"Then sure they must ordain our fate.

Mr Knapp Q. to Smith. What are you - A. A shoe-maker.

Q. Have you seen your wife again - A. No.

Q. You went to this man, asked him many questions, he answered them; you believed none of it - A. I thought very little about it.

Q. You were not cheated or defrauded by his words - A. I paid him two shillings and sixpence in money.

Q. You paid no intention to what he said, you were not deceived at all - A. I paid attention to pay him his money; as to belief I cannot say much about it.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I went to apprehend this man at 64, Queen-street. I found in his apartments two slates, and these books, I now produce for casting nativities; these are the two slates, and the books. I also found a number of letters with questions in them to be answered; this frame I now produce he called a perpetual motion at the office; it appears to be for the purpose of drawing lines on a slate. Plank and Jeffereys were with me.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentleman of the jury, this is a very unjust prosecution. I had for many years dropped the business of astrology; by no means answering any thing, when I did, it was down right distress made me do it, and for want of bread for my family. I have now a wife out of her mind, and a child only nine years old; a twelvemonth ago two children were left upon me by a relation that died, and left his wife in great distress, now they are all in distress together. My poor child came yesterday evening to me, and told me every thing was gone, and yesterday she had only a pennyworth of bread to exist on. As to this man, he came in and asked some questions about his wife, and I told him my opinion. He first scraped some acquaintance with me some years ago, and on account of old acqtaintance, he asked me some questions about his wife; I told him I did not pretend to predict any thing. He laid on the ground two shillings and sixpence. I told him I did not look for any money; he would leave it; he said, it was all the money he had. I

insisted upon his taking back a shilling; no said he, as you are so generous to give me back a shilling, I s will do it in your lottery. I told him that was a thing I by no means did do now, I had suffered before. I asked for no money; it was a thing I by no means wished to do for any body.

GUILTY , aged 70.

Confined 2 years , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-111

110. EDIZABETH CRUTCHLEY and ANN SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of November , a watch, value 3 l. two pieces of foreign coin, value 2 s. two dollars, and one three shilling bank token, the property of Ralph Allison from his person .

RALPH ALLISON . I am a soldier . I belong to the forty second regiment of foot . On the 13th of November, one or two of my comrades were drinking at a public-house; I happened to go there. before I went there, the prisoners got into my company; they robbed me of my watch, and all my money.

Q. How could they git at it - A. I agreed with Elizabeth Crutchley to go home with her, I went with her to Duck-court, Duck-lane, Westminster; Ann Smith the other woman went with me; we went to bed, I had my silver watch in my trowsers pocket and two Portuguese pieces, two dollars, and a three shilling bank token. After I had been in bed some time, I might have been asleep an hour, I awoke; When I laid down I put my trowsers under the bolster, and when I awoke my trowsers were on the bolster.

Q. Who took it from under the bolster - A. Ann Crutchley only was in bed with me; Ann Smith went out to fetch some gin.

Q. Did she come back again - A. I did not see her. I am sure I had my watch and money in my pocket; I took a sixpence out to give Ann Smith to fetch some gin.

RICHARD MUNDAY. I am an officer, I took the prisoners into custody; I searched them, I could not find the watch or money; the prosecutor give me this purse. he said he had the money in.

Prosecutor. They did not take my purse, they left that in my pocket.

Q. Were you perfectly sober - A. I had a little drink; I was watching for them all Sunday. I found them at dark drinking gin; Ann Smith said the watch was left for five shillings, they both said so I sent for a constable; as fast as I could,

Crutchley's Defence. The soldier went into other company before he went with us, when he came to me he said he would give me eighteen pence and a shilling to pay for the bed; he gave Ann Smith sixpence. After I had been in bed an hour, I told him I had been long enough in bed for the money; as for the watch I never saw nor a farthing.

Smith's Defence. I was In the room, I never saw a watch and all the money I saw was half a crown.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-112

111. ANN BARBER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November a watch, value 2 l. the property of George Darver from his person .

GEORGE DARVER . I am a gentleman's servant I lost my watch on the 29th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. I was in liquor, I met the prisoner at the Queens-head, at Knightbridge, she asked me to give her something to drink, I went into the Queen's head, and gave her some rum, and there came in a person or two that I knew, we had a glass or two coming out; the pri- went out of the Queens head before me; I came up with her, and we walked together to Hyde-park corner, and when I stopped I found my watch was gone, I looked round, and the prisoner was gone that was with me.

Q. Are you sure that person was the prisoner - A. I think it was her; I cannot swear it, I was in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-113

112. JOHN ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of November , two jackets, value 10 s. and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. the property of Phillip Jones .

PHILLIP JONES. I am chief mate of a ship ; the ship cabin door, was broken open on the 23rd of November in the export dock.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant on board that ship - A. No; I do not know what he was; these things were taken out of the cabin at night, and the cabin door broken open at night as near as I can guess, I left the ship at four o'clock on the 23rd of Novembar; on the 24th I went down, at nine o'clock in the morning; I then found the cabin door was broken open, and the staple had been drawn by force; I lost a jacket and trowsers, that were under my charge; I went to the pawnbrokers, they shewed me a jacket and trowsers that belonged to me, I told them to stop the man if he came again.

ROBERT WHITE . I am shopman to Mr. Nichol's pawnbroker in Ratcliffe. On the 23rd of November, in the evening, between seven and eight, I took in this jacket of the prisoner.

JOHN MASON . I am shopman to Mr. Dyer pawnbroker; I produce three jackets, pawned with me on the 24th of November, for four shillings by the prisoner; he appeared very much distressed at the time.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody; I found upon, him the duplicate of these things.

Q. to Jones. Look at these things - A, Here is a pea jacket mine, and the trowsers mine, they are lined with flannel.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a good deal in distress when I did this; I could not get no ship or any thing to do.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-114

113. ANN SPARKES and SUSAN SPARKES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , thirty nine pieces of paper hangings, value

9 l. 15 s. the property of Hugh Stevens and George Kibble White .

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am clerk to Mr. Hugh Stevens and George Kibble White , they are manufacturers of stained paper the manufactory is in Adam-street Westminster.

Q. Had you in your manufactory a workman one of the husbands of one of the prisoners - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of something that you discovered, did you go to the premises of a Mrs. Pinner - A. Yes; I discovered several pieces of paper there, she keeps a tin shop in Barretts-coura, Wigmore-street; in her house I discovered five or six pieces of paper, and a remnant of a border, I told Mrs. Pinner to procure more for me; Jeffreys the officer purchased other paper at several other places, and we went with a search warrant, we took all the paper that we could find; we found seven or eight pieces of paper at Mrs. pinners, we brought them away; they are here; and several other pieces of paper we took from Mr. Leggs in Barretts-court; we took nineteen pieces of paper in all, I believe from there.

Ann Spark 's Defence. I am innocent.

Susan Spark 's Defence, The same.

ANN SPARKS GUILTY , aged 57.

SUSAN SPARKS GUILTY aged 37.

Confined one year and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Dr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141130-115

114. WILLIAM FLYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of December sixty penny pieces and one hundred and twenty halfpence the property of John Hargood .

JOHN HARGOOD . I am a tallow chandler , 93, High-street, Whitechapple , the prisoner had been my porter about six weeks, or two months. Having missed two or three articles of mine, suspicion fell on the prisoner; on Thursday week last, having deposited six five shilling papers in a room, some pence and some half-pence, on the 2nd of November I missed two out of the six, and on searching for them I found them concealed under some wood that was bought to light the fire. I marked the paper of halfpence with my initials; the paper of penny pieces was only once tied round with string, I did not mark them. After I had marked them, I placed them as nearly as I found them covering them over with the fire wood; I desired my servant maid not to touch them until I got up the next morning; the next morning I examined the spot where I found these things they were gone. I then applied to Mr. Griffiths of Lambeth Street office, I let the prisoner go ont to breakfast as usual and when he got out of the house I called him back when he returned Griffiths the officer searched his person, and found the two papers in his pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you give me the halfpence the week before last - A. No I marked them the night before.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . On Friday morning I went to the house of the prosecutor; the prisoner was not gone to breakfast, I waited until such time he went; he went to breakfast; I was sitting in the parlour. I saw him go out into the street, I called him back into the shop; I searched him, and in his breeches pocket, I found a paper of halfpence in one pocket, and penny pieces in the other; these are the papers of copper. I asked him how he came to rob his master; he said it was the first time. I asked him the reason of his doing so; he said he wanted some money to make up to buy him a new coat: he begged of his master to forgive him. That is all that passed.

JURY. Q. to Prosecutor. When did you mark them - A. After I found them under the wood.

Prisoner's Defence. The money found on me was part of fifteen shillings paid me on Saturday night by my master. When Mr. Griffiths found the papers of money in my pocket, he asked me what made me take them; I said to buy me a new coat; I said it is my first offence, they ought to forgive me; they took me to Lambeth-street offence.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined 3 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18141130-116

115. JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

RICHARD SCRAFTON SHARPE . I am a grocer at the corner of Mark-lane, Fenchnrch-street. On the 19th of October, the prisoner came into my shop, he said he wanted a pound of eight shilling black tea for Charles Martin , of Venterer's Hall; he said, he had left his service and had returned again to it; I believed his story to be true, that he was in the service of Mr. Martin. I gave him the article, and the bill of parcel of the same goods. He came again the next day, and said he wanted a pound of black tea and a pound of green tea for the same master's use for the country. I gave that to him, with a bill of parcels. On the 22nd he came again, he then said he wanted a pound of green tea, for town; he represented that to be for his master's town use, it was his master's custom to have a pound of black tea and a pound of green, that he should have taken it the other day; he had the green tea, two pounds and a half of currants, three pounds of moist sugar, and nine pounds of loaf sugar; I let him have them believing him to be Mr. Martin's servant; each time he came he said he was glad of having returned. My brother is my only partner, his name is Thomas; he called again on Saturday the 29th, I had suspicion; I sent to Mr. Martin; the messinger returned, I detained the prisoner, and took him before the Lord Mayor.

CHARLES MARTIN . The prisoner had formerly been my servant; I gave him no authority to apply for these parcels; he had left me a year and a half. I did not know that he had gone for these goods.

MRS. MARTIN, Q. Did you know that the prisoner had gone for all these goods - A. No, he had no authority from me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in hopes of paying Mr.

Sharp before my master knew.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-117

116. MICHAEL MULLENS was indicted for that he, on the 10th of November , unlawfully did utter to Charles Vaisey , a certain false and counterfeit token for the sum of three shillings, he knowing it to be counterfeited; and that he had about him at the same time he so uttered it, one other certain false and counterfeit token, he knowing that to be counterfeited .

AND OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

CHARLES VAISEY . I am a cheesemonger ; I live in Widegate-street, Bishopsgate-street .

Q. On Thursday the 10th of November, do you remember the prisoner coming into your shop - A. Yes, he came in for three pennyworth of cheese; I weighed it, and gave it him; he gave me a three shilling token in payment; I sounded it on the counter, and just at that time Johnson, the officer, came in; I shewed him the three-shilling token; Johnson said it was a bad one. I told Johnson on in the presence of the prisoner, that I received it of the prisoner. Johnson desired me to mark the three-shilling token, which I did. This is the token; I have no doubt about it.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . In consequence of suspicion, on the 10th of November, I saw the prisoner; I watched him; I saw him go into Mr. Vaisey's shop; I stood outside. I saw him tender a three-shilling piece; when Mr. Vaisey had got the three-shilling piece, I heard him ringing it; I went into the shop, I asked Mr. Vaisey to let me look at it; he shewed me the three-shilling token; he said, I have just received it of the prisoner. I upon looking at it, I observed it to be a counterfeit. I shall know it again if I see it.

Q. Look at that - A. That is the token that was given to Mr. Vaisey by the prisoner; I have no doubt about it. I asked the prisoner where he got the token, and told him it was a bad one, he said, he got it in change for a pound note at Chatham. I asked him if he had any more tokens about him that he had taken in change of the pound note at Chatham; he said, no, he had not. I took him backwards to search him; in his left hand breeches pocket, I found two tokens wrapped in paper, and two loose; the two in paper had paper between them, as they are sold, to prevent them from rubbing.

Q. Look at these, and tell me whether these are the four that you found in his breeches pocket - A. These are the four that I found in his breeches pocket. I asked him where he lived; he refused to tell me. I searched his other breeches pocket; here is two shillings in good silver, and three or four sixpences; in his coat pocket I found two shillings and tenpence three farthings, and a hank of cord, and about a pound of meat; they are new articles just bought.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers at the Bank.

Q. Look at this three-shilling tokens - A, It is a counterfeit, and the other four are also counterfeits; they all appear to be made in the same die, and hear the impression of the King's head on one side, and Georgius III Dia Gratia Rex , and on the reverse bank token, three shilling, 1812.

Prisoner's Defence. These tokens I took in change of a one-pound note at Chatham Dook, at the Union Flag, of a man that was selling hardware, the landlord could not give me change, he said he would give me change; I could not tell whether they were good or bad, I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined 1 year , and to find sureties at the end of that year for two years more .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-118

117. MARY MOORE was indicted for that she on the 6th of November , unlawfully did utter to Mary Murt a counterfeit token for the sum of three shillings, and that she, on the 8th of November , did utter to Mary Murt one other counterfeit three shilling token, by reason of which promises, she was and became a common utterer of counterfait money .

MARY MURT . I reside at Southwark; I have known the prisoner since last January; she deals in fruit .

Q. In consequence of any communication with the Solicitor of the Bank, were you employed upon any occasion - A. I did it for my own credit.

Q. Did you make any communication to a person of the name of Daniel Heron - A. Yes; I received six shillings of Daniel Heron, a dollar and a sixpence; I was to purchase four counterfeit tokens of the prisoner; I was in company with Ann Bruce when the dollar and sixpence was given to me by Daniel Heron. I went with Ann Bruce to the prisoner in Petticoat-lane in an alley; Ann Bruce stopped outside, waiting for me. I saw the prisoner; I gave her the dollar and the sixpence, and she fetched me four counterfeit three shilling tokens; she went out, and soon returned, and gave me the four counterfeit tokens in the house, the door was open; Ann Bruce saw the money given to me, she was opposite. I carried them tokens home, and gave them to Goff.

Q. Who was with you - A. Ann Bruce ; I never parted with the tokens until I gave them to Goff: the tokens that I received of the prisoner I gave to Goff. I saw the prisoner on Sunday, the 6th of November, in the forenoon, between eleven and twelve o'clock; Ann Bruce was with me; at the top of Petticoat-lane I left Ann Bruce , and went to the prisoner's house. She told me on the 4th of November to come into her house at any time I pleased; I met the prisoner in the lane, close to her house, where she stood with a basket of fruit close to her house, in an alley in Petticoat-lane, near to her house; I gave her the money. Mrs. Bruce stood by; I gave her a three-shilling piece and three shillings, that was to purchase four counterfeit tokens; I got that money of Mr. May, another officer. She delivered me the four three-shilling counterfeit tokens for the money that I delivered to her; they were wrapped up in a piece of paper, in the same manner as the others. I carried them to Mr. May's house, and

gave them to him. I saw the prisoner again on Tuesday, the 8th of November; I said to the prisoner, I came again; she then said, I could come to her house any time I liked to come. I was then in company with Ann Bruce , and she in like manner went and followed the prisoner in the same manner she had done before on former occasions, she was waiting at the top of Petticoat-lane. I had a three-shilling piece then of Mr. Bruce; I took that three-shilling piece to Mrs. Moore: she served me once in her mother's house, she lived there, that is her dwelling, and twice she served me in the street.

Q. What number of tokens did you receive then - A. Two three shilling counterfeit tokens; I kept them in my bosom until I delivered them to James Bruce at the White Horse; I never parted with the third counterfeit three shilling tokens until I delivered them to Mr. Bruce.

Prisoner. Q. You have been convicted upon this suit - A. Not for selling; one counterfeit token was found upon me, and I was along with a person that had two in their possession.

Q. How do you get your living - A. By mantua-making.

ANN BRUCE . I am the wife of James Bruce.

Q. Were you employed in the beginning of November to go with the last witness to the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. On the 4th of November; were you present when any money was given to Mary Murt - A. No. I went with her to an alley in Petticoat-lane; I saw her go into the prisoner's house. I saw the prisoner and Mary Murt come out; I followed the prisoner to see where she went to; the prisoner went to Mrs. Phillip's house in Catherine Wheel-alley. I saw Mrs. Moore come out of Phillip's house with a paper in her hand; I followed her, and saw her deliver that paper to Mary Murt ; Mary Murt put the paper into her bosom; I accompanied Mary Murt home, and saw her deliver the paper with the counterfeit tokens to Goff. I saw it opened after it was delivered to Goff; I saw the paper contained four bad three-shilling tokens. On Sunday, the 6th, I accompanied her again for the same purpose; I went with Mary Murt to near the same spot where I had been before; Mrs. Murt saw the prisoner standing at a fruit stall. I saw Murt go up to the prisoner, and give her some money, three shillings and a three-shilling token. I saw the prisoner take the money and go into her own house, take her bonnet, put it on, and then she came out, and went to Phillip's house in Catherine Wheel-alley; I followed the prisoner, and never lost sight of her; I saw her go into the same house she had gone into before; I fellowed the prisoner, she then went to Mary Murt at the top of Petticoat-lane; she parted with Mrs. Murt after she had put the paper into her hand; Mary Murt brought the paper in her hand, and gave it to Mr. May, in his own house. On Tuesday Mrs. Murt went to the prisoner, and asked her to fetch two in the street, and gave her a three shilling piece. The prisoner went, and I followed, and saw her go into Mrs. Phillip's house again; I saw Mr. Phillips deliver a paper to the prisoner; the prisoner came to Murt, and delivered the paper to her; Murt and I came home to my house; she gave my husband the paper at the White Horse public-house.

JOHN GOFF . I am an officer. On the 4th of November, I received four counterfeit three-shilling tokens of Mrs. Murt; these are the four; I am perfectly sure of; she gave them me in the presence of Mr. Bruce.

JOHN MAY . I am a constable. On the 6th of November, I received four tokens of Mary Murt ; I furnished her with the money to purchase them. She brought the four counterfeit tokens to me at my own house; Mrs. Bruce was with her.

JAMES BRUCE . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 8th of November, I received two tokens of Mary Murt ; I never parted with them until I gave them to Mr. Westwood. These two are them I marked them before I parted with them. I gave her the money to purchase them; my wife went with her to purchase them.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers of the Bank; I am well acquainted with their money.

Q. Look at these four tokens - A. They are counterfeits; they represent bank tokens, and are liable to impose upon the public.

Q. Look at them - A. There is six of them in two parcels, four and two; they are counterfeits, they are liable also to impose upon the public; they are all fresh, and of the same manufactory.

Prisoners Defence. I never saw the woman before I was taken in custody; she came to the door, and asked if she might go; I said, no, and then the gentleman came, and took me into custody.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 1 year , and to find sureties at the expiration of that year for two years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-119

118. LEVI COHEN was indicted for that he, on the 28th of October , unlawfully did utter to Mary Murt a certain false and counterfeit bank token for the sum of three shillings, he knowing it to be false and counterfeited; and that he, in the space of ten days next following, to wit, on the 2nd of November , did utter. Mary Murt one other false and counterfeit Bank token, he knowing that to be counterfeited .

MARY MURT . Q. You told us in the last trial, how long you had known the prisoner - A. On last January I became acquainted with a whole party of them.

Q. Did you see him on Friday, the 28th of October - A. I did, at his own house, Daniel Heron was with me.

Q. Did you receive any money from Heron - A. I did, a dollar and sixpence, six shillings in value; I saw the prisoner at his own house, I went in, and sat down a bit; I gave Cohen the money that Heron had given me to buy four counterfeit tokens; he took the money, and went strait out of the house for the tokens, and I followed him into the street; he told me to stop at a pawnbroker's door in Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Where is Clement's house - A. In Clements-lane, out of Bishopsgate-street; he told me to stop at the pawnbroker's door until he came back; I waited a few minutes; he came back, he gave me the four tokens in my hand. I gave them to Heron, he stood convenient to where I stood.

Q. Could the prisoner see Heron - A. He did not know him; he stood convenient by; I had previously pointed out the prisoner to Heron.

Q. What did you get from the prisoner when he came back - A, Five counterfeit three-shilling bank tokens; directly the prisoner came out, I pointed him out to Heron, when he went away to fetch them.

Q. Were these tokens given you loose or in a paper - A. They were given me in paper, all of a lump.

Q. After he delivered you the money, what did he do - A. The prisoner went away strait home; upon that I delivered the paper to Heron in the course of a minute after the prisoner left me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner again in the month of November - A. I did, in his own house, the morning of the 2nd of November; Mrs. Bruce and Heron were both with me.

Q. Are you sure that Heron was with you - A. Yes I am.

Q. Was the prisoner at home at the time you went there - A. Yes, he was at home.

Q. Had you received of Heron any more money - A. Of Mr. May, I had received six shillings of Mr. May. I went into the prisoner's house, by myself; the prisoner was a bed; he came out in the street; I gave him the six shillings to purchase four counterfeit tokens. I gave him the money that I had of May.

COURT. You had of Mr. May two three-shilling bank tokens to purchase four - A. Yes; the prisoner came out in the street; I gave him the money I had received of May; he told me I owed him some money; I said, I would pay him another time. Then he went strait to the place as usual, and told me to stop at the pawnbrother's shop; I did. He went, and brought the money; when he returned I was at the pawnbrokers shop, and Heron was over the way; Ann Bruce and Heron followed him to the house. When the prisoner returned, he gave me the counterfeit tokens in my hand, they were in paper; the paper contained three three-shilling counterfeit bank tokens; he stopped eighteen-pence because I owed him some money. These three tokens I gave them to Heron.

DANIEL HERON . I am a constable.

Q. Did you deliver any money to Mrs. Murt - A. I did, on Friday, the 28th of October, I gave her a dollar and a sixpence; I accompanied her to Cohen's house, nobody was in company with Mrs. Murt and me. I followed Cohen to the house of Mrs. Phillip's, I believe it is in Catherine Wheel-alley, he came out with something in his hand doubled in paper; I followed him into Bishopsgate-street, at the corner of Artillery-lane, I saw him take her by the hand, and bid her good bye, as she stood at the corner; he ran across the way as soon as he shook hands with her; I saw him deliver her a paper, shook hands with her, and bid her good bye. I went up to her immediately again, and she delivered to me the paper immediately; I immediately took it to Mr. May at his house. I went with her again on Wednesday, the 2nd of November, with Ann Bruce and Mrs. Murt; I went to Cohen's house, in Angel-alley, Cohen was not at home. We came back again into Bishopsgate-street, Mrs. Murt met him in Bishopsgate-street; I had given her two three-shilling tokens when she came to me. He immediately ran across the way to a cheesemongers shop; I saw her give him the money; he came out of the cheesemonger's shop, I saw him come out again; Mrs. Bruce followed him immediately; I stood a little distance from Mrs. Murt; he returned to Mrs. Murt; I saw him take her by the hand; they had some little conversation together, he bid her good bye. I joined her; she delivered the paper again to me; I immediately opened it, and saw there were only three tokens. These three tokens I delivered to Mr. May again at his house. That is all I know.

ANN BRUCE . Q. In the month of November, did you accompany Mary Murt and Daniel Heron to Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street - A. Yes, I saw Mrs. Murt go into the prisoner's house, and came out again; they converced together; after they came up the alley Cohen said to Mrs. Murt, are you going to give us any gin. Heron was out in Bishopsgate-street. Mrs. Murt said she had no money. She gave Cohen two three-shilling pieces, and told him to go and purchase four tokens with that money; he said you owe me eighteen-pence: she replied, I will pay you when I come again; with that he went into a cheesemongers shop, and changed one three-shilling piece; he run, and I run; he ran me almost out of breath; he went into the house of Rebecca Phillip 's in Catherine Wheel-alley; he staid there about eight minuates; I saw him give the money to Rebecca Phillips ; he came out again after he had given Phillips the money; I saw him tender the money to Rebecca Phillips as she sat in the chair; I turned a little distance, and walked away, and when I came back, he had the tokens in his hand turning them over; I saw there were three; he wrapped them up in paper; I went on with him until he came to Mrs. Murt; I kept as close to him as possible; he never looked back, or else he must have seen me. When he came to Mrs. Murt he gave her this paper; Heron was standing by at the time; the prisoner then ran across the way; than Mrs. Murt gave the money to Heron.

JOHN MAY . I am an officer.

Q. Did you on the 28th of October, receive from the person of Heron any counterfeit tokens - A. I did, four; I marked what I received. These four tokens I received of Heron; these other three I received on the 2nd of November of Heron.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . Q. Look at these four tokens - A. They are counterfeit tokens, they bear the same impression of genuine tokens, and the three are also counterfeits; they are all of the same manufactory; they are merely washed; they do not appear to have been in circulation; they bear the resembance of bank tokens.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant, and Mr. Serjeant Bosanquet replied.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that year to find sureties for good behaviour for two years to come ,

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-120

119. JANE GREEN and REBECCA PHILLIPS were indicted for that they, on the 10th of November , unlawfully did utter to one Mary Murt a counterfeit three shilling bank token, and also that they on the 11th of November , in the same year, unlawfully did utter to Mary Murt . a counterfeit three-shilling bank token, they knowing it to be counterfeit .

AND FIVE OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

MARY MURT . I know Jane Green; I have know her since last January, she lives with Cohen as her husband, in Angel-alley, I do not know the number. On the 10th of November, I saw Mrs. Green at her house in Angel-alley; on the 10th of November in the morning Mrs. Bruce was with me: I went to her for four tokens, I gave her a three shilling piece and three shillings; I received it of Mr. May; I gave the money to the prisoner Green, she came out of her house with me into Union-street, opposite of a public house, she told me to stop there; she told me to stop there while she went of the errand.

Q. Where did she go to - A. I cannot say; Mrs. Bruce followed her. In a few minutes, she came back again, and gave me four tokens in a paper; these three-shilling tokens I gave to Ann Bruce . I told Jane Green I would see her again that day; I met her in Bishopsgate-street, with a barrow of fruit by the side of the East India warehouse; Mrs. Bruce was with me: I told her I came for half a dozen tokens: I gave her the money for them, a five and sixpenny dollar, and the remainder in shillings, nine shillings I gave her in the whole; I got that money from Mr. May; she left me in a public-house along with two other women.

Q. Where is that public-house - A. In New-street, Mrs. Bruce followed Jane Green to see where she went for the counterfeit money; I saw her follow Jane Green.

Q. What time did you see Mrs. Green again - A. In a short time she came to me in the public-house, I came out into the street with her, and then she delivered me half a dozen tokens. Mrs. Bruce was by at the time, I gave them to Mrs. Bruce.

Q. Did you see her again on Friday the 11th of November - A. I did.

Q. Did you receive of Ann Bruce any money that day - A. Yes, nine shillings in the morning, they were marked by Mr. Bruce and Mr. May. After they were delivered to me, we went both together to the house of Jane Green. Bruce staid outside. I asked Jane Green where her husband was; she said, up the lane. I asked her if she could do this errand for me to get me half a dozen three-shilling tokens, I gave her the nine shillings that I received of Mrs. Bruce. She went for the purpose of geting the tokens; Mrs. Bruce went after her; at that time I was to remain in Union-street at the same place as before; she ran, and very soon came back, and gave me the half dozen tokens into my hand, and before I could put them into my bosom Heron the officer came up and took them out of my hand; I would not let him have the tokens, and then he catched hold of her. I kept the tokens until I gave them to Mr. Westwood.

ANN BRUCE . Q. Did you go in company with Mary Murt on the 10th of November - A. Yes, I went with her to a house in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street; she went to the house of Cohen; I saw her go to Cohen and Green's house; I saw Mrs. Green come out, she left Murt in the street, she said she would meet her in Union-street as usual, and she gave her six shillings, I see that; I heard her say she would not be long before she was back again. I followed her; she went to the house of Rebecca Phillips , and I saw her with a paper in her hand; I saw her go into Rebecca Phillips house, and I saw her come out again; I saw her with a paper in her hand go to Mary Murt in Union-street, she slipped the paper into her hand; she then went away from Murt, and immediately Murt came to me, and gave it me; I never parted with it until I gave it to Mr. Westwood. I went again the same day with Murt to purchase, about three o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Green was standing with a barrow at the corner of Union-street, and two other women in company with her; I saw Murt give her something out of her hand, and I saw Mr. May give Murt the money to purchase these tokens; he gave nine shillings to purchase six tokens; I saw Murt give Jane Green that nine shillings. I saw Green come out of Phillip's house with a paper in her hand, she turned the money over, and wrapped it up again; she delivered it to Murt; I walked up to Murt: she gave them me after she had received it of Green, and I gave that second money to Mr. Westwood.

DANIEL HERON . Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner Jane Green on Friday the 11th of November - A, I do in Union Street, Bishopsgate-street; I saw her coming along Murt was waiting at a coach-makers door in Union Street; I and Barrett were together; I saw Green deliver a brown paper to Murt; I then took Green, and gave her to Barret.

MR. WESTWOOD. Q. You assist the solicitor of the Bank - A. I do on the 10th of November I received of Ann Bruce four counterfiet tokens, these four I now produce; they have been in my posession ever since. The same day in the afternoon, I received again of Ann Bruce six counterfit tokens, making in all ten of Ann Bruce ; the next morning I received six, of Mary Murt wrapped up in brown paper.

- BARRETT. Q. Did you see Jane Green on the 11th of November in company with Murt - A. I did, I was waiting in Union-street, I observed Jane Green and Mrs. Murt joined hands together. Heron took Green into custody, and delivered her to me. I searched her and found nine shillings, four out of the nine, have been marked by Ann Bruce , and Mr. May.

ANN BRUCE . Them four shillings I marked with a cross that is my mark.

JOHN MAY . Did you furnish any money on the evening of the 10th of November - A. I did to Mrs. Bruce: I furnished nine shillings, I marked them on the edge with the point of a pen knife. On the following morning, I accompained Goff and Barrett to the house pointed out to me; to be Rebecca Phillips 's; in that house we found Fanny Eden.

Q. Did you see Green come out of the house - A. No; I searched Rebecca Phillips me on one side, Bray on the other, she took out the silver, she cried, and threw it on the table, to the amount of twenty shillings, and among that silver were five of the shillings that I marked the night before; these are the five marked shillings. Goff and Bray went up stairs and searched the house, I remained below; Goff called me up stairs, we discovered the counterfeit tokens concealed in the stairs, a part of the stairs were cut away; I brought this away, it formed a box when closed, and in that box there laid twenty eight dozen three shilling tokens, and several dozen eighteen penny tokens laid in rows. I found nothing else, The prisoner Phillips said she lived there.

JOHN GOFF . I was with May on the 11th of November, I searched Rebecca Phillips 's house; I found some good money which I delivered to Joshua Bray the officer, I afterwards searched and found a stair cut; in that stair almost like a box I found sixteen dozen three shilling tokens, and twelve dozen of eighteen penny tokens, with paper between them to keep them from rubbing; I went up stairs, and in a loose cupboard I found some good money; I delivered it to Bray; the prisoner was there and saw it counted she did not say it belonged to her, Bray delivered the good money to the prisoner.

Mr. Westwood. The prisoner said the good money belonged to her; Bary delivered it to her in my presence.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM. I am one of the tellers at the bank.

Q. Look at these tokens - A. They are counterfiets and the six are counterfeits; these were uttered on the 10th and the six uttered on the 11th; the six are also counterfeits; they all bear the resemblance of a good token they are all of the same manufactory and they are all counterfeits,

Mr. Adolphus Addressed the jury in behalf of Phillips.

Green's Defence. It is all sworn falsely against me.

GREEN GUILTY , aged 32.

PHILLIPS GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 year in Newgate and to find surities at the expiration of that year for good behaviour for two years to come .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-121

120. JOHN PITT was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

BENJAMIN WILMOT . Q. Were you deputy to Mr. Brathwaite - A. Yes when this affadvit was made. I am sixteen year old Mr. Brathwaite appointed his deputy himself he was ill, he was not able to take the affidavit.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141130-122

121. CHARLES COLVILL was indicted for a misdemeanour .

The plantiff and witnsses were called and not appearing in court the defendant was,

ACQUITTED .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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