Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th April 1814.
Reference Number: 18140420
Reference Number: f18140420-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS. On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 20th of APRIL, 1814, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORTHAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , Lord Mayor of the City of London: the Right Honourable Lord Ellenborough, Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Robert Graham ; knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Sir Charles Flower , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. John Atkins , esq. Robert Albion Cox , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Watkins ,

James Jones ,

William Greenwood ,

Joseph Hall ,

Samuel Sewell ,

James Ackerman ,

Joseph Collins ,

William Lloyd ,

William Bruce ,

William Parker ,

Archelaus Cruse ,

Joseph Turner .

First Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Hale Miller ,

Walter Miller ,

George Raney ,

John Musgrove ,

Thomas Buckingham ,

John Bedford ,

James Ball ,

William Parker ,

Isaac Curtis ,

William Elwin ,

George Keene ,

William Frame .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert William Jerrard ,

William Brandon ,

James Tealey ,

James Duffer ,

William Hinds ,

James Marsh ,

James Chatton ,

John Williams ,

Charles Brown ,

Josiah Darling ,

Eleazer Williams ,

David Ireton .

Reference Number: t18140420-1

286. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bassnett , about the hour of nine in the night of the 29th of March , and burglariously stealing therein three pair of stockings value 5 s. the property of John Bassnett .

ELIZABETH BASSNETT . I am a married woman, my husband's name is John Bassnett : I live in Tothill-street, in the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster . On the 29th of March I was at home; between eight and nine on that night I heard a noise at the door of the shop.

Q. Is the shop a part of the dwelling-house - A. Yes, it is. There is but one door to it.

Q. What kind of a noise was it - A. It was a noise like the ratling of shots against the window. Upon my hearing the noise I went out to the shop door, and I caught hold of this boy. I asked him what he was doing; I don't know that he made any answer. He did not go. A man came up and assisted me in taking him into the house.

Q. What kind of articles were there in that shop - A. Hosiery, and clothes of different sorts.

Q. Before you took him into the shop, did you examine the shop to see how it was entered - A. Yes; I put my hand in the hole, and observed the glass broke. The stockings were in a glass case. The hole was big enough to take out the stockings. We found the boy outside of the shop; I found no other boy there. The prisoner was standing close to the hole outside of the shop; we took him in.

Q. Did you search him before you took him into the house - A. No, not till we took him into the house, and then we found one pair of stockings upon him; they had the shop mark; they are my husband's property. The prisoner was taken to the office the next morning; I was present at the office.

Q. What time of the night was this; was there day light enough to distinguish any human face without the assistance of candles - A. I cannot say; there might.

STEPHEN LAWSON . I took the stockings from the boy in the shop. I gave the stockings to the officer.

GEORGE ARNOLD . I received the stockings of Mr. Lawson; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Prosecutrix. These are the same stockings; there is a private mark of our shop upon them. They were laying in the window in a glass case; the case was broken. These stockings were laying in that case at that time.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking by the shop about seven o'clock; I picked the stockings up by the window on the pavement.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-2

287. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for that she, at the General Sessions of peace, holding for the County of Middlesex, on the 15th of February, in the 53rd year of his majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false money, and was sentenced to be imprisoned for one year in his Majesty's goal of Newgate, and to find sureties for good behaviour for two years; and that she afterwards on the 15th of March last, one piece of false, counterfeit, money made to the likeness of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to one Mary Holman .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I am one of the clerks to the Solicitor of the mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner; I examined it with the record; it is correct.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am clerk to Mr. Newport, the keeper of New Prison.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. Perfectly well; I have known her the last six or seven years. I was in court when she was tried and convicted for uttering counterfeit money, she was ordered to be committed to Newgate for one year, and to find sureties for good behaviour for two years more; she was sent to Newgate in execution of that judgment.

MARY HOLMAN . I live at the King's Arms, Duke-street, Grosvener-square. On the 15th of March, the prisoner came to our house; a girl and another woman was with her.

Q. Who keeps the King's Arms - A. Thomas Bird , my brother-in-law.

Q. Are you quite sure as to the person of the prisoner - A. Yes, I am quite sure. They came to get something to drink, I believe it was gin; I do not recollect which of them asked for it. One of them asked for it; my brother gave them a glass of gin. Mr. Johnson, the officer, came in at the time. I believe they all drank; the prisoner paid me for the liquor. Before the shilling was paid me Johnson came in. I took the shilling and gave it to my brother, Bird; he and Johnson marked the shilling. I am sure the shilling I received of the prisoner I gave to my brother, Bird.

THOMAS BIRD . I am brother-in-law to the last witness.

Q. Do you remember your sister giving you a shilling - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner, a girl, and the other woman in your shop - A. I did. I examined the shilling; I desired them to change the shilling, but Johnson being present he desired me to keep it; I did. I marked the shilling before I parted with it. Johnson desired me to assist him in taking them into a room that he might search them; which I did. I kept the shilling in my hand which my sister gave me, and the woman gave my

sister. I saw them all searched. Mrs. Williams was first searched; at the time she was searched I heard something drop from her daughter; on hearing something drop Johnson, the officer, in my presence turned and picked up a paper parcel containing bad shillings; Johnson picked it up by the daughter's leg: the mother was about five feet distance from the girl. Johnson returned to the mother again, and searched her, and found a quantity of bad coin; how much I cannot say.

Q. I wish to know when you parted with the shilling that you received of your sister - A. I parted with it the same evening to Johnson, the officer. I marked it before I parted with it.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer.

Q. Do you know the woman at the bar - A. I do; I have known her about a week before she was taken in custody. On the 15th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner, her daughter, and another woman, in St. Giles's; I followed them up Tottenham-court-road, and proceeded into Duke-street, Grosvener-square; I observed in my journey something in their hands. I saw them do a thing that I can describe before they came to Mr. Bird's house. I saw them take some money out of a paper and teare the paper, and chuck it in the street.

Q. Could you sufficiently discover that it was money - A. I saw it was something white; I was not near enough to discover it was money.

Q. From whom did that pass that you supposed to be money - A. From the prisoner. I saw them all go into Mr. Bird's house; I followed them in.

Q. Did you give any information to Miss Holman - A. I desired her to deal with them if they were so disposed. When I went in I heard the prisoner ask for something to drink, and saw her tender a shilling for the gin; Mr. Bird refused the shilling; the prisoner said, sir, it cannot be a bad one, take it to the light and look.

Q. Do you know what the gin came to - A. No.

Mr. Bird. The glass of gin and a glass of mixed spirits came to sixpence halfpenny.

Johnson. I told Mr. Bird when he came into the light in the tap-room to keep the shilling, and I would go out and bring the prisoners into the taproom and search them. I brought the prisoners into the tap-room and searched them. In the first place I produce the shilling I received of Mr. Bird; he marked it, and I marked it; this is the shilling. I proceeded to search the prisoner at the bar, but hearing something fall from the girl I left the mother and picked the parcel up, which laid close by the girl's feet; the paper parcel contained four bad shillings. These are the four bad shillings; they have been in my custody ever since. At the time the parcel fell from the girl the prisoner was as far from the girl as I am from Mr. Shelton. I then proceeded on to search the mother; in the prisoner's pocket among some halfpence I found fifteen bad shillings, and two bad sixpences, two shillings good, one shilling and ten pennyworth of halfpence, and two good sixpences. I then went to search the girl; she requested to warm her hands; upon my going to the table I found a shilling close by.

Q. to Miss Holman. Is that the shilling that you gave to your brother - A. I cannot say; I gave but one shilling.

Mr. Bird. That is the shilling that I received of my sister; I marked it, and the officer marked it.

MR. NICOLL. I am one of the moniers of his Majesty's Mint.

Q. I now put into your hand the shilling uttered by the prisoner to Miss Holman - A. It is a counterfeit; it is quite fresh finished.

Q. to Johnson. Shew the fifteen counterfeit shillings to Mr. Nicoll.

(Johnson handed them to Mr. Nicoll.)

Mr. Nicoll. The fifteen shillings and the two sixpences are all counterfeits; they are of the same manufactory, and these that dropped from the girl are counterfeits, and of the same sort.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress caused me to infringe upon the laws of my country.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140420-3

288. ELIZA WILLIAMS was indicted for that she, at the General Sessions of the peace, holding for the County of Middlesex, on the 17th of September, in the 50th year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false money, and was sentenced by the Court to be confined in the house of correction one year, and to find sureties for two years more, that she after being so convicted, on the 15th of March last, one piece of false, counterfeit, money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, as and for a good shilling, feloniously did utter to one Kemp Godfrey .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I am one of the clerks of the Solicitor of the Mint. I produce the copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner; I examined it with the record; it is a true copy.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I have known the girl at the bar nigh seven years.

Q. Were you present at any time in September Sessions, 1810, when she was convicted - A. I was; she was convicted of uttering counterfeit money, she was ordered to be confined in the house of correction one year, and to find sureties for her good behaviour, and she then was informed by the chairman that if she was guilty of a like offence she would be liable to a capital conviction.

Q. Was that the only time that you saw her in that court - A. No.

KEMP GODFREY. I live at No. 14, Henrietta-street, Manchester-square, with my uncle; he is a baker.

Q. Do you know the girl at the bar - A. Yes, I have no doubt of her person; she came to our shop on the 15th of March, she asked for a threepenny loaf; I gave it her. She gave me in payment a shilling; I gave her nine-pence, deducting threepence for the loaf; she went away. I put the shilling on the lidge of the counter with some halfpence; there was no other shilling there.

Johnson, the officer, came in as soon as she went out; he enquired what had happened. I told him, and shewed him the shilling the girl had given me. He marked it, and I marked it. He sealed it up. He went out into the street. That is all that I know of it. After the shilling was sealed up in paper I put it in a drawer by itself. On the next day, Johnson came; I gave him the shilling that I had received of the prisoner.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the 15th of March, I watched the prisoner and Mary Williams ; I saw the girl go by herself into the shop; (the shop in Henrietta-street, about two hundred yards from Oxford-street); the mother had been left by the prisoner in Oxford-street while the girl went into the baker's shop. Upon her coming out, I went in; I asked the boy; he produced a shilling; I saw it was a counterfeit shilling. I marked it. I told the boy to mark it; he did so. I followed the girl. She joined the mother in Oxford-street. She gave her mother the three-penny loaf; the mother put the loaf in her apron along with other articles that they had purchased. I looked at the shilling the boy gave me, the next day; I saw it was the same shilling that I had marked the day before. I have had it ever since. I see now it is the same shilling that I marked.

Godfrey. It is the same shilling that I marked.

MR. NICOLL. It is a counterfeit shilling; it is the same manufactory as the others.

Johnson. I pursued the mother to the place where I searched them, to Mr. Bird's house; I heard something drop; I picked it up. As soon as she dropped her hand, the four shillings were laying at her foot. I observed the motion of her hand. I went and picked it up; it was in a direction as if it came from her hand. There were four shillings. It was as if it came out of a paper. These are the four shillings; I have had them ever since.

Mr. Nicoll. These are the same I saw before; they are counterfeit.

Johnson. I searched the mother again; I found on her fifteen counterfeit shillings, two good shillings, two good sixpences, and two counterfeit sixpences, and one shilling and ten pennyworth of halfpence in her pocket.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of her youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-4

289. WILLIAM HENRY BOTTERILL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 14th of January , a bill of exchange for the payment of 47 l. with intention to defraud Robert Middleton Biddulph , James Cox , Thomas Somers Cox , and George Ridge .

SECOND COUNT, for publishing and uttering as true, a like bill of exchange, he knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

THIRD COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like bill of exchange, with intention to defraud Charles James Ashley .

WILLIAM AYRE. I am cashier to Biddulph and Company. The names of the partners are Robert Middleton Biddulph, James Cox , Thomas Semers Cox , and George Ridge . There are no other partners to that firm that I know of. I have lived there upwards of thirty years. Our house is at Charing Cross. On the 14th of January last, Ann Sinclair came to our house; she brought this bill of exchange which I hold in my hand. This bill purports to be drawn by Charles James Ashley ; it is drawn upon Messrs. Biddulph, Cox, and Ridge. She presented that bill for payment. I observed that it wanted the discharge of the party. I wrote it. I applied to her for a receipt. I observed there was John Peate wrote upon the back of it. She returned me the bill with these words upon it. I saw her write

"received, Ann Sinclair," upon the back of it. I then gave her four ten pound bank notes, and seven pounds in small bank notes, making together forty-seven pounds. She went away. Mr. Ashley was a customer of ours. I had been in the habit of paying several of his checks before. There had been several checks paid before, which Mr. Ashley discovered to be forged.

Mr. Alley. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Ashley - A Yes, I have seen him write frequently. At the time I paid the bill of exchange I supposed it to be his hand-writing, but since I have altered my opinion.

Q. Upon looking at it now, suppose the bill had remained in your desk and you had not heard that it was a fraud - A. Why then it is possible that I might have paid it.

Q The imitation is so correct, upon your looking at it now, if you had not heard it was a fraud should you have thought it to be his hand-writing - A. Yes, and I should have paid it.

ANN SINCLAIR. I live in Baron's-buildings, Blackfriars-road.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Phoebe Evans - A. Yes, she lodged with me; she came to my house in September last. She has lodged with me about five months.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. He has visited Miss Evans ever since she has lodged at my house.

Q. Did he visit her and come to your house on Friday the 14th of January - A. Yes, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you - A. He said he must get Phoebe or me to go to the banker's.

Q. Did you know before that time the banking-house of Biddulph and Cox - A. Yes, I had been there before with Phoebe, by the prisoner's desire. I have taken money there before upon checks. I said yes, I would go, upon his asking me. In about half an hour afterwards, Phoebe Evans came down stairs with me; she gave me a piece of paper which I thought I was to go with, having bad the conversation with Botterill before. When I got the piece of paper, Phoebe Evans and me went in a coach. We went to Biddulph's, Charing Cross. I went into Mr. Biddulph's myself, leaving Phoebe Evans in the coach. When I went into the banking-house I saw Mr. Ayre; I presented this piece of paper Phoebe Evans gave me to Mr. Ayre, and Mr. Ayre paid me

four ten-pound notes, and seven one-pound notes. I took the notes in the coach with me.

Q. Did you do any thing with the paper that you brought with you - A. Yes, Mr. Ayre desired me to write

"received," and to put my name to it. I wrote

"received, Ann Sinclair," and then I left the bill with him, and then I returned to the coach Phobe was waiting in the coach for me. I then went back to my house in the coach. When I got home Mr. Botterill was in my house. I then gave the money to Phoebe Evans, and Phoebe Evans took the money up one pair of stairs to Mr. Botterill. Mr. Bottorill was up stairs in the one pair front room, waiting for her. Phoebe Evans occupied the one pair of stairs front room.

Mr. Alley. You had the bill of Phoebe Evans - A. Yes.

Q. All that passed between the prisoner and you was that he wanted you to go to the banker's - A. Yes.

COURT. Did he say he wanted you to go with her - A. He said he should want Phoebe or me to go to the banker's.

PHOEBE EVANS. Q. You have been acquainted with the prisoner some time - A. Yes. I lodged with Mrs. Sinclair in September last. I have known the prisoner about five months; he has been in the habit of visiting me during the five months, and I lodged with Mrs. Sinclair, in Baron's-buildings, Blackfriars-road.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner giving you a piece of paper which you gave to Mrs. Sinclair - A. Yes, he gave me a piece of paper; I do not know what it was.

Q. When was it - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it in January last - A. I cannot say.

Q. Be it when it will, you gave it to Mrs. Sinclair, did not you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you and Mrs. Sinclair go with that paper to Charing Cross - A. Yes, in a coach. I laid the paper on the table, and Mrs. Sinclair took it up.

COURT. You put it on the table for Mrs. Sinclair - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose was it the prisoner gave it to you - A. He did not tell.

Q. He gave it you. You are upon your oath. What did he tell you when he gave it you - A. He did not speak.

Mr. Knapp. I thought I heard you say just now he said, take that. Come, my girl, it must come out. What did he say when he gave it you; what were you to do with it - A. He said, here. I took it down stairs, and laid it on the table.

Q. Did not you understand what you were to do with it - A. He had spoken to Mrs. Sinclair before. I heard him speak to her. I was not in the room.

Q. You heard him speak to her, and say, that you or Mrs. Sinclair must go to the banker's - A. Yes.

Q. When was that - A. I do not know when it was.

Q. Did you hear him say so on the day you received this paper - A. Yes.

Q. When you received the paper of him you laid it down on the table; Mrs. Sinclair took it up. Did you go in a coach with Mrs. Sinclair to a banking-house, Charing Cross - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been to that banking-house before - A. Yes, I had been there before; and on this day when we got to the bankers at Charing Cross, Mrs. Sinclair got out of the coach, and I remained in the coach, and when she came back we went home, and when we got home she gave me a roll of paper.

Q. Was it a large roll - A. Not a very large roll.

Q. Was it like bank note paper - A. I do not know.

Q. Was it not like bank paper - A. I believe it was. Mrs. Sinclair said she had changed a bank note on purpose to pay the coachman, she said, after she got home.

Q. When you got home what did you do with this roll of paper which you received of her - A. I laid it on the table in my own room. Mr. Botterill was there; I had left him in my room; he took it up.

Mr. Alley. Am I to understand you to say you do not recollect the day - A. Yes.

Q. It might be the bank of Holland. He did not say where she was to go and get this money, that you are sure of - A. Yes.

Q. He never gave directions to her to take it to this particular bankers to get the money for this bill of exchange. This place where the conversation passed was in Surry, and this table where the paper was put on was in Surry - A. It was.

Q. He did not say to what place she was to go - A. No.

Q. Nor that she was to go on this particular business - A. No. I did not go into this banking-house with her. I do not know what she got in the banking house.

Mr. Knapp. Did you not understand before you set off where the coach was to drive you to - A. Mrs. Sinclair told the coachman where to go.

Q. How many times had you been to that banker's before - A. Twice.

Q At whose desire did you resort to this banker's before, and for what purpose - A. No one desired me to go. I went with Mrs. Sinclair. She went there before to receive money for Mr. Botterill.

JOHN COLLINGBOURNE . Q. You have got a letter - A. I have; I got it from Mr. Voss. Mr. Voss is a gentleman living in Belvidere-place. He is here. This is the letter.

DAVID WILLIAM VOSS . I live in Belvidere-place.

Q. That letter you gave to Collingbourne - A. I gave a letter to Collingbourne.

Q. Did you ever give any other letter to Collingbourne, the officer, at any other time - A. No. I got that letter from Phoebe Evans . The same letter I received from Phoebe Evans I gave to Collingbourne. I did not take particular notice of it.

Q. Did you know Mr. Botterill before - A. Yes, by meeting him at Mr. Ashley's brother's.

COURT. You gave the letter to Collingbourne that you received from that young woman - A. I received a letter from her.

Mr. Knapp. You received but one letter from her, did you - A. No.

Q. You say you have known Mr. Botterill; how long have you known him - A. About seven months, I believe.

Q. Have you ever seen him write - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that letter, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand-writing - A. I believe it to be his hand-writing. It is not his common manner of writing, as when I saw him write.

Q. to Phoebe Evans . You have heard Mr. Voss say you took that letter to him - A. Yes, I received it of Mr. Botterill.

Q. Did you see him write it - A. No, I was in the room when he was siting at the table with a pen and ink on the table.

(The letter read, addressed to Mr. Voss, 29, Belvidere-place.)

" MY DEAR SIR,

"Excuse the liberty a wretched being thus takes in presuming to address you. I dare not address any one else. I suppose you have heard that I am discharged from prison. I am afraid that it is of no use, as I am sure I shall be pursued. Do, for God's sake, inform me what will be likely to be my fate, if you know. Excuse me by sending her; let her see Mrs. Ashley; she is not to blame; it is me. Remember me jointly to all my friends, and believe me you will oblige your troubled friend,

"W. H. BOTTERILL.

"Would to God I had never known writing. If you think it best I will throw myself upon the mercy of Mr. Ashley and the bankers."

Mr. Alley, Q. to Phabe Evans. It was a great many days after the bill was written that you received that letter - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp, Q. to Mr. Voss. Do you know on what day you received that letter - A. I do not know.

Q. On what day did you give it to Collingbourne - A. I believe on the 29th of January, the same day I received it.

Q. to Collingbourne. On what day did you receive that letter - A. On the 21st of January.

Q. Collingbourne, you are an officer of Union-hall - A. I am. I apprehended the prisoner twice. The first apprehension was on the 19th of January. I apprehended him in Baron's-buildings, at Mrs. Sinclair's. Mr. Ashley was present; he told him he was apprehended for this bill of exchange.

Q. Did he say anything about this bill of exchange - A. He did, on the second examination. I took him to Union-hall the next day, and then he was discharged. I afterwards apprehended him on the 28th or 29th, at Woolwich. When I apprehended him, he said I had him. I saw him pass; I ran after him; he put out his hand to me; he said, Collingbourne, you have me; it is the happiest moment I have in my life. He then told me that he had it in his mind to come to me, and had actually come to the corner of the street where I live. He began to tell me. I cautioned him that what he said to me I should be obliged to tell upon oath. He told me the way he get the check was visiting Mr. Ashley; he was in the room alone; the check book laid in the room; that he had taken several checks from the book; he went to a coffee-house in the City, and filled several of them up before he filled up one to please him, and he believed the one presented was the worst executed.

CHARLES JAMES ASHLEY . Q. Have you got a release - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. This purports to be a release from Messrs. Biddulph and Cox.

JOHN SHARMAN . Q. You are solicitor for the prosecution - A. I am.

Q. Were you present when Messrs. Biddulph and Cox executed this release - A. I was.

Mr. Alley. Did you see it delivered - A. It was delivered to me. I am attorney for the prosecution.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know such a one as Peate, of Deptford - A. I never corresponded with Peate. I understand there is a surgeon of the name of Peate, at Deptford.

WILLIAM JENKINS . Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Ashley - A. Yes. I have seen him write frequently.

Q. Take this bill in your hand, and tell me whether the signature of Charles James Ashley is his hand-writing - A. I believe it not to be his hand-writing; I cannot positively swear.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of John Peate - A. No, I do not.

Q. Did you ever know John Peate visiting the family - A. I never heard of that name, and I have known Mr. Ashley thirty years. From my inspection and the appearance of the signature upon the bill, I think it is not Mr. Ashley's writing.

Q. to Mr. Ashley. Take that in your hand, and tell me whether you believe that to be, or do you know it is not - A. Most assuredly not; the letters are not made like mine.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, very well; he has been at my house occasionally. I have known the prisoner a twelvemonth; he being an acquaintance of my brother's. I once gave him a check for a trifling sum of money. When I paid him this check I left my room and my check book on the table, by the side of my writing desk, and I left him in it. I was going in the country that night, and during the time I was in the country this bill was forged.

(The bill of exchange read.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-5

290. CATHERINE RUBY and JEMIMA BOWER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , eleven pieces of ribbon, contaning in length one hundred and seventy yards, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Flint and John Ray , privately in their shop .

MARY WALKER . I am shopwoman to Messrs. Thomas Flint and John Ray , Grafton-street, Soho . On the 2nd of April, the prisoner came to our shop about one o'clock in the day; one of them asked for some remnants of ribbon. I shewed them several drawers of remnants of ribbons, and then took several

remnants out of the drawers. Bower paid for them eight shillings and seven pence halfpenny. When she paid for them, she asked to see more. I shewed them another drawer, and out of that drawer Bower bought one more remnant. I then missed a piece out of the last drawer. I asked them for the ribbon which they had in their hands just now. They asked me what ribbon, and what colour. I told them I could not tell the colour, but it was the ribbon they had in their hands just then. Ruby then was going out of the door; I called out to her to have her stopped; a customer in the shop brought her in; she came in, and stood by one of the pillars. Bower made off in the confusion. Ruby was taken by force from the pillar, and taken into the accompting-house.

Q. When Ruby stood by the pillar had she any thing in her hand - A. I saw something, but I cannot tell what it was. I saw her put her hands down by the side of her when she was by the pillar. She was taken into the accompting-house, and a constable was sent for. The constable searched her; nothing was found on her. Bower was not apprehended until the following day.

Mr. Challenor. You observed no umbrella upon either of them, did you - A. No, I did not.

SARAH PITTMAN . I live with Messrs. Flint and Ray.

Q. Do you recollect these women coming into the shop - A. I did not see Bower that day; she was gone when I came in. I saw Ruby take hold of the pillar after she was brought back. She was endeavouring to conceal something between her and the pillar. After she was moved by force from the pillar, the umbrella was discovered, containing the ribbons. I took the umbrella into the accompting-house. The umbrella was propped up between her and the pillar. I had not seen the umbrella before. I laid hold of the umbrella, and the weight of the ribbons opened the umbrella. I then discovered eleven rolls of ribbons. The prisoner was searched; nothing was found on her.

ABIGAIL HALL. I was in the shop at the time the first witness charged the prisoners with having the ribbon. I saw Ruby walk out of the shop; I caught hold of her before the door closed. She endeavoured to get from me; with assistance I brought her back into the shop. At that time an umbrella came against my hand, and at the time that she was against the pillar I saw an umbrella in her hand. I saw her endeavouring to hide the umbrella; then I recollected her hurting my finger with t. I took the umbrella first from the pillar, and gave it to Miss Pittman. I saw it opened, and the ribbons in it.

Ruby's Defence. On Saturday I came from my father and mother; I met a young woman I slightly knew; she asked me to take a walk with her to buy some ribbons. I went with her to Mr. Flint's shop. I was coming out of the shop; I was stopped by two gentlewomen; they took me into the accompting-house, and brought an umbrella into the accompting-house. The other prisoner I never saw with my eyes before.

Bower's Defence. My little boy is blind. I went to Mr. Ware's, in Bridge-street. I never was out of my house all the day afterwards. On the next day I was taken in custody. I was at home all day on the Saturday with my baby.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140420-6

291. CHARLES CHINNERY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Brittle , about the hour of nine in the night of the 7th of March , and stealing therein, a china cup, value 2 s. 6 d. his property.

SUSANNAH BRITTLE . My husband's name is Samuel Brittle ; I live at 21, Pitfield-street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . My husband keeps a china-shop ; that shop is part of his dwelling-house.

Q. Do you recollect anything happening on the 7th of March - A. A person of the name of Chinnery was brought into our shop by a person of the name of Pickelt. The person that was brought in was the prisoner at the bar; he was brought in about a quarter before nine at night. It was not a very dark night.

Q. Was there any proper remains of day-light - A. That I cannot say. When Pickett brought the prisoner in, he produced a china cup to me, and asked me if it was mine. He said he saw the prisoner take the cup out of the window. I looked at the window, and missed the cup. I then took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

Q. Was any thing the matter with the window - A. It had been cracked, and had been puttied for some time.

Q. Was the hole that was broken in large enough to admit a hand to take out your china ware - A. Yes; the cup stood almost to the pane of glass that was broken; the saucer belonging to the cup might touch the pane, it was so near the window as that. I had observed the cup in the window in the afternoon. The pane of glass was whole, out the puttied part. Between five and six o'clock I took the things in; there was nothing missing then; the glass was whole then.

Q. When you went to look for the cup, that was the first time that you missed it, was it - A. Yes. I did not know any thing was broken until then.

SAMUEL PICKETT . I live in the City-road. On the evening of the 7th of March, I was in Pitfield-street between eight and nine o'clock; I was opposite of Mrs. Brittle's; I observed a suspicious character whistling. I looked round; I observed the prisoner at Mrs. Brittle's shop window; the person that whistled before, whistled again. The prisoner went to the window; I observed him draw his hand from the window, and put his hand into his pocket. He left the window. I followed him, and collared him; I asked him what he had been doing at the window. He denied doing any thing but looking in at the window. I desired him to come into the house with me. I kept my hand round his wrist, with the cup in his own hand. When I got him into Mrs. Brittle's, I took the cup from him and asked her if she knew the cup; she said, yes. I gave it her. I observed the window had been cracked; a piece had been forced out at the bottom of the pane of glass.

We took the prisoner to the watchhouse. I have had the cup in my possession ever since. This is the cup.

Prosecutor. The cup is the same sort that I had in my window; I had the complete set in my window; one is missing.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 13,

Of stealing to the value of 6 d. but not of the burglary .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-7

292. RICHARD EASTMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , twenty yards of silver lace, value 5 l. the property of John Eames , Samuel Waterhouse , John Waterhouse , and David Hogarth .

SECOND COUNT, for the like offence, only stating the property to be the property of Thomas Lambert , Samuel Lambert , and Lawrence M'Laren .

THOMAS LAMBERT . I am a laceman , I live in Bedford-street; my partners names is Samuel Lambert and Lawrence M'Laren; the other names in the indictment are the coach proprietors . I delivered the parcel to my servant to carry to the White Horse inn, Fetter-lane, and the next day the lace was brought into my shop by Thomas Rawlins , my neighbour, to know the value of it.

ROBERT HALLOWS . I am servant to Mr. Lambert. I took the parcel to the White Horse inn, there I left it with the bookkeeper; he signed my delivery book with the name of Eames.

JOHN BOSWELL . I received the parcel of the boy, and signed the book for him. The parcel was put into the partition where all the Yarmouth parcels are put. The parcel was taken out by the prisoner; he was employed to load the coaches.

JAMES WILSON . I am book-keeper to this coach; it is my duty to see the Yarmouth parcels that are in the partition put into the coach. The coachman and the prisoner assisted in loading the coach; I ticked it off in my book.

THOMAS POWELL . I am a tailor. Richard Eastman on the 16th of March came to me, to ask me if I could sell the lace for him; I took the lace to Mrs. Smith, a piece broker; she took it to a master tailor.

MRS. SMITH. Mr. Powell brought me the lace about twelve o'clock on the 16th of March; I took it to Mr. Rowland's to know the value of it.

THOMAS ROWLAND . I took the lace to Lawrence M'Laren to know the value of it; he recognized it to be his lace. I told him that the person who brought it me was at my house.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did you see Mr. Rowland - A. Yes. The lace is our property.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up this parcel in the straw where we lead the coaches; I sometimes find shillings there.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-8

293. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , four pounds weight of soap, value 4 s. the property of John Larkin and Joseph Pearson .

JOSEPH PEARSON . I an oil and colourman , I live in Aldersgate-street ; my partner's name is John Larkin . I lost the soap on the 18th of March. From suspicion I had a constable ready that evening against the prisoner went out. On the constable bringing him back, four pounds of soap was found in his breeches. He had lived with me about four months.

CORNELIUS COLE . I am warehouseman to Larkin and Pearson. On the 18th of February, I saw some soap where it ought not to be; I had suspicion; I informed my master of it. When the prisoner went out with the soap, master provided a constable. The constable brought him back, and found four pounds of soap in his breeches.

JOHN YARMOUTH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody when he came out of the shop; I stopped him, and asked him whether he had got any thing about him that did not belong to him. On my rubbing him down I found that he had something about him; I took him into the shop and searched him, and found four pounds of soap in his breeches.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that soap - A. I can swear to the soap; it is a particular make.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the soap; I went home to my wife; she was not at home. I left it in the warehouse where my coat and hat was; when I went out the warehouseman informed Mr. Pearson of it. When I was brought back I told them I bought it on purpose to send to Ilford where my child was at nurse.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-9

294. JOSEPH FOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , seventy pounds weight of candles, value 4 l. the property of Redburn Clark .

JOHN BICKERTON . I am servant to the prosecutor; he is a tallow chandler , living in Bishopsgate-street. He has a shed in Catherine Wheel yard, in which he deposits candles. On Sunday, the 27th of March, in the morning, between nine and eleven, I went to the shed for the purpose of feeding the dog, I observed every thing was safe then. I did not go again to the shed until Monday morning, about seven o'clock; I found the doors had been broken open; I stopped until my master came. The dog seemed stupid and half dead. When my master came I gave him the information. I then found a quantity of candles gone.

JOSEPH BESTTY . I am a carman. I keep a cart in Catherine Wheel-yard, in which this shed is; I went into the yard; I observed the shed door of the prosecutor about a foot open; I saw the lock of the door open. I let the prosecutor know.

JOHN LACKY HAWKINS . I am one of the marshalmen of the City of London. I saw the prisoner about half past eight, on Tuesday morning, I was

going up Golden-lane I met the prisoner with this basket, which I afterwards saw contained candles. I suspected him. I saw him go into a shop kept by one Donney. Matthews peeped throw the window. Donney took them off the counter, and put them underneath. I went into the shop, told Donney he must put that basket on the counter again. He seemed very much agitated. He said to the prisoner, take it away; I will not have it here. I begged he would not take it away. I said, you must let me know something about it. I told him he must give me an account where he got them. He said he was carrying them for Bunney. I then told him I must find out Bunney before I let him go. He gave me a direction for Bunney. I then said, that was not the first lot of candles that he brought there that morning; he said, it was; there was another lot then at home. I left the prisoner in the custody of Matthews, and I went to the prisoner's house; he keeps a small chandler's shop. I brought away two hundred pounds weight of sugar, tobacco, and Spanish liquorice. I put the prisoner into the counter. He was taken before the Alderman.

Mr. Alley. Did not he say he had the basket from Bunney - A. I am positive he said he had the candles from Bunney. Bunney came before the magistrate, and owned the basket. The prisoner said he was carrying the basket for Bunney, and he said he had another basket of candles at home.

REDBURN CLARK. Q. Do you know these to be your candles - A. I do, by the make of them, and this shed is mine in Catherine-wheel-yard. From information, I went there, and found the shed broken open. I know the candles by the shape, the bottom, and by the threads. They are about seven weeks old. There were ten threads in the candles.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He keeps a chandler's shop in Golden-lane. That is a mile and a quarter from my premises.

Prisoner's Defence. The property is my own. I had them of Mr. Howard in Whitecross-street, a gentleman with whom I do a deal of business.

- MATTHEWS. I am an officer. I heard the prisoner say that Bunney left the candles at his house, with an order for him to carry them to this man's house.

JOHN HOWARD . I am a tallow-chandler. The prisoner is a chandler, and dealer in candles. On the 19th of March, the prisoner had thirty-six dozen pounds of candles of me; on the 16th of February he had thirty-six pounds. They were all sorts of candles.

Q. Did you sell him any that had ten threads in them - A. Yes; they sell for five farthings. I sold him three dozen and six pounds on the 19th of March, and within a month before that I sold him twelve dozen pounds. Some of them were candles of that kind. I have known the prisoner upwards of a twelvemonth. I am a tallow chandler in Whitecross-street.

Q. Do you know there was seventy pounds weight of ten threads bought of you. Do you know Mr. Bunney - A. There is no tallow chandler of the name of Bunney.

Prosecutor. There is ten threads to my candles. The same evening the prisoner was committed I sent to Mr. Howard for half a pound of ten threads; there was only eight threads to them. I know these candles to be mine by the colour and shape. I have not the least doubt they are my candles; they all correspond with the cotton I have to them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-10

295. JOHN BRIANT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Alexander , in the King's highway, on the 2nd of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. three watch-keys, value 10 s. and half a yard of ribbon, value 1 d. his property .

THOMAS ALEXANDER . I live at the Swan and Two Necks. At present I am out of a situation .

Q. Where were you robbed - A. In Leadenhall-street , on Wednesday the 2nd of March, a little after twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner walked behind me; he turned round on my right, and struck me on my right arm, and struck me on my breast. I fell, and on my falling he drew my watch. He did not say a word to me. I got up, and followed the prisoner as far as St. Mary Axe; there I lost sight sight of him as he turned down Rolls-buildings. A person came up and told me the prisoner was taken. I immediately went up to him, and said the prisoner was the man that robbed me. He was taken to the watch-house and searched; nothing was found on him but a knife. The knife was not mine.

Q. Were you drunk or sober - A. I had been drinking; I was not dead drunk, I could distinguish one man from another.

Mr. Alley. Do you recollect saying to Jennings that you got into an aukward situation, and you should like to know how to get out of it. Will you swear that you did not say so - A. No.

Q. Did not you tell a woman that the flap of your coat got between your legs and threw you down - A. I fell running after him; my great coat got between my legs, but I did not tell a woman that. I fell first when the prisoner struck me.

MR. JENNINGS. I am an officer. I was sitting by the fire side; I heard a voice going by my house, saying, stop thief. I immediately ran to the door; I saw three men running, laughing; the prisoner took one way and they the other. I followed the prisoner about thirty yards; he let his breeches down; he let his breeches down as though he was doing something for himself. I asked the prisoner what he did there; he said he was doing a job for himself. A little girl ran out of the house with me; I told her to go into Leadenhall-street, and see whether there had been anything done or not. She returned with Alexander in about ten minutes or more.

Mr. Alley. Was not the prosecutor drunk - A. He had been drinking.

Prosecutor. I saw no person in company with the prisoner when he knocked me down, not did I see any man join him.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-11

296. DAVID HINDE and THOMAS WHITE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering and entering the house of Robert Thomas , he, and others of his family being therein, about six in the afternoon of the 29th of March , and stealing six handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 9 s. the property of the said Robert Thomas .

JOHN STANWORTH . I am shopman to Robert Thomas , silk mercer in Chancery-lane . On the 29th of March, I saw the prisoner White with his hand through a pane of glass in the shop window; he took a piece of silk handkerchiefs out. He broke the glass in taking the things out. I pursued him up Chancery-lane; he immediately delivered the silk handkerchiefs to Hinde. When I took hold of Hinde he let the handkerchiefs fall in the dirt in Chancery-lane, and ran behind a shop door; he was brought in afterwards.

Q. Are you sure that you saw the prisoner White with his hand through the pane of glass - A. Yes; it was day light, a little after six o'clock, and I am sure Hinde was the other person.

WILLIAM RUSH. On the 29th of March I was at work at Mr. Plush's, a plumber's shop. On my hearing some one run into the passage, I went out; there is a projection in the passage. I saw the prisoner White behind there; he inquired whether such a man as Smith lodged there; I told him there was no such man lodged there. Directly he saw Mr. Thomas's shopman had passed he ran the other way up Chancery-lane; I followed him into Carey-street. I enquired why he left the other lad behind; he said, he had been with nobody, he was never in the passage; he was never in Chancery-lane.

THOMAS SMITH . I am an officer. On the 29th of March, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoners at Mr. Thomas's shop. This piece of silk handkerchiefs were delivered to me.

Stanworth. I know it to be Mr. Thomas's property by the shop mark.

Hinde's Defence. I never had the handkerchiefs; the gentleman collared me. When he brought me to the other lad, he said he was the lad, it was not me.

White's Defence. I was going from my aunt's to a man of the name of Smith; I went into the house and enquired for Smith; the gentleman followed me and asked if I knew any thing of the handkerchiefs in Chancery-lane; I said, no.

HINDE, GUILTY, aged 15,

WHITE, GUILTY, aged 14,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-12

297. JOSEPH LAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , one silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of William Jordan , from his person .

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a bombazeen manufacturer . On the evening of the 26th of March, I was in Holborn about seven o'clock, I perceived my handkerchief being torn from my pocket; I immediately seized the person by the collar that I suspected doing it. When I had hold of him he gave it to the prisoner at the bar; I let go of the person that I had hold of, and followed the prisoner. I seized him by the collar and demanded my handkerchief; he said, if it was mine I should have it. He took it from his pocket and said he had just picked it up in the street. I took him into a shop and sent for a constable. That is all that passed.

JOHN MOBES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody. This is the handkerchief. The prisoner said he picked it up in the street.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief.

Q. Are you sure that you saw the other lad give the handkerchief to the prisoner - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the gentleman lay hold of the lad by the collar; he came after me and took me in custody. I picked the handkerchief up off the pavement.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-13

208. SOLOMON SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , part of a gold watch chain, value 10 s. two seals set in gold, value 10 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. the property of John Ripley , from his person .

JOHN RIPLEY . I am a mathematical instrument maker . On the 24th of February, about a quarter past eight in the evening, I was walking down the Minories with a friend; we were arm-in-arm together; the prisoner stepped on the pavement, came round to my right hand, and snatched my watch chain; I sung out immediately to my friend that he had got my watch-chain. The watch-chain broke, and on my turning round I fancy I trod on his heel, which made me stumble, and he too. My friend pursued him, and laid hold of him. I lost sight of the prisoner for the moment I stumbled. After he was taken he had not my watch-chain about him.

JAMES GRAHAM . We were walking down the Minories, Mr. Ripley had hold of my arm, he let go and stumbled; the jew ran off; I followed him and took him in custody; I never lost sight of him.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner. I took a candle and lanthorn and searched every where carefully for the property; I could not find it. This is part of the chain.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going in a great hurry to go to my aunt to let her know my mother was brought to bed; a gentleman called after me, and took me in custody. I know nothing of it, no more than a new horn infant.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-14

299. ESTHER HESS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a Welchman ; I am porter

to a linen draper . I was going to see my sister; I went up Sun-street to tie my garter; the officer came to me and said I was robbed. I did not see the prisoner take the handkerchief out of my pocket.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I was going up Bishopsgate-street on Sunday evening, the 20th of March, the prosecutor was stopping to tie his garter up; I saw the prisoner draw his handkerchief out of his pocket; the handkerchief was a little way out. I catched hold of her, and took the handkerchief from under her arm. I had some trouble to tell him of it, he was afraid I was going to kidnap him he said. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going into Angel-alley, I saw the handkerchief lay down; I did not know who it belonged to; the gentleman took the handkerchief out of my hand.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-15

300. LYDIA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a pewter quart pot, value 10 d. the property of Joseph Burton .

JOSEPH BURTON . I am a publican , I keep the Catherine Wheel , Catherine Wheel-alley, Bishopsgate-street . On the 19th of February, the prisoner came to my house and asked for half a pint of beer, and when she returned the half pint pot at the bar, I saw her take a quart pot, she put it under her gown, and went out. This is the pot; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-16

301. WILLIAM BROMLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , three pieces of oak, value 10 s. the property of Edward Lightfoot and Sarah Shaw .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, one stating it to the property of Edward Lightfoot , and the other to be the property of Sarah Shaw .

SAMUEL SAYER . I am a labourer. Mr. Lightfoot requested me to watch his premises; I watched them. On the 16th of March, I saw the prisoner get over a tide ditch; I saw him take three pieces of oak scantling, he put them on his shoulder, and went down the road with them; I followed him, and took him. He wished me to let him go; he said he had a large family; he is a gardener.

EDWARD LIGHTFOOT . I am a carpenter; I reside at Harrow. These oak scantlings were in my yard on the 12th of March. I went to the Assizes; I returned in eleven days afterwards. I was informed of the robbery before I got to Harrow; I saw the timber a few days afterwards. These are the oak scantlings; I knew them to be my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a large family; I took it off the road side for firewood.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-17

302. RICHARD DUNGATE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , three pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of George Paul .

GEORGE PAUL. I am a shoe-maker ; I live at 91, York-street, Westminster . I lost the shoes on the 8th of March last, from a line hanging outside of the window. I was in a room opposite of my house; I saw the prisoner come to my shop; he looked backwards and forwards; I asked a man to watch him. I ran down a gateway; I caught the prisoner, and took these three pair of shoes from him. They are my shoes.

WILLIAM COCKER. Mr. Paul happened to be at my apartment, he desired me to watch the prisoner, he ran down stairs, and when he was going over the street, I saw the prisoner take the shoes off the line; I called to Mr. Paul, and told him which way the prisoner took; he followed after the prisoner, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been living about Westminster thirty years, and being reduced, I was induced to commit that, for which I am now brought to trial. I will endeavour to make myself worthy of whatever lenity this honourable court shall shew to me.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-18

303. ELIZABETH EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of February , in the dwelling-house of William Saunders , four gowns, value 1 l. three petticoats, value 6 s. a shawl, value 2 s. a Prayer-book, value 6 d. a 10 l. bank note, a 5 l. bank note, and eight 1 l. bank notes , the property of William Mason .

ANN MASON. I am the wife of William Mason; we live at No. 10, Smith's-court, in the parish of St. James's ; my husband is a sailor invalided .

Q. Were you at home on the 2nd of February last - A. No; I was at my husband's brother's in Great Suffolk-street. I was at home in the morning; I left my house about nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you leave any body in the house when you went out - A. Only my landlady and Mrs. Evans. I occupy a sleeping-room up one pair of stairs. William Saunders is the tenant of the house. I locked my room door on the outside; there is a door inside of this woman's room that goes into mine; that was unbolted. The prisoner lodged in the room adjoining to my room, the front room.

Q. There is a door goes from one of these rooms into the other - A. Yes, there is no lock to that door; there is a bolt; I left it unbolted. I returned home about eight o'clock in the evening; I did not find it out until the next morning that it was broken open; I saw it out further than it ought to be I thought; I went to put it in. I did not observe the box the night before, when I went to bed; I left

the box locked. The next morning the lock was broken open, and the side of box was broken in; I had all my own clothes in the said box, and twenty-three pounds in bank notes. I lifted up the box lid; every thing was gone out of the box.

Q. How long had the prisoner lodged there - A. About thirteen weeks. She was there in the morning when I went out. On my return she was gone. We found the prisoner on last Thursday week. I have seen some of the property since; the officer has them here. My husband was present when some little trifling things were found in her lodging.

ELIZABETH SAUNDERS . I am the wife of William Saunders ; I live at No. 10, in the court the other witness has spoken of. My husband let out part of the house in lodgings; he himself being the occupier of the rest.

Q. We understand the prisoner lodged in one of your rooms, and Mrs. Mason and her husband lodged in the other adjoining - A. Yes.

Q. Did you occasionally employ the prisoner - A. I had engaged her to work for me half a day the day she committed the robbery.

Q. In what kind of work - A. Washing of clothes. She told me that she could not come for the whole afternoon, she was going out for needle work, she would come part of the afternoon. She came to me at two o'clock; she left me at three o'clock, and stopped away until about five o'clock. She came back; she did no more work for me. She told me she was going for needle work; I did not hear her go out. About half past five her husband came home for his tea, and when he was at tea I went up for a pair of shoes; it might be half past seven. When the husband came home he asked me whether his wife was at work for me; I said, no. I saw no more of her until she was taken on the 7th of February. She owes me a month's lodging now.

CHARLES JEFFRIES . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of February, in the Strand, about half past ten o'clock at night; I took her to St. Ann's watchhouse; she then told me that she lived at No. 5, Union-street, Chandois-street. I went there on the same evening, and there I found several little articles. I left her in the watchhouse. I was with Mrs. Saunders when I met her in the Strand. The prisoner went by the name of Williams.

Q. to Mrs. Saunders. What name did the prisoner go by in your house - A. Evans.

Jeffries. A person of the name of Brown keeps the house in Union-street; a great many females lived in the house.

Q. Who shewed you the house in Union-street - A. A girl of the name of Silvester; it was a garret, a bed room. There I found this tin case, a Prayer book, and a looking-glass; it is not mentioned in the indictment. The next day at the watchhouse she confessed that she had pawned the articles. She went with me on the Saturday morning to Mr. Alder's in Berwick-street; she said, she had pawned them, and they were there; she had destroyed the duplicates. At Mr. Alder's I found these four gowns, three petticoats, and a shawl. The prisoner said the two shifts were the articles that she had pledged at Mr. Latham's.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at these things the officer has produced, what may be the value of these things - A. I think three pounds. I have examined them; they are my own. As to the bank notes, she told me she had spent them.

Prisoner's Defence. I told Mrs. Mason I knew nothing of the money.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-19

304. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Pegram , widow, about the hour of nine in the night of the 9th of February , and stealing therein, two pictures framed and glazed, value 4 s. one iron boiler, value 4 s. two iron hinges, value 1 d. and two iron bolts, value 1 d. her property.

ELIZABETH PEGRAM . I live at No. 18, Well-street, Mile-end-new-town, in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stepney ; I am a widow. I let the upper part of the house. I sleep across the way, at my daughter's; I have slept there all the cold weather. I have the lower room for the purpose of a shop; I have lodgers in the house, in the one pair and the two pair. I have let the room where I used to sleep; I have put up a bureau-bedstead in the shop, and mean to sleep in the shop when the weather is warm. I intended to sleep there again on the day of the robbery, but there was no bed there. On the 9th of February, I quitted my house about seven o'clock; I locked my door when I went out. I returned about ten o'clock; I found my door broken open. When I came to look and examine my room, I found two pictures framed and glazed gone, one was a painting the Prince of Wales, the other the Circumcision of Christ; I also missed an iron cast boiler with a brass cock, a few loose bolts and hinges, that were hanging upon the boiler.

Q. Can you say these things were safe when you went out of your room - A. I can. I know the prisoner by sight, but no more.

ELIZABETH LOCKWOOD . I am ten years old; I live with my mother, two doors from Mrs. Pegram's house.

Q. Do you know what you are come here for - A. Yes, I do; to take an oath; I know it is a wicked thing to take an oath and say that which is not true. On the night this house was broken open, I remember seeing the prisoner with the cast iron boiler; he passed me as if he came from Mrs. Pegram's house. The cock of the boiler was a bright cock. I saw him between eight and nine o'clock; I met him; he passed me; he was coming from Mrs. Pegram's house. That is all I know. I am sure I saw him; I have known him a great while.

MARY BUCKMASTER . I live at Mrs. Pegram's, in the two pair. I remember Mrs. Pegram going out on the 9th of February, a little after seven. It was dark then. I saw nor heard anything. I came down stairs between eight and nine o'clock; I saw her door wide open, and a bag of wool laying near the door, half in and half out, and a rushlight; the rush light appeared as if it had been lit. The lock of the door laid down by the side door. The door

opens into a passage. I gave the alarm to the other lodger in the house; her name is Ann Perry . Mrs. Pegram came home a little after ten o'clock.

THOMAS PEKOE . I am a pawnbroker. I have known the prisoner seven or eight months past. On the 9th of February, he pledged this picture with me in the evening, I think after dusk, I am not certain. He pledged the picture in the name of John Wright . I lent him a shilling upon it. I have had it ever since. I am sure it is the same picture I had of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of pledging anything of the kind.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. In consequence of information, on the night of the 8th of March I went in company with Barnard Gleed and William Armstrong , two other officers, to the Nag's Head, Whitechapel-road; I there found the prisoner in the tap-room. I told him I wanted to speak to him. I asked him what his name was; he told me his name was Gray. I then told him I apprehended him on a charge of breaking open Mrs. Pegram's house, and stealing pictures, a boiler, and other things. He said he knew nothing about it. I then asked him whether he had not pledged a picture in that neighbourhood. We were then in Brick-lane, close to the pawnbroker's house. He said he never pledged any picture at all. We took him to the office.

BARNARD GLEED . Q. You have heard what Armstrong has said; has he given a true account - A. He has.

Q. to Prosecutrix. You never found the boiler again, did you - A. No, nor the bolts or hinges, nor the other picture. This picture I know to be my own. It was in my room when I went out on the 9th of February it was hanging up. I had a bag of wool in my room also.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140420-20

305. SAMUEL JUDAH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , a mare, value 20 l. a cart, value 12 l. a set of harness, value 2 l. the goods of Frederick Althans . And DAVID DAVIS for that he, on the same day, did counsel and command the said Samuel Judah the said felony to do and commit .

FREDERICK ALTHANS . I am a baker in Ayliffe-street, Goodman's-fields. On the 21st of last month, the prisoner Judah applied to me for the cart, horse, and harness. He said he wanted it to fetch some boards. He never brought it back again. On Tuesday, I gave information to the office. The cart and horse were found in Smithfield, in Clifford's possession. I had known the prisoner Judah some time, and his father. I let him the horse and cart in consequence of the confidence I put in him.

JAMES CLIFFORD . I am a green-grocer, and keep a chandler's shop at Lambeth Marsh, near the Three Compasses. I know David Davis . On Sunday morning, about eleven o'clock, he applied to me about this cart, saying, a friend of his had a horse and cart to dispose of. I asked him if he knew the horse and cart; he said, yes. He appointed to bring the horse and cart on Monday, at eleven o'clock, for me to look at it. Both the prisoners came with the horse and cart as near that time as possible. I never saw Judah before, nor did I know his name until he signed the receipt for the sale. I walked the horse about; it was lame. I said I did not want such a horse as that; it was a cripple. Judah drove the horse. He asked fourteen pounds for it; I offered nine pounds; we at last agreed for ten pounds. I paid him part of the money on the same day, and on the second day two pounds eight shillings, and the third day one pound nine shillings, and three shillings was stopped by agreement. I bought it outright I asked Davis how long Judah had it; he said, about eight or nine months. Judah said the same, and he kept it to let out.

Q. You bought it. How soon did you find that it did not belong to him - A. Not till Friday. I sold the horse for seven pounds odd. I was about selling the cart when Miller, the officer, came and seized it.

JOHN HODGKIN . On Monday I was at the bargain of this horse and cart between Clifford and the prisoners; the account that he is given is correct. Judah and Davis sold the horse and cart. Davis said, Judah had the horse and cart nine months. Judah said the same. I was by when it was paid for. It was paid for as the other witness has stated.

Judah's Defence. My employer, Mr. Olden, sent me to Mr. Althan's to borrow a horse and cart on the Monday to go to Deptford; I went down to Deptford; I got very much in liquor, and after I got in liquor I do not know what occurred.

Davis's Defence. I had been to Bermondsey; I met Judah in a cart; he was intoxicated; he asked me to take a ride with him. I went with him, and when we came to the Marsh-gate, Clifford asked me how I did. We stopped at the Spanish Patriots public-house, and had something to drink. We had several pots of hot. I went to the hair-dressers to be shaved, and when I came back I saw Judah with some notes in his hand. He told Judah he would give him any money for the horse and cart for a friend of his He told Hodgkins to take a ride in the cart to his father's. It was then a little after twelve o'clock; about half after two o'clock Judah called for his horse and cart; he did not get it.

GEORGE OLDING . I am in the wool trade, and a dealer in marine stores. I know Judah perfectly well.

Q. On the 20th of March. did you intend that he should go to Deptford - A. I did, to attend a sale, and to carry goods away. I desired to hire the cart and horse of Mr. Althan. Whether he went to Deptford that day I know not. I and Judah's father have a contract with government for condemmed stores.

JOSEPH JUDAH . I am the father of Samuel Judah . I am a dealer in marine stores. I produce the paper with the signatures of the commissioners. It is an authority to view the stores. I saw my son at Deptford; I gave him the paper to permit him in the gate.

Judah called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-21

306. ISAAC WHITE and WILLIAM JONES , alias WHITE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , four hundred and ninety-two pounds weight of bristles, value 103 l. 4 s. 9 d. and one 1 l. bank note , the property of Charles Price . And GEORGE DAIN , for feloniously receiving three hundred and twenty-six pounds weight of bristles, value 67 l. 4 s. 6 d. part of the aforesaid parcel of goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-22

307. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , a gelding, value 5 l. the property of William Lamburn .

WILLIAM LAMBURN . I live in Seymour-street, New-street-square. I am a brick-maker .

Q. Were you in possession of a gelding lately - A. Yes, it was a brown gelding. I worked him on the 9th; at night I put him in the stable. I was feeding it at ten o'clock at night.

Q. Where was the stable - A. In New-street-square, near Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. Pancras. When I fed the horse I left it in the stable; I locked the stable door, and took the key away in my pocket. The next morning, about five o'clock, I went to feed the horse again, I found the horse missing. I took all the pains I could to find it. I looked every where I could think of. On the Friday evening following, I saw a man in Smithfield; he told me he had bought a horse. He took me to the place where I found the horse.

Q. What is the name of the person - A. Mr. Special; he is a horse boiler, at the Ducking Pond, where I found my horse. I am sure it is my own horse I found there; it runs a great deal at the nose, and it is blood tailed. I have had the horse four months. I gave four pounds ten shillings for the horse; I think it is worth that now. Mr. Special told me if the horse was mine I might take it away. I have it now in my possession.

RICHARD WATLEY . I am in Mr. Special's employ; I buy horses for him for the purpose of slaughtering. On Thursday the 10th of March, the prisoner came to my house, and John Thompson , a watchman of Whitechapel parish came with him to my house. I was in bed when they came; it was about seven o'clock when they came. I asked him his business; he said he had a glandered horse to sell; I asked him where he brought it from; he said, from Mr. Lee, of Batking. He said he wanted fifty shillings for it; two guineas I gave him for the horse at the Red Lion public-house, Whitechapel, in the tap-room. I was at Smithfield market on Friday evening. I went with the prosecutor to Mr. Specialls stables. I delivered him the gelding. He owned the horse. My master delivered up the horse to him. That was the same horse I bought of the prisoner.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 13th of March. The horse was brought to the office by the prosecutor; he swore to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a-bed and asleep when the horse was stolen.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-23

308. SARAH NOBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , one thousand and sixty half pence, value 2 l. 4 s. the property of Peter Guillemard , in his dwelling-house .

PETER GUILLEMARD . I only know of this transaction from others. My house is in the liberty of the Tower. I am a silk weaver .

THURSTON ASHLEY. I am foreman to Mr. Guillemard. The prisoner is in the employ of Mr. Guillemard. In our business we provide copper change to pay the work people.

Q. On the 18th of March, had you any reason to suppose that any of your copper money was taken away - A. Yes. I kept watch, and the two Armstrongs were stationed in the house. We had agreed upon a signal; upon my seeing any person take the copper I was to cry out Rodney. On the 18th of March, I concealed myself, and at eight o'clock in the evening I heard a footstep towards where the copper was placed. I saw a child go to where the copper was. It was dark. I could only see the size of the person, not the features. I had no light until the officers came. I saw her take eight five-shilling papers of halfpence. She wrapped the shawl round her hand, put the papers of halfpence into the shawl, and put it up to her person. She took the papers of halfpence from underneath the counter, and put them into the shawl; she walked four or five feet, as if to go out of the room; I immediately got up from the place where I was concealed, and called out Rodney, to the officers; the officers came; the officer searched the shawl; they found six papers of halfpence in her shawl, and one paper was taken from her person.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Upon hearing the cry of Rodney, I came into the room; the last witness had hold of her by the arm. I then took from her in his presence, these six papers, which I had marked that night, and he had marked them in the day time. Six papers fell from her, and one on the floor. Upon our alarm, coming up stairs, she might have dropped it, as she trembled. I did not see her her drop them. These are the halfpence.

Mr. Ashley. They are the property of Mr. Guillemard.

GUILTY, aged 10,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18140420-24

309. ABRAHAM SAMUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , forty-four watches, value 50 l. four bunches of pearls, value 20 l. a silver snuff-box, value 12 s. a silver cup, value 18 s.

twenty ounces of silver lace, value 3 l. and 10 l. 15 s. in monies numbered , the property of Moses Pincas .

MOSES PINCAS . I am a dealer . I know the prisoner; he offered me a watch to sell in a cook's shop, in the street where I live; he came in the cook's shop, he asked me to buy an old watch; I looked at the watch; I bid him ten shillings for it. He came to my house the next day, and in my room he again offered me the watch; I looked at the watch; I told him I could not buy it, it was not good. My box was open, he could then see my pearls and watches. I told him I had got good watches; he went away. I did not see any thing. On Saturday night, the 5th of March, I was at the Synagogne.

Q. When did you miss your things - A. On that 5th of March. A week after I had seen the prisoner at my house, from the information of Rachel Davis I and two officers went to the prisoner's lodgings, Tower-hill; we there found the prisoner and part of the property.

WOOLF SOLOMONS. From the information of Mrs. Davis, on the 26th of March, in the evening, we found the prisoner in his room on Tower-hill; he was at supper, with a great coat on his chair by his side. I asked him who the coat belonged to; he made no answer. I took up the coat, and out of the pocket I pulled out these four bunches of pearls. The prosecutor was with us; he identified the property. The prisoner said he found them.

NATHAN NATHAN . I accompanied Woolf Solomons and the prosecutor. I told the prisoner I wanted him. I looked on the ground; I took up that coat. I said to the prisoner, is this your coat; he made no answer. I put my hand into the pocket, and pulled out four bunches of pearls. Pincas said he lost four bunches, four large single beads, and some loose ones. The pearls found on the prisoner perfectly correspond with the account of the prosecutor. These are them. The prisoner said he knew nothing of the other property. I conveyed him to the Compter. It was by Mrs. Davis's directions I went to this place.

RACHEL DAVIS . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he lodged in my house. On the 5th of March, he came home with a lanthorn in his hand, between eight and nine at night; he asked me to lend him a piece of candle, which I did. He went out with it; he returned home in less than half an hour, with a bundle with him; he appeared all in a tremble and a perspiration. On the next day at breakfast, the prisoner said there had been a robbery at Mr. Moses's, he was glad of it; he was a bad man. When the prisoner came home with the bundle he went out again, and left the bundle behind him. He returned, and took the property away at eleven o'clock at night, the same night. I then said, halloo, what are you doing; I have lost my husband through a lodger, and I will not lose my liberty through lodgers. I gave information to the officers.

Prosecutor. The pearls are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, I found them in Duke's place as I was going home.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-25

310. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , one hundred and sixty-eight files, value 1 l. 17 s. 3 d. a 10 l. bank note, a 5 l. bank note, and two promissory notes for the payment of five guineas each , the property of Benjamin Robinson .

SECOND COUNT, for life offence, stating the goods and notes to be the property of different other persons.

BENJAMIN ROBINSON. I am proprietor of the Angel coach-yard , in Angel-street, St. Martin's-le-grand. On the night of the 9th of March, the prisoner was a servant of mine. About one o'clock, the guard of the Sheffield coach informed me that the prisoner had stolen a parcel out of his coach. I asked him where the prisoner was; he said, he was run away. He gave me the parcel; I locked it up. The next morning I opened it in the guard's presence; it contained fourteen dozen of small files, a ten-pound bank note, a five-pound bank note, and two five-guinea Sheffield notes, and this invoice, and letter. One of the notes I have saved in case I should ever find the prisoner. I found him on the 15th of April, in the Saracen's Head yard, Friday-street; I asked the prisoner to walk with me to an office, and there I gave him in custody.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am guard to the Sheffield coach. On the 9th of March, as I was going across the yard I saw Clark in the coach examining the seats inside of the coach; he came out of the coach and shut the door. He got on the fore-wheel of the coach and opened the boot-lid where he put the luggage in; he turned a few of the parcels over that were at the top, and took out a small parcel, put it under his arm, and went into a bye shed in the yard with it; he turned out of the shed and stood by the side of the coach. I went to him, and said, Clark, I wish you would bring back the parcel that you took out of my boot; he said, he had not taken any parcel. I told him I was certain he had: I saw him take it out of the boot myself; he went into the stable. I went to the shed to look for the parcel; there was an empty chaise with one of the windows open, I found the parcel there, underneath the seat. I gave Mr. Robinson the parcel. At that time the prisoner was gone away. I am certain I saw him take the parcel out, and put it under his left arm, and walk to the shed with it. The next day Mr. Robinson met me; he opened the parcel in my presence, in the coach office; the parcel contained a ten-pound bank note, a five-pound bank note, and two five-guinea notes.

Mr. Robinson. I produce a five-guinea note I reserved, and this invoice, containing an account of the parcel.

Prisoner's Defence. What I am accused of is all wrong; if I had committed the robbery why had they not taken me at the time. Where were you Mr. Simpson at the time I did this.

Simpson. I was in the yard.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-26

311. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , two printed books, value 4 s. the property of Edward Simmons .

EDWARD SIMMONS . I am a bookseller ; I live at 15, Little Bell-alley, London Wall . On the 31st of March, in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop window; my boy was in the shop. After some time the boy came to me; I went to the window The prisoner had a large book that he was reading in his left hand open, and with his other hand he drawed out two books from the window, and put them in his pocket; he staid about five minutes, and then went away; I followed him, brought him back, and took the books out of his pocket. He asked me to let him go; I said, I should not. I had been served so so often within this month; I should send him to the Compter. These are my two books that I took out of his pocket, and this is a book which belongs to a bookseller in Chiswell-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor; the gentleman knows I was very sorry for what I did.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-27

312. JOHN LYNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , twenty-two sacks, value 3 l. 6 s. thirteen bags. value 10 s. two bushel of beans, value 2 l. 16 s. and eleven pounds weight of onion seed and radish seed, value 2 l. 9 s. the property of Isaac Field and George Child .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a City constable. On the 20th of February, I was going down Upper Thames-street, about a quarter before eight at night. I stopped a man with a small bag of radish seed; the next day before the Lord Mayor the man said he found it; that man was not the prisoner. On my going round to the different seedsmen, I found the property belonged to Messrs. Field and Child, in Thames-street. I told them I thought it was one of their porters that was robbing them. I asked them to let me question them. The prisoner was called into the accompting-house; I questioned him; he ran out of the shop; I followed him, and caught him. I got a hackney coach, and put him in; I secured his hands in the coach, and when I got him to the Compter he escaped from me again; I catched him again at the bottom of St. Swithin's-lane, in Cannon-street. He then said, if he had me in his own country he would smash my b - y head. He is an Irishman. He gave me his wrong address where he lived; the foreman knew where he lived. We went and searched his premises, and there we found twenty-two sacks, a great deal of seeds, and small bags; I took them to Messrs. Field and Child. I produce the property.

GEORGE CHILD . I am a seedsman, 119, Lower Thames-street; my partner's name is Isaac Field . The officer came round with a sample of the seeds that he had taken from another man; we have not the least doubt they are ours. The radish seeds have been taken round to the trade; no one could match them. The sacks produced are our property; several of them are marked. This one is marked in full length.

JOHN GILCHRIST . I am warehouseman to Field and Child. I took a Hackney-coach to convey these seeds, bags, and sacks, to Messrs. Field and Child's the next morning; I examined them. I found them to be the property of Field and Child. I cannot swear to the new bags; the sacks, I can; the different seeds I have compared with some samples that we have got; the samples tally one with the other, both the beans and radish.

Q. Did you go to these lodgings when the sacks were found - A. I did, and I found the wife of the prisoner in the room; I understood he was living with her at the time. She said, she expected him home at nine o'clock. He was then in custody. I have no doubt the seeds are the property of Messrs. Field and Child.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of the crime that is laid to my charge.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-28

313. JOSEPH WIATT and ALEXANDER FRAZER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , a pocket-book, value 1 s. the property of Robert Holland , from his person .

ROBERT HOLLAND . I am an officer late of his Majesty's Navy . On the 11th of March, I was in Newgate-street , between the hours of two and four in the afternoon, I was standing looking at the Lord Mayor going to church; I felt a tag at my pocket; I took my handkerchief out, and placed it in my other pocket. I felt another tug at my pocket, and on my turning round I found the two prisoners in possession of the officer, Brown.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I was on duty on Easter Monday in Newgate-street, about two o'clock, the children were going into church; I observed the two prisoners following the prosecutor; I watched their motions, and got close to them. I saw the prisoner Wiatt take the book from the prosecutor's pocket, and put into the hands of Frazer. I immediately collared both of them. Frazer threw the book in among the children. I let go Frazer to pick the book up; some gentleman laid hold of him as I turned round to pick the book up. I took them both into a shop and searched them both; on Frazer I found another pocket-book. This is the pocket-book that belongs to Mr. Holland.

Prosecutor. It is my own pocket-book.

Wiatt said nothing in his defence.

Frazer's Defence. I am now fifty odd years of age. I have been the father of twenty-two children, eleven of which are alive now. I had been to my employers, Mr. Smith, of Postern-row, Tower-hill, with some pens that I had finished. He gave me twelve hundred more to go on with until he sent the porter with more. I had my boy with the quills in my hand when Brown, the officer, seized me. Before that, I felt something hit against my hand; I did not see it; it fell to the ground. When the officer picked it up, it appeared to be a pocket-book. As to the prisoner, Wiatt, I do not know him; I never saw him before.

WIATT, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Life .

FRASER, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-29

314. JOHN PEARSON and ELIZABETH WRIGHT were indicted for that they, on the 4th of March , feloniously had in their custody and possession, divers forged bank notes, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

To this indictment the prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

PEARSON, aged 24.

WRIGHT, aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-30

315. JOHN PEARSON and ELIZABETH WRIGHT were indicted for feloniously forging, a certain bank note, for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners of this charge were.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-31

216. MARY BEVERTON was indicted for that she, on the 10th of February , without lawful cause bad in her custody and possession, a certain bank note for the payment of 1 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-32

317. MARY BEVERTON was indicted for feloniously forging a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note, with the same intention, she knowing it to be forged.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-33

318. THOMAS MOFFATT , alias SQUIRE MASON , was indicted for that he, on the 5th of March, had in his custody and possession, a forged bank note for payment of 2 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-34

319. THOMAS MOFFATT, alias SQUIRE MASON , was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 5th of March, a certain bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-35

320. ELEANOR BROWN, alias CALLAGHAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March, three garden hand-glasses, value 3 s. the property of William Gilpin Duthie .

WILLIAM GILPIN DUTHIE . I am a gardener : I live at Bethnal-green. In consequence of having lost garden-glasses, on the 31st of March I set Peter Brown to watch; he came to watch about nine in the evening; between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was undressing to go to bed, I heard him talking to some person in the yard; I looked out of the window and that person was the prisoner; he charged her with stealing three glasses.

PETER BROWN . I am a servant to Mr. Duthie. On the 31st of March, I was set to watch; between eleven and twelve o'clock I saw a person walk into the ground where these glasses were; it was dark; and when she saw me she threw the glasses down, and ran away. I pursued her, and laid hold of her as she was getting over the fence, and brought her to my master. I asked her how she came to do it; she said it was distress. These are the glasses. When she threw the glasses down she broke them. They are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for Mr. Duthie. I had been into the country. I went into the ground to sleep.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-36

321. MARY COOK and JACOB PRATT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March . one earthen bason, value 2 d. one pound weight of mutton, value 6 d. and half a pound weight of veal. value 4 d. the property of James Echalaz .

JAMES ECHALAZ . I live at Clapton ; I am a merchant . The woman prisoner was my cook ; the man was an acquaintance of hers, that visited her. In consequence of information, I watched her; I had been informed that something wrong was going on at my house every evening. On the 15th of March, the man was brought in by the officers, with some meat, veal, beef, and mutton, both dressed and undressed, a bottle of cream, and three large cakes that were not cut or broken, and a bason. Upon my hearing the bell of the door ring, I went to the door. The woman was talking to the other prisoner. I took hold of the man by the collar at the door. The man threw himself off the steps; he got away. The woman said, sir, it was hard that she could not speak to her friend; he was a shoemaker; he had brought her a pair of shoes. It was no such thing; she had brought up the shoes from the kitchen herself, with a bag of meat and bread. Then the constable brought in the man prisoner with the bag. I had not the least doubt what was in the bag was my property.

The man who was brought back was the man whom you had seized before - A. Yes. Some of the meat was dressed, and some undressed.

Mr. Alley. Do you go in the kitchen to see what

there is in the house - A. No, but I know what is in the house. I hired the cook myself; she was to have eighteen guineas a-year. and none of the dripping without letting her mistress see it.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the night of the 15th of March, I was watching the prosecutor's house in company with Baruard Gleed I observed Mr. Echalaz's door open; I saw the cook. The woman prisoner gave a bundle to the man prisoner; at that time I did not know what the bundle contained. I heard Mr. Echalaz speak something; the cook said, sir, surely I may give him my slippers. The man immediately ran away. I pursued the man prisoner; he threw what he had in his hand over some railing into Clapton Common. I took him. He had a green bag, which Gleed took. I took him back to Mr. Echalaz's house.

Q. When you took him, did you go and take up the bag - A. I did; I picked up that which he had throwed away; it contained mutton, beef, and veal; it was wrapped up in this handkerchief, and tied up; and this bottle of milk. The bottle was not broken. It was a wine quart bottle, with cream in it. I went back to the prosecutor's house. I asked the man how he came by that property; he said it was given him by the cook. The cook said nothing to it; he said it in her presence.

Mr. Alley. It was a common wine bottle I suppose - A. Yes; they are all alike.

Q. Have you the meat here - A. No, it would not keep.

Q. Do you not know that this poor man is a shoemaker in that neighbourhood - A. He is, I believe.

BARNARD GLEED . Q. When the prisoner was brought back to the prosecutor's house, did you hear him say he had this of the cook - A. Yes, he did; she heard it. She offered me a pound note provided I would let her go. She said she had given the articles to Pratt.

Cook's Defence. My mistress allowed me to give the bits of victuals away that were not wanted by the family. I had none undressed.

MRS. ECHALAZ. Q. Had the cook liberty to take provision dressed or undressed without your permission - A. Certainly not.

Cook called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Pratt called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

COOK, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

PRATT, GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-37

322. JAMES BUTCHER and GEORGE HARDING, alias JELKS , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sir Joseph Banks , bart. about the hour of eleven in the night of the 2nd of February , and stealing therein, two box coats, value 4 l. and seven coach-glasses, value 2 l. his property.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am butler to Sir Joseph Banks , his house is No. 32, Soho-square, in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster , and in Dean-street besides. The coach-house is in Dean-street. I was at home on the 3d of February; I was at the coach-house between seven and eight in the morning; there I found the witness, Samuel Lawrence , at the door. The door was open; Lawrence called me into the coach-house; I went in, and Lawrence, the coachman, went in with me. I perceived seven glasses were gone, four glasses from the chariot and three from the coach. The frames was broken, and the trimming inside of the carriage torn, and two box coats were missing what the coachman wore, belonging to Sir Joseph I informed my master, and I gave information to Marlborough-street and Bow-street offices.

Q. How is the house connected with the coach-house - A. The coach-house is over Sir Joseph's kitchen, and under the library. A man sleeps in the coach-house. The wall of the coach-house is the same as the wall of the house. The coach-house opens into Dean-street; the front of the house is in Soho-square. We have a free entrance into all parts of the house from Dean-street, as well as in Soho-square.

JOHN FARMER . I am coachman to Sir Joseph. I was in the coach-house on the evening of the 2nd of February; I saw the box-coat and every thing safe at that time. I locked the door at half after eight o'clock, and took the key home with me. I never parted with the key until the next morning. I was informed the coach-house was broken open. I had the key with me then. It was dark when I locked the coach-house door.

SAMUEL LAWRENCE . I am coachman to Sir Joseph. On the morning of the 3d of February, about half past seven o'clock, I went to the coach-house; it was getting light then, I found the coach-house door about an inch and a half open; I went in; I missed four glasses from the chariot, and three from the coach, and two box coats were gone. One of the box coats was the coat I wore; it is the property of Sir Joseph. It is a blue coat, with a white button.

JAMES FRANKLIN. I have been in the habit of driving a hackney coach; I was brought up a farrier. On a Wednesday night in February, I do not know the day of the month, I and the two prisoners went to Sir Joseph's coach-house, in Dean-street, Soho-square. The prisoner, Butcher, unlocked Sir Joseph's coach-house door, at about half past eleven. Butcher unlocked the coach-house door with a pick-lock key. Jelks was present at the time. Butcher and Jelks went into Sir Joseph's coach-house; they locked themselves in, and left me out to watch. I did not see any more of them for an hour. I waited at the door all the time. When I saw them again, Jelks came out with seven coach-glasses, and Butcher came out with two box coats. Butcher put on one coat; and I the other. Jelks carried the glasses to Butcher's lodging. Jelks walked on first; Butcher and I followed him. We left all the property that night at Butcher's lodging, and then Jelks and me went and slept together. We returned to Butcher's lodging the next day. Butcher and Jelks went out together; where they went to I do not know. They

left me there, and returned in about half an hour, and then Butcher and me went out in search of a man of the name of Joseph. We got intelligence at a public-house in Oxford-street, what time he would be there. We went home to Butcher's lodging again; Butcher sent me to fetch Joseph. I went to a public-house in Oxford-street; I do not know the sign of it; I saw Joseph at the public-house; he misunderstood me where to come to; he did not come at the time appointed to the house. Butcher himself went and fetched him. Butcher sold the two blue box coats to Joseph for two pounds six shillings. I was present at the sale. I never knew Joseph before. It was me that proposed the intention of stealing at Sir Joseph Banks 's, and after I was taken up I told of it to get my liberty. After I was taken up for an offence I told of it to get rid of it. I accused them of nothing but the truth.

SAMUEL JOSEPH . I am a dealer in old clothes. On the 3rd or 4th of February, I saw Butcher and Franklin at Butcher's lodgings, there was a third man, I took no notice of the third man; I don't know him. Butcher proposed to sell two box coats to me; Franklin was present. I bought the two coats of Butcher for two pounds six shillings; I paid Butcher for them. I do not know the third man. I brought the coats away in a bag. Butcher I knew before, and Franklin; I cannot say that Jelks was the third man; I had no conversation with him.

THOMAS FOY. I produce the coats I received by the hands of Joseph; I received them on the 2nd of March, his son brought them to me, this coat and another. This is the great coat that belongs to Sir Joseph Banks ; the other belongs to another person. Only one coat has been recovered of Sir Joseph's.

JOHN MARSDEN . I am an officer. I apprehended Jelks.

GEORGE BENNETT . I am an officer. In consequence of information, I searched Butcher's lodging, and brought him away.

Q. to Joseph. Look at that coat; do you know the coat again - A. Yes. I told my wife to send it to officer. She sent it by my son.

Q. Did you learn from Butcher where he got it - A. No.

SAMUEL LAWRENCE. I used to wear this coat; there is two particular marks by which I can identify it to be Sir Joseph's; I had an accident in brushing it; I tore the collar with a nail; that is one mark. The other mark is, the coat was made too long; I cut it shorter, and did not cut it straight. Them are the marks by which I know it. I had worn it about thirteen months.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-38

323. JAMES WHITEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , two shirts, value 18 s. a coat, value 3 l. two pair of pantaloons, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 7 s. and four handkerchiefs, value 7 s. the property of Henry Plaen , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Furness .

HENRY PLAEN . I lodge at the sign of the Black Dog, Old Mountain-street, in Whitechapel parish . The prisoner lodged in the same room I did, in the one pair of stairs room; he and lodged in Joseph Furness 's house. I looked at my box the very same morning, the 4th of April; it contained a black superfine coat; I paid four guineas for the coat: a shirt two pair of pantaloons, I value them at eighteen shillings; there were four handkerchiefs, I value them at eight shillings; two pair of worsted stockings, four shillings. This hat was there, but it was left; and there was a pocket-book, it contained papers of no use, but two duplicates, one of a watch, the other a quadrant. I had pawned them. I saw the pocket book containing these duplicates the very same morning. I am sure of that. I unlocked my box that day, and took a handkerchief out of the box in the morning, about seven o'clock; then I locked it; I took my key with me on board a ship. I returned to my lodging about half past six o'clock in the evening; I then found my box lid forced open. The lock was forced off the lid. It was fast below, but forced from the lid. I missed all my things in the box except a hat, a pair of pantaloons, and some papers. I believe I have not mentioned two shirts. I missed all the other articles except a hat and a pair of pantaloons. I left my lodging that morning about seven o'clock; I left the prisoner in the room in bed on that morning. A quarter before five the prisoner called me, and told me to rise, or else I should be too late; it had already struck seven o'clock, he said. I went out before him, and left him in bed. When I returned the prisoner was not in the room. This was on the 21st. I did not see him afterwards until the 4th of April. I met him in the street. He did not return to his lodging from the 21st of March to the 4th of April. On the 4th of April, when I met him in the street, I asked him to step into the house with me; he rather objected; he said he did not know me. I took hold of him, and went into a house with him, and left him in custody of the gentleman that keeps the house, and I brought Hall, the officer, and gave him in custody, Mr. Hall searched the prisoner in my presence. I saw found on the prisoner my two duplicates. I have never seen anything of my coat and waistcoat.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. On the 4th of April, Plaen came to me; I went to where the prisoner was. I took the prisoner into another room and searched him. In his trowsers pocket I found these two duplicates; he said they were his own. I shewed them to Plaen; he said they were his, he had lost them out of his box. The prisoner, after Plaen said they were his, said that he had picked them up in the room after Plaen had gone out that morning. I took him to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the room. There were other people in the room besides myself.

Q. to Plaen. Did any body else lodge in the room besides you and the prisoner - A. No. The landlord of the house is here.

JOSEPH FURNESS . Q. Do you happen to know when the prisoner went out of his lodging on the 21st of March - A. Yes, about a quarter after seven o'clock in the morning. He did not return to my lodging any more. He owed me for the last night's

lodging and two pints of beer. Nobody had any business in the room except the prisoner and Plaen.

Q. Did they make their own beds - A. No; there is a servant to make their beds.

Prisoner. There was another man in the room before I got up; I got up, went out, and returned; the same man was in the room. I asked the man if he had lodged in the room before; he said, yes.

Q. to Mr. Furness. You told me just now, that the prisoner went out a quarter after seven o'clock - A. Yes; he did not pay for his nights lodging, and two pints of beer.

Q. Do you recollect in the morning when the prisoner went out, that there was any other man in the room - A. Only them two; Plaen and the prisoner slept there. I saw the prisoner going along Montague-street, Whitechapel. No stranger came to my house that morning at all.

Q. to Plaen. Look at the duplicates produced by the officer, and tell the jury whether they are yours - A. They are mine; they have my name written by the pawnbroker; I am quite clear they are mine.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 57.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140420-39

324. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted, and the indictment stated, that at the time of committing the several offences and felonies in the first eight Courts, he was a person employed in and by the Post office of Great Britain in sorting letters and packets sent to the General Post office , at the parish of St. Mary, Woolnoth, in London , on the 22nd of November, in the 54th year of his Majesty's reign a certain letter then and there sent by the Post from Andover in Hants, to be delivered to Henry Wheatley , in London, containing a bank note for the payment of 20 l. a bank note for the payment of 10 l. two promissory notes for the payment of 10 l. each, and fourteen 5 l. promissory notes, came into his possession, that he, on the same day and year, being so employed as aforesaid, feloniously did secrete the said letter containing the said bank notes and promissory notes, being the property of Henry Lansley and William Lansley .

And OTHER COUNTS, stating the stealing to be out of a packet, instead of a letter.

And OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the property of Henry Wheatley .

WILLIAM LANSLEY . I live at Pied-mill, near Andover, I am in partnership with my brother, In the month of November last, I had occasion to make a remittance to Mr. Wheatley on account of myself and my brother Edward. On the 21st of November, I made up my letter; I kept the particulars of these notes that were in the letter. I have the particulars now; that is the original entry taken at the same time in my own hand writing. There is one Bank of England note ten-pound.

Q. On what account was this remittance made - A. We have an account with Mr. Wheatley, he makes payments for us in London.

COURT. Was it an order - A. No, it was not; nor expected by him.

Mr. Abbot. There is one bank of England note ten-pound, a country bank note of five-pound; there are many others which your lordship need not be troubled with the particulars; one of which is of this description W, 1813; 15th of December, 12, which means 1812 - A. Yes.

Q. Then there is two other country notes, which your lordship need not be troubled with the particulars; there is another of the Newbury and Wakefield bank - A. Yes, 7211, then a D. dated 23rd of October, 1811, twenty pound. The letter was directed to Mr. Wheatley, No. 7, Gough-square, Fleet-street, London.

Q. Did you seal the letter - A. Yes. I gave it to my brother with directions to give it to my servant to take to the Post office; it was to be a paid letter. I dated it on the 21st of November.

EDWARD LANSLEY . On the 21st of November, I received a letter of my brother to be taken to the Post office at Andouer, to be sent to Mr. Wheatley; I delivered it to Michael Dickman .

MICHAEL DICKMAN . Last November, I was servant to Messrs. Lansley's. I recollect receiving a letter of Mr. Edward Lansley; I am no scholar. I knew it was on a Sunday; it was to be a paid letter. I gave the letter to Mrs. Mercer, at the Post office, Andover; I paid her the postage, two shillings and eight-pence, I took it to her on the same Sunday. I received it on the Sunday. Mrs. Mercer is the mistress of the Post office.

MRS. MERCER. I am the Post-mistress of Andover. I recollect on the 21st of November, receiving a letter from Michael Dickman ; it was a paid letter; I took two shillings and eight-pence for it. I put it into the London bag; sealed the bag, and delivered it to the guard.

CHARLES ALLEN. I am a sorter in the Inland office. The Andover bag came into the office on Monday, the 22nd of November last; it came tied and sealed, as usual.

THOMAS PARSONS . I belong to the General Post office. I am a letter carrier in the General Post office. I was on duty of the 22nd of November last, in the General Post office. It is my duty to carry the letters after they are sorted at the Inland office into the letter carriers office, and to put them on their respective divisions; according as they are sorted I put them there in their proper divisions. This I performed on the 22nd of November.

BENJAMIN CRICKETT. I am inspector of the letter carriers in the General Post office.

Q. Into how many divisions are the paid letters sorted - A. Into twelve, in the first instance; that takes place in the Inland office. A letter directed to Gough-square would be in the sixth division; after it is sorted it would be carried by Parsons into the letter carriers office, to the sixth division; and in the letter carriers office, letters of the sixth division are subdivided into nine walks.

Q. Into which of these divisions would a letter for the Temple fall - A. Into the Temple-walk; that is one of the walks of the sixth division.

Q. Is that the same walk as Gough-square would be - A. No, it is not.

Q. What situation did the prisoner hold in the

office - A. He was a letter carrier for the Temple-walk.

Q. Could he have any business with a letter directed to Gough-square - A. No.

Q. Do the letter carriers assist in sorting letters - A. They do; they assemble round the table, and each sorts for his walk.

Q. When the letters are brought into the office, all persons belonging to No. 6 assemble round the table No. 6, and each take letters for his walk - A. It was the duty of two letter carriers to re-sort the letters for the sixth division.

COURT. Do all the letter carriers sort the letters - A. No; it is the duty of two letter carriers to re-sort the letters for the nine walks.

Mr. Roe. The prisoner was not one of these men - A. No, he was not. But as it would suit him, he would do it.

Q. It occasionally happens that letters are missorted, does it not - A. It does, daily.

Q. Supposing a letter came into the prisoner's hands not in his walk, what would his duty be - A. It would have been his duty to hand it over to the proper letter carrier of that walk.

Q. Ought not he to have done so before he quitted the office - A. Yes.

Q. At what place is it the usual course of letter carriers to arrange the letters for their own delivery, at what house do they place the letters for their own delivery - A. That is done in the office.

Q. Then if a wrong letter came into his hands he must have found it out - A. It is possible he might have taken it in error; he might not have seen it; it is the usual practice to arrange them in the office.

Q. Do you know of Wood, the prisoner, being there that morning - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing - A. I do.

Q. Look at that. (The book handed to witness.) - A. This the prisoner's hand-writing.

Q. This is an order from the Post-master by which servants in the Post office are directed to sign each note they receive, with the name of the person of whom they receive it, and their own name when they pay it away; the prisoner's name is signed to it - A. It is. It is read over to every servant when they first enter into the office; this was read to the prisoner.

Q. When any person pays money into the Post office is it attended to - A. It is. The receiver general would not receive a note without it is so endorsed.

Mr. Alley. You have mentioned that there are sorters and letter carriers - A. Yes.

Q. You have other officers what you call charge takers - A. Yes.

Q. The peculiar office of the prisoner that which he was employed and paid was that of a letter carrier - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-40

325. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of November , a 10 l. bank note, a 20 l. promissory note, two promissory notes of 10 l. each, and fourteen 5 l. promissory notes , the property of William Lansley and Edward Lansley .

WILLIAM LANSLEY . I live at Pied-mills, near Andover. On the 21st of November last, I had occasion to make a remittance to Mr. Wheatley on account of myself and my brother Edward. On the 21st of November, I made up my letter; I kept the particulars of the notes that were in the letter. Mr. Wheatley made payments for us in Town; it was not an order from him or expected by him; it contained the bank notes already stated in the former case. I sealed the letter, and directed it to Mr. Wheatley, No. 7, Gough-square London; I delivered it to my brother, and told him to deliver it our servant. I dated the letter the 21st of November. I have no other partner.

EDWARD LANSLEY . On the 21st of November, I received a letter of my brother to send to Mr. Wheatley; I delivered it to Michael Dickman .

MICHAEL DICKMAN . I am a servant to Messrs. Lansley's; I was so in November last. I received a letter of Mr. Edward Lansley on a Sunday; it was directed; I cannot read. I gave it to Mrs. Mercers at the Post office, Andover; I gave it her on the same Sunday I received it; she is the mistress of the Post office.

MRS. MERCER. I keep the Post office at Andover. I remember on the 21st of November last, receiving a letter of Michael Dickman ; I took two shillings and eight-pence of him, I put it in the London bag. I sealed the bag, and gave it to the guard myself.

CHARLES ALLEN. I am a sorter in the Inland office, in the Post office. The Andover bag came to the Post office in the regular course, tied and sealed as usual, on Monday, the 22nd of November. If it had been otherwise than tied and sealed I should have recollected it.

THOMAS PARSONS . I am a letter carrier in the General Post office. On the 22nd of November, it was my duty to carry the letters from the Inland office to the letter carriers office; I put them into their proper walks.

BENJAMIN CHICKETT . I am an inspector, of letter carriers in the General Post office. The letters are sorted into twelve divisions; the separation takes place in the Inland office. Letters which belongs to the sixth division after they are sorted in the Inland office they are carried into the letter carriers office. The letters of No. 6 are re-sorted into nine walks, or divisions; each carriers duty to sort the letters. The prisoner is not a sorter, but he occasionally would sort. The arrangement of each letter is made by two letter carriers. A letter carrier may take out a letter that does not belong to his walk by mistake. There is an order by the Post-master to endorse the names on notes of the person from whom they receive the note, and to put their own name upon the note when they pay it, and this is signed by the prisoner; a bill not so endorsed would not be received by the receiver general of the Post office. There are nine walks in No. 6. The prisoner has been employed in the Post office twenty-five or twenty-six years; his character up to this period has been correct and honest.

RICHARD CROSS . Q. Were you employed on Monday, the 22nd of November, in the sixth division in sorting the paid letters for the different walks of that division - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the other person employed with you in sorting - A. I cannot recollect whether it was Henley or not; the man that is dead. I rather think it was Henley.

Q. Are you also one of the letter carriers of that division - A. I am.

Q. Was the prisoner employed in rting that morning - A. I have not any recollection about that whether he was or was not. I believe he was there that morning to carry letters for his own walk. It sometimes happens the letters for the different walks a mistake is made, and the letter for one walk is delivered to the carrier of another.

WILLIAM HASSETT. I am the letter-carrier for Gough-square walk. On the 22nd of November, I was.

Q. Do you recollect whether on that morning you received a letter for Mr. Wheatley, of Gough-square - A. No, I do not.

Q. Did you truly deliver all the letters you received that morning - A. I deliver part, and send part by a person of the name of Donthwaite. I delivered all except what I delivered into Donthwaite's hands; he takes the letters for the early post. All these people that have their letters by the early post he delivers them.

RALPH DONTHWAITE . Q. Did you, on Monday the 22nd of November last, receive any letters for Gough-square - A. I cannot recollect; if I did they were delivered in the regular course.

HENRY WHEATLEY . I live in Gough-square; I am a deliverer of newspapers; I correspond with Messrs. Lansley.

Q. Did you receive any letter by the General Post office on Monday the 22nd of November - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you at any time receive a letter containing any of these notes; or all of them. Look at that paper - A. I never received any one of them, nor any letter containing any of the notes.

JOHN HUGHES . I am clerk to Messrs. Barnard, Dimsdale and Company, bankers. On the 23rd of November last, I paid a Newbury note, No. 721 l, twenty pound, in a fifteen pound and a five pound bank note. I took the description of the notes I paid it with. The fifteen pound note was No. 8291, dated the 27th of October. We never put the year without it is several years back; the five-pound note was 8688. I have not the date of the five. I have no recollection to whom I paid them.

Mr. Challenor. The fifteen pound note may be the date of another year - A. It is not likely, because it was received at the bank the night before.

JOHN BARNES. I belong to the Newbury Bank.

Q. Are you able to say whether you had more than one note of No. 7211 in circulation - A. Only one of each in circulation. I am able to speak positively as to that fact. That note is still in circulation.

PETER FERGUSON. I am a baker; I live in Whitcomb-street. Some time in December last, the prisoner borrowed ten pound of me; he said he wished to have it twos or fives, because the Post office ordered all the notes to be marked. On the 16th of December he paid me this note, a fifteen pound bank note. There is my hand-writing on this fifteen pound note. I put down 16th of the 12th month, and the two first letters of my name, P F; and it is marked William Wood .

Q. to Mr. Shelton. Read the date and number of that note - A. Dated 27th of October, 1818, No. 3291, fifteen pound.

JOHN MARSHALL . I am clerk in the banking-house of Lee and Starkey. Our house corresponded with the Andover old bank, and Wakefield bank, on the 23d of November.

Q. Look at that note, and see whether there is any thing upon it of your own hand-writing - A. There is the name of Millet made upon it by me on the 23d of November, and 55 written upon it. That was the number of notes brought in that morning. I paid that note that very day.

Q. Have you any entry in your book which enables you to say how that was paid - A. Eleven Andover notes came in at once, and paid in eleven bank notes.

Q. Turn to your book. Have you the particulars of the eleven bank notes - A. Yes. Not one of the country notes. I put them down eleven fives; there is one of them 3412, dated the 9th of September. We do not put down the year, except they are more than a year old; if more than a year old, then we enter the year.

Q. You then presume it must be the current year, from your habit - A. Yes. Another Bank of England note, No. 4725, dated 28th of June; no year mentioned.

(Andover note read.)

"Andover old bank, No. 1813, dated 15th of December, 1812. I promise to pay five pounds on demand at Andover, or at Messrs. Lee and Starkey, bankers, London.

Mr. Abbott. That corresponds with the note spoken to by William Lansley ; in the former case dated 15th of December, 1812; and it is the note Mr. Marshall has spoken to as paid on the 23d of November last.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a clerk at the Alienation office, in the Temple.

Q. Look at that note, No. 3412, dated 9th of September, 1813, and tell me whether you received it at any time of any body - A. I believe I received it of one of the clerks of Anstice and Cox, solicitors, in the Temple. I always mark the name of the attorney of whom I receive the notes. Upon this note I have wrote Anstice. This is my own handwriting.

CHARLES MINTON . I am a clerk in the house of Anstice and Cox. On the 8th of December last, I paid Mr. Williams, at the Alienation office, a five pound note, I received it of Mr. Swainson, the managing clerk. I paid it on the same day I received it. I am sure the note I received of Mr. Swainson I paid the same day to Mr. Williams. I had no particular mark on the note. I made no other payment at the Alienation office on that day.

MR. SWAINSON. I am managing clerk at Messrs. Anstice and Cox. In December last, I was.

Q. Had the prisoner a post account at your office - A. He had. He delivered letters at Mr. Anslice's office for a considerable time. There was a week's passage due to him; it amounted to three pounds twelve shillings and sixpence. I gave him a ten pound note; he gave me change, a five pound bank note. I delivered the note to Minton, to make a payment at the Alienation office. I had no similar change at the time to my recollection; I had no other five pound note.

JOHN GIDDONIS . I keep a public-house in Shergood-street, Golden-square.

Q. Look at that note, No. 4725, the second note spoken to by Marshal, and see whether it has been in your hands - A. It has; I have marked it with the name of Mr. Wood; I received it of some of Mr. Woods family; most likely from some of his children. I have marked in with the name of Wood, and I, G, my own initials. I paid it to my distillers, Wilson and Hill, Piccadilly.

Prisoner's Defence. There is not a gentleman in the Temple but what will give me a good character, besides the numerous friends I have here now. The notes tendered by me were not stolen, but in regular circulation I received them. I am perfectly innocent of the charge.

The prisoner called eleven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-41

326. JOHN CRAWLEY was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of February , at Westham, in the county of Essex , upon James Wright feloniously did make an assault, and that he with both his hands the said James Wright in and upon his left arm feloniously did strike and beat him against the ground, and under the near wheel of a certain cart feloniously did violently cast and throw, whereby the wheel of the said cart went over the breast of the said James Wright , giving him then and there, as well as by the striking and heating aforesaid, as well as throwing him against the ground and the wheel of the cart going over him, a mortal bruise upon his left-breast, of which said mortal bruise he the said James Wright from the 22nd of February did languish, and languishing did live until until the 28th of February, upon which said 28th of February; at the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel, die, and so the Jurors say he the said John Crawley , him the said James Wright did kill and murder .

WILLIAM TURNEY , I am a farmer at Childering. The deceased, James Wright , was my servant at that time. On Tuesday the 22nd of February, I was within a few miles of Childering, I observed a funeral passing along on my left hand side. James Wright was driving the team he turned out for them, and when he came in he came in slowly; he came near the corpse; he never touched the corpse, nor any person attending the funeral. I then saw two men strike him. I cannot say whether the prisoner was either of the men that struck him, I was so alarmed at the time; I cannot say where they struck him. The cart was going on a goodish foot pace. There were two horses to the cart.

Q. What was the consequence of their striking him - A. When the first man struck him he turned round, and then the other man struck him, he fell. I was in the cart, sitting on a chest; I looked over, and saw the wheel go over him all the way up. It went on his foot first, and all the way up his back, over his right shoulder. He laid sideways on the ground. He went sideways from the wheel, and the wheel went over his body.

Q. Did he say anything to these men when they struck him - A. Not a word; if he had done anything to them I must have seen it.

Q. Had this man anything the matter with him - A. He had no use of his right arm or his right leg's he walked limping. He did not complain of being unwell before this happened; he appeared, except his lameness, to be as well as he usually was.

Q. Did he complain of his breast when he was taken up - A. He complained of his shoulder and his leg; he could not bear us to touch his shoulder but what he would cry out.

Q. Did the cart go over his breast - A. I cannot say it went over his shoulder. It is a heavy cart, almost a new wheel. He was walking along by the side of his horses; they struck him as he was walking along by the side, about the middle of the two horses. He was between the two horses. He was in such a situation that if he tell it was likely the cart would go over him.

JANE FOSSY . I live in Dean-street, Spitalfields. On the 22nd of February. I was in company with Catherine Lecour ; I was within half a dozen yards of where this accident took place. I saw the funeral; out of curiosity I went up; I saw a post chaise first. I rather think the post chaise ran up against some of them; it drove off very fast; the people attending the funeral was very much enraged. The cart was six or eight yards behind the post chaise. The man that drove the cart was by the side of the horses. I saw he did not touch any of them; I am sure of that; I think the post chaise did. I am certain that neither he his horses, or cart, ever touched them. The deceased had no time to say anything, it was done so quick. When the cart passed, a man at the funeral came and struck him; after that, another man came from the funeral and struck him; he then fell. The cart was going on at the time, and when he fell the cart went over him, but what part of him I cannot tell, I was so alarmed.

Q. What became of the persons that struck him - A. I did not notice the first that struck him. The man that struck him the last blow returned to the funeral; I kept my eye upon him; I never lost sight of him; on that account I never saw the man that was run over afterwards. I pointed out the man that last struck the deceased to Mr. Stroud; he went after the man, and took him. The prisoner is the man that Mr. Stroud took, and I am sure the prisoner is the man that struck the deceased.

CATHERINE LECOUR. I was in company with the last witness. What she has stated is correct; I know no more.

HENRY STROUD . I am a butcher; I live at Stanmore. On this evening I was in my own house, up one pair of stairs; I saw the funeral; the people at the funeral were making a sad disturbance. I saw two men run from the funeral to the carman that was killed. I came down stairs as fast as I could; The poor man then laid in the road. The cart had been over him then. I went to assist the carter; he said, do not touch me, my ribs are broken. The witness then came, and made a complaint; she pointed out the prisoner as the person that struck him; I went, and took him in custody.

JAMES BROWN . I am a pupil in the London hospital. On Tuesday the 22nd of November, in the evening, I was informed that he had been knocked down, and that a cart had run over the body. I minutely examined the body, and questioned the man as to all his sensations; all that he complained of was a stiffness in his shoulder, and a pain in his ancle. I bled him profusely. I gave him some medicines. He went on perfectly well until Saturday morning. On Saturday morning he laboured under very great difficulty of breathing. There were other symptoms of inflammation of his lungs, and pain in his side. That was on the Saturday. I used proper remedies for the inflammation of the lungs. The complaint continued Saturday, and Sunday, and the Monday following the complaint gained ground. Sir William Blissard saw him on the Monday following; he desired he might lose four ounces of blood, which I accordingly drew from him, and about four o'clock the man died, and on Tuesday we opened the body. The right globe of the lungs was very much inflamed, as likewise the membrane that covered the right cavity of the chest was very much inflamed also.

Q. What would occasion this appearance - A. The application of cold and obstructed perspiration.

Q. Might not external violence occasion it - A. I do not think it did in this instance. There was no external appearance on the chest.

Q. Did it ever happen in your experience that there has been such internal appearance without external marks of violence - A. There may have been such a thing, but not in my knowledge. It is my opinion, that these appearances of inflammation did not arise from external violence. The suppuration on the right cavity of his chest indicated it was not by any violence so recently done. There was an appearance of an old disease in the left globe of the lungs. In my opinion, this internal appearance was the cause of his death. There was no external marks that caused that appearance, or his death.

Q. Were there any bruises on his breast - A. The injury was on the left side, and the inflammation of the lungs on the right. The injury was on the left shoulder, and the inflammation on the right. The injury could not have gone on so rapid if it had been occasioned on Tuesday.

Q. Could the fan have occasioned it - A. I do not think the fall could have occasioned it.

Q. Could the pressure of the wheel upon this shoulder have occasioned such appearances as you saw in the cavity of the chest, or in any manner occasioned his death - A. I think not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-42

327. THOMAS DODMAN and MICHAEL WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , one gallon and a half of rectified spirits, value 30 s. and one gallon and a pint of rum, value 22 s. the property of John Nicholson and William Nicholson , in their dwelling house .

JAMES NICHOLSON . I live in Woodbridge-street, Clerkenwell. I am clerk to John and William Nicholson ; they are distillers . On the 16th of February, in the evening, I was sitting in the accompting-house; I saw Dodman standing at the top of the stairs leading into the cellar; he looked very hard at me, which made me suspect all was not right. I then asked Dodman where Ward, the other prisoner, was. They are servants in the employ of Messrs. Nicholson. He said he was down in the cellar. I immediately went down into the cellar. Ward seemed very much agitated in seeing me come down; he made trifling excuses, and moved from one part of the cellar to the other to try to avoid me. I followed him close up. He then came up stairs into the distill-house; I followed him up. He went to the further part the still-house; I kept following him; he then made a sharp turn, when I heard something like spirits jolt in a bladder.

Q. Where was Dodman all this time - A. He was standing where I first saw him; he had not gone into the cellar then. I took hold of Ward by the collar, and asked him what he had got. He took the bladder out of rectified spirits out of his breeches, and gave it into my hand. I then called Robert Wilson out of the accompting-house; I told him to take hold of Dodman, as I had no doubt of his being a party concerned.

Q. Was Dodman within sight of you while you laid hold of Ward - A. Yes, he was. He laid hold of Dodman, and said he had no doubt they were both concerned. I then enquired in the house whether Mr. Nicholson was within. Mr. Nicholson came down. When Mr. Nicholson came, he took hold of Ward. and I took hold of Dodman, and then Robert Wilson went for an officer. Dodman then wanted to go to the necessary; I said he should not move. He then put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and drew a knife. I immediately seized hold of his arm, and called to Mr. Nicholson that he had drawn a knife. He let go Ward, and came to my assistance. When he found Mr. Nicholson was coming he threw the knife from him. In the scuffle. Mr. Nicholson threw him on his back; he got up again, and threw himself down upon his belly, and attempted to burst the bladder, and with one hand he pulled it out of his breeches and threw it from him. We tied his hands. He then pretended to faint, and laid on his back until the officer came. I told the officer he was farthing. I took up the bladder which he had thrown away before the officer came. The officer said he would soon bring him about; he gave him a tap on the head. The officer then handcuffed them, and took them to the office.

Q. What became of the bladders - A. I took it to the office and examined it; the officer, examined it

with me. One bladder contained better than a gallon and a half of strong rectified spirits; that was Ward's bladder; the bladders leaked, so we emptied them out into strong bottles. The other bladder contained about a pint and a gallon of strong rum. The prisoners were committed to prison. The spirits are here; the rectified spirits are of the value of twenty shillings, and the rum twenty-two shillings; that is what it cost me.

Mr. Challenor. What part of the premises did this take place - A. In the distill-house.

Q. That is some distance from where Mr. Nicholson dwells - A. It is connected with the house.

Q. Dodman did not offer any personal violence to any body with the knife - A. No.

Q. Do not you think he took the knife out of his pocket with intention of stabbing the bladder - A. I do.

COURT. Did he say what he meaned to do with the knife - A. He did not. The entrance to the distill-house in underneath the dwelling-house; it is covered in, and all one premises; we pay regular taxes for the distill-house as well as the house. We can go from the house into the distill-house without going into the street or into the yard.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr. Nicholson's; I received the two prisoners there. When I came, Dodman's hands were tied; I untied them, and handcuffed them together. I told Dodman he must go with me; he said, he would not. These two bladders were produced to me; one containing rum, the other a strong spirit. Mr. Nicholson produced them to me at the time they were nearly full of spirits; I kept them until the next day. I found the bladders leaked; I put the spirits into these stone bottles; I have had it ever since. I tasted it; one was rum, and the other was a strong spirit. I searched Dodman's premises; in his bed room I found four bottles of spirits, and this bladder, and a quantity of sugar; they were locked up in a chest. The bottles contained strong spirits like that in the bladder. I asked him how he came to do it; he replied, we are two rogues together.

ROBERT WILSON , I was called up by the first witness, James Nicholson . I know nothing more than he has stated.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Dodman called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

DODMAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

WARD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-43

328. MATTHEW BETTSWORTH and RICHARD MEARS were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Mary Ann Harrison , spinster , on the 3rd of April , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of William Story .

WILLIAM STORY . I belong to the East India warehouse . On the 3rd of April last, I was at the Shepherd and Dog, East Smithfield; Mary Ann Harrison was with me; this was about half past nine in the evening She asked me to lend her a shilling; I told her I would go and fetch her one; she doubted my word of coming back again. I told her if she doubted my word I would leave her my watch until I returned; it was a silver watch. Then I went home.

Q. Look at the prisoners; did you see either of them at the Shepherd and Dog - A. Yes, they were there; they were drinking at another table. When I returned, the young woman was gone with the watch. I did not see her again for an hour; then she was crying, and said the men had robbed her of the watch.

MARY ANN HARRISON . I was at the Shepherd and Dog with Mr. Story. When he went home he left me his watch. The two prisoners were both in the home; they saw Mr. Story give the watch into my hand. I came out to the top of the steps; the prisoners both followed me out. Mears whispered, she has got a watch in her hand; I heard him distinctly say, she has got a watch in her hand. I had the ribbon twisted round my finger, and the watch in my hand. I had my hand shut upon the watch; I don't think it could be seen. I believe this was about half past nine at night. After that was whispered, Mears came up and said, I had a turnip in my hand; I asked what was that to him what I had in my hand. Bettsworth asked me what o'clock it was; I answered, I did not think the watch went. He laid hold of my hand, opened it, and took the watch away from me; this was done in an instant. I made no resistance. When he had taken the watch from me, he ran away as fast as he could; I bursted out crying, and told Mears I had lost the watch; he was close by when Bettsworth opened my hand, and took the watch away from me. When I told Mears that I had lost the watch, he told me not to cry and fret, he would endeavour to find him for me. He took me down Rosemary-lane, up into Whitechapel. I told him if he could give me any information who or what he was I would not mind giving him ten shillings to have the watch restored. He kneeled down in the street, and said, God might strike him blind if he had seen the man before; he seemed to endeavour to find him out by taking me up and down the streets, but he could see nothing of him. I went to the watchhouse afterwards, and gave a description of the two men. The officer of the night went and took the two prisoners in bed together.

JAMES LUMLEY . I am a patrol. On the 3rd of April, I saw Mary Ann Harrison at the watchhouse; she gave information of the robbery. She gave a description of the two persons that had robbed her. We went to their lodgings; they were both in bed together. We found out their lodging by the enquiry that we made Hutchins and Kalep were with me. We searched the prisoners; in their lodgings we found only a little silver. They both strongly denied any knowledge of the watch. Mears declared he knew nothing of it; he was present when Bettsworth ran away with it; he did not know where the watch was. Bettsworth heard it; he said he knew nothing of it. Mears said, he would be his part towards making it up, and begged Bettsworth to tell where it was.

WILLIAM HUTHINS . I went to the prisoner's lodgings. It is true what Lumley has said.

ADAM KALEP . I have heard the account given by Lumley; it is correct.

Bettsworth's Defence. I am innocent of the charge; the woman I never saw before in all my life.

Mears's Defence. I knew nothing at all of it.

BETTSWORTH, GUILTY, aged 17,

MEARS, GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing from the person, but not of the highway robbery .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140420-44

329. JOSEPH MIRFIELD was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Henry Radford , junior , on the 20th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 20 s. his property.

HENRY RADFORD , JUNIOR. On the 20th of February, I was going down Church-street, Spitalfields , about eight o'clock in the evening; I was followed by the prisoner and another man; the prisoner pushed me violently upon the other man; it threw me forwards. I had a bundle in one hand, and my other hand was banging down. The other man laid hold of my arm; the man that I pushed against, he shoved me with his hand against the wall. The prisoner snatched my watch from my fob, and ran away, at the time I was so pushed, while the other man was holding me.

Q. So that one held you while the other took the watch out of your pocket - A. Yes. The prisoner then run away; I followed him, and cried stop thief. He ran into Spitalfields-market; I lost sight of him. While I was standing still I heard some one say come on my lad, he is taken. I went up to him; he was in Crispin-street. It was the same man who had taken the watch out of my pocket; he was standing with his back against some iron railing. He asked me if he was the man; I said yes, I would swear to it. He then gave me my watch, and begged for God's sake to let him go; he said he had a wife and a large family; I said he should not go. He was taken to the watchhouse by Mr. Rackam, and Mr. Townsend let him go.

Q. Who is Mr. Townsend - A. A butcher. He let him go before Mr. Rackam took him.

Prisoner. Did not you say if I let you have the watch you would be satisfied - A. No, I do not remember saying so.

Prisoner. Yes, you did, and then Mr. Townsend let me go.

MR. RACKAM. I live in Wood-street, No. 11. I heard the cry of stop thief; I came out. Upon that I saw the prisoner in custody of a person I did not know; the prisoner was supplicating mercy of the gentleman that held him. The gentleman let him go, and seeing him at liberty I took hold of him, and advised the prosecutor to follow me to the watch-house; he did so. I delivered the prisoner to the officer at the watchhouse.

THOMAS HART . I was at the watchhouse when the prisoner was brought in; I searched him. I did not find any thing upon him. The watch had been delivered up before to Radford; Radford delivered it to me. This is the watch.

THOMAS TOWNSEND . I am a butcher. On the 20th of February last, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in West-street, Spitalfields-market, I heard the cry of stop thief; the last voice I heard was a lad in a faint voice crying, he had lost his watch. I came out, and saw a man come in the market, and as he cleared the corner he set off running, and kept walking; it struck me he might be the party; they were giving the alarm. I hailed him; he gave me no answer; commenced running. I followed him, overtook him, and detained him two minutes. I said, gentlemen, I will thank you if you will go into the market and find out who gave the alarm; some persons went into the market, and brought the prosecutor to me. I asked him if he had any knowledge of the man I had in custody; he said that was the man that stole his watch. Upon so doing, the man said if you will forgive me I will give you the watch again. Accordingly I saw the motion of the two hands, but not the watch; as if the watch passed from one to the other, but the watch I did not see.

Q. Is the prisoner the same man - A. Not to my knowledge. It was a dark night. I consider the man I detained to be a more powerful man than he appears to be.

Q. to Rackam. Is that the man you saw supplicating for mercy, and which you conducted to the watchhouse - A. It is; I have no doubt at all about it.

Prosecutor. The watch produced by Hart is the watch that was taken from me by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been very ill since I have been confined; I hope you will shew mercy to me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-45

330. JAMES RAMPLING was indicted for that he, on the 23rd of February , without lawful cause had in his custody and possession, a certain bank note for the payment of 1 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-46

331. JAMES RAMPLING was indicted for feloniously forging a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note, with the same intention, he knowing it to be forged.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-47

332. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , from the person of Henry Andrews Uthwart , a pocket-book, value 1 s. a 10 l. bank note, a 5 l. bank note, and seven 1 l. bank notes , his property.

HENRY ANDREWS UTHWART . I live in Norton-street; I live upon my fortune . On Sunday evening, the 20th of February, about eight o'clock, I was in Newgate-street; I was going further into the City. When I was in Newgate-street, I am quite certain I had my pocket-book in my coat pocket. My pocket-book contained several letters, and about twenty-one pound in notes; a ten pound bank of England note, a five pound note, and six ones. There might be more ones, six I am sure of. I felt some person at my coat pocket. I was quite sober. Upon my feeling some person at my coat pocket I turned round to see who it was. The person that I saw had something tied round his waist; it afterwards proved to be a blue apron. At the time I saw the person he was just turning from me; I saw no other person near me. I did not recollect at that moment that I had a pocket-book in my pocket; I felt for my pocket handkerchief, it was in my pocket; afterwards it came into my mind, I found my pocket-book was gone. I set off after the person; I overtook him about an hundred yards. I did not see him until I came up to him. I seized the prisoner by the coat, and desired him to deliver me my pocket book. He solemnly declared he had not got it. I asked him if he was willing to be searched; he said he was perfectly willing. He was then searched by a person who was with me; nothing was found. I had lost sight of the prisoner. About an hundred yards off my pocket-book was found; it was picked up about a yard off the prisoner; a person picked it up and brought it to Mr. Bellchambers. The person that brought the pocket-book said he picked it up about a yard off the prisoner. I am certain it was my pocket-book; it had my letters in it, and the notes, a ten pound bank note, a five pound bank note, and either six, or more, one pound notes. The pocketbook contained all my letters and notes. I lost nothing.

JURY. Can you positively say the prisoner had an apron on when you overtook him - A. I can positively say he had an apron on then. I cannot say he had that blue apron. When I first saw him he had something round him.

BENJAMIN BELLCHAMBERS . I am a wine merchant. I live in Southampton-row, Bloomsbury-square. I was with Mr. Uthwart when he lost his pocket-book in Newgate-street. We were walking to see his sister, who lives in Dowgate-hill. It was soon after seven o'clock, Mr. Uthwart said he had lost his pocket-book. I said, my God, have you indeed, step after me. He clapped his eye upon the prisoner; he said, that is the man. From the prisoner's confusion at the moment I began to think he was the man. We had turned back about an hundred yards, and before we came to Snow-hill, Mr. Uthwart laid hold of him; he charged him with taking his pocket-book. The prisoner said he had not. Some person called out, search him. He had a jacket, with a blue apron on. I felt about him; he opened his jacket and apron. I immediately stooped to the ground, imagining he might have dropped it; and some person said, here is the book, sir. I was close by the prisoner at the time, and the person could not be more than a yard from the prisoner. I then gave the pocket-book to Mr. Uthwart. He went into a spirit shop in Newgate-street to see if the contents were right. The contents were all claimed by Mr. Uthwart. I think the bank notes in it were twenty-four pounds. It was reckoned; it was near thereabouts. Mr. Uthwart said it was all right. The prisoner went down upon his knees, and begged for mercy, or pardon, something of that kind. Richard Webb was the person that produced the book.

RICHARD WEBB . I am a journeyman carpenter; I live in Noble-street, Falcon-square. I saw the prisoner when Mr. Uthwart had hold of him; not before; he had already hold of him. When I came up I picked up the book about a yard from the prisoner; who dropped it I cannot tell. I sung out, who belongs to this book? Mr. Uthwart said, me. I went with the prisoner to the Mansion-house. I left him in charge in the Poultry compter.

Q. Did you see the prisoner go down upon his knees and ask for pardon - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know anything of the pocket-book; I never had it in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-48

333. MARY WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , twenty-three pair of stockings, value 3 l. 15 s. the property of Robert Romanis .

ROBERT ROMANIS . I am an hosier , in Cheapside . I only know the stockings are mine.

WILLIAM MUST. I am shopman to Mr. Romanis. On the 2nd of April, about five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; she was alone; she asked to look at a pair of black worsted stockings. I shewed her some. I went to another part of the counter to wait upon another person. We were very busy at the time. I was desired by a customer to watch her; James Black told me to watch her. I watched her; I saw her take two parcels of stockings off the counter; she put them in her pockethole. I accused her of stealing the parcels; she said, for God's sake do not take away my life. She dropped the stockings on the floor; I picked them up under her, and then informed my master.

Q. How many stockings were there in the two parcels that she took - A. Ten pair in one, woollen, and thirteen pair of cotton in the other; the woollen ones were worth three shillings and sixpence a pair; the thirteen pair of cotton are worth more than three pounds.

JAMES BLACK . I am a revenue officer. I was in Mr. Romanis's shop on the 2nd of April; I saw the prisoner come in; she placed herself by the stockings on the counter. The first thing I saw her move was a parcel of stockings close to her, by the edge of the counter; I kept my eye upon her. In the course of time the parcel was gone; I could not see how they went. I saw one parcel picked up by her feet. When the second parcel went I told the lad to mind her. I pointed to the lad to pick up a parcel of stockings at the prisoner's feet; he picked them up. She paid for the article she was purchasing. The

prisoner then turned towards me; I then saw a parcel of stockings between her knees. I said ma'am, you have gone far enough with this; she stooped on oneside, and the stockings dropped. She said, she had nothing. Mr. Romanis then was called down; the account was given to him of the transaction. I asked Mr. Romanis if he wanted a constable; he said, no. The prisoner left the shop, and left the change of a three-shilling piece behind her. After she was gone I said it was very ridiculous to let such a character as her go upon the public. One of the men jumped over the counter, and went after her.

GEORGE VAUGHAN. I took charge of this woman. I saw her go into the shop. I knew her person. I watched her on the opposite side of the way. I saw her come out again; she seemed as if she was very ill. She turned on the corner to the right, by Mr. Romanis's. I went after her; she was standing up against the step of a door. I asked her what she had got under her arm; it was one pair of black stockings, and different remnants of ribbon. Nothing else was found. When she was laid hold of, Mr. Romanis and this gentleman said she had taken these stockings.

Must. These are the stockings I saw the prisoner put in her pocket-hole.

Vaughan. About an hour before this period I saw the prisoner in Holborn; she went into Mr. Townsend's shop; I saw her come out; I watched her to Fleet-market, where there is a person sits and sells ribbons. I saw her drop some ribbon on the stall, and some money passed from her daughter. I watched her from there to Mr. Romanis's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the stockings off Mr. Romanis's counter. I asked the boy to shew me a pair of black stockings; he shewed me them. I paid for them. When I went into the shop there were several papers of stockings laying on the ground. I am innocent of taking the stockings.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-49

334. ROBERT DANIELS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of March , a tub, value 1 s. and sixty pounds weight of butter, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of Ann Sykes and John Sykes .

JOHN SYKES. My mother is my partner; her name is Ann Sykes . We keep the Catherine Wheel inn , Bishopsgate-street . This tub: and butter was brought into our inn to go by the waggon. I and my mother are answerable for the goods brought there.

WILLIAM STRANGE. I am a cheesemonger. I live in Bishopsgate-street. The tub and butter belongs to me. On the 24th of February, I sent twenty-four firkins to the Catherine Wheel inn; they were to go into the country. On the Thursday following I saw this tub of butter at the Mansion-house; I am sure it was one of the twenty-four that I had sent to this inn yard.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 2nd of March, I was passing through Gracechurch-street with Miller, an officer. I met the prisoner in company with two other men; the prisoner had a knot, and appeared like a porter; I suspected him immediately. I crossed the road, and followed him on the opposite side of the way, and Miller with me. I kept my eye upon him three hundred yards.

Q. Did you see him go near the Catherine Wheel inn - A. No; we lost sight of him by a quantity of carriages; they were going towards Bishopsgate-street. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards, in passing down Bishopsgate-street, by the church, I met the prisoner with this tub of butter on his knot. He was alone then.

Q. How far is the Catherine Wheel inn from Bishopsgate church - A. About one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards, on the same side as Houndsditch, below Houndsditch. I looked at the prisoner, and let him pass a bit. He was going towards the bridge. When I had let him pass I looked round, I saw one of the other men coming after him who had been with him before. The moment he saw me he made across the road, and went down Houndsditch. I immediately pursued the prisoner, and asked him what he had got there; he said he believed it was a tub of butter he was going with to Tower-street; he said a man hired him to carry it at the corner of Sun-street. I took him to the Compter. I found out who the tub of butter belonged to. This is the tub.

- MILLER. I know nothing further than what Sheppard has stated; his account is correct.

Mr. Strange. That tub is one of the twenty-four that I ordered to be taken to the Catherine Wheel inn.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a porter. I was unfortunately led into this. I was returning from Leadenhall-market; I crossed to Sun-street, a man called to me, he asked me to take this to Tower-street; the man said he would follow me. When I came to Cammomile-street the officer came up to me; the man was behind me. If he had any suspicion it was stolen, why not take the man that ran away. I am perfectly innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-50

335. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , one silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of John Finley , from his person .

JOHN FINLEY . I am a seafaring man . When I lost my handkerchief I was in Whitechapel . It was the 22nd of March, about half past six in the evening. My handkerchief was in my outside coat pocket. A person tapped me on the shoulder, and told me that I was robbed. I immediately applied to my pocket, and found my handkerchief was gone. I did not perceive it go from me. The officer shewed me the handkerchief, and asked me if it was mine. I am quite sure it was mine. It was a silk handkerchief, worth two or three shillings. An officer had hold of the prisoner.

JOHN DRINKWATER . I am an officer in the city. I first saw the prosecutor looking at Aldgate clock. I saw the prisoner trying to pick his pocket there;

he did not succeed in picking his pocket; then the prosecutor passed me. The prisoner followed him until just before he came to the Bull inn, Whitechapel; there I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket. The prisoner had a companion with him; I took them both. The person that was with him did not feel in the prosecutor's pocket. He was committed. The bill has been thrown out. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief; I seized him immediately; he threw the handkerchief down the instant I seized him. I picked up the handkerchief and shewed it to the prosecutor; he claimed it. This is the handkerchief. Smith, the officer, was with me.

Prosecutor. To the best of my knowledge that is the handkerchief I had in my pocket; I have got the fellow to it in my pocket now; they were both cut off one piece.

- SMITH. I was with Drinkwater; he has told the truth.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home with a shipmate of mine; I got stupid drunk. I have been in his Majesty's service a great many years; I had a severe wound in my head; I was discharged.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined 2 years in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-51

336. RICHARD KINGWELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Ayre , about the hour of eleven in the night, on the 19th of March , with intent to steal .

WILLIAM AYRE . I am a housekeeper in Holborn-bridge, at the end of Fleet-market, in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn ; I rent the whole house. My house was broken open. I had been spending the evening, and did not return home until between the hours of one and two on the 19th of March. When I returned, I was let in by a servant maid; I observed to her, that I smelled a sulpherous smell, I would be satisfied from whence it arose before I went to bed. I searched about. I went into the accompting-house; it was stronger there than in the other part; still I could not perceive any fire. I then went into a back warehouse; the first thing that attracted my attention was a private door bursted open inwards, it had been forced inwards, and a table that stood before it had been misplaced, and a can of oil throwed down. It immediately occurred to me that some one had entered the house that way, and as I had got no weapon I thought it necessary to get one. I immediately went to the dining-room, and took the poker. I came down stairs with the candle in one hand and the poker in the other, and went towards the door that was open. Anybody that gets down the area, if they push the door a person can come in my house; they must drop nine feet. While we were in the back warehouse, the servant screamed out, there is a man. She ran and opened the street door. I then perceived a man; that man afterwards turned out to be the prisoner. I then perceived the prisoner secreted under a bench; that bench is used by my workmen occasionally. He came out, and the moment he came out he sprang at my collar to seize me, as I suppose. I struck him upon the side of the head, knocked him down, and as he was getting up I repeated my blow upon the back part of the head; he then closed with me, and in that act the candle went out of my hand. We were in darkness. Nobody came to my assistance. I kept hold of him, and conceiving he might do me an injury I was anxious to get him towards the front door for assistance. At the front door the servant maid was calling out, murder! thieves! This was about fifteen yards from the front door. We were in the passage then. I had to get him through the door of the passage. I was obliged to release him from the grasp of one hand; the door of the passage opened inwards; I was obliged to loose one hand to get the door open. At that moment, by a sudden spring, he got out of my hands; he broke from me; I pursued him, crying, stop thief. He got out of the front door, but as I lost sight of him within a few paces I was fearful of misleading the hue and cry; I therefore still continued, and cried stop thief, as loud as I could.

Q. Before he broke from you had you any opportunity of observing him so as to speak to his features - A. Not at that moment. At the time he broke from me he ran into the street; I could see no one about the house but the girl screaming at the door, murder and thieves. When I returned, the patrol of the adjoining parish came up; I requested him to come in, and he and I examined the house to see whether there was any more persons in; there was no other person; there was a pair of boots and a hat belonging to no one in my house. The person that escaped from me had no hat on, that I am sure of; I rather think he had no boots or shoes on. While we were searching the house, the watchman of the adjoining parish came to inform me the man was secured in the watchhouse. The watchman's name is Flemming. I went there, and saw the prisoner without a hat, and without any boots or shoes on his feet, and the boots that we carried he owned, as well as the hat. I believe I asked him first whether he meaned to murder me; he said, no, God forbid. I then asked him how he came to do such an act; he said necessity had driven him to it. It was not till after the examination at the magistrate that I found that the lock of my desk had been forced; and this instrument which I produce I found in the passage. The instrument had cut away part of the wood work; the impression on the bolt exactly corresponds with the instrument.

Q. Did the prisoner say how he got in - A. He declined answering that. The prisoner's head was very bloody; I conceived that arose from the blows I had given him. That is all I know.

MARY ANN SKINNER . Q. Had you heard any noise before your master came home, in the house - A. About half past twelve at night I went into the shop, I heard a rustling with paper; it seemed to be in the accompting-house, at the back part of the shop; that is on the same floor as the area door. I did not go to see what it was. There was no other servant up in the house but me. I went down with my master when he came home. About three o'clock I was down in the back warehouse; I saw the area

door, it could not be far open without my seeing it, and when I went down with my master I perceived some one under the bench; I ran to the street door and gave the alarm.

MICHAEL CANNON . I work at this bench near the area door. I staid in the house until past ten o'clock. There is a small screw to fasten the area door, it is concealed between two boards.

Q. Can you say with certainty at the time you left the house that the area door was perfectly secure - A. Not positively at the time I left it. In the afternoon I placed the table against the door, and placed the oil-can on the table; I am quite sure the door was closed at that time; after that, I was backwards and forwards. I was occasionally in the shop. Whether the other servant was in there I cannot say with certainty; he had no business there particularly.

THOMAS FLEMMING . I am a watchman in Skinner-street. I heard the cry of stop thief, in Skinner-street; I took the prisoner in Skinner-street; he came as from the market. I saw him come from Turnagain-lane; he had no boots or shoes on, or hat. When I laid hold of him his head was bloody. I went down to Mr. Ayre's. He was searched in the watchhouse; some of our men found some articles upon him; they are here.

JOHN WOOD . I am a patrol. Flemming, the watchman, brought the prisoner into the watchhouse. I searched him. I found on him three flints, a steel, and the top part of the tinder-box, and a pair of nippers, and the bottom of a candle upon a halfpenny. The matches I found in his pocket appear to have been lighted, and burnt; the bottom part of the tinder-box was brought from Mr. Ayre's house. I fitted it to the top I found on the prisoner; it fitted it.

JOHN TURNHAM . Between one and two o'clock, I heard a noise in Fleet-market; I went to it. I found Mr. Ayre outside of his door. Mr. Ayre asked me to search the house; we went in. I found the boots and the hat; I took them to the watchhouse; the prisoner claimed them.

JOHN POWELL . I was on duty. I assisted in searching Mr. Ayre's house. I found a bag in the front shop; the prisoner owned it to be his.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the charge that is alleged against me; I had been to my father-in-law's, coming over the bridge I was knocked down; I lost my boots, and with the loss of blood I was faint; I laid myself down in the market; I lost my hat; I was almost dead. When they asked me whether they were my boots I do not know what I said, they bothered me in such a manner.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-52

337. BENJAMIN HARMER was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon Richard Hurlock , on the 28th of March , and taking from his person, and against his will, a pocketbook, value 2 s. and a bank note, value 5 l. his property.

RICHARD HURLOCK . I am a lighterman , I live at Northfleet, in Kent. This happened on Monday, the 28th of March; I was coming from Ratcliffe Cross to go to King-street, Tower-hill, about eight o'clock at night; when opposite of the Custom House, London Docks , a person came down White's-yard; it leads into Blue Anchor-yard; the prisoner accosted me; he said, oh, Peter; he took me in his arms; is that you, Peter; he fastened his arms round me, not very hard; his hands were in my pocket; he left me after that, and I instantly missed my pocketbook.

Q. Was it merely putting his arms round, or did he close your arms down - A. It was putting his arms between mine.

Q. Did it prevent your arms from acting freely as you could have done before - A. Yes, he confined my arms. As soon has he had left me I missed my pocket-book.

Q. Did you consider him doing any violence to your person, or was it in a friendly way - A. I am sure it was not in a friendly way. He ran up the yard, and I followed him for the space of ten yards; he then turned back; I caught him coming back.

Q. What did you find upon him - A. Nothing. I have not found my pocket-book at all.

Q. How do you know he took it - A. I know, because half a minute before I put my hand to my pocket-book; I found it was there. It was only the distance of crossing the yard; the prisoner accosted me. I felt my pocket-book half a minute before.

Q. And in this pocket-book was a five-pound note - A. Yes; I had seen that five-pound note in my pocket-book about six o'clock, on board my own vessel. I was by myself; I doubled it up, and put it in my pocket-book, and put my pocket-book in my waistcoat pocket. I missed it instantly he left me.

Q. Are you clear it was the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of the man.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing from the person, but not violently .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-53

338. ELIZABETH GIBBS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Yarrow , no person being therein, about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 20th of October , and stealing therein, a shift, value 2 s. a gown, value 3 s. four pair of stocking, value 2 s. one handkerchief, value 6 d. and four caps, value 1 s. the property of Sarah Yarrow , spinster .

SARAH YARROW . I live with my father, his name is Thomas Yarrow ; he lives at Forty-hill, in the parish of Enfield . On the 26th of October last, the prisoner came to our house, about seven o'clock in the morning; she came to ask leave to boil a few potatoes; when she came my father was gone out to work; he went out about six o'clock in the morning to work. When she came, there was no one else in the house but my mother and me.

Q. How long did the prisoner stay with you - A. She stopped until about half after eight. I lent

her a wooden dish to carry the potatoes. Me and my mother went out when she did; we locked the door.

Q. Was the window below secured - A. Yes. I looked about the house before I went out, every thing was safe. I returned about half after six in the evening. When I returned, the house door was open, the window had an iron hasp to it. The pane of glass over the iron hasp was broken, and the iron hasp was undone; the window was not open. The glass was broken, and the door wide open. The window appeared as if it had been opened. I found it shut, and the door wide open. The post of the door was twisted of one side; so that she could get the lock out of the outside post; the post of the door was twisted.

Q. Do you suppose any person had twisted the post from outside or inside - A. From the inside. I and my mother came home together. I missed my mother's cloak first.

Q. Tell me what you lost of your own property - A. I looked for my own property; my box was empty. I had seen my box in the morning. I missed four gowns; the best of the gowns were worth eight shillings; I missed three petticoats, value seven shillings; I missed one bonnet, value eight shillings; four habit-shirts, three of them worth one shilling; four pair of stockings; I missed three shifts, value eight shillings; five caps, four of them worth two shillings. These things were my own property.

MARY YARROW . I am the mother of the last witness. I remember the prisoner coming to our house and asking leave to boil a few potatoes; she boiled them; I lent her a dish. She went out with them about eight o'clock, with me and my daughter. I returned home with my daughter between six and seven at night; I found my window broken, and the door open. When we went out we left no one in the house, and when I returned I found the bowl I had lent the prisoner. I lost two gowns.

JAMES WALFORD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of October, at Hertford, in a straw-shed, about four o'clock in the morning; she had been sleeping there. I found these things upon her, some of them were in the bundle; and one gown she had got on. I had the patterns with me of the gowns that were lost.

Q. to Sarah Yarrow . Look at these things, and tell me whether they are yours or not - A. This gown is my property, it is worth three shillings; this habit-shirt belongs to the gown I have on; this is a pair of sleeves and a habit-shirt, I lost a gown like it; this apron had been a gown, and is now an apron; here is one shift of mine. I missed three or four caps, they are worth about two shillings.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18140420-54

139. MARGARET BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , in the dwelling-house of Michael Brookery , two bank notes, value 50 l. each , his property.

MICHAEL BROOKERY . I live at No. 6, Lombard-court, Seven Dials . I had two fifty-pound bank notes in my dwelling-house, they were in my bedroom, in this old pocket-book, and the pocket-book in this little box, and the little box was in this cannister, and the cannister was in the cupboard locked. I occupy the whole house; I rent it myself; I have got the lease of it; my house is in the parish of St. Giles's.

Q. When did you last see the notes - A. About a fortnight before I discharged the prisoner, that was on the 16th of March. The prisoner was my servant about two months; I discharged her on the 16th of March. About a fortnight before that, I took eight pounds out of the cupboard; I saw the two fifty pound notes in the pocket-book.

Q. How long had you had the notes - A. I believe on the 16th of February; I had them of Simpson and Company's banking-house, No. 2, Batholomew-lane. I never took notice of the numbers

Q. When did you miss them - A. On the 5th of April. When I found that I had lost two fifty-pound notes, I sent a friend to the bankers to find out the numbers; I had suspicion of the prisoner. I had the prisoner taken up the very day that I missed the notes.

Q. Had you any reason to know that she knew where you put the notes - A Yes. When I took the eight one-pound notes out of the cupboard she was present at the time, at the cupboard; she was present when I asked my wife for the money. I said, I was short of money to go to market. She heard me ask my wife for money, and heard where the money was. My wife asked my son to go up stairs and unlock the cupboard, and let me have some money. The cupboard door I never could unlock or lock it; my wife and son could; my wife always kept the key. My son went up, and I went with him; he unlocked the cupboard; I took eight pounds out; she did not see that. I put the money in again myself; the two fifty-pound notes were in the pocket-book at that time, I put them in myself, and a two-pound note with them. She left the two-pound note behind, and took the two fifty-pound notes.

PETER GHAHAM . I keep a clothes-shop, No. 50, Rosemary-lane. On the 18th of March, the prisoner came into my shop, and a man with her; she told me that she wanted to buy a pelisse. a handkerchief, and a pair of shoes for herself.

Q. Do you know who that man was - A. Yes; his name was Reorden. She said, she wanted for Reorden, a coat, waistcoat, breeches, shirt, hat, stockings, handkerchief, drawers, and shoes; the shoes I had none to give him; I gave him eight shillings to buy them. She told me that she had a fifty-pound note to change; I considered about the size of the note. I asked her where she got the note; she told me she got it as prize money from her brother on board the Corvas. I told her I was not in the habit of taking these large notes without going to the Bank to know whether they were right or not. She and the man told me to go to the Bank; I asked her name; she told me Margaret Bryan . I went to the Bank; I endorsed the note with mine and her name upon the note. I got change instantly. I came home; there were three or four people in my shop; I took her and the man up stairs. She said she wished to

leave some of the money in my hands, she did not want all the change. I gave her twenty-five pounds, and she left the other twenty-five pounds in my hands, and left the goods in my shop until the man should call for them.

Q. What was the amount of the goods you supplied her with - A. About ten pounds. On Friday evening the man called for the goods, and took them away at different times, and the 5th of March, that is the day she was taken in custody, I gave her whatever money she called for; on that day particular I gave her five-pounds in money.

Q. How much has she received in the whole - A. Forty-three pounds four shillings and ten-pence; the balance I deposited in the hands of the magistrate. I did not see any other note in her possession. My agreement was with the woman; she gave me the note. I acted by her directions; she agreed with me for every thing.

CHARLES JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Jennings, linen-draper, 62, Broad-street. On the 16th of March, the prisoner bought a pair of stockings of me; she gave me a fifty-pound note to pay for them, No. 8606. She told me to give her change, and put the note down on the counter; she did not say the amount of it. I questioned her about the amount of it; in about two minutes she said it was a fifty-pound note; she said, she had the note of Mrs. Grissall, in Whitechapel-road. I told her I thought it was a stolen note. I did not let her have it. I took her address Mary Sullivan , she said, she lived at Mr. Mahony's, a tallow-chandler, in the Old Bailey. She never called again for the note. She said, she would go and tell Mrs. Grissall that I had detained the note.

ROBERT GWATLERY . I am a clerk in the house of Messrs. Simpson and Company. I paid the two fifty-pound bank notes to Brookery, the numbers of the notes I gave him one fifty-pound 8606, another fifty-pound note 7083.

Prisoner's Defence. When I took the note I thought it was a one-pound note, and when I came out the two notes stuck together. I said, I would give the notes back to my mistress, when I took some money of my brother, and when I came to this shop. I saw it was a high note. I said, I am glad it is stopped, my mistress shall have it again. I came down Rosemary-lane; I met Reorden; I told him I found a note. I said, what is it; he said, let us go in here, and change it. He whispered something to the gentleman. He told me to say I had some prize money. The gentleman went to the Bank, and got the note changed. Reorden said I had better not have the change for fear it should be found about me. The clothes I had of the gentleman were old clothes, not worth the money he charged.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-55

340. WILLIAM FEATHERSTONE was indicted for feloniously making an assaulting in the King's highway upon George Vasey , on the 15th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 19 s. in monies numbered, and five 1 l. bank notes , his property.

GEORGE VASEY . I am a clerk in Cannon-street. On the 15th of April, I was returning home, about twelve o'clock at night, I went into Mr. Rogers's, the Swan and Hoop public-house, on the Pavement, Moorfields; I think it was before I went into Mr. Rogers's. I went into the tap-room to a box, there were four men sitting drinking there out of a pot of porter; the prisoner was one; there were three other men besides him sat in the same box; one of the other men was dressed in a short jacket, another in a long coat, he appeared like a coachman; there was a person in a straight coat, similar to my own, he was of a sandy complexion. I staid there about an hour and a half, or more perhaps. While I was drinking a glass of rum and water, which I called for, the coachman asked me to drink with him; I refused. The prisoner made an observation, that he had no right to ask me to drink when he had not paid himself for what he had drank. The prisoner addressed himself to me, and called me a tailor, and a great many other names that I do not recollect; he was rude to me. After I had drank up my sixpennyworth of rum and water, the coachman proposed to have a shillingsworth; which we had in. After that I declined having more; I said, it was time to go home. The prisoner and the man in the short jacket went out together; in about three minutes the coachman and I went out together. I turned to the left hand to go home; the coachman to the right. When I came out of the door I went up the Pavement, along Finsbury-place to Finsbury-square, and when I came opposite of Dr. Jones's, I was going across over the road, I was attacked by three men.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the three men - A. Yes, I amsure of it. Immediately they came upon me I turned round; before I got quite round I received a blow in my mouth, which knocked me down; that blow was with the fist. After I was down the third man took my property from me.

Q. Where was your property - A. In my left hand breeches pocket; that was five one-pound bank notes, and nineteen shillings in silver; I put it in my pocket the very same day.

Q. Had you shortly before the time you were robbed - A. Yes, I counted my money in the morning, and I took it out at Mr. Rogers's. I took six notes out, gave Mr. Rogers one to change; I put the other five notes back. I am sure I had five one-pound notes and nineteen shillings in silver; that was in my pocket at the time I was knocked down. I got up; and called watch, and the watchman took the prisoner; he met him as he was coming to my assistance.

Q. Was it soon after you called out watch - A. Yes. The watchman took him into custody. He shewed me the man; I immediately recollected him to be the man with whom I had been drinking in the public-house.

Q. Who was the other persons that knocked you down - A. The other two were the men that had been in the box with me; the coachman who came out with me was one of them.

Q. You did not get your money again I take it - A. No. I have no sort of doubt the prisoner is the man. The watchman is here that took him.

Q. Vasey, where had you been drinking before you came to his house - A. At Mr. Vaughan's, in Coleman-street. I drank two sixpennyworths of rum and water, and a pint of porter.

Q. You were near two hours in this public-house A. Yes. At Mr. Rogers's I had sixpennyworth of rum and water, and the coachman and I had a shillingsworth of rum and water between us.

JOHN GIRTON . I am an officer. I live at No. 10, Lanthorn-court. I am a ward officer.

Q. Did you go into Mr. Rogers's that evening - A. Yes, about ten minutes before two; I saw Vasey there; he sat in the box as he has described. There was only three there when I went in; the prisoner, the man in the short jacket, and coachman; the other had gone out when I went in. I was drinking a glass of porter at Mr. Rogers's. After I drank my porter I sat down two or three minutes; the prisoner and the man in a short jacket went out; they left the coachman and Vasey; they might go out three or four minutes after them. I went out before Vasey and the coachman. When I went out I saw the prisoner and the man in the short jacket standing against the Globe, on the pavement, at the corner of Fore-street. I had suspicion of the man in the short jacket; I thought I might have seen him before on the Pavement. I went over the way to facing of Fore-street; I waited there about two or three minutes; Mr. Vasey and the man, supposed to be a coachman, came out. When they came out, Vasey went towards his home; the coachman went the other way; he passed by these men standing against the Globe; in half a minute he returned back to them again. Vasey had gone on by himself; the other three were about a minute or two talking together; they went from there across Moorfields, and came out again facing of Short-street. I was going up the pavement. I saw the three men facing of Short-street; one of them went down Little Moorfields, and the other two went up the Pavement. I went up to the top of the Pavement; it was out of the ward of Coleman-street. I did not trouble myself any further. As I was coming down again afterwards, in about a quarter of an hour, I heard the call of watch; I ran up to where I heard the cry proceed from, to Finsbury-square. When I went up I saw the watchman had the prisoner in custody. I am sure he is the same person that I had seen before in Mr. Rogers's public-house.

JOHN WILSON. I am a watchman. On the morning of the 15th I heard a man call watch a little before half past two; I directly came out of my box, and ran towards the sound, into Finsbury-square. I met the prisoner running towards me; I seized him, and then I sprang my rattle for assistance. The prisoner was in a flurry. The patrol and Mr. Vasey came up; Vasey bid me hold up the lanthorn to his face; I did; he said, that is the man that knocked me down. I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Was there anything the matter with the prisoner's little finger - A. The skin was knocked off the little finger on his right hand, as if fresh done, and bleeding. The prisoner is the man I took in custody, and the man the prosecutor charged with knocking him down.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . The prisoner is the man that was brought in custody of Wilson to the watch-house. I observed his finger cut, and blood on his waistcoat; I asked him how he got it; he said he got it in a bit of a row. I searched him; nothing was found upon him.

THOMAS ROGERS . I keep the Swan and Hoop public-house. On the morning of the 15th, I remember the prisoner and Vasey being at my house, and also the witness Girton. I have heard the account the other witness has given, it is correct; they went out as has been stated. Vasey appeared to be the worse for liquor. He had one sixpennyworth of rum and water in my house, and part of a shillings-worth.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of the robbery than a child unborn.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . aged 29.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-56

341. EDWARD BRAZELY and SUSANNAH BRAZELY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , twenty-six yards of linen, value 3 l. the property of George Bartrop and Nevil Oliver , in the dwelling-house of William Harris .

GEORGE BARTROP . My partner's name is Nevil Oliver ; we are linen-drapers , 297, Holborn.

Q. Do you remember the delivery of some Irish linen at your shop - A. Yes. On the 12th of January we received a box of Irish linen on the partnership's account; it remained until the night of the 24th undisturbed, on the morning of the 25th, the night that the fire happened at Messrs. Corbyn and Company's premises. On account of the alarm we moved some of our effects to Mr. William Harris , an optician, No. 50, Holborn, an opposite neighbour; and to Mr. John Norris , a few doors off. I do not recollect the number.

Q. Do you know which of the two houses the Irish linen was taken to - A. Our stock of Irish linen was taken to the two houses, but this piece of Irish liner that was lost was taken to Mr. Harris's; the pieces of linen were marked from number 1 to 20, and the cost price was marked on them; besides the cost price, is O and W, which is the mark that we use for half-a-crown; the O for two shillings, and W for sixpence; the name of the manufacturer was on the outside, as it is to all linens, generally on the outside of the piece of cloth. After the linens were removed to Mr. Harris's, I picked them up in the parlour myself. I have every reason to believe the bulk of these linens were removed to Mr. Harris's. They were marked off, but not removed away, consequently they were the more easy to be got at. The whole box had been marked that day. They were taken that night, on the alarm of fire, to Mr. Harris's, and brought back in the morning, before our shop was open. It was the same morning they were brought away about half past seven. My young men brought them back. I did not superintend the bringing them back.

Q. Do you know anything of the prisoners - A. The woman prisoner lived servant to Mr. Harris. I know her person. She was in the room when the goods were piled up.

Q. How long was it before you suspected any of your linens were gone - A. I never did suspect when they were brought; I never counted them again. They were counted when delivered, but not counted when brought back. I found it out on the 7th of March. I had information. I accompanied Mr. Harris and a constable, now in court, and Mr. Ingram, to a house in Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road, where Edward Brazely worked and lodged. On opening one of his boxes, this piece of Irish linen, with other things, were discovered. Edward Brazely was then in the watchhouse, and Susannah Brazely in the Poultry Compter. Susannah Brazely had left Mr. Harris, and went to live with Mr. Ingram, of Cheapside.

Q. How do you know they were his lodgings - A. Mr. Moody, a silk dyer, the person that he worked for and lived with, told us that he lodged there.

Q. What did you find in the room - A. One piece of linen, my property; it was marked O W; it is now in court. I valued it in the indictment three pounds; the prime cost three pounds five shillings.

Q. How did you open the box - A. Edward Brazeley gave up the key of the box to the constable.

NATHANIEL BILLIARD . I am shopman to Messrs. Bartrop and Oliver. I was in their employ when the fire broke out at Corbyu's. I, Thomas Pink , and Thomas Pickering assisted in taking the goods from my master's shop to Mr. Harris's. It was Irish linen; we took it off the counter. Susannah Brazely opened the door. I laid the goods I carried against the parlour window. The door of the parlour was open every time I went. The next morning, about seven o'clock, I assisted in removing the goods back. Susannah Brazely then was scowering the room.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am an optician.

Q. You keep the house to which these articles were removed - A. I do; I occupy the whole house. Susannah Brazely was my servant. I was present when Edward Brazely 's box was searched, at Mr. Moody's, at the time the piece of Irish linen was found that Mr. Bartrop noticed to be his.

Q. Do you know anything of Edward Brazely - A. Not in the least; I have every reason to believe he was not in my house on the night these pieces of Irish linen were brought. A servant of mine is here to testify he was not; his name is Thomas Pickering .

JOHN BLAKE . I am a constable. I was called upon by Mr. Ingram, the hatter, to go after Edward Brazely , he had suspicion he had a hat of his. I went to the house where he lodged, No. 8, Windmill-street, with Mr. Bartrop, Mr. Ingram, and Mr. Harris. I opened the box, and took the piece of Irish linen out. I left the piece of linen at Hatton Garden office, in Read's possession.

THOMAS PICKERING . I am a servant to Mr. Harris; I was so at the time of the fire. I assisted in removing the goods from Mr. Bartrop's to master; what goods I took I put in the parlour. I knew both the prisoners. Edward Brazely was not in the house on that night or day. Susannah left master about ten days after the fire.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. This piece of Irish linen was given into my custody by Blake, the constable; I have had it ever since; I now produce it.

Prosecutor. It is the property of me and my partner; it is marked 11, O W; it is my marking.

Edward Brazely's Defence. I am innocent of this charge. My wife brought these things to me, and told me to lock them up in my box at Mr. Moody's. On Sunday she sent the key to me; she said, I might want the key, as they would search the box; every thing in my box she had bought; it was safe to let the box be examined.

Susannah Brazely's Defence. I did not scour the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-57

342. GEORGE CROFTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , six pounds weight of tea, value 43 s. the property of William Evans , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BORAM . I am an apprentice to Mr. Evans, grocer , in St. John-street, in the parish of St. Sepulchre .

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you know his person - A. Quite well. On the 14th of April, between seven and eight, he came into my master's shop; he asked for two ounces of Spanish juice; he paid me for it; he then asked me for a quarter of a pound of soap. When I was cutting the soap he took the tea and ran into the street. The tea was in a bag, ready to be sent off; six pounds; forty-three shillings was the value of it; that is what it cost my master. I have the liberty of looking at the bills. The tea was sold for forty-five shillings. After the prisoner took the tea, he ran sharp out of the shop; I followed him, crying, stop thief. He throwed the tea down. I kept running after him. He crossed the street; I took him before he reached over the street; by running, I trod on his heel; we both fell down together. I secured him, and took him back to the shop, and gave him into custody. A gentleman took the tea into the shop. When I got up I saw him with the tea; and when the gentleman brought the tea into the shop I could tell it was the same tea, by the fold of the tea. There was a bill of the tea in it. I put the tea up myself. I gave the parcel of tea to Thomas Hudson, the constable.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am patrol of St. John-street. I saw the prisoner and Boram struggling together in St. John-street. The last witness charged him with stealing the tea. I took the prisoner into custody.

THOMAS HUDSON . I am a constable. Boram delivered the tea to me with the bill in it as it is now.

Boram. This is the same tea that was brought back by the gentleman; it is the parcel I saw the prisoner take up and run away with it. It is my master's property. The shop is part of the dwelling-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor; I have no recollection of what passed. The next morning I found myself in the watchhouse.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18140420-58

343. HANNAH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , a mantle, value 1 l. a spencer, value 10 s. two petticoats, value 4 s. a veil, value 3 s. and a shift, value 2 s. the property of Mary Kirby , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Edward Parkers .

MRS. PARKERS. Q. What is your name - A. Parkers.

MARY KIRBY. I was a fellow servant with the prisoner in the house of Mrs. Parkers. The prisoner was in the service before me. I went there between nine and ten o'clock on Saturday night. The family dined out on the Sunday. The prisoner was house-maid; I was cook. She took my things up in the garret after I came. The blue cloth mantle I wore when I came to the place, I took up stairs, and put by the bedside, on a chair. When my things was taken away that was taken away with the rest.

Q. Was there a velvet spencer - A. Yes, and two white dimity petticoats, one new shift made and one unmade, and a cotton gown. I had all those things in the garret. On the Sunday after the family were gone out, Hannah Brown sent me out to get some porter. I staid about two minutes, and when I came back I went into the kitchen to dinner. The prisoner appeared as if she heard something up stairs; she went up stairs. Presently she called out, cook. I answered, what is the matter. She answered, there is a man gone out with a bundle. I asked her to open the door, to follow the man. She shut the door again, and insisted upon me going up stairs to see what was lost. I went up the stairs, and the first thing I saw was the coverlid of our bed was on the two pair landing, and my things were in it.

Q. Were all your things in the coverlid - A. All that were left.

Q. Was there the blue cloth mantle, the spencer, and the things that have been mentioned - A. No, they were gone. Some of the other things were in the coverlid; the petticoats, cotton gown, the new shift made up, were gone; the shift not made was in the coverlid. I suspected the prisoner, and got a search warrant.

Q. What was the day when the things were taken away - A. On Sunday the 3d of April, I applied for a search warrant on Monday the 4th of April. On Wednesday morning, the constable came with the search warrant and searched the prisoner's box; he got the key of the box from the prisoner, and in the prisoner's box was found my silk handkerchief folded up in her own petticoat; nothing else of mine was in her box; on a shelf by the bedside was found a shift marked in my own name, and under the bed I found the remainder of the articles that I lost; my master then desired I would leave the house, I being a stranger in the house.

Q. What country girl are you - A. I came from Ireland.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18140420-59

344. JAMES BUTCHER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Protheroe , about the hour of twelve at night on the 9th of February , and stealing therein a box coat, value 5 l. the property of Edward Protheroe .

SAMUEL BAILEY . I am coachman to Edward Protheroe ; he lives in Harley-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone .

Q. When was it that anything happened to this coach-house - A. On the night of the 9th of February the coach-house was broken open, and a box coat taken away.

Q. What connection has the coach-house with the dwelling-house - A. It is attached to the dwelling-house; there is a door way from the coach-house to the stable, and another door way from the stable to the dwelling-house; it is part of the dwelling-house. At seven o'clock in the night I was in the coach-house; when I came out I left nobody there; I locked the door; I brought the key away with me. I was alarmed at half past eleven at night by George Abbot , a coachman. I had the key with me then; I got up, and went to the coach-house immediately. I found the coach-house door thrown wide open; the stable door lock had been picked apparently. We go through the stable door into the coach-house; that was the door I had locked the same night before I went into the coach-house to see what was the matter. I observed my box coat was gone. I had worn the box coat about two months. It was my master's property. I have seen the coat since in Mr. Foy's possession.

Q. Was there any day light remaining when you locked up the stable - A. No, it was dark.

SAMUEL JOSEPH . Q. Do you know Butcher, the prisoner - A. Yes; I was in the habit of dealing with him. I cannot tell what day it was when he came to me, it was between twelve and one o'clock; he told me to go to his wife, he had left a great coat with her for me to buy; I was to give two-pounds for it; he had one box coat to dispose off. I saw his wife; I gave her two pounds for it. I brought the coat away with me. I parted with it to Mr. Foy. I was in custody. I told my children to take it to Mr. Foy. I come here to day from the house of correction.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I produce the coat; I received it of Joseph's son.

Bailey. That is the coat I wore; it is my master's property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18140420-60

345. JOHN DAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , fifteen ounces of silver, value 20 s. the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

THOMAS PIHER. I am a stone-mason. I am employed in clearing away the rubbish at the Custom House . The prisoner was my labourer . The prisoner was one of the labourers to turn up the rubbish. There was as many officers as labourers, to see what

was turned up. The labourers wore a ticket to shew their employ. The prisoner had been eight or nine months in my employ; I was satisfied with his industry; I never suspected his integrity before.

SAMUEL SABINE TAYLOR . I am an extra weigher at the Custom House. On the 26th of February, I was in Water-lane; that is a street leading from the Custom House; I saw the prisoner coming down the lane; he had this ticket on him. I searched him; in his left hand waistcoat pocket I took the silver forks which I produce; they are partly melted; and in his right hand waistcoat pocket I took these silver bowls of spoons; in his hat I found these melted pieces of silver. I asked him where he picked them up; he said, off the ruins. He said he was going to Mr. Piper for a wheelbarrow; it was his duty to have given them to an officer. There is thirty-two ounces in all.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-61

346. MARK PEMBER and EDMUND BURKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , one door, value 3 l. the property of John Patrick .

JOHN PATRICK . I live in Newgate-street; I carry on the lamp and oil business ; the two prisoners were my servants .

Q. You also had a servant of the name of Sheffield - A. I had. Some time ago I had altered my shop front, and taken the door off. I placed the door in a cellar in the neighbourhood with other property. That door was taken from the cellar without my knowledge and consent. In consequence of information from Sheffield, I employed two officers to go to the house of Paul, a carpenter, on Saffron-hill. The officers brought back to me the same door that I had lost. The door is worth three pounds. I have no partner.

JOHN SHEFFIELD . I am in the employment of the prosecutor. In consequence of something that occurred, I communicated to the prosecutor the taking of this door; it was taken on the 7th of March from the cellar in Greyfriars, in the occupation of Mr. Patrick. We all three took the door from the cellar; Pember sold it to Paul, a timber merchant, on Saffron-hill. Pember sold the door to Paul for nine shillings; Burke and I watched him to see him take the door to Paul's. The money was to be shared between us. We went to the coffee-house the corner of Fleet-market, and had coffee for breakfast with part of the money Pember got of Paul for the door.

GEORGE PAUL. I am a carpenter; I live on Saffron-hill. In the month of March, Pember, Burke, and Sheffield brought a door to me; I gave them nine shillings for it; that was the full value of it to me.

- DRINKWATER. I am a city officer. I went to Paul's and found this door.

Prosecutor. It is my door.

PEMBER, GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

BURKE, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-62

347. MARK PEMBER and EDMUND BURKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , three hundred pounds of iron, value 20 s. a lanthorn, value 4 l. and a basket, value 6 d. the property of John Patrick .

JOHN SHEFFIELD . I saw the iron bars taken from the cellar; they were taken one morning at breakfast time, about five days after the door; they were taken by me, Pember, and Burke. We took the iron bars and a large brass York lanthorn, to Butler, in Chick-lane, Smithfield. The lanthorn was sound before we took it. Pember kicked the glass all out of it. It was plate. The lanthorn was worth six or seven pounds. Pember and Burke both carried the iron and the brass. I went with them, and saw them carry it; the brass lanthorn and the old iron was carried at twice. We received of Butler for the iron twenty shillings, and eight shillings and sixpence for the brass.

JOHN PATRICK . I had a York lanthorn in my cellar; I gave five pounds for it in exchange. It was all plate glass. The iron rails were taken from the front and back of my house.

JOHN BUTLER . I live in Chick-lane. The prisoners brought some old iron; I think it was the latter end of February; I paid them thirteen or fourteen shillings for the iron, and eight shillings and sixpence for the brass.

- DRINKWATER. I went to the last witness's house, and took away this basket.

Prosecutor. It is my basket; it is worth sixpence.

Pember's Defence. I know nothing at all of it.

Burke's Defence. I am as innocent as a new-born child.

PEMBER, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

BURKE, GUILTY , aged 15,

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-63

348. ANN WATLIN and MARY BARNARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , twenty-five yards of linen-cloth, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of George Vipond and George Remington , privately in their shop .

GEORGE REMINGTON . My partner's name is George Vipond ; we are linen-drapers , 29, Ludgate-hill, in the parish of St. Martin's, Ludgate . On the evening of the 14th of March, about five o'clock, I was standing near the door in the shop. I observed the prisoners coming from the interior of the shop; from their manner and appearance I suspected them, I seized hold of Watlin, and took from her the piece of Irish-linen in question; she had it folded up in her apron. I perceived the apron projected out, that excited my suspicion. She said, she did not bring it out of my shop, but had picked it up at the threshold of my door. I took it from her, and held Watlin; Barnard was a little before. I turned Watlin in the shop. I said, if one of the young men would take her, I would go after the other. I pursued

Barnard into a passage just by, and brought her back; she walked quick. When I stopped Watlin, Barnard was standing in Horse-shoe-court, as if at a loss where to go. When I took hold of Barnard she threw a piece of gingham from herself; it is not our property. The value of the piece I took from Watlin is more than two pounds ten-shillings.

JOSEPH HENDERSON . I am shopman to Messrs. Vipond and Remington. I saw both the prisoners come into our shop as companions, they asked to see some pieces of calico; I shewed them some. Watlin bought two yards, and paid me. I served them at the back part of the shop; there were entire pieces of linen laying on the counter where I served them. There were three shopmen in the shop besides me; they are not here. I did not miss any thing until after Mr. Remington had stopped Watlin; I then discovered a piece of linen was missing from the back part of the shop.

WILLIAM KIMBER . I saw Barnard take something from her and threw it over the counter. This is the piece of linen-cloth that was delivered to me.

Mr. Remington. It has our shop mark upon it.

Watlin's Defence. I saw a woman drop the piece of linen at the door; I picked it up. I was going to give it to the gentleman. When the gentleman stopped me I told him so.

Barnard's Defence. I knew nothing of the woman, I never saw her before in my life; I did not go into the shop. I stood at the door.

Henderson. Barnard was with Watlin while she was looking at the calico at the back part of the shop.

WATLIN, GUILTY, aged 47,

BARNARD, GUILTY, aged 34,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-64

349. RICHARD BALDWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , one waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of David Farrow .

SAMUEL TILT. I am shopman to David Farrow , salesman , 73, Fleet-market . On the 9th of April, between one and two mid-day, as I was in the shop, a lad came in, and told me that we had lost a waistcoat that hung at the door-post outside of the shop; he told me if I would come out he would shew me the person that had stolen it. I immediately left the shop, and saw the prisoner about two hundred yards from the shop; he turned up Stonecutter-street, in company with another lad. I went up to him, and laid hold of him by the collar; he had the waistcoat in his hand looking at it. I delivered him to the constable. John Hodgson has the waistcoat. I had seen the waistcoat hanging up a few minutes before.

JOHN HODGSON . The lad and the waistcoat were delivered to me. This is the waistcoat.

Tilt. It is my master's waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the waistcoat at the corner of Stonecutter-street.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-65

350. THOMAS AUBERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , ten pounds weight of mutton, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Chullis .

THOMAS CHULLIS . I am a butcher , in Fore-street . The leg of mutton was taken out of my shop on the 11th of March; I have a witness here that saw the prisoner take it.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a journeyman butcher, I live opposite of Mr. Chullis's. On Friday, the 11th of March, about ten minutes past eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner alone in Mr. Chullis's shop; he took a leg of mutton down, and brought it out of the shop with him; I followed him, stopped him, and brought him back. The leg of mutton was restored to Mr. Chullis.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-66

351. THOMAS COLEMEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February, three rands of twine, value 4 s. one stone-bottle, value 3 d. and one pint of turpentine, value 1 s. the property of William Jones and Thomas Jones .

WILLIAM JONES . My partner's name is Thomas Jones ; we are oilmen , and live in Queen-street, Cheapside . On the 18th of February, I was coming down the street, I saw the prisoner come from the warehouse; he seemed loaded; he appeared to have something in his pockets. I let him pass me, called him back; he followed me into the accompting-house. I took hold of his coat; I found one rand of twine in his coat pocket, and two other rands of twine in his other coat pocket, and some red herrings; and a bottle of turpentine was found by the officer in his breeches pocket at the Compter.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner after he was given into my custody; I found this bottle of turpentine in his breeches.

Prosecutor. The turpentine is worth three shillings and sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the twine in the dust hole.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-67

352. DANIEL GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 32 s. and ten yards of muslin, value 2 l. the property of the Rev. James Bearblock , clerk .

THOMAS ROWLESON . I am a servant to Mr. Bearblock, he is a clergyman . On the 10th of March, between one and two o'clock in the middle of the day, I took the goods out of the Red Lion-inn warehouse, and put in my cart; I had been with a load of hay. My cart was standing in Red Lion-street. I put the parcel into the bag at the forepart of the cart to take it to Mr. Bearblock, at Hanchurch

I left the cart to go back into the yard again, and when I came back to my cart, the parcel was taken away.

JOHN HEATH. I am a linen-draper, in the Minories.

Q. Did you make up any parcel for the Rev. Mr. Bearblock - A. It was made up by one of my young men; it contained twenty-eight yards of cotton and ten yards of muslin; directed for the Rev. Mr. Bearblock, Hanchurch. I desired my servant to take it to the Red Lion, Whitechapel, and have it hooked; three pounds twelve shillings and eight-pence was the value of the parcel.

JAMES GARROWAY . I am a servant to Charles Jones , cheesemonger, in Whitechapel; that is very near the Red Lion. On Thursday, the 10th of March, between one and two o'clock, I saw this cart standing near the Red Lion-yard; I saw the prisoner put his hand in the front of the cart, and take a brown paper parcel out; he ran away, across Whitechapel, and up Essex-street; I lost sight of him there. I saw him about two hours afterwards in the custody of Miller and Freeman, officers. I am certain the prisoner is the man that took the parcel out of the cart.

JOHN FREEMAN. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of March; I took him at the back of Levy's house in Wentworth-street. Miller was at the front; I went to the back of the house. It is a common receiving house, kept by one Levy. I saw him coming out of the back of Levy's house. I took two of them; the prisoner was one of them. I then took him to the front of the house.

Q. Is there any appearance of a shop to this house - A. It is a kind of a chandler's shop. There I found my brother officer prevented from going up stairs. I saw the paper that apparently contained the parcel, burning; the paper was burning in a back room on the ground floor. I told the prisoner I took him for stealing a parcel out of a cart in Red Lion-street; he said, he knew nothing of it.

Q. Did you know his person before - A. Yes, I know his person well. The parcel has never been found.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a brother officer to the last witness. I went into Levy's house at the front door, and in a little room there was a great deal of brown paper in flames; I got some of it out, and was in the act of trampling it under my feet to put the flames out. A young man that was in the house ran up stairs, his name is Levy; I believe he is a relation to the man that keeps the house. He ran up stairs, and I after him to the top of the first landing; there they have got a door that shuts to; he barred the door against me.

Q. What became of the parcel the paper contained - A. I do not know. At the top of the house they have got a pigeon-trap. They might have throwed it into another yard. I went down for the poker to break the door open. He let me in after some time.

Q. Keep a good look out after this Mr. Levy - A. Yes; he does a great deal of mischief.

Q. What number is this receiving house - A. I don't know the number; it is nearly opposite of Gulstone-street; it comes into Whitechapel.

FRANCIS TAYLOR . I am ostler at the Red Lion inn, Whitechapel. Mr. Heath's young man brought the parcel, he gave me two pence; I gave it to Rowleson.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by when the gentleman took me in custody; I don't know what I was taken in custody for.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-68

353. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Lee , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 7th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, eight glass-cloths, value 8 s. a pinafore, value 18 d. two aprons, value 1 s. and seven remnants of cloth, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Lee .

MRS. LEE. I am the wife of Joseph Lee ; I live in Fulham-road, near Chelsea-common ; my husband is a gardener ; he has not done any thing for these fifteen years; he is the occupier of the house where I live. On Thursday, the 7th of April, it happened the prisoner broke into my wash-house.

Q. Who saw him there - A. The servant, Mary Walbank ; she is here. I secured the door when I went to bed; I secured the door at eleven o'clock at night. There is only one door to the house; it was the wash-house that was broken open. The wash-house is part of the dwelling-house; it is under the same roof; it communicates to the rest of the house; that door was secured by two bolts and a bell. I fastened these bolts myself; I see every night that they are fastened; there are no key to the door.

Q. There is not a separate door that went out of the house, is there - A. No, only the outer door of the house.

Q. Did you leave any body else up in the house besides the maid servant - A. No; I was the last person up, and between three and four, the servant saw a light in the wash-house; she informed me that she saw a light in the wash-house. I arose, and went and fetched a constable. I did not see the prisoner: I saw a light. The constable came as fast as he could. The constable and my son took the prisoner; he was taken when I came back again.

Q. Do you know whether there were any articles taken from the wash-house - A. He was seen to take the linen out of a copper; I did not see him in possession of these things. I examined the house; there was nothing gone but what he had by him in the yard.

Q. Did you see him in the yard - A. Yes, and I saw the goods that belonged to my husband in the yard; they were glass-cloths and kitchen-rubbers; eight glass-cloths, one pinafore, a round towel, seven rags, two aprons, and two knife-cloths; these I had seen in the copper the over night; when I returned I saw they were gone from the wash-house, and were out in the yard.

Q. Could you see how any person get into the house - A. Yes, by boring holes over the door large

enough to admit a hand to pull the bolt back. The officer has got the things found in the yard; I shall know them when I see them.

MARY WALBANK . I live with Mrs. Lee; I was with her on the 7th of April. Mrs. Lee was the last in the house that was up. I did not hear any thing. I awoke: I thought it might be between three and four; I looked round me; I saw a light in the wash-house. I got up. I saw the prisoner take some things out of the copper; I went and told my mistress of it.

Q. You perceived a person take something out of the copper - A. Yes; he had a light with him. I awoke my mistress, and then my young master; I told them there were thieves in the house. My young master's name is John Lee ; he got up, and then we went down in the kitchen, and waited while the constable came.

Q. Do you know what became of the person with the light - A. He was taking the things out of the copper I when I first saw him; when I came down I saw him again; he was taking the linen out. He took them outside of the wash-house; he was going to wring them out, to tie them up in a bundle. The constable came before my mistress, and took the prisoner in the yard.

Q. Did you observe any thing that was done to the door - A. I saw the way he got in, he bored a hole that was large enough to put in his hand and arm to draw back the bolts. The prisoner is the person. I shall know the things again; I examined them then.

JOHN LEE . I was called up by the last witness. Upon receiving the alarm I went down stairs; I looked through the staircase window; I saw the prisoner with a light in his hand. I then went down stairs, and opened the street door, the outer door at the front of the house.

Q. Which was the door that was unbolted - A. The wash-house door. I waited at the door till the constable came. As soon as the constable came I went round to the back of the house, where I found the prisoner in the act of wringing some of the linen that he had taken out of the wash-house. I then struck the prisoner with a stick that I had in my hand, and with the assistance of the constable I secured him.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. I did not.

Q. The front door had been locked, had it - A. Yes; I found the lock and all fastened; it was only the bolts of the wash-house door that was undone. The wash-house has a communication with the rest of the house; there are three windows to the wash-house, which open to the dwelling-house, and a door likewise.

ROBERT HASSENDON . I am a constable; I live about three or four hundred yards from the prosecutor's house.

Q. You were called upon on the morning of the 8th by Mrs. Lee - A. I went immediately; I took the prisoner in custody; he was in the act of wringing the linen. I took him to the watchhouse. I searched him. I found a stock and two center bits on his person, a chisel also, and a knife.

Q. What became of the things that he was in the act of wringing out - A. I moved them from the spot to the basket; they were afterwards given to Cooper, the officer. I moved them from the side of the wash-house door; I left the things in the care of Mrs. Lee. I left the things on the top of the wash-house lid; I ordered them not to be touched until I returned. I found them in the same state as I left them when I returned, and then I delivered them to Cooper, the officer. I returned in less than an hour afterwards.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am a Queen-square officer. I was applied to by the last witness to receive the things. On Friday the 8th, at two o'clock in the morning, I went with the last witness to the place where the robbery was done; there I found the things in a wet state at the washhouse door; some of it had been wrung, and some not. We brought them away. I examined the premises where the robbery had been done. On looking at the washhouse door there appeared to be seven or eight cuts with a centre bit, which had all been broken into one just over the top bolt, and there was one round one just over the bottom bolt, so that any person might put their finger in and pull the bolt back. I took the things away, and went to the watchhouse at Knightsbridge, where the prisoner was confined. I searched the prisoner; here is a silk handkerchief and a white apron I found upon him. I had information where he lived. I searched his lodgings the next morning; I there found tools of various sorts, such as chisels, centre bits, tools used by house-breakers. These are the articles that belong to the prosecutrix. I am sure they are the things I found in her premises.

Q. to Prosecutrix. I understood you at first to say there was only one outer door to the house; we find now there is a door to the washhouse at the back of the house, and an outer door at the front of the house - A. Yes. The front door was fast when I came down stairs; I fastened it the over night. There is a lock to that door, a bolt, and a bar. These articles produced by Cooper are my property. They are marked, Hatchett's hotel. They were in my copper for the purpose of washing; they were in a wet state when taken away; they were washed the same night; they were safe in the copper when I went to bed. I fastened the washhouse door with two bolts and a latch. The constable left the linen some time in the the washhouse; they had not been meddled with at all.

The prisoner said nothing his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-69

354. SAMUEL JACKSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Protheroe , esq. about the hour of eight in the night of the 19th of November , and stealing therein two coats, value 4 l. his property.

SAMUEL BAYLEY . I am coachman to Edward Protheroe , esq; his house is 39, Harley-street ; the stables looks into a mews; we can go from the kitchen into the stables; the stables are enclosed with the house wall, and there is a door from the stables into the mews.

Q. In the month of November, was this door shut at night - A. Yes, it was; I shut it about eight o'clock; it was then quite dark. I secured the folding doors of the coach-house with the iron bar; I put the iron bar into the staple, and secured it with a peg. I was ordered at half past nine. I went and found the coach-house doors wide open. I missed the box coat and the livery coat; I had just pulled them off at eight o'clock, when I shut the stable-door and the coach-house doors.

BENJAMIN WOOLF . I am a salesman. I have known the prisoner perfectly well for three years; I have bought several box coats of him. I bought this great coat and a strait made livery coat of the prisoner before the frost set in. I suspected he did not come honestly by them. I have often bought of him under the same circumstance. I was apprehended for this business, and am under bail now.

THOMAS PACE. I am an officer. I searched Woolf's house in February last; we found this coat with several others in his house.

LEAH LEE . I know the prisoner. I have seen him at my uncle Woolf's. I have seen him at different times bring box coats to my uncle's, and when my uncle has not been at home, he has left box coats with me. I have seen him sell box coats to my uncle.

JAMES GILLMORE . I searched the prisoner's lodgings. I there found several stable keys; one of them fitted the lock of Mr. Protheroe's stable door.

Bayley. That is my master's great coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the keys or the robbery, and Woolf is a man I never saw with my eyes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140420-70

355. SAMUEL JACKSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sir Robert Buggin , knt. about the hour of ten in the night of the 7th of July , and stealing therein a box coat, value 3 l. his property.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I live at No. 5, Cumberland-place. I am coachman to Sir Robert Buggin ; that is his place of residence; his coachhouse is at the back of Quebec-mews ; it adjoins the house; there is a door from the stable to the house. In July last, I was living with Sir Robert Buggin . On the 7th of July last, I came home with the carriage at ten o'clock at night; I left the box coat on the box of the carriage, and fastened the coach house door with the bar; I locked the stable door, and took the key with me. At twelve o'clock I went into the room over the coachhouse, and went to bed. In the morning when I took the carriage out to wash, the coat was gone. I found the staple that held the padlock was drawn. I have seen the coat since, and have sworn to it.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I executed a search warrant in the house of Benjamin Woolf on the 9th of February; I found this coat I now produce, with many others. In consequence of advertising it, it was owned by Sir Robert Buggin 's servant. We found this coat in Woolf's shop.

BENJAMIN WOOLF . I keep a clothes shop. I have dealt with the prisoner three years, off and on, in purchasing clothes that he brought me; he brought this coat to me the third night of the illumination in the summer; he asked me two pounds for it; I gave him thirty shillings for it. I did not think he came honestly by it, taking less than the coat was worth. I attend here to protect myself from any prosecution.

LEAH LEE . I live at No. 7, Hemmitt's-row, St. Martin's-lane, with my uncle, Benjamin Woolf . I have seen the prisoner come to my uncle's several times with box coats; I have seen that coat in my uncle's shop. I can only speak to his frequently coming there and selling box coats.

THOMAS PACE . We apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of January; we then had information that he was a deserter from a King's ship; afterwards he drawed up a false affidavit; the witness, Leah Lee , gave him a guinea to pay for it.

Q. to Leah Lee . Do you remember taking from your uncle for the prisoner a one-pound note - A. Yes, I was sent by my uncle; I took him a one-pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness here that paid the money for the affidavit at the time I was pressed; I was discharged. My friends knew I had never been on board a ship. I never saw Woolf nor Leah Lee before with my eyes. My friend Sandiford came forward and paid the money for the affidavit, and by that means I was discharged.

ALEXANDER SANDIFORD . I know the prisoner when he was taken up for a deserter; I assisted him with one pound; it was my own money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-71

356. SAMUEL JACKSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Long , about the hour of nine in the night of the 25th of November , and stealing therein a box coat, value 3 l. his property.

WILLIAM WISE . I am a coachman to Robert Long , esq. I lost the box coat on the 25th of November, from the coachhouse; the coachhouse and stables adjoins the back of the house; the house is No. 8, Doughty-street, in the parish of St. Pancras . The coachhouse and stables communicates with the dwelling-house. My great coat hung up on a truss of straw in the stable; I saw it there after it was dark. I fastened the stable door and the coachhouse doors quite secure. About eight o'clock I came to do up my horses, the coat was gone, and the stable door open; the key of the stable door was worked out, and laid on the floor. I had left it in the lock of the stable door; another key must have been put in the lock to have opened the door, or else have picked the lock.

JAMES GILLMORE . This is one of the coats we found at Woolf's. On the 9th of February, I and my brother officer searched Wool's premises; we brought away a great many coats, and this among the rest.

BENJAMIN WOOLF . This coat, I bought of the prisoner; I knew it by taking a button off, and putting

another on it soon after I bought it of the prisoner. It was before Christmas. That is all I recollect of it.

Wise. That is my master's coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw Woolf before with my eyes until I was taken in custody

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18140420-72

357. WILLIAM ROBERT CLEMENTS and JOHN BECKETT CLEMENTS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jackson , about the hour of seven on the night of the 1st of December , and stealing therein a pair of boots, value 2 l. two hats, value 2 l. a coat, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 12 s. and five plated candlesticks, value 3 l. the property of John Jackson ; a tea caddy, value 12 s. a pair of sugar-tongs, value 8 s. a silver tea-ladle, value 4 s. a pair of boots, value 30 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 30 s. the property of John Herdfield . And WILLIAM CLARK for receiving the aforesaid goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN HERDFIELD . I live with Mr. Jackson; he lives at No. 8, York-street, Portman-square . On the 1st of December, the housekeeper and I went out together, and left no one in the house about three o'clock in the day. I fastened all the shutters and locked the doors. I am sure all the street doors were fastened when I went out. We returned home about half past eight in the evening. I took the key out of my pocket, and went out to unlock the area gate; I found it shut, but unlocked. I went down the area steps to get into the house; the door was bolted inside; at last I got in at the stair window. I then found the closet in the pantry broken open, where I keep my plate; there were five plated candlesticks gone, and one silver table-spoon. I went up stairs into the drawing-room; there were two new hats lost.

Q. Whose property were they - A. Mr. Jackson's. In the wardrobe, a coat, waistcoat, and a pair of small-clothes were gone. In the next room to the bedroom, a new pair of stockings and a new pair of boots were gone.

Q. Who was the owner of all these things - A. Me and my master what I lost in the pantry; the five candlesticks are master's; the table-spoon and two pair of boots are mine; the tea-caddy and sugar-tongs were mine. My things are worth more than forty shillings, and master's property I am sure is worth more than forty shillings. Master paid for his boots three pounds; they are very stout.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. I apprehended William Robert Clements on Wednesday the 14th of February last. I searched him. I afterwards went to his lodging. He told me himself it was his lodging. I found two pick lock keys. I found none of the articles in this indictment. I afterwards went to the lodging of John Beckett Clements by the order of the magistrate; he lived at 24, North-street, Mary-le-bone. I first apprehended Clark. Clark told me he had these boots of a man of the name of Joseph, who is here as a witness. The next day after I took Clark I apprehended Joseph. Joseph said to the magistrate, if the magistrate would permit him he would disclose the man that did the robbery. Johnson took Joseph to shew us the person that he bought the boots of. We did not take Joseph into the house; we left him outside while we went in to search that place. We searched his lodgings; in a drawer of the prisoners we found forty-two picklock keys, a dark lanthorn, some phosphorus, wax tapers, and an iron crow, in North-street, Mary-le-bone; that is John Beckett Clements 's lodging; he had a room there; he did not came back to that lodging. He was not taken until the 1st of April following, and then Johnson and me apprehended him. The iron crow I have since fitted to the marks in the bureau; it exactly fitted when I applied the crow to the marks. The first witness shewed me the wardrobes. I received the boots of the witness, Brown; they have been owned by the first witness.

Q. to Herdfield. Look at these boots - A. They are the boots that I lost upon this occasion. I shewed Mr. Foy the wardrobe. I saw the crow fitted the marks there. These are my master's boots, and these my own.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. I went with Foy to apprehend William Robert Clements on the 26th of February, I think it was. At Portland-green, by the College. A few days before I apprehended him I went to his lodging; he was removing; he had removed all his things except an old bedstead, and behind the bedstead in the fire-place I found this crow, and the day I apprehended him I searched his lodgings at Portland-green; I found in his drawers eleven keys, and on the 1st of April I informed Mr. Foy where John Beckett Clements , the other prisoner, was. I went with him into a public-house in Gerrard-street; we apprehended the other prisoner.

SAMUEL JOSEPH . Q. How long have you known the prisoners, William Robert Clements and his brother - A. About three months. I have known Clark above twenty years; I have been in the habit of meeting him at different houses.

Q. Do you know the house called the Three Tuns in Oxford-street - A. Yes; I have met him there. I was in the habit of going there every day almost.

Q. Do you know the time, or soon after the time, of Mr. Jackson's house being robbed - A. No. I met the two Clements; they came to the Three Tuns in Oxford-street; they told me they had some clothes to sell to me; they wished me to come and see them. I went with them to a little cottage in the New-road to see them; it was in the beginning of December; one of the Clements went with me; I believe it was John Beckett Clements ; it was he that went with me to the cottage in the New-road. We all met at the Three Tuns public-house; we all three went part of the way. I left the brother in the house where he lived, in Mary-le-bone. When I got to the cottage along with John Beckett Clements I bought five plated candlesticks, one new hat, a tea-caddy, some old clothes, and a pair of boots; I bought these of John Beckett Clements ; I do not recollect what I gave him for them. I sold the boots to Clark for twenty-three or twenty-four shillings. I told Clark I bought them of Clements.

Q. Had you any conversation with William Robert Clements - A. No. He lodged in Mary-le-bone-lane. I bought the candlesticks and the other articles of Beckett Clements. That was the man that had the house in the New-road.

Q. to Foy. Do you know which is William Robert Clements - A. William Robert is next to the Jury, and John Beckett is in the middle.

JOHN BROWN. I keep the Three Tuns public-house in Oxford-street.

Q. Do you know any of these prisoners - A. I have seen all the three prisoners at my house; I have seen them all three in the room, and Samuel Joseph in the room with them. I never saw the Clements before February, as I can recollect. I have seen them once or twice since. I purchased this pair of boots of Clark. I bought them of him in the tap-room. Neither of the prisoners were there, only Clark. I gave twenty-six shillings for them, and a shillingsworth of liquor.

William Robert Clements ' Defence. I was unfortunately in the habit of dealing with Joseph so far as buying clothes that I wore myself, and no farther than that. At the time that the burglary has been represented to be committed, and long before that, me and my brother were at variance; and the place that he stated to be mine, and he went along with me, which is very unlikely when we were at variance, and had been a long time.

John Beckett Clements ' Defence. I have bought jewellery of Samuel Joseph , two or three seals, that is all.

Clark's Defence. I bought two pair of boots of Joseph; he told me he bought them at a sale; and the watch he told me he took out of pawn that evening.

JAMES ROWLES. I am a coachman; I live in Fleur-de-lis-court. I was present when Mr. Clark bought two pair of boots of Joseph and a watch. Joseph said he bought the boots at a sale. The burgain was made at the Three Tuns in Oxford-street.

Clark called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

WILLIAM ROBERT CLEMENTS , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

JOHN BECKETT CLEMENTS , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 39.

Of stealing to above the value of 40 s. in the dwelling-house, but not of the burglary .

CLARK, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18140420-73

358. MARY WATTS was indicted for that she, on the 17th of March , feloniously had in her custody and possession three forged bank notes, she knowing them to be forged .

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer of Bow-street office. On Thursday the 17th of March, I went to No. 41, Horn-alley, Little Greenwich, Aldersgate-street. I went there about the middle of the day; I found the prisoner there. I knew it was her house from the information I received; I went there, accompanied by Mr. Fish, one of the inspectors of the Bank of England. I searched the room below stairs, and two rooms up stairs. After I had searched the three rooms and the prisoner, I searched over the stair-case between the uprights, between the lath and plaister; there I found a parcel in a brown paper. The prisoner was with me at that time. That parcel contained bank notes. I said to the prisoner, what is this; she denied knowing anything of it whatever. She said she had lodgers in her house, and probably they might have put it there; and she had had different workmen in the house. I then took her below stairs to Mr. Fish, and shewed him the notes. Mr. Fish said they were forged notes in her presence. She denied knowing anything of them, and mentioned respecting her lodgers, and that she had a workman to fix up a grate. Mr. Fish enquired of her when her lodgers went away; she said they went away in the middle of November. The parcel was quite clean, and had not the appearance of having been there a long time.

Q. In what part of the house did you find these things - A. In the staircase, in a hole in the lath and plaister, between the uprights. These are the notes I found in the parcel; ten one-pound notes, and five two-pound notes.

THOMAS FRANCIS THOMAS . I am one of the clerks at Bow-street office. I took the examination of the prisoner by the magistrate's direction; she then said her lodger was a man, his wife, and child, whom she understood was a butcher, came to lodge with her in October, and staid with her five or six weeks; the butcher then went away; she has had no lodgers ever since; the house has had workmen in it ever since.

ROBERT FISH. I am an inspector of bank notes.

Q. Take these bank notes in your hand, the ten one-pound and five two-pound notes, are all of them forged - A. Yes, they are. The one's are all off the same plate, and the two's are of the same manufactory. The signatures to the one's and the two's are the same hand-writing; the three stated in the indictment are dated 15th of December, 1813.

Q. So that all the one's are dated in the month of December - A. They are. They would not have found their way in circulation in October or November.

HENRY PIPER . I am collector of taxes in the parish in which this house is situated. It is situated in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, in the City of London.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as the child in my arms.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-74

359. HARRIET LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a watch, value 4 l. the property of John Henry Lange , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Simes .

JOHN HENRY LANGE . I live servant with a gentleman in Fenchurch-buildings. On the 7th of April I was returning home from Stepney; I was coming near the hospital in Whitechapel; I met with the

Prisoner, and through persuasion. I went with her into a house in Angel-alley, Whitechapel ; she took me into a room; there I undressed, and went to bed. I laid my things on a chair or a table, I am not sure which. I was a little fresh with drinking.

Q. How long did you stay in the room - A. Not much more than a quarter of an hour. I undressed, and went to bed. I laid my watch on my side of the room; the prisoner left me, and quickly went off before me, and went out of doors directly. I looked for my things; my watch was gone. I called after the prisoner; she did not return. I informed the officer of it. This was on Friday.

Q. Where had you been spending your evening - A. On Stepney-green; it was seven o'clock when I went there.

JOHN WYMSH. I am an apprentice to Mr. Baker, pawnbroker, Houndsditch. On Saturday evening, the 9th of April, the prisoner pledged this watch for one pound. I knew the prisoner before; I have no doubt of her person. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. I gave information to the shop previous to her pledging it. This is the watch.

JOSEPH SCOTT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of April, the prosecutor said that was the girl that robbed him of his watch.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-75

360. JOHN STOW LUNDIE was indicted for that he, on the 15th of April, 1807 , feloniously did forge a certain note for the payment of 10 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like bank note, with the same intention.

THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS, for like offences, only stating it to be a promissory note instead of a bank note.

Mr. Shelton. Q. to the Prisoner. Are you guilty or not guilty - A. I know nothing about it.

Mr. Shelton. Gentlemen of the Jury, you shall enquire whether John Stow Lundie be of sound mind or not.

DR. AINSLEY. Q. In the year 1808, were you first called upon to attend this unfortunate young man - A. I was called first to attend him in June, 1807, and from July, 1808, to the present time; I have visited him till lately.

Q. Has he or not been in a state of derangement - A. Without any hesitation, to the best of my belief he has.

DR. TURNER. Q. Have you visited this man in Newgate as well as Dr. Ainsley - A. I have, the first year he was deranged, and I have resumed my visits; he appears as deranged in his mind now as he was in the year 1808.

VERDICT OF THE JURY - He is not of sane mind .

To be delivered to his friends; to find four sureties in a hundred pounds each, that he shall be forthcoming when called upon .

Mr. Shelton, Q. to ROBERT PEARCE , PETER PLANK , PETER PEARCE , and HENRY HUBBARD . You, and each of you, acknowledge yourselves to be indebted to our Sovereign Lord the King in one hundred pounds each. It is upon condition that when John Stow Lundie is called upon, he shall be forthcoming, and he shall not depart the Court without leave; are you all content - A. Yes.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-76

361. JEREMIAH MAXTEAD and THOMAS GILBERT were indicted for that they, on the 5th of February, in the 43rd year of his Majesty's reign , at Dungeness, in the County of Kent , did aid and abet certain persons, being then on shore, who feloniously did shoot at James Ireland , an officer of the Customs , while he was doing his duty, that is to say in securing a certain lugger, there before lawfully seized, he, the said James Ireland , being on board the said lugger, and the said lugger being within five hundred yards of the coast of Great Britain, and that they, being evil disposed persons, on the same day, did aid and beat the said persons to the jurors unknown, they being on shore with guns and fire arms, who did shoot at James Ireland .

SECOND COUNT, they stood charged as being the principles themselves, shooting at the said person, instead of charging them with aiding and abetting the said persons who did shoot at him.

And in TWO OTHER COUNTS, charged in like manner, only stating the person shot at to be John Dawkins , who was assisting John Ireland to do his duty.

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

JAMES IRELAND . In the month of February, I was mate of the Carter , she was in the service of the Customs. On the night of the 5th of that month, I was doing duty at Dungeness; I had a party of my own men in my own cutter, the Carter; and also a party of men from the Lively cutter; about ten o'clock at night, I saw a lugger; she was standing towards shore, and she run aground. I boarded her immediately; she was a shore. I boarded her with my own men and the men belonging to the Lively.

Q. Upon your boarding her, what became of her crew - A. They immediately left the lugger, and went on shore. The name of the lugger was the Diana; her cargo consisted of six hundred and sixty-five casks of brandy, one hundred and eighteen of rum; (by casks, I mean half anchors, four gallons) twenty-three of vinegar, four of wine, a case of wine, one basket of wine, one hundred and nineteen bags of tobacco, forty-three bags of ditto, twelve bags of pepper, and two chests of tea. I sent to the barracks, and got some of the Lancashire militia. After I got them and was giving the Serjeant orders, the smuglers fired upon me; upon that the Serjeant gave orders for the soldiers to fire; that cleared the beach immediately. I remained with my vessel all night.

JOHN DAWKINS . Q. In February, 1805, did

you belong to the Lively, Excise cutter - A. Yes; I was one of the party that was called in to assist Ireland on the night of the 5th; the seizure was made about ten o'clock.

Q. Do you remember any number of persons assembling and coming on shore - A. Yes; it might be half an hour after the seizure.

Q. Do you remember any one of the persons that came down doing any thing particular to yourself - A. No, I cannot remember who it was. I was wounded in my thumb; I suppose it to be by a cutlass. There was a firing. This musket was presented to me; I twisted it away from the man, and hove it to the other side of the lugger. This musket was presented to me by somebody; the musket touched me; I threw it in the lugger.

COURT. Was there firing from the people on shore - A. Yes, before we began firing.

Q. Was that musket presented at your body - A. Yes; I took it out of the man's hand, and threw it in the lugger.

Q. Did you examine it to see whether it was loaded - A. No. After I was wounded I was taken to a surgeon to get my wound dressed. I cannot say whether it was loaded or not.

WILLIAM FUGELL . I am a shoe-maker; I live at Linn.

Q. Were you carrying on the trade of shoemaking in February, 1805, at Linn - A. Yes, I was.

Q. That is near Dungeness point - A. It is.

Q. In consequence of hearing any thing about a smuggling vessel, did you go to Dungeness - A. Yes, I did. I went to the beach, and when I got there. I saw a smuggling lugger; the lugger had been seized.

Q. Were there any persons assembled there - A. Yes, smugglers the principal part of them; the number was from seventy to an hundred I think. They went down to the lugger first, a great many of them, and then returned to a house at the back of the beach, there was no noise at that time. When they got to the house, there were some ring leaders of them offered a guinea a man if they would procure fire arms, and they would re-take the lugger.

Q. Do you know any of these men that formed the party that offered a guinea a man - A. I know the party that offered it, Jeremiah Maxtead and Thomas Gilbert , they lived at Linn, where I did; I know them perfectly well; I have no doubt about it. In consequence of that offer, the smugglers brought fire arms soon after, and they fired between the lugger and the house; the lugger might be ten rods from the house. When they fired they went nearer the lugger. I do not know any of the persons who fired. I saw the two prisoners about the place, they were soliditing the people on; when they offered the money they were on foot; most of them had horses in general. After the smugglers fired, the soldiers fired; one man was shot, his name was James Walker ; his body was taken and put in a cart by Russel. To say he was a smuggler, I cannot. After I saw this I started home. I did not like much my situation. I got home about twelve o'clock.

GIDEON JACKSON. In the month of February, 1805, I kept a canteen in the battery. I remember the smuggling vessel, the Diana, being seized by the mate of the Carter; I went on the beach between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw from sixty to an hundred smugglers on the beach. I dare say Jeremiah Maxtead and Thomas Gilbert was among them. They offered a guinea to any one or more that would procure fire arms, rescue the lugger; I came away directly. I heard the firing after I got home. I gave information about three or four months ago. I came up to London with Fugell; I have never been to Linn since.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-77

362. MARY ROWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a coat, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a shawl, value 15 s. a gown, value 9 s. and a shirt, value 9 s. the property of Joseph Robson , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Collyer .

MARY ANN ROBSON . My husband's name is Joseph Robson . I lost these things on the 29th of April; I went out about a quarter after two; I returned about a quarter after three. Joseph Collyer keeps the house, and lives in the house. When I returned at three, I took the key out of my pocket; I found my door unlocked, and my drawers were open. I found my husband's coat and other things gone. I saw the prisoner coming down stairs from the garret; I tapped her on the shoulder, and said, you good for nothing woman, you have robbed me. She said, she wanted a mantua-maker; there was no mantua-maker there. There was no lodger in the house but me. I called my landlady up; she is here.

JANE COLLYER . I am the wife of Joseph Collyer ; my husband keeps this house. I saw the prisoner on the stairs, with a lap full of things; she said, she wanted a mantua-maker. I told her there was no harm done if she had made a mistake. I asked her if she would let me look in her lap; she said, no, follow me. She went up stairs again, and threw the things out of her lap on Mrs. Robson's table.

GEORGE WILSON . I am an officer. I produce a shawl, coat, waistcoat, breeches, a gown unmade, and various other articles.

Prosecutrix. These things are all mine.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-78

363. CAROLINE MAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , five yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of John Hughes , privately in his shop .

CHRISTOPHER TRUEMAN . I am shopman to John Hughes, 306, High Holborn ; he is a linen-draper . On the 4th of March, in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop; she said she wanted to purchase a gown. I shewed her various pieces of print during which time I observed the movement of her hands underneath the goods I shewed her, and I perceived

her putting something into her pocket. After she had bought the gown and paid for it, I accused her of having something; I desired to see what she had got; she said it was a printed cotton she had bought elsewhere, and when she shewed it me, I saw it was the same print I had shewn her a few minutes before. This is the print; it is the property of Mr. Hughes.

Prisoner's Defence. I took in mistake, and left the gown I bought on the counter.

Trueman. The gown that she had bought was on the counter.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-79

364. CATHERINE DWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , a coat, value 24 s. the property of Sarah Barry , widow , privately in her shop .

JAMES SMALLHOUSE . I am shopman to Mrs. Barry. This coat hung over the partition in the passage; the collar was in the shop, and the flaps in the passage. I heard myself called; I went into the passage, and saw the prisoner with the coat in her arms in the door-way. It is my mistress's property. There were many people round the door endeavouring to rescue the prisoner.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction, fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-80

365. PATRICK TURNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Raddon , about the hour of ten in the night of the 31st of March , and stealing therein three brass cocks, value 25 s. his property.

ROBERT RADDON . I live in Hatton Wall, Hatton Garden ; I am a plumber . On the 31st of March I was out. I can only speak to the property.

MARY HARRIS . On the 31st of March, near ten o'clock, I was going up Hatton Wall; I saw the prisoner at Mr. Radden's shop window, and when I came back again the prisoner still continued at the window. The thing I went for I spilled; I was therefore obliged to go back again. I heard a pane of glass break as I went along Hatton Wall; I saw the prisoner put his hand in the window and part of his arm, and I saw him pull part of his arm and his hand out of the window. I passed him, and went over and told the watchman. The watchman went and took the prisoner. The prisoner is the same person I am sure.

HENRY KILBY . I am the watchman. The young woman acquainted me of it; I went over immediately; I saw the window was broken; I acquainted Mrs. Radden of it. I turned round, and saw the prisoner standing up the gateway; I took him by the collar, and by the light of my lanthorn I saw two brass cocks lay down at his feet. I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN TELLER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Raddon. I went up the gateway, and found the largest cock of the three.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner; I found this little knife upon him. I produce these cocks; they were delivered to me.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-81

366. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Housham , about the hour of eight in the night of the 22nd of March , and stealing therein six loaves of bread, value 3 s. 7 d. his property.

ANN HOUSHAM . I live with my brother, George Housham ; he keeps a chandler's shop at No. 4, William-street, Manchester-square, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . At seven o'clock in the evening I saw the bread in the shop. John Sullivan came in to ask the price of some cord; he did not purchase any. He was the last person that I saw in the shop between the bread being there and it being gone. The bread was there when Sullivan went out. After he went out I went into the parlour. My brother was the next person that came in.

Q. You do not know who took the bread, do you - A. The bread was found upon Sullivan.

JOHN YATES . I am a baker in Wellbeck-street. I am the person that manufactured the bread. I supplied that chandler's shop.

CHARLES WIATT . I am a watchman. On my going up Wellbeck-street I saw the prisoner tying up something at a door. It was rather before eight o'clock. I do not know what it was. That was in Wellbeck-street. Housham's house is in William-street. He put the bundle on his shoulder. I followed him to Wigmore-street; I there stopped him, and asked him what he had got there; he said, bread. I there said, where did you buy the bread; he said, down Wigmore-street. That is a contrary way to where he came from. I took him in custody, and took him to the watchhouse. He dropped one half quartern brick out of the bundle as I was taking him to the watchhouse; the rest I took with him into the watchhouse. At the watchhouse there were four half quarterns, and a quartern loaf besides. There were six loaves in the whole. I produce two of them.

Yates. That is my bread. I serve Mrs. Housham.

Prisoner's Defence. It is not his bread.

Mr. Housham. The quantity of bread that we lost was found upon the prisoner.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-82

367. ELEANOR RICE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Dennis Francis Humbert , he and others of his family being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 19th of March , and stealing therein three spencers, value 30 s. a pelisse, value 15 s. a scarf, value 7 s. a frock, value 7 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. a yard of silk, value 2 s. two yards of silk, value 2 s. and half a yard of silk

netting, value 1 s. the property of Dennis Francis Humbert .

DENNIS FRANCIS HUMBERT . I am a coal merchant ; I live in Wellclose-square, in the parish of St. George in the East . On the 19th of March, while we were at dinner, about half past three o'clock in the afternoon, and the door was upon the latch; the prisoner contrived to come in the house unobserved; we were then removing from one house to another, that was the reason for the door being upon the latch. I observed somebody going out; I asked my servant if that was her going out; she answered, no, here I am. I told her to go and see who it was; she did, and in about twenty-five yards from the door she stopped the prisoner. She had my daughter's attire in her apron.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am an officer. The articles in the indictment I found upon the prisoner's person.

ESTHER MARIA HUMBERT. The scarf is mine; the whole of the articles were in my drawer in the bed room up two pair of stairs. I only saw the prisoner go out of the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress; my husband had left me. I was told my husband lodged in this house. A woman took me to this house to see for my husband in the three pair of stairs. The woman that was with me gave me the bundle; I being in liquor, took it.

Prosecutor. I never had any lodgers in my house.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-83

368. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Stow , about the hour of eight in the night of the 2nd of March , and stealing therein six waistcoats, value 30 s. five coats, value 2 l. three gowns, value 15 s. one petticoat, value 3 s. and a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. his property.

HENRY STOW . My house is No. 19, Homer-street, New-road, Mary-le-bone parish . I keep an eating-house . I was at home at the time this happened; it was about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening; the day light was entirely gone. I was sitting in the back parlour in company with my wife, (the outer door always stands open) I heard a great noise in the passage; I took the candle to ascertain what was the matter. When I came into the passage I saw the prisoner in the passage; he was taken in custody by an opposite neighbour; Mr. Watkins had hold of him. Mr. Watkins said he had information that a man had entered my house, and he suspected he was robbing me. The prisoner was struggling with Mr. Watkins to get away from him. We sent for a constable; the prisoner was secured and searched; nothing was found on him, but in the part of the passage where I found the prisoner struggling with Mr. Watkins there were a quantity of wearing apparel laying close to the prisoner, together with a quart pot. That apparel had been kept in a trunk in the kitchen. The man's apparel was mine, the gowns my wife's.

MATTHEW WATKINS . I am an opposite neighbour to Mr. Stow. On the 2nd of March, between seven and eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner Lewis go into Mr. Stow's house; I went and caught him in the passage. I saw some things lay at his heels; he struggled, and wanted to get away from me. They brought a light, and then I saw the things laying at his heels. I had him secured, and a constable was sent for.

SAMUEL PIALL . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. The things were in the passage. These are them.

Prosecutor. These are the clothes that were kept in the trunk in the kitchen; they are mine and my wife's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going into the house to get something to eat, Mr. Watkins stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-84

369. JOHN LANCHESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , seventeen yards of stocking net, value 7 l. 10 s. the property of William Hardy and George Boulton , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN BOULTON . My partner's name is William Hardy ; we are upholsterers , 47, High Holborn . I reside in the house; Mr. Hardy only comes in the house for the purpose of business; he and his family reside in the Borough.

Q. Did you lose any quantity of stocking net at any time - A. Yes, about seventeen yards, on the 19th of March. I did not see the prisoner in the shop. I heard an alarm near four o'clock; I ran out of the shop, and saw the prisoner in Warwick-court; he was running; he dropped the stocking net; I picked up the goods. I am quite sure the prisoner dropped it. The prisoner was stopped before he got to the end of the court.

Q. What is the worth of this seventeen yards of stocking net - A. Seven pounds tea shillings.

Q. How long before you heard the alarm was it that you had seen it in your shop - A. About ten minutes before.

JAMES SPEARING . I am a baker; I was passing by Mr. Boulton's shop on the 19th of March; I saw the prisoner take a piece of stocking net from within side of the door; he ran up Warwick-court; I ran after him, calling out stop thief; he dropped the stocking net when he was half way up Warwick-court; he was stopped before he was out of my sight. I am sure he is the man that took the stocking net.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I was coming by at the time of the cry of stop thief. I caught the prisoner. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by at the time of the robbery, a person came by me and dropped this piece; Mr. Read came up and took me by the collar, saying, it was me.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-85

370. MARY DAWSETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , a watch, value 2 l. a bag, value 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. three caps, value 18 d. two pillow-cases, value 5 s. a shift, value 6 d. a pair of stays, value 2 s. 6 d. four night caps, value 18 d. and three gowns, value 10 s. the property of Mary Elson , spinster .

JOHN THORNTON . I was in charge of Mrs. Elson's house at the time of the robbery. She being in ill health she was out of town. She is a widow woman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-86

371. THOMAS ABOURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , sixty pounds weight of butter, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Rice and John Vipond , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN VIPOND . I am a cheesemonger : Samuel Rice is my partner, 16, St. Martin's-le-grand ; I live in the house; my partner never resided there at all. This tub of butter belonged to me and my partner. On the 19th of March, a little after three in the afternoon, I was in the accompting-house; I saw the prisoner and another man lurking about the window. I had suspicion they were going to steal something. I concealed myself behind the iron chest in the accompting-house. The prisoner came into the shop; he muttered something; he looked about him, and up and down the street; he also looked up stairs; he took the firkin of butter on his shoulder, and walked towards the door, but hearing me coming he put it down. He said he thought it was an empty tub but finding it was a fall one he put it down again. I collared him, and sent for a constable. The prisoner begged I would forgive him. This is the tub that contained the butter. There was sixty pounds weight of butter; it is worth more than three pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined 6 months in the House of Correction , whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-87

372. CATHERINE BOWERS and MARY FAUTLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , twenty-six yards of ribbon, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Locker , privately in his shop .

ELI READ. On the 16th of March I was servant to Thomas Locker , 185, Oxford-street ; he is a silk mercer . On the day before mentioned, about half past seven, the two prisoners came into the shop; Fautley asked to look at some ribbons. Bowers and Fautley were close together. I took out a box with a great many ribbons in it, and put it before them. Fautley took her bonnet off, and laid it on the ribbon box, and measured her bonnet to see what quantity it would take to him it. She objected to the assortment, and wished to see more. I turned round to take out another box, and on turning to them again I saw Fautley take her hand from the box, and put something into her pocket. I suspected she had taken something. She then asked me to shew her some white ribbon; I turned from her to take out the white ribbon box, and when I turned again I saw the same as before. She took her hand from the box, and put something in her pocket. she bought a yard and a half of ribbon, and left the shop. I went after her and stopped her about half a dozen yards from the shop. I told her I suspected she had taken some ribbons. I brought her back and searched her, and found no ribbon upon her. I found one piece of ribbon in the shop, and Mr. Mason brought in a piece of ribbon; he said his wife picked it up in the area, just by where I stopped the prisoners. Bowers begged my pardon, and wished Fautley to do so; Fautley refused.

Bower's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

Fautley's Defence. I never saw Bowers before in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-88

373. EDWARD BUREAU was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , one pair of cart springs, value 5 l. the property of Alexander Miller .

ROBERT HEATHER . I am a coach-maker, I was employed by Mr. Alexander Miller to make a cart; Mr. Miller sent me the iron work, a pair of springs and the box-tree. I missed them on the 19th of March; they had been on my premises nigh three months. On the 19th of March, I saw them on my premises; there was no mark on them. I cannot say I should know them if I were to see them again. I know the prisoner; he keeps an old iron shop; he had a cart and horse, and sell greens about the streets.

ROBERT CARTER . I am a wheelwright, I live in Pump-court, Perkins's-rents. I was employed to make a cart for Mr. Hibbert, Mr. Hibbert was to find the springs for his cart. Bureau came to my shop, and told me he had a pair of springs to dispose off. I told Mr. Hibbert; he went to Bureau, and gave three pounds ten shillings for the springs, and they were put on Mr. Hibbert's cart. My apprentice brought them to my shop; he is not here.

Q. What became of these springs that you applied to Mr. Hibbert's cart - A. I was ordered to take them off. I took them off, and they were taken to Queen-square office. I have no doubt they are the same springs that came from Bureau; I cannot swear it.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. When first I apprehended the prisoner, I took him to Mr. Heathers; I told him I wanted some springs. The prisoner said they were left at his shop by Maybank. I have been in pursuit of Maybank; he keeps out of the way.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer. I asked the prisoner how he came by the springs; he said the springs were left at his place by Maybank, and if he sold them he was to have half the money: I asked him whether he gave Maybank any of the money; he said no, he had not seen him.

Q. to Heathers. Do you know these springs - A. I cannot swear to them.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-89

374. CHARLOTTE WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , six silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. the property of James Evans .

MARY EVANS . My husband's name is James Evans , we live at Norwood-green. I missed the spoons about the 15th of March. On the 7th of March, the prisoner was at my house, I understand. In consequence of suspicion, my husband went to the pawnbrokers at Brentford, and discovered the spoons. I kept the spoons in a drawer in my bedroom up one pair of stairs.

MARY ANN EVANS . I am the daughter of the last witness. Early in the month of March, the prisoner called upon me; I had occasion to go up into my mother's bed-room; she went with me. I opened the drawer to look for some things; the spoons were seen. She said, she should like half a dozen such tea-spoons as those. I heard my sister crying; I went down stairs; I staid down stairs five minutes. I went up stairs again; I did not miss the spoons; I had no suspicion then. The spoons were missed a week and two or three day afterwards.

ROBERT MILLS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Nicolls, pawnbroker, at Old Brentford. On the 7th of March, six silver tea-spoons were pledged with me by the prisoner, in the name of Charlotte Wood . On the 28th of March, the prisoner came again; she said, Mr. Spencer, the magistrate of Norwood, had sent her to have the duplicate altered, the name of Charlotte Wood to Mary Evans ; I objected to it at first, but as she said it was the order from the magistrate I thought he would guarrentee me for doing it. I altered the ticket, took back the old one, and gave her the new one.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-90

375. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , two turkeys, value 27 s. and six fowls, value 10 s. the property of William Buck , esq.

THOMAS LITTLEWOOD . I am a farmer; I live at Hendon . On Thursday morning, the 14th of April, I saw the prisoner come out of a shed adjoining to my own shed, the shed belonged to Mr. William Buck . The prisoner had a large basket on his shoulders, and when he came out of the shed he went along by the side of the hedge; I thought he observed me; I had suspicion of him. I went round to the gate with intent to meet him; he saw me; he stopped. I got over the gate. I asked him what business he had in that shed; he told me he had not been in the shed. I then said, I saw you come out of the shed. I asked him what he had in his basket; he said, he did not know; the basket did not belong to him. I took the basket into a public-house, and examined it; the basket contained turkeys and fowls; they had all been recently killed. At Hatton Gardon office the prisoner said he found them on Harrow-hill-common. They proved to be the property of Mr. Buck.

JAMES WELLS. I am a gardener to Mr. William Buck, he lives at Hendon. On Wednesday night, the 13th, I saw the fowls all safe then. On Thursday morning, I went to the shed, and missed the turkeys and fowls; I have seen them since at Hatton Garden office; I am sure they were Mr. Buck's property.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and publicly whipped one hundred yards in Brent-street, Henden .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-91

376. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 2nd of April , a certain order for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud George Brooks , John Brooks , and John Dixon .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged order with like intention.

THIRD COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged order, he knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud another person.

STEPHEN PEGLER . I am clerk to George Brooks , John Brooks , and John Dixon , bankers , Chancery-lane. On the 2nd of April, about a quarter before five o'clock, the prisoner presented this draft for payment. I examined it; I discovered it to be a forged instrument.

Q. Have you any gentleman of the name of John Frazer that keeps cash at your house - A. Yes; I am well acquainted with his hand writing. We have two John Frazer 's; I know the hand writing of both of them.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether it is the writing of either of these John Frazers - A. It is not the writing of either the John Frazers . When I discovered it was not the hand writing of either the John Frazers , I took him into the adjoining office; I asked him from whom he had received the check; he said, he received it of Mr. Frazer, junior, about half an hour before that time.

Q. I understand that Mr. Frazer, junior, is the son of John Frazer ; what John Frazer is it - A. An attorney.

Q. Has Mr. Frazer, junior, any son - A. Not as I know of. The two Frazers that kept cash at our house, are father and son. He said, he had the check about half an hour before of Mr. Frazer, junior, in the Six Clerks office; I told the prisoner I thought it impossible; I must detain him until I found Mr. Frazer. I found Mr. Frazer, junior, in about an hour afterwards, and brought him to the prisoner. Mr. Frazer told the boy he knew very well he did not give it him.

Mr. Gurney. And added, you had better tell all about it, did not he - A. Yes; he asked him to tell the truth.

Q. Who did you leave the boy with while; you went to get Mr. Frazer - A. I left him in a room by himself. This is the paper the boy presented to me; I have kept it from that time to this.

JOHN MUMPY . I am agent to John Frazer ,

the younger; he is clerk of the Court of Chancery.

Q. You know the handwriting of Mr. Frazer the younger, of course; look at that writing, and say whether it is his hand-writing - A. I should believe not; it is more like the hand-writing of Frazer, the elder, than Frazer, the younger. I think it is not the hand-writing of Frazer, the elder.

Q. Did you see the boy on the day he was apprehended - A. He was with me all the morning; he was my errand boy; he lived with me two months prior to that morning.

Q. Have you seen the boy write - A. I have seen him write.

Q. Can you form any judgment whether the writing on that paper is his hand-writing or not - A. I do not believe he can write so good a hand; it resembles his hand-writing. He cannot write so good a hand as that. The lad was a good boy with me. That very morning Mr. Frazer gave him a draft in go and get ten pounds for him.

(The draft read.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

Of publishing and uttering as true, knowing it to be forged, but not of the forgery.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-92

377. PATRICK O'NEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , thirty-six pieces of printed furniture, value 165 l. four hundred and fifty yards of calico, value 35 l. and six yards of muslin, value 18 s. the property of John Miles , William Whiteman , and Thomas Smith , in the dwelling-house of John Miles .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-93

378. WILLIAM ROBERT CLEMENTS and JOHN BECKETT CLEMENTS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Arnold and William Arthur , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 23d of February , and stealing therein eleven pair of boots, value 20 l. and seven odd boots, value 7 l. their property. And WILLIAM CLARK for feloniously receiving the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM ARNOLD . I am a boot and shoemaker , my partner's name is William Arthur ; we live at No. 2, Wigmore-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . I and my partner live together; we occupy the house. Our house was broken open on Sunday the 23d of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, perhaps by a picklock key. I shut the door after me on a spring lock between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. I am sure I shut it. I shoved it after I pulled it to, to see if the lock catched.

Q. How soon afterwards did you return - A. About a quarter before eleven. When I returned a quarter before eleven, the door was shut, but not locked.

Q. Had your partner been in - A. Not to my knowledge. When I got in I felt on the hooks where the boots hanged; they were missing. Some of the boots are now in court. When I went out I left no person at home. I was the last person that went out. I gave information at Marlborough-street office. I know no more myself.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 14th of February, I received information that some boots had been offered for sale at a public-house, Union-street, St. James's. I went with the first witness and asked the landlord if same boots had not been offered for sale there. I then went to a place where a man had offered a pair of boots; it turned out to be the prosecutors. That man is not here. I found they were a pair that were lost. I came back to the public-house; the landlord told me of the prisoner, Clark. I came back to the public-house; and took the the prisoner, Clark, in custody.

Q. What day was that - A. On the 14th of February, at ten o'clock at night. I challenged him about the boots; he said he sold them to this man, coachman to Lady Jersey. I told him he had other pairs of boots at home; he acknowledged he had, and told me to whom he had sold them. I searched his person; on him I found three watches. I took him to the watchhouse. I went and searched his lodging; there I found a fourth watch. One of the four watches has been owned; it was stolen from a coachman. I found also thirteen bad three-shilling tokens, and two padlock keys. I asked him of whom he had received the boots; he told me he had bought the boots of the witness Joseph. The next day I took Joseph into custody; in his bag I found two pair of boots. He is admitted an evidence. He then charged the two prisoners, Clements. I went with him and an officer of the name of Johnson to the house of John Beckett Clements , his house is No. 24, North-street, St. Mary-le-bone. The prisoner was not at home. I searched his place, and in a drawer I found forty-three skeleton keys, an iron crow, a dark lanthorn, some phosphorus, and a wax taper. I did not take the prisoner Clements into custody till the 1st of April. Johnson and me took him in a public-house in St. James's.

SAMUEL JOSEPH. I am a dealer in old clothes. It was in last February, I cannot tell the day of the month, Beckett Clements came to a public-house, the Three Tuns in Oxford-street; he told me that he had got some boots to sell. I went from the public-house to his house, and I bought of him thirteen pair of boots; two pair of hessian and eleven pair of top boots. I paid him ten pounds down, and two pounds ten shillings I paid him the next day. I sold them to Mr. Clark on the 4th of April; he paid me different prices for them; and two pair of boots were found in my bag.

Q. Do you know anything of William Robert Clements - A. Yes, he was present when I bought them, and another person besides. There were three present when I purchased them; the third man is not in custody; the other two are Beckett Clements and Robert Clements , the two prisoners at the bar.

Beckett Clements took me out of the public-house to his lodging.

Q. What became of William Robert - A. He was in the public-house; he did not go with me to his brother's lodging. Beckett Clements took me to his own house, and I paid Beckett Clements the money.

Q. How long is this ago - A. Two or three months. I am sure they are the persons.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I went with Foy and Joseph to the house of Beckett Clements, and with him to where he mentioned before. I then went to the cottage in the New-road after William Robert Clements , where he did live the day before; he was removing from the house. I searched the place; I found there a bedstead and workbench, and behind the bedstead, by the fire-place, I found an iron crow, a house-breakers tool. I traced out where he was removed to. On the 26th of March I went to the house; I saw him come put of the house, and when I went with Foy they were off; they were alarmed. I apprehended him on the 1st of April. I found out Beckett Clements at the public-house where he was.

THOMAS CRAWLEY . I keep the Black Horse public-house in Swallow-street. Clark was in the habit of using my house. One day he brought two pair of boots to my house. I do not know the day. I gave him twenty-three shillings for one pair, and a pot of beer. He left them with me to sell to a young man for twenty-five shillings. The young man wrote his name upon them; the name of Leary. I did not sell them. This is the pair of boots; they have the name of Leary upon them.

JOHN WELLS . I am a licensed victualler. Joseph used to come to my house every day about twelve o'clock, and I have seen the Clements there. Once both the Clements came there for a glass of ale, and Joseph went out with them. They knew one another well. That is all I know.

Q. to Foy. Did you try any of them keys to Mr. Arnold's door - A. No, there was no occasion to try them; they are of all sizes.

John Beckett Clements' Defence. Unfortunately for me these keys were found in my place; they never belonged to me. I never sold anything to Joseph, the Jew; I have bought of him.

William Robert Clements ' Defence. All the knowledge I had of Joseph was buying clothes of him for my own wear, and respecting the implements, the iron crow is said to be found in a place of mine; the place has never been proved to be mine; and respecting the keys, there has never been but one of them filed; my landlord gave it me. They are produced to prejudice the case, and to correspond with the Jew's evidence. However, finding implements in a man's possession is not proof of a burglary.

Clark's Defence. I bought the boots of Joseph; he told me he bought them at a sale.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-94

379. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a shawl, value 45 s. and a pelisse, value 15 s. the property of John Deckhaws .

MARIA DECKHAWS . My husband's name is John Deckhaws ; he is a seaman ; I, live in Fore-street, Limehouse . I lost my shawl and pelisse either on the 21st or 22nd of December. The prisoner came to my house and asked for a lodging for himself and another young man that was afraid of being imprest. I told him I could accommodate him. He sat down and had tea with me. The prisoner said he had brought home some handsome shawls with him. I said I had a handsome shawl my husband brought me home; he asked to look at it; I shewed it him. He said it was a handsome shawl, and seemed to like it. I put it in the cupboard. At night the prisoner went to bed he told me to get up early in the morning; he should want breakfast early. When I got up I went into the room; I saw the prisoner was not in bed; he was gone. I missed my pelisse and shawl. The prisoner must have gone out at the window. I have never seen my pelisse nor shawl again.

Prisoner's Defence. I have got nothing to say. I have served his Majesty many years.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-95

380. JOSEPH BANNISTER and WILLIAM HUGGINS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Hodgkins , widow , about the hour of seven in the night of the 20th of March , and stealing therein six silver teaspoons, value 12 s. the property of Ann Hodgkins , widow; a pocket-book; value 1 s. twenty-five shillings in monies numbered, and four 1 l. notes , the property of Ann Esther Hodgkins .

ANN HODGKINS . I am a widow.

Q. Was your house broken open at any time - A. Yes, on the 20th of March. I left the house about a quarter before two in the afternoon. I was the last person in the house. I returned a little after eight. I am positive I left the house very secure. When I returned I found a great many people about the door of my neighbours. I asked what was the matter; they told me my house was broken open. I went into the shop. I am in the grocery and oil trade. I found nothing gone from my shop. I went up stairs; I found the place in complete disorder, in a state I had not left it. I lost my silver teaspoons. I had left them on the drawers when I went out.

Q. Can you tell how they got in the house - A. I cannot. I have seen the prisoner Bannister before; I have served him with tobacco in my shop.

ANN ESTHER HODGKINS . I live with my sister. I went out with her, and came home with her. I found the disorder that has been described: I lost a pocket-book containing four one-pound notes, and one pound five shillings in silver; I had left it in my box when I went out; the box was in my bedroom.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the 20th of March, I saw the two prisoners in Green's-court; Poulteney-street, suspecting their intention, I followed them down Princes-street to Orange-street; they went once or twice round Orange-street, and into the courts, and looked up to see if there was any

lights in the houses; they went from there until they came to Whitcomb-street, to the prosecutrix's house, there they walked about some time; at last Bannister got close to the door, leaving Huggins on the opposite side of the way; when the prisoner Bannister knocked loud at the door, and crossed to the other side of the way to the other prisoner. Then they both crossed over, and Bannister then knocked at the door again; they walked about a few minutes Finding nobody answered the door, the prisoner Bannister tried the latch with something, as if he was trying to open the door; Huggins went up to him. They both got close together, apparently to me, as if they were opening the door with something in their hands; it being night, I could not tell what they had got in their hand. They left the door sharp, and went on the other side of the way; stopped there about half a moment looking about these. They both crossed over to the door again; the prisoner Bannister then entered in at the doorway, into the passage, followed by the prisoner Huggins. They got the door open; Bannister got in, and was followed by Huggins. After they had been there about half a minute, I went up to the door; I found it a jar. I looked through the keyhole, and perceived a light in the passage; seeing that, I crossed to the opposite side of way, and stood upon a high step nearly opposite, two minutes; when I saw the prisoner Huggins come to the window of the one pair; I could see Bannister by the light of the back-room one pair of stairs. Huggins shut the windows to; Bannister was behind on the right of the room, with a candle in his hand. I asked several people to assist me; nobody would. I went to a public-house about fifty yards up in the street, I called out a witness which I have got here to assist me going and detecting them in the house; that witness's name is Chapman. Before I came out of the public-house, the prisoner Huggins ran sharp across the way, and Bannister went down the same side of the way, towards Cockspur-street; I saw them go one one way, and the other the other. After they came out of the house, I lost sight of Huggins about three minutes. I kept my eye sharp upon Bannister in Cockspur-street; I watched him until I came to Spring-gardens; Bannister crossed the way, and went on the side the King's-mews is; then the two prisoners joined together again. Then I suspected they were going back. The young man with me, had a red coat on; I desired him to keep at a distance; I thought they would perceive him. I followed them up Whitcomb-street; they went into the house again the second time; when they went in the house the second time, my witness was not near me. I pulled the door, and shut them inside of the house; they were inside of the shop then with a light. I alarmed Mr. Shephard; he sent his servant out to me. I stopped about five minutes at the door; by my shutting the door it alarmed them inside, and instead of them coming out of the passage door, they unlocked the shop door, and Huggins came out; I catched hold of him, and with that, the other was peeping down by the side of the shop coming out; I catched Bannister in the shop, he was creeping out upon the ground. I then took them into Mr. Shephard's passage, and searched them. On Bannister I found a latch key, which will open the door as if it was made for it, and a small key, and a knife; on Huggins I found a knife, another latch key, and two small keys. I then took them to the watchhouse, and went back to secure the house.

Q. Did you find any property upon them - A. Not there. I returned to the watchhouse; I searched them again. I could not search them so well in the passage, there were so many ladies there. At the watchhouse I found on Huggins five three-shilling bank tokens and two shillings wrapped up in the corner of his shirt tail, and a watch in his fob, with three gold seals and a gold watch-chain. On Bannister I found a dollar, a three-shilling token, and two sixpences, and some halfpence. I then went to Huggins's lodgings; he is a dealer in marine stores. I found four picklock keys tied up in this flannel; I went from there to his stable; he keeps a horse and cart; he is a dealer in fowls and fighting dogs. In the hay-rack I found seven skeleton keys. In Mrs. Hodgkins's shop I found this chisel, it was laying down against their feet; it appears to be the chisel that broke open the trunk. I compared it with the trunk where they got the money out; there is a mark on the trunk that corresponds with this chisel. Directly I put to the door; they put the light out. The dollar and money described is the same money, although she cannot swear to it.

Mr. Walford. You knew these men perfectly well - A. Of course; I had seen their faces that evening. I set off first at dark from my house to watch them; I disguised myself. I went so on purpose to take them. It was about seven o'clock when they first entered the house; the second time it was just eight o'clock when they came out of the house; I remember the clock striking as I was going along with them to the watchhouse.

JOHN CHAPMAN . Johnson came to me a little after seven o'clock; he said, he wanted to speak with me; I went out. He said, two house-breakers had just gone into a house; he wished me to assist in taking them.

Q. Did you see them go in the second time - A. I did not. I saw them taken there; I assisted in taking them. Huggins came out first; Johnson took him. The other came out immediately afterwards; I got hold of him. I assisted in taking them into Mr. Shephard's passage.

JOHN TURNER . I am a servant to Mr. Shephard. Johnson rang Mr. Shephard's bell on the 20th of March; he said, he wanted somebody to assist him to take two house-breakers in the adjoining house; accordingly me and fellow servant went to assist him. He said, they were in the house, and when I came, out came the prisoner Huggins; Johnson seized him. Bannister came out; I seized him round the middle.

Bannister's Defence. I am innocent as a child unborn.

Huggins's Defence. The same.

BANNISTER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

HUGGINS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-96

381. GEORGE FREEMAN , alias CATTLE , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Smith , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 26th of December , and stealing therein, two coach-glasses, value 30 s. and a box coat, value 1 l. the property of James Lockhart .

SECOND COUNT, stating the goods to be the property of Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH . I keep a livery-stable , in Upper Marybone-street . On the 27th of December, I was informed that two coach-glasses and a box coat were stolen out of my premises. My premises is a private yard, an inclosed place.

JAMES BENNET . On the Sunday night after Christmas-day, me and the prisoner Freeman went to Mr. Smith's livery-stables; about twelve o'clock, as near as I can guess, we came to his gates; I opened it with a latch-key, and then Freeman and me went into Mr. Smith's livery-stable yard; we got two coach-glasses and a box coat out of one of the coach-houses; we took them away from that place. I went and concealed them at my mother's house that night, and the same night I and Freeman slept together at Butcher's house. On the next day I got the glasses away from my mother's; we were going to sell them at some acquaintance of Freeman's in Golden-lane, and then when we were going up Chick-lane two officers detected us, and took us in custody with them. We had three examinations.

Q. Who had the glasses in their custody - A. Freeman had the glasses under his arm at the time we were taken. We had three examinations; nobody came forward to own the glasses. We were discharged, and the officers had the glasses.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. On the 27th of last December, I was going down Chick-lane in company with James Riddel , about eight o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner Freeman, and Franklin, alias Bennet, together; they were coming from Saffron-hill.

Q. Who is Franklin - A. The last witness; he answered to the name of Bennet. I saw Freeman with two coach-glasses under his left arm. I had seen him before along with thieves; I suspected he had stolen them. I stopped, and asked him what he had got there; he said, they were coach-glasses, they were his own, he had found them the night before in Covent Garden market. I told him he must give me a better account than that, or else I should take him before the magistrate. I then took him to a public-house, and searched them. I found nothing upon Freeman; on Franklin I found this knife. I took them before the magistrate; they were examined three times. I could find no owner to the glasses; they were discharged. I advertised the glasses. He was taken in custody afterwards by Bennet, the officer. These are the glasses I found upon Freeman.

JAMES RIDDLE . I am an headborough. I was with Hutchins at the time he apprehended Freeman and Franklin; Freeman had these glasses under his arm.

GEORGE BENNET. I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 25th of February, I apprehended the prisoner. The great coat has never been found. When I apprehended him, he said, he knew what it was for, that little rascal of a farrier had given evidence against him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the glasses in Covent Garden market.

JAMAS BYROM. I am coachman to Mr. Lockhart. The coat has never been found. I have lived with Mr Lockhart better than three years. That is one of his glasses, I am sure of; I have cleaned them often.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-97

382. GEORGE FREEMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William M'Neal , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 8th of February , and stealing therein, seven pair of coach-glasses, value 7 l. his property.

WILLIAM M'NEAL. I am a coach-maker , in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital . On the 9th of February, about four o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by the watchman; I came down, and found the place open, and the watchman in the place. The gates had been bursted open, and the lock wrenched off the staple. We searched the carriages; fourteen glasses were gone, and the frames broken to pieces.

JAMES FRANKLIN . On the morning of the 9th of February, a little after twelve, Freeman and I went to the back gate of Mr. M'Neal's shop, we found they were fastened; there was a hole at the top of the gates. Freeman lifted me up; I got through the hole, and undid the gates. I pushed of one side, he of the other; we wrenched off the staple off the hasp. Freeman came in, and went on one side of the carriage, I on the other; we took fourteen glasses, and the next morning Freeman sold them to a jew; I never saw the jew before, nor since. I don't know where the glasses are now.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-98

383. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , two pair of pantaloons, value 2 l. the property of William Pollard , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM POLLARD . I am a draper and tailor , No. 86, Long Acre . I lost my pantaloons on the 1st of April; I had not missed them until I found them at the pawnbrokers. The prisoner was a painter at work in my house. The constable searched him, and found the duplicates of the pantaloons on him.

WILLIAM HAZARD . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner; I found these two duplicates in his hand.

JOHN BROOKS. I am a pawnbroker. One of the duplicates is mine, for a pair of pantaloons, nine shillings; I took it in of the prisoner on the 30th of March. These are the pantaloons.

MR. WOOD. This duplicate is mine; a pair of pantaloons twelve shillings, in the name of Cooper.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pledge them as my own property; I meaned to return them in two days after.

GUILTY, aged 41,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-99

384. ROBERT HOWARD was indicted for that he, on the 7th of April , feloniously was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term of seven years for which he was ordered to be transported .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-100

385. WILLIAM MULLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a gold chain, value 30 s. two seals, value 16 s. and a key, value 4 s. the property of John Kirk ; and one razor, value 2 s. the property of Peter Johnson .

JOHN KIRK . I am a servant to Peter Johnson , No. 11, Somerset-street . On Saturday the 16th of this month, Mr. Johnson sent me out, and when I returned the prisoner was in the house; my fellow servant had shewed him into the room and left him there by himself. The prisoner told me I wanted a servant to go to Scotland, he understood. I said I did, for a lady, the wages was twenty-two pounds and livery. I said, perhaps, if the servant suited the lady she would give guineas. I afterwards shewed the prisoner out. At night, when I was going to bed, I took my watch out of the stand, my chain and seals were gone. I have never seen my chain and seals since. The next morning I went to shave myself, and old razor that I had of Mr. Johnson was gone also. The razor has been found in the prisoner's possession. I missed the razor the next morning. I did not lose my watch; it was standing in a case; the chain and seals were twisted off.

JAMES BENNET . On the 23d I apprehended the prisoner; I told him my errand; he said he was innocent. He gave me the key of his box; I found this razor.

Kirk. That is Mr. Johnson's razor; it is marked P. J.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 6 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-101

386. MARY BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , two gowns, value 4 s. and seven yards and a half of cambric, value 19 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Bloodgood Hough .

ISABELLA HOUGH. My husband's name is Joseph Bloodgood Hough ; he is a captain . I live in Wellclose-square . The prisoner was my servant . I did not miss the articles until the prisoner was gone a week. The prisoner left me on the 10th of February; she went away before I was up in the morning, and took her box away. Some few days after she left me I missed the cambric. I did not miss any thing else until after she was taken in custody; I opened her box; I found in it a gown belonging to my daughter.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . On the 13th of April, I, in company with Hall, a fellow officer, and the prosecutrix, went to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 5, Anthony-street, St. George's; my fellow officer saw her in the yard and brought her up stairs; she had then a gown of Mrs. Hough's on her back; Hall took it off. I unlocked her box, and found this gown in it, and the duplicate of the cambric pledged at Mr. Castle's, Shadwell.

JOHN AYRETON . I live with Mr. Castle, pawnbroker. I produce a piece of cambric; the prisoner pawned it on the 28th of February; I lent her ten shillings on it.

JOHN HALL . I found the prisoner in the yard, and on her back was this gown. When I brought her up stairs, the prosecutrix owned it to be her property.

Prosecutrix. One gown and the cambric is my property, and the other gown is my daughter's.

Prisoner's Defence. The key was in my box; whether it was put in by mistake I do not know.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-102

387. ANN CHIPP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Thomas French .

THOMAS FRENCH . I live in Virginia-row, Bethnal-green. On the 27th of February, I was going up Shoreditch, I met the prisoner and another girl; they asked me to go home with them. I went with them as far as the Angel; when we came there I had no money in my pocket; they could not agree with me. The other girl that was with the prisoner went with me to my lodging. I took one of them to my lodging; the other followed her; and when I went to get a pot of beer I was robbed of two pounds ten shillings.

Q. There is no two pound ten shillings in the indictment - A. Here is the gown I found on her back; it is my wife's gown. I went to the prisoner's lodging on the 7th of March; I saw the gown laying on her bed; she took me out of doors. I staid on the stairs about an hour. I went into her room again; the gown was taken off the bed, and she swore to me that she had only a black gown. On the next Sunday night I found my wife's gown on the prisoner's back.

Q. Did you take the prisoner home with you - A. No, her partner. The prisoner could not take the gown; her partner took it. It is my wife's gown; she is alive.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-103

388. MARY CORDELL and WILLIAM WHITEHEAD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the

15th of March , three glazed window sashes, value 30 s. four locks, value 4 s. and five keys, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Gogney .

JOHN AUBER . I live in Bethnal-green. I had the key of Mr. Gogney's house, which was to let, to shew the house to the people that came look after it. On the 14th of March, about three in the afternoon, the prisoners both came together; they desired to look at the house. I took the key, and shewed them the house, and while they were looking at the apartment they were discoursing together. The woman called the man William; I supposed him to be her husband by the manner of them. The woman asked the rent; I told her fourteen guineas. She asked where the landlord lived; I told her; they thanked me, and both went away. About half past six in the evening the woman returned, told me she had been to the landlord, and had taken the house; she said she should move in on to-morrow. She had the key and went away. In about ten minutes after, as I was sitting in my own room, I heard a noise in the house; it was as if some person was sweeping the chimney-piece. Thirteen or fourteen days elapsed; nobody came into the house. I got into the house at the window. In the front parlour I found two sashes taken out; in the back parlour a half sash was taken out, and the locks were taken off the two parlour doors and the first floor doors. I immediately went to the rent gatherer to know if any person had taken the house; he told me, no. On my return home I met the woman prisoner in Brick-lane; I said to her, where is the key of that house you took of me; she said, what house. I said, upon the Green. I told her if she did not produce the key of the house, and produce the things, I would charge an officer with her. She said, do not, for God's sake, charge an officer with me; come with me to my mother's; I will give you the key. I went with her, and then at her mother's she said the key was lost. She never gave me the key at all. She said the young man that was with her was only an acquaintance, a very honest young man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-104

389. ABRAHAM COKELY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , eighty pounds weight of flocks, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of Edward Laxton .

EDWARD LAXTON . I am a flock-maker ; I live at 34, Crispin-street, Spitalfields .

Q. Did you lose any flocks; when was it - A. On Tuesday the 5th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went backwards and missed the two bags in question; my wife gave me some information. One of the bags was twenty-five pounds weight, and the other sixty pounds weight. I had seen them safe in the back warehouse in the morning.

JANE MOSS . I keep a mattrass warehouse, 19, Petticoat-lane. On the 5th of April, about two in the afternoon, I think, a person offered me some flocks. He had a bag on his shoulder. I told him I did not want any. I cannot say the prisoner is the man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-105

390. LYDIA CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of March , a sheet, value 1 s. a blanket, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of James Coleman , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house .

JAMES COLEMAN . I live in Kingsland-road, at the Spread Eagle public-house .

Q. Did the prisoner take any lodging at your house - A. Yes, about four months ago she took a two pair of stairs room weekly of me; she was to pay three shillings and sixpence a week; she paid me regular for six weeks.

Q. Did she come to you as a single woman - A. The prisoner first came about the room; she said there was another woman, and they would pay the rent between them. The room was furnished when she took it. There was sheets and blankets as part of the furniture, a pail, and a flat iron. The other woman left the room first, and when the prisoner left the room there was a fortnight's rent going on. After she had left the room I went into the room; I missed a sheet, a blanket, a pail, and a flat iron. In about a month afterwards I saw the prisoner; I asked her what she had done with the things that she had taken out of my room. She said she had not taken them; it was the other woman that had taken them. I told her she was the person that took the room, and I should look to her for them. The prisoner was a civil good sort of a woman. The other woman that was with her abused me very much, or else I should not have done what I have.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-106

391. EDWARD DENBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , four pounds weight of copper, value 5 s. the property of James Sheen .

JAMES SHEEN . I am a coppersmith and tea-urn manufacturer on Holborn Hill . The prisoner was my confidential servant . On the 10th of March about five in the afternoon, the prisoner came to me and asked me if I wanted him. I said, no. He had a mug in his hand. I asked him if he was going to get some beer; he said, yes. Then John Deal gave me some information. I called the prisoner back, and told him that I was sorry to be obliged to search him. I searched him. I found in his pantaloons seven pieces of copper; they weigh better than four pounds altogether. I told him I was exceeding sorry that he that I placed so much confidence in, had got my property upon him. He then said, I had ruined him; I replied, if he went on in that way he would soon ruin me. I sent for an officer; he took charge of him.

Q. Was the pieces of sheet copper that you found about him of the same sort that you manufacture in your premises - A. Yes, and in the state they were in they were worth about six shillings. That is all I know of it.

JOHN DEAL. I am an apprentice to Mr. Sheen.

I was present when Mr. George Alexander Sheen marked a piece of copper that laid on the prisoner's bench. He laid it there again. The prisoner was gone to his dinner then. He left it on the prisoner's bench, and desired me to notice it. After the prisoner came from dinner, he went about his work. The piece of copper remained on the bench.

Q. What induced you to think the prisoner took any copper - A. I saw him cutting more copper; the copper that I saw him cutting ought not to be cut. In cutting the copper he bent it; he laid it on the bench, and levelled it, made it strait again; he then took the pieces of copper off the bench, and the piece that George Alexander Sheen had marked. He took them all into the yard; he put them into the spirit-tub; where we clean our work. He took the pieces out of the tub again; he put them in at the window of the place, where we scour our work; we generally take it in at the door. After he had put it in the scouring-room window, I did not see what he did with it. I saw him take some of his work out of the spirit-tub; he took in at the scouring room door, and scoured it. After he had scoured it, I saw him come out of the scouring-room with the other pieces of copper in his hand, but not seeing the pieces of copper that he put in at the window, I suspected he had secreted them. I then informed Mr. Sheen what I had seen. I went to the spot where he had put the pieces of copper in at the window; I found they were removed. I informed my master. I still continued to watch him. After some time, he went into the work-shop; he took a mug out of the workshop to get some liquor, and left the work-shop; I followed him, and when he came to the street he saw me coming, and as I supposed, he was waiting to see which way I was going, and when I came up to him, he was looking at the church clock; I told him his master wanted him; he came back. He was charged with stealing the copper. He was searched. The copper that George Alexander Sheen had marked, was found on him, and six other pieces besides that. He said, he hoped they would forgive him, after he was searched.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in custody of Mr. Sheen, and Mr. Sheen delivered me the pieces of copper. I have had them ever since.

George Alexander Sheen . This is the piece of copper I marked; these pieces of copper are cut wastefully; it is all my brother's property.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-107

392. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , two casks, value 2 s. and one hundred and twenty pounds weight of butter, value 6 l. the property of George Cuff , Thomas Dickenson , and Joseph Cuff , the younger .

GEORGE CUFF . I am a cheesemonger ; Joseph Cuff, junior, and Thomas Dickenson , are my partners; we live in Whitechapel High-street.

THOMAS WHISTON . I am servant to the prosecuters. On the 7th of February, I weighed five tubs of butter, they were to be sent to Mr. Cropley, of Whitechapel. I weighed them about one o'clock, just before I went to dinner; I returned about two o'clock. I missed two of the tubs of butter. There were no empty casks in the yard. I can tell the weight of each tub, and its contents. The tubs of butter were in our back yards; the gates are open. There is no thoroughfare through the yard; it only opens into our premises.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a carpenter. I work in Mr. Cuff's yard. On the 7th of February, between one and two o'clock in the day. I saw the prisoner come out of the yard with a firkin on his back; in about ten minutes he returned again, he took another firkin of butter; he went into the street with that. I had no suspicion of him; I thought he was a carrier. I was working in the yard. I am sure he is the man.

Q. When did you hear there was any suspicion of these tubs - A. About two o'clock. I saw the prisoner again the next day about the same time, and in about a week afterwards I saw the prisoner at Lambeth-street office; I was then sure he was the man that I had seen with the two tubs of butter. At first I thought the prisoner was a carrier. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I have been since informed the prisoner is a carpenter.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-108

393. JAMES GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of March , eight pounds weight of hogslard, value 8 s. the property of Evan Price .

EVEN PRICE. I am a cheesemonger , in Crown-street, Finsbury-square ; I have no partner.

Q. Did you at any time lose any quantity of hogs-lard, and when was it - A. On the 3rd of March. The hogslard was placed on a pile of cheese in the shop window. I went out between three and four o'clock to the West end of the town, and when I returned, a crowd was about the door, and Armstrong, the officer, had hold of the prisoner, he charged him with stealing the lard. The officer had taken the lard from the prisoner.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 3rd of March, I was on duty with Gleed. I saw the prisoner in company with three others; I watched them. The prisoner left the three others, he came towards the prosecutor's door, he put his right hand in, and took off the lard; I immediately stopped him with the lard in his possession. I asked him how he came by it; he said, he found it. The lard is very clean, it was a muddy night. This is the lard.

Prosecutor. It is my lard.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-109

394. JOSEPH WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , a chaise, value 30 l. and a set of chaise harness, value 5 l. the property of Samuel Bennett .

SAMUEL BENNETT. I am a coach-maker ; I live in Worship-street.

Q. Did you at any time lose a chaise and harness - A. I did. On the 7th of February the prisoner came to my shop and hired a chaise and harness of me for two or three days; it was to be taken over to Mr. Fonteine's premises, opposite of mine; accordingly I took it, and delivered it myself. A few days afterwards I saw the prisoner at Mr. Fonteine's livery-stables. He asked me if I would part with the chaise, and what did I ask for it. I said, forty-five guineas for the chaise. He then stated that he had a chaise at Lamb's Conduit-street, and if I would go and see that chaise to allow him what I could for it, and meet him at a coffee-house near the Exchange, he would talk to me. I was to meet him at half past two that day. I went to the coffee-house at half past two; I waited an hour or more. I saw nothing of the prisoner. Ten days or a fortnight elapsed before I saw the prisoner again, and then I met him at the place where his broken chaise was. I went there to enquire after him; it was at a mews near Lamb's Conduit-street. While I was talking to the stable-keeper the prisoner came in with a one horse chaise, not my chaise. Having heard that he had a grey horse to dispose of, to get a sight of my chaise if I could, I told him I wanted a grey horse for a customer of mine. We both went together to a stable yard, he in his chaise and I in mine. He drove first; I followed him to go and look at the grey horse. He told me it was at the Lemon Tree yard, in the Haymarket; the stable-keeper's name is Spry. I went to the Lemon Tree yard; he there shewed me the grey horse. I then asked him where my chaise was. He said he had an accident with it coming down Bond-street; it was at the coach-maker's to be repaired; he had it new painted and new lined, and made it look very smart. He said it would be home in the morning. On the next morning I took Armstrong, the officer, with me to the Lemon Tree yard, and there I saw my own chaise. I said to the stable keeper, here is my own Tiloury. In about two hours and a half the prisoner came into the yard on horseback; he said he was ready to give me up my chaise, or to pay me for it. I told him it was then out of my power to bargain with him, he must go before the magistrate. He said he had laid out eight pound on the chaise. I have got my chaise again, and the harness.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-110

395. JAMES MARCHANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , three quarters of a bushel of coals, value 14 d. the property of Dennis M'Carthy .

DENNIS M'CARTHY. These coals were taken from a barge of mine at Wapping . They are my property.

HENRY WOOD . I am an apprentice to my brother, James Wood; he is now on board of a King's ship in Holland.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he was foreman to the barge I worked in; I was under him. At the time I took these coals out of Mr. M'Carthy's craft, we had but little coal for fire on board our craft, and between six and seven at dusk, I went and got a bit of coal.

Q. Where was the prisoner when you got this coal - A. He was in the cabin of our barge. I went of my own accord to get them. He saw me when I brought them on board. He was not within sight when I took them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-111

396. ANN HAGERTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , a watch, value 40 s. the property of John Hay .

JOHN HAY. I belong to the Aberdeen militia . I lost my watch on the 31st of March; it was a silver watch. I was under the doctors charge ill in bed in the barrack-room, in the Tower of London, on the Middlesex side . My watch was hanging up; the prisoner used to come there to sell sprats in my room.

Q. Did you see her in your room on the 31st of March - A. No. I missed my watch between three and four o'clock; I had seen it at one o'clock; it was sale at the bed-head. On the 1st of April, I saw my watch again; I knew it to be mine. I value the watch at two pounds.

JOHN DICKEY . I am a soldier in the Aberdeen militia. On the 31st of March, I saw the prisoner in Hay's room, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; she sat down on Hay's bed. I saw the prisoner rise from Hay's bed, she put her feet on the bed to look out of the window; she said, it was rainy. Her hand then was near enough to the watch to take it, if she had been so disposed; I did not suspect it at the time that she had taken it.

WILLIAM MORRISON. I am a servant to Mr. Murray, pawnbroker, No. 99, East Smithfield. On the 31st of March, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner pledged this watch; I had seen her person before; I knew her. On the next day it was claimed by Hay. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-112

397. JAMES LANGDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , six pewter basins, value 10 s. and thirty pounds weight of pewter, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Compton and Townsend Compton .

THOMAS GUNSTON . I am in the service of Thomas and Townsend Compton; they were partners at the time of this transaction, and pewter manufacturers , in Booth-street, Spitalfields. All I know is, that the pewter that was brought back to Messrs. Comptons was their property.

THOMAS DOWNES . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in Wentworth-street. I stopped him about twenty minutes after three in the morning, on the 24th of February, 1813. I believe to the best

of my recollection I saw him write with a bag. I asked him what he had in the bag; he said, goods. I said, I insist upon seeing what goods you have got He then tried in fling it at my feet. He ran away, and left the bag and the property behind him. I am certain the prisoner is the man. I took the property the next day to Messrs. Compton's; it weighed forty-eight pounds. They claimed it, It was eleven months before I saw this man in custody at Worship-street office; I recollected him then.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this charge.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-113

398. WILLIAM MASON and RICHARD COOPER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of March , twenty-six fowls, value 2 l. the property of William Turner .

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a farmer at Woodhall, in Hertfordshire . I lost the poultry in the night between the 24th and 25th. I lost thirty fowls from my yard. The poultry were all safe on the evening of the 24th. I heard that there was a man detained at Edgware with Poultry. I went there and saw the twenty-six fowls; I knew three of them to be mine by the plumage. I swore to three of them before the magistrate, and Mason was in custody charged with stealing them. The property was found upon him.

- WOTTON. I am a farmer; I live at Edgware. On the 25th of January I was at work by the road side about the middle of the day; the prisoner Mason came down the Edgware-road; his wife and daughter were with him, and a sack across his donkey. I asked him if he had anything to sell; he said, no I then asked him what was in the sack; he said nothing but a bit of hay for the jack ass. I told him I thought he had got fowls; he said it was no odds to me if he had. I took him, his wife, and daughter before the magistrate. There were twenty-six fowls in the sack; they were dead. The magistrate asked him where he bought them. He at first said he should not tell him; afterwards, he said he bought them of a higher below St. Alban's.

Q. Do you know anything of the other prisoner - A. No. The magistrate said if he would swear that he bought them of him he would give him his liberty; he swore then.

MASON, GUILTY .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

COOPER, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-114

399. WILLIAM MADDOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , fifteen pounds weight of nails, value 18 d. forty-eight pounds weight of cast iron pipe, value 5 s. fifty pounds weight of shot, value 6 s. a chisel, value 6 d. and seven images, value 6 d. the property of Charles Johnson and John Johnson .

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am an iron founder ; I live at Wapping dock. My partner's name is John Johnson. The prisoner was a servant of mine.

Q. Did you lose these nails - A. I don't know. I lost them frequently, and many other things that are mentioned in the indictment. These things were found in his house. I suspected him. He had lately set up an iron shop. I have lost these things, and they are mine.

JOHN POWIS . I am an officer. I produce the property I brought from the prisoner's house; nails, iron weights, iron pipe, iron plate, a chisel, and a hammer.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt they are my property. This I can swear to.

Prisoner's Defence. Them things were bought by my wife. I cannot give any account of what she buys.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-115

400. JAMES STOCK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Palmer , about the hour of one in the night of the 25th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, fifteen pair of shoes, value 1 l. and a pair of boots, value 1 l. his property.

THOMAS PALMER . I am a shoemaker ; I live at 31, Baldwin's-gardens, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . It is in the upper liberty. I was the last person up. I bolted the door. I went to bed. I did not go to sleep for some time. About a quarter before one I heard a knock at the street door, and then another knock at the street door. About one o'clock the watch was going past one; he called me and said the shop was robbed. I got out of bed, and came down stairs in my shirt. I found the things were gone, and the window was cleared in front.

Q. How did the person get in - A. By making a way through the shutters, and getting into the shop. The shop was entirely open; I lost fifteen pair of shoes out of the shop, and a pair of boots.

Q. Do you know anything of the prisoner - A. Yes, he is a neighbour of mine; he lives right opposite, and keeps an old iron, rag shop, and sells old clothes old clothes. And while I was contriving to fasten the shutters, the constable of the lower liberty came to me, and said, what is the matter; I said, my shop has been robbed; he said, is it a shoemaker's shop; he then said, the goods and the thief is at the watchhouse.

EDWARD HANCOCK . I am the patrol of Hatton Garden. I took the prisoner a little after one o'clock on the 25th of March last. I was at the top of Hatton Garden; I heard a comical noise; it seemed to me to be towards Leather-lane, up Hatton Wall. I looked up Hatton Wall; I saw but one man coming along, that was the prisoner. I saw him have a bundle under his right arm. I asked him where he was going with the bundle. He told me I might see if I had a mind to go with him. I asked him what he had got in his bundle; he said, a parcel of old shoes. I said, it is an unseasonable hour to carry a bundle at this time, where are you going with it. I understood him to say Saffron Hill. I said to him, are you going to Clerkenwell; he said, yes. I took him to the watchhouse, and when I got him to Hatton Garden

he threw the bundle from under his arm, kicked it, and said, take it. I still kept hold of him; I said I will take it, and you too. I called a watchman; I told him to take the bundle to the watchhouse; he did, and I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. The watchhouse is in Little Saffron-hill. When we got into Saffron-hill he threw some shoes out of his bosom; he said, take them, you'll get more by them than you will by me. I told the watchman to pick them up. I told the prisoner I meaned to take them and him to the watchhouse. The watchman took them up. I kept hold of the prisoner all the time. The watchman brought the shoes to the watchhouse, and I took the prisoner.

THOMAS PIRKS . I am the watchman. I produce the shoes that I picked up. These are the three shoes that were thrown out of his bosom, and these are the shoes that were in the bundle. I accompanied Hancock to the watchhouse with him. In going to the watchhouse he said the shoes would be of more service to us than taking of him.

ROBERT BFNNING. I am the watchman that gave the alarm to Mr. Palmer. I am the watchman of Baldwyn's-gardens. About one o'clock, as I was going round, I saw Mr. Palmer's shutter was broken, the grove of the shutter was cut; these holes were bored in the shutter. This is part of the shutter. They put their arm through, and took what they could out, I suppose. I found the shutter broken; this piece of wood is part of the shutter. When I went to the door, I found the knocker of the door tied to the scraper with a rope; I ent the rope, and called Mr. Palmer down stairs, and let him know of it, and two officers were at the door; they enquired what was the matter. I told them the shop had been robbed; they said, they had got the man and the property. They came to the house, saw Mr. Palmer, and took him to see the property.

JOHN THOMAS . I was constable of the night at the watchhouse. I searched the prisoner. I found more shoes in his breeches and in his bosom, in his pocket four gimblets, and this iron crow, it is a sawyers dog; the gimblets fit the holes in the shutter. This piece of board was quite out of the shutter; it laid on the stone.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the shoes - A. They are all mine; they are bespoke shoes; they have the names of the customers on them. They cost me five pounds.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-116

401. JOHN EDMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of March , nine pounds weight of beef, value 5 l. the property of William Saunders .

WILLIAM SAUNDERS . I am a butcher , 9, Ratcliffe Highway . On the 23rd of March, a lad ran into my shop, and told me a man had taken a piece of beef off the stall-board; I ran out, and saw the man taken. I found my beef in Barton's-court.

MR. JACKSON. I was coming along Ratcliffe Highway, I saw the prisoner cross the road; I pursued him; he struck up Barton's-court. I saw him throw the meat away. I took him in Back-lane.

Prosecutor. It was part of a buttock of beef; I am sure it was my meat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of having the beef; Jackson when I followed him, he said to the people, do not stop me, a good race, a good race.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-117

402. WILLIAM WAPSBETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , one pound and a half of bacon, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Gammage .

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I am a cheesemonger , I live in the Seven Dials . I lost my bacon on the 14th of March last; the prisoner came into the shop, took a piece of bacon, and ran out of the shop; my son ran after him, and stopped him until I came up. I took the bacon from under his coat. This is the bacon; it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do this until I had been three days without food.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s . and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-118

403. JOHN TUCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , a trunk, value 15 s. the property of William Chappel , senior , and William Chappel , junior .

SAMUEL WILKINSON . I am a journeyman to Messrs. Chappel, in Long Acre. On the 9th of April. I had put out some trunks to dry; about seven o'clock in the evening, I was taking them in; I was informed a man ran down Charles-street with one of my trunks. I saw the man with the trunk; I hallooed out stop thief. The man with the trunk ran into Drury-lane; they told me a gentleman had stopped him in Drury-lane; I came up to the prisoner; a gentleman had got hold of him by the collar; he had thrown the trunk down in Broker's-alley.

JOHN DAY . I was coming down Broker's-alley; I heard the people cry out stop thief. I saw the prisoner coming up Broker's-alley; I heard somebody halloo out stop thief, the man with the trunk. I caught the prisoner, and held him until the prosecutor came up. The prisoner wished me to let him go; he said, distress drove him to do it.

Wilkinson. This is the trunk; I am sure it is my employers property; it is my own make.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-119

404. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , a cart, value 6 l. the property of John Barrett .

JOHN BARRETT . I am a fishmonger , I live 16, Pancras-place . I lost my cart on the 22nd of March, it was standing on a bit of waste ground, opposite of the house where I live; it was a one horse cart.

The last time I saw the cart was on the 22nd of March, and on the 23rd I found the wheels at a wheelers in Whitcomb-street; the axletree I found at Howland-mews, in Howland-street, Tottenham-court-road; the prisoner had a stable there, and a horse in the stable.

WILLIAM READ I am an officer. I apprehended Smith; in his stable I found some of the things that is here; here is the axletree; the iron stand I found in the stable. The wood-part of the cart we found in Compton-court, it is the side of the cart; it is broken up. When I apprehended the prisoner Smith, he told me he knew nothing of the cart; afterwards he told me the axletree was in his stable, he bought it of a man of name of Gunston. I have been after Gunston; I could not find him.

MR. HEWES. I live in Whitcomb-street. A man of the name of Thomas, asked me to give him leave to break up a pair of wheels; I gave him leave. Two men came with the wheels in a cart; the prisoner was one that brought them. They had not been there five minutes before Barret came by, he said, are these wheels for sale; I said, no; they belong to this man. He had just began to break them up. Thomas gave a pound for the wheels to the prisoner Smith. Gunstone was present.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these things; is that your axletree - A. Yes, I am sure of it, and these iron stands belonged to the cart when the cart was taken away from me, and I am sure these are my wheels.

Prisoner's Defence. Between six and seven o'clock the day I was taken, I met James Gunston with these wheels, an axletree, and a piece of iron, in his hand; he asked me if I would buy the wheels; I told him the wheels were fit for nothing, and as I knew Thomas bought wheels, I bought the wheels and axletree; he had the iron in his hand; I did not buy the iron.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-120

405. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a cart, value 5 l. the property of James Ford .

JAMES FORD. I am a tin-plate worker , I live at Battle-bridge . I lost a cart on the 24th of January, it was taken from the side of my garden. The last prosecutor gave me information that he saw a cart in the prisoner's stable, Howland-mews; I went to the prisoner's stable. At first sight I did not know the cart. On looking over the stable, I found these four irons, and looking at the cart again, I knew the cart by the tail-board; the cart then was painted a lead colour; when I lost it it was a green. The cart had been altered so as to disguise it. I am perfectly satisfied it is my cart. I found this in the stable; this belongs to the cart to place the traces to; these two irons are fastened inside of the cart to screw two lamps into; these I found in the stable; I knew them to be my property before I knew the cart.

WILLIAM READ . I went with the prosecutor and found the cart. I asked the prisoner how he came by the cart; at first, he said, he bought it in Smithfield; at the magistrate's, he said, he bought it of Parry; Parry said, no, you bought it in Smithfield.

Prisoner's Defence. Parry had half of my stable; he brought this cart, and left the iron in my stable.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-121

406. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a sheet, value 18 d. the property of John Hannes .

JOHN HANNES . I keep the Golden Lion , Lemon-street, Goodman's-fields . On the 26th of February, I saw the prisoner coming down stairs; I asked him where he came from; he told me out of the taproom. I asked him what he had got under his coat; he said, nothing that belonged to me. I said, I would look; he ran into the passage, and was going to throw something away; it was my sheet; I catched hold of him.

Q. Did he lodge in your house - A. No; I never saw him before.

DANIEL SOLOMONS . I am an officer. I produce the sheet; it was brought to the watchhouse by Mr. Hannes.

Prosecutor. It is my sheet; it was taken out of my bed-room.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-122

407. MARY HAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , a shirt, value 18 d. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Richard Estcourt .

MARGARET ESTCOURT. I live in Chapple-street. I sent my child to Three King-court, in the Minories; he is eight years old.

Q. You sent your child Richard - A. Yes, to Three King-court, in the Minories; it was about ten o'clock, in the morning; he was to bring a shirt and two handkerchiefs. I saw the property about twelve o'clock. James Sells brought them to me.

JAMES SELLS . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 2nd of April, Mr. Gatzley, the pawnbroker, sent for me; the man said there was a woman that had taken a bundle from a child.

THOMAS SIMPSON . I am a sailor, I live in Lower East Smithfield. On the 2nd of April, I was coming along Mile-end-road, I saw the prisoner crossing the road, with a little boy after her; she was followed by the child, Richard Estcourt , he was crying, and saying, that she had the clothes; I immediately pursued her. She turned up a court, and when I came into the court I missed her. In about two minutes I saw the prisoner in the pawnbroker's. I am sure the prisoner is the woman, and I am sure the child now present, is the same little boy.

SARAH FISHER . I am servant to Thomas Gatzley, pawnbroker. I was in the kitchen on the 2nd of April; the kitchen and the shop are even together.

I saw the side door open; the prisoner came in, and hid herself behind the door. I went and asked what was the matter; she said, she did not know. She was very much flurried, and all of a terrible cried constable was sent for; he took the prisoner into custody.

Sells. This is the bundle that was delivered to me by Mr. Gatzley; he said Simpson knew more of the business than him, he had followed the woman and the child.

Prosecutrix. These are the things that I sent my little boy for.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to pawn my apron; as to the bundle, I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiants.

Reference Number: t18140420-123

408. WILLIAM AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a pair of bellows, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Griffiths .

SAMUEL GRIFFITHS . I am a tin-plate worker , I live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On the 19th of February, I left my shop in the care of a boy; I heard somebody come in the shop; I saw the prisoner go away with a kind of a run. I came up stairs; I found the bellows gone. I pursued the prisoner, and caught him within three or four doors, with the bellows in a blue apron before him. These are the bellows; they are worth three shillings and sixpence. The prisoner's friends are hard working people. They are my bellows.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy dropped the bellows; I picked them up.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Valiants.

Reference Number: t18140420-124

409. EDWARD BRAZELY and SUSANNAH BRAZELY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , nine dishes, value 11 s. plates, value 3 s. six wine-glasses, value 3 s. two custard-cups, value 2 d. two finger-glasses, value 1 s. a cruet, value 6 d. seven knives, value 7 d. a tablecloth, value 2 s. a napkin, value 6 d. a sheet, value 4 s. two remnants of bed-furniture, value 4 s. and a tinder-box, value 1 s. the property of William Harris .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a mathematical-instrument maker , No. 50, High Holborn. The woman prisoner was my servant .

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge of the man prisoner visiting her at your house - A. No. We gave her warning; she quitted my service, and went to a Mr. Ingram, a latter, in Cheapside. I suspected her, and that made me insist upon her going away Mr. Ingram called upon me. I went with him the next day to search the box of Edward Brazely; Edward Brazely was confined in the watch-house at the time I searched two boxes, and there we found all the articles enumerated in the indictment. I took Susannah to be a single woman, and if I understand right, she was married while in my service. I believe her to be the wife of Edward Brazely.

ISABELLA HARRIS. I am the wife of the last witness. When Susannah was my servant, I thought my plates and dishes diminished. I had no certainty of her taking these things, so as to prevent me giving her a character. The articles found in Edward Brazely box were brought to our house; I knew them to be my husband's property. When she went to live with Mr. Ingram, I did not know she was married to this man.

ANN INGRAM . The female prisoner came into my service from Mr. Harris's; she was in my service a month and two days. Before she was taken up, I found a finger-glass in the drawer in the prisoner's room; which Mr. Harris said is his.

Mr. Harris. I had two finger-glasses missed; I believed this to be one of them.

JOHN BLAKE . I am a constable. I apprehended Edward Brazely on Saturday, the 5th of March. On Monday morning I went to him at the watchhouse, I asked him to give the key of his box; he willingly gave me the key. One key opened both his boxes. At Mr. Moodey's, No. 8, Windmill-street, Tottenham-court-road, I found all these articles in the two boxes, except the finger-glass. I shewed them to Mr. Harris.

Mrs. Harris. They are all Mr. Harris's property.

Edward Brazely 's Defence. My wife gave me the things the very day after we were married.

Susannah Brazely's Defence. I bought the plates of a man with a cart in Tottenham-court-road; them remnants of bed-furniture I bought in Oxford-street, the knives my mother gave me.

EDWARD BRAZELY , GUILTY , aged 22.

SUSANNAH BRAZELY , GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-125

410. EDWARD BRAZELY and SUSANNAH BRAZELY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of March , a hat, value 1 l. the property of Lawrence Ingram .

LAWRENCE INGRAM. I live at No. 2, Cheapside . I received the female prisoner as servant , from Mr. Harris, in Holborn. I keep a hatters shop . On the 2nd of March, in the evening, my young man finished off one hat in particular, and put it in the locker in the window; the next morning my young man told me the hat was missing, and the hat was found in the prisoner's box; it was brought to me. I discovered it was my hat. The man prisoner told me himself he was in my house between six and seven in the morning; his wife gave him the hat.

WILLIAM HEATHER . I work at Mr. Ingram's, in Cheapside. I finished a hat, and put it in the locker. The next morning I missed the hat. I saw the hat found in the prisoner's box. I am confident it is the same hat; it is worth a guinea.

JOHN BLAKE . I took this hat out of the prisoner's box.

Edward Brazely's Defence. My wife told me to home in the morning; I went; she gave me this hat.

EDWARD BRAZELY , GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

SUSANNAH BRAZELY , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-126

411. WILLIAM MEIRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of April , two pecks of coals, value 13 d. the property of John Charrington , Daniel Cloves , senior , and Daniel Cloves , junior .

DANIEL CLOVES , SENIOR. I am a coal merchant ; John Charrington and Daniel Cloves, my son, are my partners. I can only prove the firm, and the coals are my property.

JAMES BOWLES. I am an officer. Mr. Cloves's barge was laying at Mr. Cloves's wharf, with coals in the barge. On the 3rd of April, I saw the prisoner go into the barge Christopher, 292. I stopped him after he got out of the barge, with this bag of coals at his back; it contains two pecks.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-127

412. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of George Higgens .

HANNAH HIGGENS . I am the wife of George Higgens; I am a laundress. On the 26th of March, a quarter before nine, I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief off the line, at the front of the house; I ran down immediately. He threw the handkerchief away; a boy picked it up, and gave it to me. This is the handkerchief I saw the prisoner take off the line; I had hung it out to dry; it is my husband's property.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-128

413. THOMAS BRADBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , six pounds weight of lead, value 15 d. and two brass cocks, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Fulham , affixed to this dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, the property of Joseph Booth .

JOSEPH BOOTH . I rent the house of Mr. Thomas Fulham . On the 28th of March, the leaden pipe and two brass cocks were taken from my house. I saw them on Monday evening in their proper place; they were affixed to my house, No. 1, Great Arthur-street, Goswell-street .

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of March; he said, he had taken the lead pipe and the two brass cocks from Mr. Booth's house; his father would not allow him victuals, he was obliged to do it.

GUILTY, aged 11.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-129

414. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously, stealing, on the 2nd of March , a great coat, value 1l the property of James Nixon .

JAMES NIXON . I am a soldier in the Staffordshire militia . My coat was taken from the Black Lion public-house, in Vinegar-yard, near Drury-lane Theatre . On the 2nd of March, I took my coat to the Black Lion to get my comrade to help me roll it; my comrade was not there. I laid my coat on the bench, and called for a pint of beer. After I had been in the tap-room a few minutes, I left my coat on the bench; I went into the yard, and when I returned my coat and the prisoner was gone. On the next morning. I went to the barracks, and told the Serjeant; he took me to Mary-le-bone watchhouse. I found the prisoner and the coat there. I am sure that is the coat that belongs to me.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a Serjeant in the regiment. On the morning of the 3rd of March, Mr. Piall reported that he had a man in the watchhouse with a coat on belonging to the regiment. When I saw the prisoner at the watchhouse he had Nixon's coat on.

SAMUEL PIALL . The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse on another charge, on the night of the 2nd of March; he had this coat on. Nixon came and owned the coat.

Nixon. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of using the Black Lion, I told Piall, Nixon lent me the coat.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-130

415. SAMUEL JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , three coals, value 3 l. the property of John Lord Bishop of London , since deceased .

THOMAS MORRIS . I was in the service of the late Bishop of London; his house was in St. James's-square. He died in July last. Early in March, in the Bishop's life time, three of the servants coats were missed out of the stable that comes into Charles-street ; they were worth a pound each. They were all safe in the yard about dusk. I have seen two of the coats since. This is one of them I believe.

BENJAMIN WOOLF . I keep a saleshop, in Hemming's-row, St. Martin's-lane. I have known the prisoner Jackson, three years. I bought this coat with three others, about fourteen months ago; I do not recollect exactly the month.

Q. Do you know what business the prisoner was - A. He told me he used to water-roads. I gave the prisoner six pounds ten shillings for the four coats.

LEAH LEE . I live with my uncle, Benjamin Woolf , No. 7, Hemming's-row. I was present when the prisoner brought these coats; it is about fourteen months ago.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had such property in my possession; I never saw Woolf before I was taken in custody.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-131

416. MARY GOLDSMID was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , a snuff-box, value 1 l. the property of John Brown .

JOHN BROWN. I live in Great Portland-street; I am a tea-dealer . In consequence of suspicion, after the prisoner had left my service six weeks, I obtained a search warrant. I went with the search warrant to the Royal Oak, the corner of Circus-street, in the New-road, Marybone; the prisoner was then living there. In the prisoner's box or drawer, I found my tortoiseshell snuff-box. The prisoner was with me at the time I found it. I had not missed the box until I found it. I am sure I had it during the time she was in my service. I gave twenty-five shillings for the box. It was inlaid with gold.

GEORGE BENNET. I am an officer. I executed the warrant. I found the snuff-box in a drawer with the prisoner's clothes; she said, she was very sorry she had done it.

Prisoner's Defence. In a lumber room in Mr. Brown's house, I picked up this snuff-box; I thought it of no value, and intended to get it mended. The prosecutor came with an officer, and searched my box; he said, he had lost some silver spoons. In my drawers he found this old snuff-box. The prosecutor has declared, if he could, he would transport me; I am at a loss to know, why he should be so severe for so trivial an article. I pray I may be restored to my distressed parents, who are in great distress of mind for my unfortunate situation.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-132

417. GEORGE DEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , one mahogany table, value 12 s. the property of Mary Rintoul .

MARY RINTOUL . I keep a broker's shop , in Leather-lane, Holborn . I lost the mahogany table from my shop; I did not see it taken. The prisoner had sat on the table at my door, he is lame; I thought he did it to rest himself. A child came in, and gave me information.

JANE RINTOUL . I am daughter to Mrs. Rintoul, I pursued the prisoner, and took the table from him in Hatton Garden. This is the table it is my mother's property.

SARAH COOK . My father keeps a broker's shop. The prisoner came to my father's door; he said, he had a good dining table to sell. I went over the road with the prisoner; Jane Rintoul had hold of the table; the prisoner said that is my table.

Prisoner's Defence. I only asked Sarah Cook if she bought such things. A young man asked me to help him carry the table; he would give me sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-133

418. ELIZABETH CRAWFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , three blankets, value 12 s. a bolster, value 6 s. a pillow, value 2 s. and a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of John Kerslick , in a lodging-room .

JOHN KERSLICK. I live at 48, Queen-street, Edgware-road . The prisoner came to my house on the 5th of January; I let her a furnished back room on the second floor for three shillings and sixpence a week. On the 11th of March, I desired her to let me have the sheets that she had in use. When I examined the room, I found the articles gone mentioned in the indictment. I told the prisoner if she would produce me the goods, I would forgive her the rent. I found some of the goods afterwards at the pawnbrokers.

WILLIAM TUCK. I am a servant to Mr. Hill, pawnbroker, Rathbone-place. I produce a pillow; I lent the prisoner a shilling on it, on the 31st of January. All the other articles were taken in by other persons in the shop.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. Necessity made me pledge them; I pledged the last blanket for a shilling to go on with my work.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-134

419. GROVES BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , thirty-five pounds weight of lead, value 2 s. the property of William Adams .

ELIZABETH RUFFE . I am cook to Mr. Adams, he lives in Albemarle-street, Piccadilly . I did not miss the lead until I was told of it, and then I missed it. It was loose in the cellar, as you go to the dust hole. The area door is always left open; at that time any one might go into the cellar. I only know that the lead was taken away from the cellar.

JOHN COBHAM . I am a constable. On Friday, the 11th of March, about three in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner coming down Davey-street, Berkley-square; he had something weighty in his apron; he is a dustman. I suspected he had stolen property in his apron. I stopped him, and asked him what he had got; he said, only a little bit of lead that he had found in the dust, at No. 25, Dover-street. I asked him if they had given him the lead; he said, no. I told him I would go with him to the house; he took me to Mr. Adam's house, 26, Albemarle-street; he took me down the area, and endeavoured to throw the lead down the privy. It is thirty-two pounds of lead.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the constable I would take it back again.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-135

420. WILLIAM SMITH and JOSEPH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a bolster, value 2 s. a pillow, value 2 s. a sheet, value 5 s. and a blanket, value 2 s. the property of Robert Remdalls .

MARTHA REMDALLS . I am the wife of Robert Remdalls. I let the prisoners a room belonging to my house; it has no communication with it, but it is within the same fence. They occupied the room

the 1st of February, and paid four shillings a week. They had a bed in the room, and bedding. They lodged there five weeks. Joseph told me he was a coachmaker, and that his brother was a shoemaker; Mr. Hall brought William Smith to my house in custody. I searched the room, and found the property missing mentioned in the indictment. William Smith had a bag containing fifty-three duplicates. I found all my property.

JOHN WALTER . I am shopman to Mr. Merett, pawnbroker, High-street, Marybone. William Smith on the 5th of February pledged a pillow for fifteen pence; on the 7th, a quilt and sheet for six shillings; on the 8th, a bolster for two shillings. They have been all claimed by Mrs. Remdalls as her husband's property. When William Smith pawned them he was alone.

Prosecutrix. The articles are my husband's property.

William Smith's Defence. I was out of work a long time; I thought of replacing the property when I got work.

WILLIAM SMITH , GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

JOSEPH SMITH , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-136

421. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , nine pounds weight of cheese, value 3 s. the property of Michael Gunston and Charles Prickett .

MICHAEL GUNSTON. I am a cheesemonger , 77, St. John-street; Charles Prickett is my partner. I only know the cheese is mine.

JOHN HERDSFIELD. I am one of the city officers. On Saturday, at the end of last sessions, I was going up St. John-street. I saw this lad and another about the same size standing at the prosecutors door about four o'clock in the afternoon. It was quite daylight. The other lad took the cheese, and chucked it into the prisoner's apron: The other lad ran across the road. I thought it my duty to make after the property. The prisoner ran into a back yard and threw the cheese down a privy, and bolted himself in. I saw him throw the cheese down the privy. I was close to his heels. I opened the door, got the cheese, and took him to the prosecutors.

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy gave me the cheese; I did not know he stole it.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-137

422. MARY BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , twelve yards of printed cotton, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Walker , senior .

THOMAS WALKER . I live with my father, Thomas Walker ; he is a linen-draper in Blandford-street, St. Mary-le-bone . On the 28th of March, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner came and looked in at the window; she then went to the horse that we have on purpose for shewing the goods; she took off a piece of print, wrapped it up, looked through the window again, and made off. I pursued her, and took the print from under her cloak. This is the print. It is my father's property.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-138

423. JAMES SHARPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , two pillows, value 8 s. two sheets, value 9 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. a pillow-case, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 9 d. the property of William Turpin , in a lodgingroom .

SUSANNAH TURPIN . I am sister to William Turpin ; I let a ready furnished room to the prisoner's wife, a room on the ground floor; she was to give four shillings and sixpence a week for the furnished room. On the 30th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner and wife came together to the lodging; they continued in the lodging seven or eight weeks. I had an officer, and searched the room; I missed the things contained in the indictment.

WILLIAM GIBSON . I am servant to Mr. Page, pawnbroker, Liquorpond-street. I produce two pillows, two sheets, a candlestick, and a flat iron, pledged by the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are my brother's property.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-139

424. CHARLOTTE NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , from the person of Thomas Sheppard , a comb, value 1 s. seven shillings in monies numbered, and four 1 l. bank notes , the property of Thomas Sheppard .

THOMAS SHEPPERD. I am a japanner ; I live at Birmingham. I lost these things on Wednesday night, the 23d of March; they were in my breeches pocket. I was coming down Holborn to my lodgings, the prisoner laid hold of me round the waist, and pushed up against a door at the corner of Turnstile, Holborn , and there she picked my pocket of four one-pound bank notes, and seven shillings in silver I am certain of, and my comb was found in her possession. I gave the alarm to the watchman. She went away. I did not know that I had been robbed.

Q. How soon did you find it out - A. In about five minutes after. When I came to my lodging I put my hand into my pocket to look for my money; it was gone. I put the candle down, and went out. I was all night looking after her. I saw her in Drury-lane the next morning. I am sure she is the woman. I had been with no other woman. This is the woman that laid hold of me. When I found her in Drury-lane I tapped her on the shoulder; I said, I have been looking for you all night; she said, you b - r, I never saw you.

WILSON. I am an officer. On the morning of the 24th, I took the prisoner in custody; she was very much in liquor. I took her to St. Giles's watchhouse. I told her to turn out what she had got in her pocket; she pulled out some shillings and halfpence. I put my hand in her pocket, and took

out this comb. I asked her how she came by the comb; she told me that a woman gave her the comb for her boy, who was in the Philanthrople society.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor never said a word about the comb used the constable told him if he could swear to the comb; he would get the rest of the property.

Prosecutor. That is my comb. I am positive of it.

Prisoner. He never said it was his comb until he came before the magistrate. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-140

425. GEORGE HANCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April ; a handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Branson , junior , from his person .

THOMAS BRANSON , JUNIOR. I live with my father, 77, Cheapside. I had my pocket picked on the 20th of April. I was in Piccadilly . I missed my handkerchiefs.

Q. Do you know who picked your pocket - A. No. The officer had my handkerchief. I saw it again.

JOHN CARLISLE. I am an officer. On the 20th of April I was in Piccadilly. I followed the prisoner. I saw the prisoner put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, but he got nothing. He passed from one gentleman to another; he put his hand into their pocket and got nothing; then he came to this young man's pocket, and after he pulled his handkerchief out I tapped him on his shoulder; I said, what are you a. I took hold of him by the collar; he dropped the handkerchief. Johnson, an officer, saw him as well as me take it out of the prosecutor's pocket. I said to the prisoner, you shall not pick any more pockets here, I shall take you in custody. Johnson saw the prosecutor, and brought him out of the mob. I had hold of the prisoner with my left hand, and picked up the handkerchief with my right.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. On the 20th of April I was in Piccadilly on duty; a great mob was assembled there, occassioned by the King of France coming into town. I saw a great many of those characters in the crowd, said among those characters was the prisoner. I watched the prisoner, and at last the prisoner went to the prosecutor. I saw him put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take out this handkerchiefs I touched the prosecutor on his shoulder, and told him he had lost his handkerchief. I turned round, and saw Carlisle had got hold of the prisoner. I searched the prisoner; I found two more silk handkerchiefs on him.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in Piccadilly before they pulled me in to it.

GUILTY aged 34.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-141

426. GEORGE EASTHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April two seals, value 3 l. and a watch key value 3 s. the property of John Brown Wilson from his person .

JOHN BROWN WILSON. I live at 52, Clarendon-square, Somers Town. On Wednesday the 20th of this month. I was in Albemarle-street when the procession was; I was there about six o'clock in the evening; there, was then a great crowd about the door of the hotel. My seals and key were safe on my ribbon; I saw them at four o'clock. They were cut from my ribbon. About a quarter before six, I perceived my seals and key were gone. I was told they were gone. I looked, and saw they were gone. They were gold seals, worth about three pounds. I do not recollect seeing the prisoner about me.

JAMES DAVIS . I was in Albemarle-street, at this time; I saw the prisoner and another person with him. I saw the prisoner standing by the railing opposite of the hotel. When first I saw the prisoner it was at the corner of Albemarle-street; he and his companion were whispering together. I suspected them, and kept my eye upon them. I saw him go up to Mr. Wilson. Previous to their going up I saw Mr. Wilson's seals hung to his ribbon. They stood about Mr. Wilson's person about three minutes, then they went away. I tapped Mr. Wilson on his shoulder, and asked him if he had lost anything; he clapped his hand to his ribbon, and missed his seals and key. In about half a minute, the next witness, Mr. Wright, hallooed out stop thief. The prisoner ran under a coach; he was taken by one of the witnesses. I am quite sure the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE LATHAM WRIGHT. I am a wholesale draper; I live in King-street, Cheapside. I was in Albemarle-street the day this matter happened, a little before six o'clock; I saw the prisoner and the lad he was in company with, standing very near where I was. They were whispering together. I was almost opposite of the hotel. I looked at them very hard; I saw the prisoner have hold of Mr. Wilson's seals when they were hanging to his watch; immediately a person came up, and said to Mr. Wilson, have you lost anything. Mr. Wilson looked down to his seals and missed them; I said, that man has got them, pointing to the prisoner. I called out, stop thief. I I was close behind him when he started; he ran between two coaches; he was stopped. I am sorry to say he is the man.

MR. HALL. I am a lieutenant in the Navy. I heard them sing out stop thief. I saw the prisoner run between two coaches under the horses heads. I stopped him. He had this knife in his hand, which he was attempting to shut. He threw something away back handed, down Mr. Murray's, the book-seller's steps. Mr. Stevens picked it up while I had hold of him. While I had hold of the prisoner I had several blows from different people round me; they were endeavouring to rescue him. They called me a rascal, and said he was not the man. I send out for a constable; one came, and he was secured; I took the knife out of his hand, and the handkerchief out of his breeches.

RICHARD STEVENS. I live in Bell yard. I picked up these seals just through the railings of that door where I was standing. They were just within the railing; I picked them up there; These are the seals and the key there is some of the watch are attached.

Prosecutor. These are my seals, I have no doubt about it.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-142

427. SAMUEL POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , one brass cock and ball, value 4 s. 3 d. and one pound weight of lead pipe, value 1 s. the property of James Wadmore .

JANE WALLIS . I am the servant in Wadmore's house; I know the brass cock and ball were safe in the cistern on the evening of the 7th of March; I saw it safe, between six and seven o'clock. On the morning of the 8th of March, a little after six, the watchman came; I looked in the cistorn, the cock and ball were gone, and some of the pipe was wrenched off.

THOMAS JONES. On the 8th of March, a quarter after four o'clock, I saw the prisoner about five yards from the prosecutor's house. It snowed very hard at the time. He threw down the lead pipe, ball; and cock. I asked him what he threw down; he said his glove that he had just picked up. I took him to the watchhouse. This is the brass cock, ball, and lead pipe.

SAMUEL PIALL . I examined Mr. Wadmore's cistern; the pipe appeared to have been wrenched off by this instrument that we found on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. What the watchman has said is quite false. He asked me what I had got in my hand; I said a pair of gloves that I had just picked up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-143

428. ANN WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , from the person of Matilda Lewis , a snuff box, value 1 s. a dollar, three 3 s. bank tokens, a 10 l. bank note, and a 2 l. bank note , the property of Saville Lewis .

MATILDA LEWIS . My husband's name is Saville Lewis.

Q. When did you lose these articles - A. Last Saturday week I was in my bed room when these things were taken from my person.

Q. When you went to bed where was your money and notes - A. In my pocket-book. The pocket-book was in my pocket, and my pocket between two beds, at the bottom of the bed. I had forty-five pounds in my pocket when I went to bed. I missed it in the morning as soon as I came down stairs. I missed a ten pound and a two pound note. I missed a dollar first, that gave me suspicion, and caused me to look if I had lost any notes.

Q. Do you know whether you had any three-shilling tokens - A. That I cannot say, nor did I know that the prisoner had the snuff box until the officer brought it from her. The prisoner was the only female servant in the house. I saw the prisoner searched on Sunday morning; I saw my notes taken out of her bosom, a ten pound and a two pound note, a dollar, and three three-shilling tokens. I lost a little silver, what sort of coin I do not know.

SAVILLE LEWIS. I live at the Queen's Head, St. Martin's-le-grand.

Q. Do you know that your wife had this ten pound and a two pound note - A. Yes, we counted it before we went to bed. I had written on the ten pound note the name of Clements, the name of the person of where I took it. I saw the name of Clements on the ten pound note when it was taken out of the prisoner's bosom.

JOSEPH BRANT. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner about seven o'clock in the morning. I asked the prisoner where the property was. She ran down into the kitchen, and took up this snuff box. Mrs. Lewis said, that is my husband's snuff box. This handkerchief was in her bosom; it contained a ten pound note and a two pound note, and a dollar. Mr. Lewis said on the ten pound note was the name of Clements. This is the ten pound note.

Prosecutor. That is my writing on the ten pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Mr. Lewis's house first as a lodger; the servant went away; Mrs. Lewis asked me to do the work. On Saturday Mrs. Lewis gave me two or three glasses of gin; she had one glass of gin and I another. I went up stairs with her; she sent me down for a glass of brandy for her; I got it for her. When I went up she had the pocket-book in her hand; she turned sick; she was very much intoxicated; this silver dropped on the floor, and the notes like wise. I picked them up, and put them in my pocket. Mrs. Lewis said if I would give them her she would say no more about it. I am a poor distressed woman. My husband has been a soldier in the Guards seventeen years.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-144

429. MARIA MADDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , a cloak, value 3 s. the property of James Hulme .

JOSEPH ROSIER . I am a servant to James Hulme , he is a pawnbroker . On the 23d of February the prisoner came to his shop and looked at a cloak; she walked about the door some time. This cloak was hanging on the shop door, within the shop. I saw her take the cloak. She went round the corner into one of the private boxes; there she doubled it into four. When I stopped her she was outside of the shop, putting it into a bundle. I took the cloak from her. This is the cloak; it is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. The cloak was hanging outside of the door. I took it down; I thought the fittest place was to go into the shop and try it on.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-145

430. JOHN FARTHING and JOHN THOMAS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , ten pounds weight of bacon, value 7 s. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . On Saturday the 5th of March, near half past twelve o'clock at night, I went into the Falcon public-house, Portpool-lane; the prisoners were there drinking out of one pot. I

walked into the room; I looked around me and when I came out of the door they soon after came out. I took towards Gray's-inn-lane, the prisoners towards Leather-lane. I went as far as Middle-row, and was going towards my home; I met the two prisoners in Gray's-inn-lane, just by Tash-street. The prisoner, Thomas, had got this piece of bacon wrapped up in a great coat.

Q. Do you know whether any person had lost bacon - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-146

431. RICHARD EVANS , HUGH TAYLOR , HENRY LLOYD , and WILLIAM BROWN , were indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 21st of February , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Gunnel , from his person .

SAMUEL GUNNEL. I live in Cowley-street, Westminster. I lost my handkerchief on Monday the 21st of February, between twelve and one o'clock in the day. I knew I had my handkerchief in my outside coat pocket. I knew nothing of it being taken until the officer tapped me on the shoulder and asked me if I had lost my handkerchief. On applying my hand to my pocket I found my handkerchief was gone. The handkerchief the officer produced to me was my handkerchief. I was in the Strand, going in a direction towards Temple-bar.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT. I am an officer. On the 21st of February, I first saw Brown, Evans, and Taylor, in company together; they were near Temple-bar. I followed them behind coaches, watching them. I do not recollect seeing Lloyd at all. I watched them as far as the New church in the Strand. They went on to just behind Somerset House; they made a stop there. Mr. Gunnel was passing by with a lady in a direction to the City; they then immediately followed Mr. Gunnel. They turned after Mr. Gunnel. Evans put his hand into Mr. Gunnel's pocket. Mr. Gunnel was walking on. He pulled his hand out of his pocket, and brought nothing out. He took his hand away, and went off. They walked after Mr. Gunnel again. Evans took the handkerchief out of Mr. Gunnel's pocket, and put it under Taylor's arm.

Q. At the time that this was done where was Lloyd - A. I did not see Lloyd to my recollection at all. Brown was apprehended between three and four in the afternoon. I apprehended Brown myself in Russel-street, Covent Garden. I charged him with stealing Mr. Gunnel's handkerchief. He denied it, and said he had not been in the Strand at all at the time. I apprehended Evans and Taylor; Brown ran away. I do not recollect seeing Lloyd. I was for keeping out of Brown's sight; I thought he would recollect me.

CHARLES MYERS . I belong to Bow-street. On the 21st of February; I was going up Fleet-street. Just before I got to Temple-bar I observed Taylor and the other three prisoners; they were going into the Strand. At the time I saw them first, Taylor had his hand in a gentleman's pocket; he pulled the gentleman's white handkerchief partly out. The other three prisoners could see what he was doing. Taylor did not pull the handkerchief quite out. The gentleman got from him. I followed them until they stopped just by the New church in the Strand. I was in an hurry to go to the office to deliver a note to Mr. Stafford. When I got to the office I told Westcoat there were four pickpockets in the Strand. After I delivered my message to Mr. Stafford. I went into the Strand; I saw Westcoat pulling Evans and Taylor into a public-house I observed Brown run up Castle-street and I saw Lloyd going towards St. Clement's church.

Westcoat. I searched Evans and Taylor; I found nothing upon Evans; upon Taylor I found these two handkerchiefs; one under his arm and one in his pocket.

Q. to Mr. Gunnel. Has the officer shewn you the handkerchief - A. Yes; I am certain it is mine.

Taylor's Defence. I am entirely innocent.

Evans's Defence. The same.

Brown's Defence. The same.

Lloyd was not put on his defence.

TAYLOR, GUILTY , aged 18.

EVANS, GUILTY , aged 20.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

LLOYD, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-147

432. ABIGAIL DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , ninety-three halfpence, value 3 s. 10 d. the property of Robert Gould .

ELIZABETH GOULD . My husband's name is Robert Gould ; we keep the Crown public-house , Stanhope-street, Clare-market . The prisoner was my servant .

Q. Did you know that she had that child - A. No; she hired herself to me as a single woman; she came to me on the 14th of February. At a late hour in the night on the 23rd of March, I had occasion to go into a room that nobody had any business to go into but me and the prisoner. On turning up the bed I found two papers of halfpence. They were my papers of halfpence, I can swear. They had both been opened. I had put five shillings in each paper, part of them had been taken out. I then went to my own bed room to see whether the money was right which was for the brewer, which had been sixteen pounds; there was exactly eleven pounds taken away, and five pounds left. I had no other woman servant in the house.

Q. How lately before had you counted that money in the bed-room - A. Nine days before and no person had been up stairs that day but me and my husband. I sent for an officer, and than I questioned the prisoner. The officer searched her and found a key upon her that would open my bed-room door. The prisoner said that was the key that she got into my bed-room with and all that she took was three shillings and ten-pence halfpenny.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer. On the 23rd of March, I took charge of the prisoner. This is the key I found upon her; it opened her; mistress's bed-room door. She denied knowing any thing of the halfpence. In the room in which the prisoner slept, I found these halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. These halfpence were my own; I got them for work, and sayed them to lay out upon my child

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex jury, before, Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18140420-148

433. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a pair of sheets value 15 s. of the property of Richard Williams in a living room .

RICHARD WILLIAM . I live at 19, Chamber-street, Goodman's-fields . On the 11th of March, the prisoner took a lodging in my house; he said, he was a single man; two other men slept in the room besides him. I found sheets for the bed the prisoner slept in. He took the lodging at three shillings a week; he did not come until the 15th of March to sleep there. He brought in a basket when he came to sleep; he slept at my house that evening: In the morning, about half after six, he went out; my wife went up stairs immediately, and from information I pursued the prisoner, and caught him in Rosemary-lane by the collar; I told him he had robbed me. I found my sheets in his basket These are the sheets; they are mine. They were on the bed that he slept in. They are my sheets. I have kept them separate ever since; they are worth fifteen shillings.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury; before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-149

434. WILLIAM WOODFALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , four scaffolding boards, value 8 s. the property of James Brown .

JAMES BROWN . I live in Elbow-lane. My scaffolding boards were in Goswell-street ; I was building two houses there.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a carpenter. I was going by the building in Goswell-street, on the 10th of March, some time after two o'clock; I saw a man come out of the ground with two boards on his shoulder I asked him whether Mr. Brown had sent him for these boards; he said, yes, it is all right. I was doubtful whether it was so. I followed him half way down Sutton-street; I then saw the prisoner standing at the bottom of the street, with these two other scaffolding boards. I passed the man I first saw, and went to the prisoner; I asked him who his master was he pointed to the man I first saw come out of the building; he said; he was his master, the employed him to watch them. When the first man saw me with the prisoner, he threw the boards down and ran. The prisoner wished to go after him; I did not think proper. I took him to my yard with the boards, and gave him in charge of a constable. He said he fetched these two boards by the under of the other man, who employed him I asked him who is master was, he declared he did know who he was, nor where he lived. This is one of that boarding to the prosecutor a home is upon it. The other board is in the yard.

Prosecutor They are all my goods.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-150

435. MARY BLACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , three yards of printed cotton, value 18 s. the property of Joseph Waterhouse .

JOSEPH WATERHOUSE. I am a tailor , I live at 13, Church-street, Bethnal-green . On Tuesday, the 8th of March, as I was sitting in my shop, I heard the kitchen door shut to; I instantly went into my passage, and found the prisoner coming up the kitchen stairs with a bag in her hand. I asked her what she had got there; she said, some tags, her mother had sent her to sell them. I opened the bag; it contained these remnants of cotton, my own property, I had left them in the kitchen. I can swear positively to the cotton.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-151

436. JANE ELSOM was indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of James Abbott , a handkerchief, value 1 s. a 25 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note , his property.

JAMES ABBOTT . I am a porter at Paddington warehouse . On the 25th of February, I was in New-street, St. Giles's; the prisoner asked me to go home with her; I went with her to her lodging. I fell asleep there, and when I awoke, I missed my property, and the prisoner was gone.

Q. Might it not drop out of your pocket - A. I cannot say. I was the worse for liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-152

437. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for that he, on the 29th of August, in the 48th year of his Majesty's reign, did marry one Elizabeth Batt , spinster , that he afterwards, on the 15th of November, in the 53rd year of his Majesty's reign , did marry one Lydia Burgess , his former wife being then alive , and that he afterwards in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone was apprehended

WILLIAM BLANCHARD. I am the parish clerk of East Tidery, in Hampshire. I produce the register of that parish.

"William Hill and Elizabeth Batt, spinster, by banns were married, this 29th of August, 1808". I was present at the marriage; I knew him; he is the man. I saw Elizabeth Ball last Sunday; she was alive then; I am sure she is the same woman.

JOHN GERR. I am parish clerk of Alderstoke, in Hampshire. I produce the register of that parish

"15th of November, 1813, William Hill of this parish, and Lydia Burgess , were married." They are neither of them described. I was present when they were married; I believe he is the man.

SARAH BUCKELL . I was present at the marriage of the prisoner and Lydia Burgess; he is the man.

WILLIAM PEPPALL . I am a constable, I apprehended Hill on a charge of bigamy in James street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone on Saturday the 17th of this month.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-153

438. ELIZABETH FETTIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , two pillows, value 4 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. and a curtain, value 2 s. the property of James Goodson , in a lodging-room .

ELEANOR GOODSON . My husband's name is James Goodson ; we keep a house , No. 4, Chapel-row, Spa-fields . On the 16th of August last, the prisoner hired a ready furnished lodging in my house for herself and her husband; she said, her name was Brown. She came into the lodging the same day. I missed the curtains in three or four months after she came. She left the lodging without paying her rent. When I found she was gone, I went into her room, opened the drawers; and saw the duplicate of the curtains.

Mr. Gurney. The lodgings were let to her and her husband - A. Yes. She told me she was a married woman. I let her the room for her and her husband. She went by the name of Brown; she said, her husband's name was Brown.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140420-154

439. ARCHIBALD RAMSAY and MATTHEW KENNEDY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , six peck of coals, value 2 s. the property of Isaac Robson .

ISAAC ROBSON . I am a coal merchant . I can only speak to the craft and the coals being mine. My craft was alongside of the ship in the pool.

THOMAS MOODY . I am a Thames police officer. On the 5th of April, I was on duty at Shadwell; I saw both the prisoners in the barge called Ruth, No. 1248, between three and four o'clock in the morning; they each of them took coals from the barge Ruth, and put into their barge. I told Ramsay he was doing very wrong; he said he knew it. I took them before the magistrate.

Q. to Mr. Robson. Had you a barge with coals at Shadwell - A. I had. My lighterman took a barge the day before to load her; the name of the barge was Ruth, 1248.

Ramsay's Defence. I was at work a ballast getting.

Kennedy's Defence. The same.

The prisoners called six witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140420-155

440. NIGH MULSHA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , three hundred and thirty-nine pounds weight of iron, value 18 s. the property of William Birch . And MATTHIAS BROWN for feloniously receiving, on the same day, three hundred pounds weight of iron, part of the aforesaid goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners, of this charge, were.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140420-156

441. NIGH MULSHA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , thirty-nine pounds weight of iron, value 2 s. the property of William Birch .

WILLIAM BIRCH . I am an iron founder ; I live in Clerkenwell. The prisoner had been my labourer ten or twelve months. In consequence of suspicion, on the 5th of April, about ten minutes past one in the day, I watched him as he came from the foundry; I conceived he was more bulky than he ought to be; I asked him what he had got there; he said, iron. I pulled his coat of one side; I saw a piece of iron sticking out of his pocket inside. He begged, for Christ's sake, that I would have mercy upon him, or else he should be ruined.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I took these pieces of iron from the prisoner.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I give myself up to your lordship, and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140420-157

442. GABRIEL HUGH FRANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Humphrey Davis , from his person .

HUMPHREY DAVIS . I am a journeyman sadler . On the 12th of April, at half past nine in the evening, I was in the Strand ; I felt the prisoner snatch my watch out of my pocket. I catched him by the waist, and saw the watch in his hand. I being in a crowd, had not the opportunity of taking it out of his hand. He slipped his hand behind him, and the watch was taken out of his hand. I held him fast, and called out in the crowd, this man has got my watch. I took the prisoner into the first public-house I could see. I searched him, and found this watch upon him; it is not my watch. My watch was a silver watch, and this is silver. An officer then came, and took him to Bow-street office.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I am an officer. On the night of the illumination, I was in the Strand; I saw the prisoner make several attempts. He was brought to Bow-street office. I searched him, and found this snuff-box between his thighs, and his trowsers.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this charge.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140420-158

443. JOHN HASTINGS , alias CARR , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , three mahogany chair frames, value 2 l. the property of George Gray and William Hull .

GEORGE GRAY. I am a chair-maker , in Oxford-street ; my partner's name is William Hull . I lost

three new mahogany chair frames from my premises. They were the property of myself and partner. I was coming down Mortimer-street; I saw one of my chair frames in Mr. Kensit's shop window. I got an officer, and went to Mr. Kensit's; he gave up the chair frames to me very readily. Some time after, the prisoner was detained at a pawnbroker's on suspicion. He was taken to Marlborough-street office; I went there and saw him.

WILLIAM KENSIT . I am a chair-maker; I live in Mortimer-street. On the 10th of February, the prisoner came to my shop; he offered my foreman three chair frames; I gave my foreman the money to pay for them. The prisoner said he made them himself. I placed them in the window; he came and claimed them; I delivered them up to him.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker in Compton-street, Soho. On the 28th of February, I detained the prisoner on suspicion. I sent for an officer; he took the prisoner to Marlborough-street office. I sent to Mr. Gray, and met him at the office.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Perryman's; I took him to Marlborough-street office. Three chair frames were produced; they were sworn to by Mr. Gray. The chair frames are here.

Prosecutor. They are my own manufactory.

Prisoner's Defence. A man in Goudge-street, standing at a public-house door, asked me if I could sell these chair frames, he said he would pay me for my trouble. I sold them to Mr. Kensit; I gave the man the money; he gave me five shillings. The man is not here. He is an entire stranger.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140420-159

444. JOHN HASTINGS , alias CARR , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , two elbow chairs, value 1 l. the property of William Hope .

WILLIAM HOPE . I am a broker in Rathbone-place, Oxford-street . On the 28th of February, I received information I had lost two elbow chairs; I looked in my shop, and discovered I had lost them. I went to Mr. Perryman's in Compton-street, and saw my two chairs.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker in Compton-street. On the 28th of February, the prisoner came to my shop, and brought one chair with him; he asked me if I would buy two, and he would fetch the other. From the manner he behaved, I suspected him. He asked me thirty shillings for them. I caused him to be taken into custody. These are the chairs that he offered to me, I am positive of it. I kept them in my custody until I brought them here.

Prosecutor. They are my elbow chairs; they were in my shop. I lost them on the 28th of February.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave fourteen shillings for them chairs of a man in the street; he appeared to be a porter. I went to Mr. Perryman; I asked him if he would buy them, saying, I had two of them, he should have them reasonable. I left one with him, and went for the other; then he had me detained.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18140420-160

445. JAMES WADDILINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , five doors, value 50 s. two shutters, value 10 s. and four wooden chimney-pieces, value 1 l. the property of John Holland .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-161

446. PATRICK KAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , a waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. and a pair of spectacles, value 2 s. the property of Dennis M'Carthy .

DENNIS M'CARTHY. My clothes were taken from me out of the room where I lodge in Tooley-street, in the Borough . The prisoner lodged in the same room I did. I missed my clothes on a Saturday morning. After I got up to work I left the prisoner in bed, and when I returned he and my clothes were gone. I saw the prisoner about a month afterwards; he was then dressed in my shoes and stockings and waistcoat. I am confident they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-162

447. JAMES THOMPSON and RICHARD HARTAKER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , a pair of earrings, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Sowerby .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker , No. 4, Cannon-street, St. George's in the East . The earrings were in the shop window for sale. I saw the prisoner Thompson put his finger in a hole in the square of glass, which either him or some other person had previously made in the glass. I was watching him at the time he put his fingers in and drawed these two earrings out. They are cornelian stones, gold mounted. They cost Mr. Sowerby seven shillings. I am quite sure I saw him pull them out. He went to Hartaker, who was sitting two doors off, and put them into his apron. I went and took them both out of his apron, and brought them into Mr. Sowerby's shop. I fetched a constable; they were searched, and a knife was found on each of them. These are the earrings; they are Mr. Sowerby's property.

Hartaker called one witnesses, who gave him a good character.

THOMPSON, GUILTY .

Judgement respited .

HARTAKER, GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-163

448. SARAH HAYES and ANN HARRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March ,

a veil, value 10 s. the property of Emma Bower , from her person .

EMMA BOWER . I am a single woman . My veil was taken from me in Brydges-street, Covent Garden . On the 15th of March, I was alone; I saw the prisoners in Brydges-street. I had my veil on. Sarah Hayes asked me for liquor to pay my footing; I refused. They made a snatch at my bonnet. There were seven or eight of them together. Harris struck me. They tore my bonnet off. I cannot say what became of my veil after I lost it off my head. I cannot say the prisoners took the veil off my head. I have never seen the veil since. The veil was not my own.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-164

449. THOMAS HEDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , six pounds weight of soap, value 5 s. the property of John Hunt .

JOHN HUNT . I keep a chandler's shop , 210, Whitecross-street . On the 20th of March, two men and two women came into my shop; the prisoner was one of them. They bought two herrings, a twopenny loaf, and two ounces of cheese. They returned in about a minute or two, and asked me to change the twopenny loaf. I changed it for them. They went out again. I was shutting up my shop; the prisoner and the woman came in again; they said they wanted some more herrings. They opened the lattice partition that is put up to keep people's hands out of the window. There was some soap behind the lattice partition; they seemed to be choosing herrings; I watched them. I saw the prisoner actually take a cake of soap. I saw him pass it by the lattice partition, and gave it to another man behind the door post. I instantly ran from behind the counter, and seized the prisoner, and in my scuffling with him he scuffled towards the door. The woman assisted in pushing me towards the door. We got on the pavement. I called the watch. He sprang from me. I lost my hat. In about four or five minutes he was stopped. I was informed that they had found the prisoner, and there was a cake of soap found.

MARY HARRIS . I live next door to Mr. Hunt. I found a cake of soap on our window shutter. I was taking it into Mr. Hunt, picked up a red herring. I gave them to Mr. Hunt.

Prosecutor. This is the soap; Mary Harris brought it me; it is mine.

ROBERT WOWALL . I am a watchman. I was coming into Playhouse-yard, crying the hour of one. I saw the prisoner walking without a hat. I heard the call of stop thief; the prisoner asked me what was the matter; I told him I would go and see. I took him with me. Some people passing told me what had happened. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and when I was taking him to Worship-street office he said, what a foolish man you are to lose so much time, if you would have let me gone either he or his friends would have brought me a crown. I said, it gave me more satisfaction to take such a man as him than two crowns.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken to the watchhouse for being disorderly.

Prosecutor. I gave charge of him at the watchhouse for stealing the soap.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-165

450. THOMAS DUVINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , six pounds weight of candles, value 6 s. the property of William Homan .

WILLIAM HOMAN . I am a tallow chandler and dealer in ship stores , New Gravel-lane, Shadwell .

Q. Did you lose any candles - A. I did; I found them upon the prisoner. The prisoner was seen in my other shop. I have two shops adjoining together, No. 9 and 10; they communicate together so as to make one shop. I was in conversation with Mr. Edwards concerning the sale of cotton. My apprentice, George Hopkinson, informed me that I had been robbed of some candles while he brought me some cotton; he added, he is gone to the next public-house. I went to the next public-house; I saw the prisoner coming out of the door; I stopped him, and asked him what he had got in his apron; he said, nothing. I looked in his apron; he had got two papers of candles, of three pounds each. He said they were given to him; and as he was going towards the office he requested my interference to send him on board a man of war. I said, if you are innocent, why go on board a man of war.

GEORGE HOPKINSON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Homan. Master sent me up stairs for some cotton. While I was in the next shop, (I went into No. 10), I thought I heard somebody in No. 9; I went into the shop; the prisoner asked me if we sold white wax; I told him, no. I saw the prisoner near a basket of candles; immediately he went out I went to the basket and missed these two three-pounds weight of candles. Master stopped him at the next public-house. I am positive he is the man that was in the shop. The candles are my master's manufactory. My writing is on the papers.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-166

451. MARTHA BURGESS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , five pounds weight of beef, value 3 s. the property of William Buttery .

WILLIAM BUTTERY . I am a butcher , in Whitechapel . On the 4th of March, I was in the slaughter house; I was called into the shop; the prisoner was brought into my shop charged with stealing this piece of beef. I knew the beef to be mine.

SAMUEL HOBBS . I am a servant to Mr. Buttery. On the 4th of March I was in the shop; I saw the prisoner come and take this piece of beef out of the window. I ran after her, and instantly I catched hold of her she dropped the beef. The beef is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-167

452. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a pig, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Florence Condin .

BIDDY CONDIN. My husband's name is Florence Condin ; we live in White Hart-yard, Bow . I kept this pig in the sty, in our yard; I saw it safe at night, at ten o'clock. I missed it the next morning, the 28th of February; I got up at seven o'clock, the pig was gone. She was in pig, and was worth ten pounds. I saw my pig again the same morning, at Mr. Caton's place; I am quite sure it was my hog.

EDWARD CATON . I am a farmer. I keep pigs in Bedford-street, Liquorpond-street, The prisoner brought me this pig for sale, on the 28th of February, about a quarter past six o'clock; he asked me four pound ten shillings for the pig I told him if he would call at eleven o'clock, I would pay him. I took it in my yard at that price, and before ten o'clock, the woman came, and owned the pig. I shewed her the pig after she had described it; she said it was her hog. She stopped with me until the prisoner came; I then sent for an officer, and the prisoner was taken to the office. I delivered the pig to the prosecutrix. As soon as I let the pig out, she ran after the prosecutrix.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner at Mr. Caton's. Mrs. Condin said it was her pig; the pig turned out to be an acquaintance. As soon as it was let out of the sty, it ran after her. The prisoner told me he bought it on this side of Mile End turnpike, of a man of the name of Lloyd, that sold cats meat and dogs meat. I took him before the magistrate; he was committed for re-examination. He never brought any one forward. The magistrate gave him an opportunity of finding this Lloyd.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave four pounds for the pig to a man in the street; he said, he worked at Blackwall. I sold it to Mr. Caton for four pounds ten shillings. I never was in confinement before.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-168

453. RICHARD PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , two window-curtains, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Belton ; six pair of breeches, value 12 s. two sheets, value 6 s. a pair of stays, value 6 s. six towels, value 2 s. 6 d. two shifts; value 3 s. five bed-gowns, value 5 s. 6 d. two petticoats, value 8 s. three pieces of cotton bed-furniture, value 5 s. an apron, value 6 d. a waistcoat, value 6 d. three pockets, value 6 d a pair of socks, value 4 d. twelve pair of stockings, value 1 l. three half neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. five night-caps, value 3 d. a frill, value 6 d. and a purse, value 6 d. the property of Nathaniel Odell .

SAMUEL BELTON. I am an inn-keeper , in St. John-street. The curtains named in the indictment are my property; they were stolen out of a house that I had lately left, No. 33, St. John-street .

NATHANIEL ODELL. My property was stolen from the house, No. 33, St. John-street. I was the last time in the house about a fortnight ago; the house was shut up.

Q. What time did you go there, the last time in the day - A. It was on a Sunday morning. About a fortnight after I had left there, the house had been entered into; a small box containing my wife's clothes, which had been left up stairs, was brought below, and all the contents taken away but one pair of stockings, and some things of mine were taken out of another box. I afterwards saw some property at the magistrate's, which I knew to be mine.

ANTHONY HARRISON. I am one of the officers of the City. Tuesday morning, April 12th, me and Brockwell were coming from the Mansion House; we met the prisoner in Grub-street, about a quarter after six in the morning; he had a large bundle on his head; there was another man with him; the other man had nothing at all. I said to the prisoner, Dick, what have you got here. I knew him well. He made some excuse, threw the bundle down; he ran up Butler's-alley, and I after him. Brockwell stopped with the bundle. As the prisoner ran, he threw this iron crow away. I catched him. Brockwell took the bundle to my house. I do not live far from there. On searching the prisoner, I found nine picklock-keys, a bottle of phosphorus, matches, and two gold rings, I found in his breeches pocket. I took the prisoner to the Compter. I advertised the things; Mr. Belton and Odell claimed the property.

Q. to Mrs. Odell. Look at that bundle; do you find any tablecloths there - A. Yes; they are marked. I am sure they are my husband's property. All the articles in the bundle are our own property, except the window-curtains; they are Mr. Belton's, I am sorry to say, there is not one third of the property I lost.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18140420-169

451. GEORGE JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , twelve trunk-locks, value 14 s. and twelve keys, value 1 s. the property of John Pallerick , Richard Park , and Adolph Peafield .

JOHN PALLERICK . I am an ironmonger , the corner of Greek-street, Soho ; my partners names are Richard Park and Adolph Peafield . The prisoner was in the habit of making articles for our shop. On the 22nd of April, about half past seven o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; I was behind the counter. He came up to the counter, and asked me if I wanted any bell-rings; I said, no. I wanted a gross of chest-squares. He then told me, he wanted half a dozen of bell-crank-roses; he paid me sixpence halfpenny for them, and put them in his pocket. I then came from behind the counter. I spoke to a person behind him. I then saw him going out of the shop, and perceived he had a bag in his right hand. I asked him if he had got any bell-springs in his bag; he said, no; he had got steps.

I requested him to shew me what steps were; he drawed towards the shop door, and close to the shop door he threw them out of the bag, and ran out of the shop with the empty bag. I caught up the parcels immediately, and found them to be trunk locks, the property of myself and partners. I pursued him, and lost sight of him. I got an officer, and took him in Fox-court, Gray's-inn-lane, where he lived; the officer and me had not been there a quarter of an hour when he came home. The officer took him in custody. I gave charge of him for stealing these twelve locks and keys; they are my property and my partners.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated; I knew nothing until the following day, I was before the magistrate.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-170

455. DAVID ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a feather bed, value 50 s. a blanket, value 3 s. and a pillow, value 3 s. the property of James M'Donald .

MARY M'DONALD. My husband's name is James M'Donald; he is a seafaring man . On the 24th of February, I called at, the house No. 41, New Gravel-lane , that I let out in tenements; I rent the house myself. One room I let out furnished, the other rooms unfurnished. The prisoner had the lower rooms, the shop and the parlour unfurnished; he carried on no business; the prisoner's wife gave me five shillings a week for the shop and parlour. I called to see the person who had the ready furnished room; she was gone to Gravesend. On my going up into the two pair of stairs. I missed a set of shelves that had been there; I came down, and told the prisoner's daughter that I had put the shelves there because there was no closet, and that he must return them, or pay for them. There was no family in the house but themselves. On Sunday, the 27th, the woman called, and told me that Reach had been up, and taken the bed, and several articles. I went to the room, and found the door had been broken open. On the 7th of March, I saw the bed, pillow, and blanket, which I can swear to.

MARTHA ADAMS . I lodge in this house, No. 41, New Gravel-lane. On the 26th of February, in the evening, the prisoner was having words with his wife; the prisoner's wife told me the prisoner was breaking Eliza Berry 's door open. The prisoner said, his wife was going to transport him. I saw him roll out of the back door, a bed. Some time after, I saw a man carrying the bed away, and the prisoner followed him.

GEORGE PECKHAM . The prisoner brought me this bed on the 26th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening; Mrs. M'Donald has seen it, and claimed it. I lent him ten shillings upon it; the next day he wanted six shillings more; my sister sent him word I wanted my money, and would be glad if I would take it away.

ELIZA BERRY . I know this bed to be Mrs. M'Donald's bed; I have slept on it two years.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife has a good many beds; I, in mistake, thought it was my own bed.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-171

456. CHARLES JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , a chain, value 2 l. and three seals, value 30 s. the property of Scott William Holmes .

SCOTT WILLIAM HOLMES . I live in Bread-street, Cheapside. I lost these things on the 11th of April I believe; it was on the night of the illumination. I was conducting an elderly lady in the crowd on the first night of the illumination; I was holding my hands against the wall to keep the crowd from her. In that situation I felt the prisoner pull my chain; my chain broke at the top ring; my chain, seals, and ring, were gone. I turned round, and seized the first man on my right hand, and charged him with stealing them; he said, he had not, and that I might search him; I just put my hand to his pocket. The crowd pressed me so, and I was behind the lady, I gave it up as lost. I could not say he was the man. My seals were described in an advertisement in the paper.

Q. Are you sure he is the man that you laid hold of - A. No; he is about the size. I cannot swear to him.

JOHN HARRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, Jermyn-street. On the 14th of April, I received a gold chain in pledge of the prisoner; I am sure he is the man. This is the chain; no seals were to it.

WILLIAM JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Dry, St. Martin's-lane. On the 14th of April, I took in two seals of a man; I believe it was the prisoner. I cannot swear positively to it. I lent a pound upon them.

WILLIAM ASHTON . I am shopman to Mr. Ashman, in the Strand, pawnbroker. On the 14th of April, the prisoner pledged a gold seal; I lent him fifteen shillings upon it.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday, the 16th of April. On searching him, I found five duplicates in the lining of his hat. I went round to the pawnbrokers, and got a description of the property, and advertised it. One duplicate is a metal watch, and two gold seals besides these. Since I have been here, a man has applied about the metal watch.

Prosecutor. The chain, seals, and key, are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a jew.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-172

457. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , a stove, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Hicks .

THOMAS HICKS . I keep a broker's shop in Whitechapel-road . I lost my stove on the 2nd of April, about six in the evening. My son took the prisoner with the stove.

THOMAS HICKS; JUNIOR. I am the son of the last witness. I stopped the prisoner in Whitechapel; he had the stove on his shoulder. I brought him back with the stove. I knew it to be my father's

property. I gave the prisoner in charge of the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from Stepney a man stopped me in the street; he asked me if I was willing to earn a shilling; I said, yes. He told me he would give me a shilling to carry a stove to Hare-street. I went with the stove; the man followed me. That gentleman took hold of me, and told me to take the stove back. I did, and then he told me to put it where I took it from, and then he said I had stolen it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-173

458. RICHARD KINGWELL was indicted for unlawfully entering the dwelling-house of William Ayres , with intent the goods and chattels therein being feloniously to steal .

WILLIAM AYRES. I live at Holborn-bridge . On the 19th of March, I came home about half after one in the morning. On my going up stairs I observed to my servant maid that there was a strong smell of sulpher; that I would be satisfied as to the cause. As I went towards the accompting-house, the smell was stronger still. I could perceive no fire. I then went through a passage into the back warehouse or shop. The first thing that struck my attention was a private door being opened, and a table removed that generally stood against it, and a can of oil thrown down. I immediately suspected some one had entered the house. Being without a weapon I went to the dining-room and procured a poker, and returned to the spot. Underneath a bench I observed a man secreted, or secreting himself. I told him to come out, which he did; but the moment he came out he sprang at my collar; I parried him off, and struck him on the side of the head with the poker. I knocked him down, but observing him to be upon the alert, (I had not injured him sufficiently so as to prevent him injuring me), therefore as he was rising I struck him another blow upon the back of his head, but not so hard as to prevent him closing with me, and in that act the candle went out or fell from my hand. I was anxious to get him towards the front door. My servant had gone to that door, and had called for assistance. I dragged him towards it, but in going through the passage I had to open a door; at that moment he sprang out of my hand and ran into the street; I pursued him, and called watch, but I could scarce perceive him twenty paces from me; and being fearful of misguiding the hue and cry, I stood still, and called watch. After some time, the patrol came up, and he and I searched the premises together to see if we could find any one else. We could find no one else, but we found a pair of boots and a hat. While we were making this search, the watchman of St. Sepulchre's parish came to tell me that he had taken the prisoner, and he was in the watchhouse. I went there; the prisoner was there with his head bleeding very much, and he owned the hat and the boots immediately. I asked him if he meant to murder me; he said, God forbid. I asked him what drove him to commit the act; he said, necessity. I think he said he was driven to it by distress. It was not until after, in the day time, that I found the lock of my desk had been forced, and this instrument I found. I found the wood work had been cut away from the lock; the bolt is perforated with this instrument; it is the blade of a plough that a bookbinder uses. That instrument was found in the passage.

THOMAS SWEENEY . I am a watchman. On the 19th of March last, I stopped the prisoner in Skinner-street, about two o'clock in the morning. He was without hat and shoes; his head was all over blood. I took him to the watchhouse, and I took Mr. Ayres to see the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night this happened I had been over the water to see my father; returning back to my wife, I was knocked down on the bridge. I was stunned with the blow. Coming along Fleet-market I laid me down and slept, and when I awoke I was alarmed with the cry of stop thief. I lost my hat and boots. I was so alarmed when I got to the watchhouse I did not know what I said to questions they asked me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 2 years in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18140420-174

459. NATHAN COHEN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

WILLIAM HACKWELL . I am a boot-maker, I live in Snows-fields, in the Borough. On Easter Sunday, I was in Gracechurch-street , about twenty minutes before seven in the morning; I bought sixpennyworth of oranges of the prisoner in the street; I gave him a sixpence for them. On my going away, the prisoner followed me, and offered me four oranges for sixpence; afterwards five, six, seven, eight. They were fine oranges. I was taken with the eight. I gave him a shilling to pay for them; he refused it; I gave him another; he did not like that; I gave him a third; he liked the third very well. He said he had no sixpence; he gave me the three shillings back, and said he saw I had some three-shilling pieces in my hand; he could give me a shilling and an eighteen-penny piece. I had a blackbird in one hand, and a bag in the other. I was obliged to hold my hand out to him and let him take them. He took a three-shilling piece out of my hand; he did not like that; I held out my hand and let him take another; he did not like that. He gave me two bad ones in the room of my two good ones. He took another, which he said was good. On his searching for an eighteen-penny piece, he said he had shillings but no eighteen-penny piece. He said if I gave him a three shilling piece he could give me a dollar, which would make it right to make it up six shillings with the oranges. On searching for the dollar he said he had no one, he must take the oranges and give me the money. He gave me two three-shilling pieces, took the oranges, and told me to go about my business. I then went away. The three-shilling pieces I had given him were good ones; I know

they were all good. I went on my journey to my friends, at Tottenham. I was with my father. I was going to send my sister for some beer, I discovered that all my money was bad, in looking at the three-shilling pieces. What I had were of the old coin; what he had given me were of the new. I then put them in my pocket. I stopped with my friends until the evening, and then I went home. I went down to Bermondsey watchhouse. On the following Sunday morning, Mr. Myers and I went to Cornhill; I there saw the prisoner standing at a door with oranges. I laid hold of the prisoner, and Edward Myers took him in custody. These are the three-shilling pieces that the prisoner gave me for my good ones. The same that I received of the prisoner I gave to Mr. Myers. These are the same; I know them by the brass being upon the cheeks; that is how I found them out.

EDWARD MYERS . These are the three-shilling pieces I received of Hackwell.

EDWARD HOMERSHAM . I am a teller at the Bank. These three three-shilling tokens are all counterfeits; they seem to be of one manufactory; they are washed over. They have been but little in circulation.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner. On him I found three three-shilling tokens, and fourteen counterfeit shillings.

Mr. Homersham. They are all counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. If he gave me old ones, and I gave him new ones, he might have discovered it; it was daylight.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for two years more .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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