Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th July 1814.
Reference Number: 18140706
Reference Number: f18140706-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE. OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 6th of JULY, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE. OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Dallas , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton . knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. George Bridges , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Broad ,

William Macham ,

William Tripp ,

Thomas Perrin ,

David Williamson ,

John Halsey ,

Evan Evans ,

John Evans ,

Henry Carey ,

Daniel Child ,

William Parlett ,

Owen Parry .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Oliver ,

John Warren ,

Thomas Fisher ,

William Gibbs Roberts ,

Henry Ramsay ,

Thomas Humley ,

Henry Robley ,

Francis Cain ,

George Prawn ,

Thomas Fisk ,

Thomas Langley ,

Joseph Sweetman .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Lawson ,

Cornelius Williams ,

Benjamin Abbott ,

Joseph Kinder ,

Matthew Read ,

Thomas Daffnell ,

Thomas Allwright ,

William Berry ,

John Ebdage ,

Richard May ,

David Graham ,

Gregory Wright .

Reference Number: t18140706-1

561. NATHAN PHILLIPS was indicted, for that at the General Sessions of the peace for the jail delivery of Newgate, on the 25th of May last, Henry Hart was tried, and convicted of stealing, on the 4th of May , a watch, value 20 s. a watch key, value 4 d. a seal, value 18 d. and a ribbon, value 1 d. the property of Edmund Taylor , from his person, and that the prisoner after the felony was committed, on the said day, the said goods so feloniously stolen did receive, he knowing them to be stolen .

(The record of the conviction of Henry Hart read.)

EDMUND TAYLOR . On the 4th of May, I was robbed of my watch. I saw my watch, again on Thursday evening, it was then in the possession of Kinnersley, the officer. Kinnersley has brought it here to day. This is the watch; I can swear to it being my watch; the initials of my name is upon the case. I was not present when it was found.

Q. Did you see Nathan Phillips - A. No.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I am a constable. This is the watch I got from Rebecca Hart . I went to Nathan Phillips on the 5th of May, I asked him if he had bought a watch of Isaac Jones ; he said, no; he did not know Isaac Jones , nor he had not seen him. I then described the initials on the back of the watch; I told him E. T. for Edmund Taylor . I told him it was a poor man's watch; if he had seen it, to give it up. He then said, he certainly had seen the watch; young Jones had brought the watch; he had given fourteen shillings for the watch. He said, if he would come at night and bring him the fourteen shillings, he should have the watch.

Q. He first told you he did not know Isaac Jones - A. He did. I went again in the evening with Mrs. Hart; I stood at the door; I did not go into the house.

Q. Do you know Isaac Jones - A. I do; he is a lad of bad character.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner knew Isaac Jones before that time - A. That I cannot say.

Q. When you told the prisoner that E. T. was upon the back of the watch, that it belonged to a poor man, then he said he certainly had seen it, that he had given young Jones fourteen shillings for it - A. Yes. He said, Isaac Jones said he found the watch, and he gave fourteen shillings for it. That is as much as I should like to give for the watch. He told me if he would call in the evening, and bring the money, he should have the watch again.

Q. Did the prisoner know you - A. Yes, and I knew the prisoner. I never knew any thing against him. The prisoner is a butcher.

REBECCA HART . Mr. Kinnersley came to me.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner about a watch - A. I went to some house in George-street about a watch, I cannot tell the number, it was a lodging house; there is a bit of a cook's shop, as far as I could see outside of the window; it was a dark and rainy night. I got the watch there of a tail thin man; I did not see the prisoner. I gave the watch to Kinnersley.

Q. to Kinnersley. Did you ever see the prisoner after you got the watch in your possession - A. Yes, after he was apprehended.

Q. Where you in sight when the last witness went about the watch - A. Yes; I was close to the door.

Q. Whose house was it she went to - A. Nathan Phillips 's own house.

Q. Did you see who came out - A. No; I stood back. I saw the watch. I did not see who came the second time.

Q. After the prisoner was apprehended, had you any conversation with him about the watch - A. Not then.

Q. You never learned of him whether that watch that you received of Rebecca Hart , was the watch that he received of Isaac Jones did you - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-2

562. JOSEPH PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , eighteen yards of floor-cloth, value 4 l. the property of Richard Langford , privately in his shop .

RICHARD LANGFORD . I am a floor-cloth manufacturer , at Charing Cross; my house is in the parish of St. Martin's in the fields

Q. Did you at any time lose any thing out of your shop - A. On the 4th of June, there was a piece of floor-cloth in the shop, in the morning part; I saw it there myself; I cannot tell the hour; there was no one but me there I believe.

Q. How many yards is this piece of floor-cloth - A. Eighteen yards; it is of the value of between three and four pounds; it is worth upwards of three pounds. We did not miss it at all. I went out of town as I usually do, and when I came to town on the Sunday morning, my servant, who was left in the care of the house, gave me some information.

Q. On Saturday you saw it in the shop - A. Yes. I came to town on Monday morning.

Q. Did you see it at any time on the Monday - A. Yes; I saw it at the office in Queen-square, on Monday morning; it was then in the possession of the constable, I believe.

Q. Now, before you went out of town on Saturday had you sold it - A. No.

Q. Was the floor-cloth that you saw in the possession of the constable the same that you saw in your shop on Saturday - A. Yes, I am certain of that; I know the floor-cloth to be the only piece, from the maker; in the next place, it is a pattern of my own. I do not know that we had cut a yard off, and it is the usual practice of my foreman to put a chalk mark inside of the number; it has that

chalk mark on it now. This is the chalk mark, that the foreman always puts on; it corresponds with our stock-book. There was a ticket upon it; that is torn off. and here is the King's mark, 168, the Excise mark. We only had one piece of this pattern. By the chalk mark and the Excise mark I am certain this is the piece.

THOMAS SWAN . I keep a public-house in Princes-street, Westminster. I have known the prisoner about nine or ten years; he was a respectable man, a publican I have known him in two public-houses. He kept a public-house since I have been in my house. On Saturday evening, the 4th of June, between eight and nine o'clock, he came to my house; he had this piece of floor cloths. I am sure it is the same, because I put a mark upon it myself. He opened the door, and said, how do you do, Mr. Swan. I said, how do you do, Mr. Payne; what have you got there, and where are you going to take it. As I understood him, he said, over the way. He asked for a pint of half and half. He asked me to roll it up to the bar, as I supposed, while he drank it. My servant brought him the pint of half and half. I went to get a poundsworth of change; during this time he drank the pint of half and half, and was gone, but had left the cloth. I looked at the goods; seeing it was not tied, I thought it was not honestly come by. I informed the officer of it. Green was the officer that came round. It was in my custody from that time until the next morning, and then I delivered it to Green. I put my name upon it, and I cut this piece out of it. I am sure it is the same. I delivered it to the officer, and said, for God's sake, do not take any body up until he knew it was stolen.

Prisoner. Is not your bar a conspicuous part of your house - A. It is very public; if any body came in they must have seen it perfectly.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer. On Saturday the 4th of June, I was going with the picquet between ten and eleven at night; I called at Mr. Swan's. Mr. Swan said, here is a piece of oil-cloth, Green; Mr. Payne brought it here. The floor-cloth remained until Sunday morning, the 5th, then I took it away. I watched the house on Saturday night until Mr. Swan shut up. On Sunday morning, I got up, and went to the house before Mr. Swan opened the house. I saw Payne go into the house; he called for a glass of gin; he said, I have called for the oil-cloth. I said, Mr. Payne, I want you and the oil-cloth too; this oil-cloth is stolen. He turned white, and trembled, and could hardly drink the glass of gin. I took him into custody, and took him to Tothill-fields. I came back, and took the oil-cloth away to my own house. This is the oil-cloth.

Prosecutor. I am satisfied that the oil-cloth is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the oil-cloth; it was leaning against the back of the Sessions House. I took it, on the Saturday night, to the first public-house; that is Mr. Swan's. I left it there until Sunday morning.

JURY, to Prosecutor. Do you place these things outside of the door - A. Never.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

[ The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy, on account of his former good character .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-3

563. FRANCIS STURGESS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon John Scotland , on the 19th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 5 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , his property.

JOHN SCOTLAND . I live at 27, King-street, Seven Dials; I am a master bricklayer . On the 19th of May, between twelve and one in the night, I was robbed. I was in Lisle-street, Leicester-fields . I was coming from Coventry-street. I had been out spending the evening; I went to see a young man as far as St. James's church; there I left him.

Q. What made you go into Lisle-street - A. That is my nearest way home from Piccadilly.

Q. Were you in liquor at all - A. No, I was not. I was by myself. I was coming along Lisle-street; the prisoner at the bar, two more men, and a woman, I saw in Lisle-street. I did not see them until the prisoner accosted me. They came behind me; the prisoner laid hold of me on the shoulder; (they had a woman in company) he said I promised to give the woman some money, and that I had been ill-treating her. There was no truth in that; I had never seen any of them before to the best of my knowledge. He said I had been ill-treating her, and if I did not make her some compensation, he being a constable of the night, he would take me to the watchhouse; I told him I had no money about me. One of the party began to abuse me, and charge me with an unnatural crime, and told me I was a well known character. I was very frightened. I told him I had some silver, and offered them a three-shilling token first. One of the party asked what I had given him; he said, a three-shilling piece The other man said, that is not enough; give it him back; if he does not give you more I will knock the b - y b - r in the kennel. The prisoner had hold of me all the while. The prisoner gave me the three-shilling token back. I began to be very much frightened. I put my hand into my pocket, and took out an eighteen-penny token and a shilling, and with the three-shilling token, I gave it to the prisoner at the bar. Then they left me, and I went away home.

Q. The prisoner, you say, had hold of you - A. Yes, he had hold of me all the while. He was the first man that accosted me.

Q. You did not part with any money voluntary - A. I was very much frightened. I gave it to him to get rid of them. I was under terror at the time; very much so. That terror was produced by their language, and their threats to me, what they would do.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. The 19th was on Thursday, I saw the prisoner again on the Saturday following, under the Piazzas, Covent Garden, near Mr. Robins's, the auctioneer's, door.

Q. What reason had you for suggesting the prisoner to be the same person - A. He was holding

me all the while; I had such an opportunity of observing his person, as to be sure he is the same person. I think it was moonlight. It was very starlight.

Q. From first to last, how long were they with you - A. It might be ten minutes altogether.

Q. Was the prisoner the person who principally spoke - A. No; he had hold of me all the while, and he took the money

Q. You saw him on Saturday under the Piazzas - A. Yes. I went up to him, and spoke to him, and said, you are a constable of the night, are not you; no, he said. I then said, do not you remember the circumstance that took place in Lisle-street. He walked away. I followed him up James-street, Covent Garden. He said he was going home to his lodging. When he got into Cross-street, he ran away; I pursued him. He went into a public-house in King-street; he said, you may follow me in here; I am well known in here; I have lodged here some years. I followed him in, and saw him in the tap-room; then I came out and got the patrol, and had him apprehended.

Q. How far did you go to get the patrol - A. The patrol, I believe, was at the door; he heard me call out.

Q. Had the prisoner any opportunity of getting out of that house before you returned with the patrol - A. No. The patrol went in. There was a piece of work with the landlord and some of the people. This person came out; he was taken about half a dozen doors from that house.

Q. Had he any opportunity of getting away before the patrol came - A. I do not think he could.

Q. How far is King-street from Cross-street - A. About fifty or sixty yards. King-street and Cross-street is in a line. He ran so quick I could hardly overtake him.

Q. Did you cry stop thief - A. No, I did not. I was so much agitated I did not know what to do hardly.

Q. Was there any body with you on this Saturday night - A. No. He was taken before the magistrate, and was remanded until the Thursday morning. In the interim I had this letter sent; I don't know who it came from. He was brought up on the Thursday following; he was remanded for another examination. He was taken ill in prison; it was three or four weeks before he was committed; he was never out of custody afterwards.

JOHN DUKE . I am patrol of St. Giles's and St. George's, Bloomsbury. All I know, I took the prisoner in custody on Saturday the 21st, about twelve o'clock at night.

Q. Where were you when Scotland spoke to you - A. I was in King-street, Seven Dials. When he called watch, I was near as I am to the bench. He called watch. The prosecutor said the prisoner had robbed him. I went and took the prisoner into custody. On Monday, the prosecutor gave evidence against the prisoner at Marlborough-street; the prisoner denied every thing of it, and also at the watch-house. The prisoner said, before the magistrate, had it not been for him the prosecutor would have been very roughly used.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing more to say than what I said before the magistrate. I was coming along Leicester-square; I turned up Leicester-place; I met a woman; she said, see how I have been used by that person over there, in Lisle-street; he agreed to give me half a crown, and now he has had his will of me, he has given me nothing. I said, charge the watch with him; she called out watch immediately. He said he meaned to give her something, but she was very impertinent to him; he had but little silver in his pocket. He then gave the girl an eighteen-penny piece and a shilling. That is all the money I saw.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-4

564. MICHAEL MARONEY , alias MALONEY , and JOHN ASHTON were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon James Milsom , in the King's highway, on the 12th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 20 l. a watch-chain, value 1 l. a glove, value 6 d. a hat, value 10 s. a stick, value 6 d. two crown pieces, and a French five-franc, value 4 s. his property.

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only instead of the King's highway stating it to be done in a certain open place near the King's highway.

JAMES MILSOM . On Sunday the 12th of June last; I was a servant to Mr. Parkinson ; he lives in the Adelphi. I had permission of my master to go out about three o'clock. I went out at three o'clock, and returned again a little before eight; I went out again at half past eight; my master would expect me home at eleven o'clock. I went from my master's house to Charing-cross, and from there to Whitcomb-street. I proceeded up Rider-street, into Oxford-street; I then went up Berner-street, as far as Middlesex hospital. I went with intention of calling upon Mr. Terry, of Northumberland-street. I returned into Oxford-street again, and went to the bottom of Oxford-street, towards the park. I went down Park-lane, and then I went into the park at Grosvenor gate. This was about half past ten at night when I went into the park at Grosvenor gate. I proceeded through the Park. I went almost out of the carriage road, and went into Rider-street walk. When I came into the foot path, I met Maroney; he was stooping at his gaiters; he said the gate was fast.

Q. What gate - A. Hyde Park gate, that comes into Piccadilly. He was swearing at the porters for having shut that gate. I told him if I could not get through that gate I could go through Grosvenor gate, the gate that I came in at. I directly turned, and made towards Grosvenor-gate. Maroney followed me. I got into the carriage road; I got over the railings to get into the carriage road, immediately two soldiers sprang upon me. Ashton was the soldier that attempted to knock me down. That is the man now at the bar. The other man, I saw the blow coming, I stooped my head, and in stooping

I fell. Ashton directly collared me; he called me a b - y sod, and said he would take me to the guard-house.

Q. He called you a sod; did you know what he meaned by that expression - A. I know now; I did not at that time. He said he would take me to the guard-house; I told him I was very willing to go whereever he chose to take me, if he saw anything of the kind by me.

COURT. You said you did not understand what he meaned; what do you mean by saying, if he saw anything of the kind - A. I said if he saw anything that was bad of me, I was willing to go where they liked, so they both -

Mr. Reynolds. Whom are the both - A. Ashton, Maroney, and another. They took me down the road until I came to the Serpentine river. I told them I was certain what they wanted, that they wanted my money, and the property I had about me. They asked me how much I had; I told them I had two crown pieces. Ashton asked me how much I had. I gave Ashton the two crown pieces that I had in my pocket. I told them I would give them all the money I had if they would not use me ill.

Q What induced you to give two crown pieces to Ashton - A. I was afraid they were going to murder me. One of the other men felt my smallclothes pocket; it was not Ashton; he had hold of me; with that, they said I had more. I pulled out the third crown piece; I am not certain what crown piece it was. I had two old crown pieces, and one French one; two were English. I am not certain which crown piece I gave to Ashton. I had three one-pound notes and three crown pieces. That was all I had to the best of my knowledge. I had a watch, a chain, and seal. The watch was a gold repeater.

Q. Upon you having parted with this third crown piece, what happened then - A. The men let me go. Maroney came up; he catched hold of both my arms: he let go one arm, and felt for my watch; the instant he felt for my watch I cried out murder. A hand was put before my mouth; with that, Maroney attempted to knock me down. I did not receive the blow. I fell down, and struggled; I could not cry out. When I fell down, there was a knee upon my head, a hand upon my mouth, and another pressed upon my throat. My fob pocket was very tight. I had hold of my chain before I fell; I kept hold of it at the time I was down, and then I had the key and seals in my hand. The watch-chain was broke. I had one part of the chain and seals in my hand, the small part of the chain; the other part was gone; my fob and my pocket were gone; the other part of the chain, the watch, and pocket, and fob, were all taken away.

Q. You mean the fob and pocket were both gone. Was the bank notes in your pocket - A. They were to the best of my knowledge. The instant they tore my smallclothes off they left me.

Q. What had become of your hat - A. I do not know; that was taken away from me in throwing me down. I had it when they attempted to knock me down.

Q. When they took your fob and pocket away had you your hat - A. I had not. I had a walking stick with me; that was left likewise. I had a pair of gloves; one was left; the right hand glove was left, to the best of my knowledge. They left me directly I got my head up.

Q. In what manner did they go away - A. Two went to the left, and Maroney went to the right. Maroney ran away; the two others I cannot say how went away; I did not observe them. I continued they hallooing out murder from the instant that they left me.

Q. Was the pressure so much upon you that you could not cry out - A. When the hand was upon my throat pressing me, I could not cry not. I followed Maroney; he went to the right. I never lost sight of him at all. I saw two gentlemen of the name of Beechy; they asked me where were the fellows. I directly pointed to Maroney; I said, there is the rascal that robbed me. They pursued Maroney, and overtook him; they struggled together. When I came up to them they were all three down; one of the Mr. Beechy's said, why do not you come and assist us. I said, I do as well as I can. Then I saw two more persons; I ran to them. I ran back again, and when I came back I picked up Maroney's grenadier's cap; Maroney and the Mr. Beechy's were standing up, and Maroney was with his bayonet in his hand. I took up the cap, and made the best of my way home.

Q. Now, that cap; had it a plate on - A. It had not. When I got home I examined the cap; it had no name in it, and there was no lining to it. I shewed the cap to my master when I came home. I took the cap afterwards to the Horse Guards, and wrote my name in it. I shewed that cap to my master, and informed him every thing that passed. He accompanied me the next day to the Horse Guards, and I took that cap with me.

Q. When you got to the Horse Guards did you prefer your complaint there - A. Yes; in consequence of that, six or seven soldiers were brought forward. I selected Ashton and Maroney out. Maroney was brought in first. Maroney and Ashton were taken before the magistrate.

Q. Have you seen any part of your property since - A. Yes, I saw at the Horse Guards part of my chain, a glove, my hat, a stick, and two pockets.

JAMES GILLMORE I produce a hat, a bayonet, a piece of a chain, and two seals and a key I received these of the prosecutor the day after the robbery. The prosecutor gave me part of the chain; a soldier that is here present gave me this hat; the bayonet was delivered to me by the serjeant or the corporal, I am not certain which.

EDWARD GREEN . I produce two pockets, a glove, a piece of the gold chain, and this grenadier's cap was brought to me by a soldier at the office, and the plate likewise.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that piece of the chain - A. This is the part that I retained, and this is part of the gold chain; it belongs to it. These are the smallclothes; they are the smallclothes I had on that night. This is the fob pocket, and this is the other pocket; they were torn off; and this is the grenadier's cap; I took it to the office; my name is in it;

and this is one of the gloves I had on; this is my walking-stick. This stick, hat, and this glove, were left; the small clothes, I took home with me.

JOHN BEECHEY . I live at No. 6, Great Portland-street. On Sunday night, the 12th of June, I was in company with my brother, Thomas Beechey ; we had been to dine at Chiswick with a friend. In coming home, we came through the Park, we heard the clock strike eleven as we came into the Park I saw not any one until I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner, Maroney; the prosecutor was crying out murder. I mentioned to my brother, there was the cry of murder. We instantly ran, crossed the road, close by the Serpentine river; I saw the prisoner, Maroney, running from the prosecutor; I heard the cry of murder, four times. When we saw him running, the prosecutor said, I have been robbed by a soldier, there is one of them, who has robbed me. We immediately ran, and came up with him. Marony then turned, presented a bayonet, and swore he would run the first man through that came up to him. We immediately attacked him, endeavoured to get his bayonet from him; we were down on the ground more than once, and in the scuffle he stabbed me in the hand.

Q. Did you say thing - A. Not after the expression. When he presented the bayonet, he said, by Jesus, I will stab the first man that comes forward. When we were down, there were two boys or men, we were engaged, I cannot tell which. The moment before that, I had lost my shoe, which I named to my brother; he endeavoured to find it, and picked up the plate of Maroney's cap. My brother came up, and said, I have got your shoe, and the plate of his cap; now, we will follow him. We went up to him, and told him, we were determined to take him to the barracks; he said, he would go if we would suffer him to look after his cap. There was no cap to be seen. We took him up to the barracks, a prisoner. He had no cap at all at the time we had the scuffle to that period we took and delivered him up at the guard-house, and informed the serjeant.

Q. Did he prefer any charge against any body at the time - A. Not a word.

Q. Did you see Ashton that night - A. No. The serjeant assured me if we would attend the orderly-room, he would bring Maroney forward We attended the next morning, I and my brother. I was there when the soldiers were brought in. I saw Milsom pointed him out a short time after he was in the room, and he pointed Maroney out. He first pointed Ashton out.

Q. Was any conversation made by them against Milsom - A. Not by them at that time.

THOMAS BEECHEY . I am brother to the last witness. I was returning with him through the Park. I assisted my brother. I found the plate of Maroney's cap. This is the plate I found.

WILLIAM NESBIT . I am a private in the Coldstream guards. On the evening of the 12th of June last, Maroney was brought in, in custody of one of the Mr. Beecheys; he came in with his hand bloody, and Maroney came in directly after. Maroney said, there was a hat by the door of the first gate, in the corner. I went out, and looked for the hat with a serjeant of the Staffordshire militia. This is the hat.

Q. Did you see the belt and bayonet taken from Maroney - A. Yes; I received the bayonet. This is Maroney's bayonet.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that your hat - A. It is.

JOHN BAGSHOT . I am a soldier in the Staffordshire militia. On Monday morning, the 13th, I was in Hyde Park; I was on Magazine guard at the time, about thirty yards from the Serpentine; I found a glove and a walking-stick. This is the glove and walking-stick; I gave it to Gillmore, the officer. I found them about five o'clock in the morning

WILLIAM HALE . I am a serjeant in the Coldstream guards. On Sunday, the 12th of June, I called the roll-call at ten o'clock; Maroney and Ashton were my men; they were absent out, without leave At eleven o'clock at night, I was called up by two strange people; I am positive Mr. Beechey with the stab in his hand was one of them, and his brother the other. When I got up, Maroney was without his grenadiers cap.

Q. When Maroney was brought there, did he make any charge against any body - A. No, he did not. This is the cap that was brought to the orderly-room the next morning, and this plate is the same as is worn by the grenadiers of our regiment. This is such a cap as Maroney ought to have had on; this plate fits the mark of the cap where a plate has been.

Maroney. Was not I coming off guard - A. It was your duty to be in readiness to go on the Queen's guard; that guard was not wanted. The guard was dismissed a little before. It is possible that Maroney was on the spot; he ought to have been present at roll-call or a few minutes afterwards.

HUMPHREY TERRY . I am a corporal in the Coldstream guards. I was on guard on the 12th of June, at night, in the barracks, two persons came in, and complained of having been used ill; I can swear to the man with the stab in his hand. I took the belt and bayonet from Maroney. This is the bayonet; it was bloody at the time.

JAMES GILLMORE . I was sent for, in company with Green, another officer; I took the prisoners into custody; Martoney was in the guard-room and Ashton in the privy, he was a long time in the privy. I at last, said to Ashton, I hope you are throwing nothing down the privy; he said, no. He then said, he did not knock the man down; he knew who did He said, he should say all he knew when he came before the grand board. I handcuffed him to Maroney, and another of the name of Davis.

JOHN PARKINSON , ESQ. I reside in Adelphi-terrace. On Sunday night, the 12th of June, the prosecutor came home near twelve o'clock; he was out with my permission; I expected him home at eleven. He came up to my bedchamber; he had- the appearance of a man wild, a frenzy appearance; his breeches were torn by violence, the fob-pocket completely rent from the garment; he brought a grenadier's cap with him on Sunday night. On

the next morning, I went with him to the Tilt-yard, the commanding officer was not there, Afterwards, the prisoners were brought before Colonel Bland : Colonel Bland asked the prisoners if Milsom had been guilty of any thing improper; they answered, no.

Maroney's Defence. This night, I met this gentleman in the Park; I was buttoning the knees of my gaiters; I told him the gate was locked. He said, have you got a woman; I said, no. He said if I would come along with him, he would get me one; I replied, that, I did not mind. He took me across the path-way, to the grove; he stopped there: he opened the flap of his smallclothes, took out the flap of his shirt, he then pulled out what he had; he asked me whether that would do for a woman; this man and his comrade came up, and boned him, called him a b - y sod; he immediately made a dart to get away; one of them knocked him down. He got up, and said, all the money I have, I will give you to drink. We said, we do not want your money, we will take you to the guard-room; silence, he then said, you want to ruin my character. He then said, he had got six shillings, I will give it you to drink. He put his hand into his pocket, pulled out two pieces, and said, it is ten shillings I have got; he gave it to one of the soldiers to let him go, I cannot say which. I was in the rear all the time, and never laid a hand upon him all the time. He then said, I will give you another crown to let me go. I walked in the front of them then, and these two men said, they would take him to the guardroom, and when he thought they were taking him to the guard-room, he screamed out, murder; they then were walking up the Park towards the Magazine barrack. These two gentlemen came up to me, they said, they wanted me to give them my side arms; I said, I could not give them my side arms; I will go wherever you want to take me. They said, I wanted to rob the man. Two men got hold of my bayonet; they asked this man to come to their assistance. Two of the men held the bayonet, the third man fell; in falling, this man's hand got down, and the bayonet got in his hand, and in pulling the bayonet from me, they cut me here; it is my blood that settled on the bayonet. I went myself to the Magazine barrack. I stopped to look for my cap, and in looking for my cap, I found the gentleman's hat, and took it with me, and left it at the barrack door. If they brought me a prisoner, how could I be in the rear of them, and how could they he up before me if they brought me a prisoner.

Ashton's Defence. As I was coming home, about half past ten at night, I got into the Park, there are some very large trees; on the right hand side of walk I saw a person walking to and fro on the green. Some men came up to me that had been upon guard, and asked me what I was doing there; I told them I had seen a man in the Park that I thought was at no good. They went by me. On my turning back in about four or five minutes afterwards, up came John Strange , who belongs to the same company as I do; he asked me where I was going; I said, home to the barracks. We agreed to go together. As we were pursuing our way home, he said, he had got leave of absence for all night; I said, so have I. With this, we agreed to go into town again. In returning back to where I saw the person before, I do not say the prosecutor, but where I saw the person, I saw the person and the prosecutor standing together; we made towards them. When I got within ten yards of them, I saw the prosecutor with his smallclothes down. Strange went up and collared him. The prosecutor made a spring to get from him; he said, will not you come to my assistance; I went and took hold of his right arm, and Strange held him by his left breast. He said to us, soldiers, what are you going to do with me; we said, we will take you to the guard-room. He said, do not take me to the guard-room; I have got some money I will give you to get something to drink; we said, it is not your money we want, but you shall go with us to the guard-room He then said, do you want to expose me; I said, you deserve exposing to the public at large. He then cried out, murder. Maroney was in the rear of me; he said, let him go. I said to Strange, let him go; Strange said he would not. I left him with Strange.

COURT. Q. to Prosecutor. Have you heard what these men have said - A. Yes, it is all untruth; the money was given for fear at first, and by force afterwards. I did not give it to hush up this business. It is all untrue what they have said

MARONEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

ASHTON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-5

565. REBECCA DIAS was indicted for that she, on the 4th of June, being in the dwelling-house of Hyam Lewis , feloniously did steal, a pair of stays, value 5 s. a shawl, value 3 s. two sheets, value 6 s. a bonnet, value 6 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a shift, value 2 s. two trunks, value 4 s. two aprons, value 3 s. two tablecloths, value 5 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. his property; that she did afterwards about the hour of eleven in the night of the said day, burglariously break the said dwelling-house to get out of it .

HYAM LEWIS. I live at No. 2, New-court, Winfield-street, in the parish of Christ church Spitalfields ; I am tenant of the house, and live in it. On the 4th of June, I lost all the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were taken out of the drawers, in the first story. I missed them in the morning at five o'clock. I went to bed about half after eleven; I was the last person up. When I go to bed, I always leave the door upon the latch, that Joseph Martin might come in. When he came in, he called me, and told me the room door was open, that I should get up and shut it. The prisoner was my servant; she bid me good night when I went to bed. In the morning, she was gone. It is very easy for her to have got out of the house, as the door was only upon the latch. I had not tried the door to see whether the latch had catched or not. On the 8th, I met the prisoner. I saw some of the articles at the Horse and Leaping-bar, Whitechapel; they were in the servant's possession of that house. I only found part of my things.

MRS. LEWIS. Q. Do you know the value of these articles - A. Yes; the value of the stays is five shillings; the shawl, three shillings; the bonnet, six shillings; the sheets, six shillings; the shirt, four shillings; two children's frocks, four shillings and sixpence; two aprons, two shillings and sixpence; two tablecloths, five shillings; a silk handkerchief, three shillings, I had seen these things on the over night on the drawers, and I have seen them since in Charlotte Welch 's possession.

CHARLOTTE WELCH . I live at the Horse and Leaping-bar, Whitechapel. On Saturday night, the 4th of June, the prisoner came into our taproom; she called for half a pint of beer; she had a bundle with her. After I carried her the beer, she had the bundle open; I saw a shift and apron; she was shewing them to a young woman in the taproom, asking her to buy them. I gave her three shilling for the apron, and eighteen pence for the shift. I delivered them to Coombes, the officer. The prisoner said she had no money to pay her lodging until she sold something.

- COOMBES. I received a shift and apron of Charlotte Welch . I produce them.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress offered to make it up for five-pounds.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-6

566. THOMAS WALL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Maystone , John Maystone and other of his family being therein, about the hour of five in the forenoon of the 19th of June , and stealing therein, two silver salt-spoons, value 2 s. three silver table-spoons, value 30 s. and a time-piece, value 30 s. his property.

EDWARD MAYSTONE . I am a linen-draper , 26, Frederick-place ; I am a house-keeper there; it is in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell .

MOSES COCKFIELD . I live at 15, Frederick-place. On Sunday, the 19th of June, I was up in my bed-room; I observed three men lurking about the road. I saw one man ring at the door, he tried to open the door at the key-hole; he could not get it open; he went away along with the prisoner. They went to Lady Owen's public-house. In the course of a little while after, the prisoner returned, and the other man; the prisoner got over the area rails, on to the cisternin the house of Mr. Maystone. I then awoke my brother. I saw Wall go down into the area, and open the shutter. I cannot say whether the window shutter was fastened or not. In the course of a minute or two, he opened the door, and let in the other; one was inside and one outside; the one inside opened the door, and let in the other man that was outside. I just at that time, I observed four men coming down the road, they appeared like working men; I came down, and addressed the men; I said, there were two men broke into the house opposite; if you will have the goodness to assist me, I have no doubt we shall take them. I knocked at the door, and turned round; I observed a third man standing with a sack under his arm. I said, to the men with me, pointing to the man with the sack, that is one of them; he immediately turned round, and went into Sidney-street, that leads into the New-road; he carried that sack away. I knocked violently at the door; the prisoner opened the door to me; he asked me what I wanted. I said, you have broke into the house; his reply was, I have done nothing; I came to see what you knocked at the door for. By that time, the prisoner and the other man stood in the door-way; the prisoner stood on the right, the other man on the left. The man on the left, took the opportunity to escape, as I was going to knock at the door again. I immediately seized the prisoner by the collar; he said, oh, do not, sir; you will tear my shirt. I replied, oh, d - n your shirt; you shall not go. I secured him; we sent for an officer. He searched him; a silver spoon was found upon him. I gave charge of him to the constable. This was about a quarter before six when I took him; it was about a quarter before five when I discovered him get into the house. There were three young men in the house; two of them came down.

Q. Was Mr. Maystone there himself - A. No. The two young men that came down, are both in court now; I do not know their names.

JOHN SPILLING . I am a constable. I was sent for; I took the prisoner into custody. In his right hand breeches pocket, I found this silver salt-spoon; I am certain of this spoon, and I found upon the prisoner these five silver tea-spoons; these spoons were taken out of the cupboard in the kitchen, and carried up into the parlour; I found them on the floor of the parlour; these silver table-spoons were taken off the sideboard in the parlour; I found them on the floor of the parlour; they were laid there ready to take away; the time-piece was taken off the chimney-piece, and laid on a chair, ready to take away, by the side of the spoons.

SARAH MARTIN . I am servant to Mr. Maystone. I left my master's house about half past five in the morning, I went out to fetch a little boy that I have with me all day. I am sure the window was close down, but I did not put the screw in. I shut the door when I went out, and locked it, and took the key with me. The five silver tea-spoons I had put in the cupboard in the kitchen the night before; the time-piece was hanging in the front parlour, over the mantle-piece; the table-spoons were on the sideboard in the parlour; the spoons are not marked. I am sure they are my master's. I have lived with my master four months. They have been used daily in the house; I have had the handling of them every day. I know them from their general appearance. The salt spoons round on the prisoner, is my master's property; the one the prisoner had in his pocket, has a flaw in it; I can swear it is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more about it than a new born baby.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-7

567. CATHERINE REUBEN and HANNAH

GIDDES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , one hundred yards of ribbon, value 3 l. the property of James Martin , privately in his shop .

JAMES MARTIN. I keep a linen-drapers, and haberdashers shop , in High-street, in the parish of St. Pancras . I was not in the shop when the prisoners came in.

JAMES AUTHORN . I am shopman to Mr. Martin. I was in the shop when the prisoners came in; Reuben asked for ribbon; she bought a yard and a quarter at seven-pence a yard; they had afterwards several lengths cut off.

Q. Did Giddes buy any thing - A. No; she was with her at the time.

Q. Was there any alarm before they left the shop - A. Master came in, he was serving at one end of the shop; he saw them take a piece of ribbon away.

Q. to Mr. Martin. Did you see either of the prisoners take any thing - A. Yes, Reuben; I saw her take a piece of ribbon, and gave it to Giddes. I threw the flap of the counter up, went and took it from her, and told her it was my property, and said, I should search and see if she had any thing else, and as they moved the umbrella, a piece of ribbon fell out. I picked up the umbrella, and found six pieces more in it.

Q. Do you know that either of them brought the umbrella in - A. No. I believe the umbrella stood on the right hand side of Reuben.

Q. What is the value of these pieces of ribbon - A. Three pounds, rather more than less. I said, I would send for a constable. Giddes went on her knees then, and Reuben ran away; she was pursued and brought back. These ribbons have my shop mark upon them.

Q. Had you seen either of the prisoners take any of these seven pieces that were in the umbrella - A. This piece of blue ribbon, is the piece that I saw Reuben take and give to Giddes.

Q. to James Authorn. Did you see either of the prisoners take any of these pieces of ribbon which were in the umbrella - A. No. There were three serving in the shop besides me and my master.

Q. Did either of these three give any alarm of any thing being taken away - A. No. I did not see which of the prisoners brought the umbrella in.

Prisoner Reuben. The gentleman took that ribbon off the counter, and put it into the umbrella.

Q. to Mr. Martin. Reuben suggested that you put a piece into the umbrella - A. So I did. When I took that piece, from Giddes, I put it into the umbrella. They were all in the umbrella except that one piece. I put that in myself.

JAMES WELCH. I was sent for to take the prisoners into custody. I asked them where they lived; they neither of them would tell.

Prosecutor. There was another person in the shop; she begged these girls off; she said, it was the first thing they ever did.

Welch. She is a base character, and led these girls into it.

Reuben's Defence. When I went into the shop I had no umbrella with me; there were several more people in the shop buying ribbons besides me.

Giddes's Defence. When we went into the shop neither of us had any umbrella.

Giddes called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

REUBEN, GUILTY, aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

GIDDES, GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing one piece of ribbon, but not privately in the shop .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-8

568. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , two-silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s. two silk shawl, value 1 l. 2 s. 6 d. and nine yards of sarsenett, value 12 s. the property of Joseph Sandell and William Green .

JOSEPH SANDELL. I am silk dyer ; William Green is my partner : I live at No. 15, in the Old Change . The articles lost were in the house about the 1st or the 2nd of June, to the best of my recollection, I know nothing of the circumstance; only, in searching a drawer in the ware-room, up one pair of stairs, in a glove in that drawer, I found some duplicates; I immediately went to the pawnbrokers, and examined them; I there found two silk shawls with the mark of the shop upon them; I likewise found two silk handkerchiefs, and nine yards of sarsenet, property that we had in our house to dye. The pawnbroker found the next day eight breadths of sarsenet; they have each our private mark upon them. The prisoner was our journeyman. All the servants had access to that drawer.

WILLIAM STRATTY . I am a journeyman pawnbroker; I live at 66, Long Acre. Mr. Sandell came to our house; he produced the duplicates. The prisoner pawned the articles with me, on the 3rd, 8th, 10th, and 11th. I produce the articles.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them for fear of loseing them; I intended to replace them.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-9

569. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , two cushions, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of William Crenidge .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY, aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-10

570. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , four quartern loaves of bread, value 3 s. 11 d. the property of James Henderson .

ROBERT WOOD . I belong to the Excise office. On Monday, the 4th of July, I was coming down the yard of the Excise office; I saw the prisoner. The basket stood in the gateway. The prisoner had two loaves under his arm. I saw him take one

loaf out of the basket; he put two under each arm, and walked out of the gateway. I went to the lad that belonged to the basket. I told him a person had gone out of the yard with the loaves. The lad went after him. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES LEONARD. I am a servant to Mr. Henderson. The first witness told me that the prisoner had taken four loaves out of my basket. I went after the prisoner, and found him by Wormwood-street with two loaves under each arm. He said a man gave him sixpence to carry them into Broad-street. I took the loaves from him. I am sure they were Mr. Henderson's loaves.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me that took them out of the basket; a bread man said he would give me sixpence if I would take them to the bottom of Broad-street.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury; before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-11

571. JOHN CAVELLA was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , three shillings , the monies of Isaac Israel .

ISAAC ISRAEL . I am a butcher ; I live in Petticoat-lane, in Aldgate parish . The prisoner lived with me to carry out meat. In consequence of suspicion, I marked some money, and put it in my desk at night, before I went to bed. I got up in the morning, and went to Whitechapel. When I returned, I went to my desk, and missed part of this money. I accused the lad of it; he said; he knew nothing of it. I told him I was determined to find it out; I had been missing money a good while. I went over to call a neighbour who had marked the money for me, (he is a publican) to search him; and while I went over he went into the privy: I went and pulled him out of the privy, and found three of the shillings that I had marked in his jacket pocket. I marked seventeen shillings and sixpence; I missed seven; I only found three. I do not know what he did with the rest.

Mr. Barry. You told his lordship and the jury that you marked the money - A. No, I said I had them marked.

ISAAC SOLOMON . I am an officer. Isaac Israel gave me the money that he found about him. The prisoner said, pray speak to my master to forgive me. This is the money.

Prosecutor. This is my marked money.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-12

572. MARY MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of June , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. 4 d. the property of Joseph Morrison .

JOSEPH LOOKE . I am a servant to Mr. Morrison, at the top of Fleet-market. On the 30th of June last, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, the prisoner came with another person to buy a gown. I sold her friend three gowns. In the interim I saw the prisoner with a pair of stockings in her hand; she was endeavouring to put them into her pocket; she could not accomplish it. She took them to a different part of the counter put her handkerchief over them, wrapped them up, and put her handkerchief into her pocket. I sent for an officer. She was going out. I accused her of having a pair of stockings in her pocket; she denied it. She took her handkerchief out with the stockings in it.

Q. What did the prisoner purchase - A. Nothing that she paid for; her friend paid for three gowns, one of them, she said, was for her.

Q. Might not she take them up by accident - A. She took the stockings a yard and a half from me, put her handkerchief over them, and put them into her pocket.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . I am an officer. These are the stockings; I produce them.

Looke The stockings have Mr. Morrison's private mark upon them. I am sure they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that I had these stockings. I took them up in my handkerchief. I pulled my handkerchief out, and gave them to him. I did not know I had them.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-13

573. ESTHER BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 30th of May , a shirt, value 10 s. a pair of boots, value 5 s. and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Baggeridge .

THOMAS BAGGERIDGE. I am a cordwainer ; I live at No. 4, Field-lane . I keep a shop, and sell boots, shoes, shirts, and every thing , I lost these things on the 30th of May. On the 31st, I found they were gone; I charged the officer with the prisoner directly.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, she acknowledged having stolen a pair of boots and pledging them before I searched her. On searching her, I found a duplicate of a pair of shoes and a pair of boots. The shirt the pawnbroker will produce; that I had not the duplicate of The prisoner shewed great contrition, and was sorry for her conduct.

MR. WRIGHT. I am a pawnbroker. I produce the shirt, pledged in the name of Brown, I think the prisoner pawned the shirt. I do not know her.

GEORGE FISHER . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pair of boots; a woman pledged them on the 31st of May.

JOHN FLOWER . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pair of shoes, pledged by a woman. I have some knowledge of the prisoner. This is my duplicate produced by Lee the officer.

FRANCES DAVIS . I am housekeeper to Mr. Baggeridge. I knew the shirt to be Mr. Baggeridge's property.

Prosecutor. I know the boots and shoes well; I am sure they are mine

The prisoner said nothing in her defence nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-14

574. JAMES STAPLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 6 s. the property of Major Kirkham , from his person .

MAJOR KIRKHAM. I am an engraver ; I live in Bethnal-green-road. On the 5th of July, I was in St. Martin's-court, Ludgate-hill . I was looking at a print shop; I did not know that my pocket was picked until I was told of it.

JOHN HODSON . I am an officer. On the 5th of July, I was in St. Martin's-court; I saw the prisoner with his knee against the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief out of the prosecutor's right hand pocket; I jumped up to the prisoner, and took the handkerchief from him. I then said to the prosecutor, you have lost your handkerchief. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the gentleman's handkerchief up, and returned it to the gentleman; the officer came up, and said I picked his pocket.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-15

575. SOPHIA GREENHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , a watch, value 1 l. the property of John Coates .

MARY COATES . I am the wife of John Coates ; he is a publican ; he keeps the Bull's Head , Bread-street, Cheapside . On the 16th of May, we were about letting our house; the prisoner came with a view of looking at the house. I missed the watch out of my bed-room. I always kept my bed-room door locked. My servant had left the key in the door. I came down stairs, and asked her where was the key of the chamber door; she said, in the door. I went up; I found the prisoner standing at the door, and my watch was not to be found. I at last found my watch had been pledged at Mr. Flemming. The prisoner must have taken it from the dressing room case; my servant had been in the room not ten minutes before. I saw the watch in the dressing use about five o'clock, when I put my cap on.

MR. SADLER. I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th of May. the prisoner offered me a silver watch to pledge; she went away. The next day, Mr. Coates came, he said he had lost his watch; he described the prisoner, in consequence of that information. On the 25th of May, the same watch was offered again, by a man; he said, he had taken it out of Mr. Cotterill's, Shoe-lane, for a guinea, and in the afternoon the prisoner came again, with a tablespoon; I had her taken into custody. I am sure the prisoner is the person that offered the watch to pawn with me; she wanted twenty-five shillings upon it; I would not advance her above eighteen shillings; and when she offered me the watch I took the watch into my hand.

Prosecutrix. This is my watch; I lost it on Monday the 16th of May; I am positive she is the woman that was in my house.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-16

576. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , two bars of solder, value 10 s. the property of George Priest .

WILLIAM LUCAS . I am clerk to George Priest , a plumber , in Butcher-hall-lane, Newgate-street . The prisoner was our labourer . On the 23d of June, Mr. Glossip sent for me; he said, the prisoner had left in his premises two bars of solder; he wanted to know whether they were Mr. Priest's. I told him, from the general appearance they were Mr. Priest's Mr. Priest has a large quantity of solder; these two bars might be taken away; we could not miss it.

THOMAS GLOSSIP . I am a wine-merchant. On the 23d of June, the prisoner came into my house with some tools and melted lead at his back; he put them down. There is a bottle-rack at the cellar-door. I had an idea that the prisoner robbed his master. The bottles rattled; I said, do not break the bottles. He came away, and came to the bar, and had a glass of liquor, and said, I do not pay you new. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to the shop, having a glass of liquor, and then saying, I will leave a tool; instead of that, he left solder; they were two bars joined together. About a month before, this man had done the same. This is the solder. I am sure when he left the solder, there was no solder there until he left it.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a servant to Mr. Glossip. On the morning the prisoner left the article, I was out of the way. As soon as I came in, Mr. Glossip asked me to go to the bottle-rack, and see what he had left; I with some difficulty, found it behind the bottle-rack. I took it over to Mr. Priest, and weighed it; it weighed sixteen pounds. This is the solder.

Mr. Lucas. It is like Mr. Preist's solder.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday morning, I was coming along Bridge-street, as I was crossing the road I saw two bars of solder lay; I picked them up, and took it to Mr. Glossip's. I intended to take it back to see if I could find the owner.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-17

577. HARRIOT MARKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , a sheet, value 6 s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a child's bonnet, value 6 d. a child's frock, value 6 d. five pieces of muslin, value 2 d. a petticoat, value 6 d. part of a muslin dress, value 6 d. and part of a man's shirt, value 6 d. the property of William Griffiths .

NANCY GRIFFITHS . I am the wife of William Griffiths ; he is an ironmonger , in Giltspur-street . The prisoner was my servant ; she lived near three months with me as house-maid and nurse . I lost all the articles mentioned in the indictment. She took these things to a person that took in plain work.

MISS GRIFFITHS. I am sister to Mrs. Griffiths. I know they are my sister's things.

ELIZABETH WALKER. I take in needle-work. The prisoner brought these things to me to make up into articles for herself. The child's bonnet she tell

me was her perquisite. The muslin she told me to make into caps.

GEORGE ABRAHAM WORRALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. I know all the articles to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-18

578. ROBERT MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of July , three pair of pantaloons, value 1 l. 10 s. and one yard and three quarters of kerseymere, value 10 s. the property of James Croft and Thomas Croft , in the dwelling-house of James Croft .

JAMES CROFT. I am a tailor ; I live at 22, Fleet-street . I lost these things on Saturday last, the 2nd of July, in the evening. Between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner was brought in custody for having offered the articles for sale. We had not missed them. The prisoner was my errand-boy. The goods were in our shop. Our stock is large. All I know the boy was stopped, and the property is ours.

MR. PHILLIPS. The prisoner came to my shop in Russell-court, Drury-lane, and offered the articles for sale; he said his father had ran away, and left his mother in distress; I said, what is your father; he said, a tailor. I said, very likely, if your mother comes, I shall agree with her; he said she was sick a-bed. I said I will go with you to your mother He wanted to get away; I said, no, I will go with you to your mother. He took me to a coal-shed; he said it was not there, it was at some other place. The prisoner then ran away. I called after him; he was taken. He throwed away the property. The watchman laid hold of him. The prisoner then told me he lived at Mr. Gibbons's. I went with him there. He then said he lived with Mr. Croft; I then said, I should go with him there. I did. This is the property.

Prosecutor. The articles are ours; they cost us more than less than what they are valued in the indictment. They are articles of a superior description.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first time; I will never do it again.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-19

579. JOHN WILLIAMS , alias TOMLIN, alias JOHNSON , was indicted for that he, on the 3rd of March , feloniously and without lawful excuse had in his custody and possession, a forged bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-20

580. ANN BAILEY was indicted for that she, on the 26th of March , feloniously and without lawful excuse had in her custody and possession a forged bank note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-21

581. JOHN WILLIAMS , alias TOMLIN, alias JOHNSON , was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 9th of March , a bank note for payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18140706-22

582. ANN BAILEY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 26th of March , a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-23

583. JAMES COX and WILLIAM MASON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , two quarts of distilled spirits, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Smith , Thomas Harrington , and Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH . I am a distiller , at New Brentford; my partners names are Thomas Harrington and Thomas Smith ; there are two Thomas Smiths in the firm. The two prisoners were in our employ, Cox was a labourer , and Mason a watchman in consequence of information, I directed Richard Wise to watch our distillery. On the 14th of June, I was called up about a quarter before four in the morning; I was told in the prisoners presence, that they had been taking spirits out of the spirit-cask; they denied it.

RICHARD WISE . I am a servant to Messrs. Smith and Harrington, distillers. On the night of the 13th and the morning of the 14th, I watched in the distillery; I was placed at the window, with the casement open; where I had a full view of the spirit-cask. Between two and three in the morning, I saw Mason and Cox in the distil-house; that is the room in which the spirit-cask is kept.

Q. Had Cox any business there at that time of the night - A. No; Mason was watchman. Cox had no business on the premises at that time at all. When they came, I pulled my head away from the window; the first thing I heard was one of the prisoners pull the slider off the spirit-cask; I heard the

slide go off; I then listened until I heard a liquid running into something; then I peeped up. I saw Cox put some instrument into the spirit-cask, through the hole where the Excise officer dips. I saw the liquid run from his hand into the can while he was squeezing that. After that, he ran off again out of the spirit-cask, and then squeezing it into the can; I think he was there half an hour.

Q. Now, while Cox was doing this, what did Mason do - A. He stood with his lanthorn, giving him a light. When they had taken as much as they chosed, Mason moved his position he back stood in; he stood with his back rather towards me; he moved in the front of me. I did not keep looking the whole half hour; sometimes I was looking, and sometimes listening. I heard somebody walk across the distil-house; I saw Mason walking to the second wash-still, he fetched a broom; I saw him sweeping the dust over the top of the spirit-cask to dry up the wet; that when we came in the morning we could not see what had been done. They went away then, and took the can with them. I then came down, went into the distil-house, and perceived the fresh dirt which they had swept over the wet on the cask.

MATTHEW GIBSON . On this night, I was placed outside of the premises to watch; Carver, the constable was with me. I saw Cox some from the distillery a little after three; I followed him about two hundred yards, and then I told Cox, I wanted to go home with him, and after he got home we searched him. We found nothing. He took a pocket-handkerchief out of his pocket, it smelled very strong of spirits; I took the handkerchief from him, and smelled it. I returned it to him some time afterwards. I gave Cox into the possession of the constable. I returned into the distillery. I asked Mason who had been there; he said Cox, he had come to sleep, he had been out late. I asked Mason if he had left nothing with him; he said, he had not. We looked round for the spirit, which he had taken out of the spirit-cask. Behind Mason's watch-box, we found a quart bottle of spirits in a sack; in removing the sack, the spirit run out of the bottle. This is the spirit; it is raw corn spirit. I believe it is the spirit which they took from the spirit-cask; it corresponds with it. I found the tin can concealed in a saw-pit; one hundred and ten yards from the distillery. This is the tin can; in it was five pints of raw spirits; it was warm from the spirit-cask; it is the identical spirit; the same as in the bottle.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Cox called three witnesses, who gave him a good character

Mason called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

COX, GUILTY , aged 40.

MASON, GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-24

584. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for killing and slaying Ann Smith , his late wife .

MR. MEARS. I am a surgeon. I was called in to attend the deceased on Friday evening the 10th of July, preceding her death; she died the next morning. I found her in a state of insensibility. There were external bruises on her eye, jaw, and on part of her head, near the temple.

Q. Were any of these bruises that you saw likely to produce death - A. It is possible. She died the next morning. I opened the head on the Sunday morning, and found the brain in a state of inflammation. The membranes of the brain were in a state of inflammation.

Q. Was that inflammation in consequence of the bruises that you saw, or might it be the effect of excessive drinking - A. It might be occasioned by either.

Q. Is thery anything to determine which might cause it - A. No.

Q. Was there any such connection between any of the external bruises that you saw and the bruises next the brain, that induced you to determine what had caused the inflammation - A. No.

Q. Then I understand you to say, from inspection of the bruises there was nothing to determine in your mind which caused it, the bruises or excessive drinking - A. No; it might be occasioned by either.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-25

585. JOACHIM BOAS and MOSES ROCHATZ were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , twelve yards of muslin, value 30 l. the property of John Simpson .

FREDERICK WHISTLER . I am in the service of Mr. Simpson; he is a Manchester warehouseman , in Bow church-yard. On Tuesday the 14th of June, the two prisoners came to Mr. Simpson's warehouse, about a quarter past six in the evening; they told me they wanted cambrics.

Q. Did they speak English - A. I do not think they can speak English at all. I took them into the cambric warehouse, and shewed them fine French cambrics; they looked at several pieces. I opened three or four papers for them, each paper containing twenty-five pieces. After five or ten minutes, they looked at the same pieces again, putting the goods behind them, and slipping over packs; they laid them behind them. I then thought they were after thieving them. I waited a little while. I saw Boas attempt to put a piece under his coat. Boas had got part of a piece off the counter; he then saw I was looking at him; he put it back. A short time after that, Rochatz got further from me, took his place, and while I was talking with Boas, I heard five pieces fall off the counter; I then said, you will spoil all the goods. They both appeared very much agitated. My brother was with me; I told him I thought they were after thieving, and desired him to watch. I began to talk with Rochatz; he took out of his pocket a paper. I thought he wanted to take the numbers and prices. I told the porter to fetch him a pencil. While he was gone, Boas came near me; the other took his place. I was in a narrow place. Boas opened a piece of muslin, held it up before me, began talking about the width,

saying six quarters; he held it five minutes up; that made me suspect the other man was secreting something; it was impossible for me to see without rising upon my toe. I looked over the muslin, and saw part of a piece of muslin under Rochatz's coat. I immediately thrusted by Boas, and as I got to Rochatz, he turned round; I got hold of him, and pulled the piece of muslin from under his coat; I pulled it out, and threw it on the counter. I hallooed to my brother, and the porter to fetch Mr. Simpson Mr . Simpson and my brother came I gave them both in charge. I did not mark the piece directly.

Q. I believe you are not able to say which piece it was - A. I am not. I can swear it was the one the constable has, or this. I should have no doubt only in their putting the muslin back, they put it out of fold. I afterwards found another piece rumpled. I cannot be sure whether it might not be the other. They are both muslin.

GEORGE WHISTLER . I am brother to the last witness. My brother desired me to watch the prisoners while Boas was holding up the muslin. I went to the side of the counter. I saw Rochatz endeavouring to conceal a piece of muslin under his coat; when I perceived that, I ran for Mr. Simpson.

HENRY MACKRAEL . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge, and this piece of muslin likewise.

Frederick Whistler . These two pieces I can swear they are both Mr. Simpson's property. I have examined them; one of them has my own mark; the other has the mark of the same parcels. They are the same goods I was shewing to them.

Boas's Defence. I came to England on the 27th of May; I did not come to rob this country, or to settle.

Rochatz's Defence. The same.

BOAS, GUILTY , aged 28.

ROCHATZ, GUILTY , age 25.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-26

586. JOACHIM BOAS and MOSES ROCHATZ were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , seven pieces of cambric, value 15 l. the property of Thomas Ainsworth and Richard Ainsworth .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be in the dwelling-house of Richard Ainsworth .

RICHARD AINSWORTH . My christian name is Richard; my partner's name is Thomas; I have no other partner; me and my father are manufacturers of cambric muslin ; our manufactory is in the country; our warehouse is No. 1, Fetter-lane, in the parish of St. Peter, Westcheap, in the ward of Farringdon within ; the warehouse is the ground floor of the dwelling-house. I live there occasionally; my father does not. The servants of the firm sleep there; the rent is paid for out of the profits of the business. On the 14th of June, the two prisoners came to our warehouse about half past four in the afternoon, they wanted to look at cambric muslins; I could not understand them. I and my clerk, Mr. Barber, shewed them a great many; they wanted to look at more; we could not find any thing fine enough for them.

Q. How many pieces were taken down for them - A. A great many scores. They went away without buying, said, they would return with a broker. They seemed hurt that I could not understand what they said.

Q. How soon after they were gone, did you miss any thing - A. I went away immediately. I thought their manner old; but I did not see them take any thing.

THOMAS BARKER. I am clerk to Messrs. Ainsworths. I assisted in shewing the goods to the prisoners; during the time they were there, I did not see them take any of the goods. After they were gone, I assisted in putting up the goods again; I missed seven pieces of cambric muslin, of two different qualities.

Q. Were they part of what you had opened to shew the prisoners - A. They were.

Q. Between the time of their leaving you, and the time of making this discovery, had any other persons been there - A. No, there had not. In consequence of what I heard the next day, I went to Guildhall, and found them in custody, and then I went to Mr. Roberts, the Golden Fleece, Wine-court.

Q. Did you receive of Mr. Roberts any pieces of cambric - A. No; the officer did. I found there seven pieces that I had lost.

ROBERT ROBERTS . I keep the Golden Fleece, Wine-court, Fleet-street.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. I have seen them a few times; they came for refreshment, and occasionally left goods with me.

Q. On the afternoon of the 14th of June, did they come to your house - A. On the 14th of June, they left a parcel with me; what time of day, I cannot tell. I afterwards shewed that parcel to Mr. Barker. They were together when they left it; they asked me to take care of the parcel until they called for it.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a constable. I received of Mr. Roberts seven pieces of muslin on the 17th of June; they have been in my custody ever since. I produce them.

Q. to Barker. Look at these seven pieces - A. They are the property of Messrs. Ainsworths; I know them by the marks that are on them; I am positive to them all. That is precisely the number of pieces I lost; there are three six quarters wide, and four two-eighths yard wide. I am sure they are them that I shewed them.

Mr. Ainsworth. They are my goods, I am perfectly sure of it.

Boas's Defence. We met a person when we were out, we bought them; we into this public-house, and left them there.

Rochatz's Defence. The same.

BOAS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

ROCHATZ, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-27

587. FRANCES WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , twelve silver table-spoons, value 8 l. the property of Richard Meikle , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD MEIKLE . I live in Wapping Wall, in

St. John's parish . I lost twelve silver table-spoons at different periods. The discovery was not made until the 4th of June. I missed them about two o'clock in the afternoon on the 4th of June, we missed eleven; only one was in the house then. We afterwards missed another the same evening.

Q. Had you know the prisoner - A. Yes; his sister lived servant with me, and she frequently on head to see her sister. When I missed the last spoke I questioned my servant about who had been there; she said, Betey's sister. On Monday morning I found that spoon at Mr. Delaney's, a pawnbroker; he accompanied me to the office, and at the prisoner's lodgings I found there the whole of the duplicates for the twelve spoons pawned at six pawnbrokers. The prisoner took me to these pawnbrokers herself. She before denied every thing. The officer found her in the act of throwing the duplicates in the fire.

MR. DELANEY. I am a pawnbroker; I live in Church-street, Rotherhithe. On the 4th of June, late in the evening, the prisoner pawned with me a silver table-spoon. This is the spoon.

Prosecutor. This is my spoon; I had it at dinner, and missed it at supper. I know the spoon by a particular dent on it. I have no doubt it is my spoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been long out of place.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing one spoon only, value 12 s.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-28

588. ELIZABETH WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a watch, value 2 l. a chain, value 2 l. two seals, value 2 l. and a key, value 2 d. the property of John Clark , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN CLARK . I live at No. 3, George-street, Adelphi, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields ; I rent the whole house. On the 11th of June, I lost my watch from the upper room, on the third floor. The room door was not locked. The watch was hanging up against the waistcoat, in the room. I had seen the watch in the morning.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I never saw her before I saw her at Mr. Cameron's, a pawnbroker, the corner of Drury-lane.

JOSEPH PILKINGTON . I am shopman to David Cameron , 318, in the Strand. On the 11th of June, about seven o'clock, the prisoner came to redeem some goods for herself, and when she had redeemed them she offered a watch to pledge for a man, she said, that lived in her house; he wanted to make up some money. I lent her four guineas upon the watch. The watch is worth ten pounds.

JAMES FLETCHER . I apprehended the prisoner; she said she had the watch of one Vincent Hewitt , sometimes he went by the name of Jones. She said he was to meet her at the Piazzas, Covent Garden, on the Tuesday. On Tuesday night, I accompanied her to the Piazzas; no such person came. I have not been able to find Hewitt. I searched the prisoner's room in Tavistock-court; I found no duplicate there.

Prisoner's Defence. The person for whom I pledged the watch I had a slight knowledge of about two years; he has asked me at different times to pledge things for him, which I did. He expressed a great dislike to pledging anything himself. I met him on the 4th of June, in Covent Garden market. I had then in market, to the her shop, for some herbs I had been afficted for some months. I was extremely in when I met him. He asked me how I was; I told him my husband had left me; I was ill in health. He asked me to pledge him a watch; I told him I would. I told him I was going to Mr. Cameron, who is my pawnbroker. He gave me the watch, and told me to ask four guineas upon it. I pledged it; the gentleman lent me four guineas upon it; he gave four one-pound notes, three shillings, a sixpence, and some copper.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-29

589. ANN RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , two yards and a half of hair shag, value 18 s. and two yards and three quarters of worsted shag, value 7 s. the property of Matthew Green , privately in his shop .

MATTHEW GREEN . I am a tailor and salesman : I keep a shop , 120, Edgware-road, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone .

Q. On the 8th of June, did you miss any articles out of your shop - A. I did. I went out in the morning, between seven and eight o'clock; my wife and Elizabeth Stollworthy had the charge of the shop while I was away. When I returned I missed a roll of hair shag and a roll of corderoy; they were in the window when I went out. After that I went down to my stable; Elizabeth Stollworthy came to me at the stable, and said, come down, you have been robbed of two yards of hair shag and two yards and three quarters of worsted shag. I then went back to my shop. My wife and Elizabeth Stollworthy told me the prisoner had been in the shop, and had bought an article. Before I went out, I saw the yards of hair shag and the two yards and three quarters of worsted shag.

Q. Were they in the shop when you went out in the morning - A. Upon my oath they were; and when I went out to my stable they were there then. I then went after the prisoner into the Harrow-road; I met her coming out of the washhouse of the Running Horse public-house, in the Harrow-road. I was close to her heels all the way. I brought her back to my house, and sent for a constable. Before the constable came, Elizabeth Baker brought the articles to me; she said she found them in the washhouse. They had my private mark upon their; I value them at twenty-five shillings.

ELIZABETH BAKER . On the 8th of June, I saw the prisoner in the washhouse of the Running Horse public-house between eight and nine in the evening. I saw her in the washhouse before the last witness. I went in directly she was taken to give her her fish. I found two pieces of shag in the washhouse, one piece of hair shag, and a piece of worsted shag; they were laying on the dresser. I took them to Mr. Green. These are the two pieces of shag.

Prosecutor. These are the articles I lost. I lost more.

ELIZABETH STOLLWORTHY . I live with the prosecutor, and serve in the shop. On the 8th of June, the prisoner came into the shop three times in that day; the two first times she purchased nothing; the last time she purchased a pair of cotton drawers; that was eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Green coming home, and then going to the stable - A. Yes; she was in the shop at the interim he was at the stable; she purchased this pair of trowsers.

Q. Do you know any thing of these articles that were lost that were found in the washhouse of the Running Horse - A. Yes, I saw them in the shop before the prisoner came in. Mrs. Green served the prisoner with the cotton trowsers. She is not here; she could not leave the shop.

Prosecutor. The articles are in the possession of Piall, the constable; he is not here. I am certain the articles brought back by Elizabeth Baker were the articles that were taken out of my shop. I am positive they are my property.

GUILTY, aged 42,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-30

590. JANE PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , fourteen shirts, value 3 l. one hundred and three pair of drawers, value 15 l. six towels, value 6 s. a table cover, value 5 s. a trunk, value 5 s. and a napkin, value 1 s. the property of Andrew Anderton , esq. in his dwelling-house .

ANDREW ANDERTON , ESQ. I live in Baker-street, Portman-square ; I am the owner of that house; it is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . The prisoner was my cook ; she had been with me about ten weeks before she absconded; she absconded from my service on the 26th of April; she lived in my service by the name of Jane Pearce . I had no reason to suppose she was married to anybody. I hired her myself is the name of Jane Pearce . I considered her a single woman. I have lost a considerable quantity.

Q. On the day she absconded did you miss a box - A. There were a number of empty boxes in my house that I took no account of. After she was gone I found that I had lost property, and during the time that she was in my service I brought her forward to investigate her conduct. In consequence of this she absconded my service. After the 26th of April I saw my property before the magistrate; they belonged to me.

COURT. Thomas Wellington was not in your service - A. No, he was not. I heard of the person; he did not go by the name of Wellington then. I heard of Thomas Wilkins ; he is the same person. He was four months at my house without my knowledge, as I have been informed. The property that has been stolen from me were supernumerary things; they were kept locked in my wardrobe; I kept the key; it must have been opened by a false key. They could not have got it without the wardrobe had been opened in an improper way.

WILLIAM BOND. I am an officer. On the 25th of June, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, it is at a corner house between Well-street and Margaret-street, Oxford-road. I went up stairs into the bedroom with her; I found this trunk. I have got the key of it. The key was in it. I found fourteen shirts in it, six waistcoats, and three pair of drawers; and behind the tester of the bed I found six towels. I found a great quantity of duplicates. I found them in a man's blue coat between the top of the tester of the said bed. I asked her how she came to take these things from her master; she said she did it on account of the young man, Thomas Wellington ; he was going to sea. I took her into custody, and took her to Bow-street, and took these things with me.

Mr. Pooley. Was not this young man in the room at the time - A. No; I wish he had.

Q. Do you know whether he lodged there - A. I have every reason to believe he was in bed at the time I tapped at the door. All the prosecutor's apparel I brought away from there.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these shirts - A. They are my shirts; they were extra linen; I had never worn them; the shirts and handkerchiefs are mine. I know the trunk; the trunk was in my house at the time when the prisoner came into my house. I had emptied the trunks into my wardrobe. I am sure this trunk is mine.

COURT. When had you seen any of the linen before the prisoner went away - A. I looked into my wardrobe after the prisoner came into my service; I missed a great quantity of things after she came. I am convinced they were in my wardrobe after she came into my service. I keep two men servants; the men servants do not sleep in the house. My other woman servant is living with me now.

COURT. General Anderton , was any wages due to the prisoner when she went away - A. There were four months wages due to her when she went away.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-31

591. JOHN SMITH and HENRY HENSTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Rider , about the hour of two in the 6th of June , and burglariously stealing therein, one pair of boots, value 1 l. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. a pair of gaiters, value 3 s. two umbrellas, value 1 l. two tea-spoons, value 3 s. the property of John M'Kellar ; one pair of half boots, value 5 s. and a petticoat, value 3 s. the property of Mary Jones ; and a shawl, value 3 s. the property of Sarah Plunkett .

SARAH PLUNKETT . On the 6th of June last, I lived servant with Captain M'Keller.

Q. On Tuesday, the 7th of June, what time did you get up in the morning - A. Between three and four; as I went down stairs I struck a light on the top of the stairs; when I got down stairs, I saw the kitchen-door open, and when I saw the area-door open, I went up immediately to my master, and told him I thought somebody had broken into the house.

Q. Whose house is it - A. Mr. Rider's; she is the person that keeps the house. Mrs. Rider is not here. She is a married woman.

Q. Do you know her husband - A. No.

Q. Does Captain M'Kellar lodge there - A. Yes; there are other lodgers in the house. Mrs. Rider lives in the house herself now. Mr. Rider does not. She lets lodgings.

Q. You went up and told your master that the house had been broken open - A. Yes. He came down with a dressing-gown on, took a sword, and came down with me; he saw the kitchen door broken open, and the lock of the cupboard in the back kitchen, that was broken, and two silver teaspoons were taken out of the cupboard in the back kitchen; a pair of gaiters, and smallclothes, were taken off the line. I had washed them on the Monday. I had seen the spoons the night before; I had locked them up in the cupboard; they were missing when I came down in the morning.

Q. Was it day light - A. Yes; it was as light as now. The spoons were Captain M'Kellar's; the gaiters, and smallclothes, likewise were his; I had seen them on the line in the kitchen in the evening. The boots were in the passage, outside of the door; they were hessian boots; they were gone, and two umbrellas, which hung up in the passage; they were gone; they were all Captain M'Kellar's. The kitchen door was wide open. The person that shut the kitchen-door is here. I lost a shawl out of the back kitchen.

MARY JONES . I live in Mrs. Rider's house; I am a servant to a person in the first floor. I fastened the kitchen windows betwen nine and ten o'clock.

Q. Do you know any thing about the area-door - A. I did not fasten the area-door.

Q. How happens it that Mrs. Rider is not here - A. I do not know; I saw her last night. I went to bed about half after twelve. When I came down in the morning, I missed a gown, petticoat, a fur tippet, and a pair of half boots.

JOHN M'KELLAR. I lodge in this house. I was there on the night of the 6th of June. The servant called me about half past three in the morning. When I came down stairs, I missed a pair of boots, a pair of breeches, a pair of gaiters, two silver spoons, and two silk umbrellas. I saw them afterwards at Hatton Garden police office; the articles that I saw, were the articles I lost out of this house.

JOHN LIMBRICK. I am an officer. The two prisoners were brought to Hatton Garden office by Waller, a watchman, on Wednesday, the 8th. I searched them. I found these gaiters in the crown of Smith's hat. I looked at the smallclothes that he had on; they were like them. Hutt, my brother officer, has got them. The umbrella I found upon Smith. I found nothing upon Houston.

Captain M'Kellar. The gaiters are mine, and the smallclothes.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I produce the pair of smallclothes that the prisoner, Smith, had on.

Q. to Captian M'Kellar. Where is this house - A. 13, Southampton-street, New-road, St. Pancras.

Smith's Defence. I bought the gaiters and breeches of a jew.

Houston's Defence. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-32

592. SAMUEL BUSHEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June, eight yellow crystals, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of Thomas Johnson , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am a lapidary and glass-cutter ; I live in White Lion-street, St. Giles's ; I rent the house. On the 6th of June, 1812 , I had a necklace to be re-cut again; they were yellow crystals. The prisoner worked for me; he had them to do. On Saturday, in the afternoon, I went out; I called him down stairs to settle with him; he said, these yellow crystals were nearly finished, he wanted me to pay him for cutting them. I did, and he was to work it out a dead horse; he was to cut them in my own premises, and on Tuesday, the people sent for their work; he was not come to his work. When I looked for the crystals, I saw some of them; eight were missing. I saw the eight crystals at a persons house of the name of Stephen Warwick .

Q. Are you sure that the crystals that you saw at Warwick's were yours - A. Seven of them I can swear to; they have been finished. I have delivered them to the owner.

Q. When you found these things at Warwick's, did you make any enquiry after the prisoner - A. I heard he had been at Birmingham. I found the prisoner on the 18th of last June.

Q. None of the crystals are here I suppose - A. No.

Q. What were the value of these crystals - A. They would cost me six pounds to replace them; I think they are worth that. I would not have suffered him to carry them home to work; it is a thing not customary.

STEPHEN WARWICK . I am a gold seal maker. On the 11th of June, the prisoner, Bushel, came to my house to sell some crystals; he asked me twenty-six shillings for them; I bid him twenty-four shillings. He took twenty-four shillings; he said, he was going to Birmingham. Afterwards Mr. Johnson came to me, and said he had been robbed. I delivered to Mr. Johnson the same crystals I received of the prisoner.

ALEXANDER BALL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. He acknowledged he had taken the crystals; he hoped Mr. Johnson would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them eight crystals of a man in Wardour-street.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing to the value of 25 s only .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Reference Number: t18140706-33

593. WILLIAM HAYDON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of

James Donaldson , about the hour of eight in the afternoon of the 4th of June , and stealing therein, three silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. the property of James Donaldson .

ANN DONALDSON . I am the wife of James Donaldson ; I live at No. 4, Savage-buildings, Stepney-green, in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stepney . On Saturday, the 4th of June, in the afternoon, between five and six, I went out; I locked the door, and left no one in the house. I returned between eight and nine, I found the door open, I called out hoy, halloo; I saw a light in the back room. The prisoner came forward; he immediately came up the area; as soon as he came out, I laid hold of him, and put my finger into the button-hole of his coat; I said to him, what have you robbed me of. He struck me; I fell back at my full length; he ran off. I raised my head up, and called out stop thief. I saw my child pursue him. I met Mrs. Maddox, a neighbour, I told her my house had been broken open, and I had been knocked down. I went into my house to see what I had lost; I found a lamp that I had set upon a table with a tinder-box, set upon a stool. I missed three silver tea-spoons; they were in the house when I went out. I had them in my hand just before I came out; they are worth six shillings.

Q. Now, look at the prisoner; are you sure, or have you any doubt whether he is the person who was in the passage - A. I have no doubt at all. I know it is the man I had hold of.

NIMROD BINNS. I live at No. 4, High-street Stepney; I am a cabinet-maker. On Saturday, the 4th of June, near dark, I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw a woman lying down, it afterwards proved to be Mrs. Donaldson. I saw a man walking by me; when he came to the rails, I attempted to collar him. He stooped under the rails, which made me suspect he was the thief. I pursued him with the cry of stop thief; he ran away, and just as Mr. Palmer came up, he dropped three silver tea-spoons; I picked them up. I saw the spoons fall to the ground: they must have fallen from the prisoner. When I came up to the prisoner, he was taken in custody, by Fettis and Palmer. The spoons were delivered into the custody of the constable, and the prisoner was taken to the watchhouse.

MR. PALMER. I live at No. 1, Abel's-buildings, Goodman's-fields. On Saturday, the 4th of June, about half after eight, I had occasion to go to Stepney. I saw the prisoner, and the last witness pursuing him. I heard the cry of stop thief. I crossed the way to look at the prisoner; he made a run against me, in order to baffle me from catching him; I followed him as far Cottage Grove; Mr. Fettis came across the road, and catched him. I heard the spoons drop, but I did not know what they were. I and the other witness took the prisoner back to Mrs. Donaldson.

MR. FETTIS. I saw the prisoner running; I stopped him; he cried stop thief. I took him as he was running. That is all I know.

CHARLES JAQUES . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse about nine o'clock at night. Mr. Binns delivered three teaspoons to me. These are them.

Prosecutrix. The spoons are my husband's property.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was brought back Mrs. Donaldson said she never suspected me; she suspected a near neighbour.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-34

594. JAMES MARTIN , alias JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Howard , about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 31st of May , and stealing therein, a gown, value 8 s. his property.

JOSEPH HOWARD . I live in Westminster parish, it is called the parish of St. John the Evengelist ; I rent the house. I went out between nine and ten in the morning; I left my wife behind me.

MARIA HOWARD . I went out about ten o'clock in the morning; I left nobody in the house; there is only one room in the house. I locked the door; the window I fastened with a stick, that it might not slide back. I came back about nine o'clock at night, just in the dusk of the evening; I found the door locked when I came home. At eight o'clock the next morning, I missed a gown off the head of the bed; I had seen the gown on the Tuesday morning, when I went out. On the Wednesday, I saw it in the officer's hands; it was in the possession of Gillmore.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I got the gown at the pawnbrokers, Mr. Graham, in Strutton-ground. I was giving him directions to stop it if it should be offered. On Whitsun-Wednesday, between eleven and twelve, a young woman of the name of Jane Lutz , brought it in; the pawnbroker called me back, told me the gown was on the counter. In consequence of what she said, I went in pursuit of the prisoner. As soon as the prisoner saw me, he ran away; I overtook him in the space of twenty yards; he cannot run fast; he is a cripple. When I took him, I asked him where he had got that gown; he said, he found it; he gave it to the girl to pawn. I told him, I should take him to the office. Going along, he said, a young woman gave it him; he did not know who she was.

JANE LUTZ . Q. Where do you live - A. I live no where. I used to sleep in Westminster at that time. I paid for my lodging every night; I used to walk about in the day.

Q. And did nothing to support yourself - A. No, sir. I knew the prisoner about a fortnight before he sent me with this gown to pawn. On the 1st of June he gave me this gown to pawn, and told me to ask seven shillings upon it. I stopped in the pawnbrokers five or ten minutes. Mr. Gillmore asked me where I got this gown. I came away from the pawnbroker's with Mr. Gillmore, and as I was returning I met Martin; I pointed him out to Gillmore. Martin walked away as fast as he could. I am sure I got the gown of Martin.

Q. Did you learn of him where he got it - A. No.

SUSANNAH ROBERTS . I live next door to Howard, the prosecutor. I was in the yard in the course of the day two or three times. The door was fast. I had

the key of the house. The door was fastened by a padlock. In about two hours after I went out, I saw the door open; I called Mrs. Hughes.

MARY HUGHES . I live next door but one to Mrs. Roberts. On this day, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner go into the privy in the yard. I looked at Mrs. Howard's door; the lock was upon the staple, but the hasp not in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I own I gave the girl the gown. I am innocent of breaking and entering the house. Girls of the town come into my room; they might have left the gown there.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 6 d. only .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-35

596. THOMAS JAQUES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , six sacks, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Mellish Thatcher and John Smith .

WILLIAM PEARCE . I am a licensed victualler, 24, in the Strand. On Saturday the 28th of May, about half past ten at night, the prisoner brought six sacks, he throwed them into the bar, and asked my wife if she would give him leave to leave them there till the morning. She was not willing to let him leave them. She came and asked me; I said he might leave them on the top of the cellar stairs if he liked. He said it would save him carrying them two miles. He left the sacks. In about an hour after, some cost porters came to enquire if anybody had left any sacks; I said, they had. They told me he had stolen them, no doubt; they had been watching him.

Q. Did they take the sacks away - A. No, I would not let them have the sacks. I locked them up in the cupboard. The next morning the prisoner and another man came for the sacks; I would not let him have them. I told the prisoner that I understood he did not come honestly by them; I should not let him have them. In the mean time we were talking the officer came in and took him.

JAMES DONALDSON . I am a constable. On Sunday the 29th of May, I received information of some sacks having been left at the One Tun, in the Strand. I and my son went down together, and asked the landlord about these sacks. When I went in, there were two coal-heavers standing there. I gave my son item to mind the door. I called the landlord of one side. I saw the prisoner there; the landlord pointed him out; I took him in custody. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse; I went back for the sacks, and when I had them at the watchhouse, I asked him where he got them sacks; he said he had them of a man of the name of Carter. That is all I know about it. I took the sacks home, and have had the care of them ever since. I went to Mr. Thatcher, and found they were his sacks.

THOMAS MELLISH THATCHER . I am a coal-merchant; I live at Hungerford wharf, in the Strand. John Smith is my partner. On Monday evening I received information from Donaldson, the officer, that he had got some sacks. I went, and saw six sacks. I immediately recognised them to be mine. These are the sacks; they are marked, and it is a peculiar cloth. I know them to be mine.

Q. Had you seen these sacks shortly before they were lost - A. I cannot say; I might; my son had; he is here. The prisoner has been in my employ three years: he had worked with me shortly before these sacks were stolen.

THOMAS THATCHER . I live with my father; I am employed in his business.

Q. Now look at these sacks; who do they belong to - A. They belong to my father. On Saturday morning there were twenty-one sacks hanging upon the rails at the top of the yard. On Monday morning I was called upon by Donaldson, the officer, to count them; there was but fifteen left out of the twenty-one; six were gone. I compared these sacks with the fifteen that were left; they are the same. They are marked with a particular T. On Saturday evening, when the gates were shut, I saw the prisoner within fifteen yards of the premises; he had a very large bundle under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I was desired to take the sacks by the man who has absconded; I did not know they were Mr. Thatcher's, or anybody's else.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-36

597. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Handy , from his person .

JOHN HANDY . I live at No. 9, in Basing-lane. On the 28th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the Strand ; I lost my handkerchief out of my pocket; it was found again immediately after it was taken out.

Q. Did you perceive it go - A. Yes. Immediately I felt my handkerchief go I turned round and saw the prisoner and the officer struggling; my handkerchief was between them both the same moment.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer of the City. On the 28th of May I was in the Strand about an hour before I saw the prosecutor. I was following the prisoner up and down the Strand, observing him. When I came to Akerman's, the picture shop, I saw the prisoner go close to the prosecutor, and saw him take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket. I took hold of him directly he took the handkerchief, and took the handkerchief out of the prisoner's hand. This is the handkerchief; I have kept it in my possession ever since.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor took his handkerchief out of his pocket; he gave it to the officer as soon as the officer took me up. They said they would send me to Bow-street.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-37

598. CHARLES SMITH , alias CHAPMAN , was indicted for that he, at the general sessions of the peace of our Lord the King, for the county of Suffolk, holden at Bury St. Edmonds on the 8th of March,

in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign, he was tried and convicted of feloniously and knowingly having in his possession counterfeit bank notes without lawful excuse, that he was sentenced by the court to be transported for the term of fourteen years; that he afterwards, to wit, on the 24th of June , feloniously and without lawful cause was at large at the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-38

599. LYON LEVI , HENRY TRUSTTON , and SAMUEL LEVI , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Stevenson , senior , George Stevenson , junior , and Leader Stevenson , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 18th of March , and stealing therein three hundred silk handkerchiefs, value 20 l. twenty-five pieces of figured sarsenet, value 100 l. five pieces of gauzenet, value 5 l. and three pieces of silver tissue, value 3 l. their property.

HUGH JONES . I am a servant to Messrs. Stevenson; the names of the partners are George Stevenson , the elder and younger, and Leader Stevenson; their warehouse is No. 42, Bow-lane, Cheapside ; they keep a silk warehouse, and are dealers in silver tissue ; the warehouse is in the parish of St. Mary-le-Bow . On the night of the 18th of March, I was the last that went to bed. I locked up the house, and went to bed. I locked the warehouse at eight, and went to bed between ten and eleven. I arose in the morning about seven o'clock. I found the warehouse had been opened; it had been entered through the empty house in front, in Bow-lane; it appeared they came into our warehouse at the parlour window. I do not know that the parlour window was shut the night before. The warehouse door was shut the night before. In the morning, when I came down, that door was open.

Q. What had there been stolen - A. Bandana silk handkerchiefs (I do not know the number), and silver tissues.

JAMES BAMFORD . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Stevensons. Upon Mr. Jones stating this discovery I was called down.

Q. Is your warehouse door in the house - A. It is part of the dwelling-house, the first floor. The warehouse door is an inner door in the house, up one pair of stairs.

Q. When you got up did you find the warehouse had been robbed - A. Yes. We lost three hundred pieces of bandana handkerchiefs, twenty-five pieces of figured sarsenet, five pieces of gauzenet, and three pieces of silver tissue; altogether of the value of above a thousand pounds.

HYAM ISAACS. I live at No. 50, Cable-street, Wellclose-square. I am a tailor, salesman, and slop-seller. On Monday the 21st of March, Lion Levi (the old one) came to me; he asked me whether I would buy any silk handkerchiefs; he said he had not got them with him, if I would go to his house he would shew me them. I went with him directly. His house is in Guildford-street, Petticoat-lane; it is something of a chandler's shop. He took me into his back parlour, and shewed me four pieces of the handkerchiefs; he asked me five shillings a handkerchief; he told me he had got more, handsomer than them. I asked him to shew them me; he said if I would go with him he would shew them me. I went with him to Baker's-row, Whitechapel, to Harris's house; Harris was at home. He took me into a little bed-room backwards; there stood a deal box full of handkerchiefs, bandana, chocolate, and blue. I told him I could not see them in that room, to shew them me in a room more light. Levi told me to go up stairs. I went, and when I got up stairs, Mr. and Mrs. Harris brought the box up stairs together. They put the handkerchiefs on the bed. He asked five shillings a handkerchief; there is seven in a piece; that is thirty-five shillings a piece. I offered him thirty shillings; he would not take the money, and I went away. I went home to my house again. Soon after, he returned to my house; he brought me a pattern of silver tissue; he then said, look at that, that is much handsomer than you have seen before; and he brought me some patterns of sarsenet with flowers in it; be asked me four shillings a yard for the silver tissue, I gave him three shillings; and I dealt with him for the sarsenet. He asked me three shillings a yard for the sarsenet; I offered him half-a-crown; he took it; I bought the sarsenets; I agreed with him at my house. Then he told me he would let me have the handkerchiefs at thirty shillings if I would call and take them away. He went away, and told me to come directly. About an hour after, I went to Harris's house; I found him there. I took my son and daughter with me. When I got to Harris's house I went up stairs; Mr. Levi was measuring the sarsenets and putting the handkerchiefs together. There were there besides him, all three of them. There was Lion Levi, his son, (Harris was not up stairs, he was in the house), Thrustton was there. Trustton is a partner to Levi, as I understand, to Lion Levi. Mr. Levi tied up some handkerchiefs in my bundle handkerchief; he counted them one by one, and tied them up.

Q. How many bundles were there made - A. Three at a time; one for me, one for my son, and one for my daughter, and we were to come back again each of us. Each of us went again a second time; that made six bundles. There were several pieces of handkerchiefs that I objected to, and likewise sarsenetts; I left them behind. Lyon Levi told his son to fetch some more.

Q. Did he go out for them - A. They went out of of the room and talked; I did not hear what they said. His son went and brought them in in a basket. The room door was shut; I cannot say where he brought them from.

Q. When the son brought the second parcel, who came with him - A. The son came first; Trustton brought some more. We went altogether three times; we made three trips, and carried goods home three times each of us.

Q. When you had done, how did you settle accompts - A. Then it was almost night, and I was tired, it being a distance off our house, we went

home, and between eight and nine in the evening Lyon Levi and Trustton came to my house together in the evening; they had each of them a piece of paper, and the accompt was put down, and I took an accompt likewise. The goods amounted altogether, what I purchased, to one hundred and sixty-seven pounds. Trustton cast up the accompt. One hundred and one pounds five shillings I paid in money that same night; I paid it to Trustton; he gave it to Levi; they were close by, sitting together at one table. Truston handed the money over to Levi; that left a balance of sixty-five pounds fifteen shillings, which I put in my book. I have got it here.

Q. Were these the goods which were afterwards found at your house by the officers - A. Yes; the goods that were taken away by the officers are the very goods that I bought of them.

Q. After you had bought this did either Levi or Trustton call again - A. About a day or two after Mr. Levi called at my house, and shewed me three or four pieces of sarsenet, a pink, a laylock, and a green shot with white. I bought no more of them. He told me he had some more handkerchiefs, about forty or fifty pieces more. He did not call after that time.

Q. When did the officers come to your house and find these things - A. On Thursday the 7th of April, the day before Good Friday. They found these things in my house; they found some in the shop, and some in the parlour, and I was taken in custody.

Q. In consequence of any questions the officers put to you did you give any information against the prisoners now at the bar - A. I did, almost the same minute I was taken.

Q. In consequence of the information you gave, did you send your son by the officers direction any where - A. Yes, I sent my son to Levi's house.

Mr. Knapp. Do you mean to describe to the jury that these things were all found in your shop and parlour, and that none of them were concealed - A. Yes, none as I know of.

Q. Was not any part of them found behind a picture - A. I know nothing of that.

Q. Now recollect it. I perceive you are alarmed - A. No, I am not alarmed. There was none found behind a picture; they were in the very same bundles; they were all laying in the parlour; they were in a cupboard; that cupboard door was open.

Q. Is there any hole behind the picture - A. I do not know, sir.

Q. Do you mean to swear there is no hole behind the picture - A. There is not; they were found in the cupboard.

Q. You were taken up in April, were not you - A. Yes, on the 7th of April.

Q. Did you tell the same story at the Mansion House that you have to day - A. No, and the reason why, I was not asked.

ISAAC ISAACS . I am the son of Hyam Isaacs.

Q. On Monday the 21st of March, did you see the prisoner Levi at your father's house - A. Yes.

Q. After he had been with your father did you and your sister go with your father to Harris's house - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you see there - A. Mr. Levi and Harris; they were tieing up silk handkerchiefs, and looking at them.

Q. While you were there did you see Trustton and young Levi - A. Trustton came in while they were tieing up the handkerchiefs, and young Levi came in with a basket of things. I, my sister, and my father, took each of us a bundle of things home. We went three or four times. The things that we took home were silk handkerchiefs and sarsenets.

Q. We understand the officers came to your father's house on the 7th of April, took all these things, and took your father in custody - A. Yes.

Q. Were these thing the officers took the things that you, your sister, and your father, brought from Harris's house - A. They were.

Q. Now, upon your father being taken, were you sent by your father and the officers to go to Levi's - A. I was; I saw Mr. Levi; I told him my father wanted to see him at Harris's to pay him some money, and to buy some more goods.

Q. Did you go there slow or fast - A. I went fast; he asked me why I ran so fast, and why I sweated so, I told him my father wanted him; he said he would come directly; I was to go on. I went on towards Harris's, and when I got to Harris's house I found the officers stationed there.

Q. Did Levi come to you there - A. No, he sent his son, Samuel Levi , there; the officers wanted to detain him; he told them he could not stop; they let him go. His father never came, nor did he come back.

ELIZABETH ISAACS . I am the daughter of Hyam Isaacs.

Q. Do you remember Levi being at your father's house on Monday the 21st of March - A. Yes.

Q. After Mr. Levi had been with your father, did you, with your brother and your father, go to Harris's house - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find going on there - A. I saw some silk handkerchiefs, sarsenets, and silver tissue there, in a white deal box.

Q. Who was there - A. Mr. Levi was the only person I saw first; afterwards I saw Mrs. Harris, Trustton, and Samuel Levi. I assisted my father in carrying the goods home.

THOMAS BRANSCOME . I am a city constable.

Q. On the 7th of April, did you go to the house of Hyam Isaacs - A. I did.

Q. Did you find there any goods which were claimed by Mr. Stevenson - A. I did, ninety-three pieces of Bandana and seven pieces of silk. (some of them had been cut), and three pieces of tissue; three pieces Brown found in the shop; the rest we found in the cupboard in the parlour.

Q. Was there any picture with a hole behind it - A. Yes, that was at the top of the cupboard, in the parlour; that had been fastened up. Brown opened it. There was a picture hung before it; behind was a loose board. The picture was bigger than the board, so that the picture would prevent our seeing the entrance to the cupboard. It was a corner cupboard; the upper part was boarded up. I produce three pieces of handkerchiefs; the rest have been returned to Mr. Stevenson. When the picture was

removed the concealed part was easily seen. These three pieces are bandana handkerchiefs.

Q. Upon your taking Isaacs, did Isaacs give you information of whom he got them - A. He said he bought them of the three prisoners at the bar, with Harris; he said if I would go with him he would shew me where he had them. I remained with him in the coach, and Brown and Freeman, by his information, went to Harris's house. Afterwards, there was a plan; it did not succeed. They sent young Isaacs to Levi's house.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I went to Isaacs' with Freeman and Branscomb; we found the goods.

Q. Did Isaacs offer to give information where he had them - A. He did. In consequence of his information we sent young Isaacs to Levi's house, to tell Levi to come to Harris. Young Levi came to Harris's. I had Isaacs in the house, supposing Levi would come. Levi did not come. We searched Harris's house.

Lion Levi's Defence. May it please your lordship - Gentlemen of the jury, I am standing in your presence accused of a charge, if found guilty must affect my life. I trust you will attend to the following circumstance: the man, Isaacs is a well known character for receiving stolen goods; he also keeps a house of ill fame. He has been charged with the offence, he being in possession of some of the property. He first said he bought them of a smuggler, and now he says he had them of me; and to confirm his testimony his son and daughter are the only witnesses called: they, like the father, are bad characters: the son acts in the receiving business, while the daughter conducts a common brothel. I trust with caution you receive their evidence. Gentlemen of the jury, Henry Trustton was not charged with any share in the transaction. When he was seen before the Lord Mayor as my witness, Isaacs was present; he laid nothing to his charge; and the son and daughter, I humbly presume, came to save the father. I therefore most humbly rely on your lordship's humanity, that the doubtful testimony and character of Isaacs, who was acquitted of the misdemeanor this day, together with the bad character of the son and daughter, will operate in my favour, and in the favour of the other prisoners at the bar.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-39

600. JOHN PUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of Dennis Colvil , from his person .

The prosecutor not appearing the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-40

601. EDWARD SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , eleven ounces weight of wool, value 4 s. the property of John Drinkald , Matthias Prime Lucas , John Drinkald , and Joseph Barber .

And OTHER COUNTS, the property of other persons.

JOHN DRINKALD. I am a wharfinger ; my partners are Matthias Prime Lucas, John Drinkald , and Joseph Barber . I lost my wool from Custom-house quay. On the 28th of May I had several bags of wool laying on the quay; seeing the prisoner on the quay, I went round; I saw him in the act of taking wool out of some of the bags. I perceived he had wool concealed under his coat.

- . I am a constable. I took the wool out of the prisoner's smallclothes and under his arm-pits.

Prosecutor. It is my wool; I am the wharfinger.

Prisoner's Defence. I own to having the wool, but I did not take it out of any of the bags; I picked it up in the gateway.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined 9 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-41

602. JAMES DODDERIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , ten shillings , the monies of William Jacobs .

WILLIAM JACOBS . I am a publican , the Guildford Arms, Guildford-street . The prisoner was a boy that lived with me a fortnight; I had a recommendation with him. I missed money at different times out of the till. On the 20th of June I marked ten shillings; I put them in the till; the next morning I missed them. I immediately followed the prisoner to the kitchen, and demanded the money that he had broken open my bar and robbed me of. He told me he did not break open my bar; he had only pushed up the shutter, and he had only robbed me of a few halfpence; I told him to produce them, which he did; he produced the halfpence. I told him I wanted the silver. He pulled out a purse; I turned out of the purse from nine to twelve shillings, in shillings and sixpences. I told him that was not the money. I thought it was my money, but it was not the money I wanted. He turned to a cupboard, and brought me some shillings; seven of them were the marked money. He said he was very sorry for it.

Q. How many did he bring out of the cupboard - A. Eight or nine; seven of them are the marked money. This is the marked money; there is a little dot upon it, marked with a nail. The prisoner said he hoped I would do nothing more with him than discharge him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed for things.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-42

603. JAMES HETT was indicted for the wilful murder of William Richardson .

WILLIAM ABBOTT . I was a sailor on board the ship. Kingston in her voyage home; The prisoner was first mate . William Richardson was a sailor on board. When we were at Santa Cruz, Richardson was in the hold when we were stowing rum; it is about ten weeks ago. The deceased was in the hold stowing rum; he was a little intoxicated in liquor. The man was not capable of doing his duty; he was

laying down on the puncheons. The mate told him to get out of the way: he took a billet of wood about twelve inches long and three inches square; he beat him shocking on the sides, shoulder, and jaw; he struck him more than three times; they were very hard blows indeed; he said, d - n your eyes, (while he was beating him) I will be your butcher. Richardson said nothing at all.

Q. Had these blows any effect afterwards - A. Yes, the jaw was never proper afterwards; it was swelled; he could not eat his victuals, and on some day, in the homeward-bound passage (I cannot recollect the day) the deceased was at the helm. I stood on the larboard side of the windlass. I saw the mate take the main-brace, and beat him shocking. The main brace is a rope about three inches and a half round. It is not a usual rope to strike seamen with. The rope was just by him; he struck him with this rope over the sides and shoulders. Richardson stopped at the helm until he was relieved by another man.

Q. Did you see him after he came from the helm - A. Yes, he was like a man out of Bedlam; he never had his right senses afterwards. I saw nothing at all afterwards.

Q. When did you arrive in the Thames - A. I cannot say the day of the month; it is about three weeks ago. I kept company with Richardson until the day he died. I was with him very often.

Q. How was his health afterwards - A. Not the same as before; he was like a madman. Before that he spoke sensible to any man in the ship; afterwards he would chew tobacco of one side of his mouth, and eat his meat on the other side.

Mr. Pooley. Did you see the prisoner before the magistrate - A. I did.

COURT. Did he come voluntary - A. I cannot tell. I saw him come in the first time I went. At that time the magistrate admitted him to bail.

Q. How came you not to tell the whole before the magistrate - A. He did not ask me; he left me to tell my own story. I did not tell him all.

Q. Have you had any discipline from the mate - A. He beat me one, that was when I first came on board.

Q. Did you threaten to bring an action against him for that beating - A. No.

Q. Did you know why the prisoner beat Richardson at the helm - A. It was for something about the steerage. He struck him three times. I cannot say exactly where the blows fell.

OLIVE JOHNSON . I was a seaman on board the Kingston on her homeward-bound voyage.

Q. Do you remember Richardson - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember anything happening between him and the mate while you were stowing the rum - A. Yes; while he was down in the hold he took a billet of wood that laid under the rum casks, and struck him with it. If it had been square all about, it was five inches round. Both ends of the billet of wood was not alike, one end about five inches and the other end three inches and a half. It was flat on one side, and corner-like on the other side.

Q. What was Richardson doing when the mate struck him - A. He was sitting on the top of a cask. The hatchway was open. We were waiting for orders of the mate what we should do. The mate had given no orders. We were come from our dinner.

Q. Now, in what manner did he strike Richardson - A. He struck him as hard as he could over his jaw and over his cheek. He struck him four or five blows.

Q. How was Richardson at that time, was he drunk or sober - A. He was neither drunk nor sober; he was between both. He had drank half a pint of rum before it was served out to us.

Q. How was he after this beating - A. He went working on a good while.

Q. Was Abbott by when this happened - A. Yes.

Q. How was the man's cheek afterward - A. It was swelled up a little; he did not make much complaint about it.

Q. Now, afterwards, about three weeks before you got here, do you remember anything happening at the helm - A. No, I was not up; I did not see that.

Q. Did you ever see the mate and him, and any thing happening to him at another time after that - A. Yes.

Q. Where was Richardson when you saw anything happening - A. He was abaft the windlass. Richardson was working upon a platt, the mate came and asked him why he was doing the platt such a foolish way. He did not do the work properly. Richardson had not his proper senses, nor never had since he was driven from the helm.

Q. Not having done this, what did the mate do to him - A. He struck him with a two and a half inch rope, with a foretopmast staysail halliard. He gave him six or seven blows, some over his arm, thigh, and backside, as the man turned himself about. Sometimes the mate held the rope with one hand, and sometimes with both hands. The captain came forward in the forecastle, and asked him what was the matter with him. The prisoner was not by at the time. I was not present when Richardson was driven from the helm.

JOHN YOUNGER . I was carpenter on board the Kingston.

Q. Do you remember the day when anything happened between the mate and Richardson - A. I remember the event; it was about three weeks before we arrived at London. Richardson was at work; the mate came to him; the mate told him to go to work about the platt; the more he endeavoured to clear them the more he warped them.

Q. To what was that owing - A. It appeared to me the man was quite delirious.

Q. Had he always been so - A. No; a few days before we left Santa Cruz he was so, and continued so all the way home.

Q. Was that known by every body in the ship - A. Yes.

COURT. What day did you leave the country - A. I cannot say. We were six weeks coming; we got home on the 22nd of June.

Q. How soon after you left the country did he become in this state - A. Three or four days.

Q. When the man could not disentangle the foxes what did the mate do to him - A. He took up a rope

immediately, a three inch rope, and struck him over his back and loins. He gave him about a dozen blows altogether; they were heavy blows.

Q. How was he after this beating - A. He was the same as before; quite out of his mind; he was quite sullen stupid; he never spoke anything to any one. He was about forty. He came on board a ruptured man.

Q. Did not you say before the coroner that he became ill after he received that beating, and remained so until he came on shore - A. Yes; he was the same before he was beat, when I saw him.

Q. Tell me whether that is not your hand-writing - A. It is, I told the coroner the same as I do now.

Q. It is here stated that he became ill soon after this beating, and continued so until he came on shore - A. That is not true.

WILLIAM GARDNER . I am a seaman on board the Kingston.

Q. Do you remember on the morning Richardson being at the helm or wheel - A. Yes; I cannot say exactly the day of the month; it was between two and three weeks before the ships arrival; it was between six and seven o'clock in the morning; as he was at the helm, the mate took up a three-inch rope, and struck him about eight blows, as nigh as I can tell; he struck him two or three blows over the head, and some more over the body. He took the rope in both hands. About two o'clock in the same day he received some more blows from the mate as he was standing on the larboard side, abaft the windlass. Some of the people were swinging the mast up; he was not to it; it was his duty to do it if he had been in his proper senses.

Q. Did you perceive at any time that he was not in his proper senses - A. I asked him several questions that day, and received no answer from him: he continued in that state until he arrived at home.

MARGARET CARTER . I live in Bluegate-place, Shadwell. Richardson lodged in my house before this voyage, and when he returned home he came to my house as usual. When he came, he came to the window instead of to the door: he came as though his brain was turned, and his eyes were turned in his head. I sent for a tailor, and had him some clothes made, and a shoemaker for some shoes. He had his breakfast, and went to Shadwell office. I did not go with him, nor did I did I know of it until next day. As soon as he had been to the office he came home and went to bed. This was on Wednesday that he came home to my house; on Thursday he got up, and wanted to go out again; I took his hat from him, and told him I did not want any law work. On Friday morning I sent for a doctor; he was gritting his teeth as if in a convulsion fit. Dr. Ball came, and Mr. Rutherford likewise. Richardson never got out of his bed; he died on Monday morning.

PHILIP BATEMAN . I am a surgeon. I opened the body of Richardson. Upon examining the body I found several bruises; one on each of his sides, and on the left arm, and particularly under the left ear, and two or three slight bruises about the head. I opened the head, and perceived the man's death was occasioned from inflammation of the brain, the cause of which I cannot say. The bruises might be the cause of it, or might not. Principally an inflammation arises from excessive drinking of spirits.

COURT. Would new rum be likely to produce that description of inflammation more than other liquor - A. It would.

Prisoner's Defence. There are a great many things alleged against me that is false.

MATTHEW KENNEY . I am a surgeon. I was a passenger, and returned in this vessel, the Kingston.

Q. On your passage home was Richardson in ill health, so as to be under your care - A. Not till the 6th of June, and then he was in a state of stupefaction, after intoxication; no medicine could be of any use to him. The medicine for him was temperance. He made no complaint of ill treatment, nor was it made by any one else to me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him the character of a humane man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-43

604. MICHAEL M'GUIRE was indicted for manslaughter .

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a pupil of the London hospital. The deceased, O'Brien , was brought there on Monday the 28th of June, near eleven in the forenoon; he died on the 20th, at near eleven o'clock at night. I examined his body after his death; I found a rupture in the right groin, and a laceration of the several intestines, and a very violent inflammation all over the abdomen. I conceive the violence done to the abdomen was the cause of his death. The rupture was a recent one. The rupture and the inflammation were connected; I conceive they were both done at the same time; both originated by the violence done to the abdomen. The hernia was produced at the time he was kicked or struck.

SOLOMON JEWELL . I am surgeon's beadle of the London hospital I saw the deceased, O'Brien, brought there on the 28th of June; he died on the 29th. He was very ill indeed when brought in, and growing worse from the time he was brought in until he died.

Q. Did he believe himself to be a dying man at the moment he was brought in - A. He was told so by the magistrate when he took his deposition, and he believed himself to be a dying man; he told me so as I was helping him in; he appeared to be a man approaching to his dissolution.

Q. Now, while under the apprehension of his approaching death did he tell you anything - A. He told me the day prior to his being brought to the hospital there had been a quarrel with him and M'Guire; there was a challenge given to fight; he could not recollect whether he gave it, or whether the prisoner challenged him; he said, after that, in the afternoon, they met again, and he was dragged into an entry in the court, and kicked, and struck. I asked him particularly who did it; he said, M'Guire.

MARTHA BAILEY . I live in Tewkesbury-court, Whitechapel. On Monday morning, the 27th of June, M'Guire gave O'Brien a challenge to fight; the

deceased refused. In the afternoon, between four and five o'clock, the deceased came up the court; the prisoner abused him and his wife very much. The deceased then challenged to fight, and struck the first blow. They fought together. The prisoner dragged the deceased into a passage; what happened after I cannot say. He was in the passage about five minutes; the deceased came out; he got up to the landing of his own stairs; he could get no farther. I went to help him; he begged of me to let him lay still. That is all I know, except the prisoner called the deceased many foul names.

MRS. HUMPHREYS. I live in Tewkesbury-court, No. 4. In the evening I was going out of the court at the same time; I laid hold of the deceased's arm while he was standing on his legs; I said, Brien, what brought you into this skirmish; he said, they would not leave me alone. I did not see the fight.

SARAH BENNET . I live in Tewkesbury-court. On Monday morning, about eleven o'clock, I saw the quarrel between the prisoner and the deceased; the prisoner challenged the deceased to fight; the deceased would not. They parted. They met again in the afternoon; then the deceased gave the challenge to fight. The deceased gave the first blow; there were only two blows given on both sides. I did not see them in the passage. I saw the deceased come out of the passage; his mouth was filled with blood.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-44

605. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 23rd of June , a bank note for payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note; with the same intention.

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating the instrument to be a promissory note instead of a bank note.

And FOUR OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, with intention to defraud Benjamin Millwood .

JANE MILLWOOD . I am the wife of Benjamin Millwood ; he keeps a chandler's shop , Trinity-lane, Queenhithe. On the 23rd of June, the prisoner came blusteringly hallooing out, Millwood, Millwood, give me change for a two-pound note; when he hallooed out the name of Millwood, my husband was not at home; he called at the door; I came to the door to give him two one-pound notes, all that I had. I received of him a two-pound note, apparently, in return. I put the note I received of him into my pocket book; there was no other note there; he said, at the time that I gave him the change, Mr. Powell, I am coming. I went to the door, and saw him go to Mr. Powell. Mr. Powell lives at the next door to me. As I had seen the prisoner several times before, I wondered where he lived. This attracted my attention. I took particular notice of his person. I kept the note in my pocket-book until about ten o'clock at night. Mr. Millwood came home; I gave it him to buy fish the next morning.

Q. In consequence of anything that passed did you see the prisoner on the next day - A. In the course of the next day I had suspicion that the note was a forged one. Before that suspicion had arisen, the prisoner passed my door. About ten minutes before word was brought me, he stood and stared at me. I thought him a gentleman; I curtsied at him, thinking him a gentleman. On the next Saturday, at half after three o'clock, I saw the prisoner walk before me in Thames-street; I went up to him and tapped him on the shoulder; I said he was the gentleman I was looking for; he said he knew nothing of me. I took hold of his collar, and said he must go with me. He offered to put his hand into his pocket; he said if two pound was any object, he would give me two pound, or any money that he had; he pulled out a handful of notes, a good many. I then told him if he gave me the King's dominion I would not take it; he then put them in his pocket. I said he must go with me. When I got into Little Trinity-lane, where I live, he ran away; there he set off running; I called out, stop thief; my husband heard me; he came to my assistance; he and Mr. Powell together took the prisoner into custody; they brought him to my house. I fetched a constable myself; his name is David Lindsey .

Mr. Gurney. You had no other note - A. I had not in the world, nor Mr. Millwood.

BENJAMIN MILLWOOD . I am the husband of the last witness.

Q. On Thursday night, the 23d of June, did you receive of her a two pound note - A. Yes; I put it into my purse; there was no other note in it. I kept it in my purse till the next morning; I paid it to Mr. Saunders, a fish salesman of Billingsgate, for some lobsters.

Q. Do you remember, on Saturday night the 25th of June, your wife calling out stop thief, and you going out after the prisoner - A. Yes, in Trinity-lane; that is the lane I live in; I saw the prisoner; he was running very fast; I ran after him, and catched hold of him. I turned him round; he said he was not the man. I brought him back to my house; he asked me for a pint of water, which I gave him; he then wanted me let him go; he offered me two pound to let him go, and some more money that he had got in his pocket if I would let him go. I gave him in charge of a constable.

JAMES SAUNDERS . I am a fish-salesman, at Billinsgate.

Q. Do you remember receiving of the last witness a two-pound note - A. I do; I received it for a small parcel of lobsters; I marked the note that I received of him. I mark all the notes I take, unless it is an oversight.

Q. What is the mark you put upon it - A. Queenhithe. It is my own hand writing. I am sure that is the note I received of him, as any person can be of his own hand writing. I am clear is the note I received of the last witness for the lobsters. I sent the note to the Bank by another person. I have not written the word Queenhithe upon any other note than the note I received of the last witness. I always ask the place of abode.

GEORGE POWELL . I live in Trinity-lane, next door to Mr. Millwood.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your shop on Thursday, the 23rd of June - A. I do; I have no doubt he is the person, I was at dinner; some person called out Mr. Powell; I came forward; he then asked for Robinson, a baker; I told him I did not know any body of that name. He went to the next door, and asked that lady to change him a two-pound note. My shop is next door; he spoke loud enough for any body to hear at the next door. Before he went from me the first time, he apologised for disturbing me at my dinner. In about two minutes, he came back again, and asked me if I knew any body in the name of Robinson; I told him I did not recollect any body of the name of Robinson. I never saw him before; he called on me the next day.

MARY MORGAN. I am the wife of William Morgan ; he keeps a wine-vaults in Whitecross-street. In May, the prisoner came to my house; nobody was at the bar but myself. The words he said, is Mr. Morgan at home, can you give me change of a two-pound note; you do not know me; is Mr. Morgan at home, I hope he is well. He said, his name was Webber, he lived in Banner-street. I gave him silver, and received of him apparently a two-pound note in return.

COURT. What did you write upon the note - A. Webber, Banner-street, under the right hand corner. That is my writing, and that is the note, I am positive of. Then the prisoner went away.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am the husband of the last witness.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you knew him before that day - A. Never; as I know of.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 25th of June last, I went with Mr. Lees, one of the inspectors of the Bank, to a public-house in the Poultry; I found the prisoner there. Mrs. Millwood pointed him out as the person that had given her the two-pound note. I asked him if he had done so; he said, he never gave her any note; he had no such transaction at all. I searched him. I found good notes upon him, which I gave to Mr. Lees, to the amount of ten-pounds about him.

Q. Was there about him a two-pound note - A. There was. I found a key upon him; I asked him what it was the key of; he said it was the key of his chest. I asked him where he lived; he said, No. 5, Greystoke-place, Fetter-lane. I told him his house must be searched; he said, it would alarm his wife; he would send her a note, desiring her to let the house be searched. In consequence of that, he wrote this note in my presence, and directed it Mrs. Mitchell, No. 5, Greystoke-place, Fetter-lane.

"My dear wife, the gentleman that calls will look over the house. I am your affectionate husband, JOHN MITCHELL ." I went there, and saw Mrs. Mitchell; I took the key with me. I unlocked the chest with the key he gave me; I found some good notes in the bottom of the chest, which I delivered to Mr. Lees. The good notes were altogether in a small piece of parchment; I think forty pounds, or thirty-eight pounds; I cannot recollect which. I looked then at the clothes in the chest; I felt the flaps of the coat pockets; there were four or five coats. I felt something in the pocket flaps of three of them; the coats are here; I found in this coat eight two-pound notes, slid in between the lining and the outer part of the coat; this was only in one flap. Here is another coat; I found in his coat nine two-pound notes on one side, and eleven on the other side; all two-pound notes.

Q. Now, look at the eight, and tell me whether you know them - A. I marked them. These were in coat No. 1. I have no doubt whatever they are the same notes; I marked them before I parted with them. In coat No. 2, I found nine and eleven; these are the nine; I marked them before I parted with them: these are the eleven. This is the coat No. 3; in this was ten on one side, on the other side thirteen; this is the parcel ten, and this the parcel thirteen.

Q. Did you find any thing else - A. I found four hundred counterfeit shillings.

JOHN LEES . I am one of the inspectors of Bank notes in the Bank of England.

Q. Look at this note, that is the one in the indictment - A. It is a forged note; the paper and signature; it is forged in every part.

(The note read.)

Q. Look at the other note, the one uttered to Mrs. Morgan - A. That is also a forged note in every respect.

Q. Now, look at these several parcels - A. I have seen them before; they were delivered to me instantly. These parcels are also forged; they are of the same manufactory as the second; the first that I looked at, they are impressions from the same plate; the signatures are various; they appear to be the same hand writing. They are all forged in every respect.

Prisoner's Defence. I trust your lordship will allow me the benefit which has been allowed to other prisoners; I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-45

606. WILLIAM GARDNER and MARY MORRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , two gowns, value 1 l. a handkerchief, value 4 s. two yards of calico, value 2 s. four caps, value 4 s. a pair of pockets, value 3 s. a towel, value 1 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. and a coat, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Terry , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS TERRY . I live at No. 7, Carey-street, St. Giles's ; I am a lodger there.

Q. Whose house is it - A. Mr. Shield's; he has taken the house of the owner; he lives in it.

Q. Had he taken it before this robbery was committed - A. Yes. I have a room there; I am a married man. On the 1st of June, I went out; I locked my door about one o'clock; my wife went out before me. I returned at half after three; I found my door locked; I missed my coat. They must have opened the door with a false key. I only missed a coat of my own; my wife missed the other things.

Q. What was the value of the coat - A. Six shillings.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. I do; they lodged in the next room to me. I saw my coat again a few days after the robbery at the pawnbrokers; I am sure it is my coat.

ELIZABETH TERRY. I am the wife of the last witness. I came home at nine o'clock at night, from work; I missed my things from my box. The gentleman at the watchhouse took a cap of mine and a pair of pockets off the woman prisoner.

JOHN MORGAN . On Wednesday, the 1st of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Mary Morris come out of the house with something in her apron; I saw Gardner and her standing talking together in the yard. I heard that Terry had been robbed; I told him what I had seen. When I saw the two prisoners together, they were in the coachyard.

SARAH FUSWELL . I live in St. George's watch-house. When the prisoners were brought to the watchhouse I locked them up. I searched Mary Morris . On her head was this cap; the prisoner said, it was Mrs. Terry's cap, but she did not know what became of the other three caps. I found this pair of pockets upon her. I took from her a cap and a pair of pockets. That is all she had.

MR. BROOKS. I am a pawnbroker, 54, High-street, St. Giles's. I know the female prisoner by sight. I believe it was her that brought this coat on the 4th of June; I know her by the name of Morris. I know nothing of the man.

Prosecutrix. This is my cap and pockets; they were in the house on the day in question, clean in the box.

Prosecutor. That is my coat.

Gardner's Defence. I went out that morning at eleven o'clock.

Morris said nothing in her defence.

GARDNER, NOT GUILTY .

MORRIS, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-46

607. RICHARD HARDY was indicted for that he, on the 14th of June , in and upon William Payne , did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said William Payne in and upon his right side, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a soldier in the East London militia . On the 14th of June, I was at Hoxton Market-place , next door to where the prisoner lives; I was beating a drum at a wedding. Richard Hardy came out just as I was beating the drum, with a knife; I perceived it; I chucked the drum down on the ground. He then took hold of my collar and shook me. He then stabbed my drum twice. Then he took a fresh hold of me, tighter, where he had hold of my collar; then I perceived a stab.

Q. Did you see what motion he made with his hand that stabbed you - A. No. I saw the knife in his hand.

Q. Did you see the motion of his hand when he stabbed you - A. I cannot say I did see the motion of his hand by his shaking me.

Q. Whereabouts did he stab you - A. On my right side; it was a little clasp knife.

Q. How deep did it penetrate - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were you examined by a surgeon - A. Yes; Mr. Parkinson.

Q. Had you given Hardy any provocation - A. No other than by beating the drum.

Q. Had he objected to that - A. Not that I heard.

Q. Had you known Hardy before - A. No.

Q. This you told us happened on the 14th of June; how long did you continue under the surgeon's hands - A. Three weeks.

JOHN VIVEN. I am a drummer. I saw the prisoner scuffling with Payne; as I came up, Payne fell, exclaiming, oh, Lord, I am stabbed. Me and my comrade, Adair, got him up, and took him to surgeon Parkinson. I saw Hardy have hold of Payne; I did not see Payne have hold of Hardy.

MARY THOMPSON. I live in Queen-street, Hoxton Market-place; right opposite of the prisoner.

Q. Did you see this affray or not - A. I heard he was stabbed; I picked his sword up off the ground, and I went round to the doctor to bear if the wound was mortal. When I returned, I saw Hardy; I said the poor young man was stabbed; Hardy said, d - n his eyes, he had been waiting for him all the afternoon; he knew he would serve him out before he had done.

JAMES PARKINSON . I am a surgeon; I examined Payne's wound; it was an inch deep, hardly more; two inches would have been dangerous; a wound an inch deep is not likely to be attended with fatal consequences. It appeared to be a cut, not a stab. It might be done by Payne turning quick round, or by Hardy drawing the knife. Every thing that I saw might have occurred if there was a scuffle between the parties.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-47

608. JOHN NIGHTINGALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , two pounds twelve ounces weight of nutmegs, value 5 l. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a labourer in the East India Company's warehouse. The prisoner was a labourer also. On the evening of the 15th of June, I was in Leadenhall-street warehouse , I observed in the spice warehouse two small bags upon a pile of mace; I watched these bags by the direction of Mr. Brookes. I saw the prisoner go near these bags; he was gone near ten minutes. I saw Nightingale go down to the place where they were; I did not see him take the bags. I knew they were there when he went down that place. Immediately he was gone, I went down, and saw they were gone. I informed the commodore of it. In consequence

of that, the prisoner was searched, and the bags were found upon him.

JOHN CLARE. I am an officer, and a labourer in the spice warehouse, where the nutmegs were. The prisoner was also a labourer. I searched the prisoner. I found forty-four nutmegs in his coat pocket, and two pounds of nutmegs in his breeches pocket; he pulled them out of his breeches and delivered them into my hands. I found two bags of nutmegs upon him. He said, he was sorry for what he had done.

MR. BROWN. I was there when his lodgings were searched. We found six pounds of nutmegs there; they are worth ten shillings a pound, exclusive of the duty.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-48

609. TRUMAN M'DONALD was indicted for that he, being clerk to Stephen Griffen and Thomas Griffen , was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for and on their account, and that he being such clerk, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, on the 26th of March , 2 l. 10 s. 6 d. for them, and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JAMES PILHAM . I am clerk to Mr. James Stewart, a performer, in Broad-street.

Q. Do you know Stephen and Thomas Griffen - A. Perfectly well; they are drug brokers . The prisoner is clerk to them. I paid him two-pound ten shillings and sixpence on the 26th of March, I paid him that money on Messrs. Griffens account. These are the receipts. I am clear in my memory that I paid him.

STEPHEN GRIFFEN. My partner's name is Thomas Griffen ; we are drug brokers, Queen-street, Cheapside. The prisoner was my clerk, in March last; he was entrusted to receive money on my account; he was to pay it over to us. He never accounted to either of us for the two pound ten shillings and sixpence received of Mr. Pilham. I told him I discovered on going round to several of my customers, that he had received brokerage, but to what extent, I did not know; he then told me. I neither threatened or promised him any thing whatever. He then set down on this paper, and what he could not remember he took out of the ledger; he set down this two pounds ten shillings and sixpence, as part he had received of Mr. Stewart on my account, and had never accompted for it to us. This conversation took place on the 15th of June; I had dismissed him prior to that.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-49

610. ELIJAH STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , five shirts, value 10 s. a night-cap, value 20 d. eight pocket handkerchiefs, value 4 s. eight pair of stockings, value 4 s. 6 d. and a flannel waistcoat, value 6 d. the property of John Clark .

JANE CLARK . I live in Hoxton; I am a laundress; my husband's name is John Clark . Towards the latter end of May, I delivered the bundle to my little girl, to take a few doors off; the other things were taken from my wheelbarrow; the man took the things from the barrow; he was taken directly. I saw the man run; I cried stop thief. He threw them down, and was secured. I picked up the bundle.

JOHN MARTIN . I was coming along the street; I heard a woman cry out stop thief; I saw the prisoner throw a bundle from under his left arm. I apprehended him; the prisoner is the man.

THOMAS CROSBY . I am a constable. I was at the watchhouse door; I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner threw the bundle of linen away. The prosecutrix delivered it to me. I secured the prisoner, and took him into the watchhouse.

Prosecutrix. I picked up the bundle of linen, and took it to the watchhouse. This is the bundle of linen; it is clean linen. I was taking it home; I am answerable for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I deal in oranges and lemons. Coming home I turned up Philpot-lane, and as I was running up Lime-street, the watchman said, I must go along with him; they searched me, and found nothing about me.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-50

611. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a wrapper, value 1 s. twenty-two yards of kerseymere, value 5 l. 10 s. nine yards of cambric muslin, value 1 l. 5 s. 9 d. and fifty-six yards of cotton, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Alexander Scholefield .

JOHN SMART . I am a carman. I drive Mr. Scholefield's cart, at the George inn. I was taking out a truss to go to Mr. Denbigh's, Monument yard; the truss weighed an hundred and a half, and just as my back was turned, this other truss was taken out of my cart. I was not absent above three minutes. I am certain the truss was in the cart when I took the other out; it was the last thing I saw.

THOMAS MOODY . I am a post-boy. I saw Smart take a pack out of the cart into Monument yard; I saw after that, two men at the cart; one in the cart, the other standing on the ground. I suspected they were robbing the cart. The man in the cart helped a truss on the shoulder of the other man on the ground. I was convinced they were thieving the truss. I followed the man with the truss, and brought him back to the cart again, and delivered him and the pack in the charge of Smart. The prisoner is the man, and this is the pack. I told the prisoner he did not belong to the cart. The cart stands in the same yard that my chaise does.

GEORGE GLOVER. I am a pork butcher, in Leadenhall-market. On the 25th of May, I was coming up Fish-street-hill, I saw the post boy

seize the prisoner with the pack on his shoulder; he said, where are you going with that pack; he said, to deliver it. to be sure. The carman came up; he gave him in charge of the carman.

MR. MAXWELL. I saw the prisoner take the truss out of the cart; the post-boy and I seized him both together.

DAVID CHANDLER . I am an officer. I produce the pack, I took the prisoner into custody.

Smart. I am sure that is the same pack I had in my cart.

Prisoner's Defence. A man said, my lad, take this truss for me into Monument-yard, and when I got into Monument-yard I was laid hold of. I told the man that laid hold of me, there was the man that I was carrying it for; that man ran away. The post-boy said he saw him give it me and run away.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-51

612. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , seven yards of kersey mere, value 3 l. 13 s. the property of Ebenezer Davis .

EBENEZER DAVIS. I am a tailor and shop-keeper , 106, Leadenhall-street . On Friday the 3d of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop; I was in the back part of the shop; the boy cried out, master, here is a thief. I immediately ran to the door, and saw the boy pursuing the prisoner; I cried, stop thief. The prisoner threw the goods away; my boy picked it up, and I took the prisoner into custody.

GEORGE POLLOX. I am a servant to Mr. Davis. I was sweeping the parlour out. I saw the prisoner come into the shop; he took a piece of cloth, and ran out. I ran after him, and cried stop thief; he took down Billeter-lane; he threw down the piece of cloth; I picked it up. He was taken, and given into the constable's hands. This is the piece of cloth; it is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 2 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-52

613. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , thirty pounds weight of sugar, value 26 s. the property of Frederick Waymouth .

FREDERICK WAYMOUTH. I am a sugar-baker ; I live in Well-street . The prisoner is a person that I used to buy straw mats of. I have every reason to believe he came to my premises when I was absent.

Q. What is Mr. Brier - A. He is a sugar-boiler; he lives in the sugar-house. I lodge all my men.

Q. You had notice, I believe, to produce a deed - A. Yes, this is the deed.

CHRISTOPHER STRODER . I am in Mr. Waymouth's employ. I have seen the prisoner came frequently to the sugar-house prior to the 27th of May. In consequence of what I observed, I gave information to Mr. Waymouth. On the evening of the 27th of May, I observed the prisoner go into the sugar-house; the officers were nigh at hand the same time. I informed them directly.

JAMES KENNEDY. I am an officer of Worship-street. I received directions to attend near Mr. Waymouth's sugar-house; I did. On the evening of the 27th of May, about a quarter after nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of the sugar-house. I stood opposite of the sugar-house. William Armstrong said, Mr. Kennedy, this is another acquaintance of mine. I asked him his name; he told me his name was Knight. I asked him what he had got in his pockets; he said it was sugar. I then asked him where he purchased it, or did he bring it out of the shop; he said that was no place to speal about it, if we would go into a house he would tell me. I took off his hat; in his hat I found upward of five pounds weight of sugar in a handkerchief to keep it from his hair. In his coat pockets I found upwards of thirty pounds weight of sugar. I asked him how he came by it; he said he would rather decline making any answer. I took him into custody, and brought him to the office the next morning.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG. I was with Kennedy at this time. The account that he is given is correct. He is an old acquaintance of mine by living in the neighbourhood, not from any criminal affair.

LAWRENCE DEPREE. I am one of the sugar-bakers in this house. I have seen the prisoner in the fill-house at unusual hours. On the morning of the 28th of May, I looked in the fill-house; I saw some sugar was missing from the bin. The sugar produced by Kennedy is as much like the sugar as if it had been taken out of the bin. When I saw the prisoner in the sugar-house. Mr. Brier was always with him.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is all the property in the sugar-house yours - A. It is.

Q. What is the value of that thirty pounds weight of sugar - A. It is five pound the hundred weight; it cost me about ten pence the pound.

Prisoner's Defence. For the last two years I was in the habit of shaving Mr. Brier. I considered Mr. Brier to be Mr. Waymouth's partner. I have known him fifteen years; he lived in the neighbourhood that I reside in before he came to that sugar-house. I used to shave him two or three times a week. I asked Mr. Brier two weeks ago to let me have half a hundred weight of sugar; he said it was not for sale; it was raw sugar; he said he would give me some. I told him what he had given me was very dirty; it did not answer the purpose. He said he would give me some clean, which was the business of that night. I took between twenty and thirty pounds; I was tying it up in my handkerchief; it was unable to retain it. I broke the handkerchief. I placed as much as I could in the handkerchief, the remainder I rolled up in the handkerchief, and placed it as well as I could in my hat. That is the truth. I was stopped.

FREDERICK BRIER. Q. This is your hand-writing to this paper, is it not - A. Yes; I have one like it about me.

Q. How long have you lived at this sugar-house in consequence of these articles - A. Ten years.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he used

to come and shave me. I gave him permission to take the sugar; he wanted it for brewing. I knew of his taking the sugar; I gave him leave.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-53

614. JOHN TROOP JUERT, alias CHARLES COX , was indicted for that he, on the 16th of February, in the 48th year of his Majesty's reign, by the name of John Troop Juert did take to wife Amelia Jenkins , at the parish church of St. Mary, Newington, in the county of Surry; that he, afterwards, by the name of Charles Cox did take to wife on the 23d of September , Mary Lloyd , Amelia (his former wife) being then living .

GEORGE MOSS . I bring the sentence of Sir William Scott , between John Troop Juert and Amelia Jenkins . (The sentence read.)

"We do pronounce a decree, and declare the marriage between John Troop Juert and Amelia Jenkins as null and void."

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-54

615. JOHN MILLER , alias JOSEPH , was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon George Gray , on the 3d of March , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. his property.

GEORGE GRAY . I live in Gloucester-street, Norton Falgate; I am a millwright . On the morning of the 3d of March, I was going down Whitechapel High-street ; I was met by the prisoner; he gave me a blow on the right eye, and drew the watch out of my pocket; he immediately ran across the street. I hallooed out, stop thief; the watchman being upon the alert stopped him on the opposite side of the way. I never lost sight of him from the time he gave me the blow until the watchman stopped him. The watchman took him into custody.

Q. Was the watch found upon him - A. The watch was upon him when he was taken in custody by the watchman.

Q. Who found the watch upon him - A. He dropped the watch as soon as he was taken into custody. The watchman picked the watch up. I am sure it is my watch.

JOHN ULBERT . I am a watchman of High-street, Whitechapel.

Q. On this Sunday morning, about one o'clock, did you hear the cry of stop thief - A. I did. I pursued the prisoner, and took him; he dropped the watch when I had hold of him; I picked it up. This is the watch that he dropped.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I implore the humane attention of the court, I having no friend alive, nor have I the means of retaining able counsel in the law to defend me. I trust I shall receive an impartial hearing. It is painful and awful for me to enter into this charge. It is the first time in my life I have had to answer for a dishonest act. I have been faithful in serving my king and country fifteen years. I am a native of Liverpool; and since my discharge I have been employed in the docks of London and Dentford. On Saturday night, the 2nd of July, about the hour of one and two in the morning, the prosecutor was robbed in Whitechapel; the watch was found upon me. With regard to any knowledge in me how the watch was taken; all I know, I never took the watch. As to the assault, I am not able to describe, from the very forward state of liquor I was in. Unhappily, from a fracture in my head, when I take any drink I have not the ability of knowing what I do. I hope and trust in some measure that may extenuate some part of the crime, and from every circumstance ariseing in my favour, where there is a doubt I hope I may receive the benefit of that doubt, and I shall how to the verdict of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-55

616. SARAH OSBORNE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Skinner , no person being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 1st of June , and stealing therein, a quilt, value 2 s. 6 d. his property.

ANN SKINNER . I am the wife of John Skinner .

Q. Did you lose a quilt - A. Yes, on the 1st of June; I lost it out of my room. I had seen it half an hour before I lost it. I lost it between four and five o'clock.

Q. When did you see it again - A. In about half an hour I saw it again in the prisoner's box in her room. She rented a room of me. I have a witness here that took it out of her box. Her box was not locked.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the house when you went out - A. No, she was not at home when I went out; she was at home when I came back. When I came home I saw her going out of my room. She put my quilt in her box; I saw one corner hanging out. I asked her for my quilt; she sat herself upon the box, and said I should not have it. She said she would stay a month in the room, and let me have nothing.

- HUTCHINS. I am an officer. I produce the quilt. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prosecutrix. It is my quilt; it is worth half a crown.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix knew I had pawned the quilt; I told her I had taken it out; she came into my room, and took every thing out of the room; she threw four or five pails of water over me, and drank with me after it. The quilt was not taken out of my box.

Prosecutrix. The prisoner threw water over me first; I did not drink with her afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-56

617. JOSEPH SHEPHERD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Storey , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 3d of May , and stealing therein, a watch,

value 5 l. two flutes, value 1 l. a case of mathematical instruments, value 2 l. twelve bank dollars, three 1 l. bank notes, and a 5 l. bank note , the property of Robert Storey.

ROBERT STOREY . I am a labourer in the London Docks . I live at No. 4, Love-lane, Wapping-street, St. George's, Middlesex ; I am a housekeeper there. On the morning of the 3d of May, I went out about eight o'clock. I left my wife in the house, nobody else. I returned about ten minutes past four in the afternoon.

Q. Did you miss any property when you came back - A. Yes, I missed my watch and other things.

Q. What else - A. They were chiefly drawing instruments, a telescope, two flutes, a rule, a compass, and three pounds six shillings in dollars: I lost twelve dollars.

Q. Any bank notes - A. Three one-pound notes and a five-pound bank note, a brass weight and scale. They are not in the indictment. I had seen all these things in the house when I went out in the morning. They were all locked up together in a chest when I went out in the morning. That chest was locked, and I always carry the key myself. That chest was taken away, when I came home, altogether.

Q. Now, when did you next see the watch - A. On the 29th of May following; an officer of Lambeth-street had it then.

Q. Have you since seen or found any of the other things - A. No, none at all.

Q. Now, what was the value of the whole of the property that you lost - A. Near sixty pounds altogether.

ELIZABETH STOREY . I am the wife of the last witness. I was left at home on the 3d of May when my husband went out. I went out at ten minutes after three. I locked the door, and the windows were all shut. I was out about twenty minutes.

Q. Now, when you returned did you find the house locked and secure, or how - A. I found the back door on a jar; that door was shut on the latch when I went out.

Q. Could any body open that latch from the street - A. No; they must have come through the other persons premises.

Q. How could they come in from your neighbours premises - A. There is a passage that leads into the yard, from that yard they could open the latch. I missed the chest; it was gone. When I went out I tried the door; the latch was fast. I left no person in the house whatever.

ELIZABETH HEDLAM . I live in Thomas's-street, Whitechapel; I sell fish.

Q. On Friday the 20th of May, did you meet the prisoner any where - A. Yes, just by the workhouse.

Q. What is he - A. He said he worked at the coal work. He asked me to do him a favour; to pledge a watch for him, for a sailor that was going to sea. I agreed to pledge it for him; he wished me either to pledge it or sell it. I asked him what he asked for it; he said two pounds. I afterwards pledge the watch for thirty shillings. I returned him the duplicate and the money. I pledged it at Mr. Dexter's. I bought the duplicate of him afterwards. I was to give him ten shillings; I gave him six shillings in part; I had no more at the time. He went and asked the person that belonged to the watch whether he would take it; he came, and said he would.

MR. DEXTER. I am a pawnbroker. The last witness pledged a watch with me on Friday the 20th of May; it was taken out of my house on the Saturday.

THOMAS BARRETT . I live in Thomas's-street, Whitechapel; I am a coach-smith. I purchased of Mrs. Hedlam the duplicate of a watch. I gave her fifteen shillings for the duplicate. My wife took the watch out of pawn at Mr. Dexter's, and brought it to me. I wanted money on the 22nd, I had it pledged at Mr. Christie's; on the 28th, I sent my wife for the watch; Mr. Christie stopped her for the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-57

618. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21sth of May , a watch, value 5 l. a chain, value 3 l. and two seals, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Elgar , in the dwelling-house of Richard Lawrence .

THOMAS ELGAR. On the night of the 21st of May, I was at Mr. Lawrence's house; I was taken ill; I lost my watch that night from my sleeping-room up one pair of stairs.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the house that night - A. I did not; I had seen her in the house before. I have lived there sixteen years. I saw my watch again in about a month afterwards.

THOMAS TAUNTON . I produce the watch. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch; the seal and chain is mine; there is one seal missing. My name and address is on the inside case of the watch.

Q. What is the value of the watch - A. Near thirty pounds; it is a gold watch; I have had it three years; it was new when I bought it. The seal and chain is mine. There is one seal missing. The chain is gold; it is worth two pounds, or more.

LYDIA LAWRENCE . I am the wife of Richard Lawrence ; he lives in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. My husband rents the house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at your house on the 21st of May - A. Yes; she called in. I had known her before. I sent her up into Mr. Elgar's room myself. He was taken ill. She was there about a quarter of an hour. Mr. Elgar was in the room the whole time; he was so ill he could not speak. The prisoner went away when she came down from Mr. Elgar's room.

Q. Did the prisoner give any reason why she went away - A. She said she thought I looked cool upon her; perhaps I might, she appeared to me to be in liquor.

RICHARD JAMES EVANS . I am a pawnbroker; I produce the chain and seals.

Q. Where did you get that chain and seal - A. I took it on the 23d of May last of the prisoner at the

r. I am sure the prisoner is the person of whom I took it; she pledged it in the name of Ann Williams; I lent her thirty shillings upon them. They were worth about forty-five shillings.

Q. What would you give for them - A. Not more than two pounds.

Taunton. I am an officer. I got this watch at No. Little Union-street, Piccadilly. I apprehended the prisoner in Carnaby-street; I told her I suspected she had taken a gold watch belonging to Mr. Elgar. she denied knowing anything about the watch. I searched her, and found nothing about her; afterwards she told me where the watch was, and went with me to find the watch at No. 2, Little Union-street, Piccadilly. She said she had left it with a friend, deposited in a tea-caddy. I have had the watch ever since. She was with me when I took it out of the tea-caddy.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Lawrence is a relation of mine. I had been there about a fortnight. Mr. Elgar came home exceeding tipsey; the watch he gave me; and through the death of my child, and its illness, I pledged the chain. I meaned to tell Mr. Elgar of it. He told me in the coach he did not wish to hurt me.

Q. to Mr. Elgar. How long have you known the prisoner - A. About fourteen years. I know nothing of her for the last four years.

Q. Did you give her the watch - A. I am certain I did not.

Q. Did you see the prisoner before she was apprehended - A. Yes, once she called upon me at the Bank, saying, that she understood some suspicion had attached upon her on account of the watch. She said she had been ill, or she should have been with me before. She gave me her address; she referred me to two places where I might search her boxes; I told her probably I might call on her that evening.

Q. Did she say that she had got the watch - A. She did not; she said she was poor, but honest. She informed me where she lived, that I might search her box. The watch that I lost I was in the habit of using daily.

Q. to Taunton. Did she mention to you that Mr. Elgar ever gave her the watch - A. Never to me.

JURY, Q. to Mr. Elgar. What was your illness, was it intoxication - A. I can hardly speak to that. I had been dining with the Governors of Pentonville school. I remember Mrs. Lawrence's daughter lighting me up into the room; I fell down. That is all that I remember. I am subject to the bile.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of her being intoxicated at the time .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-58

619. JOHN FISHER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George M'Wrinkle , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 5th of July , and stealing therein, eight shirts, value 4 l. twelve pair of stockings, value 3 l. a tablecloth, value 2 s. two coats, value 6 l. seven waistcoats, value 2 l. two boxes, value 2 s. five silk handkerchiefs, value 12 s. a chain, value 1 l. two watches, value 2 l. and four seals, value 1 l. his property.

GEORGE M'WRINKLE. I am clerk to a navy agent ; I live at No. 8, Mount-street, Whitechapel, in the parish of St. Mary M'Felon, Whitechapel . I am a housekeeper there.

Q. On the 6th of July what happened - A. I was the first up in the house; when I went down stairs the back door was standing wide open.

Q. What people are there in the house - A. There is my wife and five children, no servant. I have a lodger. I rent the house myself.

Q. On the 5th of July, who went to bed last - A. We all went up to bed together. I bolted the back door myself; I saw the front door was fast; the windows were all fast; the washhouse window I did not fasten myself, it was fastened by my youngest son. I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock; I arose next morning about seven o'clock; I came down stairs first; the back door was standing wide open; that was what I had fastened myself the night before. I first went into my parlour; I found all my drawers open, and my desk open. There is a desk and book-case in the back parlour, and the little door within the desk was cut and opened, and all my papers were strewed about.

Q. What other things were taken - A. Various articles of wearing apparel; the drawers were not entirely stripped to be sure. I lost eight shirts.

Q. What is the value of them - A. About two pound the eight shirts; nine pair of silk stockings and three pair of cotton, they were worth about three pounds; I lost seven waistcoats, they were worth about forty or fifty shillings; two coats, one was quite new, the two worth about six pounds; five silk handkerchiefs, worth about ten shillings; a tablecloth, two shillings; two watches, about two pounds; there was a gold chain to one, and four gold seals; the chain and seals, about two pounds; and two boxes, two shillings. I believe that was all I lost. One half of the washhouse window lay in the garden; one half of the sash removed, and the shutter, there was a hole cut in it. I presume the entrance into the house was opened that way. I have seen my watches again.

Q. Did you know your watches again - A. Yes, I saw them at the police office about eleven o'clock the same day. I saw all my property there, and the prisoner was there.

Q. What was the value of those things put altogether - A. About twenty pounds I should think. That is all I know of it.

PHILIP JAMES . I am a patrol of Whitechapel High-street.

Q. On the 6th of July did you see the prisoner - A. Yes, a quarter before three in the morning; it was broad day light; I stopped the prisoner with two bundles; I laid hold of the small bundle; the large one he throwed down; he said, take them, and let me go. I sprung my rattle; Mr. Partridge came up to my assistance. We took him to the watchhouse with the two bundles, and delivered him into the officers hands. That is all I know about it.

WILLIAM DIXON . I am a constable. I keep a public-house in Church-lane, Whitechapel. The

last witness brought two bundles to the watchhouse; I received them of him. I produce them now here. I received them about three o'clock in the morning of the 6th of July.

Prosecutor. These things are all mine. The watches are mine; I know them by the maker's name. All these things were in my house on the night of the 5th of July, when I went to bed, and missing in the morning when I came down. They are mine.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Of stealing the goods to the value in the indictment, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house in the night time .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-59

620. CHARLES VARNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , in the dwelling-house of William Franklin , a pocket-book, value 1 s. an umbrella, value 3 s. and four 1 l. bank notes , the property of James Ground .

JAMES GROUND . Q. Did you lose any property on the 31st of May last - A. Yes, a pocket-book and four one-pound bank notes.

Q. Where do you live - A. At the Rising Sun in Charles-street, Long Acre . William Franklin keeps the house; he occupies that house.

Q. From what part of the house did you lose it - A. From the club-room. There are different people that sleep in that room that belongs to the club. They were left in my box. I belong to the club.

Q. Were you any loser - A. No.

Q. Was it a lock-up box - A. Yes; I had the key of it. The 31st of May was on Tuesday; I was there on Tuesday evening again; the officer informed me. My box was still locked. I had not missed the property before Wilson, the officer, came in. I opened my box to see whether I missed anything; I missed my pocket-book.

Q. Was there any marks upon the notes to enable you to know them again - A. No; they were in the pocket-book.

Q. When did you see your pocket-book again - A. That same night, in Wilson, the officer's hands; and on the 4th of June I saw my umbrella, when the prisoner was committed.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I am an officer. I produce the pocket-book and the umbrella.

Prosecutor. I know the umbrella to be mine by the top being broken, and I know the pocket-book by a bit of the red leather being torn off. There is a draft of forty pound in it now; that is not in the indictment. I have received ten pound of it.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he slept at Mr. Franklin's one or two nights. I saw him there at the house.

Wilson. On the 31st of May, the prisoner, in company with a man of the name of Harvey were passing by our office in Bow-street; I took them into custody. I got the pocket-book from the prisoner, and the umbrella, at the hour of eleven in the morning.

Q. What was in the pocket-book at the time - A. Four one-pound notes, a check of forty pounds (ten of it has been received, and sundry other memorandums. He was coming from Long Acre, as if from Franklin's house; it appeared he was coming from Franklin's house by the direction he was going. I asked him where he got the umbrella from; he informed me, from his brother; he was going to pawn it to get his breakfast, as he had got no money. He said that before I took the pocket-book from him. I have had the pocket-book and its contents ever since, and the umbrella.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Tothill-fields, in the evening, I picked the pocket-book up.

WILLIAM FRANKLIN . I keep the house; it is in the parish of St. Martin in the fields.

Mr. Clark. In the indictment it is in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields.

Mr Franklin. I pay my rates to St. Martin's. There have been a number of people sleep in the same room; two other people had access to that room besides the prisoner.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-60

621. CHARLES HOLLINGSHED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Nellon , a coat, value 1 l. two shirts, value 16 s. two handkerchiefs, value 5 s. three bank dollars, value 16 s. 6 d. and two 1 l. bank notes , the property of James Foster .

JAMES FOSTER . I am a shoemaker ; I live in Baldwyn's-gardens, No. 4 ; I believe it is in the parish of St. Andrew's; I am not certain. I lodge in the house of Thomas Nellon ; he lives there.

Q. On the 3rd of July did you lose any property - A. Yes; a blue coat, of the value of thirty shillings; two shirts, value ten shillings; a silk handkerchief; a cotton handkerchief, value sixpence; two one-pound bank notes; and three five-shilling and sixpenny pieces. I lost them between eight and nine in the evening; I saw them when I went out; that was about a quarter before six in the evening. I returned a few minutes after nine. My box was in the tap room; where the prisoner and myself lodged. Immediately I went up stairs, I missed my things. The prisoner was in the room when I left the room. He was not there when I returned, and my things were missing. I did not see the prisoner until the following Wednesday. He had lodged in the room with me four or five weeks. I lost my property on Sunday evening, the 3rd of July. I saw my property and the prisoner at the office on the Wednesday evening.

DANIEL FOLEY . I am a labourer. I was in St. Giles's on Monday, the 4th of July, between ten and eleven in the morning, I saw the prisoner there, he had got his kit of tools in an apron, and a shirt in a handkerchief. I bought a coat and a handkerchief of the prisoner. The officer has got the coat and handkerchief. I bought it on Monday; the officer came for it an Wednesday.

EDWARD PAYNE. I am a labouring man. I met the prisoner on the afternoon the day after the things were missing; he had got his kit of tools and one shirt tied up in an handkerchief; he asked me to buy

a shirt; I did; I gave him four shillings for it. I put the shirt on directly I bought it. I gave it to the officer on Wednesday. The shirt that I gave to Mr. Read, the officer, was the shirt I bought of the prisoner.

WILLIAM READ , JUNIOR. I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 5th of July, the prisoner came to me, and told me he wanted me to take him into custody. I asked him what for; he said, for a felony; he told me he had robbed a person at No. 4, Baldwyn's-gardens. Me and my father, another officer, on the Wednesday went with him to St. Giles's, and took the two witnesses into custody; they told us, they had bought it fairly, and they would give it up to us. All that is recovered, is a coat, handkerchief, and a shirt. The prisoner told me he had spent the money, and the other shirt he had sold to a strange man in the street; he did not know who he was.

Q. Had the prisoner his senses - A. Yes. He said these two men had his tools, and they would not give them up; he might as well resign himself up; he could not go to work. I went and found his tools.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the coat - A. I am sure it is my coat; I had the coat made for me; I value it at thirty shillings, it is worth more; the handkerchief is worth five shillings; the shirt is worth eight shillings. I am sure they are my property.

Q. to Read. What parish is this house in - A. In the parish of St. Pancras.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-61

622. JEMIMA BOWERS and MARY FITZGERALD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 17 s. the property of Henry Stubbs , privately in his shop .

SARAH STUBBS . I am the wife of Henry Stubbs ; he is a haberdasher ; he lives at 51, Holborn; I cannot say the name of the parish. On the 5th of June, some time before five o'clock, the two prisoners came in together; I was in the shop when Bowers asked for ribbons; I shewed them some. Bowers took off Fitzgerald's bonnet, said she wanted ribbon to trim it; she put the bonnet on the drawer, in which the ribbons were, and with her hand that was under the bonnet, she took a piece of ribbon. I did not see the colour of the ribbon, but by the motion of her hand, I perceived that she had taken a piece of ribbon.

Q. Did you perceive that - A. I did. I perceived that by her motion of her arm, that she took a piece of ribbon from the drawer; this was Bowers, and by some management or other, she got the ribbon out of the drawer, and put it down by her side. When I detected her, Bowers had got the ribbon into Fitzgerald's hands; by what manner I cannot say; her hands were under the counter.

Q. Did you give any alarm before any thing was said about missing any ribbon - A. Fitzgerald said, she had paid me for what ribbon they had; I said, no. She said, very likely it had fallen down; I told her, I looked for the money on the counter. I told them if the money had fallen down, it had fallen on their side of the counter. I pushed Bowers away from the counter very easily, but when I came to push Fitzgerald, she would not move. I at last with great force, pushed her away; I was leaning over the counter; then she caught the ribbon in her hand.

Q. Are you sure just before that, that piece of ribbon was not on the ground - A. Yes, I am; I am certain it had been in the drawer. I leaned over, and saw her catch the ribbon; I saw the ribbon then, and its colour. Then I went round the counter; I took hold of Fitzgerald's arm, and told her she had got a piece of ribbon; she then put it on the counter.

Q. Now, at the time you saw Bowers take Fitzgerald's bonnet off and put it on the drawer, and you saw her take a piece of ribbon out, from that time until this time, how long might it be - A. It might be a minute and a half, not more.

Q. When she put it on the counter, did you look at it and see what it was - A. Yes; it is here; the officer has it. This is the piece of ribbon; there is eighteen yards of it; it is of the value of seventeen shillings; there is my shop mark upon it. I sent for an officer. Jemima Bowers went away in the mean time. One only of them was taken in custody at that time; Fitzgerald stopped; Bowers did not.

Q. How came you to let her go away - A. I had only a boy and a young man in the shop, they did not know any thing of the business; there was nobody but me to manage the business. It was not with my consent that she went away; she went away because I could not stop her.

Bowers. Q. Are you sure I am the person - A. I am; you were in my shop three minutes. I had seen you before. I had seen you in my shop twice before that, and suspected you.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I apprehended both the prisoners.

Bowers's Defence. I went to Hatton Garden office; at the same time, Mary Fitzgerald was there; I never saw the ribbon, nor do I know any thing of the young woman.

BOWERS, GUILTY, aged 20,

FITZGERALD, GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-62

623. CHARLES WILKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July, a gelding, value 17 l. the property of James Kill .

JAMES KILL . I live at Old Brentford; I let out saddle horses, and deal in horses .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I never saw him until that day.

Q. Did the prisoner on any day hire a horse of you - A. On Monday week the prisoner came to my house for a saddle horse to go to Kingston, and back; I let him have one to go that journey; not on his own account, not till another man answered for the horse. It is a difficult thing to let a saddle horse to a stranger; he was to return the same evening at eight o'clock.

Q. What home was it - A. A little brown Welch horse, a Roman nose; with one eye; it was a gelding; I value it and from seventeen to eighteen pounds. He did not come back that evening. I never saw my horse from Monday about the middle of the day, until Friday; a friend of his came to me after I had been searching for him two days; he asked me if I was in the habit of letting out horses; I told him I went. He asked me if I had not lost a horse; I told him I had and asked him if he knew where it was, she said he did not. I saw the horse again on Friday, the horse was at livery at the Flying Horse, near Lambeth-street office, in the care of the landlord of the name of Chuk.

Q. Was that the horse that you had lent the prisoner - A. Yes; I am sure it the same horse that he had hired on the Monday.

Q. Do you know his marks - A. Yes; he is a brown gelding, small brush tail, black eyes, and wrashed round. I had the horse four months; he had one eye, and a Roman nose; the near eye was out; that was the horse I let the prisoner have on the Monday.

Mr. Knapp. You did not know the prisoner before - A. No.

Q. You applied to a friend of the prisoner, he came with the prisoner - A. I should not have let him have the horse without that friend had passed his word for him. I saw the prisoner again on the Friday; I knew him directly.

Q. Did you make any enquiries after the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Was not the prisoner intoxicated at the time he hired the horse - A. He might; I took very little notice of him. He hired the horse at five o'clock in the afternoon of Monday.

HENRY BIGGS . I am a butcher; I live at Mile-end. The prisoner called on me last Tuesday morning, about eight o'clock, he asked me if I knew any body that had got a poney to sell; I told him I did not. I told him that I had a little blind horse that I would part with. Accordingly my lad went with him to shew him the horse. When he came back he liked my horse vastly well; he proposed to chop the brown gelding of the prosecutor's; he offered to take five pounds in exchange and my horse for this gelding; we struck no bargain. He told me that he had an uncle that kept the Bird in Hand public-house at Bow; his horse unfortunately fell down with him at Mile-end, he could not proceed so far; the brown gelding fell down with him.

Q. Did he tell you what he was - A. He said he was the landlord of the Running Horses at Brentford. A friend of mine was coming by at the time. I suspected it was not his own horse. I asked my friend his opinion, and he and I agreed to go down to Bow to ask the uncle if he kept the Running Horses at Brentford; the prisoner made an objection to go towards Bow; he said, he would go up Globe-lane. I agreed to that, and as he went round Old Ford, he wanted to get out of the cart; he said, I had tried the horse enough. I came through Old Ford into Bow; I said to the prisoner, you say your uncle lives here, we will have a little porter; he said, no; he did not want his uncle to see him with a bad arm; I said, your uncle will excuse that. I pulled up to the door; he got out of the cart. The landlord and landlady were at the door. I told the landlord I understood that the young man was his nephew; the landlord made no answer. I asked him the second time; he said, he was no relation nor any kin whatever. I told the prisoner I thought the horse was a stolen one; I would give him in charge of an officer. I left the prisoner with two friends that were in company with me. I drove the horse home to my own house. The horse was taken to Lambeth-street, and left in the care of Mr. Coombes, by order of the magistrate.

Q. Was the horse that was left in the charge of Coombes, the same horse that you had of the prisoner - A. Yes, it is; I have no doubt about that.

WILLIAM COLE. I am a cow-keeper, in Mile-end-road. On Tuesday morning last, Mr. Cooper called to me, and related the case of the young man wanting to shop the horse with Mr. Biggs; I said, I should persuade them not to have any thing to do with the horse. He said, he was going to his uncle at Bow; the prisoner objected going down the road; he would go down Globe-lane. The young man wanted to get out of the cart; he said, they had trial enough of the horse. Mr. Biggs said, you have an uncle at Bow, we will call upon him; he said, no, he should not like his uncle to see him in that situation. He got out of the cart, went to the landlord, told him to say he was his uncle, if we should ask. The prisoner said it was his own horse, he gave two ten-pound notes for it. I said, do not try to lug other people into difficulties. The landlord said, he was not his uncle. As we were walking up Mile-end-road, he shoved us both into a ditch; I got out again. He ran off; I called stop thief. A dog crossed the road, run against him, which impeded his running. At last, I came up to him; I got hold of him. Mr. Coombes came past, he took charge of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor when I hired the horse; when I came round from my journey at Bow I tumbled off the horse; the next morning I was so tipsey I did not know how to walk. I did not mean to part with the horse.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-63

624. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , fourteen yards and a half of carpeting, value 43 s. 3 d. the property of Alexander Cleland , in his dwelling-house .

ALEXANDER CLELAND. I live at No. 14, Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital, in the parish of Mary-le-bone ; I am an upholsterer .

Q. Did you lose any carpetting in June last - A. I lost a great deal in former days.

Q. Do you know of fourteen yards and a half being taken away - A. Yes; that was taken the 21st of June, the fourteen yards and a half; it was standing in the front window, in the shew window; it was within the house; I expose nothing outside of my window. I had seen it at half past two o'clock. I missed it directly one of my men came in

from his dinner. I was standing with my man and my wife; my wife looked round, and gave the alarm; I missed the piece of carpeting immediately my wife gave the alarm, I pursued the prisoner; he was overtaken; he threw the carpet from him in Well-street; I saw the carpet come from him, it went into the kennel. He was taken at the corner of Union-street; he went to the top of Well-street before he was taken. I never lost sight of him only when he turned round the corner.

Q. You saw him at your shop, did you - A. Yes, I did. The carpet is here; some of my work people picked it up; there is fourteen yards and a half.

Q. What did it cost you a yard - A. The cost is a great deal more than what I charge; it cost six shillings a yard in the piece; carpets are rather fallen now; it is worth four shillings, or four shillings and sixpence a yard now. This is the carpet; it is mine.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . I am a chair-maker; I work for Mr. Cleland. I came into Mr. Cleland's, and was talking with him; I heard the alarm, and I pursued the prisoner, and never lost sight of him. I was the first that pursued him out of the house; I saw him throw down the carpet about twenty yards up Well-street. I saw him taken; he was taken about twenty yards off me; I was the next that came up. The prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-64

625. WILLIAM ELLIOTT was indicted for that he, on the 6th of July , in and upon James Hale , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, did cut the said James Hale , in upon his left elbow, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating the intention to be disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

SUSANNAH HILL. I live at No. 9, Morgan-street, St. George's in the East; in the house of my mother; my mother keeps the house. The prisoner lodged in that house, he occupied the one pair of stairs room; he paid four shillings a week for it. On Tuesday night, the 5th of this month, he came home about eight o'clock, he was very much in liquor indeed; his neice came home with him. I and his niece undressed him; we got him to bed between eight and nine. After I had put him to bed. I went down stairs to get him some water to put by his bed-side, and when I went down, he got up; he broke the things on the mantle-piece; this was between eleven and twelve. When I heard he was breaking the things, I went up stairs; I said, for God's sake, do not break the things. He took a bundle of matches, and put into the fire, and then he put an apron into the fire; I begged him for God's sake, not to set the house on fire. He then took me by my side, and was going to throw me down stairs, but I ran down, and shut the street door after me when I ran out.

Q. At the time you so run out, did you consider yourself in personal danger - A. Yes. I sat on the steps; I heard him within breaking the things, both in my room, and in my mother's room. I went for the watchman; I could not find the watchman on the beat. I then went to the watchman, Hale; I desired him to come and take him out of the place until he was sober. Hale came with me to the house; when he came to the door, I spoke to the prisoner; I desired him to open the door; he would not. I saw my mother coming down the street, within two doors of me; I asked her to give me the key. She went to open the door herself; the watchman asked her to give him the key. The watchman took the key and opened the door, and as he was opening the door, Mr. Elliot unbolted the door. I did not see what took place. As soon as I entered the house I found the watchman was hurt directly; I helped him off with his coat.

Q. Did you see a hatchet in the house - A. Yes, when the watchman came back from the watchhouse; that hatchett belonged to Elliott.

Mr. Adolphus. What is Elliott - A. He is a painter and glazier.

Q. He came home at eight o'clock quite drunk - A. Yes. My neice and me went to bed in half an hour after him.

Q. You put him no water at his bed-side - A. No, I had no time to get it.

Q You could have got it before twelve o'clock - A. Yes, I could.

Q. He was unfortunately gone down for the water when you unfortunately awoke - A. Yes.

Q. When the watchman was at the door, your mother asked to come in - A. Yes.

Q. He opened the door to let your mother come in - A. Yes.

Q. And when the door was opened, the first person that presented himself, was the watchman; he expected to see your mother; he saw a man he had no motion of before. The axe was his own; whether he had struck with it or no, you cannot tell - A. No.

MARY FOREMAN . Q. You keep this house in Morgan-street - A. Yes. On the night of the 5th of this month, I came home between ten and eleven o'clock; I found my daughter at the door, with the watchman and the patrol.

Q. Before the watchman opened the door, did you hear Elliott say any thing - A. When I tried to open the door, the door was bolted; I said, Elliott, let me in; he said, no; b - y b - r should come in that night. I asked the watchman to open the door; I told the watchman I would give him the key, provided he would upon his word, return me the key. The watchman opened the door; I did not see what took place at the moment.

JAMES HALE . I am a watchman of St. George's. On the night of the 5th of this month, I was called by the prosecutrix. The patrol opened the door; on the door being unlocked by the patrol, I had heard Elliott say, the first person that entered the house, he would do him a mischief. I was the first person that entered; as I was entering the house with my lanthorn in my hand, Elliott struck me on

the arm at the elbow with the axe, just against the socket the bone is cut asunder. He cut the bone three inches over. He struck at me after that, missed me, and hit the patrol. I was taken to the surgeon directly.

Mr. Adolphus. He had not known it was you, who you was, and what you came for - A. When I came to the door the prisoner was looking out of the window; at that time the patrol was along with me. I told him what came for. The young woman that fetched me was there then, and the mother came up at the time we were talking. The young woman wished me to break the door open; I told her we had no authority to break the door open. He was not breaking the things when I came up; he was looking out of the window; he had been breaking the things before.

ISAAC LANE . I am a patrol. I was called a quarter before twelve by the watchman; I went with him, and saw Elliott at the window. We demanded admittance. I had my patrol's coat on; he had his watchman's coat on and his lanthorn. I told Elliott not to kick up a disturbance in the street at that time of the night, because it was what we did not suffer. I asked him to give the girl admittance; he would not; the girl desired me to break the door open. I told her I had no more right than the watchman without the cry of murder in the house. The mother came up just at that period of time; she gave the daughter the key to unlock the door; she could not get it open then. She gave it to the mother, and she could not get it open. I said, are you the landlady of the house; she said she rented the house; then I said, give me the key, I will endeavour to open the door, which she did, under promise of letting her have the key back again. I opened the door, and while I was unlocking the door the prisoner unbolted it. There was nobody but the prisoner in the house; then I saw the prisoner when he opened the door; he stood behind the door with something in his hand, which I then thought to be a stick; I afterwards found it to be a hatchet. I then said twice, come out, here is a second Williams, he has got a hatchet in his hand. The watchman went in, his lanthorn was first knocked out. I saw his arm, and his lanthorn was struck; his arm fell. He had a lanthorn in his hand. I was standing at the door. At first, I thought it was only a stick. I received a blow on my wrist, which took all the use of my hand away. I received that blow from Elliott: then I put my hand upon the shoulder of the watchman to get him out; he cut me twice upon the arm. When I saw the hatchet, I drew my cutlass; I said, if you rise that again I will run this through you. He then shut the door, and shut me out. I got assistance. The woman of the house opened the door again; then we went in, and took him up in the one pair of stairs room. After we had taken him down to the watch-house, I returned back with my partner for the hatchet; we found it in the house. This is the hatchet. Seagrove, the other patrol brought the hatchet out of the house.

Q. Did anybody strike him - A. Not before he struck the watchman and me, and then in our defence we hit him with our sticks.

ROBERT SEAGROVE . I am the other patrol. I came up after the mischief was done. I found the prisoner up stairs by the window. I found the hatchet laying between the bed side and the wall.

Isaac Lain . This is the lanthorn; it is now in the same state as it was brought into the watch-house.

MR. BENNETT. I am a surgeon.

Q. Did you examine the wound the watchman had received - A. I did. He had received a severe cut at the elbow, which had divided the elbow joint. The cut was about two inches deep; the blow was within two inches of the point across the elbow.

Prisoner's Defence. When I got up for a little water I saw no person there; I could not get any water. What crockery ware I broke belonged to myself A knock came to the door; I told them no person should come in; who it was I did not know. When the watchman brushed open the door, I did not know who it was. I had the hatchet in my hand; I told them they should not come in. I struck; where the blow fell I could not tell. I went up stairs and sat close by the window.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

Reference Number: t18140706-65

626. GEORGE BURGESS and THOMAS HASSEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a silver snuff box, value 5 s. the property of a person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I am an officer of the city of London. On the 9th of July, the night of the illumination. I saw the prisoners from Spring Gardens to Carlton-house; I had my eye upon him; I followed him about two hours. I followed them close in the mob, and saw them take from several people pocket handkerchiefs, before I saw them take the snuff box. They went more than a dozen times from Spring Gardens to Charing Cross. I saw them at Spring Gardens come round an elderly gentleman and a lady together. I saw both the prisoners round the gentleman, and as they left the gentleman I saw something shine in Hassen's hand like a snuff box. They both left the gentlemen at the same time, and went towards Carlton-house again. They turned up St. Alban's-street, and went to the first public-house in St. Alban's-street, and directly they went into the public-house I searched them; I found on Hassen a silver snuff box, four silk handkerchiefs, one cotton, two pair of scissars, a knife with the blade open, a tailor's thimble, a rule, and a pair of gloves. Upon Burgess I found one silk handkerchief in his breeches pocket, and two cotton ones. I told them I had been following them. They said they found all the things. They said they found the snuff box by Spring Gardens. At the place where they said, it was impossible for them to stoop, the crowd was so great, or else I should have taken them; I could not on account of the mob.

Q. Had the handkerchiefs the appearance of having been found upon the ground - A. No; they are now as they were found; they have no appearance of having been upon the ground. I have advertised the things four or five times; nobody has come forward.

This is the snuff box; it is gold inside. Hassen took it out of the gentleman's right hand waistcoat pocket.

Burgess's Defence. I went out to see the lights; on my returning I met Hassen; I had seen him twice before. We went together into this public-house to have some refreshment; Johnson came in and searched me, and found this silk handkerchief, I had it given to me in the morning by a young man, who is gone to sea. The cotton handkerchief is my own.

Hassen's Defence. On the night of the illumination I left my lodging at eleven o'clock; I walked up Pall Mall, I felt something soft under my feet; I found a silver snuff box wrapped up in some silk handkerchiefs I then met this young man; we went into a public-house together. Johnson came in and searched me, and found the property on me.

BURGESS, GUILTY , aged 18.

HASSEN, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18140706-66

627. BENJAMIN BARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , from the person of Henry James Coombes , a pocket-book, value 1 s. and a 1 l. bank note , his property.

HENRY JAMES COOMBES . I am a bottle merchant ; I live in Bush-lane. On last Thursday I was in Fleet-street . I only know I lost my pocket-book and a one pound note.

JAMES BRAY . I am a constable of the city of London. Last Thursday, about three o'clock. I was in Fleet-street, in company with two more officers. Just by Shoe-lane there was a bustle, and directly the bustle was over three men turned out of the mob and went into Shoe-lane. We followed them up Shoe-lane. One of the officers knewing them to be suspicious characters, we stopped them, and took them to the watchhouse, and searched them, and the pocket-book was found in the prisoner's pocket. That is all I know of it.

- WESLEY. I produce the pocket-book. This is the pocket-book I found in the prisoner's pocket. There is a one-pound note in it.

Prosecutor. I know it to be mine by the name of Styles being on it in my own hand-writing.

Mr. Adolphus. You know nothing of losing your pocket-book - A. I found the bottom of my pocket cut; I do not know where it happened exactly. I had been standing not far from Shoe-lane ten minutes speaking to a gentleman. I am sure it is my pocketbook.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards St. Paul's, I saw this book on the ground by the corner of Shoe-lane; I took it up, and put it in my pocket. I was asked by the officers what I had got. They took me to the watchhouse, and searched me; they found the pocket-book. I told them I found it; I had more right to it than they had. They immediately locked me up.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-67

628. JAMES ADAMSON and ELIZABETH FOWLER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. two pillow-cases, value 1 s. two pilows, value 4 s. a counterpane, value 6 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. and fifteen pounds weight of feathers, value 5 s. the property of Ann Mears , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARY STRATTON . I am Mrs. Mears's neice; she lives in Cock-lane ; she lets lodgings furnished . I let the lodgings to the prisoners. Both of them applied for the lodging. It is about eleven weeks ago they came to the house; they came as man and wife. The woman looked at it first, then she brought her husband; he left a shilling earnest for the room. They took a front room up two pair of stairs at five shillings a week. They staid in the room about ten weeks, I think.

Q. Did they pay any rent - A. No. I went to ask for the rent; they owed twenty-two shillings and sixpence; she told me she would fetch her husband to pay me in five minutes, and ran out of the room, as if to fetch him. I let down the bed, and saw all the bed clothes were gone. I called out to my husband to stop her; she ran away from him; my husband went after her. She took him to a public-house, where she said she had found her husband, and he should make every thing good in a moment. She ran away from my husband. I went with my husband in the evening, and found the man in a public-house in Chiswell-street. He said he would make every thing good if my aunt would take his word for it. She said that would not do. She then sent for Mr. Worrall; he took him into custody. My aunt has never been paid. I am sure they both came together, and passed as man and wife. The man and the woman slept there together every night.

JAMES FRANKLIN . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Fleet-market. I produce a blanket and two pillows; they were pawned by a woman.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker in Whitecross-street. I produce two sheets, a quilt, and a pillow-case, pawned by a woman.

GEORGE ABRAHAM WORRALL. I produce what is left of the feather bed, and the duplicates of the different articles pawned in the name of Mary Smith . They were given to me by Mrs. Stratton's husband.

Q. to Mrs. Stratton. Do you know where these tickets were found - A. Yes, a man, an acquaintance of the prisoners, brought them there to get them out of pawn. The articles produced by the pawnbrokers are Mrs. Mears's property, and this is all that is left of the feather bed, the feathers are gone.

Fowler's Defence. Adamson is innocent; I am guilty.

ADAMSON, GUILTY , aged 49.

FOWLER, GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined 2 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-68

629. WILLIAM FORDYCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , three printed books, value 3 s. the property of Ann Pitkeithly ; and five printed books, value 5 s. the property of John Heath .

ANN PITKEITHLY. I lost these books on the 1st

of June from my seat in the Rev. Mr. Fletcher's meeting; it is a Scotch meeting.

MRS. HEATH. I attend this meeting. Several of the books the prisoner took were mine. When the books were missed the prisoner was followed, and the books taken from him.

EDWARD LEWIS . I am the officer that was sent for to take charge of the prisoner for stealing these books. The prisoner said he did it for want. These are the books.

Mrs. Pitkeithly. Three of the books are mine.

Mrs. Heath. Five of the books are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The pew door was open. I did not intend to take the books away.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-69

630. JOHN PETTIFER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , 3 l. in monies numbered, the monies of Thomas Green , in the dwelling-house of Harry Tiller .

THOMAS GREEN . I am a fellowship porter . I lost my money on Sunday the 28th of May, at Harry Tiller 's house, in John's-court, Somerset-street, Aldgate . When I was there the old gentleman said, go to your old bed where you used to sleep before, my lodgers all will not be in to-night. I went to sleep in the bed; the prisoner came in and laid alongside of me. I had about four pound in silver in my pocket. I pulled my waistcoat off, and laid it by the bed side, and then the next morning I asked the landlord what o'clock it was; he said it was almost five o'clock; I said I am in time. We work on Sunday morning in mackarel time. I asked the landlord if any body had been at home while I was asleep; he said his lodger came home at half past twelve. As I was going to my work I met one of my fellow servants: he asked me where I was going; I said, down to the Gate; he said, there is nothing to do there, there are no beans come up. I returned home. Coming up the Minories I met the prisoner; I did not know then that he was the lodger of the old gentleman's. The prisoner told me he lodged with old Mr. Tiller. I said to the prisoner, I'll take a drop with you at the next public-house; he said he did not like to go there. I then said, suppose we treat old Mr. Tiller with a drop; he said he would not be up. The patrol met me; he said he would see me home. He came with me to the top of the alley. I told the patrol I had been robbed in the night, and I thought this was the man that robbed me. He searched him, and could find nothing upon him but a crown paper of halfpence and eighteen pence in silver. The constable came; he said he had a bag of silver in the watchhouse. The constable coming down stairs picked up a bag of silver. He said he would swear that was the bag of silver he had in the watchhouse. The officer asked him where he got that money; the prisoner said he had no occasion to take any trouble about it, it was Green's money, he dare say Green would not hurt him. He asked me to take one pound fifteen shillings, and he would try to make it up with me. I said I would leave it all to the officer. The officer said he must bring it before the Lord Mayor.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was.

Q. Was the prisoner sober - A. He was half and half. He said it was Green's money; Green would not hurt him. I have worked many a day with him.

Prisoner. How long have you lodged with Mr. Tiller - A. Three years.

JOHN TILLER . Q. What do you know of this business - A. Mr. Green came to lay with me a little before eleven o'clock; he went to bed. He had been in bed an hour and a half when my lodger came home; he came home at half past twelve; he went to his own bed; he laid down about an hour; then he came out of the room where Mr. Green was. He did not come back again until Mr. Green brought him in.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On Sunday morning I was sent for. Previous to that I had seen the prisoner with a bag of silver; he gave one or two shillings away. Mr. Green made me strip him naked. I could find no silver about him. I said he had some silver about him; I had seen some in his hand, and coming down stairs I looked in a crevice on the stairs, I found a bag with this silver; I said, I have got the money. I asked the prisoner how he came by this money; he said he took ten shillings of one and a pound of another. As soon as he found I was going to the parties to see whether it was true, he then said the silver is Mr. Green's.

Prisoner's Defence. I received of Mr. Harris, of Tower-street, on Saturday morning for watching, one pound; and ten shillings of another man for labour. The sum taken from me by the officer is thirty-seven shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY, aged 50,

Of stealing to the value of 37 s.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-70

631. GEORGE SHOVEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a pocket-book, value 1 s. the property of John Beal , from his person .

JOHN BEAL . I am a painter . I had my pocket picked at the corner of King-street , about half past five in the afternoon, on the 9th of July. I was following Lord Wellington's carriage, and a person that was with me. I put my hand back, and found my pocket-book was gone. On seeing the prisoner go through the crowd I followed him; I put my hand to his coat, and felt the pocket-book through his coat, and while I was attempting to take it out the pocketbook fell to the ground. The officer took him into custody immediately. Several officers were on the spot.

WILLIAM BRADSHAW. I stood by the prosecutor some time; all in a moment, when we wanted to see Lord Wellington come to Guildhall, this gentleman lost his pocket-book. I immediately collared the prisoner. I saw the pocket-book between Mr. Beal and the prisoner.

JAMES TRURO. I was stationed at the corner of King-street to see that no other carriage come down

King-street than what belonged to the procession. I heard the cry of, a pocket-book. I saw the prisoner. I took him into custody. I said, where is the book. The prosecutor had it in his hand; he gave it me. I produce the book.

Prosecutor. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly was there on the day mentioned in the indictment. I was standing in the crowd the same as any other gentleman might; at the time a certain coach came by there was a great crowd came up; this book came upon my foot. I raised the book to my breast. I was accused of the theft. As to my taking the gentleman's pocket-book I deny. I certainly had got the book. I never took/ it from the gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-71

631. JOHN HILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , two rings, value 10 s. the property of Elizabeth Lewis .

The prosecutrix not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-72

632. JOSHUA BOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of a person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am an officer of the city. On last Thursday, I happened to be in St. Paul's church-yard , and going through the crowd I saw the prisoner, and watched him; near the Tobit's Bldg. I saw him put his hand towards a gentleman's pocket, he drawed the gentleman's handkerchief out. I laid hold of the prisoner. The crowd was so pressing I was obliged to take care of the prisoner. I could not reach the gentleman.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg leave to state that my prosecution is carried on alone by mere suspicion, as the handkerchief was found in my possession. It was on Thursday the 7th of July, I went out on purpose to see the procession at St. Paul's; the crowd was great. I felt something at my feet. I had some difficulty to pick it up; it was a handkerchief. I placed it in my bosom. The officer seeing me stoop and pick up something, took me into custody. The officer is my prosecutor. I never was a moment before confined. I work hard for my living. I rely on your lordship's consideration.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-73

633. EDWARD GUPPRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , a handkerchief, value, 1 s. 6 d; the property of a person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I am a city officer. On the 11th of June, I saw the prisoner at Spring Gardens; it was on the night of the illumination. I observed him an hour to and fro with the mob. I watched him from Spring Gardens to Carlton-house. He appeared to be by, himself. On my following him I saw him attempt many people's pockets, and when he came down to Spring Gardens I saw him take a white handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and directly he got out of the mob. I could not get up to the gentleman by reason of the mob. I could hardly stand, the mob was so great. I have never seen the gentleman again. I and two officers followed the prisoner out of the mob; directly he got out he took a silk handkerchief from his pocket and tied round his neck. He turned round; and saw Cooper, an officer of Queen-square. He ran in about two yards; we stopped him. I told him what I had seen. He said it was through distress. I searched him; he had seven handkerchiefs upon him; one round his necks, one or two in his hat, and the rest in his pockets. I did not know his person. I had only observed his actions that night. This is the handkerchief I saw him take out of the gentleman's pocket. It is a white handkerchief; it is worth eighteen pence.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I was out on duty this night. I watched the prisoner from Cockspur-street to Spring Gardens. I saw him attempt a pocket or two, and just as he got through the crowd I saw him draw this handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket. When he came out of the crowd we took him into custody.

STEPHEN LAWSON . I am an extra constable. I was with Cooper and Johnson on duty this night; I saw him attempt several pockets. I saw him draw a light coloured handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket at the end of Spring Gardens. We have never been able to find the gentleman.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor young fellow. I have not been long out of the country. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-74

634. JAMES SHARP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a silver cup, value 10 l. the property of the master of the University of the Holy Trinity in Cambridge, and the fellows of the same college .

SECOND COUNT, the property of Charles Claydon .

EDWARD WINTERTON . I am shopman to Messrs. Blake and son, refiners, Long Acre. On the 4th of June last, Esther Smith brought a silver cup to me to sell. I asked her if she sold it for herself; she said, no, for her brother. I stopped the cup, and sent to Bow-street for an officer.

ESTHER SMITH. I am a married woman; my husband lives in Deady's-yard, Hampstead-road; he works for a cow-keeper. The prisoner is my brother. I received that cup on the 4th of June, of the prisoner; he told me he found the cup, would I dispose of it. I took it to Mr. Blake's, in Long-Acre; there it was stopped, and myself. The prisoner came voluntary, and acknowledged he gave it me.

HARRY ADKINS . I am an officer. On Saturday evening, the prisoner was brought to the office, by

a man of the name of Booth. I was directed to make some inquiries. I went to Ester Smith 's lodgings, and searched her house, and under her bed, I found a livery coat; the prisoner acknowledged it to be his coat after he was apprehended. I went again the next morning to Deady's-yard in the Hampstead-road. I met the prisoner, he was coming from Deady's-yard. I asked him if he gave a silver cup, to his sister the day before he said, he did; he found the silver cup in Parker's-piece, at the back of Emanuel College , when he was exercising his master's horse, six weeks before that time. I asked him if it was the same cup; he said, it was; it was in a much worse state when he found it; he had cleaned it a great deal; he had put it in his cupboard, there it remained until he came to London. When he found it in Parker's-piece, it was covered over with dirt and grass. I did not know the prisoner. I saw his brother-in-law where he was. He said, he was before me; he was coming to me.

CHARLES CLAYDON . I am butler to this College, at Cambridge. The prisoner was a servant to Lord Mount Charles, student of that College. That cup, was in my custody as butler to the College. I missed that cup at the latter end of April, or the beginning of May.

Q. The prisoner, as the servant of a nobleman, had the means of getting where the cup was - A. Yes. The College things are trusted in the students rooms. I am quite sure the cup is part of the College plate; the plate of the College is in my custody as butler.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-75

636. JAMES BOSTOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a tea-kettle, value 12 s. and a basket, value 1 s. the property of William Bailey and Daniel Bailey . And WILLIAM BROWN for feloniously receiving the same goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

GEORGE BAILEY . I am brother to Messrs. Baileys; the partners names are William and Daniel Bailey . On the 25th of May, between seven and eight in the evening, I met the prisoner coming along Sitchborne-court, about fifty yards from their back premises. The prisoner had a basket; I believe there was nothing but straw in it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-76

637. JAMES MORLEY and WILLIAM SAVAGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Gould , from his person .

THOMAS GOULD . I am a servant to Mr. John Reymer , 44, Finsbury-square.

Q. Did you lose a handkerchief on the 20th of June - A. I did; I was in the Park; I presume it was about eleven o'clock when I lost the handkerchief; it was on the day the review was. I did not know my handkerchief was gone until the officer, Johnson, apprised me of it; I felt in my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone. I never saw the prisoners to the best of my knowledge; I was looking at the soldiers.

Q. When was the handkerchief produced to you - A. Not till Johnson took Morley; then he produced the handkerchief, which I knew to be mine.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am one of the City-constables. I was at the review in the Park; I saw both the prisoners there; they were in company together, for an hour. I was in company, with Lawson. I saw both the prisoners attempt many pockets, and pull handkerchiefs out. I saw the prosecutor there, Thomas Gould . I saw Morley and Savage go up to the prosecutor; I saw Morley take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his own breeches pocket. I told Lawson to keep his eye upon the prisoners, while I went and apprized the prosecutor of it. I asked the prosecutor what sort of a handkerchief it was; he described it. I then went and apprehended the prisoners. I took the handkerchief out of Morley's breeches pocket, where I had seen him put it. I handcuffed the prisoners with a deal of difficulty. I found the handkerchief corresponded with the initials of the prosecutor. The prosecutor came to the office, and swore to the handkerchief. I know the prisoners persons well.

Mr. Curwood. You saw Morley take the handkerchief out of Mr. Gould's pocket - A. Yes; and I saw Savage cloaking Morley, while he took the handkerchief out of his pocket.

STEPHEN LAWSON . I and Johnson followed the two prisoners an hour in the Park; they were attempting gentlemen's pockets. I saw them step behind Mr. Gould; Morley picked his pocket of a handkerchief; Savage was cloaking him. I kept them in sight while Johnson went to the prosecutor, the prosecutor came up. We took them into custody. They made great resistance. I saw the handkerchief taken from Morley's pocket; that handkerchief was claimed by Mr. Gould. Savage was particularly active in attempting to pick gentlemen's pockets.

Morley's Defence. I was standing in the crowd. Johnson came and took me in custody; he said, he took a handkerchief from me; at the same time, he took it off the ground.

Savag's Defence. I went into the Park: I was with Morley an hour altogether; I never before saw any thing of Morley, nor he of me.

MORLEY, GUILTY , aged 21.

SAVAGE, GUILTY , aged 19,

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-77

638. JOHN CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , three shirts, value 15 s. a frock, value 5 s. two shifts, value 11 s. and a petticoat, value 3 s. the property of Susannah Limbrick , widow .

SUSANNAH LIMBRICK . I am a widow, and a laundress ; I live at 15, Lewisham-street, Westminster . On the 25th of May last, as I was taking my supper, I heard some of my neighbours calling out,

the man is robbing the yards of open; I went out in the yard. I found on linen down, some of it was on the ground and some was taken away Some of the neighbours had the prisoner stopped. This was about half past ten at night.

JOHN GARN . I am a constable; I live in Bennet-street, Westminster. My house is about forty yards from the prosecutrix's; my house is in one street, and there is an another the back yards joins. I went out in the yard; I saw a man jump from the wall. When I went into Bennet-street, he ran up to the top of the street. A person get hold of the prisoner by the collar; he said, you are a constable take this man into custody. I took him down towards the watchhouse; I heard there was a yard robbed of ne in Lewisham-street. I went into Lewisham-street in the yard of No. 10, I found a shirt, a frock, and a great coat of the prisoner's in the pocket of the great coat, were two keys. The shirt and the frock were taken from No. 15; I found them in the yard No. 13. The next day, I took the prisoner before the magistrate. I produce the property. This latch key opened the door of the empty house.

MR. PARR. On the night of the 25th of May, I was coming home; I was going to knock at the door of my lodging, a lady called me on the opposite side of the way, she told me there were thieves in the next house; she begged me to go and inform Mr. Denham, the landlord of the empty house; I went in the landlord, and knocked at the door, and while I was standing at his door, I heard the door of the empty house open, I approached the empty house; I saw the prisoner come out, followed by another man; I stopped the prisoner; the other man passed me. I brought the prisoner back, and gave him into the hands of Garner, the constable.

Prosecutrix. The frock and shirt are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went that way to ease myself, the cry of stop thief was called; I jumped up to see what was the matter. I was not in the empty house, nor in the yard.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-78

639. MARY HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Jane Jones , spinster .

JANE JONES. I am a servant , I live at No. 6, Moor-street, in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster . On the 10th of June, I hung my gown out in the yard to dry between seven and eight in the evening, the lady that lived in the second door, asked me if I had taken my gown in; in consequence of what one said, I pursued the prisoner and took my gown from her. This is the gown; I am sure it is mine.

MARY ANN FIELD. I lived in the second floor in the same house. I was looking out of the window; I saw the prisoner coming out of the house; she was wrapping up something. I ran down stairs, and asked the prosecutrix if she had taken in her gown; she said, no. I immediately ran after the prisoner, and catched her in Greek-street, with the gown. The prosecutrix came up, and took her gown from the prisoner. I am sure the prisoner is the same woman. The prosecutrix fetched her master he took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

ABRAHAM GRESWELL . I am a constable. I was at the watchhouse when the prosecutrix's master brought the prisoner in. I searched her. I found four shillings and sixpence upon her. She had pawned a gown before. She could not give any account how she came by the prosecutrix gown.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening I was taken into custody, I was enquiring for a lodging; a woman came up to me with a bundle she told me she would find me a lodging; she gave him the bundle to hold it for her. I did not know it was a gown until these two women came up, and told me I had stolen a gown. I have been a servant, and suffered great hardships; I am an hundred miles from home.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-79

640. JAMES HAYWOOD and EBENEZER BOSTER were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

JAMES LAWSON . I am an extra constable. On the 7th of June, me and Green were in the Park ; I observed the prisoner, Haywood step behind a gentleman, and pick his pocket of a handkerchief; he looked at the handkerchief, and threw it to Boster; Boster put it into his hat; they went off. I followed Haywood, and took him, and Green took Boster. One of these handkerchiefs it is; Green can tell which it is; both these handkerchiefs were in Boster's hat; Green took them out of his hat.

EDWARD GREEN . I saw Haywood pick the gentleman's pocket of this handkerchief; the moment he took it, he chucked it to Boster; he put it into his hat. I took Boster immediately. I saw Haywood drew the handkerchief from the gentleman.

Haywood's Defence. I deny it; the handkerchief belongs to me. I met Boster by Westminster bridge; I gave Boster some money to buy some bread and cheese, and gave him my handkerchief to put it in. Boster took the handkerchief away from the public-house. When I was in the Park I thought I had lost my handkerchief; Boster said, no, he had got it.

Boster's Defence. The officers said we were two returned lags.

Haywood called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Boster called one witness, who gave him a good character.

HAYWOOD, GUILTY , aged 19.

BOSTER, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18140706-80

641. WILLIAM POISDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a shirt, value 2 s. and a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. the property of William Sosbe .

WILLIAM SOSBE . I am a mate of a brig now laying

in the London Dock . I lost my shirt and trowsers on the 7th of June, they were taken out of mine cabin William Poisden was a sailor on board, he confessed stealing them.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am an officer. On the 7th of June, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was going out of the London Dock gate; he had something bulky about him. I asked him what he had got; he said, nothing at all, I searched him; he then told me he had a shirt going to be washed. I took the shirt from him. The captain was by; he said it was the mate's shirt. He said the mate and he had lost shirts. In the prisoner's trowsers I found these pankeen trowsers; they belong to the mate; and this other shirt I found on him belonged to the captain.

Sosbe. This shirt and trowsers are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor when I took them; they were in my bed. I did not know what I was about.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-81

642. SAMUEL TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of a person to the jurors unknown from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the 7th of June, I was in the park; I saw the prisoner and two more; by seeing their motions I followed them a length of time with Barrett, another officer, and when they got to the King's palace. Lions took from the gentleman this silk handkerchief. The prisoner, Taylor, was in company with Lions. We had followed the prisoner and two others to and from in the park. The three men were in company together all the time in the park. It was as much as we could do to take Lions and Taylor. We could not get at the prosecutor, I took Taylor; Barrett took Lions; he rushed out of his hands.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer. I was in company with Johnson at the time. I saw the prisoner in company with two others. The prisoner put his hand into a gentleman's right hand coat pocket, and took out a piece of paper; he chucked the paper down, and said it was no chance. The person not in custody took this handkerchief out of his gentleman's pocket. I took him. He rushed out of my hands. Out of Taylor's pocket we found two handkerchiefs. I am positive they were all together. I am positive to the prisoner's person.

Prisoner's Defence. Them two handkerchiefs. I bought in Petticoat-lane. I was bailed out, and attended here last Wednesday.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-82

643. HENRY SEATON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. On the 11th of June, I was opposite of Mr. Akerman's in the Strand . On the last night of the illumination on hearing a great many people crying out take care of your pockets, I forced myself into the crowd that was opposite of Akerman's. In the crowd, I observed the prisoner, Seaton, attempt two or three pockets. He shew this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and forced it into his flap under his apron. The handkerchief is marked C. T. The crowd got great, and he was pushed outside. As soon as he got outside he called out Ben; at last had answered to the name of Ben. The prisoner made use of a bad oath, and blamed him for not being active in the crowd. They were close together. I laid hold of them, one in each hand, and took them to public-house in Burleigh-street. I searched Benjamin Turner first. He is not here. I found nothing upon Turner. I then turned up Seaton's apron; I found this handkerchief tucked in his flap, and the other handkerchiefs in his breeches, one in his hand and one in his coat pocket. Seaton cried, and said it would break this mother's heart.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the handkerchiefs; they were all rolled up in a dirty handkerchief.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-83

644. WILLIAM VARNELL and JOHN WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . On the day mentioned in the indictment, the Emperor was coming to town. I saw the two prisoners and another in company together; they came over Westminster-bridge, and when they came into Parliament-street . I saw them draw this handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket. The gentleman followed me to the officer he would not come in. The gentleman said, it was his handkerchief, but he would not prosecute the boys. The magistrate bound me over to prosecute. There are the initials on the handkerchief of the gentleman's name. I searched Ward, and found three handkerchiefs upon him. Ward's father bears an undeniable character in the neighbourhood.

Varnell's Defence. The white handkerchief is mine. I don't know the other prisoner.

Ward's Defence. As I went into a shop I picked the handkerchief up. I staid in the shop with it in my hand to see if any body would own it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-84

645. JAMES WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , from the person of Adam Sturgess , a purse, value 6 d. 2 l. 10 s. in monies numbered, a 5 l. bank note, and four 1 l. bank notes , his property.

ADAM STURGESS. I am a butcher . On the 21st of May, near noon, I met Ward in the Strand; I

asked him to go with me to take a glass of spirits at Mr. Robins's, the Bull's head, in Hungerford-market , when I paid for. After sitting a little we drank a glass of spirit each; the prisoner then said, we will make ourselves comfortable, you have got three pence in your hand, we'll have a pint of porter, which I paid for. I sat on one side of the box, and he on the other. I drank once out of the pint of beer; all of a sudden I went to sleep. When I awoke I said, Mr. Robins, where is Ward, he has robbed me. The prisoner had left the house. The moment I awoke I fell my thigh cold, and then I found my pocket cut off. Mr. Robins said, for God's sake, Sturgess, give information a Bow-street office immediately.

Q. What did that purse contain - A. One five-pound note, on the back of it was I. G. Nicholson; and four one pound-notes, and two pound ten shillings in silver. I applied at Bow-street; Limbric came down to the house. I know nothing more about it. There was not one man in the box with me but the prisoner.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. A year, or more, I suppose the pocket was cut by a pair of scissars. The purse had the money in it; the purse was in the pocket, and that cut off.

WILLIAM MILLS I am a constable. I had information that Sturgess was robbed on the Saturday. I know the prisoner well, he is a soldier in the third regiment of foot guards I met him on Sunday morning, the 22nd of May, in Tothil-street, Westminster, as soon as I met him, he and I went into the Checquer public-house; we had some gin and milk together. I sent a person off to Sturgess. I kept the prisoner until Sturgess came and identified him; he said, that is the man that robbed me. I then took the prisoner from that public-house, into the parlour of another public-house; where I searched him; he and his wife were together, and on the prisoner I found a pair of scissars, a knife, sixpence, and some halfpence; after that, I searched his wife; upon her I found three three-shilling tokens, two eighteen-penny tokens, and three sixpences in silver.

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I live at Mr. Robins's: the Bull's Head, Hungerford-market. I saw Mr. Sturgess come in; he had something to drink; after which, he sat down; he paid my master ten shillings; he pulled out his money to pay the ten shillings. I saw some notes and silver. Afterwards he put his money into his purse, and put the purse into his left hand pocket again; then he came into the tap-room. Ward said, set down; make yourself comfortable; you have got money in that hand for a pint of porter; put that farthing into your pocket. After which he sat opposite of Sturgess. Ward afterwards moved round; and sat close by the side of Sturgess. He sat there a good bit. I went to the bat to serve some porter. The prisoner was looking round to see if any body was in the house. After that I went out with some beer, and returned in again. Ward was gone when I came in. Sturgess awoke; he said to my master, Robins, where is Ward; master said he was gone. He then said, he has robbed me. I know nothing more. He sat with his right hand towards the prosecutor's left side when he came round to him.

Q. to Prosecutor. Which breeches pocket was cut - A. The left hand breeches pocket.

WILLIAM STAFFORD . I am a tailor. I paid Ward one pound twelve shillings and ninepence on the 11th of May.

Prosecutor. When this man was taken the three shilling pieces were found on his wife; she said her husband was paid a three-shilling piece in wages on the Saturday night.

ALEXANDER GOULD . I am a tailor. I paid Ward in that week fifteen shillings in halfpence, and three three-shilling tokens the week previous.

Q. to Mills. Produce the three-shilling token you found on his wife - A. This is the one his wife said she took for wages on that Saturday night.

Prosecutor. I can speak to that three-shilling piece; there is a mark on the neck. I had that in my purse on the Saturday morning.

JAMES MACKLIN . I am a tailor. On Saturday evening, the 21st of May, the prisoner called in at a public-house; he sent for me. When I came in he said his dog had won twenty guineas, and I should have part of a bottle of wine He called for it, and paid for it. I saw about six three-shilling pieces. It was about six o'clock when he sent for me.

WILLIAM CHURCH . I am a victualler. It was at my house the prisoner had the wine; he paid me in silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I totally deny the charge altogether. I will tell you the whole of the circumstance from my first meeting Mr. Sturgess to my being taken into custody. I was paid by Mr. William Stafford thirty-six shillings. I am a tailor, and work for the regiment. At twelve o'clock I was dismissed, and coming down the Strand I met Mr. Sturgess; he laid hold of me, and would insist on me going with him to the Bull's Head, Hungerford-market. I told him I did not wish to go with him, because he was in liquor. He would insist upon me going; to pacify him, I went with him. We had twopenny worth of rum each. Mr. Sturgess paid the landlord at the bar some money at the bar After that, we went to the door, and stood there together three or four minutes. Mr. Sturgess said he had got three pence left, he would go into the tap, and have a pint of beer. The landlord would not serve him unless he would promise to go when he had drank the beer, seeing him in liquor. We sat down together in one box; a woman was ironing in the next box; she wanted to get by me. I got up and went and sat by the side of Mr. Sturgess, and while we were drinking this beer Sturgess laid his head on the table, and appeared to be asleep. I said to him, it is of no use my being with you, I wish to go home. I went home, and saw no more of Mr. Sturgess till the next morning. When I went home, finding my wife not at home, I went to a public-house and got two or three pints of beer, and in Union-street I had four-penny worth of meat. This said dog of mine came in; I gave him a bit of bread. Then, I went into the Marquis of Granby; the dog came in there. I sent for Mr. Macklin; he is a master I have worked for many years. I was in liquor. I treated Mr.

Macklin with what money I had out of good nature and friendship. I got quite intoxicated. The next morning I went into a public-house in Tothill-street, Mills, the constable, was there. I had a halfpenny-worth of milk, and a glass of gin. Mr. Sturgess came in. I was searched; I had a sixpence and ten or eleven pennyworth of halfpence. My wife was when searched, and what money she had she had earned. Mr. Sturgess then said he did not know any part of the money, and on the Thursday he swore to a three-shilling piece. I am as innocent of the charge as God is true in Heaven.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-85

646. ANN LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a tablecloth, value 10 s. three sheets, value 30 s. and a tea-spoon, value 3 s. the property of John Norris .

JOHN NORRIS . I am an upholsterer ; I live in High Holborn. The prisoner was my maid servant . I did not miss my things until the 25th of May; they were pledged at different times. I lost three sheets, a tablecloth, and a silver tea-spoon. The prisoner lived with me about six weeks.

Q. Are you a married man - A. No. I suspected the prisoner on account of insobriety. She was so intoxicated on the 24th of May, I was obliged to discharge her. She came on the following morning, the 25th of May, for her clothes. I desired her to wait a few minutes, and she should have them. In the mean time, I sent for a constable. On searching the drawers where her clothes were kept, I found about a yard and a half of cotton, and some small pieces besides, my property. The constable, afterwards searched her pockets, and found various duplicates; here is three of them. There were sixteen in the whole. There are four articles here; one of them has been given up. I took her to Hatton Garden office with the constable; she was remanded for another examination. The pawnbrokers are here.

MR. SALTER. I am a pawnbroker, 93, High Holborn. I produce a tablecloth pledged on the 9th of May, and the tea-spoon on the 25th. I took them in of the prisoner.

MR. WALTER. I am a pawnbroker in Theobald's-road. I produce three sheets. I took them in on the 19th and 23d of May, of the prisoner.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these goods - A. The articles here produced are my property.

Q. Had you a character with the prisoner - A. Yes, an unjust one. The prisoner had not been in the service of the person that gave her a character.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please you, my lord, and worthy gentlemen of the jury the prisoner lived servant with Mr. Norris, her prosecutor. There was no mistress. Mr. Norris being a man of great business occasioned his absence a great many times, and the prisoner not being possessed of money of her own, unguardedly happened to pledge some things belonging to Mr. Norris, with no other intent but to bring them home again when Mr. Norris paid her, which he always did upon the prisoner making her bill. I am in hope you will be pleased to take my case into consideration and in duty bound will ever pray.

ANN LLOYD.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-86

647. ELIZABETH HOWARD , ANN BAKER , and SOPHIA MOORE , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of June , a watch, value 2 l. and a seal value 1 l. the property of James Bartlett , from his person .

JAMES BARTLETT . I am a shoemaker ; I live at No. 15, Turk-street, Bethnal-green. On the 21st of June, about ten minutes past twelve at night, I was going through Norton Falgate, the three prisoners accosted me; they took me into a court; they all came round me, and asked me to go up stairs. I did. I sat down on a chair; a sickness came on me, I came down stairs again; they followed me. I clapped my hand to my fob and said, I am robbed. One of them seemed confused, and was going away. I laid hold of her hand, and got the watchman to take her into custody. I believe Moore was the person that took my watch.

Q. Did you know her before - A. No. The watchman took the prisoner into custody, and took her to the watchhouse. I followed him. The constable sent him to find the watch and the other two prisoners. The watch was brought in, and the other prisoners.

WILLIAM RAY . I am a watchman. I was going my round in the street at half after twelve; this gentleman called me; he had hold of a girl by the arm; he said, he had been robbed of his watch, by three young women. I took Moore to the watch-house; I gave her in charge of the officer of the night. While he was searching Moore in the watch-house, he told me to go out and find the other two prisoners. I went out, and went to the top of the alley where the gentleman met the girls; it is Smallcoal-alley, Norton Falgate; I took the prisoner, Ann Baker ; she said, let me go up to Bet Howard. She told me where Bet Howard lived, and as I went to the door, Bet Howard came out: she said, let me go up for my bonnet; I said, never mind your bonnet, you have not far to go, and as we were going up the court, Bet Howard put the watch into my hand. I never told her what I wanted; she said, here is the watch.

The humble Defence of Ann Baker , Elizabeth Howard , and Sophia Moore. We met with John Bartlett , the prosecutor, in the street, on the 20th of June; the said John Bartlett laid hold of Baker's arm, he insisted of going home with her; seeing him in liquor she told him to go home. He said, he would follow her; he pursued us to our room, and seated himself in a chair in our room, and insisted upon having connection with Ann Baker ; he pulled his watch out, and said, he would lay between two; he became sick at the stomach; Sophia Moore led him out, and said, he should not make a dirt in the room; he was obliged to go into the court; he went to the top of the court, and feeling his pocket he missed his watch, and charged the watchman with them; he

being in liquor, we suppose he forgot he laid the watch down. When Ann Baker went into the room she took the watch up, Elizabeth Howard did not know the watch was in the room. The prisoners had no intent of keeping the watch, nor had either of them been in custody before for any crime. We all are poor girls, having no friends to come forward for us. We are in hope you will take our case into consideration, and in duty bound we shall ever pray, Ann Baker , Elizabeth Howard, and Sophia Moore .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-87

648. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , two petticoats, value 2 s. a frock, value 2 s. and a bed-gown, value 2 s. the property of James Wixon .

FRANCES WIXON . I am a married woman, my husband's name is James Wixon. The prisoner was my servant . On the 26th of May, seeing the prisoner intoxicated, I suspected she had taken my property; I charged her with taking the articles, and on searching her. I found the duplicates upon her.

THOMAS COLE. I am a pawnbroker; I live at 181, Shoreditch. I produce two petticoats, a bed-gown, and a frock; the prisoner pledged them in the name of Mary Smith .

Prosecutrix. The property is all mine.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140706-88

649. GEORGE CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a bridle, value 10 s. a leather, value 6 d. and four wax candles, value 2 s. the property of Henry Fonteroy , a pair of boots, value 10 s. and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of George Gardner .

GEORGE GARDNER. I am a groom to Mr. Henry Fonteroy , No. 7, Berner-street . I went out of town on the 25th of June; I returned again on the 27th; I missed the boots out of my box, four pieces of wax candles, a leather, and my shoes. The bridle, leather, girth, and wax candles, belonged to my master; the boots and shoes are my own.

THOMAS READ . I was constable of the night. Dunn, the watchman, brought the charge to me.

THOMAS DUNN . I am a watchman of Marybone. About half past three in the morning of the 27th of June, I had gone my round; I returned to my box. I blew the light out in my lanthorn; I went into my box. The prisoner came past my box at the corner of Titchfield-street; I asked him where he was going; he said to work. I observed that he had a bundle under his arm; he said, he was going to work at Mr. Tyson's in Park-lane, he kept livery stables I perceived a pair of girths drop on the pavement. I asked him what he had got in the bundle; he said, his clothes. I said, you walk along with me; I brought him into Lower Titchfield-street; he ran away from me. Some of the girths that fell from under his arm, he picked up. I ran after him, and catched hold of him by the collar. I told him if he did not stop, I would knock him down. I brought the prisoner round to the other end of the market place, and Barney Murray , another watchman, and I examined the bundle. On examining the things, I found two bridles, two girths, a leather, a pair of boots, a pair of shoes, four wax candles, and a pair of overalls. There is three indictments against him.

BARNEY MURRAY. I am a watchman in the market. Dunn brought the prisoner to my bear; he and I examined the bundle; it contained what Dunn stated.

Read. I produce the property.

Gardner. The bridle, girths, leather, and wax candles are my master's property. The boots and shoes are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say at all about it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140706-89

650. GEORGE CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a bridle, value 10 s. the property of John Kennedy .

STEPHEN HETHERIDGE. I am coachman to the honourable Mr. John Kennedy; we stand at livery at Mr. Smith's, in Upper Marybone-street ; it is all in the same yard as the property in the former case was. On the 27th of June, I lost a bridle of my master's; I had the care of that bridle.

THOMAS DUNN . This was the same night, and the same transaction. On the 27th of June, in the morning, about half past three, I put my light out in my lanthorn; I saw the prisoner, he came on the opposite side of the way; he had two bundles with him. I took him and the two bundles to the watch-house.

THOMAS READ. I produce the bridle; I received it of Dunn.

Hetheridge. This is my master's bridle. Mr. Kennedy's stable is the next stable to Mr. Fonteroy's, and the same entrance.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140706-90

651. GEORGE CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a pair of overalls, value 5 s. the property of Henry Lord Ashbrooke .

THOMAS DUNN. Q. Was there in the bundle the prisoner had under his arm, a pair of overalls - A. Yes; they were the cover that contained the former things; they were wrapped up in the overalls.

THOMAS READ . When the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, there was a pair of overalls. I produce them.

GEORGE BENNET. I am a servant to Henry Lord Ashbrooke . On the 27th of June, I lost a pair of overalls. These are the same; they are his property.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140706-91

652. RICHARD CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 15th of June , fifteen penny-pieces, and twenty-three halfpence , the monies of Richard Owen .

RICHARD OWEN . I am a pork-butcher ; I live at 26, High-street, Shadwell . On the 15th of June, I lost copper money to the amount of two shillings and three halfpence; they were taken from the till under the counter. The prisoner was in my service. On the morning, of the 15th, when he was apprehended, there was found upon him fourteen penny-pieces and twenty-three halfpence. On the evening of the 14th, I marked copper money to the amount of between eighteen and nineteen shillings. It was the habit of the prisoner to go to the till in the morning. When I heard him come down stairs, I came after him, and stood on the stairs; I heard the halfpence jingle, as though some one was removing them; I then went to the office, and got Mr. Partridge, the officer.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. On the 15th of June, in the morning, Mr. Owen fetched me. The prisoner was at work. I called him into the parlour; I told him my business; he very readily took the copper money out of his pocket. Mr. Owen said, they were the marked money. These are the halfpence.

Prosecutor. They are the same I marked; I can swear they are my own property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140706-92

653. JOSEPH HOLLAND , alias JONATHAN WILD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , forty thousand eight hundred bible sheets, value 48 l. two hundred Italian testaments, value 7 l. and two thousand sheets of an octavo bible, value 40 l. the property of John Reeves , George Reeves , and Andrew Strachan .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of Thomas Rutt .

THOMAS RUTT . I am a printer at Shacklewell. I print bibles there, and testaments, for Messrs. Reeves and Strachan. On the morning of the 31st of May my warehouseman came to me. I went to the warehouse, and saw from the appearance of the warehouse there had been an entering into the one pair of stairs window. They had let down the upper sash, and opened the door of the warehouse. There were marks of crows upon the door. They had stolen a large quantity of bibles and testaments, and then they broke their way out. They stole bibles and testaments worth upwards of one hundred and fifty pounds. I have seen the bibles and testaments since; they were the identical things that were stolen out of my warehouse.

Mr. Barry. Were the bibles perfect - A. Forty thousand and eighty-five perfect, two hundred Italian testaments perfect, and sixty quires, part of an octavo bible.

EDWARD TOVEY . Q. Do you remember the morning that Mr. Rutt's printing office was broken open - A. Yes, on Tuesday morning. On that morning I was disturbed by a cart rattling at the back part of my house. I thought it rained. We are obliged to cover up our work when it rains. I am a brick maker. I went out of doors, and saw the cart. I followed the cart. One man was with the cart, and two behind it. I heard one say, I am afraid we shall not be off with this job now; I am afraid we shall be taken. They whipped the horse to go as fast as they could. They went towards Clapton. This was between two and three o'clock in the morning.

Mr. Barry. Who the men were, you cannot swear - A. No. All I know, there were three men with the cart.

DAVID BUCKINGHAM . I am a green grocer; I live at 101, Wentworth-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; I have known him eighteen months, or upwards. On the morning of the 31st of May, between six and seven in the morning, I was getting out of bed; somebody knocked at the door; I went to the door; the prisoner came; he said, will you let me leave some things for half an hour; I said, yes, you can lay them down here. I was not dressed; I went into the room, and dressed myself, and came into the shop again; I found a number of printed papers. I said, what have you got here; he said, waste paper, the property of his brother, who was in that line. They were the same printed papers that has since been given to the officers. While I was dressing myself, I heard a cart coming along; when I came out, I saw no cart. After I was dressed, two men came in, the prisoner asked for pen and ink and paper; I gave it him. He wrote a note, and gave it the two men. He then said, I will put the paper down in the cellar; I said, do not put it there, the cellar is damp. He said, it is of no consequence, as it is going to be removed directly; he then moved it into the cellar, and went away.

Q. Did you the next day deliver that paper to any person - A. I did, by the prisoner's order, to a man of the name of Laugley; Laugley fetched away the paper by that written order, a part of the paper. The prisoner called again in about two or three days; I then said to the prisoner, how could you ask me to let you leave any thing in my shop for half an hour, and leave it here for two or three days; he answered very short. He said, I will take it away directly, and went off.

Q. In consequence of any suspicion that you entertained, did you remove these things out of your house - A. I did, to No. 28, in Wentworth-street, a house that I had the letting it. After that, I went to the office. The officers took the paper into their possession.

Mr. Barry. Are you not known by the name of James Buck - A. I never answer to that name.

Q. Have you ever had the pleasure of seeing me here - A. I have. I have been at the bar, where the prisoners are; I was convicted of a burglary.

Then you were under sentence of death in Newgate - A. I was; I might be twenty months; that is twelve years ago. I have been here since, for an offence against the revenue; I was confined in Newgate for the offence against the revenue; I may

have been twenty months out of Newgate for that offence. I was pardoned of the first offence.

ISRAEL LANGLEY. At the time this transaction took place, I lived at No. 8, Cooper's-buildings. I went to Buckingham's house, and saw some printed paper by the information of Osborne. The prisoner went into the cellar with me to look at the paper; after I had seen the paper, I agreed to buy it. I fetched away about five hundred pounds weight. I bought it by the lump. I paid ten pounds in part of payment two days afterwards; I paid it to Osborne. That is the paper which the officer had. I went to the office voluntarily, and gave the same account which I have given now. I paid the money to Osborne. The prisoner did not receive a farthing of me; Jem Osborne received the money. Upon my honour I thought the paper was stolen. I lock the paper from a house in Harrow-alley, Petticoat-lane.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . In consequence of Mr. Rutt, laying his information at Worship-street office, I, on Monday, the 6th of June, in company with Mr. Rutt, found eleven bundles of paper in a room where a madman was laying in bed, which Mr. Rutt said, he knew to be part of his property; that was in a house in Harrow-alley, in Petticoat-lane, and on the 17th of June, I, in company with my son, went to 98, an empty house, in Wentworth-street; in a cellar we found the remainder part of the paper. We sent for Mr. Rutt; he knew it to be that which he had so lost. After I had found this, I went to Langley's house, in company with Mr. Rutt. I left word for Langley to attend at the office; he came voluntarily, and gave some information. Then I took some steps at Buckingham's house; he also attended. Then on Wednesday, the 29th of June, I, in company with my son, and Gleed, apprehended the prisoner on the charge of this robbery; I told him the charge; he said, he knew nothing about it.

Q to Mr. Rutt. Have you looked over the property - A. Yes. I believe we have recovered the whole of the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it, no more than you do.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-93

654 HENRY BOUCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May . a watch, value 3 l. the property of Nicholas Arthur Hayden , from his person

NICHOLAS ARTHUR HAYDEN. I am a publican , I keep the sign of the Swan , Swan-street, Bethnal-green . I lost my watch on the 1st of May last, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening; I knew I had my watch when I went into the bar at ten o'clock, and about half after ten I went to sleep, and when the clock struck eleven my wife told me to shut the shutters up. I put down my hand for my watch to see if it could be eleven; my watch was gone. When I came into the bar the prisoner was in the parlour; the prisoner was gone when I woke

SUSANNAH JANE HAYDEN . I sent for my husband into the parlour when first Mr. Boucher came in, I had no liquor in the bar; I sent the child to him to fetch some out of the cellar; my husband was asleep in the bar. Boucher came to the bar to know what was to pay for himself, and the gentleman with him came into the bar. The prisoner was going to come in; I said, we never suffer strangers to come in; if he came in, it was five shillings fine. I left my four children in the bar, and my husband asleep in the bar.

SUSANNAH JANE HAYDEN , JUNIOR. Q. Do you know that young man at the bar A. Yes; I saw him at our house. While my father was asleep, he came into the bar; I saw him take my father's watch out of his pocket. After he was gone, I told my father and mother.

JOSEPH PRINCE . The watch was delivered to me. I produce it. The prisoner said, he was sorry for what he had done.

Prosecutor. It is my watch; it is worth two pounds. I asked the prisoner for my watch; he put it on the table.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Hayden had his property delivered up to him; then he demanded two pounds ten shillings.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-94

655. MARY VEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a gown, value 9 s. the property of Harriet Hopkins , spinster .

HARRIET HOPKINS . I was upon a visit in Brownlow-street . I lost my gown on the 21st of June; my gown was on my bed in my sleeping-room; I saw it there about half past two; I missed it about three o'clock. I saw my gown afterwards in the hands of Mr. Judd; he had the prisoner in custody. I am certain the gown is mine; it is worth nine shillings.

GEORGE JUDD . I am a leather-seller. Miss Hopkins was on a visit at my house. I left the street door open for the workmen and the customers. I saw a strange woman in the passage; I immediately ran after her; I opened her apron, and there I saw the gown.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me the gown to hold.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-95

656. WILLIAM HENRY CROWEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , one three-shilling bank token , the money of William Whitbread .

WILLIAM WHITBREAD. I a cheesemonger ; I live at 94, High-street, Wapping . On the 30th of June, from suspicion, I marked some silver, three three-shilling tokens and a eighteen-penny token. I gave it to Mr. Hook to lay out at the shop to try the prisoner's honesty. I waited in Burr-street for Mr. Hook to come to me, and tell me what money he had laid out. Mr. Hook went to my shop, returned, and said he had laid out ten shillings and sixpence.

I then went to my shop, and examined the till, and found only an eighteen-penny token and two three-shilling pieces I went to the police office with Mr. Hook, got an officer, and after that saw the prisoner at Mr. Nicolls's, in the Highway I said, William, there is a three-shilling token missing, I suspect you have it. He said, no, I might search him. He was searched; the three-shilling piece was not found He then said, I will tell you the truth; the three-shilling piece is not about me; I gave it to a friend of mine in Nightingale-lane In consequence of what he said I found the three-shilling piece at a house kept by a man of the name of Dickons, the corner of Old Gravel-lane. Dickons went up stairs and fetched a three-shilling piece down that had not any mark on it. The prisoner then said, bring the three-shilling piece down that I brought to you. Dickons went and fetched the marked three-shilling piece, and gave it me. He said the prisoner gave it him that evening to save for him. The officer has the three-shilling token.

SAMUEL HOOK . The prosecutor gave me three three-shilling pieces and an eighteen-penny piece. I laid it all out with the prisoner. I observed it was marked. I put a mark of my own on it. I delivered it to the prisoner to the amount of ten shillings and sixpence. I went and told the prosecutor I had laid it out.

WILLIAM DICKONS . I am an acquaintance of the prisoner. On the day he was taken up I received a three-shilling piece of him; he asked me to take care of it for him for a day or two. His master came to me in about twenty minutes afterwards; I delivered one to his master that was not marked I did not know there was any mark upon it. I brought down another; that was claimed by Mr. Whitbread. The prisoner asked me to bring down the three-shilling piece that he gave me.

JOSEPH HARDING . I apprehended the prisoner on this charge. I produce the three-shilling piece that Dickons gave me.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-96

657. THOMAS TYRELL and ANN TYRELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , three sheets, value 12 s. a bolster, value 8 s. and two quilts, value 10 s. the property of William Walden , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM WALDEN . I am a housekeeper , 64, Golden-lane, St Luke's . I know both the prisoners, they are man and wife; they took a lodging at my house; my wife let them the lodging.

MARTHA WALDEN . I let the lodgings to the prisoners at five shillings a week. They both came together when first they came. They had two sheets; they had the third sheet afterward; a bolster and two quilts to use with the lodging, and other things. They left the lodging on the 4th of June. They did not give up the key on Saturday when they went away. On Sunday morning I got a constable to open the door. I found the three sheets, the bolster, and two quilts gone. The man prisoner came on the Saturday after I had opened the door.

William Walden . I saw the prisoner on Sunday morning; he said it was not in his power to pay the rent; if I would wait he would pay it on the Monday. I asked him if he did not intend to pay anything else; the lodgings were robbed. He then said, I should be no loser; he would pay the rent on the Monday, and redeem the things, and bring them back. He did not. He called again on the Thursday, and saw my wife. In the evening I went in search of him and took him.

ROBERT WILD. I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, Chiswell-street. I produce a quilt pledged by Mary Frost for three shillings on the 26th of February. It was either the prisoner or her daughter, I cannot say which, and a sheet pledged on the 10th of January for four shillings in that name. The articles were afterwards claimed by Mrs. Walden.

ROBERT MARTIN . I am a shopman to Mr. Gadsden, 104, Whitecross-street. I produce a bolster pawned on the 18th of January, in the name of Thomas Tyrell , and on the 29th of March, a sheet pawned by Ann Tyrell ; they were claimed by Mrs. Walden.

MR. REORDEN. I produce another quilt, pawned on the 16th of April, in the name of Ann Tyrell .

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

Thomas Tyrell's Defence. I told Mr. Walden I would get them back again. I could not get a friend at the time to lend me the money. I would have got them as soon as I could.

Ann Tyrell was not put on her defence.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

THOMAS TYRELL , GUILTY , aged 44.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

ANN TYRELL , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18140706-97

658. ISAAC FRANCIS was indicted for that he, on the 28th of May , was servant to William Hewitson , and employed and entrusted to receive money for him, that he, being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 1 s. 10 d. for his said master, and that he did afterwards embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

WILLIAM HEWITSON . I keep a coal-shed in Golden-lane. The prisoner was my servant; he lived with me about a month; he carried out coals, and when he delivered the coals when the customers paid him he was to bring the money to me or to his mistress. I had a customer of the name of William Trott ; my wife sent him with the coals to Trott; the prisoner said he did not pay him for them.

ISABELLA HEWITSON. I am the wife of William Hewitson. On the 28th of May, I sent the prisoner with a bushel of coals to William Trott; they came to one shilling and ten pence. The prisoner carried the coals, and said Mr. Trott did not pay him.

WILLIAM TROTT . On the 28th of May, the prisoner brought me a bushel of coals; I paid him one

shilling and ten pence for them on delivery. Mrs. Hewitsoh came to my door, and asked me if I had paid the lad for the coals; I told her I had.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Has the prisoner ever brought that one shilling and ten pence to account - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the money; I kept it; I thought of making it up. I told master they would pay the next time.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-98

659. PRUDENCE LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a watch, value 1 l. the property of Matthew Muire .

MARY MUIRE . I am the wife of Matthew Muire ; we live at 5, Compton-street . My husband's watch was hanging up at the mantle-piece; I saw it at eleven o'clock. I then went to sweep the stairs, and a person of the description of the prisoner passed me on the stairs. I lodge in the two pair of stairs front room. I am quite sure the watch was safe when I went out of the room to sweep the stairs. I had been on the stairs five minutes. I looked at the watch when I went out of the room, and when I returned the watch was gone.

Q. Have you ever seen the watch again - A. My husband found it the same day.

MATTHEW MUIRE. On the 2nd of June, I went to work at six o'clock; I went home at twelve o'clock to dinner; my wife told me what she has told you. I suspected a woman in the house; I took up this woman; it proved not be that woman. The magistrates advised me to search the pawnbrokers. I found my watch at Mr Lane's, in Drury-lane. I then went and informed the magistrate. The pawnbroker informed me at five o'clock it was pawned, in the name of White, of Long Acre. On Monday the 10th of June, the pawnbroker informed me he had found the person that had pawned the watch. I went and found the prisoner in Steward's-rents, Drury-lane. I took her to the pawnbrokers; they said she was the person that pawned the watch. I then took the prisoner to the magistrate. That is all I know. The watch that I saw at the pawnbroker's is mine. The pawnbroker has it.

THOMAS HARTLEY. I am a servant at Mr. Lane's. I took in a watch on the 2nd of May of the prisoner, that watch was claimed by Muire. I think it was about twelve o'clock when I took it in. I advanced seventeen shillings upon it. Some time in the course of that day, Muire came; I shewed him the watch. After that, a man brought the, and wanted more money upon it. I told him he could not have more money upon it. I gave information, which caused this woman to be taken up. This is the watch, it is worth twenty shillings.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 2nd of May, as I was walking along the street, a woman was making a bargain with a man to sell a watch; they did not agree. I asked the woman what she wanted for it; she said, twenty-five shillings; I agreed to give her twenty-two, and as I had not enough, I gave her five. I went to Mr. Lane's, and pledged it for seventeen shillings, which made up the deficiency. If I had come dishonestly by the watch I should not have taken it to pledge where I was known.

Hartley. I never saw the prisoner before, as I know of. She said the watch belonged to her husband. She came alone to the shop.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-99

660. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of June , a watch, value 2 l. the property of William Dolley .

WILLIAM DOLLEY . I am a day labourer ; I live in the Borough. On the 3rd of June, I was going home; it was a little past twelve at night. I had been working at a distiller's in Aldersgate-street. Going along St. Martin's-le-grand , the prisoner came up to me, and while I was talking to her she drawed my watch and ran away with it. The prisoner was alone. I perceived her take my watch. The prisoner ran away. I could not find her again that night. I am sure she is the woman, I saw her the next evening in St. Martin's-le-grand, at ten o'clock. She was taken then. I saw her at the watchhouse, and knew her again. I described her person to the officer; he took her by any description. I have never seen my watch again.

THOMAS BRADNAM . I am a watchman in St. Martin's-le-grand I know the prisoner by sight; I used to see the prisoner in St. Martin's-le-grand; she has passed me twenty or thirty times of a night, frequently. On the 3rd of June, I was calling past twelve, I met the prisoner and the prosecutor, they were going up New-rents; I was coming down; I put my lauthorn up, and looked at her; nobody else was near but the prisoner and the prosecutor. Seeing him a country looking man, I thought if he had any property he would lose it. I am sure the prisoner is the woman he was with. After calling the hour, I went to my box; I met the prosecutor; he said he had been robbed of his watch; I said, was it the woman I saw you walking with; he said, yes. The next night the prisoner was taken by the constable.

JOSEPH BLANCH. I am a constable. In consequence of the description the prosecutor gave me of the person that robbed him. On the next night I apprehended the prisoner. I told her the charge; she said she knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please you, my lord, and gentlemen of the jury, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was standing at the door of a house in Newgate-street to shelter myself from the rain. Mr. Blanch said he wanted me. I immediately went to the watchhouse with him, where I remained two hours. Mr. Blanch came into the watchhouse, with a young man; he pointed me out to him; he said, that is the woman that robbed you; he then said to the watchman, did not you see this woman and man together just before the time he said he was robbed. The watchman said I was the woman that he had seen

with the prosecutor. The prosecutor solemnly declared he never saw me before. The prosecutor then came to me and asked me for the watch, or one pound five shillings. As I had never seen the watch, I thought it very hard I should pay for a thing I never had seen. I knew nothing of the watch, nor ever did I see the prosecutor before.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-100

661. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , one hundred and twenty pieces of paper hangings value 50 l. the property of Richard Ballad and Edward Robinson .

RICHARD BALLAD . I can only prove the property is mine.

EDWARD ROBINSON . I am a partner with Richard Ballad. On Thursday the 2nd of June, I happened to go into the neighbourhood to take a pint of beer. A young man come in, and said, there is a light in your accompting-house. We are paper manufacturers for paper-hangers . Our accompting-house is in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields . I went opposite of my window; I did not see any light, but on looking in between the joints of the shutters I saw a light, and heard some persons talking. I then went and knocked at the door. They asked, who's there from within. I said, here is one. The door was immediately opened to me. I then saw three persons; they were all strangers to me. I am sure the prisoner is one of them. One of them asked me what I wanted; I said, I want you. I rushed upon them, and seized the prisoner; the other two ran away. I called out, watch; the watchman came up to my assistance, and secured the prisoner.

Q. Did you perceive any of your paper hangings were gone - A. Yes, one hundred and twenty pieces were moved out of the racks, and twelve pieces tied up in bundles. They were tied up with one string in the middle. We always tie them up at both ends.

Q. What would be the value of the one hundred and twenty pieces - A. Forty or fifty pounds. They first forced the door by a crow. There were the marks of two different crows upon the door. The lock of the accompting-house was broken also. The paper had been taken from the accompting-house, and there were nine shillingsworth of copper taken out of the desk belonging to my partner, which he had left there. The prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

JAMES BALLAD . I am an apprentice to Richard Ballad and Edward Robinson . I left the manufactory near a quarter past eight. I was the last person that left the manufactory the pieces of paper were all in the racks in the accompting-house, on the next morning they we all tied up.

Q. to Rolanson. You say you found the mark of crows upon the door; did they leave the crows behind them - A. Yes, two crows and a dark lauthorn were left on the stairs.

THOMAS HART. I was the officer of the night, I took charge of the prisoner at the watchhouse; these crows were delivered to me.

JOHN BONNY. I am a watchman. I took charge of the prisoner; he said he was coming by the premises; Mr. Robinson was having a row with some people; he hauled him in, and said he had been robbing the premises.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-101

662. CHARLES RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , twelve knives, value 32 s. and twelve knives value 11 s. 8 d. the property of Charles Barns .

CHARLES BARNS . I am a cutler ; I live 113, Gray's-inn-lane . On the 27th of May, I missed twelve knives and twelve forks. I afterwards saw them at the pawnbroker's, Mr. Armstrong's, Baldwyn's-gardens. When I saw them at the pawnbrokers, I was sure they were my own manufacturing; they were quite new; they had never been used.

ROBERT ARMSTRONG . I am a pawnbroker, in Baldwyns-gardens, Leather-lane, Holborn. On the 27th of May, the prisoner pawned these knives and forks with me for one pound. I am sure he is the person.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; he denied taking the knives and the forks. I took him to Armstrong's; he then said he had taken them; his master owed him some money for work he had done, and when his master paid him he should have taken them out, and restored them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-102

663. WILLIAM SELWOOD TAVERNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , thirteen coach-glasses, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Edward Houlditch , James Houlditch , and John Houlditch .

WILLIAM WATSON . I live in Hanway-yard, near Oxford-road. I am a painter and glazier, and deal in glass.

Q. On the 22nd or 23rd of June, was the prisoner at your house - A. I cannot say the day; it was about that time. The first time he called and left the glasses I was not at home; he left the glasses, with my servant. When I saw him I had thirteen, coach-glasses in my possession. I asked him how he came by them; he said he came honestly by them. I told him I had my doubts about it; as an honest man he could have no objection to go with me to the person that had lost them, or to Bow-street. He said he had no objection to go with me. I was fearful of going with him by myself; I sent for a constable. The prisoner gave me the name of Bateman, in Eagle-street. When the constable came he seemed very much agitated, and begged me to let him go; that determined me not to let him go: he was taken to Bow-street office; the prosecutor appeared to give evidence.

GEORGE ANDREWS . I am a servant to the last

witness. On the 22nd of June, the prisoner brought thirteen plate glasses to Mr. Watson's house; he asked me whether we bought plate glasses; I told him I could not say without I saw them; they were tied up in a green baize. I looked them over. I asked him what he asked for them; he told me he had sold some for two pounds ten shillings a set, and some for three pounds a set. A set is four I told him I did not think Mr. Watson would give more than seven shillings for each of them; he said, that was too little. I told him I could not say any thing about them; he might take them away, and bring them when Mr. Watson was at home. He said, he had some way to go, he would leave them. I told him when I expected Mr. Watson at home. The prisoner called again.

Mr. Watson. I produce the glasses; I have had them ever since.

JOHN JAQUES . I am a servant to Messrs. Edward, James, and John Houlditch ; they are coach-makers, in Long Acre. They were in possession of a great many glasses; the glasses are here; they were taken from the shop; the shop is facing of the dwelling-house. The manufactory is the corner of Bow-street. My idea is, that he concealed himself in the shop. I concluded that somebody remained in, and broke out. I found nine frames broken and forced to get the glass out; we discovered the loss of thirteen glasses. The prisoner was a servant to Mr. Houlditch's. I engaged him about a month before; he is a single man; if he kept to his work he could earn three guineas a week; if he was particularly industrious he could earn more than that; we have men that will earn six guineas a week. This frame I remember being made for a coach fourteen years ago; this glass fits it. One glass will not fit another frame; they vary more or less.

Prisoner's Defence. One glass will fit another frame. I am taken out of my turn; I am quite unprepared.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-103

664 ANN RIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , two silver table-spoons, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Daniels .

SAMUEL DANIELS I am a silk manufacturer . The prisoner worked for me about five months; my manufactory is the top of the house.

Q. What reason have you to charge the prisoner - A. I have no more proof than her own confession.

HANNAH MAY . I work for Mr. Daniels. The prisoner came out of the kitchen laughing. The spoons were missing on the 17th of June. I asked her what she had done with them; she said, she had pawned them at Mr. Burrow's, in Barbican, for a guinea; she had paid a little of the money to one and to another. I said, it was a wonder any pawnbroker would take in spoons of her; she said, she always pawned there; they knew her. That is all I know.

SPIRE HOLLOWAY. I am a silk manufacturer. I live in Mile-end-road. I went with Mr. Daniels to Mr. Burrows; in consequence of what the girl said, I asked Mr. Burrows to let me see the spoons that had been pledged the day before; I described the spoons and the girl to him. Mr. Burrows denied having taken many such spoons of any such person, or any table-spoons of any description at that time. I returned with Mr. Daniels to his house. I addressed myself to the girl; I asked her how she could assert such a falsity, to say that she pledged the spoons at Mr. Burrows. I asked her for the truth, and insisted upon knowing where they were pledged; she said, she had told all the truth to Miss Daniels. I then said, what is the truth; she then said, that she had actually pledged them at Mr. Burrows, in Barbican, for a guinea. I told her that was a falsity, they were not there. She made a long pause, and then denied that ever she had been the thief. She had previously told me that she lost the duplicate out of her bosom. She said, all this was an invention; I examined Mr. Burrows's books; I did not find such an entry in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-104

665. JOHN CONNOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a plane, value 3 s. the property of John Ranbert .

JOHN RANBERT . I am a carpenter . I lost my plane from out of the work shop in Church-lane ; I left the plane on the bench.

WILLIAM WHITE RICE . I saw the prisoner take the plane from Ranbert's bench; I let him go outside of the premises before I took him; I then took the plane from under his coat. The door was upon the latch; nobody was on the premises. This is the plane.

Prosecutor. It is my plane; it cost me four shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw nobody there; I took the plane to get me a two-penny loaf; distress made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-105

666. WILLIAM BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a scaffolding-pole, value 5 s. the proper of Stephen Spencer .

STEPHEN SPENCER . I am a bricklayer and builder . I lost a scaffolding-pole in March, 1813 ; it was worth five shillings; it was in Church-street, Islington . I was building a common sewer. The last time I saw the pole was the night before it was gone. The prisoner is a stone-mason . Of my own knowledge, I don't know that he took it. The next day I saw the scaffolding pole divided into parts to make a roof for a shed; I have no doubt the roof and its parts, constituted the pole I lost. The prisoner acknowledged when he was taken, that he took the pole. He was not at home when I went to look for the pole. He absconded from then until now. I have made enquiries, and never could find him.

WALTER BRIANT. I am a painter. I saw the

prisoner take the pole, and saw him bringing of it: he took the pole from the end of Church-street; it was a fence against the common sewer. I cautioned him, and desired him to bring it back; he said, he would not. I told Mr. Payne; Mr. Payne employed Mr. Spencer to do this work. I gave up the place, at the things were lost; I did not wish to have the charge of it any longer. I saw the prisoner cutting it up; he applied it to a roof of a shed. which he built to keep his tools in. After Mr. Payne and Spencer looked for the property, the prisoner absconded for a twelvemonth.

DENNIS FLANNAGHAN. I saw the prisoner sawing this pole. Upon the next day, I saw a shed built up. Mr. Spencer came the next day, and claimed the pole. I am sure the prisoner is the person that I saw cutting this pole.

WILLIAM READ . I took the prisoner into custody; the prisoner said, Briant helped him to take it away. I have brought two pieces of the pole; it was formed into a roof for a shed, that the prisoner had built for putting his tools in.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not deny taking it, but Briant was the man that sawed it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-106

667. JOHN RYAN , GEORGE MULKEY , and WILLIAM PHILLIPS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Henry Lowndes , from his person .

HENRY LOWNDES. I live as clerk with my father, 6, Gutter-lane, Cheapside; he keeps a muslin commission warehouse. On the 20th of June, I was in Hyde Park , at the review; I went into the Park about ten o'clock in the morning; I am sure I had my handkerchief in my pocket when I went into the Park. My handkerchief was taken from me without my feeling it. The witness Avory, came and told me of it about one o'clock. I missed my handkerchief in about two minutes after the prisoners were laid hold of, and Avory took my handkerchief from Ryan. I am quite sure the handkerchief was mine; it was worth three shilling and sixpence, or four shillings. I saw my handkerchief taken from John Ryan .

JOHN AVORY . I am an officer. On the 20th of June, I was in Hyde Park, I saw the three prisoners all together; I saw them all go to the prosecutor; he was looking at the soldiers. They came from him again. They all three went to him again; in about half a minute they left him, and returned instantly to him again; the prisoner Ryan was in the middle, the other two were on each side of him; they covered Ryan. I saw Ryan pull his hand from the gentleman's pocket, and put whatever he had in his hand, under his coat. I saw the hand had apparently a handkerchief, something of this colour; he put it under his coat. John Dobson , a neighbour of mine, was with me at the time. The prisoners then left the gentleman. I went and told the gentleman that I believed he had his pocket picked; he told me he had not; he felt in his pocket, he said, he had lost his handkerchief. I asked him to go with me, I would shew him the man that had picked his pocket, and when I came up to the three prisoners, they were from twenty to forty yards off; they were all three together at that time. I then charged them with stealing the gentleman's handkerchief. I took the handkerchief out of Ryan's left hand pocket, he had got inside, under his arm; I searched him afterwards. I found this handkerchief upon him, and these two handkerchiefs I found in Phillips's pocket. The three prisoners were altogether, as nigh as they are now.

JOHN DOBSON . I was with Avory in the Park at the time this matter happened. I saw the three prisoners together before the gentleman's pocket was picked. I saw them try more than one pocket; that induced me to watch them. I saw Ryan draw his hand upwards from the gentleman's pocket, and put whatever was in his hand, under his coat.

Q. Had they been near the gentleman before that - A. Yes, they had been once; they returned to him again instantly. I saw Avory acquaint the gentleman of what had happened. I kept my eye upon the prisoners; they continued together. Avory and the gentleman came, and secured them. I was present when they were searched. Ryan had the handkerchief which was claimed by the prosecutor; that was taken from under his left arm. Then they were all taken.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that handkerchief - A. It is my handkerchief. I am quite sure of that. This is the handkerchief that was taken from my pocket.

Ryan's Defence. I humbly hope to present these lines in my defence. I hope and trust my case will meet the judicial proceeding of this bar, and that notwithstanding what has been said by the witnesses, there may appear yet some favourable circumstance to a youth at the early age of seventeen, for the first time brought to this bar to answer for any charge of a felony. On Monday, the 20th of June, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I went into Hyde Park; I had not been there long before an officer came and took me into custody, with the two young men now at the bar; stating before the magistrate, that we were in company together; which I avow to my knowledge I never saw the two prisoners before. I will now ask the officer whether he did not observe before the magistrate, that he had been pursuing another one with a velveteen jacket on, and said, he had plenty of handkerchiefs about him. I do allow that the handkerchief that was dropped by a lad, who was making his way in the crowd, I took it up.

Prosecutor. No such thing; he was asked if it was his handkerchief; he said, yes; he knew it by the pattern.

Mulkey's Defence. I am quite innocent. I never saw either of these prisoners before in my life.

Phillips's Defence. These two young fellows are strangers to me.

RYAN, GUILTY , aged 18.

MULKEY, GUILTY , aged 17.

PHILLIPS, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-107

668. SARAH SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , two glass rummers, value 2 s. the property of James Powell .

JAMES POWELL . I am a victualler ; I keep the Crooked Billet , King-street, Tower-hill . I was not at home at the time of this transaction.

MARY ANN JONES . I am servant to Mr. Powell. On the 7th of June, the prisoner came through the liquor-shop into the tap-room; she did not ask for anything; afterwards I missed two rummers from the tap-room table; I asked her whether she had them; she denied it. I searched her, and found them in her right hand pocket. This was on the 7th of June. She was taken up directly, and has been in custody ever since

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner; the two rummers were delivered to me. I asked her how she came by them glasses; she said somebody must have put them in her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for it. It is the first time I ever was here.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-108

669. JOSEPH WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the property of John Winfield .

JOHN WINFIELD . I am a pawnbroker , 165, High-street, St. Giles's . Joseph Wood lived shopman with me. On the 4th of June, as I was discharging my books with the tickets. I found two tickets that referred to a watch taken in on the 17th of May.

Q. Do you mean to say that you saw him take the money, or did he fail to account for it - A. No, I did not see him take the money; he accounted for it in an artful way. He did not take the money from the till; he contrived to withhold the money. I found two tickets of a watch in the name of Joseph Clark. The hand-writing of the tickets and the book is his hand-writing. On Tuesday the 17th of May, it was entered, Joseph Clark , silver watch, lodger, a guinea and a half. I referred to the file which I have in my hand; I found these two tickets to be in the handwriting of the prisoner; I asked the prisoner how there could be two tickets in his hand-writing. I counted the tickets over, and I looked in the balance book, in which we set down the abstract of the business; then I looked in this book; I found on the 17th of May I delivered one hundred and one pledges; the money received for these pledges was twenty pounds eight shillings and three farthings. When I counted the file, I counted one hundred and two tickets; as no one is infallible, I reckoned the tickets over again; I found there was one hundred and two tickets on the file, and the amount came to twenty-two pounds four shillings and nine pence three farthings. The way that this robbery has been committed, on the 17th of May he took one pound eleven shillings and sixpence, and the watch was booked a guinea and and a half to make up this deficiency, whereas, the watch was never pledged at all. That entry was made in the book to cover that guinea and a half. As he confessed to me without any promise or threat, I turned the prisoner away. The next morning, on looking over some other things, I procured a search warrant; he came to my house on the Wednesday, and sat down in the parlour. I wished to have a witness with respect to what was going on; I sent for Mr. Perryman. When Mr. Perryman came I said, this affair of the watch; I was by no means satisfied. At last, my saying it was his hand-writing, that all the business was done by himself, he then said, sir, I will own it, there was never such a watch pledged. He said he took the money out of the till, and if I would fetch him the day book he would shew me. He did shew me the date and the place.

DAVID PERRYMAN . Q. Did you hear what this prisoner said at the time that Mr. Winfield took him in custody - A. I did; he pointed out that he actually took one pound eleven shillings and sixpence from the till; he was asked several times if there was any more; he said he took one pound eleven shillings and sixpence, and no more.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction . fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-109

670. CHRISTOPHER TURTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , from the person of John Smith . a 10 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note , his property.

JOHN SMITH . I am a sailor . I lost my bank notes on the 28th of May; I lost them out of a purse that I have got in my pocket. I went to sleep in the Robin Hood public-house, Gray's-inn-lane .

Q. What time of the day was it - A. I cannot say; I was asleep when it was taken out of my pocket. I went to sleep about half past one in the day; I awoke between three and four in the afternoon; the prisoner was in my company then; he said I had another hour to sleep. I was going away by the afternoon coach, and I awoke by the noise in the house. That was about half past four. I went to the door, looked in my pocket-book, and missed my notes. A post chaise man stood against the public-house door, I asked him what notes were left in my pocket-book. I cannot read; I do not know one note from another. He said there was a one pound note and a five-pound in the pocket-book. There ought to have been a ten pound note and another one pound in the pocketbook. I told the landlord I had been robbed; he told me to go for an officer. I went to Hatton Garden office, and got an officer.

Q. You do not know who took it, do you - A. No. The prisoner went out of the house when the office came.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. The prosecutor told me he had lost a ten pound note. He did not say at that time that he had lost any more. I learned who was in company with him. I searched the other man that was in company him. The prisoner was gone then. They told me the prisoner also

was in company with him. The prisoner, I learned, was a ostler to Mr. Fagg, a stage master. I sent for the prisoner; he came. I accused him of the robbery; she denied knowing any thing about it. I took him to his master's stables, and told him I was sure he was the person that had got the note, and I would not leave you stable until I found it. I proceeded in searching and when I came to a little cupboard, he then said if I would turn my back to the door he would take out the note and give it me. I turned my back to the door; he put his hand into the cupboard, then put his hand to mine; he put this ten pound note into my hand. I took the prisoner to the office. One of Mr. Fagg's men came to the office, and said they had found a one pound note in the stable. I went down to Mr. Fagg; he delivered me the one pound note. It was in an old shoe. The prisoner owned to taking the ten pound note. He said if they hang me for it, I will tell you where it is.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-110

671. THOMAS WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , twenty-two pounds weight of lead pipe, value 5 s. the property of William Jones , affixed to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS COLES . I am a stone mason, No. 2, Portland-road, Marybone. On the 1st of June, I came out of Holborn, crossed Bloomsbury-square, into Great Russell-street . I saw a man standing on an iron grate, letting himself down into the area. When I came farther on I saw the prisoner stand on the area rails with the lead in his arms. I said to him, halloo, what are you doing there; he threw the lead down directly, and jumped on to the pavement. This was about half past two, on the 1st of June, in the morning. He endeavoured to get away. I seized him in Bloomsbury-square, by the iron rails. The watchman came up; we took him to the watchhouse. The watchman and I took the lead out of the area, and took it to the watchhouse.

MR. DORRINGTON. I am a watchman. I heard the cry of watch between two and three o'clock on the 1st of June. I took the prisoner into custody, and assisted Mr. Coles in taking the lead to the watchhouse.

JOHN ROBERTS . When the lead was taken to Marlborough-street office I assisted in taking it to Mr. Jones's house to see whether it corresponded; it did.

Prisoner's Defence. I ran away from Mr. Coles, he had a stick; I thought he would strike me.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-111

672. CATHERINE WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a chair, value 4 s. the property of John Harlow .

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a servant to Mr. Harlow; he is a broker , 107, Shoreditch . On the 27th of May near five o'clock, the chair was at the door in the front of the shop. This is the chair. I went in the yard; my mistress called me out, and said, there. I went out of doors I was told the prisoner had gone down Bele-court. I went down Bele-court. I saw the prisoner sitting on this chair. The prisoner told me she found it there, and she had sat down upon it; that was not true. I am certain it is my master's chair.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated in liquor. I know I sat down on the chair; as to moving it, I do not know that I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-112

673. THOMAS WHITFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June ; a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Ann Nichols , widow .

ANN NICHOLS . I am a widow; live at No. 8, May-place, at the bottom of Brook-street, Hampstead-road. I lost my stockings and handkerchief the last day in June; I left them in the watchhouse on the Wednesday night at eleven o'clock.

Q. Who took them - A. I believe the prisoner. They broke open the place. They wrenched the post, and broke part of the post away to get the bolt back.

GEORGE SQUIB. On the 30th of June, about six o'clock in the morning, I being in the watchhouse, a person cried stop thief. The prisoner came the back road where this woman lived; he being likely to be pursued, threw the copper down. He was caught by a gentleman's coachman, and in the prisoner's pocket I found this pair of stockings and this handkerchief, which Mrs. Nichols claimed.

Prosecutrix. These are my stockings and handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the Hampstead-road; I met two men, they asked me if I would carry a copper for them; I answered them I would. They took me in a field; the copper laid in the hedge. They put it on my head. I carried it across the Hampstead-road, and going by the watchhouse a man stopped me with it.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-113

674. THOMAS WHITFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a copper, value 1 l. the property of Richard Saunders , affixed to a certain building of his .

ELLIS KIME . I watched the prisoner and another man; I saw them go behind a house; they came back with a copper; I said, I think they have been stealing this copper. I told a man to step forwards to the watchhouse door. The other man was walking behind Whitfield; he ran away. Whitfield finding the other gone, he threw the copper down on my leg. A coachman stopped the prisoner. The prisoner was not out of my sight the whole time. The prisoner is the person that had the copper on his head. This is the copper.

Prosecutor. This copper was in my washhouse. It is my house. Mrs. Nichols lives with me. It was stolen at the same time the other things were.

Prisoner's Defence. In the Hampstead-road, this man asked me to carry this copper. I had a shilling for carrying it to St. Giles's.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-114

675. GEORGE BROWN , alias SHERER, alias SHEWOOD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a stock, value 15 s. two planes, value 5 s. a square. value 5 s. a chisel, value 6 d. and a plane iron, value 6 d. the property of William Clark .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a carpenter . I was at work at North-end, Fulham . I lost these things from Captain Cornwall. I left them in the building on Saturday the 30th of April; I returned on Monday, they were gone. The prisoner worked at the building as a bricklayer's labourer .

JESSE SPILLERS . I apprehended the prisoner on another indictment; that led to the detection of this robbery. I searched the prisoner's house; in it I found a quantity of carpenter's tools. The prosecutor saw them; he said his name was on them. These are them.

Prosecutor. They are all my tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them things left in my care by a man of the name of James Davis . I did not know whose they were.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-115

676. JANE CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a knife, value 6 d. and two three-shilling bank tokens , the property of Samuel Brown .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-116

677. ELIZABETH GILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a pail, value 1 s. and a gown, value 5 s. the property of Charles Rice .

ELIZABETH RICE . My husband is a weaver . I lost my pail and my gown. I did not know that I lost them until a girl came and told me. All I know is, that I lost my pail; that is all I can say about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-117

678. GEORGE NICOLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , four loaves of bread, value 3 s. the property of Charles Stamford .

CHARLES STAMFORD . I am a baker . The basket of bread was my property; it was in a barrow; the bread was my property. He left the basket in George-street, Hanover-square, while he returned to get something for a customer.

JAMES WAYTE . I am a baker. I saw the prisoner take the four loaves out of the basket in the barrow in George-street, Hanover-square. I pursued the prisoner, and took him. He told me he was ordered to take them out, and to follow the man. I told him he must go with me to Marlborough-street office.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, he told me to take four loaves from his barrow, and to bring them to him. He said he could tell me of a place. That young man came and took me in custody.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 6 months in the house of icorrection , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-118

679. THOMAS PUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , one ass, value 30 s. the property of James Damier .

JAMES DAMIER . I keep a chandler's shop and coal shed at Limehouse-fields . I turned the ass out on the night of the 16th of June, into an open place. On the 20th I sent a boy after it; he found it; he told me it was on Bow common. I went to Bow common to look after the ass; I found it at Laytonstone, in Essex. The ass was in the road. The brother of the man that owned it said he had exchanged it with Pugh for another.

THOMAS ODELL . On the 24th of June, Pugh came to me; he brought this ass, and said the ass belonged to him; he had had it a great while. I changed my ass with him for this ass and a pot of beer. James Damier came on the 24th, and owned the ass.

Q. Have you seen the ass to-day - A. I have; it is the same ass that Pugh brought to me.

Prosecutor. That ass is mine.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Vallance.

Reference Number: t18140706-119

680 THOMAS SLATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , twenty-four pair of stockings, value 3 l. 10 s. a coat, value 5 s. five cloths, value 5 s a pair of gloves, value 1 s. and a basket, value 6 d. the property of James Lacey .

JAMES LACEY . I live at Caseborton. On the 28th of May, about nine o'clock on Saturday morning, I came to the top of Fleet-market with two bundles in a basket; they contained all the things in the indictment, and a great deal more. A person came to me at the top of Fleet-market, and said, Mr. Lacey, where are you going; I told him to the Oxford Arms, Warwick-lane. He addressed me as though he had known me. He went down Fleet-market with me, turned up Snow-hill, and instead of going into Warwick-lane he turned into Giltspur-street. I told him I was going to the Oxford Arms, Warwick-lane. I told him that I had never been to the Oxford Arms but once before. He said he would be my porter and my pilot. I gave him the two bundles in the basket that I was carrying on my own back, and some money to pay him for his trouble; and when we got into Newgate-street, he turned up Giltspur-street, and went to the Fortune of War. I followed him to the Fortune of War, and when we came to the Fortune of War, this said Thomas Slater sat on the bench. I never saw him before. We sat down there. The prisoner joined company with me and the other man; he sat, and had two or three

pints of porter. I then said, I must go; the prisoner, Slater, then said, I will walk with you, if it is agreeable. They went behind me some of the way; we came up to Newgate-street; I turned round for Warwick-lane. The girl that had been with the prisoner at the Fortune of War, came and laid hold of my arm just then, and said, master, let us go and have something to drink, and as soon as she caught me by the arm, I looked round after the prisoner and the other man; they had turned round the corner. Instead of running after them, I ran after the girl, imagining she could discover where they had gone to; the girl got away from me. I next saw the prisoner at Hatton Garden office, on the Wednesday following. This happened on Saturday, Whitsun-Eve. On the Wednesday following I saw the prisoner at Hatton Garden office. I had given information of the transaction. I am sure when I saw the prisoner, he was the person that run away with the other man with the property, and I am sure now that the prisoner is the same person.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. In consequence of the prosecutor describing to me the man who had run away with his property, that one of them had a crutch; on the Wednesday I apprehended the prisoner at a public-house in Portpool-lane. I searched the prisoner; in his pockets I found these two gloves. I shewed them to the prosecutor; he said, they were his; he bought them at a shop in the Poultry. I went there, and Mr Dean said, he bought four pair. I took the prisoner to the office. I have not found any more of the property.

Prisoner. Q. to Prosecutor. You had them gloves packed up in the basket; did you see them any more after you bought them, until you saw them at Hatton Garden office - A. I did not see them until Mr. Read brought them to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to go and see a person confined in Bartholomew's Hospital; I went to the Fortune of War, at the corner of Cock-lane; I sent a female to this person in the Hospital, and I was sitting at the Fortune of War waiting for the return of this female, waiting for her to come out again; I had not been long at the door, before the prosecutor came up with a shabby man; he was so intoxicated he could hardly stand; he set down by the side of me; he drank out of my pint of beer, and handed it to the other man. I said, I thought it insulting to make free with my beer in that way. I had another pint of beer, I came out with it; he said I will have some again. After that, he had a pot of beer, and paid for it. Then this woman that I had sent into the Hospital came back. He got up, and said, is this your wife; I said, no. He kissed her again; she took hold of his arm. All this passed while the prosecutor was sitting between me and the man that had the property. Before the magistrate he said, I did not speak a word with the man that had the property; neither did I touch it. He insisted upon my going with him to shew him the way to Warwick-lane, as he was dubious of the person carrying them. I went with him; the woman and the man went arm in arm, and as soon as I got to the corner of St. Sepulchre's church, I turned the corner, and went down Snow-hill; it was my own way home; I left them to go their way. I never saw any more of the prosecutor until I was taken. These gloves are my own property. I leave it to decide whether he can swear to them gloves, or not; he having never seen them after he bought them.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-120

681. JOHN SAUNDERS and JOHN NIXON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of June an ass, value 2 l. the property of the right honorable William earl of Mansfield .

THOMAS BYE. I am a servant to the right-honorable William earl of Mansfield, at Caen Wood . An ass was lost from his premises, on the 23rd of June, at night, or early in the morning of the 24th; it was a valuable ass, and a favourite animal; it was in the paddock when I saw it last; the paddock was perfectly secure. The gate must have been broken open; the ass could not have got its own accord. I saw the ass again on the 7th of July, in Fitzroy-market; I saw Joseph Payne in possession of the ass; I knew it immediately.

JOHN PAYNE. I am a fishmonger; I live in Fitzroy-market. On the 24th of June, I bought the ass of both the prisoners; I gave them a one-pound note and my ass in exchange for this ass; they delivered me the ass, and took away my ass. I heard no more of it until Mr. Perks and Mr. Bye came and claimed the ass. When they came to me I did not know that the ass was stolen. I went with them to Bow-street; there I gave the same account that I have now given, and these two men were taken up.

SAMUEL MORRIS . I am a butcher in Fitzroy-market. The two prisoners are the men that sold the ass to Mr. Payne, on the 24th of June. I saw them then.

JOHN SMITH . I apprehended the two prisoners. I told them what I apprehended them for; they said, they bought the ass of a farming man, in Holborn; there was tied to a waggon two asses. I think they said, the waggon belonged to a man of the name of White, he lived a good way off in the country; they did not say what town or place. I have seen the prisoners before; I know no harm of them.

JOHN PERKS. I am an officer. When I took Mr. Payne into custody, he very readily took me, and he and his wife pointed out the prisoners. I asked him what conversation took place when he purchased the ass; he told me. The prisoners said, they brought the ass from Hampstead.

Q. to Payne. Did the prisoners tell you where they got the ass - A. They said, it came from Hampstead; they had not had it long; they said, they bought it of a gentleman at Hampstead; they did not say whom.

The Prisoners joint Defence read in court. My lord and gentlemen of the jury; as we were walking down Holborn, we saw a man riding upon a mare ass, and a colt; we bought the ass, and sold it to Mr. Payne; we did not know it was stolen. We told Mr. Payne where we lived. We were apprehended for stealing the ass. Since we have been in custody,

we have tried to trace the man; we have advertised the ass, and offered a reward for apprehending the man, and if you will find us not guilty, I do assure you, if ever we find the man, we will take him into custody.

JAMES NEWTON . I am a costermonger, like the prisoners; I keep an ass. I know both the prisoners; they drive asses about, with greens upon them.

Q. On the 24th of June, or thereabouts, do you remember going down Holborn, and seeing any asses - A. Yes, at the corner of Gray's-inn-lane; I cannot say the day of the month, it was about a week or a fortnight before the prisoners were taken into custody. I asked the man with the asses, the price of them; he said, three pounds. I bid him two-pounds for one; he said, that would not do. John Dixon and John Saunders came up; I cannot say what price he asked them; they bid him two pounds for one. He said, he would talk to them if they would give him something to drink. It was a dark brown ass. I have seen the ass again; it is the same ass that these men bought. The man told me, he brought the asses from Birmingham.

ALEXANDER ELLIS . I sell all sorts of vegetables.

Q. Do you recollect any morning early seeing any asses in Holborn - A. Yes; I have seen that ass to day, or one much like it. When I saw it in Holborn, it was in the possession of a stout man; he had a spade in his hand; there was a waggon before him He said, that waggon belonged him. James Newton came up. He asked me to buy the asses; he told me, he brought them from Norfolk.

WILLIAM GILL . I am a market man; I sell and asparagus about the streets; sometimes I carry them upon myhead, and sometimes upon an ass. One morning early, I was coming towards Holborn-bars, I met a man with two asses; he asked me if I wanted to buy any asses; he asked me three pounds for the two asses; I told him, I had no money to purchase them. Dixon and Saunders came by. I and my friend took our goods upon our head, and went home up Holborn. This is four Fridays ago.

The prisoners called six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140706-121

682. THOMAS WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , two hundred pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of James Gillam , affixed to a building of his .

JAMES GILLAM . I was in the country, and when I returned, the lead was gone.

JOHN POULTER . I am foreman of the pot-ash manufactory. On the 10th of June as I was coming across the common near Bow, between two and three in the morning, Thomas Wright and another man came out of a field in the road, towards the end of a foot-path; they were crossing into a field from the foot-path. We passed them. I said, what have you been at that way; one of them made answer, we have just laid her in a ditch. We walked on about about twenty yards. I had a suspicion that they had been breaking a fence, or something of that sort; and then they returned, and went over the same railings as when we passed them. The prisoner was knocking of some wood, as I thought; I said, you are pretty fellows breaking a fence, and when we came to them, the prisoner was beating something; I found it was lead. The man that was with me, saw the other man burying some lead. The prisoner made off. I took up this heavy piece of lead that he was knocking together. I said, he shall not go off so, I would take him if possible. I pursued the prisoner, and Smith that was with me; we took Thomas Wright; we brought the prisoner back, and took him to the watchhouse, and afterwards we took all the lead to the watchhouse. I said, this lead must have come off Mr. Gillman's premises. The prisoner said he knew nothing of it. I saw where the lead came from

JAMES SMITH . I am a labourer. I was coming home at the time with Poulter. I saw them coming over the gate; I asked them what they had been at; they said, they had left her in the ditch. Then we went away about twenty yards; I came back, and looked over the bank of the field. The other man saw me looking over; he said, there is somebody looking over; he then ran away. Thomas Wright threw down the lead; then he ran away. We went to see what they had got there; we found it was lead; I looked round, and found a great many pieces. I heard a knocking; I saw the prisoner hammering the lead together; the other man was covering it over in a ditch, close by, and as soon as we found where the lead was, we put it altogether. I ran after Thomas Wright ; we took this man, the other escaped. The prisoner asked me what I was going to do with him; I told him, to take him to the watch-house; I did.

JOHN WHEEL . I am an officer. I received this lead at the watchhouse. I took the lead to Mr. Gillam's premises, and compared it. By the thickness of the the lead, and by the holdfasts on the shed, and by the marks on the lead of the holdfasts, I have no doubt it came off Mr. Gillam's shed.

Prosecutor. I only know we missed the lead in the morning.

Wheel. I have been in the plumbering business. By the nail holes in the lead, and the wall hooks, it corresponds.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal the lead.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-122

683. PETER FITZER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of May , a watch, value 30 s. the property of George Bishop .

MRS. BISHOP. My husband is a waggoner . I lost his watch on the 22nd or 23rd of May, it hung over the mantle piece. The prisoner and another boy were in company together, about five minutes after five in the afternoon; they asked me if I had any cooper's work to do; one of them stood by the window, and the other a little distance off. I went up stairs, and when I came down again, the watch was gone.

MARY HARRIS . On the 23d of May, the prisoner and another boy came and asked me if I had any coopers work that I wanted to be done; I said, no. I saw the other boy come from Mrs. Bishops house; he went across the street to the prisoner, and said something to the prisoner. They went off together. Soon after, Mrs. Bishop said she had lost her watch while she was up stairs I said, the cooper's boy must have taken it. I know the prisoner: he mended a pail for me. I never saw the other boy before.

JAMES HALL . I am a pawnbroker in the Minories. On the 23d of May, I took in this watch of the prisoner. To the best of my knowledge he came between five and six in the afternoon. I lent him one pound two shillings upon it.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I shewed the prisoner to the pawnbroker. The last witness informed me he was the person that pledged the watch.

Prosecutrix. This is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. Before the magistrate, the pawnbroker could not swear that I pawned the watch.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-123

684. RICHARD HARWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , one hundred and twenty penny-pieces and forty halfpence , the property of Richard Lee .

RICHARD LEE . I am a baker ; I live at 84, Rosemary-lane . The prisoner was my servant . He took the halfpence out of my cupboard. I detected him in the room where I deposited them, about three o'clock Myself and an officer was concealed in the parlour. At about ten minutes past three in the morning, the prisoner came into the room. We detected him as soon as he came into the room, before he took any thing; the officer took him in custody. About ten o'clock, the same day, the officer searched his premises, and found three papers of copper; two five-shilling papers of halfpence, and one five-shilling paper of penny-pieces, and one paper with a few halfpence in it; there might be forty. I did not count them. I could not swear to the money. I have every reason to believe they are mine, by the papers. The officer has the papers.

Mr. Challenor. On Saturday you paid the prisoner his wages, did not you - A. Yes; my wife did.

SAMUEL MILLER . I was employed to detect some person that the prosecutor thought robbed him. I sat up in his room on Thursday morning the 31st of May; about three o'clock, the prisoner came into his room where the closet was. While the prisoner was going to the closet where the money was, I rushed out of another close to it, and took him into custody. On Friday night I marked the money. On searching the prisoner's house I found three papers with them halfpence of my marking in his custody. I found these halfpence, two five-shillingsworth, and another paper with forty halfpence in it. These are the several halfpence that I marked S M upon the back of the papers. On Tuesday I took the prisoner into custody; on Friday I marked them all S M. Mr. Lee saw me mark them, and Mrs. Lee, I believe. I marked the penny-pieces as well as the halfpence.

COURT, to Prosecutor. Had you ever paid away these papers marked by Miller - A. No.

Mr. Challenor. You told my lord that your wife paid the prisoner on Saturday night; of course, how she paid him you are not aware - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-124

685. JOHN HYLAND and HENRY MADDEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , two wooden boxes, value 3 s. the property of John Norris .

JOHN NORRIS . I am a journeyman whitesmith . I lost these two boxes from No. 2, Peerless-row, City-road . They were two wooden boxes, covered with paper like bandboxes; the contents I could not tell the magistrate. They belonged to a lodger of mine that was sixty miles in the country, that left them in my house. They were taken out of a closet in a one pair of stairs front room.

MRS. BURTON. As I was sitting up in bed in the morning. I saw a box throwed out of the window a few minutes before five in the morning.

Q. Who threw it out - A. A man that was in the room; it appeared to be like the man with the white hair. I cannot say he is the man. His name is Madden.

Q. What kind of a box was it - A. A caravan trunk, covered over on the top with paper. I saw but one.

Q. Was there any body to receive it - A. Somebody caught it. I did not see that. I got out of bed and looked out of the window; the man jumped out the window immediately.

Q. How high was this window - A. One pair of stairs. I saw the person; he appeared to be like Madden; he was a fair man.

Q. Upon your oath, what do you believe - A. I believe he is not the man. I think the man appeared rather shorter.

Q. How could you tell me just now that he was like him, having light hair; now, you say you believe he is not the man - A. I beg pardon, sir.

Q. Do not beg pardon of me, beg pardon of God Almighty, whom you have sworn to - A. I do not wish to swear, because I am in a doubt whether he is the man.

Q. Now, you are playing lust and loose. He was very much like him - A. Yes. The man that jumped out of the window was rather shorter. There were three of them, I believe.

Q. Where was the third man standing - A. I only saw two men.

Q. Who were you examined before - A. Sir William Parsons .

Q. What kind of a man was the man that walked along, and took no notice of it - A. A tallish man. I did not see his face; he had his back towards me.

Q. Did you see the face of the man that jumped out of the window - A. Yes; Madden's face has some resemblable. I think the man is not so tall.

Q. You said before the magistrate,

"on Monday morning, half an hour after five o'clock, as I was sitting in my bed, I saw a box throwed out of the window; I got up, and saw a man in the prosecutor's room; when he saw me he jumped out. The prisoner, I believe, is the man that jumped out; he has every appearance of it. There was another man in the street; he took no notice, and walked on." Now what do you say - A. I leave it to your judgment.

COURT. My judgment is that you want to prevaricate - A. I do not know what to say.

JOHN TERRY . I am an excise officer. I was sitting at my room window in the City-road, about half past four in the morning of the 6th of June. I saw the prisoners, in company of another man, pass on the opposite side of the way; they stooped at the corner of Peerless-row; they stood there apparently in conversation. They walked down Peerless-row; they were out of my sight; my window would not command a view of them. I waited a few minutes; the prisoners then came up again; the third man was with them; they stood at the end of Peerless-row, all three of them, the two prisoners and another man. After some conversation, they walked up and down the City-road, and then went down Peerless-row again. They returned the third time, all three of them. The man who is not here had an apron on when I first saw him; when I last saw him he had no apron or hat on. They ran down the row again. I arose upon my feet, ran down stairs, and crossed the road to look down the row. I saw the prisoners with something on a truck, that was covered over with the apron apparently. I had left my door open; I ran back and shut it, with intent to take the prisoners. I ran down the row; I could not find them, nor any watchman.

Q. What day was this - A. Monday morning, the 6th. On Wednesday morning, I was going along Mitchell-street, at the back of St. Luke's; I met the two prisoners, in company with the other man, coming down Brick-lane; I leaned down, pretending to button my knee, by that I had a full view of their faces. The man that escaped asked me if I should know them again. I told the watchman I had reason to believe these men were housebreakers. We followed the two prisoners, and took them; the other man escaped. I have no doubt of the identity of the prisoners, nor I never had a doubt.

Hyland's Defence. On Monday morning I was in bed till seven o'clock.

Madden's Defence. The same.

HYLAND, GUILTY , aged 20.

MADDEN, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-125

686. JOHN PENNISTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , two pair of boots, value 5 s. five shoes, value 5 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of John Allcock .

JOHN ALLCOCK . I am a labouring man ; I live in Elizabeth-court, Whitecross-street . On the 3d of July, early in the morning, I lost my shoes and boots. I happened to be locked out of my lodging; I would not disturb my landlord or landlady, and being a fine morning I walked up and down the street. After I had walked about two hours, the watchman came up, and said, you have got some property in your bundle; I said, it was my own. He said he saw a parcel of bad fellows walking up and down the street; he said I had better sit in his watch-box, it would be safer than walking backwards and forwards in the street, and while he was crying the hour of three I sat in his box. I felt asleep in the box. My property was taken from me. My bundle was taken from under the seat of the watch-box. My bundle contained two pair of boots, five shoes, a pair of breeches, some meat and bread in the apron. Soon after the watchman cried the hour of three, I awoke, and missed the bundle. I got up and saw the watchman I told him I had lost my bundle. After this, the constable came; the watchman related the circumstance to him; the constable said he had taken a man with a bundle.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . On the 3d of July, a quarter after three o'clock, I was standing at my own door, I saw the prisoner running with this bundle under his arm. I pursued him. In Salmon and Ball-court he threw the bundle down. I followed him, and catched him. I asked him whose bundle it was; he denied having the bundle in his custody. He was never out of my sight.

ROBERT LOCK . On the 3d of July, a quarter past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner pass with this bundle; I said, Hutchins, there is a man gone by with a bundle, I don't think it belongs to him. Hutchins pursued him, and caught him. This is the bundle; it contained boots and shoes.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor. I was coming down Salmon and Ball-court; these men accused me of robbing a bundle, which I never saw, nor had I been in Whitecross-street that night.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-126

687. JOSEPH WEBB and WILLIAM BLISS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , three fowls, value 4 s. the property of John London .

CHARLES COTTON . I am gardener to Mr. London, at Haverstock-hill, Hampstead .

Q. Did he lose his fowls - A. Yes. On Tuesday the 5th of July they were running about. I cannot tell where they took them; they did not break open any fowl-house; they were hay-making in the next field. The fowls ran here and there in the barn. I missed two of the hens after feeding them in the morning. I watched for them; at twelve o'clock at noon I missed another hen. These men were in the barn. I looked through the barn, and saw them take the fowls from under the hay. Webb did. I ran after the prisoners, and asked Webb what he had got there that did not belong to him; I said, whose fowls have you got there; he said he did not know. I said, they are mine, and you are my prisoners. I found nothing upon Bliss.

WEBB, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

BLISS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-127

688. PETER RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , from the person of Charles Challenor , one 100 l. bank note, one 50 l. bank note, one 5 l. bank note, one 2 l. bank note, and one 1 l. bank note , his property.

CHARLES CHALLENOR . On the evening of the 24th of May, I was at a wake at St. Giles's. I stopped there nearly an hour. I went out, and two women followed me out. I went with them to Covent Garden; they then left me. In a few minutes afterwards I perceived I had lost my property.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18140706-128

689. JOHN FRANKLIN was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of June , was servant to William Haggerty , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 s. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

WILLIAM HAGGERTY . I am a wood-chopper ; the prisoner was my boy. I employed him to sell my wood, and to receive the money for it. I sent two boys out with the horse and cart with wood to sell for thirty shillings. The other boy's name was Maggs. They never returned. A strange boy came home with the cart, and the greatest part of the property was gone.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18140706-129

690. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , a saw, value 5 s. a basket, value 3 s. the property of William Neville ; two saws, value 10 s. the property of Stephen Wing ; a saw, value 5 s. the property of John Pitt ; and a saw, value 5 s. the property of William Baron .

WILLIAM NEVILLE. I am a journeyman carpenter . On Saturday the 18th of June, I lost my saw and basket. I was repairing Sir Richard Gower 's house. My saw and basket was in the housekeeper's room on the ground floor. I left them there to go to dinner at twelve o'clock. As I was coming back at one o'clock, I saw the prisoner going across Cavendish-square with a basket on his back. I asked the prisoner to let me look at the basket; he let it fall off his shoulder. I knew the whole of the property. The saws are worth thirty shillings. This is my saw; it is worth three or four shillings; and the basket is mine.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18140706-130

691. ISAAC WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a wooden chest, value 2 s. and one hundred and twelve pounds weight of tea, value 40 l. the property of William Fry and Joseph Booth Watson .

GEORGE WAKEMAN. I am a carrier. On Wednesday morning. I was alarmed by my watchman, stating, that a man was taken to Marybone watch-house with a chest of tea. I went to the watch-house, and saw the chest there. That is the identical chest. The waggoner delivered the way-bill to me; he is here.

WILLIAM PLOMER . I am the waggoner. I received the way-bill of Isaac Boden, the bookkeeper of the Castle and Falcon inn, Aldersgate-street. When I receive the way-bill. I receive the waggon, and all the goods in the waggon. I carry them to my master's wharf, and there I put them.

Q. On what day did you carry this to the wharf - A. Tuesday night. I found out the deficiency on Wednesday morning. I discovered, about half after six, a gap in the waggon.

ISAAC BODEN. I made out the way-bill myself I saw the goods loaded in the waggon. I am able to say that every article in the way-bill was put into the waggon, and was delivered to Plomer. I knew this box was tea. I am sure this article was put in the waggon.

JOHN BOND. I am a hackney coachman. On the 5th of July, the prisoner came up to me about half after nine at night, and said he wanted a coach to go to St. Luke's. I told him to get on the box to shew me the place. In going along, I said, what part of St. Luke's; he said, the City-road; I said, the fare is five shillings and sixpence; he said he had but half-a-crown in his pocket. He jumped off the box, went into a place where they had laid a foundation for some new houses, and brought up a chest that laid in this place. I then said to him, I do not think it is any good; I shall not like to carry it. I turned the coach about. It gave me suspicion that he had not come honestly by it. A dog was barking at the prisoner. He put the chest down; he was sitting upon it. I said to a boy, go and get a watchman. One of the boys got a watchman. Before the watchman came, the prisoner took the chest on his back, and ran across Montague-square. I ran after him, and cried stop thief. A gentleman knocked him down. I am positive the prisoner is the man who first hired me for the coach.

Q. to Mr. Wakeman. Does that chest correspond in all respects with the chest that came in the waggon - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiant.

Reference Number: t18140706-131

692. LEVI BARNETT was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM CANNON . I work for Mr. Shepperd, a lozenge maker, in Fleet-street. On Sunday, the 19th of June , I delivered some letters for my master in Leadenhall-street. I saw the prisoner; I purchased four oranges of him for four-pence; I gave him a good shilling; he said, he had no sixpence; he then said, he had no copper. He looked at the shilling before he said he had no copper. He gave me the

shilling as I supposed back again. He then said, have you got an eighteen-penny piece, or a three-shilling piece; I gave him an eighteen-penny piece. He gave me another shilling, and the rest in copper. I am sure the prisoner is the lad. I gave the shillings to Shuter, the constable.

JOSEPH SHUTER . I am a constable.

Q. Did not the last witness give you two shillings - A. Yes; before the Lord Mayor. I have had them ever since. I apprehended the prisoner in Leadenhall-street; he ran up a gateway. I saw him slip something out of his breeches pocket, and put it into his mouth. These are the two shillings I took out of his mouth.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of tellers of the Bank.

Q. You are acquainted with the coin of this country - A. I am.

Q. Look at these two shillings, and tell me whether they are genuine or counterfeits - A. They are both counterfeits; they seem to be both of one manufactory, and the other two are likewise counterfeits; they all seem to be of one manufactory.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time, to find sureties for good behaviour for 6 months to come.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-132

693. EDWARD ROGERS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

PETER IMES . I am a fellowship-porter ; I attend at Billingsgate-market . On the 25th of May ; the prisoner asked me what price the mackarel was; I told him thirty shillings an hundred. He said, he would have half an hundred; he gave me fifteen shillings. I gave the fifteen shillings to Mr. Crouch, the salesman ; he said, they were all bad. Mr. Crouch gave charge of the prisoner in my presence.

STEPHEN CROUCH . I received the fifteen shillings of Imes. I looked at them; I perceived the moment I took them, they were all counterfeits. I asked Imes of whom he took this money. I afterwards saw the prisoner. I asked him how he came by these shillings; he said, he did not know; he took them in trade. He immediately took out all the money he had. I said, you could not have fifteen shillings all bad without knowing where they came from.

MR. TANNER. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. I received the fifteen shillings of Mr. Crouch; I have kept them ever since.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I assist the solicitor of the Mint.

Q. Look at these fifteen shillings, and tell me your judgment of them - A. They are all counterfeits, and exactly all of the same sort; they all are fresh; they were much fresher when I first saw them.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for good behaviour for 6 months to come.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-133

694. ABRAHAM COHEN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

GEORGE WORSLEY . I am the son of John Worsley , living in Wood-street, Cheapside. On Tuesday, the 15th of this month , I saw the prisoner near the Bank ; he was selling oranges. I bought some oranges of him before. He at last offered me six for sixpence. I gave him a dollar; he gave me a three-shilling piece, a bad one, and two shillings. I shewed the three-shilling piece to my father; he suspected it was a bad one. My father went with me to a silversmith's in Cheapside, and then we went to the Mansion House, and got an officer. I went with the officer to the back of the Bank; the officer took the prisoner into custody.

JOHN WORSLEY . I am the father of the lad. He brought me a three shilling token; I went with him to a silversmith's. I afterwards went after the prisoner with the officer and my son; my son pointed the prisoner out; the officer took him to the Compter.

Q. Is that the three-shilling token your son gave to you - A. It is; I marked it at the Compter.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. I received of Mr. Worsley this three-shilling token. I searched the prisoner; I found seven three-shilling tokens and a dollar, good.

Q. Look at that three-shilling piece, and tell me whether that is it - A. Yes; that is the three-shilling token I took out of his lining. I found in his close waistcoat pocket, seven three-shilling tokens, five eighteen-penny tokens, and ten shillings and sixpence.

Q. Now, was that found in the same waistcoat pocket where the three-shilling token was taken from - A. No, the other waistcoat pocket. The good money was by itself.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers of the Bank.

Q. Look at that three-shilling token tendered to Worsley, and tell me whether it is a genuine or a counterfeit token - A. It is a counterfeit one, and quite fresh, and this other is a counterfeit; they both seem to be of one manufactory.

Mr. Adolphus addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY ,

Of uttering one counterfeit token only.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for 6 months to come.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140706-134

695. ROBERT ROGERS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

No evidence being adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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