Old Bailey Proceedings, 26th October 1814.
Reference Number: 18141026
Reference Number: f18141026-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 26th of OCTOBER, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Right Honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Allen Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Richards , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Carr Glyn, bart. Sir. John Perring , bart. Sir Charles Flower , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam knt. John Atkins , esq. Robert Albion Cox , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Tyler ,

William Redpath ,

Joseph Read ,

John Callow ,

Thomas Atkinson ,

Stephen Crouch ,

James Hoppey ,

James Topless ,

James Milner ,

Thomas Morris ,

John Ames ,

William Abel .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Wilson ,

William Sexton ,

William Rogers ,

Thomas Pratt ,

William Fairchild ,

Easebius Saint ,

John Philp ,

John Bremner ,

James Sharp ,

Joseph Brockey ,

William Richmond ,

John Brough .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Anthoney Tunstall ,

Peter Paul ,

Giles Wakelin ,

Edward Price ,

Joseph Green ,

Joseph Light ,

Joseph Stockdale ,

William Field ,

John Weston ,

Edward Fitch ,

John Hatchard ,

William Falconer .

Reference Number: t18141026-1

869. ELIZABETH M'DONALD was indicted for that she, at the General Sessions of the Peace, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 1st of June, in the 53d year of his Majesty's reign, was tried, and convicted upon an indictment against her, for that she, on the 22nd of May, in the year aforesaid, one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, unlawfully did utter to one Mary Russell , spinster, and that she had about her at the time, one other piece of counterfeit money, and coin, made to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence; it was therefore ordered that she should be in New Prison Clerkenwell for the space of one year, and to find sureities for good behaviour for two years to come; that she afterwards on the 7th of October , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to William Kilsbey , she knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL. I am clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner. I examined it; it is a true copy.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am the keeper of New Prison, Clerkenwell. I knew the prisoner very well; I was present when she was convicted in June sessions, 1813, of being a common utterer of counterfeit money; she was ordered to be imprisoned in New Prison Clerkenwell, one year, and to find sureties. She suffered her punishment. I have no doubt of person at all.

AMELIA BAILEY. I am the wife of a grocer, in Gray's-inn-lane. On the 7th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, she asked for a quarter of an ounce of tea and half a quartern of sugar; it came to three-pence; she gave me a shilling; I looked at the shilling, and perceived it to be a bad one. I gave it her again, and told her to go away.

WILLIAM KILSBEY . I keep the Poacock public-house, in Gray's-inn-lane. On the 7th of October, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came into my house, she asked for a glass of gin; she gave me a shilling; I looked at it, and said, it was a bad one, and put it down by the side of her. My wife took it up. I am quite sure it is the same. My wife then said, that woman brought bad shillings one day last week. I then said, she is a smasher, she shall not smash no more here. She then attempted to run away; I catched her by the arm. She threw a shilling from her hand directly on the ground.

Q. Had you seen what she did with the shilling that she took off the counter - A. She was never out of my sight. I saw her take up the shilling off the counter; I saw the shilling that she offered me in payment; I saw her hold it in her hand up to the time of her throwing it away. I saw the shilling that she dropped; that was the shilling she had offered to me. Mr. Loveday picked it up, and gave it me; I knew the shilling perfectly well; it had two marks, like C upon it. She had no other shilling then that, that I know off. I sent for Dickens, the officer. Dickens searched her before me. I delivered the shilling to the officer, after I had put a mark upon it. I told Dickens to search her mouth; he searched her mouth. She appeared to all that were present, to be trying to swallow something. She would not let him look into her mouth; she made a desparate resistance when he endeavoured to look into her mouth.

JAMES LOVLDAY . I am a weighter in the Custom house. I was at Mr. Kilsbey's on the 7th of October, I saw the prisoner drop a shilling; I picked it up. I gave it to the landlord; he marked it, and gave it to the officer.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was sent for on this occasion. I took the prisoner into custody. When I went into the bar, Mr. Kilsbey said, do you know this woman; I told him I did; I had taken her once before, and she had then a twelvemonth confinement. I searched her, and found on her one bad shilling in her pocket. This is the shilling I found in her pocket, and this is the shilling the landlord gave me; I have kept them separate.

Prosecutor. This is the shilling that was picked up, and that she offered to me. I put a W. upon it; I was going to put W K upon it, I thought W would be sufficient.

Dickens. She fought a great deal to prevent me from taking her. I put my finger in her mouth; she had something in her mouth, that she swallowed; I tried to make her bring it up; she would not. I know the prisoner well; she knew me as soon as she saw me. I also found three shillings and five pennyworth of halfpence all by themselves in her pocket.

Mrs. Bailey. The tea and sugar came to three-pence.

Mr. Kilsbey. The gin came to two-pence. The Peacock public-house is about one hundred and fifty yard apart.

JOHN NICOLL . I am one of the moniers in his Majesty's Mint.

Q. Look at the shilling uttered in question - A. It is a counterfeit. The other is also a counterfeit; they are both counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. Please your honour, these two men when they took me before, a woman brought me the bad money; these men came and took me for offering bad money. I am a poor desolute woman. If you are going to hang me, hang me out of the way at once, and do not use me in this manner; I had two one-pound notes that Mr. Beeby gave me,

which they took from me, and then they pumped upon me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 68.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-2

870. THOMAS SHARP was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Dobbins .

SECOND COUNT, for the like murder, only stating the deceased's name to be Elizabeth Buchanan . And also charged upon the Coroner's inquisition for the like murder.

JAMES DOBBINS. I work for the Hampstead water work Company; I live at Millfield farm, Millfield-lane, near Kentish Town. The deceased lived with me in my house; I was not married to her; she had lived with me twenty years; she was called by my name; her christian name was Elizabeth, she was generally called Elizabeth Dobbins ; her real name was Elizabeth Buchanan ; she employed herself by taking in washing .

Q. On the day of her decease, at what time did you come home to dinner - A. About twenty minutes past one, on the 4th of October; I staid at home three quarters of an hour, or an hour, as near as I can guess. When I went away from dinner, I left the deceased there, she was at work when I came out from home; she had the linen about on the tubs in rotation for the woman to come to work the next morning; the linen was in the room below. there is a little bit of a passage from the door of that house to the room where that linen was, and a door in the passage to that room.

Q. Did you work at that time with a man of the name of Clark - A. Yes; he asked for some water; I told him to go to the house to get a mug. I said, I did not care if I had some myself. This might be a quarter after three. I was then by the barn door, at that time, about fifteen yards from the house, as near as I can tell; we were taking out tools out of the barrow into the barn; they belonged to the Company, and were deposited in the barn.

Q. In consequence of something that Clark told you, did you go home - A. Yes; when I came home, the door was wide open, the outer door was wide open, and the inside door too. When I went in, I saw the deceased laying down by the side of the copper, growing; I went to take her up; I could not; I ran back, and called for Clark to assist me to get her in a chair; Clark came immediately, and we lifted her into a chair.

Q. In what state was the deceased - A. Her head was cut open entirely; the brain I believe was in the head, but the bones were scattered about the place, and I saw my poker standing up by the side of the copper, bent, and all bloody.

Q. Did she ever speak afterward - A. No; she lived about a quarter of an hour, but never spoke.

Mr. Gurney. Was she a single woman before you lived with her - A. A widow; she went by the name of Buchanan.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a labourer, in the employ of the Hampstead water work Company. I returned to the barn about three o'clock, with Dobbins; I asked for some water; I told him I was dry; he sent me to his cottage for a mug. I went to Dobbin's cottage; I found the door fast; I spoke twice, I called Mrs. Dobbins; I received no answer; I thought I heard something groan. I went and told Mr. Dobbins so; he said, he would go himself, and get a pot for the water. I stopped at the barn, and put my tools in, while Dobbins went to his cottage.

Q. How much time might elapse from your getting from the door of the cottage, and his return there - A. It might be ten minutes.

Q. Supposing any body to have been in Dobbins's cottage and wanted to go away towards London, would he pass in the same direction as Dobbins would come, or go the contrary way - A. The contrary way. After Dobbins went to the cottage, Dobbins called me from the barn to the cottage; he remained at the cottage, hallooing out for me; I went to the cottage immediately. When I got to the cottage, I saw the woman lay by the copper hole; the cottage door was open; Dobbins was in the house, and the woman laying by the copper; she was not quite dead then; she never spoke; her head was very much cut, and bleeding I set the chair, and helped to put her in the chair. A docter was sent for; he sent me to the pond where I had been working, after the other men.

CHARLES BATEMAN . I am a carpenter, at Kentish Town.

Q. On the 4th of this month, were you going by Dobbins's cottage - A. At half past two o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether that is the man that you saw at the cottage - A. That is the man that I saw standing at the post of the gate of the cottage; his back was towards me; he turned as I went by, and I had a view of his face; he had on a fustian jacket, and a black handkerchief round his neck, seeing a stranger made me notice him. I saw him again as soon as he was in custody, at half past three or four o'clock the same day; I am clear he is the same man I saw at the gate at half past two; I was clear of it then; I know it was the same man directly I saw him.

ABRAHAM TYLER. On the 4th of October, I was at work at Mr. Whitehead's, about twenty-five yards, from Dobbins's house. In the middle of the day, I went to Dobbins's cottage, to borrow a wheelbarrow, about three o'clock; I saw the prisoner eating a large piece of bread and butter; he was standing about two feet in the house, by the street door.

Q. Is there a gateway fronting of Milfield-lane - A. Yes, it was in the inner door of the house; I saw him he was eating a large piece of bread and butter. Mrs. Dobbins was in the house; she said, I might have the barrow and welcome. I went away without saying any thing more to any of them; this was about three o'clock. I saw the prisoner again the day he was in custody, about half after six o'clock, I was sure he was the same man that I had seen in Dobbins's house; and that is the man at the bar.

THOMAS CHAMBER . I am a labourer. On the 4th th of this month, I was about two or three hundred

yards from Dobbins's house, digging a foundation for a brick wall for Mr. Ryner's; two men were with me working; near about half past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming towards me out at the end of Millfield-lane; I saw that he had an arm full of cloths, not tied uploose, one of the sleeve shung down; he was coming towards me; when he saw me, he turned across the road, went up a bank inside of a field, through a gap; Thomas Bremmer went up to him first, James Seal next; and I third. When I came into the field, he was kneeling on one knee, packing up the linen in a red handkerchief, with white spots; we went up to him. James Seal asked him where he got the linen from; he said, he bought them within a mile of Edgeware, of a gypsey man; he said, he gave nine shillings for them. Then Thomas Bremmer and James Seal took him by the collar, and brought him down the bank, into the road, nothing more was said by the prisoner in my hearing; they took him to Mr. Iver, the magistrate; I did not go with them. I did not hear of the murder until he was carried to Mr. Iver the magistrate. I went to make enquiry if any body had lost the linen; in the course of that enquiry, I heard of the murder.

JAMES SEAL . I was working with the last witness. I saw the prisoner Sharp, in the road; I observed him coming down the same side of the road where I was working, that is the left hand going from London; I observed him bringing a bundle of linen loose, with the sleeves of the shirts hanging out; he came near us; he crossed down the road; it appeared as if he turned out of the road; on seeing us, he got up a bank, through a gap in a hedge, opposite where we were at work; I thought that was done to avoid our observation. Bremmer first went into the field after him; I was close to Bremmer. The prisoner was kneeling on one knee packing up the linen. Bremmer asked him what he had got there; he replied, he had got some things he had bought of a gypsey man, with a donkey, within a mile of Edgware, he gave nine shillings for them. I told him that was a poor story to tell; he said, that was were he got them from. I told him I thought he must have stolen them some where near the spot; I was sure he had not come honestly by them. He said, he bought them, they might be stolen, or they might not; he bought them of a gypsey man, with a donkey. I pursuaded him to go back to the place from whence he had stolen them, and the people might probably forgive him; he still persisted that he had bought them, that he had not stolen them. We took him down the road; then he said, for God Almighty'-sake, young man, do not bring me to any hurt, or trouble; I bought the things; it would be a sad thing to bring him to any trouble; he said, he was the eldest I think of eleven children. When I talked to him to go back, I offered to go with him to where he took them from; he said, he could not go back, he did not know where they came from: any otherwise then he had bought them of a gypsey.

Q. Who took the bundle - A. He took it himself down the town; I took it over the hedge; he was taken to Mr. Iver, of Kentish Town the bundle was given into Mr. Bush's the constable's care. That is all the conversation I had with him. In about an hour after I heard of the murder.

THOMAS BRIMMER . I was working with Chamber and Seal on this day. I have heard the account they have given; it is quite correct.

JOHN BASH . I am a constable of Kentish Town.

Q. Did you receive any bundle from the workmen that have been just examined - A I did; it was delivered to me at Mr. Ivers's. I have kept it ever since.

Q. to Dobbins. When you came back and found your wife in the way you have described, did you look about the cottage, and see whether any thing had been taken away - A. I did not. I did in the course of the day, in the afternoon, I discovered shirts and handkerchiefs had been taken away. This shirt is my own, now produced by Mr. Bash; it was in my house that day, and when I searched, it was missing. I had seen the shirt on Monday morning; Tuesday was the day of the murder.

Q. Was any other linen gone - A. Yes.

COURT. You described the linen was laid out in rotation when you went out; was it in the same order when you came back as it had been before - A. No. When I left my wife, it was in tubs, in rotation, for the woman's washing. When I looked for the linen, some was gone, and some left. This is the poker that was found in the room; it is mine. I saw it in the room when I went out; it was not bent then; it is hent now, and there is the appearance of a good deal of blood upon it; when I found it, it was in its usual place.

Q. Look at the ticket on that linen - A. This is the hand-writing of the deceased; it is the bill of the articles of washing for a person of the name of James Jones .

JOHN HENSON . I am a constable. This is the linen that was taken from the prisoner Sharp. I packed them up after the different owners had sworn to them; it is what I received from Bash.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Dobbins. The linen found is only a small portion of what was lost; had you taken any account of what was lost - A. I did not then; I did in the course of the day, in the afternoon; I found there had been shirts and handkerchiefs taken away. This shirt is my own; I am sure this shirt was in my house that day, and when I searched for it, it was missing. I had seen the shirt on Monday morning; Tuesday was the day of the murder; and the other linen was gone.

JAMES JONES . I am a servant at Mr. Christopher's. Mrs. Dobbin's washed for me. I delivered my linen to her on the 23rd of September, there were five shirts, two pair of stockings, two pair of socks, one pocket handkerchief, one half silk handkerchief, and a pocket handkerchief, in which it is tied; I had delivered her more linen than in here; all that is there, was left with her.

Q. How lately had you seen Mrs. Dobbins - A. On the Saturday, and on Saturday she gave me part of the linen; I could not take the whole then.

ELIZABETH JONES . I worked for Mrs. Dobbins. I ironed all her linen, and have done it all for twelve

years; every thing here I ironed on the Friday and Saturday previous to her death; on Saturday evening at ten o'clock, I parted from her.

GEORGIANA COLLINSON. Q. Did you employ Mrs. Dobbins as a washerwoman for any body - A. Yes. I delivered Mr. Longham's things to Mrs. Dobbins on Monday, the 3rd of October. This is Mr. Longham's parcel; this is part of the linen I gave to Mrs. Dobbins on the Monday to be washed; I never had it from her; it is dirty now, in the same state as I delivered them.

COURT. Q. to Dobbins. When you left your wife on Tuesday about half after two o'clock, did she complain of having been robbed, and her things to be gone - A. No.

Mr. Andrews. That is the case on the part of the prosecution; I have not called the surgeon.

COURT. No. When the pieces of the scull bones are found about the place, and the scull beat in, there is no occasion to call the surgeon to say that was the cause of her death.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, only I bought the things.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-3

871. PATRICK SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting David Weit , in the King's highway, on the 6th of October , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a tin case, value 2 d. and fifteen shillings in monies numbered , his property.

DAVID WEIT . I am a drummer in the Lancashire Militia .

Q. Where were you on the 6th of October - A. I was at the sign of the Man in the Moon public-house, about a mile from Chelsea.

Q. What time of the day was it you were robbed - A. Just upon the hour of four o'clock in the afternoon, in open day-light.

Q. Where were you - A. I was going home; the prisoner was conducting me home to the barracks, as I was a stranger. He took me to a bye place, knocked me down two different times; he knocked me about till I was insensible. I was quite insensible when he robbed me. When I came to myself, I saw the prisoner with my tin box; he kept my tin box, the fifteen shillings, and the discharge, that were in it; in the tin box were three three-shilling pieces, one eighteen-penny piece, four shillings, and one sixpence. I went home to my barrack; the prisoner was not to be found. I was all over mud, and my face was cut. When I heard he had came home, I went forward, and took him by the collar; I said, this is the man that robbed me. On the night when I came home, I could not get any instructions of any body where to find the prisoner. I heard he came home late at night. The next morning I got up early. The prisoner got over the back wall, and the next morning to that, the serjeant took the prisoner. I told the adjacent he prisoner was the man that had robbed me. I told him the particulars. I went afterwards and shewed the serjeant and the police officer the spot where he robbed me. The prisoner saw at the bar is the man that robbed me.

FRANCIS BAILEY . I know the prisoner and the prosecutor. On the evening of the 6th of October, the prosecutor came into the house with his face scratched and black, and his legs had been kicked. He told me he had been knocked down by the prisoner, and robbed of his tin box, fifteen shillings, and his discharge. The prisoner belongs to the 27th regiment of foot. I saw nothing of the prisoner until the morning of the 7th, I seized him by the collar at the York barracks; he did not seem surprized at my taking him. He denied taking any money from David Weit . I confined the prisoner. I reported it to the Commanding officer; the Commanding officer told me to give him over to the Civil Power.

Prisoner. Q. to Weit. Did not you lose the tin box the night before that - A. No. I had it about me when I was robbed.

Q. to Bailey. Was the prisoner drunk or sober - A. He had got a drop to be sure; he was not drunk. This is the piece of paper that was dropped in the necessary. The prisoner took part of this paper to wipe his backside with; the prosecutor's name is on it; here is Weit, drummer, upon it; it is part of his discharge; he has not passed the board.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day before, I saw the prosecutor laying down in the necessary, I picked him up; the next morning, he said, he would treat me for behaving so civil to him. I was conducting him home to the barracks, I could not get him along; he fell down a great many times; he dropped the tin box; we went back several times to look for it. I went home. He fell down a great many times, and when he got home, he made this complaint that I cut him; he cut himself by falling down.

MR. GREEN. I am an officer. The prisoner is one of the men that knocked the man down in the Five fields; he bears a bad character in the regiment.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-4

872. WILLIAM JONES , alias MILKY , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frederick Fisher , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 9th of June , and burglariously stealing therein, a writing-desk, value 5 s. twenty pawnbrokers' duplicates, value 6 d. one pair of snuffers and stand, value 2 s. a plated mustard-pot, value 2 s. a candlestick, value 6 d. two frocks, value 1 s. three glasses, value 1 s. four decanters, value 4 s. a redicule, value 2 s. a muslin cap, value 6 d. a wash-hand bason, value 6 d. a pair of nut-crackers, value 2 d. a cribbage-board, value 6 d. three sticks of sealing-wax, value 3 d three rouge-boxes, value 1 s. two papers of India currie, value 1 s. twenty jewellery working tools, value 5 l. fifty gross of steel beads, value 5 l. a sliding-box, value 6 d. a puzzle-board, value 6 d. three brushes, value 6 d. five gross of buckles, value 2 l. the property of Frederick Fisher .

FREDERICK FISHER . I am a jeweller , I live at No. 8, Nelson's-place, in the City-road, in the parish of St. Luke's ,

Q. On the 8th of June in the night, was your house broken open - A. After twelve o'clock at night it was. I went to bed about twelve o'clock on

the 8th of June; I was the last person up in the house; before I went to bed, I made the house secure, every part of it, particularly the kitchen door; I am sure I shut that close to when I went to bed. About half past six o'clock or seven o'clock, I was disturbed by my children; I got up; I found my kitchen door buttoned on the kitchen side; there is a door at the bottom of the stairs which leads into the kitchen. The button was fastened on the inside of the kitchen; it must have been done after I went to bed.

Q. How did you get the door open - A. I put my son out of the window; he by getting out of the window, came in backwards, and so got into the kitchen, and turned the button that was inside of the door in the kitchen. I then came into the kitchen; the drawers were all open, and every thing was gone. It appeared that they got into my yard from another yard, over the wall. The door was broken open. Whether they got in at the door or the window, I cannot tell; they were both fastened. I bolted the kitchen door on the over night; the kitchen door opens by a latch. I am confident I latched it to go in by the kitchen door. The yard is surrounded by a wall; it is a ground floor kitchen. I went to Worship-street office; I got a officer. I went with the officer to Burgess' father's premises; they are situated close to mine. I knew Burgess before; he is his father's horse keeper; his father is an hackney coachman. Burgess was in the loft. In the loft we found a japanned waiter, a brass candlestick, a silk handkerchief, and a blue quart decanter, it is not in the indictment. Part of them were in the parlour, and part in the kitchen, and I also found some duplicates: they were given up to me; there were about four duplicates. I have taken the things out of pledge; they were found in the loft, hid under some hay bands. The duplicates had been in a desk in the parlour. I bought them; they were my own.

Q. Were all the articles in the indictment taken from you that night - A. They were.

Q. Did you hear afterwards of any desk being found - A. Yes, on the 29th of July; I was out at the time it was brought to my house. When I came home, it was produced to me by my own family; it was broken all to pieces. I know nothing where that was found.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before this - A. I did not. I knew Burgess. I saw Burgess and the prisoner speaking to my little girl on the night of the 8th; I am sure the prisoner was with Burgess that night, about seven o'clock.

Mr. Alley. You have said Burgess was the son of a coachman, why did not you tell us he was a notorious thief - A. I know he is now; I did not know it then.

PHILIP MARCH . I am a watchman. On the 9th of June, at night, about eleven o'clock, I heard of the robbery. Mr. Fisher informed me his house was broken open and robbed.

Q. Do you know Burgess - A. Yes his farther's yard ajoins Mr. Fisher's. I met the prisoner after the robbery was committed; I saw him at the end of Nelson-place, between four and five o'clock in the morning; I knew his person before; he was an associate with young Burgess: there was another one with him; I did not see Burgess with him at that time. I went up New-street; I saw him turn up Bath-street, towards the New buildings; this might be the morning of the 10th, I cannot speak exactly to the day of the month; it was the morning after the robbery. I met the prisoner, I thought it had a suspicious look; I went to my brother watchman, and informed him of it, and when I came to Nelson-place, there were none of them to be found. I went to Burges's yard; I found the wicket not as I found it before; I went into Burges's yard; I saw the loft door open; I went into the loft. I saw Jones and another person with him in the hay loft. I desired them to come down; I told them they had no business there; they refused at first; I insisted upon their coming down. I told them I had more with me, then they came down; then I took them to the watch-house. I am sure the prisoner was one of them; I had seen him before in Nelson-place; I knew his person before. The next morning they were taken to the Police office and discharged. I did not search the loft.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. On the 11th, of June, I went with Mr. Fisher to Mr. Burgess's premises I saw the father; I told him I was come to search his premises; the prisoner was not present; the loft was open at that time; I went up into the loft with Mr. Fisher. I found a blue decanter, a silk handkerchief, a japan waiter, a brass candlestick, and a great quantity of duplicates; we then came out of the loft, and went down into the yard; I saw young Burgess in the harness-room; Mr. Fisher gave charge of young Burgess; I took him into custody, I told him what I took him in custody for; he denied any knowledge of it; he said, he did not know whose the property was, nor who did the offence he said he had nothing to do with it, nor did he know any thing about it. I knew nothing of the prisoner at that time.

WILLIAM BURGESS . My father is a Hackney Coachman; I used to clean his horses. I have known the prisoner about seven or eight months; I saw him on the 8th of June, he came to my father's stable he asked me if I would go with him to get a pair of boots.

COURT. What time in the day was this when he came to you - A. Between seven and eight in the evening; he asked me to go with him to get a pair of boots; he told me I could get a new pair of boots if I would go with him; I at that time, I did not know where I was to go; I told him to stop, until I fed the horses; and shut up the gates; he then told me; I was to go to Mr, Fisher's house; Mr. Fisher's house is opposite of the gate. He said, there was a pair of boots hung up in the back kitchen; he said, between twelve and one o'clock would do. I walked about with him until I thought it was time to go and get my supper.

Q. Did you see the children of Mr, Fisher that night - A. The prisoner did; I was with him; the prisoner asked the child what time her father came home; the little girl said, sometimes at one time,

and sometimes at another, but she was generally in bed; it was about half after eight when this conversation took place; then we walked about until almost ten o'clock; then I went to get my supper about ten o'clock; I told him to stop until I came out; I went home and got my supper; I came down stairs as if to go to bed; I slept below, and got my supper up stairs, and came down as if to go to bed below; I slept in my father's house, in little Moorfields; the stables are in the City Road.

Q. Did you go to bed - A. No, I went out: when I came out I saw the prisoner, he was waiting for me. The prisoner and I walked about until almost one o'clock, then we went to Mr. Fisher's house. it was nigh one when we went to Mr. Fisher's house, it was dark.

Q. Was there any illumination that night - A. I don't think there was. When we got to Mr. Fisher's house, we got over the wall into the back yard; the prisoner went and lifted up the latch, and put his toe under the back kitchen door, and the door opened; the door opened easy; we came back again. I am sure he lifted up the latch. We walked back to the bottom of the yard; we went both of us and set in the privy; after we opened the door, and just as we got into the house, the watchman went past two; it was so dark then, we could not see in the kitchen.

Q. What did you wait in the privy all this time - A. For fear they should have heard us open the door. We waited in the privy an hour; we went back, and we both went in; we stopped a little time until it became a little light. We packed up a great many clothes out of all the drawers, and tied them up in a large table cloth; there were childrens clothes and different things; there were a pair of snuffers and stand in the desk. Then we went into the front parlour; we packed up a quantity of glasses and bits of old rags all that we could find; then we went and got two desks from the parlour; we put into the entry that leads to the door.

Q. Among the glasses that you took, were there any blue decanters - A. There were two blue, and several white ones; the big writing desk was heavy; there was gold upon the decanters. We went into the cellar where the fowls were; we killed them.

COURT. There is no fowls in the indictment - A. The snuffers and stand we put them together in the desk, and we put the desk in the hen roost, in my father's yard; the other things we put in the hay loft; after we had taken them out, we then unchained the front door, and unbolted it. The decanters we also put in the hay loft. We went out at the front door, it is a spring lock; after we went out, we pulled the door to gently, we went out both of us, and took the things into my father's stable-yard; we opened the desks there; there were a great many swivels and card racks; we found some little tin boxes, they contained various things, two large boxes of jewellers tools and weights. We covered the bundles over with the hay hands in the hay loft; we covered the desk too; we shut the hay loft door after us, it was not locked. We walked about a little while, and then we began to work.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you see Mr. Fisher after this - A. We were cleaning the horses and washing the coaches; between seven and eight o'clock I heard Mrs. Fisher and the children say, they had been robbed. I said it was a very bad job for them; we left the things in the loft until Saturday morning.

Q. What night was it that you committed the robbery - A. I cannot say the day of the week.

COURT. It was Thursday these things were stolen - A. The next Saturday after the robbery had been committed; the prisoner came and took away two bundles and the writing-desk out of the hay loft; I was in bed at the time. He told me afterwards where he took them to. I went in the afternoon to Sarah Stacey 's lodging, in Checquer-alley; I found the prisoner there, and the two bundles there. The prisoner said, the child's dress he thought was not of much value, he had given them to her for her child. I asked the prisoner if he had got any money.

Q. What is Stacey - A. She is a girl that walks the streets.

Q. Did you find any of these things at Stacey's - A. Yes. I told him I could not stop, and made an appointment to meet him. The next morning he came to the stable yard; when he came to the stable yard, I went with him into my father's hen-roost. He looked into the desk, and took the snuffers and stand out; he said, he would keep them until he saw me again. He came to me between three and four in the afternoon. I went with him into Old-street, and from there into Tabernacle walk; we went to a pawnbroker's, the corner of Tabernacle-row; he said, he would pawn them at Mr. Walker's if I would wait at the door. He went into Mr. Walker's, the pawnbrokers; he came out again with a shillings worth of penny-pieces, and a duplicate; I had six penny-pieces. We went into Chiswell-street, we got some victuals to eat; we walked about and parted. I was taken up first, and at Worship-street office, I was discharged. I was afterwards taken up for another robbery, by the Hatton Garden officers, and made a witness of; I was charged with this offence afterwards; I gave the same account I have to day. I was a witness here last Sessions, and gave my evidence; those persons got convicted.

Mr. Alley. Those men got convicted - A. Yes.

Q. Hutt, the officer, proved that those men were found in the fact.

Q. You say, your father is a coach master; you call yourself a ostler - A. I used to clean his horses. I had thirteen horses to clean.

Q. I suppose you drive yourself, do not you - A. No, sir; I am ostler to my father, and live in his house.

Q. This was on the 8th of June that the prisoner spoke to you - A. Yes.

Q. That was on the night of the illumination, was it not - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. You pretened to your father, you ate your supper and went to bed; you deceived your family, and went out.

Q. You brought the stolen property and put it into your father's stable; so that your father might be hanged? What time of the night was it when you went into the prosecutor's premises - A. Nigh one

o'clock, and just as we got into the kitchen the watchman went two o'clock.

Q. So that after you had ransacked this house, you carried this property into your father's premises - A. Part I carried, and part the prisoner carried.

Q. You have said something about Sarah Stacey; did not you know her by the name of Sarah Lacey - A. No.

Q. She is an old acquaintance of your's, is not she - A. I know her by eye-sight; the prisoner introduced me to her.

Q. You said some of the things was brought by the prisoner to her - A. Yes, as the prisoner told me. Sal Stacey was in the room at the time he said so.

Q. Was it not you that brought the things to Sarah Stacey - A. It was not. I was in bed at the time. He took them in my father's cart; it was in the afternoon when I went.

Q. Was she examined before the magistrate - A. No.

Q. Is she here to day - A. Not as I know off.

Q. So then Stacey, who knows this important fact, that the prisoner carried the property to her lodging, if it is the fact, is not here to day - A. I do not know that she is here to day as a witness for the prosecution.

Q. You say the prisoner came to the place, and took out of the desk the snuffers and stand - A. Yes, that was in the morning. He took them in his pocket, and said he would keep them until he saw me again.

Q. That place where they were, was a place of concealment, was it not - A. Yes.

Q. More so than his own pocket? I dare say you did not go into the pawnbroker's - A. He went in himself; I stood at the door. He pledged them in the name of Jones, Peerless-row. Instead of that, it should have been Poole-terrace. His father is a milkman, and lives in Poole-terrace; he lived with his father-in-law; his father-in-law has his name up Cunningham.

Q. You were taken in custody, and then you told this - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say, that when you were first taken you told of this robbery - A. No, I did not. I was not asked any questions at the office at all.

Q. Upon your oath, did not the officers ask you whether you knew any thing about this identical robbery - A. That was in the yard. He told me if I knew any thing, I had best tell, he could not promise me any thing. I told him, no.

Q. And you were discharged - A. Yes.

Q. How long after that, were you taken into custody by an Hatton Garden officer - A. Two months perhaps.

Q. So this thing slept in your breast two months, and then you were taken up for a burglary at Baguigge Wells - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Jonathan Wild - A. Yes.

Q. Have you accused Jonathan Wild - A. Yes, and caused him to be taken up; he was examined three times, and then dismissed.

Q. How often were you examined before you told any thing of this poor lad at the bar - A. Only once. I was taken up; they took the charge, and I was sent to the House of Correction; I was in the House of Correction before I spoke on this charge.

JURY. You mentioned that you passed by this house, did you see in the back kitchen a pair of boots - A. No, sir.

Q. How did you disearn the colour of the bottles if it was not day light - A. Every thing that we took out of the parlour we took out of the door; it was past four o'clock when we came out of the house, it was just peep of day then.

COURT. Did you perceive the stair-case - A. Yes, they came into the kitchen; there is a stair case door; we buttoned that. I buttoned that I believe, it was either I or the prisoner that buttoned it, to hinder the people from coming down stairs.

THOMAS MILLER. I am an apprentice to Mr. Walker, pawnbroker, No. 19, Tabernacle-walk.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. When I came to the examination at Hatton Garden office, I had a faint recollection of the prisoner; I was not positive to him; I had a recollection of his person. I have a stronger belief now then I had then. I have a stronger recollection of him the longer I look at his person. On the 17th of June, I took in pawn a pair of snuffers and stand; I cannot say what time of the day. I advanced a shilling upon them, to a man of the name of Jones, in Peerless-row; in all probability, I paid him in penny-pieces. In harvest time, we are short of silver, we generally pay for small pledges in penny-pieces. I believe at that time, I paid in penny-pieces.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. In consequence of information from Burgess, I received these things of a person of the name of Stacy; I found Maria Stacey in the room, and another woman there. Sarah Stacey 's child was playing on the floor, and Maria Stacey in bed, and the other woman. I produce a frock and two pair of breeches; I took them off Sarah Stacey 's child, or at least, from a child that was there. I was informed that Sarah Stacey lived in the same house.

Q. Where is Maria Stacey's lodgings - A. No. 5, Rose-alley, Golden-lane. A Mrs. Ford keeps the house.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these snuffers and stand - A. I believe them to be my property; there is my mark upon it. I had them from the Country, with other goods, to sell by commission. The frock produced by Limbrick, they are the same pattern that we lost; they were made up as they are now, for a child to wear. These thing in the basket were brought to my house, and said to be found in Burgess's yard.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I found them things in Burgess's father's yard, in a box, in a hen-roost. I conveyed them to Mr. Fisher's house; Mr. Fisher was not at home. I left them with the family.

Mr. Fisher. They have been in the possession of my family ever since Mr. Armstrong returned them. I am sure they are the things that I lost.

Barnard Gleed. These are the articles that I found in the hay loft; they are all here.

Prosecutor. The blue decanter is mine, this candlestick is mine; I have got the fellow to it at home. I believe they are all mine. A great many things

have not been found that were taken away. I lost the leases of two houses; independant of the leases, I lost above an hundred pounds.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on another charge in September last.

REBECCA FORD . I live in Rose-square, near Golden-lane.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Sarah Stacey - A. Yes; she lodged in my house between two or three years off and on, not continually, we parted twice between that time. She had a child; she had a sister lived with me; her name was Maria Stacey . When she was not at my house, she lodged in Checquer-alley. I gave the officers the directions where she lodged.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this robbery; I leave myself to the mercy of the jury.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his youth, and believing that he was led into it by the accomplice .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-5

873. JOHN HAYES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , one cheese, value 5 s. the property of Henry Humphreys , privately in his shop .

JANE HUMPHREYS . My husband's name is Humphrey Humphreys, not Henry.

COURT. It is Henry in the indictment - A. That is a mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-6

874. JAMES POLOCK was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Green , about the hour of ten in the forenoon, of the 19th of July , Ann the wife of Joseph Mayton , being therein, and stealing, a watch, value 2 l. five silver tea-spoons, value 10 s. one silver table-spoon, value 7 s. and a silver desert spoon, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Mayton .

ANN MAYTON . My husband's name is Joseph Mayton; I live at No. 5, Castle-street .

Q. Were you at home on the 19th of July last - A. Yes. I lodge in William Green's house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him at your house on that day - A. I did not see him. I was down stairs mangling some things; I saw a man come in about ten o'clock in the morning; I did not see him; I heard somebody come in; I came up. I had locked my door before I went out, but I had not taken the key out, and when I came up, I found my door open; there was nobody in my room at all. William Green occupies the house; he sleeps there, and I have one room.

Q. Do you know in what state the outer door was in - A. The outer door was open, and my room robbed. When I got into my room, I looked at my linen; it was all right. I went out of doors, I saw the glimpse of somebody go out; I could not tell whom. When I came out of the room first, I saw somebody going out, and I saw my door open; I went out of doors, I asked if any body had gone in; a little boy, his name is Foster, gave me some information. I returned to my room; I missed live silver tea spoons, a table-spoon, a desert-spoon, and a silver watch. I did not get a view of his person so as to be able to say who he was.

JOHN FOSTER . I am thirteen years old; I live with my father, No. 19, Castle-street. On the morning of the 19th of July, my mother was washing for Mr. Mayton, and about ten o'clock, I was looking out of Mrs. Mayton's window; I saw the prisoner go out of Mrs. Mayton's house. I knew his person before. I saw him go into the house, and I saw him come out of the house; he was about three minutes in the house. He went round the corner when he came out. I knew the prisoner's face; he had on a velveteen jacket, and pearl buttons on it. I had seen him a great many times before.

HENRY LEWRY . (The witness being deaf and dumb, Thomas Irwin was admitted to be his interpreter.)

Q. Have you seen the prisoner - A. Yes; I have often seen the prisoner at the bar; I know him well by sight,

Q. Do you know where Joseph Mayton lodges - A. I do not know the name of the place; I know the house when I see it. I saw the prisoner go into the house; I think it was on a Monday; it was in the middle of the day. I saw him take a watch, a salt-seller, and some spoons, seven articles altogether; he took the watch from the nail or a peg, and the spoons from a shelf in the cupboard. I could perfectly distinguish the articles he took. I saw him bring the articles out of the house; I saw him put some into his pocket immediately upon getting to the door, and the others he carried in his hand, and put his handkerchief round them. The prisoner when he came out, took down a turning, and then went another way. I then walked about to amuse myself until my meals was ready, and then I went home to my meals. I gave information of what I had seen some time afterwards; I cannot say how long it was afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time I am accused of the robbery, I was in Pall Mall with my fruit. The officer saw me the day after the robbery, he never said a word to me about it; if the officer did not see me, I saw him. He took me in custody on the Wednesday. I am innocent of the charge.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, the 21st of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-7

875. JAMES MENEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , six pounds weight of bacon, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Nicholson , privately in in shop .

THOMAS NICHOLSON . I live at No. 7, High-street, Whitechapel . On Saturday, the 24th of September, about half past eleven at night, I had just swept the shop out, a man told me that the prisoner

had taken away a piece of bacon, and pointed out the prisoner to me; the prisoner then was turning up a court. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I pursued him, and took him in a court; the prisoner then was in the act of putting the bacon in a basket that he had with him. I brought the prisoner and the bacon back to the shop. I gave the prisoner into the charge of an officer. I am sure that the bacon that I took from the prisoner, was the bacon I lost; I cut it from the side myself. I value the bacon at five shillings; six pounds at ten pence a pound.

DAVID CONWAY. On the night of the 24th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was coming down Whitechapel. I was informed a man had stolen a piece of bacon; I said, I was a constable. Mr. Nicholson gave me charge of the prisoner. I searched him; in his basket I found five pieces of mutton, and a bunch of onions.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up this bacon as I was coming back from market, about six yards from this gentleman's stall.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 3 s. only .

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18141026-8

876. ELIZABETH HOSKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , three pair of shoes, value 11 s. the property of John Swift , privately in his shop .

JOHN SWIFT . I am a shoe-maker ; I keep a shop in Crown-street, Finsbury-square . On the 4th of this month, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop, she asked for a pair of shoes that were in the window; she tried them on, and said, she would be measured for a pair. I measured her foot. She said, she lived at No. 7, Finsbury-square; she went out of the shop. After I had measured her, I looked at the horse of shoes; I thought I missed two pair of girls shoes. I went after her, and overtook her; I told her she had stolen some of my shoes; she said, she had not. Two pair dropped at her feet; I picked them up. I saw them fail; them two pair are mine. The third pair dropped from under her shawl, on my counter. These are the three pair; they are worth nine shillings. She said, she meaned to come back to pay me for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I came out of the shop with the shoes in my hand; I did not mean to steal them; I intended to return to pay for them.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 1 year , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-9

877. FARDY CARROLL was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's kighway, on the 3rd of September , upon Jane, the wife of James Smith , putting her in fear and taking from her person, a pocket-book, value 6 d. two keys, value 3 d. an eighteen-penny bank token, a shilling, a sixpence, eight penny-pieces, nineteen halfpence, and two farthings , the property of James Smith .

JANE SMITH . My husband's name is James Smith. On the 3rd of December last, the prisoner met me at the corner of Park-lane, the Oxford-street end; it was between eleven and twelve when he accosted me; he accosted me after the same manner as if I was an unfortunate woman; he said, if I chused to go and have any concern with him, he would give me a shilling; I told him I wanted nothing to do with him, to go about his business; he would find enough to answer his purpose. I then walked away from him. He crossed over the way. I saw nothing more of him for near half an hour afterwards, then I was going down Park-lane when he met me again.

Q. How came you to be so long in the street there - A. I was waiting for my husband. He then asked me if I was in the same mind; I told him, I was, certainly. He told me it would be better for me to comply. He walked away, and I walked away; I walked towards Oxford-street. He walked the other way. I walked down Park-street , to the corner of North-row . He there met me, he there told me I had better comply; I told him, I should not. He told me it should be worse for me, not to give him any more of my impudence, or he would not leave me an eye to look out of, nor should I be able to tell who hurt me; that he spoke to me. I then went to turn myself sideways from him, he gave me a blow on the side of my head, which knocked me down to the ground; I cried out murder, and endeavoured to rise, and before I got up he repeated his blow, and knocked me down again; he then kicked between my shoulders, and my neck, and at the same time I felt a violent pull at my side, which tore off my pocket, and the front of my petticoat. What passed afterwards I cannot say.

Q. Did you see whose hand did that - A. It was him that did it; I am sure of it; there was no one near. What passed afterwards, I know not. The blow entirely deprived me of my senses.

Q. How soon did you come to yourself - A. I did not come to myself until the latter end of the week following; I was without my senses until the surgeon opened my head, and took the bruised blood out.

Q. What had you in your pocket - A. I had an eighteen-penny piece, a shilling, a sixpence, and eighteen pennyworth of copper, I do not know whether it was in halfpence or penny-pieces; I think I had two farthings. That is all I know that passed between him and me.

Prisoner. Did not I give you any money - A. No, you did not.

Q. Were not you in a public-house in Oxford-street with me - A. I never went into that public-house with you; I never went a yard of ground with you.

JEREMIEH ABEL. I am a watchman. On the night of the 3rd of September, I was in North-row; I heard the prosecuterix Jane Smith , cry murder, about a quarter before one; I ran to her assistance directly. In going to her, I met the prisoner runing from her; he was very nigh one hundred yards off her, when I met him, he was runing, as fast as he could; he was in North-row. He got past me; I called out stop him; the patrol stopped him. He

dropped the pocket and the piece of petticoat when the patrol stopped him. The night constable examined what was in the pocket; I did not. I left the prisoner with the patrol. I went to the woman; I found her bleeding very much, and laying speechless; she was quite senseless when I picked her up.

JOHN BESTWIELS. I am the patrol, I was in North-street on the night of the 3rd of September; I heard the shrik of the woman; the watchman called out stop him. I stopped the prisoner; he was running as fast as he could. I took him to the watch-house; I saw the pocket down at our feet; I did not see the prisoner drop it. I had hold of the prisoner, scuffling with him to stop him. The prisoner acknowledged that he tore the pocket from the woman; the prisoner was taken to the watch-house by Jeremieh Abel, the watchman. I was present when it was examined; there where in it an eightteen penny piece; a shilling, a sixpence, and eightteen penny worth of copper. The prisoner was present when it was examined. The night constable took possession of the pocket and the money, to produce it at Malborough Street office.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I tell you that I gave some money to this girl - A. You said something about it she contradicted you, therefore I took little notice of what you said.

ALEXANDER BALL , I was constable of the night. On the 3rd of September, about one o'clock the prisoner was brought into the watch-house; Jane Smith was brought into the watch-house at the same time; she was in a fainting state and covered with blood; it was some minutes before she could speak to me. When she could speak, she said, she had been knocked down, and robbed of her pocket. The prisoner was nearer to me than the prosecutor. After she gave me the charge, the prisoner said he gave her an eighteen penny-piece for her to accommodate him, and afterwards she refused to accommodate him; she refused to give him the eighteen penny-piece back again. He told me he wanted to get the eightteen penny-piece back again; she tumbled down and that is the way the blood came. I examined the pocket.

Q. How long did the prosecutrix stay with you - A. About a quarter of an hour. I sent the beadle and two patrols with her to the Hospital. I did not expect she would live until the morning, she was so bad.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this girl at the corner of Duke-street, Oxford-street; I made my bargain with her, to stroke her for eighteen pence, I had no more about me only three pence and a pound note. I went to Mr. Saul the publican in Oxford-road; she was with me. I asked him for change of the pound note; he said, he had no change. I asked him to lend me eighteen pence, and I would leave the pound note with him. I asked him for liquor; he would not give me any, I went out with this girl. I gave her the eighteen penny piece; I went with her as far as Park street, then she unbuttoned my breeches, and took two pence out of my pocket, and put it in her own pocket; she strove to get out of my hands; I kept hold of her until her petticoat broke; she fell down, I saw the watchman by the side of me; I passed the watchman, and dropped the pocket out of my hand. I have two witnesses but they are not here to day; I hope your honour and the Gentleman of the jury, will give me liberty to have my witnesses to morrow.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre

Reference Number: t18141026-10

878. GEORGE COATES . was indicted for feloniously making an asault in the Kings highway, on the 22nd of October . upon Mark Randell Moss , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. 5 s. a gold chain, value 20 l. and a gold seal, value 3 l. 3 s. his property.

MARK RANDELL MOSS . I am a Mariner ; I live in Ward's-row, Bethnell Green. On Saturday night about twenty minutes past eight, from that till half past eight I was going from Bishopgate Street to Church Street; at the end of a dark Street leading into Church Street the prisoner, in company with some more, attempted to hustle me down; it was light enough to distinguish the prisoner. I defended myself, and told him not to molest me. The prisoner turned round, and spoke to his companions. He and his companions, made a second attempt to take hold of me, and I having some property about me which had been paid me by some merchants in the City, I was determined I would not be robbed. The prisoner made a strong hustle, and go my gold watch out of my fob; he actually took the watch out of my pocket; I collared him with one hand, and seized hold of the watch with the other, and insisted upon his delivering my property up to me again; a scuffle ensued, in which the prisoner was assisted by his companions. The prisoner and I both fell down on the pavement, in which situation, I was very ill used by the prisoner's companions. my head suffered and my body; my coat was torn in pieces. I got up again, and succeeded in wrenching the watch from him; the chain broke, the watch fell; the body of the watch got seperated by the fall on the pavement. I held the prisoner fast, although I received the ill treatment from the others, until assistance came. The body of the watch was picked up, and gave to me. No constable being near. the gentleman who assisted me, helped me to take the prisoner to the watch-house, a Mr. Shearman; he held the prisoner requesting some person to go for a Constable; that constable did not come; some more assistance came of the neighbours; a desperate effort was made by the party to rescue him from the people who had him in possession; the attempt to rescue him, by bludgeons, and sticks, and desperate blows were received by those who held him; the prisoner made a desperate resistance himself to get away, by fighting and beating those about him. He was taken at last to the watchhouse, and there the property was delivered to the headborough.

Q. You say the case and the body of the watch were separated - A Yes, it is still altogether but in a divided state. The person who robbed me took the watch and chain altogether; he had full possession of it. I seized him by the collar, and fought for my watch. In the course of the scuffle, I said, give me my watch;

the case and chain did not fall out of his hand, it was the body that fell out of his hand. Mr. Shearman gave it me again; I did not see him pick it up.

JAMES SHEARMAN. I live in Church-street, Bethnel Green. On last Saturday night, about half past eight in the evening, I heard the cry of give me my watch; about ten yards from my house; I went out; I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner struggling together. I immediately laid hold of the prisoner, and sent some one to Mr. Jackson, the constable. I heard something drop on the stones.

Q. On seeing these persons, did you observe the prisoner - A. Yes; I knew the prisoner well before. I never let him go until he was taken to the watch-house. I heard something drop on the stones directly I said the words go to Mr. Jackson, the constable; it fell from the prisoner, as I supposed. I did not see it fall from the prisoner. Mr. Jackson, the constable, would not come and take the charge. I sent a woman for Mr. Hichman, the headborough, and while that woman was gone, another woman picked up the inside of the watch, and gave it to me.

Q. Did you observe the case, chain, and seal - A. Yes; I observed it when the prosecutor was wrenching it out of the prisoner's hand. I saw the case, chain and seals, fastened together; I saw them in the hands of the prisoner. I assisted in taking him to the watchhouse; in turning round the corner where the robbery took place, several unknown persons to me made an attempt to rescue the prisoner. I felt them push to endeavour to throw us down. The prisoner would not walk, he made us carry him.

Q. Did any blows pass - A. I did not see any. The prisoner endeavoured to rescue himself by biting my finger; I thought he would have bit it off. I received no blows; there were a great many people about us. I was inside, holding of the prisoner. I cannot say whether there were any blows or no. The prosecutor was walking by the side. My attention was taking up in holding the prisoner, in case he might get away. In going along to the watch-house, we were pushed into an entry; we pulled the prisoner out of there, and succeeded in taking the prisoner to the watchhouse.

ISAAC BOND I live at No. 19, Church-street. On last Saturday night, about half past eight, I heard the prosecutor cry out give me my watch, or words to that effect. I immediately ran to the spot, about thirty yards off. I then saw the prisoner struggling with the prosecutor and Mr. Shearman. I immediately laid hold of the prisoner. Mr. Shearman sent for Mr. Jackson; he did not come. My attention was particular taken up with the prisoner. I saw the watch first in the prosecutor's hand; I saw the body of the watch when we got to the watchhouse, not before. I was with them in the watchhouse. The prisoner would not walk to the watchhouse, he cried out as if we were murdering of him. He bit my hand as soon as I laid hold of him. There were a great mob; we were completely pushed about, out of the path at times. I did not observe any blows. The prosecutor received a blow-by the side of his head; I saw the marks of it when he came to the watch-house; who gave it him, I don't know. He said, he had been badley beat when he came to the watch-house.

SAMUEL ALLEN . On my road home, on Saturday evening, in Church-street, Bethnel Green, I saw the prisoner make a violent struggle to get away from the prosecutor and witnesses; the crowd made a great struggle to get the prisoner from them, and particularly they had great sticks, which I saw them make use of. I can only corroberate the testimony of the other witnesses.

Prisoner. Did you see any body receive any blows - A. I did; I received some myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along; I was intoxicated; I had been to see my brother, who had been at sea thirteen years. I was in company of one man, who led me into it. That is all I know about it.

MR. HINCHMAN. I am an headborough. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. That is the watch that was taken from me; it was mine; I delivered it to the headborough.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18141026-11

879. CHARLES HASKE ALLEN was indicted, and the indictment stated, that at the time of committing the said felonies in the first eight counts mentioned in the indictment, he was a person employed in sorting letters and packets at the General Post office , at the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth, London , that he on the 20th of July , at the said parish, a certain letter then sent by the Post from Dartford, in Kent, to be delivered to James Wentworth , at Wandsworth, in the County of Surry, came to his hands while so employed as aforesaid, that he afterwards feloniously did secrete the said letter, then containing a 10 l. note .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing a 10 l. note out of the said letter, the property of James Wentworth .

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be a packet, instead of a letter.

AND OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the property of George Hall .

RICHARD CLARK . In the month of July last, I was living at Dartford, with Mr. George Hall. On the 29th of July, I made up a letter to be sent to James Wentworth , of Wandworth; I enclosed in the letter a ten-pound note, the number of the note is 5325, dated 21st of May, 1814; having put that note in the letter, I wafered it; I myself, took the letter to the Post office. I was then in the employ of Mr. George Hall. This note was the property of Mr. George Hall, my employer.

Mr. Knapp. You say, you wafered this letter; you wafered the letter in an hurry, did not you, and you took it away to the Post office - A. No. I am particular in money matters; I put the impression of a stamp upon it. I am particular in money matters; about two hours after I had wafered and put the stamp, I carried it to the Post office. I am perfectly

convinced the wafer was holding when I took it to the office. The Post office is at Dartford; I put the letter into the box.

HENRY HORON . I was Post-master at Dartford. On the 19th of July last, I made up the letters for the London packet. I forwarded all the letters that ought to be forwarded; I cleaned the box.

CHARLES ROW . Q. What is your employ at the Post office - A. I receive the bags of letters that come from the Country. I was on duty on the 20th of July last.

Q. Can you say whether the Dartford bag arrived in its usual course on that morning - A. It did. The prisoner was on duty that morning; it was his duty to open it; in point of fact, he did open it.

Q. Was he employed in any other duty besides opening the bag that morning - A. Yes; he was clerk at the table; he had to sort his portion of letters at the table.

Q. Had he to separate the Country letters from London - A. I cannot speak to that.

CHARLES PEISSE . Q. On the 20th of July, were you employed in the General Post office - A. I was. I was at the same table with the prisoner at the bar; our first duty is to open the bags, and then to give them to the clerk to examine it. I assisted in sorting letters to the Country again.

Q. You assisted in sorting Country letters - A. Yes; I threw out those which were for the Two-penny Post.

Q. A Wandsworth letter would be separated from the London letters - A. Yes.

COURT. In the first instance, you separate all the London delivery from the Country delivery, and then you have them in two separations, those which are for the Two-penny Post; a Wandsworth letter would be delivered by the Two-penny Post - A. Yes. It was the prisoner's duty and mine, to tell the charge of the Two-penny Post.

Mr. Attorney General. For instance, suppose a hundred letters to be sent by the Two-penny Post, that hundred letters would be charged two-pence each, and a hundred two-pences would be the charge of that quantity of letters, that would be handed over - A. Yes.

Q. Did you upon that day secrete any letter that passed through your hands - A. The whole of the letters that came into my hands, I gave regularly over. We finished our duty by eight o'clock in the morning.

JAMES WENTWORTH. I live at Wandworth; I am a servant to Mr. George Hall, he is a millwright. The establishment is at Dartford. I was doing millwright work for him at Wandsworth.

Q. Did you on the 20th of July, receive any letter from Dartford - A. I did not; I expected one; it did not come. I expected a remittance of money; it never came.

Q. Has a bank note 5325 come to your hands for ten-pound - A. It never did. No letter came to my hands on that day. I received a letter on the 22nd, but not on the 20th.

ROBERT NASH . I am shopman to Mr. Ellsworth, linen-draper, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him - A. Yes; I saw him on the 20th of July last, at Mr. Ellsworth's shop; I think about one or two o'clock; he came to buy some handkerchiefs; he bought six handkerchiefs, he paid for them in a ten-pound bank note; I desired him to put his address on it; he wrote his address on it.

Q. Look at that note - A. This is the note; he wrote what is written upon this note, C. Willbram, Trafalger-place, City-road. Mr. Ellsworth wrote his acceptance, T. E. the initials of Thomas Ellsworth .

Q. Did you know him before - A. I had seen him before. I saw the prisoner write this address myself; I handed him the pen.

Q. When did you see him again - A. I saw him again that day, about two hours afterwards; I saw him go down Bishopsgate-street, and I saw him again two or three days after that, going down Bishopsgate-street; I knew his person perfectly well.

Q. Where was it when you saw him again - A. At Giltspur-street Compter, about a week or a fortnight ago; I knew him as soon as I saw him; he was with several others. I have not the least doubt he is the person that came to our shop on that day.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You had seen the prisoner on the day before - A. No. I had seen him a dozen times before.

Q. You are speaking to the identity of a person that you saw in July - A. Yes. The ten-pound note drew my attention to him; from that circumstance, I have not the least doubt he is the person that gave me the note.

Q. to Mr. Clark. This bank note when put in at Dartford, was perfect in all its parts - A. Yes, it was.

Q. to Robert Nash . Was the bank note perfect in all its - A. I cannot speak to that; it had the appearance of a note in currency.

COURT. Q. to Peisse. Was the prisoner in the employ of the Post office - A. Yes, about fifteen or sixteen months.

PETER DOWLAND . Q. Are you in the office of Mr. Parkin, the Solicitor of the Post office - A. I am.

Q. Have you made deligent enquiry at Trafalger-place, to know whether any person of the name of Wellbram lived in Trafalger-place - A. Yes, I made every enquiry at every house; I could find no such person as Wilbram.

Q. to John Row. The prisoner was a clerk at the Post office, was he - A. Yes; he had been so fifteen or sixteen months.

(The note read.)

HUGH PARKIN . Q. You are a son of the Solicitor of the Post office - A. I am.

Q. Where did you get this note from - A. From the Inspector in the Bank of England; this note is cancelled in the usual way, by a hole being punched out. It was delivered to me in the usual way, by the Inspector of bank notes, I believe by Mr. Dawes.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

London jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-12

880. WILLIAM KING and ROBERT KING were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Bloomfield , about the hour of four in the night of the 12th of October , and burglariously stealing therein, twenty four bottles of wine, value 5 l. his property.

JAMES BLOOMFIELD . I live in the Broadway Westminster ; I keep the public house there the Feathers . On the 13th of October, a little after four in the morning, I was alarmed by the patrol and watchman ringing of the bell; I went to the window they told me to come down stairs, as my cellar door was broken open. I came down stairs and found my cellar door broken open; the cellar door is underneath the house. I had seen it at eleven o'clock in the evening; the last time, it was perfectly fastened then; I am quite sure of that. I fastened it myself; there is a chain and bolt within side; I unlocked the door in the passage to go into the cellar; I went into the cellar; the patrol and watchman went into the cellar first and Robert King stood in the cellar; the patrols name is Leonard; he walked on first; I carried the light: I was behind him on the stairs; I drew back, and the prisoner, Robert King came up stairs. I bid not see the prisoner untill he came up the stairs. The patrol presented a pistol, and desired him to come forward, and come up stairs; the patrol presented his pistol and said he would shoot any body that bid not come forward; upon that, Robert King came forward I am sure it was him; he came up stairs immediately; we secured him, and took him to the watch-house. After that we went into the cellar, and examined it; there was no one there. He said, there had been two men, they were both gone; he said, he was coming by there about four o'clock in the morning. a man came out of the cellar with a basket in his hand. I asked him who he had with him; he said he did not know. The watchman told him he had better tell who they where; he said he knew nothing about them. We found seven bottles of wine standing by the cellar door, some on the butt head, and some on the floor.

Q. Were these bottles there when you left the cellar at night - A. No; they were in the wine cellar, and I had the key in my pocket. The wine cellar door was forced open by some sharp instrument or other.

Q. Did you observe any thing else besides - A. Some bottles on the floor that had been broken; they had been taken out of the wine cellar, and taken as far as the cellar door that goes out into the street. I missed nothing but the wine.

Q. Was there any wine taken away - A. There were to the amount of two dozen taken away from the bin. I found seven bottles, there were four broken; I missed two dozen entirely; how many more were taken away, I cannot say. The watchman told him in his way to Queen-square, he had better tell who was with him; he said, he knew nothing about them, he was going by promiscuously; the man told him going by if he would help him up with the basket, and go in for two or three bottles that were handy, he would give him one for his trouble. That is all he would say. When he went down for the bottles, the watchman closed the door upon him that is the way he was detained.

Q. Do you know any thing of William King - A. No; I only saw Robert King in the cellar.

Q. Were there any marks upon your bottles - A. There was a C. on the white wine bottles. It was quite dark at that time.

PARTRICK LEONARD. I am a patrol. I was going my round, on the morning of the 18th, my dog was with me, about three doors of Mr. Bloomfield's house, I saw William King pass by me, he came quite close to me; I looked very sharp at him: I was coming down Chapple street; when I came to Mr. Bloomfield's cellar, I saw the trap open; my dog had disturbed them; there was no soul coming either way but him; he was at the cellar door, he had a soldiers coat on; I could not see that he had any thing with him, but the big coat; he went on. When I came to Mr. Bloomfield's door, I found his trap door open; I waited a moment or so; I heard the noise of a foot among the broken bottles; I called to the watchman, and bid him pull the bell. I pulled out my pistol; I put the trap door too, and stood there untill we disturbed the Landlord. I told the Landlord to come down, there were robbers in the cellar; I went down with the pistol in my hand; I saw the prisoner, Robert King . between two butts in the corner of the cellar; I told him to come out, he came out directly; I took hold of him by the collar, and handed him to the watchman. Then I went down again; I searched all about, there were three bottles on the top of the butt full, and four down along side of it; I found part of three bottles that were broken, and the wine spilt, just by the side of the bottles; the wine cellar door was opened, the lock had been forced open; I went into the wine cellar; I saw the sawdust scattered about, and a bottle broken among the sawdust. Then I took the prisoner to the watch-house. I went to Mr. Bloomfields house again. After that I was going my round; I went to get a pint of beer at the wine vaults; the prisoner William King came in, this was five o'clock; we had done our duty then. When I was drinking my beer William King came into the house: I stepped forward to take him into custody; he ran off; I knew the prisoner again directly. I said that fellow is one that past me are at the time when I came to Mr. Bloomfield's to take his brother into custody in the cellar, I went after the prisoner, and seized him.

Q. You said you saw the prisoner, William King , with a soldiers great coat on - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PYEBY. I am the watchman. At half past four, just as the Abbey clock struck the half hour, the patrol called to me; I said all is well; he said, no, come this way. When I came up to him, I saw the cellar flap down, and one of the folding doors open; I said there is somebody in the cellar. I rung the bell for the landlord; the landlord lifted up his sash; I said, make haste down, your cellar is broken open, and I have a notion to think there is somebody in it. I afterwards went down into the cellar, and found Robert King concealed between two butts; I took Robert King into custody in the passage.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer. In consequence of information. I went to the prisoner William King 's lodging on the 14th; about one o'clock in noon day, I found William King in bed; partly dressed, and partly undressed, and under the bed we found this soldiers great coat; in the cupboard I discovered two bottles broken, and the corks drawed; this one had white wine in it very recently, and the other red. The next day I searched his lodgings again. I found in the cupboard this empty pistol.

Prosecutor. There is no marks to my bottles. I lost chiefly red wine; I think there might be a few bottles of white, but the red I perfectly know.

JOHN VAUGHN . I am a constable. I was with Gilmore and Watson. I can only say his evidence is correct.

JOHN WATSON . I am a constable. I was with the two last witnesses. I can say no more than Gillmore.

WILLIAM DAVEY . I am a patrol. I stood at the cellar trap while they went down into the cellar. I only saw Robert King there. I cannot say any other, than what Leonard has said, is all the fact.

William King 's Defence. The Pistol I have never used for many years; the other bottle was broken with no cork in it, and the great coat was thrown on the further side of the bed, not under the bed.

Robert King 's Defence. I cannot say any thing more than what I have said.

ROBERT KING, GUILTY DEATH , aged 19.

WILLIAM KING , NOT GUILTY .

[The prisoner Robert King was recommended to mercy by the jury, and the prosecutor, on account of his youth ]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards ,

Reference Number: t18141026-13

881. WILLIAM KING . was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Hearn , about the hour of two in the night of the 10th of October , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, two gallons of peppermint, value, 36 s. one gallon and a half of shrub, value. 24 s. one gallon of brandy bitters, value, 10 s. 6 d. and three casks, value 7 s 3 d. his property.

WILLIAM HEARN . On Monday night, the 10th of October, my cellar was fast at eleven o'clock my cellar window is under my bar window, at the front. I fastened the cellar window myself; I went down about eleven o'clock to see that every thing was fast; I saw every thing was fast at eleven o'clock, On the next morning, I went down into my cellar to get some liquors to put into my bar; I missed three casks, one of peppermint, another of shrub, and the other containing brandy bitters, but they were not all full; the shrub was two gallons, value twenty four shillings, the peppermint, thirty six shillings, the brandy bitters; half a guinea, and the casks, seven and three pence I had seen all this in my cellar the night before when I closed the cellar, and when I went into the cellar in the morning it was gone. I looked at the cellar window; the bolt of the cellar window had been wrenched off; I imagine by a crow; there was the impression of a crow. I did not see the crow, only the mark of a crow. or some other instrument. I heard no noise in the night. I have a witness here that did.

MRS. WEBBERS. I live next door to Mr. Hearn. On the 10th of October in the morning, I heard a noise near my cellar window. I had some lodgers which I had tored to take their goods out, I was fearful it was them taking their goods out, it was not, because I found their goods in the room in the morning.

JOHN GILLMORE. I am an officer. I went with Waller and Wetson to the lodging of the prisoner, on Friday the 14th of October, to the prisoners lodging in Vine Street, within two hundred yards of the prosecutors house. On searching the lodging's I found these small slaves, and two pieces of heading; the heads have got the prosecutor's name, written in chalk upon them. We found several hoops in the fire, and two pieces of heading, and we found more pieces of staves burning, and in the same room we found a bottle containing rather better than a quart of brandy bitters, in a stone bottle.

Q. Nobody lays claim to that bottle, do they - A. No. Mr. Hearn was desirous of trying the bitters with those of his own. I gave Waller, the constable, the bitters to take to Mr. Hearn, for Mr. Hearn to compare it.

JOHN WALLER . I am a constable of St. Martin's. I received the betters of Gillmore, to take to Mr. Hearn; I delivered them back to Gillmore; they never were out of my custody.

THOMAS MILLS . I live at No. 6, Anderson's-walk, Vauxhall; I am a servant to Mr. Barnett, and sons, distillers. The staves produced by Gillmore, are part of Messrs. Barnett and sons casks.

Prosecutor. I compared the bitters with Mills the distillers man; they are equally a likewith mine, in every respect; they are the same in taste and smell; I really believe the bitters came out of my cask. I have not the least doubt it is the same as what I had in my cask.

Mills. These staves are part of a cask sent by Robert Barnett and sons to Mr. Hearn, with bitters; here is Mr. Barnett's race mark on them here, and here is the head on which Mr. Hearn's name is chalked by myself I am in the habit of writing in chalk on the head every persons name, that the carman might know how to deliver them. Gillmore found the head of this cask in the prisoner's room; this cask had peppermint in it; there is P M, denoting peppermint, that I wrote myself.

Q. to Prosecutor. Had your name been writ upon the casks that were missing - A. Yes, and I have no doubt the cask with my name chalked on it. That is the cask.

Q. to Mills. Do you know the staves - A. I do, by the race mark, and I know the cask by my writing upon the head; the staves answer with the head; they are three gallon cask staves, and this is a three gallon cask head.

JOHN WATSON . I am a constable. I went with Gillmore and Waller to the lodging of the prisoner; he was in bed when he was apprehended. I took these two pieces of the cask out of the grate, they were burning; I found the other pieces at the bottom of the cupboard, in the prisoner's room; it was

there with a number of hoops, now present; these are the hoops of three cags.

Q. to Mills. Look at these hoops; can you tell how many casks these hoops formed - A. They belong to three casks, twelve hoops upon three casks; here are nineteen there ought to be thirty six: these hoops had been on more than one cask; some were two gallons, and some three gallon cask hoops; the name is written by myself; that head was a three gallon cask of peppermint.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought two casks of a man up by St. Giles's church, they were empty casks; part of the staves were in one of them; he had a stone bottle in his hand, for which I gave him five shillings. I asked him how he came by them; he said, he had been cleaning out a publican's cellar, and what was in the bottle was damaged shrub.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

of stealing in the dwelling house, not of the burglary .

Second Middlesex jury before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-14

891. AMES CRISP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a watch value 12 l. the property of Robert Tulloch , in the dwelling house of Thomas Harrison .

ROBERT TULLOCH . I lodged at the Tavistock Hotel in June last; I had a gold watch while I was there. I lost that watch on the 29th of June; my watch was in my dressing case on the 29th of June; it was there at seven o'clock in the morning when I went out, and when I returned at five o'clock in the afternoon I missed it.

Q. Was your dressing case locked when you went away - A. No it was not locked.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes; I know him; he was a servant to Mr. Harrisson, who keeps the hotel; he was porter there, and lived as one of the servants of the Hotel at the time. I have seen my watch since at Bow Street, about five weeks ago; Perks, the officer, produced it before the Magistrate. I shall know it again when it is produced.

Mr. Adolphus. Did you live in town last June or only there on a visit - A. I lived in town; the town is my regular residence, I had no servant at the Hotel.

Q. Crisp was not employed about your person - A. He was employed about the house as boots.

Q. Are you sure that you did not leave your watch in the water closet - A. I did not.

COURT. Was the prisoner at all employed about the rooms - A. He did not attend the lodgers in any of the rooms as I know of; my room was up one pair of stairs.

Q. Who keeps the Hotel - A. Mr. Harrison; he lives there.

JOHN PERKS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the 20th of September, on the charge of stealing a one pound note of his Master, at the Tavistock Hotel. I took him to the public office Bow Street, and locked him up. I asked him where he lived; he told me his wife kept a chandler's shop, at No. 2, Cross Lane; I went there, and searched, and in the parlour there were a chest of drawers, and in one of these drawers' I found this watch his wife was present and a young man living at the Hotel, of the name of Wilsdon.

Q. Who was the house kept by - A. The lower part of the house was kept by Mrs. Crisp, the wife of the prisoner, the lower part of the house is a shop, and parlour, kept by the wife only; she had two little children, and seemed forward with child again. When I found the watch, I took it to the office, and looked into the robbery-book; I found the number talley with the number of Mr. Tulloch's watch; the number tallied with the number in the hand bill. I took the watch to Mr. Tulloch; he attended at the examination. The watch has never been out of my possession since I took it out of the drawer; I found this watch in the drawer. There was another watch, five spoons, and some other valuables, all put together.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that watch, is that your watch - A. It is; I know it by the maker's name, and by the general appearance; there was no chain to it, only merely the watch; it is of the value of fifteen pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the watch in the water closet, and when I found it there was a piece of coloured string to it, and a single key.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-15

883. ANN SMITH and JAMES HUNT were indicted for that they, on the 8th of October , feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in their custody and possession three forged 5 l. bank notes, they knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoners pleaded.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-16

884. ANN SMITH and JAMES HUNT were indicted for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a forged bank note, for the payment of 3 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , and also to defraud another person .

Mr. Knapp, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-17

885. JAMES HUNT was indicted for feloniously forging a 1 l. bank note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , and also to defraud another person .

Mr. Knapp, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-18

886. JAMES HUNT was indicted for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a forged 1 l. bank note , with like intention.

Mr. Knapp, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-19

887. JOSEPH BLOXAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , two rolls of ribbon, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Slute , privately in her shop .

ELIZABETH SLUTE . I keep a haberdasher's shop , in Monmouth-street . On the 26th of September, as I was sitting in my parlour, behind the shop; Ambrosia Turner came into my shop, and told me the prisoner was behind my counter; I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner behind the counter; I asked the prisoner what he wanted; he said, he had dropped a halfpenny. I suspected he had been at some of the ribbons; he was at the part of the shop where the ribbons were. The prisoner ran away; Ambrosia Turner ran after him, and brought him back. the prisoner then pulled two rolls of ribbon out of his pocket, and laid them on the counter. I sent for a constable, and gave the prisoner in charge.

Q. What were the pieces of ribbon worth - A. Five shillings is under the mark, that I am positive of. These are the ribbons; I am sure they are mine.

AMBROSIA TURNER . I keep a shop in the same line of business. I went into Mrs. Sluter's shop; I saw the prisoner on his hands and knees behind the counter. I asked her if she knew she had a boy behind the counter; the boy came from behind the counter, and walked towards the door. She desired him to stop; he would not; he ran away; I ran after him, and brought him back into the shop. He then took out of his pocket two pieces of ribbon, and laid them on the counter.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-20

888. ANN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a coat, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 8 s. and a pair of drawers, value 1 s. the property of William Blankley , junior , in the dwelling-house of William Blankley , senior .

WILLIAM BLANKLEY , JUNIOR. I live with my father; he is the same name; he lives in Bloomsbury market ; he is a poulterer. On the 19th of October, I saw the prisoner in my father's passage, about five o'clock in the evening, she had a bundle in her hand; seeing her have the bundle, my brother came into the shop; I told him, I thought she had been stealing of something. I told him to watch which way she went; I went up stairs to see if any thing was missing; I opened my drawer, and missed a new suit of clothes of mine; they were gone from out of my drawer; the drawer was not locked. I ran down stairs, and told my brother to pursue her, and I followed into Holborn; my brother took her.

Q. What is your brother's name - A. Frederick Blankley . He brought her home with the bundle, and on opening the bundle, I saw they were my clothes. She said, if they were mine, I might take them. I took my clothes; it was an olive coat, a light waistcoat, and a pair of kerseymere breeches.

JAMES WARREN . I am an officer. I received the clothes of Mr. Blackley. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are my clothes.

Q. What is the value of them - A. The whole of them at thirty-nine shillings, including the drawers; William Blankley , the elder is the occupier of the house.

FREDERICK BLANKLEY . I am a brother to the last witness. I saw which way the prisoner turned. I waited until I heard my brother tell me to pursue her; I pursued her, and stopped her in Holborn, she had a bundle with her; I went directly home with the prisoner and the bundle. I am sure it is the same bundle; we examined it; I found a coat, waistcoat, breeches, and a pair of drawers; I knew them to be my brother's clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as God in Heaven of what I am accused of; I will tell you the particulars if you will give me time.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-21

889. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , from the person of James Clark , a 40 l. bank note, a 20 l. bank note, and eight 5 l. bank notes , his property.

MR. LEES. Q. You have a 40 l. note, have you not - A. Yes, I have; I produce it from the Bank.

JAMES CLARK . Q. Look at that note, and tell me whether that is the note you lost on the 18th of June - A. I lost it on the 18th of June, near Fleet-market. This I will swear is my note.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You have seen the prisoner before - A. Yes; I cannot say I saw him on that day. I lost it on the 18th of June.

JOHN VICKREY . I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday, the 14th of August. He produced his pocket-book by my desire. I took the note to be Bank, and there it was stopped.

COURT. This case at most rests only upon suspicion; it is lost in June, and found in the prisoner's possession in August.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-22

890. JOHN KNIGHTLY was indicted for felonously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Hall , he and others of his family being therein, about the hour of twelve at noon on the 12th of October , and stealing therein six handkerchiefs, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Hall.

THOMAS HALL . I am a linen-draper , No. 59, Bishopsgate-street, Without . I lost the property a little after twelve at noon. I was in the shop by myself; on hearing a bustle at the door, I went to see what it was; I saw the prisoner, and Mitchell had hold of him; not knowing that I had been robbed, I looked towards my shop window, and missed six handkerchiefs. The prisoner got away from Mitchell; I pursued him, and brought him back.

JAMES MITCHELL . I am a servant to Mr. Winds,

a coach-maker, Bishopsgatt-street. I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Hall's window; I saw him put his hand in the window, and take out the handkerchiefs he was in company with another. He gave the handkerchiefs to the other, and the other made off with them. I got hold of the prisoner to take him into Mr. Hall's shop; he got away from me; Mr. Hall pursued him, and brought him back. I am sure the prisoner is the boy; the other boy was rather taller than himself; the other boy got off.

Prisoner's Defence. That young gentleman took me to a poulterer's shop next door to Mr. Hall's shop, he asked them if I had taken any thing; they said no; then I run away; the other gentleman catched hold of me, and took me back to the shop.

GUILTY, aged 12,

Of stealing, not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-23

891. GEORGE GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , from the person of Charles Denham . a pocket-book, value 6 d. three 10 l. bank notes, and three 5 l. bank notes , his property.

CHARLES DENHAM . I am late of the West Indies, in the merchants service . On the 10th of September, I was in Fleet-market when I lost my pocket-book; I knew I had my pocket-book one minute before I missed it, in turning round to get a note changed I felt for my pocket-book; to change a one pound note; I ascertained it was gone; it was in my outside coat pocket. I did not know who had stolen it. I ascertained I had lost it; I advertised the pocket-book, some suspicious persons were taken in custody, among them was this boy. Some of my articles were found on this boy. On the Monday following, Armstrong, the officer, took this boy in my presence, and carried him before Mr. Moser, the magistrate; there the boy acknowledged he had changed the five-pound note; he also acknowledged, he was the person that took the pocket-book out of my pocket, and that he was with the others; he told me where he laid out the five-pound note, and upon going to the place, I ascertained it was my property; it is here, and the pocket-book is here likewise. The prisoner said, he had taken the notes out of the pocket-book; he acknowledged that he himself, in company with one or two other boys, took the pocket-book out of my pocket, and when he had taken the notes out, he threw the pocket-book down a privy in Petticoat-lane. He said, that he had spent one five-pound note at Mr. Meadows's, a clothes-sale shop, in Houndsditch. He gave no account of the others. I have the pocket-book now in my possession. He shewed us the privy; in dragging the privy, the pocketbook was found. I can swear it is my property.

MR. MASON. I am shopman to Mr. Meadows, 39, Houndsditch; he keeps a clothes-sale shop. On Saturday, the 12th of October, there were several boys came into the shop.

Q. to Denham. What day was the 10th of September - A. On Saturday. I lost my pocket-book about twelve o'clock at noon.

Mason. He came to our shop between four and five; they asked me whether I had got any clothes that would fit them; I asked them what sort of clothes they wanted; one of them said, a velveteen jacket, and trowsers; the waistcoat and a short coat the other boy had. There were four or five boys together; I believe the prisoner to be one of them; I think he is the boy that had the velveteen jacket and trowsers. After they had tried them on, they asked the price; I told them; they paid me. I took four pounds eight shillings for the two suits. I think one of the boys presented me with a ten-pound note, I cannot say which it was.

Q. Had not you a five-pound note - A. Not of the prisoner, I had not. Two or three boys came afterwards, they gave an order for a coat; they gave a five-pound note; this boy was not there then. I gave the ten-pound note to Mr. Meadows, my employer. I cannot say where it is now; the five-pound note was paid on the same day; the prisoner did not offer that, it was a boy a considerable deal bigger than him; there were three of them I think came afterwards.

Q. Was not the prisoner in company with them - A. I did not see him in company with these boys.

Q. Did you give the boys the clothes - A. No; he had the clothes afterwards, I think.

Q. Now, Mr. Mason, who was it that came to the shop, how many boys came into the shop - A. There were four or five I dare say.

Q. How came you to say there were only two - A. I beg pardon, I have said, no such thing; there were four or five.

Q. Take care what you are about? You have said the prisoner ordered a velveteen jacket - A. The prisoner asked for a velveteen jacket and trowsers; that is all. The prisoner put them on in the shop.

Q. What did they come to - A. The two suits came to four pounds eight shillings.

Q. What did you take for the boys suit - A. I cannot say.

Q. Have not you said this boy's suit came to one-pound sixteen shillings - A. They were both paid together.

Q. Now, consider, whether he gave you a five-pound note, or a ten-pound note - A. I don't think he gave me a five-pound note; I cannot take upon me to say he gave me any money at all; I cannot tell who gave me the money.

Q. Do you recollect whether you have said, he gave you a five-pound note or a twenty-pound note - A. I do not recollect saying any thing of the kind.

Q. You do not recollect whether he gave you a five pound note or a ten-pound note; you have said here a ten-pound note once? Have you seen the clothes again - A. I saw them at Worship-street, I believe.

Q. You must know them; do not shuffle with me? you must know whether they were the things that you sold in your shop or not - A. Our shop when out of articles go and borrow.

Q. Upon your oath, was the prisoner the person that came into your shop - A. I think he was.

Q. Do not you know he was; have you never sworn he was the boy - A. I swore that he was in

the shop, and that he was the person that bought the velveteen jacket and trowsers; I have seen the boy once before; I see him now, and I saw him at Worship-street office.

COURT. You upon your oath, don't know whether it was a five-pound note or a ten-pound note? You disgrace yourself very much.

THOMAS PRATTEN . I am shopman to Mr, Meadows likewise. I recollect the prisoner being at our shop.

Q. What money did he pay - A. I dont recollect; I was standing at the door seeking customers to masters, business; the five pound note was brought out to me to get change; Mr. Meadows said he had not change; Mason gave it to Mr. Meadows, and Mr. Meadows desired me to go and get change; I went to the next door, and got change, five one pound notes; I gave the five one pound notes to Mr. Meadows. It was in the early part of the day; the prisoner was in the shop before I got change at the next door.

MRS. CRAST. I live at 38, Hounsditch. I changed the five pound note for Pratten. This is the note I changed.

Prosecutor. That is the five pound note I lost.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Monday, the 12th of September, Mr. Denham came to me; after I had heard what he had to say, in about an hours time; I went to Spread Eagle Court, in a room in that court, I found this velveteen jacket, trowses, and hat, with other clothes. I took posession of them clothes. and went to the office with them, and in half an hours time, the little boy, the prisoner was brought to me at the office, by a person of the name of Hareson, (who is now under confinement for an assault upon his wife) I locked the boy up; the boy said, sir, I will tell you all the truth; he then gave me to understand that he was in a market with a boy of the name of Denham; that Denham picked the gentleman's pocket of the pocket-book; he, the prisoner, being a little way off; and they both ran away together. I asked him whether he knew what Bank notes where; he said, no, he did not; but they had throwed the pocket-book with some of the papers down a privy, which he would shew me and the gentleman; we went that night to a privy, but not the right; the boy might very easy make a mistake; we dragged the privy; we did not find it; we dragged another privy, and found the pocket-book which the prosecutor knew to be his; with three sixteenths share of lottery tickets; we searched further for the two bills of exchange; we never could find them. I shewed the boy this velveteen jacket, and trowsers; he said, these are mine. Where did you buy them; he said, he would shew me and the gentleman; we went into Hounsditch with him, I holding him by the arm. I asked him what he gave for them going along; he said sixteen shillings. I said boy, how did you get the money; he said by holding gentleman's horses. I went into the shop, and shewed the boyes cloth's, and they had every reason, they said to believe they were the clothes that they sold. I then asked, with what they were paid for; I was answered, by master, or man, by a five pound note. Where is that Next door; I sent the gentleman with the change of the money there, and by that means I came into the possession of the five pound note. The prisoner was taken back to the office. and committed, I never have been able to get young Denham, yet he and young Knightly I the prisoner that was tried before this, and Griffiths, were all in company at the time of the robbery. The prisoner had a velveteen jacket, and trowsers on, which I took off him. These are them.

Q. to Mason. Look at these things - A. These are the same, or like what I sold; I might have sold them, I cannot pretend they are my clothes or they not; because every shop that is out of an article, they can go and apply at the wholesale warehouse for the same article, and the next shop can go and get such an article with the same mark on them.

GUILTY , aged 9.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-24

892. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , one yard of canvass, value 1 s. and thirty yards of cloth, value 25 l. the property of James Hall , John Bacon Hall , John Edward Holmes , and William Hall .

JAMES HALL . I am a wharfinger ; my partners are John Bacon Hall, John Edward Holmes , and William Hall; our wharf is in the parish of St. Botolph, Billingsgate, adjoining the River Thames .

JOHN RIVERS . I am a watchman at Mr. Hall's wharf. On the evening of this present month I saw two men on the wharf at half past ten. I could not hear distinctly what they talked of. When they came nearer to me, one of them said, Damn him, he will not split. I suspected there were no good intentions by these words. They went down the steps to the vessel. While these two men were talking together, the prisoner made his appearance, walking too and fro upon the wharf, and about five minutes after the men had gone down to the vessel, the prisoner went into a shed, where the packages were stowed. I was placed in a situation where I could see him come out; he could not see me. In about three minutes after he come out with a package under his left arm, and in going round to the landing-waiter's box, going to the water-side, I came out, and went after him; I seized him by the right collar. I said friend, what have you got here? He said nothing, and instantly dopped the package. I said, what is it that lies here dopped down? He said he did not know; he was near stumbling over something. I then said, what was your business down here at all then. Do you know any thing of those men that went down the steps. He said, they came with him to go with the Gravesend boat. The Gravesend boat does not go from that place. They haul off there sometimes. I do not believe the tide served then. I sent for an officer.

EDWARD STOCK . I took the prisoner into custody. I had the custody of the property. I produce it.

Prosecutor. The packages were given into a charge to forward to Ramsgate. The package contained six yards of Merino cloth, and twenty-four yards of pelisse cloth. It is worth twenty-five pound ten shillings. The prisoner I have seen with two puted thieves.

Prisoner's Defence. He said, if I told him who these two men were, he would let me go. I never had hold of the package at all. I was going in the boat to Gravesend.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 27.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-25

893. HENRY HART was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of October , six sheets, value 12 s , the property of William Borradaile , Isaac Harrison , and John Watson Borradaile .

JOHN WATSON BORRADAILE . I am a hat manufacturer . I lost these hats from our gate, 34, Fenchurch-street , on the evening of the 7th of October, a little after seven in the evening.

EVAN JONES . I am a servant to Mesrs. Borradailes. I watched the gate about half after seven o'clock. I saw three men on Wednesday three weeks come within the gate. I saw the prisoner Hart with three papers of hats in his hand. I rung the bell for assistance to come out. The prisoner threw the hats behind him when he saw me. I stepped outside of the gate; he threw the hats down behind him. I then took the prisoner into custody, and took him into the accompting house. He took these hats from a package that was in the gateway; a large package, that held twenty-two dozen; these hats were taken out after the pack was cut, but there were some taken out before. I cannot say who cut the pack.

JOHN NICHOLL. I saw the six hats after the alarm was given; they were lying behind the gateway; they were afterwards picked up, and taken care of. These are the hats.

Prosecutor. These hats are our property; I have no doubt of it. The names of the partners are William Borradaile , John Weston Borradaile , and Isaac Harrison , Our warehouse is some distance from the gateway where this package was. This package I had just received; these hats were in our own private gateway.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of this charge as the child unborn. I have served in the army eighteen years. I have been transported before for seven years for a crime that I was guilty of. I applied to the society for the refuge of the destitute; it was too full to admit me. They furnished me with one pound; I went into the city; I was taken up by a police officer; it was impossible for me to get any employ, as my character was gone. Should I unfortunately be found guilty, I hope to be sent out of this country for ever, as I am certain I could not get my living in this country.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Transported for seven years

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-26

894. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of October , a stove grate, value 18 s. 6 d. the property of David Evans .

DAVID EVANS I am a stove grate maker . I live in Crutched-friars . I was not at home when the circumstance happened.

ANSELM GEARING . I am clerk to William and Henry Breen. They are malt factors in Mark-lane. On Saturday evening last I was passing the prosecuter's door, about six o'clock. The prisoner, with a lad about sixteen years old, in a white jacket, passed me within about half a yard. The prisoner sent the boy in a white jacket to take up the stove that was standing by the prosecutor's door; the boy took the stove up, and carried it into Jewry-street. I went into Mr. Evan's shop, and informed his man that a boy had taken a stove away. The man went round the corner, and I went with him; he took the stove off the prisoner's shoulder. The prisoner had got it then upon his shoulder; we took the prisoner into custody, the boy escaped.

JOHN IVES . I am porter to Mr. Evans. I was in Mr. Evans's shop. I followed the men by the information of the last witness, and catched the prisoner with the stove upon his back round the corner in Jewry-street.

THOMAS PINNER . I took the prisoner into custody on Saturday night, the 22d of October. This is the stove.

Prosecutor. That is my stove.

Prisoner's Defence, I was coming by a young man I saw with the stove upon his shoulder. He asked me which way I was going. I said towards Whitechapel. He said he would give me sixpence to take the stove to Houndsditch. I took the stove about twenty yards when a gentlemen came and stopped me with it. I told him I had it of a young man that was to give me sixpence for taking it to Houndsditch.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-27

895. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for felonionly stealing on the 23d of September , sixteen pound weight of cheese, value 10 s. the property of William Strange .

WILLIAM STRANGE . I am a cheesemonger . I live at No. 2, Bishopsgate-street. I know nothing of the circumstance of the robbery.

JOHN STRANGE . I am the nephew of the last witness. I assist in the shop. I was at the far end of the warehouse. I saw the prisoner come into the warehouse, and take the cheese from off a tier which stood near the door. He took it up under his right arm, and run off immediately. I pursued him, and took him with the cheese under his arm, about ten yards from the spot, and conveyed him to our accompting house, and sent for an officer.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I produce the cheese.

Prosecutor. That is the cheese that was taken out of our warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the misfortune to have six months in the house of correction, When I came out of there, I seeked for employ, I could not get any work. I was out of work, and did not know what to do.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-28

896. JAMES CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of September . one egg glass, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Palmer and Thomas Burnell .

THOMAS BURNELL . I keep a china and glass

warehouse , No, 17, Coleman-street . My partner's name is Thomas Palmer . I lost the egg glass on the 27th of September. I found it under the stairs going up to the warehouse. The prisoner was my porter; he had lived about ten months with me; I set Thomas Gold to watch him.

THOMAS GOLD . I am a porter to Mr. Burnell. I watched this place to see which of the servants might presume to take sway this glass; in a short time James Conner came down; he was looking round him; he took up the glass; he hastily conveyed it into his small clothes, and hastily walked off the premises. My master being on the watch likewise, fetched him back into the accomping house, and on searching the prisoner, he found the egg glass upon him.

THOMAS WADMAN . I am an officer. I produce the glass. I took it from his right-hand breeches pocket. I asked him where he lodged; he told me; I went to his lodgings, and found a great deal more property.

Q. To Prosecutor. Look at that glass? - A. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor asked if I had any thing about me? I had the glass in my hand; I gave it him.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined three months , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-29

897. JAMES CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of September , four glasses, value 4 s. one decanter, value 1 s. 6 d. six cups & saucers, value 3 s. 6 d. two mustard pots, value 2 s. and two glass stoppers, value 2 d. the property of Thomas Palmer and Thomas Burnell .

THOMAS BURNELL . After we had taken the prisoner into custody, we searched his lodging in a court in Saffron-hill; and locked up in his trunk we found the articles described in the indictment. Some of the articles were not finished; they were not fit for sale.

Prisoner's Defence. They were the property of my wife; she is dead; see left them there.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined three months , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-30

898. CHARLOTTE EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of September , one hat, value 5 s. the property of George Franks .

CHARLES JACKSON . I am shopman to Mr. George Franks , a hatter , the corner of Redcross-street, Barbican . On the 26th of September last, an alarm was given, that a woman had taken a hat. I immediately ran up Beech-street into a court, there I found the prisoner with the hat in her possession. This is the hat; it was taken from the outside of the door upon a stick. I am sure it is my employer's hat.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-31

899. JOHN DOWER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2th of September , fifteen ounces of tobacco, value 7 s. the property of John Lloyd , a tobaconist on Snowhill .

JOHN ROBERTS . I am clerk to Mr. Lloyd.

Q. When did you lose your tobacco? - A. On the nineteenth of September I secreted myself in a part of the warehouse. I saw the prisoner come up the warehouse; he took two handfuls of tobacco from a cask, which he put into his coat pocket, and returned again almost immediately, took two handfuls more, which he put into his breeches pocket. Soon after he went out, I followed him, and collared him, and took hold of his coat pocket, and brought him back. I sent for an officer, who searched his pockets, and took out of his pockets fifteen ounces of tobacco, in the whole, from his coat and breeches pockets, of the value of seven shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I trust to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-32

900. JOHN MYHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , two pair of stockings, value 3 s. and one purse, value 3 s. the property of John Bell .

SECOND COUNT, the property of Cesman Sparks .

CESMAN SPARKES. I live with Mr. Bell, a grocer . Last Sunday morning, Mr. Bell said, he had suspicion that the prisoner had some of my property; he called in an officer. He found four or five pair of stockings on his legs, and property in his bosom. He is a servant to Mr. Bell. I lodge with Mr. Bell.

JOHN BELL . I have for a considerable time suspected that the prisoner robbed me. On Sunday last, from the appearance of the prisoner's dress, I perceived that he had a great quantity of clothes on; I requested that he would walk up stairs with me, and open his box; which he did, very reluctantly. I then perceived by his legs, that he had more stockings on than belonged to him. I put him down on the bed, and took the stockings off his legs; he had five pair of stockings on his legs, three pair in his bosom, a waistcoat on belonging to Sparks, and shirts belonging to a gentleman that is dead, who lodged in my house when he was alive.

Q. That is not in the indictment - A. In his pocket we found a silk handkerchief, belonging to me; he had other property in his box.

MR. WOOD. I am an officer. I produce the property. All these things were found upon him, and some in his box.

Prosecutor. They are all under my care.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-33

901. RICHARD HOLLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , a gander, value 3 s. and three geese, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Walter .

THOMAS WALTON . I live at Thames Ditton ; I am a gardener . I lost my geese on the 15th of September; they were on the common; I lost three geese and a gander. I only knew my property.

JOHN KING . I am a gardener, at Hampton Court Park, not far from Thames Ditton. I bought three geese and a gander of Thomas Holloway , on the the 16th of September, about ten o'clock in the morning; I never saw the prisoner before. I gave eighteen shillings for them. These are the geese.

Prosecutor. All the four geese are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. They promised to give me my liberty if I would pay for the geese.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-34

902. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , six shirts, value 1 l. four pair of trowsers, value 10 s. a coat, value 1 l. four pair of stockings, value 4 s. a blanket, value 12 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a book, value 2 s. and a bag, value 1 s. the property of Charles Kent , in the dwelling-house of George Davis .

CHARLES KENT . I came on shore on the 4th of October. The prisoner came up to me, and asked me if I had a lodging; I told him I had no lodging. Then he took me to the house of Davis; I then took my clothes to Mr. Davis. I paid a shilling for the night, and on the next day, I went and looked out for a ship. The prisoner took my clothes, and went away; on the night of the 5th I missed them. My handkerchief and book I found on the prisoner, and the next day I found my coat; the prisoner had sold it to a barber. The bundles I gave to Mr. Davis to take care of. I lost two bundles altogether; containing all the articles in the indictment, and many more.

GEORGE DAVIS . I live at No. 3, Angel-alley, Nightingale-lane , I let lodgings. On the 4th of October, the prisoner and the prosecutor came to my house to take a lodging; the prosecutor was to lodge with me. I knew the prisoner three years. They both came in together, and they both went away together. The prisoner brought the bag. The prosecutor returned without the prisoner, about nine o'clock; he slept in my house.

Q. When did you see the prisoner next - A. The next morning, about nine o'clock. The prosecutor went out in the morning before I was up, and before the prisoner came. The prisoner came about nine o'clock, and enquired for the prosecutor; I told him to go up and see whether he was at home or no. He returned in about half an hour, and enquired if the prosecutor had been; I told him no, he had not been. He told me he was going to take the bag away, part of the bag belonged to him, and part to the prosecutor; they were going to lodge together, they were not coming any more to lodge at my house; then he took the bag away. I saw the prosecutor at night again. The prisoner came again, and left word with me to tell the prosecutor he was going on board the Mary Ann , and that he was to come to him on board the Mary Ann , in the London Docks; he said, the Captain had got a birth for him to go to work, and when I saw the prosecutor, I told him the bag was gone. I went with the prosecutor, and found the prisoner at the Shepherd and Dog, on the same day, the 5th, at night. I asked the prisoner where the bag was; he said, it was in the London Dock, he could not give it me until the morning. We got two watchman to take him; he made great resistance; in the scuffle, down dropped this book, handkerchief, and steal; the prosecutor claimed them. The prisoner then said, half in the bag was his, and half the prosecutor's. The prosecutor said all the property in the bag belonged to himself.

PATRICK LONG . I am the watchman that took the prisoner, on the 5th of September, at nine o'clock at night; he made great resistance, and swore if he got clear, he would act Portuguese fashion with us.

Prosecutor. The property in this bag was all mine; this book, handkerchief, and steel, are mine.

GUILTY, aged 38,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards

Reference Number: t18141026-35

903. JANE WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , in the dwelling-house of David Stanborough , one silk handkerchief, value 5 s. a quilt, value 12 s. a shift, value 5 s. a gown, value 12 s. and two one-pound bank notes, his property.

DAVID STANBOROUGH . I am a bricklayer . The prisoner was my servant ; I paid her eighteen-pence a week and her victuals to look after my children. I live in Kirby-street, Church-street, Bethnel Green ; I live in the lower part of the house; I do not keep the whole house, the house is let out in distinct apartments. I missed the things on the 20th of September.

SOPHIA STANBOROUGH . The prisoner was my servant. On the 20th of September, I went to Spitalfields to buy my goods, as I used to do. I bought the goods there. When I came back to my door, it was locked, with the key outside of the door. I had left the door open, and the prisoner in my house. She was gone when I went in; the first thing that I missed was a light linen gown, that I had left in the arm chair; the next thing was my bed curtains.

COURT. That is not in the indictment - A. The other articles I had them set down, because I have a very bad head piece; the articles are here present. I missed shoes, petticoat, a silk handkerchief, a silk skirt, two gowns, a white cambrie skirt, besides a dimity petticoat, a shawl, a pair of white stockings, two pounds in money, and two one-pound notes each, that was in the same drawer.

Q. Were these notes marked - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Should you know them if you were to see them again - A. I think I should. I found one upon her, under one of her arms, and the other she said, she had changed; she acknowledged that. I found the prisoner at the top of the Minories, about twenty minutes after nine. I went out at half past six, and returned about half past eight. When I took her I came by Bishopsgate Church, it was twenty minutes after nine; I found her at the top of the Minories,

and I found every article upon her, except one gown, petticoat, and stockings, which she had pawned for ten shillings; a flannel petticoat she had on when I took her, and my shawl, also I found a one-pound note under one of her arms, and sixteen shillings under the other. She said, she had changed one of the one-pound notes, and had the sixteen shillings about her; she had four shillings out of it. The prisoner was very much in liquor when I took her. I called her up at six o'clock; she slept in my apartment. She got drunk after she robbed me I suppose.

Q. Were the two one-pound notes in the same place - A. Yes; in a little box, in the middle drawer, in the room that I slept in. It was all the money that I had in the world, and there was a sheet and one blanket, she tore in half.

COURT. I cannot enquire into those things that are not in the indictment? What did the prisoner say - A. At the top of the Minories I saw the prisoner; I took hold of her by the shoulder; I said, you hussey, I have got you; she said, I will come along with you, do not hurt me. My husband came up, and he took her to Worship-street office. Mr. Armstrong searched her. I was not satisfied, and when I found the one-pound note, I took her into a room by herself. Armstrong only found the wearing apparel. I searched her; by taking her clothes off. Armstrong searched her as far as decency with propriety would admit them. I found under her arm pit, the one-pound note, and then she owned to taking the other, and having the change of it, and said she had spent four shillings; and she had sixteen shillings left.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you find any note under my arm - A. Yes, next to your skin, and found sixteen shillings under your other arm, wrapped up in a handkerchief of mine.

COURT. Where did you find the duplicate - A. The officer found that in her pocket; a duplicate of a gown, stockings, and petticoat; pledged for ten shillings.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG . The prisoner was brought to the office by the prosecutor, and his wife, on the 20th of September; I searched her, and in her pocket I found seven shillings in silver, and seven shillings and seven pence halfpenny in copper; I then desired the prosecutorix to search her, more narrowly, and she found that money on her.

Q, Did you see her searched - A. No; I was in another room; she gave it me immediately she found it. I produce the duplicate of the gown, petticoat, and stockings, I found on the prisoner; the things are here; these are them.

Prosecutrix. These things are all mine; a pair of shoes, petticoat, shirt, and a gown, in the handkerchief; it was found in her bundle; I had it in my house before she went away.

Q, What is the value of that - A. two shillings a silk petticoat nine shillings a silk skirt, five shillings, the black cotton gown, five shillings, a cambrick petticoat, two shillings; they are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a long fit of illness; I was eight months in Bartholomew Hospital; I stated to the prosecutrix that I was very much embarressed; she said, she would do the utmost in her power for me, and then she put me off till the next morning; I was very much hurt in mind. I ask for mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, and the prosecutrix ].

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-36

904. JOHN ANDERSON and THOMAS DOOLEY were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Joseph Longhurst , in a certain open field, near the Kings highway, on the 7th of September putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. an umbrella, value 5 s. an handkerchief, value 2 s. a hat, value 10 s. a coat, value 4 l. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. and a promissory note, for the payment of 10. his property .

JOSEPH LANGHURRT. I live at Staines.

Q. Where were you on the evening of the 7th of September? - A. In Bedfont-lane . I was on foot. I was stopped by three men in the road; they had soldiers' clothes on, all three of them. Two of them had belts and bayonets. When they stopped me, they asked me how far it was to Bedfont; I told them about a mile; the next village was Bedfont. They then said one to the other, they would turn back from whence they came. I walked on fast, and they walked on after me; I was walking from Bedfont to Staines ; I thought they wanted to rob me; I ran I believe about an hundred yards, and I fell down; they came up to me before I could get up; They then collared me, and took me through the hedge, across the field, into a gravel pit, about forty yards in the field, to the best of my knowledge; when they had got me into the gravel pit, they took my property away, and stripped me of all my clothes, naked they stripped me of all my clothes, gaiters, stockings, and shoes; the shoes are not in the indictment; my shirt, my handkerchief, my hat, a pocket-book, a knife, and my umbrella; then tied my hands together; then took my watch away, and a ten-pound Staines bank note. I asked them for some old clothes to put on; they said d - n you, hold your tongue, or else we will kill you, we will murder you; they mentioned both.

Q. How long did they stay with you - A. After they tied my hands, one staid with me quite an hour, from nine till ten.

Q. What did he remain with you all that time for - A. I cannot say; he stood over me, about two or three yards from me.

Q. Did any thing particular occasion his going away - A. The other two men came returned back at ten o'clock to the other man that stood over me. I was tied, and laid in the hedge with my hands and legs tied.

Q. In the hedge next to the lane - A. No. In the hedge that grows in the pit.

Q. Then they immediately left you, did they - A. Yes. They examined my hands. They said, if I hallooed they would murder me. They all three left me.

Q. In what state did they leave you, with respect to your clothing - A. They left me an old pair of

trowsers, a waistcoat, and they put an old cap over my head; they left me in that state until half past six o'clock in the morning, the things they left me were very old indeed.

Q. During the time that they were with you, had you an opportunity of seeing their faces? - A. Yes; I am not quite clear of all, but the tall one was the man that stood over me from the hour of nine until ten.

Q. What sort of light was there? - A. It was not dark, it was dusk just at eight o'clock.

Q. You observed the prisoner Anderson, did you, first? - A. Yes; because he caught hold of me first. They were all dressed in soldier's clothes. I am not so clear as to the short one as I am to the tall one. I firmly believe the short one to be in company with Anderson, I think I can recollect him being pock-marked; he threatened my life the last time he spoke to me, I firmly believe Dooley to be the man, he is a little pock-marked.

Q. You took no particular observation of his features? - A. No.

Q. Only being pock-marked? - A. No.

Q. Have you any thing more particular to say respecting that man which you believe to be the prisoner, Dooley? - A. No; I have a letter I received from the prisoner Anderson. They told me to strip; I did, and they assisted me in stripping.

Q. Did they all assist? - A. I am not quite clear as to that. Anderson in this letter confesses that he was guilty of the robbery. This letter was sent to me by the post.

Q. to Anderson. Do you recollect that I begged a coat of the other man to keep you from starvation? - A. Yes, you did; they refused it first; you begged a coat for me

Q. Did you hear the other men say any thing of taking your life away; I pleaded with the other men to spare your life? - A. I did not hear that.

MARY GRIGG . I live under the Piazzas, Covent Garden. I keep a pastry cook's shop, and sell tea and coffee.

Q. Do you remember the prisoners coming early in the morning of the 8th of December? - A. Yes, between four and five o'clock.

Q. How many came? - A. Three, Sir. One of them was dressed in black, and the other two in regimentals.

Q. Have you any recollection of the persons who was in regimentals? - A. The two prisoners I am sure are the two.

Q. How long did they remain with you? - A. Until between seven and eight, as near as I can guess.

Q. Did they breakfast? - A. Yes; the third man was dressed in black.

Q. You do not know who he was, do you? - A. Yes; he was the person that was convicted here last sessions. He in black wanted change for a ten pound note. I did not change the note for him; the man in black went out, he returned and paid me the three and sixpence.

JOHN STRATFORD . I live at Kensington. On the morning of the 8th of September, I was at the Ship public house, in James-street, between three and four o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you see any person come into that public house while you were there? - A. I did, about a quarter before four; two were dressed in soldier's clothes, and one in black. I remarked two of the persons so as to know them again. The man in black was one, and the tall prisoner the other. They asked the lad who served at the bar for half a pint of rum, they had it put into milk; and after drinking it, the man in black offered a ten pound note in change; the lad refused to give them change. I was standing close by the bar when the man offered the note; he begged very hard for change, that is the reason I took notice of them; he held the note between his finger and thumb; the lad, after being asked several times for change, asked the man in black what note it was? He said it was a ten pound note, and after another question or two, he said it was a note of the Staines bank. I took my nephew in with me to give him something to drink with me, before he went home; his name is Charles Stratford .

Q. Are you perfectly sure the prisoner Anderson was one of the three men? - A. I have no doubt at all. They all partook of the rum and milk, and before I set out, I saw them have the glass refilled; the man in black asked to have something to eat; the lad told him they never sold any thing to eat.

CHRISTOPHER STRATFORD . Q. Wore you in Covent-garden on the morning of the 8th of September; - A. Yes, I was at Mrs. Grigg's, the pastry-cook's shop. When I was there I saw both the prisoners at the bar; the other person was standing upon his legs, just going to leave these men to go out; the other man was in black. The two prisoners had regimentals on; they had the cross-belt with the bayonet on it, and on the plate of the belt, there was 45. I took particular notice of the prisoners, both their collars and cuffs were turned up with green. They had something to eat and drink; they had only a bottle of ginger beer while I was there. I saw them pay for nothing. I did not stay for the man's return that went out. I am positive sure to the persons of the prisoners. Both of them I took particular notice of. Dooley did not sit in the chair any length of time, he was in and out of the yard. Dooley set next to me. The man in black went out; I did not observe his uneasiness until the man in black went out. I heard him wish for his return. I thought there was something extraordinary in their conduct. I walked round the market to see if I could see any of the officers of Bow-street, to come in and look at them. The next day I saw Bacon, the captain of the patrole. I communicated my suspicion to him on the Tuesday following. The one in black came to the same house. I told Bacon that one of the men came back, and had left an umbrella with Mrs. Grigg. Bacon went in the course of the afternoon, and found that man within one hundred and fifty yards

CHARLES STRATFORD . I am nephew to John Stratford . I went into the Ship public house in James-street. I saw the two prisoners at the Ship, and another man dressed in black. I am sure the two prisoners were there; they came in a little before four o'clock, and there was a third man dressed in black. The two prisoners were both dressed in regimentals.

I saw the man offer a note to be changed; it was doubled up, I did not see what note it was.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner Anderson, in company with John Perks , at the White Lion in Covent garden. He was then in bed, with his hat shoes, and coat off. He was in bed with the rest of his clothes on. He had this handkerchief on his neck; this handkerchief has been identified by the prosecutor. I have had it ever since. On the same afternoon, I, in company with Perks. apprehended Dooley at the King's head public house, in Covent garden; he came to enquire for a young man with large whiskers. A coachman was present; I took him into custody; he came to enquire for the man I had in custody. I took Dooley to the office, Anderson was then in custody; they denied any knowledge of the robbery, and any knowledge of each other.

JOHN PERKS . I am an officer. I was in company with Bishop when both the prisoners were apprehended, I know nothing more than what Bishop has related. I was present when he searched them; we shewed them each other; they denied any knowledge of each other. We asked Dooley, whether he knew Anderson? he said he did not, and Anderson said he did not know Dooley.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that handkerchief produced by Bishop. - A. It is mine. I know it by the holes, and by being the fellow to it in my possession; they came both off one piece, the pattern corresponds exactly. I had this handkerchief in my pocket at the time of the robbery.

Anderson's Defence I was compelled to do it, or else I was to share the same fate as the man that fell in my way. I at last agreed so far, if they would not hurt any one. When we met Mr. Longhurst, Strangeways asked him the way to the next town; he replied, about a mile. We replied, then we will go back from whence we came. Strangeways ran, we followed him; the gentleman fell; Strangeways laid hold of him first. Strangeways pulled off his clothes, I begged of him to give the man clothes to keep him from starving with the cold. I asked Strangeways to let me put my coat on the man, and when we came back again, Strangeways said, let us kill him. I begged of them to spare his life; they were both angry with me all the way we came to London. I was ignorant of the man having any money until we came to London. We then went into the King's head: the other man told me, he had a pocket-book and a note; Strangeways said, it was a three pound note. I asked to see it; we went to get our breakfast. I asked him if he had got change, he said no, it was a ten pound note. I was compelled to do it, in order to save my own life, and I saved the prosecutor's life. I plead guilty.

Dooley's Defence. I am innocent of the fact; I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

ANDERSON GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

DOOLEY NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre

Reference Number: t18141026-37

90. JOHN ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , thirteen yards of oil cloth value 3 l. the property of Fenwick Bulmer .

FENWICK BULMER. I am a floor-cloth manufacturer in the Strand . I lost the floor-cloth about the 27th of August. I lost it from my manufactory between the night and the morning.

JOHN SELMAN . I am foreman to Mr. Bulmer. On the 26th of August last, at past twelve o'clock, the factory was safe, and on the 27th, early in the morning, it was broken open, and robbed of oil cloth. - The factory is in King's Head Court, James-street, Westminster. I found the oil cloth at Mr. Read's shop, a broker, London-wall, On the 15th of September last. I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM BLAND . I am an officer. On the 15th of September Mr. Bulmer informed me, that his floor cloth was exposed for sale at Mr. Read's, London-wall, which had been stolen from his premises at Westminster. I went with Mr. Bulmer and his two men; I found seven pieces of oil cloth; I now pro duce that Mr. Bulmer said was his property. Mr. Read was at home? I asked him how he became possessed of it? He said he bought it of Mr. Levi; he had given three pounds ten shillings for it; afterwards he corrected that, and said, it was two pounds ten shillings. I took the floor-cloth, and desired Mr. Read to accompany me to the Lord Mayor. We then went in search of Levi. We could not find Levi that morning. I found Levi: he came home in the afternoon, when Levi and Read came to my house; he stated, he bought the oil-cloth of a man called Stuttering Jack, at Westminster. Mr. Read told me he bought it on the 29th of August.

JOHN READ . I keep a broker's shop in London-wall. On Monday I first saw the oil-cloth; on the Wednesday following I bought it. I cannot exactly say what day of the month. I saw it or bought it on the 15th of September. Mr. Bland saw it; I had had that about a fortnight in my shop.

Q. On the 29th of August you bought it of Levi? - A. About that time; it is the same floor-cloth that Bland the officer took; I told Mr. Bland that I gave three pounds ten shillings for it. I afterwards said two pounds ten shillings.

MOSES LEVI . I live in Baker's-buildings, Houndsditch. On Saturday night the 27th of August, I went to the Lyceum. John Abrahams was there, whom we call Struttering Jack. In short, he said he could get some floor-cloth, about twelve or thirteen yards, and some of it was two yards wide, at four shillings a yard. I said if it was two yards wide, it was cheap of the money. I did not ask him if it was new or old, and on the Monday following I went out. I had a fowling piece to sell, which I sold in the Strand for eight guineas, to Mr. Ashman, a pawnbroker, facing Hungerford Market, and I bought a lot of brokery of him for six pounds ten shillings. I called a coach, and took them home. About four o'clock in the afternoon, when I came home, my wife said. Jack has left here some floor-cloth for you; I found it lying on my chair. I then went to Wallis's public house. Jack was sitting there; he said he had left some goods at home for me. He went home with me to my house. I looked at the floor-cloth; I said, here is none two yards wide, they are odd remnants, we call them wasters I then said to John Abrahams it is too dear. He said it cost him three shillings and sixpence a yard; he told me to sell it, and what was got by it

I should have half profit. He told me to advance him the money, he had not paid for it. I paid him two pounds five shillings and sixpence. I then sent for Mr. Read, Mr. Read came. I sold him four pounds worth of the goods, I brought home in the coach, and seeing the floor-cloth, he said, Levi, what will you have for the floor-cloth; I said, I will have two pounds ten shillings. He gave me that for it. That is the same floor-cloth I bought of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. It is my floor-cloth; it is worth three pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I have seven small children; I am innocent of what I am charged with.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-38

905. MICHAEL STANLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , one hogshead, value 8 s. the property of William Strange .

WILLIAM STRANGE . I am a cheesemonger , No. 2, Bishopsgate-street. I can only prove that the property belongs to my father.

MRS. CUMMINGS. I bought this hogshead of the prisoner. He told me his name was Collins. I am a carman's wife. My husband deals in hogsheads. I live at No. 1, Elbow-court, Trinity-lane. I bought the hogshead in May, the prisoner brought it to the door, as he had done before. I bought it of him, and gave seven shillings and sixpence for it. The next hogshead he brought me, I had him taken up, and when he was taken before the magistrate, he said, his name was Stanley. The prisoner is the man, I am sure of it.

JOHN SHAW . I am a cooper; I live in Church-lane, Whitechapel. I deal in casks and hogsheads. I bought this hogshead of Mrs. Cummings; I gave her nine shillings for it. My cart took it up, and when I took it to Whitechapel, the hogshead was stopped. I was informed it was stolen; it is now in the yard. It is the same hogshead I bought of Mrs. Cummings.

THOMAS PALMER . I am warehouseman to Mr. Strange. This hogshead contained bacon. I took the bacon out of the hogshead; I put it at the warehouse door in Cammomile-street, on the 10th of May; I lost it the same day, and on the same day I found it in Church-lane, Whitechapel. It is now in the yard; I am sure it if my master's hogshead.

JURY. Q. to Mrs. Cummings. How long was it from the time of your purchasing the first hogshead and his bringing the second hogshead - A. The next day. He was not prosecuted then. I am sure he is the same man.

WILLIAM BLAND . I apprehended the prisoner on Friday last, on a certificate of an indictment being against the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was three days in Goal for the very same hogshead, and tried, and cleared at Guildhall for it.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-39

906. JAMES BROWN , FRANCES WILKINSON , and MARY SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one pelisse, value 15 s. the property of Robert Andrew Clark .

ROBERT ANDREW CLARK . I am a silk mercer , 21, on the Pavement of Moorfields . I knew nothing of the circumstance of the robbery; I can only swear to the property.

CHARLES JACKSON . I am a stone mason, On the 15th of October, I saw the three prisoners together, in Grub street; I followed them from Grub street into Honey-suckle court, leading into Moor lane. At the corner of Moor Lane, Fore street, they all went into a wine vaults; I waited there until they came out; I then followed them down Fore street; in Fore street there is a ham shop opposite of Coleman street; the prisoner Brown put his hand to a fine ham there, the two women stood along side of him, they just meddled with it and walked away. Then somebody happened to come into the shop, or else I believe it would have been taken from there. They proceeded to the pavement Moorefields, the prisoner Smith and Wilkinson looked at a pellise hanging at Mr. Clark's door; Brown stood by them; it was hanging outside of the door, each of them looked at the pellise, and walked a little distance, and had a little conversation together. They returned back; the prisoners Smith, Wilkinson and Brown stopped. When they came back, the prisoner Wilkinson. began to unpin the pelisse, so did Smith, until they got the pelisse down. The prisoner Smith then gave it to Brown; he put it into his apron, and ran off with it. I pursued Brown, I followed him back again into Grub street; I saw where he went with the pelisse. I went and gave information to an officer, what had happened; he came with me, and on coming down Grub street with the officer; I pointed out the three prisoners at the corner of the court, where I saw Brown go up with the pellise; I left them there when I went and informed Mr. Clark how his property had been taken from his door. Mr. Clark came with me. I pointed out the prisoners; he gave them into Hutchins, the officers, custody. After the officer had searched them Mr. Clark and the officer were proceeding to go where Brown had taken the pelisse; the prisoner Smith said, they might go; she had taken care to plant it where it is safe enough We found it afterwards; it was pledged at Mr. Flemings's Fleet market; we found it there on the Monday morning.

Q. What day was it stolen - A. On Saturday the 15th of October between one and two in the afternoon. I am positive to the three prisoners at the bar; knowing them before induced me to follow them.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am an officer. On the 15th of this month, Jackson came to me, and said, there were three people in Grub street that had stolen a pelisse. When I got into Grub street, I saw the three prisoners at the corner of Jacob's Well court I told Jackson to go to the prosecutor; I kept them in sight till the prosecutor came; then I took them in custody. I searched them, and found eight duplicates upon the prisoner Smith. I then asked them if they knew any thing of a pelisse; they denied all knowledge of that. I was proceeding with the prosecutor to go and search Brown's lodging; Smith

said, let them go, and search; I have planted that safe enough, meaning the pelisse, I thought. I searched Brown's lodging, and found no pelisse there. I took the prisoners to the Comote.

JAMES MAXTEAD . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pelisse; I took it in on Saturday evening, the 15th of October. I don't know who I took it in of, it was a young woman. I have no knowledge of the prisoners.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that pelisse - A. It is my pelisse; it is the one that was hanging up at my door.

Brown's Defence. I have nothing to say.

Wilkinson's Defence. What that man has sworn is as false as God is true.

Smith's Defence. On Saturday week, Wilkinson asked me to go and have part of a pint of beer; I went and had part of a pint of beer. An officer came and took charge of me for stealing a pelisse, of which I knew nothing.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 29.

WILKINSON, GUILTY , aged 30.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-40

907. JOHN THOMPON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , fifteen pounds weight of linen rags, value 5 s. the property of Matthias Prime Lucas , John Blenkarn , Joseph Barber , and Robert Smith .

JOHN BLENKARN . I am a wharfinger ; our wharf is at the Custom House New Quay ; my partners names are Matthias Prime Lucas, John Blenkarn , myself, Joseph Barker , and Robert Smith ; they are the whole of the partners. On the 22nd of September, I knew one of the bags of rags appeared to be cut open, and the quantity stolen were nearly the same as found upon the prisoner.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. No.

JOHN BROWN. I am a watchman. On Thursday, the 22nd of September, about half past three in the morning, I saw a ladder put through the window, about eight foot high, and the prisoner descended. I set about twenty yards from where he came down. and at four o'clock he came back; he passed me with a bag in his hand. I got up, and said, what do you do here; he said, I am watching a craft. I said, I have been watching of you for half an hour. What have you got here; I looked. He had got a little bag in his hand, and seeing the rags, I asked him how he came to take them; he said, he did it through distress. I took him to the watch house.

GEORGE PRINCE . The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse. I took from him what was in the bag in the watchhouse. The rags were all put into this bag, for the convenience of keeping them all together. He had rags round his waist, and in his hat.

Prosecutor. We had such rags on our wharf.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 3 months , and to be whipped at the carts tail one hundred yards in Lower Thames-street, until his back be bloody .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-41

908. AARON HANDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of October , a watch, value 35 s ; the property of Jeffery Childs .

ELIZABETH CHILDS . My husband's name is Jeffery Childs; he is a porter to Mr. Goodman, a brass founder , in Barbican . On the 2nd of October, I got up at nine o'clock in the morning, and brought the watch down in my hand. I went out to light my candle, and when I went in, I missed the watch off the mantle-shelf. I saw the prisoner go up the court where I live. My husband went and found out the prisoner. I got information that the prisoner lived in Dean-street, Soho. A constable went, and took him.

Q. Did you find the prisoner at the bar - A. My husband saw the prisoner come out of the public-house. The prisoner is the man I saw in my court; he has a wooden leg. He said, he had given his wife the watch, she has it in her boson. I went up to the prisoner's wife, and took the watch out of her bosom. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I gave the watch to my husband, and went for a constable. I asked the prisoner what possessed him to take it; he said, a young man gave it him at the bottom of the court.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me before - A. Never, until the Sunday morning; you were within eight or ten steps of my door.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the watch up in a dust-hole in a court in Barbican; in about an hour after, a man and a woman came to me, and said, I had picked up a watch; I delivered the watch to them. They gave me in charge of a constable. I am innocent of the charge against me. I have served my King and Country fifteen years, and lost a leg in that service.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined 3 months , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-42

909. CHRISTOPHER WOOLFFROM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , in the dwelling-house of John Pike , a tablespoon, value 5 s. a bag, value 1 d. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 5 s. a box, value 2 d. a waistcoat, value 1 s. seven pounds in monies numbered, two half guineas, two seven shilling pieces, and a 1 l. bank note , the property of John Pike .

JOHANNA PIKE . My husband's name is John Pike ; we keep the Pitt's Head in the Old Bailey, in the parish of St. Sepulchre . On the 21st of September last, the prisoner lodged in our house. I went up stairs several times that day. I went up, and opened the door of my bed-room; when I went in my son was there; on my going into the room, I missed my property; I missed a canvas bag, and some silver, and a one-pound note in that bag.

Q. How much silver was in that bag - A. I cannot exactly say; there were some pounds of silver in that bag, and a little brass box, with two half-guineas,

and two seven-shilling pieces, and another box, with crown pieces, and half crowns, and a good many foreign silver coins.

Q. How much money altogether in point of value - A. Seven pounds in money, besides the two half guineas, the seven shilling-pieces, and the foreign coin.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming down stairs - A. Yes; he came down stairs in an hurry, about the middle of the day; I cannot ascertain the exact time. On the 15th of October, I saw the prisoner again in the Compter. I asked him how he could think of robbing me and my children? my little child cried; he said, do not cry my little man. said, he was very sorry for what he had done. That is all he said.

Q. Did he tell you in the Compter where your property was - A. Yes. A gentleman wrote into the country in consequence of what he told, and my property came back. I live in the house, and my husband lives with me.

ROBERT PIKE , I am the son of the prosecutor. On the 1st of September, the prisoner asked me for the key of my father's door, to go and shave himself.

Q. How long had he lodged in the house - A. About ten days. I opened the door for him, and I locked the prisoner in the room; because he said, he allways stripped himself start naked; he said, he allways locked the door when he stripped himself, I locked him in, and I went up stairs to feed, the rabbits. I did not come down untill half an hour. I ran down, and fetched the key again; then I came, and unlocked the door again, and I asked him if he was ready; he said, yes, and just after he came out of the room; I went into the room to put on a clean shirt to go with the prisoner to meet his ship. I continued in the room until my mother came up, and on my mother coming up; she missed the property in question.

Q. Had he ever been in that room before by himself - A. No.

JOHN HODGSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, I took him to the Poultry Compter. I found this pocket-book upon him; in that I found his name. I found this comb and this knife. This is the waistcoat I took off the prisoner, and this handkerchief I took off his neck; it belongs to a lodger of Mrs Pike's.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at that waistcoat - A. It is my husband. The spoons are mine, and this is the bag that the money was in.

Hodgson. That box was sent up out of the country, and the spoons likewise.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court; I have been four years in England; I was a purser in the Danish Navy, upon a parole of honour.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, and the prosecutrix, on account of his being a foreigner ].

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-43

910. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , from the person of James Abrey Hart , 4 s. and 6 d. in monies numbered, and a one-pound bank note , his property.

JAMES ABREY HART . I am a bricklayer . On the 1st of October, about twelve o'clock at night, I was passing by Spring Gardens; the prisoner took hold of me; I told her I would have nothing to do with her. She would walk with me, she walked as far as Carlton house, and then she was going to turn back; I missed my money from my trowsers pocket; my pocket was open. I had not stopped any where with her. I asked her for the money; she said, she had not got it, I told her if she did not give it to me; I would give charge of her. I lost one pound four shillings and sixpence. She was searched, and one pound one shilling and sixpence was found upon her.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner; I took her to the watch house, in crossing over by the Mews gate, on the pavement, I heard some money fall; it was moon-light; I looked on the pavement; I saw sixpence; I picked it up. I heard somebody say, she had taken it out of her mouth. I searched her mouth, and found a one-pound note, with a shilling in it. I went to the watchhouse, and gave it to the constable of the night. I found no more of the money. A crowd came about, and I wished to get to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM CRESWELL . I am the constable of St. Martin's. I was in the watchhouse that night. The prosecutor said, he had been robbed of one-pound four shillings and sixpence; the prisoner had taken it. The watchman said, he had part of it; he gave me a bit of paper, and a sixpence. I opened the bit of paper by the fire; it was a one-pound note, with a shillings wrapped up in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate woman; I never took any money from the prosecutor; I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-44

911. WILLIAM CONNOLLY , JAMES SULLIVAN , WILLIAM HANNAWAY , and DENNIS LEARY , were indicted for that they, on the 29th of September , upon Barnard Shields , did make an assault, and that they, with a certain bludgeon, the said Barnard Shields, in and upon his head, did strike and beat, and did thereby give to him, in and upon his head divers mortal bruises, and confusions, of which he languished until the 3rd of October, and then died, and so the Jurors say, that they, the aforesaid prisoners, him, the said Barnard Shields , did kill and murder .

GEORGE JARVIS . I am a watchman of the parish of St. George's in the East . On the 29th of September last, I heard a noise at the public-house, called the Ship and Blade Bone; I went into the house to get half a pint of beer. I saw Mrs. King, the landlady, about two minutes before I went in; directly I went in I saw Hannaway; he was very active in swinging a stick round, and then he came up to me, and hit we on the head, as if he had a done on purpose.

Q. Before that, had you interfered as watchman - A. No. I was having half a pint of beer, and said nothing. I catched hold of him by the collar, and asked him what he did what he had struck me for; etc gave me no answer. He threw me down, and hit me in the mouth, in the house. I got up again, and I crawled out of the house on my hands and knees, and as soon as I got out, I was knocked down again. My lips were out to pieces, and my teeth knocked in, and one of my fingers bruised. I cannot say who knocked me down; there were three or four of them.

Q. Do you know any of the men who were there at that time - A. No

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Harden - A. Yes. I saw him before I came out of the house.

Q. When you first came into the house, did you see these four prisoners there - A. No; only the one that I swear to; that is Hannaway; I did not see any of the other three prisoners there. After I was knocked down out of the house, I sprang my rattle, and several watchmen and a patrol came to my assistance. We went behind the house, and found Hannaway. I gave Hannaway into custody; King, the watchman, had Hannaway in custody, and when I went into the house there were fifteen or sixteen men; four or five followed me out.

Q. You do not know whether the prisoners were of the party, do you - A. Only Hannaway; he followed me out of the house; he gave me a blow. I gave charge of him for that blow. The rest of the party that followed, I do not know who they were.

Q. When King was taking Hannaway to the watch-house, were you attacked by any body - A. Yes, by Connolly; he ran at me to do me some mischief, he had no weapon in his hand; he was trying to get hold of me; I guarded myself with my stick, as well as I could, until he got my stick from me. I went to Old Gravel-lane, and called for assistance.

CORNELIUS SULLIVAN . On Michaelmas Day, I was at the Ship and Blade Bone at night, I was in the tap-room; the chief of them were Irishmen. James Sullivan was in the tap-room; Dennis Deary I understood was up stairs. I saw Jarvis, the watchman, in the tap-room.

Q. Was there any scuffle among any of the drinking party - A. There was, and I assisted in making them quiet. I went out of doors, and put up the shutters, by the landlord's desire. All was quiet before Jarvis, the watchman came in. After I had put up the shutters, I came into the tap-room again, I found Jarvis close to the door inside, laying down, I picked him up.

GEORGE PITMAN . I am a patrol. On the night of Michaelmas Day. I heard Jarvis spring his rattle; I went to his assistance. I found him in King-street, about forty yards from the Blade Bone; his mouth was bleeding when I saw him. I and the other watchman went with him to the Blade Bone. When I got there, I found Hannaway there. He gave me charge of Hannaway for striking him; I and King took Hannaway in custody.

Q. At the time that you took Hannaway in custody, did you see any, other men in the house - A. Yes; there were several, Dennis Leary , and the prisoner Sullivan, were there. Upon our taking Hannaway in custody, and taking him along to the watchhouse, I found several persons coming after me, some of them came from the public-house, and some the other way; different parties of them got together; they tried to rescue Hannaway out of the watchman's hands; some had large and long sticks, and some had none. I sent King and another watchman with Hannaway towards the watchhouse; five of us planted ourselves to defend the watchmen; we drew our cutlasses to keep the mob back; we got to the corner of King-street, fifty or sixty were coming after us; they ran into after us at Silver-street; there were about five of us. They knocked us down, and took our cutlasses from us, and after we were down, they jumped upon us. I received a cut upon my left arm with a cutlass, and my other arm was bruised. While I was down John Coile came to assist me; they were jumping upon me when he came up, and Barnard Shields came to my assistance; he was also knocked down.

Q. Can you tell me who were the persons that thus attacked you, and the other watchman, among those that attacked you to rescue Hannaway, do you know any of them - A. Yes; Dennis Leary , and James Sullivan , they were trying to rescue Hannaway from us. Barnard Shields was taken away to the watchhouse. We searched the Ship and Blade Bone; in about ten minutes after, I crawled away. We found in that house Dennis Leary , and Sullivan, in bed; they were in a muck; Leary's shirt was torn a little, and Sullivan had a mark on his throat; it appeared to have been just done; the skin was grazed off about an inch.

THOMAS LOADEN . I a patrole of St. George's. On the night of Michaelmas-Day, I went to the assistance of Jarvis, upon the spring of his rattle. He was coming from Martin King 's; when I come up he was bringing Hannaway towards the watch-house. I was knocked down as soon as I came up. I cannot say who knocked me down; there were about ten or twenty with sticks. I said to my partner, deliver the man to the watchman, and draw your cutlass. Hannaway was sent on with King and another; the attack began in Silver-street; there were about sixty or seventy of them, they had got bludgeons. I put myself in a posture of defence, to prevent them from rescuing Hannaway. They began upon me first with bludgeons. I put up my left arm to save my head, it-fell down after, it was broken. I fought with my cutlass a got bit; my arm was broken with sheir bludgeons. I was knocked down; they jumped upon me at the time I fell down, my cutlass was in my hand. The prisoner Connolly took it out of my hand. I put up my hand to save myself, and Conolly struck at me with the cutlass; he cut my fore-finger of my right-hand as I laid down almost off. I crawled under a cart, and got away. I heard Shields call out for assistance, I went to him; I could not see any body. He was smothered in mud; I knew his voice well. I can only speak to Conolly.

EDWARE SPITTER. I am a patrole of the parish of St. Georges. On the 29th of September I was in

Old Gravel-lane; I heard the spring of the rattles, I went to assist my brother patrols and the watchmen. I saw a party in King street, and the watchmen with Hannaway in their charge. I went with King the watch with Hannaway to the watch-house, by that means I was out of the affray.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am beadle of the parish of St. George's. Barnard Shields was brought to the watch-house; where I was about half past twelve o'clock, his head was cut, he was in a very bad state. He appeared to have received a great deal of injury. He lived from Thursday until Monday; he died on the 3d of October, Mr. Watt attended him. I removed him from the watch-house to the hospital.

CHARLES WATT . I am a surgeon. I attended Barnard Shields . I was called in about twelve o'clock at night, the night he received the injury. He had received six blows on his head, three of which were very considerable. They were inflicted with a blunt instrument, one wound on the right temple, and one on the left. One on the right side the crown, and the other on the left. He lived until Monday twelve o'clock, that is four days. I opened the head with my brother surgeons; we removed the upper part of the skull, and, after removing, the first covering of the brain in the membrane of the brain, we found a quantity of serum.

Q. Was that an indication of an injury of the brain? - A. No doubt, Sir; this was underneath where one of the blows were; the blows on the right side of the head, that was sufficient to account for his death, with the other appearances we saw. I have no doubt he died in consequence of the injuries he received.

Mr. Alley. My Lord with respect to the prisoner Hannaway, he cannot in law be responsible for the sudden act of others in which he took no part; this case cannot be murder, at the most only manslaughter.

COURT, Gentlemen of the jury, upon this evidence you cannot convict Hannaway; you will acquit Hannaway, and then you will consider that of the other prisoners.

HANNAWAY NOT GUILTY .

JURY.

Connelly. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Sullivan. The same.

Geary. The same.

MARTIN KING . Q, Do you keep the public house known by the name of the Ship and Platebone, near Gravel-lane? - A, Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the night of the 20th of September last? - A. Yes. Jarvis the watchman came into my house, a quarter past eleven at night. He seemed to be rather intoxicated. When he came into the house he and another man had a quartern of gin; he had no beer at all.

Q. Was there a person of the name of Hannaway there? - A. Yes, he was standing close to the bar. I was coming out of the bar with a pot of beer in my hand; he put his head to my shoulder, and shoved me away in jest; he did me no injury. I never had an angry word with him in my life; he lodged with me. I took no notice of his shoving me away. I went into the parlour with the beer, and returned into my bar again. I then saw Jaarvis the watchman and Hannaway have hold of each other. I cannot say who laid hold of the other first. I saw Hannaway trip the watchman up; immediately the watchman went out, and sprang his rattle, and three men came in, and took Hannaway; that is all I saw.

CONNOLLY GUILTY. aged 29.

SULLIVAN GUILTY, aged 22.

LEARY GUILTY, aged 24.

Of manslaughter, not of the murder .

Confined one year , and fined 10 l.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre

Reference Number: t18141026-45

912. JOHN STRONG was indicted for the wilful murder of Jane Strong his wife .

JOHN STRONG , JUNIOR. - Q. How old are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. You are the son of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Your father and your mother lived together, did they? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the day on which your mother died? - Yes, it was last Michaelmas-day; it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening. My father came down stairs, and asked my mother to account for the money. I do not know what money; she said she would not give any account. Then she went to the window.

Q. Was your father sober at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Was your mother sober? - A. No; she was not.

Q. Before she run away to the window, had your father said any thing else to her? - A. No.

Q. What did she run to the window for - A. I don't know. My father cried, and then went and shut down the window; that was before she jumped out. She did not attempt to get out then? she threw up the window, and stood by it; my father went and shut it down. A few minutes afterwards, a Gentleman came, Mr. Allcroft; then my father went out out of the room with Mr. Holcroft; my mother staid in the room. My father came back when Mr. Allcroft was gone. My mother told him to take pen and ink and she would render an account. Then she gave account of all the money but twelve shillings; then she hesitated a little, and went and threw it up. She went to jump out; my father went to lay hold of her; she fell hackwards out of the window into the street; she cut her head by falling backwards into the street. She bled; she got up and knocked at the door. My sister opened the door, and let nor in. I went to meet her; then she had her hand to her head, and said, O! my head! The tea-pot laid on the side-board; she threw it at my father. I don't know whether it hit him or not; but the water went over him. He shook it off; he was going to strike her, but he did not. I pulled him by his coat; he then tore his hair, and cryed, and said, what a woman is this? My God, children, what shall I do with her? He went to lift her up, he could not; she was reeling on the floor. When she threw the tea-pot at him, she then tumbled down by the sideboard, and hurt her eye. When she fell down on the floor; she kept rolling about, and tearing her clothes off. When My father tried to lift her up, she would not let him, and continued rolling about. She tore her pockets off; I picked them up. I examined the pockets for money; I found a one pound note and some silver. I gave it to my father. My mother was crying; then

my mother did not speak any more. She was lying all along dead on the ground; my father went and fetched the doctors. He came and said my mother was dead, and went away. I did not see my father commit any one act of violence upon my mother.

CHARLES STRONG and ALEXANDER STRONG 'S evidence was the same.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18141026-46

913. JOHN CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , a shirt, value 5 s. and two waistcoats, value 15 s. the property of James Dudley .

JAMHS DUDLEY. I live at No. 105 in the Minories . I am a slopseller . On the 15th of October I lost a shirt and two waistcoats, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon. They were inside of the door when I last saw them. I saw the prisoner take them. I immediately went and took the prisoner by he collar, and took the shirt and waistcoat from under his jacket. I am sure they were my property. The prisoner said he had made a mistake. he meant to pay for them. I delivered the things to Forrester; I am sure they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to ask the price. I went to the very door.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined one month , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-47

914. JOSEPH GILL , alias STILES , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , a box, value 2 s. the property of John Willan . And other Counts, for like offence, only stating the property to belong to different persons.

CHARLES JAMES FOX. I was guard of the Gloucester mail, on the 24th of December, the Gloucester mail arrived at the Post office, between six and seven o'clock, it was one of these foggy mornings; all our passengers left us at the Post office; we there put the luggage in the boot, into the inside of the coach, to get at the passengers luggage. The coachman drove on along Cornhill; I walked down Cheapside after the coach, to the top of St Martin le-grand; there was a stoppage in St Martin le-grand at the narrow part; I returned back to the coachman, to tell him there was a stoppage there, I saw a person go, and open the coach door, and take a box out, about a foot wide, and about a foot and a half long, I directly seized the prisoner by the neck; he had hold of the box in his left arm; we had a struggle together, and fell down; both our hats came off. The prisoner got up, and, ran; I got as quick as I could, but having boots on, and my great coat, I could not run so quick as he could. I followed him down St. Paul's Churchyard; at St. Paul's Church-yard one Seymour got hold of him, and when I came up I was knocked down dead as a bullock. I cannot tell by whom. When I recovered myself. I found that the person that Seymour had hold of was gone away. He had had left his hat behind him.

THOMAS SEYMOUR . I am a bricklayer. On the 24th of December I was in St. Paul's Church-yard; was returning at St. Paul's Church-yard into Cheapside about a quarter before seven in the morning. I heard the rattle spring, and the guard cried stop thief! Instantly the prisoner came up, and the guard pursuing him. He was threatening vengeance. The prisoner is the man. He held his fist up at me, saying, Da - n you. I laid hold of him, we both fell down together; he overcame me. I got up, and soon was down again. I am positive the prisoner is the man. The guard came to my assistance; he saw him kicking me in the groin. I believe the guard cut him over his nose, by the blood running so furiously down his face. When I was down, and the prisoner was kicking me in the groin, a tall man came up and struck Fox over the head. One of the prisoner's companions knocked the guard down; I said, you have struck the wrong man, at that time supposing he was an officer. A tall man, or a man with a crape over his face, knocked Fox down. I still kept my hold of the prisoner, and before I could take up my hat a bludgeon hit me over the head, and I was knocked down, the prisoner got away. I saw the prisoner again the day he was brought to Bow-street. I knew him again directly.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . I am an officer. I know the prisoner perfectly well by sight. About three weeks afterwards I saw the prisoner in company with thieves; before that I had him in custody. I saw him at the White Horse, in Old-street-square. After some coarse language, the prisoner asked me if there was a screw loose? I said there was. I will get the guard to came to see if he can point you out. He said I should appoint my own hour, and he would come. The prisoner did not come. I saw the prisoner next in Piccadilly, at the time when the balloom went off. He was in the company of three or four thieves; he looked round and saw me; he made his escape under the coaches. The next time I sew him was on a Sunday evening, at the Shepherd and Shepherdess, in the City road. Harrison was with me at the time, and when he came into the room I took him there.

ROBERT WHITE . I am the coachman of the Glasgow Mail. The box was taken out of the coach, and after the struggle between the guard and a man, it was given to me. I took it to the Inn, and delivered it to Mr. Willian's bookkeeper. I believe the box was worth a shilling; it was in my way-bill. I made no observation on the box. When the box was given back to me, I took it to the Inn. I had not a box too many, nor a box more than was in my waybill.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-48

915. JOHN MANNING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , seven bottles, value 1 s. 6 d. one point of spirits of wine, value 3 s. four ounces weight of soap, value 6 d. two ounces of salt, value 1 d. eight ounces of blue, value 4 d. and two ounces of opodeldock, value 1 s. the property of Edward Harvey , Robert Baron , William Langton , and Thomas Beckwith .

THOMAS BECKWITH . My partners names are

Edward Harvey , Robert Baron , and William Layton , we are chemists and druggists , Giltspur-street . The prisoner was one of our porter s; he lived with us eighteen or twenty months, he had twenty shillings a week. On the 17th of September, I set a watch upon him. I stopped the prisoner at eight o'clock, Drinkwater was placed in the passage, through which the prisoner must pass. On leaving the counting-house, I stopped the prisoner; I told him I wanted to speak with him; he immediately pulled out of his breeches a bottle of spirits of wine. Drinkwater, the officer, then came, and searched him, and found some Castile soap, Epsom salts, and pepper upon him; they are the articles that we deal in. The prisoner then said, he was sorry for what he had done. We then searched his lodgings, in a court in Cow-lane; we found two or three bottles, one containing spirits of wine.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner; I found the soap in his breeches; the salts in his hat. I searched his lodgings. What was found in his lodgings are in the handkerchief; they must have been taken some day before.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-49

916. JACOB ISAACS was indicted for that he, on the 30th of June , feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a certain forged bank note, for the payment of 500 l. he knowning it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-50

917. JACOB ISAACS was indicted for feloniously forging, uttering, and disposing of, a 500 l. bank note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-51

918. JACOB ISAACS was again indicted, for that he, feloniously had in his custody, a certain bank note, without lawful authority from the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, containing divers words, apparrently to resemble a Bank note .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-52

919. ELIZABETH LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , four silver table-spoons, value 2 l. four silver tea-spoons, value 1 l. three table cloths, value 1 l. the property of Frances Maria Clark , widow .

FRANCES MARIA CLARK . I am a widow; my house is No. 12, Windsor-terrace, City-road . The prisoner came into my service on the 16th of September. I had no other servant in the house. I had seven lodgers and boarders in the house. At the end of the week, I found she was not likely to suit me; I gave her a months warning, in case either of us was suited before the month was up, we would part. On the 28th, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I went up stairs; I found she had gone away; she went away saying, she would go and get some pump water. She never returned. I examined the tea-spoons; I found four of them were gone. I had seen them that evening at tea, at eight o'clock. They were silver. I gave a pound for five of them; they are worth eight shillings. I missed four silver tablespoons after that; they are worth a pound. I missed four table cloths; they are worth a pound. I went into the parlour to look for the salt-spoons; they were also missing; they were worth four shillings. I have never seen any of the things since. On the Saturday following, I met the prisoner in Artillery-place, she went into a public-house with a man. I had her taken up; the prisoner abused me.

MARY CUMMINGHAM. I was a servant to Mrs. Clark; she appointed me to come that night, on the 28th, I saw the silver tea-spoons; there were five silver tea-spoons went up, and four came down.

Q. What time did the prisoner leave the house - A. Between nine and ten; she said, she was going for water; she never returned. I saw the prisoner wipe the four tea-spoons, and place them on the dresser. What became of them after, I don't know. I have never seen them since. I know nothing of the tablecloth, or table-spoons.

Q. Did the prisoner leave her clothes behind her - A. No; she lert an empty box.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the girl when she brought the things down I was going for some pump water; she said, she had come to live there; I told her to call her mistress; she would not. I went away as my mistress had brought this servant into the house, and had undermined me; I had no clothes; I had made away with them through sickness. I am innocent of this charge.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-53

920. ELIZABETH LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , three brooches, value 50 s. the property of Raymond Colaco , in the dwelling-house of Frances Maria Clark , widow.

RAYMOND COLACO , was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-54

922. THOMAS ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the 20th of September , upon Rees Harris , a subject of our Lord the King, that he feloniously did cut and stab the said

Rees Harris , in his left eye, and upon his right hand with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating the intent to be to dissable him.

AND THIRD COUNT, to do him some bodily harm.

REES HARRIS . I am a clergyman and schoolmaster . I reside on Chelsea Common. On the 20th of September I had been at Hoxton, to collect rents of two little cottages that were paid weekly, I left Hoxton about 10 o'clock, or a little after. As I was coming down Haberdashers' Walk, coming from Hoxton . At the left-hand lamp post going into Haberdasher's Walk , the prisoner started at me, at least a similar person; a person started upon me, and knocked me down. The person that did it articulated these words;

'I have been waiting for you for some time, and now I will do for you.' I received several successive blows while on the ground. I felt something like an incision in my eye; I had two incisions in my eye. I did not see the instrument; I saw him lift up his hand when these blows were given me; He repeated the words,

'I have been waiting for you, and now I will do for you.' I then felt something had struck my, eye, and then I growned dismally; and could not be heard. I then roused myself from the ground, and lifted up my hand to protect myself from further violence; I put my hand across my head. I received an inscission in my hand while I was protecting my head. I then articulated the word murder as well as I could; I was heard by some neighbours in the place, and a watchman came to my rescue, who is my evidence; the watchman picked me up, and gave me to a gentleman, who is here; he brought me alight. I was delivered to this gentleman, and taken to a public-house cut and maimed. I described the person of the prisoner; he being in a blue jacket, and white buttons on his sleeves; his feature I could not observe. I was knocked down like a bullock, twice; he laughed, and sprang at me. I was taken to a public-house across Haberdashers'-street, directly opposite to the lamp, and I was sent in a coach to Bartholomew's Hospital; I remained in the Hospital near three weeks.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner since - A. Never until this time.

Q. When you first saw the prisoner, had you any recollection of him - A. I never had seen him in my life before that time.

Q. Do you know what he was - A. At Worship-street I understood he was a seamen, on board the Gladiator . I could not attend the examination; the surgeon sent a certificate that I was unable to attend the examination; by these inscissions I have nearly lost the sight of this eye, and it has almost injured my faculties.

THOMAS PRIEST . I am a watchman in Shoreditch parish. On the 20th of September, I heard the cry of murder; I went up to the prosecutor immediately; I saw Mr. Harris laying down bleeding. I saw the prisoner at a small distance, and as soon as I had lifted up Mr. Harris, the prisoner was pointed out to me by the people that were about. The prisoner was daring any body to come near him. I was confused at the time; I cannot tell the expressions he used at that time exactly. Some of the people said, watchman, that is the man, take him. I got hold of the prisoner in the most cautious manner I could, and one or two young fellows assisted me in going to the watchhouse.

Q. Had he any weapon - A. None that I discovered I could not see any weapon; I got him to the watch-house, and I told the night constable of it he said he was not in charge. I told him I left the man bledding; he was not able to come. The prisoner said, if any man came that he had been scuffling with, he would do for them with the poker, or something. The constable told him if he was not quiet, he would lock him up in the cage; he still persisted, and the constable, or house man, sent for another constable; during this time the prisoner stood by the fire place; the constable said here is a knife, whose knife is this; the prisoner said, that is my knife. This is the knife, it was given me by the Magistrate; he desired me to produce it; I cannot exactly say this is the exact knife, it was a knife of this size. The constable said. if it was his knife he might take it; he was silly enough to give him the knife. When he had got the knife he became more outrageous, and the other constable that arrived put him into the cage; he resisted being put into the cage. After being in the cage he pulled a knife out, and rubbed it, and said if the prosecutor came he would do for him with that or something else. This knife was delivered to me by the magistrate. The prisoner said, if he had injured the man, he was very sorry for it, he would go down on his knees, and ask his pardon, or make him any recompence. I went from there to the public-house to see the prosecutor and the constable went with me for the charge. Mr. Duncombe desired to see the prisoner; he came, asked the prisoner, now he came to injure the man, he was almost dead; the prisoner said he was very sorry, and he was willing to go down on his knees, and ask him pardon. I think the prisoner was in a state of intoxication.

ROBERT DUNCOMBE . I live in Haberdasher-Place, Hoxton; I am an insurance broker; I live almost opposite where this transaction happened. On the 20th of September, I heard the cry of murder repeated twice; I went out in consequence of hearing it; when I first opened the door it was extremely dark; I returned and took a candle in my hand; I saw Mr. Harris laying on the ground, he was calling for help. The prisoner I think was within two or three yards of him; I think it was the prisoner; there was no other person near him when I first went out.

Q. Did that person say any thing - A. I took a stick in one hand, and a candle in the other; I heard a voice say take care of that fellow with the stick; I was then chiefly occupied in rendering what assistance I could to Mr, Harris; a young man came up and immediately gave charge of the prisoner. The first time that I opened the door, I heard a voice say, we have found the devil, let us kill him. I then accompained Mr. Harris to the nearest public house,

and went for a doctor, an assistant of Mr. Weston's in Shoreditch came; he was afterwards taken to the hospital, and attended by the Hospital surgeon.

Q. Did you see the prisoner again while he was at the watchhouse - A. I did; I went to the place where he was confined; I asked him how he could think of injuring Mr. Harris in such a manner; he said, if he had hurt him, he was sorry for it, and asked to be let out of his confinement; he said he would go down upon his knees and, ask the gentleman's pardon, if they would let him out. I then retired from the watchhouse, and went to the public house where Mr. Harris was; in a little time a surgeon come; he wanted to bleed him; Mr. Harris was disinclined to be let blood.

Q. What reason have you to think the prisoner was the person that injured Mr. Harris - A. Because he was the only person on the spot; I had a light in my hand. I did not observe his features I cannot indentify the person. He was given in charge by a young man, and taken to the watchhouse. I noticed his sailors dress generally; that is all I can speak of my own knowledge. The prisoner I think was very far from being sober that night.

ISAAC TURTLE . I am resident surgeon at Bartholemew's Hospital. I was there on the 20th of September last, I know the person of Rees Harris ; he was brought to the hospital on the night of that day, I think about twelve o'clock; I examined the state he was in; he had three wounds, two on the left eye, and one on the back of the right wrist; two wounds on the lower eye-lid on the same eye-lid, and one on the back part of the right wrist. I concluded it was done by a sharp instrument; there being no laceration or cotusions it appeared to be an unscissed wound on the back of the wrist; it extended through one of the integuments, and divided that one at the right hand.

Q. What was the state of the wounds under the eye-led - A. They bore the state of lacerated wounds.

Q. There were no other wounds about him which appeared to you to be cut - A. None. I cannot say positively it was done by a sharp instrument; it bore the appearance of it; it was a simple unscissed wound.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not the least malice against the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. The man I never saw before until I saw him at Worship-street office.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him the character of a quiet humane man.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-55

923. WILLIAM BARNETT was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Hall , in the King's highway, on the 21st of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a pocket-book, value 6 d. a pencil-case, value 6 d. three half-guineas, two seven-shilling pieces, and a ten-pound bank note , his property.

JOHN HALL . I am a publican ; I keep the Castle , at Great Ealing. I was in Town on the 21st of September, I went through Crown-street, Finsbury-square , about half past eight in the evening; by the light of the lamps and the light of a shop gave me sufficient light to see the prisoner's person. I met the prisoner; he came and run right up against me. I never saw him before with my eyes, although he told me he was an old acquaintance, I looked very hard at him, to see if I had any knowledge of him at all; in the mean time, some one pushed me up to him, and at the very moment I felt a rush at my side pocket. I clapped my elbow against my pocket, to give my pocket book protection. I found it was gone; he did it as sharp as he could, and took the pocket book out. Upon this I was very much alarmed for a moment; I saw the prisoner walking off with the pocket book in his hand; the prisoner walked quietly off; I was so alarmed for a moment or two I did not cry out. At last I cried out, Stop thief! The prisoner was pursued and brought back to me. They asked me whether he was the man, when they brought him back; I called out that he is the man, hold him. The prisoner went into some ruins; I saw him brought out of the ruins; as soon as he came out of the ruins I saw him.

Q. Are you sure the man who went into the ruins took your pocket-book away - A. I have not a doubt of it. I had my pocket-book brought back to me again; that was the pocket-book that the prisoner had taken away.

Q. Look round at the prisoner, and see whether you have any doubt that he is the man - A. He is the very man, as he called me an old acquaintance, I thought I had a right to look at him.

Q. When you say that he walked quietly, was that first - A. Yes; when I cried out, Stop thief, he mended his pace briskly.

CHALLES HEARN. I was in Crown-street on the night that this happened, about eight o'clock.

Q. (to Mr. Hall). You say somebody pushed you behind? - A. Yes; there were five or six of them; I was pushed by one and pulled by another. I have no recollection of the party except of the prisoner, one of them said, Damn your old eyes, cannot you tell what is the matter?

CHARLES HERN . I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner running towards me, just making his escape from the persons who were in pursuit of him. I stopped him and searched him, and delivered him into the officer's' hands. The prisoner said, for God's sake let me go; some persons came up; he wished me to deliver him into their hands. I threw the prisoner down; by way of detaining him. One of the party struck me; I fell upon the prisoner; I delivered the prisoner to the officer Bacon.

JOHN HANSON . I was in Crown-street, Finsbury square, on this night. I heard the cry of stop thief in my master's shop. I went to give assistance the prisoner was then in custody. I took a light it look for the property. I found the pocket-book to the ruins, where the prisoner had been. I then gave it to Mr. Illman to keep, not knowing the prosecutor.

ALEXANDER ILLMAN. I received the pocket-book of Hanson. I have had it ever since; this is the pocket-book, it never has been out of my possession. When the prisoner was brought into my house, I

asked him where he lived? he said he should answer that to my betters.

Prosecutor. This is my pocket-book; it contains now the property mentioned in the indictment. I am certain lit s my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through Christopher's alley; I heard the cry of stop thief. A gentleman collared me immediately; he said I was the thief. The prosecutor swore I took his pocket-book; I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18141026-56

924. LYDIA CASE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of September , ten silk handkerchiefs, value 4 l. the property of Briant Ward , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS THOMAS . I am a patrole in the parish of St. Sepulchre . On the the 22d of October, about half past five o'clock, I was patroling I saw the prisoner in St. John's street . I had a suspicion of her for several evenings past. I had seen her several evenings when I went patroling, in company with a man, and other evenings in company with the same man. She was going into different shops, waiting for an opportunity, as I suspected, to thieve something. I watched her: she went up to 126, I saw her go up; the man was walking by the side of her; she walked by the shop two or three times, looking into the shop. The man took her to the window, as I thought he was shewing her something in the shop lying on the counter. I went on the opposite side, watching them. The man he fell back to the left hand side of the door. She stepped forward and very fast, She threw herself across on the counter; I could see her bring something off the counter. I took it out of her hand the moment she came out of the the shop. She crossed to the opposite side of the way, where I was watching her. I took hold of her hand, and took the handkerchiefs out of her hand. I gave her to Mr. Newton, the constable.

Mr. NEWTON. I am a constable. The patrole delivered the prisoner and the handkerchiefs into my hands. These are the handkerchiefs.

BRIANT WARD. These are my handkerchiefs. I saw them in my house about fifteen minutes before they were produced to me as stolen by the prisoner. They cost me four pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. The man was going by; he desired me to pick up these things, they were outside of the the door. I did so.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 12.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18141026-57

925. WILLIAM GARDNER and THOMAS OSMOND were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Andrew Westerland , on the 14th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a handkerchief, value 8 s. two shirts value 19 s. a pair of shoes, value 10 s. three breast pins value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 4 s. a pocketbook, value 6 d. 16 s. in monies numbered, and a 10 l. note , his property.

ANDREW WESTERLAND. I am a seaman . I live in Fennington street. On the 14th of September I was attacked and lost my money. The Swedish consul sent me at night to work on board the ship. The next day I went to a public house to get a pot of beer before I went on board.

Q. Where is that house? - A. It is called the Folly House, Blackwall. It was six o'clock when I went down there in the evening; I was attacked by the prisoners when I came from the public house, between seven and eight The prisoners stopped me, there were three of them; one of them stepped back.

Q. Where were you when they stopped you? - A. In the middle of the street.

Q. Where was it, between Limehouse and Blackwall ? - A Yes.

Q. Did you know any of the persons that stopped you? - A. I had seen them before; they knocked me down me first. I lost my hat.

Q. When they had knocked you down, what did they next do? - A. They took my pocket book, one of them did, and my new clothes that I had in my handkerchief in my hand; my money was in my pocket book; when they had taken that they ran away; they ran away with the pocket book and the bundle. There was in the pocket book one English crown. three three shilling pieces, two shillings in silver, and the ten-pound bill that I got from the consul. It was my own property; there were three breast pins in my pocket book, two new shirts in the bundle, and in the pocket book my discharge from the ship; and in the bundle a pair of new shoes, and one pair of white cotton stockings; it was a new silk and cotton handkerchief; these are the whole of what they took from me.

Q. Could you see their faces? - A. We walked together from the public house; I saw them at the public house before I was robbed; they walked along with me from the public house until we came to the canal; they there took my things, and ran away, after they had knocked me down. I saw them in the public house; there was a light in the room, I observed their persons so as to know them again.

Q. Are you sure the persons who knocked you down and robbed you were the persons that were with you in the public house? - A. Yes, I am sure that the two prisoners are two of the three men who robbed me.

Q. Have you seen any of your things since? - A, Yes, the ten pound bill, Mr. Forrester has got it.

WILLIAM MURRAY . I am a navy agent; I live in Church Row, Aldgate.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes; they called on me the 14th of September, about nine o'clock in the morning. The prisoner Gardner tendered me a ten pound note, and asked me to change it for him, in the presence of one another. Looking at the note, I saw it was the Consul's handwriting. I asked Gardner how he came by it? he said he got it for his wages. I asked him what ship he was on board of? he said he forgot the name. I asked him the Captain's name? he also had forgot that. I told him then to put his name on the back of the bill, and to call in an hour, I would give him an answer. He indorsed the bill in the name of Westerland. They then went away. I immediately inclosed the bill in a letter to Mr. Tottel, the Consul:

the bill was returned back, and a letter from Mr. Tottel, saying it was stolen from a sailor. I am certain it is the same bill returned back with Gardner's indorsement. There is now the indorsement of Gardner upon it. Gardner called; I told him to stop a few minutes. I sent for the parish officers, and had him apprehended, and the other also; they both came together. Not being able to walk, I gave the bill to Forrester, the officer, to shew the Lord Mayor, I never had the bill since,

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer of Aldgate. The place described by the prosecutor where the robbery was commited, is in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stepney, in the county of Middlesex. Mr. Murray gave me charge of the two prisoners. This is the bill that Mr. Murray gave me. It has been in my custody ever since. It is in the same state now as it was then. On searching Gardner, I found a paper that was in the pocket book where this note was.

Q. You cannot tell that the note was taken out of the pocket book? - A. No, only what the prosecutor said.

Q. (to Westerland.) Look at that note; do you know it again? - A. Yes, I do; it is payable at Hell Bank in Sweden.

Q. Is there any thing upon it by which you know it? - A. I know my name is upon it. This is the same note that was in my pocket book.

(the note read.)

WESTERLAND. This paper was in the pocket book, Forrester found it on the prisoner.

WILLIAM HENNERSLEY. I am an officer. On the 20th of September. I was sent for to Mr. Murray's to apprehend Osmond. I found him at Mr. Murray's home; I took him into custody. I asked Osmond going along to the Compter, if he knew any thing of the robbery? he denied it. The next day he said, he would tell me all he knew of the robbery. I neither promised him any favour, or threatened him; he said he had been drinking with the prosecutor, in company with Gardner; that Gardner had persuaded him to go and rob the prosecutor; he said he had plenty of money about him. Osmond said he would not go; Gardner said he had better come along, that he should have part: through his persuasions Osmond went with him. I asked him if he had seen any thing of a bill; he said they all run away when they had robbed him; he said he saw the bill in the begining of the bustle, but he never had seen any thing of it afterwards. I asked him if he had any part of the money. He told me he had. I asked him what became of the breast-pins? He said he saw Gardner give a girl of the town one or two. He did not know which it was; he said he was sorry for what he had done; that was all he said; he said he was persuaded by Gardner or else he should not have done it.

Gardner's Defence. I picked up a draft in Ratcliff Highway, on Monday morning. This man was close behind me; he said, what have you picked up? I said, I did not know; I can neither read nor write. I shewed it to a clothesman; he told me to go with it to Mr. Murray, I should have money for it.

Osmond's Defence. I saw him pick up something; I did not know what it was at the time.

GARDNER GUILTY DEATH , aged 40.

OSMOND GUILTY DEATH , aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-58

926. THOMAS HENRY STEVENS and HUGH MORRISON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Tramfield , about the hour of one in the night of the 5th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein a pipe, value 5 s. a whip, value 2 s. a yard of Irish cloth, value 2 s. a pair of stays, value 3 s. two thimbles, value 1 s. two table cloths, value 6 s. two bottles, value 2 d. a till, value 1 s. ten shillings in monies numbered, and a one pound note , his property.

THOMAS TRANFIELD . I keep the Wheatsheaf public house , Dorset-street. in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On the night of the 6th of this month, I was up last in the house. I bolted and locked the street door. I left the till in its place; the till was not locked, the key was missing. I got up the next morning some time after five, not quite daylight. I went to take down the shutters, and I discovered a wooden pannel in the window out of one side of the window. The shutter had been taken down and put up again. The pannel had been taken out by some instrument; they must have taken the shutter down, and have put it up again I am certain on the over night it was perfectly secure. They had left my bar door open; they had unbolted my bar door that goes into the street, and they went out that way, that door was fastened the over night perfectly. I found the bar in a confused state; the till was completely gone; there was a one pound note in the till the over night, and upwards of forty shillings in silver, and from ten to twenty shillings in halfpence; all were gone together. There were four packages of halfpence on the counter; they were left; they visible enough if there had been light enough for them to have seen them, whoever they were that had broken into the house; they had forced a lock exactly underneath the place where these halfpence were. They had not got that till open; the key of the other till was in that till, but they did not get that till open.

Q. Had you a German pipe there? - A. Yes; I had used it the over night; I missed that, and I had got some cordial bottles; four of them were disturbed and two were taken away. They were common quart bottles; one with Noyeau, and the other with lovage, with gilt labels; they had left a pair of napkeen breeches behind them. They took some articles of linen, and they took a penknife out of my desk. I lost a whip, that hung over the door, and I missed a table cloth and a bank note. I am certain it was in the till.

Q. Did you know the prisoners - A. Yes; Morrison was in the habit of using the house before I came into it, and often; I never saw Stevens in the house.

JOSEPH BECKITT . I belong to the house of correction. I went with Adkins to Stevens's house; I found this phosphorus in Stevens's waistcoat pocket, a crib, and a dark lantern. I found upon the ledge, outside of the window: this thimble was found on the table in the room.

HENRY ADKINS . I am an officer. On the 12th I first received the information, and on the 12th, I,

in company with Beckitt, apprehended Stevens. I went to No. 6. Mitchell-street. Lissen Green; I saw Stevens. I told him I came to apprehend him on suspicion of robbing the wheatsheaf public house. I asked him for the duplicate of a german pipe, that he had pledged for two shillings; he said, he had not; he did not know what I meaned; I then proceded to search the room; in a box in the room. I found two table cloths; in the bed I found two old shirts. He said, they were his shirts. I asked whose box it was; Amelia Buckley , was with him. She said, it was her box. In that box, I found a pocket-book. I asked him if he knew Morrison, or William the Baker. After taking Stevens to the office, I went with Beckitt, and apprehended Morrison at the Duke Wellington public house, Crawford Street, I asked him what his name was; he said, William Johnson . I asked him if he knew Henry Stevens ; he said, he did. I told him, I took him for the robbery of the Wheatsheaf public-house. On taking him to the watchhouse, he said. he did not care what became of him, his name was not Johnson, but Hugh Morrison .

JAMES GODDARD . I am a journeyman to Mr. Creswell, 38, Whitechapel-road. On the 7th of October, a German pipe was pledged with me, by Hugh Morrison ; another man was with him, of the heigth and size of Stevens. I am not sure it was Stevens, but I am sure of Morrison.

GEORGE LANE . I am a pawnbroker, 89, Edgewere-road. I produce two table-cloths, pledged on the 10th of October; they were brought by the daughter of a creditable woman, in our neighbourhood, in the name of Allen.

BETTEY ALLEN. Q. Did you take some tableclothes to pawn at Mr. Lane's - A. I did. I had them of Amelia Buckley .

AMELIA BUCKLEY . I live at No. 6, Mitchel-street, Lisson Green. I know Stevens; he was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to me, he did not live with me constant. The Wheatsheaf public-house was broken open last Thursday night three weeks; that was the night he came to me. I had seen both the prisoners that day, between five and six o'clock; I saw the two prisoners in Crown-street, Soho, at an old iron shop; I went there that evening; between five and six, and while I was there Stevens and Morrison came in, and we remained there until between nine and ten o'clock; then we all went home to Mitchell-street, to my place, and they staid there until eleven o'clock; it was a very wet night, it rained very hard. Morrison said, come Stevens let us go, they cannot lock the till, I have got the key; he put his hand into his pocket, and took a key out. They both left my place then, and between one and two Stevens came in, he knocked two or three times at the door, who let him in, I don't know. He brought a bottle with him; he said, here Amelia, here is a bottle, where shall I put it; it is marked Noyeau on it; he pulled out two shirts. I told him to put the bottles on the table; a handkerchief with five shillingsworth of loose halfpence he put on the bed, a silver thimble, two old shirts, two table clothes, a German pipe, and a pen-knife, that is all I found when I got up in the morning. The next morning, the two prisoners came, and took breakfast with me. We all three went to Whitechapel. They took the German pipe with them. I left them between four and five in the afternoon, at the Red Lion public-house. I did not see them again until the next day. I gave these table-cloths to Bettey Allen to pledge for me. These table-cloths were brought into the house by Stevens; they were very dirty; I washed them.

Q. Do you recollect the officer coming a few days afterwards - A. Yes. The things that the officer took were the things that were brought in by Stevens and Morrison. This thimble was one of them; I had it by me a few days. When Morrison and and Stevens were together, I said, this thimble fits me. They told me I might have it. That is the way I became possessed of it. I know the table cloths; they were tied up in my pocket-handkerchief, that I sent them in.

Q. Did you ever see the house that was broken open - A. Yes. On the Saturday following, I went down with Morrison; Morrison said, he was going to Stevens's father. I waited at a public-house until he came out, and then me and Morrison went home together; in our way back, we went by this house; he said, this is the house that me and Stevens got into; I don't know the street, or the sign; it was almost dark. He asked me to drink there; I said, no, I rather would not have any thing to drink there,

Q. to Prosecutor. The till that you lost was not locked, was it - A. No; the key was lost.

Q. Look at that German pipe, is that yours - A. It is; I gave half a guinea for the head before it was mounted, the mounting cost me two shillings. I lost this pipe. I had been using it the over night; it is worth thirteen shillings. The pen-knife sixpence; the wooden till a shilling. I lost above ten shillingsworth of halfpence, besides forty shillings in silver.

JANE TRANFIELD . I am the wife of the prosecutor. These shirts I was upon that very night, cutting of the wristbands; these are the very same wristbands I cut out; the shirts are worth two shillings; a yard of Irish cloth is mine, worth two shillings, and this iron-holder I bought that very same day, it is worth twopence. The stays are mine; I had unpicked them, worth sixpence; this handkerchief, worth sixpence; the two table cloths they were there that night; they are worth two shillings, and the thimble is mine, it is worth one shilling; I lost it that night.

Stevens's Defence. On Saturday morning I met Morrison in the New-road, as I was going into Edgewere-road; he asked me if I wanted to buy any shirts; I said, no, I had got no money. He asked me if I was going to Mitchell-street; I said, yes; I had not been there for two or three months before. He came to Amelia, and brought these things; he asked me twelve shillings for them. I bought them, and gave them to Amelia. I left him with Amelia, as he had been there before. On Thursday I was not at all with Amelia, and when I have been with Amelia, Richardson has come there; I have always got out of bed when he came; he has come there with property.

Q. to Amelia Buckley . Have you lived with Richardson - A. I have.

Q. He was a notorious house-breaker, was not he - A. He was.

Morrison's Defence. I sold the things to Stevens on the Saturday morning. I found them by the side of Dorset-mews.

STEVENS, GUILTY , aged 17.

MORRISON, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richards .

Reference Number: t18141026-59

927. CATHERINE HENRICKS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Fitzgerald , about the hour of twelve at noon, on the 6th of October , and stealing therein, a gown, value 5 s. his property.

SUSANNAH FITZGERALD . I am a married woman, my husband's name is Daniel Fitzgerald; he rents the whole house, No. 9, Puckeridge-street , and lets it out in lodgings . I keep a chandler's shop. The door is generally open. I lost my gown on a Thursday, about a fortnight ago. I kept my gown in the back room, the next room to the prisoner's room. I was not at home at the time it was taken. I saw my gown at Bow-street, I knew it to be mine, and I had seen the gown in my room an hour before I missed it.

GEORGE CRESWELL . I am a bricklayer. I was at work at the top of the house. The prisoner came into the yard; I saw her raise the sash up, and take the gown out of the window. I told M'Donald of it.

DANIEL M'DONALD. From the information of Creswell, I followed the prisoner, and stopped her at the top of the street, and gave her into the charge of Mr. Roberts, the watchhouse-keeper.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am the watchhouse-keeper of St. Giles's. The prisoner was delivered to me. I saw her searched by a woman: the gown was found in her pocket. Mrs. Fitzgerald saw the gown, and claimed it. This was on the 6th of October. This is the gown.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown. The prisoner had lodged in my house a week.

Prisoner's Defence. I pray for the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 1 month , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-60

928. JAMES GERMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Sowerby , about the hour of ten in the night, of the 12th of October , and stealing therein, nine ear-rings, value 11 s. his property.

ROBERT WILD . I am a servant to Thomas Sowerby , pawnbroker , No. 4, Cannon-street road, St. George's, Middlesex . Mr. Sowerby does not live there.

Q. Did you tell the clerk of the indictments, that Mr. Sowerby did live there - A. Yes. The female servants and the apprentice lives there. Mr. Sowerby resides in Chiswell-street, Finsbury-square.

Q. Was there any ear-rings taken from this shop Of my own knowledge, I don't know. I attend for Mr. Sowerby; his bad state of health will not permit him to attend.

MATTHEW MOSS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Sowerby. On the morning of the 13th of October, I discovered that the bottom part of a pane of glass had been shoved in; I do not know what time it had been done; it could not have been done a day. I knew there were ear-rings placed directly opposite where the whole was made, within an inch of the bottom part of the glass, about dinner time, on the 12th, there were ear-rings there; nine of the earrings were missing, one ring was taken from a card, and one left. I saw the ear-rings the next morning at the watchhouse; I knew them to be my master's property. The prisoner was in custody at the time I saw him.

ABRAHAM CROFT . I am a hair-dresser. On the evening of the 12th, I was standing at my own door; I saw two lads at a watchmaker's window, in the street I live in; the prisoner was one of them. I heard some glass drop from the watchmaker's window; immediately the prisoner's companion ran away. The prisoner went to two windows further on, looking in at Mr. Ellis' window, a furrier. The patrole came up to me; I told him of the prisoner; he laid hold of the prisoner, and took him to the watchhouse. The other boy made his escape.

GEORGE HENLEY. I am the patrole. From the information of Croft, I laid hold of the prisoner; I asked him what he was doing of; he said, he was going home. I felt in his breeches pocket, and found he had this wire in it. I took him to the watch-house, and searched him; I found these nine earrings in his fob-pocket. These ear-rings were claimed on the 13th by Moss, Mr. Sowerby's apprentice, as his master's property. These are the earrings, and this is the wire, The prisoner attempted to threw the wire away going to the watchhouse; I prevented him.

Q. to Moss. Look at the ear-rings - A. They are all Mr. Sowerby's property. This ear-ring tallys with the one I have got. The value of the nine earrings are eleven shillings.

GUILTY, aged 12,

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-61

929. ALEXANDER WILSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Welch , about the hour of twelve in the night, on the 11th of October , and burglariously stealing therein, two pair of boots value 50 s. a pair of boot legs value 13 s. an umbrella, value 7 s. two pieces of sheep skin, value 4 d. two pieces of leather, value 2 d. a petticoat, value 1 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a pair of sheets, value, 15 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a curtain, value 6 d. six towels, value 4 s. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a night-cap, value 6 d. a canvas bag, value 2 d. a button-hook, value 6 d. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. a shaving box, value 2 s. and one shilling, and four pence, in monies numbered , the property of George Welch .

GEORGE WELCH . I live at No. 5, Wilson Street Grays Inn-Lane, in the parish of St. Pancras ; I rent the whole house. My house was broken open on the 11th of October; I went to bed about a quarter before twelve; I was the last up in the house. When I went to bed the house was secured; I went into the kitchen the last thing, I have only my wife myself, and lodgers, in the house. I am sure all my lodgers were in the house when I went to bed. The next morning, I got up at half past seven; I was the first up in the house that came down stairs; as I went into the kitchen I saw the kitchen window wide open. I fastened it myself the night before, the last thing; that is the way the thieves got in. They got in at the kitchen window; there is an area at the kitchen window; they had put some instrument between the two sashes, and so opened the window; the window was not broken. I turned my head round, I missed my two pair of boots. I am a shoemaker; I missed my umbrella; a bag of dirty linen was hanging behind the door; they had removed them from their situation. The boots and the bag of linen that had been hanging behind the door were taken away; two shifts, two pillow-cases, a shirt, a pair of sheets, a pair of stockings, a curtain, six towels two napkins, a handkerchief, a night-cap, a canvas bag, a pair of trowsers, and a shaving-box; in one of my waistcoat pockets there were sixteen pennyworth of halfpence, these were all taken away. I saw some of my things the next day in the afternoon, about four o'clock, at Hatton Garden office. I knew them to be my property that had been stolen the night before. I arose about half after seven, it had been day-light then I suppose about an hour.

Q. Did you find any marks in your kitchen of any candle having been used - A. Yes, on the frame of the window; there was a place where a candle had been stuck there, and droppings of tallow all the way down. A candle must have been burning there some time by the appearance of the wood, the wood being all scotched. I found a piece of tallow candle on the ground the next morning, it had been placed on the seat of the window, and had tumbled down underneath it.

Q. You found a piece of candle underneath the window on the floor? - A. Yes; I went to Hatton-garden office, and gave information.

ELIZABETH MARIA WELCH . I am the wife of the last witness. I went to bed before my husband. I heard nothing of the robbery until my husband came up and told me of it. I can only say the same as my husband has said. The articles are his.

SOHHIA MARY LEE . I live at 26, Field-lane. My husband buys and sells old boots and shoes. On the 12th of this month, about half after eight in the morning, the prisoner brought a bag with boots and leather in it; he threw the things out altogether, he asked me if I would purchase them. The bag contained two pair of men's boots and some leather; the boots were almost new, they had not been much worn; a pair of boot legs and a number of women's clothes, and one shirt.

A. Did you know this man before - A. No, not till then. I found amongst them napkins, towels, and stockings. When he shot these things out on the ground, he asked me if I would purchase them, I said I would call my husband down stairs. Mr. Lee came down stairs; he being an officer, took the prisoner into custody. My husband asked him how he came by these things? he said he got them at Highgate. He said he would not tell where. Mr. Lee said, you have stolen them. He then went down on his knees, and said, if he would let him go he would leave them. He was taken to the Compter and afterwards to Hatton Garden office. My husband has kept the things ever since.

Q. Did you go to the office - A. Yes; I saw Mr. Welch claim the things.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable of St. Andrew's parish. I live at 26, Field-lane. My girl called me down stairs. I found the prisoner sitting on a chair, the boots and leather were on his right hand side. I asked him what he wanted for the boots and leather? He said a guinea. I looked at him in the face; I knew him. I said you are a thief. Where did you steal these things? He said he had stolen them, and instantly went on his knees, and begged me to let him go. I said I shall do my duty, you may depend upon it. He then said he found them in a yard at Highgate. He said he should not say any more as I was determined to keep him. I kept the articles, and took him to the Compter. First of all I took him as a city prisoner, afterwards I took him before a Middlesex magistrate. I removed him from the Compter; I searched him in the thigh of his pantaloons; between his pantaloons and breeches I found this tin tobacco-box, with fresh tinder and matches, this knife was in his pantaloons pocket; the back of the knife is jagged with striking a light. In his waistcoat pocket I found this button-hook, this is claimed by Mr. Welch. In his hat I found this silk handkerchief, it is marked with G. W. the initials of Mr. Welch's name. Mr. Welch claimed the things that he shot out of the bag. I then went to Mr. Welch's house, to ascertain how it had been entered. The earth outside of the house is tlay; the inside of the wall is about six feet high, and the garden mould fresh dug. I examined the footsteps with the prisoner's shoe. I found on the prisoner a thick pair of nailed shoes. Mr. Read and I applied the shoes to to the footsteps on the clay and on the mould; the shoes corresponded with marks of the footsteps. I found no other footsteps than his. It appeared to me it had only been done by one person. I afterwards examined the window; it has a hoop spring catch; it appeared to me to have been opened by pushing one sash up, and pulling the other down, and then sliding this knife between, up it opened the catch; there is the mark of a knife of this size on the window. These things have been in my possession ever since. I produce them.

Prosecutor. I have looked at these things, they are mine; I am quite sure of it.

Q. Look at that handkerchief found in the prisoner's hat. - A. There is my initials G W. upon it. I left it on the sofa the over night, and I missed it the next morning when I came down. The boot-legs

are mine, and all the rest of the property. This button hook was in my waistcoat pocket with the halfpence, I am quite sure of that.

Prosecutrix. I have looked at the linen, I know it to be my husband's linen. Some of them have our initials on them. Some I had before I married Mr. Welch, which has the initials of my maiden name.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I am an officer. I went to the prosecutor's house. I observed a piece of candle had been stuck on the lining of the sash; it had been burning there some time; it is a wonder it had not set fire to the lining of the window. I observed the footsteps; I compared the prisoner's shoe with the footsteps in the mould, and the clay. I could only see one footstep; the prisoner's shoe tallied with the mark of his footsteps.

Prisoner's Defence. I implore your Lordship's forgiveness in taking the liberty to address you I am evidently with a heart broken down with grief; yet I feel some commisseration that every justice will be done; and if I am correct in the pale of reason, when I say, the charge admits of much doubt. It was my misfortune to pass where the robbers had done the violence. I never committed the act I am charged with. Never in my life did I commit a felonious act that actually has not been proved; this ought to have been done. Am I to suffer for the violent act of others; I expect to meet with that compassion which justice so warmly demands.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 46.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-62

930. JAMES TOPPING was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the king's highway, on the 25th of October , upon Elizabeth Petlow , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a shawl, value 18 d. her property.

ELIZABETH PETLOW . I live at No. 3, Hare-alley, Shoreditch. I take care of a nurse child . On the 25th of October, I was returning home; I was in Church-street, Bethnal Green . I had been to see a few friends home; the prisoner met me; he gave me a violent blow on the side; I am quite sure he is the person; he is a perfect stranger to me. I never saw him before he met me. He said nothing to me before he struck me a violent blow on my breast. I have been very ill ever since. I had a shawl on; it was a common printed shawl; I had it on at the time; I had nothing on but my shawl. The shawl was worth eighteen pence. I gave nine shillings and sixpence for it; I have worn it long, the colours were all worn out; it is an old one now. When he struck me, he dragged the shawl off my shoulders. When he took hold of my shawl my hand was up to my mouth, the shawl was up to my mouth in my hand. He stuck his nails into my hand before he could get it away. I called out watch, I have lost my shawl; he run a little distance, I went to run after him; he dropped my shawl, I ran and picked it up; as I picked my shawl up, I said, that is the boy that struck me, and took my shawl; the prisoner is the boy that struck me, and took my shawl; there was another boy with him, and two girls; the boy offered me sixpence not to come against him. When I called out watch the boy and the two girls left him; he went strait on, he was never out of my sight, except when I stooped down to pick up my shawl.

Q. What is the watchman's name - A. Woodcock

MARY ANN PETLOW I am sister of the prosecutrix. That night I was with her when she was robbed. We were coming along; I saw the prisoner and another lad, taller than him, with two women, we gave them the wall; The prisoner struck my sister, and took her shawl away. I am sure he is the person that struck her, and took her shawl away; he threw the shawl away, I stooped to pick the shawl up, and never lost sight of him only that moment. I am certain he is the lad, the other lad and the two girls went away at that time; they met us as we were going one way, and they the other.

JOHN WOODCOCK . I was watchman in Church-street, Bethnal Green. On the night of this transaction I heard the women hollow out watch. I went towards them; the young woman hollowed out, this man has robbed me of my shawl; she was within sight of him at the time when she called out.

Q. Had she picked up the shawl at that time - A. She had not got it in her hand; the prisoner asked me to let him go. A gentleman come up, and told me to take him to the watchhouse, and search him, he thought he was a young thief. The prisoner asked me if I thought he would do any such thing; I said I did not know. I met his companions; the prisoner was just behind them there were two young women also; they were running away from the cry of Stop thief; I searched him at the watchhouse. When I took him, he had an handkerchief, which he attempted to throw away. He had an handkerchief on his neck besides that that the officer has. He wanted to throw away a stiffner that he took out of his hat; he he took the silk handkerchief from some where behind him.

Q. Did you know his person before? - A. No.

THOMAS JACKSON. I am an headborough; the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse about half past twelve in the morning by the watchman, charged by the prosecutrix that he had struck her, and robbed her of a shawl. The watchman gave me a silk handkerchief and a stiffner that he wanted to throw away; I have kept it ever since. There is no mark on it; when she charged him with striking her, and taking the shawl, he kept crying, and said, did I think as he would do any such a thing. The shawl was delivered to me; this is it.

Prosecutrix. That is the shawl that was taken from me by force; I gave it the watchman; it is worth eighteen pence.

Prisoner's Defence. I was just come out of the country; I was coming along Church-street with my brother and his sweetheart. I had been at my uncle's. Coming along, the woman went about an hundred yards away, when the patrole took me; he said I was charged with taking a shawl. I said I know nothing about a shawl. he said come along back; with you, I said; I will in a minute. I asked the lady, whether I had taken a shawl of her's; she said, she believed I did. The patrol said I had; then the lady said I had. I knew no more about the shawl than nobody,

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 15.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Cemmon Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-63

931. CHARLES ROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , one pound weight of pepper, value 18 d. the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing like pepper, the property of the East India Company .

THIRD COUNT, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

JAMES MURDOCK . I am the chief clerk of the East India Dock Company. The Hugh Ignis East India ship was lying in the East India Dock on Tuesday last; she was delivering her cargo; part of her cargo is pepper, part in bags, and part loose. At about half past one I went on board, in consequence of a message from the Captain. The first of my business was with a person of the name of Brown. I was then induced to go to a place where the prisoner was in the cabin; he appeared to be in a tremor, and was quite agitated upon my looking in. The prisoner is a custom house officer; he was superintending the delivery of the cargo. I went into cabin; he was then sitting on a box, near the door; there was a quantity of pepper running from the waistband of his pantaloons; he said he did not know how he could commit such a crime. Upon searching him, about a pound of pepper was found in his pantaloons. This is the pepper. it is worth eighteen pence.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of tenpence only .

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-64

932. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , eleven pound weight of pepper, value 11 s. the property of our Lord the King ,

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of the East India Dock Company .

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be the property of persons unknown.

JAMES MURDOCK . On Tuesday last, I went on board the ship Hugh Ignis, in the East India Company's Dock . On going on board, a jacket was produced to me by the commanding officer, Mr. Hunter. The jacket had this bag, containing twelve pounds of pepper, concealed as it might be between the lining of the jacket and the external part of the jacket, that jacket that the prisoner has on now. I knew the jacket, and caused Brown to be called out of the hold. I asked him how he had come by the pepper? He said it was given to him by the revenue officer. I asked him to point him out to me; he pointed out Charles Ross , the prisoner that has gone from the bar; he said Ross was the person that gave it to him. At this time the prisoner was employed as a piler of loose pepper into sacks.

COURT. He is indicted for stealing; to steal is one and to receive is another; the receiver is the most guilty; but he is not guilty of that which he is charged.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-65

933. NEWCOMEN EDGEWORTH was indicted for that he, on the 26th of February, in the year 1803. at the parish church of Cheshunt, took to wife one Mary Elizabeth Savory , and to her was married, and that he afterwards, on the 13th of October, 1813 , at the city of York , took to wife one Ann Townsend , his said wife Mary Elizabeth being then living ; and that on the 22d instant, was apprehended and taken in Middlesex, for the said felony.

REV. Mr. ARMSTRONG. Do you know the prisoner - I do

Q. In the year 1803 did you marry him - A. I did, to Mary Elizabeth Savory , at Cheshunt, in Hertfordshire. I was acquainted with his wife before he married her, and with him afterwards; she is now living.

Q. The prisoner has been abroad, has he not? - A. I have heard so.

Q. In how short a time after he returned from the Cape of Good Hope did he marry Mrs. Townend - A. I cannot speak to that; he shewed me a letter that he received from his wife after he returned from the Cape of Good Hope.

Q. Did he remind you of the time he received that letter? - A. No; he shewed me the letter, and talked about it. My own memory furnishes me with the knowledge that I married him.

COURT. Did Miss Savory live at Cheshunt when she was married - A. She did; I heard of the second marriage.

REV. WILLIAM BULMAN . I am a clergyman at York.

Q. On the 13th of October last year, did you perform the ceremony of marriage between the prisoner and any other person - A. I did; between the prisoner and Ann Townend . I had known Mrs. Townend many years before; he applied to the Surrogate for the licence, I performed the marriage by licence. I speak from memory; I cannot remember the day of the month only from the register. I have seen the prisoner since the marriage a great number of times. I have been called upon to interfere for her protection; I know him perfectly.

GILES REES . I am a baker, living in Crawford street, Brunswick square. I appehended the prisoner in Seymour-place. Montague square, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, Middlesex. I delivered him into the charge of a constable, at my own house.

Prisoner's Defence. In the first place, the counsel for the prosecution has held out to the Court, and the Jury, that I represented myself as a gentleman, whereas I am no such thing: my brother is Major Edworth . A quarrel with my father threw me upon the world eight or nine years ago. I held a menial situation with Mr. Townend. Mr. Townend said he observed somethind in my manner far superior to my then situation. He desired to enter into my history. I gave it him; he promised he would put me forward in the world. My brother died; my family took me by the hand, and Mrs. Townend and I corresponded for nine years. I married Miss Savory in the year 1803. I entered into his majesty's service, and after being separated from Miss Savory seven years, I returned

into England. On my return home I found Mr. Townend was dead. In consequence of a correspondence that originated between Mrs. Townend and me, I went down to York, and was in the habit of dining with her three or four weeks previous to our marriage. I have sent down the deed to Mrs. Townend, and I trust my service for my country thirteen years; although I may have erred in this, yet I hope that will be taken into consideration.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Richard .

Reference Number: t18141026-66

933. GEORGE BECK and HARRY GRIFFITHS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Howell , widow , about the hour of eight in the night, of the 30th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, a pelisse, value 2 l. two dresses, value 2 l. and a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Lavina Frances Howell , spinster : a dress, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. and two pieces of calico, value 5 s. the property of Mary Ann Badger , spinster .

JOHN WILSON . Q. Have you a house No. 27, Surry-street - A. I have.

Q. On the 30th of September last, was that house under repair - A. It was.

Q. In the course of the day had you been in the house superintending the work - A. Yes; several times. I was there while the workmen were there. A quarter before eight, I went there to see if all was safe. No. 27 and 28, both the houses join backwards. I entered the house 28, I heard a noise over head. There is a room that Mrs. Howell always had projects into my house; there is a door which has communication to my house from hers; there had been a new door fixed up.

Q. On the 30th of September? my question is whether there was any door which by being opened would communicate from one house to the other - A. There was a door on the two pair of stairs, which was not in the house, by which you might go from one house to the other upon that door being opened; the door was fastened up, till this time, nailed up; it was considered as a party partition, and nailed up not to be used. Upon my hearing this noise, I went into Mrs. Howell's house to desire some friends to give the alarm that there were thieves in the house. Mr. Howell and I were providing ourselves with weapons. After having done so, I went out at Mrs. Howell's front door; young Mr. Howell was just before me; Mrs. Howell I believe, was standing at the door. She saw the two persons come out. When I got out at the front door, I was informed that somebody had gone away. I pursued Beck up Strand-lane, into the Strand.

Q. The front of the house is in Surry-street - A. It is. He went up Surry-street; I did not get sight of him until I found him in the possession of one of the witnesses, George Banks . I and Banks with others, brought him in custody; he made great resistance as we were bringing him along. I was behind him; I had fast hold of him, others had hold of him by the collar. I saw him stoop, on his stooping I saw a boy pick up something when he was stooping. I did not see him drop it. I suppose he put his hand on the ground, and laid it there.

Q. By whom was it picked up - A. I cannot say. I saw his hand close to the ground. They key was picked up close by the side of his heel; the key was laying as if it dropped before him; he was stooping that very moment. It is a skeleton key, which fits the door.

SAMUEL LACK . I produce the key.

Mr. Wilson. The prisoner was taken to Bow-street. I went back to the house afterwards.

Q. Did you find any thing in your house - A. Nothing particular. Upon my return, I found Mrs. Howell's house had been robbed.

Q. Did you find by what means the thieves got access into Mrs. Howell's house - A. They had broken down the door. They had got into my house, and broken the door that I mentioned before. That skeleton key would open my front door.

COURT. They opened your door by that skeleton key, they got into Mrs. Howell's by opening the door on the two pair of stairs - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Did you find any of the stolen property in your house - A. It was found before I went back. A crow was found in the house. I saw the crow that was said to be found there. I was at the office when Griffiths was brought there.

MARY HOWELL . I am a widow; I reside at No. 28, Surry-street, in the parish of St. Clement's Danes . There is a door which communicates to my house and his; by my consent this door was made, that here after it might be useful to Mr. Wilson.

Q. How was the door fastened - A. With nails. My own furniture was in the room. I slept in that room ever since it was done, it was sufficiently fastened with nails; a pair of drawers were placed against the door on my side, and a pair of small drawers on the top of these drawers, and a writing desk of my daughter's. The room was my own chamber, for myself and daughter.

Q. How late in the day had you been in that room - A. About four o'clock; at that time all was safe.

Q. In the evening did Mr. Wilson come into your house by the back door - A. There is a communication at the lower part of the house. Mr. Wilson came into my parlour, and said there were thieves in the house.

Q. Does your back parlour go into Mr. Wilson's house - A. There has been some communication with the back parlour; that is not now. Mr. Wilson was in my house. That door is shut up; as he boards with me, we have had an entrance when the house is finished to come into my house, from his back parlour into our work shop. He came into my front parlour and alarmed me that there were thieves. I was in the front parlour when he came in, and said there were thieves in the house; upon that, all my family went out at the front door of my house; I went with them. I went to the door No. 27, Mr. Wilson's house, I found a bag at the door. I supposed the man had escaped them; I did not know. The bag was full. I brought the bag from the door, and gave it my servant to take it into my house. The bag contained

my daughter's clothes. Ann Dalby is my servant. When it was opened, I found it contained my daughter's clothes. The house was in great confusion. I at last found the way the thieves got in. I went up stairs; I saw the door had been opened, that had been nailed, the partition door; I found that door had been forced open into my bed-room, the drawers had been pushed off one side, the drawers had been opened; the small drawers and the writing desk had been carried into the empty house, and a considerable number of articles had been taken out, as it proved in the bag.

Q. Had there been more things than that bag contained - A. Not as I know off. I believe the bag is here, with the contents.

MARY ANN BADGER . Q. You are the daughter of Mrs. Howell, by the first husband - A. Yes. I sleep in the room with my mother, that she has spoken of. I had been in that room at five o'clock; the door was secure at that time, perfectly so.

Q. Upon Mr. Wilson giving the alarm of thieves in his house, did you go to the door of your mother's house - A. I did; I was standing at my mother's door, with my sisters, two of which went to ask assistance after the alarm; during which time, two men came out of Mr. Wilson's house. and passed me: on their passing me, I said, here they come. Mr. Wilson and my brother came out of 28 at the time; one of them ran up Howard-street Howard-street leads to the Temple, and the other went through the arch way, which is called Surry-place, into Strand-lane. My brother pursued the one that went towards the Temple. Mr. Wilson pursued the one that went towards Strand-lane.

Q. How soon was either of them brought in custody to your house - A. Soon Griffiths was brought by my brother, within a few minutes.

Q. Do you know whether he was one of the men that came out of the house - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you see the other man who was taken to Bow-street - A. No, I did not.

Q. At the time that they came out of the house, did you direct the attention of your sister to them - A. I did.

Q. Where were they at that time - A. About as far as from where I stand as to the Sheriff.

COURT. When your brother, Mr. Wilson, and Miss Louisa Howell came out, where the men in the street then - A. No, they were not.

LOUISA CAROLINE AUGUSTA HOWELL. Q. Upon the alarm made by Mr. Wilson, did you with your sisters, go out to the street door - A. I did. I went across the way to call for assistance.

Q. While you were there, did your sister call your attention to any thing - A. Yes, by saying here they come. I looked, and saw two men come out of the door; they passed close to me. I laid my hand upon the arm of one of them; I said, you are a thief; he pushed past me. I ran after him; he ran towards the Temple. My brother came up to me, and joined in the pursuit; I pointed him out to my brother. I lost sight of the prisoner at Water-lane. My brother was before me; he was almost close to him. I returned home from Water-lane, He was brought back to our house in a minute; he was taken almost immediately after I left off pursuing.

Q. Did you know him again - A. No, I cannot say I did.

Q. Do you know that the man that was taken, was the man that you pursued - A. No, I did not. I had not a view at all of his countenence. I am quite sure that the man that I pointed out to my brother, was the man that I saw come out of the house.

Q. Had you any opportunity of observing the other man - A. No, none at all.

LAVINA FRANCES HOWELL . I ran out of the house at the alarm given by Mr. Wilson. I saw two men come out of Mr. Wilson's house, one of them passed me close; he took up Howard-street, that leads to the temple, he was walking very fast; I took hold of his coat, my sister was by my side. We were close together, and finding he was laid hold of, he turned round, and looked me in the face. I perfectly saw his countenance; I saw his face by the fineness of the evening, and the lamp very near me at the corner house. After he looked me in the face he ran off, up Howard-street, followed by my sister, brother, and myself; my sister pointed him out to my brother I heard her say, that is the man I laid hold off; that man she pointed out. I continued the pursuit as far as Arundle-street, my brother and sister went on. In a few minutes, the man was brought down. That was the same man; I recognized him immediately he was brought into my mother's house. That is the prisoner Griffiths.

THOMAS HENRY HOWELL. Q. Mr. Wilson came into the room, you all went out - A. We did; upon going out, my sister told me that one of the men that came out of the house, turned down Howard-street; upon which I ran into Howard-street, there I saw another of my sisters, who pointed out Griffiths. I pursued Griffiths; he ran, and I ran after him; I gained ground upon him; when I came near him, he turned round, and said, if you come near me I will knock you down. I still got nearer to him; he kept running all the time. I came up with him in Grey-hound Court; I there took him; William Hamblen had him first of all; I was about three yards off, when Hamblen stopped him. Upon Hamblen stopping him, I came up, and collared him; he turned round, and said what do you collar me for; I said your are the man that I want. I brought him back to my mother's house, with another gentleman; I took him into the parlour. He was then taken to Bow Street. That is the prisoner Griffiths.

ANN DALBY . I am a servant to Mrs. Howell. Upon the alarm I ran out of the front door also; I saw the light in the house before they came out, and I saw them come out; I was about two yards from them. When they came out, I said to them, who are you, one of them said, who are you. He crossed towards Howard-street. The other went through the arch way, towards Strand-lane. It appeared to me, that they dropped something at the door, as one was coming out of the door. I saw the prisoner's arm make a motion, the arm gave a jerk at the door; I thought he dropped something by the motion of the arm at that spot my mistress picked up a bag

my mistress gave me the bag; I took it in doors. The bag contained the young lady's things.

Mrs. Howell. I found that bag in the spot by the door of the house, that the witness described; that was in a minute or two after I went out.

Ann Dalby . That bag of clothes was taken to Bow Street, and given to the constable afterwards. That was the first thing that shewed us our house had been robbed, by the young ladies dresses, The two men were brought back immediately afterwards, and Griffiths was brought into the house,

Q. When he was brought back, did you know him again - A. Yes I did; he was one of the two men that I had seen come out of the house. I afterwards saw the other one at Bow Street; I knew him then; he ran underneath the arch way. He had the same dress on and appearance at Bow Street, as the man I saw run up the arch-way. I noticed Griffiths the most. It was a fine light night, I have no doubt of the other. At Bow Street I swore to Griffiths, by his features; to Beck by his dress and appearance. When they came out of the door they paused, and stopped at the door a minute or two; that gave me an opportunity of seeing them.

Q. to Mrs. Howell. Where you present when the officer took an inventory of the things in the bag - A. Yes; the bag was brought into the parlour as soon as Griffiths came in,

WILLIAM HAMBLEN . I work in Water-street. On the evening of the 30th of September I heard the cry of stop thief; I then listened for the foot. I heard a foot coming towards me, coming from the arch-way, towards Grey-hound Court; I was at work in my stall, my stall is in Water-street, three or four doors from the arch-way. I then ran out, and met Harry Griffiths coming running up the street, he stopped when he saw me; I looked him full in the face. He said to me, you are mistaken, I am not the person. I said nothing to him, I let him step up the Court, and I catched hold of him by the tail of his coat; we had a bit of a scuffle together. I lost my hold; he tried to get himself from me. I then caught him by the collar; Mr. M'Kenzie, the green grocer, came to my assistance first, then Mr. Howell came. Mr. Howell said when he came up, hold him fast. Mr. Howell catched hold of him by the collar; I followed behind, and assisted in conducting him back. I heard Griffiths say to Mr. Howell, D - n you I tell you I am not the man.

GEORGE BANKS . On the evening of the 30th of September. I was in Surry Street. Miss Howell ran over to me and asked my assistance in catching the thief, saying, he was in the next house to Mrs. Howells. I saw the two men come out of that house. Hary Griffiths passed about a yard from me, and the other about two yards. Griffiths run towards Howard street, and Beck run up Surry Street, through an arch-way, which leads into Strand-lane. I pursued Beck, he was crying stop thief lustily. Beck ran through the Arch-way into Strand-lane; he crossed the Strand, and ran into Newcastle Street, I kept within a yard and a half of him all the way; he knocked a person down in Newcastle-street, that person never left hold of him. I came up, and caught hold of his wrist. I am quite certain he is one of the two men that came out of the house. I never lost sight of him; he resisted violently while I had hold of him. Mr. Wilson came up, and he was taken to Bow Street.

SAMUEL WILKINS . I heard the cry of stop thief in Newcastle-street; Beck passed me at the end of Albemarle-street, he was stopped; he made great resistance; he knocked a person down. I assisted in securing him. We took him to Bow-street; as we were going along he said, d - n your eyes, let a poor fellow put on his shoes; he halted, and let him stoop. Instead of touching his shoes, he put his hand to the hind part of his heel, and dropped a key. I was in the act of picking the key up, a gentleman put his hand forward, and picked it up himself.

Q. Did he attempt to get from you as you were taking him along - A. He tried to get from us; he did not. At Bow-street I saw the gentleman that picked the key up, hold the key up, and I saw the officer take it from his hand.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. Upon Beck being brought to Bow-street, this key was given to me by a gentleman of the name of Meaken, in the presence of Banks. I took the key afterwards to Mr. Wilson's house; I found it opened the street door with a great deal more ease than I could with their own key.

THOMAS CAVE . I am an officer. I searched Beck at Bow-street; in his coat pocket I found this skeleton key, and a knife.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . I am a Bow-street officer. After Beck had been brought to the office, I went to Mrs. Howell's house with Smith. I received of Mrs. Howell a bag with clothes, and made an inventory of it. They have been in Smith's care ever since.

- SMITH. I was with Limbrick. I received the bag with the contents of Mrs. Howell out of the parlour; I took it from her to the office. This is the inventory, I wrote it myself.

Lavina Frances Howell . This is my pelisse, it is worth two pounds; two dresses of mine, one pound each; a silk handkerchief mine, five shillings.

Q. Where were these things - A. In the chamber, in the chest of drawers.

Q. Now Miss Budger - A. There is a dress of mine, value ten shillings; a petticoat, value five shillings; two yards of black crape mine, five shillings; these things were in the drawer in the chamber, that stood against the door. I had seen them at five o'clock in the afternoon, when I locked the drawer.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Limbrick. When you went to Mrs. Howel's house, did you go to Mr. Wilson's house - A. Yes, I examined the door by which they were suspected to enter. I found the door had been nailed up, and two or three of the nails were pushed off one side. The nails had been partly driven in and turned down on one side; the door had been forced open on Mr. Wilson's side; by forcing the nails up; there were marks of the nails being forced up; it did not want much force to get the nails up, it had been done on Mr. Wilson's s side. I found this crow lying down by the drawers; the drawers had opened by the crow, and the crow appeard to have been left

behind in Mrs. Howell's room. I compared the crow with the impressions on the drawers; it fitted the impression.

Beck's Defence. Does it stand to reason that I could put my arms down to drop a key on the ground when there were twenty or more people around me. I cried stop thief all the way I heard the mob coming up Strand-lane, and the key that was found on me was the key of my room door, it was given me by my landlord.

Griffiths's Defence. I was in hopes of bringing forward a respectable witness to prove that I was in his company a few moments of my being taken in custody; I left him because I had some business to do on the other side of the water. I was going from Temple-bar to Arundel-street, and on my going through the arch-way there was a cry of stop thief, and as I came along Mr. Hamblen said stop: I stopped; a minute or more elapsed before Mr. Howell came up: he said, you are one of them. I said, do not accost me in that way, I will knock you down if you do. Gentlemen of the Jury, there are two men charged in this indictment; whether one or both are guilty is for you to determinate: if any doubt should arise in your minds on that point, it is better that ten guilty men should escape punishment, than one innocent man should suffer. I have made every enquiry in my power to get my friend to come forward to prove I was in his company: he is gone down I find to Saffron Walden fair with horses; I cannot have the benefit of his testimony.

BECK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

GRIFFITHS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-67

934. JOACHIM DE LEFONT was indicted for that he, on the 4th of October , upon Manuel Vieira , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and that he, with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut him in and upon his left arm, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him ,

SECOND COUNT, for like offence stating the intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grevious bodily harm.

MANUEL VIEIRA . I am a Portuguese ; I belong to the Spanish ship, the Philip ; she was laying lately off Union stairs, Wapping.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he lately came to work on board the Philip along with me. I was a sailor belonging to it; one time in the morning he said, I had no business on board a Spanish ship, because I was a Portuguese. On the evening of the 4th of this month, I came on shore to get my sea stock to go on board; I was walking in the street by the Royalty Theater , the prisoner came behind me, and stabbed me in the left arm; I looked round, I saw him, and spoke to him; I said you might be ashamed to serve me so. I dropped the things that I had. He said no words from you, he spoke Spanish, which I understood myself. He said, I will serve your comrade the same; you have no business in Spanish ships; he had in his hand a large knife, and when he told me I had no business in Spanish ships, he struck me again with the same knife, in the same arm. I laid hold of the knife; I could not get the knife from him. Some of his countrymen came to help him; then I ran away. When I ran away, he stabbed my jacket, it did not touch my skin; he stabbed the jacket in my back. I went to a surgeon, and got my wounds dressed. It was this jacket that I have on now.

Q. Had you given him any provocation of any kind - A. No; I never spoke to him.

Q. How long have you been in this country this time - A. Going for three months, part on board a ship, and part on shore. My comrade is not here; the ship went away the next day, and he went with the ship.

WILLIAM PELLET . I am an apprentice to Mr. Holloway, surgeon, Burr-street. On the 4th of this month, the prosecutor came to me to have his wounds dressed; he had two wounds on the left arm, one on the dead joint muscle; it appeared to have been inflicted by a knife; the other was near the wrist, that was a simple inscissed wound, not far deep. The dead joint muscle was injured some little, it is recovered now.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor worked on board that ship five days, I had never any thing to do with him at all. The night he was on shore, I never came on shore at all. I am quite innocent of the charge. Mr. Thomas here knows I was on board.

MR. THOMAS. I don't know he was on board that ship; I knew he belonged to the Spanish ship, De Elberga; the owner of the ship is Mr. Dubois London Wall.

JOHN GILLMORE . I am a Thames Police officer. I took the prisoner up the next morning on board the ship he was in. I took the prosecutor with me to find him out; he pointed him out to me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Riehards.

Reference Number: t18141026-68

935. THOMAS HADLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Lyng about the hour of six in the afternoon of the 17th of August , and stealing therein, a watch, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Lyng .

ELIZABETH LYNG . My husband's name is Thomas Lyng , he is a carpenter . I live in Grey Eagle-street, Spitalfields ; I have only one room on the ground floor. On the 17th of August, I left my room; the watch was hanging up at the mantle piece about five o'clock; when I left the room, I locked the door, and took the key with me. I returned about eight o'clock; I looked for the watch, it was gone.

Q. Did you see anything of the prisoners wife - A. Yes I had been walking with her; she asked me to take a walk with her. I went with her. I saw the prisoner come out of a pawnbroker's shop at the corner of Widegate-street, with a pound note in his hand: I went up to him, knowing him. He took his wife and me to a liquor shop, and treated her and me to a glass of peppermint each of us. When I went home, I went to my husbands, and asked him if he had got in at the window and taken the watch; he said not. On the next day a young man and the

prisoner's daughter brought me the watch; she said, her father was very sorry for it. This is the watch. I am sure it is my husband's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am astonished my prosecutor is not here; I wish he had been here; I expected to see him; I then should have had an opportunity to have asked him whether he did not tell me to go to his wife to borrow some money, or if I saw his watch to bring it to him; he and I had been drinking together all the day.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18141026-69

936. HENRY WORKMAN and JOSEPH ORCHARD were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Walter Atkinson , about the hour of ten in the forenoon, of the 12th of October, and stealing therein, a watch, value 2 l. two seals, value 15 s. and a watch-key, value 5 s. the property of Fanny Reading .

FANNY READING . I live in King-street, Hammersmith, in the parish of Fulham . On the 12th of October, my watch was hanging up at the mantle-piece; about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I went to the baker's for some flour; I shut the door after me, and left my watch in the parlour. It is my brother-in-law's house, his name is Walter Atkinson ; I keep his house for him; and when I returned home from the bakehouse, my watch was gone. I had left the door shut; I found it on a jar.

SOPHIA EAST. I am a washerwoman. I was sitting in my own house, at the back of Fanny Reading 's house; I heard the call of Joe three times. I went to the door, and looked out; I saw Orchard and Workman together, in the lane that I live in, at the back of Mr. Atkinson's house; soon after I heard the watch was stolen.

WILLIAM BOUCHER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 13th of October, I took in a guilt silver watch in pawn, of Joseph Orchard , and on the Saturday following the officer came to enquire of it; I shewed it him. I can swear to Orchard. This is the watch.

RICHARD SMITHERS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners, and on Saturday, the 15th of October, Workman before the magistrate, confessed to the robbery, he said, that Orchard and he met together on Monday; he said Atkinson's sister had a nice watch and some gold seals; they agreed to meet on Tuesday evening, they stood about six yards from the door some time; Orchard said, it was not fit to night. On the next morning when Fanny Reading went to the bakehouse Orchard went into his father's house, and Workman went into Fanny Reading 's house, and took the watch, and when he came out he called Joe Orchard .

Prosecutrix. I am sure it is my watch.

WORKMAN, GUILTY, aged 16,

ORCHARD, GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-70

937. RICHARD CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , four ounces of rhubarb, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of his Majesty .

Second Count, the property of the East India Company .

Third Count, the property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

ALEXANDER BELL . I am the sixth mate of the Walmer Castle, East Indiaman. On the 30th of September the Walmer Castle was in the dock of the East India Company , for the purpose of being unladen. The prisoner was a tide-waiter , superintending the delivery of the cargo; from suspicion I searched the prisoner. I asked him whether he had any rhubarb about him? he said no. In his pocket I found four pieces of rhubarb; there was a rhubarb box broken in the hold. I examined that box; there were more pices of rhubarb gone from the box than what I found on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly declare I am innocent. I found the rhubarb on the deck. It was not my intention to take it away. I intended to explain it to the officer.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-71

938. ANTHONY SWINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , value 5 l. the property of Eliza Larkin , widow , in her dwelling-house .

ELIZA LARKING . I am a widow. I live at No. 51, New North-street, Red Lion-square. I live upon what is allowed me by my friends. I left my watch with a jeweller to repair, about three months ago, before I went to Ireland. It is not more than five weeks ago; I went to my jeweller's to enquire for my watch, and did not find it.

Q. What is your jeweller's name - A. A Mr. Salton in Coventry-street; he said he had given it to my servant. My servant told me Anthony Swinton took it from her; I have not received my watch since.

SARAH CHRISTIE . I am a servant to Mrs. Larkin. The jeweller brought the watch and left it with me for Mrs. Larkin.

Q. When was that - A. In the middle of July. I kept it near a week, and Captain Swinton asked me for it, to send into the country; he said he wanted it to send into the country to my mistress. I have seen it since in Marlborough street, about a fortnight or three weeks ago.

EDWARD SALTON . I am a jeweller. I live in Coventry street. On the 15th of July Mrs. Larkin left a watch with me to repair as early as possible; as soon as the watch was done, I sent it with my servant; my young man went with the watch; he was to get my watch back again. He returned and said he was answered, she was out of town. I called myself with it a third time, and as I had no suspicion with me at that time, I left the watch with the servant. I had been once before, and was answered she was out of town. I never saw the watch after I left it, until I saw it at Marlborough street office.

JOHN PLANK . I am an officer. I had this watch delivered to me at Marlborough-street office; it was produced by a man, I believe, of the name of Davison,

in the presence of the prisoner. The prisoner the minute before said he did not know where the watch was. Davison said he had it of the prisoner. This is the watch.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at that watch; is it your's - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I forwarded the watch to Mrs. Larking; she never applied either directly or indirectly for it.

GEORGE FLETCHER . In the month of August I was a servant of the prisoner at Salisbury-square. The prisoner then resided in Somerset-street; I was not with him in Somerset-street until the 9th of August. He gave me a watch, and directed me to pack it up, and to send it to Bristol; he wrote the directions himself; it was directed to Mrs. Larkin, at Clifton, near Bristol. If Mrs. Larkin was gone, it was to be returned. I took it to the mail guard, at the Swan with two Necks. Lad lane, and delivered it to the guard. I did not take it to the coach-office. Captain Swinton desired me to take it to the mail guard on the beginning of August. Afterwards I was his servant in Somerset-street; I wrapped the watch in brown paper, and delivered it to the mail guard.

COURT. Can you give any reason why you did not enter it - A. Because I was not desired to enter it.

Q. You know you were porter and porter and warehouseman. I should have thought if I employed a porter he would know how to pack up things, and that he would not send a parcel by the guard, he would have taken it to the coach office.

Q. What is your name - A. George Fletcher ; they call me George Smith ; I was taken up with Mr. Swinton at Marlborough-street office. I went by the name of Smith; my real name is Fletcher.

JOHN BASTER. I live at 21, Southampton-street. Russell-square. I know the lady that calls herself Mrs. Larkin; she has lodged with me, and afterwards she visited me. She informed me that she had a house at the east end of the town; she went first by the name of Larkin. One morning she cried to me very much, and said she had left a good husband at Bengal; his name was Ford, and desired me always to call her Ford, and not Larkin, her husband Ford was now living in Bengal. She begged me to write a letter to reconcile her to her husband; I promised so to do for her. I asked her how she came by the name of Larkin? She said she lived with Mr. Larkin five months; that he took her away from her husband. She said that Mr. Larkin presided at the Marine Board at Bengal.

COURT. When was this? - A. About fifteen years ago she begged me to write to reconcile her to her husband.

Q. You wrote that letter for her, did you? - A. No, I made a copy of it for myself; I never shewed it her. Yesterday week she told me she would swear one hundred and fifty oaths, and swear black was white, and white was black, but she would transport Mr. Swinton; and if the judge and jury should acquit him, she would blow his brains out. It is true, I assure, you gentleman; and she has said, at other times to me, frequently, that she was sure Mr. Swinton had no intention to do her any harm, or of robbing her of any thing. I then asked her how she came to charge him with felony? She said she was advised to do it; she did not say by whom in particular. She said she had written for this watch in the country; she could not write herself; she employed a lady to write to him to send her this watch.

COURT. What business are you - A. I am in the coal trade; I do as other coal merchants do; I draw from the wharf. My office is at my own house.

Q. You have no wharf, no carts, or horses, nor any accompting-house - A. I keep no clerk whatever, nor any carts or horses; I am my own clerk.

Q. She said she had been married at Bengal to Mr. Ford, did it not strike you as very odd - A. I thought her a very odd character.

Q. She told you, she would swear one hundred and fifty oaths, that black was white, and white was black, to either hang or transport Swinton, and if the Judge or Jury should acquit him, she would take the first opportunity to blow his brains out - A. Yes.

Q. But at other times she said to you, that Swinton never meaned to do her any harm, or to rob her, did not you say how can you swear black is white, and white is black, to hang or transport him; did you never make that observation - A. I might.

Q. You might, or you might not. Perhaps you advised her to go to Newgate to see Swinton - A. I deny that ever I gave her any advice of any kind.

Q. Did you never give her instructions about the indictment - A. Nothing more than from her solicitation. I did it out of common charity. She had no person to go with her; I went with her.

Q. You the friend of Swinton to go with her to give the instructions about the indictment - A. I do not know that I am the friend of Swinton.

Q. You can say whether you are or not. How came you to go with Mrs. Larkin to give the instructions about the indictment? what date did you give in - A. The date she gave; I don't know what particular date.

Q. How came Swinton to get you - A. I was subpoened; the subpoena was served me in the street; I had been to Clerkenwell.

Q. Swinton knew you had been to proser the bill.

Q. Did you never tell the attorney you would give him some money if he would get the bill throwed out - A. No.

COURT. Q. to Mrs. Larhin. Can you write - A. I can, but not so good a hand as I could wish.

Q. Who was the person that pursuaded you to go to Newgate to see Swinton - A. Mr. Baster; he told me not to take my other two witnesses there, Mr. Salton, the jeweller, and Sarah Christie .

Q. Did you ever desire him to write a conciliatory letter to Mr. Ford - A. No, in the presence of God I never did.

Q. Did you ever tell Baster that you would swear black was white, and white was black - A. No, I never did.

Q. If the Judge and Jury should acquit him you

would shoot him - A. I never said that; I do not know how to use a pistol; I could never have said that; that never was uttered by me.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Shelton. Do you know Baster - A. I have known him for several years.

Q. Is he a man to be believed - A. By no means; he is not a man to be believed upon his oath.

GUILTY, aged 45,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-72

939. JAMES FLOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , three saws, value 9 s. three squares, value 3 s. the property of Henry Goss ; three saws, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Wilson ; three saws, value 9 s. and a pair of compasses, value 1 s. the property of Daniel Deakin .

HENRY GOSS. I am a carpenter . I work for Mr. Hall, carpenter, at Whesstono. On the 5th of October, I was working at Mr. Hall's shop. I left my tools in the shop at night, and my fellow workmen also. I fastened the doors of the workshop myself that night, with two bolts, and the next morning when we came to our work, the door that I fastened myself was open; a hole was cut through, so as to shove the bolts back. We looked for our tools; they were gone. We came up to Town, and made enquiry at the pawnbrokers, and in Compton-street, Soho, while we were in enquiry at the pawnbroker's a man came in with a basket of tools, and went out again; this was about half after ten. The shopman said, there, a man came in with some tools, he has gone out again; we went out, and saw the prisoner with my basket at his back; I ran after him; he dropped the basket directly I got up to the basket; I fell over the basket. The prisoner ran up a court where there was no thoroughfare; my partners followed the prisoner over the wall, and took him. I secured the basket; it is my basket, and my tools are in it. These are my saws; I can swear they are mine.

THOMAS WILSON . I am a carpenter. I was in Compton-street with my partners at the time. When the prisoner run out, I followed him over the wall, and through a house, and lost sight of him. My partner came round another way, and catched him. I am sure he is the man. Some of my tools are here.

DANIEL DEAKIN . I am a carpenter. I left my tools in the workshop, at Mr. Hall's. I was at Compton-street; I pursued the prisoner. I came round the house; the prisoner ran through. I got sight of him at the top of the street; I catched him. I am sure he is the same man. Some of my tools are here.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking looking for work; I saw two men with baskets-they each dropped them; I picked them up, and came to London with them, and when I came into London, these men saw me, and recognized their tools. I am a carpenter .

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-73

940. GEORGE TOWNSHEND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , two pound and a half of beef, value 2 s. and one pound and a half of lamb, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Covington .

THOMAS COVINGTON . I am a butcher . I live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields. In concequence of suspicion, I applied to Armstrong: we were told by my other servant that the prisoner had taken the meat. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Parliament-court, Old Artillery-ground, in the cupboard in the front room, I found a piece of lamb and a piece of beef. The prisoner was not with us, his wife was in the room The prisoner afterwards said it was his wife, and he lived there with her, and the next day we apprehended the prisoner in a house in a street in Holborn; the prisoner was in an up stair room, in a house. Armstrong looking under the bed, discovered the prisoner; we took him to Worship-street office, in a private room, and my other servant, Blackallah, was taken into the same room; Blackallah said, he had taken the meat, I had a warrant; the warrant was read over to Townsend. Townsend said he had taken the meat, but he had none of the money.

CAROLINA ELLIS . I lived with the prisoner as his wife, at No. 1, Parliament-court. There was a loin of lamb brought to the prisoner by Blackallah; on Saturday, and Blackallah on the same day, brought two pieces of beef; I put them in the cupboard. The prisoner was not at home when the meat was brought,

JOHN ARMSTRONG , I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 2nd of October. I apprehended Blackallah at Mr. Covington's house, on the Monday, under this warrant, and in company with my son, and Mr. Covington, I went into a house in Red Lion-court. Shoe Lane, up two pair of stairs; there was the prisoner's mother in the room, his wife and family and at last I discovered the prisoner under the bed; I then took the prisoner to the office, into the parlour, I then fetched Blackallah into the office. I asked Blackallah whether that was the person charged in this warrant, and told Blackallah to repeat the charge that he had made against him. He charged the prisoner with stealing some meat and money the prisoner said I gave the meet, but I know nothing of the money. I said to the prisoner did you put the money in your masters till he said, no.

JOHN BLACKALLAH . I am a servant to Mr. Covington, the prosecutor, the prisoner was his servant . On Saturday, October the 1st, the prisoner gave me a loin of lamb, that he took of Mr. Convington's front board to carry home to his lodging I took it there in Parliament-court. He also gave me a leg of mutton, a piece of beef and a steak to take there to his wife. I took it to his wife, and I had a piece of flank beef.

Q. to Prosecutor. Where abouts is the value of the beef and lamb - A. Two shillings.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined 3 months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-74

941. HENDRICK CHARLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , four handkerchiefs,

value 30 s. the property of Joseph Griffin , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH GRIFFIN. I am a silk mercer .

HENRY BREWMAN. I am a shopman to Mr. Griffin. On the 21st of September, the prisoner came to look at some handkerchiefs; the price was too high; they were seven shillings and sixpence. I then shewed him some at three shillings, which he held up to the light to examine with one hand, and with the other hand he put the four handkerchiefs in question in his pocket. I saw by his actions that he was putting some thing into his pocket; I saw him move his hands. I did not see him take the property. I saw by his actions that he was putting something into his pocket. I got over the counter, and touched his trowsers. I asked him what he had got there: he instantly took the handkerchiefs out, and throwed them on the counter, and said he had nothing. We gave him then into the custody of the people at the watchhouse. These are the handkerchiefs; they are Mr. Griffin's property,

Prisoner's Defence. He did not find any handkerchiefs about me.

GUILTY, aged 40,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-75

942. THOMAS PECKHAM was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Edwards , on the 10th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a pocket-book, value 1 s. an handkerchief, value 1 s. and four one pound Bank of England notes , his property.

JOHN EDWARDS. I am a gentleman's groom . On the 20th of October, late at night, I was locked out of my lodgings; I went into a public-house; I staid there until near two or three o'clock. I cannot say exactly. I came out of the public house, and two or three in the house came out with me, about the time they were shutting up the house. I walked on my way home to the George in Long Acre; the prisoner laid hold of me by the arm at the end of Charles Street, Covent Garden , and with his other hand he drawed my watch; he tried to escape with it. I caught hold of the tail of his coat, and called out watch, and held him until the watch came up, and assisted me. The watchman came up, and took him to the watch-house; he was searched at the watchouse; my silk handkerchief was found on him.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was intoxicated; I am sure the prisoner is the person that robbed me.

RICHARD CLARK . I am a watchman of St. Paul's, Covent Garden. At three o'clock I heard the watchman call watch; I went to his assistance: he had hold of the prisoner by the tail of his coat; he said the prisoner had robbed him of his watch. I took him to the watchhouse; at the watchhouse he was searched, and the prosecutor's handkerchief was found in his pocket. In taking him to the watch-house, he threw something away. The prosecutor said it was his watch. After I had taken him to the watchhouse, I returned the way I came, and looked into all the areas; I could not find the watch. The prisoner and the prosecutor were both in the dark.

JOHN BETHEL . I am the beadle; I was at the watchhouse; I searched the prisoner; I found this pocket-handkerchief on the prisoner; as soon as the prosecutor saw it, he said it was his. After we had locked the prisoner up, we went with a candle and lantern to look for the property, and returned with the watchmen to the place where the prosecutor was stopped. We found this pocket-book with four one-pound notes in it. We found no watch. We found these keys; they belong to the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. This handkerchief is mine, and they keys are mine, the pocket-book is mine; I had four one-pound notes; they are in it now.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privately from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-76

943. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Mary Ann , the wife of John Neal , on the 5th of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a shawl, value 5 s. the property of John Neal .

The prosecutrix not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-77

944. WILLIAM GARDNER and HENRY YATES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , one box, value 2 s. one barrow, value 2 l. and two hundred pounds weight of soap, value 5 l. 2 s. the property of Edward May Bercher , in his dwelling-house . And SOPHIA CROUCH and SARAH GARDNER for feloniously receiving the same goods, they knowing them to have been stolen .

EDWARD MAY BERCHER. I am a tallow chandler : I lost this soap on Thursday evening, the 20th of October. it was in my private passage: the barrow was beyond the shop door, at the further end of the passage; it was placed there. In the course of the day I lost it, I believe between eight and nine o'clock. I went to Bow-street to give information, and to enquire about it, and while I was looking for an officer, the officers who are here, came to my house in my absence. I returned about ten o'clock, and found they had the property in their possession.

WILLIAM GODFREY. I am a patrole of Bow-street. On Thursday, the 20th of October, I received private information that there was a barrow wheeling along Broad-street, and a large box upon it. I went to a place in Charles-street, where they supposed the property was; I proceeded along the passage to a back room on the ground floor; I knocked at the door, the door was locked. They asked me who was there; I told them a friend; it was full five minutes before they opened the door. I saw the four prisoners in the room, and a box containing soap, two men and two women. The box was there broken open, the cords cut. Gardner was sitting down on the box smoking his pipe, Yates was on the bed, Crouch was washing, and the other woman

sitting by the side of her. I asked how the box came there; Crouch said, she and Gardner brought it in out of the passage, supposing it was left by some person. I searched the whole of the prisoners; on Crouch I found two pieces of soap in her pocket, which matched the soap in the box. The barrow was taken to the watchhouse by the watchman found in the street.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . I am an officer. I was in company with Godfrey. I went into this room with him, where the four prisoner were. I searched the bed; between the bed and the sacking were these two pieces of soap, and under the bed was this cake of soap; this cord was hanging about the bed, it appeared the cord had been cut.

Q. Whose room is it - A. Sophia Crouch 's, the stout woman.

THOMAS ANDREWS . On the 20th of October, I was doing some business for Mr. Payne in Charles-street. I saw a wheelbarrow going by, with a corded box, a person of the name of John Green was wheeling it to where we stood talking together. I saw the prisoner Yates was one of the four men.

Q. All you know is, you saw a box on the barrow, and Yates was one of the four persons with it - A. He is the person.

THOMAS PAINE . I live at 38, Charles-street. I saw the box in the room. I did not see it go in. I I only saw the box in Sophia Crouch 's room.

Q. What is Crouch - A. I do not know; I let her the room.

Q. Do you let people lodgings without knowing who they are and what they are - A. Some times we do.

Gardner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I was going past the door, I had a pipe just filled with tobacco; I went into this room to ask for a light. I had not been in the room two minutes when Godfrey knocked at the door; Sophia Crouch said, who is there.

Yate's Defence. I was with Gardner when he picked up the box; I went into the room with him. Godfrey knocked at the door; Sophia Crouch asked who was there, and opened the door; they came in.

Crouch's Defence. I had been out on an errand, and when I came in, this box stood in the passage; I fell over it. I asked the young woman to bring me a light; she brought me a light; I saw it was a box of soap.

GARDNER, GUILTY, aged 20,

YATES, GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

CROUCH, GUILTY, aged 22,

Of receiving knowing it to be stolen .

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH GARDNER , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-78

945. WILLIAM NELSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 8 s. two hats, value 10 s. a pair of stockings. value s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of gaiters, value d. two broaches, value 6 s. and a locket, value 1 s. the property of Benjamin King , in the dwelling. house of Elizabeth Hill , widow.

BENJAMIN KING. I am a stone mason . I lost all the things mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Did you lose them all at one time - A. I cannot say. I left my lodging to go into the country three weeks ago last Monday. I left the the prisoner there lodging in the house; he lodged in the same room with me.

Q. What was he - A. I don't know. These things were in my box when I went into the country. The landlady sent for me. I came home, and found my things gone. I have only seen my locket since.

MRS. HILL. I am the owner of the house where King lodged.

Q. Do you know any thing to prove that the prisoner took these things - A. There was no other person in the room but he and a young man.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner. I found the duplicate of a locket in his waistcoat pocket. This is the locket.

Prosecutor. It is my locket.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this charge.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing the locket only .

Whipped in Jail , and Discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-79

946. RICHARD BLOOMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , six yards and a half of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of Simeon Brown , privately in his shop .

HENRY NEWSMAN . I am a servant to Simeon Brown , linen-draper , 44, Broad-street, St. Giles's . On Tuesday, the 11th of October, the prisoner stole a piece of print that hanged on a line by the door; directly I got outside of the door the prisoner was pointed out to me. I pursued him, and took the piece of the print from under his coat. This is the print; it is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Whipped in Jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-80

947. PATRICK CONWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 26th of September , a great coat, value 10 s. the property of Soloman Hart , privately in his shop .

SOLOMAN HART. I keep a clothes shop . No. 206 Shadwell High-street . On the 26th, of September, in the morning, I pinned the great coat against a piece of list, and spread it out inside of the door. I missed it about two o'clock in the afternoon.

JOHN MATTINGLEY. On the 26th of September, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came by my shop, he had Mr Hart's great coat on. I took him to the watchhouse. I saw the coat claimed by Hart. This is the coat.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the coat in the street.

GUILTY, aged 29.

of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined 6 months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-81

948. SAMUEL HOLT was indicted for feloniously on the 2nd of October , a pair of gaiters, value 15 d. and two shoes value 1 s. the property of William Pritchard .

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . On the 2d of October, the prisoner called upon me. he said, to pay me a debt he owed me. All that I know is, I lost my gaiters and shoes.

WILLIAM DICKENS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at his lodging in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell. I found the two odd shoes in his room, and the gaiters, He took me to a gin-shop, and gave them me. These are the gaiters and the shoes.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, or I should not have done so.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-82

949. THOMAS DONNOGAN was indicted, for that he, on the 10th of October , upon Thomas Radford , a subject of our Lord the King, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did cut and stab him in and upon his face, with intent in so doing, to kill and murder him .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-83

950. MARY PERRY , MARY MASCALL , and MARY WATSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , sixty yards of ribbon, value 1 l. the property of George Lack , privately in his shop .

GEORGE LACK. I am a haberdasher . On the 20th of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners Mascall and Perry come into my shop; they came into my shop together to purchase come ribbon to trim a bonnet. My wife was in the shop serving; she is not here. They gave a great deal of trouble. They were shewn three drawers of ribbons; my wife served them; they purchased a bit of ribbon at threepence a yard; they paid for it. The prisoner Perry paid me for it; they left the shop; in about five minutes after they left the shop, Johnson the officer came in. He produced four pieces of the ribbons. three of which I can swear to be mine, and the fourth piece, I missed a piece resembling it in make and shape; the fourth piece I was not so sure of as the three, it had no mark; the other three pieces had. They were worth twenty shillings, to the amount of sixty yards.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city officer. On the 20th of last month, on my going up Holborn, I met the three prisoners. Suspecting their intention, I followed them from Holborn to 100, Holywell-lane, Shoreditch, to Mr. Lack's shop; they continued in company all the way. At Mr. Lack's shop, Perry and Mascall went in; the other waited outside; the one outside I took into custody before Perry and Mascall came out of the shop. I had a gentleman with me, his name is Musgrove. I desired him, when the two others came out of the shop, for him to take me, and I would take the other. I laid hold of them when they came out, with his assistance; Mascall had the umbrella. I saw by the appearance of the umbrella, I thought there was something in it that ought not to be. In the umbrella there was four pieces of ribbon at the bottom; here are the three pieces that are marked; these three pieces were shown to Mr. Lack, and claimed by him and his wife. Mascall said she had not taken any ribbon, she had purchased a bit. The three pieces were taken into Mr. Lack's and there they were claimed. These are the the three pieces of ribbon.

MR. LACK. My shop mark are upon the ribbons; they are mine.

Mascall's Defence. I and Perry went to the prosecutor's shop, and purchased a bit of ribbon. I laid the umbrella down; while I was being served, there were a great many people in the shop. How the pieces of ribbon came into the umbrella I know not.

Perry's Defence. The same.

PERRY, GUILTY , aged 19.

MASCALL, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

WATSON, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-84

951. WILLIAM COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of October , forty-six pounds weight of ham, value 2 l. 6 s. the property of Richard Carr .

RICHARD CARR . I keep a chandler's shop ; I lost my ham on the 9th of October. I missed it between eight and nine in the evening. On the next day I saw my ham in the prisoner's room, in a box; the knuckle was cut off in my shop; I knew the ham directly.

EBENEZEE DALTON. I am an officer; on the 10th of October I went with Carr to the prisoner's room. I told the prisoner I had come about the ham; he said he had none; I said I am sure you have. I took a fork and put it in the pot on the fire, and pulled up a piece of ham. He then said, I have got some ham in that box, I bought it in Whitechapel. He could not tell what he gave for it.

Prisoner's Defence. This piece of ham I bought for one pound, two shillings and sixpence, in Whitechapel. I was intoxicated when I bought it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined two months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-85

952. WILLIAM COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , two pounds and a half weight of wafers, value 10 s. the property of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN . I keep a wax and wafer shop in Whitechapel. I tied up thirty pounds of wafers in two pound and a half bags. I lost one of these bags. I cannot exactly say the day I lost it. On Friday I missed one bag. I bagged them up several days before that.

EBENEZER DALTON . I found this one bag of wafers in the same box I found the ham.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-86

953. HANNAH WILSON was indicted for that she, on the 9th of October , being in the dwelling house of Charles Paine , feloniously did steal a watch. value 4 l. two seals, value 30 s. and a watch key, value 5 s. the property of John Kearns .

JOHN KEARNS . I am a cutler . On the 19th of October, late at night, I was coming home from a friends in the Adelphi, about a quarter before one. I met the prisoner in Drury-lane. I went home with her to Charles Paine 's house, in Charles-street, Drury-lane ; it is a lodging house, and when I got there. I staid till day light. The prisoner staid with me some hours, and then she absconded. I staid in the room until seven o'clock, and then she had been with me six hours. When I awoke in the morning the prisoner was gone, and then I concluded I was robbed. I missed my watch, I have never seen it since.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-87

954. JOHN BUTLER BELL was indicted, for that he, at the hour of four in the night of the 23d of October , being in the dwelling house of John Hook , feloniously did steal three waistcoats, value 7 s. a pair of breeches. value 3 s a pair of pantaloons, value 12 s. three shirts, value 7 s. two fans, value 1 s. eight handkerchiefs, value 3 s. four pair of stockings. value 7 s. the property of John Hook .

JOHN HOOK . I a housekeeper , No. 2, Sutton-street, Soho . On Sunday night, the 23d of October, I and my wife were the last up in the house. I saw before I went to bed, that the house was all perfectly safe, and security fastened. I fastened up my house, and my cellar flap as usual. I am a licensed victualler. About four o'clock in the morning the watchman said. I had thieves in my house. I came down to the watchman; he told me a drayman had been past, and had told him he saw a man coming out of my cellar flap. I went to the cellar door and found it secure as I had left it the over night; and on my examining the cellar. I saw a box that was left in my care, and the contents of the box scattered about in the cellar, and I saw the prisoner in the corner of the cellar, hid behind a butt. The contents of the box, the the greatest part of them, are in the indictment. I had been in the cellar in the afternoon; there were none of the things in that box scattered about then; the prisoner I have seen come in and out of the house, I knew his person.

Q. Did you find any part of the house broken - A. No, I found some of the property about him, which had been in the box; I and the watchman found the prisoner in the cellar, and the box broken open.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, and found some pocket handkerchiefs and several articles; the gentleman that belongs to them is here.

Prosecutor. They are all mine. I left them in the care of Mr. Hook.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-88

955. WILLIAM SUTHERBY was indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , forty-eight yards of linen cloth, value 6 l. the property of John Henry Burchell , William Walford , and Charles Green .

JAMES GARCH . I am in the employ of Messrs. Burchell. The names of the partners are John Henry Burchall , William Walford, and Charles Green. They are Dyers , at Old Ford; on Saturday, the 8th of October, we had three hundred and fifty long ells to dye scarlet. I dyed them scarlet. I am positive, on Saturday evening there were three hundred and fifty dyed scarlet. I saw them on the Saturday night. The prisoner is a setter to dry the cloths; they put them on hooks to dry.

JOHN RUTH . I am foreman to the prosecutors; on Wednesday, he 12th of October, I counted all the pieces of long ells that had been dyed scarlet. I missed two of them; they are at least worth thirty shillings.

THOMAS ARNOLD . I am a setter in the employ of the prosecutors. The prisoner was a setter; on Monday the 10th of October, the prisoner asked me if I was going out; I said I should go out and have a pint of beer at one o'clock. The prisoner said he would do the same. Some of the men were gone to dinner; they lived thereabouts. No one was left in the field but the prisoner and me. I returned in about three quarters of an hour; the prisoner was not there; he did not come to work no more in the course of that day. There is a place in the field where these pieces were put when they were dry, and they are left until we have done work.

EDWARD HOLMES . I have known the prisoner twenty years. I am a setter; he is a setter; he lives in Thames-street, Dog-row, Bethnal-green; on Monday, the 10th of October, I saw the prisoner in a field close by the prosecutor's premises; he was coming in a direction from the prosecutor's, as if to Bethnal Green. He had two bundles of long ells, scarlet, in his arms; I hallowed out to him, Will; he walked away from me, and made no answer. This was about one o'clock.

GEORGE PLANK . I know the prisoner. I met him coming to Bethnal Green; he had a bundle of scarlet cloth on his left shoulder; I cannot tell how many pieces. I said, cannot your cart take the goods fast enough, without your taking them? he replied, these are wanted in a hurry.

ELIZABETH BAXTER . I saw the prisoner come home on Monday the 10th of October; he had some scarlet cloth across his shoulder. He went home with it; he went out about four o'clock in the afternoon, with a bag apparently full.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday evening; he said he knew nothing about it, he denied it before the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this charge. I worked for the prosecutors almost two years, and always conducted myself honestly.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months , and to be publickly whipped opposite the prosecutor's dye-house, at old Ford .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-89

956. THOMAS LEWIS was indicted for that he on the 15th of September , certain marks, to wit, nine marks, of the broad ar then being upon three casks, the property of lord the king , for victualling stores, the said marks being usually used upon such stores of our Lord the King, did deface and take out of the three casks; and John Wallis , for that he, before the felony aforesaid, was committed by Thomas Lewis , on the same day, and the same place, did cause and procure the said Thomas Lewis the felony to do and commit for the purpose of concealing the three casks, the stores of our Lord the King .

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a surveyor of the Thames Police; on the the 15th of September I went on board the brig Bactor ; she was lying off New Crane Stairs, Shadwell, Middlesex . When I went on board, I saw Lewis on deck; I asked him if there was any King's stores on board, he said not that he knew of. I then proceeded to search the ship, and in the hold I saw three casks, and underneath the casks I found a quantity of casks. I produce this bag of chips; I found these chips under the casks; there was then part of the broad arrow upon many of them; they had just been cut off.

Q. Had any thing been done to the casks to conceal the chips being cut off - A. Yes, they had been painted; the paint was wet upon them; the casks had been originally painted all over, but they were fresh painted over the parts that had been cut off. There had been chips taken off by each side of the bung-hole, and also on the head of the cask; the places where the chips had been taken off are the places were the broad arrow is usually put on. I went on board and asked Lewis where the casks come from; he said from France, by the commissary in France; he said he had taken soldiers; these casks were sent on board to contain water for the soliders. I then asked him how they come not to be returned at Deptford, when he returned the other stores; he said he was freighted at Bourdeaux with brandy, I asked him why they were not returned back? He said that Wallis the other prisoner, who went out as supercargo of the ship had told him that the casks were given to him by the commissary in France, and that he had no occasion to return them. Lewis told me he was master of the vessel himself; I then asked him who cut the marks out of the casks; he said he did not know who had done it.

Mr. BELL. I am master cooper of the victualling premises at Deptford. The casks are usually marked on each side of the bung and upon the head. On these casks, the marks on each side of the bung are taken out or defaced. They are the marks that we usually put on them. I have no doubt they were the stores of the victualling office, Deptford; the rase mark is taken out; it is a little mark. I have examined all the three casks; I have no doubt or hesitation in saying they are part of his Majestys stores at Deptford.

JOHN SMITH. I am an apprentice to the owners of the ship. I remember Mitcnell coming on board, and seizing these three casks.

Q. What had been done on these three casks - A. When he came on board that morning, he gave orders to get them out from underneath some wood that was forward; he cut out the marks of the broad arrow, and told me to paint them over; he painted some, and I the others, and afterwards, in about three or four hours, the officer came on board.

Lewis's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I stand before you charged with an offence against an act of parliament, to this time unknown to me. On the 31st of August I shipped myself on board the brig Bactor, Captain Wallis, commander, at three pounds a month, and continued on board as mate. Soon after I became acquainted with Captain Wallis; he told me a young man of the name of Shew, who was subject to the impress; he said it would be necessary for me to have my name on the book as captain, and Shew as mate. I never took any charge of her. I was always obedient to the orders of Captain Wallis. Three puncheons came on board, and were filled with water at Bourdeaux, for the ship's company. I arrived at Deptford, and was informed, the ship casks were not to be delivered at the victualling office; Captain Wallis ordered me to take out them marks of the three casks; I did as he commanded me before all the ship's company. I thought I was correct. I still left most conspicuously the broad arrow on the hoops of the said casks. I had my chests in the deck of the vessel, when a Thames Police officer came on board; he said the three casks were concealed, that they had his Majesty' mark defaced; he found by the men on board that I had done it. I was then taken to the Thames Police office, and then ordered to attend the next day; not knowing the difficulty, I attended the following day at the office, where I met with the captain, and instead taking to himself the ill consequence of this act, in consequence of his command, he converted it into a shield for his own protection, saying that I was captain, and that he acted as supercargo; that the magistrate would not believe, and from the evidence then adduced, the magistrate committed Captain Wallis and me for trial, whereas I acted by the captain's commands.

LEWIS, GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for fourteen years .

WALLIS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-90

957. SARAH SLOPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a watch, value 2 l. a clock, value 6 s. the property of John Askew , in the dwelling house of Samuel Chapman ,

JOHN ASKEW . I live at 8, Feather's-court, Drury-lane , in the one pair of stairs room, On the 26th of October I missed my watch, and my wife missed her clock. They have since been found at the pawnbroker's. The prisoner worked for my wife at the army work, and lodged and lived with us. I am an undertaker ,

THOHAS CHAPMAN. I am a pawnbroker in Chandos-street, Covent-garden. On the 26th of October, the prisoner pledge a watch with me; I advanced fifteen shillings upon it. This is the watch.

WILLIAM NEWBY . I am a servant to Mr. Allen; on the 22d of October the prisoner pawned a clock with me for six shillings. I am positive the prisoner is the woman. This is the clock.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, and this clock is my wife's.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY, aged 20.

of stealing, to the value of 39 shillings .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-91

958. JOHN DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , a looking-glass, value 30 s. the property of John Ayre , privately in his shop .

JOHN AYRE . On the 22nd of October, I left my shop about half after five o'clock, and when I returned, the prisoner was in the shop in custody, and the looking-glass by the side of him. When I went out I left the looking-glass on a chest of drawers in the shop.

DAVID M'QUEEN. I am a shoe-maker; I live next door to Mr. Ayre, in Drury-lane. From information, I pursued the prisoner, and took him in Newcastle-street, with the glass.

Prosecutor. It is my glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out looking for work all day; two young chaps gave me the glass, and told me to take care of it for them. I did not know what to do with it; the witness came and took me.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 2 months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-92

959. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a hat, value 10 s. the property of John Boag .

JOHN BOAG. I am a sailor , I live at the Rose and Crown, Dartmouth-street, Westminster . I lost the hat between the 7th and the 16th. I saw the the hat when I locked the room up. I left the lodgings on the 7th and returned on the 16th; I found my door open, and my hat gone, I have seen my hat since. The prisoner was a soldier in the 1st regiment of Foot Guards ; he was quartered in the house.

THOMAS WETCH. I am a salesman, 6 Monmouth-street. On the 12th of October, the prisoner came to me, and said he wanted a waistcoat to work in; I looked him out one for nine shillings. He had this hat on, it was almost new; he said, he would change the hat for the waistcoat and some money to boot. I gave him the waistcoat and a shilling for the hat. I am quite sure the prisoner is the man.

Prosecutor. That is my hat; I gave twenty-four shillings for it.

Prisoner's Defence. He accused me of taking the hat, and promised to forgive me if I would tell where it was. I told him directly, and took him to the place where it was.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-93

960. THOMAS WALL , WILLIAM TOOLEY , and WILLIAM ANDREWS were indicted for feloously stealing, on the 19th of September , one watch, value 20 l. a chain, value 2 l. a seal, value 10 l. and a key, value 2 s. the property of Rice Ives , from his person .

RICE IVES. I keep the White Hart , in Oxford-street.

Q. Had you your watch, chain, seals, and key, stolen from you - A. I had, on the 19th of September, I was two doors of the other side of Berwick-street, Soho ; I had been in Montague-square. I was returning home; I was quite sober. I met the prisoners in company with seven or eight others.

Q. Were they strangers to you - A. No; I had known them before, but at that moment I did not recollect their persons, although I had known them before; I had known many of them perfectly, and the others I had seen before. They were noisy. I was going off the pavement to make way for them; the prisoner Andrews either was or appeared to be in liquor, he staggered against me, and threw me against the pavement, seven or eight immediately came round me, and took from me my watch.

Q. The staggering against you, you say was done by Andrews - A. Yes; I am positive to his person, he had a white apron on. I had a knowledge of him when I got to the watchhouse. The man that took my watch is not here. I struck him, as he staggered back I saw my watch drop out of his hand. I could have recovered my watch if it had not been for the prisoner Wall.

Q. Did Wall pick up the watch - A. No; he jumped right in between me and the man that took it. I laid hold of Wall by the collar, and kept hold of him by the collar, and kept hold of him until the watchman came up. Tooley and Andrews followed us to the watchhouse; the watchman took Wall to the watchhouse. I observed to the watchman that we must have them as soon as he got rid of Wall; they without any ceremony followed us into the watchhouse, and the moment they came in, I gave charge of them.

JOHN PEARCE . I am a watchman. After I had called the hour of half past twelve, I heard the call of watch; I ran up immediately. I found the prisoner Wall in the custody of the prosecutor; the prosecutor gave charge of him to me. He told me he was the man that prevented him from recovering his watch. There were several people around us in two parties of two and three. We proceeded on to the watchhouse. The prosecutor said, as soon as you deliver Wall at the watchhouse lay hold of the man with the apron on, and I will take the other. On our coming into the watchhouse, Andrews and Tooley came in also, and Mr. Ives gave charge of them immediately; the prosecutor said they were part of the gang that robbed him in Oxford-street, and taken his watch, chain, seal, and key from him.

Q. to Mr. Ives. What kind of a watch was it - A. It was a fine tortoishell watch, the watch cost me twenty-five guineas; the chain was a heavy gold curbed chain, I gave five guineas for it. I have

never seen it since. I advertised the watch, with ten guineas reward.

Wall's Defence. When I was coming up Brunswick-street towards my way home I ran down Oxford-street, Mr. Ives catched hold of me by the collar; he said, I have lost my watch, I shall take you; he appeared intoxicated, and when I was going into the watchhouse, these other two men were taken into the watchhouse. I never saw them before. Mr. Ives stated to the magistrate that I stooped down to make away with the property, although Mr. Ives knew the man who had taken the watch. and as to my moving my arms, they were tired with the watchman holding of them tight.

Andrews's Defence. I am innocent of the crime I am charged with.

Tooley's Defence. I saw Wall in custody of the two watchmen; I followed them into the watchhouse, and then I was taken into custody.

WALL, GUILTY , aged 26.

TOOLEY, GUILTY , aged 17.

ANDREWS, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-94

961. JAMES M'DERMOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a pair of stockings, value 20 d. and two pieces of ribbon value 10 s. the property of Thomas Smith .

JENKINS WILLIANS. On Friday the 2nd of October, I saw the prisoner unpin a pair of stockings, that were against the door, they were under cover in the passage; he brought them into the shop he stood close to the counter, with the stockings in his hand, nobody behind the counter could see the stockings in his hand; be kept them concealed before the counter; he asked for something on the counter, and then he asked for change of a twenty pound note; he did not tender the note. I answered, I could not change it; the shopman was serving a customer with ribbons. I saw the prisoner take from the box, a coloured ribbon, and then he asked the shopman to let him see some white ribbon; it was shewed to him; he bought one yard, and paid sixpence for it. I saw him put his hand into the box, and take a piece of white ribbon. I then sent for an officer. I went round the counter, and would not let the prisoner go. He asked me what I wanted with him; I said only my own, he threw the stockings on the counter, and said if I would give him change he would pay me for them. I asked him for the note; he said he would not give it me. Then the officer came, and took the ribbon out of his pocket. These are the two pieces of ribbon, and these are the stockings they are my masters property.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the gentleman.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined three months and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-95

962. GEORGE CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a trunk, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Barnabus Merrick .

BARNABUS MERRICK. On the 12th of October, the prisoner called upon me, and asked me if I would let him my trunk; I let it him for two shillings the day. In the evening he came and paid me two shillings; he said, he wanted it for the next day, might he keep it in the shed belonging to the house, as he wanted it early the next day; he said, his name was James Hart , he lived at No. 61, Nicoll-street, Bethnel Green. After two days the trunk did not come home. I applied at the place where he gave me directions; there was no person of that name lived there; there was a shed to the house; I looked in the shed; my truck was not there. About a fortnight after, I met the prisoner; I asked him why he had not brought my truck home; he said, he would bring it home that afternoon; by what he had under his arm, I thought he was a weaver. I have seen my truck since, at a wheelers, in the New Cut, by Lambeth.

WILLIAM DUKE . I am a wheeler, in the New Cut, Lambeth. About a month ago, the prisoner came to me with a truck to sell; I gave him one pound seven shillings for the truck. This is the receipt I got of him. The truck was afterwards claimed by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-96

963. GEORGE CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a truck, value 4 l. the property of Stephen Palmer .

STEPHEN PALMER . On the 1st of October, the prisoner came and hired a truck of me at threepence per hour. I make trucks for myself. He said, he wanted to move a chest of drawers; I let him have a truck; he was to return it at eight o'clock at night. He said, he lived at 12, Christopher-street, Holywell Mount. He never returned with the truck. I saw the truck afterwards in the New Cut, Lambeth, and to day I have seen it at the New Inn, over the way; I am sure it is my truck.

MR. DUKE. I live in the New Cut, Lambeth. The prisoner came to sell this truck on the next day; I stopped him and the truck. The prosecutor has seen it, and claimed it.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-97

964. SAMUEL CONLIFFE and JOHN COOPER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , sixty pound weight of cheese, value 50 s. the property of Edward Powell .

EDWARD POWELL . I am a master of a barge, in the Grand Junction Canel ; my barge was in the Canel, near Paddington wharf . On the morning of Tuesday, the 18th of October, I discovered that I had lost two cheshire cheeaes from my barge.

MR. STRANGE. I keep the Green Man, at Paddengton. On Monday the 17th of October, Conliffe applied to me to buy some cheeses, about the middle of the day and told me a boat man had some cheeses to sell, if I wanted to buy any. I asked him the weight and the price; he did not know either. I told him to bring them to me, I would buy if I could, and

between eleven and twelve at night Conliffe came to me again, As I was coming out of the parlour he called me to come to him; he took me into the kitchen in my house, there sat Cooper, I saw a couple of cheeses in a bag. I asked them the price of the cheeses. They were both together. I will not be positive whether it was fifty or sixty shillings. I thought it was a fair price, according to the size of them. I told them they were too much for me; they said, one was about forty pounds; the weight of the other they could not guess. I went from there, and told my wife, and when I returned to them, they reduced the price, until they got down to thirty shillings; at last, I was to have them at my own price. I heard that they were stolen cheeses. I left them in the kitchen. I told them the cheesses were all safe. They said, they wanted money; I said, to Conliffe, I will lend you six shillings. The next morning Cooper came into my bar; I asked him where his companion was, and said I must see you both together, and then we would see about it. I then had them both taken into custody. These are the cheeses.

Prosecutor. They are the cheeses that I lost from my boat.

CONLIFFE, GUILTY , aged 24.

COOPER, GUILTY , aged 21,

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-98

965. WILLIAM BLACKHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , three leaves of deal, value 3 s , the property of Julias Mott .

WILLIAM COATES , I conduct the business of Julias Mott, timber merchant , No. 4, Kingsland-road, he has no partner. The prisoner was one of Mr. Motts customer s, and has been so two or three years, On the 22nd of September, or near thereabouts, the prisoner came to the yard about three o'clock in the afternoon, he went into the shed, where the deals were previously cut into widths for customers; he brought out several leaves of deal, which I observed was more than the quantity he usually purchased. He set them at the counting-house door, where we usually take the money; he then went into the shed again, where he remained some time; during which, I examined the leaves of deal he had brought up, which were divided into two parcels; I took the money and attended the gentleman; I asked him, what number of leaves of deal he wanted; he stated the number to be the larger portion, taking no notice of the smaller he had put of one side; he said, he wanted as many as the larger parcel contained; the larger parcel contained five or six leaves; the smaller parcel was three leaves. I made the entry in the Cash-book. I cannot tell the exact price. I think it must be seven shillings. I gave him the opportunity; he took both parcels. I saw him take them both.

COURT. Gentlemen of the jury, you cannot make a felony of this.

JURY. He might have come and paid for it the next morning.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-99

966. THOMAS BURGESS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , two bridles value 15 s. the property of Robert Barrowdale .

ROBERT BARROWDALE . I am a stable-keeper in Bond-street . I missed the two bridles on the 22nd of September, they were taken out of a stable in my yard. The prisoner had lived with me about five or six weeks.

- Philo. I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner I watched him out of an old iron shop, he was then in company with two others, He had offered the bridles for sale. I took him to Bow-street and found the bridles upon him. These are the bridles.

Prosecutor. They are the bridles that I lost from my yard. I never suspected the prisoner until I saw these things.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 1 year and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-100

967. JAMES DYKIN , JOHN HIPPS , and WILLIAM JOHN JONES SULIVAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , twenty pieces of wood, value 10 s. the property of Zachariah Skyring ,

ZAGHARIAH SKYRING. These pieces of wood were taken from some houses in Hackney-road .

JAMES WADDILAOVE . I live within half a mile of Cambridge Heath. I have the care of twenty-five houses. On the 11th of October, I saw the three prisoners in Nelson's-place, Hackney road, they had a load of wood each on their shoulders, part a door frame and some wood that had been knocked up against the windows; it had all been knocked to pieces, and connected into bundles for each of them. This is the wood.

Q. to Mr. Skyring. Have you seen this wood - A. I have.

Q. Can you say with certainty, that this wood was taken from your building - A. I cannot say I can.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-101

968. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a coal-scuttle, value 1 l. the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a furnishing iron monger , in Shadwell High-street. I lost a coal-scuttle on the 6th of October; a boy brought this note, it is an order for a coal-scuttle, signed Thomas Ebbles . Having a neighbour of that name, and supposing it came from him, I delivered the coal-skuttle to the boy.

Q. Was the prisoner by - A. No, not at all within sight. The boy went out of the shop, and crossed the street, not in a direction to Mr. Ebbles. I and my shopman followed the boy; when I went out I met my shopman with the prisoner; the prisoner had got the coal scuttle.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-102

969. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a chair value 6 s. the property of Thomas Davies .

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the wife of Thomas Davis ; he is a broker , in Golden-lane . This chair was under my own window. The value of the chair was six shillings,

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it - A. I saw it a few minutes before; the chair was gone between five and six in the evening; the chair was brought back.

FRANCES EASTWOOD . I live opposite to Mrs. Davis. I saw the prisoner take the chair.

EDWARD GOUGH . I heard the cry of stop thief. I stopped the prisoner with the chair.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry to say it is my first offence.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined 14 days , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-103

970. ELIZABETH COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a shirt, value 3 s. the property of James Oliver .

Mrs. OLIVER. I wash for my brother James Oliver . I live at Ball's Pond; the shirt was sent home to my mother-in-law.

Q. When had you seen your mother-in-law - A. At the latter end of August. The prisoner was a servant out of place . The prisoner robbed her of several things when my mother was in the country. My brother lost his shirt; I could not tell him any thing about it, until my mother came home, and then the shirt was found. Mr. Prince took the prisoner, and then the ticket was obtained.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I apprehended the prisoner; on searching her, I found a ticket of a petticoat, shirt. and spencer, pawned for nine shillings. Ann Oliver said her sister had lost a shirt. I took her sister to the pawnbroker; she claimed the shirt.

JAMES OLIVER , I live at Mrs. Fothergill's, 106, Aldersgate-street. I produce a shirt pawned on the 22d of August by the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. It is my brother's shirt. It is the shirt I lost at my mother's.

GUILTY , aged 20,

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-104

971. HARRIET DAVENPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a watch value 2 l. the property of Henry Dowding , from his person , and JOHN NEAL for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the same, he well knowing it to be stolen .

HENRY DOWDING . I am a taylor . I lost my watch on the 23d of October. As I was going home I met the prisoner Davenport between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, at the corner of Charles-street, Drury-lane. She asked me to go home with her; she said she had an apartment of her own. I went with her up into a garret in Charles-street . I was with her ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I came down, and she followed me, and when I came into the street' I missed my watch. I turned back to look for the prisoner, there was nobody to be perceived in the passage. I took the patrole with me up stairs to the room where I had been. The door was fast; I knocked at the door, and a dog barked. Afterwards he dog growled, as if somebody was holding its mouth. I asked for the door to be opened; nobody answered. I went with the patrol to the watchhouse to ask if we might break the door open. The constable would not give leave: we went back and knocked at the next room door; there was a man and a woman there; we stood a considerable time on the landing of the stairs; the patrol hid his light, thinking somebody might come up the stairs. In about a quarter of an hour, the prisoner Neal came up the stairs; the prisoner Neal came up the stairs, the patrol seized him by the collar, and while the patrol had hold of his collar, Neal dropped the watch.

Q. Had Neal been in the room - A. Not as I know of; there was no light in the room, and the watch was without a case. We took him to the watchhouse; it had a case when I lost it. I found it on the stairs without a case. I am sure I had the watch; I felt the watch as I went up stairs; I am certain I had the watch with me. I lost the watch after I got into that house. I am sure of it; I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

Q. Are you sure that the man dropped the watch - A. Yes, it fell at the time that the patrol had hold of him.

JOHN WHITECLOTH. I a constable. I produce the watch. I know no more than holding the property. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

JOSEPH FURZEMAN . I am a patrol. Between twelve and one, on the 23d of October, in Charles-street I met the prosecutor. He said he had been robbed of his watch; he took me to the house; I went up stairs with him, and knocked at the door; I went down to the watchhouse to know whether I might break open the door, The constable would not give me any order. I went back and waited a quarter of an hour, and the prisoner Neal came up stairs. I then took the lantern from under my coat; Neal then jumped down two or three stairs, I followed him, and perceived the watch go against my thigh, and it fell down on the stairs. I called for Baker the watchman to take hold of him, while I picked up the watch. I picked up the watch without the case. I took Neal to the watchhouse. I went back and found the case on the stairs where I found the watch.

Davenport's Defence. I put the watch on the bannister of the stairs; I certainly took the watch, and laid it on the bannister of the stairs. Neal knows nothing about it, no more of it then a child unborn.

DAVENPORT, GUILTY , aged 24.

NEAL, GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months , and fined 1 s.

Reference Number: t18141026-105

972. PETER DOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , three tin cans, value 3 s. two gallons of Sperm oil, value 12 s. three gallons of lamp oil, value 10 d. and two pound weight of stone blue, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Hukbuck .

THOMAS HUBBUCK. I am an oil and colourman . The prisoner was my porter . I never suspected the prisoner. The officer detected him in the street with my property on him.

JOSEPH PELLIS. I am an officer, On the night of the 10th of October, a quarter before nine o'clock. I stopped the prisoner in Broad-street, St. George's parish. He was carrying across his shoulder a bag and basket. I asked him what he had got there; he told me oil, he said he come from Mr. Hubbuck, and he was going to carry it to Mr. Hubbuck's customers in Whitechapel. I had a suspicion all was not right; I took him into a public house and asked him for a bill of parcels; he said he had none. I asked him where he was going to carry it to? he said to a private house, but he did not know the name. I asked him if Mr. Hubbuck knew of it? He said he did not. On examining the can, I found two gallons of sperm oil, and a gallon of turpentine in the can in the bag. I took him to the office; I then went and searched his house, and in the cupboard in the first lower room, I found a tin can, containing two gallons of lamp oil, and a bladder containing a pint and a half of turpentine, and ten pound weight of red paint, and two pounds of stone blue, the whole of which I took to the office. I asked the prisoner about them; he said he brought them from Mr. Hubbuck's a little at a time, his wife had been very ill, and he was in great distress. This is the property

Prosecutor. I know the whole of the tin cans; I know the blue, and the tin can containing the red paint. I dealt in all the the articles.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; I have a wife and two small children.

Prosecutor. The prisoner behaved much to my satisfaction for many years

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one month , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-106

973. JOHN HALEY and MARY HALEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a shirt, value 7 s. a dressing gown, value 25 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 23 s. a waistcoat piece, value 40 s. two pair of pantaloons, value 50 s. a pair of breeches, value 14 s. an epaulet, value 20 s. two pair of gloves, value 4 s. two pair of gaiters, value 5 s. two pair of braces, value 2 s. and one handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Abraham Simmonds .

ABRAHAM SIMMONDS . John Healy was my shop-man . In consequence of information I received, I went to Mr. Salkeld, pawnbroker in the Strand. I there found an epaulet, that belonged to me, pledged for twelve shillings. I obtained a search warrant, and searched the prisoner's lodgings the following morning. I there found a quantity of duplicates between the mattras and the bed, and some of my goods scattered all over the house.

THOMAS PACE. I am a constable; on the 15th of September I went with a search warrant to the prisoner's house. Mr. Simmonds found the things, and duplicates, and gave them to me. There is forty-four duplicates; ten duplicates at Salkeld's, and six at Ashman's, in the Strand. These are the duplicates of articles pledged at Ashman's.

Mr. RITT. I am shopman at Mr. Salkeld's; one of the prisoners pawned at our shop for seven or eight years. I produce a pair of pantaloons, two waistcoats, a pair of trowsers, an epaulet, a pair of gloves, and a pair of breeches, and a waistcoat piece; these were all pledged by the woman.

Prosecutor. I am certain they are all mine; and the epaulet is mine; the epaulet is worth two pounds fifteen shillings.

WILLIAM GAPSON. I am shopman to Mr. Ashman, pawnbroker, I produce a shirt pawned by Mary Haley , and a flannel gown pawned by a person of the name of Smith.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

JOHN HALEY , GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

MARY HALEY , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-107

974. JOHN HALEY was indicted for that he, being servant to Abraham Simmonds , on the 31st of August, he received two shillings for and on account of his said master; and then afterwards did secret and steal the same .

There being no evidence adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-108

975. MARTHA RICH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a watch, value 4 l. the property of Rowland Griffiths .

ROWLAND GRIFFITHS . On the 17th of September, I met the prisoner in Drury-lane . She asked me to go home with her. I went home with her to her apartment; I had not been with her five minutes before she picked my pocket of my watch, She stepped out of the room; she said she wanted to go and get something to drink, I was surprised to see her go out of the room. I felt for my watch; I went to the door to go out after her; she had locked the door outside, so that I could not go after her. I knocked at the door, she returned in three or four minutes, and asked me what was amiss. I said she had robbed me of my watch, I laid hold of her by the arm, and pulled her to the street door, and hallooed out watch. There came seven or eight women in the passage, and the prisoner made her escape. I went to the watchman and patrole; I could not find her. This was twelve o'clock at night. In eight days afterwards I saw the prisoner again in Drury-lane. She denied having any knowledge of me at all or of my watch. After a good while she confessed where she had pawned my watch; it was pledged at Charing Cross, I went and found the watch.

JAMES ROSS . I produce the watch from John Dobree 's, Chairing Cross; a man in the name of John Walker pawned the watch on the 19th of September, for two pounds two shillings.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner Defence. I found the watch on my bed after the prosecutor had left the room.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-109

976. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , twenty pounds weight of bacon, value 15 s. the property of Henry James Elburn .

HENRY JAMES ELBURN . I keep a chandler's shop . I lost my bacon on Saturday evening, the 15th of October, about seven o'clock; I was at home; a man came into the shop took the bacon out, and ran away with it.

Q. Who was that man - A. The prisoner at the bar; I saw him run away with it. My sister saw him unhook it; she called to me, that the man had ran away with it. I ran out after him, saw him with the bacon, and stopped him; he threw the bacon down. I am sure he had the bacon.

SARAH GIBSON. I was in the parlour. I saw a man came into the shop, and unhook the bacon, and he afterwards ran off with it. I gave my brother notice of it; of at that minute.

Prosecutor. This is the bacon; I saw him drop it; it is my bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Henry-street, somebody cried out stop thief; this gentleman took me to Hatton Garden office. I never saw any thing of the bacon until I was brought to the office.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-110

977. SARAH HOOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , one eighteen-penny bank token, and one shilling , the monies of John Emblin .

MARY EMBLIN. A friend marked twenty-two shillings and three eighteen-penny pieces. The prisoner was my servant . I saw the marked money. I put it in my drawers, in the ward-robe, in my bed-room; it is a drawer I always put the money in. I had frequently missed money in that particular drawer. On the 8th of October, between seven and eight in the morning, when I had done breakfast, I went to the drawer, and applied the usual key; I found a difficulty in opening it; I at last, opened it; I counted the money. I found an eighteen-penny piece and a shilling short of the marked money. Mr. Emblin went, and fetched an officer. I saw the officer take the marked eighteen-penny piece and the shilling out of the prisoner's box.

GEORGE WOOD. I am an officer. I found in the prisoner's possession one shilling and one eighteen-penny token marked with a stamp. I have them in my hand.

Prosecutrix. That is the shilling and the eighteen-penny piece I put in my drawer.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-111

978. LOUISA JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , a shawl, value 3 l. the property of Ebenezer Rennie .

JOANNA RENNIE . I lost my shawl on the 27th of August. The prisoner came on the 27th of August, she came to enquire if I had some shawls for a lady to look at. I asked her where; she said at Bow-street. I asked her to leave the address, and I would send them. She said, she was going there, and if I would send any person, she would send them to the lady. I sent my shop woman with them, with two lace shawls. I did not hear any more until the person came back again.

COURT. Did you ever see the prisoner before - A. Never before she came into my shop.

Q. Can you swear positively to her person - A. So far as I can judge, I verily believe her to be that person.

ELIZABETH MOEL . I am a shop woman to Mrs. Rennie. The prisoner asked me to go with her; as she went along, she said, she was quite a stranger in town, and her mistress was a foreigner in Bow-street; when she got there, she told me to go into the parlour, and she would go up, and tell her mistress she was come; she came in again in a few minutes; she said her mistress being a foreigner, did not like to see strangers; and she would take one of the shawls up stairs to her, and show her. I waited there a little time, and she never came. I saw two servants in the passage; I went; and asked them where the young person was; she told me to sit down, she dare say she would not be long. I waited there a long time, after that, and began to be quite uneasy, and asked her again; she said the person was gone out that came in with me. I asked her what she was gone out for; she said, to shew her mistress the shawls. They said they knew nothing of the girl, she was quite a stranger.

Q. What house was this - A. The Brunswick Hotel in Bow-street, Covent-garden. I never saw the prisoner again, until I saw her at Bow-street; I am sure she is the person to the best of my recollection; it is her, I have no doubt about it I never saw the shawls again.

Q. How was the person dressed that came into your mistress's shop - A. A purple spencer, black bonnet, and a dark silk gown.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person they have mistaken me for another.

CLARA JOHNSON . I am sister to the prisoner, The 27th of August, was Saturday, I went to Bayswater at nine o'clock in the morning, my sister Lonisa Johnson, was with me the whole of the day, I returned from Bayswater at five o'clock in the afternoon, it was my little boys birth day; my sister had an allowance of a guinea a week. I am constantly with my sister.

COURT. Whose house was it at Bayswater - A. My mother's; she is not here.

EMELIA MIRANDA . I am sister to the prisoner: I live with my mother at Bayswater; I remember Clara and Louisa being at Bayswater to celebrate Clara's child's birth day; she was there at eight o'clock in the morning, until four o'clock in the afternoon, and then Clara and Louisa returned to London.

SUSAN SMITH . I am a servant at the Brunswiak Hotel, in Bow-street.

Q. Do you remember a young lady coming to the house, and asking for a lady with whom she came - A. Yes, I was at Bow-street that day; I let that person in the house.

Q. You saw Elizabeth Wild , is that the witness that you let in - A. Yes; the prisoner is not the person that came with her. I am sure the prisoner is not the person that was with Elizabeth Wild .

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-112

979. LOUISA JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a spencer, value 1 l. the property of Hannah Dove .

HANNAH DOVE . I keep a ready-made linen warehouse . The prisoner came to my shop on the 24th of August, about twelve o'clock in the day, she asked me if I would send some spencers to a lady, the lady was not able to come herself; I called one of my young woman to go with the spencer, and the prisoner. The prisoner conversed with me in the shop near twenty minutes, which gave me an opportunity to recognise her again. When the young person was ready, I packed up the spencer, and gave it to her, and told her to go with the lady to Hart-street. I worked for several ladies in Hart-street, Bloomsbury, and thought it might be for some of them. The young woman returned to me again, as white as ashes, and in such a tremble, she could not tell what to do; when the servant came back, she told me she had been to the Bath hotel. I went to the hotel, and asked who the person was that wanted the spencer; they said, they knew nothing about the lady. The second time I saw the prisoner was in St. Martin's-court; a lady that was with me, said only look at these two girls; I looked at them, and stood looking at them ten minutes. I said, there is the person that took the spencer from me; her face was towards me as she was eating the pastry.

Q. Did she look off you - A. Not that I know of. I went away from the window with intent to get a person to take her into custody; the person with me said, I would not take her now. We watched her out; I said, I would go home and fetch Louisa, and see if she was of the same opinion. She walked up New Street; I fetched Louisa; she said, that is the person, I first saw her on the 24th of August, this was on the 25th of September.

Q. How long was it from your looking at her in the pastry cook's shop, and your seeing her in New Street - A. An hour. I had a full view of her in the pastry cook's shop; she might not see me. When Louisa recognized her in New-street, Covent Garden we followed her up King-street, down New-street again; I went into George-street to inquire for a constable; not finding one, I went into a public house, saw a watchman; he went with me, I laid hold of the prisoner; she was with Clara then, that is her and then I got to the light, I said, to the watchman, this is the woman take charge of her; she pulled herself away, and said she was not the person. I was mistaken. She went to the light because I would not let go of her, she pulled off her bonnet at Bow-street, at the first examination I swore to her; the same as I did the second examination, and the more I see her the more I think it to be her.

LOUISA JORDAN . I am shopwoman to the prosecutrix. On the 24th of August, I went with the prisoner to the Bath hotel, in Hart-street, Covent Garden, at twelve o'clock in the day; she knocked at the door, and a servant let her in; she walked into the back parlour; she desired me to set down until she returned, I thought she went up stairs to a lady. Finding she did not return, I went out to the landing-place, called the boy who was cleaning knives; I asked him if he knew any thing of the person who had brought me there with the spencer; he said, he knew nothing of her; he called a person of the name of Mrs. Brown. I asked her if she knew any thing of the person; she said, she did not. I went out of the room, and I never saw the spencer after that. When the prisoner came to me, she said, give me the spencer, and I will go and fit it on the lady. That is all I know, I gave it her. I am certain the prisoner is the person. The spencer has never been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person; I am unjustly accused.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 2 years , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-113

980. WILLIAM CARTER , JOHN LAWRENCE , and CHARLES COWDELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a coat, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 10 s. and two pair of breeches, value 1 l. the property of William Busk , esq.

HENRY SCOTT . I am horse-keeper at Mr. Hobson's livery stables, Finsbury-place. On the 8th of last month, I received a large paper parcel of Mr. Dunn's porter. I took it of the porter, and put it into Mr. Busk's gig.

Q. Where does Mr. Busk live - A. In Hertfordshire.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners - A. Cowdell and Lawrence has worked in the yard, as helpers.

Q. You did not observe either of them by the gig, when you put the parcel in, did you - A. I did not.

THOMAS MORLEY . I am foreman to Mr. Dunn, tailor, Bedford-street, Covent Garden. I packed up a parcel, containing all the articles in the indictment, a coat, waistcoat, and two pair of breeches; it was directed for William Busk , esq. they were made for his servant. I gave it to Peter Lane, the porter.

PETER LANE . I received a parcel of Morley, Mr. Dunn's foreman; I was ordered to take it to Mr. Busk, in Broad-street; one of his clerks told me to take it to his stable-yard. I did, and delivered it to Scott.

DANIEL BISHOP . On the 9th of October, about seven in the evening, I was in company with John Lines , in Whitecross-street; I met the prisoner

Carter carrying a bundle under his arm, it was tied in this handkerchief. I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said, to sell it to a jew. I then asked him where he got it; he said, he had it of two young men at the Kings Arms, in Little Moorfields; he described their persons; the other two prisoners answered to his description. I went to the King's Arms, and apprehended the other two prisoners.

Q. to Morley. Do you know the christian name of Mr. Busk - A. William Busk , esq.

Q. Look at that coat and waistcoat produced by Bishop - A. It is the coat and waistcoat that was made for Mr. Busk, and given to the porter to take to him.

JOHN LINES . I was present when Bishop took Carter into custody. The account that he has given is correct.

Carter's Defence. John Lawrance gave me the things to sell for him; he said, he found them in a gateway near Lackington's library; I was at the Kings Arms when he gave them me. He told me to take them to a jew; I was going to Playhouse-yard, on the road to there, I was taken by an officer; I then gave up the party that I had the clothes of.

Cowdell's Defence. When Lawrence gave Carter the things, he asked me to lend him a handkerchief. That is all I know.

Lawrence's Defence. I left my work on the Saturday; I picked up the coat and waistcoat at the corner of the gateway; I took them home, and put them in a blue apron. On Sunday morning William Carter came into the room, and asked me what I had got there; he asked me whether I was going to sell it; I said, yes, I had no other use for it.

Q. to Scott. Did Mr. Busk go into the country that day - A. Yes, at eight o'clock; he goes out regular.

LAWRENCE, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

CARTER, NOT GUILTY .

COWDELL, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-114

981. COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a coat, value 7 s. the property of Andrew Mullin .

ANDREW MULLIN. On the 7th of October, I lost my coat; my coat was in my bed-room, at the Three Tuns, at Staines . I went to work at six o'clock, and left my coat in the bed-room. The prisoner slept in the same room; I left him in the room. I returned about half after six in the evening, my coat was gone. The prisoner was taken on the Sunday following. The prisoner had sold the coat to Mr. Spencer.

JOHN SPENCER . I am a dealer of clothes, at Staines. I bought a coat of the prisoner on the 7th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning; I gave him six shillings for it. The same evening Mullin saw the coat, and claimed it. This is the coat.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 14 days and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-115

982. JOHN CLARK and EDWARD HAYLIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , one three-shilling bank token, four penny-pieces, and six halfpence, the property of William Cowling , from his person .

GEORGE FKEDERICK TURNER . Q. Do you know the person of William Cowling - A. Yes, he is a sailor ; he is now gone to Sea.

Q. Do you know that he had his pocket picked at any time - A. Yes, on the 25th of September, between four and five, I went into a loft to watch some boys, who were gambling round a cart; the two prisoners were there. Cowling was asleep in the New-market, Finsbury-square , The prisoner Haylin got into the cart, and after removing Cowling's arm from his left side, he unbottoned his great coat, and then his other coat, and rifled his waistcoat pockets, and gave the money that he took out of his pockets to Clark, who was standing by; he then went, and did the same thing at Cowling's pocket as he had done before. I then thought it was time to take him. I ran out of the loft, and took Clark; Haylin ran away.

JOHN MORTON . I am an headborough. On the 25th of September, I was crossing the New market Finsbury; I saw Turner had got hold of Clark; he said, he had picked William Cowling 's pocket. Haylin ran away with the best part of the change of a pound note. I took from the hand of Clark a three-shilling piece, four penny-pieces, and three pennyworth of halfpence. I took Haylin the same night at eleven o'clock, at his house.

Haylin's Defence. I am innocent.

Clark's Defence. The same.

CLARK, GUILTY , aged 17.

HAYLIN, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-116

983. SAMUEL TAYLOR and ANN TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , a bed-tick, value 9 s. a sheet, value 10 s. a flat-iron, value 6 d. and a candlestick, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Norwood , in a lodging-room .

LETITIA NORWOOD . My husband's name is Thomas Norwood . I let the prisoners a room, about seventeen months ago the woman took the room first, the husband came in the evening; they had a two pair of stairs furnished room, at four shillings and sixpence a week; they paid the rent until the last week; I gave her notice to quit. I went up into the room, and all the things in the indictment.

ROBERT WILD . I took a sheet in pawn of the female prisoner on the 1st of October. This is the sheet.

Prosecutrix. It is my property.

SAMUEL TAYLOR , NOT GUILTY .

ANN TAYLOR, GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined 14 days , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-117

984. MARY BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a pair of spectacles, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Clark , from his person .

THOMAS CLARK . I am a schoolmaster . I live in Brook-street, Holborn. On the 6th of October I had my spectacles taken from me in Fullwood's Rents Court . Mr. Huggins held the spectacles up and asked me if they were mine. I said they are mine. They were taken out of my left-coat pocket; they worth five shillings.

JOHN HUGGINS . On the 6th of October I saw the prisoner close to Mr. Clark in the crowd in the court. I had been watching her half an hour, I saw her take a pair of spectacles out of Mr. Clark's pocket. She was going out of the court. I caught hold of her; Mr. Clark claimed the spectacles when I shewed him them. I took the prisoner into a public house, and searched her; I found a silk handkerchief, a cotton handkerchief, and a pocket-book upon her, and a shillings worth of halfpence. I shewed the handkerchiefs, and they were owned.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not been three weeks from Wales; I have a large family of children.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-118

985. MARY BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , one handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of William Whittenham , from his person .

WILLIAM WHITTENHAM. On the 6th of October, at twelve o'clock, I went into Fulwood's Rents with a friend, upon business. I did not perceive the prisoner near me, nor the handkerchief gone from me. I know I had my handkerchief: I had used it in court. I followed the officer taking the prisoner into he public house I saw the officer take my handkerchief out of her pocket.

JOHN HUGGINS. I took the handkerchief out of her pocket, When I took her up for stealing the spectacles, this handkerchief was claimed by Mr. Whittenham.

Prosecutor. It is mine. There is W. upon it, No. 1. It is my own; I value it at eighteen-pence, it cost me eight shillings.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-119

986. JOHN ANTROBUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , one regimental jacket, value 8 s. and one pair of overalls, value 6 s. the property of our Lord the King .

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am a soldier in the third regiment of guards. The prisoner informed me he was discharged from the marines on the 10th of October. I left my overalls in my room about one o'clock; the jacket did not belong to me, it was taken from the barrack room where I sleep in the Tower. My overalls were taken out my box under my own bed. I put them in my box on the 10th, about one o'clock in the afternoon; on the following morning I went to put them on to go on parade, they were gone. In the morning when I complained I had lost my overalls, a man complained he had lost his jacket. The prisoner was taken in custody on the evening of the 19th, I saw him in the guard-room; I asked him where my overalls were, and the jacket, when he informed me they were in a house in Westminster, he had left them there, and I might have them if I would call for them at a house the right-hand side in Tothill-street, where they sold old clothes. I went to the house and enquired for a pair of overalls and a regimental jacket; the jacket has been found since. I was stopped thirteen shillings and sixpence out of my pay for them. I had them, I know, the day before.

THOMAS HILL. I am in the third regiment of guards. I lost my jacket on the 10th of October, It was left on my bed in the barrack-room. I left the barrack-room at six o'clock in the evening; I returned to the barrack-room at nine o'clock; my jacket was gone. William Street bought the jacket. I have seen the jacket since; this; is the jacket; I went into the barrack-room where William Street slept; I saw the jacket, and claimed it immediately. Street is a soldier in the same regiment of guards.

WILLIAM STREET . I belong to the third guards. I bought the jacket in Tothill-street of Elizabeth North ; I gave two shillings and sixpence for it, on the 18th of October. It was claimed by Hill; I never saw the prisoner until he was taken.

ELIZABETH NORTH . I keep a clothes-shop, 31, Tothill-street. I bought the jacket and a pair of overalls of a dark man. I cannot swear it was the prisoner; I cannot tell the day of the month I bought it. I bought it about a fortnight before I sold it to the soldier. The prisoner is like the man I bought the jacket and overalls of; he said they were not his own, they were his father's. I put them out of doors the next morning; I sold the overalls to an old clothes man; I gave three shillings for the jacket and overalls.

THOMAS HILL . That is the jacket I lost. I put my name in it myself.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-120

987. SAMUEL PRIEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , twenty-six pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of John Smith and Thomas Pepper .

THOMAS PEPPER . I am in partnership with John Smith ; I live at Old Ford . On the 21st of October, having some plumbers and carpenters work to do, we engaged several men to do the same three days. After the plumbers had worked, I found a piece of lead secreted in a shed, under some bits of wood bent half round, apparently to fit the body, with a nail projecting at about half an inch from the centre. Having a suspicion that it was intended to be taken away, I took the earliest opportunity of marking it I marked it before dinner-time. In the afternoon I made my observations of the different men, and my suspicion fell on the prisoner. When they left work at night, I ascertained the lead was gone.

I disguised myself in my great coat. I followed the workman to Bow, thinking to detect the receiver; but being foiled in that, I immediately seized the prisoner with the lead on him. I found it secreted under his waistcoat or jacket, in the front of him, with the nail projecting, as I supposed, for the nail to catch the waistband of his breeches, with a loop to his shoulders. This is the lead, with my mark upon it. It is mine and my partners property. The prisoner is a plumber.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-121

988. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , a sheet, value 7 s. and a pinafore, value 1 s. the property of Nathaniel Clark .

NATHANIEL CLARK. I am a turner ; I live in Brick lane, Bethnal-green ; I lost these things on the 15th, and part on the 17th of September. On the 15th of September my wife hired the prisoner at Spitalfields-market; on her refusing to tell her where she resided I suspected her to be a bad character; she did not lodge in my house. We missed a sheet off the bed. I accused her of robbing me of a sheet; she gave me a duplicate of the sheet; she told me she had pledged my table-cloth at Mr. Attenbarough's, and two other duplicates were found upon her.

Mr. BURGESS. I am shopman at Mr. Attenborough's, pawnbroker. I produce a table cloth pawned by the prisoner, and a sheet.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 06.

Confined one year and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-122

989. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , four shirts, value 1 l, two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and one waistcoat, value 3 s. the property of George Lee .

GEOREE LEE. I am a taylor . I left my things on the 3d of October, in a closet, in my room. The prisoner slept in my room that night, I only know that I lost my things out of the closet.

ANN POPE. I keep the house; I let lodgings by the week. The prisoner came to my lodging on the 3d of October. She slept in Lee's room that night. Lee kept his things in the closet. Lee was out that night. The prisoner went away at half after six in the morning. After that I went into the room to take the bed, and missed Lee's things. The linen was there when the prisoner went to sleep. I am certain of that.

ROBERT HUNT . I am an officer. On the 6th of October I took the prisoner into custody. He confessed he took the property, He pledged three shirts, with Armstrong, of Baldwin's-gardens; the other shirt he sold to a Jew in the street, and the handkerchiefs for a quart of muscles.

Mr. ARMSTONG. I am pawnbroker in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 4th of October the prisoner pawned three shirts at my shop for twelve shillings. These are them.

SAMUEL KNIGHT. I am a pawnbroker; on the 5th of October, I took in a waistcoat of a lad that was in the habit of pawning for the prisoners.

Prosecutor. These shirts and the waistcoat is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was urged by distress to do this.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-123

990. CATHERINE CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , sixteen yards of printed cotton, value 16 s. the property of Eleanor Gibson , widow .

ELEANOR GIBSON . I am a widow. The prisoner lodged in my house. This morning I came home with my fruit from the market. I gave the prisoner a sheet to pawn for herself; she took my print. The prisoner owned to the magistrate that she took it.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I took the prisoner into custody. She told me she took the property; she would not tell me what she did with it.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman on the overnight lent me a halfpenny. The next morning she said if I wanted an article to pledge I might have it; I said no, I will take my gown off my back. She sent me to pledge a sheet, and when I returned, she accused me of taking this print.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-124

991. ELIZA GOOSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , five blankets, value 3 l. four counterpanes, value 3 l. eight cushion covers, value 5 s. a swing glass, value 5 s. six bed curtains, 5 l. 15 s. four chair covers, value 2 s. a set of bed furniture, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Alexander Campbell , Esq.

GERGE PETIT. I am an upholsterer. I live in Brewer-street, Golden-square. I placed the prisoner in the care of Captain Alexander Campbell 's house. I had the care of Captain Alexander Campbell 's house; I had to see to it, and the furniture. The house is No. 56, Devonshire-place, Portland-place . I was desired to sell for him by contract; and the the furniture, altogether. I placed the prisoner in it to take care of it, and to shew it to such persons as wished to see it. She is a married woman; I think I placed there on the on the 40th of June last. On the 18th of last month, by the prisoner's husband's master I was informed; he came down to me, and told me; that he had been informed by the husband that she had been making away with the property. Her husband is a chair-maker by trade. From which I went to Marlborough street; the magistrate sent me with an officer to the house to search it, to see whether, the property was stolen or not. I searched it, and found the articles in the indictment missing, and a great many others. There was missing two blankets, two sofa covers, eight chair cushion covers, two pillow cases, a swing glass, five bedside carpets, six bed curtains, 4 hearth rugs, one baize cover, four flat irons, a set of bed furniture, and a pillow; all these

things were taken out of the house. The prisoner had not given me notice that she had left the house. When I went to the house the husband was there. I expected to find her there. I accompanied the husband to the house where he thought she was. I found her in a room in Windmill-street, where she delivered to me part of the duplicates of the property she had pawned. I then requested she would accompany me to Devonshire-street, where the officer was in waiting; and when she got to Devonshire-street she delivered part of the duplicates to the officer, and part I have received since. She has been in confinement. I took her to Marlborough-street office, She was there committed. On the husband I found no duplicates. I do not think he was accessary to it, nor did he know it, in my opinion. These are the the duplicates I received of her when I found her.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer. I was sent with Mr. Petit to the house in Devonshire-street. The prisoner was not there. I waited there while Mr. Petit went to her husband to see for her. When she came back I received twenty-two duplicates from her. These duplicates led to six pawnbrokers where we found the things.

WILLIAM Compton . I am a pawnbroker; I produce two curtains and two bedside carpets the prisoner pawned with me, on the 10th of September, and on the 7th of October.

Mr. AMBER. I produce a hearth rug pawned by the prisoner on the 19th of August, another on the 20th of August, another on the 12th of August, a hearth rug on the 15th of October, and one on the 5th of September. I produce the green baize and the curtains.

Prosecutor. The whole of the things are here; they were all under my care.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-125

992. ELIZAETH GIBBS and ELIZABETH YEOMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , a watch, value 5 l. a chain, value 3 l. a watch key, value 5 s. three rings, value 3 l. a handkerchief, value 18 d. and four shillings , the goods and monies of John Strimpfell .

JOHN STRIMPFELL. I live at No. 42, Bermondsey street. I am a foreigner ; I lost my money in a room where I met with these girls; Gibbs took me to the room, and Yeoman brought me a candle.

Q. What did you lose - A. A silver watch, a book, and bills that were mine, a gold seal, and a gold key; a silver snuff-box, three gold rings, and four shillings in money, a pair of silk stockings, and a handkerchief.

Q. Which of them took it - A. Gibbs; and Yeoman brought a candle.

Q. How did she take it - A. I put my watch under my pillow, and when I awoke I found all these things gone.

Q. Did you ever find your things again? - A. I found nothing.

Q. What did the other woman do - A. She only brought a candle, and went away.

Q. When you awoke in the morning, who was in the room - A. Nobody; the door was not secure enough; upon which she put a table against the door that nobody could come in.

MICHAEL CALVERT . I am a watchman; on Monday morning, the 3d of last month, I cried the hour of one o'clock, in Charles-street, Drury-lane. The prosecutor came to the door and cried watch. I went up to him directly; he said he had lost his watch, his silver snuff-box, and this handkerchief. I looked about the room; after I got the prosecutor dressed I took him to two or three different rooms; he said they were none of the girls that he knew. I took the prosecutor down to the watchhouse.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am the watchhouse keeper; the watchman brought the prosecutor into the watch-house. I took down his place of abode; I and Cowley went and informed the landlord, if he did not find the women he would get into trouble. There were three apprehended. The prosecutor spoke to these two, he would not speak to the third. I shewed him the room; the prosecutor said that was the room, and the landlord of the house said they were the two women that were with him.

WILLIAM COWLEV. I found the prisoners in Holborn, and brought them to the watchhouse; the prosecutor came and spoke to Gibbs sleeping with him, and Yeoman lighting the candle. I shewed the prosecutor the room; we searched it, and found no property at all; Gibbs gave me the key of the room.

Q. to Prosecutor. Were you sober - A. I was.

Q. Look at the women at the bar - A. Gibbs is the woman I slept with, the other brought the candle.

Gibb's Defence. I never saw the man with my eyes before. I was taken in custody, and then he charged me with a robbery.

Yeoman's Defence. I was at my sister's.

GIBBS, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

YEOMAN, not GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-126

993. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , a great coat, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Wood .

Prisoner. My right name is Tooney.

THOMAS WOOD . Q. Is the prisoner the man - A. Yes; I am a carter . On the 4th of October I lost my coat out of the cart in Chiswell-street , between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I stopped my horses while I went into Mr. Whitbread's yard to see if I could get a load of dung, and when I come out my coat was taken out of the cart. I saw the prisoner with it; when he saw me he threw the coat down and ran away, Two officers came to my assistance, and the prisoner was taken.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I in company with Hutchins on the 4th of October. The prisoner came past us between eight and nine o'clock. We heard the cry of stop thief. We run up towards him; he dropped the coat. Hutchins picked up the coat; I got hold of the prisoner by the collar, and pushed him into a house; we both fell together. In his struggling he got away, He got up stairs into the house; he there got out of the garret window, and got on the top of

of the houses. A gentleman of the name of Rummer got out of his house, and brought him down. We secured him and took him before the magistrate; this is the coat.

Prosecutor. This is my coat.

Mr. RUMMER. I live in Golden-lane. On the morning of the 4th of October, I heard there was a thief in the lane. I went to the door, the mob said he was on the top of the houses. I ascended out of the skylight of my own house; I ransacked the roof of four houses; I saw nothing of the the prisoner; there was an empty house next to these houses. I got into the garret window, and opened a closet, there I found the prisoner in the closet, with the door closed upon him. I brought him down, and delivered him to the officers; the prisoner told me he had a wife and four children. He has neither wife or children.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-127

994. MARY HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of September , a tea-kettle, value 1 s. a poker, value 6 d. a pair of tongs, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Norwood , in a lodging room .

LETITIA NORWOOD . My husband's name is Thomas Norwood ; I let the lodging to the prisoner on the 22d of March. She had a husband, he lived with her; I let her have all the articles mentioned in the indictment for her use in the lodging; it was a furnished lodging, She was to pay four shillings and sixpence a week for a two pair of stairs room. When she left the room in September, I found the tea-kettle and the other things gone; she took me to where she said she had sold them at an old iron shop, in Whitecross-street; the woman said, she did not know her.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-128

995. WILLIAM JONES and MARIA WATMORE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , ten breakfast cups value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Hussey , widow .

ELIZABETH HUSSEY . I am a widow; a dealer in china and earthenware ; I live in Paradise-row, Chelsea . I lost my cups on the 22nd of October, they were taken from a hook outside of the door.

ELIZABETH HALL. I am a servant to Mr. Knight Paradise-row, Nightman. On the 22nd of October, between nine and ten o'clock, I went out for an errand; I saw the woman prisoner lift Jones up to reach the cups; he could not reach them. The woman lifted him upon her shoulder. I saw him cups as I was going by, and coming back, running away with the cups. I am sure im, he is a sawyer, and the young woman th her mother, in the neighbourhood of

Jones's Defence. I am innocent of what I am brought here for.

Watmore's Defence. I was not out all the evening it happened.

Jones called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Watmore called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-129

996. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , one pair of overalls, value 12 s. and two pair of breeches, value 12 s. the property of John Harvey .

JOHN HARVEY. I am a clothes-saleman , No 27, High-street, St. Giles's. I lost the overalls and two pair of breeches. On the 21st of October, in the morning, a gentleman enquired for such articles; I looked for them and missed them. The same evening the officer Brown shewed me the ticket of the overalls, and asked me if I knew the hand-writing; I said, I did.

WILLIAM BARRETT . On the 17th of October, I was on Saffron-hill, in company with Carlisle; I saw the prisoner with a bundle in his hand: I thought it was not right. When he went into a shop his companion stopped out. I asked the prisoner what he had got; he did not give me a satisfactory answer. I took him into custody.

MR. BELFOUR. I produce two pair of breeches; the prisoner pawned them at my house on the 17th of October.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pair of overalls; they were pledged by the prisoner.

Prosecutor. The overalls and the two pair of breeches are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the duplicates.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-130

997. RICHARD MULFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Robert Dibbenham .

ROBERT DIBBENHAM . I am a clerk . I lost my shirt about twelvemonths ago; it was taken out of the house where I live. The prisoner was a porter in the house.

MRS. JONES. The prisoner told me to fetch a number of things out of pawn, to sell them, and give him the overplus. This shirt was one of them; here is Mr. Dibbenham's name in full length upon it. I washed for the prisoner. I burnt a shirt of the prisoner's; I gave him another for it.

Prisoner. Q. to Prosecutor. When did you lose that shirt - A. About nine months ago.

Prisoner. If that is the shirt I must have had it in my possession a year and a quarter.

Prosecutor. You said, the washerwoman gave you this shirt for the shirt she burnt.

Mrs. Jones. The shirt I gave him had two patches on the shoulder.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined 1 year , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-131

998. JAMES BOURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , a wooden door, value 10 s. the property of John Squire .

JOHN SQUIRE . I am a bricklayer . I lost my door on the 29th of September, it was broken off the door post, and taken away; it was done in the evening.

DENNIS O'LEARY. I am a watchman. On Thursday, the 29th of September, a man passed my watch-box, he bid me good night. I asked him where he was going with the door; he said to Mr. Moss's above Hackney. I followed him to Mr. Moss's; he laid the door down, rung the bell and run away. I pursued him, and brought him back to Mr. Moss's house; he went to the ladies in the house; he said ladies, I have brought you the door. The ladies said, they knew nothing of the door, or him. I then took him to the watchhouse. This is the door.

Prosecutor. It is my door. The door was on the door-post, and locked up a quarter after five in the afternoon.

Prisoner's Defence. The man saw me with the door. I told him I picked up the door at Dalston, not knowing the consequence of what I was doing. When the watchman spoke to me I was rather confused; I found whereabouts I was.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 1 year , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-132

999. RICHARD COPPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , one hundred bricks, value 3 s. the property of James Southwood and William Southwood .

WILLIAM SOUTHWOOD . I am a slater ; my partner 's name is James Southwood .

THOMAS TERRY . I am a labouring man. On the 30th of September, I saw Richard Copper, he came with his master's cart to the gate of his master's premises; he went to the heap of bricks, and loaded his arms with bricks; he put them into the cart; he went again eleven or twelve times, and put them into the cart, and then he drove away with the cart.

CATHERINE GARNLEY . On the 29th of September, the prisoner came, and asked my husband if he wanted any more bricks; my husband said, he wanted a few more. The prisoner brought some bricks in; he said he met my husband with a barrow of bricks; the barrow broke down, and he said he put the bricks into his cart, and brought them home for me.

Q. How many bricks were there - A. Near an hundred.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 1 year , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-133

1000. MATTHEW COLLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , a shirt, value 4 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of gloves, value 18 d. and a pipe reed, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Ann Alders and James Alders .

JAMES ALDERS . I am a pawnbroker . The prisoner was my journeyman . I lost the things, and on the 23rd of October I found them in the prisoner's possession; I missed them from Berwick-street, Soho. On the 12th of October, a person applied for a pair of stockings pledged with us, and on searching the book, it appeared redeemed; I could not find them. I sent for an officer, and the things were found in the prisoner's box.

WILLIAM CARVEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. The shirt and handkerchief he had on, the other articles were in his box. This is the pipe reed. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. They are my property; the pipe reed was an article that we had in the window for sale.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-134

1001. JOHN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a jacket, value 15 s. a pocket-book, value 2 s. a bill of exchange for 13 l. 5 s. 8 d. and three 1 l. bank notes, the property of Palmer Tuddensham .

PALMER TUDDENSHAM. I lost my jacket at King-street, St. George's in the East . My pocket-book was in my jacket pocket; my pocket-book contained a bill of exchange for thirteen pounds five shillings and eight-pence, and three one-pounds bank notes. The prisoner took the bill for payment. I took an officer, and apprehended him.

EBENEZER DALTON. I am an officer. On the 18th of October, Mr. Tuddensham applied at the office, saying, he had lost a bill of exchange, and other things; I went with Mr. Tuddensham to Mr. Lancaster, a butcher, Spitalfields-market; I there apprehended the prisoner, and searched him; I found nothing on him.

MR. LANCASTER. I am a butcher, in Spitalfields market. The prisoner Dixon offered me this bill; I can swear to the bill. When he brought it, he asked me to accept it. This is the bill.

Prosecutor. This is the bill; I lost it; I am sure of that.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went for payment of the bill, Mrs. Lancaster said Mr. Lancaster was not at home; the daughter told me it was a stolen bill. I paid for the bill in the public market, Smithfield.

Prosecutor. The bill is not negotiable; I never endorsed it.

AMELIA KARN . I was present when the prisoner took the bill.

Q. What bill is it - A. To be received on the day of payment.

Q. Where was it - A. In Smithfield market.

Q. Do you live with the prisoner - A. Sometimes; I am going to be married to him.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-135

1002. FRANCES HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a sheet, value 6 s. and three silver tea-spoons, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Allwright .

THOMAS ALLWRIGHT . I am a tallow-chandler ; I live at No. 20, Rosemary-lane . I missed the spoons, and the sheet on the 27th of October. I suspected the prisoner, I sent for a constable; he came, and searched her, and found the duplicates upon her. The prisoner was our chairwoman .

JOHN TURNBRIDGE. I apprehended the prisoner. I searched her, and found the duplicates of the property upon her.

JAMES WHEATLEY . I produce three silver spoons, pledged by the prisoner.

THOMAS HAINES . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet, pawned on the 27th of September, by the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined 6 months and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-136

1003. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , a watch, value 20 s. the property of James Andrews , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-137

1004. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , one hundred and twenty halfpence, value 5 s. the property of Charles Vickham .

MRS. VICKHAM. I am the wife of Charles Vickham .

Q. When did you lose your halfpence - A. I cannot rightly recollect. I lost them from my bar window; they were done up in a five shilling paper. I had suspicion of the prisoner taking them. I gave the prisoner change for a shilling, and afterwards I saw he had a great many halfpence. I told him he had stolen my halfpence.

CHARLES VICKHAM . I found a paper of halfpence on the prisoner; the paper contained three shillings and five-pence. I cannot swear to the halfpence, or the paper.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-138

1005. MARY SALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a great coat, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Sharp .

THOMAS SHARP . I am a slop-seller , in Whitechapel . On the 19th of October, I saw the prisoner looking at the clothes in my shop; I asked her if she wanted any thing; she said, she wanted a pair of trowsers; she had no money then, she would bring her husband in the evening. In the afternoon, I missed a coat; my suspicion fell on the prisoner. I went to the pawnbrokers, and found my coat.

THOMAS FOX. I am a pawnbroker. I produce the coat the prisoner pledged it with me on the 19th of October.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the coat in the public fair in Petticoat lane; I pawned the coat for five shillings.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-139

1006. JOSEPH COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a coat, value 1 l. the property of Henry Shaw .

HENRY SHAW . I am a porter at Mr. Willan's, Inn keeper , Bull and Mouth-street. I lost my great coat out of my cart, in Duke-street Bloomsbury ; I took a bag into Mr. Hanser's the sign of the Fox and Duck. I heard a noise; I ran out. I pursued the prisoner, because he ran, I took him, and then my coat was pointed out to me.

MARY TUCKER . I saw the prisoner with two others, one of them went to the side of the cart, and took the coat; the prisoner went to the side of the horses head, nodded to the other, and then he took the coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-140

1007 JAMES HUGH EDWARDS , alias CHARLES EDWARDS was indicted for that he on the 12th of November in the 50th year of his Majesty's reign, by the name of James Hugh Edwards , did take to wife one Jemima Hart , and to her was married, that he afterwards, on the 30th of October, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign , by the name of Charles Edwards , feloniously did take to wife one Anna Timson his former wife being then alive .

WILLIAM HART . Q. In the year 1809, were you present at the ceremony of marriage, between the prisoner and any other person - A. Yes, with Jemime Hart, my sister; he was married to her on the 11th of November 1809 at St. Andrew's Holborn. I took a copy of the register of the marriage. I compared it with the book; it is a correct copy.

(Read)

Prisoner. I wish to know whether your sister had any property at her marriage - A. She had not.

RICHARD WIATT. I am clerk at St. James's Parish. I produce the register book of marriages:

" Charles Edwards and Ann Timson were married in this church, by banns, by me, J Mabbett, curate; this marriage was solemnized between us Charles Edwards , Anna Timson , in the presence of Richard Wiatt , and Mary Ann Jacob ."

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. I have seen him before. I cannot exactly say he was the person that was married.

Q. Have you a paper directing the publication of banns - A. I have this is it. (Read) Charles Edwards , Anna Timson , Piccadilly both in this parish it is written in pencil.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mr. Hart. You have been acquainted

with the prisoner's hand-writing ever since your sister's marriage have you not - A. Yes, and Before. I have been familiar with his hand-writing. I am certain that paper is his hand-writing. I have seen him write fifty times, and Charles Edwards in the register of marriages, is most assuredly his hand writing In the course of last year I became acquainted with his visiting Miss Timson; he gave me a promise that he would leave off visiting her, and said the acquaintance was all over.

JAMES TIMSON . Q. I believe you are the father of the second wife - A. I am.

Q. In the course of last year did the prisoner visit your family as a suiter to your daughter - A. I saw him once or twice at our house for the purpose of addressing my daughter; he represented himself as a single man; I afterwards received information that he was a married man. I was with Mr. Hart. I forbid him the house; he came to my house in the name of Charles Edwards . My daughter was always called Susanah by me and her family.

THOMAS SMITH . I live at 48, Greek-street, Soho. On the 30th of October, last year, Miss Timson lodged at my house; the prisoner visited her there. I am sure the prisoner is the person. After a time he said he was married to her; he said he would pay the rent of the room. I understanding there was something wrong in the marriage, I forbid him the house. He said he would not be convenient for Mrs. Edwards to find a lodging; I told him I was quite satisfied with his character; she might stay as long as she liked. I would not suffer him to cohabit with her there.

FRANCES WALLACE . I am sister to the prisoner's wife, Jemima Hart . At the time he was married to her, they lived at our house at Walworth; he lived with his lawful wife; he slept with her the very night before he said he was going to the office; he should return early in the evening; instead of his coming he sent this letter, that he was going into the country; I believe this to be his hand writing. I have seen his writing, and have seen him write frequently. The letter is directed to Mr. Joshua Wallace. Welbeck-row, Walworth Ladies school;

"Mr. Harris pressed me much to go to Windsor with him. I shall be back on Monday; I shall continue Jemima the money. Go to bed soon.

Your's, J. H. EDWARDS."

I saw him on the evening following; he then confessed to me that he had married Miss Timson. He has since then lived now and then with his wife; she is now pregnant by him. At that time we did not believe him; we thought he said what was really not true.

Prisoner. Q. Do you mean to say you heard me aay I was married to Miss Timson - A. Certainly I do; my sister was present, and almost in fits; you told me so when you returned on the Monday evening. You told me you had married Miss Timson, and could not live any longer with my sister.

Mr. Guerney to Mr. Timson. Q. Your daughter has the misfortune to be pregnant by the prisoner - A. Yes, she has.

Prisoner's Defence. It is not my intention to deny an intimacy between myself and Susannah Timson , which intimacy has been with a perfect knowledge of my wife, nor is it I conceive any consequence to the present charge; it is not in my power to employ counsel, being by this prosecution deprived of assistance. I am sorry to have heard the evidence gone through as it has; I do not say there is a conspiracy among the witnesses, some of them having been mistaken, and the other part have not corrected the mistakes; but my innocence or guilt is to be determined by the evidence. There has been no positive evidence before the court of any marriage between me and Miss Timson; there is evidence of a person calling himself Charles Edwards and Anne Timson , and there is evidence of my marriage with Jemima Hart. The subscribing witness has been called; he cannot identify my person. I am surprised at that, for I have been at that church several times to search the book of marriages. I would defy any two persons of the name, who were not very dissimilar in the advantages of that part of education, to write their names without being able to trace the resemblance of each to the other; a man's name being usually written with rapidity, and are very negligent of the form of the letters. I entreat the jury to consider the nature of the evidence is by no means positive. Miss Timson, if her attachment to me was so violent would have spurned at my disgrace, when she knew her own character could not have escaped in such a compromise; and one of the papers given in evidence against me was in pencil writing, which I submit is not cognizable in a court of justice, and whatever I have said at best is evidence; I submit whether that might operate against me; it has not been misproved that Susannah Timson is not the Anne Timson; all that has been proved is an occasional cohabitation with Anne Timson . It is hard for a man to be convicted because the name of Edwards in the book of marriages.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Timson. Look at the signature of Anne Timson , and tell me whether you believe that to be your daughter's hand-writing - A. I believe it to be her hand-writing.

Q. Is she sometimes called by the family Susannah - A. That is her name; I believe she altered it to Anne, to suit the prisoner's purpose.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven pears .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-141

1008. JOSEPH BUTCHER was indicted for that he, on the 26th of October , in a certain place and street. called Grosvenor-row , upon Jane, the wife of Thomas Bailey, unlawfully did make an assault, with intent to spoil, burn, and deface, the clothes of her the said Jane Bailey , that he did then and there in the said public street, spoil, burn and deface, a gown, value 20 s. and a shawl, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Bailey , upon her the said Jane Bailey .

JANE BAILEY . My husband's name is Thomas Bailey .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A; Yes; Sunday I think was on the 16th of October; on the Thursday evening previous to the Sunday, I had something thrown over me; my gown, and every part of my dress was injured; my shawl, petticoat, and stockings.

I set my son to watch on Sunday evening; I told him not to leave me a moment.

Q. Where had you been on Sunday - A. To chapel; I was returning from chapel when I met with this; I returned from chapel about a quarter past eight in the evening; I was about twenty yards from my own house in Grovesnor-row, Chelsea; I was coming home from chapel, in the foot-path, in the main street; my son screamed out, here he is: he screamed out, that something was thrown over me, and I understood him to say Butcher; I perceived the effect immediately on turning round; I have the things in court. I tested it; it burnt my skin off my lip, and water poured from my mouth in torrents; it burnt my mouth very much, and made my mouth water very much.

Q. What effect did it produce upon your clothes, what clothes did it injure - A. Stockings, shoes, a shawl, and a gown; I valued my gown at twenty shillings; this is my shawl that I had on on Sunday evening; it has burned my gown in seven places, it has burnt it all to pieces; that was produced by the liquid thrown over it; the gown was quite whole, and almost new. The shawl has many great holes in it; the shawl was worth ten shillings, and more than that; I believe it was valued a pound at the office. They were both in a perfect state before the liquid was thrown over them. When the liquid was thrown over me, I saw the prisoner cross the way; my son accused him of doing it; he said that Mr. Butcher had thrown something over me; Butcher denied it; he said, would he say that he did it; yes, the boy said, he would say so before any magistrate in England. That was all that happened at that time. The boy supported his charge, and the prisoner denied it. My husband laid hold of him; he did not search him, he being a neighbour, and it being a Sabbeth evening.

Q. He was a neighbour - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been upon good terms - A. We had no words; I did not know that he owed me the least ill will in the world. When my husband laid hold of him, he let him go; he did not want to take him from his wife and family that night.

Q. Could you at all see the liquid or whatever it was that came from him - A. I did not see; it was behind me.

THOMAS BAILEY . I am the husband of Mrs. Bailey. On the 16th of October, I, my son-in-law, and my wife, were coming from chapel; I did not see the prisoner until after this matter happened; all that I observed, I was opposite of Mr. Chapman's, the baker in Grosvenor-row; my son-in-law said to his mother, there was something thrown over her; again he gave the alarm; in consequence of that, I turned round, and catched hold of the prisoner direct, he was close to me; I saw that my wife's clothes were burnt. I asked the prisoner, how he came to do it; he denied it. The boy accused him of it. I found my wife's clothes were burnt. The prisoner touched me on the waistcoat, which stained my waistcoat; my waistcoat is stained now. I am not acquainted with the smell of aquafortis; there was a very strong smell upon it, and a very unpleasent one; it was a strong smelling liquid that stained my waistcoat. I washed the place since; I believe the is a stain upon it now. I let him go directly; I was not aware of it at the time it happened; at the time I laid hold of him. I was not aware that the waistcoat was stained with his touch; not till I got in doors.

Q. Did any other person touch your waistcoat - A. Not at all. There was some gentleman took hold of him when I let him go; I requested he might not be kept in custody that night; I said, I knew him very well, he was a neighbour, I knew where to find him; the next morning in consequence of which he was suffered to go at large.

Q. What is he - A. He keeps an eating-house. I told him he had done an unmanly action, and I hoped he would consider of it, and prepare himself against the morning; he wanted to know what I ment by calling it an unmanly action, and seemed to want to fight; I told him I wanted no disturbance in the street at all; I should not defend myself that way; therefore, he would be prepared for the next day. My wife's clothes at the instant fell to pieces, not immediately, but in a short time afterwards. The next morning I did not take him before the magistrate; in consequence of his having gone to Marlborough-street to obtain a warrant against me for assaulting and stopping him in the street; I thought it necessary to defend myself; I went to Bow-street, and got a warrant, and had him taken up.

RICHARD CAVE . I am 16. I returned from chapel all the way with Mr. and Mrs. Bailey; I walked all the way behind my mother. In consequence of having received information of my mother on the Thursday evening, On Sunday evening, I saw the prisoner come out of an entry with a phial or something that held liquid in his hand.

Q. Where was that entry - A. That is Grosvenor-row; it is a cart way to a factory and paper stainers. He had a phial, and his thumb on the top of the phial; when he came out of the entry he was about a yard and a half, or rather better from Mrs. Bailey.

Q. Were there any other person as near as him to Mrs. Bailey - A. No; I fanoy he watched that opportunity. I say him throw the liquid out of the bottle; the liquid came some on my mother, and some on the ground; some fell on my stocking, which I instantly felt it come through my stocking, and made my leg smart a little. This is the stocking; the acid is in the stocking now; I was so near the prisoner, that he nearly tripped me down; there was no other person near that could throw it on my mother. Upon my screaming out the prisoner hovered over me, and said, do you say, I did it; I said yes, I will swear it before any magistrate in England, I now say upon my oath the prisoner did it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him the character of a good tempered man.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-142

1009. FRANCIS SMITH JOHN PRICE and

JOSEPH PARKER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , two hundred and thirty three pounds of lead, value 3 l. the property of Catherine Row , spinster , affixed to a house of hers .

THOMAS ROW , I am father of Catherine Row. she is a single woman.

Q. Do you know any thing of the loss of lead, which was affixed to any dwelling house of hers - A. I do; the house is situated 48, Upper Berkley-street, Edgeware-road, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone .

GEORGE BATHY . I am a patrole of St. Giles's. I apprehended Price on Saturday evening, the 22nd of October, about half past seven, it was dark, I seized hold of Price, in Belton-street, Short's-gardens, Drury-lane, he was sitting upon a bag, which covered some lead; I took him to the watch-house. The lead weighed one hundred and thirty-three pounds; the lead is here; it was claimed by Mr. Row. I did not see the other prisoners.

MARY BLOOMFIED . I am a lodger; I am a mantua-maker. On the 22nd of October, I saw all the three prisoners together, a little after seven in the evening; Price had a bag with a large quantity of lead in it; they went into several marine store shops, and asked them to buy it; they would not buy it; then it was lifted on Parker's shoulder; Price said, we will not go down Bow-street. I met Sarah Shears ; we agreed to follow them. They went into Belton-street; they asked a woman to buy it; she said, no. Then they throwed it down at an old Iron shop; Price said, I know, it is right now. I ran up Belton-street; I saw two patroles; I gave information of what I had seen, and directed them to the prisoners.

SARAH SHEERS . I am a washerwoman. On this Saturday night, I saw all the prisoners together; Mrs. Broomfell pointed them out to me in Little Earl-street; I am positive to the persons of all three; two of them were taken that night; Wilson, a Bow-Street officer took Smith; the patrol took Price. That is all I know. Parker ran off at that time.

JOSEPH WALTER . I am a constable of padington. I apprehended Parker on Monday, the 24th of October, in Oxford Road; Mr. Martin asked me what I thought of that man, he had some lead on his back; he put the lead down in a gateway, and set upon the lead; a soldier helped him up with the lead; he crossed Oxford-street; he came from the corner of Queen-street, Grovesner-square, to the further end of Oxford-street; there I laid hold of him, and asked him where he was going with the lead he had on his shoulder; he told me he was a porter to Mr. Stevens in King-street Seven Dials. I told him that was not the way to take it to the Seven Dials; he was going towards Grovesner-square. I took him to Marybone watchhouse; the watchhouse keeper was not there then. We took the prisoner with us to find his master at the Seven Dials; we could not find a Mr. Stevens; he got into a public-house at one door, and ran out at the other. I pursued him and catched him again, in a cellar in Munmouth Street, and brought him again to Marybone watchhouse. I could not find out a Stevens, his master. The weight of the lead he had is one hundred and thirty pounds. I went to the house in Upper Berkley-street; I saw that lead had been taken away, and the lead that Parker had been a part of that lead.

MR. MARTIN. I live at 32, Adam Street West I was walking in Berkley-street, on Monday the 24th of October, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner Parker coming out of the front door of the house, with the lead on his baek; he shut the door after him; I followed him into Oxford-street, and gave information to the constable.

Smith's Defence. I am innocent.

SMITH GUILTY , aged 25.

PRICE GUILTY , aged 43.

PARKER GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-143

1010. DENNIS DULVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of October , forty piece of wood value 10 s. the property of James Burnet and Robert Burnet .

JAMES BURNET . I am a builder ; Robert Burnet is my partner . The prisoner was a labourer to us I lost the wood from the Oxford coffee-house, Oxford-street . The prisoner worked as a labourer there. I went, and found the wood in the prisoner's possession in Belton-street, St. Giles's I opened the cupboard in his room; there was a great deal of our wood there. I am sure it is our property; it is new stuff; I had it from the timber yard not two days before he took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take a piece of wood.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined 6 months and Publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-144

1011. ELIZABETH CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , two coats, value 10 l. the property of George Barrow .

GEORGE BARROW . I live at Highgate; my accompting house is in the city. On the 3rd of October, I came to town in a box coat, and a great coat; I brought the coats safe in town to my house in the city, and I saw them hang up where they usually hang, in the first landing, I saw the coats at half past three in the afternoon; they were safe then. on the landing, the prisoner is a stranger to me.

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a foot-boy to Mr. Barrow. I was directed to go to master between seven and eight in the evening with the coats; I could not find them, I saw them safe at half past three.

GOODMAN SOLOMON. I am a deaer in clothes, in Field-lane. On the 3rd of October, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop with this Chaise coat; she asked me one pound for it; it is worth four pound in the trade; I would not buy it. She had another coat on her arm. I asked her what she wanted for that; she said, she would sell this first I asked her whose they were; she, said, her husband. I told her to fetch him in, and let me see him; she walked off. My wife fetched Barnley, the constable; he took her in custody.

Prosecutor. They are my two coats; I paid seven guineas for one of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the coats in Kingsland-road; they fell out of a chaise.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-145

1012. BENJAMIN SWAINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a handkerchief, value 1 s. a frock, value 6 d. the property of Mark Bennett ; and REBECCA BARNETT for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

WALTER MABERLEY . I am ten years old. I live in Corporation-lane, Clerkenwell; I live with my brother; he is a shoemaker.

Q. Do you know Mark Bermond ? - A. Yes, he is a straw-hat bleacher. He lives near me in Corporation-lane; he had a handkerchief, apron, a child's frock, and a child's shirt; his wife had put them in the yard to dry; they were lying by the field to dry. I saw Swainson cut the lines down, and take the things off the line. This was about half after three in the afternoon. I saw him about half after eight; I recollected him again; I am sure he is the same boy. I saw Ward with him; Swainson took the things.

JOHN WARE . I live in Northampton-row. I saw Swainson get over the wall, and take these things from off the line. I was helping him to do this in Bermond's yard. I then went with him with these things into Claremarket. I sold them to Mrs. Barnett; she gave me two shillings for them. I was taken up, and then I told of this.

Mr. Knapp (to William Read ) Do you know whether this woman is married - A. No, not of my own knowledge.

SIMON KISS . I am the clerk of the Jews synagogne.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether that is a marriage agreement - A. It is according to the custom of our religion.

SWAINSON, GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

BARNETT, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18141026-146

1013. BENJAMIN PAINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , five yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Simeon Brown .

WILLIAM SHARMAN . I am a shopman to Simeon Brown , he is a linen draper at the corner of Drury-lane . I hung the piece of cotton at the door on Monday, the 24th of October. There was an alarm that a person had run away with a piece of print; the other shopman ran out and pursued the prisoner, and took the print from him.

HENRY NEWMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Brown. The prisoner was pointed out to me; I pursued him; he threw the print away. I took the print up, and collared the prisoner; the prisoner was tipsey; the piece of print was hanging on a string at the door. There is no mark that I can identify it by. It is the same pattern and the same length. I saw it a little time before it was taken away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-147

1014. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , twenty-four yards of ribbon, value 4 s. the property of Eleanor Watson , Mary Ann Watson , and Sarah Ruth Watson .

ELEANOR WATSON . I am a haberdasher , No. 5, Spencer-street, Goswell-street . My partners names are Mary Ann and sarah Ruth ; they are my sisters a neighbour detected the prisoner before he had taken the ribbon out of the window.

THOMAS LESTER. I saw the prisoner looking in at Miss Watson's window. The prisoner had got about a dozen yards out of the window; there were eight or ten yards inside; he had not got the whole of the ribbon.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-148

1015. CHRISTOPHER HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , four pound weight of beef, value 3 s. one pound weight of veal, value 1 s. and two eggs, value 2 d. the property of John Richardson the younger .

JOHX RICHARDSON, JUNIOR. I keep an hotel in Vere-street . On Saturday the 22d of October, the prisoner lived in my house; he slept in my house; he had a bundle under his arm. I asked him what it contained. He said, his dirty things. I desired him to come into my room; he did; I opened his apron. In it was four pound of beef, undressed; he appeared sorry, and said he hoped I should overlook it. I sent for a constable, and had him searched.

WILLIAM PIALL . I am a constable. I found a piece of veal in the prisoner's pocket on searching him; it was dressed; about a pound. I found two eggs in the crown of his hat. He acknowledged to me he had never taken so much before, he had taken a little.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-149

1016. JAMES LACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a looking-glass, value 24 s. the property of Benjamin Elliot , two decanters, value 4 s. and four wine glasses, value 6 s. the property of Mary Ives .

MARY IVES . I keep a public-house in Seward-street, Brick-lane, in the parish of St. Luke's . On the night of the 19th of October, I was alarmed that the robbers had been in between the hours of seven and nine. I went into my parlour, and I missed a looking-glass, some drinking-glasses. and two decanters. I saw the looking-glass brought in; the looking-glass I borrowed of Mr. Elliott; it was not my own, and the wine-glasses were brought back, and the prisoner; the wine-glasses were broken to piece.

Q. How did the prisoner get in - A. I do not know; the tap door goes with a pulley, and the parlour with a spring-lock.

RICHARD COOPER . I watched the prisoner above an hour: he was lurking about on a rainy night in the street. I thought him to be a suspicious character, and when he ran away I pursued him; he had a looking-glass under his arm; I did not see him go into the house; he went into the house either at the door or the window. I saw him in Goswell-street with the glass under his arm; he threw the looking-glass into a butcher's shop. I followed him and took him. I brought him back to Mrs. Ives; the officer found the glass.

HENRY COOPER . I watched the prisoner with my brother. I missed him all of a sudden; I saw two persons come from Mrs. Ives's public-house. I ran up to Mrs. Ives's; I saw the parlour window wide open. I went into Mrs. Ives's, and asked her whether she knew her parlour window was open, and whether she had any thing there that she could lose. She went into the parlour, and said she had lost a looking-glass. I immediately ran out with my youngest brother into Goswell-street. He said there was a man over the way with a looking-glass under his arm. We crossed over to him; he began to run; he passed the butcher's shop as he was running; he threw the glass in at the window. We pursued him and took him; we never lost sight of him; we brought him back to Mrs. Ives's. The constable searched him and found upon him two knives, and two decanter stoppers. He was taken to the watchouse; this is the looking-glass.

BENJAMIN ELLIOTT , This is the looking-glass I lent to Mrs. Ives.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-150

1017. WILLIAM BOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October , a rummer glass, value 18 d. the property of William Gee .

WILLIAM GEE. I a publican . I live at the Coach and Horses, Welbeck-street . On the 17th of October. the prisoner came into my house; I was in the parlour myself. He sat down, and was soon after joined by another person. My little girl said they were the men that where there on Monday, when we lost three pint pots and some glasses. They called for a glass of ale; I was particular what glasses I sent in. A gentleman came in and called for sixpennyworth of gin and water; the gentleman, after he drank the gin and water, went out, and left the glass in the room. I opened the door, and looked in, and saw one of the glasses were gone; one or them went out; I ordered Piall the constable if the prisoner offered to go out, to stop him. I then asked the prisoner if he had got any properly of mine; he said he had not. I told him I missed a glass. Piall came and took the glass out of his pocket; this is the glass; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. As I had cracked the glass, I put it into my pocket; I intended to pay for it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-151

1018. MARY CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of October , from the person of William Grantham , a purse, value 2 d. and fifteen shillings in monies numbered, a 15 l. bank-note, a 1 l. bank note and five notes for the payment of one each , his property.

WILLIAM GRANTHAM . I am a labourer ; I lost my purse a fortnight ago last Thursday evening; i was between one and two o'clock. I was at Knightsbridge-green. I had my supper at the Marquis of Granby, being soon to go to bed; I took a walk with two men and two women into the town; the prisoner was one of the women. After they had persuaded me that it was too late to go to bed, I laid down on the green with one woman on each side of me, I saw the prisoner step over the mans' back; she put her hand into my pocket, and took out my purse with the money. I understood she took a coach. and drove off to St. Giles's. I saw her run away; she threw her shoes away, and ran away. after she had got my purse. I told the other woman she had better go with me, and shew me where to find the prisoner. The prisoner took a coach; the coachman has come forward; his name is William Fox.

Q. What had you in your purse - A. Twenty pound in notes, and fifteen shillings in silver.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am a constable. I received these notes of the coachman, William Fox , at Marlborough-street office. He said he found them in his coach. He was bound over to appear here; he said he did not think it was worth his while.

WILLIAM FOX was called; and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Mrs. ROPER. I assisted in taking the prisoner for the safety of myself. I asked Mr. Knight to take charge of her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-152

1019. JAMES CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , from the person of James Casey , two one pound notes , his property.

JAMES CASEY . I am a sailor . On the 7th of October I was at Poplar; I was going home to my lodging; I met two soldiers; they asked me if I would give them something to drink; I asked them if they wanted any thing to eat; they said they did. I took them into the public-house, and sent out for for some victuals. I sat down on the bench with two one-pound notes in my hand. I fell asleep by the fire, and when I awoke my notes were gone.

FRANCES HOWARD . I am servant at the public-house. I saw the sailor, he was tipsey; he fell asleep with two one-pound notes in his hand; the prisoner looked at the notes, and put them into his right hand coat pocket.

JOHN WARREN . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found these two one-pound notes in the front of his cap.

Prosecutor. They are mine, they are following numbers.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor let the notes fall out of his hand; I picked them up with intent to give him when he was sober.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-153

1019. EDWARD DOWDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , one three-shilling bank token , the property of John Jones .

JOHN JONES . I am a linen-draper , in Lower Eaton-street, Pimlico ; about a month ago, I found I had been robbed of money out of the till; no suspicion fell upon the prisoner; he bore the best of characters while he was with me. I did not intend to bring him here, but I was bound over. He is a good boy of himself. I am afraid he has bad advisers: I will take him again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-154

1020. JOHN GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , two ounces of paint, value 6 d. four painting brushes, value 6 d. and half an ounce of varnish, value 2 s. the property of John Ingram .

JOHN IRGRAM . I am a chair manufacturer ; I live in the City-road. In consequence of suspicion, I fetched an officer to be in my house at the time the prisoner was leaving his work; the prisoner was going to leave off work; he was searched; nothing was found upon him. On being charged with taking the bottle out of the shop with varnish in it; he said he had the bottle at home, with some little varnish in it. We went to his lodgings, and found the bottle of varnish with these brushes, and some mineral green paint, about two ounces: the spirit varnish is about half a pint.

JOHN RICKLEY . I saw the prisoner take the varnish in this bottle, he put it into his hat, and carried it away.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the spirit varnish at the oilman.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-155

1021. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a bank dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of John Sterney , from his person .

JOHN STERNEY . I met the prisoner last Wednesday, near Finsbury-square ; she took me down a passage, and took a dollar out of my pocket. I took her to the watchhouse; she gave up the dollar.

Prisoner's Defence. The dollar is my own; he seeing the dollar in my hand, he wanted to force it out of my hand. I would not let him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-156

1022. MARY ROBERTS and MARY ALLEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , two pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of George Tindall .

GEORGE TINDALL . I am a shoe-maker ; I live on Great Saffron-hill . On Saturday, the 8th of October, about three in the afternoon, I was coming out of my back parlour into the shop; I observed the prisoner Mary Allen looking at some shoes that were hung at the door post, having lost some things previous, I put myself in a situation to see her without being seen; in the space of a minute Mary Allen took two pair of shoes off a hook, on which they were hung; I immediately went to the door, by that time she was as far as the next door; I immediately went up to her; she was in the act of giving them to Mary Roberts ; I took hold of both of them, and sent for an officer. These are the shoes; they are mine.

ROBERTS, GUILTY , aged 27.

ALLEN, GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-157

1023. STEPHEN WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , two candlesticks, value 10 s. the property of Elizabeth Davis .

ELIZABETH CECIL. I am a servant to Mrs. Davis. she keeps a boarding-school , No. 3, Coventry-street . I saw the Prisoner coming out of the door with the candlesticks in his hand. There was another man, taller than the prisoner; he ran away. I suppose he came down the area steps, I shut the door, and shut the prisoner in.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-158

1024. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , three blankets, value 30 s. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am a linen draper , No. 16, Grace's Alley, Wellclose-square . I lost these blankets on Thursday, the 27th of October, a little after six in the evening. I went to the door, and immediately missed these blankets; I looked up the alley, and saw the prisoner with the blankets hanging down, they being so large he could not fold them up so, but what I could see them; I pursuad him; on turning round, Gillmore the officer met him, and took him in custody with the blankets upon him.

JOHN GILLMORE . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner with these blankets upon him; I took the prisoner into custody; there was the shop bill upon them. The prisoner said, a gentleman came out of the shop, and gave him the blankets to carry. This is the shop bill, and there is the shop mark besides.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18141026-159

1025. THOMAS THORP was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JAMES TOMLIN . My partner's names are James Taddy , Alexander Hatwood , and George Friend , we are tobacco and snuff manufacturers , 45, in the misnories,

in the city of London. On the 20th of July last, the prisoner came into our shop with this order, he presented me with this note; I marked the order before, I parted with it. Mesrs Taddy and Co. Please to let the bearer have twenty pounds of returns, and twenty pounds of fine shag, and by to-morrow one hundred pounds of common scotch for

Your Obedient. Perry, Leather-lane".

I told the prisoner if he would go to the office for the permit, the goods should be made up for him.

Q. Did he say from whence he came - A. I do not know but what he might Robert Perry was the person that we did business with.

Q. Did he say he came from Robert Perry - A. I don't know that he did, any further than presented the note. I told our warehouseman to weigh it off and if Thomas Sharp got the permit, he should have them on his return, the goods were weighed, and delivered to him in my presence; by John Torrington , our warehouseman. The prisoner never called again.

JOHN TORRINGTON . I am servant to the last witnes. I packed the returns, and the shag tobacco, and delivered it to the prisoner.

ROBERT PERRY . I am a tobacconist 58, in Leather-lane, Holborn I deal with the house of Taddy and Co. I have done business there some years.

Q. Take that note in your hand and tell me whether that is your hand writing - A. It is not; I give no order at that time I did not know the prisoner prior to this transaction. I gave him no order to get any shag tobacco or returns. The prisoner was quite a stranger to me; he had no authority to go with that order for me.

Q. to Mr. Tomlin. Where abouts is the value of this tobacco - A. Ten pounds three shillings and four pence.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined one Year .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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