Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th September 1814.
Reference Number: 18140914
Reference Number: f18140914-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 14th of SEPTEMBER, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable WILLIAM DOMVILLE . Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Henry Dampier , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir. Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter ; Christopher Smith , esq. William Heygate , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Henry Neville ,

William Moore ,

Charles Wright ,

Robert Gunstone ,

George Hedley ,

Alexander Waugh ,

James Entweezle ,

Charles Christie ,

William Palmer ,

James Hammond ,

William Cousens ,

Joseph Wilkinson .

First Middlesex Jury.

Richard Norton ,

William Roper ,

John Clark ,

Richard Angell ,

Richard Waits ,

John Eason ,

John Jackson ,

John Hill ,

Thomas Laye ,

William Haydren ,

John Whitehead ,

William Preston .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Brathwaite ,

William Whitehall ,

John Patworth ,

James Jandrell ,

John Patridge ,

Thomas Davis ,

Thomas Langley ,

Jenkins Lake ,

Thomas Wilson ,

Thomas Blankley ,

William Mackey ,

Arthur Seal .

Reference Number: t18140914-1

696. RICHARD HARRIS and JANE HUNT were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Fielding , in the King's highway, on the 20th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 3 l. a chain, value 6 d. two keys, value 6 d. nineteen shillings in monies numbered, and seven 1 l. notes , the property of John Fielding.

JOHN FIELDING . I am a servant .

Q. Do you know Ann Hunt - A. I do. On the 20th of August, a little before nine in the evening, I was coming home from Portman-street; coming along Oxford-street, I met with Jane Hunt; I asked her the way into Holborn; she said, she was going there, she would shew me. She brought me through George-street; in George-street two men met me; the prisoner was one, Harrison was the other; the prisoner jostled me; the other man pulled the chain from my watch. The prisoner put his hands round my neck; the other man catched me by the legs, and throwed me down on the flag stones, and robbed me of my notes in George-street; my notes were in my right hand breeches pocket. They took my watch from me also, and my silver, to the amount of nineteen shillings. They then left me across the door of No. 4. A woman had the candle at the time.

Q. What woman - A. Jane Hunt . They put out the candle; the light disappeared.

Q. Was Jane Hunt in company with you when the men came up - A. No, she was not.

Q. Then she was not the woman that you met - A. No, she was not.

Q. I thought you said, you met her at the corner of Oxford-street - A. No; it was another woman. The two men and the woman were all strangers to me; I never saw them before.

Mr. Barry. The woman that you first met, was an acquaintance, was not she - A. No; I met her at the lower end of Oxford-street.

Q. I thought you said, that you met them all at the corner of Oxford-street - A. No; it was another woman. Jane Hunt was the woman that had the lighted candle when I was robbed.

Q. How long have you been in London - A. Eight months; I came from Dublin.

Q. Now, sir, what hour in the afternoon did this take place - A. About ten minutes before nine o'clock, when they robbed me. I went into the next house, it is a public-house; I told the landlord I had been robbed of so much money.

Q. Where did you live - A. In Guildford-street, in the Borough. I am now out of place, and I was out of place at the time I was robbed. I first came over from Dublin with the Archbishop of Dublin, and I went back with him to Dublin.

Q. What wages had you when you were in place - A. Twenty-six guineas.

Q. Now, sir, it was about nine o'clock in the afternoon - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you dine - A. At my house, in Guildford-street. I left my house about two o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. What became of you from two o'clock in the afternoon until nine o'clock at night - A. I went to Portman-street, and stopped there, with Lord Clareall's servants.

Q. What had you to drink - A. Nothing to injure me; I drank share of a pot of porter.

Q. You said, you were pulled down by two men - A. Yes; that was in George-street

Q. Did you see any one come past you - A. No.

Q. This was on Saturday, the 20th of August. Did you ever see the man at the bar before - A. No; but when the woman brought the light out, I saw his face, and I saw him go into the public-house the next morning at six o'clock; I pointed the man prisoner out to my friend, who was with me.

- ABRAHAMS. I am a patrol of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner at the Maidenhead public-house, in Dyot-street. The woman was apprehended at No 4, in the same street. I searched the prisoner. I found nothing on him relating to this case.

JAMES CADMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the woman at No. 4, in Dyot-street. I searched her, and found nine shillings upon her.

Harris said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hunt's Defence. On Sunday morning the prosecutor came to the house No. 4, I lived servant there; the prosecutor brought three officers with him; he said, I was the person that held the candle. I had never seen the prosecutor before that time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-2

697. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, on the 10th of August , about the hour of ten in the night, being in the dwelling-house of Phineas Wright , did steal, a watch, value 3 l. the property of Peter Massa ; and that he, did afterwards burglariously break the said dwelling-house in the night to get out of it .

PETER MASSA. I am a mariner . On the 10th of August last, I lodged in Phineas Wright 's house, No. 14, Garden-street, in the parish of St. George's ; I went to bed between ten and eleven at night. I had a watch in my pocket, and three shillings in silver when I went to bed; I went to sleep. I awoke between four and five; I missed every thing out of my jacket pocket, except a knife and a key.

Q. Have you seen your watch since - A. Yes. It is a double case watch. I shall know it again when I see it.

PHINEAS WRIGHT. I live at No. 14, Garden-street, St. George's parish. On the 10th of August last, Peter Massa was one of my lodgers. On that day, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner

came to my house and made an agreement to lodge in my house that night. Massa went to bed about half past eleven. After that time, the prisoner came to me; I lent him three shillings. He was to come back about half past twelve in the morning; he did. I then shewed him up to bed; he slept in the same bed with Massa. After the prisoner went to bed, I locked the outer door myself, before one o'clock. About half after one, I heard somebody go down stairs; I did not see him. I heard the back door make a noise. I went down about half past one; the front door was then wide open. I went up to see who was in the house. I missed the prisoner, and nobody else. I afterwards went to the Black Horse, and had the prisoner taken into custody.

LYON JONES. I live with Mr. Solomon, a watchmaker, in Nightingale-lane. On the 11th of August, in the morning, a little after five, he asked me whether I had a watch-ribbon to sell. I sold him a ribbon. I looked at his watch; I observed there was a glass wanting. I tried to fit it; he left the watch with me to fit a glass to it. The watch was a single cased watch; it opened both ways. I lent him a plain watch.

Q. Should you know that watch again if you saw it - A. Yes.

Q. Did he return it to you - A. No, he did not. I did not see him again until he was taken up.

Q. Were had you taken the watch that he had left with you - A. To the glass-cutter; his name is Walters. I went with John Brown, the officer, to Walters.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I, and Butler, apprehended the prisoner I searched him, and found in his pocket this card of Mr. Solomons; that led me to Mr. Solomons, and I found this plain watch upon him.

Jones. This is the watch. I lent the prisoner.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the second watch; is that yours - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. When I took the watch I was in liquor. Mr. Wright shewed me up to bed; I laid myself down; I felt a watch in this man's pocket. About half past three, I went out; I met this man at the door; I asked this man if he had got any watch ribbon to sell. I broke the glass of the watch. I asked the man to put the glass of the watch in; he gave me another watch to put into my pocket. I did not intend to keep the watch. I told the prosecutor I was looking after him. When he came into Mr. Lee's, in New Gravel-lane, where I went to, he said, he was looking for me.

Q. to Mr. Wright. Was he in liquor when he went to bed - A. No.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-3

698. THOMAS PEARSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Butler , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 13th of August , no person being therein, and stealing, a jacket, value 12 s. a waistcoat, value 6 s. and a pair of breeches, value 15 s. the goods of William Butler .

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am a house-keeper , at Sherard-green, in the parish of Wilsdon .

Q. Was your house broken open in August last - A. Yes. About five o'clock in the morning, my wife and I went out together. I returned about seven o'clock. My wife was the first person that returned. She can give a better account than me.

CATHERINE BUTLER . I went out about five o'clock in the morning. I returned about seven in the evening. I locked the door. In the evening when I opened the door, I went into my room; I saw my bed was down, and all the furniture laid upon the top of the bed. There was a hole in the roof large enough for a person to get in; that was the way the house was entered. I left my house all safe and sound when I went to work. When I returned, I missed my husband's jacket, waistcoat, and breeches. I saw them on the Sunday. This was on Saturday.

Q. Do you know the value of these things - A. No, I do not The prisoner was a neighbour; he lived at the next house to me.

WILLIAM BOUCHER . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Upper Gower-street, Bryanston-square. The prisoner pledged with me a velveteen jacket, waistcoat, and a pair of breeches, for fifteen shillings. The value of them might be about twenty-eight or thirty shillings. He pawned them in the name of Thomas Pearson ; he pawned them on the 13th of August, on a Saturday. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. This is my husband's jacket, waistcoat, and breeches; they are all my husband's property.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-4

699. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a gown, value 4 s. three caps, value 3 s. two cravets, value 4 s. three collars, value 4 s. two tippets, value 7 s. one yard of lace, value 7 s. a veil, value 7 s. a silver tooth-pick, value 2 s. a smelling-bottle, with silver top, value 2 s. two necklaces, value 8 s. and two minatures, with frames, value 1 l. the property of Charlotte Powell , spinster ; a cloak, value 1 s. an apron, value 1 s. a shift, value 4 s. and a night-cap, value 6 d. the property of Sarah Powell , spinster ; a petticoat, value 18 d. the property of Mary Powell , spinster ; in the dwelling-house of James Powell .

CHARLOTTE POWELL . I live in my father's house; his name is James Powell ; his house is in the parish of Christ Church, Spitalfields. I was out when the robbery was committed; it was on the 1st of August. I can only speak to the property.

JAMES POWELL . I am the father of first witness. I only know from the report of my wife, Ann Powell ; she is here.

ANN POWELL . I am the wife of James Powell . Our house is No. 27, Lamb-street, Spitalfields; in the parish of Christ Church, Spitalfields .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I never saw her until the officer brought her to my

house. I was at home on the 1st of August; I was in the shop. About four o'clock in the afternoon, I went up stairs; I found the door of one of the rooms open, the key of that room hung upon the bail below stairs, where it always did. My daughter, Charlotte, had locked the door of that room.

Q. How do you know - A. Because the key hung in the place where it always did. My daughter, Charlotte, locked the door When I entered the room, the drawers were all open, and empty; about half after two o'clock. My daughter's clothes were all in the drawers.

Q. to Charlotte Powell. Upon this first of August, were you in the room where your mother has been speaking of - A. Yes. I left the room about half past two; I locked the door, and left the key down stairs in the parlour. When I left the room, the drawers were all locked, except one. My clothes, and my sister's clothes, were in these drawers. In one of these drawers, was a black veil, two necklaces, and a great number of things; almost all the things I and my sister wore. On the Saturday following, I saw one of my gowns again. This happened on Monday, the 1st of August.

Q. Did you see all that was missed - A. No, not all. Some are lost entirely; a veil is now missing, a broach, some collars, and a pair of minature pictures.

Q. Are you sure that all these things were safe in the room when you went out at two o'clock - A. Yes; I had looked over the drawers that morning. I did not return home until Tuesday. I shall know all the things when they are produced.

REBECCA MAILER . I keep a clothes-shop, in Fore-street; in the parish of Cripplegate. On the 1st of August, the prisoner came to my house, between the hours of five and seven; I cannot positively say the hour; she offered me for sale, five gowns, three small neck-handkerchiefs, three bonnets, a small white muslin cloak, and a shawl; she offered these for sale. I bought them all. She asked me two pounds eight shillings; I gave her two pounds five shillings for them. On the Saturday following, Miss Powell passed my door; she saw a gown hang in my window; she asked me if I knew of whom I had purchased it; I described the prisoner. I then told her every article I had bought, to the best of my knowledge, and told her, I would go in pursuit of the prisoner in Rag-fair. I had seen her at my shop three or four times before. On the 18th of August, the prisoner came to my house again; I caused the prisoner to be taken into custody. I returned to the Miss Powells all the property.

MATTHEW POLLETT . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner. The things have been returned to Mrs. Powell.

COURT. Who received the things from Mrs. Mailer -

Mrs. Powell. My daughter, Charlotte, brought some of them home from Mrs. Mailer.

Mrs. Mailer. Charlotte Powell took some, the other Miss Powells took the rest.

THOMAS HART . I am a headborough of the parish of Christ Church. I produce the bundle delivered to me by Mr. Powell, in company with Pollett.

James Powell . I delivered to Hart the bundle, and gave charge of the prisoner.

Charlotte Powell . On the 6th of August, I went to Mrs. Mailer; I saw several things that belonged to me, and my sister.

Q. Did you take from her a bonnet - A. Yes. The things that I took away, I took to my father's house. The same things that were delivered to me, I delivered to my father; he delivered them to Hart. I know them all. These are the same things I received of Mrs. Mailer; they are mine, and my sisters.

Q. Did you ever recover any of the things except what are now before you - A. Yes. There were found in the prisoner's box, a gown, a shawl, and a bonnet, of mine. These two handkerchief are mine; I know this gown by having worn it, I know this shawl by having had it a long while, it was in a band-box; I missed it, and found it at Mrs. Mailer's.

SARAH POWELL . This cloak is mine, the spencer, and gown; they were in the drawers, in the bed-chamber, on the 1st of August, in the morning; they were missing in the afternoon. They are worth thirty shillings.

MARIA POWELL . One gown belongs to me, and a bonnet.

Charlotte Powell . I value the things that belongs to me altogether at thirty five shillings.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I produce two collars, a pair of stockings, and a silver tooth-pick. On the 19th of August, I went to the prisoner's lodgings to apprehend her upon another charge; she was not at home. On searching her box, I found these things belonging to Miss Powell. The man that lived with her, told me it was her box. He was bound over to attend here; he has not come. It was at No. 17, Bell-court; I knew her to lodge there.

Charlotte Powell. The things produced by Mr. Dickens, are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The things in my box were my own; they have taken all my things away, and left me destitute.

JURY. Q. to Mrs. Mailer. Did the prisoner give any description how she came by these things - A. She said, she bought them of a person in the fair.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-5

700. JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Ann Welchman , spinster .

MARY MACEY . Q. Where did you live on the 4th of August - A. No. 27, Mount-street; I was a dress-maker at that time.

Q. Did you know the deceased, Miss Welchman - A. Yes; I had known her three years. She had been in my employment during that time.

Q. Was there an agreement between you and Miss Welchman, that she should take your business - A. Yes. She was then residing in my house.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner at the bar coming to your house on the 4th of August last - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known or seen the prisoner before - A. Yes, frequently; he went by the name of Smith at that time.

Q. Have you ever heard him describe his business or situation of life - A. Not to me; to Miss Welchman.

Q. What time of the day was it when he came to your house - A. A little before eight in the evening. I saw him when he first came in; he was shewed into the work-room, the middle room; that communicates with the front room.

Q. To whom did the house belong to - A. To Mr. Watkins; he lodged in it.

Q. Who was in the work-room when the prisoner came in - A. Her sister, Hannah Welchman, a work-woman, myself, Miss Maynard, the servant girl, Mary Sissel , a Miss Few, and the deceased, Mary Ann Welchman , was there.

Q. What passed between him and the deceased. Miss Welchman - A. He sat down quiet at first, until she accused him of taking a pair of scissars; he was then very impertinent, and used very improper language. We all left the room, except Miss Welchman; we went into the adjoining-room, the front room.

Q. In the front room could you hear what passed in the work-room - A. Yes; we could hear. We heard him name to her, to go out to supper with him; she said, she could not go. Then he wished her to send for salmon, that he might have supper there after eleven o'clock. After we had done work, I went into the work-room again, into the middle room, were the deceased was. I desired the prisoner to go; he said, he would not go until Miss Welchman had given him a letter which she had of his. Miss Welchman said, she had destroyed it. We left him in the work-room some little time after, and went down to supper, me and the others; Hannah Maynard , myself, and family, went down to supper. We left the prisoner and the deceased in the work-room; they were quite alone.

Q. At the time that you left the front room, how was the window that looked towards the street - A. The shutters were bolted. There are two windows; they were both so when we went into the kitchen to supper.

Q. How long had you been in the kitchen before you either saw the prisoner or the deceased again - A. About five minutes; I saw the deceased, Miss Welchman; the deceased came down to us.

Q. Did the prisoner follow - A. No. Miss Welchman was in the kitchen only a minute; she said, she must return to the prisoner, not for us to wait supper for her; she must return to the prisoner, and she hoped she should soon get him out. In about five minutes, I was alarmed by Miss Welchman screaming; next was the report of the pistol, and instantly the report of another. I ran up stairs, not farther than the parlour. I did not go at all to the first floor; I stopped in the parlour.

Q. Did you see the prisoner any more that night - A. No.

Q. If he had come down stairs to have gone out, must not you have met him as you went to the parlour - A. No.

Q. When you went to the parlour, how near did you stand to the door - A. That parlour is a back room.

COURT. Might not he have gone out before you might have met him - A. He might. I did not see him, or hear him; or hear the door shut, or open; the street door was shut.

Mr. Knapp. Does the door open inside - A. Yes.

Q. He might have come down stairs, and you not have seen him - A. He might.

Q. How many persons were there lodging in this house; where there other lodgers besides you - A. In the second floor an old lady and her neice. This happened between eleven and twelve at night.

Q. Do you know whether all the persons in the house were within that night when the murder was committed - A. All.

Q. You did not fasten the door yourself - A. No.

Q. Nor had you fastened the window - A. I saw the girl fasten it; it was fastened inside.

ROBERT WATKINS . Q. I believe you were the house-keeper of the house in which Miss Macey lodged - A. I was.

Q. On the night of the 4th of August, at what time had you gone to bed - A. About eleven o'clock I went to bed. I sleep in a room that is built in the yard, behind the house, belonging to the house.

Q. At a little before twelve, were you called by your house-keeper - A. I was. As soon as I was called, I got up. While I was getting up, I heard a screaming in the first floor.

Q. Were you called up on account of the dispute - A. I was. I went to the noise. The scream was followed immediately by the report of a pistol; the report of a pistol was followed by the report of a second pistol. I ran up stairs as quick as I could; when I got on the top of the stairs Miss Welchman was laying half way out of the room; her legs were in the room; her head out. She was bleeding at the head; she appeared to be dead at that moment, quite dead. I went into the room directly, and saw no one. I found no man there; from the back-room, I went into the front.

Q. Did you search the middle room also - A. Yes.

Q. As you did not find any body there, did you find any means by which any person might have got away - A. Yes; the window of the front-room over the door was open.

Q. Is there a perch under that window - A. There is a lead over the door; he might have got out upon the lead of the door, and have got down without falling upon the spikes. I saw a pistol in the front room, and one in the middle-room.

Q. Did they appear to have been recently discharged - A. I did not examine them.

Q. Did you find a hat in the room - A. I do not recollect seeing a hat until a quarter of an hour afterwards. The hat and pistols Mr. Moon, the constable, has them. A surgeon was sent for immediately by Mr. Russell, in Mount-street.

THOMAS MOON . I am a constable of St. George's, Hanover-square. In consequence of the alarm, I went to 27, Mount-street. I went with two or three watchmen immediately. I gave orders that the house might be searched. I immediately went up stairs to the first floor. On entering the first floor front room I saw the deceased, Miss Welchman, supported in a chair, with two wounds upon her head. I observed a wound in the right temple. I found the pistols in about a quarter of an hour afterwards. The pistols were both found in my presence. A hat and one pistol was found in the front room where the deceased was supported, and one pistol in the middle room, called the work room. These are the pistols, and that is the hat. The pistols were examined, both of them; both appeared to have been recently discharged. The surgeon examined them; I did not.

Q. to Miss Macey. How was the prisoner dressed that night - A. A dark coat (I think, black) and light gaiters.

WILLIAM COLLINSON . Q. I believe you keep a public-house next door to Mr. Watkins's house - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 4th of August, a little before twelve, were you alarmed by any noise in Mr. Watkins's house - A. Yes; I first heard a scream in Mr. Watkins's house, then I put up the window, and saw a man lay upon the pavement, apparently opposite of the door of Mr. Watkins's house, as if he had come out of the window; he got up directly, and ran away towards Charles-street. He had no hat on.

Q. Has the prisoner been ever at your house - A. He has been there once; I did not see him.

Q. Does he bear any resemblance to the person whom you saw run away, turn round, and look - A. I have seen that gentleman come to Mr. Watkins.

Q. Does he bear any resemblance of the person who lay on the pavement and run away - A. I cannot say.

Q. You have no belief about it - A. No.

WILLIAM KINGSTON. Q. Did you happen to be in Mount-street on the night of the 4th of August - A. Yes; I saw a man pass by me between Mr. Watkins's house and Charles-street; he came in a direction as if he had been at Mr. Watkins's, and was without a hat; he went to Charles-street.

MR. RUSSELL. I am a surgeon. On the 4th of August last, I was sent for to Miss Macey's; I went, and saw Miss Welchman; she was just expiring; the cause of her death was the two wounds she had received, one in the right temple, the other on the left side of the head. They appeared both pistol wounds. The pistols were found in the room. I had the holding them, and on putting my finger in them they were damp, therefore I think they had been recently discharged.

ANN STENNETT . I am housekeeper to Mr. Watkins.

Q. Did you call Mr. Watkins up in consequence of what was told you - A Yes that was before the pistol was fired. After the pistols were fired, I found a bullet on the spot, where the deceased's head laid. I gave the bullet to Mr. Watkins.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a hatter, in Bond-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, sir, very well; I knew him as the servant of Mr. Crawford, in Old Burlington-street. In the early part of June, he purchased a hat of me. He told me he was about to marry a young lady, who was a forewoman in Mount-street. This is the hat I saw at Bow-street, and I believe it to be the same I sold him.

Mr. Alley. You do not finish the hats yourself, do you - A. No.

Q. If you had not have heard of the murder, you would not have know any thing about that hat - A. I could not.

Q. Did not you hear that the prisoner had lost his hat at Burlington Gardens - A. Not this hat; an old hat.

Mr. Gurney. You seeing the hat again, do you believe that to be the hat that you sold him - A. Yes, sir.

JOHN PICKEN. I am a soldier in the 3rd regiment of foot guards, and a servant to General Jelks .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, perfectly well. On the Friday evening, the 5th of August, a quarter before ten o'clock, he came without a hat to me, and borrowed a hat. I did not hear of the murder of Miss Welchman until the Sunday following. I asked him how he came to be without a hat; he said he happened to get himself into a hobble at Bartholomew fair, and lost his hat. The fair was over that day, I believe.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, 16, Grosvenor-mews; I found the cases of a pair of pistols, the bullet moulds, four bullets, and a key. The bullets, cases, and the key, fits the pistols I have produced to-day.

HENRY BRACKEN . I am a farmer at Sutton, near Salisbury.

Q. Did you formerly know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, sir, he worked for me formerly.

Q. Early in the month of August, did you see him near Salisbury - A. Yes, on Tuesday the 9th of August; I caused him to be apprehended. I read the description of him in the newspaper, and caused him to be taken up.

Q. How near Salisbury was it - A. Between eleven and twelve miles the other side of Salisbury.

Prisoner's Defence. I am certainly innocent of the charge. It was never my intention to murder Miss Welchman, nor ever did such a thought enter my head; and that hat Mr. Chapman, the hatter, knows is not mine. I lost my hat in Burlington Gardens. Them pistols are not mine; I never had any pistols since I left Spain. I never offered or asked for supper, the witness knows it well. I went down stairs with my hat a little before eleven o'clock, or about that time.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-6

701. WILLIAM HENRY HOLLINS , alias HENRY WILLIAM HOLLINS , was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Pilcher .

GEORGE CARTWRIGHT. I live in Lower Grosvenor-street . Elizabeth Pilcher was servant with me and my father. She was quite a young woman. On the 4th of July I heard the report of a pistol about ten o'clock in the evening. I went down stairs, and saw Elizabeth Pilcher laying on the floor in the passage supported by my man servant, and the prisoner in the passage also.

Q. You are sure it was the prisoner, are you; look at him; is that the same man you saw in the passage - A. Yes, it is the same man I saw in Bow-street. At the time I had not time to discern him. I went to him, and took the pistol from his hand. The watchman then came in; I gave him in charge of a watchman. I know nothing more.

Q. At the time that you saw this young woman laying on the floor was she dead - A. No, she was taken into the parlour by my servant; his name is William Martin .

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am servant to Mr. Cartwright. On the 4th of July, about a quarter before ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the door; he asked for Elizabeth; I let him in; he came into the passage. I am sure he is the man. I immediately called Elizabeth Pilcher down stairs.

Q. Do you know what the prisoner is - A. He has been an exciseman. He had been there two or three times before; he asked for Elizabeth; I concluded he wanted Elizabeth Pilcher ; she came down and went to the door to him. The door was pulled to, but not shut. She went on the outside; they appeared to be talking together. I went directly into the parlour. I heard nothing that passed particular. Immediately I heard the report of a pistol, I heard a female scream. After the report of the pistol, I found it was Elizabeth; I caught her in my arms.

Q. She had not fallen then - A. No, sir. She was then in the passage. The door of the house was then open.

Q. When you caught her in your arms did you perceive any thing about her person - A. Yes, under her right arm I saw a black mark, as if by gunpowder.

Q. Did she say anything - A. She did, but I cannot say what; she spoke, but not for me to understand what she said. She was followed up the passage by the prisoner, into the house; he said let me kiss her; it was not granted; somebody prevented it; by this time, several people had come. I saw her clothes tore down, and I saw the wound on her right side.

Q. At the place where the black spot was did you observe any rent in her clothes - A. I did. Afterwards I saw her clothes torn down, and I saw the wound. She was taken into the parlour, and laid upon a chair. There was not much blood. I assisted in taking her up stairs. That is all I know. This was on the 4th of July, a Monday. She died on the Sunday following. The prisoner was secured in my presence; he made no resistance; he said something; what it was I am not able to say.

Mr. Gurney. Did you see any remains of the poison he had taken - A. There was something laying on the steps, broken glass, and something spilt white.

Q. Had it the appearance of arsenic - A. There was a white liquor; I looked at it; I could not tell what it was.

SAMUEL LONG . I am a watchman in Hanover-square. On the 4th of July, I was patrolling Lower Grosvenor-street; I was standing about ten or a dozen yards from Mr. Cartwright's door. I heard the report of some fire arms; I instantly ran to where I thought I heard the report spring from; on my coming up to Mr. Cartwright's door; the door was half open; I saw a man stand in the passage.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, is that the man - A. That is the man; he had a pistol in his right hand. Mr. Cartwright was singing out watch; I made answer, here I am. He said, that is the man, seize him; I instantly laid hold of the prisoner. The prisoner said, do not seize me, I shall not run away. I said, no, I shall take good care you shall not run away. I said, I believe you have killed the woman. He said have I; I answered, I believe you have. He said, is she dead; I said, I believe she is. He then said, let me kiss her cold lips, poor girl, I loved her. That is all I know. I secured him, and took him to the watchhouse.

Mr. Gurney. Did you observe this glass and poison - A. No. I did not stay with him in the watchhouse; I went on my duty.

WILLIAM DEANE. I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house.

Mr. Gurney. Did the prisoner bring any thing off his stomach after he arrived at the watchhouse - A. Yes, he vomited; it was washed away; he asked for cold water; I let him have it. He drank between three and four quarts of cold water, and vomited a great deal in the course of the night. I did not confine him as other prisoners are; I let him sit in my chair. I went to Mr. Cartwright's two or three times in the night, and enquired the state of the poor woman's health. I found one pistol in his pocket. This is the pistol that was fired off; it is bursted. It was loaded too full I understood. That pistol was delivered to me at Bow-street.

Q. to Martin. Did you take that pistol out of the prisoner's hand - A. No; Mr. Cartwright did.

Q. to Mr. Cartwright. Is that the pistol that the prisoner had in his hand - A. Yes; it had the appearance of having been loaded to the muzzle with powder and shots.

JOHN HEAVISIDE . I am a surgeon. I was called in about eleven o'clock on the 4th of July, in the evening; I saw the young woman who had been carried up stairs. On examining her, I found the wound on the right side; it was a gun shot wound. She lived until three o'clock on the Sunday following, and then she died. I opened her body; I found there was a wound, and three hundred shots in her liver alone.

Q. What sort of shots - A. I understand they are called No. 2; very small ones.

Mr. Deane. I have some of the shots that were found on the steps; here are three of them I produce.

Mr. Heaviside. They were about that size, and

three hundred were in the liver, and two hundred in her bowels. I have not the least doubt that was the cause of her death.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a most serious regard for the young woman, as I had for my own child. I never thought, nor never had it in my mind to injure the poor girl. I respected her, and loved her, and would have done as much for her as I would for my own child. I declare, in the sight of a just God and your lordship, as to the manner I fired that piece off I know no more than your lordship. If I am found guilty, my sentence is just, I acknowledge in the sight of God. I hope it will be a warning to all. If I die, I die; sure am I, my soul will be happy with God.

RICHARD STONE . I am a journeyman carpenter; I live at No. 2, Swan-place, in the Kent-road. The prisoner lodged with me.

Q. How long had he lodged with you before the 4th of July - A. Nine months.

Q. During that time did he appear to you to be a person in a sound mind - A. He did not.

Q. What did you observe in his deportment that made you think he was a man not of a sound mind - A For some few days the carpet was always drawed up in a morning, and the room was wetted all over; and several times in the morning, and late at night, I have heard him singing; his singing was humming, not singing a song. My wife was very much frightened at him; at last he seemed very wild indeed. My wife wished me to speak to him to get him out of the house; I did not; he remained in the house until the time this unfortunate affair happened. At other times he was melancholy.

Q. How long have you thought he was deranged - A. Near six weeks before the 4th of July.

Q. Did you sleep in the room under him - A. No, he slept in the front parlour, and I in the back parlour. I have heard him get out of bed as I supposed, as I supposed he tumbled out by the noise; he would be singing and making a noise; he was more so the night before the 4th of July than he was before.

JURY. Did you ever mention it to any other person than your wife - A. No.

EMMA MASON . I am the daughter of a publican in the neighbourhood where the prisoner lived. The prisoner was accustomed to take his breakfast in our house.

Q. Have you ever observed anything in his department which gave you reason to think he was deranged - A. Yes, often; I have seen him very melancholy; he talked rather incoherent; he was often writing, scribbling; his writing was not as other people usually write; it was scribbling. I was afraid of staying in the room with him. I always got out of the room when I could. I thought he was deranged.

MR. COHEN. I am a calico printer; I live in the Kent-road. I knew the prisoner in Locks-fields; I have had no knowledge of him for the last three years; before that, I had reason to suppose the man was out of his mind; he used to alarm the whole neighbourhood with his screams and hallooing in the night when I lived near him. I have seen him in the public-house called the Cottage of Content in a very incoherent manner.

COURT. Was he sober at these times - A. Not exactly so.

ROBERT COOPER . I am a baker; I live in Deane's-buildings, Lock's-fields, No. 9. I lived next door to the prisoner for seven years. I have not known much of him for this time twelve month; he left his lodgings, and went into the Kent-road. I have observed a great deal of derangement in him when he lived near me. I was called in one evening by his daughter; I went up stairs, and found him laying on his bed; he was biting the sheets on the pillow. This is about a year and a half ago. I asked him the reason; he said it was for Betty. He was considered by all the neighbours to be in a deranged state. I remember once he talked about throwing himself over London bridge; that was at three o'clock in the afternoon. He was formerly a clerk in the Excise; it is better than two months ago he has been out of that office; he was suspended or what they term put back.

MRS. BENNETT. I live in Dean's-buildings, Walworth, within two doors where the prisoner did live. I believe the prisoner to be a very insane man indeed at times. I had not been long in that neighbourhood before he made love to me. I am a married woman, and have six children. That is about three years and a half ago; at that time I had been in no house with him ever in my life. Mr. Bennet was very angry with me; it made me very uncomfortable. Within the last six months he had poison taken from him in my presence. It was six weeks before this affair happened. The daughter and the mother took it from him. I did not see it taken. He had a very insane appearance at the time. I attended Mr. Pilcher, Elizabeth Pilcher 's father. I attended Mr. Pilcher three months for insanity. The prisoner was very intimate with her family.

Q. to Martin. Then you opened the door, and he asked for Elizabeth; did he seem confused - A. No, I never had the least opinion there was any insanity about him, none in the least.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-7

702. JAMES HARDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , three bullocks, value 12 l. the property of Thomas Moss .

THOMAS MOSS . I am a miller , and have a little land.

Q. Did you keep any bullocks - A. Yes, in the Essex-road, near the sixteen-mile stone . I had four bullocks in a field. I lost three. I had seen them all just in the dusk of the evening on the 18th of August. The fence of the field was all secure. The gate was secured, but not locked. The cattle could not get out of themselves.

Q. How early the next day did you go to your field - A. My man went about five o'clock in the morning. Between seven and eight I went to the field, and perceived three were gone. They were three small Scotch bullocks. I saw them again on the next day at night. I gave three pound fifteen shillings for them. I bought them to fatten. I saw them again

in the possession of Blair. He delivered them up to me. Blair was hired to drive them into the country by the person that had purchased them. When I claimed them he delivered them to me.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No, I do not know I ever saw him before.

MR. FINCH. Q. What are you - A. I am a salesman at Smithfield market.

Q. Do you know the man at the bar - A. Yes, I sold three beasts for him. I saw him first on the 19th of August. I sold them about nine o'clock in the morning. The prisoner was a stranger to me before that day.

Q. What did the prisoner come to you for - A. He desired me to sell the cattle in his name.

Q. What cattle - A Three Scotch runts. I sold them for him to a person of the name of Churchyard, he lives at Milton, near Woodford.

Q. Who is Stephen Blair - A. The person that ties my goods up.

Q. Are you sure that you delivered to Blair the three bullocks that you received of the prisoner - A. Yes, I am. I know nothing more.

STEPHEN BLAIR . I am a drover to Mr. Finch, the last witness.

Q. On the 19th of August did you receive any bullocks of him for the purpose of taking to Mr. Churchyard, of Milton, in Suffolk - A. Yes, I did. I received them between nine and ten in the morning; I was going to drive them to Brentwood; they were to be left at Brentwood for Mr. Churchyard; I had no other cattle with me. I was stopped at Mile End with them, and detained there; Mr. Moss's man stopped me, his name is Collier; he claimed them as Mr. Moss's property. I delivered them over to Mr. Moss. I was told he lived at the sixteen mile stone; I took them to him; he claimed them as his own.

WILLIAM SMELLING . I am collector of the toll at Painsbridge-gate, three miles below Rumford. I saw the prisoner come through the gate in the morning between one and two o'clock on Thursday, the 18th; I knew him by sight. A person to go to Mr. Moss's land would pass my gate.

Q. When he went through the gate, had he any thing with him - A. He had no cattle with him then; he was in company with another person. I saw him again about eleven o'clock at night, the same day, he drove the three beasts through my gate, and paid me the toll for the three bullocks, one penny halfpenny; they were small Scotch beasts. I am quite sure he is the man that went through in the morning. We have a large lamp at the front of the house at the toll gate; I had an opportunity to observe him; I am certain he is the man. When the prisoner paid me the toll, I saw no other person with him then.

EDWARD DILLONE . I am a drover. I know the prisoner. On the 18th of August, another man came up to me first, and asked me to take some beasts to Smithfield. The prisoner came close behind with the beasts; this was at Mile End, just by the Mackerell public-house, in Essex-road.

Q. You saw the prisoner driving three beasts - A. Yes; the prisoner is the man that I saw driving the three beasts. He followed the beasts up, and went with me to Smithfield. I had more beasts to drive. He mixed these beasts in with mine, and he followed behind me.

Q. What beasts were yours - A. Some oxen and some heifers.

Q. What became of the other man - A. He went away. This was between three and four in the morning; it was quite dark.

Q. That was Friday morning - A. Yes, it was when his beasts came to Smithfield; they were tied up for Mr. Finch to sell. That is all I know.

CHARLES JAQUES . I am a constable of Mile End. From information, I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of August, at the Fountain public-house, Mile End; I told him on a charge of stealing some beasts. In his waistcoat pocket, I found a five pound note, and a bill of sale for the cattle. This is the five-pound note, and this is the bill of sale for three beasts.

(The bill of sale read.)

Q. to Mr. Finch. Look at that bill of sale - A. This is the bill of sale of the three beasts; I made it myself. The five-pound note was paid him by my book-keeper.

JOHN FOUNTAIN . I am book-keeper to Mr. Finch, and I am clerk to Mr. Jones. I paid that five-pound note to the prisoner; by the direction of Mr. Finch, I took the numbers of the notes that I paid him. I have got a memorandum in my pocket. This note corresponds with the memorandum.

DANIEL LEADEETTER. I am one of the marshal-men. The prisoner and another man last Wednesday were brought to the Mansion House; they were remanded until the Friday. The prisoner sent for me to come to him in the Compter. I went to him. He said, he wished to say something to me; he said, he received these beasts of Gazelie; he was induced to sell them as Gazelie owed him some money; he was induced to sell them to get the money of him. The Grand Jury threw the bill out against Gazelie.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by another man to drive the beasts; when he came near the Fountain, he put the beasts into this drover's hands, saying to me, he wished me to go into the market, and speak to Mr. Finch, to make the best of them, and to receive the money for him; as he was something in my debt, he ordered me to keep part of the money for myself. It is a false thing to say of me I stole the beasts.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 50.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-8

703. JOHN RICHARDS and HANNAH GOODGER were indicted for that they, on the 31st of August , two pieces of base coin, each of them resembling the coin of this realm, called a shilling, falsely, deceitfully, and traitorously, did colour with materials, producing the colour of silver .

SECOND COUNT, that they, on the same day, and at the same place, two round metal blanks, each of them did colour with materials, producing the colour of silver.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the

31st of August, I went with the officer, Harrison, to a house in Smart's buildings, No. 6, in Holborn ; I went into the one pair back-room; I tried to get in, but the door was locked. I knocked at the door three times; I knocked again, and then Hannah Goodger opened the door. I entered the room; it smelled very strong of aquafortis. I told my brother officer, to lay hold of the prisoners, there was coining going forwards; the man prisoner was sitting in the room, with his shirt sleeves tucked up; there was another man in the room; I did not know him; the woman prisoner came to the door in a confused state. My brother officer, secured the man prisoner; the other man went out. I searched the room. On the fire was this cup, half full of aquafortis, and thirteen shillings in it; the thirty shillings were in the aquafortis boiling on the fire; I knew they were counterfeit shillings. I then proceeded to the cupboard at the side of the door. I found in a plate fifty shillings, all ready for circulation. I found in a paper some shillings half finished; I have got them here, and a number of papers containing a white stuff, a composition. I tried this stuff this morning, before Mr. Powell; it coloured a copper halfpenny white, the same as a good shilling.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. Look at these thirteen shillings the witness has produced - A. The thirteen are fresh, and seem unfinished; they are counterfeits.

Q. Look at the fifty - A. They are counterfeits, and fit for circulation, except one.

Johnson. I found in a bason some aquafortis and water. I also found two vials, one with aquafortis, and the other with vitriol, and I found this stick, what they stir the aquafortis round in the cup; it is burnt with aquafortis. In the chimney I found this coarse rag, what they rub over the shillings with after they come out of the aquafortis after being boiled. This spoon is what they mix up the composition; it is stained with the white composition; there was a saucer full of this composition. I do not know the name of the stuff. That stuff, and with what is in the jug, will colour a copper halfpenny with the white surface of a shilling. I found these white rags; they have the appearance of having been burnt with vitriol and aquafortis. I found a flat iron, which appeared as if copper had been hammered on it, and I found scowering paper. The prisoners were very much confused, and said nothing in my presence. We took them out of the room as soon as we could, for fear they should throw any thing off the table.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a City officer. I was with the last witness, and Harrison, at this house in Smart's-buildings. I searched Richards. In his waistcoat pocket, there were these six shillings wrapped up in this check rag.

Q. to Mr. Nicoll. Look at these six shillings - A. These six shillings are in a finished state; they are counterfeits.

Drinkwater. I examined the man's hand; they were yellow; his fingers of both hands were yellow.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am an officer. I searched the woman prisoner. I found a shilling loose in her pocket, and this hussiff, with a parcel of duplicates in it.

Q. to Mr. Nicoll. Look at this shilling - A. It is a counterfeit, and of the same sort as those found upon the man; it is fit for circulation.

Harrison. The woman's fingers appeared quite yellow. The woman in going along sucked her fingers, and in doing that, she was sick; the man prisoner, gave her this handkerchief; the handkerchief appears to have been burnt with aquafortis or vitriol, it is quite rotten.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I assist the Solicitor of the Mint, and I have done so a great many years.

Q. Have you looked at these articles now produced, the compositions, are they the sort of articles used for colouring base coin - A. They are.

JANE BALL. Q. Do you know No. 6, Smart's-buildings, Holborn - A. I do; it is in the county of Middlesex.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar - A. I do; they lodged at my house on the 31st of August; they lived together as man and wife; they came to me as such.

Richards said nothing in his defence.

Goodger's Defence. I am innocent; I know nothing of it.

RICHARDS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

GOODGER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-9

704. MARY BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of Margaret Church .

MARGARET CHURCH . I live at No. 1, Angel-court, in the Strand ; I am a widow . I keep a school . I lost my shoes on the 18th of July; I lost them by a woman entering my house; she was hid in the cellar. I made a search for her. The woman at the bar is the woman that came into my house at nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. What part of the house did she enter - A. She came in at the street door. She secreted herself on the kitchen. I went down the stairs leading to the back celler. She had secreted herself on the kitchen stairs.

Q. How came you to find her there - A. By the neighbours alarming me, that there was a strange woman had entered my house. I sent for a constable; he came, and searched her. He took a pair of shoes out of her pocket, which I knew to be mine. I heard her go down stairs; I was sitting in the parlour, on a chair near the door.

Q. Did you know this woman before - A. No; I never saw her before to my knowledge.

CHARLES SHARP . I am a constable. On the 18th of July, I was sent for by Mrs. Church: I went there. I searched the prisoner, and found this pair of shoes in her pocket. Mrs. Church said, they were her property. The prisoner said, she bought them in White Hart-yard, close to the spot. These are the shoes.

Prosecutrix. They are my shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a pain in my bowels;

I went into the lady's house as the street door was open; I went into the cellar. I am innocent of stealing the shoes; I bought them in the street.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined 1 month in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-10

705. CATHERINE DOYLE was indicted, and the indictment stated, that at the general sessions of the peace holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 17th of September, in the 50th year of his Majesty's reign, she with one Mary Phillips was tried and convicted of uttering counterfeit money, and that she was sentenced to be imprisoned in the house of correction one year, and to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more; that she being so convicted of being a common utter of counterfeit money, afterwards on the 26th of July last, one piece of counterfeit money unlawfully did utter to one Elizabeth Marlar , she knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I am clerk to the solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner, Catherine Doyle, in 1810. I examined the copy with the record; it is correct.

(Read)

WILLIAM BEEBY. Q. Have you the charge of New Prison, Clerkenwell - A. I have. I am clerk to Mr. Newport, the keeper; he is ill. I have known the prisoner about four years.

Q. In September, 1810, were you present at the sessions house when she was convicted - A. I was present; she was ordered to be in the house of correction one year, and and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for two years more. She was delivered to the governor of the house of correction, and Phillips was sent with her.

ELIZABETH MARLAR. I keep the Gun , at Islington .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house - A. Yes, it was on the 26th of July, she came at about eleven o'clock in the day; there were three of them; one stood outside the door; the prisoner and another woman came in. The prisoner called for a quartern of cloves; I served her; she gave me a shilling to pay for it; I gave her sixpence in change. They went out, and the moment they went out Johnson (the officer) came in. I shewed him the shilling that the prisoner gave me; the same shilling I marked by his desire. I am quite clear the prisoner is the person that gave me the shilling, and I gave her the liquor.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city officer.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; I have known her some time.

Q. Did you see her on the 26th of July last - A. I did; I saw her first in Whitecross-street; there was a party of them together; I suppose there were fourteen or fifteen of them, together; the prisoner was supplying them with bad shillings. I know that of my own knowledge. The prisoner was giving some money to the parties before she went off; she was distributing them herself. Three of them set off together; the prisoner at the bar, and two others. I knew the other two before. They went to Old-street; they at last came to Mrs. Marlar; they separated themselves before they came there; they went into several houses before they came there, and when they came to Mrs. Marlar, I placed myself at the bow window, so that I could see them and they could not see me.

Q. Did you see any thing tendered from the situation of your place - A. I did, a shilling; the prisoner tendered it after the cloves had been served out. I am sure the prisoner is the person that tendered the shilling. They came out, and immediately I went in and asked Mrs. Marlar to let me look at the shilling; Mrs. Marlar shewed me the shilling; I desired her to mark it; she gave it me; I have had it ever since.

JURY. How many went in - A. Two went in and one staid out. I kept the shilling. I went after the prisoner, and took her into custody. I did not tell her what I took her in custody for; she knew. I searched her; in her pocket I found this tin box; it contained sixty-eight counterfeit shillings, and three counterfeit sixpences. In another box I found a bit of scowering paper, which appeared to have rubbed the shillings to get the grease off. I also found on her eighteen-pence in copper, good money, and a dollar good, and a sixpence good. I gave them to her. I asked her how she came by the money; she said she found them all.

Q. Is that the shilling that you received of Mrs. Marlar - A. It is.

JURY. We should like to know where the shilling was put before it went from Mrs Marlar into the officer's hands.

Mr. Knapp, Q. to Mrs. Marlar. You say, Mrs. Marlar, the prisoner gave you this shilling - A. Yes, I put it into the till with two good shillings; they had letters on them, and this was a plain one. I am sure the one I received of the prisoner I gave to the officer.

Q. You say the two other shillings had letters on them, and this is a plain one - (The shilling uttered by the prisoner to Mrs. Marlar, handed to the Jury.)

Mr. Knapp, Q. to the JURY. Has that shilling letters on it - A. Yes, it has.

Mrs. Marlar. No, that is a mark.

Q. What sort of letters were upon the two shillings in the till - A. One was an A and the other a P stamped with a punch. The mark on the prisoner's shilling is my mark. I had noticed the two good shillings; I know the persons from whom I had actually received them. I have not the least doubt that is the shilling I received of the prisoner. I had only two others in the till.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. Look at the shillings; here are different parcels - A. That parcel are all bad and counterfeit; the other other parcels are all bad and counterfeit, and the shilling uttered to Mrs. Marlar is bad, and a counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman took a false oath. I never offered a base shilling. The other woman is lesser than myself; she gave the shilling. I poured out the liquor. I never gave the shilling; I did not indeed.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-11

706. CATHERINE M'CARTHY was indicted for that she, having been twice convicted of being a common utterer of base and counterfeit money, that she afterwards, on the 25th of July last, feloniously did utter to one Ann Ward , a base and counterfeit shilling, she knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL. I am clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the records of the convictions of the prisoner; I got it from the office of the clerk of the Peace, Clerkenwell. I examined it; it is a correct copy.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY. I have the charge of the New Prison, Clerkenwell.

Q. Look at the woman at the bar; do you know her - A. I do.

Q. Was she convicted in November Sessions - A. She was first convicted in January, 1802, and in November Sessions she was convicted of a double offence; having been before convicted there.

ANN WARD The prisoner came to my house on the 25th of July last; I am a haberdasher in the Strand . I think it was between eleven and twelve o'clock she came in by herself; she asked me for half an ounce of cotton; she was particular whether it was sewing cotton or drawing cotton. I took the shilling of her; I suspected it to be a bad one; I was looking at it, and on my looking at it, Johnson (the officer) came in; he asked me to take care of the shilling. I put it on the back counter by itself. There was no other money on the counter where it could possibly be mixed. After I had placed it there, Johnson searched her, and when Johnson had searched the prisoner, I gave it to him. I am sure it is the same shilling that I received of the prisoner. The till was before me, and the back counter behind me. There wast nothing there.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city officer. I was in St. Giles's the day this took place, about half past eight in the morning; I saw the prisoner; I knew the prisoner; I watched her and another woman; I followed them through many streets, and saw them alternately go into different shops.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing what they went into the different shops for - A. Yes; they passed many shillings; they were put into the till. I followed them until they came to Mrs. Ward's shop; I looked through the window; I saw her tender a shilling to Mrs. Ward, and while Mrs. Ward was looking at it I went in. I desired Mrs. Ward to keep the shilling by itself; it was a bad one. She looked at it, and put it behind her. The prisoner was present, and never mentioned a word. I told the prisoner I thought she had caution enough before, instead of going on the same game; to that she said nothing. Before I went out I searched the prisoner; upon her I found another bad shilling of the same make, and the same letter on it; there is a W. on it. There was another bad shilling wrapped up in paper.

Q. Did Mrs. Ward give you the shilling that she had received of the prisoner - A. Yes, after she had marked it in my presence. This is the shilling; I have had it in my custody ever since. I also found upon her three shillings and one sixpence in good silver, and fourpence three farthings in good copper. I found several articles upon her, threads, &c. In the course of her journey she went into shops, where these things could have been bought. She went into nine or ten different shops; a pork shop, wine vaults, haberdashers, &c. I have had these shillings ever since. One of them is the shilling I had of Mrs. Ward, and the other I found upon the prisoner. This is the shilling I had of Mrs. Ward.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint - A. I am.

Q. Look at the shilling the prisoner uttered to Mrs. Ward - A. It is a counterfeit shilling; it is bent.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 57.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-12

707. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Robert Dan , on the 20th of July , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a 2 l. bank note , his property.

ROBERT DAN . I am an out-pensioner of Chelsea . On the 20th of July I came from Chelsea; I arrived at Shadwell between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I had four two pound notes and a twenty shilling note; I had them in this hand. I was going to give them to a woman that had been my friend to keep them for me. I and the next witness were going along; the prisoner came along and catched hold of my hand.

Q. Look at the prisoner; is that the man - A. That is the man.

Q. What did he do when he first came up to you - A. He just made a snatch at my notes as he was passing; he took them out of my hand. I laid hold of him by the collar, and asked him what he was going to do with me; he up with his fist, and struck me over the neck; he set off running; he came and struck me a second time, and threw me clean into the highway. As he was running away I called to a woman that was with me to go and fetch an officer. He then bore straight into Mr. Lee's public-house. Mr. Lee keeps the Black Horse, in New Gravel-lane.

Q. Did you go into Mr. Lee's house - A. I went in, and remained there until the officer came.

ANN KIMBERLY . On the 20th of July, I went with Dan to Chelsea, to take his pension. I returned to Shadwell with him, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. What part of Shadwell were you in - A. In King David-lane, Shadwell. There were very few people in this place when the prisoner came up to Dan.

Q. Now; look upon the prisoner - A. That is the gentleman; he came up to Robert Dan . Dan had the notes in his hand; he had just pulled them out of his pocket; he was going to count them, to leave them in a gentlewoman's hands, a lady down Fox-lane, that had been a good friend to him; he thought of leaving two or three pounds for himself in her hands. When he was counting his notes, the prisoner

came up; he said, he had catched him at last; he snatched the money out of his hands. Dan said, do I owe you any thing; he used bad words, and said, yes. Dan scuffled with him to get some of the notes back again; then he up with his fist, and struck him about the jaw bone, I believe; I cannot say where exactly.

Q. When he struck him upon the jaw bone, had Dan hold of him then - A. Yes. Dan kept hold of him. He told Dan if he did not loose him, he would serve him so again; he immediately struck him again about his bosom; he fell upon one knee; he still kept his hold by the shirt of his coat.

Q. You say, he held fast of Roberts' coat - A. Yes. He walked away; he broke away from Dan. Dan walked after him; he told him if he followed him, he would serve him so again. They walked along the street until they came to New Gravel-lane, and when they turned down there, Dan told me to go for an officer. I went for an officer; his name is Willan. When they came to New Gravel-lane, Roberts walked on very fast, and Dan with him. I then went to Shadwell office for an officer. I got some boys to watch where they went to. When I returned, they told me where they went, and when I came back, I took the officer to Mr. Lee's house, in New Gravel-lane; I found the prisoner there when I went in with the officer. The prisoner said, he had no notes in his pocket. I had a child with me. I went out of the public-house. Afterwards when I was called in, I saw some notes. That is all I know.

ROBERT WILLAN . I am an officer of Shadwell office Ann Kimberley came and fetched me; I went with her to Mr. Lee's; I saw the prisoner there; he was surrounded by a great many people in the tap-room, waiting until an officer came. I searched him. I found nothing upon him.

Q. After you had searched him, did any body say any thing to you, that led you to a farther search - A. Yes; Mr. Lee, he is here. I went into the privy; I searched the privy. In a crevice I found a two-pound note.

COURT. Q. to Dan. How many of your notes did the prisoner snatch out of your hand - A. Four two-pound notes, and a one-pound note. I got two of the two-pound notes, and the one-pound note back; I catched them out of his hand.

Q. to Willan. You found only the two-pound note - A. Here are the other two-pound notes; I took them from the prosecutor. The magistrate ordered me to give him other money for them. The three two-pound notes are successive numbers. I have kept them ever since. The prisoner made very great resistance; it was with great difficulty that three of us could get him to the office; two other officers came to my assistance.

Q. to Dan. Were there any marks on the notes when you lost them - A. I am no scholar. I had them just as the gentleman gave them me at Chelsea. I did not look at them

JOHN LEE . I keep the Black Horse public-house, Shadwell.

Q. Look at the prisoner - A. I know him very well; I had known him a good time before; he is a coal-whipper; he whips the coals out of the hold. On Wednesday, the 20th of July last, he came to my house, between two and three o'clock; the prosecutor immediately followed him; he said to the prisoner, you have robbed me; the prisoner answered, I have taken nothing from you but what you owed me. I said, if he owes you any thing, you have no right to rob him, to take it from him in that way. He struck the prosecutor in my house. I said to the prosecutor, fetch an officer; he shall not go off until an officer comes. During the time the prosecutor was gone for an officer, the prisoner went out into my back yard; when he went out, he had some paper in his hand, it looked very white. I went to the privy; I said, Roberts, you should not have robbed the man; he then got up, and I think I then saw one or two duplicates in his hand. When he came into the tap-room. I secured him in the tap-room I stood at the door, and would not let him go He staid in the room until the officer came.

Q. You told the officer he had better go and look in the yard - A. Yes; I went with the officer, and saw him find one two-pound note. That is all I know.

Q. to Dan. Had you any previous acquaintance with the prisoner before that day - A. I had no acquaintance with him. I had never spoken to him before. I had seen him working at the coals.

Prisoner's Defence. This man said, he did not know me; I am a pensioner; he is a pensioner. We had been drinking together at a public-house at the top of the street, the sign of the Red Lion. This man worked in the rope-ground, and I jobbed in the rope-ground. I lent him eighteen shillings; I asked him for it several times; he owned to it once or twice; he said, he would pay me. I threatened to summons him. On this day, as I was coming from my work, I met this man; I asked him if he would pay me this trifle. I said, you have had your pension; he said, no; I owe you nothing; I will pay you nothing. He pulled these notes from his waistcoat pocket. That woman was not by him then; she came afterwards, and said, I had robbed him. I said, you are telling a story. There were people then walking thick and fast. This woman came from Shadwell office with an officer. After I went into Mr. Lee's house and called for a pint of beer; they would not draw me any beer, because this man said I had robbed him. I walked out into the yard, and returned into the tap-room again. I never struck the man, nor any thing of the kind; it was broad day light, and not two stones throw from Shadwell office, and there were many people passing.

GUILTY, aged 53,

Of simple larceny .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-13

708. RALPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , ten pounds weight of lead, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Lambert Jones .

RICHARD LAMBERT JONES . I am a plumber ; I live in Little Moorfields . The prisoner was my labourer . On Tuesday, the 6th of September, his

duty was to be at my shop. I stood a distance from the shop; the prisoner was then in the act of locking the door up; as he generally did of an evening. He then came up to me; I observed something bulky at the side of his coat, rather more than of an ordinary size; I asked him what he had got there; he replied, nothing. I said, I must see. I took out of his pocket ten or twelve pounds of lead. I asked him if he was not ashamed of himself; he begged of me to forgive him, and he would come to work in the morning; he supplicated very strong for mercy. I sent for an officer, and had him taken to the Compter. That night I went to his lodgings with an officer. There I found lead and solder; I cannot charge the prisoner with that. Upon examining the lead the prisoner took, one piece was stamped with a particular mark; I knew it to be mine.

THOMAS POLLETT . I produce the lead. On the 6th of this month. I took the prisoner in custody, and took charge of this property.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt the lead is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for what I have done.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-14

709. THOMAS BENHAM and ANN BENHAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , one printed bound book, called a Prayer Book, value 5 s. and one other book, value 5 s. the property of Francis Rivington , Charles Rivington , and John Rivington .

WILLIAM RULE . I am foreman to Messrs. Rivingtons; their names are Francis, Charles, and John.

Q. What do you accuse these prisoners of - A. On the 19th of July, we had six books come from the binders, and on the 20th or 21st following, one of these books were missing; which circumstance I mentioned to Mr. Rivington. I was desired to attend Hatton Garden office; where I saw the book that was lost.

Q. Do you know the man and woman prisoners - A. The man was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to the shop for some little articles; he was porter to Mr. Smith, one of our bookbinders. He used to come to our house with the books. I know nothing of the woman.

JOSEPH ILEBURY. I am foreman to Mr. Bird, bookbinder. We bound these books, and sent them home to Mr. Rivingtons on the 19th of July last. I know nothing of the prisoners.

WILLIAM THISSELTON. I am an officer. I received private information that the female prisoner had pledged a quantity of books that she had received from her husband. I went to Mr. Hill's, the pawnbroker; there I found some new printed books, Bibles, and religious books. I at last, found the man prisoner worked at Mr. Smith's, in Albious-buildings; he is a bookbinder; he works for Messrs. Rivington. I went into the house, and apprehended the man prisoner. The woman was waiting in Albions-buildings; I apprehended her. I afterwards found that the book mentioned in the indictment was bound at Mr. Bird's, in Hatton Garden. I discovered there were thirty pledges at Mr. Hill's; all new books. Out of these, several were claimed by Mr. Rule, as the property of Messrs. Rivingtons. The prisoner acknowledged that he had done it through distress. I asked him how he had done it; he said, he took home the work between boards, when he delivered his work he used to purloin books, and put them between the boards; he told his master so.

Prisoner. It is a false thing his saying I took them between boards and brought them away.

Thisselton. He did most positively say, he took them away between boards. He told me his wife used to pawn them. He said before the magistrate, he did it through want.

JOHN ROSSITER . I am shopman to Thomas Hill, pawnbroker, 42, Turnmill-street. I produce the Prayer Book; the female prisoner pawned it on the 20th of July, for three shillings and sixpence.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN I am a pawnbroker, 53, St. John-street. I produce three Bibles; they were pawned by the woman, I believe; they were pawned at three separate times.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, 92, St. John-street. I produce a Bible, pawned on the 2nd of February last, for three shillings. I cannot say who the woman is.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of these books I am charged with.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-15

710. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , two silver table-spoons, value 20 s. the property of Henry Adams .

HENRY ADAMS . I keep the Ship tavern , in Leadenhall-street . On Saturday, the 20th of August, between the hours of two and three o'clock, the prisoner came into my coffee-room; he called for his dinner; it was given him by the waiter. There were three or four spoons on the table. I had a suspicion of the prisoner. I desired the waiter to look out, as I suspected the prisoner to be the person who stole two spoons on the Wednesday preceeding. According to my order, he looked out, and missed two spoons off the table where the prisoner sat I desired him not to take notice, to go backwards and in his business. As soon as I was satisfied the prisoner had the spoons, I sent for an officer; which I had detained in the bar until he had paid the waiter for his dinner, and half a pint of wine. I desired the waiter to go to the bottom of the court, and to wait there, and the person that I should follow, that was the man that I suspected. The prisoner went out of my premises; I followed, and stopped him. I told him that I had a strong suspicion that he had some of my property about his person; I had sent for a constable, he should search him, and to avoid a noise in the street, we would go back, he should be searched in my house; the officer came and took him up stairs, and searched him. I heard the spoons rattle in his pocket as he went up stairs, and during

the officer had his hand in his right hand pocket. The prisoner produced the two silver spoons from his left hand pocket; he said, there is your spoons; I believe it is your intention to give me in custody; I said, most certainly. He was taken to the Compter. The officer has the spoon.

JAMES HAND. I am an officer. As I was searching the prisoner's right hand pocket, he pulled these spoons out of his left hand pocket, and delivered them to the prosecutor; he said, these are your spoons Them are the spoons; they have never been out of my custody since. The prosecutor delivered them to me.

Prosecutor. They are my spoons.

Prisoner's Defence. I have little to say in my defence. I should not have been guilty of this offence had not temptation been thrown in my way. I went to the house to dine. I had no idea of stealing anything although the gentleman has said he had a suspicion of me; he had no ground for that suspicion.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-16

711. HENRY CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , five bullocks, value 55 l. the property of Alexander Adair , esq.

EDWARD NOKES . I am a servant to Alexander Adair , esq. he has a farm at Addis, near Croydon . On the night of the 21st of July, I put half a dozen bullocks into a field; I locked the gate of the field. The next morning five of these bullocks were missing. The lock was taken out of the post, the gate open, and five of the bullocks gone.

EDWARD CRAMP. I am a dealer in cattle. On the morning of the 22nd of July, I was in Smithfield market; I observed there five bullocks, and while I was handling them the prisoner asked me if I would buy them; I said yes, if he and I agreed about the price; he asked me, twelve pound a piece for them, and agreed to sell them for eleven. They were small Scotch cattle. I marked them at the tail, and after I had marked them I went round the market. The prisoner came to me for the money; I asked him what his name was; he said, Thomas Pardon ; he came from Hadlow, in Kent; he said his father kept a farm there; they were his father's property; his father kept Bone farur, at Hadlow. I enquired of three salesmen if they knew such a person. I returned to the prisoner; I told him it was not customary without he knew any body in London, and giving reference, to pay money to a stranger. He said he did not know any body in town. He then said if I did not pay him for the beasts he would put them to somebody else to sell, which he did to Mr. Biggs. I then, went to Mr. Biggs, and told him not to sell them, as I had bought them. The prisoner said he would drive the beasts away. He was in the act of doing it; I called an officer, and told him to detain the beasts until he could prove he came honestly by them. The beasts were detained, and taken to the Fox and Knot yard, the regular lock-up yard I then went to the prisoner, and told him he and I would have no more words about it; if he could prove he came honestly by them I would go with him to Hadlow, and pay the coach hire, and I would pay him at his fathers. A drover informed me that Mr. Adair's bailiff was at the Fox and Knot yard. I went to Fox and Knot yard, and saw Mr. Pick; he claimed the five bullocks as Mr. Adair's property.

JAMES PICK. I am bailiff to Alexander Adair, esq. On the morning of the 22nd of July, I was informed of the loss of these five bullocks; I took my horse, and came to Smithfield. I found the bullocks in Fox and Knot yard; Cramp and I looked at them together. These five bullocks that Cramp and I saw together, were Mr. Adair's property. We sent them back to Mr. Adair.

STEPHEN CADMAN . I took the prisoner in custody at the Fortune of War. I asked the prisoner if there was a place broken open to get the bullocks out of the field; he said, there was; he did not say he broke it open; he said nothing more; he was smoking his pipe.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person who took the bullocks out of the field.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-17

712. JAMES ROBERTS , alias JOHN GHOST , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a piece of silk handkerchiefs, value 38 s. the property of Joseph Taylor .

THOMAS NEWBANK . I am shopman to Joseph Taylor, 54, West Smithfield . On the 25th of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my master's shop; he asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed him some. After he had looked at them, he asked to look at some others that were in the window. I turned round to get them, and when I returned to him with the other handkerchiefs I perceived his left hand behind his coat. He looked at these other handkerchiefs, and of them he offered me five shillings for it; I said I could not take it. He turned round to go out; I saw a piece of handkerchief behind his coat; I called to him to stop; he then began to run. I set off after him; a man stopped him, and took the piece of handkerchiefs from him. I got up to the prisoner; the man gave me the piece of handkerchiefs. I took hold of the prisoner, and took him back to the shop. This is the piece of handkerchiefs; they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. It being my first offence, I beg for mercy.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-18

713. GEORGE HORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a clock, value 4 l. the property of John Bond , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BOND. I am a publican ; I keep the Bear and Staff , Smithfield . I lost my clock on Tuesday the 12th of July last; it was in my back parlour. In the afternoon the prisoner came in and had three

pints of ale. I went in the parlour, and saw him there. I heard my wife give the alarm; I came down stairs immediately my wife said, only think the man that is just gone out has taken the clock. We pursued the prisoner. In the course of ten minutes the prisoner was stopped by the patrol, and taken to the watchhouse. I went to the watchhouse, and saw the prisoner and the dial; it was given in the charge of the constable. That is all I know of the transaction. This is the dial; it is mine. I am sure the prisoner was in the parlour at the time I went up stairs.

ELIZABETH BOND. I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner came in about ten o'clock. I served him with some ale; he had two or three pints of ale; he asked the waiter for a bed; I told the waiter to tell him he could not have a bed; we never let strangers have a bed; the waiter told him. He paid for the three pints of ale, and had change of a one pound note. About twelve o'clock he passed by the bar; I was sitting in the bar; he wished me good night; I got up, and wished him good night. I saw he had something in his hands which he held under his arm; I thought it did not belong to him. I gave the alarm and several went after him; but they did not see him until he was just taken. When I locked in the coffee-room I saw the dial was gone. That was between twelve and one o'clock.

JOHN STEVENS . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Red Lion-alley, Cow Cross I called my two partners to my assistance; we took him and the dial to the watchhouse.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is my dial; I had it about a year and a half. I am the landlord of the house; it is in the parish of St. Sepulchre.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-19

714. WILLIAM GODDEN and CHARLES WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , two brass legs, value 2 l. six sets of twisted string, value 2 l. 9 s. ten pair of brass hinges, value 6 s. forty-nine screw-drawer nobs, value 13 s. the property of William Rolfe ; and one writing-desk, value 5 l. the property of James Rolfe .

WILLIAM ROLFE . I am a manufacturer of pianofortes . I live at 112, Cheapside. I have a manufactory, No. 28, London Wall . It has a private entrance and a carriage entrance into it. On Sunday the 31st of July; the prisoners (at about half past nine in the evening) they were surprised at my son's calling in his way home to Islington. I did not see the prisoners until they were in custody. They are quite strangers to me.

JAMES ROLFE . I called at the manufactory about twenty minutes after nine on Sunday evening, the 31st of July. We have two entrances to our manufactory, one a carriage entrance, the other a private entrance for the men to enter the workshop, about two yards from each other. The moment I put the key into the lock of the door where the workmen enter. I heard a great noise; I did not go in; I enquired who was within two or three times, and receiving no answer I called out for assistance. In a short time two men came up; one informed me he was an officer; he begged me not to open the door until he got farther assistance, conceiving they were desperate characters within. He went for assistance; the other remained with me. A few minutes after he was gone two men rushed out of the carriage entrance. We pursued them. The prisoner Godden I secured in Fore-street, about one hundred yards from the manufactory; we lodged him in the Compter; and on our returning we met the prisoner Williams custody; he was taken in Moorfields.

Q. Do you know they are the same men you saw come out of the manufactory - A. I do not; I have every reason to believe they are. I lost sight of Godden, for a moment; he was walking when I stopped him she was pointed out to me by every one that knew him. When I stopped him all the things in the indictment were missing. The property was found on the staircase, ready to be taken away. It consisted of a portable desk: that was mine; it contained brass work and and wire, my father's property. I believe the prisoners to be the persons.

JOHN FOSTER . I was coming down London Wall; I heard Mr. Rolfe call for assistance; I assisted him. I was the first man that came up to him While I was standing with him the officer came up; he said we had better stop until he got other assistance. When he was gone, two men rushed out of the gate; Mr. Rolfe ran after him, and called stop thief; I called stop thief likewise I ran after them; I lost sight of one of them; he turned into Moorfields. Godden I kept sight of I was close behind him when he turned out. I ran by the side of him in Fore-street. I never lost sight of him. I pointed him out to Mr. Rolfe; he took him into custody.

JOHN LINNET. I am a constable. Mr. Rolfe gave me charge of Godden; I took him to the Compter. I took this padlock out of his pocket, and these keys.

JOHN LENCH . I am an officer. On Sunday night, the 31st of July, about twenty minutes after nine o'clock; I heard the cry of watch. I immediately ran to the spot where the voice came from; young Mr. Rolfe said there was somebody in his premises. I went immediately to get another officer. As I was returning with the officer there was a cry of stop thief. The prisoner Williams was running towards Moorfields. I got sight of him just as he turned round Moorgate. Williams is the man I pursued. A man after him on horseback. I am sure Williams is the man I was pursuing. Another man stopped him in Moorfields; I came up just as he was stopped. When I got up, he said do not hurt me, I wish I had not taken to this way. I took him to the watchhouse, and searched him; he had only a few halfpence about him. I took him to the Compter, and returned back with Mr. Rolfe to search the warehouse. When we opened the door, there were a great many things tied up in different bundles. This chisel was laying against the bundles; here are two skeleton keys that laid close to the bundles. This key opens the warehouse door; this opens another, and here is a handkerchief; he had no handkerchief

round his neck when I stopped him; this handkerchief contained some doe skins.

Godden's Defence. I was at home at half past five in the evening; I had occasion to go towards the Tower. On my return home I came through the Church-yard, and up Fore-street, in my way home to Golden lane.

Williams's Defence. On my going round London Wall, I heard the cry of stop thief; I followed the thief; he made his escape; he kept crying out stop thief. Some gentleman stopped me: he said, he must take me back, and see, he had no doubt I was the man.

Godden called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GODDEN, GUILTY , aged 17.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-20

715 JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a coat, value 5 s. and a waistcoat, value 1 s. the property of Francis Robinson .

FRANCIS ROBINSON . I am a mariner, commander of the Leicester . The prisoner, I believe, is a mariner .

Q. What makes you accuse him of taking your coat and waistcoat - A. My coat and waistcoat was taken out of my cabin, on Monday morning last, about half past four o'clock, and they were found in another vessel. That is all I know.

JOHN CARR. I was on board a collier; that is not Mr. Robinson's ship; there was one ship laid between Mr. Robinson's ship and ours. I slept upon the half deck; our dog barked; I jumped out of bed; I looked into a lighter; there was a man there; I asked him what he was doing there so early in the morning; he came on board our ship, and asked me to lend him our boat to put him on shore; I refused. He said, he would get a scaller. I stepped over our ships quarters; I saw a little bundle laying upon the lighter's gunnel; the prisoner was standing about a yard off the clothes. I called out here, a hand here, I suspect this man, here is a thief; the Captain came, and looked at the clothes; he said, he is a thief. I directly took hold of him. One of our men went on board the lighter, and fetched the clothes.

Q. Did you know any thing of the prisoner - A. No; I never saw him before. It was between five and six in the morning. The dog barking, I looked into the lighter; I then saw the prisoner, and the bundle.

JOHN HERBERT . I am an officer. I produce the property. On this morning, I was rowing by the tier, I heard the cry of police. I took the prisoner into custody. This coat and waistcoat were delivered to me on board the lighter; I have had them in my charge ever since.

Prosecutor. It is my coat and waistcoat.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-21

716. JASPER MORLEY and WILLIAM BESHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , one pig, value 25 s. the property of Barnard Hales .

BARNARD HALES . I am a licenced victualler , I keep the Durham Arms , Hackney-road . I lost the pig out of the sty on the 30th of August, in Hackney-road. I was alarmed by my dog; I went down, and found there was somebody at the sty, and then I called Collins, who is here, to my assistance, and as soon as he came near the gate, the prisoners run; one with the pig in his arms; he dropped the pig coming out of the gate. We followed them both until we catched them; we never lost sight of them until we catched them.

Q. What is the name of the man that dropped the pig - A. Morley. The other got down the ditch. He called Besher back; he came back, and made a blow at me; he missed his blow. The other struck me; I throwed him down, and held him there until assistance came; Collins is the man that came to my assistance. This was at eleven o'clock at night; it was a dark night. I was quite near to Morley when he dropped the pig.

WILLIAM COLLINS. I am a sailor. I was with Mr. Hales, he asked me to come to his assistance. I saw both the prisoners come out of the gate; I saw the pig close by one of their feet. I gave chace of them; I got Morley down, and gave him into Mr. Hales possession. I pursued Besher; I got him down, and kept him down until more men came up.

JAMES DANIELS. I heard the alarm of thieves: I ran to the assistance of Hales and Collins. I saw Collins strike one down; I gave assistance.

Morley's Defence. We were coming by that day, there was an alarm, somebody called out stop thief; they fired at us; we ran away.

Besher's Defence. The same.

MORLEY, GUILTY , aged 30.

BESHER, GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-22

717. ROBERT STEWART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , six silver tea-spoons, value 12 s. two silver table-spoons, value 16 s. a watch, value 2 l. two silver wine-ladles, value 2 l. one pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 5 s. a great coat, value 1 l. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a tablecloth, value 5 s. and a gown, value 10 s. the property of James Scowler ; a hat, value 6 d. and a pair of pantaloons, value 18 d. the property of Ralph Scowler ; a great coat, value 1 l. the property of Robert Scowler ; in the dwelling-house of James Scowler .

JAMES SCOWLER. I am a house-keeper ; I live in the Commercial-road, in the parish of Stepney .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he was my lodger ; Robert and Ralph Scowler are lodgers also. I am a house-keeper.

Q. Did you lose any property - A. Yes; out of the closet in the parlour. Part of the property was found on the prisoner when he was taken. I believe the property is not here. The prisoner had no more clothes than what he had on when Ralph Hope, the officer took him.

MRS. SCOWLER. I am the wife of James Scowler. I lost the property out of the cupboard, in the parlour; the 9th of July was the day I last used the silver spoons. I missed them on the Sunday morning, the 10th of July; at six o'clock in the morning, when I first got up; I missed six tea-spoons, a pair of silver sugar-tongs, and a metal watch.

Q. What was the value of all this property - A. I cannot say; the silver articles were new when I bought them; they cost five pounds; they were second hand when he took them. The watch I had a long while; the handkerchiefs was worth a few shillings. The key of the parlour was left in the door. I know that the prisoner took the property; none of the property is here; none could be found on him.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 30th of August; he was going to the East India House to receive his pension. I found a hat and a pair of pantaloons on him that belonged to Ralph Scowler. He had no more clothes; I left them with him. He then told James Scowler, when he got his pension he would pay him for the things he had taken out of his house. He was charged with stealing the silver articles.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had done the robbery, could it be thought that I would have gone to the India House, and stood before the gentleman the whole of the day. I have served my King and country.

GUILTY, aged 51,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-23

718. HENRY CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of September , in the dwelling-house of Ann Ogle Simpson, widow, a coat, value 3 l. a pair of trowsers, value 30 s. two pounds fifteen shillings in monies numbered, a 15 l. bank note, a 5 l. bank note, a 2 l. bank note, and five 1 l. bank notes , the property of David Hogg .

DAVID HOGG. Q. Who is your mistress - A Ann Ogle Simpson; she is a baker; she lives in Stanhope-street, Clare-market.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he lived in her service about twelve months ago. On the 3rd of September, I missed a black coat, a pair of grey trowsers, a fifteen-pound note, a five-pound note, a two-pound note, and five one-pound bank notes. These things were put in my box; my box was at the top of the house; the bake-house was in the lower floor. I missed the property on the 3rd of September, about eleven o'clock. In consequence of that, I traced out the prisoner; I suspected him. I had seen the prisoner about two months before that, at my mistress' house. I traced out the prisoner at the Edenburgh Castle public-house, at Wapping; I found that he had lodged there on Saturday and Sunday night.

Q. What day was the 3rd of September - A. That was Saturday. I enquired if he was at home; they expected him soon. I waited, and in about half an hour, he came in. I told him he was the man I wanted; (however, in the mean time, I sent a young woman down, to the Thames Police office, for an officer.) When he came in, he was without his hat. When I asked to speak to him, he wanted to go out of the room; I kept the prisoner in the room. The officer came, his name is William Dyeball . I delivered the prisoner to him; he took him into custody. We searched him, and found nothing on him. As we went over Hermitage-bridge, the prisoner jumped into the water; there was a boat there that took him up again. Then Dyeball took him again, and brought him before the magistrate.

Q Have you got your property again - A. No. Part of it is in the constable's hands.

DAVID GALL. I am a baker. I lived in the place before Henry Clark went away. He happened to come to my house on the Saturday.

Q. Do you happen to know what day of the month it was - A. No. The prisoner was apprehended on the Monday; it was the Saturday before he was apprehended. He came in for his box; he was very much intoxicated. A friend of his seeing him have a great deal of money, advised him to give it me to keep for him; he gave me a fifteen-pound note, a five-pound note, and five one-pound notes. Then I helped him down with his chest, and put it into the coach. I went with him to the Edinburgh Castle; we put the box down there. His sister came there; I gave her the money at the Edinburgh Castle; I gave to his sister twenty-one pounds eleven shillings and sixpence; a fifteen-pound note, a five-pound note, a one-pound note, and eleven shilling and sixpence in silver. The rest he paid to a young man.

WILLIAM DYEBALL . I am an officer. I was sent for; I went to the Edinburgh Castle. David Hogg delivered the prisoner into my charge. I told the prisoner I must search him; which I did, and found nothing. I told him he must go with me to the office; he rather refused. I asked him if he had any clothes there that belonged to him besides what he had got on; he said none but what he stood up in. In taking him to the office, he tried to make his escape, by jumping over the rails into the water; he turned himself on his back, and swam like a cork: he was taken up by a boatman. I got him again, and I took him to the office, and went back and enquired if he had any box there; they readily told me he had, and pointed it out. The box is now in court. My brother officer and I searched the box. In the box we found this coat, and these trowsers. David Hogg said they were his property.

Q. to David Gall . Look at that box - A. It is the same box that I helped him with.

Dyeball. We then proceeded to the office. I left Smith to wait for the sister; they told us the sister was sent for.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. I went with Dyeball to the Edinburgh Castle. I waited for the return of the prisoner's sister; she came in company with her husband. I informed her the situation of her brother, and requested to know if she had received any money of him; her husband answered, we have received three bank notes of him. The sister pulled them out, and shewed me two bank notes, not the third; one is a fifteen-pound bank note, the

other a five-pound bank note; these are them; I received them of the sister; I have had them in my possession ever since. The other was a one pound note they had broke into. They likewise acknowledged that they had received eleven shillings and sixpence in silver.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that coat and trowsers - A. The trowsers and coat I am quite clear are my property. The fifteen pound note produced by Mr. Smith; and the five pound note, are part of the property I had in my box. I know them by my handwriting being upon them.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18140914-24

719. JAMES TOPPING and ROBERT GARRETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , a watch, value 4 l. and a watch key, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Brown , in his dwelling-house .

JANE BROWN . I am the wife of Thomas Brown ; his dwelling-house is in the parish of St. Luke's . On the 29th of July, about ten o'clock in the morning I saw my husband's watch it I hung over the mantle piece; no one was in the room but myself. I went out to the gate; I left the door open, and when I returned the watch was gone. I was not out of the house more than two or three minutes. I missed the watch immediately I returned. The prisoner passed me at the end of the court. I did not see him go into my house.

ANN TONGUE . I live near Mrs. Brown. On the 29th of July I was standing at my own door; I saw Mrs. Brown go out; immediately after, I saw the prisoner Topping go into Mrs. Brown's house; he did not stay longer than a minute. I did not see the other boy at all.

JAMES BRAY . I am an officer. On the 29th of July, I was coming up Tabernacle Walk, some distance from Mrs. Brown's house I saw the prisoner Garrett running; a mob was coming after him. I ran after him; he turned down Paradise-street; he ran through a court there; I catched him. I received information that he had stolen a watch; I asked him what he had done with it; he said he did not steal it, he had it of the other boy. I asked him what he had done with it; he said if I would go with him he would shew me where he had put the watch. I then met the prosecutrix, she had the watch in her hand. The watch had been picked up and given to her before I came to her. I have the watch now. The prosecutrix gave me the watch. Topping and Garret asked the prosecutor to forgive them; she said she would not. This is the watch.

Prosecutrix. It is my husband's watch; a strange person picked the watch up, and gave it me. I overtook Topping and Garrett in Tabernacle Row.

Topping's Defence. I was very dry; I went up a passage, and into this lady's house; I found the door open; I asked for a drop of water; there was nobody within; I came out again, and asked the lady at the next door; she said what have you been in there for; I said I went in to ask for a drop of water; in half a minute after, there was an alarm after me that I had stolen the watch; I told them I had not.

Garrett's Defence. I was going along the street; a constable came and look me, and said I had been stealing a watch; I said I had not. I never told any body the other boy gave it me; he had not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampler.

Reference Number: t18140914-25

720. THOMAS READ was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isaac Joseph , with intent to steal, about the hour of twelve in the night of the 31st of August , and stealing therein, four mugs, value 2 s. three plates, value 1 s. six basons, value 18 d. a butter-pot, value 1 s. six cups, and six saucers, value 18 d. two butter-boats, value 1 s. six basons, value 18 d. six images, value 18 d. three salts, value 3 s. a cream-pot, value 15 d. and four children's cans, value 6 d. the property of Israel Lyons .

ISRAEL LYONS. I live in Middlesex-street; I lodged my things in the house of Mr. Joseph. I only come to prove the property.

ESTHER JOSEPH . I am the wife of Isaac Joseph : he is a house-keeper , in Monmouth-street; it is in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields

Q. Was your house broken open on the 31st of August last - A. Yes. I did not find it out until six o'clock in the morning. On the night of the 30th of August, I went to bed at ten o'clock: I saw the property safe; I missed it the next morning. I saw my house had been broken open. The sash was taken out of the back kitchen.

Q. Did you take any particular notice of the goods that Lyons left - A. I saw the blanket that he had left; it was safe on the dresser. I had a woman a washing; I went to give her her supper. All was safe when I went to bed. Lyons goods were left on the dresser in the back kitchen.

CHARLOTTE NIGHTINGALE . I am charwoman to Mrs. Joseph. On the 30th of August, I went out a quarter before eleven o'clock. I secured the window and the street door. I saw the basket with the crockery ware in it in the kitchen when I went out.

Q. to Israel Lyons. Now, tell us what property you left in this place - A. I left five shillingsworth more than is here.

JAMES FAGO. I am an officer. I had information on the 31st of August, that the prisoner had made his escape from a Bow-street officer. I took him in Cambridge-place; he had this basket of crockery-ware, he was shewing them in the parlour. I took him, and this basket of crockery-ware into custody. They have been in my custody ever since. I followed him through information.

Lyons. This is part of the property I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-26

721. ARCHIBALD TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , a watch, value 2 l. and a watch-key, value 10 s. the property of John Thomas Watson , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN THOMAS WATSON . I am a bricklayer ; I live in Bow-street, Westminster, facing of the Abbey; in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields ; I am a housekeeper there. On the 20th of August, the prisoner came to my house between twelve and one o'clock. I came home to my dinner. The prisoner asked me to purchase the duplicate of a watch. I said, Taylor, what do I want with a watch, there are two hanging there. I shewed him the two watches; they were hanging over the mantle-shelf; he said he wanted money for this duplicate; he must have money. He asked me if I could inform him where a Jew lived, that he might sell this duplicate. I said this is the Jews sabbath. It was on Saturday, at half past twelve o'clock. The Jews will not purchase until their sabbath is over. I sent him to Hyams, a Jew, on the ruins. Then the prisoner left me.

Q. Who was in the room with you besides the prisoner - A. My wife was. It being dinner time after the prisoner went to the Jews, I had my dinner, and went away to my work; it was then about half past one o'clock. My watches were both hanging there when I went to my work. The prisoner went away almost immediately when I directed him to the Jew. About four o'clock my wife came to me at my work, and said Taylor had been there after I was gone. She told me my watch was gone, and Taylor had taken it. I went home, and took Taylor with me. My wife told me where he was drinking. I went and took him home with me. I said nothing what I wanted with him until I got home. Going along, he said he was surprised why I should have the impertinence to detain him from his business, I being an officer. I had no staff with me to secure him in the open street. When I got him to my home, I put on my coat, and told him I was a constable. I took my staff out, and said I must search him. I searched him; I found nothing on his person whatever. He began to be very impertinent to me. I sent for a brother officer to assist me; we secured him. We went to the house where two men were in company with him drinking. Me and my brother officer took the prisoner to the Rose and Crown, the corner of Dartmouth-street, where the prisoner had been drinking with the other two men. We searched one of the men that were drinking with him. The man that we found and searched had offered this watch to pawn at Mr. Thompson's, a pawnbroker. Mr. Thompson was ordered to deliver the watch to me by the magistrate. This is the watch; it is one of the two that were hanging over the mantle-piece. Mr. Thompson delivered this watch on the Thursday after the Saturday I lost the watch.

HANNAH WATSON . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you remember on the 20th of August last, the prisoner coming to your house - A. Yes; he was there twice; the first time was between twelve and one; he asked my husband to buy a duplicate of a watch. In the afternoon, he came a second time, in company with another man. The first time he came alone. When the prisoner went away the first time my husband was at dinner. My husband went to work between one and two; when the prisoner returned, it was after three. A soldier of the name of Brown was with him; they came to see a woman that lodged in my house, up stairs; she happened to be in my room. They all three went up stairs. She was speaking to me at the time they came to the door.

Q. When your husband went out were the watches all hanging up there - A. They were; they were there when they came at three o'clock; I am certain of it; they were hanging over the mantle-piece.

Q. How long did they stay up stairs - A. About ten minutes. Mr. Taylor came down to my room; he might set there about half an hour; he then asked me to go to let them know he was going. I did. I went up the first staircase and called them; they came down stairs with me to the street door.

Q. How long might you stay up stairs - A. It might be five minutes on the first landing. We then came down all three together. The prisoner was then at the street door; he was waiting for Brown. The two men then went away together. In about ten minutes after they were gone I missed the watch from the mantle-piece.

Q. You missed one of the watches from the mantle-piece - A. Yes. When the prisoner went away, and Brown, the young woman went up stairs directly.

Q. Are you sure that when the two men were there she was not in the room - A. When they came she was there, but not afterwards. When Brown went up to her she was not in my room. When Brown came down, she came to the street door with him, and when they were gone she went up to her own room immediately.

Q. Now, between the time of their going and you missing the watch, had she come into your room - A. No, nor any one else. When I missed the watch, I went to my husband and told him of it. I told him the house they were at. I saw them standing at the Rose and Crown door when I went to my husband. My master came home faster than me. That is all I know.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am the soldier that came with the prisoner to Watson's house. I went to visit a young woman there; she had been acquainted with me twelve years ago. When I called with Brown I went up stairs with her, and Taylor went up with me, and after a little time Taylor went down stairs. Mrs. Watson came and called me down; she told me Archibald Taylor wanted to go. I came down with the young woman then. Taylor then stood at the door. I went out with Taylor, and the young woman went up stairs.

Q. Do you know anything of the watches that hung in Watson's room - A. As I stood in the passage I saw the two watches as I was going up stairs.

Prisoner. Were not you present the whole of the time I was in the public-house - A. I was.

Q. Did you see me have a watch, or pass it into any one's hands - A. You went out of the Rose and

Crown; something passed between you and Mr. Green what it was I cannot say.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of the watch - A. It cost me upwards of forty shillings; I would not take three guineas and a half for it; the key is gold; I value it at ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been thirty years in one regiment, and never was brought before a court martial.

GUILTY, aged 47,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only ,

Confined 12 months in the house of correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-27

722. JAMES MARKEY was indicted for that he, on the 28th of August , upon Mary Ann Alders , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault and her the said Mary Ann Alders , against her will did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-28

723. MARY MARRIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , three shawls, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of Henry Smith and Thomas Price , privately in their shop .

THOMAS PRICE . I keep a linen-drapers shop in Tothill-street, Westminster, in the parish of St. Margaret's; my partner s name is Henry Smith . I was not in the shop when the prisoner came. Thomas Druce was the young man that attended the shop then.

THOMAS DRUCE . I was in the shop when the prisoner came into my master's shop on the morning of the 14th of July. I had just come from breakfast. There are two or three others; they were not in the shop at the time. The prisoner came for a small quantity of len muslin, and while I was ringing the bell for assistance to come into the shop. she took the shawls. I did not see her take the shawls. There was no other shopman in the shop at the time. When I returned from ringing the bell, I missed the shawls from off the counter. I advised the prisoner with having them; she said she had not got them. I still said she must have taken them off the counter. The three shawls were taken off the counter; they were concealed by part of her apron being over them. They were taken entirely from the counter.

Q. What is the price of the shawls - A. Three pounds ten shillings.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am an officer. I produce the shawls; they were delivered to me by the last witness. They have been in my possession ever since.

Prosecutor. These shawls are our property. The prisoner sent a letter to us, saying, she was sorry for what she had done, and stated a great deal of contrition.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning of the 14th of July, I went into the shop to purchase some stuff for caps. The shopman was busy at the time. I stood with my back against the counter, with my face opposite him, waiting to be served. By some means the shawls fell off the counter; I picked them up while the shopman was putting some things by. I had been drinking two or three glasses that morning. I did not mean to take them away.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-29

724. CHRISTOPHER FORESHAW and ANDREW ANDERSON were indicted for that they; on the 5th of August , feloniously did make an assault in and upon John Lewis , in a violent manner, with intent the monies of the said John Lewis to steal and carry away .

JOHN LEWIS . I am a seafaring man .

Q. On the 5th of August last were you at Stepney - A. Yes, about a quarter after eleven o'clock at night, I was going home, and just before I went to the rope house, Anderson came up and took hold of my arm; I had never seen him before; he asked me where I was going; I told him I was going home. Foreshaw then came up and took hold of my right hand. Anderson said to Foreshaw, we must look to see whether he has any money I had my coat and waistcoat buttoned. The prisoner pulled my coat open, and tore my waistcoat pocket. I hustled with them to get away; I got away from them, and ran about. An hundred yards; they ran out right over Mile End-road. I went into the rope-house, and looked at them, and then I went into the road, and sung out robbers. I went to the Ship public-house; some gentlemen were coming out of the public-house; I told them what had happened to me six of us pursued them. I took the way I had seen them ran. I was not present when the prisoners were taken.

RICHARD HOSKINS VAUX . I was at the Ship public-house when Lewis came past the door, it was about a quarter past eleven at night; he said, he had been stopped by three men in the fields, but they had not robbed him of any thing; he described their dress. There were six or seven of us at that time; we divided ourselves. We knew the spot Lewis had described. We went where it was most likely we should fall in with them, we passed through the posts by Mr. Steven's rope-house, of rope-ground; Foreshaw was laying there about thirty feet from the foot-path, close another side; we asked him to get up; he readily got up. He asked what we wanted with him; we told him there had been an outery that a man had been stopped there. It was in the moonlight night. When Foreshaw got up, I asked him what he did there; he said, he had been in the French prison and in a Spanish prison; he had no work or lodging; he was going down to his master; he had promised to get him employment.

GEORGE KA . I was in the public-house. I went out after the people that were supposed to have stopped Lewis. I found Anderson between the ground and the George public-house; I touched Anderson as he was laying in the field with my stroke; he started up I asked what he was doing there; he said, he had no lodging; he laid there to sleep. He was taken charge of. He had a jacket and trowsers of the as he in now.

Q. to Mr. Vaux. When you found Foreshaw, how was he dressed - A. His dress are nearly the description

Lewis had given him; he was dressed like a caulker.

Foreshaw's Defence. I have been on exile from my country fourteen years; I have bad for my country. On this night, I was tired; I did drank a drop too much in the day I find myself down in sleep. I never saw the prosecutor until I was brought into the house. I am a Swede.

Anderson's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-30

725. CHRISTIAN HAMPSHEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , three pounds weight of sugar, value 2 s. the property of Charles Danvers and Adolphus Kent .

JOHN STILL was called, and not appearing, the prisoner was it.

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-31

726. WILLIAM NORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a watch, value 2 l. 10 s. and a key, value 1 d. the property of James Dew , from his person .

JAMES DEW. I am a labouring man . When I lost my watch, I was on London-bridge , looking through the balustrades of London-bridge at the time that Mr. Wardle and son's premises were burning; I felt some person's hand at my side; I felt my watch draw from my pocket, it hit me over the hand; I turned myself round, and catched the prisoner by the collar; I saw he had my watch in his right hand; I attempted to take it away from him; he let it fall on the ground. He tried to get away from me, and pulled me off the curb into the horse pavement. I picked up part of the watch while I had hold of his collar; some other person picked up the remainder of the watch, and gave it into my hands. Harrison, the officer, came up, and took him into custody.

ANTHONY HARRISON. I am a City constable. On Sunday, the 28th of August, I took the prisoner into custody for robbing the prosecutor of his watch; the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner. A person of the name of Hill picked up the case of the watch. This is the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, after having been arraigned at this bar for a felony, on suspicion of stealing a watch, I lament, I have no counsel in the law to defend me. On Sunday, the 28th of August, it happened I was standing on London-bridge to see the contagiation; most unfortunate for me. I was standing close to a person who had lost his watch, by being taken out of his pocket. The prosecutor said he had missed his watch he upon that turned round, and discovered his watch laying on the ground. I humbly submit bow I can be the person that took it; the reason of my being close, to the prosecutor was on account of the people being so close together. Can it be supposed that I took his watch, unless he had laid hold of my hand with the watch in it, and then I dropped nothing; yet, he has brought me before the court on suspicion of my taking his watch. I am perfectly innocent of the slightest suspicion of any thing of the kind.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18140914-32

727. WILLIAM MADDOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , fifteen bare skins, value 5 s. the property of Henry Bacon Hall , John Henry Holmes , and William Hall .

WILLIAM COLSTON . I am a labourer to Messrs. Hall. On the 4th of August, I saw the prisoner cutting a bale of skins on the wharf; the tarpaulin over the bale was removed of one side. I went and told Mr. Hall.

JAMES CROSLEY . I am foreman to Messrs. Hall; the names of the partners are Henry Bacon Hall, John Henry Holmes, and William they are warfingers , in Thames-street. On the th of August, the last witness informed me there was a man by my masters goods. I saw the prisoner lay hold of one of the bales, and some of the skins were gone. I called my master; I told him I had suspicion he had some of the skins. He came, and found some in his trowsers and some in his hut.

HENRY BACON HALL. My man called me. I found the prisoner at Billingsgate; on examining him, I found eleven skins in his breeches, and four in his hat.

GEORGE WHITE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. I produce the skins.

Prosecutor. The skins are my property, I counted the skins in the bale, these were taken out; there were eighteen short.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by the East India Company to play the engine at the fire; that is where I picked up these skins among the straw. I delivered the skins up, and then they sent for an officer.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-33

728. ISABELLA WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a watch, value 40 s. and a key value 2 d. the property of John Broadhead , from his person .

JOHN BROADHEAD. I am a toy-maker ; I live at No. 7, Swan-lane, Upper Thames-street. On the 7th of August between twelve and two o'clock in the morning, I was going home; I missed my watch. I cannot say where I met the prisoner.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was not so drunk but I I missed the watch. I walked about the street with the prisoner; I felt my watch gone. I charged the watchman with her, and the watch was found upon her.

WILLIAM BEARD . I was the constable of the night. About a quarter before two o'clock, the prisoner was brought into the watchhouse, charged with stealing the prosecutor's watch. I searched her and found the watch in her shoe. She said, the prosecutor gave her the watch. The prosecutor was more confused than drunk; he walked very well and spoke tolerably well.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did you give her the watch for any favour - A. I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me the watch, and when he left me, he wanted it back again; I refused it him, as he gave it me; he used me most cruelly indeed.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-34

729. JOHN, alias JAMES, SHEPHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of September , four yards of hessian sheeting, value 4 s. the property of Samuel Pope , the elder , Thomas Bickham . and Samuel Pope , the younger .

SAMUEL POPE , SENIOR. I keep a Manchester warehouse , 67, Cheapside; my partners names are Thomas Bickham and Samuel Pope , junior. I lost the hessian on the 1st of September; on the 2nd we found it. I went to the Mansion House, and desired Matthews to come to my house, and take the prisoner into custody; he came, and after he took him into custody, the prisoner asked Matthews what was the matter; I told him he was a bad man; he had robbed me; he said, he had not. I then told him to take his hat and go about his business, and take his bag with him; this bag contained shreds, which are swept up; the shreds we allow the porter, as perquisites, with the straw, which is another perquisite for the porter. He went then into a lower warehouse by himself, and fetched his bag, and brought it into the upper warehouse. I then asked him if there was any thing in the bag but shreds; he said, no. The officer took him to the Poultry Compter; there the officer asked him again if there was any thing in this bag but the shreds; he answered, no, nothing but shreds. The officer turned the bag upside-down, and out came this hessian; four yards of Scotch sheeting, called hessian. The officer asked him if the sheeting was shreds; he said nothing then. The officer marked the sheeting. The prisoner acknowledged that he took it, and meaned to make a pillow-case of it. I told him he had stolen many other articles, and he had better tell me all he had done, and whom he was connected with. We then went and searched his lodgings, 59, Vere-street. There we found many other goods our property; we found there a piece of calico.

CHARLES MATTHEWS. I am a constable. Mr. Pope came to me at the Mansion House; he told me he had a porter that he thought had been robbing him. I went with him to the porter; I asked the porter if he had any box there; he said, no; he had a bag. I put my hand into the bag twice, and pulled out these shreds. I told him to come with me to the Poultry Compter, and there at the bottom of this bag I found these four yards of sheeting. He said, he was going to make a pillow-case or something if that sort. Then I went to his lodgings. I found some of the prosecutors property there, and through a paper in this bag, I found a quantity of goods at a public-house in Camberwell.

Prosecutor. The hessian sheeting was taken from the prisoner's bag; it is our property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-35

730. GEORGE CHESHIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , an oil-stone, value 7 s. the property of Benjamin Truby .

BENJAMIN TRUBY. I am a carpenter . I lost my oil-stone on the 11th of July last, from a house where I was at work. I saw the prisoner with the oil-stone under his arm, in Tooley-street; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said, it was his father's. I said, it was mine; I can swear to it being mine. This is it; it is my stone.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I believe he is a bricklayer.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the stone.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-36

731. JAMES HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , three pieces of woollen cloth, value 41 l. the property of John Hayton .

JOHN HAYTON . I am a dealer in woollen cloths , I live in Lombard-street. On the 21st of July, I had occasion to send out six pieces of woollen cloth to Basinghall-street. The prisoner was a jobbing porter for me a few times; he called in the morning about ten or eleven o'clock to know if I had any thing for him to do; I told him to call again, I believed I had something for him to do. He called again; these pieces of cloth were delivered to him by a relation of mine, of the name of Crosby, to take to Basinghall-street. He did not return any more that day; he should have come back to take three more; there were six to go. In consequence of that, we were alarmed, and made enquiry to know whether the goods were delivered; they were not delivered.

Q. What became of the goods - A. They were never heard of; we never found the goods at Messrs. Dalby and Company's in Basinghall-street; he never delivered the goods. After waiting two or three days, we offered a reward, and three or four days after that he was taken, and after going before the Lord Mayor, he was fully committed.

JOHN HAYTON CROSBY. On the 21st of July, I delivered three pieces of cloth to the prisoner to take to Messrs. Dalby and Topping, of Basinghall-street.

JOHN EATON . I am warehouseman to Dalby and Topping, 65, Basinghall-street. On the day the goods were to be sent to us, the 21st of July, they were not received; I was at home on that day; they have never been received by us; I am sure of that.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning I received the goods, I met with a seafaring man; we had the share of five or six halfpints of ale, and some liquor, which took effect of me; whether I pitched them any where, or left them any where I cannot say. On the next morning, I found myself on Tower-hill, I was so bad as that.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-37

732. THOMAS COLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , three yards of corderoy, value 6 s. 6 d. the property of James Milner .

WILLIAM BERCHER . I am a packer in the service of Mr. Milner the prisoner was a labourer there. On the 11th of August, I and Mr. Milner measured a piece of corderoy; it measured twenty-four yards. I marked the piece as measuring twenty-four yards. I left the warehouse in the evening at dark, and I left the prisoner there. The next morning, when I came to the warehouse again, I looked at the piece of corderoy; when I came to the end of the piece; I found it was deficient; I measured it then again; it measured but twenty-one yards instead of twenty-four. This is the piece of corderoy; it is cut, jagged with a knife.

JAMES MILNER . I am a packer in the Old Change. On receiving information from the last witness, I caused the prisoner to be apprehended. I sent for an officer; he came about ten o'clock. I went with the officer to the prisoner's lodgings in St. Martin's-le-grand; I there found the three yards of corderoy among other things. I matched the three yards of corderoy with the remainder of the piece in my warehouse; it matched exactly. This corderoy is my property. I am sure that piece was cut off the bigger piece.

Prisoner's Defence: I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-38

733. SAMUEL WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August, a coat, value 10 s. and a glass cruet, value 1 s. the property of David Ross .

DAVID ROSS . I keep a tavern and oyster-house in Lombard-street . I lost my coat on Sunday the 14th of August. When I put my hands into water I take my coat off, and put it into the back room; having lost two before this I the servants were suspicious of this old man I went out, and found the coat upon his

Q. Did you see him in the house - A. Yes. The servants came and told me he was not two doors from the house. I went after him and took the coat from him. This is the coat and the glass cruet; they are my property, I am sure it is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to your lordship's mercy, and this honourable court.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-39

734. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , a counterpane, value 8 s. the property of John Gillies .

ELIZABETH GILLIES . I am a married woman. My husband's name is John Gillies. I am a dressmaker. I live at No. 9, Baldwin's Gardens . My counterpane was in a tub of water in my yard. It was taken out of the tub between the hours of eight and ten in the evening on the 11th of August. The officer brought it me the next day.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. On the 12th of August, I received information that the prisoner was endeavouring to pledge a wet counterpane at Mr. Flemming's, pawnbroker, Fleet-market; I went and met the prisoner coming out of Mr. Flemming's door; she was endeavouring to roll this counterpane in a dirty rag. At that time the counterpane was quite wet. I asked her what she had got there; she made no answer. I told her I was an officer; I should see what she had got I asked her whether she had taken it from her lodgings; she said, no, it was not hers, she did not know any thing about it. I locked her up, and made enquiry about the way I understood she came; I discovered it belonged to Mrs. Gillies; I went and told the prisoner I had found out an owner. This is the counterpane.

Prosecutrix. This counterpane is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the greatest distress imaginable, I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-40

735. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , a pewter quart pot, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Wootton .

THOMAS WOOTTON . I am a publican ; I keep the Bull's Head , Smithfield Bars . I lost my pot on the 9th of August, about half past four in the afternoon. The prisoner came into my house; he sat himself down on the table where the pot was. I went to another table to get some pipes; the prisoner took the put off the table; and went out; I went out, and brought him back, and gave him into Carlisle's custody; he searched him; and found the pot upon him.

JOHN CARLISLE. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found this pot on him.

Prosecutor: This is my pot

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in Jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-41

736. SARAH WATSON was indicted for that she, on the 22nd of August, feloniously and without lawful excuse had in her custody and possession, a forged bank note, she knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-42

737. SARAH WATSON was indicted for feloniously forging, disposing, putting away, and for offering to a person a false and forged bank note to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , and also to defraud another person .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-43

738. ELIZABETH POOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , a watch, value 1 l. a chain, value 6 d. and a seal, value 1 d. the property of John Jackson , from his person .

JOHN JACKSON . I am an umbrella maker ; I live in Tewkesbury-court, Whitechapel. I lost my watch in Hoxton-square on the 3d of July, about half past eleven in the forenoon. I had the chain in my right hand when I sat down on the grass. I met with the prisoner in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch; I went with her from Holywell-lane to a public-house. She said she had been out all night. From there, I went to a public-house in Spitalfields; I called for a pint of beer and a pipe of tobacco; I asked her to drink; she said she could not drink beer; she would have a glass of gin. I called for a glass of gin for her; I gave two-pence for it. I called for another pint of beer, and asked the prisoner to drink; she said she could not drink beer; she called for a glass of gin. I came out. She said she was hungry, she wanted something to eat. I gave her a penny; she bought two cakes of a woman with a basket. I went to another public-house to get a pint of beer; I had another pint of beer and a pipe of tobacco. We had a glass of gin each. I went from there to Shoreditch, and from Shoreditch to Hoxton-square. I set myself down in Hoxton-square, opposite of the houses: with my right hand I had hold of my watch chain. I fell asleep, and when I awoke Mr. Giles asked me if I knew who the person was I was with; I said I did not; he said that woman had taken my watch.

Q. Who saw the prisoner take the watch - A. Mr. Giles's servant. I was so drunk I do not know what happened to me.

SARAH HARMAN . I am a servant to Mr. Giles, Hoxton-square. On the 3d of July, I saw the prisoner come and sit down in the square; the man and the woman went apparently to sleep. In the course of half an hour, the woman awoke; I left the window then, and went again, and then I saw her put the man's watch in her bosom.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I apprehended the woman; she acknowledged she had been with the man in Hoxton-square. The 3d of July was on Sunday. Mr. Giles was at church: when he came home the servant told him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-44

739. JOHAN DA SILVA was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Davis .

JAMES DAVIS. Q. Had you a brother of the name of Thomas Davis - A. Yes; I was with him on the 12th of December, 1810, in Nightingale-lane, East Smithfield; I was quite sober. It was a moonlight night, I well recollect; the moon was up. My brother was with me; he was a little in liquor. The last house we were at was the Newcastle Arms.

Q. Did you join any company - A. We had three more persons besides ourselves.

Q. Was the prisoner there - A. I cannot exactly say; he might be in the house; I cannot exactly say whether he was or no.

Q. Did you know a man of the name of Antonio Cardosa - A. I well remember seeing him in the house.

Q. Did you and your brother join company with him - A. Not in the house; it was between eight and nine o'clock when he went out of the house.

Q. Did your brother go out of the house the same time with you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe whether Cardosa was left in the house - A. I cannot exactly tell; as we were going out we bid the landlord of the house good night. This was before nine o'clock. We went up to the East India Arms, and was going to turn down Maudlin's-rents, there we found some women.

Q. Do you know who these women were - A. Yes, their names are Mary Rogers , Sarah Brown , and Biddy Jennings. On turning round the corner I believe these girls were making water; both me and my brother fell over these girls; one of the girls came up, called my brother something, and threatened to beat him with a patten, with which she afterwards struck him. Sarah Brown struck me with an umbrella; Mary Rogers struck my brother; I think so, I cannot exactly tell. Rogers was in a passion. Brown struck me with an umbrella; I pulled her out into the street by the habit shirt, took the umbrella from her, and threw it into a green shop. One of the girls (I cannot say which it was now) said, go and fetch Antonio Cardosa . I saw one of the girls go; I cannot say which it was. My brother walked on to go away. When the Portuguese came up, one of the girls struck my brother with a patten; I said, do not strike him; do not mind him, he is in liquor, come and have something to drink.

Q. Did the girls walk on after you and your brother - A. They staid until four men came up; one of them attacked me; they followed me and my brother from the Newcastle Arms; they came behind me.

Q. Did they speak to you before they came up to you - A. No. The women then were close at hand. When they came up I knew Cardosa by seeing him in the house. I believe Cardosa was one of the four men that came up, and I am certain the prisoner Da Silva was another of the four.

Q. Was there light enough that night to enable you to distinguish his face - A. Yes; there was a butcher's shop open with a light, and another public-house window was open; the light from them windows assisted me in seeing the man. I saw the prisoner at the time of the affray; I saw him at the time of his coming up; I had the opportunity of observing him by these lights; I am able to say he is one of them. One of the girls said to one of the men, that is the b - r there, do not leave a bit of life in him; pointing to the deceased, Thomas Davis , my brother; she said, that is the b - r, kill him, do not leave a bit of life in him. After that, the prisoner now at the bar attacked me; I threw him into the mud. I had a long scuffle with Da Silva, because he collared me without any notice. I never saw him.

Q. Had he any thing in his hand - A. That I cannot tell. After I got away from Da Silva, I ran into the path; the prisoner ran towards where my brother was, and assisted Cardosa: he went to where the women and my brother were.

Q. Had any mischief befallen you while you and the prisoner were engaged - A. I cannot tell; I did

not feel it at that time. I ran towards my brother; my brother recovering himself, he run; he got from them; they let him go; he run; he fell

Q. How far did he run - A. He ran from the top of Maudlin's-rents to Burr-street.

Q. When your brother ran, did you follow him - A. Yes.

Q. Did either of the men or women go with you - A. I cannot tell; there were a number of men there when my brother fell.

Q. Was any thing done to your brother in your presence after you had released yourself from the prisoner, before your brother fell in Burr-street - A. I cannot tell; I observed nothing.

Q. In what manner did these men conduct themselves while they were about you - A. The women were very violent.

Q. Can you tell me which of the women it was that addressed herself to Cardoso, and said, kill him - A. - A. The young woman called Sarah Brown , alias Gotts; she addressed herself to Antonio Cardosa - A. When my brother got to Burr-street, the fell; he said, O Lord, O Lord. That is all I heard. My brother was taken into Dr. King's, in Burr-street. I saw the surgeon examine him. I believe he was dead before he got in; he appeared to me to be dead when I first took him up, by his head pulling from side to side; there then appeared no signs of life in him.

Q. Now, at the time that you saw your brother run, did you see Cardosa - A. Yes; he and the prisoner Da Silva were close together, surrounding my brother.

Q. Did you see either of them do anything; if you did, describe it - A. It is so long ago, I cannot recollect.

Q. When you took your brothers to the surgeon, what did you do yourself - A. I went to Mr. Birnie's, the Sugar Loaf and Punch Bowl; that was not the house I had last come from. I went to find a young man. I went to the Bee Hive, and found him; he and I went to my brother's craft, and staid all night. My brother was a waterman. I saw no more of Cardosa or Da Silva. The next day I went to the Thames police office and saw Cardosa; I knew him to be one of the men that was fighting my brother. I knew Cardosa to be one of the four men.

Q. How soon after this did you go abroad - A. It is now near two years since I went out to the East Indies; I went to China direct; I met with Da Silva. I went on board the Charles Grant , at Wampoo, with my captain, on a Sunday evening; I staid a little time at Wampoo, and as I was going down below on board the Charles Grant to see a young man of the name of Chapman, I heard Da Silva speak there; I had some knowledge of the voice; I asked Chapman if that man's name was not Da Silva; he said, yes. I went to the opposite side of the ship, and took Da Silva by the collar, and brought him to the main hatchway. I asked him if he knew me; he said, no; I asked if he remembered being in a house, and called out, and aiding and assisting in killing a young fellow, a waterman; he shrugged up his shoulders, and walked away; he put his handkerchief to his mouth that I should not see his face. I then returned to my own ship with my captain. At another time I was going on board the Charles Grant , Da Silva was looking out of the port; he saw me; he said, I am very sorry I did not kill you.

Q. Sometime after you scuffled with Da Silva you found yourself wounded - A. Yes, I had a cut in my arm, all through my clothes.

BIDDY JENNINGS. Q. Do you remember the night that Thomas Davis was killed, in 1810 - A. Yes.

Q. Were you near Maudlin's rents - A. Yes; I was at the end of Maudlin's-rents, in company with Sarah Brown and Mary Rogers . I had just before been with them at the Newcastle Arms, dancing.

Q. Do you remember the two Davis coming up to you - A. Yes.

Q. What took place when they came up to you - A. One of us had occasion to go up Maudlin's-rents, and just as she was getting up at the corner of the place, these two brothers came up and gave Sarah Brown a shove; Sarah Brown hit him directly with her umbrella; the other brother took the umbrella out of her hand, and gave it into the green shop; after that, the deceased turned about, struck Sally Brown , and knocked her down in the mind; she got up again immediately. I saw Antonio Cardosa come and give him two or three stabs in the face.

Q. Before Antonio Cardosa came had you heard any thing said about him - A. No, sir.

Q. When Antonio struck him in the face what did he strike him with - A. I cannot say; the last blow knocked him down. I did not see any thing more of it. I saw the prisoner get up and run away.

Q. After Da Silva came out of the public-house, Antonio knocked the deceased down - A. After he knocked the brother down I heard no more of it until I heard the brother was dead at the corner of Burr-street.

Q. You had seen the deceased before that - A. Yes, I had seen him in the public-house with the girl that he cohabited with. I never saw Antonio Cardosa after that night, until I saw him at the police office.

HENRY ABLE . I am a victualler. In December, 1810, I kept the Newcastle Arms, Nightingale-lane. The prisoner used my house at that time.

Q. Before the night that poor Davis met with his murder, had you seen Da Silva in your house alone, or in company - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Cardosa - A. On this night, Cardosa and two others ran out together; a girl came, and called Cardosa. I am confident that Cardosa and Da Silva went out with the two other men; I did not follow them. Cardosa was the first that returned; Da Silva returned in about half an hour; when Da Silva came in, he had a knife in his hand, a table-knife round pointed; he said, it was his landlady's knife. Staples, a young man, came in, and said to Da Silva, you have stabbed the man; Da Silva made no answer. I asked him if he could swear to stabbing the man; he hesitated, and said, he could not. I said it was of no use detaining Da Silva. I had heard there had a man been stabbed; I had not been out to see. Da Silva went out immediately,

leaving the knife with me. It was a common case knife; there was nothing remarkable on it. When I saw Cardosa next was at the Police office. Da Salva I have not seen until these three or four days.

EMANUEL MERCURY. I am a Police officer. I apprehended Cardosa that night, at No. 2, Cable-street, Back-lane, at his lodging, between eight and nine o'clock, almost immediately after the transaction. After he was handcuffed, he produced a clasp knife, he said, he had been eating his victuals with it; the knife was rather rusty.

Q. Did you after that endeavour our to apprehended Da Silva - A. I did, that night, and other times; I could not find him.

JOHN THOMAS . I am a surgeon. I lived with Mr. King in December, 1810. The deceased, Davis, was brought to me; he just breathed; there was some appearance of life. I afterwards examined the body to ascertain the cause of his death; I found a small wound upon the back, a good deal of blood upon the clothes.

Q. What part of the back - A. Between the shoulder-blade and back-bone; no other wound that I saw.

Q. Was it a deep wound - A. It appeared so; I opened the body, and found the wound had penetrated the lobe of the lungs three of four inches; the cavity of the chest was filled full of blood that issued from the wound.

Q. Did you discover enough to make you say what was the cause of his death - A. I attribute that he died from that wound. That wound night have been made with some sharp instrument; a common clasp knife would have made such a wound as that.

(The conviction of Antonio Cardosa read in court.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the public-house when some women cried for assistance, saying, they had been illused; at the instant I came out of the house, I received a blow in my face. I did not return another. I received a second blow, and fell to the ground. I then got up, and run away to my lodgings, and remained there until I thought the disturbance was over; I took a bit of bread and meat in my hand, with a knife and went to get a put of beer. I heard a man had been murdered by a Portuguese; I had a knife in my hand which I brought from my lodging; I was fearful of taking this knife to the door, for fear I should be accused. I never concealed myself, or absconded from my lodging until I was shipped on board a ship bound to Guinea. I never had any thought that any one could blame me that I should be accused of such a tyrannical deed. I have been twice in this country since; I had my lodgings near Nightingale-lane On the day I was accused by the brother of the deceased, it is a false accusation; it originated by a lady of the Francis, my landlady; on the day I received my money on board the ship going to Guinea, I would not give her any money; she said, she would have me taken out of the ship, and said, I was the man that committed the murder. This worthy gentlemen, is all I have to say in respect to this cause. I call God to witness that I am innocent, nor had I any knife in my hand when I went out of the public-house, nor ever had I the thoughts of it. I swear solemny, like a Christian, that I did not know of the murder of Davis at the time this misfortune happened, until I came to the public-house again. I certify to the gentlemen, that I ab hor the using a knife, nor have I been accused of a smaller crime. A long time have I been in the English service, always behaved properly, have been esteemed by the officers and ship mates in every ship I have been in, and welcomed by all my friends. I have no more to say. It is a very improper thing, after being so many weeks in this country, that I should be accused of this offence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-45

740. WILLIAM MEDGETT was indicted for the wilful murder of Margaret, his wife ; and also charged on the Coroners Inquisition.

ELIZABETH SAUNDERS. Q. Did you know the deceased, Margaret Medgett - A. Yes; I lived in the same house as she did.

Q. Who was her husband - A. The prisoner.

Q. Where you at the house on the night she came home, when she received her death - A. Yes. She was very much in liquor when the husband came home; I desired him to go up stairs.

Q. Did you hear any words pass between the prisoner and the deceased - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see the son of the deceased come down stairs - A. No. He came down stairs, I did not see him. The prisoner came and knocked at my door, he asked me to go up to his wife he said she was very ill; I went up stairs; I saw the deceased, she was partly on the bed and partly off. He asked me whether any thing could be done for her; I told him he must get a doctor; he went out for a doctor returned back, he said he could not ring the bell; he went back again, and brought the doctor with him. The doctor said, she must be taken in a coach to the Hospital.

MR. CHOPPING. Q. You are a surgeon; you saw this poor woman - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the disease by which she appear afflicted - A. I saw the injury that she received brought on a wound.

Q. You were before the Coroner - A. I was.

Q. You said before the Coroner. that the injury that she received did not appear alone the ordinary circumstance that occasioned her death - A. I understand she was under the influence of liquor before it happened; it would have materially assisted the hemorrhage.

MARY HURD . I am the sister of the deceased. She had very large veins about her thighs; she shewed me the hurt, I being her sister. She told me the doctor said if she did not wear a bandage, it would be the death of her. She left the bandage off; I blamed her for leaving off the bandage.

Q. to Mr. Chopping You have heard the evidence given by the last witness; what is your opinion now - A. On the examination of the body, there was no appearance of violence done, except in the internal membrane; there was a small wound on one side. on the other side there was a contusion and swelling.

Q. If an ordinary blow might occasion death, might not a small blow cause an effusion of blood - A. It would.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 41,

Of manslaughter .

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-46

741. WILLIAM PALMER , alias WELLS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , eighty-nine stones, value 10 l. eleven ounces of silver, value 3 l. two ounces of gold dust, value 2 l. half an ounce of gold cuttings, value 1 l. the property of William Watson and Benjamin Rawlins , in the dwelling-house of Silas Bevan .

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a jeweller ; my partner 's name is Benjamin Rawlins ; at the time of the robbery we lived at 32, Castle-street, Leicester-fields ; in the house of Silas Bevan; the house is in the parish of St. Martin's in the fields .

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know his person - A. Yes. On Friday the 24th of June, he applied to me for work; we engaged the prisoner to come to work on Monday morning. He came on Monday, and continued working for us until the Saturday week following. On the Saturday week following, I received an order for some garnet ear-rings; in the evening I looked out a small box to pick out these small garnets; I immediately perceived a considerable number had been taken away; I informed my partner. We referred to the stock-book, and found a number gone; there was fifty-two gone. We had never missed any thing previous to the employment of the prisoner; suspicion then fell on the prisoner. I told the prisoner the work he had in hand was particularly wanted; he offered to come the next day, Sunday morning; which I wished him to do, because no other person should be there but himself. On the Sunday, about one o'clock, I took a small topaz from the box when he was there. (Previous to this, I had counted all the stones in the box, and weighed them also, there were seventy-two stones.) The prisoner continued to work himself, and me only, until he talked of going to dinner; as an excuse, I told him I must fetch him some water from the bottom of the house. On my coming up with the water I met him going out to dinner. I immediately went to the shop, and counted these stones; I missed eight. I then told my partner of it, and thinking he would come on the Monday morning, I took no further notice of it then. He did not come on Monday morning at his usual time; at twelve o'clock at noon I went to the Magistrate at Queen-square office. I found out the prisoner's lodgings, but there he went by the name of Wells; I never knew him by any other name than Palmer. I considered it might possibly be some other person. On my return home. my servant told me he had come to work. I immediately returned to Queen-square, and obtained a warrant; the officer came with me. When I came home, the prisoner was in the work-shop; I went into the work-shop; I told him it was needless his coming to work on the Sunday, and to neglect his work on Monday. I asked him the number where he lived. I said, if I had known where he lived, I would have gone to him; he said he lived at No. 2, Arabella-row, Pimlico. I told the officer his address, and called the prisoner into a back-room. The officer searched him, and found a number of duplicates on him, and some pieces of silver; one of the pieces of silver I had given him as materials to work with. I went with the officer to look at twenty-nine stones, pawned at Mr. Lane's in Holborn, with the duplicates; the pawnbroker's man has them now I, and the officer, Popal, searched his lodgings. We found a little box of stones; some of which I knew to be mine. I found eight topaz stones, and fifty-two garnets; I found the eight topaz stones I lost on the Sunday; the fifty-two garnets were missed on the 1st of July. The twenty-nine stones at Mr. Lane's were a variety; I could not speak to every one of them. I am positive I lost fifty-two garnets, and eight topaz stones, and the twenty-nine found at Mr. Lane's, I know some of them.

ELEANOR DEVEY . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; he lodged with me about two months in the two pair of stairs room, at No. 2, Arabella-row, Pimlico; he went by the name of Willis.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 11th of July, me and my brother officer were applied to by the prosecutor. I went to the prosecutor's house, Castle-street, Leicester-fields; I there took the prisoner into custody. On searching him, I found two pieces of silver and a duplicate of twenty-nine stones pledged at Mr. Lane's, Holborn, for five shillings. I and the prosecutor went to the pawnbroker's; the prosecutor saw the stones; he identified some of them.

GEORGE POPAL . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Watson to the lodgings of the prisoner, No. 2, Arabella-row, Pimlico. I went up into the two pair of stairs room; I found a box there; I opened the box; it contained fifty-two garnet stones, and eight topaz stones. The prosecutor identified seven of the garnets and the eight topaz stones. These are the stones; I have kept them ever since.

THOMAS RUTLAND . I am a shopman to Mr. Lane. I produce twenty-nine stones, pawned on the 30th of June, by a man; I do not recollect the prisoner.

Q. to Mr. Watson. Look at the twenty-nine stones pawned at Lane's - A. I can assert three out of the twenty-nine to be mine and my partner's. The garnet stones found in the prisoner's lodgings, I can swear to be our property, and the eight topaz stones are ours, and the silver the officer has produced is ours; the silver is worth two shillings, and the stones altogether eight pounds.

JURY. What is the value of the property you can really swear to - A. I should think from two to three pounds.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-47

742. JOSEPH WIFFEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , two shirts, value 20 s. nine cravats, value 20 s. a pocket handkerchief,

value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. and two pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of George Humphreys .

GEORGE HUMPHREYS . I live at No. 5, Crescent-place, Blackfriars . The prisoner lived with me as groom , and took care of my wardrobe. I missed the articles in the indictment; on Thursday I found them. I did not miss them until I found them. I was present when these articles were found at the prisoner's lodgings; he lived with me between four and five months. I sent for a constable, and had him taken into custody in my house. The constable and I went to his lodgings at the Queen's Head, Water-lane; in a bed room up stairs I found six cravats, a pocket handkerchief, and a pair of shoes; my name is inside of the shoes; they had been worn very little. He lodged out of my house; he lodged at this public-house when first he came to me. I also found two shirts and two cravats at his washerwoman's; the two shirts are worth forty shillings. The washerwoman's name is Sims. My two waistcoats I found in the hay-loft, hid under the hay. He acknowledged taking the waistcoats, and said where he had put them. One of the waistcoats has my name on it in full length.

RICHARD MARLOW. I am a constable. By the direction of Mr. Humphreys, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, the Queen's Head, Water-lane, and to Mrs. Sims, the washerwoman; the husband is here. I brought two shirts from the washerwoman's. Mr. Humphreys found the two waistcoats, and gave them to me. I produce them and the two shirts.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

WILLIAM SIMS . I only know my wife washed for the prisoner. I have seen the prisoner come backwards and forwards for his linen.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no friend. I trust entirely to your lordship's mercy.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-48

746. JAMES CLOWES was indicted for that he, on the 10th of July , upon Philip Mighill , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and with a sharp instrument, to wit, a knife, unlawfully did cut and stab him in and upon his cheek, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, with intent to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

PHILIP MIGHILL . I received this cut in my cheek about eleven o'clock in the morning, on the morning, on the 10th of July. I was in my bedroom at that time. I was not very well at that time. I lodged in Mr. Bristow's house, near St. Bride's church .

Q. Did the prisoner use to sleep in the same room with you - A. He used to sleep in the room, but I did not see him sleep there. I had slept there two years.

Q. Had the prisoner slept there the night before this matter happened - A. No.

Q. How early did you first see him in the room - A. About ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did he speak to you - A. No, he appeared quite deranged. I thought him a madman. At that time he was down upon his knees, with his hands lifted up; he said, Jesus, come down from Heaven, and take the evil spirit from me. I did not at all apprehend any mischief was intended for me. He continued in this way nearly an hour. I believe all this was real madness. He then came to the foot of the bed; I persuaded him to lay down, in mild language; I said, my good fellow, you had better lay down, and take a nap; he gave me no answer; he spit in my face; he never treated me in that way before; he always behaved remarkably civil. I did not resent his spitting in my face, because I thought he was mad. I only told him to lay down; he said, come out, you imp of Hell, come out; he immediately cut me with a pen knife on the cheek. I could not see he had a knife in his hand, he did it so quick. There was nobody in the room but our two selves; to avoid being cut the second time I got under the bed; he continued walking about the room. It was about twenty minutes before any assistance came. He did not follow me under the bed to cut me again; he continued falling on his knees and clinching his hands, and making use of the same expressions. The landlord came into the room; the prisoner then ran out of the room. The cut in my face did not do me much injury. I thought he was a madman then, and I think so now.

RICHARD BRISTOW . I am the landlord of the house. The prisoner came into my house about eighteen months ago, and the prosecutor lodged there; he was then in his sound mind, a civil quiet man. About a week before this affair happened he returned from a voyage; he told me he had some money to receive at Greenwich; he asked me to lend him a few shillings until he returned from Greenwich.

Q. Did he know Mighill lodged there - A. I believe he did; he did not appear to be insane at that time. He did not return so soon from Greenwich as I expected by a day or two. On the 9th, the night before this affray happened, he came in between eleven and twelve; he was in a great perspiration, with no handkerchief on; he rather looked wild, and seemed in a very agitated state. I said, Clowes, what is the matter with you; he wished to tell me a long story; I was busy at the bar, I could not attend to him. I begged him to sit down in the tap-room until I was more at leisure; at the same time I told him I had no bed, I would allow him to sit up in the taproom. He remained there all night. I found him very restless; I thought it was the effect of drinking. At the time I went to bed he was very calm, and much disposed for sleep. I had every reason to suppose he was a quiet civil man. When the maid got up in the morning, she found him very restless, kneeling in the tap-room.

Q. Did you see him do any of these eccentricities - A. When I went up at eleven o'clock in the day, I saw him in such eccentricities; he was going down on his knees in this extraordinary way; I spoke to him very sharp. Mighill came from under the bed, called out, Mr. Bristow, he has cut me with a sharp knife; that cause me to act cautious with him; I

thought then he was actually in a deranged state. I coaxed him; I got him down stairs; he stopped below a little with the knife in his hand. Being a strong powerful man, I was afraid to interfere with him; he went out in the street, and the officer secured him. He has been with Sir Sidney Smith , I understand, and he told me he had received a wound in his head. When he drinks his head is nearly cracked.

Q. When he was on shore before did you observe whether he and Mighill were friends - A. So much so that they would both drink out of one pot, and have it filled up again.

JOHN LOCKLEY HARPER. I am a constable. On Saturday the 10th of July, I was sent for to the White Bear, Bride-lane; I went out, and saw the prisoner going towards Blackfriars-bridge; he had the knife in his hand when I took him in custody; he was sometimes praying and sometimes swearing. I believe him to be mad at that time. I secured him, and took him to the Compter. I took the knife from him. I was obliged to get a person to assist me; he was very violent.

MR. WALDRON. I am a surgeon; I attend Giltspur-street compter. I saw the prisoner while he was in the compter; he was certainly deranged at the first part of his being in the Compter. I examined his head; there is evidently a fracture of the bone; that, joined with liquor, might produce derangement. He was under an irritable fever, under an impression of religious terror. After a day a two, he became perfectly tranquil. He behaved very well from his recovery during his continuance in Giltspur-street Compter.

NOT GUILTY,

On account of derangement at the time the act was done .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-49

736. GEORGE GILKES and JOHN RADLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , one copper, value 20 s. the property of William Rhodes , then affixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM RHODES . I live in Huggin-lane . The house that was broken open belonged to me; that house was shut up at the time: it is in the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry . I am the sole owner of that house. The officer called on me at seven o'clock in the morning, and said my house was broken open. I went up stairs; I found my copper was removed away. I had seen the copper there three days before. It appeared to be fresh done. An iron crow was laying on the table. The staple by the side of the door of the house had been forced.

WILLIAM BROCK. I am a constable. On the 13th of August, about ten minutes after six, as I was coming from Billingsgate with a peck of oysters; I saw Gilkes walking about the door of the prosecutor's house; the other prisoner, Radley was standing at the street-door, wrenching it open; I kept looking at him; Gilkes took notice. I went on, and took my oysters into Wood-street. I returned in about ten minutes. I gave information to Harrison; I told Harrison to come to my assistance. When I returned to the door, I saw Radley standing at the door; I pointed him out to Harrison; Harrison catched hold of him, searched him, and picklock keys were found on him. I went into the house; I saw Gilkes n the house; he was coming round to Harrison; I catched hold of him; he was at the bottom of the stairs.

Q. Had the door been forced open - A. The staple of the door had been forced out, so that people could get in. Upon going in, I saw the copper was taken out of its first setting, about eight feet from the fire place. Harrison found a crow. I saw the crow in Harrison's possession. Gilkes and Radley were secured.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am an officer. Brock gave me information. I went to the house. Going up Aldermanbury, I saw Gilkes at the prosecutor's door; I told Brock to follow me; instead of that he went round Basinghall-street way. I saw Radley instantly came towards me when he saw me. I instantly laid hold of Radley by his collar; I dragged him to Mr. Rhodes's door, and pushed him. The door was upon a jar; the door had the appearance of having been forced open. A scuffle ensued in the passage; Gilkes came running down stairs; I laid hold of him with my left hand; he wanted to put his hand in his breeches; I gave him two or three violent kicks, and then I handcuffed them both together. Brock came in. We searched Radley; I found ten picklock keys, a knife, and some twine upon him. I searched Gilkes; I found thirteen picklock keys, a knife, a gold ring, and a one pound note upon Gilkes. The one pound note I gave him back since. I took him up one pair of stairs, into the back kitchen; I found the copper was laying in the back kitchen; it appeared to me to have been recently taken out. On the dresser I found this iron crow all over lime, that was the instrument we supposed raised the copper; it was smothered with lime when I took it. The copper was removed about eight feet. I tried the crow on the middle door and the outside door; it fitted the marks on the doors. I secured them, and let Mr. Rhodes know; he claimed the copper. This is the copper.

Q. to Mr. Rhodes. What is the value of the copper - A. It is worth twenty shillings; I paid more than twenty shillings for it. It is mine.

Gilkes's Defence. Harrison found nothing at all on me. I was coming by the door; I saw the door open; I knocked at the door; I wanted to know if anybody lived there; I could not find anybody. I went up stairs; I found nobody there. I came down; I saw Radley shoved into the door.

GILKES, GUILTY , aged 22.

RADLEY, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-50

743. ALEXANDER ROSS and MARY NASH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , from the person of Thomas Young , twenty-seven bank notes, value 54 l. and a 1 l. note , his property.

THOMAS YOUNG . I am a sailor .

Q. When were you robbed of your notes - A. On the 7th of August; I do not know the name of the street. It was in a bad house facing of New Gravel-lane .

Q. Are you sure you had them there - A. Yes. On Sunday night, about eleven o'clock, I went to this house with Mary Nash ; I gave her five shillings and sixpence to sleep with her that night; she fetched a pot of beer out of it. I pulled my clothes off, and went to bed. In the morning, when I awoke, I found Mr. Ross in bed with me. Mary Nash went to another house to sleep. I was groggy that night.

Q. You and she went to bed first - A. I went to bed first; she never came to bed, but left me. I fell asleep. In the morning about three o'clock I awoke; Ross, the lighterman, was in bed with me.

ROBERT WILLAN . I apprehended the prisoners. I never found any notes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-51

746. THOMAS BISHOP was indicted for killing and slaying Margeret Higgens .

JOHN WATMAN . On Tuesday, the 23rd of August, I was at the bottom of Fleet-market; it was a duskish evening; I was standing at the corner, by Mr. Waithman's door. The deceased was coming across from Fleet-market ; the prisoner was turning a chaise at the corner, at the same time.

Q. How did the prisoner drive it - A. He was driving it faster than he should, he owned, and I saw the deceased fall; I could not tell whether it was a fall, or whether it was the off horse that knocked her down; the horse on the off side was upon her when she was down. The driver immediately pulled up, and stopped the horses, with the horse upon the woman.

Q. Did you see the horse upon the woman - A. Yes; the horses feet were upon the woman. He stopped his chaise immediately; he seemed much hurt, and behaved exceeding well.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-52

747. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Sims .

JANE DAY . Q. Do you remember in July last, John Sims being rode over - A. Yes; on the 29th of July, I saw the boy ride over John Sims; the prisoner is the boy; it was in the public street in Clerkenwell . The horse was going very fast; the horse was going full gallop; the boy had hold of the horses main; I did not see it had any bridle or halter.

MARY FEWHEY . I was coming behind the boy on the 29th of July; there was a boy alongside of him on a grey horse; the prisoner was on a black horse. The two horses walked on together until they came to the White Horse public-house; the prisoner then touched his horse with his heels, the horse went on a trot, and afterwards full speed; it was near eight o'clock at night. I did not see the prisoner ride over the man; I was too far behind.

MRS. GREEN. I saw the prisoner on horse back. I saw him kick his horse with his heels; the horse went on full speed; I saw him ride over the deceased; I saw the man fall.

WILLIAM THISSELTON. I know nothing of the transaction. I knew the deceased. I apprehended the prisoner.

James Day . I knew the deceased. I saw him knocked down; I saw him taken to the Hospital; his name was John Sims .

CHARLES WING . I was called to see this man in the Hospital; he was in a state of insensibility when brought to the Hospital.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-53

748. ROBERT SILVER CARLEY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 13th of August , a certain order for the payment of 43 l. with intention to defraud Sir John Perring , bart. Benjamin Shaw , Stephen Nicholson Barber , and Henry Houston .

SECOND COUNT, with intention to defraud Richard Livey .

ROBERT HINNEY . I am a ticket-porter. On Saturday, the 13th of August, I was plying at Lincoln's-inn, it might be a quarter after one o'clock the prisoner at the bar made application to me to go into the City; he came to me, and desired me to go to Sir John Perring and Company, bankers , Cornhill, and to bring cash to the amount of this bill; he gave me the check; I was to bring the cash in small notes. I was to bring it back to Lincoln's-inn; I was to be there precisely at two o'clock to that place. I asked him where I was to take it to if I did not see him at two o'clock; he told me to come to No. 4, Tooke's-court, Carey-street. I took the check to Sir John Perring 's Cornhill; I presented the check to one of the cashiers in the house; the check was questioned directly; without any further examination the check was stopped, and I was detained.

Q. At the time the prisoner told you if he did not meet you to come to Tooke's-court; did he tell you what name to ask for - A. He told me to ask for Carley, but not to let the governor know, meaning his master. After the note was stopped, Brand, the officer was sent with me to Lincoln's-inn; a few notes were given me to be looking at them when I returned back to the prisoner. I got back to Lincoln's-inn; the prisoner came to me in less than five minutes; he asked me if I had got the money; I told him I had. I took the notes out of my pocket, that had been presented to me, and pretended to be looking over them. I told the prisoner to stop a little, there was a gentleman that wanted to speak to him. Brand was on the opposite side of Lincoln's-inn; he came up, and met him. He asked Brand if he wanted to speak to him; Brand told him he was his prisoner.

WILLIAM CLOVER DYER . I am one of the cashiers in Perring and Company's house. On Saturday, the 13th of August last, the witness, Hinney, presented a draft at our house for payment, a porter did; I cannot positively swear to the porter again. He put the check on the counter; when the porter put it into my hand, I did not think it was the hand writing of Mr. Livey. I asked the ticket-porter from whom he received it of; he said if a person in Lincoln's-inn-fields. I suspected it was a forgery, and took it into Mr. Barber.

STEPHEN NICHOLSON BARBER . Q. There are four partners in your house, are there not - A. Yes;

Sir John Perring , bart. Benjamin Shaw , Stephen Nicholason Barber, (myself,) and Henry Honston, nobody else. On Saturday, the 13th of August, a ticket-porter presented a check at our house; Mr. Dyer brought it to me. The porter is Henney. This is the check. I am acquainted with the handwriting of Mr. Livey; this is not his hand-writing.

(The check read.)

WILLIAM BRAND . I am one of the marshalmen of the City of London. On Saturday, the 13th of August, I was sent for to Messrs. Perrings banking-house, upon this occasion. I accompanied the porter, John Hinney , to Lincoln's-inn; I placed myself at a distance, to see if any person came to claim the charge of the check. I saw the prisoner come towards Hinney; upon my seeing them together, I immediately went towards them. The porter said, this is the person, that gave him the check. I asked the prisoner if he had given that check to the porter; he said, yes. I told him he was my prisoner. I asked him how he came possessed of that check; he rather hesitated at that moment. I asked him who the gentleman was; to that, I believe, he made no reply. I asked him what profession the gentleman was; he said, he did not rightly know. I asked him the gentleman's name; he said, he could not recollect. I thought it a strange account. I asked him where they were when he had taken it; he said, in the street, near the square. This passed in the square, in Lincoln's-inn-fields. It was in a street near the square, but he could not tell the name of the street. I told him he would have to give a better account of it than that; I was under the necessity of taking him with me. We then went through the court, into Chancery-lane; he stopped at the printers in Chancery-lane; that was at my instance, we went in there. I desired him if he could recollect the gentleman's name and where he lived, to put it down in writing; he seemed to be apprised of my intention, and said, I am not afraid of giving you my handwriting, I assure you the check is not mine. We then went to the printers on our road to the Compter, we got as far as St. Dunstan's church, he then said, he had made an appointment to meet the gentleman in the street, or in an eating-house, which is a few doors off the Bar. I told him I would take any steps that he thought proper, in order to discover the party. He then said, if the gentleman sees me in the street with you he would not come up, and then we should not be able to see him. I was in my private dress. I told him I could not with any degree of propriety leave him; we would do the best we could. We went to the eating-house, and found no one. He had put down the name of Sampson on the paper. He then told me this Sampson was a brother clerk; he wished to go to Carey-street. We went into Tooke's-court; I sent the porter up to Mr. Hewett's to know whether Sampson was at home, and while we were waiting at the end of the court, Sampson made his appearance, about an hundred yards from where we were. The prisoner perceived him first, and beckoned him; Sampson hastened his pace, and came up to us; Carley spoke to Sampson; he said, Sampson, this check you gave me is a forgery. I said, it is challenged as a forgery; tell all you know of it. I asked Sampson how he came possessed of it; he said, he had given it to Carley. Sampson said, he had taken it of Mr. Livey in a money transaction. He said, Mr. Livey was a tallow-chandler, living in Chancery-lane. I went with both of them, holding one in each hand. Mr. Livey was at home; the check was shewn him. I asked him if he had paid away a check for forty-three pounds; Mr. Livey said, he did not recollect paying any check of that amount; he referred to his book, and said he had not. I asked Mr. Livey to write his name; which he did. I then produced the check which I had with me; I asked him if he had any knowledge of it; he said, he had not; it was not his hand-writing. I told him it had been presented to his bankers for payment, and found to be a forgery. Mr. Livey then turned to Sampson and Carley, and said. I hope you have not been doing this; you will both be hanged together. Sampson said, he had. This was in the hearing of Carley. He said, he had done it; he began to tell the motive of his doing it; he said to Mr. Livey, do not you recollect paying away a check of eight or ten pounds; Mr. Livey said, he did. Sampson then said, I spoke of the impropriety of giving a check in writing, not using the printed check; how easy it was for any one to forge a check of that kind. He then said, he did not do it with intent to keep the money, only to shew Mr. Livey the impropriety of so doing. I told them I was under the necessity of taking them both to the Compter, but we had better go to Messrs. Perring and Company first. We took a coach, and went to Sir John Perring 's, and from there to the Compter.

Q. While Sampson and Carley were together, did Sampson say any further - A. I put him in the coach; I think he began first I do not recollect whether Mr. Livey began first. The conversation began about the dangerous state he was in; he was saying he did not mean to defraud Mr. Livey out of his money; he intended to return it him. A question arose how Carley came to be possessed of the note, it being a forgery; Sampson said it was prepared in Carley's presence. I spoke further of the danger of the case, what an unpleasant state they were in. Sampson said, Carley had spoken first to him; he said, he wished he knew of any way of getting a little money, it would be of infinite service to him at that time; Sampson said to Carley, he did not know any way, unless by preparing a check; Carley said, in whose name; Sampson replied to Carley, I saw Mr. Livey some time ago prepare a check, I think I could make use of his name; the check was wrote, excepting the number of Sir John Perring 's house, Carley took down the directory and gave him the No. of the house and I believe he mentioned No. 72. I rather think Sampson put it down, as a direction for the porter where to go. All this passed in Carley's presence, and in mine. We never separated until they got into the Compter. I asked Carley whether he had taken the direction from the directory; Carley said, he had taken it down, he did not know for what purpose. Carley was endeavouring to clear

himself of any knowledge of it being a forgery; he said, if I had any knowledge of it being a forgery I should hardly have given the direction to the porter where to come.

Q. These two persons you found out afterwards were clerks in the same office - A. Yes, Sampson informed me so. Sampson hesitated in telling me Carley and he were brother clerks.

RICHARD LIVEY . I reside in Chancery-lane. I knew the lad Sampson ever since he was born.

JOHN SAMPSON . Q. Now mind, tell us the truth - A. I am upon liking with Mr. Drewitt, the attorney. I am seventeen. I had been in Mr. Drewitt's office six weeks before this happened. The prisoner was a clerk there some time before me.

Q. Look at that check; who wrote it - A. I did; I wrote it. The prisoner and me only were present when I wrote it. On Saturday morning, the 13th of August last, at the time that Mr. Drewitt, junior, was out of town, Carley had a list of debts that he had to collect of a client of Mr. Drewitt's; he said he wished to know how he could get some money, he wanted money very bad; I told him I wished I could inform him how; he then asked me if I knew any way; I said, no. He asked me a second time; he said a few pounds would make him happy; I then asked him what he would say if I would write him a check; he said, could I? I said, I did not know; I had seen a gentleman write one at my father's house about a week ago. He then seemed very much pleased, and reached me half a sheet of paper, and told me to do it. He asked who the gentleman was that I saw write the check; I told him Mr. Livey; he asked me whether he wrote on a blank sheet of paper or a printed one; I said, on a blank bit of paper. I then fore a piece of paper off, and began to write it. I wrote that check. He previously asked me whether I would not date it back; I said, what for? he said, it would look a little better to date it a few days back. Before I gave it him, I asked him whether I should write it for forty-three pounds; he said, yes, that would do. Before I gave it him, I asked him who should take it; I told him he must not take it himself; he said, no, he would not take it himself, he would send somebody with it; he said he would send a porter with it from Lincoln's inn; I said, very well. I held it in my hand, and he took it from me. When he took it, he asked me if I knew the number of the house; I told him I did not. He then took down the Directory, and looked in it; he found it was Messrs. Perring, Shaw, Barber, and Company, No. 72, Cornhill; he then remarked that I had left out a name in the firm, I had left out Mr. Barber's name; I told him that was of no consequence, Mr. Livey did not put it in; he asked whether I was sure I was right; I said, yes; he tore a piece of paper off, and wrote a direction for the ticket porter, and wrote the number of the house; he went out with a view to give it to a ticket porter; he came back, and said there was not any ticket porter on the stand. I had got to go to York-street, Covent Garden; as I was going along I thought I had done wrong; I asked him for the check again.

COURT. Did you write the check - A. Yes. He said, oh, no, it is of no consequence, I will go myself; I said, you must not, give it me; he said, no, I will send a porter with it. He afterwards sold me he had given it to a porter, but not the direction; he told him at was 72, Cornhill, and he was to meet the porter precisely at two o'clock in the inn. He then tore up the piece of paper that he had wrote the direction on; he said, if anything should happen he would having nothing in his possession; he said he could work no longer; he longed to have the money in his possession, and put his pen of oneside; he said he would go and meet the porter, and if I would be at the eating-house, Temple-bar, he would meet me there.

Q. How much were you to have - A. That was not said; he said he would stop five pounds directly he got it; he told me he told the porter to bring small notes; he was very urgent for the time to come. At two o'clock he went out to meet the porter; I was close after him; I was frightened; I knew I had done wrong; I kept watching him all the time. When the porter came, he held out his hand as if he had got the notes; the porter took hold of his arm; the officer came then. I followed them until they came to Took's-court.

Prisoner's Defence. The first word on this business was, Sampson said, Carley, do you know where I can get a porter; I said, yes, in the inn; I said, perhaps I can go. I was in the habit of seeing him have checks and notes; I thought he came honestly by it. Sampson appeared confused to the officer. I am quite innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-54

749. THOMAS EDWARDS and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , sixty-three pounds weight of butter, value 2 l. the property of Alexander Ainsley , privately in his shop .

ALEXANDER ANSLEY. I am a cheesemonger ; I live in the parish of St. George, Middlesex .

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you took them in custody - A. On the 11th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I saw one of the prisoners crossing the road; he had the cask of butter on his shoulder. I went up to him, and asked him what he had got there; he said he did not know; he then said he was going to take it to Mr. Clark's; I asked him who Mr. Clark was; he said he did not know. The watchman came and took the prisoner into custody.

Q. Which of the prisoners was that - A. Williams.

Q. Was any body with him - A. Not as I saw.

ELIZABETH RICHARDSON . I go out charring and nursing, or anything I can do. On the 11th of July, about half an hour after nine at night, I saw the prisoners under Mr. Ainsley's window; I saw they had a tub of butter; I saw Williams lift it into Edwards's arms; I hallooed out, who stole the firkin of butter. My brother was with me; he went into the shop and informed them.

Q. How soon after this did you see the prisoners - A. Two or three days afterwards I saw them at the office; I knew them again. I was not a yard off

them. It was a dark night. I saw them by the light of Mr. Ainsley's window.

JOHN LENNAM . I am a servant to Mr. Ainsley.

Q. Do you know anything of this firkin of butter - A. About ten minutes before this firkin of butter was taken I saw Edwards in the shop bargaining about some pieces of bacon; he did not buy any. When the alarm was given we looked about; and missed the firkin of butter. It stood behind the door.

ANN BARRETT. I am an unfortunate woman. On the 11th of July, I was in company with Edwards and Williams at the City of Carlisle in Rosemary-lane; we had a pot of stout there. It might be nine o'clock. Between nine and ten the robbery was done. Edwards asked Williams and me to go out to Ratcliffe-highway. Edwards went into this shop; he looked at two pieces of bacon. Edwards asked Williams to go into this shop to buy a relish for supper; I went in; he looked at many pieces of bacon; he had one piece weighed; he bought none. That is all I have to say.

FRANCIS JACKSON. I am an officer. When I took Edwards into custody he said he had the firkin of butter of a man, he was to give him a shilling for carrying it. The next morning he said he would tell me the man, if I would go after him. I went after Williams. I brought Williams to the office; he then declared Williams was the man that gave him the butter; Williams denied it. I produce the firkin.

Prosecutor. It is my firkin.

Edwards's Defence. When I came out of Mr. Ainsley's shop a tall man said to me. will you earn a shilling; I said, yes; he put the tub of butter on my shoulder. I told the patrol when he laid hold of me, a tall fellow gave me the butter.

Williams's Defence. I am an innocent man. I know nothing about the butter, so help me God Almighty.

EDWARDS, GUILTY, aged 52.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY, aged 57.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-55

750. WILLIAM MEADE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , one hat, value 10 s. the property of Harry Holman Criddle .

GEORGE ORGAR . I am shopman to Harry Holman Criddle ; he keeps a hatter's shop , No. 46, New Bond-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square .

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know his person - A. Yes, I knew him to be the same man, he came with some fringe for a gentlemen; he came to a young man at the back of the counter at work on the hat now in question. The young man went into the further end of the shop, at the back of the house, to make enquiry; he brought some fringe for a gentleman to have at the upper part of the house; he gave the fringe to a young man that was behind the counter; the young man not exactly knowing who it was for, he would go and make enquiries about it; accordingly he went to the back part of the shop with the frings, and left the prisoner at the counter.

Q. Where were you - A. I was in the shop, in a little enclosed place, at a distance from the prisoner.

Q. Was anybody with the prisoner then in the shop - A. Not anybody. Before the young man returned the prisoner concealed a hat under his coat. I did not see him put the hat under his coat. I observed the prisoner standing by the counter, and a person coming in to speak to him; that person went but immediately after he had whispered something to the prisoner; in about two minutes after that, the prisoner went out, before the young man returned.

Q. You did not observe him do anything yourself, did you - A. No, I was at work upon a hat. The prisoner was not in the shop more than five minutes. Upon his going out, I saw something at the back of his coat, which I suspected to be a hat. It was a close coat he had on; he went out with it in that manner. I immediately followed him, laid hold of him, and told him he must come back to the shop with me; he came back; I told him he had got a hat underneath his coat; he denied it; I said, I will take it from you, and on my turning round the hat fell from him. I secured him, and kept him until my master came. This is the hat that fell from him; I delivered it to Foy, the officer.

MR. LEVIE. I was going up Bond-street when the prisoner came out of the shop; he attracted my attention; I thought he was tipsey; the shopman followed him. I saw something sticking out. The shopman took the prisoner into the shop. I saw the hat sticking out. When the shopman brought him into the shop the hat fell from the prisoner. The prisoner then asked what we detained him for.

THOMAS FOY . I apprehended the prisoner. The hat was given to me by Orgar. This is it. I have had it ever since.

Orgar. It is my master's hat; it is worth more than ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated in liquor. I am ignorant of what happened.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-56

751. SARAH KEATING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a counterpane, value 1 l. two silver tea-spoons, value 10 s. a silver milk-pot, value 30 s. five silver table-spoons, value 2 l. a chair-cover, value 18 s. two pair of stockings value 8 s. seven sheets, value 3 l. 15 s. two shirts, value 1 l. six knives and forks, value 3 s. a set of bed furniture, value 7 l. the property of Charles Augustin Busby , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES AUGUSTIN BUSBY. I live in Berner-street ; I have a house there, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone .

Q. Was the prisoner in August your servant - A. She was.

Q. On the 25th of August did you perceive that you had any silver tea-spoons - A. Yes, I saw three. I afterwards, on the same day, missed some bed-furniture. I charged the prisoner with the theft. I

have since seen the furniture that I missed; it was produced by the pawnbrokers when I told them I had missed such articles. The prisoner delivered up a duplicate to the officer.

ROBERT MERCHANT. I am a servant to Mr. Buxter, pawnbroker, 15, North-street, Middlesex Hospital, near Berner-street.

Q. to Mr. Burby. The articles that you missed were in your house - A. Yes.

Q. to Merchant. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did she ever pledge any articles at your master's house - A. Yes. I have the articles here; Dyer brings some articles that were pledged with him. I bring bed furniture; counterpane, milk-pot, two tablespoons, three tea-spoons, two sheets, one tablecloth.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

EDWARD DYER . I know the prisoner; she has pledged things at my master's; two silver tea-spoons, two silver ladles, a pair of sheets, a single sheet, and two shirts.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband has left me three years; I have three small badys, I was in distress, and took these things in hopes to replace them. I was above fifty pounds in debt.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, and the prosecutor, on account of her distress and her family.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-57

752. JOHN MANNERS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Skinner , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 28th of July , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, a tea-caddy, value 6 s. four keys, value 18 d. two baskets, value 4 d. and a copper, value 30 s. affixed to his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SKINNER . In July last, I had a house in Somers-town ; that is in the parish of St. Pancras . I quitted the house on the 15th of July. I am an Excise officer . I was ordered to move by the Board of Excise; I took a lodging at Chelsea.

Q. Had you any intention of returning to this house - A. I could not tell whether I should return or not; I still owned the house; I held it on an agreement if business called me to that quarter, I should return again, by agreement; I am precluded from under-letting of it.

Q. You had removed the greatest part of your furniture - A. Yes, I had.

Q. Had you removed your bed - A. Some of them; I had left one mattress bed in the house, in case I might want to sleep there. I have been continually backwards and forwards to the house; if circumstances would permit, I was determined to come back again.

Q. You left your house about the 15th of July, did you - A. I did. I was in the house on the 27th, I left it between eight and nine o'clock at night, all safe. I paid for the copper, that was in the house as a fixture, so as to have a right to move it when I went elsewere. I left a mahogany tea-caddy, with brass feet, two small straw baskets, a leaden sink, in the front kitchen, and the keys were taken from the doors from the top to the bottom of the house; I had left the keys in the doors. I went to my house on the 30th, between eight and nine in the evening, it was nearly dark: at that time, I found all the doors were open both front and back.

Q. Is it a house by itself - A. No; it is a house in the street. I went in, and found the articles which will be now produced, missing. I lost some other trifling articles; even the keys were gone, and the brass finger plates were broken off the doors. On the day following there was nobody in the house, nor had I given leave for any body to be in the house. We went again on the 30th, and saw the house in this condition.

Q. When did you see your house again - A. On the 1st of August. I am almost sure there must be more than one that committed this depredation; by sundry articles they had left used in the house, and from the dirt they left.

JOHN COWLEY . I am a patrol. I was acting for the other patrol. When I stopped the prisoner at night, I was at Somers-town.

Q. What night was that - A. In the morning of the 28th of July, between five and six o'clock; I saw the prisoner coming with the copper on his head, and a bundle in his hand; he was alone; he did not come direct from Mr. Skinner's house, he came down another street. I went up to him, and asked him what he had got there; he said, I am moving. I said where from; he said, only up here, a little way. I asked him where he brought the copper from; he said, he was going to get it mended. I told him he must go to the watchhouse, and give a better account of himself. I took him, and the property to the watchhouse; I took hold of the bundle that he had in his hand. At the watchhouse I saw there was a mahogany tea-caddy in it, with four brass feet. The copper and the tea-caddy, Whitehair, the constable of the night, has them in his possession.

PETER WHITEHAIR . I am the constable of the night. On the 28th of July, between five and six in the morning, the acting patrol and the watchman brought the prisoner into the watchhouse, and a bundle in has hand. I asked him where he was going; he said, to the coppersmith, to get it mended. I asked him the name of the coppersmith; he said, he did not know; he should know when he got there. I searched his handkerchief; I found that tea-caddy in it. I asked him whether he was going to the coppersmith with that; he made no answer to that. I searched his pockets. In his inside coat pocket I found a bag, containing five skeleton keys and nine other keys; the fourteen keys and a screwdriver, have been in the custody of the officer of Hatton Garden office ever since, by order of the magistrate. The officer is here, his name is Limbric.

JOHN WINDELL . I was watchman on the night of the 27th, and I was on duty on the morning of the 28th. I met the prisoner with Cowley; we took him to the watchhouse; there he was searched. That is all I know.

JOHN LIMBRICK. I am an officer. Mr. Whitehair sent to me on the 28th, to come and look at the man. I went to the watchhouse, and saw him; I told him. I knew him. When he brought him to the office, I searched him. In his hat I found these two baskets. I got the keys of the house from Whitehair, the constable. I went to Skinner's house. This skeleton key opens the street door, and these other keys fits every lock in the house. These things have been in my custody ever since. I produce the copper.

Prosecutor. I can swear to it being my copper; there had been some acid in the copper, which eat the copper in a circle quite bright. I have not the least doubt it is my copper; the tea-caddy is mine, and the baskets; they were made by the French prisoners; these keys belong to the parlour, and the first floor doors.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I cannot deny that the property was found upon me; I am innocent of stealing them. I was met by two men, who asked me to carry the property as far as Holborn; I had not proceeded far, before I was taken into custody. I was to have three shillings for carrying them.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the copper worth - A. Thirty shillings: the tea-caddy six shillings.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-58

753. HANNAH TOWNSHIND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , in the dwelling-house of Charles Hutchins , two 1 l. notes , his property.

CHARLES HUTCHINS . I am a baker ; my dwelling-house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On Saturday, the 13th, I saw my four one-pound notes in my box; the box was in the room that I sleep in; I locked the box, I think, I am not certain. On Monday, I missed two of the one-pound notes. On Tuesday, I gave Piall, the constable, directions to apprehend the prisoner, and I went with Piall to the prisoner's lodgings.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PIALL . I am constable for the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On Tuesday, the 16th of August, I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's lodgings; she lodged in the house with the prosecutor; the house is divided into two apartments, one stair-case to them.

COURT. Q. to Hutchins. Who pays the rent and taxes - A. I pay my part, and Penny paysthe other part himself; it is divided into two different tenements; one outer door, and one stair-case to both of them. Penny lives in the house.

Piall. I took the prisoner into custody; I charged her with the offence; I neither threatened her or promised her any thing. I asked her how she could rob so poor a man as Mr. Hutchins, with a large family; she told me, she believed the devil was in her when she did it; she said, she opened the drawer with a key. I found a number of keys in her room. She pointed to this key; it opens the drawer of the box. She told me, she paid one of the notes to Mrs. Chapman, the other to Mrs. Goodage. I have known the prisoner some time; I never knew any thing against her until now.

Q. to Hutchins. Does the prisoner bear a good character - A. Yes; I never heard any thing against her.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-59

754. SARAH CRUSTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Francis Farrell , on the 27th of July , in the King's highway, and taking from his person and against his will, eleven 1 l. bank notes , his property.

FRANCIS FARRELL . I have been a soldier ; I am now a Chelsea pensioner .

Prisoner. Have not you received some money of me not to prosecute - A. I have not.

Q. Do you know M'Carty - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you receive four pounds of him - A. Never in my life. On Monday last, I received three pounds seventeen shillings, as part of the money that I lost. On the 27th of July, I received my usual pension.

Q. How much money was it altogether - A. Eight pounds. I was deprived of my money between seven and eight o'clock; I was in Phoenix-street, Bloomsbury, going into George-street, I was opposite the Turk's Head, sitting on a step counting my money in my hand, and my hand in my hat; I was sitting down; the prisoner came behind me, rushed herself upon me, and forced eleven one-pound notes out of my hand; she got the notes out of my hand before I was aware of it; when she had done this, she crossed over the street; I ran after her as soon as I had power to get on my feet. She went into a public-house, in at one door, and out of the other; I pursued her through both, I cried out as loud as I could that I was robbed by that person. She run down George-street; where I was jostled by several persons. I did not lose sight of her until she run into No. 4, George-street; when she got in there I was afraid of my life; a great multitude came about me, and I had been jostled in the street; I did not go into the house after her. A person said, if I would stop there he would get me a constable. The prisoner was taken that night. The next morning I saw her; I knew her person; I am sure it is the same person.

Prisoner. Did not you find five-pounds of your money - A. No.

WILLIAM O'BRIAN. I am a taylor.

Q. Do you know the persons of the prisoner and Farrell - A. Yes, I do. On the 27th of July, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was sitting in my room at work, I heard a noise in the street; I looked out of the window. I saw the prisoner run away from the prosecutor; she went into No. 4, George-street. Farrell told me the woman had robbed him of eleven pounds; I said to Farrell, you stand there; I will get a constable. I went for a constable, and brought two.

BENJAMIN WYATT . On the 27th of July, I was on duty. I was informed Farrell had been robbed by Sarah Cruston . I found the prisoner at No. 9, George-street; I took her to the watchhouse. She

had no notes upon her. I gave charge of her on suspicion of robbing a soldier.

HENRY MORGAN. I am a patrol. I assisted the other patrol in taking Sarah Cruston to the watch-house. The next morning, the prosecutor saw her; he said, he was sure she was the woman.

CHARLES M'CARTHY. I heard O'Brian say, he found five-pounds of the money.

Q. to O'Brian. Did you ever say, you had found five pounds of the money - A. I found five pounds in the prosecutor's hat after the money was taken away from him.

Q. to Prosecutor. I understood you, that you had lost all your money - A. No; I lost to the amount of eleven pounds altogether. I had received eight or nine pounds that morning; I had more money than that. I know that the prisoner took the sum of eleven pounds from me; she did not take the whole I was in possession of.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-60

755. CHARLES LOGAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Michael Brady , on the 14th of August , and taking from his person and against his will, a pocketbook, value 18 d. and two 1 l. bank notes , his property.

MICHAEL BRADY I am a surgeon ; I live at No. 2, Leadenhall-street. On Saturday, the 14th of August, I came out of a poulterer's shop, I had been purchasing of a fowl; I was in the parish of St. George's . I had my handkerchief in my hand, with a fowl in it; no sooner had I come out of the poulterer's shop, but the prisoner came up to me, and throwed his hand into my bosom, he took my pocket-book out.

Q. Was there any thing in that pocket-book - A. There were two one-pound bank notes, and my pension-ticket; he moved it from the bottom of my pocket to the top, to take it away; I seized the pocket-book in one hand, and him in the other. He had hold of the pocket-book in one of his hands when I seized him. I had got hold of him; he struck me; I cried out watch. Three men immediately rushed upon me, to endeavour to rescue him from my hold; this they could not do. I gave the prisoner into the hands of Francis Jackson .

FRANCIS JACKSON . I heard the cry of watch, this Saturday night; I came up to where the prosecutor and the prisoner was; the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner. He gave him into my charge; I took him into custody to the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday night that this happened, I had been to the Play with my sister, before the Play was quite over, I left her to go home, I was going to meet a young woman. Going through Wellclose-square, three or four men were wrestling one with another, this gentleman was among them; there was another gentleman looking on, as well as me; he turned round to me, and said, you are one of them; he laid hold of me, and I laid hold of him, the same as he did me; I said, do not tear my clothes. Mr. Jackson came up, and asked the charge; he said, two or three men had assaulted him, this was one of them that tried to get the bundle out of my hand; he never mentioned his pocketbook. A gentleman came into the watchhouse; Mr. Jackson asked him what he had to say; he said, he had seen the whole of it. Mr. Jackson said, I believe you are concerned with this party; no, said the man, I am not; he gave Mr. Jackson his address. Jackson gave me no address. As soon as I said he was no good, but a pick-pocket, he walked out. I am innocent of this affair.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-61

756. THOMAS RICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , forty pieces of printed calico, value 70 l. the property of James Mannel .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating them to be the property of other persons.

BENJAMIN GLOVER . I am a warehouseman in the house of Sir Robert Peele . I sold fifty pieces of printed callico to Mr. Casley, on account of John Mannel ; they were to be sent to Messrs. Fullers: I saw them sent; I think they were sent on the 19th of July. The value of them fifty pieces was from one hundred and fifty to one hundred and sixty pounds.

Q. Did you at any time afterwards, see these goods in the possession of Mr. Elsworth, a linen-draper, in Bishopsgate-street - A. Yes; I saw them there on the 28th of July.

JAMES HEATHER . Q. You are a partner in the house of Peele and Packer - A. I am the person that conducts the business. I saw the fifty pieces that were sent to Fuller's to be packed. It is the custom of our business to put tickets on each piece to be packed. We packed them in one bale; the mark of the bale was J. P. K.

Q. On what day did you send that bale to be shipped - A. On the 21st of July; I delivered it to Bedford, the porter.

- BEDFORD. Q. When you received this bale, what did you do with it - A. I put it in the cart, and gave the carman a note, directing him to Galley Quay. The cart was in the care of William Briscoe

WILLIAM BRISCOE . I am a carman. On the 21st of July, I received a bale of goods in a passage, opposite Sir Robert Peele 's house, at Fuller's house; I took it to Galley Quay. The bale was marked J. P. K. No. 20.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a partner in the house of Jacklin, Williams, and Company, lightermen.

Q. From whom did you receive these goods - A. Of Mr. Smith, of Galley Quay. Mr. Smith's porter is our porter. The bale was marked J. P. K. I received of Mr. Smith, belonging to the house of Sir Robert Peele , and Co. John Rolfe was the man that delivered it, he is a lighterman. The bale was shipped on the 21st of July, I took it delivered to John Rolfe .

JOHN ROLFE . I am a lighterman; employed by Jacklin and Company. I took a bale to deliver on

board the Hell brig. I took no notice of the day of the month. I delivered it on board the Hell brig.

JAMES MANNEL. I am master of the Hell brig.

Q. On Thursday, the 21st of July, did you receive any bale on board your ship - A. Yes, it was marked J. P. K. No. 20. I received it about four in the afternoon, it was put on the deck. I went on shore at five o'clock, and left my mate on board.

ARCHIBALD TAYLOR . I am the mate of the Hell brig. I remained on board the ship all night; I saw the bale about nine o'clock, and missed it about six the next morning.

JOHN M'KNIGHT. I am a wholesale linen-draper, 88, Watling-street; my partner's name is James Wilmot .

Q. On Friday, the 22nd of July, did the prisoner come to your warehouse - A. He did; he came with patterns of printed cotton for sale, he asked sixteen-pence per yard; I offered him fourteen-pence per yard. My partner afterwards purchased them at fifteen-pence per yard. The prisoner said, they must be sold for cash. I requested that he would bring the goods by three o'clock. He brought some himself about four o'clock, he came up stairs, and said he had delivered them. In about two hours, I went down; I found forty pieces there. I paid him seventy pounds for them.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A retail linen-draper.

THOMAS ELSWORTH . I am a retail linen-draper, Bishopsgate-street. On the 23rd and the 25th of July, I bought thirty-one pieces together of prints of M'Knight and Company, at twenty-one pence halfpenny per yard, credit. Mr. Glover came afterwards to my house, and saw the goods, and claimed them. The manufacturers mark was not on them, they were taken off; the salvages were perfect.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Thames Police officer. Upon this hale of goods being stolen, information was given at our office, and a reward offered; the information came there in the forenoon of the 22nd, we caused hand bills to be distributed immediately. On the 27th, I received instructions from Sir Robert Peele , to go to Mr. Elsworth's. At Elsworth's, I was referred to M'Knight, and at M'Knight's to the prisoner. I saw the prisoner at M'Knight's on the 30th; I asked him how he came by these forty pieces. I told him the extent of the robbery. I suspected these prints had been stolen. I told him that a bale had been stolen to the amount of fifty pieces. I asked the prisoner if he had any objection of giving up the person of whom he had purchased them; he declined telling me of whom he had purchased them. I informed him in the presence of M'Knight and Elsworth, that if he did not give up the name, I must take him before the magistrate; at last, he told me that he had them of a young man, a neighbour. He did not tell me his name. He said he was a customer. I took him to the office. Before the magistrate, he mentioned the name of Pratt, who lived near the prisoner's house. I had a search warrant, and searched Pratt's house. I could not find Pratt. I took thirty pieces away from Mr. Elsworth. These are them.

Q. to Mr. Glover I believe you first saw these in the warehouse of Mr. Elsworth, as the pieces you sold; are these your patterns - A. They are. I had sold them to a Mr. Casley; they are most of them new patterns. I sold them for two shillings and two-pence per yard, cash.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased the goods in question, of a man of the name of Pratt, residing in Brunswick-street, Blackfriars-road; I knew the man as a general customer at the shop. He came to me on the morning of the 22nd of June, he said, he had a friend in embarrassed circumstances; he applied to him to sell forty pieces of cotton, could I assist him in selling them; I replied, I could not tell; I would take the opportunity of going and looking at them. I said, they would not suit my trade. I was going into the City, if he would let me have patterns. I would endeavour to sell them. That is the whole of the transaction; I leave it to your minds, whether under such circumstances I am guilty of the fact I am charged. I purchased them for the sum of sixty-five pounds, and sold them again for seventy pounds; I sold them to M'Knight.

The prisoner called fifteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-62

757. JANE COLLINS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Alice Bolus on the 25th of June .

JAMES BOLUS . I am a waterman, and constable of the Thames Police office My wife, the deceased, was a woman very much given to liquor. On the 25th of June, she was in liquor. She would have cut me down with the shovel, if I had not prevented her. She was desperate in liquor. I never struck her, or pushed her. I took the shovel from her, she fell upon her head. She was very much intoxicated when I left her, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning. She said, upon her death bed that Mrs Collins had given her her death blow. She was then in immediate apprehension of her death, she always said so, from the time she was taken ill. She said, that Mrs. Collins had struck her under her heart, and had given her her death blow. She died about eleven days after, on the 5th of July, last year.

ESTHER MONTON . Mrs. Collins came into my mother's shop, and threatened Mrs. Bolus very much indeed; that was the morning the fight was. Mrs. Collins had not offended Mrs. Bolus. Mrs. Collins' boy came for a quarter of a pound of cheese. Mrs. Bolus came in the morning; we asked her whether she had it or no; Mrs. Bolus said, she had not sent for any. Mrs. Bolus went and fetched Mrs. Collins' boy to our shop; the boy would not say whether he had it or no; he would not come in doors. Then Mrs. Collins came, she swore she would have Mrs. Bolus' life before night. Mrs. Bolus accused the boy of getting the cheese without any order. Mrs. Collins was very angry about her accusing her son. I did not see them fight.

ELEANOR HAGAR . I saw the fight between the prisoner and the deceased. The beginning of this quarrel was, with respect to three three-shilling

pieces that were deposited in a drawer, they were to defray the expence of reparing a boat. This boy was in the habit of going for errands for Mrs. Bolds. She spent one of these three-shilling pieces in liquor; she accused the boy of taking another to get the cheese with; the quarrel began upon this, and lasted six hours in the street. The deceased flew over into Mrs. Collins' room, she began to beat the boy; the mother defended the boy; they catched each other by the hair of their head, they pulled off each others caps, and the window being open, Mrs. Collins and Mrs. Bolus both fell over the ledge of the window. I cried out murder. This was about three o'clock in the afternoon.

MR. TOULMAN. I am a surgeon. I was called in to attend Mrs. Bolus; she complained of a great pain across her chest. I attended her till her death; she constantly complained of pain across her chest. She died on the 5th of July. I opened her body; there was no inflamation, but a very large extraversation of blood upon the lungs; the head appeared to be much bruised. The extraversation of blood on the lungs was the cause of her death. I think her life was not worth one years purchase; her life was very precarious. I rather think it was the effect of violence. I saw no external appearance of a blow near the heart.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-63

758. SAMUEL LANE was indicted for feloniously assaulting, Mary, the wife of Thomas Fell , in the King's highway, on the 20th of July, and taking from her person and against her will, a shawl, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Fell .

MARY FELL . I am the wife of Thomas Fell ; he is a taylor , in Hackney-road. On the 20th of July last, I went to my club-feast, on returning from my club-feast, this happened between twelve and one o'clock. My club-feast was at the Horse and Leaping Bar, Whitechapel. I was returning home between twelve and one; the prisoner knocked me down.

Q. Was it a dark night - A. No, it was not very dark. He passed me twice, and when he came on my right hand side, he knocked me down, and left me bleeding upon the bare stones. I do not know what he knocked me down with; I did not see a stick in his hand.

Q. Did you receive any wound - A. Yes; on the right side of my head. After he knocked me down, he took my shawl off my neck, he ran away with it.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner - A. About half an hour afterwards; I saw him in the watchhouse.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing him - A. He passed me twice; I had a full view of his face. I am positive as to his person; he is the man that knocked me down.

Q. How came the prisoner to be taken - A. Jane Clark was with me; she hallooed out stop thief; I know he is the man that knocked me down, and took the shawl from me.

Q. Was the shawl ever found - A. Yes; the man is here that picked it up, and they have got my cap that he left me bleeding in.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you when you were robbed - A. In the middle of Brick-lane; I was on my right hand side. I saw your face at the time that you passed me.

JANE CLARK . I was in company with the last witness. I saw her knocked down; I called out stop thief; they pursued him near half an hour, and as soon as I saw him, I knew him; I said, that is the man that took the shawl off her neck; it was light enough to perceive the prisoner, it was a starlight night. I saw the prisoner afterwards in the watchhouse; I knew him again directly.

THOMAS - . I am a post-boy. In my way home to my wife, in Fashion-street, on this night, I saw two men pass me, I can only swear to one of them, that is the watchman; it was about half past twelve. I saw a man coming before the watchman. I picked up a shawl in my way back. I heard the watchman cry out stop thief; I went back to see if he wanted any assistance.

Q. Did you see the prisoner taken - A. Yes; I saw the watchman take the prisoner. When the prisoner was taken, he was running as fast as he could; he lost one of his shoes; we went back and found it. The prisoner was running first, and the watchman pursuing him. The prisoner is the man that the watchman took.

WILLIAM SLADER . I am a watchman of Christ Church, Middlesex. On this night, I heard the cry of stop thief; I took my station in the middle of the street. The prisoner was coming towards me, I saized him by the breast; he was running as hard as he could run; he tore away from me, and tore my finger-nail. I cried stop thief, pursued him, and took him again at last.

THOMAS HART. I was the officer of the night.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wound in my uncle, that I can hardly walk, much more run; I got this wound at Hampton, in Bendan, under the command of Admiral Vebere .

JOHN BISHOP . I am one of the turkeys in Newgate.

Q. You have had an opportunity of seeing the prisoner from the time of his commitment; how can he walk - A. A little lame.

Q. Could he run - A. He might run badly; I never saw him run.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the shawl - A. This is my shawl, that he snatched off my neck; I had it five months, it had never been in water.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-64

759. JAMES POWELL and JANE TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , a watch, value 40 s. the property of James Ward , in the dwelling-house of James Geeves .

JOHN WARD . I am a chairman. On the 19th of August, about ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner at the end of Shire-lane, by Drury-lane; I went home with her. She took me to a garret in Charles-street, Drury-lane, in St. Giles's parish, in Mr. Geeves's house. I went into this house, and

the girl together. We had a candle. I took my watch out, and wound it up, and put it in my hat, and my hat on the table. She pretended to go down stairs to get me a pipe of tobacco; she put the candle out before she went out; she shut the door after her, and made it fast; she fastened the door outside, so that I could not get out. I went to my hat, my watch was gone. I did not see James Powell in the room until after I missed the watch; he then came up in the room.

JAMES GREEVES . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane. I remember this transaction. I went up, and opened the door. I sent for a watchman, and assisted in taking the prisoners into custody. The two prisoners lodged together in that room. The watchman found the watch under the coals, in the cupboard.

MICHAEL CUTHBERT . I am the watchman. I found the watch under the coals, in the cupboard. The woman was not in the room. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. The watch is mine.

Taylor's Defence. I met the prosecutor at the end of Drury-lane; the prosecutor came home with me. I went out to get a pot of beer; when I came back, the prosecutor and the landlord were in my room; they asked me for the watch; I said, I had no watch. Powell came up with Geeves.

POWELL, NOT GUILTY .

TAYLOR, GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-65

760. HOLIDAY SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Peters , on the 14th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. a seal, value 2 s. and a watch-key, value 1 d. his property.

WILLIAM PETERS . On the 14th of August, about ten o'clock at night, I was coming along Winfield-street, Whitechapel , in my way home, I was walking on the curb-stone, a mob came round me, some before and some behind me; they jostled and pushed me; the prisoner came and drew my watch from my fob, and run across the street with it. I did not like to say any thing, because there was no watchman near; I was afraid they would murder me among them. I knew the prisoner two years before; he used to be gambling at a broad place, close to where I live.

Q. When he drew the watch out of your pocket, what did you do - A. I did nothing, for fear I should be murdered. He took the watch completely out of my pocket with one jerk; he run across the street, and I went home as soon as I could. I did not run after him, nor call out stop thief, because I knew him so well. I knew I should catch him some time or other. I told my wife the man that robbed me, if she should see him to get an officer, and have him taken up; she did. I have never found my watch again.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. On Wednesday morning, after the robbery, the prosecutor's wife came to me, and said, she knew where the lad was that robbed her husband; I went with her. She pointed out the prisoner to me; I took him into custody, near the spot where his father lived in Winfield-street. I told the prisoner what I took him for; he said, he knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a watchman, in Winfield-street. I was there on duty on the night of the 14th of August, I went on duty at ten o'clock; I saw nor heard of any mob or noise, or any thing of the sort. I never heard a syllable of it from ten o'clock till half after ten o'clock.

Q. Do you know the young lad at the bar - A. Yes; I have known him three years, he is a very hard working industrious lad; his father keeps a cart and horse; I call him up early in the morning to go to market. I also know the prosecutor. On the night of the 14th of August, I saw him come out of the Cross Keys at ten o'clock; I advised him to go home, and to go to bed; he was in liquor. He never mentioned that he had lost his watch to me; if he had, I could have found out the lad in two or three hours.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-66

761. ELIZA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , in the dwelling-house of James Smith, six 1 l. bank notes , the property of Archibald Gray .

ARCHIBALD GRAY . I am a printer . I lost my property in the room that I went to along with the girl; I met the prisoner at the foot of Long Acre, near twelve at night, on the 7th of July, I went with her to her lodging

Q. Who keeps the house - A. A man of the man of Smith, I understand keeps the house.

Q. When you came there what happened - A. We went to bed together. When I went to bed I had the property with me. I saw the notes when I gave her the money out of my pocket-book, two or three minutes before I went to bed.

Q. What property had you - A. Six one-pound notes, and some silver. I was quite sober; I had not been drinking any where. I had been upon business with a gentleman, and I was going home when I met this girl; I went to bed, and went to sleep. I awoke between one and two o'clock; when I awoke, the prisoner was gone. I found my pocket-book, but the notes had been taken out of it. I did not see the prisoner afterwards until the 11th of August and then I saw her in St. Andrew's watchhouse. None of my notes have never been found. I am certain she is the same person.

MICHAEL CUTHBERT. I am a watchman. The prosecutor informed me he had lost six one-pound notes; he shewed me the prisoner's room; I knew her person. On the 10th of August, I apprehended her in Drury-lane; I searched her; the money was gone then.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of the man; I was not in his company. I had left the lodgings before this man had lost his money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-67

762. EDWARD TALBOTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Benson , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 27th of August , and stealing therein, two shawls, value 12 s. a half handkerchief, value 2 s. a piece of flannel, value 6 d. five rows of beads, value 1 s. a turnbridgeware-box, value 6 d. a pair of shoes, value 6 s. an apron, value 6 d. and six pawnbrokers duplicates, value 6 d. the property of Ann Feathers .

ANN FEATHERS . Q. Who did you life with on the 27th of August - A. With Elizabeth Randell ; she, and I lived in John Benson 's house, in the first floor; his house is No. 6, Feather's-court, Gray's-inn-lane, in the parish of St. Andrew Holborn .

Q. Do you know whether the door was shut up that night - A. No. On the night of the 27th of August, me and Elizabeth Randell went out at half after nine at night; I locked my door when I went out. I returned about half after eleven, to take a shawl out of my box, and went out again. I did not return again until betwixt six and seven in the morning; when I returned in the morning, I found my door locked, I went into my room, and went to take out a towel; all my property, and Elizabeth Randell 's property was gone.

Q. What was that property - A. Shawls, half handkerchiefs, a towel, this turnbridgeware-box, and some petticoats, were gone. I saw the prisoner on the Friday, and on Saturday, the 26th. I did not see him after until he was in custody. He had been in our room the day before; he came and asked us how we did. We asked him about the shawl. This the shawl; he pledged it for four shillings. He denied knowing any thing of it.

Prisoner. It was the girl that was with her that I went to see.

Ann Feathers . Elizabeth Randell drowed herself on the Monday evening, after being robbed of all her things on the Sunday.

JOSIAH SHERGOLD . I am an officer. On Monday, the 28th, there was a disturbance in Kent-street; the prisoner was brought to me by two men, charged with robbing a young woman of this small handkerchief. I searched the prisoner. I found this turnbridge-ware-box on the prisoner. I searched his lodgings in Kent-street I found this piece of flannel, and this pawnbrokers duplicate. I went to the pawnbroker's; then I found out the prosecutrix. I shewed her the goods; she claimed them. The other unfortunate young woman drowed herself on Monday; through distress of losing her things.

JOHN JONES . I am foreman to Mr. Willis, pawnbroker, No. 9, in the Borough. The prisoner pledged this shawl with me.

SARAH ROSS . I live at 150, Kent-street, in the Borough. The prisoner came in on Sunday morning, with a bundle; he went up stairs, and opened it at the foot of the bed; a pair of jean shoes dropped out of the bundle, I picked them up, and delivered them to him.

Prosecutrix. That shawl, and the turnbridgeware-box is mine, and the other shawl is mine, the red shawl, pledged with Jones. This is the shawl that I accused him of taking on Sunday.

Prisoner's Defence. A day after I arrived in London from Liverpool, I was going through Gray's-inn-lane I was disappointed in business that I came after. I met this girl, she was standing in an entry in her shift; she asked me to give her something to drink; I said, I did not care if I did. I not being accustomed to drink in the morning, it took effect of me. She prevailed upon me to go up into her room. After being in her room, she told me all her clothes were in pawn. I very imprudently, knowing my own circumstance, released her gown and shawl, which cost me fifteen shillings; after that, she got me to send out for more drink. She then took me to a milliner's shop, where I purchased a bonnet for her, at sixteen shillings. We went into a confectioners, where I bought more articles. Then after that, she told me that the other young woman had some things out; she got one pound seventeen shillings of me, and during the time I was with her, I was nine pounds the worse for being in her company. She took me to the Bull and Gate inn, Holborn, she there demanded a one-pound note before she would go to bed with me. The other young woman seemed to have something very heavy on her mind; she said, as soon as she could, she would charge her lodging. I gave her five shillings, and a one-pound note. I went up to these girls room, a black-smith was in the closet, which she called out into the room. Elizabeth Randell came home. I said, I had distressed myself with what I had done for them; I said I had not even a shilling to get my dinner. She said, here is a shawl, pledge it for what you can get on it, do not tell Ann Feathers I gave it you. I went and pledged it. I have distressed myself with relieving that girl, and her comrade. I am a stranger here; I was only one day in London when I met with this prostitute.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-68

763. JOHN ANGLING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Weston , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 9th of August , and stealing therein, a curtain, value 3 s. a shift, value 4 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a hammer, value 6 d. a cap, value 6 d. a coat, value 2 s. and one pound weight of horse-hair, value 6 d. his property

THOMAS WESTON . I am a house-keeper ; I live in Shire-lane, in the Liberty of the Rolls . I sell coals . My house was broken open on the 9th of August, after I went to bed. Me and my wife went up stairs to bed together; the doors and the windows were all secured. I cannot say whether any one of the lodgers had gone out, and left the street door open, or no. We went to bed at half after ten o'clock, on the 8th of August; we got up on the 9th, at seven o'clock in the morning, it was day light then; I missed my coat and shirt, they hung up in back parlour. I heard no noise in the night. It was the celler partition that he broke open, and crept out of the shop through a trap door. All the

things in the indictment, and much more were missing.

WILLIAM READ, JUNIOR. I produce the things; they were delivered to me in the office, by the constable and the prosecutor.

Prosecutor, I found the things in the bag in the morning of the 9th of August, they had not been taken out of the house; only put in the bag. He had on a shirt, a shift, and my stockings on his feet. I was present when he was found; he was found in the outer shop; he pretended to be asleep, he was laying on the bag that he had packed the things up in. I can swear to all the things produced are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with a young woman at the Trumpet public-house; I said it was late, I could not get in; she said, she would find me a bed. She went to this house, and asked for a bed; the door was wide open. I crawled down into the kitchen; I there found some flocks, I laid down. This woman came down, she took my shirt, my clothes, and all my money in my pocket. I never heard a soul come in; it must be her that robbed me. As to a hammer, Mr. Weston did not find on me. They dragged me out of the kitchen; I had not a thing to cover me. I put a shift on instead of a shirt. I being blind, did not know what I laid hold of. I have been blind six years.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-69

764. WILLIAM BAXTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isaac Snowsill , Mary Old , widow, being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 31st of July , and stealing therein, six half-guineas, one seven-shilling piece, sixteen pounds in monies numbered, a tea-spoon, value 2 s. a pair of money scales and weights, value 2 s. 6 d. a promissory note for the payment of 10 l. 2 s. 6 d. the property of Isaac Snowsill ; and one bill of exchange for the payment of 7 l. 19 s. 3 d. the property of Thomas Snowsill .

ISAAC SNOWSILL . I live in Gray's-inn-lane, No. 120, in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn , above the bars.

Q. On Sunday, the 31st of July, did you go to Church in the afternoon - A. On Sunday, the 31st of July, about three o'clock, my wife, daughter, and servant, went out of my house first; I went out about ten minutes after three o'clock; I left the door locked, as we usually do; the door of my apartment I locked myself; I took the key of the street door in my pocket, and pulled the street door upon the spring-lock; I left the door fastened upon the spring-lock. I went to Church, and staid until divine service was over. I was the last person that came out of the house; I left a widow woman in the garret, her name is Mary Old ; I left her in the house that day. When I returned, I found the street door open, and the one pair of stairs door open; I missed some of the property. My wife can speak to more than I can. I found the drawer that the property had been in, was wrenched open; the things taken out of it are mentioned in the indictment, money and notes; my wife can speak to the money better than me. One note for ten pound two shillings and sixpence, given by one Mr. Shury, I can speak to; he is an attorney at law. I have a perfect knowledge of that note; that note was stolen out of the drawer that stands in the one pair of stairs room, just by the door.

Mr. Reynolds. What business are you - A. I am a patten-maker.

Q. Is the house your own - A. No; I rent it; the house is entirely in my own occupation. I came home about five o'clock; my wife and daughter came home together, they were sent for; they did not know any thing about it. I am sure I fastened the door after me.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I am a City officer. On Sunday, the 31st of July, about half past nine in the morning, I saw a man of the name of Joe Golding, at a house in Brook's market: while we were there, the prisoner came to the public-house door, he accosted Joe Golding ; I was coming out. I had been with Golding; that gave me information. The prisoner met Joe Golding ; the prisoner got into conversation with Joe Golding ; he said to Joe Golding we'll have a drop of gin. Joe Golding spoke to me, and we went into the house again; we went to the bar, we had a quartern of gin, and made three outs of it. The prisoner took out a key from his breeches pocket, he held the key up in his right hand; it was a skeleton key. From the description that I had of the prisoner, and his holding the key up, I concluded that he was the man that was going to commit the robbery. The prisoner and Joe Golding went to the door while I paid for the gin; when I came to the door, the prisoner and Joe Golding were talking together. The prisoner said with an oath, it would not do to stand there, the traps were after him, meaning the officers were after him. I asked him what for; the prisoner nudged Joe Golding on his elbow, and asked if all was right, meaning like himself; Joe Golding said, yes, to be sure, yes. they walked down a bye street, they did not like to go in the public streets, because the traps were after him. I followed, and asked what it was for; he said, have you not heard of the burglary over at Lambeth; he told me in what manner he did it. He said, I am the man, do not you know me; he said, there was a forty pounds reward for him. That still induced me to keep in his company, to find out what he had done. He then told me of one in the Lambeth-road, were he and Rowe had been concerned together. He told me what he was going to do that morning; he said, he was going to do a good one in Gray's-inn-lane, where he was sure of two hundred pounds in notes; he said, it would be too late to do it then; it was to have been done in the morning, when the people were at Church. He persuaded Joe Golding to go home, because he said, he was drunk; Joe Golding was not drunk, he was half drunk. He persuaded Joe Golding to go home, and to meet him at half past one. I was to meet him also. They kept on, and I followed them at a distance; they agreed to meet in Gray's-inn-lane at half past one. I followed them at a distance, to perceive where they were going to; I followed him down to a court in Gray's-inn-lane; I kept watch at that court, that

they should not break into the house when I was absent; I never lost sight of that court. At half past one, or rather better, the prisoner came and touched me on the shoulder; he said, Joe Golding was a bed, and drunk. He said, his hand itched for it; he would do it himself, for there was a good two hundred in in the house. He said, he had left his wife on Saturday morning, with the intention of getting some money for a bill, that he had been out all night, and money he must have. After talking together some time in Gray's-inn-lane, he asked me if I had got any halfpence in my pocket; I told him I would feel, I put my hand in my pocket, I pulled out a shilling, I gave it him, in silver. He said, he was going to get a pint of beer; accordingly, he went to the Guy Earl of Warwick, and had a pint of beer. While he was in the public-house, I met two City officers, I told them the transaction that was going to be done; one of them went into the George public-house, facing of Gray's-inn-lane. where he could have a view of the house, and see who went in, and who came out; that officer's name is Bray. While I was looking about, the prisoner came out, and said with an oath, the old woman is out, and her daughter, but there is the old man in He went into the public-house again for a quarter of an hour. He came out again, a second, time from the public-house, there, said he, now, the old man is out. He then said, his hand itched, he must have it; here goes! he went up to the door. I stood underneath the George window. He went up to the prosecutor's door; he opened it with a key in his hand; I was at a distance. I immediately went to the prosecutor's door, and as I got to the door to see how the door was, he came out: he said to me, my things will not fit, meaning his keys, but he said, he must have it. He immediately went back again to the house a second time, and went into the house; he stopped in some time, and then I crossed over the way. I saw the curtain of the one pair of stairs let down in the prosecutor's house; I stopped about ten minutes at the door. He came down; I observed his pockets were bulkey; I immediately then took him into custody at the door, and gave Bray the signal to come to me. I took the prisoner then to the public-house; Bray came. When I got the prisoner in the public-house; I searched the prisoner. In this breeches pocket, I found sixteen pounds in silver, three pocket-books, a little tin case, with six half-guineas, a seven-shilling piece, a pair of money scales and weights; and one silver spoon broken; in the pocket-books there were several bills; the bills are now in the pocket-books the same as then. I searched the prisoner in the presence of Bray.

Q. Did he tell you how he came to know how there was property in the house - A. He did; by his brother formerly keeping company with the prosecutor's daughter, and the family being well acquainted with each other.

Mr. Reynolds. How long have you been an officer - A. Five years.

Q. Johnson, tell me honestly; did not you tell him first, you could tell him of a good place to go to - A. No.

Q. Did not you tell him, you would put him in a way where he might get something worth while, and did not you give him one of the pick-lock keys - A. Certainly not. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. You saw the watchhouse-keeper after you took him there - A. Certainly.

Q. Had not you a conversation there - A. No. In the confused state we were in at the watchhouse, we were in a hurry to get back to the prosecutor's house; we were not certain there was any person to take care of it.

Q. When the prisoner came out of the house, did not you say something of this sort, d - n your eyes, go in again, do not spoil a good job, there is nobody coming - A. No; that is false.

Q. Could not you have persuaded him not to do it - A. No; if his inclination led him to do it, let him do it, and bring him to justice, or else he would commit other depredations.

JAMES BRAY. I am a City officer. On the 31st of July, I met Johnson a little before two o'clock in the afternoon. In consequence of what he said to me, I concealed myself in a public-house, facing Gray's-inn-lane, in Holborn. I saw the prisoner come across, and go to the door of the prosecutor, Mr. Snowsill; he was at the door about four or five minutes; he then came out of the door, and crossed the way. He then came to the door again, and went in at the door again, he was in some time.

Q. How long do you think he was within - A. Nearly a quarter of an hour; he came out, and went across the way; then Johnson gave the signal; I ran over to the house where he took him in. I saw him searched, and I saw Johnson find that property on him. Johnson said, where is there a watchhouse near; I said, in Eagle-street; we will take him there, and left him in the custody of the watchhouse-keeper. The prisoner asked Johnson for some silver which he said was his own; the watchhouse-keeper was present. Johnson said, he should have none; if the watchhouse-keeper would let him have a little bread and cheese, or beer, he would pay him on the next day for it. We hurried back again to the prosecutor's house, not knowing there was any body in the house to take care of it. We found an old lady in it; shewas up in the garret. We knocked a good many times before we could gain admittance; we acquainted the old woman with what had been done, and waited until the old gentleman came from church, and acquainted him of the circumstance.

Q. to Johnson. Did the old woman ever go out while you were watching the house - A. No, not at all while I was in the street.

MRS. SNOWSILL. My husband always trusts me with all his valuables; he never keeps any; he always gives them to me as soon as he gets them.

Q. Had you on the 31st of July, money and bills of exchange in your care - A. Yes. These pocketbooks are not finished, I can swear to all the three pocket-books, and I can swear to the silver-spoon, I broke it myself, I know this half-a-crown to be mine, it was in this bag with the other silver, I made the bag myself; I had six half-guineas, and one seven-shilling piece; they were in a little dirty tin-box; I know the tin box, it is an old acquaintance.

THOMAS SNOWSILL . I am the son of the prosecutor. The bill of exchange for seven pounds nine shillings and three-pence, I gave to my mother to take care of it for me. This is the bill; it is my bill. It is drawn by Mrs. Lions; Mrs. Poole signed it. This is my hand-writing upon it, Thomas Snowsill : I wrote that upon it before it was stolen.

RICHARD HATTON . I am the watchhouse-keeper of St. Andrew's, Holborn. I was up stairs at the watchhouse when the prisoner was first brought to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you hear Johnson say any thing about any concern in the business - A. When he gave me charge of this business, I asked him if he knew the prisoner; he told me he did. He knew it was going to be done at ten o'clock in the morning; he saw him going into the house, he told me. I asked him how he knew it was going to be done; he told me he was introduced by one of the party, a crack; he saw him go into the house, he was in some time, and came out again; he did not see any thing about him; he went up to him, and said you d - n fool, go in again, do not spoil a good job, there is nobody coming, go in again; he went in again, and came out again, and then he saw he had got something about him; then he secured him.

Q. So that he had been in once - A. Yes. He went in the first time, he came out again; he had nothing about him; he then told him, you d - n fool, go in again, there is nobody coming, it is all right; he came out the second time, he saw he had something about him; he then secured him.

Q. So that his going in the second time, was by the advice of this worthy officer here of Justice - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. You are the watchhouse-keeper of St. Andrew's, and St. George, the Martyr - A. Yes, I have been in the service of that parish twenty-two years.

Q. Who was present when this conversation was - A. Another officer of justice.

Q. His name is Bray, is it dot - A. I do not know his name.

Q. Are you upon your oath - A. Certainly. I took it down at the moment; I have some part of it here; I do not know whether you can make it our. (Witness shewing a paper) I wrote it the moment they were gone. I did not like to take the charge until I knew the particulars.

Q. Are you in the habit of making memorandums when you take a charge - A. I generally do make a memorandum when there is any thing particular; I made it upon a piece of paper. They are all total strangers to me.

Q. Did you mention it to the magistrate - A. No, I did not; I had no business. They told me there was a ten-pound reward in our parish; I told them there had been, there was not then.

Q. You thought it was an extraordinary thing of an officer - A. I did. It is all truth. I have no interest either one way or the other.

COURT. Johnson, stand up; you have heard this; did you make use of any such expression - A. No. There was not time to mention all that; I was not in the place three minutes. The man is a villain to say what he has; he is a villain for so saying.

Q. Johnson, I understand you to say, you did not hold that language - A. I did not. There was not time then to say it; I was not there above five minutes.

Q. Was there time to say any part of it - A. The only thing I mentioned to the watchhouse-keeper was, when he asked for the money, I said, he should have none; if he wanted a little bread and cheese, or beer, to let him have it, and I would pay for it the next day.

Q. to Bray. Were you present during the whole time Johnson delivered the prisoner to the watch-house-keeper - A Yes.

Q. Did he tell this man, after he saw the prisoner come out once he went up to him, and said, you d - n fool, go in again - A. He never said any thing of the kind.

Prisoner's Defence. Johnson has false sworn himself. Do you remember putting your hand into your waistcoat pocket, and pulling out a handful of bad shillings.

Johnson. I had but two shillings in my pocket; they were not bad. You passed one of them, or else took another out of your pocket. It is false to say, I took out a handful of bad shillings. I had no other money in my pocket but the two shillings.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-70

765. JAMES COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , two coats, value 2 l. a waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of William Bligh , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES NEWBURY . Q. On the 27th of July, were you a servant to Colonel William Bligh - A. Yes; he lives at No. 66, Montague-square .

Q. In consequence of what you heard from the cook, did you ran up the area - A. Yes; I got into the square, turned the corner of George-street; there I saw a man with some clothes on his arm.

Q. What coloured clothes were they - A. Blue turned up with red, the Colonel's livery.

Q. Did you at the time you first saw him, call out stop thief, and he was stopped - A. He was stopped on account of my calling out stop thief I never lost sight of him from the time I first saw him until he was stopped.

Q What did he do with the clothes - A He dropped the clothes in the pursuit before he was stopped.

Q. Who look them up - A A man in the street, I do not know who he was; the beadle received them of him, one of the witnesses; when I came up I saw they were my master's livery; they belonged to the groom.

Q. They were the Colonel's clothes, and worn by the groom - A. Yes; a great coat, another coat, waistcoat, and breeches; a plain blue great coat, a livery coat, with red collar and breast, a kerseymere red waistcoat, and a plain pair of corderoy breeches.

Q. What was the value of these things - A. About fifty shillings.

ELIZABETH BONNEY . I am a cook to Colonel Bligh .

Q. On this 27th of July, were you in the back kitchen - A. I was; I could from thence see the house-keepers room. I saw a man come out of the house-keeper's room, he had clothes under his arm, they were blue clothes; I cannot say whether they were my master's livery, or no; I called to Newbury. The man went up Montague-square, and turned into George-street; he had the clothes with him; when he went into George-street, he run towards Gloucester-place.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you think that is the man - A. I did not see his face; I could not see any thing, but the light jacket that he had on. I only know the man by a jacket he has on now.

JAMES BUTT . Q. About twelve o'clock on the 27th of July, were you in Gloucester-place - A. I was.

Q. Did you hear the cry of stop thief - A. I heard an alarm, but not distinctly; I being at a distance, could not say whether he was in George-street, or Gloucester-place; he was near both; I did not see any thing with him; he was running; he ran to the corner of King-street, where I stopped him; then he had nothing about him. Newbury came up soon after.

DANIEL COLLINS . Q. On this 27th of July, were you in Gloucester-place - A. Yes; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running; I saw the clothes under his arm, which he dropped in the middle of the street.

Q. Were there people running after him - A. Yes; there was a number of people after him. I ran after him, and assisted in securing the prisoner.

Q. Do you know who the clothes were given to - A. No; I did not mind the clothes, only securing him.

JOHN BLANCHARD . I am the beadle. Newbury gave me the clothes; a kerseymere red waistcoat, a blue great coat, with red collars and facings, and a pair of corderoy breeches.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out after a situation; I saw a mob, and heard the cry of stop thief. That gentleman was as likely to have the things as me. I run to the mob as the others might.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-71

766. THOMAS DOVER and JOHN CONNER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , three gowns, value 2 l. two petticoats, value 5 s. one mantle, value 1 l. one pair of stockings, value 6 d. and a box, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Humston , widow , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Proctor .

ELIZABETH HUMSTON . I am a widow ; I lodged in the house of Thomas Proctor ; I went out to keep a house for a gentleman in the New-road.

Q. Do you know Dover - A Yes; I told him to go and fetch my box at Mr. Proctor's, No. 7, Barrett's-court, Wigmore-street. He never returned with the box; he was apprehended on the Monday following.

Q. Is any of that property that was in the box now in court - A. It is.

ELIZABETH MAYSTONE . Dover came to me on the Sunday morning for Mrs. Humston's box; I delivered the box to him.

JAMES NEIGHBOUR . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gown, and a petticoat, pawned with me, by a boy, on the 5th of September.

Prosecutrix. They are my property; they were in the box.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a pawnbroker, No 5, Tottenham-court road. I produce a gown, pawned with me on the 5th of September, by a boy.

WILLIAM CHESTERMAN . I am an officer. On the 7th of September, I apprehended Dover. I searched him, and found four duplicates on him A man of the name of Winfield gave up this gown at the office. Conner went with me, and shewed me where the things were pawned.

JOHN CANTON . I am shoeman to Mr. Lowther, pawnbroker. I produce a mantle, pledged at our shop, by John Conner .

Prosecutrix. These are all my things.

Dover's Defence. I was engaged to fetch the box from Barrett's-court.

Conner's Defence. I went with Dover for the box, and pawned the things

DOVER, GUILTY, aged 14,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

CONNER. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-72

767. WILLIAM MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , a watch, value 4 l. the property of George Shaw , in the dwelling-house of George Kidder .

GEORGE SHAW . In the month of August, I lodged in George Kidder 's house. The prisoner lodged in the same house. On the 15th of August, I missed my watch in the morning. I told the prisoner I had suspicion he had got my watch; he denied any knowledge of the watch. The officer came and took the prisoner into custody.

JOHN TANNER . I am shopman to Mr. Manger, pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned the watch with me on the 16th of August; I am sure of it. This is the watch.

THOMAS FRIEND . On the 22nd of August, I apprehended the prisoner on suspicion of stealing this watch. He told me, I neather threatened or promissed him any thing. He told me he had stolen this watch, and pawned it for a pound, and he would shew me where he pawned it; he not exactly know the name of the street. I went to Mr. Manger's, the pawnbroker, with him; he produced the watch. The prosecutor identified it.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, my name is on the inside case. I had seen it about three or four days before I missed it; it was in my box; the box was unlocked.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-73

768. WILLIAM PULLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a tin-box, value 1 d. a knife, value 6 d. and two 1 l. bank notes, the property of Michael Green , from his person .

MICHAEL GREEN . I am a sailor . I lost my tin-box on the 28th of July, I missed it about four o'clock in the morning, on London-bridge ; I was asleep there. I lost my tin-box, and two one-pound bank notes, my knife, and my protection.

JOHN SMITH . On Thursday, the 28th of July, I took the prisoner into custody. I searched him, and found this knife upon him; the prisoner said, it was his.

Prosecutor. It is my knife, one of the blades is very bad, it will bend any way; that is how I know it to be mine. The prisoner gave me the tin-box back again. This is the tin-box; it belongs to me; I have had it five years. He gave it me before he was taken into custody. A young man that he shewed the notes to, said it was mine. I asked the prisoner if he had any money left; he said, he had three shillings. He told me he picked it up on London-bridge, where I was asleep; he throwed my protection over London-bridge, he kept the notes, and went and bought clothes with it; he told me that before he was taken up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along to work at four o'clock in the morning to a coal-wharf; at the right hand side of London-bridge, there was one or two notes in a box, and a bit of parchment; I did not know what use the parchment was, I throwed it over the bridge; the notes I looked at. There was no cover to the box.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-74

768. MARY ANN ELIZA READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , fourteen yards of cambric, value 6 l. the property of John Stiles , privately in his shop .

JAMES BAILEY . I am shopman to Mr. Stiles, linen-draper , Bishopsgate-street, without . On the 12th of September, about half past eight in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and requested to look at some French cambric; I shewed her some. She bought three nails at fourteen shillings a yard; I took two shillings and seven-pence halfpenny of her for it. From her manner, I suspected her; I let her go out of the shop, and then I perceived the parcel of cambric was diminished. I pursued her, took hold of her arm, and told her, I believed she had got something that was not her own, and as I was bringing her back into the shop again, I perceived a piece drop from her clothes. The officer being on the spot, I gave her in charge. He searched her, and found nothing else. About two minutes afterwards, a man came in the shop, and brought two quanties more of French cambric; they appeared to be Mr. Stiles's property. There was no other customer in the shop at the time the prisoner was there.

STEPHEN BOYCE . I am a weaver. I was coming past the shop just at the time that the prisoner was taken into the shop; afterwards I saw two persons pick up something, they were going to walk off with it; I called to them to give it to me; they did, and I took the two pieces of cambric into Mr. Stiles's shop.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. On the 12th of September, between eight and nine o'clock, I was coming by Mr. Stiles's shop, I saw the prosecutor have the prisoner in his hand; he said, here Sapwell, take her. I instantly began to search her, and close to her right foot, I saw this piece of cambric muslin; I cannot say I saw her drop it; it is five yards, and these two other pieces, I received of the prosecutor. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-75

769. ABRAHAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Bannister , from his person .

SAMUEL BANNISTER . I am a baker , 27, Middle-row, Holborn. On the 17th of August, I was standing in Mr. Holt's auction-room, Cheapside , about one o'clock in the day, I perceived the prisoner was looking at me, as I thought, with a bad intention; about five minutes afterwards, I was standing in another part of the auction-room, I felt my handkerchief go out of my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner go from me, I took him by the collar; he was trying to secrete the handkerchief behind his back, under his coat, and after some little struggle, he gave it up, and said, he hoped I would forgive him; I told him if such an old man as him set such examples, I should take him to the Mansion House; there would be no end of such things without making an example of him.

- FOGG. I am an officer. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief; it has my initials.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the handkerchief up from under my feet; I did not know it was his handkerchief. I am between sixty and seventy years of age, and never was in trouble before.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-76

770. ROBERT RUSKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , two 10 l. bank notes, one 5 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank notes , the property of John Duncan .

JOHN DUNCAN . I am a seaman .

Q. When did you lose your notes - A. On the 30th of August, at Charing Cross, in the afternoon; I went up in a boat to Woolwich, and arrived at Charing Cross, in the coach; this man pretended to be my friend; he took me away from the coach to get some dinner, he was waiting there, and when I had my dinner, he asked me if I had any money; if I had, I had better leave it with him, it would be safe. I put two ten-pound notes, a five-pound note, and a one-pound note, on the table, bank notes; a

woman took it off the table, and put it in her pocket. The woman was waiting in the house. He called her his wife. The prisoner went out of the house; he left me in the house. Then I went out, I could not find my way back.

Q. Where you groggy - A. No; not while I was in the house. When the prisoner was taken, he offered me a pound note to let him go. I am sure he is the man. There was no other man with me, but the prisoner.

JOHN PETTON . I was taking the luggage out of Greenwhich coach. The prisoner came up, and asked the sailor to come out of the coach, to have dinner; he took the sailor away. I cannot tell what house he went into; I could not leave the coach.

JOHN MAYHEW . I am an officer. The sailor came to the office, and said he had been robbed by a tall man, in a fustian jacket. I took the prisoner at the Ship public-house. As soon as the sailor saw him, he said, he was the man. The prisoner said, is that what I am taken for; I never saw the man before in my life. The money has never been found. The coachman that brought the sailor up from Woolwich, said he could swear the prisoner is the man that look him away from the coach, but he could not attend here, he must drive the coach. The sailor could not point out the house to me where the prisoner took him in, nor have I been able to find it.

NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-77

771. ELIZABETH WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , five pair of stocking, value 10 s. the property of Even Davis .

MARY DAVIS . My husband's name is Even Davis. On the 22nd of June, I went out in my yard to draw some water, my back window was up; I saw the prisoner going out of my shop; I went into my shop, and missed five pair of stockings. I pursued the prisoner, and saw her under a gateway, in Commercial-street; I took hold of her, and said you thief, you have taken my stockings. My stocking then were in her apron. These are the stockings; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-78

772. MARY SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , a silver gravy-spoon, value 3 l. six silver desert-spoons, value 3 l. 12 s. 6 d. six silver table-spoons, value 4 l. the property of Matthew Burchall , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. Knapp, councel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence; the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-79

773. JOHN PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of August , a table, value 2 s. a chair, value 10 s. four other chairs, value 2 l. a billiard-table cover, value 1 s. two cushions, value 2 l. and two rollers, value 1 s. the property of John Henry Powell Schneider , esq.

JOHN HENRY POWELL SCHNEIDER . I live at Sothgate, in the parish of Edmonton, in the county of Middlesex . I can only speak to the property when it is produced.

JOHN HENRY SCHNEIDER. I am the son of the last witness. I saw the billiard-room on the 10th of August, between ten and eleven, before I went to bed, it was shut up, and secured, as it always had been; the windows had no fastenings to it. On the morning of the 3rd, I found one of the windows broken, and the things gone. I shall know the articles when they are produced.

JOHN BURRELL . I am butler to Mr. Schneider. I saw the billiard room on the night of the 2nd of August. On the morning of the 3rd I saw the billiard-room again; it appeared to have been entered, and the property gone. The prisoner came to me on the 8th of august, he asked if Mr Schnieder was at home. I told him no. He then said, that he wanted to see him, as he had found the chairs that were lost. I asked him where; he said, in the wood. He told me he was going home betwixt nine and ten o'clock on sunday night, that was the 7th, he saw a man before him in the wood, he walked on; something catched his toe, and throwed him down; as he fell, he saw a man in the wood, he fired a pistol at him. The prisoner got up, and said he had two more and he should have the contents of them; he went up a little farther he saw something under a tree, he went to see what it was, he saw, this chair; he took it home he asked me what he had better do; I told him to consult Mr. Walker, his master. The prisoner is Mr. Walker's bailiff, I believe he lived in Mr. Walker's lodge. He went away from me between twelve and one; he brought the chair in a cart; it is a sort of a merlin chair; I did not observe there was any injury done to the chair. I am confident it is the billiard chair, that I had seen in Mr. Schnieder's billiard, room.

EDWARD BALDWIN . I lodged with the prisoner, in Mr. Walker's lodge, the lodge is near the road, about three hundred yards from Mr. Schneider's ground. The prisoner was Mr. Walker's bailiff, he had the care of the barn, and the yard. I did not hear of the robbery.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming home any time of a night - A. on the 7th of august, sunday night, between nine and ten o'clock, he came home with this chair; he said he found the chair in the road, as he came along he saw a man stand on the road, on the left hand side; he went up to the man; the man told him to keep off; he said to the man to fire away, he had got two loaded pistols; he stumbled against the stump of a tree; the contents of the pistol went over his head; he supposed it was providential. he went up the wood, he found the chair, he brought it home on his back.

COURT. There is nothing to bring it home to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex, jury before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18140914-80

774. HENRY WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of August , two watches, value 2 l. 15 s. and a seal, value 10 s. the property of Susannah Whitting , widow , in the dwelling-house of James Braid .

SUSANNAH WHITING . I live at No. 7, Chipperfield-street, May Fair, in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square ; I believe James Braid keeps the house, it is his dwelling-house.

Q. Had you in your house in August last, two watches and a seal - A. Yes, in my lodgings; they were worth about three pounds ten shillings.

Q. Where were you at the time that you lost the watches, were you out - A. No; I was in the kitchen. I have seen them since in the hands of the officer.

JOHN MURRAY . I am a shopman to Mr. Winfield, pawnbroker, in High-street. On the 17th of August, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner pawned this watch with me; I am sure I took this watch in of the prisoner, I lent him thirteen shillings on it.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer.

Q. Did you receive the prisoner in custody at Mr. Winfield's house - A. I did, on the 17th of August. I searched him, and found a silver watch on him; which he said, was his own; there is a seal to it.

Q. Prosecutrix. Look at the watch that Murray produced - A. This is one of the watches that I lost; I knew it by the maker's name and the number; and the watch that Godfry produced, is mine; I saw them both between nine and ten o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the watches on the day the lady speaks of.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18140914-81

775. WILLIAM WOOD , alias WHITE, alias JONES , THOMAS POWELL , alias REGAN , and THOMAS HART , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Stock Gower , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 8th of August , at St. Pancras , with intent to steal and stealing therein, fifty-eight bottles, of red wine, value 10 l. twenty-seven bottles of Lisbon wine, value 3 l. twenty-four bottles of sherry, value 4 l. twelve gallons of rum, value 11 l. ten gallons of Hollands, value 12 l. twelve gallons of gin, value 4 l. five gallons of shrub, value 3 l. 10 s. two gallons of noyean, value 2 l. 18 s. four gallons of peppermint, value 3 l. five gallons of brandy and gin mixed, value 3 l. and one quarter-cask of red port, value 26 l. the property of Stephen Stock Gower .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only stating the house to be the dwelling-house of William Stock , and the goods to be the property of the said William Stock .

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. On the morning of the 9th of August, I was in the neighbourhood of Bagnigge Wells; I observed a cart coming along, and a young man driving it; I went behind the cart, and observed the tail-board down, the cart was empty; that gave me suspicion. I walked on a little further; I passed the cart; I observed a tall man come from the door of the side of Bagnigge Wells, that door is called Nell Gwyn 's door; immediately he come out of the door, he ran after the cart, and jumped into it; the driver was in the cart, and immediately the cart drove away, as fast as it could; I was going to ran after the cart; I saw Wood and Powell come out of Nell Gwyn 's door; I immediately seized hold of them by the collar; I said, what game are you after here; they said, none. I said, I am sure you have, the cart is just gone. I immediately pulled my pistols out, I said, I would shoot the first that made resistance. I took them up to the watch-box by the Bull and the Pound, and delivered one to the watchman; one I kept myself, and we took them to our lock-up room, at Hatton Garden office. I went back with the watchman to Bagnigge Wells; I observed Nell Gwyn 's door at Bagnigge Wells, was broken open by an iron crow; I looked inside of the step of the door; and perceived three hampers standing there, and a quantity of stone bottles. I left the watchman in the care of the property. I went to alarm Mr. Stock, he was in bed; Mr. Stock was in the house belonging to Bagnigge Wells. When I got in, I saw the place that was broken open. We examined the cellar; we found a great quantity of wine in bottles; I opened them.

Q. Besides wine in the cellar, did you see any thing else - A. I found this iron crow in the hamper; that hamper contained fifty-eight bottles of red port. I then examined the iron crow to the marks on the Nell Gwyn 's door, it corresponded with the marks on Nell Gwyn 's door. I examined the cellar door; the crow corresponded with the impressions on the cellar door; the cellar door was open; the cellar was in a disturbed state. I saw a bottle with wine in it, the cork was pushed in; there was a drop of wine left, and the cork forced in. I found only one bottle in that condition. On searching about the cellar I found these two corks.

Q. You have a brother officer of the name of Limbrick - A. I have.

Q. In consequence of any thing that you afterwards learned, did you take a man of the name of Burgess - A. I did; in company with two Bow-street officers; the two Bow-street officers brought him to me in the fields I did not go with them. A person of the name of Mayhew and another officer took him, and brought him to me on the 17th; he was taken to the Police office Hatton Garden.

Q. In consequence of any information that you received, did you go to the house of the prisoner Hart - A. I did; in company with Limbrick; I did not find Hart at home. He was apprehended near one o'clock in the morning, on the 19th; I apprehended him myself, at No. 36, Cloth Fair.

Q. Do you know whose house that is - A. No, I do not. Limbrick found a good many things at Hart's house. Limbrick found his breeches; they will be produced by Limbrick.

Q. Do you know what business Hart is - A. A baker; three years ago he kept a baker's shop at Kentish Town; I had occasion to weigh his bread.

COURT. Was the bread forfeited - A. I do not think it was.

FRANCIS HUMPHRIES . I am a watchman belonging to St. James, Clerkenwell. On this night, I was in my station, near the Bull public-house, near Bagingge Wells. It was just gone two when Mr. Hutt brought two men, and called to me for assistance he gave me charge of White; I assisted in taking them to Hatton Garden office. Mr. Hutt and I returned together to Bagnigge Wells; there I saw some casks, hampers, and bottles at Nell Gwyn 's door; the door was on a jar. The moment that Mr. Hutt touched the door, we went in, and there I saw three hampers, five kegs, and three large stone bottels. I took charge of the goods while Mr. Hutt alarmed the people of the house. Then Mr. Hutt and Mr. Stock examined the premises.

WILLIAM BUSH . I am a carpenter.

Q. Had you been employed to do some work at Nell Gwyn 's door - A. Yes; a week before the robbery; I fastened it up; I drove some spikes and nailed it up. I saw it the night before the robbery, it was secure then.

WILLIAM BURGESS . Q. How old are you - A. I am nineteen. My father is a hackney coachman; he lives in Nelson's-place, in the City-road.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes; I have known Powell, and Wood, six months, and Hart, about three months.

Q. Were you with the three prisoners on the night this robbery has been said to be committed - A. Yes; I was with them from seven o'clock in the evening until nine; we were at the King of Prussia-row, Hoxton, altogether; Mr. Wood told me I was to get the horse and cart out that night, and to meet them at the Westmoreland Arms, Westmoreland-place, City-road, at ten o'clock at night. I went home to get the horse and cart; I got it I went to the City-road; Wood met me, and took the cart of me at the bottom of Westmoreland-place; Wood was by himself. Then he told me to go home, and to come back to him as soon as I could.

Q. Why were you to go home - A. Because I did not want to let my father know I was going out. I went, and returned to the Westmoreland Arms a little after eleven o'clock; I found Hart there then, nobody else. I expected to find Wood there; I found Hart. I went with Hart to the Blue-coat Boy public-house, at the top of the City-road; when I came to the Blue-coat Boy, Wood and Powell were there. Powell got in the cart, and laid down in the cart; Wood led the mare by her head, and walked on. I and Hart walked on fast, and followed. We turned down a turning to go to Bagnigge Wells; we at last, got to Battle-bridge; Hart and me went down the left hand, towards Bagnigge Wells; Wood and Powell went another way with the cart and horse, towards Maiden-lane way. A little after twelve o'clock, Hart heard the horse and cart coming back to us. Wood said, it was too soon to go. We all got within the cart, and went towards Maiden-lane; it being too soon, we drove up Maiden-lane, to a large brick field; the mare and the cart we put into a barn. Wood directed me to stay with the horse and cart until they came back again; they all went together down Maiden-lane, towards Battle-bridge, all three. I stopped there until a little after two o'clock, then Hart came, and throwed some dirt in the cart, to rouse me. I laid down in the cart, and fell asleep. Hart throwing the dirt in roused me. Hart told me to follow him; I followed him down the road that leads to Bagnigge Wells; I drove the cart; Hart went on foot first. I drove on; when Hart stopped, I stopped; I saw a man coming along the road, that I was informed was Mr. Hutt, the officer, he came from the turnpike out of Spa-fields, towards me, and looked into the cart. Then just as we got to Baggnigge Wells, Hart jumped into the cart; he told me to drive on. I asked him what for; he said, never mind, drive on; he struck the mare with the pin out of the tail-board on the rump. I drove on very fast; I could not hold the mare; then we went down to the turnpike; he kept saying, I hope the turnpike-gate is open; we stopped at the gate, the gate was open; we drove on, and went up a lane by the Workhouse, into the City-road. We put the cart and mare up just about three o'clock, in my father's stable. On the next day, Hart and I went to Bagnigge Wells. Hart said, Wood and Powell were fools for packing up so much, it would have broken the cart down.

Q. Do you know what the hampers contained - A. Hart told me red wine; he said, they packed them up; he said also, there was brandy, rum, gin, and peppermint.

Q. Did you learn from him, whether they had packed up all the wine - A. No. Hart told me they had put it in hampers. He said, they had only drank one bottle, and he had spilled some over his breeches.

Q. When Hart jumped into the cart, do you remember his telling you any thing at that time - A. Hart told me the man in the road, was Hutt, the officer, that weighed his bread once at Battle-bridge.

Mr. Gurney. How old are you - A. I am nineteen.

Q. How long have you been a thief - A. Not long, three or four months. I gave information of this when I was taken up.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I went in company with Hutt, and searched the prisoner Hart's house, in Cloth-fair, on Friday, the 19th of August; I found a pair of breeches with the remains of port wine upon them, and I also found a phosphorous-box at Hart's house. Hart told me he had not done any baking for a year and a half.

WILLIAM STOCK . I am the landlord of Bagnigge Wells; I slept there at the time the buglary was committed. I was awoke about three o'clock in the morning, by Mr. Hutt.

Q. Had you seen the cellar the night before - A. Yes; about half past ten; it was perfectly secure then.

Q. Did it contain hampers of wine and gin - A. No; the hampers were in the yard; they were empty. There were wine, gin, anniseed, and noyean, they were all in the cellar, except the anniseed and peppermint, they were in casks, or stone bottles; the port in quart bottles; one cask of wine; there were sherry and lisbon wine also; there were a quarter cask of red port, that was in the cellar; that was

moved the next morning from where I saw it the over night. At three o'clock, I was alarmed; I went to my cellar; I saw the cellar door had been broken open by an iron crow, which was found in a hamper. Afterwards, I saw the crow fired to the cellar, by Hutt; the crow corresponded with the marks exactly. The cask of port wine was not in the cellar. All the rest were removed completely out of the cellar: the port cask was removed completely out by the door. The port wine and spirits were under my charge.

Q. What parish is this house in - A. St. Pancras .

Q. Do you know the wine - A. I do; it is marked with the initials of the person I bought it of. I have no doubt if it being my property, not in the least. I had the charge of it. Stephen Stock Gower is the owner of Bagnigge Wells. It is under my charge.

John Hutt. I produce three bottles of port-wine.

Wiltram Stock. I am the inhabitant of the house: I sleep in the house, and take care of the premises; I am responsible to him.

Q. Wereabouts is the value of the property - A. Between eighty and one hundred pounds.

Wood's Defence. I am intirely innocent.

Powell's Defence. The same.

Hart's Defence. The same.

WOOD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

POWELL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

HART, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

Second Middlesex jury, before Sir. Justic Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-82

776. MUNOO was indicted for an unatural crime .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-83

777. JAMES RAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , a watch, value 3 l. the property of David Steers .

DAVID STEERS. I live at the Red Lion, Walham-green, Fulham .

Q. On the 26th of July, did you loose a watch - A I believe it was on the 27th in the morning; I saw it about eleven o'clock on the 26th, when I went to bed; I laid it on the table, at the foot of the bed, in the bed-room.

Q. What was the value of it - A. I gave five guineas for it, three years ago. At two o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by my wife, saying that there was somebody in the room; I got up in the bed, and called soldier; I heard a man run out of the room, when I heard that, I got out of bed, and heard a footstep going up stairs; I followed it; he was going up into the garretu; I went into the room where I heard him go into; there I found two men in bed, one of them was the prisoner. I sent for an officer, and one of my children when she went to an officer, she brought in the watch; it was thrown out into the street, and knocked all to pieces. I said to the two soldiers, one of you have been into my room; the other man laid furthest from the window: he said, have you lost anything; I said, I did not know until I get a light. I got a light and missed my watch off the table. The other man said, if have missed any thing, it is the man that you have just drop into the room has taken it. My child brought the watch in not of the street.

Prisoner. Q. Was I awake or a sleep when you came in the room - A. You were asleep, and snoreing.

THOMAS TILLEY. I am a soldier. I was billeted at this house on the 26th of July. The prisoner slept in the same room with me.

Q. Did you see him go out of the room that night - A. No. I heard him come in the room, the landlord of the house followed him in about a minute afterwards. When the landlord came in, I told him I was awake; if he had been robbed to go and see what he had lost; if he was robbed, it was the left hand man. He went down stairs, got a light, and said, he was robbed. I was there when the watch was brought in by the child, and the officer was sent for.

Q. Was there any body else in your room - A. Yes, another soldier. I am confident it was not the other soldier that came in.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner go near the window - A. The window was close to the side of his bed; it was open. I did not observe him go to the window.

Q. to Prosecutor. How old was the child that brought in the watch - A. Eleven years; she is not here.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 26th of July, or on the morning of the 27th, the prosecutor came up into my bed-room, he asked whether any man had been out of bed; he was answered by Tilley, no. I said, my partner had been out of bed, he must know it: he asked him if any thing was stolen; the landlord answered, he did not know. I was asleep at the time. The landlord went down to his room; he said, he missed his watch. I was instantly searched, and nothing found upon me. The watch was picked up by the landlord's daughter in the middle of the turnpike-road. Tilley, the soldier, offered me twelve shillings to acknowledge the thiefs, which I would not do. I have no doubt the said person, is actually the person; he must have throwed the watch out of the window.

Q. to Tilley. Did you offer this man twelve shillings - A. I did, to confess the truth, to let me pass the board, knowing I was at Hammersmith when I should be at Chelsea; seeing the Doctor, I told him, that he was injuring me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampler.

Reference Number: t18140914-84

778. ANN HICKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July a gold chain, value 2 l. the property of John Needes , privately in his shop .

JOHN NEEDES . I am a pawnbroker , in Pater-noster-row, in the parish of Christ's Church, Spitalfields .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; she was in my shop on the morning I lost the chain, on the

22nd of July; that chain I bough. I had it for sale. I lost it out of a tray that stood on the counter; he had seen it about an hour before I missed it. The prisoner came on the morning of the 22nd of July, to pledge a pair of shoes for one shilling.

Q. How soon after the prisoner was got did you miss it - A. It might be half an hour after thee prisoner was gone I missed it.

JOHN WATSON PHILLIPS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Willat's, pawnbroker.

Q. Did the prisoner come and offer anything at your shop - A. Yes, on the 22nd of July, she offered a gold chain for eight shillings; she did not pawn it. I asked her who sent her; she said, her mother. I asked her whether it was gold; she said, she did not know. I found it was gold, but rather inferior gold. I sent it up stairs to my master, she was told to fetch her mother; she then said, he had no mother; her mistress sent her. She had a mistress in White Lion-street; she said she worked there. She was told to fetch her mistress; she said, she would; she went out, and came back with a person, she called aunt; her aunt then stated, that while she was at Newgate market, she broke open her fathers box and took the chain out, we returned the chain to the aunt. The prisoner's farther came to the shop the same day, and offered a silver watch, and a gold chain to it for four guineas; I examined it; it was the same chain. I bid him 3 l. on it. I stopped the watch and chain, he said, he would jump over the counter, and get it. I told him, he need not be afraid, he should have it when my master came home I stopped the watch and chain untill my master came in. I thought I knew the chain, this is the chain.

PARTRICK DUNCAN. I am a mill wright.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; she said, she found the watch chain in the street; she pawned it somewhere in Whitechapple; she gave me the duplicates. I took the chain out of pawn; I afterwards took it to Phillips; I did not know the worth of it, the watch was my own.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the chain underneath the window, in two bits of brown paper, I met a gentlewoman that lodged at the house where I do; she pawned the chain for twelve shillings in Whitechaple. I offered the duplicate to Patrick Duncan for three shillings; he went and took the chain out of pledge for twelve shillings.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that your chain. - A. It is; I can positively swear to it, on account of it being slighter than chains of this discription are usually made: the chain cost me 2 l. 16 s.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18140914-85

779. JAMES MAGENIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lutwych , about the hour of twelve in the night, on the 23rd of May , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, a silver tea-pot value 4 l. a silver wine-strainer, value 1 l. thirteen silver table-spoons, value 8 l. twenty-one silver forks, value 3 l. two silver cups, value 3 l. a silver cruet-stand, value 1 l. 12 s. two pair of boots, value 3 l. two rasors, value 1 s. a strap, value 6 d. two pair of shoes, value 1 l 4 s. two pair of breeches, v. 2 l. 10 l. a soap-pan, v. 6 d. a pair of pantaloons, v. 10 s. two bats, v. 2 l. two coats, v. 2 l. a waistcoat, value 1 l. two table-cloths, value 1 l. 19 s. two seals, value 1 l. 15 s. two ivory boxes, value 5 and a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Lutwych .

JOHN LUTWYCH I live at No. 15, Mecklenburg-square, in the parrish of St. Pancras . On the night of the 23d of May I saw the house was fastened; I saw that all was fastened. I took up the key of the front door into my chamber after I had fastened up the chain. In the morning between six and seven o'clock, I was alarmed; I came down stairs, I found that my house had been robbed, that the thieves had got into the house. I went into the garden; I found that they had cut a pane of glass out of the pantry window; they had then, I imagine, taken out the pin that fastened the two shutters together; it was laying upon the garden ground; when they had opened the shutters the pantry door lock had been forced; by opening the windows, they got access to the pantry; they then forced the pantry door, and got access to the house, tracing their progress; the next door lock was also forced, and then they had access to the whole house.

Q. Did they get into the dining-room - A. They did, and took away two silver cups.

Q. Had they taken the things stated in the indictment from the different rooms - A. They had.

Q. What was the value of the whole of them - A. One hundred pounds; they cost me more.

Q. From the number of drawers broken open, did it appear to you, that they had been a good while in the house - A. They must. They had broken open the desks, and scattered the letters and papers about. They had also broken open a side drawer. I found dropping of wax candle in the back parlour, on the desks; they had broken open two desks, and upon the table also there were droppings of wax candle, in my dressing-room.

JAMES CHRISTOPHER FORESIGHT . I reside the next door to Mr. Lytwych.

Q. On the night that Mr. Lutwych was robbed, did you see any man near this house - A. I saw two men between the hours of eleven and twelve on Monday evening, they were standing against the railing, looking into the parlour window, but when I came up, they went away; they only went to the railing of the square, and there they stood. On the night preceeding the Sunday, I saw the two men in the very same place, at the same hour; they were standing looking against the rails, in the same way; they crossed again; they were lottering about; they went against the rails of the square. The prisoner is about the size of one of the men; the other was rather taller.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 30th of June, at one o'clock in the night at the bottom of Guildford-street, Gray's-inn-lane; I saw the prisoner in company with another, I had suspicion of them; I went up to one of them; I asked what he had about him; I rubbed him down, and found he had nothing about him. I was alone. The prisoner was going away; I went after him, and laid hold of him; I asked him

what he had about him; he said, nothing. I felt him. I told him I must see what he had about him; I put my hand into his pocket; I was pricked by a center-bit. I said, you have some sharp instruments about you; then he told me he was a carpenter, and they were his tools. I took him to the watch-house, and searched him. I found a dark lanthorn, a center-bit, four pieces of wax candle, a phosphorus-bottle and matches, a skeleton-key, for a front door, two chissels, a screw-driver, a knife with two bladles, a rope-ladder, for the purpose of getting out of a window, and this pistol, loaded with ball; the charge is down here, here are the bullets and powder. I afterwards took these chissels to Mr. Lutwych's house; I applied them to a desk and a drawer; the chissels exactly corresponded with the marks on them.

Q. Did you learn from the prisoner where he lodged - A. Yes; he told me he lived at 62, Rose-street, Bloomsbury. I took Samuel Lack with me there; on searching his lodgings, I found this pair of boots, two razers, a strap, a memorandum-book, a box with soap, a brush, and two small ivory boxes.

SAMUEL LACK . I was present when the prisoner gave directions to the last witness of his lodging, and I was present at the searching of his lodging, and when I came back, I asked the prisoner where he got the property I found in his lodgings; he told me he bought it. That is all I know.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these things, and tell me whether they are yours - A. These boots are mine, although they have been worn by another person since they have been taken; I know them to be my boots; these razors are mine, I should know them among a thousand, there is my own mark on them; the memorandum-book has some of my own memorandums in it now; the razor-strap I cut to make it fit my shaving-box; these little ivory boxes contains dentifice powder one, the other is charcoal.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer asked me where I lodged, I had no reason not to tell him, had I been conscions of any thing improper, I should not have told him; I had not. I would submit to the law. Ask the officer what was my conduct when the other man ran away.

COURT. Q. to Wainwright. Did the prisoner attempt to get from you - A. As soon as the other man ran away, I told the prisoner I would knock him down if he offered to run away; I saw him attempt to throw something away. I threatened to break his legs if he stirred hand or foot. I had a stick and a cutlass. I saw him put his hand to his coat, that induced me to threaten him. We found this phosphorus bottle and matches in his box at home, besides the one I found on him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140914-86

780. ROBERT BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Paul Frederick , nine two-pound bank notes , the property of John Hall .

PAUL FREDERICK . I keep the Black Boy and Cat at St. Catherine's . John Hall lost the notes in my house. I paid these notes to John Hall on the morning of the 11th of July, all running numbers; one of the notes was traced to the prisoner.

SAMUEL COSTENS . Sarah Mitchell brought a two-pound note to my house, I changed it for her. I live at the back of the Iron Gate, St. Catherine's.

SARAH MITCHELL . My father is a lighterman; he lives at St. Catherine's. Mr. Bryan gave me a two-pound note to get change; I went to Mr. Frederick, he could not give change. I took it to Mr. Costens, he gave me change.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to our office. I heard the prisoner say, he did not rob the man; he would give him five pounds not to say any more about it.

Q. Where is John Hall - A. He is in the jail.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-87

781. JAMES CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , two shirts, value 4 s. and a shift, value 1 s. the property of William Eagles Mott .

WILLIAM EAGLES MOTT . I live near Ball's Pond, just beyond Islington . I lost my shirts on the 10th of August, between eight and nine in the morning, a child told me he saw the prisoner get over my garden fence; I followed the prisoner, and took him.

ANN MOTT . I hung up the linen on a line in the garden. A child saw the prisoner come over the pales.

WILLIAM MILLWOOD . As I was going home to my breakfast, I saw the prisoner in the lane, and as I came from my breakfast, I saw him get over the pales, I saw something white under his arm; I ran and told Mrs. Mott.

Q. Are you sure it is the same man - A. Yes; I am sure the prisoner is the same man that got over the pales, and that had something white: I run after him: three men stopped him; Mr. Eakin brought him back.

SAMUEL EAKIN . I was going home. The lad made an alarm, and shewed me the man. I went and took the prisoner, with this bundle upon him.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the things up.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-88

782 MARY GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , three pounds weight of ham, value 2 s. the property of Evan Price .

ELIZABETH PRICE. I live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square ; my husband is a cheesemonger ; his name is Evan Price . I lost the ham on the 16th of August, from off the counter, in the shop; I did not see it taken. The prisoner came into the shop. The young man that saw her take it was nearer to her than me; he went after the prisoner, and caught it upon her.

HENRY HONEY . On the 16th of August, I was in Mr. Prices's shop when two woman came in; I saw Mary Green go to the other counter; she said, bring me half a pound of bacon, bring it streeky The prisoner went out of the shop. I told Mrs. Price that she had taken something. I went after the prisoner; she threw the ham down; I picked it up This is the ham. An officer came by, and took the prisoner into custody. I saw the ham in the prisoner's lap as she went out.

Prosecutrix. It is my ham; I had just cut it before the prisoner came in.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; there were two other people in the shop.

GUILTY . aged 25.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction . fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-89

783. MARY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of William Reid .

ANN REID. I am the wife of William Reid : he is a shoe-maker , 24, Litchfield-street, Soho . I lost the shoes on the 28th of July; the prisoner and another woman came into the shop. I fitted the other woman with a pair of shoes. The prisoner kept taking the shoes out of the window; she took one shoe out of the window, the other was tacked to it. The prisoner went out of the shop with the shoes; I went after her, and lost sight of her. The publican sent to our house, and said, a woman had left a pair of shoes in his house, with our name in them. At last, I saw the prisoner; I told her she had stolen the shoes, and had her taken up.

CATHERINE REEVES. The prisoner came into Mr. Moore's public-house; she asked leave to go into the yard; she said, I shall leave a pair of shoes with you until I come back, but do not tell your master; I said, why not; she said, she expected some money from a gentleman, and if he saw her with the shoes, he would not pay her. I took the shoes to my master; he sent to the prosecutrix. These are the shoes.

Prosecutrix. They are my shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. A young woman asked me to take care of these shoes.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 1 month in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-90

784. WILLIAM BUSHNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , two shirts, value 20 s. four pair of stockings, value 8 s. a nightcap, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and a bag, value 1 s. the property of Edward Henry Waterworth ; and three shirts, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Spencer , from the person of Thomas Cummins .

EDWARD HENRY WATERWORTH. I am an assistant to Mr. Thomas Spencer , surgeon , Islington-road. I lost these things on the 25th of July; I gave my linen to Thomas Cummings , the son of my washerwoman.

JOSEPH MARTIN. I am a City constable. On the 25th of July, I was coming up Great Saffron-hill; I met the prisoner coming down Great Saffron-hill; I perceived he had something bulky in a blue apron, which he had before him. When the prisoner had passed me, I observed him turn his head, and look after me. I suspected that he had got something that did not belong to him: I watched him into Bleeding Hart yard. I ran after the prisoner, and collared him with my left hand. and the bundle with my right hand, and asked him what he had got there; he was so agitated, he could not speak; he only cried. I took him to the office; the magistrate not sitting then, I delivered him into the charge of Brown, the officer. I asked the prisoner when he was going with the things; he said, he was going to Mother Dench's; she is a noted receiver, particularly of boys. He said, he had them of a boy in a field, he gave them to him

THOMAS CUMMINGS . I am eight years and a half old; my father is dead, my mother takes in washing. I went to No. 8, Islington, for the linen, and as I was going home with it to my mother, the prisoner came up to me, he asked me if I would go of an errand for him; I said, yes. He said, he would give me fourpence. I was to leave the linen with him; I left the linen with him; he said, I was to enquire for a man that owed him some money; I went, I could not find the man, and when I returned the prisoner was gone.

Q. Did he give you the fourpence - A. No; he was to give me the fourpence when I had delivered the message.

CHARLES BROWN . This is the property. Martin brought the prisoner and the bundle to the office, and left them in my custody, on the evening of the 25th of July, in consequence of enquiries I found the owner of the property.

Mr. Waterworth. Some of the linen are my property: the other is Mr. Spencer's.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-91

785. JOHN JONES and THOMAS SERMON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown from their persons .

JOHN VAUGHAN. I am an officer. On the 21st of August, near three in the morning, I was in St. Giles's at the fire; there were a great crowd assembled; I saw Jones and Sermon together, in the act of feeling into several persons pockets; Jones was the person that went to several persons pockets. putting his right hand into them; at last, he came up to a gentleman that was looking at the fire, he touched his pocket, as he had several others before; I then saw his hand go into the pocket from whence he drew out a silk hankerchief with his right hand: he put it under his left arm, and gave it to Sermon; they went away, up to the left. I went to the gentleman, and asked him, if he had lost any thing; he said, he had. I lost sight of the gentleman. When I went to

the prisoners, I saw Jones draw a fine handkerchief out of a persons pockets, in the same way that he had before; the moment he drew the handkerchief he saw me, and they separated, and went round the coaches; there were four coaches in a triangle he went to the third coach; Sermon throwed the handkerchiefs into the coachman's hand, and then they separated. I pursued him and went back to take the coachman I saw him again, sitting on the coach-box, with a man of the name of Daniel was sitting with him, Daniel is a desperate character. I was going to take the coachman down, several of the people began to swear what they would do. I was alone; I could not take him.

Sermon and Jones Defence . On the night mentioned in the indictment, we spent the evening in company together after our work: at half past twelve, we saw the appearance of the fire. The officer took us under the idea of getting money from our friends; our friends went to the constable of the night; he said, we might make it up for five shillings each.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-92

786. NICHOLAS OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a bag, value 3 d. a watch, value 2 l. and one three-shilling bank token, the property of Elizabeth Whitewood , from the person .

ELIZABETH WHITEWOOD. I live in Chapel-street, Holywell Mount. I lost this property on the 15th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening, just by the turnpike in Worship-street , I was going by with a bundle in my hand; the prisoner came by, he gave a violent snatch, and tore the bundle away; it was a silk bag that I had in my hand; he snatched it, and run away; I called out stop thief; the prisoner was stopped. I never saw his face. All that I know, a man snatched a bag out of my hand, he run away; he was pursued; he was taken with my bag.

Q. What was this bag a ridicule - A. It was a black bag.

JOHN GILES. I am a carpenter. I was sitting in at the Nags Head public-house; I heard the cry of stop thief. The prisoner is the person that cried out stop thief as he passed me. I saw nobody running before him; another person called out stop that man that calls out stop thief; I stopped the prisoner.

WILLIAM GRIGG . On the 16th of August, I was on the road; I heard a gentlewoman call stop thief; I saw the prisoner running; I instantly cried out stop thief. The witness that came out of the public-house, stopped him. The prisoner threw the bag behind him; the next witness picked it up.

JOHN SQUIRE As I was going home in the evening, in Holywell Mount; I heard the alarm of stop thief; the man was thrown down; he was taken into the public-house. The lady said, she had lost her black bag, it contained silver, and other articles I kicked my toe against the bag; I picked it up, and gave it the lady.

ANTHONY CAVALIER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. I produce the bag; it contains a watch.

Prosecutrix. It is my bag; it now contains what I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whiped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-93

787. WILLIAM WILTON was indicted for feloniously marrying one Ann Dormer , his former wife being then alive

JOHN STANLEY . I am the clerk at St. George's Church, Hanover-square. I produce the register book of marriages at that parish

" William Wilton and Jane Estcot both of this parish, were married in this Church, by banns, this 24th of November, 1805, by me, F. Nicolls, curate; this marriage was solemnized between us, William Wilton and Jane Estcot , in the presence of Edward Farley , and Thomas Gee ."

ANN FARLEY . I was present at the marriage. Jane Estcot is still alive.

Prisoner. I found out Jane Estcot had been married before; when she lived with me, she had a letter of her husband's death.

COURT. Q. to Mrs. Farley. What was her first husband - A. I do not know. I have known her twelve years. I never saw him.

ANN DORMER . I was married on the 1st of December, 1811 , at St. George's, Hanover-square , to the prisoner.

Mr. Stanley. I produce the register-book of marriages.

" William Wilton and Ann Dormer both of this parish, were married, by banns, in this Church, December 1st, 1811, by me, Edward Williams , curate."

Q. to Ann Dormer . Are you sure that is the man - A. Yes. He told me his wife died in child-bed.

Prisoners Defence After I married Jane Estcot , her husband came into London; I hearing it, we parted by mutual consent. I shortly became acquainted with Ann Dormer ; I married her at the same Church. After that, Jane Estcott desired to see the child; which I agreed to. I believe Jane Estcott has now the register of her marriage with Mr. Estcott.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-94

788. JOHN FRANCIS WOODFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of August , two sheets, value 1 l. and a quilt, value 13 s. the property of Henry Oriel , in a lodging-room .

HENRY ORIEL . I am a taylor ; I live in Goodman's fields, in the Minories . On the 2nd of August, I let a lodging to the prisoner, he was to pay me weekly; he went to bed at eleven o'clock. I fastened my door. The next morning, I came down stairs at five o'clock; my street door was wide open. I went into the prisoner's room; he was gone, and the

sheets and blankets were gone. The next day, I saw the prisoner in a public-house in East Smithfield. I have never found my things. I went for the officer, Mr. Coombes, and had him taken into custody.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer. I asked the prisoner to tell me what he had done with the prosecutor's things; he said, if I would go with him to Newgate-market, he would shew me the person he sold the things to. I took him to the office; he was committed.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the things at all.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-95

789. ANN DENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of July , one spoon, value 5 s. the property of James Poster Barham .

WILLIAM GRIFFEN. I am a servant to John Proster Barham . The spoon belonged to Mr. Barham; his name is John Poster Barham .

COURT. That is not the name in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-96

790. MARY THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a tea-kettle, value 4 s. the property of John Markham .

JANE MARKHAM . I am the wife of John Markham ; I live at 51, Brick-lane, Spitalfields . I lost my tea-kettle on the 1st of August; I was in the adjoining-room when the prisoner came in, and took the tea-cettle off the fire, she went out; I followed her out into the street, and into the next street, then I said, to her I think you have got something that I have lost; she said, no: she had got nothing. I said, let me look, and under her apron, she had my tea-kettle half full of boiling water. This is the tea-kettle; it is mine.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-97

791. THOMAS DESETER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , seven pounds weight of flour, value 2 s. the property of David Steane .

DAVID STEANE . I am a baker . On the 17th of August, I was standing in the shop, between ten and eleven in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop from the bakehouse; Mrs. Steane came behind him, and said, what is this; she laid hold of him, and asked me. He pulled her out of the shop, and knocked her down; he then run away. I pursued him, and brought him back to the shop, and took this stocking of flour from him.

MARGARET SEANE . When the prisoner lived with us, I suspected his honesty. On the 17th of August, between ten and eleven in the forenoon, as he was going out, I put my hand to each of side of him; I asked him what he had about him when he was going out. I laid hold of his jacket pocket; he dragged me out on the pavement, and knocked me down.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I searched the prisoner; he was in the custody of the prosecutor. He put his breeches down; I pulled out this stocking of flour, he had it round his loins and under the waistband of his breeches.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-98

792. ARCHIBALD WINTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th July , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of George Wilson , from his person .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-99

793. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of September , a cheese, value 30 s. the property of John Peak .

JOHN PEAK . I am a cheesemonger , in Drury-lane . I lost my cheese on the 3rd of December. I had five cheeses standing at the door. About five o'clock in the evening, one of them was gone. From information, I pursued the prisoner, and took him with the cheese at Shorts Gardens; he had the cheese on his arm.

WILLIAM CROSS . I am a broker, in Drury-lane. I saw the prisoner go by our shop with the cheese under his arm. I had a little while before seen five cheeses at the prosecutor's door; there were only four cheeses then, one was gone.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I produce the cheese.

Prosecutor. That is my cheese.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry the cheese; he said, he would pay me for my trouble; I do not know where he lived.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whiped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-100

794. ELIZABETH ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , a bottle of wine, value 5 s. a three-shilling bank token, and a 1 l. bank note , the property of Edward Beal .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-101

795. JANE BIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a silver table-spoon, value 8 s. two silver tea-spoons, value 3 s. a gown, value 6 s. and a shawl, value 8 s. the property of John Avery .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-102

796. ESTHER FERGUSON , alias CHERRY , and ESTHER DOBSON, alias FERNANDEZ , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , thirteen 10 l. bank notes, five 5 l. bank notes, and fourteen 1 l. bank notes. the property of Abraham Broms , from his person .

ABRAHAM BROMS. I am a captain of a Swedish ship .

Q. On Tuesday, the 6th of September, had you received any bank notes - A. Yes, at Messrs. Fullers I received them, there were near two hundred pounds altogether; they were ten's, five's, and one's. I put the notes into my pocket-book when I received them, and my pocket-book into my breast pocket; I left the Exchange about five o'clock; as I was leaving the Exchange, Esther Ferguson met me; she asked me to go to her lodgings; I went with her, I forgot the name of the place; I went with her into a house, and when I came into the house, they locked the door, and put the key in their pocket.

Q. Was there any other person in the room at first - A. There was a little girl of twelve years old. The moment I saw the door locked, I was afraid; I wanted to go directly. Ferguson asked the little girl to go down, and ask the other lady to come up; Esther Dobson then came up, and Esther Dobson came and set on my left knee; when she came up, she got a working my coat outside, so as to raise the pocket-book up to the top of my pocket; then Ferguson came close, and looked over my shoulder, took the pocket-book, and ran down stairs. While Ferguson was down stairs, Dobson kept her arms round my neck. Ferguson came up stairs, and tried to put the pocket-book into my pocket, it fell down; I picked it up, and found all the notes were gone. Ferguson then took out the key, and said I might go if I pleased. After I picked up the pocket-book; I said to Furguson, you have taken my money away; they told me I was wrong, I said, yes, one of us must be wrong; I shall go and find a constable. I saw a man of the name of Kippax; I asked his assistance. I took one, he took the other, to the office; we secured them both.

Q. Had you more money than what you received at the bankers - A. Yes. I had one hundred and ninety four-pounds, or two hundred and four pounds, I am not sure which.

Mr. Alley. Q. This was an aukward cruise that you had; how many notes did you get at the bankers - A. One hundred and sixty-seven notes. I cannot recollect what notes I had besides.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes.

Q. When the girl took your pocket-book, why did not you take it out of her hand - A. I was afraid there was some people below; I was afraid of being killed.

WILLIAM KIPPAX . I am a Greenwich pensioner. On Tuesday, the 6th of September, I was at my brother's house, in Church-lane; there is an alley by the side of our house, I saw the Captain and Ferguson came down the street, about five o'clock, he had hold of Ferguson by the hand; I saw them again in about ten minutes afterwards; he was singing out for a constable. I went to the door immediately; he came up our steps with Ferguson in his hand; he said, these girls had robbed him to a great amount. I saw Dobson, she had a key in her hand. I went for a constable; I could not get one. I told Dobson to come along with me; she threatened to knock me down. I said, come along to the magistrate. I assisted in taking the prisoners to the office; I delivered them over to Dalton, the officer.

EBENEZER DALTON I am an officer The two prisoners were brought to Lambeth-street office, by Kippax, and the prosecutor I searched them, and found nothing on them. The prisoners gave me the key for me to go and search the house; I searched the house, and found nothing.

WILLIAM BORER . I am a clerk at the house of Fuller and Co.

Q. On the 26th of September, did you pay Mr. Broms any sum of money - A. I did; I paid him one hundred and sixty-seven pounds, in ten's, five's, and one's.

Ferguson's Defence. When the gentleman came into the house, I never saw him with any money.

Dobson's Defence. The same.

FERGUSON, GUILTY , aged 20.

DOBSON, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-103

797 JOSEPH SHACKELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August, a fir joist, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Mayor . And JOHN WATTS , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the same goods, he well knowing them to be stolen .

CHARLES MAYOR . I lost a fir joist from Gloucester-place . I am a builder . I have got eight houses in Gloucester-place, finishing there. I lost the joist on the 27th of August. The prisoners are both strangers to me. From information that several of the joists were missing, I went to the building, and missed them.

GEORGE COOPER . My father has eight houses opposite of Mr. Mayor's building. On Saturday, the 27th of August, I saw a man come to the area of one of Mr. Mayor's houses; I saw him draw a fir joist out of the front area; he put it on his shoulder, and carried it away; I followed him into the Edgware-road; he took it into Watts' premises; Watts was on the premises. I heard nothing that passed. Watts sells wood and coals. I gave information at Marlborough-street office. I knew Shackell to be the man that took the fir joist out of the area, and carried it to Mr. Watts' premises.

WILLIAM KRENE. I am a servant to Mr. Markey. I saw Shackell come and take the joist out of Mr. Mayor's front area of one of his houses. I am positive to his person. I saw him draw the joist from the area; he then put it on his shoulder; I followed him; he took it to Watts's yard; Shackell left the joist at Watts's yard.

JOSEPH HORNEY. I am a constable. I apprehended Watts in his own yard; I saw the joist there, there were six joists there I apprehended Watts on this charge. I told him he must go before the magistrate with me; he said, where to; I said, Marlborough-street. He said he would endeavour to

find out the person he bought the joists of. I and Watts were going along Oxford-street together, Shackell came up to him; Watts then said, this is the man I bought the joists of. I told Shackell he must go with me; he said, I had no business to take him. I shewed him my staff; he set off running. Mr. Watts then laid hold of him, to prevent him going away; Mr. Watts and I took Shackell to the office. At the office, Watts was bailed, and surrendered here this morning.

Watts called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

SHACKELL, GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , publickly whipped .

WATTS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-104

798. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , a hat, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Baker , privately in his shop .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only stating it to be the property of Jane Bloomfield , privately in her shop.

THOMAS SMEETH. I am a hatter in the house of Thomas Baker , in Ratcliffe Highway. The business is carried on in his name for his sister.

Q. What part of the town is this shop in - A. 151, Ratcliffe Highway , a retail hatter's shop. On the 27th of August, between ten and eleven in the evening, I was at work; I looked up, and saw the prisoner walking out of the shop; there was no person in the shop but me; I immediately followed the prisoner; I saw him take his old hat off, and put the new one on; I immediately seized the new hat with my right hand, and the prisoner with my left, and brought him bark to the shop. I am sure the new hat I saw him put on his head, belonged to the shop; a few minutes before, I had just finished it. I gave the prisoner into the custody of an officer.

Q. Where was Mrs. Bloomfield - A. In the side-room; she knew nothing of the matter.

FRANCIS JACKSON. I am the constable that took the prisoner into custody. This is the hat. On Sunday morning, he told me he bought the hat at that shop, or the next shop; I could not find any shop that a hat had been bought and not carried away.

Smeeth. That hat is the property of my employer; it is worth twenty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the hat at a hatter's shop.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-105

799. WILLIAM JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a piece of handkerchiefs, value 50 s. the property of Eliza Grant , spinster , and Charlotte Grant , spinster .

CHARLOTTE GRANT . I am a single woman; my partner's name is Eliza Grant ; she is a single woman; our shop is 223, in the Strand , it is a ready-made linen shop, and we sell handkerchiefs . On the 18th of July, about ten in the morning, three boys came into our shop; two of the boys were tall, and the other one short; when they left the shop, I saw the short boy's coat, it very much resembled the prisoner's coat; the tall boy asked to look at some common handkerchiefs; I shewed them some, they did not buy any; they went out, and said, they would call again; they looked at several other handkerchiefs. In about an hour and a half after, this piece of silk handkerchiefs was brought in by Mr Lee, the constable; that piece of handkerchiefs was placed in the frame of the window; he must have slid back the frame to get at it, while the two other boys were at the counter; he was near enough to open the frame; the frame was not fastened. They said when they went out, they had not money enough to pay for the handkerchief they had fixed on; they would call again. I am quite sure this piece of silk handkerchiefs were in the shop when the three boys came in; I had placed them in the frame some time before; I am quite sure I had not sold them.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable On Monday, the 18th of July, about a quarter after eleven o'clock, I observed the prisoner and two other boys, which I knew to be suspicious characters; the two other lads were older and taller than the prisoner; I knew the three boys were companions. I observed the prisoner had something in the breast of his coat; I followed him; the other two kept behind when I followed him. I caught hold of the prisoner by the collar, I said, what have you got here; he said, a little boy has given them to me. I asked him to tell me who the other two boys were; he would not tell me. I locked him up in the counter. I took from him this piece of handkerchiefs, it was under his coat, at his breast. I took the piece of handkerchiefs to Miss Grant; she claimed them directly. On the next day, as I was taking him to Bow-street office; he said, he found them in a gateway in Fleet-market. This is the piece of handkerchiefs.

Prosecutrix. I am sure this piece of handkerchiefs are mine; it is worth fifty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up a gateway in Fleet-market to make water; this piece of handkerchiefs was laying there; I picked it up, and put it into my bosom.

Lee. It was a wet day; the handkerchiefs were quite clean.

GUILTY, aged 12,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Judgment respited, till next sessions .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-106

800. JAMES STRANGEWAYS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Joseph Longhurst , on the 7th of September , in a certain open place, near the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a pair of gaiters, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 6 s. a hat, value 10 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a pen-knife, value 2 d. a walking-stick, value 2 d. an umbrella, value 2 s. a pocket-book, value 1 d. and a 10 l. bank note , his property.

JOSEPH LONGHURST. I live at Staines; I am a carpenter .

Q. When were you robbed - A. On Wednesday, the 7th of September instant; I was in Bedfont-lane ; I was walking in the main-road, it was about eight o'clock in the evening; it was dark.

Q. How near were you to the town of Bedfont - A. About a mile; I was between Staines and Bedfont, on the Staines side . I was met by three soldiers apparently, they had red jackets on, turned up with green.

Q. Was there light enough to distinguish the colour - A. Yes.

Q. Was the moon up - A. The moon I believe was near upon rising. I am positive the red jackets were turned up with green. They asked me how far it was to Bedfont; I told them I thought about a mile. They then said one to the other, they would go back from whence they came. I walked on fast: they walked on after me; they met me; I was coming from Bedfont; they came as if from Staines: they turned after me. I thought what they wanted was to rob me; I ran. They ran after me; they ran about an hundred yards before they came to me; I fell: one of them caught me before I got up. They said they wanted my money; the others came up. As soon as I was up, they dragged me through the hedge, out of the turnpike road, across the field, the distance of about forty yards, into a pit; they then demanded my money; I gave it them, and my watch.

Q. What money did you give them - A. A ten-pound country bank note of Ashby's, the Staines Bank, and a silver watch; no other cash.

Q. What was your silver watch worth - A. Five guineas. They stripped me of all my clothes from my person; they took my coat, waistcoat, breeches, stockings, gaiters, and shoes; they stripped me entirely naked of everything. I then asked them, if they would be so good as to let me have some of their old clothes to put on; I thought I should catch my death of cold. They gave me the prisoner's old trowsers, and a thin waistcoat; in that condition they left me. After they had got my things, they tied my hands together behind me, laid me down in the hedge, and then tied my legs. Two of them left, and told the other to stop until they came back again; near half an hour this man stood centry over me. When they returned, they examined my hands and feet, to see whether my hands and feet were fast, I suppose; they left me.

Q. Did they use any violence towards you before this - A. No; they never struck me at all. They left me at ten o'clock. I heard a clock strike ten at Stamwell, a church clock, and Sir William Gibbons ' clock. That is all I know of them that night. I staid in this situation until six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you attempt to cry out - A. Yes, I did, at about an hour and a half after they left me. I then endeavoured to make myself heard; I laid still for about an hour and a half, I was afraid of making a noise.

Q. Could not you get any body to come to your assistance until six o'clock - A. No; I was heard by a great many people, but nobody came to my assistance till six o'clock.

Q. You say, they were three persons in soldiers clothes, were you able to distinguish the persons of either of them - A. I cannot possibly say; I believe their coats were turned up with green; I will swear to that.

Q. Have you any reason to believe you have seen either of these persons since - A. Yes; I believe the prisoner at the bar is one; he was the person that changed clothes with me; I believe he put my clothes on.

Q. How long do you think he was left over your person - A. About half an hour; he was not the person that was left centry with me; the prisoner was close to me near half an hour, as near as I can guess. I firmly believe him to be one of the three.

Q. Have you ever seen your property again - A. Yes; on the Tuesday following; this was on Wednesday, the 7th. On Tuesday following, the 13th, I came to Bow-street, I enquired if they had heard any thing of the man; I saw the prisoner; that Tuesday I went with the officer, he took me with him to the Piazzas, Covent Garden; there I saw a bundle, with my gaiters, shoes, and umbrella.

Q. Were you sure the shoes, gaiters, and umbrella, were your property - A. Yes; that were taken from me that night I was robbed; I am positive that they are mine. The officer then said, he thought he was not far off. We went up James-street, and found the prisoner at the Nag's Head, in James-street; the prisoner had a black coat on, a black waistcoat, and light coloured breeches, and other things; I did not notice much. The coat, the waistcoat, and one handkerchief, he had on, was mine; I was quite certain they were my property; the handkerchief round his neck, I am sure was mine. They were the property of which I was stripped of that night. He was then taken to Bow-street by the officer, and committed.

Q. At the time that you saw him, had you any recollection of his person at the time you saw him - A. No; I cannot say I had.

Q. What, you can be more certain now, than you were then - A. I believed the prisoner to be the person that took my clothes, and put them on. When I saw him in James-street, I thought him to be one of the persons that robbed me; I cannot speak positively, I believed him to be one of them then. After the officer took the prisoner into the room, he said, he bought the clothes of two soldiers, the morning after the robbery.

Q. Did he describe the morning - A. He said the next morning.

Q. Had you told him what day the robbery was committed - A. Not to him, I did not.

Q. Under the Piazzas you found your shoes, gaiters, and umbrella; was the prisoner shewn that bundle - A. Not then, I believe he was not; I do not recollect he was shewed that bundle. I never heard the prisoner claim the shoes and gaiters. My watch has never been found.

MARY GRIGG. I keep a pastry-cook's shop, under the Paizzas, Covent Garden, and sell breakfasts for

the market people. On Tuesday morning, after the robbery, three men come into my shop, between five and six in the morning, they were two soldiers, and the prisoner was dressed in a black coat and waistcoat; they were taken up on the Tuesday following.

Q. Had either of them a bundle with them - A. No; they came into breakfast. The prisoner wanted change of a ten-pound note.

Q. Did he shew you the note - A. No; he only asked if I could give change; I could not give change. He went out, and came in again, and paid for all the three breakfasts. I changed a shilling cash.

Q. to Longhurst. Do you recollect you were robbed on Wednesday, the 7th of September - A. Yes.

Mrs. Grigg. It was on Thursday, the 8th, that they breakfasted at the Piazzas.

Q. You told me, it was Tuesday, the next day after the robbery; how came you to say it was the 8th of the month - A. I recollect the 8th, by being market morning, the market mornings are Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays.

Q. Had you heard that this robbery had been committed at Staines before these person breakfasted with you - A. No. Afterwards I heard of the robbery at Staines.

Q. Did the officer come to you on the same day that these people breakfasted with you - A. No; on the Tuesday after the robbery.

Q. How came you to say the first time, they first came to breakfast with you on a Tuesday - A. I think it was on a Tuesday; I may be mistaken.

Q. Give me any reason why you thing it was the 8th - A. I cannot rightly say. On the Tuesday after they had breakfasts, the prisoner came alone, about eight o'clock in the morning as high as I can guess, and after breakfast, he asked me whether I would be so good as to take care of that parcel, he would call again. I took care of the parcel for him. That is the parcel, contained the shoes, gaiters, and umbrella, claimed by Longhurst.

Q. What time of the day did Longhurst come - A. I think between three and four in the afternoon. The officer and Longhurst took the prisoner together. Nobody was with the prisoner when he left the bundle.

Q. You say, the prisoner breakfasted with two soldiers, what was their uniform - A. A person in the shop said it was red turned up with green. I cannot say any thing.

WILLIAM BACON . I am an officer of Bow-street. The first information I received was from Longhurst, I think on the 8th; I patrol that road. It was in the day time he came to me; he said, he had been robbed the night before. I sent him to the office to give information there; during the time after he was gone, I received another information; in consequence of that, I went to London myself; I was then given to understand, that they had been to Covent Garden, and breakfasted. I went to Mrs. Grigg on the 9th, I examined her.

Q. Are you quite sure it was not the same day that you first received information from Longhurst - A. I am not certain; I think it was the 9th, the day after Longhurst had been with me.

Q. to Mrs. Grigg. Do you recollect Bacon coming to your shop about the robbery - A. Yes: I think it was the day after the men breakfasted with me.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect the soldiers that were with me, having the bundle, and leaving it there the morning they breakfasted with me - A. No, they did not. It was left the second breakfasting time, you breakfasted there by yourself.

COURT. Q. to Bacon. You went to this woman's shop and made enquiry - A. I did. On Tuesday, the 13th, I got another information, I came to London again; when I came to the office, I saw the prosecutor again. I took the prosecutor with myself; I said, come along with me; I took him to Mrs. Grigg's, and shewed him the shoes, gaiters, and umbrella; he said, they were all his property, as soon as he saw them. After that, I said, come along with me, he is not far off; at last, we found him at the Nag's Head; the prosecutor saw the clothes at the Nag's Head, and claimed them. I asked the prisoner how he came by them; he said, he bought them of two soldiers. At that time, the prisoner did not know that we had got the the bundle at Mrs. Grigg's. He said, he had bought them of two soldiers.

Q. Did he say who the two soldiers were, or where he bought them - A. I asked him if they did not belong to the 45th.

Q. Is the uniform of the 45th scarlet turned up with green - A. It is. He said, the two soldiers were of the 45th. I said, you are a deserter as well as them; he acknowledged that he was a deserter.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Exeter with two of these men, there was a third man, he was dressed in regimentals, his name was Brown; they said, we had better go on; they walked on before me; about four miles from Salisbury, we went into a public-house; when we went out, I walked on before them. The third man had some coloured clothes, he shewed me a black coat and waistcoat. I have not seen the other man since, until I came into London. I gave the third man, six shillings and an old brown coat for the black coat and waistcoat, that the officer took from me. They told me when I saw them again in London, they wanted me to buy some clothes for one of them; I told them I would do it, but at that time it was too early, there were no shops open. They then said, they would go and have something to drink, and the two soldiers had this bundle with the shoes, gaiters, and the umbrella. We went to a public-house, and asked the landlord for change of the ten-pound note; he could not. They had no money; one of them gave me his watch to get some money until he got change for the ten-pound note; he gave me the watch to get three shillings on it, that they might get something to eat; I went with it. I then asked the landlord where we might get something to eat; the landlord directed me to this house. We breakfasted there; she charged three shillings and sixpence for the three. I went back for sixpence of the man where I had left the watch; I then came

back, and paid the sixpence; we all came out together, and one of the men that had the bundle left it there: we all then went to where I had left the watch, from there to the public-house: there I left them, and went and bought clothes for one of the men. I brought the clothes back, and the change of the ten-pound note. I paid for what they had, and three shillings and sixpence for the watch. I then put the clothes on; I took a handkerchief out of the bundle, and put it on my neck; the shoes and gaiters I never wore. I put the coat and waistcoat on; the waistcoat I exchanged for a linen one; the black waistcoat belonging to the black coat being too short for me, I paid two shillings for the linen waistcoat and the black one. On Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, I slept at Mr. Salter's house; Monday was the first day I came into London.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-107

801. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Allen , two guineas, two three-shilling bank tokens, two shillings, two sixpence, and eight 1 l. bank notes , the property of John Wesley .

JOHN WESLEY . I am a coach-plater ; I lodge in Samuel Allen 's house, No. 10, Stone cutter-buildings, Lincoln's-inn-fields, in the parish of St. George's in the Fields . I lost the money between Sunday week and last Sunday night; last Sunday week it was in my box the bank notes, gold, and silver; there were eight one-pound notes, two guineas, two three-shilling pieces, two shillings, and two sixpences, all my property. On Thursday morning I found my box was open.

Q. Why do you accuse this man of taking it - A. On Saturday evening, I had occasion to go to my box for change, and saw all my money was gone. I suspected the prisoner; he lodged in the house, and he slept out of his lodgings. On Sunday morning, I went to the officer, we went in search of the prisoner, and found him in Leg-alley, in a one pair back-room; the officer, and me, went into the room, and saw the prisoner; I told the officer that was the man; as soon as the officer had got hold of him, he pointed to me, and said, that is the man have robbed; he said, spare my life, my mother will make up the money to you again that I have made away with. The officer went to search him; he would not willingly be searched, he was obliged to tie his hands; we found on his person three one-pound notes, one guinea, and five three-shilling peices. That was all that we found upon him.

Q. Could you identify the notes - A. One of them.

Q. Was there any other lodgers in the house - A. Yes; four or five besides the prisoner and me.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS. I am an officer. On Sunday morning, the prosecutor came to me, and said, he had been robbed; I went to Leg-alley, and there I found the prisoner in a one pair back room, with a bundle in his hand, and a great stick in the other; he was just going away. The prosecutor pointed him out to me. I proceeded to search him he said, that is the man that I have robbed; he hoped the prosecutor would spare his life. He would not be searched; I was obliged to tie his hands; I then searched him, and found three one-pound notes, a guinea, and five three-shilling pieces. He wanted the prosecutor to forgive him; he said, his mother would give him the money again not to appear against him, it was a drunken job; he was very sorry for it. These are the one-pound notes that I found upon him.

Prosecutor. This is one of the notes that I lost; I am sure of it; I marked it upon the corner; I wrote upon it before I lost it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to get a place of work; on my return, I met five of my shipmates; I stopped with them until Saturday. On Thursday they passed the board of Admiralty at Greenwich; on Saturday they made a subscription for me; I got five pounds and some silver.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-108

802. HUGH FARRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , nine pair of stockings, value 30 s. the property of John Marnder , privately in his shop .

JOHN MARNDER . I am a hosier ; I live in the parish of St. Martin's in the fields . On Saturday night, the 17th of September, I was sitting in the parlour; I came into the shop, and found the prisoner brought into the shop, charged with having stolen the stockings.

THOMAS DOBSON . I am a linen-draper; I live directly opposite to Mr. Marnder. I was standing at my own door; there are a number of these boys in the neighbourhood. I saw the prisoner looking in at Mr. Marnder's shop for five minutes; he put his foot in the shop, snatched a bundle of stockings, and run away with it; I pursued him, and brought him back, and gave him into the custody of the constable.

ISAAC PIKE . I am an officer. I produce the stockings.

Prosecutor. The stockings are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to go to the Philanthropic Society, if you please.

GUILTY aged 10.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-109

803. MARY RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , two shirts, value 5 s. a shift, value 4 s. a frock, value 3 s. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. a shawl, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of James Metcalf , from the person of Elizabeth Fuller .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only stating the goods to be the property of Elizabeth Fuller .

ELIZABETH FULLER . How old are you - A. Going on six years old.

Q. Now, tell us what happened to you - A. On Saturday night, I was fetching some clothes to be mangled; a girl took them from me at my mama's door.

Q. What girl was it - A. She was dressed in a blue and white gown; she said, let me take them to your door; I screamed, and said, this is the door, and then she run away with my bundle.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the woman - A. It is; I never saw her before; she had a blue and white gown on. When I saw the prisoner at the watchhouse I knew her again.

MRS. MEDCALF. On the 6th of August, I sent my little girl with the mangling I had mangled; the gentlewoman returned them. I heard the child scream, this is my mothers door; I went out directly; I saw the prisoner running, with the bundle under her arm, and the child running after her. The prisoner dropped the bundle; it was picked up, and given to me, I saw the prisoner with the bundle under her arm. These are the things; they were in my care; I had them to mangle.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-110

804. BENJAMIN HOOKHAM and JOSEPH WOOLLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , three shirts, value 12. three neck-handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a pair of breeches, value 6 d. the property of Edward Harewater .

EDWARD HAREWATER . I am a tin-plate worker : I lodge at Mr. Clark's, No. 10, Leather-lane . I lost these things on Wednesday, the 31st of August; I do not know how they were taken. All I know is, I lost my property.

ISAAC CLARK . I keep the house No. 12. in Leather-lane About half past three, on the 31st of August, I heard a great noise in my garret; I went into the room; I saw Hookham in the room, he had his right foot on a chair; he got out, and went on to the other house, and when I got out, I saw another person on the roof; I said, what, are there two theives come to rob me; Hookham said, I am come to see if any plumbing business is wanted here. I then saw the prisoner Woolley on the roof of the other house; I did not see any thing in their possession. When I saw them at the house where they were it work at, I said, you are the fellows that got over the roof of the house; Woolley then said, whatever is deficient I will make it good, because he had engaged Hookham to come and work for him that afternoon.

MR. MOORE. I am the employer of Woolley and his partner; I employed Woolley to paint this empty house, it is mine.

CORNELIUS NORRIS. I heard Mr. Clark's house had been robbed, I went to Mr Moore's empty house to look for the things that were lost from Mr. Clark's house; I found the shirts, stockings, and handkerchief, in the cellar of the empty house. I produce the property.

JOHN HOLLEY. There was an alarm that Mr. Clark had been robbed; I went to the door of 39, Charles-street; a man attempted to come out, my brother stopped him. I then kept a strong guard, that no man should come out; I went into the first room; I saw Hookham; I asked him where the other man was. I said, you were robbing Clark just now; then I saw Woolley in the back parlour, with the paint-pot in the window; he was attempting to mix paint. He was not there on my entering the house.

MATTHEW HOLLEY . I stopped Hookham as he was coming out of the house. When I spoke to him, he ran up stairs, and made no answer.

Prosecutor. These are all my things.

Hookham's Defence. I am in the habit of being a labourer; I was sent to this house to work; I began to work at the top of the house; I was cleaning out the gutter; he asked me if I robbed his room; I said, no; I am wiping out the gutter. He said, I had; I said, I had not. I proceeded on with my work.

Woolley's Defence. I had this house to paint in Charles-street for Mr. Moore; I employed Hookham to clean the wood work, to get it ready for me to paint; they came into the house, and said, some man had made his escape; after that, they said, they had found two pair of stockings, after the man had escaped.

HOOKHAM, GUILTY , aged 46.

WOOLLEY, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-111

805. MARGARET RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , four sheets, value 1 l. two tablecloths, value 1 l. a counterpane, value 3 s. and an apron, value 1 d. the property of Elizabeth Davis , widow .

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am a widow woman; I live in Well's-row, Islington. On the 26th of July, I gave the prisoner these things to take to the manglers, about one o'clock in the day; she never returned with them. The prisoner lodged with me two nights.

ELIZABETH CAREY. Margeret Ryan brought me these things to mangle, on the 26th of July, in the forenoon; she came for them again, and paid me for the things, and took them away. The things have never been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to look after a place, Mrs. Davis gave me these things to take to the manglers; she told me to fetch them back again; when I came out of the manglers with the things I met a woman, she asked me if I was out of a situation; I said, I was. She told me, she knew a place; she sent me after a place; she held the things until I came out, and when I came out, she was not there. Mrs. Davis's daughter came after the things; I told her the same as I tell now. They took me up two or three days afterwards.

Prosecutrix. On the 26th of July, she took the things; she was not taken until the 17th of August. We told her to bring them home, and gave her from the Monday till the Wednesday.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-112

806. THOMAS TOWNSHEND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a

purse, value 6 d. and 17 s. 6 d. the monies of Luke Flannaghan .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only stating it to be the property of Michael M'Lockey .

LUKE FLANNAGAN . I am a soldier in the 67th regiment . I lost my purse on Saturday morning, between four and five in the morning; it was laying on the chair by the side of M'Lockey. The prisoner came into our room between four and five in the morning; he took my purse, and shook the silver out into his hand. The prisoner lodged in the same house. I am sure he is the same man. I have known him three weeks back.

Q. You lost seventeen shillings and sixpence - A. Yes.

MICHAEL M'LOCKEY. On the 10th of September, between four and five o'clock in the morning, the prisoner bursted our door open; he came into in the 67th regiment the room, and came to the chair where my silver laid; he took the purse; he shook the silver into his hand; he threw the purse on the chair, and run down stairs. I followed him into the yard, and asked him for the money; he said, whatever money there was, it was in the purse. I am sure he is the man. I had the care of the money.

RACHEL HUSSEY . I was in the room at the time; I saw the prisoner come into the room between four and five in the morning; he took the trowsers off the chair, took the purse out, shook the silver out, and threw the purse on the chair.

WILLIAM MONDAY. I apprehended the prisoner. I searched him, and found nothing but base coin about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into their room. I had been drinking. I sat upon a chair until between seven and eight in the morning; I never went out of the room. This girl slept in the same bed between the two soldiers. I went into the Ship public-house; these people came and swore I robbed them; I never stirred out of the public-house until they searched me.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-113

807. SAMUEL WYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , four pounds weight of ham, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Gammage .

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I am a cheesemonger , 24, King-street, Seven Dials . I lost the ham on the 27th of August, I saw the ham taken from the prisoner.

SAMUEL GAMMAGE . I saw the prisoner come and take the ham off the table, and lay it on the counter; he went out into the street with it. I went after him, and took it out of his hand, and delivered him to the watchhouse. This is the ham; it is my father's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime, as to my knowing of taking it, I being so much intoxicated. I do not know where it happened that night. I did not know where I was until I found myself in the watchhouse. On the 4th of March, fourteen years ago, I received a kick from a dray horse; I was given over as dead, and when I drink a little drop I do not know what do; had I been sober I am sure it never could have happened.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-114

808. HENRY BOYLE was indicted for burglariously stealing, on the 3d of September , a looking-glass, value 10 s. three pictures, value 4 s. and a tablecloth, value 6 s. the property of Daniel Duggins .

ELIZABETH DUGGINS . I am the wife of Daniel Duggins ; I live at No. 1, Elbow-lane, Ratcliffe-highway ; my husband is a sailor . The prisoner came to my house on the 3d of September, he said he was discharged from on board a man-of-war. I lent him some money, and gave him a supper. I left the house in his care, and went out, and when I returned the prisoner was gone; I directly missed my looking-glass, four pictures, and a tablecloth. There was nobody in the house when I went out but the prisoner. I have never seen the articles since. I saw the prisoner the next morning at the Sun public-house in Sun-yard; I took two officers in with me. I was afraid of going in by myself; I charged him with robbing me; he said, me rob you.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner. When the prosecutrix charged him with robbing her he denied it until I locked him up; he then said if I would let him out he would shew me what he had done with the property; he took me to several places. I could not find the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a state of intoxication. I did not know what I was doing of.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-115

809. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , two planes, value 6 s. the property of Samuel Wiatt .

THOMAS STAPLETON . I am a watchman in Marybone. On the 5th of August, a quarter before four in the morning, in John-street, Edgware-road, a man hallooed to me, watchman, there is a thief in the road; he has come from a new building with some tools of the workmen. I seized the prisoner, and took him. The prisoner had got two planes, two trowels, a hammer, and nails, and some small tools. I asked him where he got them tools; he said, from home; he lived at Paddington. I took him to the watchhouse.

Prosecutor. The two planes are mine. I am a carpenter; I was working in Portland-place, Edgware-road. I missed the planes on the 3d of August.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined 1 year , publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-116

810. NATHAN GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , two sacks, value

5 s. and two pecks of flour, value 5 s. the property of Christian Dill . And WILLIAM HOOPER for feloniously receiving the said flour, he knowing it to be stolen .

CHRISTIAN DILL. I am a baker , 366, Oxford-street. The prisoner, Gibbs, was a servant of mine, Hooper was a muffin baker, he kept a muffin shop in Adam and Eve-court, facing of my shop. On the 10th of August, William Somersett , of Bayswater, passed my door; he gave me information.

JOHN MILLER . I am a servant to Mr. Dill. On the 10th of August, I missed a bushel of flour out of a sack; I told my master of it.

WILLIAM SOMERSETT. I live at Bayswater; I keep a stall. On the 10th of August, I was going to Billingsgate; I was passing by Mr. Dill's house about ten minutes before five in the morning; I saw the prisoner Gibbs come out of the shop with a sack with flour in it; he put the sack down outside of the door; he then pulled the door; he ran across the road with the sack of flour, and went up Adam and Eve-court. Upon my return from Billingsgate, I made it known to Mr. Dill.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I went to the house of the prisoner Hooper with a search warrant. I asked Hooper for the flour that Gibbs had brought in that morning, the 10th of August. Hooper made no reply. I had a brother officer with me, and Mr. Dill. I repeated the question, and told Hooper that I had a search warrant, that he had better give it up. He told us it was in the drawer; he shewed us the drawer; the drawer was full; he had emptied the flour out of the sack in the drawer; he shewed us the sack, it was on a shelf; I asked him how much he had paid for it; he said, nothing. I told him to empty the flour into the sack, which he did. Mr. Dill said the sack was his; he gave no account how he came to receive it so soon in the morning; Hooper was then taken into custody. I afterwards took Gibbs into custody for stealing the flour. Gibbs denied the charge.

Gibbs' Defence. I was very unwell in the morning, I went home to get something to drink.

Hooper's Defence. I went out at five o'clock in the morning, and did not return till near seven; I then found the flour in my drawer.

GIBBS, GUILTY , aged 25.

HOOPER, GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-117

811. ROBERT HURD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a shirt, value 2 s. the property of Jane Rivers , widow .

JANE RIVERS. I am a widow; I live in Sun-yard, Nightingale-lane . I missed the shirt on Saturday the 10th of September, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. The shirt hung out of the two pair of stairs window.

PATRICK GIBBONS . I went to the prosecutrix in Sun-yard; I saw the prisoner; I pulled off his hat, and found this shirt in his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this woman's room. I asked to lay down, and when I had laid down two or three bad girls came into the room. This shirt was put into my hat by the bad girls. They took all the money out of my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-118

812. JOSEPH HOPKINS , alias FINCH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July, from the person of David M'Taggart , a tin-case, value 2 s. 6 d. and six 2 l. bank notes , his property.

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of Thomas Lister .

DAVID M'TAGGART. I am a soldier, in the 2nd Royal Queen's regiment .

Q. Were you employed by Lister to take any property of his - A. Yes; on the 27th of July, I had six two-pound bank notes, and instructions of his; this tin box was in my left hand coat pocket; I went to the Angel inn, to go by the coach, about five o'clock in the afternoon. I know the tin box was in my pocket when I was at the Angel inn. I saw the prisoner and another man with him at the Angel inn tap-room. The prisoner was by when Lister handed me the tin box, with the notes, to take care of for him. We wanted to go by the coach; I went out to see for a cheaper coach at the Bull and Mouth. Thomas Lister remained in the tap-room. The prisoner and his companion left the Angel tap-room when I did. I had come half-way down Angel-street when the prisoner's companion laid hold of my arm, as if to scrape acquaintance with me. The prisoner came behind me, and picked my pocket of the tin box, the six two-pound notes, and the instructions. I felt the prisoner do it; he ran away; his companion ran in the rear; the prisoner before me. I pursued the prisoner, seized him, and took the tin box out of his hand. An officer came up, took the prisoner into custody, and took the tin box from me. It was examined; the six two-pound bank notes were in it.

THOMAS LISTER . I am an out-pensioner of Chelsea hospital. On the 27th of July, I gave M'Taggart my tin box, containing six two-pound bank notes and the instructions. I recollect seeing the prisoner at the Angel tap, and his companion.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a porter; I live in Bell-court, St. Martin's-le-grand. I heard the cry of stop thief, and I saw the prisoner running. There is no thoroughfare to the court. I saw M'Taggart running, calling, stop him; he came up, and took the tin box out of his hand. The constable came and took the prisoner and the box.

JOSEPH BRANCH . I am a constable. I secured the prisoner and the box; this is it.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the tin box coming down Angel-street; I returned him the box immediately he asked me for it.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-119

813. JOHN HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a bag, value 2 s.

and half a pound weight of feathers, value 18 d. the property of Roger Wood , Charles Nightingale ; and Ambrose Eade .

CHARLES NIGHTINGALE. My manufactory is in Maiden-lane, Islington; Ambrose Eade and Roger Wood are my partners. The prisoner was my labourer .

THOMAS SWANTON. I am a servant to these gentlemen; they are feather dressers . In consequence of suspicion, I was ordered to watch the prisoner. On Monday evening, the 29th of August, the prisoner was at work in the loft where the feathers are. I looked through a hole in the partition; I saw him turn his breeches down, wrap a bag round him, and button his breeches over it it. It was an empty large bag; and I saw him put a small bag of feathers in his hat.

EDWARD COOPER. I am a constable. I was sent for. I searched the prisoner. I took the bag from his breeches, and the bag of feathers out of his hat.

THOMAS ROOGE . I compared the mark on the bag with the stock list; they corresponded. I have no doubt the bag and the feathers are my employers property.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I asked the prisoner how he came to rob his master; he said he was very sorry for it; he was tempted to do it.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-120

814. MARIA OLDFIELD , alias MARTIN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , from the person of John Vaughn , four 1 l notes , his property.

JOHN VAUGHN . I am a tailor ; I live in Montague-court, Little Britain. I lost four one-pound notes on the 20th of July, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I had been at the George in St. Martin's-le-grand, at my benefit club; I went into the public-house about nine o'clock; I staid till ten o'clock.

Q. How came you to lose your notes - A. I met with this young lady, the prisoner. I spoke to her first; she asked me to go with her; I went with her to Mr. Cohen's house, in New-rents; it is a house for the reception of men and women. I was perfectly sober. At Mr. Cohen's I had a glass of shrub; I had five one-pound notes in my pocket-book. I changed a one-pound note there I staid with the prisoner half an hour there; there was nobody else in my company, only the prisoner and me.

Q. You left the George at ten o'clock; where had you been - A. I went home, and then a friend and me walked about the streets.

Q. Had you been picking up women together - A. We were looking about us; we were returning home when I met the Molloy, my friend, took a woman with him into the house. I went up stairs with the prisoner. Molloy stopped down stairs, waiting for me. I returned down stairs. She came out of the house before me. I paid the people of the house as I was coming out. I felt for my pocket-book, I found my notes were gone. I did not look at my pocketbook before she left me.

Q. How do you know it was not gone before that time - A. I looked at my pocket-book when I went into the house; I am sure I had four one-pound notes with me. I looked after she; I could not tell which way she went. This was on Tuesday night. I did not see the prisoner until the next Tuesday, a week after, and then at the watchhouse she said if she had so much money she would return it me. She never admitted that she had taken it.

EDWARD MOLLOY . Q. Were you at this club - A. Yes; I came away at half past ten, and then Vaughn and I walked about the street. When he went into Cohen's, I knew he had five pounds, and as Vaughn came down stairs, he said let me see if my money is right. He examined the pocket-book; the notes were gone. This was between the 19th and 20th of July. The prisoner was not taken till a week afterwards; she then said if she had so much money about her she would return it.

JOSEPH BRANCH . I apprehended the prisoner. I believe she is an unfortunate woman of the town.

Prisoner. Both these men were very tipsey.

Q. to Molloy. Had you been drinking - A. A little; we had share of three pots of beer. I was perfectly sober, and the prosecutor was sober too.

Prisoner's Defence. I left Molloy and the prosecutor talking with three or four women in St. Martin's-le-grand; he and the prosecutor were arm in arm together; I wished them good night; they left me and wished me good night.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-121

815. DAVID RUSSELL and REBECCA RUSSELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a watch, value 1 l. a pair of blankets, value 10 s. a pair of sheets, value 14 s. a fender, value 5 s. and a set of fire irons, value 5 s. the property of Nicholas Hughes , in the dwelling-house of William Galatly .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-122

816. BENJAMIN WOOLFE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lloyd , about the hour of four in the night of the 23d of September , and stealing therein, two great coats, value 2 l. the property of William Vaughn .

JOSEPH COOPER . I was an officer at that time at Queen-square office; I am not at present. I only know that to the prisoner's house to execute a search warrant, and found the coats. I know nothing of Mr. Lloyd's house being broken.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-123

817. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of August a bag, value 50 s. the property of Sarah Mindenhall , widow .

SARAH MINDENHALL . I am a widow; I have

nothing but what I work hard for at the wash-tub and had a pig about five months. I lost that pig on the 31st of August. It was lost from the waste where it was grazing, about Little Stanmore.

Q. Why do you accuse this man of taking the pig - A. I have lost several things out of my garden, and one night in particular I had all my lines cut down. I suspected the prisoner.

Q. What is he - A. A patrol.

Q. Do you know any thing about this pig - A. I bought this pig to fatten; I never saw it after it went out; I sought after it. On the evening of the 31st of August I was against the prisoners back gate of his garden, the prisoner's wife saw me, she shut the door as soon as she saw me. The next morning the house was shut up. I got a search warrant. We found the pig's entrails under ground in the garden. They were scarcely cold, and the hairs of the pig were in the garden, where they poured the water down when they scalded the pig.

Q. By hair, you mean the bristles - A. Yes, and underneath the entrails was a calf skin likewise.

FRANCIS HODGES . I am a farmer. I was there after the search was made. I saw the entiails of the pig dug from a wall at the back part of Wright's house. I also saw the hair of the pig that formed the sediment of a pail of water, by which it had been scalded. I also saw part of a calf skin that was dug out near the same hole that the entrails were, in a putrid state, as though it had been buried some time. I saw the head of the pig, together with some of the rest of the carcase after it had been found in a pond in a different place. The pond was about two fields from Wright's house; it is the nearest pond to Wright's house. The pig was cut to pieces in a bad manner, not in a butcher-like manner. From every appearance it had not been stuck; his skull had been dashed in, or beat in, smashed to pieces. There was to two or three guts, parts of the tongue. There was also in the pond the other part of the tongue; it was torn in two; I should not suppose it was cut; it was in a ragged state; the other part of the tongue was to the head that I saw on the 1st of September. The water in the pail had been emptied. It appeared as if done with caution.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I am a constable of the parish of Little Stanmore. On the 1st of September, William Prentis came to me, and said he had a search warrant to search John Wright 's house. I then went with him to the house. We searched all over the house, and found nothing; then William Prentis went into the garden, he saw a piece of ground that had darely been opened; it was out of that hole the pigs onward were picked up. I told Wright he must go with us. I secured him in the cage until the next morning. The next morning I heard he had broken out of the cage. We thought he would go to Bow-street for his money. We came to Bow-street, and there we found him outside of the office. He was then committed to New Prison.

WILLIAM WHITE . I am the headborough of Little Stanmore. I dug in Wright's garden; nobody directed me; my own judgment led me there and nothing else. I am in the habit of mowing ground, I saw the ground had been fresh mowed. The pales are four feet high. The paling was not broken then. The prisoner broke the paling down about half after two o'clock in the morning, when he took the horse out to come to Bow-street. That was after we had left him in the watchhouse. Mr. Stone first saw the park in the pond.

SAMUEL STONE . I am a farmer and innkeeper at Little Stanmore. I found part of the pig in one of my ponds in my field.

Q. Did you observe the head - A. No. I found two legs, a shoulder, and part of a rib, and some odd bits. Another person found the head. It had been killed in a very bad manner. I can only say I lost a call in the beginning of May. We supposed that was the calf skin.

Mr. Adolphus. Was the pork floating or sunk - A. Some floating and some sunk.

DANIEL WHITE. I am a baker, and constable of Isleworth. Mr. Stone first found the pork; he sent for me. I searched the pond, and found the head. The skull was entirely knocked into the brain. It never was stuck. I found every joint except the spare rib. It is cut in a curious way.

JOSEPH DELL. Between nine and ten o'clock on the 1st of September, I was by the cage after the prisoner was put into it. The other patrol was near the cage. The prisoner said, Jack is that you; when you go home tell them to take that out of the house. Jack was on horseback. There were many boys about the cage.

Q. Do you know what that was - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. This is a malicious prosecution. At the time they searched my premises they were coming away they were met by the prosecutrix and her daughter. She accused them of not having done their duty. She said she was sure her property was there. Her daughter pointed to the place where they found the entrails.

JOHN VICKRAY . I am a patrol on the Edgware-road. On the night of the 1st of September, I was at the cage with Wright's wife. I was on horseback.

Q. Did he give you any direction about his house - A. No, not a word. His wife stood at the gate when I went past. I saw no boys there.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-124

818. JAMES TUCKER and ANDREW WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , four pounds weight of bacon, value 4 s. the property of Robert Griffiths . And SARAH BROADFIELD , alias GILLINGHAM , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, she well knowing it to be stolen .

ROBERT GRIFFITHS . I am a chandler ; I live at the corner of Great Saffron-hill.

Q. On Friday evening, the 12th of August, do you remember some boys coming to your shop - A. It was the night before the boys came.

Q. How many in number came - A. I think as many as seven or eight came; it was just after dark; they asked for a halfpenny worth of small beer; the girl drawed it; they drank it; they handed it from one to another. I did not notice the boys going away. I can only identify them from seeing them in the watchhouse; two of the boys are here were in my shop; and Dearns. My wife missed a piece of bacon the next morning, it was laying in the shop under two sugar bags. The next morning Barnley brought the bacon to me.

JOHN DEARNS Q . Do you know these two boys, Tucker and Ward - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being taken up by Barnley - A. Yes.

Q. The night before you were taken up by Barnley, had you been to Mr. Griffiths's shop - A. Yes

Q. Were these two boys Tucker, and Ward, with you - A. There were six boys altogether.

Q. For what purpose did you go there - A. To endeavour to take this piece of bacon. When I went into the shop, I asked for a halfpennyworth of small beer; the beer was given us, and while it was handed about, Tucker took this piece of bacon.

Q. Did you see him take it - A. No. I knew what he was going to do; we all knew it.

Q. After he had got the bacon, and you all had the beer, what did you do - A. We bursted out a laughing, and went out of the shop; we ran up Saffron-hill; towards Holborn; that took us towards Mrs. Gillingham's.

Q. Had you known Mrs. Gillingham's before - A. No; only what the boys told me. I knew they were going to Mrs. Gillingham's.

Q. What became of the bacon - A. We sold it to her; Ward and Tucker took it to her; we waited at a place while they went in; Ward and Tucker went to her shop. When they came out they brought a shilling; we spent the shilling, some bought fruit and others bought bread with it; we divided it; we all had two-pence a piece. About four o'clock the next afternoon, we were all taken up.

JOHN BARNLEY. I am an officer. On the evening of Friday, the 12th of August, I was in a shop directly opposite Mrs. Broadfield's; I was in Mrs. Cook's shop. While I was there, I observed the boy, Tucker, go in with something under his jacket, and hand it over the counter; I then saw Mrs. Broadfield take it into the back room.

Q. What was it - A. I could not exactly see what it was then; she took it into the back room; she either put it on a shelf or hung it to the ceiling; she reached up high with it; she then came back into the shop, opened the drawer, took out some money, and gave it to the boy Tucker; Ward was with him.

Q. Did Ward go in with him - A. I think he did; if he did not, he went to the door with him. I got a search warrant, and searched Mrs. Broadfield's house the next day; I searched that place where I saw her reach her hand up; my brother officer would search the place and found that piece of bacon; it was hung up to the ceiling, just at the place where I had seen her reach her hand up. I had learned of the boys where they had taken it from. I sent for Mr. Griffiths; he claimed it. This is the piece of bacon. Mrs. Broadfield told me if I could get the bill thrown out, she would give me forty pounds; I told her it must go on in its regular course.

Mr. Griffiths. This is my piece of bacon; I cut it myself. The moment I saw it, I knew it.

Tucker's Defence. She told me to get more bacon, she would give me more money for it, and Mrs. Broadfield told me to cut gentlemen's seals off, and afterwards Mrs. Gillingham said, not to bring bacon, to bring better things.

Ward's Defence. She told me not to bring bacon, but to bring better things.

Broadfield said nothing in her defence.

TUCKER, GUILTY, aged 11.

WARD, GUILTY, aged 9.

Judgment respited .

BROADFIELD, GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-125

816. JAMES TUCKER and MICHAEL WELCH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , three pounds weight of bacon, value 18 d. the property of James Charman . And ELIZABETH BROADFILD, alias GILLINGHAM , for feloniously receiving the same, she well knowing them to be stolen .

Mr. Gurney, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners was

ACQUITTED

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-126

817. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a deal plank, value 12 s. the property of William John Joliffe and Edward Banks . And THOMAS DAVIS for receiving the said plank, he knowing it to be stolen .

EDWARD BANKS. My partner's name is William John Joliffe ; we are agents for building the Strand bridge .

Q. Was there a plank missed by you at any time - A. It was missed a the latter end of August; it had been placed on the copper dams; after that, it was placed upon the pile head, to work an engine upon; it was nailed.

Q. Was it fastened when you saw it last - A. I cannot say. The engine was moved off it.

COURT. There is no evidence here whether it had drifted or not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-127

815. MARY NORRIS and CATHERINE HENLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Lamor Wood from his person .

THOMAS LAMOR WOOD. I live in George-street, Portman-square. On the 19th of July, I was returning from Hampstead; I cannot particularly say the time; it was between ten and twelve at night; I met with these two women at the corner of George-street, New-road; they were standing together they asked me if I would come with them; I went

with them into some field at the back of George-street ; I retired with Mary Norris ; the other went on about as far from me, as I am from you, sir. When I retired, I and Mary Norris were laying down, I felt something move my right hand breeches pocket; my watch was in that pocket; upon feeling that, I twisted the pocket round; about half a minute after that circumstance, she said to Catherine Henley , come here, I must go; Catherine Henley came up to me, and I took hold of her to be sure of one.

Q. Had you missed any thing - A. No. As I took hold of Catherine Henley, the other ran off as fast as she could. Directly I saw her run, I felt in my pocket, and missed my watch. I charged Henley with having a hand in stealing the watch. I said she knew who the other girl was; she said, no, she had never seen her before that night. I told her if she would tell me where to find Norris, I would let her go; she told me she would not tell, because she did not know. I left her with the watchman, and charged her with stealing my watch. I have seen my watch since.

Q. When you turned your pocket round did you feel your watch in your pocket - A. I did; it could not fall out after I twisted my pocket round.

GEORGE SQUIB. I was constable of the night. I apprehended Norris about four or five days after the transaction, in Puckeridge-street, St. Giles's; I told her if she would give up the duplicate of the watch, Mr. Wood would forgive her; she said, she had not got the duplicate, a friend pawned it for her, his name was William Jones ; if I went to the Falcon on Saturday night, I should find him there. I went there; the landlord did not know any body by that name. While I get the duplicate was sent to the watchhouse it was given by her to my wife, and when I came home, my wife gave it me. The watch was pledged at Mr. Collins's. This is the duplicate.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS . I am shopman to Mr. Collins, pawnbroker. I produce the watch; it was pawned by a man. I am sure this is the watch that I gave the duplicate, produced by Sqaib.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Norris's Defence Catherine Henley did not know I had got the watch; my shawl fill off, I picked the watch up with my shawl.

Henley's Defence. I am innocent.

NORRIS, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

HENLEY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-128

815. JAMES PIPER and JOHN CLARK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , eighteen remnants of cloth, value 10 l. the property of Thomas Russell .

THOMAS RUSSELL . I am a mans-mercer , No. 1, Water-lane, Blackfriars. I lost the property on Tuesday, August 9th, about two o'clock, in the afternoon; I sent the goods by the errand boy, his name is James Bumstead .

JAMES BUMSTEAD . On the 9th of August, I was met by Clark in Smithfield, he said are you going to Arnold's; I said, yes. He said, where have you been all this while, Mr. Russell promised to send me them three hours ago; he said; he was going back to measure the remnants. He asked me if I had brought the buttons; I said, yes. He said, he wanted six yards of the best black cloth, and some galloons; he told me to go back with him to Mr. Russell's; I went back about three or four yards with him; he then said, I need not go all the way to let him have the goods, and I had to run for the French cloth for Mr. Arnold; he took the goods off my shoulder, and took the buttons; I went back, and told Mr. Russell; he said, I had been swindled out of the goods. I am sure Clark is the person that took the goods from me; Piper was behind him; they seemed as if they were companion's together.

ANN SAVORY . I keep the George, in Wardour-street, Soho. I saw the prisoners in the public-house on Friday, the 12th of August, about twelve o'clock; they were together. Mr. Foy came in shortly after; I had sent a person for Mr. Foy; I thought there was an improper transaction going forward; they had a jew with them of a suspicious character; they were in the parlour a long while.

Q. Had Piper and Clark any thing with them at first - A. Not then. The jew came in afterwards; as soon as the jew came in, Clark went out; he returned in five minutes; he brought the cloth wrapped up in green baize; he took them in the tap-room; the parlour door is partly glass; he beckoned the jew, and Piper came with him into the tap, and shortly after Mr. Foy and Bennett came in.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. On Friday, the 12th of August, about eleven o'clock in the day, a person came to me from Mrs. Savory, stating that there were some suspicious characters at their house, and bid me go up to look at them in order to prevent their coming there another time. I went into the tap-room; I saw Joseph, the jew, sitting in a box, and the prisoner opposite. Joseph gave evidence here last April. On the left hand side of the jew, were these remnants of cloth, which I now produce. Joseph got up to go; I beckoned him; I immediately went in, and asked who the parcel belonged to; the two prisoners said, it did not belong to them; the other persons that were there, denied all knowledge of the bundle. I asked the prisoners whether they knew Joseph; they said, no, they did not know him at all. I opened the parcel, and found it contained a quantity of cloth. I took the prisoners into custody, and took them to the office. I advertised it; this gentleman came forward and claimed it.

Q. to Mrs. Savony. Are these the things that were wrapped up in green baize - A. Yes, I had seen the jew repeatedly with the prisoners at my house. I have never seen them since.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these things, and see whether they are your remnants - A. Yes, they are mine; they tally with my stock-book.

Piper's Defence. I know nothing of it; I never saw the lad in my life.

Clark's Defence. The same.

PIPER, GUILTY , aged 26.

CLARK, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-129

822. JOHN SIDNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , two sheets, value 14 s. the property of Mary Fletcher , in a lodging-room .

MARY FLETCHER . I live at No. 3, Earl's-buildings, Upper East Smithfield . On the 10th of July, I let the prisoner a lodging furnished with a bed and bedding. He was to pay me half-a-crown a week. He staid two nights. When he went away he took the two sheets; he never paid for the lodging. I have never found my sheets again.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE. I apprehended the prisoner; he said his mother would pay for the sheets if I would let him go.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the officer I knew nothing of the sheets.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 year , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-130

823. JOHN WESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , ten shirts, value 15 s. and a shawl, value 18 d. the property of John Borton .

ELIZABETH BORTON. I get my bread by the wash-tub. I lost my things on the 22nd of July; I live in a kitchen, 12, Brook-street, Fitzroy-square . I lost ten shirts; I was out about ten minutes, about half past eight in the morning, I went out my work; I left my husband's breakfast at the are, and a loaf and butter in the cupboard for him to get his breakfast. I came back at half after nine; I asked my husband if he had breakfasted; he said, no. There was nothing for him to eat; I looked in the cupboard; the loaf and butter was gone. I missed my shirts; a child said, a man had been in my room; he said, he came with something to be washed. Mr. Crocker has got my things.

EDWARD CROCKER . I am an officer. From information, I pursued the prisoner; I found him in the New-road, with a bundle at his back; I took him back to Mrs. Borton; she claimed the property in the bundle. I secured him. This shirt I took off the prisoner; he had put on a clean shirt out of the the bundle, and put this dirty one in it.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the New-road, this bundle laid before me; I went into the field, and put this clean shirt on.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-131

824. HANNAH HENDRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of August , a gown, value 3 s a waistcoat, value 18 d. and two handkerchiefs, value, 2 s. the property of Timothy Redding ; a pair of breeches, value 4 s. and a waistcoat, value 4 s. the property of Dennis Holland ; and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Ellen Carey .

JOHANNA REDDING . I am the wife of Timothy Redding . I lost a gown, waistcoat, and a handkerchief; I took the prisoner in as a lodger , and when I was out at work, she took these; things, a pair of smallclothes, and a waistcoat, belonged to my brother and a handkerchief, to a lodger; the officer found, the things.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I took the prisoner into custody. I found some duplicates upon her; these two handkerchiefs I found on her neck, Mrs. Russell owned.

CHARLES LOCAS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned with me, a pair of breeches and a waistcoat on the 3rd of August.

JOHN ANDERSON . I produce a pair of breches and handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner, with me.

DENNIS HOLLAND . This pair of breeches and this waistcoat are mine.

Mrs. Redding. This waistcoat and handkerchief are mine; the gown has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed; the prosecutrix lent me things to pledge.

Prosecutrix. I never lent her these things to pawn.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-132

825. SARAH MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a watch, value 2 l. two seals, value 6 s. a chain, value 6 d. two keys, value 2 d. and a broach, value 6 d. the property of Rowland Lamas , from his person .

ROWLAND LAMAS . I am a Swede . I lost my watch on Monday morning, between five and six o'clock. I met the prisoner about eleven o'clock at night; she took me to a house; I went to bed with her. She went out in the morning, and all my things were gone. I found my watch at the pawnbroker's. I am sure she is the woman.

MARY CHAMBERLAIN. The prisoner brought the watch to me on Monday morning; she asked me to go with her to get some money; she said, she had to receive three pounds; she only received fourteen shillings. Coming back, she said, she had got her husband's watch in her pocket; she asked me to pledge it. I pledged the watch for two pounds, in East Smithfield. I gave her the money, and the duplicate She gave me the duplicate and the chain and told me to take care of them until she saw me again.

JAMES WHITNEY. I am a pawnbroker. I produce the watch. The last witness, Chamberlain, pawned it with me, in company with the prisoner, on the 5th of September, about twelve o'clock at noon.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I took the prisoner into custody, on Sunday, the 11th of August; she told me I should find the duplicate of the watch at Mrs. Chamberlain's. I went to Mrs. Chamberlain; she gave me the duplicate. She told me the brooch was with her sister, in Cornwall-street. I went to her sister, and got the brooch; she said, she had given the brooch to her brother-in-law to keep for her sake.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, seals, and brooch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in this man's company two days and two nights at my own expence; he said he had no money; he gave me his watch to pledge. The brooch he gave me

Q. to prosecutor. How many days was she with you - A Sunday night. She left me on Monday morning. I gave her the money for the first night. The next morning she took three shillings from me and my watch.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-133

826. JACOB NASMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of August , a handkerchief, value 6 d. nine 1 l. bank notes, and one 5 l. bank note , his property.

JOHN MACKDONALD . I am a seaman , and so is the prisoner.

Q. What countryman is the prisoner - A. I cannot say. I was robbed in the public-house. I cannot say whether I was robbed by him or not. I was robbed of fourteen pounds; nine one-pound notes and a five-pound note. I lost it out of my pocket; it was in a pocket handkerchief.

JOSEPH FRANCIS. I keep the Sampson and Lion public-house. On the 20th of last month the prisoner and the prosecutor came into the house with six men in company with him. Mackdonald called for a pint of beer and half a pint of gin; the prisoner called for a pint of beer. The prisoner offered the prosecutor his beer. The prosecutor said, you had better come and sit here. He sat down. The prisoner drank some of his beer; the prosecutor offered him some of his gin. The prosecutor got drowsy; he laid his head upon the table. The prisoner thrust his hand over the table into the prosecutor's pocket, and took the black handkerchief out. I hallooed to him that insisted upon his giving the man his money back; he said he took nothing. I asked him the second time to give him the handkerchief. As soon as he went away I ran after him, and took the handkerchief from him. This is the handkerchief and the money.

Prosecutrix. That is my handkerchief and my money.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-134

827. MARY ANN PICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a sheet, value 12 s. and a pair of bellows, value 2 s. the property of Margaret Jones , spinster .

MARGARET JONES. I went out on the 1st of August; I did not return home till the next evening. I am an unfortunate woman. When I came home I found my door open; I missed my sheets and my bellows. The prisoner lived below stairs in the same house I did, in the room below stairs.

- I am a pawnbroker. I produced she pawned on the 1st of August by the prisoner; I sent her three shillings on it.

MARY CHAPMAN . I bought this pair of bellows of the prisoner on the 1st of August; I gave her thirteen pence for them.

Prosecutrix. That is my bellows and sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix and another unfortunate girl live in my house over my head; she asked me to pawn the sheet; I said it was too soon for the pawnbrokers to be open. The other woman told me to sell the bellows; I did. I took the duplicate of the sheet to the prosecutrix in the watch-house.

Prosecutrix. I never was in a watchhouse in my life.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-135

828. WILLIAM NORCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. the property of Charles Fisher , in a lodging-room A pair of boots, value 1 l. a pair of shoes, value 8 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Charles Miles .

HANNAH FISHER. I am the wife of Charles Fisher ; he is a locksmith . I live at 23, Bowling-street, Westminster . On the 14th of July, I let the prisoner part of a bed. Charles Miles had the other half of the bed; he had two sheets upon the bed. He came in about a quarter after eleven o'clock; he staid until morning, about twenty minutes past seven, then he went out; he returned back again for something. I asked him to lock the door, and return the key to me. I waited till he came down stairs. I took the key from him. I went up stairs directly, and missed my sheets and Miles's boots. My husband ran after him. I saw him in St. John's church-yard. I saw him with this small basket with the boots in it. I said, you have got the sheets. He went into the back parlour, and pulled the sheets from under his waistcoat, and the stockings. I saw the handkerchief; I said, you have got Miles's pocket handkerchief. I put my hand in the prisoner's pocket, and pulled out a shoe of mine. The prisoner gave me the other shoe.

CHARLES MILES . These are all my things.

Mrs. Fisher. These are my sheets.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 28.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury .]

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-136

829. JOSEPH SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Benson .

ANN BENSON. I am the wife of Thomas Benson ; he is a glass silverer . I lost my shirt from No. 4, New-street, Charles-street, Commercial-road . I had a yard full of linen; I had not room enough; I hung this shirt in the next yard. I saw the prisoner come off the step; I asked him what he had got there. I suspected he had taken something out of the yard.

When I saw him come off my shop I store his shirt, and took my husband's shirt from him. This is the shirt; it is mine.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-137

830. JOHN KEITH and JAMES EVES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of August , twelve handkerchiefs, value 12 s. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown, from their persons .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the 1st of August. I was in Hyde-park ; I first saw the prisoners about four o'clock in the afternoon They were in company together. I saw them about the canal where the naval fight was. I saw them very busy attempting to pick people's pockets about the canal. I had missed them about two hours. They went into the green park at the time the fireworks were going off. I saw them at the same actions there; they were picking pockets in the green park. They were going out; they were met by another: I knew him. I knew the prisoners. I knew the other man they met to be a thief. They were going out then. I followed them until they got to a public-house. I let them go into the public-house. When they were picking pockets it was impossible for me to get hold of them, the crowd was so great.

Q. Did you see them under any circumstance that you are quite sure they had actually taken pocket handkerchiefs - A. I was sure they had a number of handkerchiefs about them, and that they had actually effected their purpose. I followed them into a public-house to see what they had about them. I searched them regular. On Keith I found concealed in his smallclothes and at his back seven handkerchiefs. On Eves I found five in his smallclothes and pockets. I secured them. The handkerchiefs have been all advertised.

Q. Do you know the persons of those people whose pockets they were picking - A. I do not. I could not bring them forward.

Eves Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge in taking anything from any person whatever. I went to Hyde-park at the time of the fair. I fell in company with Keith at six o'clock in the morning. We came out of there, and went into the green park to see the fireworks. This young man kicked his foot against a bundle; he picked it up, and opened it; it contained these handkerchiefs. We went to the public-house, and called for a pot of beer. Johnson came and took us into custody.

Keith's Defence. What the other prisoner said, is a real fact.

KEITH, GUILTY , aged 20.

EVES, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-138

831. THOMAS O'NEIL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , sixteen handkerchiefs, value 8 s. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown, from their persons .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I am a officer. This happened on the 1st of August; after I had taken the other prisoners into custody, I went into St. James's Park, close by Spring-gardens ; there was a great crowd there. I saw the lad turn up a number of women gowns; I saw him take a white handkerchief from a lady's pocket; when he took the lady's handkerchief, he crept in between the people. The mob was so great, I could not see him; the pressure was so great, I could neither lay hold of him, or acquaint the lady. This was the handkerchief; it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night. I have not been able to acquaint the lady of her loss. I saw the prisoner attempt a gentleman pocket. He was in and out of the crowd near an hour, at this work before I could lay hold of him. At last I caught the prisoner in my arms, and brought him out of the crowd. The prisoner pretended to be in liquor, and by his own account he had enough to make him in liquor, by what he said. He was not in liquor. I searched him, and found sixteen handkerchiefs all about his body, from his chest to his knees. There were soldiers breast plates, bells, and toys, in his pockets. One of these white handkerchiefs I saw him take from a lady's pocket. Nobody appeared at the examination except his father. He acknowledged he had taken three handkerchiefs: he said he had only been out a month upon the game.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-139

832. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a silver table-spoon, value 5 s. the property of Jacob Dodd .

REBECCA DODD . I am the wife of Jacob Dodd ; I live at No. 50, Portpool-lane . I missed the silver spoon about three o'clock in the afternoon, about a month ago. I had seen it in the morning about ten o'clock. Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner came into the shop and had a halfpenny worth of beer. I saw the spoon in the shop before she came in; after she was gone I missed it. I went round to the pawnbrokers to see anybody had offered my spoon. I have seen the spoon again (it is broken now) at Mr. Armstrong's. I met with a broken spoon; he was going to buy it for old silver; I thought it was mine. The prisoner was present. As the spoon was broken, I should not like to swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-140

833. ABRAHAM SOPER was indicted for that he, on the 23d of July , was clerk to Thomas Goding and James Goding , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money and bank notes for them, that he being such clerk, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession a bank note for the sum of 10 l. for and on their account, and that he did afterwards embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

And OTHER COUNTS, for embezzling different bank notes.

THOMAS HAINES . I keep the Bricklayer's Arms, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square. I know the prisoner, he was collecting clerk to Messrs. Goding's,

Knightsbridge; he was in the habit of calling and receiving money of me for Messrs. Goding's by brewers . On the 23d of July, he called upon me, I paid him ten pounds,

Q. You publicans are in the habit of keeping a check-book - A. Yes; this is my check-book; the entries are in his hand-writing. There is an other writing in the book but his. I have seen him write often.

"July 23, by cash 10 l." That is his handwriting, I believe, from my own knowledge of his hand-writing. Here is a stamp receipt on the blotting paper. It is wafered on the blotting paper for the same sum.

"Cannon brewhouse, Knightsbridge. July 23, 1814, received 10 l. A. Soper." I am sure the receipt is his hand-writing.

THOMAS GODING . Q. I believe you carry on the business of a brewer at Knightsbridge - A. Yes, my partner's name is James Goding . I have no other partner. The prisoner was my collecting-clerk four years and a half. He was so in the month of July last. When he went out to receive monies this is the book in which it was his duty to make the entries of all monies he received. He had a book besides; he ought to made an entry in that book besides, at the time he received it; then he would bring his pocket-book into the accompting-house, and make the entry in that book of money he had received, and also his expences of what he had expended.

Q. Then on the footing of that book he would have to pay what money he had received, and take the money that he had expended - A. Yes.

Q. Does that book contain any account of monies received on the 23d of July - A. It does not.

Q. I observe there is sixpence expended at Mr. Haines, the prosecutor - A. I allowed sixpence or a shilling, or two shillings, just as he thought necessary. John Yandell is the cashier who would have received it.

Q. Did he ever accompt to you for that ten pound - A. He did not accompt to me; his usual course would be to accompt to Mr. Yandall; he generally signs the book for the money he receives for his expences.

Q. When did the prisoner quit your service - A. I discharged him on the 3d of August, when I discovered this.

Q. At the time that he quitted your service and left his book, did you ask him whether he had any other sum not accounted for - A. I did. I taxed him closely with this; he sat down, and wrote a number of names that he had not accounted for. I asked him to what amount he had gone; he said he was about two hundred pounds deficient.

JOHN YANDELL . I am cashier at Messrs. Godings. This book is the prisoner's hand writing.

Q. Did the prisoner account to you for the ten pounds received on the 23d of July - A. Never. If he had accounted for it, it would have been in that book.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-141

834. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , two gowns, value 10 s. and a petticoat, value 8 s. the property of Catherine Donnovan , spinster .

CATHERINE DONNOVAN . I am a servant out of place . I lost my gowns from my mother's house, 83, New Gravel-lane, Shadwell , on the 11th of August. I saw them about one o'clock in the way. At ten o'clock at night they were gone. I left them in my box in the one pair of stairs room. I saw my gowns again at the office. My petticoat has never been found. The prisoner broke open my mother's room while I was out looking after a place.

JOHANNA DONNOVAN . I am the mother of the last witness; her box was kept in my apartment. The prisoner came into my apartment; I ordered him him down stairs; he would not go. I bundled him down stairs, and locked my door, and put the key in my pocket. When I came home I found my door broken open. My daughter's box was in the room, when she came home she missed her gowns and petticoat.

WILLIAM JOHN HEWITT . I am a pawnbroker in Anchor and Hope-alley. A woman calling herself Margaret Roach pledged two gowns with me for ten shillings. The prisoner was with her. They both went away together.

SAMUEL JACKSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. I searched him; on him I found a duplicate of two gowns pledged for ten shillings.

Prosecutrix. I am sure these are my gowns.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came to London, the old woman asked me to give her a drop of gin. I treated her out of half a pint of gin. The old woman and her daughter said, as I had prize money to take I must give them three pound, or they would get a bill against me.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-142

835. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a saw, value 2 s. two guages, value 3 s. a square, value 1 s. a spike-bit, value 6 d. and a saw-set, value 6 d. the property of William Deckins .

WILLIAM DECKINS . I am a journeyman carpenter . I lost my tools on the 10th of September. I was working in Old Brompton-road. I left these tools in the building between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday night. I saw my tools the next morning in the constable's possession. The prisoner was then in custody.

MARY JONES . I am a servant. I live opposite of the building where the tools were taken away. I saw the prisoner come out of the house on Saturday evening, the constable followed him.

GEORGE HALL . I am a constable. From information I followed the prisoner, and took him into custody; he had a basket of tools with him.

Prosecutor. These are my tools.

Prisoner's Defence. The girl never saw me come out of the building. A man gave me the tools to carry for him. I have been a seaman twenty-two years, serving his Majesty.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-143

836. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , two yards of baize, value 3 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Kershaw .

MARY KERSHAW . My husband's name is Thomas Kershaw , he keeps a sale-shop . These things were stolen from his shop about a month ago. I was at home at the time. They were on a shelf in the shop. I was in the back room at the time the prisoner came in and reached his hand over the counter. He laid hold of a pair of pantaloons and a piece of baize. I followed the prisoner, and took him; he dropped the goods; I picked them up. He got away from me; he was taken again. When I saw him, I told him he was the man that had taken away my baize and pantaloons; he denied it.

JOHN SHAW . I am a constable. Mrs. Kershaw pointed the prisoner out to me; I took him into custody. He denied taking the goods. On my taking him to Lambeth-street office, he said he thought they had been of more value, or else he would not have taken them. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. They are my husband's property. The baize is worth three shillings and the pantaloons worth two shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I was sorry. On my going to Lambeth-street office, this officer met another officer, he said he was very unlucky since he had been in office; he said he had not got any blood money.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-144

837. MARY COTTON , alias CHATHAM , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a gown, value 5 s. the property of John Nixon .

JANE NIXON . I am the wife of John Nixon . On the 17th of August, I lost my gown. I hung it up to dry in Mr. Collins's timber-yard. I did not miss it. The officer came and took me to the office; there I saw the prisoner in custody, and my gown was there.

THOMAS COLLINS . I had given Mrs. Nixon leave to hang her clothes up in my timber-yard. The gates were open in the day time. I saw the clothes hanging there. I did not take notice of what was hanging. I saw the prisoner picking up wood in the yard. She turned the gown off the line, and dropped it into her apron. I laid hold of her, and took the gown out of her apron. The officer came; he took her to the police office. This is the gown.

Prosecutrix. That is my gown.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up three pieces of wood. The gentleman put the gown into my apron; he said he would make me suffer for it.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-145

838. SARAH SIMMONDS was indicted for that she, on the 10th of August , did by force take and carry away a certain male child of four months old, with intent to deprive James M'Donald and Mary M'Donald , the parents of the said child .

SECOND COUNT, with intent to steal the articles and apparel on and about the same child.

JAMES M'DONALD. Q. Perhaps your wife knows more about this than you do - A. No; we were both together. I live in Church-lane, St. George's.

Q. Did you lose a little boy at any time - A. Yes, about four months old. On the 10th of August I lost him. My wife and I were going to market together. We left our house a little before six in the morning. We took our infant with us; it was a boy; it was dressed. I carried the child. We were going to Billingsgate. I carried the child as far as the Seven Stars. Rosemary-lane. The prisoner stood at the door; she said, it is a fine child, let me kiss it; she took it out of my arms. I never thought of her taking it away. I went to the bar to drink my porter; my wife went with me. The woman staid outside at the door. I left the child in her arms.

Q. How long did you stay with your wife drinking your porter - A. About ten minutes, leaving my baby in this woman's arms, supposing it would be safe, and on my going to the door, the baby and the woman was gone. The bell of St. George's in the East was just ringing six o'clock. I looked up every place, I could not find the child. I got the bellman to cry the child. I am sure the prisoner is the woman that admired the child, and wanted to kiss it. I went home. George Sellars , the constable, brought the child to the Seven Stars, where it had been taken from. The next morning I saw the prisoner at the watchhouse in Poplar. I knew her. I am sure she is the woman that took my child. My child had no marks of violence on it when I got it again, only stripped of its clothes.

ELIZABETH M'DONALD. Q. Is that the child that was lost - A. It is; it is about five months old now; it is a boy. I and my husband went to market together on the 10th of August. I left the child in his arms while I went into the Seven Stars to get a pint of beer. I did not see who he permitted to take it.

Q. Did you see the woman when you went into the Seven Stars - A. I just saw the glimpse of the woman; I did not speak to her. My husband can speak to her. I was about ten minutes in the house; when I came out, the child was gone. I had the child cried by the bellman, and the lady of the house writ bills. I saw the child in the evening again. The constable brought it me with no shawl nor petticoat on. It had a shawl and a petticoat on. The shawl cost fourteen shillings; the petticoat was worth a shilling. I saw no violence on the child, only as I heard the prisoner beat it very much, because it would not suck her dry breast.

JOHN WHEEL. I am a constable of Poplar, Blackwall. I was called into the Green Man, Poplar, saying, there would be a bargain of a child for the parish if I did not look after it.

Q. How far is the Green Man, Poplar, from the Seven Stars, Rosemary-lane - A. About three miles and a half.

Q. Did you see the prisoner have any child - A. Yes; she beat it, and used the child most violently. The child appeared as if it was starving almost. It was in a girl of the town's lap when I saw it first.

The prisoner was by her. I thought the child looked too decent for the prisoner; the prisoner was very dirty, and the child very clean. I took the child from the girl of the town, and went to the prisoner with it; I said to the prisoner, where did you get this child; she said, it was her dear boy; that she had born a mother's pains for it; nobody had a greater right to it than herself. The child was crying; she beat it; she said, it was a cross young devil. I told her if it was her child, she had taken spirits enough, she might have a glass of water or so. I thought she had taken too much liquor for a woman to take care of a child. I watched her for nearly a mile, until I saw her out of our hamlet. At that time, I had no suspicion it was not her child. At the time I saw the child, it was very thinly clothed; it had neither shawl or petticoat on; only a frock.

GEORGE SELLERS . I am the headborough of Blackwall and Poplar. On the 10th of August, I saw this woman, between four and five o'clock, I was called out of our drinking-house; I am a shipwright. The inhabitans called me out; the child had been cried that was lost. The inhabitants, by the child crying, did not think it her's. I went up to the woman; she was given in my charge by four housekeepers. I asked her if it was her child; she told me she would answer me to-morrow. The child had no shawl on then or under petticoat. I took the prisoner into custody; I suspected she had stolen the child. I found out the parents of the child; I gave the child afterwards to Mr. and Mrs. M'Donald; I kept the child half an hour after Mrs. M'Donald saw it, before she could take she fainted away at seeing the child; the mother has it now.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say; I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-146

838. WILLIAM STILES and WILLIAM HODDER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , six pounds weight of candles, value 7 s. the property of John Treacher , Benjamin Treacher , and Joseph Treacher .

JOHN TREACHER . I am a partner with Joseph and Benjamin Treacher ; I am a tallow-chandler Mrs. Jackson has an annuity out of the business; she takes no share in the losses, nor has any capital in the business; she had the business before us.

RICHARD EDWARD JACKSON . I am the manager of Messrs. Treachers' business. Stiles was the porter ; he was entrusted to carry out candles to the customers Messrs. Treachers' business is carried on in High Holborn; they have another concern in Pater-noster-row This was in High Holborn. On the evening of the 26th of August, Stiles was sent from the shop in Holborn, to the Duke of Northumberland's house, in the Strand, with twenty dozen candles. I assisted in packing them up. I am sure he went out with twenty dozen. After he was gone, I received some information; in consequence of that, I went to Northumberland house, and saw six dozen taken out of one box.

Q. How many had been delivered - A. They had not been emptied; the candles were in two boxes and one basket. The two boxes were quite full when he went from our house, and when I saw it at Northumberland house, six pounds were out of it. I asked him what became of them; he first said, the porter at Northumberland's house had his allowance out of it; he afterwards said, he had taken them out of the box and put them in the basket. The candles in the basket were considerably larger than those in the boxes, and there were none in the basket of the size of those in the boxes. I told the house-keeper to keep the candles separately. I corded up the boxes: she put them in a closet, and kept the key. The prisoner then brought home the truck, and when he had delivered the truck in the shop, the officer that I had with me, immediately took him into custody.

Q. You saw there was six pounds deficient - A. Yes; the value of them was seven shillings. I weighed the candles myself.

JOHN BLACKLAW . I am fourteen years old; I work at a rope-shop, the corner of Drury-lane. On the 26th of August, I saw Stiles take a box of candles off the truck; he put them on his shoulder in St. Martin's-lane; he took them into a court; I saw him take the candles out of the box, a good many; I cannot say the quantity; he put them into Hodder's basket; I followed Hodder to the top of Long Acre, but no further. I saw them again at the magistrates. That is all I know of this business.

Q. Did you see what Stiles did with the box afterwards - A. He put it on the truck again, and went towards Charing Cross.

JOHN RUTHWIN . I am an officer. On the 26th of August, I was sent for. I saw Stiles coming out of Northumberland house; I followed him to his master's; I then took him in custody; I told him his situation. After some little hesitation, he owned that he took forty-seven or forty-nine candles in number, he was not sure which; that he had given them to Hodder, a shoe-maker, that he worked in a stall at the corner of Stone cutter-passage, Lincoln's-inn-fields, opposite of Whetstone-park. In consequence of this, I went to Hodder, and told him what I had against him; he denied it, and said, he knew nothing about the candles. I found five candles in his stall. I asked him where he got them; he said, he had them two months. They appeared to me to be of the same manufactory. The prisoners were then brought before the magistrate; there Hodder said, these five candles were part of what he had received of Stiles; the rest of them he had sold to a jew, with a bag at his back; he did not know the jew. From information, I went to the house of John Normington .

JOHN NORMINGTON . I keep the Running Horse public-house, in Little Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields. I know the prisoner Hodder; he came to my house, and asked me if I would buy any candles; he produced six pounds. I believe these are them in this paper. I gave him the same price as I do my tallow-chandler.

Mr. Jackson. I saw the candles which Mr. Normington said he bought of Hodder; I have no doubt they are Mr. Treachers property.

Stiles's Defence. I have already acknowledged my guilt to my employers; I throw myself on your lordship's mercy.

Hodder's Defence. I agreed to sole, heel, and welt, a pair of shoes for Stiles; I took the candles for doing it.

STILES, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 6 months , and fined 1 s.

HODDER, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 1 year , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-147

839. MOSES WOOLFE LEIPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , two counterpanes, value 2 l. 10 s. five hundred and fifty seals, value 20 l. and one hundred cornelian stones, value 20 l. the property of John Stewart .

MRS. STEWART. I am the wife of Lieutenant Colonel John Stewart .

Q. Had you some time ago, some valuable property to dispose off, some precious stones - A. Yes. The prisoner was introduced to me by a man of the name of Harding, as the son of a rich merchant; the prisoner told me himself, he was the son of a rich merchant, residing at Paris; he represented that he was a partner with his father, a rich merchant, in Paris; that he transacted business in London for his father in Paris. This is his card

"M. W. Leipman, Gun-square." He pretended to me that he was introduced by the Rev. Dr. Erschall, of St. Mary Axe; he came with a reference to the house. He told me he attended the Exchange in the foreign mercantile walk. He obtained of me eight hundred pounds worth of goods. I shewed him a couple of coverlids of my own work; he desired to see them. I only mentioned having them. He said, he wished to make his father a present of them. I have seen him write; I believe this letter is his hand-writing.

"66, Cavendish-square, 31st July, Madam, I am just now in the square, and may-be I can sell your two counterpanes; send them by the bearer, and let me knew the lowest price, and give him something to put them in; he shall bring them back to you by to-morrow, or next day; addressed M. W. LEIPMAN". This is the letter; it was brought by a boy. I gave the boy the counterpanes. I saw the prisoner afterwards in the course of two or three days; I then asked him, why he did not send the counterpanes back; he said, he was afraid to send them back, the Custom House officers might seize them. I told him they were not contraband; the same boy that took them to him, might bring them back to me. He then said, he would send them back immediately. They never did come back. After some time, I found I was taken in.

Q. Did you find him at No. 7, Gun-square - A. I did not; he was removed from thence. I got no money of him. I put too much confidence in him; I thought he was an honest man. Mr. Harding came with a message from the High Priest; instead of coming as a servant, he came as a gentleman.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the counterpanes and the tapes, which were illegal goods.

COURT. If they were illegal or smuggled, that does not alter your offence.

Prisoner. I sent the boy for them with a note; the lady cautioned me that they were illegal. I do not know where the person lives that purchased them. The lady told me not to send them up; she was going in the country; if she wants the money, she may have it. The lady particularly desired me not to send any money in a letter.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-148

840. THOMAS ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , five hundred bricks, value 2 l. the property of John Scott .

ROBERT STARLING . I am clerk to Mr. John Scott , at Ball's Pond, Islington; the field is called North-field. When bricks are delivered to a customer, before delivery, we give a delivery note; that note is shewn to the kilnman; they come to our accompting-house, and take the delivery note; that note contains the quantity of bricks to be delivered.

Q. Who was the kilnman of that field - A. Charles Tripp .

Q. Look at this note - A. This is a fictitious note; there is not the carter's name to it.

Q. Had the prisoner ever applied at your accompting-house for the delivery ticket - A. He came four several times for tickets, for other people, not for himself; there is no delivery tickets to him.

WILLIAM NORRIS . I am a ploughman and carter at Mr. Scott's premises.

Q. Do you recollect Trip - A. Yes; I recollect when he was dismissed, and I know Elliott; I saw his name upon the cart.

Q. On the week before Trip was dismissed, you were plowing in the field - A. I was. I plowed on the Monday, and on Thursday. On the Monday, I saw Elliott in the field; he came with a cart and one horse; he took the bricks from out of the field; Tripp, the kilnman, delivered them to him. I saw the prisoner load the cart, and I saw him take the bricks away.

WILLIAM DODD . I am field clerk.

Q. Did you go down to Ratcliffe Layer with Goodwin - A. Yes; I examined the bricks on the prisoner's premises. I could form a judgment of their being made in Mr. Scott's mould, and I know them by their being made with coal-dust instead of ashes, and I found some others that were made in 1813.

Q. Had you in the field bricks of this years making - A. Yes, and in 1813. Balls Pond brick field is by the side of the road; some evil disposed person knocked the stock off the table; the moulder knocked the two nails out, and got two spikes with two large heads; that made the alteration in the stock; after that, all the bricks had the impression of the heads of the two spike nails; I found ninety-three thousand were missing; these bricks were about two pound a thousand; we had originally about four hundred thousands; we had two hundred thousand made last summer with that mark.

CHARLES TRIPP . I was kilnman at Mr. Scott's; he discharged me on the 7th of May.

Q. Do you know William Norris - A. Yes; I recollect his ploughing the field a week before I was

dismissed; while he was ploughing there, Elliot came with his horse and cart; he took away five hundred bricks from the kiln; I helped him to load them; he paid me two shillings a hundred,

Q. Did he bring any ticket with him - A. No; he must know they were stolen. Master sells them at four shillings a hundred. I was afterwards dismissed. I did not give any information of the robbery untill I was in custody myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I have carted bricks from Mr. Scott's fields five or six years. All that Tripp has been saying, is wrong. Shortly before Christmas, I carted three or four thousand bricks from the prosecutor's; I had tickets for them, and then Tripp told me if I wanted any more bricks, to come to the field, he was authorised to sell them. While the road was snowy, I had only a one horse cart; I could not go down the lane; I went afterwards for some bricks, and paid the whole value. I repeatedly asked Tripp for the tickets; if he did not make the return to the master, it was not my wish that he did not. Gentleman, if he is permitted to swear that I had the bricks for less than the value, I trust you will not think that I bought any bricks knowing them to be stolen.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-149

841. SAMUEL EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a three-shilling bank token , the property of John Grace .

ANN GRACE . I am the wife of John Grace . I lost my three-shilling piece on the 11th of August; I went into Mr. Richardson's shop, in Liquorpond-street ; I laid my three-shilling piece on the counter; Edwards was standing by; he took it up. I said, that is my three-shilling piece. Mr. Richardson said, if I was you, I would send for an officer; an officer was sent for.

JOHN LLOYD . I am an officer. I asked the prisoner how much money he had about him; he said, a three-shilling piece; he took out his box, and there were two three-shilling pieces in it. Mrs. Rowley said, she can prove the three-shilling piece; she paid it to Mrs. Grace on Saturday night.

Prisoner's Defence. It was impossible for me to take it and put it in my box, without the people in the shop seeing me; that three-shilling piece is my own.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-150

842. MARTHA GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a blanket, value 3 s. and a sheet, value 2 s. the property of Jane Adair , in a lodging-room .

JANE ADAIR . I live in Booth-street, Hoxton . I let the prisoner a furnished-room; she continued in it five days; she went away. I heard nothing of her until August; I looked into the lodging; I missed a blanket and a sheet. She left the duplicate of them on the mantle-piece.

THOMAS MILLER. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket and a sheet, pawned by the prisoner, on the 18th of July.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time I committed the offence, I was very much distressed.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-151

843. RICHARD JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , four saws, value 8 s. three planes, value 3 s. an oil-stone, value 1 s. a hammer, value 6 d. two chissels, value 1 s. and a chalk rule, value 6 d. the property of John Hunt .

JOHN HUNT. I am a carpenter . On the 5th of August, at six o'clock in the morning, I missed the tools. I had left my tools in the building at seven o'clock the preceeding evening.

JAMES RAMSEY . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of August, the prisoner offered the tools to pawn; I detained them, and the prisoner. These are the tools.

Prosecutor. These are my tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased these tools at the public-house.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-152

844. JOSEPH RANDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Saxby Trueman .

ANN TRUEMAN . I am the wife of John Saxby Trueman . On the 1st of August, I was going down St. James's-street; my sister and me where going to the Jubilee, and as we came to the gateway of the Palace, the prisoner after following us all the way, he there pulled at my sister's parasol, and veil; she pushed him away. He run in between us, and took my handkerchief out of my hand, and my Jubilee ticket; he run away; I holloeed out stop thief; the prisoner dropped the handkerchief; it was picked up and given to me. I did not want the prisoner to be detained. This is the handkerchief; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it entirely out of a joke.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-153

845. GEORGE SWANN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of July , fifty-four pounds weight of butter, value 4 l. and a cloth, value 1 s. the property of John Howard .

JOHN HOWARD . I am a cheesemonger ; I live at Newington Butts, Surry. I lost my brutter on the 23rd of July; I lost it off my barrow. I left a lad in care of the barrow in Paternoster-row .

GEORGE GRIFFEN . Some times I go to market with Mr. Howard. On the 23rd of July, in the morning, I went with him to Paternoster-row. A

man came to me as I was with the barrow, and said, your father or master, which ever it is, has sent me for the last flat he brought down to you; he took the flat of butter, and went away, through the market with it. The prisoner I am sure is the man. I have seen the flat since, and the butter too.

JAMES AILEN . I was in Goswell-street the same morning; I saw the prisoner with the flat of butter on his shoulder; a person coming along said, he thought he had stolen the flat of butter, seeing him go fast up Hatfield-street; he turned up an alley, and threw the butter down; I took the butter, and another man took the prisoner. This is the flat.

Prosecutor. That is my flat.

Prisoner's Defence. At the end of Newgate-street, a man asked me to carry the flat of butter for him; I was not the man that took it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 1 year , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-154

846. WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , one bushel of onions value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Bryant .

BENJAMIN BRYANT . I am a farmer , at Fulham . I lost my onions on the 1st of September; I caught the prisoner in the act of pulling them up in my ground; he was destroying my crop; he was taking five shillings worth. I have only brought what the prisoner had in his arms; I saw him in the fact.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-155

847. JAMES SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a peck of linseed, value 14 d. the property of James Burgess and William Burgess .

JAMES BURGESS . My partner's name is William Burgess ; we have a warehouse at Wapping . On the 9th of September I lost the linseed.

WILLIAM FORD . I live at Wapping. On Friday, the 9th of September. I observed the prisoner coming out of a warehouse, where Mr. Burgess's porters were landing linseed; I had in the early part of the day seen the same man go across the wharf; shortly after, I saw the prisoner go across the wharf, and by his dirty appearance, I did not think he belonged to Mr. Burgess's porters. I asked the prisoner whether he belonged to the gang of porters; he said, yes. I let him pass, and shortly after, I saw him come from the warehouse; in coming from the warehouse I observed us he passed me, his jacket pockets full; I touched it, it felt soft. I informed Mr. Burgess's foreman; he took his jacket off. This is the jacket; there is a peck of linseed in each pocket.

Prosecutor. We had such linseed as that in our warehouse.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-156

848. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a sheet value 7 s. the property of James Barrett .

MARGARET BARRETT . I am the wife of James Barrett; I live at Hornsey-place . I lost my sheet this day fortnight; I hung it on the line to dry, about half after eight in the morning. I went up stairs to clean my room. I came down, and missed the sheet; I gave the alarm. I pursued the prisoner; he was taken.

MICHAEL MOORAT . I overtook the prisoner; he had got a bundle with him. I told him to give me the sheet; he said, he had not the sheet. I told Mrs. Barrett to go for a constable. The prisoner then told me to come with him, and he would give me the sheet. I went with him; he gave me the sheet out of a hedge. This is the sheet.

Prosecutrix. That is my husband's sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in want of bread; I have been in the ea service.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 1 month , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-157

849. JOHN DANFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , twelve dozen of iron screws, value 10 s. twenty-four iron hinges, value 18 d. thirty thousand iron brads, value 5 s. and two brass locks, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Hobbs .

SAMUEL HOBBS . I am an ironmonger , in Long Acre . On the 6th of September, my shopman shewed me a number of vacant pidgeon-holes in the shop; I replied, you very likely have sold them; no, he said, he had not. He remarked there was one particular kind of hinges; almost all of them were gone. I took a strip of paper, and marked every one of the pigeon-holes, with the goods it contained on the paper. In about half an hour, I compared the paper with the pigeon-holes in the shop, and three papers were gone, each containing a gross of screws. The prisoner was my porter . In the further part of the day, I missed other goods. I followed the prisoner when he went out, and found these goods upon him, my property. I followed the prisoner out in the evening, and found these goods upon him; here are three gross of screws, a paper of hinges, and a paper of brads; he had them at various parts of his body. In the evening when he went out, he throwed his coat over his shoulder, to avoid detection. I knew he had some of my property upon him I know them to be mine; they had the shop marks upon them, and they were the papers which I took notice of in the former part of the day.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. I found these two brass locks between his shirt and his skin, and this paper of brads I took from his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and four children; they are starving now.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined 2 months , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-158

850. ROBERT SETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of John Mark Cowan .

JOHN MARK COWAN . I am a bootmaker . On the 4th of August, I lost my handkerchief. I was in the Strand . I was returning from the park about eight o'clock in the evening. I felt an unusual pressure behind me; it induced me to turn round. I saw then the prisoner was behind me with my handkerchief in his hand. I accused him of picking my pocket; he said he had not; he picked it up, and was going to give it me. I told him I was not satisfied. He said he was well known in the neighbourhood; I said, where? he said, the landlord of the Swan Public-house knew him. I went with him; the landlord said he had seen him, he did not know anything about him. I took him before the magistrate. This is my handkerchief that I lost from my pocket; the prisoner gave it me.

SAMUEL LACK . I took the prisoner into custody at the Swan public-house. I searched him, and found two handkerchiefs upon him, one in his hat and one in his breeches.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-159

851. BRYAN CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a pair of shoes, value 8 s. the property of John Brees .

JOHN BREES . I lost my property on the 8th of August. I was waiting to get into my lodgings in Golden-lane . I thought the young man heard me; he did not. It was a quarter past eleven in the evening. I was perfectly sober. I was tired. I fell asleep on the step on the opposite side of the way; the prisoner came past, and took off my shoes. I awoke when he took off the last shoe. I held the prisoner until the watchman came to my assistance.

WILLIAM MONDAY . I am a watchman of St. Luke's. About a quarter past eleven, I was walking to and fro. I heard the prisoner sing out watchman. I knew his voice. I ran up Golden-lane, and saw the prosecutor; I said, what do you call me for; he said, this man has taken my shoes. The prisoner said, he had not the shoes. The prosecutor said, you gave them to your comrade.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-160

852. NANCY HAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , six pounds weight of bacon, value 6 s. the property of Thomas William Hodgson .

THOMAS WILLIAM HODGSON . On the 23d of August, I was passing through the shop; I saw the prisoner with her right hand in the shop. She took this piece of bacon; it was entirely in the shop. I seized the prisoner with the piece of bacon in her hand. I got a constable, and she was taken to the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the piece of bacon in my hand to ask the price of it; he was watching me so closely I could not take it.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-161

853. MARY GAHAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a blanket, value 10 s. the property of Henry Chave .

SARAH CHAVE . I am the wife of Henry Chave; he keeps the Bedford hotel , Southampton-row, near Russell-square . The prisoner was a servant . On the 8th of August, she was called up at four o'clock in the morning to wash; she answered and said, she was not going to wash. About six o'clock, a man called out and said there was a bundle at the back door that looked into the mews. The porter went out; he said he knew the apron that the blanket was tied up in. The blanket was found at the back door. The man that called out asked me if it belonged to my house.

CHARLES GREEN. I am the porter at the hotel. A man called me and asked me if the bundle belonged to the house; I said I did not know. I thought I knew the apron. I called my fellow-servant up; she said it was the chambermaid's apron.

MARY CATOONE . I am the kitchen maid. The porter asked me if I knew anything about it; I said I knew it was the chambermaid's apron. The prisoner was chambermaid at the hotel. I asked the prisoner what she was going to do with it; she said she was going away that day, and she took it to pay her wages. This is the blanket.

Prosecutrix. The prisoner had been in the house but ten days. I did not know she was going away. She had three shillings of me. That is my blanket; I will swear to it. She took it from the one pair room, from under the bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the bundle. My apron was mended with white cotton; that apron was not. The cook had an apron like mine. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-162

854. JAMES LOOBEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Mons Alson Limberg .

MONS ALSON LIMBERG. I am a Swedish sailor . On the 3d of September, I was on board the brig Thomas in the London docks ; I had my clothes and my watch in a bundle, tied up in my handkerchief. I took it down in the forecastle. I went down, and found the watch was gone. On Monday the 5th, I found the watch at the pawnbroker's.

HENRY CASTELL . On the 3d of September, the prisoner pawned a watch at my house; on the 5th, he redeemed it; ten minutes after he redeemed it, the prosecutor came and asked me if I had seen such a watch; I said it had been pawned with me, and redeemed. I gave him a direction where to go and find the man and the watch too.

JOHN GEORGE . I am a servant to Mr. Cording, a pawnbroker, Ratcliffe-highway. I produce a watch pawned with me on the 5th of September, and on Saturday following the prisoner came to redeem it. I stopped the watch, and the prisoner was taken in custody.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal the watch; I bought it of another man.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-163

855. MARY PETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , a gown, value 5 s. a cap, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. a habit shirt, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Rose Flannaghan , widow .

ROSE FLANNAGHAN . I am a widow; I live on the common, Hounslow heath , in a little house by itself. On the 21st of July, I went out to work about four miles and a half from my house, and when I returned I went to my box for sixpennyworth of coppers, I said to my little boy, have you seen any one about my premises; he said, yes, Mary Peters . I went to the Bell at Hounslow; the landlord told me Mary Peters lived at Smallborough-green. I pursued her and found my things. She had my cap on her head, my shirt on her neck, and my stockings on her legs, and my handkerchief in her hand. I said, that is my handkerchief. She gave me my property. These are them; they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 3 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-164

856. DANIEL MENDEES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , a set of fire irons, value 3 s. she property of William Kent .

WILLIAM KENT . I am a broker , No. 16, Great St. Andrew-street, Seven Dials . I lost my fire irons from the house where I live. They were standing outside with other goods for sale. I heard the irons rattle. My neighbour came and asked me if I had lost anything; I said, yes, the fire irons.

JOSEPH COLLINS . On the 27th of July, I was looking outside of my window; I saw two men standing together. I saw the prisoner take the fire irons, and give it to the other man. I am sure the prisoner is the person that took the fire irons.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-165

857. GEORGE WATKINS and JOHN TURVEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , fifteen pounds weight of mutton, value 8 s. and three pounds weight of beef, value 2 s. the property of John Hewitt and Joseph Warmington .

JOHN HEWITT. I am a butcher in Leadenhall-market . I lost the meat on the day stated in the indictment; it was stolen early in the morning, before I was up. Joseph Warmington is my partner .

WILLIAM PATRIDGE. I am beadle and night officer of Whitechapel. On Saturday morning, the 13th of August. about four o'clock in the morning, I was coming up Church-lane: I saw two men come along each with a bundle on their back. I followed them, and asked them what they had got; they said they had got some cloths, they were going to work at a slaughter-house. I put my hand on the cloth, and felt a knuckle; it was a knuckle of a leg of of mutton. I opened the cloth; it was a shoulder of mutton on Turvey, and on Watkins a leg of mutton and a piece of beef. The two prisoners told me they worked for Mr. Warmington. I informed Mr. Warmington; he came forward and claimed the meat.

Prosecutor. The meat was the property of myself and partner.

TURVEY, GUILTY , aged 37.

WATKINS, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-166

858. WILLIAM SORRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a pelisse, value 7 s. and a shawl, value 6 d. the property of William Briaris .

MARY BRIARIS . My husband's name is William Briaris . I lost my pelisse at West-end fair. I had a booth there. I left them in the booth a few minutes, and when I came back to the booth I heard the cry of stop thief.

THOMAS HUNT. The prisoner was stopped by the people. I took him into the public-house, and searched him; the shawl and pelisse was inside of his coat. This is the pelisse and shawl.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them as I was coming through the fair.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-167

459. THOMAS NORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a silver tea-spoon, value 15 d. the property of William Hill .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-168

860. WILLIAM ROBERTS and JOHN THORNBOROUGH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , one hundred and twenty halfpence, value 5 s. the property of Esther Headeach , widow , and Thomas Gibson .

GEORGE HEADEACH . I am the son of Esther Headeach, she is a grocer ; her partner 's name is Thomas Gibson. I live at the corner of Ryder's-court, near Russell-square. On the 26th of July, the prisoners came into the shop and asked for some fruit. I was obliged to go to the other end of the shop to get it, and when I returned I found they were laid hold of with a five-shilling paper of halfpence in their hands. Before they came in the paper of halfpence was laying before me.

JOHN GRANT . On the 26th of July, I was at work at a cabinet-maker's shop opposite Mrs. Headeach and Gibson's shop; I saw the two prisoners at their shop window. I heard a voice say, Jack. Roberts came to their private door; Thornborough went up to him; I saw them make immediately to the front of the window. I saw Thornborough give Roberts a five-shilling paper of halfpence. Roberts was in the act of concealing them while Thornborough

was leaning over the counter. I ran over the way, and seized Roberts with my right hand, and Thornborough with my left. I then said to young Mr. Headeach, these men are robbing you. I saw him take the halfpence off the counter, and I saw them taken from him.

ROBERTS, GUILTY , aged 18.

THORNBOROUGH, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-169

861. PHILIP MACOLME was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , two pounds weight of copper, value 3 s. the property of William Josiah Cowley .

JAMES LATHAM . I am clerk to William Josiah Cowley; he is a coppersmith , in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner was a workman , a filer .

ROBERT ASKEW . I am a servant to Mr. Cowley. On the 12th of September, I saw the prisoner double up a piece of copper, and put it into his pocket. This is the piece of copper, I saw him double up, and put into his pocket; afterwards he went out with it. It is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 2 years , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-170

862. JOSEPH SUMPTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a wooden tub, value 1 s. and forty pounds weight of pickled salmon, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS BROOKS . I sell pickled salmon and oysters . On the 12th of September, a few minutes before ten at night, I heard something moving at the door; the salmon stood at the door, upon two boards. When I heard something move, I turned my head, and missed the tub of salmon; I ran into the street; I saw the prisoner with the kit of salmon, and the kit-cover in his hands. The kit and the cover is here.

Q. Where is the salmon - A. What was picked up, was stolen, by two men. The two men that were with him, told me if I appeared against him, they would kill me; I might expect nothing else.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-171

863. JOHN RILEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Patrick Callaghan, on the 2nd of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, thirty-one pieces of British lace, value 20 l. the property of Thomas Hughes .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of Patrick Callaghan .

PARTRICK CALLAGHAN. I live at No. 6, Queen-street, Soho; I am clerk to Mr. Hughes, lace manufacturer , 83, Moffatt-street, City-road. On Tuesday, the 2nd of August, I went into the Rose public-house, the corner of Wimpole-street and Wigmore-street, to have a glass of porter; which I drank in the parlour. I came out, and left the three halfpence upon the bar door. A person called Mr. Callaghan, how do you do; that was by a man of the name of Allen; Riley gets up, and called me out of the tap-room into the street.

COURT. This man you charge with a highway robbery, called you out into the street - A. He did.

Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes; I dare say I had known him five or six years before. I knew him in place as a gentleman's servant, when I kept a public-house in Grosvenor-street; I had not known him in any other situation than as a gentleman's servant, in and out of place.

Q. Did you ever know him as a Custom House officer - A. No.

Q. Nor Excise officer - A. No; he was chiefly out of place. He called me out of the house into the street.

Q. Did you go into the street - A. Yes; we went into the street, and then he laid hold of my bundle; it was then five o'clock, in broad day-light, at the door of the Rose in Wimpole-street, and the corner of Wigmore-street. He said, I have been laying wait for you a great while, now I have got you, I hope I shall make my revenge of you.

Q. What was there in this bundle - A. Thirty-one piece of British lace, value twenty pounds and upwards; all British lace.

Q. What revenge did he take - A. He laid hold of my bundle; I laid hold of it also. He took it away, and I took it away again; I had it best part away from him, with that, I laid hold of it again. He said, it is of no use; I am a Custom House officer, and I will show you my commission; I was too agitated to read it.

Q. You cannot say it was not a commission, can you; was it on parchment - A. I don't think it was; it was paper. I cannot be positive whether it was paper or parchment; I don't think it was parchment; I think it was paper; it was paper.

Q. It was paper, was it - A. Yes, my lord.

Q. What was the paper that he produced to you, did you satisfy yourself, and read it - A. I did not. I was too much agitated in mind to read it. He wrapped it up in a short time.

Q. How long had you it in your possession - A. I saw nothing more in it than the name of a gentleman in Devonshire-place, and John Riley .

Q. Do not you know it was a commission or a letter - A. It was a letter in my opinion; he did not give it into my hands, he shewed it me.

Q. Had not you an opportunity of finding out it was a commission - A. He had one part, and I the other; he pulled it away before I had time to read it all over. I thought if he was a Custom House officer, there was no danger of the goods; I thought Mr. Hughes goods would be in no danger, as they were not foreign.

Q. We know British lace is near the foreign - A. He did not seize as a Custom House officer; I am certain he seized it to keep it. I called out, I was robbed, and called for assistance; I secured him so long, he did not get out of my sight, until he went to the Custom House; he did not go in; I

believe he knew better. After he had hold of the bundle, I opened it to him; he said, he was not a judge. I said, bring it to any of these people in Holborn, or Oxford-street; I thought he was going into the lace-makers in Oxford-street. I said, why do not you go into here, that is a lace-makers. I told him at the time, all was of no avail. He took it to the Custom House, or at least unto it.

Q. Then this man that committed the highway robbery upon you, takes you through all the streets in the face of the whole world; what became of the bundle - A. He had it on his arm all the time. When we went into Mincing-lane, he said to Allen, take care of this bundle until I come to you. I kept in sight of the bundle, and Riley came in ten or twelve minutes after; he said, he should go before a Peace officer. I took hold of the bundle, and walked after him; he went towards Whitechapel, near Aldgate-pump. I said, Riley, where are you going; what is the reason that you will not go to the Custom House; he said, he must go before a Peace officer.

Q. What became of your bundle - A. He had hold of it all the while.

Q. After going up Whitechapel, did he say he would lodge it any where - A. Yes; I brought him to lodge it in the Custom House.

Q. You had the impudence to go before the Grand Jury, and swear this is a robbery - A. Why, sir, what do you call it.

COURT. I will tell you what I call it; if the man applies for a copy of the indictment, I will grant him it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140914-172

864. JOHN COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September ; from the person of John Keene , two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two frocks, value 4 s. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. ten shillings in monies numbered, and a 1 l. bank note , his property.

JOHN KEENE . I belong to his Majesty's ship Shearwater , laying at Sheerness. On the 8th of September, I was at the sign of the White Lion, in Fleet-street , between eight and nine in the morning; I had travelled all night, the coach broke down, I was severely hurt; I fell asleep in the tap-room. I went out to make water; the prisoner was then breakfasting with the landlady. As soon as I came in again, I saw the prisoner going out; I then found my money was gone, and when I awoke I found my neck handkerchief had been taken off, and the pad of the handkerchief laid down by me where I was asleep, and my bundle was taken from me; it contained two frocks, and a pair of trowsers; the bundle was tied up in an handkerchief I pulled off the night before.

Q. Did you miss the bundle before you went out - A. No. A frock and a pair of trowsers were taken out of the bundle; the handkerchief was tied up again. I was leaning on this bundle. He took out of the bundle two frocks, a shirt, and a pair of trowsers; he tied the handkerchief up again.

Q. When you returned and found these things taken out of your bundle, did you look for your money - A. Yes; I did not perceive it was taken away untill I went out, and saw him crossing the yard; I then missed a one-pound note and ten shillings from my right hand jacket pocket. When I fell asleep, there was no other person in the taproom but the prisoner. Seeing the prisoner crossing the yard, I asked the landlady where he was gone to; she said, she believed to the privy. I went out of the house, and went down Wych-street; I went to the King of Pruissia in Wych-street; the landlord asked me if I was looking for any body; I told him I was looking for a man that had robbed me; I said he was a tall man with a green coat on; he told me to come with him; I went into the house with the landlord, and I saw the prisoner. The prisoner would not let me see the bundle; he had my handkerchief in his pocket. I was present when part of my property was taken from him; the magistrate ordered it to be given to me. I found my two frocks, a shirt, handkerchief, and a pair of trowsers. These are them, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention of keeping them; he left them in my care; he followed me to the King of Prussia.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined 6 months , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18140914-173

865. CHARLES MOSS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a servant to Mr. Ellerby, in Ave Maria-lane; he is a wholesale dealer in hardware.

Q. Does Messrs. Johnsons deal with Mr. Ellerby - A. They do.

Q. Some time ago did the prisoner live with Messrs. Johnsons - A. He did, about four years ago. On the 11th of July, the prisoner came to our warehouse for a set of white handled knives; he brought this paper;

"one set of plain white handled table knives and forks, a set of desserts, and a pair of carvers, for Messrs. Johnsons, in Fleet-Street." That is the paper he delivered into my hands; I looked out the articles, gave him them, and a bill of parcels, supposing him to come from Messrs. Johnsons, as he had came at other times. Upon my suggestion he was apprehended.

WILLIAAM JOHNSON. My partners are Ebenezer Johnson , the elder, and Ebenezer Johnson , the younger. Some time ago the prisoner was our servant , in May, 1811, he left us.

Q. In the month of July last, had you authorised him to go to Mr. Ellerby's, to obtain knives and forks for you - A. Certainly not.

Q. Whose writing is that paper - A. It is not either mine or my partners. The prisoner was not employed at all by us since 1811.

SAMUEL ALDER . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner. This duplicate I took from the prisoner; I asked him how he came to act in that manner; he said, it was through necesity.

DAVID CAMERON. I am a pawnbroker. I produce the property. I did not take it in pawn myself.

Martin. These are the knives and forks.

Q. What are they worth - A. Three pounds nineteen shillings and sixpence. They were pawned for thirty shillings.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-174

866. JOHN SIMMONDS was indicted for that he, on the 24th of August , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Charles Moss , he knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, he stood charged with uttering on the same day another piece of like counterfeit money to Henry Moss .

CHARLES MOSS. Q. Do you live at Momel in Essex - A. I do. My brother, Henry Moss , he lives at Pickstead in Essex. We happened to be together on Sunday the 28th of August, about seven in the morning, or soon after. I first saw the prisoner at the corner of Leadenhall-street , as I was coming from St. Mary Axe; he had a basket of oranges on his arm; I asked him how he sold them; he said, two for sixpence first, then he said three for seven pence, at last he offered four for six pence; that was the agreement I made with him. I offered him an eighteen-penny piece to pay for this sixpennyworth of oranges; that was a good one; he said he could not change the eighteenpenny piece; he said if you give me a three-shilling piece I will give you half-a-crown. I gave him a three-shilling piece; he put it into his pocket, and said he could not change it; he said, if you give me an eighteen-penny piece I will give you a shilling. I put the three-shilling piece he gave me into my pocket. I gave him the eighteen-penny piece I first offered him, and he gave me a shilling. I did not take particular notice of it at the time. I put it into my pocket along with the three-shilling piece. I had no other shilling in that pocket, or three-shilling piece. My brother Henry was with me; he bargained with the man; they were both at one time. I then went to an aunt of mine, and after some conversation I examined the money I had received of the prisoner; upon that examination both the shilling and the three-shilling piece turned out to be bad. I marked them. I delivered the shilling that I had received of the prisoner to Draper, the constable. I am sure it is the same shilling I received of the prisoner. In the course of the day, I saw the prisoner again between four and five in the afternoon, in Cornhill. My brother was in company with me, my mother, and my wife. The prisoner saw me, he kept eyeing of me, and was walking away. I pursued him; he ran as soon as he saw I followed him; I overtook him; he had a basket of oranges with him; he throwed them down in the street, as I supposed that he might run quicker. I overtook him in Cornhill, and delivered him to the constable, Draper. I knew the prisoner directly; I have no doubt of his person in the least.

HENRY MOSS . I live at Pickstead; I was with my brother on Sunday the 28th of August on London bridge. I observed the prisoner selling oranges there. I agreed to buy sixpennyworth; I was to have four for sixpence. I offered him a sixpence first; he refused it; it was a good sixpence. On his refusing the sixpence, I offered him a dollar; he gave me two shillings and two shillings and sixpence. At St. Mary Axe I shewed them to my aunt, and found they were bad. Afterwards I saw the prisoner at the same time as my brother did; he ran away as soon as he saw me; he flung the oranges away. Draper secured him. I know one of the shillings he gave me; he bit it, and said it was good. The mark is on it now. This is the shilling he bit, and said it was good. I am quite sure of that shilling.

BUSBY DRAPER. I am a constable. I was in Cornhill on Sunday the 28th of August.

Q. Did you see Moss endeavouring to secure the prisoner - A. Yes, I went up and took the prisoner into custody. Upon searching him, I found one three-shilling token and twelve shillings, all apparently bad. These are the part I received from Moss, and these are them I found on the prisoner.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . Q. I believe you assist the solicitor of the Mint, and have done so for twenty years - A. Yes.

Q. This is the one received by Charles Moss - A. That is a counterfeit.

Q. Now look at the shilling produced by Henry Moss - A. That is also a counterfeit, and the three-shilling token is a counterfeit, and the twelve shillings produced by Mr. Draper, they are counterfeits, and the same manufactory. They are all of the same make.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . Q. Look at the bank tokens that have been produced - A. They are counterfeits, sir.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out at all that morning.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for two years next following, and to be further imprisoned until those sureties be found .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-175

867. JAMES SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 31st of August , unlawfully did utter to Edward Griffen , one false and countefeit dollar, made to pass as a certain silver dollar of the coin circulated by the Bank of England, he well knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

EDWARD GRIFFEN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Griffen, my brother; he keeps a perfumer's shop in Skinner-street and Snow-hill . On the 31st of August, the prisoner came into my brother's shop about one o'clock in the day, he asked for a cake of soap, which came to sixpence. I gave him the cake of soap; he offered me a three-shilling piece; I told him it was a bad one; then he offered me a dollar. I took it to Mr. Wilson in the back room. I marked it with a file upon the head. That was a bad dollar. Mr. Wilson said it was a bad dollar. He told the prisoner he had offered me a bad three-shilling token before. Then Mr. Wilson made towards the door to keep the prisoner in; he tried to make his escape. This is the three-shilling token that the prisoner offered me, and this is the dollar.

WILLIAM WILSON . I lodge at Mr. Griffen's. On the 31st of August, the lad brought a dollar to me. I went with the lad, and I said to the prisoner, this is a bad dollar, where did you get it? you have before offered the lad a bad three-shilling token, will you let me look at it; he instantly gave it me. I took it in my hand, and said to the prisoner, it will be necessary for me to detain you. These are both bad, the three-shilling piece and the dollar. The prisoner attempted to escape; he got out of the door. I brought him into the shop again, and sent for a constable. I marked the three-shilling piece. That is the three-shilling piece. The constable searched him, and found ten three-shilling pieces on him.

MR. BARNARD. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found upon him ten three-shilling pieces, all bad. These are them. I marked them. I asked him how he came by them; he said he picked them up near the Mansion house.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers of the Bank. I am perfectly acquainted with the coin issued by the Bank.

Q. Look first at the dollar, and tell us whether that is a genuine bank dollar - A. It is a counterfeit; it has the resemblance of a bank dollar. The three-shilling token is a counterfeit, and the ten three-shilling tokens are all counterfeits. They are all of the same manufactory. They are all made from the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the money near the Royal Exchange. I do not know good money from bad; if I had I should not have offered one after the other. I told the same when I was taken as I do now.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to find sureties for two years next following, and to be farther imprisoned until those sureties be found .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140914-176

868. JOSEPH JOSEPH was indicted for that he, on the 17th of August , unlawfully did utter to William Fitzgerald , a certain counterfeit token, he knowing it to be counterfeit; and that he at the same time had a certain other piece of counterfeit money, made to resemble a good shilling , whereby he became a common utterer of counterfeit money .

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

WILLIAM FITZGERALD . I have lately come from Ireland. On Wednesday the 17th of August, I was walking down Cornhill , about three in the afternoon , I cheapened some plumbs. I asked the prisoner what he would take for a dozen plumbs; he said, nine for sixpence. I looked out sixpennyworth. I drew out a sixpence, a shilling, and a three-shilling token. I had them in my hand open, so that he could see them. I put the plumbs in my pocket, and offered him sixpence: he said the sixpence was bad, give me that three-shilling piece, I will give you two shillings and sixpence. I gave him the three-shilling piece. I had a suspicion of the man, because I knew the sixpence was a good one. He put the three-shilling piece in his right hand breeches pocket; he began to make a bustle with the silver in his pocket; he said, here is your three-shilling piece again; he said, he had no change; he took the three-shilling piece he gave me out of his left hand pocket. I looked at the three-shilling piece; I perceived it to be a bad one. I looked at him, and asked him what his name was, and where he lived; he told me. I sent an old woman for a sheet of paper to take down his name and residence. I said, my lad you want to go to Pat with me now. There was a comrade with him; he said , sir, what are you about, I will give you a three-shilling piece if you do not like that. I said I liked it so well I would keep it and him too. The constable, Brown, was near. I gave the prisoner in the charge of Brown, and I also gave Brown the three-shilling token that the prisoner gave me out of his left hand pocket.

JOHN BROWN. I am a city constable. I was in Cornhill on the 17th of August. I took the prisoner into custody. Mr. Fitzgerald gave me the three-shilling token; I gave it Mr. Westwood before the Lord Mayor. I searched the prisoner; he said he knew nothing about it. In his right hand pocket I found two or three three-shilling pieces, and under the leaves in the corner of the prisoner's basket I found a bad shilling. This is the shilling, and this is the three-shilling token uttered to Mr. Fitzgerald.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . Q. You are a teller of the Bank - A. I am.

Q. Is that three-shilling token a counterfeit - A. It is, and the shilling also is a counterfeit.

Mr. Adolphus addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for 2 years next following, and to be imprisoned until those sureties be found .

London jury before Mr. Recorder.


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