Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st December 1813.
Reference Number: 18131201
Reference Number: f18131201-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 1st of DECEMBER, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM DOMVILLE LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUISAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable WILLIAM DOMVILLE , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; George Scholey , esq. Harvey Christian Coombe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester ; esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Smith , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justice of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Day ,

John Edwards ,

John Berridge ,

William Haspinell ,

Robert Hobb ,

Benjamin Farrow ,

William Anderson ,

John Land ,

Ambrose Welchman ,

John Tringham ,

Henry Evins ,

Robert Dodgson .

First Middlesex Jury.

Charles Busby ,

William Thorn ,

Charles Depree ,

Charles Strahn ,

David Pitcairn ,

Robert Phillips ,

William Smith ,

William Fossy ,

Richard Griffiths ,

Richard Dunball,

John Lark ,

Alexander Thompson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Morgan ,

Thomas Moss ,

Edward Wills ,

Peter Brown ,

John Jeffreys ,

Richard Hager ,

James Ward ,

James Richard Parry ,

Benjamin Allen ,

Joseph Churchill ,

John Blanchard ,

George Osborne .

Reference Number: t18131201-1

1. THOMAS WHITFIELD was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 9th of January , a bed, value 3 l. a pair of sheets, value 5 s. two blankets, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 2 s. a bolster, value 2 s. and a rug, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Smith ; whereof James Brown , Samuel William Amos , and William Mackey , alias Merritt, last April sessions were convicted of burglariously stealing .

CHARLES ROYLE . I lodge im Mr. Joseph Smith 's house, No. 4, Green's-court, in St. James's parish . I and Logan, occupied one room in Joseph Smith 's house; it was a furnished room. Mr. Smith, did not live in the house. Upon a Saturday evening, in January, I believe the 7th, I missed the bed that I lay on, and the bedding, blankets, sheets, coverlid, rug, bolster, and a pillow, were all gone when I came home, about nine o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect when you last saw them safe in your room - A. About seven o'clock, as near as I can say. I left my room at seven o'clock, and did not return till-nine; I left nobody in the room; when I went out I locked the door. When I went out, Logan was not at home; each of us had a key of the room. I came home about nine o'clock; I found the room door wide open; there was no marks of violence on the door; it had been opened by a key, or a picklock. The first time that I saw the things was here, in this court, in April last.

Q. Did you know Brown, Amos, or Mackey - A. No further than seeing them here. I know nothing of the prisoner, or the business, than what I am told.

JOHN LOGAN . Q. Do you and the last witness, Royle, rent a room of Smith - A. Yes; I had been there about two months before that; Royle about a fortnight; it was a ready furnished room, we rented it of Joseph Smith .

Q. Do you recollect the time when the bed and bedding were missed, when you were not at home - A. Yes, I was at home a little before seven; I put on my things and came away; I am sure I locked the door when I left the room. I came home about nine, and then I found the bed and bedding gone. I know nothing of the prisoner, nor did I see the things until they were brought here last April.

JOHN COTTON . On Saturday, the 9th of February last, Samuel William Amos , Brown, and William Mackey , alias Merritt, and I, went to Mr. Smith's house, No. 4, in Green's-court. Brown with two picklock-keys opened the parlour-door, me and Brown went in the room; Merritt stood in the passage. We went in, and brought out the bed; we brought out the bed on the left hand in the room, sheets, blankets, two quilts, a bolster, and a pillow. The street door was shut, and latched; we lifted up the latch. The parlour-door was locked; we opened that with a picklock-key; we brought out the bed and bedding, and took them to Mr. Saunders's, in Dudley-court, Crown-street; he declined buying them. He told us to go to Whitfield, he would buy them.

Q. What was he - A. A farrier. I and Brown went to Whitfield, the prisoner; I and Brown had the bed, sheets, blankets, quilts bolster, and pillow. We found Whitfield up stairs in the first floor, he lodged there. Brown and me knew him before Brown went up and told him what we had; I staid down stairs. Brown and Whitfield came down stairs to me; we asked him whether he would buy the bed and bedding; he said, bring it to the shop, and he would look at them in the work-shop; we took them in his work-shop up the yard. We shewed him the bed, sheets, blankets, and quilts; he looked at them all. He told us to go to the King's Head public-house, and he would come to us. He asked us to tell him what part of the town it came from; I told him it came from St. James's, about Peter-street. He said, if he knew what part of the town it came from he should know how to dispose of it; then he told us to go to the King's Head public-house; I and Brown went, and left the bed and bedding there. He came to us in five minutes; he asked us what we asked for it; we told him two pound. He said, he would give us twenty-three shillings, that was all he would give; we agreed to take it. He gave me and Brown a one-pound note, and a three-shilling piece; then we parted, nothing more passed.

Q. Did you see Whitfield afterwards - A. No, not till now, except at Queen-square office. I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of November, at a public-house in Tottenham-court-road, and last February I found the property in his room.

Q. How did you know it was the prisoner's room - A. From Cotton's confession, after procuring a search warrant.

Q. What did you find there - A. I found a bed. I took him with me, and a woman of the name of Ann Clark ; she identified the property. I found a bed, one sheet, two blankets, and two patch-work quilts. This is one of them; I found them under the bed in Whitfield's room; Whitfield's wife was in the room when I was there.

Q. Was there any yard to that house - A. Yes, and a farrier's shop; we searched that at the time.

Q. Do you know the number of the house - A. No. I have got the landlord of the house here. This is one of the coverlids I found; I have had it in my possession ever since. The other things I produced in April sessions; they were returned to the owner. On the prisoner's person I found these picklock-keys.

SHERLOCK DOVEY . I am the landlord of the house in Crown-street, Soho. The prisoner rented of me a one pair of stairs front room; the house

belongs to me, but not the shop; there was a shop behind it, it has no concern with my house. There was a smith's at the back of the house. The prisoner lodged in the house last January; his wife lived with him. I never saw him in the house after the bed was taken away; his wife continued there. I did not see the things taken away. The officer brought me a subpoena last Monday to attend here, at the house where the prisoner lodged.

Pace. I served the subpoena on the landlord personally in the samehouse; Mary Clark was with me.

MARY CLARK . I live in Green's-court, St. James's. When the property was found in Whitfield's room, I was with the officer. I am Mrs. Smith's sister, the wife of Mr. Smith, who owns the house.

Q. Do you know this house in Green's court - A. Yes, and I am acquainted with the furniture. I made the beds every day.

Q. Is that the coverlid of the bed now produced - A. Yes, I have no doubt of it. The value of the bed and bedding was about three pounds altogether.

Prisoner's Defence. At Queen-square Mr. Smith could not speak to the bed; he said he would send his sister.

Mary Clark . I know the bed and bedding to be the property of Mr. Smith's; all the furniture in that house was his property. I made the beds every day. I know the bed and bedding to be his property.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-2

2. SARAH WHITTLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Jefferies , about the hour of seven in the night of the 23rd of November , with intent the goods and chattels in the said dwelling-house therein being burglariously to steal .

CHARLOTTE JEFFERIES . My father's name is Thomas Jefferies , he lives at No. 9, Martha's-buildings, in the parish of St. Luke's . The whole house belongs to him; there is but one room on a floor. The lower room we call the parlour; it opens into the passage, and the street door is generally upon the latch; we have lodgers in the house, in the two pair. On the 23rd of November, my father went out in the morning to work, and my mother went out just before one; my mother says, she double locked the door. The lodger was out at work. I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon; I did not try the parlour door, it was shut; I opened the latch of the street door, and shut it again. I returned near seven, it was quite dark then; I had no light with me; the street door was open. I went up stairs, and when I was up stairs I heard a noise; I thought it was my mother come home from work. I came down for a light; I observed the parlour door open, and no light in the room; I went over the way to get a light; I was not a minute hardly in getting a light; I returned with a light; I went to go in the parlour, the woman pushed the door, and would not not let me go in; when I found the woman in the room I held the door that she should not come out.

Q. You did not see the woman, did you - A. I did not; I only heard her voice. I called for assistance. I went out at the street door, and several people came to my assistance; I begged them to hold the street door while I went to my mother. I fetched my mother, and when I returned with my mother, the prisoner was in the passage. My mother went for an officer; two officers came. She said, pray let me out, she wanted to go home, she had a long way to go, as far as Chick-lane, Smithfield; she said, she had come for a peck of coals.

Q. Does your mother sell coals - A. No, sir, nothing at all. And she said, she wanted a person of the name of Phillips, a bead-blower.

Q. Did you go into the room where she was - A. I did, before she was taken away from the house. I observed the parlour-door lock had been forced off with an iron crow; I saw the iron crow; it laid between the sacking and the bed.

Q. Had your mother such an instrument as that - A. No, sir. The prisoner was secured; she had moved a caravan box that stood upon a deal box; she had moved it off the deal box and put it on the bed. The caravan box contained linen, and wearing apparel. The officer took her in custody.

SARAH JEFFERIES . I am the mother of the last witness. I go out to work; I left the house at near one o'clock, and before I went out to work I double locked the door, and pushed the door with my knees; the door was made fast.

Q. Can you recollect what time it was your daughter fetched you - A. About ten minutes after seven. I was at work when she fetched me, and when I returned I saw a crowd at my door; I went into the house, and saw the prisoner there; the prisoner was in the passage. I found the parlour door had been broken open; the lock had been forced off the door; it was on the ground, and there was an iron crow between the bed and the sacking.

Q. Had you any such instrument as that in your house - A. No. My caravan box was turned topsy-turvy upon the bed.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing - A. She said, she came from Smithfield for a peck of coals; she enquired for a Mr. Phillips, a bead-blower, at No. 3; my house is No. 9. There is no such name of that trade in the court.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before - A. Never to my knowledge.

THOMAS WOODS . I am an officer. On the 23rd of November, I was sent for; I went to the house immediately, and another officer got to the house about seven o'clock. I saw the prisoner in the passage, near the door; the door was then open. I took her into the parlour to search her; I found nothing particular on her, only some halfpence, and the key of her own door. I saw the lock of the parlour laying on the floor, it had been forced off. On searching the bed, this iron crow was found; Charlotte Jefferies found it; she gave it to me. I fitted the crow to the marks on the door; it fitted exactly.

JURY. It is a large spike nail; it is not a crow.

Wood. I have no doubt, in my own mind that the door was forced with that instrument. I asked the prisoner if that instrument was hers; she denied it, and said she was going for some coals. She said she lived in West-street, Smithfield.

Q. How far is West-street from Martha's-buildings - A. At least half a mile.

Q. Had she anything with her with which she could bring the coals - A. Yes, there was a bag. I told her it was a long way to come for coals; she then said she wanted a Mr. Phillips, a bead-blower; she was informed he lived at No. 3, in that place.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband is abroad. I have four children. I had been out at work; I came home; my daughter said there were no coals; I went out to get some; as I went down stairs a woman asked me if I knew Mr. Phillips, a bead-blower; I said yes, but I did not know where he lived; she said in Old-street-road, and she would shew me. I went with her to this court in Old-street; she told me it was No. 3. I counted the doors; I went in at the third door from the road; I saw the young woman; I thought it might be Mr. Phillips's daughter going up stairs. I knocked at the door; the young woman came down stairs; she said, there is somebody there. I went up stairs; they fastened me in. I came down stairs again. I never went in my room whatever there. They laughed; I thought they were joking: she said I should stay in until she fetched somebody for me. If I had been a thief I could have run away, and not have staid in that manner. It is far from my disposition to go a thieving. I depend upon my honest labour for my support. I was never in the parlour until the officer put me in.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18131201-3

3. HENRY THORNTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , two 5 l. bank notes, two 2 l. bank notes, and a 1 l. bank note, the property of Isaac Leach , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Rickaby .

ISAAC LEACH . I live at No. 7, Marybone-lane, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . I rent the shop and parlour of Mr. Thomas Rickaby ; he lives in the house himself, and the prisoner lodged in the house. All the other part of the house is let out in tenements.

Q. When was it you took the prisoner up - A. On the 11th of November, last month.

Q. Now, tell me all you know of this transaction - A. A few days back the prisoner passed my door; he said he was just come out of the country; he asked me if I could tell him of a private lodging I told him no. I asked him where he came from; he said from Doncaster in Yorkshire; I replied, that is just by where I came from, come in, and stop a bit, I will enquire for you. After he came in I spoke to him about them that I knew; he said he knew them also; I then said, you can sleep with me until I can get you a lodging.

Q. Did he from that time sleep with you - A. Yes, except the two nights that he slept out of his lodging. When he came back the first time he said he had been robbed; the first time I thought he had been robbed; the second time I thought he had not been robbed. He came home with the same story; after dinner I said I would go with him to the house where he had been robbed, which was of a Sunday. I then went with him to the house, and then from the story he had told I supposed it to be true, and then the next day we obtained a warrant to apprehend the people; they got clear. I told him, although he had been unfortunate he should have victuals and lodging with me until he got employment; so it went on for a fortnight. This was the second or third night that he slept out; he said with me from the first night until the Thursday fortnight following. He got up; I thought he went out to get employment; he soon returned again; that was the 11th of last month; he returned back in half an hour after he went out; he said he thought there was nothing to be done in London, he thought he would go off into the country. I told him I would give him some victuals to eat as he had no money. He seemed to say he was going towards the North, and seemed anxious to get away. I gave him an eighteen-penny piece to get a pot of beer; his hand shook, which led me to suppose all was not right. When he was gone for the beer I went and unlocked a caddy that I had got, and found that I had lost fifteen pound in bank notes; two five-pound notes, two two-pound notes, and a one-pound note. There was some money left behind, but that was shut down under the lid of the caddy. The caddy was still locked. Soon after, he came back with the porter; I accused him of taking the notes. He denied it, and said that he had not got it. After some time talking with him, begging him to give me the money, he would not; I sent for an officer; his name is William Nevill . The officer came; I then told the prisoner if he would give me the money I would forgive him. The officer told him to give up the money. I then gave charge of him, and he went out with the officer. I did not go with them; I staid in my shop. In about fifteen minutes be returned with the officer, and the officer brought back the fifteen pound that I had lost, but I did not see the notes until I saw them at Marlborough-street office the same day.

Q. How soon after - A. About an hour and a half I suppose.

Q. What shop do you keep - A. A chandler's shop.

Q. Did the caddy stand in your shop - A. No, in a drawer in my bed room. I don't think the drawer was locked; the caddy was locked, and the key in my coat pocket.

Q. Do you know whether you had ever opened the caddy in the presence of the prisoner - A. Yes, frequently of a night I have took money out and put money in while the prisoner was sitting there.

Q. During all the time the prisoner was with you was the prisoner in any employment - A. No, except doing an errand for me, which he always seemed extremely willing. That is all I know, except speaking to the notes when they are produced.

WILLIAM NEVILL. I am an officer of Marybone, and assistant watchhouse-keeper. I was sent for to go to Mr. Leach's. I went there; the prisoner

and Mr. Leach were talking together. Mr. Leach wished to have his money; he said he thought it a cruel thing of him if he did not assist him in finding it; he did not wish to have; him but he did not like to lose his money, as he had been so kind to him. The prisoner said he had not got it; he refused to look for it. Mr. Leach then said he must give him in my custody. The prisoner asked me if he was given in my custody should I prosecute him. I said, I should not prosecute, but if Mr. Leach gave him in custody I should not let him go again. I took him in custody. The prisoner called and asked me if I would permit him to go and find the money. I told him I had no objection to his finding the money, but I must go with him. I went with him into Hyde-park; he turned short of the right hand side of the Cumberland gate; he walked first, and I followed him about two hundred yards under the wall; he went up to the wall, there he stopped, pulled up a turf, and then pulled up something. The notes were doubled up in his hand; I could not see them. He brought his hand towards his clothes, as if he was going to put them in his pockets. I immediately seized him by the wrist, and said I must see what is in your hand. I pulled the notes out of his hand by force. I immediately then put the notes in my pocket unexamined, any further than I could see

"Five," outside. I brought him back to Mr. Leach's house first, and told Mr. Leach that I had the prisoner and the notes both. These are the notes. I took the prisoner to Marybone watchhouse, and when I had locked him up I examined the notes. It was so near the time of going to Marlborough-street, I did not shew the notes to Mr. Leach until I was before the magistrate.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at the notes - A. I can swear to the notes; there is the two five-pound notes, two two-pound notes, and a one pound note; I know them to be my notes by the marks upon the back of them; the two five pound notes are marked; one with the letter N upon one of the fives, the other with the letter R.

"February" I remember perfectly well upon this one. The two two's have the names of the persons I took them of in the neighbourhood; Mrs. Collins is written by herself; the other is Mrs. Gibson; I wrote that with my own hand. I am certain they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the notes to take to the bank; I carried them to the bank in Hyde-park, and put them in the bank. The officer said he would make a little money of me; and Mr. Leach said he would not appear against me.

Prosecutor. I never gave him any notes to carry any where, nor entrusted him with money only for a pot of beer.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-4

4. SAMUEL JENNINGS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Starey , about the hour of two on the night of the 20th of November , and stealing therein a great coat, value 30 s. and a chaise rein, value 4 s. the property of Benjamin Starey .

GEORGE SHERBY . I am a groom to Mr. Benjamin Starey, he lives at Newington-green ; his stab is about one hundred yards from the dwelling-house; the stable is at the bottom of a garden, and the stable is quite separate from the house; to go to the stable we go round a lane, up a small foot path, that some of the neighbours have access to their gardens.

Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Starey - A. Four years and about a month. The stable has been occupied with the horse ever since I have been with him.

Q. Is there any thing but the stable - A. The coach-house. I sleep over the coach-house. On the evening of the 20th of November I took the horse and chaise down to the stable at ten o'clock in the evening; after I had taken the horse out of the chaise. I put the chaise in the coach-house, and the horse in the stable, and after I had fastened the door up I went to bed. The reins and great coat were in the chaise in the coach-house. I locked the stable door myself. I went to bed about half past ten o'clock, as near as possible. I got up about seven o'clock in the morning precisely. It was light at seven o'clock. When I came down I came into the coach-house to get into the stable. I saw before I came down stairs the coach-house door had been broken open. It was Saturday evening that I went to bed; on Sunday morning I heard a noise; I am not certain to the time; it was very dark.

Q. How do you, know it was not before twelve o'clock that you heard the noise - A. I am sure it was not; I had not much sleep before I heard the noise. On Sunday morning it was I heard the noise, it was like as if something had fallen; I got up in the room, suspecting the horse was loose, but not hearing any thing afterwards I went to bed again.

Q. You say you perceived the coach-house door was forced - A. Yes. When I went down stairs I found one of the doors were open, and the lock was broken off. I missed the great coat and the pair of reins of the chaise harness. I saw them again on the Monday morning.

JOHN CUTLER . I am a constable of St. Mary, Islington. On Sunday morning, the 21st of November last, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another man, each of them had a bag on their shoulders; one man went down Elder-walk; the prisoner past me; I was going home down Lower-street, Islington; I stopped the prisoner; I asked him what he had got; he said, a few turnips. I asked him if that was all; he said, no, he had got some reins that he had found in a ditch. I told him I was not satisfied with that, he must go with me, and as we were walking together I met a brother officer that has the care of the watch-house. When I took him to this officer, he made his escape from me. I commanded the watchman to assist me. We pursued him beyond the Britannia fields; there the watchman got up to him first, and took him. He is here. I secured him, and brought him to the watchhouse. I left the bag in the care of the other officer, while I pursued him. These are the reins that were in the bag.

THOMAS FRANKLIN . I am constable of the night at Islington watchhouse. I met the prisoner and Cutler as I was going from the watchhouse, along Lower-street, Islington; the prisoner had a bag. The prisoner said, he had turnips; I said, you had better examine the bag. I saw a pair of reins in the bag; there were some turnips also in the bag. I said to the prisoner, this has a very suspicious look; where did you get these reins; he said, a man, a rat catcher, that he knew desired him at Stoke Newington to bring them to Islington.

Q. to Cutler. When you met the prisoner in Lower-street, which way did he appear to be making from - A. From Newington-green.

Q. to Franklin. You were saying that a rat catcher desired him to bring them from Stoke Newington to Islington - A. Yes; he was to make a shilling or two of them if he could. I then said to Cutler that it had a very suspicious look. Cutler ordered the watchman to assist in taking him to the watch-house; the watchman's name is Shirley. Then Cutler stepped a little nearer to the prisoner; the prisoner started across the road; directly Shirley and Cutler ran after him. I took care of the bag and reins, and after they put the prisoner in the watch-house, I gave Cutler the bag again.

JAMES SHIRLEY . I am a watchman. I pursued the prisoner, and took him; within a field of where I took the prisoner, I perceived him drop something of a light colour; I could not see what it was then. I am quite sure I saw it drop.

- MAGNEESH. I am a milkman. On last Sunday morning, I was going to the barn at Stoke Newington; I saw a man running; I thought he had something, and I saw him drop something; I got over the bank to look; it was this coat. Shirley and Cutler were pursuing him.

Q. to Shirley. Look at these reins - A. I know them to be my master's, and the great coat I can swear to being my master's great coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the bag and the reins up; I know nothing of the coat.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Of stealing the reins only, value 6 d. not of the burglary, nor of the coat.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-5

5. ISAAC WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , two trunks, value 10 s. the property of the Rev. Edward Bowen .

REV. EDWARD BOWEN. I live at Stanmore. On the 13th of November last, I was coming to town in a post chaise; I had three portmanteaus on the foot-board with straps, and passing through Bow I heard a knocking under the chaise; I looked out before and behind; I saw nothing but men in a cart. I again heard the noise was forward; I looked out; I saw a hand coming from under the chaise; I opened the door, and called stop. I then saw the prisoner recovering himself from stooping, run off; I pursued him, and brought him back. The post-boy pointed out to me the portmanteaus; I saw the straps hanging down.

Q. Describe what had been moved - A. Instead of the portmanteaus standing right square, they were a little oblique, but still on the foot-board; they were a little out of the line they had been placed when we sat off from Romford. Neither of the portmanteaus were removed from the spot where they had been.

COURT. It was an attempt to commit a felony, but very properly prevented; it will be unnecessary to go any further in this case. There was an attempt to commit a felony, but the party was interrupted before it was done.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-6

6. JAMES DORSETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , twenty-one yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 14 s. the property of Joseph Johnson and Josiah Smith , privately in their shop .

JOSEPH JOHNSON . I live at 75, High Holborn ; I am a linen-draper ; my partner's name is Josiah Smith . On the 15th of November, I was engaged with a customer, George Vaughn brought in the prisoner about half past six in the evening, with a piece of print, saying, that piece of print had been stolen out of our house a few minutes before that; it was printed cotton.

Q. You had not missed it before, had you - A. No, nor any one in the house knew of it being stolen. I did not know of it until it was brought in. Vaughn took the prisoner and the cotton to Bow-street; I followed him, and as soon as the magistrate sat, he was examined, and committed.

GEORGE VAUGHN . I am a broker. On the 15th of November, I saw the prisoner in company with two others, near Great Turnstile; they were endeavouring to commit a robbery at the corner of Turnstile; it was very dark. They throwed open the door of a shop, at the corner of Great Turnstile; the prisoner was engaged in endeavouring to get a silk shawl out of the shop; his head was just within the door. This was not Mr. Johnson's house. He was prevented, they came, and shut the door immediately. These three boys then went on, until they came to Mr. Johnson's door; when I placed myself on the right hand side of the way. They were about the door for a quarter of an hour; they were endeavouring to take the prints from out of the shop, and at the moment a waggon passed by, which hindered me from seeing whether they took any thing; before that, I took particular notice of the linen, where it was placed, and at the moment the waggon was gone by, I noticed a piece of print was missing. I still kept my station, and I missed one of the lads. In about five minutes after that, the prisoner went into the shop, as if he was going to purchase a print, laying hold of the print, and looking at it, and at the same time he laid hold of it he brought it out of the shop; I immediately then run over the way, and went to lay hold of the prisoner, when he dropped the print; he had it in his hand, in the street; I saw him drop it. He run about ten yards. he was never out of my sight; I then laid hold of him, brought him back to the spot where he had dropped the print; I picked up the

print, and took the prisoner into the shop; Mr. Johnson said, it was his print. I then conveyed the prisoner to Bow-street office. This is the printed cotton; I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. to Mr. Johnson. Look at that printed cotton - A. Yes; it has our shop mark; I am positive it is mine and my partner's property; there is about twenty-one yards of printed cotton at two shillings and three-pence a yard; the value of it is about two pound four shillings. They took two pieces of print.

Q. About this time who else was in the shop - A. Two customers, the boy, and myself; the shop-man was gone up to tea: the boy was in the back shop; at the moment he was clearing the goods out of the back shop into the front shop. I never knew it was lost until Vaughn brought it in.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-7

7. MARY CARPENTER and MARY WHEELER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , seven yards of callico, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Hart , privately in his shop .

JOHN DAWSON BLOMER . I am shopman to Mr. Hart, linen-draper , in Holborn . On the 18th of November, both the prisoners entered Mr. Hart's shop, they asked for some white calico; I shewed them three or four pieces. After a short time they pitched upon one; I cut them a yard and a half off. They then asked for some pink muslin; that being in the back, there is a partition that divides the two shops. I shewed them two pieces of two different shades of colour; there being a piece of the same colour in the front shop, they conceived it was the same colour; they both went into the front shop. After looking at it the second time, they said, they would prefer one of the two that I had been shewing them in the back shop. I then left them in the shop, ran for the two pieces which I had been shewing them in the back shop; they pitched upon the palest shade of the two; I cut them off a quarter of a yard, the quantity they wanted; they paid me for the two articles, and went out of the shop. In about an hour and a half, Lee, the officer, came into the shop, and brought the calico which they had taken; I owned it, that being Mr. Hart's property.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. About five o'clock on Thursday evening, the 18th of November, I was sent for, at Mr. James, a haberdasher, Holborn bridge; Mr. James desired me to take the two prisoners in custody. I proceeded to search the prisoners. Upon the person of Carpenter, I found this piece of calico. I then searched Wheeler, and in a small basket which she held in her hand, I found these two pieces of calico. In conveying the prisoners to the Compter, the prisoners particularly requested me to keep this piece of calico, and said it was at my service the piece found upon Carpenter, if I would keep it for my own use they would he much obliged to me. I made enquiry in the neighbourhood; I judged I should find the owner. I went to Mr. Hart's shop, and before I produced the yard and a half of white cotton, and the quarter of a yard of pink muslin, I had found in Wheeler's basket, the last witness told me he had sold them two articles. I then discovered the owner of the seven yards of calico found upon Carpenter.

Blomer. The yard and a half of white calico, and quarter of a yard of pink cambric muslin, Carpenter purchased of me; this piece Lee, the officer, brought in is the piece stolen; it is seven yards of calico, value half a guinea; they stole, they did not pay for it. I am sure it is Mr. Hart's property; Mr. Hart's private mark is upon it; it cost half a guinea. I did not miss the calico before it was brought back by Lee.

Q. How many shopmen does Mr. Hart employ - A. There are four sons constantly employed; two of them were in the shop while the prisoners were there.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; called one witness, (each,) who gave them a good character.

CARPENTER, GUILTY , aged 28,

WHEELER, GUILTY , aged 36,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-8

8. SCIPIO ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , one pig, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Henry King .

HENRY KING . I am a salesman , in Newgate-market . I lost the pig on the 30th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning; I was in my business, selling my meat, when the pig was taken away.

WILLIAM CHIPPEY . I was waiting for Mr. King to come round again; I had bid eleven-pence a pound for the pig; it was a dead pig, and while I was waiting I saw the prisoner come round, and take the pig off the hook, and put it on the boy's shoulder, then he crossed over to where I stood, at the hamper of meat that was unpacked, which was laying in the door way; the boy came on the right hand side of me, and the prisoner crossed over to the left; I saw him look after the boy, I thought he was going to call him back; it is customary to weigh them before they take them away; I found he did not call the boy back; I went and informed Mr. King that the boy had taken the pig away without weighing. I went after the prisoner; I asked him where the pig was that he had taken off the hook; he said, he had seen none. I said, I was certain he was the man that had taken the pig off the hook; you are a liar, said he, I have not been in Mr. King's door-way to day; I said, I was positive it was him. Mr. King came up, and gave charge of him; he was taken to the Compter.

Mr. King. The prisoner never asked me the price of the pig; I had no conversation with him about the pig.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am brother to the prisoner.

My brother asked me to go with him to market in the morning; he said he was going to buy meat, and a pig. I was out of place; I said, yes; I would get up, and go with him. My brother asked the price of the pig; my brother came and told me to take it. My brother came and put the pig on my shoulder; I did not know where to go with it; I was going home with it; a man came after me, and asked me where I was going with the pig; I said, home. He took the pig off my shoulder, and bid me come back.

Q. to Chippey. Was this the boy - A. Yes.

THOMAS FISHER . I am a servant to Mr. King. I saw the boy in Newgate-street; I took the pig off his shoulder; I was in the act of taking him back to the shop, he ran away.

Mr. King. I saw the pig brought back by Fisher; it was my pig.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-9

9. JAMES KEVILLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of November , one pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Jenner .

JOHN JENNER . I am shopman to my brother, Thomas Jenner , hosier, 47, Holborn-hill . On the evening of the 22nd of November, between five and six, the stockings were at the door, and while I was serving a customer, the officer brought in the prisoner with the stockings.

- HERDSFIELD. I am a messenger at the Justice-room, Guildhall. On the 22nd of November, I was going along Holborn; I saw the prisoner take the stockings from Mr. Jenner's door; I followed him, and took up the stockings; he dropped them in Bartlett's-buildings. These are the stockings.

Jenner. The stockings are my brother's property.

GUILTY, aged 10.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-10

10. PHILIP MORTEAU was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , two crucibles, value 1 d. one quarter of an ounce of gold and silver filings, value 8 s. and thirty stones, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Bowditch .

THOMAS BOWDITCH . I am a jeweller , Bell's-buildings, Salisbury-square, Fleet-street . The prisoner was my journeyman ; I had employed him two months. On Thursday previous to the 15th, I had lost silver cuttings. On Monday, the 15th, I sent for a constable; he found the articles in question upon him; two crucibles, thirty stones, and a quarter of an ounce of gold and silver filings.

WILLIAM BOWDITCH . I work with my brother. On Monday, the 15th of November, I saw the prisoner take the crucibles, the stones, and the gold and silver filings.

- WIGMORE. I am a journeyman to Mr. Bowditch. I saw the prisoner take the filings, and the stones; he put them in his pocket.

JOHN WHITE . I am an officer. I produce the property. On the 15th of November, I apprehended the prisoner; I searched him; in his pockets I found the crucibles, the filings, and the stones.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress made me do it. Previous to this I had been six months out of work. I never did any thing of the kind before. I owed Mr. Bowditch fifteen shillings; I worked it out.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-11

11. THOMAS RHODES was indicted for the wilful murder of Samuel Prestow .

NAMES OF THE JURY.

John Day ,

Robert Hobbs ,

Ambrose Welchman ,

Robert Dodgson ,

John Edwards ,

Benjamin Farrow ,

John Land ,

James Buckland ,

William Haspinall ,

William Anderson ,

John Tringham ,

Richard Bright .

The indictment was read by Mr. Andrews, and the case was stated by Mr. Abbott.

GEORGE METCALF . I am porter to Mr. Daniel Haigh ; his warehouse is in Aldermanbury ; he resides in the country.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I have known him eight or nine years.

Q. How much of that time has he been living with Mr. Daniel Haigh - A. I cannot exactly say; I think seven years.

Q. Where had he been living before the 30th of November - A. I do not know exactly where he had been; I understood he had been in confinement.

Q. What time of the day on the 30th of November did you see him first - A. At ten o'clock in the morning; I went there to open the warehouse; I knocked at the door, the door was opened; I went in, and the prisoner rushed in, and when I went into the warehouse, the prisoner was talking to Thomas Bottomley , who opened the door when I knocked. I heard him ask Bottomley to lend him some money; he told him, he had none. The prisoner also asked for his trunks; I told him that they were in the house. He asked me which way he must go to get them; I told him round by Dyers-court, that was the way he could get them best.

Q. Now, in what state did he appear to be in - A. He appeared to be as he always was.

Q. How long had he been out of your observation - A. Perhaps fifteen months; he appeared as well as ever I saw him in my life, quite composed. After I referred him to the back door to go for his trunks, he went out at the front door, and came back at the front door; he might be absent a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes: when he came into the warehouse he asked for Bottomley again; Bottomley was not returned. He said nothing more; he went out. It was past one o'clock before I saw him again; I then saw him at Mr. Haigh's desk.

SAMUEL HAIGH . I am uncle to the unfortunate man at the bar.

Q. Have you any connection with your brother, Daniel Haigh , in the warehouse - A.I am not a partner

in the house. I attend at the house as warehouseman.

Q. Your nephew, I understand, had been a clerk there some years - A. Yes. I was not there at that time. On the morning of the 30th of November, he called at my house about eight o'clock in the morning. My house is in North-place, City-road, about a mile and a half from the warehouse. The servant came up stairs and told me there was a person wanted me below. I went to him. When I went down stairs I saw Thomas Rhodes was in the room; I was very much surprised to see him. I said, bless me, Thomas, are you here this morning: what! have you got out of St. Luke's; yes, he said, he got out that morning out of the window. I said, it was an unfortunate circumstance; I had understood he was to be out soon; it was unfortunate that he had broke out. He then said, he was going into the country; he wished me to let him have two or three pounds; I paused for a short time; I said I would go up stairs and see. I came down again directly, and told him he should have the money. I had a ten-pound note in my pocket-book; I sent out for change; he had the money before he went. He stopped and breakfasted with me. Jane Haigh gave him the money, not in my presence.

Q. Did you learn from him how much money he had - A. I did not ask him any questions; he breakfasted with me, my wife, Mrs. Haigh, and Mrs. Haigh's daughter.

Q. Did he tell you where he was going - A. I said to him, you seem quite well; he said, yes. I asked him if he was well; he said, yes. I then said, as you are going into the country, when you get down there what do you intend to do. He answered, that he had laid all his plans before he came out. I enquired no further about it, being in haste to get away; the time was arrived which I usually appear at the warehouse. I went away, leaving the prisoner with my wife.

Q. How long was he with you in the whole - A. Altogether I was not more than five minutes with him. It was half past eight when I first saw him. I went out before nine o'clock; I was absent from him part of the time dressing myself. He appeared to me quite cool and in his senses. He might be insane and I not discover it.

Q. Had you seen him before he was confined - A. I had not seen him since February last. I called twice at Hoxton to see him; when I went to enquire for him they shewed me into a room; he was confined at Hoxton, in a mad-house. The keeper came along with him. I talked with him. I did not stop more than five minutes. I asked him if he was well. He said he was.

Q. Had you been in the habit of seeing him for a long time before - A. No. He was sent to Hoxton in October. Before the 20th of October I had not seen him for eleven years. I do not recollect the time I saw him before that. I did not see him from the 20th of October to the early part of November, not above three or four times.

COURT. Where was he when you saw him in October In Daniel Haigh 's house, as a clerk. I was not there at that time. I did not attend as a warehouseman until after the prisoner was confined.

Mr. Gurney. Now, when you did see him before he was confined, what was his appearance to you - A. had heard before I saw him of his printing paper about his giving peace to all the world. I said, he certainly must be mad. I said that on seeing the papers. When I saw him and conversed with him he did not appear to me to be insane, but he might be, and I not able to discover it. Before the prisoner was sent to the madhouse at Hoxton, I had heard that he had printed and published papers. I went and saw him at Hoxton; I was there five minutes; I conversed with him upon these two occasions at Hoxton; he was then the same as when I conversed with him on the 30th of November; he then appeared to me to be as sane as on the morning of Tuesday last. I saw no difference.

GEORGE LOWTHER . I am a pawnbroker and salesman; I live in Tottenham-court-road.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner before - A. Never until Tuesday the 30th of November, then he came to my shop between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, he said, he wished to look at a pair of pistols that were in the window; he dealt with me for them; he gave me one pound fifteen shillings for them. Very little conversation passed between us, and what did, was about the mould for casting the bullets; that he was very particular about. He asked if the mould was the right mould that belonged to the pistols; he examined the barrals, and was very particular about them, he unscrewed the barrals; I told him, I had no doubt but it was the right that mould belonged to the pistols. I had some difficulty to persuade him that it was so, but upon my warranting them, he said, he would take them. He then said, I presume you can make some abatement; he then produced two one-pound notes; I gave him five shillings change. He seemed to have his circumspection as well as any other person might be in purchasing; he was attending to see if the screw fitted.

(The pistols produced Daniel Cartwright .)

HARRIET RILEY . Q. Miss Riley, are you acquainted with Thomas Rhodes - A. Yes; he is my cousin; I have known him six years, by attending Mr. Haigh's family; he called upon me on the morning of the 30th of November. I had conversation with him for near an hour. It was near ten when he called upon me

Q. I presume he had been at your house upon former occasions - A. Probably he had.

Q. What part of the house did you first see him - A. At my bed-room door, he came up to that door.

Q. Had he been previously in the habit of doing that - A. Never.

Q. Did you go down stairs with him or let him go down first - A. I begged him to walk into the drawing-room; he did. My bed-room is a floor above my drawing-room. When I went down to him in the drawing-room we were alone. He said he had been at Mr. Daniel Haigh's warehouse that morning; he said he was going there again to settle an account between themselves.

Q. Has Mr. Daniel Haigh a house in the country - A. He has; he resides at Fursedown; he has just gone there; he lived at Battersea Rise before. The

prisoner mentioned that his uncle had left Battersea Rise. He considered, he said, his uncle had done him an injury; he said he would have justice. I wished him to apologize to his uncle; he answered, it is not the fashion to be injured, and then apologize. He mentioned his own escape, and named the different places he had been in, and mentioned where he was going to when he left me.

Q. Did you know that he had been in confinement - A. No, I did not know it until he told me.

Q. Did he appear to be in his senses - A. His behaviour was melancholy in the extreme; his sentences were incoherent. I mentioned to him that I thought he ought to be happy with his uncle; his reply was, that he was crowded, he had not room enough; and at another moment he said my brother was in my house; I declared he was not. His appearance was not collected, but I cannot judge.

DANIEL HAIGH . Q. We understand you are the uncle of Thomas Rhodes - A. I am.

Q. He had been in your service some time - A. Yes.

Q. During the latter part of his time, being with you, what was his conduct - A. His conduct was extremely good up to last October. The first intimation I had of his conduct was a letter I received from him when at Ramsgate. This is the letter. I received the hand-bill after I came home. I cannot say when I received the hand-bill.

(The letter read, dated October 8, 1812, signed Thomas Rhodes , addressed to Daniel Haigh , esq. Post office, Ramsgate.)

"There is a time in the affairs of men, when taken in time it leads on to fortune. Since the time I have seen you there have come into my head many thoughts, which when combined produced the address alluded to. The address was printed, but Mr. W. H. and Charles did not approve of, No. 6, Aldermanbury, being in it; it was therefore suppressed, and all the copies burnt. I presume it right to make it known to you (that you may make your arrangement) that I shall quit your service for the benefit of the human race. Do not hurry away from Ramsgate; I am not a deserter. This request please to grant me; have the goodness to take my brother into your house when I leave; please to do that for my sake; if not for my sake, for the sake of humanity. Do that, and hereafter I will only ask you one favour. Please to return an answer by return of post, saying that you will take him, or that you will not take him, as I must place him somewhere before I throw myself on the world. Do not make yourself uneasy upon my account depend upon it,

I am, dear THOMAS RHODES."

(Copy of the Address)

"Address to the World! A man born and bred in this country, promises to procure an honourable peace; he engages to lay a foundation in England which will be the means of procuring an universal peace, and to fulfil that of Scripture which says, nations shall no longer rise up against nations, nor kingdoms against kingdoms; their swords shall be beaten into Ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks. For further particulars enquire of Thomas Rhodes , Aldermanbury."

Q. to Mr. Daniel Haigh . Did you send him any answer to that letter - A. Not to him.

Q. How soon after the receipt of that letter might you come to town - A. I think I came home about the 19th of October; the Saturday after I came home I invited him to dine with me in the country, and my two sons. After dinner I entered into conversation with him; I told him I understood he had a grand scheme, that he had got the good of his country at heart, I wished to know what it was. He said it was a secret, he could not divulge it at present. I asked him what means he had of accomplishing his purpose. He said, that was a work of great magnitude, to overturn the Government and establish another, meaning the Government of France. I supposed he meaned this Government. I asked him if he liked the present Minister. He said he did not; he liked Sir Francis Burdett ; Mr. Canning was not a good friend of his. I then told him if he went on with these fanciful notions he would either bring himself to a gallows or a madhouse. He seemed indifferent if he lost his character, and said the world was wide enough; he thought he could do something for himself. I think I received another letter from him before I took any measures. This is the next letter I received from him.

(The letter read, signed,

"Rhodes, a servant of the Lord," addressed to Daniel Haigh , esq. Battersea Rise.)

"October 31, 1812.

"DEAR UNCLE, If we be of God we shall prosper; if we be of man we shall come to naught. Cease to do evil; learn to do well: him that is ashamed of me, him will I also be ashamed of. To the disobedient of the Lord, the great and terrible day is at hand; but if the disobedient turn to the Lord, great and happy things are at hand. In this day nations and people shall be happy. Your dear beloved son George spoke to you about a proposition I have to make to you; I shall be glad for you to assist me, as you did John Haigh , junior; or in other words will you send me five thousand pounds. If you refuse me my request I shall be your enemy. That money will be applied to good purposes. An answer to this will oblige your true friend."

Q. to Mr. Daniel Haigh . After the receipt of that letter did you take any measures - A. It was suggested by Mr. Charles Haigh , to have a medical gentleman there, without Rhodes knowing of it. Mr. Haslam is the principal gentleman of Bethlem hospital. Mr. Haslam came and saw him once.

Q. Did you learn from Rhodes whether he discovered what your object could be in having this person - A. I did. I have a letter here that points that out.

COURT. Then Mr. Haslam did come and converse with him - A. He did, and after that I received this next letter from him.

(The letter read, signed Thomas Rhodes, addressed to Mr. Daniel Haigh , esq. 6, Aldermanbury, Cheapside.)

"London November 25, 1812.

"Mr. Daniel Haigh , sir, I heard a buz; what is that buz, and who is that buz; oh, oh, it is

little Daniel, that is buzzing, is it? get upon your money bags my little man, and you will be nearer to me. Here, well done, what is the buz; I have got a bill against you for gratitude; well, well, I'll look at the accompt, and see how it stands. Oh, Daniel, the balance is in my favour. Why, my little man, what sort of clerks do you keep; they have not given me credit for one single thing; what countrymen are they. Oh, the Lillies, the Lillies, are you Lillies; stop Daniel, I have got a bill to execute against you of several thousands, for defamation. NB. It seems entirely to depend upon your clerks; send them to Goggan before they ruin you. Mr. Haigh, for you I have a great regard. The demand I have upon you, and others, must be in force; I have sworn by earth, and shall I couple hell. The debt I must have, and will. Madness in your mind is a satisfaction; in mine it is is a disgrace. Duty demands satisfaction, and satisfaction I'll have, or I will perish. I ask, and I will have a joint affidavit, or ten thousand pounds; the joint affidavit to be taken by you, Daniel Haigh, Mrs. Haigh, Mrs. Hutchius, and you, the above named men, women, and children, to swear before the Lord Mayor, and furnish me with the affidavit; that you, neither before or hereafter, in public or private, say, that Thomas Rhodes was, or is cracked, or insane, or touched with insanity, or words of the same purport, and that you never make use of the said words to Thomas Rhodes , late clerk to Daniel Haigh . The person I was introduced to there was not pointed out to me, to be there for the express purpose, or with any or the least intention, of questioning Thomas Rhodes , late clerk of Mr. Haigh, in order to ascertain whether Thomas Rhodes was or not touched with lunncy, lunatie, mad, or touched with madness, or insane, or touched with insanity, or any other offence of the same purport whatever. That Mr. Jones had no intention or nature above stated, so help you God. The affidavit above mentioned, and many other good bills to the amount of ten thousand pounds, I expect to receive of you on, or before the expiration of four days, 10th of November. If one of my demands is not complied with, I am determined to have satisfaction.

THOMAS RHODES .

An answer to my brother will be attended to."

Mr. Daniel Haigh . Here is another letter, neither date or signature; the post mark is the 1st of December; I believe it to be his hand writing; it is not writ in his usual hand; it is addressed to Daniel Haigh, 6, Aldermanbury, Cheapside; it begins, to Daniel Haigh , and others whom it may concern.

Q. to Mr. Daniel Haigh. When you returned to town on the 1st of December, did Rhodes return - A. He left me after the date of the second letter, before the third. I believe the day after I received the second letter, I called him into the accompting-house, and settled with him; he gave me a receipt for the balance, as to his wages.

Q. What was his conduct at that time - A. He was exact in business, the same as he used to be, and after we had settled, his conduct then was exactly as it used to be. When I asked him what he saw in my conduct to demand of me five thousand pounds to overthow the Government; he said, that would not do; he must have a larger sum now.

Q. After the last letter, did you take any measure to put him in confinement - A. I went, and consulted with Mr. Stephens, in the Old Jewry; he was put in a private house at Hoxton, at Miles's, at Hoxton.

Q. This is a house for insane persons - A. It is; he continued there I think two or three months; he was removed from there to St. Luke's, by my permission.

Q. Did you see him on the 30th of November - A. I saw him pass my accomping-house window; I have no doubt he saw me; he looked in at the window.

Q. When he came in you went backwards - A. I went with two gentlemen and my son; I don't think I should have gone, only I was called away. A friend met me behind the Bank; I told him what had happened. I did not see any thing of the transaction of the death of Prestow.

Q. Did you receive that printed paper of the prisoner - A. No; I received some one at the accompting-house.

Mr. Gurney. The day that you invited Rhodes to dine with you at Battersea Rise, you had a long conversation with him - A. Yes, we talked together a good while; he talked of giving peace to the whole world.

Q. You thought it very wild, and in consequence of what you observed you engaged Mr. Haslam to come and see him - A. Yes.

Q. And after that, you finding he was insane, you had him confined - A. I did, and when we heard that he was away from St. Luke's, assistance was sent to get him back again if he could be found.

JAMES CHARLES . I am clerk and warehouseman to Mr. Haigh. I knew Rhodes several years before he went to Hoxton.

Q. Towards the latter part of the time, did you find a scheme that he had in view of bringing about peace - A. Yes; he first mentioned it I think about October, 1812, and I think Mr. Daniel Haigh was at Ramsgate at the time he first mentioned it.

Q. Did he shew you any printed papers - A. I heard there were such things; I conversed with him upon the subject of the printed papers while Mr. Haigh was at Ramsgate; he seemed determined of giving peace to the world; I talked to him about it. I suggested the great impropriety of publishing a paper of that sort; he went off immediately, and stopped the publication of it. In short he went out of the house to do that, when he returned he told me he had suppressed it. I told him not to circulate any more; I found his name at the bottom of the paper. I told him we should have a number of people come to the house, when the paper was circulated. He went about his business as usual. Except in that single subject there was no departure from reason.

Q. What was his natural temper and disposition - A. I always thought him very sullen and obstinate; he was always very friendly with me; we were upon the best terms, in short, we could not be otherwise.

Q. On the 30th of November, did you see him at Mr. Haigh's warehouse - A. I did; when I first saw him it might be about noon; when he came in I was busy in the warehouse; I went up to him, and shook hands with him. I asked him how he was; he said, pretty well. I said, you look very well. He said; how is Mrs. Charles. I asked him, how they treated him; he said, pretty well; better than he expected. I said, you look pretty well Rhodes. He then went into the warehouse, where there were some furniture prints lay; we began talking about one thing or the other, that might have taken place in the business; there were one pile of prints he observed in particular; he said, this is some of the old stock, and I rather think it was some of the old stock. We went on about these prints; he took down one of these prints, put it on the counter, he observed the date, and seemed to think they were part of the old stock; his uncle did not join in the conversation. I conceived his conversation was rational. I was told that a gentleman wanted to speak with Mr. Daniel Haigh ; he was in the accompting-house. I left the prisoner, and told Mr. Haigh a gentleman wished to speak with him. Mr. Haigh said, Charles, what would be the best to be done; Prestow, the deceased, was sent for.

Q. After having fetched Prestow, did you return to Rhodes - A. It was my intention to do so, I was prevented by a gentleman coming in upon business. When I was coming down stairs with the gentleman I had been with, Mr. Samuel Haigh said, Mr. Charles, do not come down stairs, he may shoot you, he has a pistol in his hand.

Q. Daniel Haigh quitted the accompting-house before you went up stairs - A. He quitted the accompting-house when we sent for an officer.

Q. Could he quit the accompting-house without passing Rhodes - A. Yes, he could. I remained upon the top of the stairs a few minutes; while I remained on the stairs, I saw Rhodes quit the warehouse, and go into the accounting-house; I stood there until I saw Prestow come into the warehouse; it is an open stair-case. Prestow went into the accompting-house, he perceived that Rhodes had a pistol, he retreated, and stepped back; Prestow had a small stick in his hand, he might hold the stick up; I cannot say whether he did or no. Prestow advanced a second time; I saw him go into the accompting-house, and I heard the report of a pistol; after the report of the pistol, I saw Towe run in, and I ran in after Towe; to help to secure the prisoner. Towe was endeavouring to take the other pistol from him. I ran up to the prisoner, and put my arm round his neck, in order to secure him too; Towe was on the other side endeavouring to take the pistol from him; we secured him. I saw some man in the passage, I beckoned to the man to come and assist; when he came in I run off to get a surgeon; Prestow was laying with his head on one of the steps bleeding.

Q. Should you know the stick that Prestow had in his hand - A. A man told me afterwards that was the stick.

Metcalf. I was sent out to fetch Prestow.

Q. What was Prestow - A. He was serjeant of the night .

Q. Do you know whether Prestow was known to the prisoner - A. I don't know. When I returned with Prestow, I stood at the right hand side of the accompting-house door outside, in the warehouse. The prisoner then was in the place where Mr. Haigh generally sits. Prestow went to the door; the prisoner held the pistol up; the prisoner said, he had another; that is all I heard him say. Prestow stood at the outside; I stood behind him. Prestow had a stick in his hand; Pristow said, he had a pistol. Prestow advanced the second time; I stood where I was. I don't think Prestow spoke, holding the stick down. It appeared to me that he struck with the stick, to strike Rhodes, I cannot say whether he did or no; the prisoner fired in the twinkling of an eye; I saw the discharge: I saw it flash in the pan; I ran backwards at first when I saw the flash I heard the report, Prestow fell dead, and never stired in the least as I saw.

Q. Had Prestow advanced near enough to reach the prisoner with his stick - A. He was within half a yard of him. There are two steps in the accompting-house where Rhodes was.

Q. Did not you say before the Coroner, that Prestow struck his legs - A. It appeared to me that he struck where his legs was; I think he meant to strike his legs in my own mind; I cannot exactly say whether he hit him or not.

JAMES TOWE . I belong to St. Luke's Hospital. The prisoner was under my custody at St. Luke's; I saw him from time to time when he was there; he behaved himself very properly when he was with us.

Q. Did you observe any symtoms of insanity - A. I am not a sufficient judge for that; I believed him to be insane, because he was in the house.

Q. You have heard of his contriving his escape on the night of the 29th - A. Yes, and I, and Thomas Fossy , went to seek after him; I first saw him at Mr. Haigh's accompting-house, about one o'clock in the day, he was in the warehouse; soon after I saw him, I said, I was come for him; he drew a pistol from his pocket, told me to take care of myself; he presented the pistol at me; I withdraw to another part of the warehouse, towards the door; he walked backwards and forwards in the warehouse. I saw him go into the accompting-house; I saw Prestow come. The prisoner was alone in the accompting-house; when Prestow came, Prestow opened the accompting-house door. I could see the prisoner, I was on one side of Prestow. Prestow went a little way in the accompting-house, with the door in his hand; the door opens inward; the prisoner presented a pistol at Prestow; Prestow said, oh, dear man, you lay for shooting, do you; and withdrew. Prestow was a powerful man. Prestow advanced the second time quick up to the place where Rhodes was; I did not see Prestow aim a blow, or see him have a stick the second time; the first time I did. I saw Rhodes present the pistol at Prestow the second time, I heard the report, Prestow fell immediately, he shewed no signs of life afterwards, as I saw. Upon Prestow falling, I rushed

forwards to secure Rhodes; Mr. Charles and somebody came to my assistance; I took the pistols from him.

Q. When you rushed forward at him did you see any pistol - A. He presented a pistol, and snapped the pistol at me; I rushed forward and laid hold of him. He was endeavouring to cock the pistol again; I took the pistol from him. The other pistol I believe was down on the ground; I am sure he had two pistols. After I had secured him I took him back to St. Luke's myself, and then the officers, Harrison, and Cartwright, took him in custody at St. Luke's.

Q. Did you convers with him as you were taking him back - A. I did; he told me if the other pistol had gone off he should have shot me as dead as Prestow.

WILLIAM EDINGTON . I am a surgeon. I saw the unfortunate person Prestow at the warehouse; I examined his head; he was dead when I saw him. The cause of his death was a shot from a pistol.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am one of the marshalmen. I received these pistols at Mr. Haigh's house, one had been discharged, the other was loaded with powder and ball. I asked him where he got the pistols; he told me he bought them in Tottenham-court-road. I took the prisoner from St. Luke's; Harrison was with me. He said, he got the powder and hall in Oxford-street. I asked him where he got the horn that the powder was in; he said in the Haymarket. I then asked him if he knew Prestow, he said, he knew him very well to be an officer, and a resolute man, for he had seen him handle an Irishman bringing him up Aldermanbury; he knew him to be a resolute man. I then said, suppose Mr. Nalder had come, would you have shot him! yes, he said, or any other person that came to molest him. He gave very regular answers to every question I put to him; I took him to the Compter.

COURT. Now, would Thomas Rhodes wish to say any thing for himself he is at liberty, or if he wishes to leave it to his counsel; his counsel will examine any witnesses that he has on his behalf -

Prisoner. I have no counsel.

COURT. If you wish to say any thing you are at liberty now -

Prisoner's Defence. I feel myself an injured person; it appears the capital part of the charge is done away; I need not defend myself on that head. In October, 1812, I published that paper; I was taken up and placed in the Compter by Mr. Nalder, the City marshal, he said he would take me before the Lord Mayor; he began to search me; I made no resistance. He took from me a knife, and when I was in the coach I asked him whether I might have a private or public examination; he said, which I pleased. I said I prefered a public one; I was taken into a private room in the Mansion House; the letters were all taken before the Lord Mayor, read, and all sworn to, except the third; Mr. Haigh could not swear to that. A gentleman said, his lordship would not do any thing in it, he would wish to defer it until the Thursday week. I had an idea that they were going to take me to a private mad-house; said, I had no objection of going to Newgate. I was sent back to the Poultry Compter, and on the day that I was to be taken to the Mansion House, instead of taking me there, two keepers from the mad-house came for me; Mr. Nalder said, there was an order for me to go to the mad-house. I was shewn into the turnkey's room; the two keepers came in, they said, they had an order to take me; I pulled my coat off to have the straight jacket on; they said, I was quiet enough. When they got me a few hundred yards towards Miles's mad-house, they tied my hands, they searched me; I had some money they did not find; I gave that up. I did not know what a place a mad-house was, and on the 9th of April, I was taken from there to St. Luke's Hospital. When I had been there three or four months, I was informed the physician said I was quite well enough to go out; I then thought they had no right to keep me there after the physician said I was well; I was determined to break out. I got out, and got the money that has been stated. I bought the pistols to protect myself, as it may appear to the court and the jury. This man has stated that I knew Prestow; I did not know the man was an officer. I found he came to take me, but I never heard he was an officer until I was in confinement. They have stated that I presented the pistol at Mr. Prestow, I do not think they could see, except looking through a glass-door; I do not think that is legal to swear looking through glass.

JOHN HASLAM . I am the apothecary of Bethlem Hospital. I have been conversant with the complaints of insane persons about twenty years; I have in that time had the opportunity of seeing many thousand cases. In November last, by desire of Mr. Haigh, the prisoner was introduced to me under a feiganed name, rather against my will; I had one interview with Rhodes for near two hours; my opinion is that he is absolutely insane; on my certificate he was put into Hoxton mad-house. I invited him a dozen times at Miles's; his mind was in a state of insanity; I delivered my opinion that he was an uncurable lunatic.

WILLIAM NEVLY . I am the apothecary of St. Luke's. The prisoner was brought to our house on Friday, the 9th of last April. I saw him almost dailey; he was brought to the Hospital in a deranged state; he continued in a deranged state; he was always so. I saw him on Monday before he escaped; he was in the same deranged state. I considered him unsafe to go into society.

Prisoner. From what do you form your opinion that I am insane - A. From your action, and ideas, and your general conduct told me that you were an improper person to be at liberty.

Q. You judge from ideas; you have a good opinion of yourself. Do you remember ever my being confined with a strait jacket, or a hand-cuff - A. I do not. I could see from your general conduct that you wished to make away with your uncle, and I have the same idea of you now that I always had.

Q. Why did I not shoot my uncle when I was there - A. I coneeive you had not a fair opportunity of doing it.

Rhodes. Do you think a mad-man is so considerate as to think of that.

DR. SUTHERLAND. I am physician to St. Luke's hospital. The prisoner has been under my care during the time he has been confined there. I saw him every Monday, and in my judgment he was insane the whole of the time. I should consider it imprudent that he should be at large. He certainly was not capable of judging whether his actions were right or wrong.

NOT GUILTY .

On the ground of insanity.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-12

12. JOHN TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a coat value 12 s. the property of William Hayward .

WILLIAM HAYWARD . I keep a saleshop in Barbican . On the 8th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, a neighbour's servant informed me that the prisoner had taken a coat from the door; I pursued him; he threw the coat down; I picked it up, and brought the coat home. This is the coat; it is mine; it was hanging outside of the door.

MARY DAWSON . I saw the prisoner take the coat; I informed Mr. Hayward of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the coat lay on the pavement; I picked it up the same as another might.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-13

13. MARGARET TILLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2th of November , a watch, value 2 l. a 3 s. bank token, a 18 d. bank token, and seven shillings, the property of James Ellis , from his person .

JAMES ELLIS . I am a farming man ; I live at Dagenham, in Essex. I lost my watch on the 8th of November. I was going up Essex-street, Whitechapel , about one o'clock in the day; I enquired for Mr. Sealy's yard. I saw some women as I went along; one of the women said she would shew me Mr. Sealy's yard. I went with her about thirty yards, she then left me; then another woman came up to me, and told the woman that had left me had got my watch. I put my hand to my fob, and found my watch was gone. This woman said, if I would give her some gin she would get me my watch again. I clapped my hand to my pocket; I found my purse was gone. I then went to Lambeth-street office. I was a little tipsey. The prisoner was the first woman I saw in Essex-street.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I went into Essex-street on Monday the 8th of November, I was informed a man had been robbed. I went into a public-house where the prisoner was; she said she knew I was an officer; she would give me this watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman that he first accused is now in Newgate. I had no intention of keeping the watch.

Prosecutor. I accused no other woman with the watch. I thought the other woman took my money. The watch Mr. Freeman has produced is my watch.

Q. Did you go into any room with her - A. I did not.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-14

14. GEORGE CHAMBERS and THOMAS LORMAN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Bland , about the hour of nine on the night of the 10th of November , and stealing therein a great coat, value 10 s. a hat, value 5 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Moxon ; and a great coat, value 10 s. the property of John Moxon .

THOMAS MOXON . On the 10th of November last I went with a friend to dine at the Bath hotel in Harlington-street, Piccadilly . When I got there it was about five o'clock in the afternoon; I pulled off my great coat, and put it on a chair in the hall. I left my hat and my brother's hat and coat on the chair. About ten o'clock in the evening the waiter came in and asked us whether we had come with hats and great coats and gloves. I went to the place in the hall where I had left them; they were gone. The officer came in about ten minutes after the waiter; he had got my great coat and hat, and my brother's great coat. I remarked at the time that I had a pair of gloves in my pocket; he went and fetched them.

EDWARD BLAND . I live at the Bath hotel, in Harlington-street. My father's name is Thomas Bland ; the hotel is kept by him . It is in the parish of St. George; Hanover-square. I was in the hotel at the time this transaction happened.

Q. Do you know the hall or passage going into hotel - A. Yes, towards the street. It is the entrance into the hotel part; it is opened by a glass door with a pulley; that is the regular entrance into the hotel part. I remember Mr. Moxon being there, and near ten o'clock I missed the coats and hats off the chairs. I had seen them on the chairs. I went into the room, and asked the gentlemen if they had missed them; they said, no. I recollected in the course of the evening seeing two persons coming and making some enquiries, but whether they were the prisoners I cannot say. That was about nine o'clock; it was dark then. While we were enquiring, Nicolls the officer and some others came in with the coats and the prisoners. The prisoners were taken to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am an officer. I was the person that brought the great coats into the Bath hotel. On the 10th of November I was upon duty that evening; I was at the Gloucester coffee-house, seeing the mails off, as we generally do of a night. We attend regular from eight o'clock to a quarter past eight. The two prisoners passed the Gloucester coffee-house. I am sure of their persons; I knew them well; that induced me to follow them: they crossed over to Harlington-street to the door of the Bath hotel; they walked by the door several times; they entered the avenue; that is the covered way of the street door, before you come to the glass door; they then went round to the other door in Piccadilly, they went into the passage there; that is an open

passage; they returned back into Harlington-street, and at that door they watched there for some time in and out of that avenue, until there was an opportunity. I saw one of the prisoners push the door open, and go in, and the other held the door until he came out. They both then came away together, as close as if they were arm in arm together. I followed them down Harlington-street; I had placed Payntington and Jones at the corner of Harlington-street, to prevent their escape. When I got near to to them I called out to Payntington and Jones; I then saw something drop from one of the prisoners. I cannot say which of them, nor could I tell what it was until I came to it. When they came out I perceived a bulk in one of their arms; which of them had it I cannot swear. It dropped from one or other of them.

Q. You saw something drop from the prisoners - A. Yes.

Q. You could not swear what it was - A. Not till I came to it. I saw the hat roll into the kennel; Payntington and Jones turned round the corner, and took the two prisoners into custody immediately; this was all in my sight.

Q. Are you sure the two men Payntington and Jones took, are the same men that you saw come from the door of the Bath hotel - A. Yes. I picked up the coats and the hat.

THOMAS PAYNTINGTON . I was upon duty with Nicolls. I observed no further than what he has stated. When Nicolls called out, I stopped Lorman; Jones stopped Chambers. I searched Lorman; I found only a knife upon him.

THOMAS JONES . I was with Nicolls and Payntington. I saw them coming along. I knew Chambers very well. I laid hold of Chambers; Payntington laid hold of the other. I found the gloves afterwards in the necessary, after they were locked up in the watchhouse, under the seat; they were throwed down. I gave the gloves to Nicolls.

ABRAHAM FARROW . I was with Nicolls, Jones, and Payington. I saw the two prisoners pass by the Gloucester coffee-house; I saw the prisoners go to the Bath hotel; I saw them come out of the Bath hotel; I saw them drop something; I could not exactly tell what it was.

Q. Could you see sufficient so as to be sure that one of the men that dropped something was one of the men that came from the hotel - A. I did. I am sure I found in Chambers's pocket a pair of gloves. I observed a button at the wrist of the gloves. The next morning I saw the gloves that Jones found in the necessary; they were the same gloves. Chambers asked me for the gloves and handkerchief I found in his pocket. I gave them him; I thought they were his own. The next morning I saw them again, when Jones found them in the necessary; they are the same gloves I found in Chambers's pocket.

Q. to Prosecutor. Just look at these things - A. This is my great coat, and the hat I can swear to by the shape and look, and the gloves are mine; they have buttons at the wrist, and I know the other great coat; it is my brother's.

CHAMBERS, GUILTY , aged 36.

LORMAN, GUILTY , aged 31.

Of stealing only, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-15

15. MARY STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a silver fish slice, value 1 l. eight silver table-spoons, value 4 l. ten silver dessert spoons, value 4 l. a silver butter ladle, value 2 l. four silver tea-spoons, value 12 s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10 s. four sheets, value 1 l. two shirts, value 1 l. and three waistcoats, value 1 l. the property of James Steel , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES STEEL . I am a distiller ; I live in Great Ayliffe-street, Goodman's fields ; the prisoner was my servant ; she lived with me about twenty months. She left me on Wednesday the 17th of December. On the day she left her service I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment. I applied at Lambeth-street office the same evening; Miller, the officer, came to me on the next day, we could not find the prisoner. In the mean time, Mary Hayes, my washerwoman was with us in the house; she confessed of taking many things. She gave up some duplicates to Miller, the officer, and said she had taken many things to pawn. She, Miller, and I, went to the pawnbrokers, Mr. Fleming, in Whitechapel. I there saw a silver soup-ladle which I knew to be my own. On the Saturday evening following the prisoner came to my house; she gave me a considerable number of duplicates out of her pocket; I said it was a shocking business she was engaged in; I asked her what could have induced her to have done so. She said, her family had been the ruin of her; she had to pay her brother's funeral expences. I said, I could not pass it over. I sent for the officer, and gave him the duplicates.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Cable-street. I produce a fish-slice, it is of the value of about thirty shillings; two table-spoons, value thirty shillings four tea-spoons, value twelve shillings; a pair of sugar-tongs, value ten shillings; a dessert-spoon, value six shillings; two shirts, value one pound; three sheets, value thirty shillings; and two waistcoats worth about three or four shillings. They were pledged at our house at different times from May to November; they were pledged in the name of Mary Hayes , and by her.

WILLIAM HENRY MULLIDGE . In November last I lived with Mr. Fleming, pawnbroker, in Whitechapel. I produce a soup-ladle, two gravy-spoons six table-spoons, and nine dessert-spoons, all silver. They were pawned with me at different times; they were pawned by Mary Hayes .

MARY HAYES . Q. You have pawned several things for the prisoner, have not you - A. Yes; she first asked me in May if I would take the articles, she had no money to keep the house. I said to her, you know you do wrong. She said she should be arrested for her brother's funeral. I pledged for her a silver soup-ladle, a butter-ladle, and two table-spoons. I took them to Mr. Flemings; I got four pound for them, and I gave the duplicate and the four pound to the prisoner. I pawned several things for her afterwards; I gave her the money. The prisoner told me

that she had twenty-one pound to receive, and when she received that she would take them out again. I told her it was wrong to pledge these things; she had only to go to the counter and ask for the money.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 18th of November I was sent for to question Mary Hayes about these things. I found her at Mr. Steel's. I took her with me to Mr. Fleming's to search for the property. She told me there was some pledged there. On the 20th I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Steel's; she had come there; and seventeen duplicates the prisoner laid on the table in my presence; one of the duplicates is in the month of June, a soup-ladle, butter-ladle, and two gravy-spoons, four pounds, in the name of Mary Hayes , 30th of June. I ordered the pawnbrokers to bring all the things forward.

Prosecutor. The whole of the articles produced are mine.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-16

16. WILLIAM GOLDING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Elliston , about the hour of one in the night of the 27th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein four thousand eight hundred copper halfpence, the monies of Charles Elliston .

SECOND COUNT, for that he, on the 28th of November, about the hour of three in the forenoon, the said dwelling-house did break and enter, and feloniously stealing the like copper money, the property of Charles Elliston , he and his family being therein.

CHARLES ELLISTON . I keep a house in Shoreditch , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, in the county of Middlesex. I am in the tripe business .

Q. Was your house robbed on the night of the 27th or the morning of the 28th of November - A. Yes. On the night of the 27th, I went to bed at twelve o'clock; we were all in bed by twelve o'clock. My servant lad saw the house properly secured. My sister went to bed last.

Q. Did you yourself see that the house was properly secured - A. I did not. I was up first the next morning; it was day-light then. That was Sunday morning. On my going down stairs the first thing I found was this closet broken open where this property was.

Q. Whereabouts was this closet - A. Adjoining the shop, in the centre of the house. The door had been fastened with a lock. The door was wide open; the wood work had given way.

Q. Had you seen that door locked the night before - A. I had not.

Q. Can you say when you went to bed it was safe - A. My sister kept the key.

Q. Do you know what was in the closet - A. Not exactly. It was the place that we usually kept our copper money; and the boiling house was broken open. There is a range of buildings from my dwelling-house to my boiling-house. We go into a yard out of the house, into a washhouse. We cannot go into the boiling-house without going into the wash-house in the yard; that yard is enclosed by a brick wall all round. The boiling-house appeared to have been wrenched open by a crow, or some such instrument. There were no fastenings to the closet in the boiling-house. There are two doors to go through before you get out of the boiling-house to that closet. The back door of the house was upon the latch; it was not locked. They could not get into the yard without getting over the wall, or getting into the boiling-house. A pair of large gates were forced open; they go into a back street; these gates were forced open; they were shut the over night. There were some silver spoons missed out of the cupboard; they have not been recovered. I saw an instrument fitted to the place by the officers.

FANNY ELLISTON . I am the sister to Charles Elliston.

Q. Do you recollect going to bed on the Saturday night before the robbery - A. Yes. I was the last up in the house.

Q. Was the back door leading into the yard, shut - A. I don't know.

Q. I mean out of the house into the yard - A. All the doors of the house were shut; there is a pully, to it, no fastening at all. The boiling-house door that opens into the yard that was shut with a bolt; I saw it.

Q. Did you see the closet adjoining the shop - A. I kept the key of that; that closet is in the middle of the house; I know it was locked.

Q. Do you know what was in that closet - A. Copper tied up in five-shilling papers, and a few half-crown papers.

Q. What quantity of halfpence do you suppose them to be - A. About fifty pound. I tied up all the money myself. On Sunday morning I was up first; I came down stairs about half past eight o'clock, and when I came down all the papers of halfpence were gone out of that closet. Me and my brother, a servant maid, and a servant lad, slept in the house that night. I know nothing of the prisoner; I never recollect seeing him before.

Q. Did you see the state of the boiling-house - A. I sent the lad to fasten it.

Q. Did you yourself see if it was fastened - A. No.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday morning last, the 28th of November, about eight o'clock in the morning. Freeman and Dalton were with me. We went to Weatherhead's garden, Virginia-row, Bethnal-green. We had information that the prisoner lived in that house. He was not at home then. We wanted until nine o'clock; the prisoner came home. I opened the door to him when he knocked; I seized him immediately. I had found these halfpence in the sitting-room; they were all found before he came home. We secured him after a little resistance. I asked him whose halfpence these were; he said he knew nothing about them; some person must have brought them; he asked who it was.

Q. You found his wife there did you - A. Yes, and she said some woman in a blue and white gown.

There are more halfpence than a man can carry at once; I then took the prisoner to the office. On Monday morning I went with Dalton to the prisoner's house, and found this crow.

Q. What did you find at his house at Bethnall-green, before the prisoner came there - A. I found this quantity of halfpence, which is five pounds, or thereabouts; they are in paper parcels, tied up in this apron; my fellow officers found the other things. A clock hung up in the room, I asked him whose that was; he said that was his, but the halfpence were not. His wife and three children were in the house, nobody else; there were only two rooms. The oldest of his children is ten or eleven years of age.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I went to this house with Miller. I found these halfpence packed upon the top of a box, by the side of the bed, in the bedroom. There are only two rooms to the house. I saw my brother officer find a crow, and a hammer; the crow was on a chair at the foot of the bed, and the claw hammer. I waited with the other officers until the prisoner came home.

EBENEZER DALTON . I am one of the officers that went to this house. I was present when one parcel of halfpence were found. I found a crow on a chair, at the foot of the bed; I found this iron claw hammer on the same chair, and this phosporus bottle on the mantle-shelf in the bed-room. I took the crow and the claw hammer to Mr. Elliston's house; Miller was with me. It appeared the door had been broken open by this crow, the marks on the wood work appeared to fit, and the boiling-house door appeared to have been broken open by this claw hammer; the great gates were broken open; the locks was forced off; I have no doubt it was done with this crow.

Q. What distance is this house at Bethnal-green off Elliston's - A. A quarter of a mile, not more.

Q. to Fanny Elliston . Look at these papers of halfpence that are produced - A. They are all in stiff brown paper; I can undertake to say they are halfpence of my packing up, and I know them by the string; it is larger than packthread.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday morning, a quarter before seven, I awoke. I got up, dressed myself, and went on purpose to get something to drink; there was a man I had spoken to in the week, I asked him to dine with me on Sunday; I went to where he lodged, in Black Horse yard; I enquired of the niece whether he was in; the girl went up stairs, and asked him if he was willing to get up, because William was below. I went up stairs and the man that was with me; we had a drop of something to drink, and when we came down stairs I went directly to my own place, and directly I came to my own door, them gentlemen catched hold of me; I said gentlemen, what do you mean by this; they said, you know. They took the other man in custody as well as me; he has been liberated.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-17

17. WILLIAM GOLDING was indicted for feloniously being at large in this Kingdom before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he was ordered to be transported .

EBENEZER DALTON . I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner; I received it of Mr. Shelton. I saw Mr. Shelton sign it.

(Read.)

Dalton. I saw the prisoner at large on Sunday morning last; I saw him in Weatherhead's-garden, Virginia-row, Bethnal-green, in the county of Middlesex.

RICHARD SMART . I am one of the turnkeys at Newgate.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, he was under my custody in Newgate, in January, 1812.

Q. After then do you know what became of him - A. He was transported beyond the seas, for the term of seven years; on the 14th of February following he was delivered on board the Restitution Hulk at Woolwich; I delivered him in pursuance of his sentence when he was convicted, that was in February, 1812. I delivered him there myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will take it into consideration; I have a wife and three children, one can neither walk or talk, and my wife is far advanced into pregnancy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-18

18. JOSEPH TAYLOR and WILLIAM LUCK were indicted for that they, on the 28th of November , two sheep, value 4 l. the property of William Brown , did kill, with intent to steal the carcases of the said sheep .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a farmer ; I live at the parish of Dunton, in the county of Bedford. I sent some sheep up to grass here, about three months ago; I think the gentleman's name is Vass, in the parish of South Mimms, Middlesex .

Q. On the 28th of November, did you make any enquiry about your sheep - A. Mr. Vass's foreman came up to me; he said, I must come up immediately; I got up that evening to where my sheep were at grass, and when I came there I found two of them were missing; there were two short of the number I sent. I know noteing of the prisoners.

WILLIAM CHAMPION . I live in the neighbourhood of South Mimms; I am bailiff to Mr. Vass.

Q. Did you go to make search after the sheep that were missing - A. Not till they were missing, and I was informed by Dawkins, the constable, out of Mr. Vass's field; I went and counted them; two were missing; there should have been altogether ninety; I counted but eighty-eight. On Sunday morning, I found the skins in the field adjoining, where they had killed them: I knew them to be the skins of Mr. Brown's sheep; they were marked with B. and also marked with red oker; the other eighty-eight were all marked with B. and red oker.

NICHOLAS DAWKINS . I apprehended the prisoners first; John Emmitt was with me. I went out upon speculation with Emmitt, there had been so many depredations done about Barnet; I went to the North-road; I heard the footsteps of men coming, it was a little before two o'clock in the

morning; I head somebody approaching towards me; I clapped myself in the hedge, and two men came up, it proved to be Taylor, and Luck; the prisoners are the men; Taylor came forward with his bludgeon in his hand; the next was Luck; he had the carcase of a sheep on his shoulder, in a sack, except the entrails and the skin; I asked Luck what he had; he said, a little bit of mutton. It appeared to me to be a whole sheep. I asked him where they got the sheep from; they told me out of Mr. Vass's field. I asked him if it was Mr. Vass's sheep; he said, no; they were taken into grass. He begged forgiveness, and that I would not take him before the magistrate on account of his wife and family; he said it was the first time, and the only sheep he ever had. After I had secured Luck, I secured Taylor; they both begged for mercy; they both informed me it was the first sheep they ever had taken, and the only one. I asked where the skin was; they both together told me they had throwed it into a dell hole in the field.

Q. What is a dell hole - A. A gravel-pit, or any place, that lies lower than the field.

Q. Did they describe the place to you that you could find it - A No, they did not. I took the prisoners to my house, and the sheep in the sack, kept them there until about seven o'clock, then I went to Mr. Walsh's, the constable. I left John Emmett in charge of the two prisoners. Walsh and I went to search for the two skins; we first of all called upon Champion, Mr. Vass's bailiff; I asked him whether he had any sheep laying near the ground of Mr. Wilson; he said, yes. The prisoners had described down by Mutton-lane, near Mr. Wilson's; they told me the sheep lay in a field near Mr. Wilson's. We counted the sheep eighty-eight; we searched about for the skins; we could not find it. We could see the places where two different sheep had been killed. After missing two sheep by the shepherd's account, the constable and I went to Taylor's house; Taylor's house is about three quarters of a mile across the fields from where the sheep were; we searched his house; in a sort of a back house there, we found a sheep cut up, and salted down in a large red pan.

Q. Was this the same morning - A. Yes; the mutton was cut in pieces not bigger than a pound and a half or two pounds, not at all as a butcher would cut. The meat was quite warm in the middle of the pan.

Q. What hour in the morning was this - A. Between nine and ten; the meat was pressed very tight in the pan, and the pan was covered over with a top, and the cover was made of red earth, the same as the pan, it fitted close; there was a bloody sack just by it. I said to Taylor, you told me you had only one sheep, and you also said, you had thrown the skin into a dell hole; he then said, they had throwed the skins into the brow of the hedge, and Champion found them there; in the mean time we went to Mr. Walsh's Champion found them; I left him in search of them.

Q. to Champion. Where did you find the skins - A. I found them under the brow of a hedge near Mutton-lane, in Mr. Wilson's field; I carried the skins to Mr. Walsh's, the constable.

Q. to Dawkins. I understood you to say that Taylor said it was the only sheep that then they had taken - A. They both said so; they were both present. When I searched Taylor's house, Taylor was not there; he was in custody with Luck, at Walsh's, the constable. I saw Taylor's wife, I knew it was his house; I enquired; the person that told me said it was Taylor's house, and he said, that is Taylor's wife; she said, she was not. I was with his wife at the house; I never was there with Taylor. He was a prisoner from the time I took him until he was committed. Walsh was with me when I went to Taylor's house.

Champion. I know it is Taylor's house.

THOMAS VASS . I know it was Taylor's house; the premises belong to me, it is adjoining my premises, it is in South Mimms parish; it is in the middle of some meadows, near Potters-bar; there is no houses near it, it stands by itself,

Q. to Dawkins. Where did the house stand that you understood to be Taylor's - A. At the back of the village, it stands in a meadow by itself.

Q. What is the name of the village - A.Potters-bar.

Mr. Vass. That is the situation of Taylor's house.

MR. EMMITT. I accompanied Dawkins about two o'clock, Sunday morning last; the two prisoners came up, I assisted Dawkins in stopping them; Luck had the sack with the sheep in it. After the prisoners were secured, I took the sheep on my back; I carried it near three miles to Mr. Dawkins's house; about seven o'clock we took the prisoners to Mr. Walsh's house. I was left in custody with them.

Q. What passed when you apprehended the prisoners - A. Luck said, he had the sheep from Mr. Vass's field. They both begged forgiveness of the crime.

MR. WALSH. I am a constable of Barnet. Dawkins and Emmitt brought these two prisoners to my house about seven o'clock in the morning; when Dawkins and his partner brought them, the prisoners said they had brought the sheep from Mr. Vass's field, near Mr. Wilson's; we searched about the field; we could not find them. We saw where two sheep had been killed; when we discovered two sheep had been killed, we went to Taylor's house as Dawkins has described before, and after we had taken the meat from Taylor's house, we took the two prisoners before the magistrate. I have had the skins in my custody ever since; these are the skins; I received them from Champion.

Prosecutor. I branded the hips, on the off hip with the letter B. and here is the B. on the off hip on both these skins; to the best of my knowledge they are my skins.

Champion. The marks on the skins are exactly the same as the others.

Luck's Defence. We did it for want; we were greatly in distress.

Taylor's Defence. I have got four small children. I was greatly in distress. I had my rent to pay; I did not know which way to get a bit of bread.

TAYLOR, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

LUCK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of their family.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-19

19. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a timepiece, value 18 s. the property of Thomas Pilkington .

CHARLES HAMILTON . I am an apprentice to John Maud , No. 15, Tabernacle-walk . My master's tailor's shop is opposite of Mr. Pilkington's shop. Mr. Pilkington's is a broker . On Saturday, the 20th of November, about three in the afternoon, I was at work in the shop; I saw the prisoner put his right arm into Mr. Pilkington's shop, and take out the time-piece; he went down the walk with it until he came to the Tabernacle-walk; he then turned down Tabernacle-row. I saw the prisoner brought back in the course of five minutes, and an officer was sent for.

JEREMIAH DEATH . I live in Leonard-street, that is near Tabernacle-walk. On the 20th of November, I saw the prisoner with two persons, pass my door; a chaise stood opposite of my door, one of them turned up the apron of the chaise and looked in, that induced me to go and watch then; I saw them at another shop, they went from that to Tabernacle-walk, and went towards Mr. Pilkington's shop; I saw them just beyond Mr. Pilkington's door; they all ran down the walk; I followed the prisoner, crying out stop thief; the prisoner threw the time-piece out of his coat; I picked it up, followed him, crying out stop thief. I am sure the prisoner is the man that throwed the time piece down. He was stopped before he was out of my sight; he was taken back an officer was sent for, he was taken in custody.

THOMAS PILKINGTON . I keep a broker's shop, in Tabernacle-walk, my shop is opposite Mr. Maud's, I was not at home at the time the transaction happened. When I came home I found the prisoner in my house; the time-piece was produced I believe by Mr. Death.

ANDREW THOM . I am an officer. I produce the time-piece; I received it at Worship-street office.

Q. to Death. Is that the time-piece that you picked up - A. It is; I carried it to Mr. Pilckington's shop, it was taken to Worship-street office, and there delivered to Mr. Thom; this is the timepiece, I put my mark upon it.

Prosecutor. It is my time-piece, it is of the value of eighteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will be as favourable as you can; it is my first offence; I was intoxicated at the time.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-20

20. JOHN READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Richard Snowden , from his person .

RICHARD SNOWDEN. On the 30th of October last, I was mate of the ship called the Ocean, she laid at Shadwell dock tier ; there were ships on both sides of it.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him; did he come on board your ship on the 30th of October - A. I cannot say.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner first - A. When I went on board the second ship from us; the ships were all close together, alongside of one-another.

Q. Did not you see the prisoner before you saw him on board that ship - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. But you had a watch, had not you - A.Yes; the watch was in the cabin, in the bed place; I sleep in the bounds of the big cabin.

Q. Do you know when you last saw your watch - A. On the night of the 29th of October, between nine and ten at night, I then saw my watch either in the cabin or the bed place. I missed my watch between twelve and one o'clock. Before I missed my watch, I heard a trampling upon deck; I went upon deck, and asked who it was. I asked the man what he wanted. It was dark; I could not see his person. He told me he was going on board the Mary of Newcastle. I then looked for my watch, it was gone; the man went over our ship, and went over the tier. I called the ships crew up, and told them I was robbed of my watch, and that a man had gone over the tier of the ship, I was suspicious of him; we then got a lanthorn, and went in pursuit of him, and found him in the second ship from us; he was standing at the back part of the rudder trunk, Thomas Reddick got up to him first; he said, he saw the watch; I came up to him last. I asked the prisoner to let me look at the watch; he held it out, and said, is this your watch; I looked at it, and said it was my watch; I put the watch in my pocket. I took the prisoner to my own ship, and kept him there till day light, I then sent for an officer; the officer came, and took the prisoner before the magistrate. Before the magistrate I laid my watch down on the table; the magistrate gave it into the constable's possession.

Prisoner. The night being dark the waterman unfortunately put me on board this ship instead of my own; I heard the mate sing out; the waterman said here, take this watch, keep it for me; I did not know whose watch it was; the prosecutor heard me sing out for the waterman.

Q. to Prosecutor. Do you recollect the prisoner telling you the waterman gave him the watch - A. Yes, he told me the same story.

WILLIAM REDDICK . I am a seaman on board the Ocean.

Q. Do you remember Snowden calling you up upon deck - A. Yes, he told me he had lost his watch; we then took a lanthorn and went over the tier to look for the man; I saw him behind the rudder trunk in a ship, the next but one to us. I said to the mate, he is here; he began to hustle his clothes, and asked what we wanted with him; he said he was mate of a ship, he had plenty of money and good friends; I said you have got our mate's

watch, and we must have it. He said he had no watch. I looked sharp at the prisoner to see what sort of a man he was. I saw the glass of a watch in his right hand. I then told the mate he had a watch in his hand; the mate took hold of the watch. The prisoner said he had not stolen it. He wanted us to put him on board the Mary, and he would shew us the person that took it. We then took the prisoner to our own ship, and the next morning the prisoner was put into the bands of a constable.

DAVID FLEMMING . I am an headborough. On the morning of the 30th, I took the prisoner into custody. I took him to the office. Snowden laid the watch on the table before the magistrate; the magistrate gave the watch into my hand. This is the same which I now produce.

Prosecutor. It is my watch; I have had it eight years.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a sea-faring man . I have been in the most capital actions that have been fought at sea. I am a stranger here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-21

21. MICHAEL ANTONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , from a vessel called a brig, in the navigable river Thames, a watch, value 8 l. 8 s. a watch-chain, value 1 l. a pocket-book, value 1 s. a 5 l. bank note, and two promissory notes, value 1 l. 1 s. each, the property of Thomas Plaxton .

THOMAS PLAXTON . I am master of a brig ; she lies at Hull, in Yorkshire, at present. She was robbed at Custom-house quay on the evening of the 16th or the morning of the 17th of September. It wanted about twenty minutes to eleven when I went to bed; I put my watch upon a shelf at the head of my bed. My pocket-book was in my coat pocket. I hung my coat upon a nail in my state-room. In the morning when I went to look for my watch it was gone, and my pocket-book was gone also. After that, I found an old pocket-book in a vessel the next to mine, and my ship papers were in it.

JOHN BELLAMY . I am a wharfinger at Custom-house quay. On the 17th of September, in the morning, about eight o'clock, the master of a vessel laying next to the brig Samuel; the brig Samuel was then laying at the Custom-house quay; the master of the vessel produced to me this pocket-book, observing that there were ship papers in it; no doubt it belonged to the master of a ship. I examined the book in his presence, and found the papers of the Samuel. On shewing them to the captain and mate of the Samuel, the captain stated these papers were in his book previous to his losing it. This book was found on the deck of the vessel, as if dropped by accident. On examining the letters in the book in a foreign language, which are Portuguese, they got an officer; they went in search of the thief; in so doing, the Samuel went away from the Quay. On the 14th of October following, a Yarmouth vessel was laying at our Quay; her name, the Hannah, Captain Miller On the night, or early the next morning, the prisoner was detected in the state-room in the act of taking his watch, previous to which he had pulled off his shoes and gone into the forecastle and took the boy's jacket; he afterwards went into the captain's cabin, where the captain seized him; he was taken to the Compter. The captain of the Hannah was going away the following day, and Captain Plaxton was coming again. Captain Miller was allowed to depart; the prisoner was remanded until Captain Plaxton arrived. On the 16th of October, the officer and me went agreeable to the prisoner's directions written with his own hand-writing. We went into Denmark-street where he stated he had got some linen, which he should be glad to have. This direction was to a female in Denmark-street, who took the officer over to the other side of the way to where the bundle of linen was; the officer and the female brought the bundle of linen to me, and in that bundle the first thing we found was Captain Plaxton 's pocket-book. This bundle of linen was taken out of Dennis Holland 's house, in Denmark-street; finding the pocket-book in it. I went to Dennis Holland , and asked him if he was satisfied that this bundle was left by the prisoner; he stated it was. The hand-writing in the pocket-book found on the deck of the ship precisely corresponds with the writing the prisoner gave to the officer to look for the linen. This is the first book.

Q. A book was found with the papers belonging to the captain - A. Just so.

Q. In that book there is writing exactly similar to the hand-writing of the direction the prisoner gave to get his linen - A. Yes.

JOSEPH BOWDEN . I am a cooper. On the 14th of October, it was right to be at the watchhouse, being a constable of the city. The prisoner was brought to me on the following morning charged with having robbed the brig Hannah, Captain Miller, master; he went down into the forecastle; he took the boy's jacket and pocket-book. I took him to the Compter. The next day he was brought up to the Lord Mayor; on the 16th he had another hearing; he asked me to go to No. 16, Denmark-street, to where he lodged, to fetch him some clean linen. I went. When I came there they said they knew nothing of him; they had no property of his. Over the way, at Dennis Holland 's, I found a handkerchief.

Q. What is Dennis Holland - A. He is an old man that sells fish about the streets. The prisoner had lodged there. On my looking into the bundle, I found the pocket-book in the bundle. I came back to Giltspur-street compter, to the prisoner. I took the bundle to the prisoner; I asked him if he knew any thing of the pocket-book; he said, yes, he did; then I asked him if he had the captain's property; he said he had, it was country notes; he could not get rid of it. He said if I would get the captain not to prosecute, he would give up his property; he said he wanted to give up the property to Captain Plaxton . The Lord Mayor granted me an order to take him to No. 14, Drury-lane. This was on Tuesday evening; he told us he would give up the property on the following morning, and to go with us, and when we got to No. 14, Drury-lane, I saw it was a large distillers. I said to him, you did not lodge there; he said, no, he should not tell me where it was until he had got a letter from his landlady. There

were five or six came round me that knew him; they got refractory. I was obliged to put him in the Compter; he would not give up Captain Plaxton 's property. He told me I and the Lord Mayor might be d - d altogether.

DENNIS HOLLAND . I sell things in the street. On the Tuesday before the officer came to my house, the prisoner came to my house; he came in with a handkerchief in my hand; he had a pennyworth of spice-cakes, which he paid for; he had a pipe in his hand; he lighted it, and went to the street door. I was going out to get some cakes. I said to him, do not leave your handkerchief there, perhaps my child may play tricks with it. He left the handkerchief, and went to where he resorted. It is the same handkerchief the officer found.

Q. What was in it - A. I don't know; it was in the same state that he left it. On the Friday afterwards I asked my child if the man had been for the handkerchief; she said, no. After that, the girl came over; she said, have you a shirt of Antony's. I said I did not know; I had an handkerchief, if you want it, take it to him.

Prosecutor. The officer took me to the prisoner; the prisoner confessed the robbery. He said he had the property, and if the officer would go with him the next morning he would give him the property.

Q. Did you over find your watch - A. No, the watch has never been found. He would not give up any of the property. I have got my pocket-book, and that is all. This is my pocket-book.

Q. to Bowden. Now, produce the two pocket-books - A. I have three altogether; the third pocket-book has duplicates in it. This is Captain Plaxton 's pocket-book; it was inside of a flannel shirt in the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I had Captain Plaxton 's pocket-book, because a young fellow gave it me. The other pocket-book is none of mine.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-22

22. THOMAS BROADHOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , a pair of tongs, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Argent Keemish .

ARGENT KEEMISH. I keep the King's Head in Pudding-lane . On the 30th of October, the prisoner came to my house and called for some beer; at the time he was drinking the beer he was pointed out as a notorious bad character, by a person who lodged in the house, and spoke of him as having robbed me before, which induced me to set a person to watch him, On his leaving the house, he was followed a few yards; the next witness saw he had something under his coat; he brought him back, and I took this pair of tongs from under his coat; they are my property.

JOHN HORSEY . I was at work at Mr. Keemish's door. I saw the prisoner come out with something under his coat; I followed him, and asked him to help me to strike a ladder; he said he could not stop; then I told him he must go back with me. I walked him back. Mr. Keemish came and took the tongs from him.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-23

23. WILLIAM TONGUE and ANN HESELDINE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , eighteen pounds weight of soap, value 15 s. three pounds weight of coffee, value 6 s. three pounds weight of tea, value 1 l. seventeen pounds weight of sugar, value 17 s. two pounds four ounces weight of currants, value 1 s. 6 d. one ounce of allspice, value 3 d. and one ounce weight of ginger, value 3 d. the property of George Dunman .

And THREE OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, stating it to be the property of different persons.

SAMUEL HAMER . I am solicitor in a commission of bankruptcy issued against George Dunman. I have the commission here; the commission is dated 11th of October, against George Dunman, of Aldgate High-street , tea-dealer and chapman , 1812. I can speak to the assignment of it. The assignees appointed were John Travers and Joseph Raw ; they were appointed on the 6th of November; the 6th of November it was superceded. The assignees were chosen by the creditors.

JAMES PALMER . I am in the employment of John Biley , he is a messenger of bankrupts.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Tongue - A. I do. I gave him the warrant, and gave him directions to take possession of the effects of George Dunman , as assistant to Mr. Biley.

Q. What was the duty of the prisoner when he had so taken possession - A. His duty was to take possession of the property as assistant to Mr. Biley. I put this man in possession on the day the commission opened, on the 12th of October; the same afternoon I gave him the warrant.

ANN WHITTAKER . I am servant to Mr. Dunman. I remained in the house after the bankruptcy.

Q. Were you there when the prisoner, Tongue, came as assistant to the messenger to take possession - A. Yes. He slept in the house. On the 6th of November I observed a bag of tea in the closet in the room in which he slept. I informed Mr. Fairbrother of it; he was the person that was selling off the stock for the assignees. This was Saturday. On the next day (Sunday), about a quarter after four, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop; at that time. Ann Heseldine came to see Tongue. This was the third Sunday upon which she had come.

RICHARD FAIRBROTHER . I was sent into the house of Dunman to sell the stock, by the order of John Travers , one of the assignees on the 5th of October; that day week Tongue came, on the 12th; he remained there until he was taken up, on Saturday the 7th of November. I looked in the prisoners room; I found a bag of tea there, in the closet, in Tongue's room.

Q. How much did that bag contain - A. About a pound and a half; I marked the bag with a pen and ink D. I derected Kinnersley, the officer, to watch; in consequence of the information of Kinnersley, I went to the female prisoner; she had been searched before I went. I went to her lodging; she said,

she would disclose every thing. I afterwards saw the prisoner Tongue, he owned Heseldine had been to see him that day.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. On the 7th of November, I was stationed at the back door of Mr. Dunman's house, in Petticoat-lane; there is a window there which enabled me to see what was going on in the warehouse. I saw Tongue walk along the warehouse; he had a candle in his hand, and two bundles; he came and opened the back door of the house in Petticoat-lane, when he opened the door, he gave Heseldine two parcels under her blue mantle; she then came out; I followed her into Aldgate High-street; I stopped her there. I told her I was an officer; she made great resistance. I shewed her my authority; she submitted then. I searched her, and found eighteen pounds of soap upon her, a pound and a half of tea, a pound of coffee, and five pounds of sugar. I asked her where she lived; at last I went with her to her lodgings. We went down stairs to a lower apartment; she said there was nothing there. She then took me up stairs, there I found tea, sugar, nutmegs, cloves, plumbs, raisins, and currants; after that I returned to the house where the prisoner Tongue was; I told Tongue. I had taken Heseldine in custody, and had taken her to the Compter; he said, he was sorry for it; he gave it her; he was guilty. Heseldine told me the mam lodged in the house where I found these things, and he had give her the property. Heseldine opened the door of the house with the key she took out of her pocket, and with her key she opened the drawers in the room where the things were found. This is a bag of tea I took from Heseldine.

Fairbrother. That is the bag of tea I found in the closet in Tongue's room; there is my mark upon it.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; called four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

TONGUE, GUILTY , aged 68.

HESELDINE, GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-24

24. JOSEPH PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a coat, value 2 l. a shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Adams .

JOHN ADAMS . I am a coachman ; I drive the Windsor coach. I lost my coat on the 17th of November, from the Bolt and Tun-yard, in Fleet-street , about twenty minutes past two in the day time; my coat was inside of the coach; I employed a man to drive my coach from the White Horse cellar to the Bolt and Tun, Fleet-street. I went down to the Bolt and Tun, Fleet-street, pulled off my coat and chucked it into the coach, in the Bolt and Tun-yard. I then went down to Covent Garden, met the coach, looked inside of the coach, and all over the coach, and could not find my coat any where; there were six passengers in the coach. I laid my coat on the cushion when I left it in the coach. I asked the coachman what had become of my coat; he told me he did not know. A young man, who is in court, said he saw the prisoner take it. All I know, I lost my coat.

GEORGE SLADE . I am a coachman. On Wednesday, the 17th of November, I asked the coachman that drove for Mr. Adams to give me a cast to Charing Cross; I asked him to let me ride by the side of him, and put my little boy inside; he gave me leave. My little boy is seven years old. When I put him in, I saw a drab coat on the front seat inside; soon after that, I got up outside of the coach myself, and several people got inside of the coach, among whom was the prisoner, he got inside; But previous to the coach going out of the yard, I saw the prisoner get out of the coach on the near side of the coach, with a drab coat on his arm; he then walked out of the yard, and I saw no more of him; I described him to Mr. Adams, by which means he found the man, I believe.

Q. How long was he inside of the coach - A. I suppose not more than seven or eight minutes; I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM POUREY . I am a journeyman pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Cotterill, Shoe-lane. On the 17th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner pledged this coat with me; I lent him twelve shillings upon it; I am sure he is the man. This is the coat.

THOMAS MASTERS . I took the prisoner into custody; I searched him, and found this shawl in his pocket.

Prosecutor. It is my coat, and the shawl is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-25

25. WATSON HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , two shoulders of mutton, value 12 s. the property of George Laban , John Hewitt , and Joseph Warrington .

JOHN HEWITT . I am a butcher ; my partners names are George Leyburn , and Joseph Warrington .

Mr. Adolphus. It is Laban and Warrington in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-26

26. SAMUEL ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a great coat, value 1 l. the property of Walter Boraskil Lonsdale .

WALTER BORASKIL LNSDALE . I am an insurance broker . I lost my great coat on Saturday last, in the afternoon, in the Subscription-room at Lloyd's coffee-house . I can only identify my property.

JOHN BARNET . I am a constable. On Saturday, between four and five in the afternoon, near dusk, I was sent for to Lloyd's coffee-house; when I came there the prisoner was there, with this coat on his back; the prisoner was given into my charge; I took the coat off his back.

WILLIAM RICKARDS HIGLOW . I am a waiter at the Subscription-room at Lloyd's. Between four and five in the afternoon, one of our young men observed to me that the prisoner looked rather suspicious, he had on a great coat, it was too long for him; he went out of the door; I followed him down stairs, overtook him in Cornhill, and brought him back.

Prosecutor. That is my coat; I saw it on the back of the prisoner myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very intoxicated at the time.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-27

27. CATHERINE KEENE was indicted for that she, on the 26th of July , had divers forged and counterfeit notes in her custody and possession .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-28

28. CATHERINE KEENE was indicted for that she, on the 26th of July , feloniously did dispose of and put away a forged 1 l. note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-29

29. FREDERICK HOFERMANN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , twenty-nine pounds weight of raw sugar, value 9 s. the property of George Dettmar and Henry Dettmar .

GEORGE DETTMAR . I am a sugar-baker ; my partner's name is Henry Dettmar. On the 6th of November, when I came from the country to my warehouse, I was informed by my servant that I was robbed of some sugar.

JOHN DETTMAR. I saw the prisoner throw a bag down; I picked the bag up, and called stop thief; he was stopped.

HENRY VASS . I belong to this sugar-house. I was up stairs about five o'clock in the morning; I saw some sugar was taken from the heap in the warehouse. In the afternoon I went into warehouse again, I heard a man come up the steps; in about a minute he went down again. In about five minutes afterwards, I saw the prisoner coming up the yard; I went after him; I found him in the kitchen, sitting smoking his pipe; I went into the boiling-house; I saw a bag of sugar there. I felt it, and saw it was sugar; then I went and asked the man to catch him; a little while after I heard the men call out stop thief; I stopped the prisoner.

Q. Did you detect him with any sugar - A. No.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I produce the sugar; it was given me at the office.

Q. to John Dettmar . Is that the bag of sugar that the prisoner dropped - A. Yes, it is; it is raw soft sugar.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentleman of the jury, my distress in an unguarded moment caused me to do this error; I have therefore subjected myself to punishment; I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-30

30. JOHN RITCHEY was indicted for that he, on the 8th of July , without lawful excuse had in his custody and possession, three forged 1 l. bank notes, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-31

31. JOHN RITCHEY was indicted for that he, on the 8th of July , did forge a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away, a forged bank note, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-32

32. HARRY GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 22d of July , a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away, a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, stating the instrument to be a promissory note instead of a bank note.

GEORGE WARMAN . Q. Were you introduced to the prisoner any time in July last - A. Yes, I was. I saw him at the Cock, the top of Shire-lane.

Q. Were you employed by any person - A. Yes, by Mr. Avory, on the part of the bank. I met him first at the top of Shire-lane: that was on the 19th of July last. I found him there. I went with his wife to the top of Shire-lane; he was standing at the top of the lane, and we spoke together. I asked him how he did; he asked me how I did; I said, I was very well. He asked then, how Henry Myers did; I said he was very well when I saw him last; that was on Sunday, and I was very sorry to see him there; by there, I meaned Newgate; that I wanted some screens of him, meaning bank notes. We walked together until we came to a house in Carey-street. We went in, and drank together. He said he could let me have a score if I wanted them. I said I would have two first, to try them. He came out and agreed to me the next morning at eleven o'clock, at the corner of Carey-street; by eleven o'clock on the next Wednesday, the 21st of July.

We parted that day. I communicated to Avory what had passed. The next morning I met Avory and Wainwright at the Green Man in Shire-lane. Avory gave to me a one-pound bank note, which he marked, to buy two forged notes of the prisoner. Avory and Wainwright went to the house where the prisoner and me had been the evening before, and I went to the corner of Carey-street, according to promise.

Q. On the 21st - A. Yes. I met Griffiths there according to promise; he gave me two one-pound notes; I gave him the same one pound note which Avory had given to me.

Q. Had any thing been said by him what price you were to pay for them - A. Ten shillings a-piece for them; that was mentioned the evening before, the 19th of June. Me and the prisoner Griffiths went to the house where we had been the evening before; that is in Carey-street.

Q. Was Avory and Wainwright there - A. Yes; they were there, and I saw they were drinking together, and Griffiths and me drunk together. We then came out, and I and the prisoner agreed to meet at the Three Herrings in Bell-yard. That was to be the next evening at ten o'clock. Then I went to the house where Wainwright and Avory were, and shewed to them the two notes that I had purchased.

Q. Were they for you - A. No; I took them to Mr. Westwood, and delivered them to him; he desired me to mark them.

Q. Were they marked before you parted with them - A. I parted with them to Mr. Westwood, they were not out of my sight before I marked them with my name.

Q. Look at these two notes - A. These notes were marked by me before they went out of my sight; I am sure these are the two notes I received of the prisoner. On the following evening, I met the prisoner again at the Three Herrings; Avory and Wainwright were both there, they were not apparently in my company, they were in the same room. I met the prisoner there, and the prisoner said, he did not like the note I had given to him the morning before, it had been marked by some of the small bankers: I said, it would make no difference to me, I gave him twenty shillings in silver for it, and he gave me the note back. Then we came out, and agreed to meet the next morning at the Green Man in Shire-lane; I walked with Griffiths to the end of Cary-street, and then we parted. I then met Avory at the end of Bell-yard; I told him that Griffiths had returned me the note, and I had given him twenty shillings for it. Then on the next morning I went with Avory to Dickens's house, the officer in Gray's-inn-lane, where Avory searched me. He gave me that one-pound note and a dollar. The one-pound note Avory gave me to by more notes of Griffiths, at the Green Man, in Shire-lane; then Avory and me went to the Green Man in Shire-lane; this was on the 22nd of July. I went there along with Avory, and had my breakfast, and change of a note to pay for my breakfast. I told the landlord to keep it.

Q. How much did your breakfast come to - A. Five pence. Then soon after Harry Griffiths came in; we drank together, and then came out, and going up Shire-lane, Griffiths gave to me a one-pound note, a bad one; I gave him ten shillings in silver. We then walked together until we came to the end of Carey-street, then we stood and talked some time, and then went to the Five Bells, in Chancery-lane. We drank together, and he gave me a direction to find him any time if I should want him.

Q. What did you spend at the Five Bells - A. Five pence there, and when we drank at the Green Man I paid two pence towards the reckoning at the Green Man.

Q. Then altogether you spent a shilling at the two houses - A. Yes. We then came out, and parted. I then went with Avory to the Black Dog in Gray's-inn-lane, where he searched me; he found on me a one-pound note and fourteen shillings.

Q. Do you mean the one-pound note that you received of Griffiths - A. Yes, and fourteen shillings and sixpence in silver. We then went to Mr. Westwood.

Q. Had you no money in your pocket but what had been given you by Avory - A. No. On the 27th of July, the prisoner's wife came to me; I bought a note of her; I gave eleven shillings for it. On the 27th of July the prisoner came to me at the Guy earl of Warwick, Gray's-inn-lane; that was in consequence of an appointment with Griffiths's wife; he met me there. We sat and drank together some time, and agreed to meet on the 28th, the next evening; he did not come on the 28th according to promise; his wife came on the 29th, in the evening; she told me her husband should come. Soon after, he came again, on the 29th; he was to meet me on the 29th; he came.

Q. Were you in company with him when he was apprehended - A. Yes; he was apprehended by Wainwright and Dickens.

Q. When Avory searched you he found a one-pound note - A. Yes, and fourteen shillings and sixpence. I put my name on that note at Mr. Westwood's.

Q. Look at that note, and see whether there is your mark upon it - A. No, sir, that is not my mark.

MR. HARMER. Q. Do you know Mr. Bellamy, the clerk of the Oxford assizes - A. I do.

Q. Did you examine that copy - A. I did, I saw him sign it. The record was brought by the clerk. I examined the copy with the record when it was in the hands of Mr. Bellamy. This is the copy of the record: in the 50th year of his Majesty's reign, Charles Warman , late of the parish of Worcester, labourer, was charged with having stolen a cow, price 15 l. the property of Henry Bateman , and the jurors say that the said Charles Warman is guilty, and the person indicted with him is not guilty.

Mr. Adolphus, Q. to Warman. What place are you a native of - A. I was born in Birmingham. I left Birmingham quite young. I get my living here by wine portering and shoe-making. I continued in that line a considerable time.

Q. How long is it ago since you went into Worcestershire

- A. It is four or five years since I went there.

Q. How long had you been there before you left it - A. I was there two years or better.

Q. Do you remember being present at any assizes in Worcester - A Yes. I stood at the bar. I was tried, sir, and when I went out of court I went to jail, and staid there two years and better.

Q. You know Mr. Bateman, of Worcester, do not you - A. Yes, he lost a cow. I was in the court the same day as he was; and after he had said a good deal about me, I was not allowed to go away.

Q. Who was the judge - A. I forget.

Q. Who did you serve in the wine trade while you were in London - A. Mr. Moss, and nobody else.

Q. Did not you serve any person in Coventry-street - A. Yes, Mr. Cole. I was there for a month.

Q. You parted with him on excellent terms - A. Very fair.

Q. Did you never apply to him for a character - A. No, I did not want a character of him.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about bottles of wine before you left him - A. Yes; he missed some wine, but I did not have them.

Q. Did not you confess to him that you stole his wine - A. No, I did not.

Q. Mr. Cole is in the parlour. Did not Mr. Cole accuse you of stealing two bottles, and you acknowledged having them - A. I acknowledged the bottles were there, but I did not have them.

Q. Did not you admit to him that you had stolen the wine - A. I am sure I forget now whether I did or not. The property was there, I never had it.

Q. How long have you been in town since you left your comfortable quarters in Worcester - A. Ever since the 6th of June last; I came up to town and got a place at Mr. Clark's, a wine-merchant, in Maiden-lane. I think I went to Mr. Clark's on the 14th of June. I arrived in town on the 4th; I staid at Mr. Clark's until the latter end of the summer; it was before I laid an information a long time. When I bought the notes of Griffiths was last July. It is eighteen months since I came up from Worcester. I have been in London two years next May.

Q. Who did you serve after you left this gentleman - A. Then I went to Mr. Perry, a wine merchant in Warwick-row; he deals in wine, spirits, and is a publican.

Q. He keeps the Goat and Compasses, does not he - A. I never knew the sign. I lived there three weeks.

Q. Who did you serve afterwards - A. Then I went to my mother's home, and worked at shoe-making. She lived then in Holborn.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with Myers - A. I cannot say, a long time before I left Moss's house.

Q. Myers was a practiced house-breaker; did not you know he was a thief all the time of your acquaintance with him - A. Yes, not all the time.

Q. How were you introduced to Griffiths - A. By the recommendation of Henry Myers .

Q. Was it by the introduction of Myers or his wife that you were introduced to Griffiths - A. He said his wife should go to Henry Griffiths .

Q. Was any letter or note written - A. Not as I know off. I went to the Green Man, and he was to come there; it was Myers told me he should come there.

Q. Where was Myers at that time - A. In Newgate, under sentence of death.

Q. Did you ever see that note - A. No.

Q. At the time that you were introduced to Griffiths were you in the service of any wine merchant - A. No, I was not; I pretended to be and named Mr. Thompson as my employer in Fetter-lane, I stated that to Myers, his wife, and Griffiths; that was not true.

Q. Upon that they introduced you to Henry Griffiths - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you also state to him, or some of them, that you had a private still and could supply gin at a cheap price - A. No, I left gin at Griffiths's house, it was not out of a private still, it was bought at a shop; I kept it at Mrs. Baker's up at the Seven Dials. The direction he gave me to find him is there.

Q. You had never seen Griffiths before the 19th of July - A. No.

Q. And then you dealed in bank notes with him - A. Yes.

Q. How came this gin to be left - A. I did not agree for the gin to be left; I took it there, and left it for him.

Q. Which gin you said came out of a private still, it was not true, you had bought it elsewhere - A. Yes.

Q. You met Griffiths on the 19th of July, and had a conversation about bank notes - A. Yes, sir, there were several things occured, I cannot remember now; there was nothing mentioned about gin that time, the gin was left, that was after the Friday as I had seen him on the Thursday; the 19th was on the Monday, nothing passed about gin or a private still then. I saw him on the next morning; on the 21st I saw him again.

Q. Did any thing pass about gin or a private still then - A. I gave him a bottle of gin then.

Q. On the 21st the officers were all present, were not they - A. Yes.

Q. Then they saw you - A. I gave it him as we sat in the box.

Q. Could not the officers see that - A. They might for what I know, I cannot say they did; I delivered to him then a bottle of gin. I saw him the next morning.

Q. At which time was any thing said about a private still - A. There was nothing said about a private still.

Q.You have admitted already that you said you had the gin from a private still - A. No, I have not.

Q. You never mentioned to him that you could get gin at a cheap price - A. No, I told him I could get gin.

Q. Was it for money - A. We were to whack it; he was to have the gin of me for nothing until he

sold it, and then we were to part the money. I was to buy it at the retail price.

Q. And you left this gin at this lady's house in the Seven Dials. Upon your oath, did not you tell him that you could get gin from a private still at ten shillings a gallon, and he was to pay you in bank notes, and now you say you were to get the gin at the retail price - A. Yes, the price was not mentioned; when the gin was sold it was to be shared what he sold it for. I was to buy it and pay for it.

Q. Suppose he sold fifty shillings worth, were you to have twenty-five shillings, and he twenty-five shillings - A. That was not agreed; the money that he sold it for was to be shared between us.

Q. What quantity did you leave at the woman's house - A. I left two quart wine bottles.

Q. When was that - A. I think it was on a Friday, I am not sure.

Q. How often had you seen him before that - A. I think I had seen him three times before that.

Q. How long before this had you been acquainted with Avory and Wainwright - A. I have been acquainted with Wainwright a long time.

Q. How long have you been employed about this particular business - A. I cannot say, it might be a month and more; if I could tell you exactly I would.

Q. Have you detected any other persons in this offence - A. No.

Q. Do you expect any benefit from detecting persons dealing in bad bank notes - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with Wainwright - A. A matter of eight or nine years.

Q. That was when you were in town before - A. Yes.

Q. You kept up some correspondence with Wainwright when you were in the country - A. No.

Q. Had you told him before this time that you began to deal with Griffiths, of your journey to Worcester - A. I told him that I had been convicted.

Q. Then perhaps you had mentioned it to Mr. Westwood - A. It was not mentioned till afterwards I had bought of Griffiths; Mr. Westwood knew it before.

Q. You went before the Grand Jury - A. We did.

Q. Did he knew it a week before - A. I dare say he did, it might be more or less, I cannot say.

Q. Did your friend, Myers, know of it - A. Yes, he knew it.

Q. On the 19th of July you had never seen Harry Griffiths before that - A. No.

Q. Was Wainwright and Avory with you before you went into the public-house with Griffiths - A.No.

Q. That is the time you say he was a perfect stranger to you, he agreed to supply you with forged bank notes - A. Yes.

Q. On the 19th of July, that was the matter you went into at once - A. Yes, it was.

Q. What is the sign of the house that you went into in Carey-street, can you remember it - A. It was in Carey-street, near Clare-market, it is a public-house in that turning that leads up to the china warehouse.

Q. The officers were not with you there - A. No.

Q. You met the next day at the corner of the street - A. Yes, I met Mrs. Griffiths at the Green Man; I went to the house in Carey-street with Avory and Wainwright.

Q. They did not search you then to see what was about you - A. No.

Q. Therefore you might have had two forged bank notes in your pocket and they knew nothing about it; that might be so - A. Yes.

Q. They had not searched you then - A. No.

Q. They gave you a one-pound note - A. Yes.

Q. But they did not search you to see whether you had brought a forged note or no - A. No.

Q. You parted with the one-pound note to Harry Griffiths , you got two forged notes?

Q. You went back to Avory and Wainwright directly, did you shew them the two forged notes - A. Yes.

Q. Pray how came it that Avory and Wainwright did not go immediately and seize the man - A. I don't know indeed.

Q. The note was marked on purpose that they should know it again. Did not you say to them you had better go and take him now, the thing is done - A. No; I went to Mr. Westwood.

Q. The note was marked there by you, that note never having been out of your possession - A. Yes; the next evening I saw Griffiths again, Avory and Wainwright was with me then.

Q. Why did not you tell them to take him then, how came you not to do that - A. I do not know.

Q. He returned to you the note that had been marked by the officers, and the mark that he pointed out to you was the mark that had been put upon it - A. I believe it was; I did not take notice of it. He said I do not like the note you gave me last night, it has been marked by some small bankers; I put the note in my pocket; I kept it the whole night myself, and then gave it into the hands of the publican in the morning.

Q. Now, upon the 22nd they gave you more money, they gave you back the same note and a dollar, was the dollar marked - A. No.

Q. Griffiths had the marked note a day and a night before it came to you with this complaint, he had it on the 20th, on the 21st in the evening he returned it; these are all the notes, and there is your hand writing on the back of it - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to write upon this note bought of a stranger - A. Because I did not know his name then.

Q. How came you to write upon it Henry Griffiths - A. He gave me his name afterwards.

Q. How came you to write upon the forged note bought of a stranger - A. Because when I first bought it I did not know his name, I took it to Mr. Westwood; that is the reason I wrote upon it bought of a stranger, and after I knew his name writ upon it Henry Griffiths .

Q. You bought two notes, did not you - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to write Henry Griffiths upon one, and upon the other bought of a stranger: how came you not to run your pen through it - A. I cannot say.

Q. The whole of the hand writing is your, is it not - A. I only wrote my name.

Q. Who wrote the other - A. Mr. Avory might write it, it was writ upon in my sight at Mr. Westwood's office.

Q. Do you mean to say the words bought of a stranger, and the name of Charles Warman below, do you mean to say they are one hand writing - A. Bought of a stranger and Henry Griffiths are written by a different hand, and Charles Warman is my writing.

Q. Bought of a stranger is your writing - A. Yes.

Q. What did you mean by telling me that Avory might write it - A. I am sure I cannot rightly say.

Q. You have told me every syllable, there is your own writing, do you mean to swear it, every syllable is your own writing - A. I can swear to my own name.

Q. Is every syallable there your own writing, say yes or no - A. I can swear to my own name.

Q. Upon your oath man, you have sworn both ways already; bought of a stranger, are them words or not your own writing, and Henry Griffiths - A. Yes, they are.

Q. Then what did you mean by telling me they might be Avory's. Now, I ask you how came you to write bought of a stranger - A. Because I did not know his name then.

Q. Upon the 20th of June did not you know Henry Griffiths 's name; who did Henry Myers say he was going to recommend you to - A. I did not know his name.

Q. When you wrote Henry Griffiths who told you his name - A. His own writing.

Q. Do you mean to say that you wrote this two several times - A. Yes.

Q. How long was the first from the second - A. The 20th to the 22nd.

Q. If Griffiths was a stranger to you, how came you to write the name Henry Griffiths if you did not know that on the 22nd in the evening - A. On the 22nd I wrote his name Henry Griffiths .

Q. You wrote a stranger on the 20th - A. I don't know I wrote upon both, they might be pinned together and I might write upon one.

Q. You told my friend you writ upon both before ever they were out of your sight; how came you to say that they were pinned together - A. I wrote upon the note.

Q. Did you write upon both these notes the first time you went to Mr. Westwood or did you not - A. I am sure I forget.

Q. Do you remember what your deposition was a quarter of a year ago, that you writ upon them both at one time, or did you not - A. I am sure I cannot rightly say; they were pinned together I know.

Q. Now, sir, take these notes in your hand, and tell me what time elapsed after you wrote a stranger, and Henry Griffiths - A. I wrote his name on the 22nd, I did not know his name before the 22nd, he gave me direction when we were at the Five Bells.

Q. Monday was the 19th - A. Yes.

Q. Tuesday you saw him again - A. Yes; Wednesday evening I saw him again, then I gave him some gin.

Q. Who was you to leave this gin for at this woman's - A. I was not to leave any that present time.

Q. And now you pretend that you were introduced without knowing what name of the person was. Do you mean that you were introduced to a man's wife without knowing her name, and that his name never passed between you and the officers until that day - A. No.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with Avory - A. About six or seven months.

Q. That was after your return from Worcester. Have you got Griffiths direction - A. No; Mr. Westwood had it.

Q. Who introduced you to Avory - A. Wainwright.

Q. You told Avory at your first introduction of your unfortunate affair at Worcester - A. No, not when first I was introduced, it was soon after.

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . I am clerk to the Solicitor of the Bank.

Q. Was it with your knowledge that the last witness was employed to deal with the prisoner - A. It was.

Q. Did the last witness come to you with two other witnesses, and give you these two notes - A. He did, on the 20th of July; I know Avory came with him, and I think Wainwright did; he had before communicated to me. The introduction he wrote on one of the notes bought of a stranger on the 20th of July, and his name Charles Warman . I think the writing of the other was done by Avory, in the presence of Warman, and in my presence he wrote bought of blank on the 20th of July, Warman signed it then.

Q. You think the previous words were written by Avory - A. I think it was; the blank was a suggestion of mine, because he stated he did not know the man's name.

Q. Now, on this, the word stranger is taken out, the words Henry Griffiths is put over it, when was that done - A. On the 22nd of July, and then the other note the blank was filled up with Henry Griffiths , from the 20th of July to the 22nd; the notes remained in my possession.

Q. On what day was that one-pound note brought to you - A. On the 22nd of July, at that time he communicated to me the name of Henry Griffiths . I received this note of Avory, in Warman's presence; Avory communicated to me that his name was Henry Griffiths .

COURT. You received that note of Avory in Warman's presence - A. Yes, that was marked by Avory, and left in my custody; they have been in my office the principal part of the time under my own lock and key; I know them from the marks that are upon them to be the notes that I so received.

Mr. Adolphus. This third note was given to you

by Avory. J. A. 22nd July, 1813, is written upon it. Had you seen Warman before this day the notes were produced to you - A. I think I saw him once before, he came to me with Avory, I think two or three days before the 20th of July, and on the 20th the notes were brought to me.

Q. Then it is not true that this plan was in agitation thirteen days - A. I don't think it was a week before.

Q. Pray sir, who first told you of the conviction of this man at Worcestershire - A. He himself, after he had bought the two first notes; I am not, sure whether it was not on the 22nd. The prisoner was not committed until August.

JOHN AVORY . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street office.

Q. Did you make any agreement with Warman to detect any person dealing in bad bank notes - A. Yes, with Warman, by the order of Mr. Westwood. I agreed that Warman should detect some persons; I introduced Warman to Mr. Westwood I think on Monday, the 18th of July, or the 19th.

Q. On Tuesday, the 20th of July, in consequence of any appointment with Warman did you go any where with Warman - A. I went to the Grange in Carey-street. William Wainwright went with me. After Wainwright had been there five or six minutes Warman came in with the prisoner at the bar, they went into the tap-room and had something to drink.

Q. Had you before that given Warman something - A. I gave him a one-pound note in the Green Man public-house, Shire-lane; I marked that note. That is the note that I gave him to purchase with.

Q. Then after that you saw them in company together at the tap-room in the Grange - A. Yes.

Q. How long - A. They might he in there five or six minutes, they drank together, and they went out together, and in the space of five or ten minutes Warman came back; he then produced two one-pound notes, they were taken to Mr. Westwood, and they were marked in my presence.

COURT. Who were they marked by - A. By me and Warman.

Q. Which of them has your hand writing - A. Bought of a stranger, 20th of July, Henry Griffiths , is my hand writing. He said, he bought them of a man, he did not know his name; it was written bought of a stranger upon this one only; I believe it is my hand writing what is signed Charles Warman . The other is bought of blank, he did not know the man's name; bought of blank is my writing; I writ upon both.

Q. And Charles Warman signed that - A. I believe he did; that was on the 20th. On the 21st I saw the prisoner again at the Three Herrings in Bell-yard; Wainwright was with me.

Mr. Gurney. Did you go there by appointment with Warman - A. Yes, I did; Warman and the prisoner were in company drinking together.

Q. Did you see any thing pass from one to the other - A. I saw Warman give to Griffiths some silver, I saw the prisoner give Warman a note; it appeared to be a bank note. After this they went out together; I went out after them, and Wainwright with me went out after them.

Q. Did you see them together in the street - A. No, not at that time. I saw Warman a very few minutes after that at the top of Bell-yard, he shewed me that good note that I gave him to purchase with; he said he was to meet him the next morning at breakfast time, at the Green Man public-house, Shire-lane.

Q. The next morning, the 29th, where did you first meet Warman - A. At Dickens's, in Gray's-inn-lane; I searched him.

Q. At the time he left Dickens's what money had he about him - A. A one-pound note and a dollar. I then went with him to the Green Man, there he had a basin of tea, and a quartern of gin they had together; he changed the note with the publican by my direction.

Q. Did you give directions to the publican about that note - A. Not at that time, after it was changed. The prisoner came in about ten minutes; when the prisoner came in he joined company with Warman, they drank together; he paid his reckoning; they went out together. He paid two-pence towards the gin; they went out together; I followed them; they went talking together up Shire-lane into Carey-street and there they talked together some time. I followed them, and as they kept talking together I went round Chichester-rents; when I went round into Chancery-lane I saw Wainwright opposite of where the prisoner and Warman were walking together; Wainwright was watching them. I went to Wainwright; he told me they were gone into the Five Bells. I went after them, and waited until they came out. I saw them coming as if from there, they went a little way up Chancery-lane and parted.

Q. When they parted did you follow Warman - A. Yes; I met Warman in Holborn, he and I went to the Black Dog in Gray's-inn-lane; I there searched him again; I found upon him a bad one-pound note and fourteen shillings and sixpence in silver. I went with Warman to Mr. Westwood; I delivered that note to Mr. Westwood; I marked it before I parted with it.

Mr. Adolphus. How long have you been acquainted with Warman - A. Wainwright recommended me to him; he told me he knew somebody that passed away bad notes.

Q. What did Warman mention about himself - A. He told me he knew a man of the name of Henry Myers , he knew very well that he was in the habit of passing bad notes, he had offered him some. He told me nothing about himself.

Q. Nothing about his adventures in town or country - A. No.

Q. This was in April - A. Yes.

Q. And then Henry Myers was the object, since then he got into another secret - A. He never mentioned any other person - A. He went to Henry Myers in Newgate; he came to me; he said, Myers was to recommend him to a man that would sell him some. On the 20th I saw him in company with Griffiths; I had never seen Griffiths before to my knowledge.

Q. In September you found a bill against Griffiths; had Warman told you of his adventure then - A. No; the first I heard of it Mr. Westwood got it out of him.

Q. Was that before you found a bill - A. I cannot say.

Q. You found the bill in September sessions - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not hear the indictment was under some difficulty respecting of its being tried, and was not you for the first time informed that this man had been capitally convicted in the country - A. I think it was.

Q. Then it is not true that within a month this man told you that he was a capital convict - A. No, it is not true; I never knew nothing of it until Mr. Westwood inform me of it; since Warman has acknowledged it he has told me of it, not before.

Q. The first night that you see him in company with Griffiths he went out and was absent from you five or ten minutes - A. Yes, some minutes.

COURT. When - A. When the two first notes were purchased.

Q. You did not see your marked bank note again, it was full twenty-four hours in Warman's possession, how it got there you could know nothing, more than what he told you - A. No, not any thing more.

Q. Is it quite possible he might have got these other notes from some other man - A. I do not know; I was in company with him all the morning, he was not in company with any body else.

Q. You had not searched him so as to know they were not already in his pocket - A. No, I had not searched him.

Q. On the morning of the 22nd you met this man at Dickens's, how long were you there - A. A very little time; I there searched him as close as I could.

Q. When he came to you and said he had sold one-pound note for two bad ones, it did not occur to you that was the time to take him - A. No, not till I had got directions.

Q. How often was it that you saw Warman and Griffiths in company together; did you see a bottle of gin handed - A. No, I never saw a bottle of gin handed.

Q. At the time you saw a paper that you supposed to be a bank note passed could any thing pass without your seeing - A. Nothing could.

Q. Therefore it is not true that a bottle of gin could pass without your seeing it - A. I do not think it could; I sat directly opposite at the time this transaction was going on, from the 20th to the 22nd of July. He gave old Mrs. Myers some gin to take to her son. That is all I saw pass between them.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . Q. You are occasionally employed by the police office - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in company with Avory on the 20th of July - A. Yes, at the Green Man public-house, Shire-lane. I went there for the purpose of assisting him in the detection of the prisoner.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come there - A. No. I saw Avory mark a pound note, and gave it to Charles Warman ; Warman said if he would go to a public-house in Carey-street, I believe it is the Grange public-house, we went there; we had some porter there. In a short time the prisoner came in in company with Charles Warman ; in a short time they went out together, and in a short time Warman returned, he brought two forged notes; we went to the solicitor of the Bank's house. The next night I saw them in company again about twenty minutes before ten, at the Three Herrings in Bell-yard; I saw the prisoner and Charles Warman .

Q. Did you see any thing pass between them - A. No, I did no.

Q.On the following day, the 22nd, did you see them again - A. I did, a little before nine in the morning. I sat on a bench in Carey-street outside of the door; I saw them pass me on the opposite side of the way. I saw the prisoner turn down Shire-lane to go towards the Green Man.

Q. Had you seen Warman before that - A. I do not know that I had. I kept sitting in the same place until I saw Warman and the prisoner coming out of Shire-lane again, they both went towards Chancery-lane? I walked after them, and between Star-yard and Chancery-lane they stopped together. I thought if the prisoner saw me a second time he might have suspicion of me; I ran up Star-yard, I ran round Chichester-rents to the corner of Breem's-buildings, and I saw the prisoner and Warman go towards Fleet-street a little way, they went down Chancery-lane towards Fleet-street, they went in that direction, but they went into the Five Bells public-house. I ran home and changed my coat, and went to the Black Dog Gray's-inn-lane. I saw Avory take from Warman fourteen shillings and sixpence; Avory said he was satisfied.

Mr. Adolphus. When did you first hear of Warman's adventure of Worcester - A. After he had made the first purchase of Harry Griffiths .

MR. THOMAS. I keep the Green Man Ship-yard, Shire-lane. On the 20th of July, Warman changed a one-pound note with me; he desired me to keep it until he had silver for it, then he would give it me. I afterwards gave that note to Dickens some days afterwards.

SAMUEL DICKENS. I am one of the Bow-street patrols. On the 24th I received a one-pound note of the last witness.

THOMAS GLOVER . Q. You are one of the inspectors of bank notes - A. I am.

Q. Look at that bank note bought on the 22nd, is that a genuine or a forged note - A. It is a forged note altogether; the signature is forged, the paper, and every part is forged.

Q. Are these two forged in all respects - A. They are; they appear to be impressions from the same plate, and filled up with the same hand writing.

(The note read.)

(The pardon of Charles Warman produced.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, having a clear conscience of the charge permit me to address you. I most solemnly declare my innocence of dealing in any forged notes whatever; I have no doubt in my own mind Warman

has done this either to obtain money from the bank solicitor, or a permanent situation in their employ, be it for which of these it is swearing my life away. I grant my character has been impeach, that imputation does not resemble the present charge. And as it appears by the officers and Warman, that this is a premidated business; they have thought proper to select me for a viction, as I have been unfortunate they thought they might assail me with impunity. I feel convinced through a disgraced individual. No prejudice will operate upon the present occasion to my disadvantage; when he states that he was recommended to me his subject was entirely different, as you will see by the purport of this letter in my hand; I have the letter which was sent by his friend Myers.

"Mr. Griffiths, a young man has called upon me, he informs me he is in concern with a private still, he will sell you cheap; yours respectfully H. MYERS. P. S. You may see him every morning at nine o'clock, at the Green Man." This letter was delivered to me by Mary Weston. He wishes to impose upon this honorable court, I trust your lordship will examine the evidence given by Avory and Wainwright, they do not correspond with the evidence of Warman, namely of purchasing forged notes of me; there I drew their premeditated guilt in this business. Their giving Warman a one-pound note for the purchace; why then after they had so far completed a fair case for conviction, why not apprehended me; this I am sure must convince your minds as men of understanding, that you are satisfied no purchase took place. Gentlemen, that this was a premeditated business; another reason shews it, my returning a one-pound note; how inconsistant, can any man believe that for a minute; would not a guilty man have kept the marked note in his own possession, sooner than returning it, this is too glaring a thing; a guilty man could have no difficulty in gitting rid of such a note rather than risk life. Would not a guilty man have destroyed this testimony, but that must rest upon your opinion. I was seized in Gray's-inn-lane, and taken into the shop of a broker, who is in court; who stated that he saw me searched, and what money I had about me, which was seven shillings, was given me back. I hope gentlemen you will clearly weigh the evidence given, and give an impartial verdict. I trust your lordship will consider that no man's life ought to be at stake for such a man as Warman. I by mere accident learned that he was convicted of a felony; I am not the first innocent man that Warman has accused as will appear to the court. I have made every possible enquiry; I have wrote to Worcester to find the man; had I brought the man it would clearly prove that he wanted to swear away an innocent man's life. I was offered by the prosecution a pardon of this charge if I would plead guilty of a crime that would have subjected me to transportation; I could not plead guilty of that offence.

GILES COLE . I live at Woburn-place, Russell-square.

Q. Do you see a person near you that was in your service - A. Yes, Warman, he was in my service two months; I had some suspicion of this man. I found two bottles of gin secreted behind the water tub in the warehouse; he begged my pardon. I discharged him on that account.

Jury's Verdect. We pronounce him NOT GUILTY from the prevarication of the first evidence.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-33

33. HARRY GRIFFITHS was indicted for having forged bank notes in his custody and possession he knowing them to he forged .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-34

34. JOSEPH DREWE MAY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 3d of July , and willingly acted and assisted in forging an order for payment of money for 1732 l. 13 s. 8 d. with intention to defraud our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away, a like forged order, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, with intention to defraud different other persons.

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for disposing of and putting away a forged and false altered bill of exchange with like intention.

NAMES OF THE JURY.

William Baker ,

John Whittingham ,

Joseph Adams ,

John Wright ,

Thomas Cotchett ,

William Sneeth ,

William Simmons ,

John Taylor ,

William Abdy ,

John Stirling ,

Thomas Elmsley ,

Anthony Woodland .

The case was stated by Mr. Attorney General.

RICHARD FORD . I am accomptant for cash at the Victualling office .

Q. Look at that bill, sir, do you inspect the bills after they are made out - A. I do, sir.

Q. Do you recollect any bill being made of the date of that you hold in your hand - A. Yes, the bill was made out on the 5th of May, 1813, at the Victualling office, and it was subject to my inspection.

Q. Have you any entry in any book of the bill which you have in your hand - A. Yes, there.

Q. When that bill was made out what was the sum of it - A.732 l. 13 s. 8 d. That is the sum for which it was issued at the Victualling office, registered May 5, 1813.

COURT. Read the bill as originally made out - A.

"London Victualling office, registered the 5th of May, 1813, No. 2223. August 5, 1813. Mr. Treasurer, We pray you to pay, ninety days after date, to Samuel Kingsford or order, 722 l. 10 s. 8 d. for meal delivered into his Majesty stores at Deptford 19th of April, 1813, as appears by various vouchers properly certified in this office, this day, the 3d of August, 1813. The amount of meal, 722 l. 10 s. 8 d.; interest from this day to the 3d of August, being ninety days, 10 l. 3 s. total 732 l. 13 s. 8 d. accomptant, R. F. that is myself. That is my hand-writing, signed Nicholas Brown , I. Aubin, Nicholas E. Steward. There is the same figures carried out in the margin 732 l. 13 s. 8 d. I delivered it to Mr. Elliott and Paulsgrove personally on the 10th of May.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT . I am in partnership with William Paulsgrove ; we are agents to Samuel Kingsford .

Q. Look at that bill in the hands of Mr. Ford; did you as agent to Mr. Kingsford receive that bill of the Victualling office on the 10th of May last - A. I did. I made this tick at the right hand corner at the top before I entered it in my book. I have the book in which I made the entry.

Q. At the time that you made the entry was it in its present state, or in any other state - A. It certainly was not in its present state. The total of the bill was 732 l. 13 s. 8 d. as entered in my book. I remitted this bill to Mr. Kingsford. I sent it by one of my clerks.

Q. You say the sum the amount of meal was then 722 l. 10 s. 8 d. then there is the addition of 10 l. 3 s. to the 722 l. 10 s. 8 d. - A. Just so, sir. I sent the bill to Mr. Kingsford on the same day I received it at the Victualling office and in the same state I received it.

SAMUEL KINGSFORD . Q. Did you receive at the Victualling office any bill in payment - A. I did, from the hands of Mr. Elliott's clerk. This is the bill, only it is altered; the amount of it was when it came into my hands 732 l. 13 s. 8 d.

Q. What did you do with the bill - A. I took the bill home to my residence at Wandsworth, there it laid until the 17th of May, and then having occasion to go to town on the 17th, I took it to the bankers Messrs. Perrin; I endorsed it before I took it them.

Q. I need hardly to ask you whether the bill was precisely the same as you received it of Mr. Elliott's clerk - A. Precisely the same as I received it of Mr. Elliott's clerk.

- . I am clerk in the house of John Perrin and Company. This bill appears to have been paid from Perrin and Company, to Barber and sons, they are bill brokers. It was delivered to them to carry into the market, and to discount it.

Q. What was the principal sum standing then as the original sum issued by the Victualling office, the property tax deducted at 16 s. 3 d. - A.731 l. 17 s. 5 d. the sum I credited in my books; my entry is on the 19th of May. I entered it on the day it was paid away; 16 s. 3 d. from 732 l. 13 s. 8 d. makes 731 l. 17 s. 5 d.

JOHN LION . I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Barber and sons, they are bill brokers.

Q. Did you at any time, and when, receive from the house of John Perrin and Compony, any Victualling bill - A. Yes, on the 19th of May, for the purpose of it being discounted.

Q. Look at that bill - A. There was a deduction for property tax, made at the time 731 l. 17 s. 5 d. That is the bill that I received at the time, there is no doubt of it.

Q. Did you get it discounted - A. Yes on the 1st of July, at Usher and Brind, they live in Birchin-lane.

Q. What was the amount you discounted with them - A.731 l. 17 s. 5 d. I discounted it for the sum I had given for the bill.

Q. Which of the gentlemen did you go to - A. To one of the the gentlemen, or their clerk, I cannot say which.

JOHN USHER . I am a bill broker.

Q. Cast your eye upon that Victualling bill, and tell me whether you discounted that bill - A. I believe we did, I have no doubt of it.

Q. For whom did you discount that bill - A. For Barber and sons; the principal sum carried out in that bill is 731 l. 17 s. 5 d. We discounted it for Barber and sons, on the 1st of July.

Q. What did you do with it - A. I brought it to the accompting-house, perhaps I gave it into the hands of my partner, or laid it on the desk, or gave it into the clerk, or partner, Mr. Brind, and from the statement of our books it went into the hands of Mr. May, or his clerk. The entry in my book is the hand writing of my partner.

Q. Do you know personally what became of it afterwards - A. No further than appears in my books.

Q. Do you see Mr. May afterwards - A. Certainly not

Q. You never saw him upon the circumstance of that bill - A. To the best of my recollection I believe not, certainly not.

Mr. Scarlet. Were yours the hand that received it from Barbers - A. Yes, it was paid into my hands; I brought it home to my accompting-house, and laid it on the desk.

Q. But you made no entry upon it - A. No, none at all.

Q. Is it the constent practice of bill brokers to enter the bill in the book on the same day - A. The entry does not take place on the same day perhaps.

Q. Do not you always enter them in your books - A. Not always enter very bill in the book that we discount.

Q. At the time that you received this bill of Barbers, were there any other money or other bills to the amount of 14,000 l. at the time with this; is it your course to give a bankers check or bank notes - A. We pay over money to the amount of 10,000 l. without making any entry; in a large concern we pay in one payment for the whole.

Mr. Attorney General. When you do not enter them at the moment, what means do you adopt to know; what I want to know is when you make a payment of 10,000 l. how do you know whether you receive more or less, there must be some period when some gentleman must want to know how he stands - A. We can tell, we make our arrangements in the evening or the next morning; we take paper memorandums in our pocket-book at the bankers desk.

Q. Cast your eye upon that, tell me whether that produced you 1700 or 700 - A. I obtained for it 731, I have do doubt about it whatever.

Q. When it was passed away what did it produce to your house - A. Only the sum that we had given for it, that I am certain of it.

Q. So though it is not carried into your ledger you have documents that you are able to ascertain the

the fact, and if a 1000 l. had been paid over, you would be able to ascertain the fact - A. Certainly, the same evening or the next morning.

COURT. With respect to that particular bill, you have no doubt you received it for 730 l. odd - A. No doubt of it.

Q. Is that from a recollection of your own or from any memorandum - A. By the entry in our books. I have no personal recollection of the bill.

WILLIAM BRIND. I am in partnership with the last witness, Mr. Usher.

Q. Who are the persons that transact your concerns in your accompting-house - A. Ourselves, and the clerk, Mr. Nicolls.

Q. Turn to your entry in your book respecting this bill, what is the first entry you have - A. A bill entered 731 l. 17 s. 5 d. This is the Bill book; on the 1st of July it was entered. That bill came into our house on the 1st of July; it was brought into the office from Messrs. Barker and son.

Q. What is the sum - A.731 l. 17 s. 5 d. after deducting the property tax.

Q. What became of that bill afterwards - A. That bill went from our office to Mr. May's office. It is very probable it went from our office by me; I have not the least doubt about it.

Q. While it remained in your office, and before it went to Mr. May, was any alteration made in it - A. Certainly not. It went from our office on the 1st of July. We have an entry of it going from the house in another book. This entry is made by the clerk; he is here.

COURT. The first transaction of it coming into your house is entered by you - A. It is.

Q. Did that bill produce to your house any larger sum than that which was on it - A. Certainly not; it went forth for 731 l. 17 s. 5 d. That is the original value deducting the property tax.

Q. Was it passed from you as a single bill - A. It went out of the house with other bills; it came in with other bills.

Q. And went from you with other bills - A. It did.

Q. You were the person that took that bill out - A. I did; I took it to Mr. May's office, and left them there.

Q. Has Mr. May a clerk - A. Yes; he transacts business in Mr. May's absence; he receives all bills that are brought into the office to discount.

Q. Do you know whether he fills up drafts for money - A. I cannot remember.

Q. You do not know whether he did or no - A. No.

Mr. Attorney General. Did you ever see a single instance of his drawing any - A. I don't know.

Q. With whom did you transact this particular business of this particular bill - A. I positively cannot say.

Q. Did you ever transact with the clerk any discount to so large an amount as this transaction - A. Yes; I have left bills frequently with Mr. May's clerk.

Q. All clerks do receive something for the master's consideration, and when the master comes home he gives instructions - A. Exactly so. 5,401 l. 15 s. 4 d. that is the amount of the whole of that bundle of bills.

COURT. The whole of that part in which this bill was included -

Mr. Attorney General. It is so, my lord.

Q. What is the number of the bills - A. Nine bills. They were all Government bills; I got the sum total by 700 l. and odd, not by 1700 l. and odd.

Q. Suppose 1700 l. to have been paid upon the footing of this instead of 700, must not you have seen that an error, and that you were overpaid a 1000 - A. Undoubtedly; a 1000 l. paid over is easily detected upon this occasion; I am certain I received no more than seven. We received cash.

Q. Had you any other transaction with the prisoner that day when you in your return received the discount of the 5,401 l. 15 s. 4 d. - A. The principal eight were a Treasury bill of 100 l. 520 l. and one of 700 l. a Victualling bill 749 l. 2 s. 4 d. and 732 l. that is the bill in question.

COURT. Can you say from your own recollection whether you had any personal communication with May - A. I cannot say whether I had or not.

Mr. Attorney General. You say if the principal is not at home you would leave them with his clerk, if Mr. May would discount the bills he might leave a draft to discount them with the clerk - A. Yes, or by sending cash.

WILLIAM NICOLL. I am a clerk to the two last gentlemen. I find an entry to the amount of 5,401 l. 15 s. 4 d. That is the going out of them; they went to Mr. May; they were to return the cash to the amount of 5,401 l. 15 s. 4 d.

Q. If a 1000 more had been returned should you have known that - A. We certainly should.

RICHARD BRUCE . I am a bill broker, in partnership with Thomas Warren ; my accompting-house is in Shorter's-court, Throgmorton-street.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming to your house in July last - A. I do, the 3rd of July.

Q. What time in the day was it - A. I rather think it was late, it being the last entry in our Bill book; that circumstance strikes me that it was late.

Q. When does your business close in the day - A.We generally leave the office about half after four, but leave a person until five, in case any body should come. It was between three and four he applied to discount a Navy or Victualling bill for 1731 l. 17 s. 5 d. due on the 3rd of August.

Q. Did he mention the amount of the bill when he applied to you for the discount - A. I cannot say; he produced the bill.

Q. Look at the bill, and tell me whether that is the bill - A. This bill agrees with the bill in my book except I have entered it Navy; it appears to be a Victualling bill; they are known in the market by the name of Navy bills; they are drawn by the Victualling office upon the Treasurer of the Navy. Upon his applying to get the discount; I answered we would try to get it done.

Q. Did you go out to get it discounted - A. I myself carried it to Bruce, Simson, and Company,

Bartholomew-lane, bankers; that is but a short distance from our place of business.

Q. How long might you be absent - A. I should suppose not ten minutes. I returned and said, that I had got the promise to have the money for the bill.

Q. Did you see the prisoner May - A. I cannot say whether he was in the office when I came back; it was communicated to him that we had the promise. I brought the bill back to make a ticket of it.

COURT. You did not part with the bill - A. Only for my clerk to enter it; my clerk having entered it, I myself went to the house of Bruce and Company, and got the money; I received 1,724 l. 10 s. 4 d. that is the money by allowing all the discounts, which is seven guineas and a penny; I returned with the money.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. I did see him, whether he was waiting or came in afterwards I cannot say; I can say I saw him.

Q. Did you deliver him the amount of the money you had received - A. That I cannot say, whether my partner or my clerk gave it him, I cannot say.

COURT. Did you bring back the amount deducting the discount - A. Yes, in bank notes.

Q. Did the prisoner request any loan in addition to the discount of this bill - A. He did of 600 l. We agreed to make him that; the loan was made to him in addition to the produce of this bill; the total sum was paid by a draft.

Q. What was the amount of the draft - A.2,321 l. 15 s. 11 d. That was a draft upon our bankers, Down, Thornton, and Freen.

Q. Give us the figures of the principal sum making that sum that you have mentioned - A.11 s. 2 d. that Mr. May was debitted in an old balance, the 1st of July: then there is the discount of the bill 7 l. 7 s. 1 d. discount of commission 2 l. 3 s. 3 d. making total 10 l. 1 s. 6 d. that taking of the Navy bill 1,731 l. 17 s. 5 d. deducting the 10 l. 1 s. 6 d. leaves 1,721 l. 15 s. 11 d. advance 600 l. making the total 2,321 l. 15 s. 11 d. The check has been paid.

Q. For the loan that you made the prisoner, did he lodge any security with you - A. I have not the least doubt he did. That is the check.

Q. Is that check your hand writing - A. It is not: it is my partner's, Thomas Warren .

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say you were present when he wrote that check - A. I have every reason to believe I was. I cannot take upon me to swear it.

Q. Then you cannot swear that the prisoner was present when it was written - A. I can swear it was delivered to him.

Q. Now, you will swear that check was delivered to the prisoner - A. That I will.

Q. Will you swear that you were the hand that delivered it to him - A. I cannot.

Q. Will you swear that your partner was the hand that delivered it him - A. I cannot.

Q. Can you swear that your clerk was the hand that delivered it him - A. I cannot. I can swear certainly no other person delivered it him.

Q. Then you can swear it was delivered to him either by yourself, your partner, or your clerk, but which you cannot tell - A. I cannot.

Q. And you cannot swear you were present when it was delivered to him - A. I can swear that check was delivered to Mr. May in my office.

COURT. Are you certain you were present when it was delivered to him - A. I am not. I have no doubt the prisoner had the benefit of this check.

Mr. Scarlet. But you cannot swear you were present when he received it - A. No, I dare not say that.

Q. It is possible it might be sent to him in his accompting-house, is it not - A. No; I can swear that it was not sent to his office. My partner, and clerk, knew it was delivered to him in our office.

Q. You are swearing to what your clerk and partner told you - A. We do not make a minute of every transaction.

Q. Do you mean to swear of your own knowledge that the prisoner was present in the office and received the check - A. I can say I know it was delivered to him in the office.

Q. Do you know the clerk of the prisoner - A. I have no recollection of knowing him at that time.

Q. Did you ever know him - A. I knew him about the month of August following; I cannot recollect whether I knew him at that time or not.

Q. Did the prisoner come to your office to ask for the discount - A. He came to our office to ask it to be discounted.

Q. Were you the person he applied to - A. I should think so, because I was the person that went out to get it discounted.

Q. Will you swear that you first saw him - A. I have no doubt of it.

Q. And that he brought the bill when first he came - A. Yes, and brought the bill.

Q. Now recollect, was not the first application made to you whether you could discount a Navy bill - A. To the best of my recollection he produced the bill at the time; I have no doubt about it.

Q. Then you do swear that the bill came as the application - A. I believe it was.

Q. Will you swear it was, positively, that is a matter you cannot be mistaken - A. I have not the least doubt of it.

Q. How long might it be from the time that you first went out to enquire about this bill, and your return to the office - A. I conjecture about ten minutes.

Q. Is it not in your habit to be going to different bankers in the way of your business - A. It is.

Q. Was there any thing particular in this transaction to fix this transaction in your memory more than the others - A. The circumstance that makes me conclude it was late, it was the last entry in the Bill book. I don't know any particular reason but that.

Q. Except that circumstance that you perceived this the last entry in the Bill book, you would not have known whether it was eleven in the morning or three in the afternoon - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Is the entry made in the Bill book by you - A. By my clerk.

JOHN BROOKSBANK . I am clerk to Messrs. Bruce and Warren.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house on the 3rd of July last - A. Yes.

Q. Who was in the accompting-house when he came - A. Mr. Warren, Mr. Bruce, and myself.

Q. What application did he make - A. He wished a Victualling bill to be discounted, or a Navy bill, which is the same thing, for 1,731 l. 17 s. 5 d. That is what he said. He delivered the bill to Mr. Bruce; Mr. Bruce went out with the bill.

Q. Did Mr. May remain in your accompting-house when Mr. Bruce was gone - A. I have no recollection until Mr. Bruce returned or not.

Q. Did Mr. Bruce bring back the bill with him - A. He did. I then entered the bill in my book; this is the book, 3rd of July, 1813, received of J. D. May, a bill, Navy, payable to Samuel Kingsford , registered 5th May, No. 2223, 1,731 l. 17 s. 5 d. due the 3rd of August, property tax being deducted. I made this entry in my book from the bill before me in the Bill book.

Q. At that time were the figures in the body of the bill or in the margin 700 or 1700 - A.1,731 and a fraction, were on the bill; I am positive of that.

Q. You have told me you are not certain whether May remained in the accompting-house after Mr. Bruce went out or went away - A. No.

Q. Was he in the accompting-house afterwards - A. He was in the accompting-house afterwards; Mr. Bruce had returned, and said, he had got a promise to get it discounted. He then made an application to Mr. Bruce and Warren, for a loan of 600 l. They agreed to make that loan to him.

Q. I presume upon a deposit of security - A. Yes.

Q. Upon that was a check drawn upon Mr. Warren - A. Yes. That is the check; it is Mr. Warren's hand writing. That check was given the prisoner in my presence.

Q. The prisoner was there when Mr. Bruce came from Bruce, Simson, and Company, and you say the prisoner applied for a loan of 600 l. - A. Yes. The accompt was made out; that check is the amount of that accompt.

Q. Who was in the accompting-house - A. Mr. Warren and myself, whether Mr. Bruce was in the accompting-house after he informed Mr. May I cannot be certain. I was present when Mr. Warren drew the check, and I was there when the prisoner went away; he went away with the check.

Mr. Attorney General. J. D. May 2,321 l. 15 s. 11 d. these are the figures in the book to which you refered to there - A. Yes; that is made out by Mr. Warren.

HUGH HALL . I am clerk in the banking house of Mr. Bruce and Simson.

Q. Did you on the 3rd of July last, discount any bill - A. Yes, I paid the money for it; I paid the amount of a Victualling bill to Bruce and Warren, bill brokers, Shorter's-court, 1,731 l. 17 s. 5 d. I pait it in Bank notes. I made the entry of paying the bill.

Q. That which you have been reading is not your hand writing - A. No, it it not.

Q. Do you know any thing of it except from that entry in that book - A. No.

Q. Look at that folio of the bill, and see whether you have the corresponding mark - A. Yes; this is our folio G. 1. and a 3. they are Mr. Wilson's writing; that is in a place in which our house uniformly makes a mark to correspond with the entry in the bill book.

Q. Turn to your entry in your Bill book, and see whether you have any corresponding mark - A Here is an entry on the 3rd of July, with the corresponding marks G, 1, and a 3. I paid the bill myself; I made an entry of the payment on the credit side is 1,724 l. 10 s. 4 d. G. B. Which refers to the book in which the bill is entered; that is the amount of the bill with the discounts.

COURT. The whole of this gentleman's evidence is that he paid the whole amount of that bill to Bruce and Warren on that day -

Mr. Attorney General. Yes, it is.

THOMAS FREEN . I am a partner in the house of Bruce, Simson, and Company.

Q. Mention the names of the firm - A. Patrick Crawford Bruce, George Simson , Thomas Freen , and Harry Mackenzie .

Q. Look at that Victualling bill, do you find that bill endorsed by any member of your house - A. It is endorsed by myself; I endorsed it with a view of getting it discounted at the bank of England. I only know from whom it was received by the books.

JAMES TAPP . I am clerk in house of Messrs. Everett and Company; Mr. May kept cash at our house.

Q. When was that accompt closed - A. It is not now finally closed.

Q. When did he cease to bank with you - A. About August.

Q. Was that by the desire of the house - A. I think it was.

Q. Look at your book, and see whether there is any thing carried out to his credit on the 3rd of July - A. Mr. May is credited on that day 10,644 l. 4 s. 7 d.

Q. Is that made out with a check 2,321 l. 15 s. 11 d. - A. Yes; I hold in my hand a check for 2,321 l. 15 s. 11 d. that constitutes a part of it.

Mr. Alley. Had you the opportunity of knowing a person of the name of Lathy, a clerk to the prisoner - A. I did, William Lathy .

Q. Did he on the 3rd of July, make a claim of 10,000 l. upon your house - A. It was brought and claimed upon Mr. May's account, but by whom I don't know.

Q. Lathy was a person in whom the prisoner had implicit confidence - A. He was the person that frequently brought the books; he as frequently brought cash as Mr. May, and probably more so.

Q. Have you seen Lathy lately - A. No, I do not know what has become of him.

Q. You know Lathy's hand writing, and the

fashion of his figures - A. I think I know his figures.

Q. Look at the sum 1700 in the margin, do you know the fashion of that one - A. I do not know 1731 at the top of the bill is Lathy's hand writing.

Mr. Attorney General. The sum of 1700 and odd pounds you have no doubt is Lathy's writing - A. I have no doubt whatever of it.

Q. Take the bill in your hand, look and see in four parts the figure of I introduced - A. I do; there are only three.

Q. There are four; take it in your hand again; the first sum I at the top upon which you have been speaking upon, which a figure I stands before I in the margin, by the pounds, shillings, and pence, do you believe that to be Lathy's writing - A. I think it is the same hand writing as the top.

Q. Comparing it with the figures in your own mind of Lathy's hand writing, do you believe it to be Lathy's hand writing - A. It is impossible to swear it is.

Q. Look further down, you will find the words the amount of meal 1724, do you believe that I before the 7 to be Lathy's hand writing - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you find the casting of that 174, do you believe that I to be Lathy's writing - A. I cannot say.

Q. You have been asked whether you know where Lathy is - A. No.

Q. Was he a relation of the prisoner as well as clerk - A. I believe he was brother-in-law. He had no authority to sign drafts.

Q.Then if he had drawn as upon the credit of May in Lathy's name would you have paid - A. Certainly not.

Q. If he had signed the name of May would you have paid it - A. Certainly not. All that he did was writing the name and the sum.

Q. Did you ever know him do any more - A. Certainly not.

COURT. Are you acquainted with the prisoner's hand writing - A. Certainly.

Q. I want to know whether the I in the margin before the 732, and the figure I in the lower part of the break before 724, and the figure I before 732. are them fingers of the prisoner's hand writing - A. I believe they are not, so far as any body can be a judge of a person's hand writing they are not.

MR. DAKERS. I am a clerk in the house of Everett and Company.

Q. Did you make any entry on the 3rd of July to the credit of the prisoner May - A. I did, the sum of 10,000 l. That is my hand writing.

Q. Was that made up with No. 2223 - A. It was.

Q. Do you believe that to be the check - A. I do.

CHARLES COCK. I am a clerk in the discount office in the bank.

Q. Was that bill discounted by the Bank for Messrs. Bruce, Simson, and Company - A. It was discounted on the 22nd of July; I discounted it at 1731 l. 17 s. 5 d. deducting for the property tax.

Q. Was it carried by the Bank into the Navy office for payment - A. It was.

MR. TWEEDY. I am cashier in the Navy office, in the Victualling department.

Q. Was that bill paid to you by the Bank of England - A. It was; that bill was one of a number of bills amounting to 14,600 l. It was represented as a bill of 1700 l.

Mr. Scarlet. You are a cashier in the office of the Treasurer of the Navy - A. I am.

Q. That individual bill was brought to you for payment - A. Yes, with six others; I saw it myself. I drew the draft for payment.

Q. The Treasurer of the Navy keeps no money in his office, only in the Bank of England - A. In the Bank of England.

Q. Did you look at that bill before you paid it - A. I have no doubt but I looked at it.

Q. In the hurry of business I believe the practice has been to look at the figures only - A. The bill was detected in our office after the payment took place.

Q. If the practice has been to look at the figures only, a I might be put in without your detecting it - A. Certainly; generally we look at the body.

Mr. Attorney General. That is case on the part of the prosecution.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your lordship, gentlemen of the Jury, it is not in my power to address you by my counsel. If ever there was a moment that I had made myself incapable of addressing you, it is the present moment. Gentlemen, you stand between the public and the prisoner to see that justice is meted out to both; with you the matter will be rested. When the whole case is gone through, the decision will be left for your consideration. Gentlemen, my life is in your hands, and what is dearer to me than life. Gentlemen, I am of respectable parents; I received a good education in this great metropolis; I have carried on the business of a broker a great many years with credit to myself, and up to this hour I have maintained a character void of offence. I have lived in the bosom of my family; in the society of a most affectionate wife and my children have I spent my evenings after the business was over. I mention not these circumstances that they can clear me of the charges, but I mention these circumstances to shew the improbability, and I think I might add, the impossibility of a man so acting to be guilty of an act to forfeit his life and character, and to bring distress upon his family. I will now proceed to the subject under your consideration: the indictment charges me with having forged the instrument, or of having altered it, and what is indeed the very essence of the crime that I did it with intention to defraud his Majesty, and the Treasurer of his Majesty's Navy. That the hand-writing that was made there is mine, not a tittle of proof has been adduced, and I feel boldly assured that I must be acquitted. The next charge is, that I uttered it knowing it to be forged. Gentlemen, that transaction was conducted principally by my clerk. In that clerk, I reposed the utmost confidence. I was daily in the habit of leaving blank bills signed, for him to fill up.

He had the entire management of my banker's credit, and by the clerk was all the bill business transacted. Gentlemen, upon such evidence as this, the most respectable merchant might be placed at this bar. Some few years since, Mr. Weston was placed at this bar; his clerk availed himself of the confidence of his master; he forged a power of attorney upon General Tooney , whose dividends Mr. Cohen, the army agent, was in the habit of receiving. I have not been able to procure the attendance of my clerk; he is beyond my reach. It would be idle to detain you by stating circumstances upon which I cannot procure any legal proof. There is no evidence beyond presumptive evidence of the forgery, and whatever there is further necessary for me the learned judge will point out to you. The learned Attorney-General has done no more than his duty, and I believe I may say, after he has done his painful duty he will rejoice in my acquittal. If there is a doubt in the case the learned judge will tell you to give me the benefit of that doubt. Gentlemen, God be with you and direct you.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30,

On the counts for uttering knowing it to be forged.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-35

35. WILLIAM PARKER and WILLIAM BOWERS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Charles Denham .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-36

36. ABRAHAM LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , two bottles, value 10 d. and three pints of beer, value 1 s. the property of George Burleigh .

GEORGE GAMBLE . I am porter to George Burleigh , wine merchant . On the 11th of November, I had some beer upon the truck in bottles, in a two dozen partitioned basket. I was going up Houndsditch with it about seven o'clock in the evening, and facing of the pallisadoes of Aldgate church I felt some one behind the truck. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner walk away. I immediately went after him, and I found two bottles, which I missed out of my basket, upon him. We secured him, and took him to Aldgate watchhouse, and gave charge of him, and produced the bottles; one was broken, and the other I took to where I was going with it to the Three Nuns, Aldgate. When I laid hold of the prisoner he had the bottles in his hands, and was not above three yards from the truck. The bottles contained stout porter.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-37

37. JOHN BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a hat, value 7 s. the property of George Steptoe .

The witnesses not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-38

38. JOHN KEENE alias WRIGHT , was indicted for feloniously forging a certain bank note, on the 8th of November , for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like bank note, with like intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note of 5 l. with like intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, to defraud George Frederick Merryman .

JOHN LAWSON . I am a servant to George Frederick Merryman , trunk-maker , at the foot of London-bridge . On the 8th of November, the prisoner came to our shop; he said he wanted a trunk; (the prisoner is the man); I shewed him several; he purchased one; it came to two pounds. The first he looked at he agreed for twenty-four shillings. He bought one at two pounds; he gave me a five-pound note. I went over to Mr. Leighton to get change for it. I got change there.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular upon the note - A. Yes; there is a piece out of it. I observed

"Holborn" upon it. There is

"Brook-street, Holborn" This is the note.

Q. You let him have the trunk - A. Yes. I have seen the trunk since. This is the trunk, to the best of my knowledge. I know the trunk by the bill; there is the bill here inside of the trunk. I have no doubt whatever that is the trunk.

Prisoner. Can you swear that is the note - A. I can swear that is the note that you gave me. You are the person that gave it me; you said you were going to Gravesend.

WILLIAM LEIGHTON . I live at 36, Fish-street-hill. I keep a wine-vaults there. On the 8th of November I saw Lawson; he brought me a five-pound note for charge.

Q. Should you know that note again if you were to see it - A. Yes; this is the note; that is my writing. I wrote upon it immediately, Mr. Merryman, November 8th, 13. I am sure it is the note.

Q. You are a neighbour of Mr. Merryman - A. Yes; I live in the same ward. He carries on business, I believe, on his sole account. I never heard he had a partner.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I keep a clothes-shop in Shoreditch. The prisoner came to my shop some time in September; he purchased a waistcoat; he paid for it in a five-pound note. I asked him his name and address; he said, give me a pen and ink, I will put it on. He put on a name. It was in September; I cannot recollect the day. This is the note. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

SUSAN SERJEANT . I am servant to Mrs. Sarah Taylor ; she keeps the Equestrian tap, Blackfriars-road. On the 9th of November last, the prisoner came to my mistress's house, between one and two in the afternoon, he called for a glass of negus, and he called for two bottles of port wine; he gave me a five-pound note to pay for the wine; I gave it to Mrs. Taylor. The wine came to thirteen shillings.

SARAH TAYLOR . I keep the Equestrian tap-house.

Q. Did you receive a note of the last witness - A. I did, on the 9th of November last. I had some suspicion of that note; I carried it into the next door; I shewed it to Mr. Nicholson. I delivered the note to him.

Q. The same note you received of the last witness you delivered to him - A. Yes. The prisoner was in my house at the time. He had three glasses of negus, that came to four shillings, and two bottles of port wine.

Q. Was any constable sent for - A. Yes, Mr. Holmes; he came and stopped with the prisoner.

MR. NICHOLSON. Q. Were you at the tap-house that we have been speaking of - A. Yes, I live next door.

Q. Did you receive a five-pound note of Mrs. Sarah Taylor - A. Yes, I did; she had some suspicion of it being a bad one; she asked my opinion of it. I took it from her; I thought it was a bad one. I thought it best to get a constable. I returned with Holmes to the house. I left the prisoner in custody of Holmes, after asking him a few questions; the constable asked him where he took the note, in my presence. He seemed very much agitated, and said he had got it; afterwards, he said he had took it at Smithfield, with others, for a horse and two cows. I asked him where he came from; he said, from Gravesend, and then he said he had received it in change for a one hundred pound note, which he had received in Smithfield for cattle that he had sold. I said I thought he was guilty. I desired Mr. Holmes to stay with him while I went to the Bank. I took the note with me; it was there ascertained to be a bad one. I delivered it to Mr. Rogers.

Q. Did you write your name upon it before you delivered it to Mr. Rogers - A. No, I did not.

Q. Are you sure the same note that you received from Mrs. Taylor you delivered to Mr. Rogers - A. Yes, I am positive of it. I marked the same note afterwards.

Prisoner. How do you know it to be the same note - A. I marked it with my own name.

Q. That was afterwards - A. I never delivered to Mr. Rogers any other five-pound note than the one I received of Mrs. Taylor.

MR. ROGERS. Q. You are an inspector at the Bank - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive of the last witness a note - A. I did. This is the same note I received of him. I marked it, and he marked it afterwards. It was never out of my sight from the time I had it until I delivered it to him again.

JOHN THOMAS HOLMES . I am a constable.

Q. Do you remember the witness coming to you requiring you to go to the Equestrian tap-house - A. Yes; on Lord Mayor's day. The Equestrian tap-house is kept by Mrs. Taylor. I saw the prisoner in the tap, and I saw a note which was shewn to me in the tap; I asked the prisoner if he had no smaller notes or change about him; he said, he had not. I asked him to bank the note, and put his address to it; he wanted to know what was the matter with it; I told him we doubted it being a good one. I then asked him where he lived, and who he had got it of; it mattered not, he had get it he said, and as to where he lived it mattered not to me, he lived no where particular he was a travelling man. I told him if he did not give me a more satisfactory account I should keep him in custody, and send over to the Bank to know whether the note was a good note or not. I then said, if Mr. Nicholson would take the note to the Bank I would keep him in custody; I had him in the parlour all the time. He was then very anxious to go after Mr. Nicholson in a coach, he had a great many more notes that he took of the same person, they might be all bad, he had taken them in change of a gentleman. I asked him what sort of a gentleman it was that he had taken them of; he said, a master farmer, a gentleman dealer in Smithfield. At last he told me he lived at Gravesend. I asked him where the gentleman that he took it of lived; he said, he did not know. The prisoner said, he had part of a house with a gentleman at Gravesend. I asked him how he obtained his living; at last he said, he obtained his living by selling liquor on board a ship. I then asked him whether he knew several people that lived at Gravesend; he said, he did not; he had been but three weeks there; he came from Cork to Bristol; that had dealt in cattle in Cork. I asked him if he knew the man he had sold the two cows and the horse to. He said he did not know, but if I would go with him to Smithfield he would shew him to me. Soon after, Mr. Nicholson returned with Foy; he was then searched, and taken to Marlborough-street-office. I saw him searched; he had two five-shilling and sixpenny pieces and a ten pound note upon him. He wanted to pay for the reckoning while Mr. Nicholson was gone for Foy and Glover. He was anxious to pay with the money several times. Foy also found a small key in his waistcoat pocket, apparently a drawer key.

JOHN FOY. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner; I found upon him two dollars, a six-pence, a ten-pound note, and a key. I learned where his lodgings was; the next day he told me. After I had searched him he was taked to the office, and from there to prison. I asked him the first day where his lodgings was; he would not tell me, and before the magistrate he did not tell. I learned from him the next day, at the house of correction, that his lodging was at St. George's coffee-house, Blackman-street, in the Borough; if I would apply to Mr. Ellworthy, at St. George's coffee-house, in Blackman-street, in the Borough, he would tell me who he was, and that he lodged there. I went there; his lodging was pointed out to us by Mr. Ellworthy; Mr. Ellworthy shewed me the prisoner's room; the door was locked. I told Mr. Ellworthy it was necessary the door should be opened; he broke it open directly. The key that I found upon the prisoner fitted the drawers; the drawers were open, all but the top drawer; that was locked. In the top drawer I found two five-pound notes folded up in a piece of paper, which I marked. These are the two five-pound notes.

Q. Did you find any other notes any where - A. I found thirty-two dozen counterfeit tokens in a drawer along with the notes, and under the carpet I found two parcels of notes, one parcel containing

twenty, and the other six, in the same room; they were all counterfeit. I found them in a small brown paper parcels under the carpet. The carpet was laid down, and under the carpet were these notes. These are them.

Q. Have you seen the trunk that is produced - A. Yes, that is the trunk that I found; the ticket at the top is partly torn off, and some of the bits laying at the bottom of the trunk. There were five good one-pound notes I found in the drawer with the two five-pound notes. They were separate from the five. The bad notes were in a paper, and the good ones by themselves.

Prisoner. There were some silver in the upper drawer.

COURT. There were some good silver that they have denied; do you mean to say they have not given it up to you - A. Yes.

Foy. There was no good silver in the drawer.

JOSIAH ELLWORTHY . Q. I believe you keep a wine-vaults in Blackman-street, in the Borough - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; he with another person took a front room one pair in my house.

Q. How long did they occupy that room - A. I do not rightly know; I suppose nine weeks. That was the room Foy came and searched. I was not at home when he and the woman took the room. I was at home when he lived there some part of the time.

Prisoner. How did I behave during the time I lived in the house - A. Very well.

JOSEPH BECKITT . I am one of the turnkeys in the House of Correction.

Q. Did you receive any letter of the prisoner on the 20th of November - A. I believe it was about the 10th, it was the next morning after he was in custody. He desired me to put the letter in the Post; I gave the letter to Mr. Westwood.

Q. Did you afterwards receive from him any more letters - A. I think the next letter was the next day. I did not put either of the letters in the Post; I delivered them both to Mr. Westwood.

Prisoner. Can you swear that is my writing - A. Yes; you gave me two letters; I saw you direct one of the letters. There was nobody locked up in that room but yourself; nobody could get access to you; nobody could write it but yourself.

Q. That you cannot tell, for I had been down in the yard - A. I do swear to it; you had never been in the yard when that letter was wrote; you had only been in the yard on your coming in.

Q. Did you not write a part of my letters - A. Not of these.

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . Q. You are clerk to Mr. Kay, the solicitor of the Bank - A. I am. I received this letter of Beckit on the 10th of November, I marked it at the time I received it, and Beckit marked it in my presence. The second letter I received of him the next day. These are the two letters I received of him.

COURT. Read the first letter first.

(The first letter read.)

Signed John Wright . Directed to Mrs. Thompson, Fortnight-court, near St. George's church in the Borough.

"My dear, I have to inform you that I was taken up about a bad bill, which I did not know it was so. I think it must be the bill received of the man I sold the horse but if it is not, somebody must have given her this note for small notes; I did not know this. Tell you and the girl to come and see me to day, do not fail. Tell the girl to take all my money out of the top drawer; there are two notes in paper folded up, do not take it to your house or the other, for they will come and see. They took all I had away from me. I did not tell where I lived, for they would take all, but they would give it. I was afraid to tell where I lived in regard of the man of the house. It would be better for me to tell. I am in the House of Correction."

The next letter, signed John Wright , directed to Mrs. Thompson, Fortnight-court, near St. George's church Borough.

"My dear friend, I hope you will have the goodness to write to me, and tell me how the officers did come on yesterday. You go to that place, and you will know all; the name is St. George's coffee-house in the Borough. Go to some friend who will give advice about this. I am a horse dealer; some time back I sold a horse, three weeks ago; the girl was present. I hope you will prove it; I will pay them well for it. I sold a cow; it would be a great deal in my favour. They know what it is; they must come, or it will be of no use. Do all you can in this. I shall talk to you another time. Tell me in your letter whether the girl has taken the rest of the money away; tell them not to keep it at your house or the other. Direct to John Wright at the House of Correction. You can bring it yourself, or send it by somebody to day, it will be taken in. I wrote to you yesterday, and no answer."

THOMAS GLOVER . I am Inspector of bank notes at the Bank.

Q. I put into your hand the note uttered at Mr. Merryman's - A. That is a forged note in every respect.

Q. That is the one uttered to David Phillips - A. That is also a forged one, equally of the same description as the other.

This is one uttered at Mrs. Taylor's - A. That is a forged one.

Q. Look at these two found in the top drawer - A. They are also forged.

Q. Look at these two parcels, one of six, and the other twenty - A. They are all of them forged: they all appear to be of the same impressions, and from the same plate the whole of them. I have looked at the signature also, they appear to be filled up with the same hand writing.

(The note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18131201-39

39. JOHN PLUMER was indicted, and the indictment states, that at the time of committing the several felonies mentioned in the first eight counts,

he was a person employed by and in the Post office in sorting letters and packets brought to the General Post office in London , that he on the 8th of October , at the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth, a certain letter, then lately before sent by the Post from Newcastle upon Tyne to the said Post office to be delivered to Peter King , containing a bill of exchange made for 20 l. 10 s. came to his hand and possession while he was employed as aforesaid; that he on the same day, and the said place, did secrete the said letter containing the said bill of exchange, being the property of Andrew Burk .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously stealing and taking from and out of the said letter the said bill of exchange.

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, in like manner, only stating it to be a packet instead of a letter.

And FOUR OTHER COUNTS, in like manner, only stating is to be the property of Peter King .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS BRIDGES . I am clerk to the Comptroller of the two-penny Post office.

Q. Did the prisoner on the 8th of October fill any station there then - A. He was a letter carrier in the two-penny Post office .

Q. In consequence of any thing, was any measure taken with respect to the letter carriers on the 25th of October - A. Yes; two Bow-street officers were placed there to search the letter carriers of the East division. The prisoner was a letter carrier of that division.

Q. How many letter carriers were there to that division - A. There were six.

Q. What was done with these officers attending - A. They proceeded to search the persons of these six letter carriers. Upon searching the prisoner they found in his breeches pocket a letter directed to Mr. Peter King ; I saw them find it.

Q. Look at that letter, sir - A. That is the letter.

Q. In what condition was that letter when so found - A. It was opened, a good deal rumpled, and doubled up.

Q. Was any thing else found - A. Yes, a bill for 20 l. 10 s. was found in the same pocket. This is the same bill.

Mr. Alley. Would this letter come into his possession regularly in office as a letter carrier - A. As a charge taker it would.

STEPHEN LAVENDER . I am an officer.

Q. Were you called in any time, and when to examine the prisoner at the bar - A. On the 25th of October, at the Post office in Lombard-street, in company with Tannton; Mr. Bridges was present. On searching the prisoner, I found in his right hand breeches pocket a letter; I marked the letter. This is the letter. The letter was crumpled up, and had the appearance of having been in his pocket some time; it was doubled up in this description. I found a bill of exchange also in the same pocket; I marked that at the time, and delivered them both to the last witness. The prisoner made some excuse at the time of having picked up the letter in the office.

Mr. Alley. What was his expression by picking up, you would be understood he found it in the office - A. I understood him so.

JAMES KERSLEY . Q. You were clerk to the late Mr. Burke - A. I was, sir; he died on the 5th of November last.

Q. Had you any occasion of knowing of his sending any letter to Peter King in October last - A. I did not know of it until the Sunday before he died.

Q. Look at that letter, and see whether you know whose hand writing that is - A. It is Mr. Burk's.

COURT. Both the direction and the body of the letter - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the bill - A. The bill is Mr. Burk's writing.

Q. Turn to the direction, and read the whole of that which is Mr. Burk's writing - A. The whole is not.

Q. What part is - A. Paid two shillings is what is in Mr. Burk's writing.

Q. Whose hand writing is the other part - A. A clerk of ours, Thomas Charlton .

Q. Was Mr. Charlton in the habit of going to the Post office for Mr. Burk - A. He frequently was.

Mr. Alley. Mr. Charlton is alive, is he not - A. Yes, and in the country.

JAMES JOHNSON . I am a stamper in the Post office, at the E. table.

Q. Take that letter into your hand, tell me whether you can explain all the marks - A. The country Newcastle stamped upon it, is the stamp office at Newcastle; I have no doubt about it. I am in the habit of seeing letters that come from Newcastle upon Tyne; I believe that is their stamp.

Q. Now, on another part of the letter you will see a large P, witk a figurs of 2, and a dash up in red ink - A. That is what is signed I should suppose by the clerk of the country, of receiving money for the amount of the postage; that mark is acted upon in London, and letters are delivered free in consequence of it.

Q. Is there any other mark that denotes that it is received in the General Post office - A. Yes; here is the E. table stamp, that is the letter E. Then there is the word paid below the E. October 8th, that is the date of the mark October 8th; it is my duty to stamp them; there is the impression of the stamp.

Q. Paid E. October 8th, what does that denote - A. That it came to the E. table such a day of the month, that is to be delivered free. I have no doubt but that mark was put by myself, from the impression of that piece of brass which you have in your hand.

Q. The table E. I think you have already said is the table where letters sent by the General Post are put - A. Yes, it is the first table where the bags are opened.

SAMUEL BURT . I am a sorter in the two-penny Post office.

Q. What is the price of single letter from Newcastle upon Tyne - A. One shilling, and a double letter. two shillings I am a sorter of letters in the two-penny

Post office to all the divisions; generally I sort them before they get into their particular divisions.

Q. Look at that letter, and look at the stamp ten o'clock, October 8th 1813, F. N. - A. That is our stamp denoting ten o'clock delivery; October 8th, 1813, forenoon; that denotes a delivery by the Twopenny Post, that shews the letter came into the Twopenny Post department.

Q. Now, turn the letter over, you will find two letters G. P. at the corner of the direction - A. That denotes that it is within the boundry of the General Post delivery.

Q. Does it some times happen that a letter sent in the General Post delivery gets into the Two-penny Post department - A. That frequently happens.

Q. When that happens are these letters imprest with the letters G. P. - A. They are, and then the two-pence would not be charged for the letter.

Q. Then looking at these marks upon that letter, that letter had come into the General Post, and had been transferred into the Two-penny Post - A. It was certainly.

Q.There are several divisions in the Two-penny Post - A. There are seven; one is called the Eastern division.

Q. Is Collit-place, Stepney, within that devision - A. It is.

Q. Would a letter intended to be sent by the two-penny Post get into that division - A. It would.

Q. Where is the Eastern business transacted - A.In the Eastern division Post office, Lombard-street.

COURT. Letters of the Eastern division are delivered from Lombard-street - A. They are; they are also sorted in Lombard-street for that delivery.

Mr. Abbott. How many persons are there employed in sorting letters for the Eastern division - A. Six.

Q. In what way is sorting effected - A. They are first taken from the sorting office by the prisoner, who is the charge taker, that is before they get into the Eastern division. The prisoner was on duty on the morning of the 8th of October.

COURT. They are first taken from the sorting office to the different walks by the prisoner - A. Yes; they have a box to take them.

Q. Whose duty is it to take them - A. The charge taker. The prisoner was charge taker; the prisoner only takes them to that division. He was on duty that morning.

Q.They are first sorted into the divisions at the sorting office - A. Yes: they are first sorted at the sorting office into the different divisions, and then carried to the letter carriers office at the Eastern division, they are sorted into walks.

Q. You say it was the prisoner's duty to take them from the sorting office into the Eastern division - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbott. When he has brought them to the Eastern division what then is done - A.They are sorted part by himself, and the letter carriers, they assist him in sorting them into the different walks of the division.

Q. How many walks are there belonging to that division - A. Six.

Q. Which of these six was the prisoner's walk - A. Whitechapel.

Q. Is Collit-place, Stepney, within his walk - A. No, it is not, but it is within the Eastern division.

Q. Now, in the process of sorting in the Eastern division, the prisoner and the other person are each to take them for the different walks; all that are doing duty at that time are employed in sorting them into the different walks - A. Yes; every letter carrier has a seat for himself, and six boxes to sort them into, to saperate them.

Q. How many were employed that morning - A. All six were employed that morning, on the 8th of October.

Q. In the process if any one chuses to take a letter not within his own walk, has he the opportunity and means of doing so - A.He has.

Q. Perhaps some times it may happen by accident that a letter gets into a wrong walk - A.It does, frequently.

Q. When that happens what ought that person who has possession of that letter to do - A. He ought immediately he finds the letter to give it to the person whose duty it is to take it; that is what he ought to do.

Q. But if it came to him by mistake, in whose delivery is Collit-place, Stepney - A. It is the walk within the Commercial-road; William Stringer is the letter carrier to that walk. The letter carriers sign their names themselves. William Stringer was upon duty that morning, as it appears by the signing of the book.

Q. Does it appear that the prisoner was on duty that morning - A. He was; he signed his name. I know his signature.

Mr. Alley. When letters come by the General Post to the office they are sorted - A. They are.

Q. Then after the letters are sorted at your office they go into that office - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore it is impossible for the prisoner to obtain possession of that letter before it came to to your office - A. In the first instance it was.

Q. When the letters come to your office are they returned the same day - A. This letter it appears by the stamp could not be returned on the same day to the General Post office; we frequently return them if we notice them in time.

Q. Do you mean to say letters that come by accident to the Two-penny Post office, by which you discover where they are to go, are to be returned to the General Post office, are they to be sent in a mass to the General Post office - A. They are sent in a locked box to the letter carriers office at the General Post office; they are taken to the place called the Book; they are re-sorted. It appears by this letter, that this letter came to his hands. The prisoner is a Two-penny postman.

Mr. Abbott. If the letters are misserted, if you are in time to send them by the General Post delivery you return them; if not in time you send them by the Two-penny Post and mark them G. P. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM STRINGER . I am one of The two-penny Post letter carriers for the Eastern division, the Commercial-road walk.

Q. Where you so on the morning of the 8th of October - A. Yes, for the Eastern division, the Commercial-road walk.

Q. Is Collit-place, Stepney, within your walk - A. Yes, sir.

Q. A letter directed to Collit-place, would come to you, would it not - A. Yes.

Q. Take that letter in your hand, and say for whom it was intended - A. The direction on this letter is within my walk; I never received that letter on the 8th of October, or any other time. The letter should come to my hands if all was right; it did not.

PETER KING . Q. Did you know the late Mr. Andrew Burk - A. I did, he was a correspondent of mine. I was in the habit of corresponding with Mr. Burk.

Q. On the 8th of October last, did you receive any letter from Mr. Burk - A. No.

Q. Look at the direction on this letter, and say for whom it is intended - A. The direction on this letter is my direction. I never received the letter or the bill on the 8th of October, or any other time; This bill never reached me.

(The letter read.)

"My dear sir, yours of the 1st I have before me; my last contained advice of all the bills, also my banker going to a watering place without leaving me the balance of the bills; I have wrote to him, he will remit me this week, respecting these bills, which receipt I shall do as to the six hundred pounds. I have always four hundred pounds, so you may make yourself easy upon that head. I think they had better be paid as well as the last, both on account of our credit, if we have to pay Mr. Barber and Co. their commission. I should have gone through your accompts, but I can make nothing of it without the dates. Thank God we are free. Please to pay Mr. Dodd his bill, 10 l. 15 s. I hope your new speculation will do. I have got a severe fall from my horse, which has nearly disabled me all my right side. I am glad Mrs. King is better. Dear sir, I am yours sincerely. Newcastle, Mr. Ward and son, to A. Burk, debtor.

To cash paid to Mary Atkinson 12 l. 1813.

January, 1 month - 3 l.

February, 1 month - 3 l.

March, 1 month - 3 l.

June, 1 month - 3 l.

July, 1 month - 3 l.

Creditor by cash debts - 12 l. 11 s. 6 d. 20 l. 8 s. 6 d. stamp 1 s. 6 d. Gentleman, as Mary Atkinson has ceased from the 5th of July to call for her monthly money, have taken the liberty of drawing at sight 20 l. 10 s. in the favour of Mr. King. Please to say if she calls again whether we are to remit her monthly payments."

(The bill of exchange read.)

Newcastle, October 5th, 1813.

At sight, please to pay P. King or order, twenty pounds ten shillings, value received in monthly payments to Mary Atkinson . A. W. Ward, London.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Burt said just now, that the General Post office letters very often go back; there is hardly an office but in which are missorted letters. The men that come against me knew many other letters besides in that division are sorted into my division, and as I am charge taker I have no time for sorting letters. I don't think one gentleman here ever saw me sorting letters. I receive of fifteen men, and while I am taking the money I leave it to them to take them out, I have not time until they are gone to see whether my letters are right or wrong; on Monday morning particularly, when I am gone out, I have to come back, the walk has been so heavy, we have petitioned Mr. Johnson two or three times to alter our walks, to take off the collection of that walk as it is so heavy; if we detain a letter one time we are afraid of giving them back for fear of being turned out of office; we have not time to do what we ought. Mr. Burt has said that the letters are brought in a box; they are not always brought in a box, sometimes he brings them out in his hands; all the men take them out in their hands.

Mr. Burt. There is a box for the purpose, whether they use it at all times I cannot say; it is the charge takers duty to take them in a box.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his former good character.]

London jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-40

40. SARAH HUNT , Junior , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Nathan , about the hour of nine in the night, on the 1st of November , and stealing therein three shifts, value 9 s. two shirts value 6 s. two sheets, value 16 s. and three pounds in monies numbered, his property . And SARAH, the wife of CHRISTOPHER HUNT , for receiving the said goods she knowing them to be stolen .

EVE NATHAN . My husband's name is Samuel Nathan .

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes, they were lodgers in my house; they lived in my house eighteen months.

Q. Did you miss any of your property - A. Yes, in July last, a great deal of property; I missed different articles at different times. The first thing that I missed was out of my bed-room, out of a dirty clothes-bag; I do not recollect the day of the month, I think it was in July; I did not miss them all at once.

Q. Do you recollect at any time finding either of the two prisoners in your chamber - A. Yes, on the 1st of last month, the little girl, Sarah Hunt , junior. When I went into my chamber I saw Sarah Hunt , junior, she was in my chamber standing up against a pair of drawers.

Q. You could not see what she was doing - A. No, I could not; there were a many strangers in the room, and my husband and daughter seeing what was the matter just as I entered the room.

Q. At that time had they quitted their lodging

- A. No, they were lodging in the house; I had given them warning to go several times. I had great suspicion of them. I found nothing myself.

Q. When did they quit their lodging - A. On the 2nd of November,

Q. When you entered your room you found your husband, your daughter there, and a great many strangers - A. Yes. The mother came down stairs; she said to her daughter, is that you Sarah; the daughter answered yes, it is me. The mother ran up stairs as fast as ever she could. It being Sunday night it was an hour before we could get an officer; the officer came, and searched her; he found in her pocket two bad shillings, and a key, that would open all my drawers; she said the key belonged to her father's trunk, and in her mother's room the officer found some duplicates.

SAMUEL NATHAN . I am the husband of the last witness.

Q. Do you recollect this night your wife has spoken of - A. Yes; this was on Sunday night, the 1st of November. My girl went up stairs to make the bed, she called father; I went up, and found Sarah Hunt , the little girl, by the side of the drawers; she said I have taken nothing; I said, you have taken enough. I said, I would send for an officer. The mother came down stairs, she said, is it you; yes, she said, it is. She never came to the girl, but ran up stairs as fast as she could. I went for an officer; he searched her, and found in her pocket two bad shillings and a key. The key fitted my drawers better than my own key.

FRANCES NATHAN . I went up stairs to make my father's bed; I went into the room; I found the door open.

Q. Had you been in the room a short time before that - A. Yes, about a quarter of an hour before.

Q. When you came in the room whom did you find - A. Sarah Hunt , the little girl. I asked her what she was doing there; she said, hush, do not say any thing. I called my father directly; he came up, and asked her what she did there; she said, she had not taken any thing. My father went for an officer; he searched her, and found a key upon her that opened our drawers; she said, the key belonged to her father's trunk. The officer went up stairs, tried the key to her father's trunk; it would not open it.

JAMES RIDDLE . I am an officer. Mr. Nathan called upon me about nine o'clock on Sunday night. I found the little girl, the prisoner, and a number of people in Nathan's bed-room.

Q. What did you find upon her - A. A key. I tried the key to Nathan's drawers; it opened them. I went up stairs to the room where the mother lodged; that is the other prisoner; I searched the room. I found a few duplicates in the mother's drawers. I examined the chest; she said the key belonged to her father's chest; I examined it, it would not go in.

Q. Did the mother say any thing - A. No. I went with one of the duplicates I found in the mother's chest of drawers, to Mr. Fothergills, a pawnbroker, he produced the bed gown; Mrs. Nathan was with me, she owned the bed gown by a tare in the bosom.

PATRICK EDWARDS . I live with Mr. Fothergill, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. I produce a bed-gown; it was pledged with me on the 21st of September.

Q. Do you know who pledged it - A. I do not.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought some things in Rosemary-lane, through necessity I was forced to pledge them; with respect to the key, my daughter found it.

The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc

Reference Number: t18131201-41

41. PETER WILLIAM PLOMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , seven gold seals, value 12 l. the property of John Beykett Jarman , in his dwelling-house .

ABRAHAM PRING . I am shopman to Mr. Jarman.

Q. Tell us what happened on the 15th of November last - A. I saw the prisoner come into the shop; I saw him catch a handful of seals; I was standing at the other part of the shop. John Lamport was doing the seals. I saw him catch a handful of seals, and make off with them.

Q. Where were the seals - A. On the counter, in a tray.

Q. Was the tray in any body's hands - A. Yes, in John Lamport 's hands.

Q. Now, what time in the day was this - A. About a quarter before six in the evening.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether that was the man - A. I believe it is.

Q. Of course you had lights in your shop - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come into your shop - A. He put one arm in the shop, and just his head.

Q. He reached at the tray, did he - A. Yes.

Q. He could be in the shop but an instant at most - A. No, and in an instant he was out again.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say that is the man - A. I believe it is; I am quite certain of him. I immediately pursued him; when I got into the street I saw it was the same man.

Q. How far was he - A. Not ten yards.

Q. Of course in the Strand , there were a great many people, were not there - A. Yes, he crossed the Strand, and went into a court.

Q. Did you see him cross the way - A. Yes, he went up Hewitt's-court.

Q. Did you see the same man run up the court - A. Yes; I saw nobody in the court but him. I called stop thief; he turned out of the court, and went up Forage-island, turned into New Round-court; I followed him there. He went into Chandois-street; I followed him; he went into another court, and crossed Bedfordbury; as I was crossing Bedfordbury, I heard some seals gingle against a door.

Q. Was that door near where the prisoner run - A. Yes.

Q. Did you perceive any motion of his arm - A. No; it is the corner of Lemon-tree-yard.

Q. At the time that you heard the seals gingle against the door did you see any motion of his arm - A. No.

Q. He run on, did he - A. Yes; he went into this yard, there was no thoroughfare for him; a boy standing by in the yard saw him throw the seals down. I lost sight of him in Lemon Tree-yard; I looked for a few minutes.

Q. Did you see him take up this yard - A. Yes; he sheltered himself in this yard.

Q. Did you see any body else in the yard - A. Yes, the people that went with me, and the constable. In a few minutes I saw him walking down with another man.

Q. You saw the same man walking down the yard as if to come out - A. Yes; immediately I seized him the constable and me had him home to the shop. That is all I know.

Q. Were the seals found - A. Yes, the boy is here that picked the seals up; they were brought home.

Prisoner. He said, as I came down the yard he seized me, that I deny: because he suffered me to walk out of the yard with a person here fifty yards, before they could make up their minds to know whether I was the person or another person; they said, they could not make up their minds; they said, they believed it was a man drest in black, one of them did say that.

Q. to Pring. Did you hear any body say that - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner. It is evident they did not know, or else they would not have walked after me.

Pring. I said, I thought he was the man.

JOHN LAMPERT . Q. You are shopman to Mr. Jarman, are you not - A. Yes. On the 15th of November, about a quarter before six in the evening, I had a tray of gold seals out of the window; I was arranging them to put them in the window again.

Q. You were arranging them at the counter I suppose - A. I was, to put them in the window again, in their place, suddenly a man rushed in, and snatched a handful, and run off; he stepped one foot in the shop, put his head in, and reached a handful out of the tray.

Q.Look at the prisoner - A. I have not the least shadow of a doubt but what he is the man; I form that judgment by looking at him. When he took up the handful of seals, I ran to the door and hallooed stop thief; I did not go after him.

Q. Was that before or after your fellow servant had gone out - A. Before.

Q. When you ran to the door did you see any body - A. I saw the man that stole the seals run over the way across the Strand; he took up Hewitt's-court, I did not follow; I saw the man brought back by Abraham Pring and the constable.

Q. When he was brought back, did you then know he was the same man - A. I did; I had not the least doubt of it.

Q. Were the seals brought back - A. They were, Abraman Pring brought them back the same evening. I shewed the seals to the magistrate; they were delivered into officer's hands.

GEORGE DAVIS . Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him - A. Yes. I was standing in Old Round-court, I saw the prisoner running through, Abraham Pring was running after him, he was about twelve yards of him. I saw the prisoner running, I was running almost by the side of him; he ran into Shelton-court, and there he walked with some more men; he ran from Shelton-court into Bedfordbury; a butcher pointed to the prisoner, and said that is man; then he run again across Bedfordbury into Lemon Tree-yard. I was running by the side of him; he dropped the seals down in Lemon Tree-yard; I still running by the side of him.

Q. Did you see him drop the seals - A. No, I could not, it was so dark; I was close to him; I heard them. I heard the seals drop, and immediately picked up six; they dropped down in one corner of a private door.

Q. Were there any other persons in the court - A. Not when he ran into it as I could see. I picked up six seals; I gave them to Abraham Pring ; I saw one more seal found at the same spot that I picked up the others.

Q. After the seals were dropped, and you picked them up, do you know what became of the prisoner - A. I lost sight of him for about ten minutes; then he came down the yard walking by the side of an old gentleman that lives up the yard; immediately he came down the yard Abraham Pring said that was the man, and immediately the butcher that said in Shelton-court that was the man, he said, that was the man again.

WILLIAM RADLEY . I was in Old Round-court. I heard the cry of stop thief; I instantly run after a man; he went up Old Round-court; I followed him all the way up Old Round-court. I saw him go up Lemon Tree-yard; I followed him up the yard; I saw him throw the seals down; he then run off. I picked up one seal, I gave it to Pring. I saw the prisoner come down Lemon Tree-yard with an old gentleman; as soon as I saw him, I told Mr. Pring that was the man. The prisoner asked me what I wanted with him; I said again that was the man.

GRIFFITHS JONES . I live in Lemon Tree-yard. This prisoner was in my room when I came in.

Q. Was your door open - A. No; he knocked at the door, my wife let him in; I was not at home when he came in. When I came to my door my wife opened it; I saw the prisoner in the room; he said is there any one below; I told him there were a few boys at the bottom of the yard. The prisoner asked me if there were any on below; I said, no.

Q. He meant below in your house, did not he - A. Yes. He said, I will go; then we went out together; he asked me to go down the yard with him, and he would give me something to drink if I would choose to drink it; I went down the yard with him to the bottom of Taylor's-buildings, and then he was taken hold of; he was quite a stranger to me. I had never seen the man before.

JAMES PARRY . I assisted in taking the prisoner. On the 15th of November, a little before six o'clock, I heard the call of stop thief; I immediately went

out; I saw a quantity of people at the bottom of Lemon-tree-yard; they said a man had gone up the yard that had robbed a jeweller's shop. I got a link and searched the yard; I could not find him. We gave over the search. I saw him come down the yard; I assisted in apprehending him, and I assisted in taking him back to Mr. Jarman's.

Q. to Pring. How many seals were found altogether - A. Seven; these were all that were lost.

Prisoner. Before the magistrate they said eight seals were lost.

Pring. I said that, but not positively; we thought eight seals were all lost.

Lampert. I said I thought there were eight lost: on Wednesday morning, when the examination closed we corrected the mistake.

JOHN BRADLEY . I am a constable. I assisted in taking the prisoner before the magistrate, and the seals were delivered to me. These are the seals.

Prisoner's Defence. I have one observation to make, that is the improbability of either of Mr. Jarman's shopmen being able to identify me to be the person that took the seals; so sudden a thing they could not identify me again if I was the man.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-42

42. JOSEPH JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Crossland , on the 20th of November , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a great coat, value 2 l. a pocket-book, value 1 s. and four 1 l. bank notes, his property .

EDWARD CROSSLAND . I live in Aldersgate-street.

Q. Were you robbed on Monday night last - A. Yes, at six o'clock at night.

Q. Were were you going - A. To Gravesend, in a boat with my great coat on my left arm, and a bundle under my left arm. When I got into Lower Thames-street there were four or five men following me; it being a dark night I went down a turning to the boat, and went a little further than St. Mary's-hill ; it is opposite of Billingsgate; and whether they tripped my heels up or pushed me down I am not certain. They took from me my great coat, and at the same time picked my left hand inside pocket of my pocket-book, and a memorandum book. In my pocket-book were four one-pound notes. They pulled my bundle from under my left arm, and while I was striving to disengage myself three or four gentlemen came up, and one of them said the prisoner was the man.

Q. Are you sure you were either thrown down or tripped up - A. Yes, I fell from violence of some person.

JOSEPH CALWAY . On Monday evening, the 29th of November, I was going along Thames-street, I saw three men at the bottom of a court; immediately after I saw a fourth man knocked down. There were two men with me. As soon as we saw the gentleman knocked down we went up to him, two of the men ran away, the third man was stooping over the gentleman, the prosecutor. On our nearly approaching, the third man ran away. I immediately said to one of the gentlemen, this man has been robbed. We immediately pursued the third man; he was stopped on St. Mary's-hill. I never lost sight of him; I saw him stopped; he was brought back, and nine one-pound notes were found upon him. I believe they belonged to himself. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE ROBINSON . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner to search him; he pulled out nine one-pound notes. The prosecutor examined these notes; he said none of them belonged to him.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-43

43. MICHAEL FARRELL was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of January , in the 37th year of his Majesty's reign , at Nicrome, in the county of Cork, in the kingdom of Ireland, was married to Mary Featherstone , spinster , and that he afterwards, during the life of the said Mary, at the parish church of St. Martin's in the fields , was married to Elizabeth Cowell , spinster .

WILLIAM FEATHERSTONE . I am a protestant.

Q.Had you a sister living in the county of Cork in the year 1797 - A. Yes, her name was Mary Featherstone .

Q. In what parish was she married in - A. Nicrome, in the county of Cork.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner in Ireland - A. I did.

Q. Did ever you accompany them to the house of Mr. Barry, to a priest, a gentleman in the county of Cork, a neighbour of her master's - A. Yes, I did.

Q. What year was that in - A.1797. It was about the middle of January.

Q. What was the priest's name - A. Father O'Keith. I knew him to be a priest by the character of him. I had never seen him before.

Q. For what purpose did you attend them to the priest - A. For the purpose of seeing the prisoner and my sister married. Many respectable persons were there. They were married in my presence and many others. They lived together from the year 1797 to the present year. My sister is now alive; I saw her about six days ago.

CHARLES CALAGHAN . I am a labourer, a native of Ireland.

Q. Do you know Mary Featherstone - A. Yes, and I know Michael Farrell . I was present at Mr. Barry's house when they were married by father O'Keith, a catholic clergyman, in the year 1797.

ELIZABETH COWELL . Q. Your father was an officer - A. Yes; he is dead, and after his death I lived with my mother.

Q. Did you about three years ago, in the summer, go to Margate - A. Yes; I there met with the prisoner; he said he was a dragoon; I took him for an officer. He visited at our house; my mother sanctioned it. He continued at Margate three months while I and my mother were there. He paid me a great deal of attention.

Q. When did your mother die - A. About a year and a half ago.

Q. In the month of May last, did the prisoner call

upon you - A. I think it was in April; I saw him in Margate. I saw him three times before he made a proposal of marriage; he came to my room in the Haymarket; I then lived with my aunt. He then proposed marriage; he knew I was of age, and in possession of my fortune. He said, it was very fortunate that he should come just at the time I was of age; he wished the marriage to take place the next day. I said, I wished to consult my uncle and aunt; he said, what signified my uncle and aunt, if I did not marry him he would put an end to his exestance. I consented to marry him; the marriage took place the next Sunday, at St. Martin's church. On the Sunday proceeding the Saturday we were married, he proposed my going with him to the Bank, and taking out two hundred pounds; I said, I thought an hundred was sufficient. After the marriage we went to Barnet, and from thence to Holy-head, and then to Ireland; he quarrelled, and left me. He came over here; I came to London afterwards. He left me in Ireland without any money.

REV. MR. DEVEREAUX. I am a Catholic Clergyman.

Q. Can you tell me whether it is the custom of Priests in Ireland to marry those of their own persuasion at private houses - A. Clearly so.

Prisoner's Defence. I am ignorant of any marriage but the latter.

Q. to Featherstone. How old do you think the prisoner was when he married your sister - A.Twenty-one; he was as big as he is now.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-44

44. JOHN KEVILLE and JAMES HELSLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , nine pounds eight ounces weight of lard, value 10 s. the property of Michael Gunston and Charles Prickett , privately in their shop .

MICHAEL GUNSTON . I am a cheesemonger ; I live in St. John-street, West Smithfield ; my partner's name is Charles Prickett . I can only speak to the property.

THOMAS MORGAN . I am a shopman to Michael Gunston and Charles Prickett . I saw the lard in the shop window about ten minutes before it was taken away; I closed the window with the lard inside, under a shelf. I heard the patrol cry out for assistance; I looked; I saw the window had been raised up, and the lard was gone. The lard was produced by the patrol; it is my employers property.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrol of St. John-street. On the 30th of October, about half past six, I came down St. John-street, I had suspicion of these two prisoners seeing them walking backwards and forwards before Gunstone and Pricket's shop; I stepped into a passage adjoining the shop. I heard Keville say brush, he gave a whistle. I came out of the passage; I went lower down, told the patrol on duty to look out. I crossed on the opposite side of the way, and watched the prisoners; I saw Helsley go first, and shove the window up; Keville was looking out. Helsley handed it out, and gave it to Keville; they both crossed over to where I was watching them; I laid hold of them both; I called Tio, it is a bye word of ourselves to collect the patrols; Keville struggled, and got his coat off, and got away; another patrol catched him. This is the lard.

Prosecutor. It is my lard.

KEVILLE, GUILTY , aged 23.

HELSLEY, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-45

45. MARY MACARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , five 1 l. bank notes, the property of Thomas Cole , from his person .

THOMAS COLE. I am bailiff to Mr. Crowley. On the 28th of November, I was passing along Oxford-street, about ten o'clock at night; at the end of Portman-street the prisoner came up to me, she asked me to go with her; I told her I would not go with her. I was going home to Paddington; she followed me to Paddington. I turned down Edgeware-road ; she wanted me to treat her; I pushed her from me two or three times. She put her hand about my body; I had my hand out of my pocket. When I pushed her from me, I did not observe her hand in my pocket. It struck me that she had taken something from me when I saw her run from me, and within two or three minutes afterwards I missed my purse from out of my right hand breeches pocket; my purse contained a five-pound bank note, two two-pound bank notes, and thirteen ones. When I missed my purse the prisoner was entirely out of my sight; I then went to the watchhouse, and gave information to the officers of the night.

Q. When did you afterwards see the prisoner - A. The next morning, about twelve o'clock, I saw her in the street near where she lodged.

Q. Now, look at the prisoner - A. I am sure she is the woman. I saw some of my notes found in the prisoner's box, in her room; the prisoner owned the box.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am a constable. On Sunday night, between ten and eleven, the prosecutor came to me at the watchhouse; he described the prisoner to me. I found her in Puckeridge-street. Newitt, the prosecutor, Cole, and I, were together standing in Puckeridge-street; the prisoner came along, the prosecutor pointed towards the prisoner, and said that is the woman; we took hold of her, and brought her to Marlborough-street, and locked her up. We obtained a search warrant; we went to Church-lane with the warrant. I learned by the officer of the night that she lived there and it proved to be correct. We found in her box five one-pound notes. Newitt, and the prosecutor were with me.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I produce the notes; I took them out of the box.

Q. You went to a room which you supposed to be occupied by the prisoner - A. We did, where her box was found. I opened the box with a pocket, in the presence of the last witness, and the prosecutor.

I found five one-pound notes; I have had them ever since.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes. She came out of that house directly we went there.

Q. to Prosecutor. You say there were thirteen one-pound bank notes - A. Yes.

Q. Can you describe the numbers upon any one of the bank notes - A. I can describe the marks upon five of these notes were P. Green, 1127, and the notes produced by the officer have P. Green, 1127, upon three of them.

JOSEPH ORIENSHEW . I am agent to Crowley and Co. Canal-carriers. The three notes marked P. Green and Co. I paid them to the prosecutor; I wrote P. Green and Co. 1127, on Saturday, the 27th of November.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me three one-pound notes; after we had been drinking at the public-house together, he asked me how many notes he had given me; I said, three. He said, one was enough, if I did not give him two of them back again he would have me in Newgate. I am a stranger in the country.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18131201-46

46. JOHN WHITNALL , JOHN REECE , ELIZABETH CLARK , and JACK SWEENEY , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Audley , about the hour of six in the night of the 23rd of November , and stealing therein three pocket-books, value 2 s. three hussiffs, value 2 s. two boxes, value 2 s. a box of dominos, value 2 s. 6 d. and a comb, value 6 d. the property of Richard Audley .

RICHARD AUDLEY . I live at 160, Piccadilly . I missed the things on the 24th of November, in the morning; I found the glass of my shop-window out, and these articles were taken out of the shop-window.

Q. What were the things - A. Pocket-books, hussiffs, boxes, combs, pencils, and many other articles.

Q. Can you say when you saw them safe in your shop - A. I saw them on the day before; I missed them on the 24th in the morning. I saw some of the things afterwards not all of them.

EDWARD LAWLER . Q. Do you know any thing about this - A. Yes; I saw Elizabeth Clark on the 23rd of November, about six o'clock in the evening; Elizabeth Clark was picking the putty off Mr. Audley's shop-window; Jack Sweeney stood by her; Elizabeth Clark took the glass out of the window. I saw her put her hand into the shop window; she took out some things, and put them into a handkerchief, that she took off her head. I was going to my mother's stall; I stopped, and looked at them.

Q. Did you see any thing of the two other boys - A. No. Clark went down St. James's-street; I did not go after them. I went to my mother, and told her.

JULIA WILLIAMS . On the 23rd of November, I bought a pocket-book and two boxes of Elizabeth Clark; I gave her three pence for the three articles. When Mr. Nicolls came, I gave them to him.

JOHN ING . I bought a pocket-book and hussiff of John Reece. I gave them to Nicolls.

ANN KERR . I bought three purses, a pocketbook, and a hussiff, of Elizabeth Clark , on the 23rd of November; I gave sixpence for them. I gave them to Nicolls.

MR. NICOLLS. I am an officer of Bow-street office. I executed a search warrant upon Mrs. Kerr, Ann Kerr 's mother. She said, her daughter had bought such articles; she produced to me three hussiffs, a comb, and a box of dominos. I took Ann Kerr in custody; she told me that Reece was the boy that cut the window; she was present. Ann Kerr told me that other people had bought some; she went, and shewed me. I produce the articles I received.

Q. to Prosecutor. On the night of the 23rd, do you recollect looking at your windows - A. About four o'clock I observed it had not been cut or broken. They are my property.

Whitnall's Defence. I bought a purse of John Reece .

Reece's Defence. The window was broken before.

Clark's Defence. This little boy came, and told me the window was broke, and he had got some things; I went, and got some myself; I sold them for sixpence.

Sweeney's Defence. I was not there at all; I gave Clark sixpence for a hat.

WHITNALL, NOT GUILTY .

REECE, GUILTY , aged 10,

CLARK, GUILTY , aged 10,

SWEENEY, GUILTY , aged 10,

Of stealing only.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18131201-47

47. JAMES JOHNS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October, in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign , three hundred slates, value 1 l. 12 s. the property of John Hellewall .

JOHN HELLEWALL . I am a slater . I lost my slates from the Hampstead-road ; they were taken from some buildings there. The prisoner was my journeyman ; he left me about the 11th of October.

JAMES SHEEWILL . I carted some slates out of the Hampstead-road for the prisoner, about a year and a half ago, or two years; I took no notice of the time.

Q. Describe where the premises were situated that you carted these slates from - A. I cannot tell now; I took them them from some where near the Hampstead-road, to King-street, Westminster.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18131201-48

48. MARY ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , four silver table-spoons, value 2 l. a silver dessert-spoon, value 7 s. three silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. a silver salt-spoon, value 1 s. 8 d. a gold chain, value 10 s. a silver

snuff-box, value 12 s. and a gold broach, value 1 l. the property of Archibald Wier .

SARAH WIER . I am the wife of Archibald Wier ; we live at No. 3, Princes-street, Bridgewater-square .

Q. Look at the prisoner; did you see her on the 13th of November - A. Yes, on the 13th of November I saw the prisoner in the passage of my house; she was going out at the street door; she was wrapping up something in a silk handkerchief: I heard it rattle; she went down the steps; I followed her down the street into Barbican; there is a public-house at the corner of Barbican, the White Bear: she ran in at one door, and was coming out again at the same door, there I met her. I then charged her with taking my property; she ran back again through the passage; the landlady tried to stop her; she pushed her of one side. When I got there I called out stop thief.

Q. Then she was coming out the same way that she went in - A. Yes, I called stop thief.

Q. What did you lose - A. All the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were the property of my husband. I had them in my hand a few minutes before. The spoons were on the sideboard in a room on the ground floor.

WILLIAM KETTERMALL . On the 13th of November, just as I was going from Charter-house-square into Carthusian-street, I saw Mrs. Wier, she cried stop thief: the prisoner was running towards me; I took hold of her; she let the property drop on the side of my feet.

ROGER HIND . I was coming down Carthusian street at the time the prisoner dropped the property. I saw it drop from her person; I picked it up; I gave it to Mr. Stevens.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am an officer. I produce the articles I received from Mr. Hind.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in such a place before. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-49

49. MARGARET TYLER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Ayscough , about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 24th of July , Ann Dugmore in the same dwelling-house being, and stealing a diamond necklace, value 100 l. a gold neck chain, with lockets, value 30 l. seven lace veils, value 17 l. five guineas, a 5 l. bank note, and a 2 l. bank note, the property of John Ayscough .

ANN DUGMORE and MARY HIPWOOD were called, and did not appear in court.

THOMAS DALE . I know nothing about the robbery.

Q.What do you know about this offence - A.Nothing at all.

Mr. Gurney. Are you the same Thomas Dale that went before the grand jury about this bill - A. I am.

JOHN BLACKLIN . I am a potatoe dealer in Mint-street, in the Borough.

Q. What do you know about this business - A. I do not know any of the circumstance. I did not go before the grand jury.

Q. How much money were you offered by Mrs. Ayscough if you would go before the grand jury - A. Twenty pounds, and a situation of an hundred a-year.

Q. What did Dale receive for going before the grand jury - A.He did receive money.

Q. Do not you know that Dale did not know any thing about the fact - A. He has told us that.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-50

50. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , two trusses of hay, value 6 s. the property of John Tapps .

WILLIAM RUSSEEN . I am servant to John Tapps, at Twickenham. On the 29th of October I delivered ten trusses of hay out of the loft into a caravan drove by John Powell; it was to go to Mr. Moore; his coachman's name is Petit.

- PETIT. On Monday the 29th of October, John Powell delivered me eight trusses of hay; I asked him why there were not more; he said the roads were bad and the horses were weak; his master would not send more.

JOHN POWELL. In October last I was servant to Mr. Tapps, he is an inn-keeper at Twickenham. On the 29th of October I had ten trusses of hay delivered to me; they were to be taken to Mr. Moore's stable, Rams Mews, King-street, Westminster. When I came to Hammersmith I stopped at a public-house; I asked the ostler if he wanted a truss; he said, yes. He asked me to let him have another; I let him have a couple. The prisoner gave me three shillings for them.

Q I will not ask you how many times you have robbed your master -

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-51

51. GEORGE CARPENTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , two ounces weight of silver, value 10 s. the property of William Jackson and Henry Jackson .

HENRY JACKSON On the 2nd of November, we suspected we had been robbed, and we had the silver weighed from which we supposed it was taken.

Q. What sort of silver was it that you weighed - A The refuse silver, the cuttings, and the filings, kept for the purpose of going into the crucible, and when it was weighed we deposited it in a corner in the melt-house. Phillips weighed it, he can speak to the weight.

GEORGE PHILLIPS . I work for Messrs. Jackson. On the 2nd of November I weighed the refuse silver deposited in the can, it weighed twenty-one ounces fourteen pennyweights. I weighed it immediately after one, when the men had gone to dinner. I re-weighed it between nine and ten o'clock; there remained twenty ounces five pennyweights. The prisoner then was about leaving work; he was stopped in the accompting-house; Mr. Jackson sent for an officer; he was searched in my presence, and on him were found two ounces and a quarter of silver, among which was a piece of silver wire three-fourths of an ounce, what he had to work with; the other were clippings and cuttings, that made up the deficiency of the silver in the can. The prisoner said it was his first offence.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18131201-52

52. JOHN REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , fifteen books, value 8 s. the property of William Hughes .

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a bookseller . I live in Islington . On the 1st of November, between 7 and 8 o'clock, I was returning home. I met the prisoner a few yards from my door with the books under his arm. I asked him what he had got there. I pulled one book away from his arm. I saw it was mine. I instantly collared him, and with assistance I took him to the watchhouse. These are the books; they are all mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-53

53. ROBERT SPICA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a sack, value 1 s. and nine pecks of oats, value 11 s. the property of William Cawthorn .

JOHN WOOD . I am Bailiff to William Cawthorn . He lives in Ivy-lane; his farm is at Woodford . On the 5th of November I saw a sack in the hay-loft; that sack contained oats. On Saturday, the 6th of November, I saw the oats in the sack, and on Sunday I went and marked the sack. On Monday I sent the prisoner with a load of potatoes to Spitalfields market. I immediately followed the team, and walked by the side of him. He said he had got some oats in the cart; he asked me if I saw him take them. I told him I did not. He told me he took them from the granary round the pea rick down the ploughed field, and threw them over the hedge. He then said he would leave the oats. I told him he should take the oats forward as he had got them. I followed him to Spitalfields; there I saw him take the oats out of the cart, and set them down by the side of Mr. Truss's warehouse.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-54

54. FRANCIS CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , a watch, value 10 l. a chain, value 1 l. two seals, value 2 l. and a ring, value 5 s. the property of Alexander Henry , from his person .

ALEXANDER HENRY . I live in Finsbury-square. I lost my watch on the 5th of November. It was taken from me in a crowd in the Strand .

THOMAS CAVE . I am an Officer of Bow-street. On the 6th of November, between nine and ten in the evening, I and Humphreys went up into the Strand by Akerman's; there were gas lights. We went into the corner public-house. The landlord told us there were a great many pocket-books down the areas in Beaumont's buildings. We went into the Plough public-house: we saw the prisoner, he was warming some beer by the fire: he came to the door: Humphreys laid hold of him. I came up to him. I put my hand to his fob, and pulled out a gold watch. He said, are you going to rob me. I said, no, I want this watch. I asked him whose it was; he said, a man of the name Phene Morgan gave him the watch, and told him to stay there until he came to him. He told us, if we would wait a bit, we should see, Phene Morgan would come in to him. We secured the prisoner, and took him to the watch-house. After that we went back to the house; Phene Morgan came in; we secured him, and put him in the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-55

55. ANTHONY RUTTER and WILLIAM GUEST were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , two coats, value 10 s. a hat, value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of John Warrener , a horse-cloth, value 5 s. and a pair of leather breeches, value 5 s. the property of William Holden .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoners were acquitted .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-56

56. RICHARD FINCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , a coat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a sheet, value 2 s. and a yard of silk, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Rust .

JANE RUST . My husband's name is Thomas Rust . I lost these things on the 6th of November at half after 7 in the morning. The prisoner lodged in our house. I heard him go down stairs at half after 7. He said he worked in the London Docks. I heard him go down stairs, and go into the lower room; he remained there about two minutes. He went to the street door, opened it, and went out. On my hearing him open the door so hastily, I jumped up to the bed-room window. I looked out, and saw him with the coat and breeches under his arm. I ran down stairs, threw the door open, pursued after him, and lost sight of him. I am sure he is the man; he lodged in my house four days, no more; I am positive of his person; it was quite light; I saw him very plain, and the coat and breeches under his arm. I am certain of it.

Prisoner's Defence. When I got up in the morning, I came down stairs. I could not find the way to open the door directly. As soon as I could open the door, I went away.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-57

57. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a saddle, value 1 l. and a pair of stirrups, value 10 s. the property of William Stapleton and John George Stapleton .

JOHN BROWN. I am horse-keeper to Mr. Stapleton; the names of the partners are John George Stapleton and William Stapleton ; they are coal merchants in Whitefriars . The saddle was in the top loft on the 8th of November, on the 10th it was gone.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 10th of November, about ten o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Rose-lane, Spitalfields; he had a bag with a saddle in it. I asked him what he had got; he said a saddle; he had bought it at a place near Much Hazard; he gave seven or eight shillings for it to a stranger: this is the saddle.

BROWN. It is my employer's saddle.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will have mercy on me; extreme distress was the cause of my doing this; I have a wife and two small children.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in the House of Correction , fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-58

58. JAMES GOLDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , six 1 l. bank notes , the property of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN . I am a wine cooper . I deal in bottles and casks. I lost my notes on the 9th of November at night. I was going home from Snow-hill about five o'clock at night. I was going by the pastry-cook's shop in Newgate-street . The prisoner and two or three more stopped me bodily; they hustled me; my coat was buttoned; they soon opened that, and took my pocket-book out of my side pocket. I put my hand in my pocket, and missed my pocketbook; it contained six 1 l. notes and a check. I could not run after them. I made haste to the Banker's, No. 66, Lombard-street, and stopped payment of the check. It was a quarter after five when I was there. They told me to be there the next morning, to see if they came in with it. On Wednesday morning I went to Hatton-Garden office, when these gentlemen here asked me what I wanted. I said my six 1 l. notes. They said they had got the six 1 l. notes and the pocket-book, but they had not got the check. I am sure Golding is one of the men that hustled me, he was as near to me as my finger is to my nose.

GEORGE VAUGHN . On the 9th of November I saw the prisoner in company with a man of the name of Williams, and knowing them both to be notorious characters, I watched them. They were going up Brook-street; they walked on the left hand side of the way, and I on the right, till we came to the top of Brook-street, near the potatoe warehouse. I stood at the potatoe warehouse door on the right, and as they were passing me, I saw Williams take some notes out of his pocket-book and give them to the prisoner Golding. They walked on down Dorrington-street, Brook's market, and went into the George public-house, Leather-lane. It being on a particular day, I thought they had committed a robbery. I went to Hatton Garden, and informed Read senior of it, and Read senior went with me to the George public-house, and there Read searched them in my presence. On Williams and Golding he found three 1 l. notes on each, and some silver upon one of them, but how much I cannot say.

WILLIAM READ . I am an Officer. I went with Vaughn. I took Williams and Golding in custody. On Williams I found this purse with three 1 l. Bank notes; on Golding this purse with three 1 l. Bank notes, a three shilling token, and two shillings in silver, and this handkerchief.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the notes found on Williams and Golding - A. If they are mine, they are five old ones and one new note. I lost six 1 l. notes, five old ones and one new one.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-59

59. MARY FALKINER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a watch, value 10 l. six silver table spoons, value 3 l. and four silver table forks, value 2 l. the property of Edward Godding Jones .

EDWARD GODDIN JONES . I am a doctor . The prisoner was a servant, a cook ; my house, is in the parish of St. George, Hanover square . I heard of the loss of the things on the 12th of November. I lost six table spoons, four silver forks, and a gold watch belonging to my wife. I left the prisoner in charge of my house. On the 26th of July I went into the country, and returned to London on the 30th. It appears there was something taken then. I returned to London again on the 13th of November, on hearing from my servant that the watch was gone. At that time the prisoner was in my service.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a pawnbroker. I live at No. 12, Fleet-street. On the 9th of November the prisoner came to my shop, and offered a gold watch to pledge; she asked 5 l. upon it. I asked her whose it was; she said, her own, and she should redeem it very shortly. I told her I was convinced that was not the truth, and if she would really tell the truth it would save her a great deal of trouble, and save her character. Much conversation then took place, she hesitating to tell me, and I pressing her to tell where she got it from. When she walked into the parlour, she confessed that she was a servant to Dr. Jones; that she had taken it out of a drawer in Doctor Jones's house, and meant to replace it, and if I would give it her back again she would go and do that immediately. She would not tell me where I could see Dr. Jones. She told me where he lived; he was out of town, and she had not the key of the house; there was nobody in it. As I could not find out Dr. Jones's, I sent for an officer. She was taken before a magistrate. I know nothing of the other things.

THOMAS PALMER . I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Alders, Berwick-street. On the 17th of September I took in four silver table spoons for 2 l. I took them in of a woman; I cannot swear to the woman; and on the 12th of October my fellow shopman took in four silver forks and two silver table spoons; he lent 4 l. upon them. He is not here; we could not both attend.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I was sent for at Mr. Harrison's to take the prisoner in custody. On my asking her what things were taken out of her master's house, she admitted she had taken some spoons, the duplicates were in the kitchen. The duplicates of four forks and two spoons, and four table spoons, were found by her direction. These are the duplicates.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-60

60. NATHANIEL GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , 41 lb. wt. of beef, value 2 l. and an iron hook, value 1 d. the property of Benjamin Cox , privately in his shop .

BENJAMIN COX . I am a butcher . I live at No. 11, Beech-street, St. James's .

WILLIAM MANNING . I am a butcher. On the 30th of November I saw the prisoner pass with a piece of beef, it was a piece of a loin and a rump, it weighed 41 lb. I followed the prisoner through part of Great Marlborough-street, across Oxford market. I met with Hammond; we immediately followed the prisoner up Castle-street. We took him to Carsaby market, and made enquiry; we could not find any body that lost it. We took him to Marlborough street office. At last we found Mr. Cox.

Q. to Prosecutor. Where was this piece of beef taken from? - A. It hung in my open shop about three yards from the door. I was not present when the beef was stolen. I went to the office and saw the beef; I think it was my beef; there was a hook to it. I cannot swear to the hook; hooks bear a great resemblance, and there may be a piece of beef like mine. The tail had been cut off, another butcher might cut it off in that way. I have enquired the prisoner's character, he bears a very fair character.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the beef up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-61

61. JOHN BLENHIM , WILLIAM WERRELL , and JAMES WELCH , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Parker , about the hour of eight, on the night of the 29th of November , with intent the goods and chattels therein being burglariously to steal .

JAMES PARKER . I am the son of James Parker ; my father is an optician ; he lives at 53, Princes-street . The prisoners broke the window on the 29th of November, at eight o'clock. I snuffed the candles; I saw the windows were perfectly safe. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour I heard a noise at the window. They cut the putty out, and pushed the glass in. I heard the noise. I went out and saw the officers take the boys.

Q. They drove the window in - A. Yes.

Q. You went out, and saw the boys in the hands of the officers - A. Yes, that is all I know.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am an officer of Bow-street office. On the 29th of November I saw the two prisoners Blenhim and Welch at Mr. Parker's shop window. I perceived Blenhim moving his hand close to the glass; Blenhim and Welch were close together. I saw the motion of Blenhim's hand as if he was cutting the putty from glass. They both went away from the window, and then all the three prisoners got together, and just at the end of the shop window they were conversing together. Then the prisoners Welch and Blenhim left Werrall and went to the window again. I saw Blenhim in the same act as before stated. They both left the window again, and the three prisoners got into conversation at the window again; during the time a cart was going by the door. The prisoner Welch went to the glass, and pushed the glass in; he returned back to the other two, and said I have done it. The two prisoners Blenhim and Welch came to the other window, and Werrall crossed over the way. I saw Blenhim put his hand into the hole in the glass; he took his hand out, and removed half way up to the front of the window; he returned to Welch at the other window. I saw the prisoner Blenhim put his hand in again; the prisoner Welch stood at his right; there was a whistle from the other side of the way; they were making off with them. I took them into custody. I searched Blenhim, and found a knife on him, a tobacco box and a tobacco stopper.

Q. When you first saw Blenhim and Welch where was Werrall then - A. At first he was standing two doors off.

THOMAS POYNTINGTON . I was with Nicolls on the 29th. The same night I apprehended Welch at the window. I have heard what Nicolls has stated, it is correct. I did not see the lad's hand in the window.

ABRAHAM FARRER. I am an officer. What Nicolls has said is correct. I apprehended Werrall. I know no more than what Nicolls has stated. I did not see the hand in the window; a cart was going by at the time.

Q. to James Parker . You lost nothing - A. No.

Blenhim's Defence. I went with Welch to take a parcel to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross. Coming by we saw the window broken. Nicolls the officer came and took us in custody; neither of us broke it.

Welch's Defence. I had been to the Golden Cross to take a parcel. Coming along that street the officer Nicolls took me. I know nothing of breaking the glass at the window.

Werrall's Defence. I am a shoemaker. I was working with my father until half past nine at night, and as I was coming along there Nicolls took me in custody.

BLENHIM GUILTY - Death , aged 17.

WERRALL GUILTY - Death , aged 17.

WELCH GUILTY - Death , aged 15.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-62

62. ISRAEL HYAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , 24 yards of printed cotton, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Sonby , privately in his shop .

THOMAS SONBY . I was robbed on the 2d of November, between six and seven in the evening. The linen was within the door, just inside of the uprights. I was about the middle of the shop. I saw a boy hold up his hand for me to go to the door. I immediately ran. I saw a piece of print lie at my neighbour's door one end, and the other end was fastened to the iron at the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-63

63. MARTHA BURGESS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of George Minton ,

GEORGE MINTON . On the 10th of November the prisoner stole a pair of stockings from me. I know nothing of the transaction.

ANDREW PATTERSON . I am a hosier. I live next door to Mr. Minton. On the 10th of November I saw the prisoner; she was outside of Mr. Minton's shop. These stockings were put outside, pinned on a

wire. The prisoner took a pair off the wire and put them under her cloak. When she moved away, I told the prosecutor.

WILLIAM MURRAI . I am a servant to Mr. Minton. In consequence of information from Mr. Patterson I went out and laid hold of the prisoner, and brought her into the shop; she then dropped the stockings from under her cloak. These are the stockings; I had hung them outside of the window. I am sure they are my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 80

Publicly whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-64

64. ELIZABETH VASS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , 20 bound books , the property of John Lions .

WILLIAM GRANT . I am clerk to Mr. John Lions ; he lives in New court, Temple ; the prisoner was his laundress . On my return from Chester Assizes, a number of Mr. Lion's books were taken away. I am confident they were in the chamber, when Mr. Lions and I set off for Chester Assizes on the 20th of August. I returned on the 20th of September. On the 1st or 2d day after my return there were a number of books missing. Mr. Lions returned on the 29th of October. I mentioned it to the prisoner. She returned 109 books before Mr. Lion returned. She refused to tell where the remainder were. We discovered 17 others at the pawnbrokers.

THOMAS WINDSOR ALLEN . On the 6th of September I took in Burke's works, eight vols. for 16 s. I believe the prisoner to be the person that pawned them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-65

65. JOHN ENSTON and ELIZABETH ENSTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , a peck of wheat, value 2 s. the property of John Hierons .

JOHN HIERONS . On the 23d of November I detected the woman prisoner with the wheat. The man prisoner was threshing for me. I was watching her at the time, and followed her out of the yard. I went to the stable. Enston got up; he went to the heap of wheat, and poured the wheat into the woman's basket; the woman came out of the barn with the basket, she went round on one side of the yard.

Q. Who advised you to prosecute the woman - A. Myself.

Q. What is the quantity of the wheat - A.About a peck; this is the wheat, and here is a sample from the bulk; the wheat is worth two shillings.

JOHN ENSTON - GUILTY , aged 32.

Publicly whipped and discharged .

ELIZABETH ENSTON - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-66

66. SARAH FARLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , two pillows, value 2 s. two pillow cases, value 1 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. a gridiron, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of James Laver .

SUSAN LAVER I let the prisoner a room; she said she was a married woman, and had one child. I asked to see her husband; he came; he lodged with her all the time in my house. When she took my room, she took it in the name of Farley; I find now her name is Ford, and she says he is not her husband, he is only a man that she lived with.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-67

67. JAMES HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , one hay cloth, value 2 l. the property of James Spencer .

JOHN HEMAN . I am coachman to James Spencer of Finchley ; he is a farmer . On Sunday, the 7th of November last, in consequence of what the Barnet patrol told me, I went to the Green Man on Monday morning; there I saw the hay cloth, and I saw the prisoner in the cage at Highgate. I am quite sure the hay cloth I saw at the Green Man is the property of Mr. Spencer; it has his name on it. The prisoner is quite a stranger to me. The hay cloth used to be kept in the shed in the yard; it was not under lock.

DAVID JACKSON . I am one of the Barnet patrols. I patrol the road from Barnet to Highgate. On the 7th of September, near 10 o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner with the hay cloth on his back; it was near the seven mile stone where I took him. I told him he had got a hay cloth on his back; he said yes, he was going to the Green Man with it to cover a load of hay in the morning. I kept my eye upon him to see whether he went to the Green Man; instead of going to the Green Man, he turned down the road which goes to Crouch End. I laid hold of him. I told him that was not the way to the Green Man. He said no, but he was going that way. I left the hay cloth at the Green Man. After I had secured him, I gave him to my partner; he took him to the Cage. I brought the prisoner to Bow-street office. The next morning I went to Mr. Spencer's house. I informed Heman; he got up and examined the premises; the hay cloth was missing. The next morning I shewed him the hay cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the hay cloth. I was going with it to where it belonged. I was taken in custody.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-68

68. JOHN LEADER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , three sacks, value 5 s. the property of James Bryer .

JAMES BRYER . I am horsekeeper under Mr. M'Intosh; he is Contractor of the Prince Regent's Canal .

Q. Did you lose three sacks at any time - A. Yes, the prisoner was in my employment. We have almost 80 boys; some sleep in the stable, and some elsewhere. I was watching I saw the prisoner take three sacks out of the yard; he took them out of No. 16 on the wharf. I took the prisoner to the constable; he was taken to the watch-house; these are the sacks I detected him with stealing. I asked the prisoner what he did with the sacks; he said, he took them to put them under his bed.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-69

67. JAMES CAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , nine silver tablespoons, value 11 l. twelve silver forks, value 9 l. six silver tea-spoons, value 2 l. a silver soup-ladle, value 2 l. a silver butter-ladle, value 1 l. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 1 l. a silver butter-knife, value 10 s. a silver sugar-shovel, value 1 l. and four silver bottle-labels, value 1 l. the property of John Turner Clements , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH ANN CLARKE . I am a servant to Mr. John Turner Clements , Woburn-place . On the day my master's house was robbed a man came down the area steps; he opened the kitchen door; he asked me for Mr. Gradon, a fellow-servant of mine, the footman. I told him he was not at home, but I thought he would soon return, from the time he had been out, on account of dinner. He then asked my leave to wait; I said, by all means.

Q. Did he sit down - A. He was just bending himself to sit down as the parlour bell rung. I immediately went up, and left no one in the kitchen but the prisoner. I went into the dining-room, and while I was in the dining-room the street door bell rang. I went to the street door, and when I opened the door, a stranger (another man) appeared, he also asked me for Gradon.

Q. He asked you for the same fellow-servant as the prisoner had asked you - A. Yes; the man asked me how long Gradon had lived with us, and said he supposed he might see him at three o'clock. I said, you may see him any time this afternoon. No other conversation passed. He turned towards Russell-square; then I shut the door. I went into the dining-room immediately, and took the tray. I saw the same man return by the dining-room window; he was then coming back from Russell-square. I took the tray down stairs into the kitchen, and saw the prisoner was gone.

Q. Are you quite sure that the prisoner is the man that you left in the kitchen - A. Yes, I feel quite confident of it.

Q. How soon afterwards did Gradon come home - A. I saw him come home the next morning. When I found the man at the bar was gone, I went up the area steps immediately, thinking the prisoner knew the other person that came.

Q.When you went up the area steps did you find the man that was missing - A. No, I could not discover one or the other. I went back again; I went into the pantry, and saw the tray of plate was gone. I had seen the tray of plate in the pantry about three minutes before the prisoner came in the kitchen. I then took a silver fork out to carry up stairs. Gradon did not come home till the next morning. I did not tell Gradon of it, nor did my fellow-servant. I screamed out when I missed the plate; my mistress immediately came down; the intelligence was sent to my master; my master came home with Vickrey, a Bow-street officer.

Q. What plate was missing - A. I cannot exactly say; my master valued it at one hundred pounds. We found more lost afterwards than what is in the indictment. The tray was full of plate.

Q. Were you present when this circumstance was old to Gradon - A. No.

Q. In consequence of this was any steps taken by Gradon and you - A. Yes; I described the man to Gradon, his dress, and every thing, so far as I was able. This happened on Friday, the 12th of November.

Q. Then Gradon did not return till Saturday morning - A. No. On Sunday morning, Gradon and I went to the Spanish chapel to see if the prisoner was there. We did not see him there. Then we went to the Crown public-house in Clipstone-street; we sent to the prisoner's house, No. 11, Clipstone-street. I believe he is in lodgings. The prisoner's wife came. We did not see the prisoner.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner - A. Not till I saw him in a public-house in Fenchurch-street.

Q.Have you since seen a coat that you know - A. I have since seen a coat that was the colour of the coat the prisoner had on. I did not see the prisoner until he was taken in custody.

Q. Did either of the persons call again that had called for the prisoner - A. No.

Q. When you first saw the prisoner had you the least doubt of him - A. No, I had not. I knew his face then, though he was dressed in a different way. He was dressed clean when he came to enquire for the footman, and when he was taken in custody he was shabby.

JAMES GRADON . I am a footman at Mr. Clements, 51, Woburn-place.

Q. Do you recollect the circumstance of your master's plate being missing - A. Yes.

Q.Before you went into the service of Mr. Clements had you known the prisoner - A. Yes, about two years at different times.

Q.Had you made any communication to him respecting your family - A. I mentioned to him that the young man that kept company with my daughter, his name was Watts; he lived as butler with Mr. - . I do not exactly recollect the gentleman's name. I told the prisoner that just before I went into the service of Mr. Clements.

Q. Had you ever introduced him to Watts - A. Never, I believe he might have seen him, but never to have known him. He walked with him once on the 17th of October.

Q. Do you remember the day on which your master's plate was missing - A. Yes. I was out of my master's house that day. I did not return the whole day. I returned at seven o'clock the next morning. I went out with a message for my master; I stopped out without leave. My master told me of the plate being missing about nine o'clock.

Q. Who did you suspect to be the person that stole the plate - A. The prisoner from the description of the maid servant. I suspected Carey and Johnson, from the description the maid servant gave me; in consequence of that suspicion we went on the Sunday following to the Spanish chapel, with a vew if we could see any person of my acquaintance. After that we went to Clipstone-street. We sent a message from the public-house to the prisoner's house, to know if the prisoner was at home; his wife came. On the Wednesday following, Watts called upon me, to know why the prisoner called at his master's

house. In consequence of what Watts said, the prisoner was apprehended.

ANN NUNN . Q. What are you - A. I go out a cooking. I was out on the 11th of October, at Mr. Marriott's, No. 41, Russell-square. While I was at work there a person of the name of Carey came, the prisoner is the man, he had a blue coat on, with an umbrella in his hand; it was between one and two.

Q. What did the prisoner ask for - A. Mr. Watts.

Q. Who is Mr. Watts - A. He had been butler, but had left. I told him, he had left him. He asked then to see the footman; I told him he was at dinner, and asked him what he wanted; he said, he wanted to know where James Gradon lived; I told him 51, Woburn-place; he went away then. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am a Bow-street officer. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, on the 17th of November, No. 17, Clipstone-street, Marybone. I found this blue coat.

Mrs. Nunn. It is exactly the colour of the coat the man had on when he came to Mr. Marriott's.

JOHN FAIRCLOTH . I am an assistant Elder at the East India warehouse. I produce the Company's book. It appears by that book the prisoner did not attend at all on the 12th of November.

JOHN EVERETT . I am assistant Elder at the East India warehouse.

Q. On the Monday before he was apprehended, had you any conversation with him - A. Yes, between eight and nine in the morning, he sent for me; he asked me to put him down in the book to be present. He sent for me under the gateway.

Q. Is that the place where the book is usually kept - A. No. He asked me the favour to put him on the book present on Friday, on the 12th; I told him I would put him on the book, or cause him to be put on the book sick.

Q. Whether he was ill or well - A. At this time he told me he was ill on Friday, and I believed he was ill on the Friday, seeing him look so bad. He rather paused about it, still wished to be put on the book as present; I told him I would do what I could, if I did not put him on the book, Mr. Nash should.

Q. You mean sick, do not you - A. Yes; that ended the conversation at that time.

Q. In the course of the day did you see him again - A. Yes; he asked me whether he was put down on the book as present. I told him, no, he was put down sick; I dare not put him down any other way; I should have been discharged if I had. He was very unhappy and uneasy. We were together some time. We went and had some beer together after. He said he was unhappy and uneasy. I said, oh, my God, Carey, what have you been doing; I am sadly afraid you have been guilty of a robbery. I said that because I saw him so agitated.

Q. What answer did he make to that - A. Yes, I have. Oh, my God; I said who saw you. The maid. That is all.

Q. Did any thing pass after that - A. No. We both went home; I went my way, and he went his. I did not tell any body of this for three or four days: I believe I first told the Commodore Gentry of it. I have known him five years and three months; I never knew any thing amiss of him; I would trust him with any thing.

MR. CLEMENTS. I live at 51, Woburn-place. My house is in the parish of St. George's Bloomsbury, I believe.

Q. What is the value of the plate you lost - A. Between sixty and seventy pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason I asked Mr. Everest to put me down in the book sick, the Company only allows two days to be absent in a month. I never did the robbery; I am accused falsely, so help me God.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Watson.

Reference Number: t18131201-70

68. CHARLES EDWARDS and CHARLES LAVIGNE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Shanks , from his person .

THOMAS SHANKS . I am a wine-merchant ; I live in Mark-lane. On the 5th of November, I went to see the illumination. I perceived my handkerchief was gone between Somerset House and Brydges-street . George Vaughan came up to me, and asked me if I had lost any thing. I put my hand into my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. Vaughan told me he knew who took it. Vaughan took hold of the two prisoners. When he laid hold of them, he told them not to draw. I followed them to Bow-street. I saw the prisoners searched, and my handkerchief was found upon Edwards, I believe, I am not certain.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am a broker, 65, Gray's-inn-lane. On the 5th of November, I first saw the prisoner, Edwards, facing Somersett House; I saw Edwards engaged in picking Mr. Shanks's pocket; he took something from his pocket, but what I could not tell; he then put his hand between two or three people, and give something to Lavigne; that was the first time that Lavigne was noticed by me. I then asked Mr. Shanks if he had lost any thing; he said his pocket handkerchief. I talk Mr. Shanks to follow me; he did. I laid hold of the two prisoners; I gave the two prisoners up to Mantz, the officer.

THOMAS MANTZ . On the 5th of November, I was near Somerset House.

Q. Did you see the two prisoners there - A. I did not see them before I took them in custody. We took them to Bow-street. I searched Lavigne. I found three handkerchiefs, and a constables staff. I asked him if he was an officer; he said, no.

EDWARDS, GUILTY , aged 20.

LAVIGNE, GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-71

69. SARAH ROBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , three coats, value 30 s. two pair of breeches, value 1 l. and two

pair of pantaloons, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Bartlett .

THOMAS BARTLETT. I am a master tailer ; I carry on my business in Grosvenor-street, Hanover-square . On Thursday evening, or Friday morning last, I had my shop broken open; it was a shop adjoining to a public-house. I left work on Thursday about half after one in the night; I locked the shop up, and left no one in it; I took the key with me. When I came to work the next morning, I found the door had been bursted open, and near the shop I found a large crow. There were three coats gone, worth thirty shillings; two pair of breeches, and two pair of pantaloons.

Q. When did you see any of these things again - A. On Saturday morning, at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM KING . I am a pawnbroker. On the 26th of November, the prisoner pledged a coat with us, which was claimed by Bartlett, and a pair of breeches on the 26th; I am certain of the prisoner's person. The prosecutor came, and claimed them. The prisoner came to the shop again; I sent for a constable, and she was apprehended.

FRIEND LAWRENCE . I live with Mr. Turner, John-street, Golden-square. On the 26th of November, the prisoner pawned this pair of breeches with me, and a pair of pantaloons.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a pawnbroker, Berner-street, Oxford-street. On the 26th of November, I took in pawn a coat of the prisoner.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-72

70. JOHN RALPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , four three-shilling bank tokens , the property of John Sharp .

JOHN SHARP . I am a butcher ; I live in High-street, Marybone . The prisoner had been my servant near three years. On Friday evening, the 19th of November, I came home a little before ten; I was informed by Mason, my servant, the prisoner had taken money from the bowl. I fetched the watchman in my house, and gave the prisoner in charge; the prisoner was then in bed. The watchman, I, and Mason, went up stairs, into the prisoner's bed-room. I took up the prisoner's working jacket; I asked him if it was his; he replied it was. I gave it to the watchman; he searched it in my presence. In the jacket pocket was thirteen three-shilling bank tokens, a five shilling paper of halfpence, and a shilling.

Q. We have nothing to do with the halfpence, he is charged with stealing four three-shilling bank tokens; can you tell us whether you lost any bank tokens - A. No. Mason can prove that I lost four.

Q. Did he claim these thirteen three-shilling bank tokens - A.He did not. In consequence of the money being found in his jacket pocket, I took out my pocket handkerchief, and the watchman tied up the thirteen three-shilling tokens, and kept possession of it. I gave the watchman charge of the prisoner; he took him to the watchhouse. The prisoner wished me to forgive him.

SAMUEL MASON . On the 19th of November, between five and six o'clock, there were eight three-shilling tokens in the bowl in the desk; I counted them over two or three times. I marked four of them: I made a cross under the neck part. A little after this, I lent a neighbour two three-shilling tokens out of this bowl; they were not marked. I left the four marked ones behind. In the course of half an hour the same person brought two others back; that made the number eight again. Between seven and eight, I saw the prisoner go to the desk; after I had seen him there, I went behind the desk; I then saw five bank tokens had been taken away; they were only three left. I informed my mistress of it. I saw the watchman take thirteen three-shilling bank tokens from the prisoner's jacket pocket, among which were the four marked ones; I picked them out at the watchhouse; they were given to the constable.

THOMAS CARR . I am a watchman. I was taken into the prisoner's bed-room. I searched his jacket pocket; in it I found thirteen three-shilling bank tokens; I tied them up in Mr. Sharp's handkerchief, and delivered them to the constable of the night in the watchhouse. The prisoner begged for mercy.

Mason. These are the four marked bank tokens.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 6 months in house of correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-73

71. MARK ARNOLD and THOMAS HAYDEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a bedstead, value 1 l. the property of William Acott .

WILLIAM ACOTT . I live at Southgate. I purchased some fixtures and furniture in the house of Mr. Gundry, Enfield Chase ; the furniture and fixtures remained in the house after Mr. Gundry had left it, until I had an opportunity of selling them. On the 13th of November, I received information of the house having been robbed, and on the 14th the house was robbed, and on Tuesday, the 16th, the house was again robbed. In consequence of that I went to Winchmore-hill.

Q. Did you find there any cart - A. Yes; when I get there the cart was in the public-house yard, the things were taken out, and lodged in the house; a bedstead I saw, and I have sworn it to be mine; the other things I have no doubt is mine. I am sure the bedstead is part of the furniture I bought at Mr. Gundry's house.

THOMAS PRIOR. I had the care of this house; it was broken open and robbed on Saturday morning, the 13th; when it was robbed again I cannot tell.

ZACCHENS SOAMES . I am a servant to Mr. Acott. On Monday, the 15th, I went to the house to ascertain what was taken away; a bedstead was gone from the library, a copper was taken from the brewhouse. On

the next morning I went to the Kings Head; I there heard the cry of stop thief; I stopped Mark Arnold , he was running in the road.

JAMES JOHN HEAD . I am ostler at the Kings Head. On Tuesday, the 16th of November, Mark Arnold came with a cart to our house; Thomas Haydon and James Lee were with him. The cart came about a quarter past six, it was dark then; there was a fourth man, George Arnold, with the cart; they came into the house to drink; they where in the house a good while. William Bird came to me, and said he thought there were some stolen goods in the cart, he asked me to see who came out of the cart while he went for a constable; a constable came, his name is John Bracken . In the cart was a bedstead, copper tongs, poker, gridiron, a quantity of potatoes, a pair of reins, and a bludgeon; James Lee came out; the constable asked him if he belonged to the cart; he said, I cannot say I belong to it, I am with it. The other men came out, they all ran away; they were pursued. Mark Arnold was brought back within an hour and a half; Hayden was taken in the morning; I am quite sure they are the two men; I know them well; they live just by the Chase.

WILLIAM BIRD . I am a labouring man; I live at Winchmore-hill. On Tuesday, the 16th of November, I saw the two prisoners with a cart, about four in the afternoon, between Winchmore-hill and Palmer's green; they were coming as if towards London; they had no cart with them then; Mark Arnold had a copper at his back, it was beeten together. I saw them again about a quarter after five with James Lee 's cart; the two prisoners were both in company, they were within a quarter of a mile of the Kings Head public-house, Winchmore-hill. About a quarter past six I heard a cart coming up the road, I went out and locked; it was James Lee's cart; Lee, Arnold, Hayden, and George Arnold were in it; they went to the Kings Head. I gave information, and fetched the constable; then the prisoners run away.

JOHN BRACKEN . I am a constable. I took the bedstead out of the cart; I have kept it ever since. Mark Arnold was pursued, taken, and put into my custody.

Prosecutor. The bedstead is mine.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a patrol. I apprehended Hayden at his father's house, on Wednesday morning, he was in a lumber room covered over with dirty linen.

Hayden's Defence. We found the bedstead in the road; I was going to make my brother-in-law a present of it to George Arnold .

ARNOLD, GUILTY , aged 20.

HAYDEN, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-74

72. JOHN SHIRLEY and JOSEPH PARSONS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , one pound eleven ounces weight of bacon, value 18 d. the property of Michael Willshire .

FRANCES WILLSHIRE . My husband's name is Michael Willshire ; he keeps a cheesemonger shop , Titchfield-street, Marybone . On the 8th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner Sirley came in for a quartern of butter; Parsons came in to give him a farthing. I then missed the bacon off the counter; the bacon was nearer Parsons than Shirley. I taxed Parsons with having taken the bason; he said, he knew nothing about it. I went and fetched Mr. Hawkins, the publican; Parsons then took the bacon out of his hat, and asked forgiveness; he was taken to Marybone watchhouse. This is the bacon; it is my husband's property.

SHIRLEY, NOT GUILTY .

PARSONS, GUILTY , aged 16.

Publicly whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-75

73. ELIZABETH SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of November , six books, value 3 s. the property of Charles Fox .

CHARLES FOX . I am a bookseller ; I live in North-place, Gray's-inn-lane . I lost the six books on the 2nd of November; the prisoner opened the door, and came into the shop, there was nobody in the shop; I was in the back-room. I heard the door go; I went out, and saw she had four books under her arm with labels at the back; I saw they were my own. She said, she wanted to sell them, they were given to her by a lady. I took the four books from her. She had a basket; I searched the basket, and found two more books. These are the six books; they are my own; they were taken out of my shop; they are worth three shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. Do not believe him; I found the books.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-76

74. JAMES TOBIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , fourteen pounds weight of raw sugar, value 7 s. the property of James Bellinger .

JAMES BELLINGER . I am a sugar refiner , in St. Mary-street, Whitechapel . The prisoner was my servant .

MARTIN M'LARTLY . I am a sugar boiler at Mr. Bellinger's. On the 19th of November, about five in the evening, I saw the prisoner had his pockets full of sugar, and a small bag of sugar in his breeches. I asked him what he had got in his pockets; he said nothing. I took him before my master. The prisoner took the sugar from his pockets and breeches himself. altogether the sugar weighed fourteen pounds.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-77

75. GEORGE BUIST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of November , thirty-three pieces of leather, value 15 s. the property of Peter Lawrie .

PETER LAWRIE . I am a sadler . I make saddles for the Army. The prisoner was my journeyman .

Q. On the 2nd of November, had you any complaints of any saddle flaps being missing - A. Yes.

in consequence of suspicion, I got an officer. We searched the prisoner's lodging; in a large trunk in the area we found these pieces of leather. I know them to be mine; there is a vein in the leather marked by my press, my press being broken.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had been at home, these pieces of leather would have been worked up and sent home to my master.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-78

76. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a pair of boots, value 7 s. the property of Archibald Lawler .

ANDREW CURRIE . I am apprentice to Mr. Lawler. I saw the prisoner take the boots off the hook as I was sitting at work. He walked past the shop window with them. I pursued him and brought him back to the shop. I took the boots out of his hand, and gave them to my master.

Prosecutor. These are the boots; they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. When the boy came after me, I said, I believe these are the boots you are looking for.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-79

77. CATHERINE BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 lb. weight of tea, value 6 s. and 1 lb. weight of sugar, value 1 s. six nutmegs, value 6 d. four oz. of sugar-candy, value 4 d. and three pieces of Spanish juice, value 4 d. the property of George Bailey White .

GEORGE BAILEY WHITE . I am a grocer and tea-dealer , 47, Shoreditch . The prisoner was my servant . These articles were found under her bed on Sunday, the 14th of November. I was out at the time. On my return home; these things were lying on the kitchen table.

JOHN ROSE . I am a servant to Mr. White. About nine o'clock on Sunday night my mistress was going to lay the children in bed; she felt something hard; she pulled it out, it was two bags under the bed; it was in the prisoner's room; the prisoner's bed is in the kitchen; the prisoner was standing by the side of the bed; these two bundles contained tea, sugar, and nutmegs; the sugar-candy and Spanish juice were found in the prisoner's box.

Prosecutor. I produce the property; I believe them to be mine.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-80

78. MARY BRIANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a great coat, value 15 s. and a quadrant, value 1 l. the property of James Young .

SARAH YOUNG . My husband's name is James Young; he is a seaman . I lost the quadrant on the 25th of November; the prisoner was my servant ; she pledged that and a great coat also.

JAMES RUSSEL . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a great coat pledged by the prisoner in the name of Mary Evans.

MR. MURRAY. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a quadrant pledged by the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. It is my husband's great coat and quadrant.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-81

79. SARAH CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a three shilling Bank token, an eighteen-penny Bank token, five shillings, four sixpences, and twenty halfpence , the property of Edward Thorngate .

EDWARD THORNGATE . I am a publican . I keep the Black Horse, George-street, near Brick-lane, Spitalfields . On Tuesday evening, the 30th of November, after my customers were gone out, I wanted something for my supper. I went out. Before I went out I laid this money on the bar counter; there were 18 shillings in silver. I left it on the bar counter about 12 o'clock at night, and five shillings in halfpence. About 12 o'clock I went to the cook shop to get something for my supper. I locked up the door, and took the key with me. On my return I asked the watchman to give me a light; the watchman saw me to my own door and gave me a light; I saw the money on the bar counter then. I then said to the watchman, if you know a nice girl, we will have a bit of fun to-night. The watchman went away, and left the prisoner in the house. In about three hours the watchman came by and saw the street door open. I then asked the watchman if he knew where the prisoner lived; he said, yes, and took me to the prisoner's room. He and I searched the prisoner's room, and under her pillow I found an old handkerchief with my silver in it. I then told the watchman my pieces of silver were in one three shilling Bank token, two eighteen penny tokens, and two of the shillings were marked.

Q. Were you drunk or sober - A. I was perfectly sober.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. I went to the prisoner's room with the Prosecutor; under her pillow I found this money; the prisoner denied having any money; this is the money.

Prosecutor. Here is one three shilling Bank token, two eighteen penny tokens, two shillings. one stamped T I, the other M Q; the shillings I swear to be my property.

Jury. Q. Did you give the girl any money - A. No, I was to pay her in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-82

80. JAMES WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a hat, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a coat, value 5 s. a

waistcoat, value 3 s. and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of John Sweeney .

CATHERINE SWEENEY . I live in Poplar ; my husband's name is John Sweeney; he is a labouring man . I lost these things from my house on the 10th of November; the prisoner was a lodger of mine. When I found him he had my husband's shoes on his feet.

Prisoner's Defence. The Prosecutrix says, she met me with her husband's shoes on my feet; it was no such thing, they keep a disorderly house; there were other lodgers in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-83

81. ANN WESTWATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a watch, value 30 shillings, and ten shillings in monies numbered, the property of Charles Hasel , from his person .

CHARLES HASEL . I am a corn chandler at Bromley, in Middlesex. I first saw the prisoner on the 30th of October, at eleven o'clock at night, at the Barley Mow public-house, Gravel lane . The prisoner came in, and asked me what I was going to give her to drink. We had a pint of gin hot. I then paid the reckoning and went out to go home. The prisoner followed me out, and asked me to go with her to the third door from the public-house, and as soon as I entered the door, the landlady of the house asked what I was going to give them to drink? I gave her a shilling, she fetched half a pint of gin. I told the prisoner I was a married man. I found the prisoner very busy handling me. I drank a glass of gin, and went out to go home. Going along, I put my hand into my pocket, and missed my money and my watch. On the next morning I went to the house where I had been the night before. I asked the prisoner for my watch; she denied having it. She said, if I had lost it it served me right. I got an officer: he found my watch at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN GEORGE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Cordey, a pawnbroker. On the 1st of December the prisoner pledged this watch with me for 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. this is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. This man accosted me at the public-house. He asked me where I lived; I told him a few doors on. He followed me to my house. On the next morning I found the watch by my bedside.

Q. to Prosecutor. Might not the watch drop out of your pocket - A. I should think not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-84

82. CATHERINE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , a pellise, value 30 s. the property of Elizabeth Symes .

ELIZABETH SYMES . I lost my pellise on the 4th of November out of the back parlour. I have since seen the pellise at the pawnbroker's in Brook-street.

WILLIAM DRAKE . I am a pawnbroker in Brook-street, Holborn. I produce a pellise pledged by the prisoner on the 2d of November for 12 shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the pellise of a Jew for 1 l. 5 s. I pledged it to get some necessaries.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-85

83. JOHN STEERS was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of October , was servant to William Knox , and was employed and entrusted to receive monies for him; and that he being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive 3 s. 4 d. halfpenny on account of his said master, and that he did afterwards secrete, embezzle and steal the said money .

WILLIAM KNOX . I am a broker . The prisoner was my servant; he was entrusted to take my bills and receive the money for me; he received 3 s. 4 d. halfpenny of Thomas Humphreys , and never brought it to accompt with me.

THOMAS HUMPHREYS . I am a publican, a customer of Mr. Knox's. I paid the prisoner for the last bread that he served me, on the 4th of Nov. 3 s. 4 d. halfpenny. I pay as I go on; I have no trust.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Knox being out of the way, I stopped my wages out of the money I received. I had frequently done it before; Mr. Knox never made any objection to it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-86

84. THOMAS SHERIDAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , 10 lb. weight of pork, value 9 s. the property of John Jones .

JOHN JONES . On the 18th of November last, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come up to the door and take the pork off the hook; he went away with it; I followed him about five yards, and took the pork from him. I took him to the watch-house, and from thence to Marlborough-street office.

Q. What quantity did he take - A. Rather better than 9 lb. nearly 10 lb.

Prisoner's Defence. I took hold of the pork; it fell upon the table; I had no intention of taking it away.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-87

85. DANIEL POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , two trusses of hay, value 6 s. the property of Matthew Ashton .

MATTHEW ASHTON . Q. I believe you have some land by Bagnigge Wells - A. Yes, the prisoner was my horse-keeper , he had the care of my yard; we have missed a good deal of hay.

ROBERT HILL . I was in Grays Inn lane on the morning of the 15th of November. I saw the prisoner pass on the opposite side of the way with something bulky; it was two trusses of hay tied together with a rope.

Q. Did you see where he came from - A. No. I asked him where he was going to take that hay to; he told me, to his master in Portpool-lane. I asked him where he had brought it from; he told me, a little way down Grays Inn lane; he was coming as if from Mr. Ashton's; he observed to me that the watchman, whose beat it was in, knew that it was all right. By this time the watchman came up, his name is Lawrence. I said, Lawrence, what do you know of this hay? He said he believed it was all right; the man goes by here every morning with a couple of trusses, and has done so some time. I asked him what reason he had to suppose it was all right? He told me that he had been appointed on that beat five months, and he not thinking it was quite right, he stopped the prisoner. The prisoner told him the same story as he did me; that the prisoner said to him, as you dispute the hay, I will put it down, and I will go and get a person to prove it. With that Lawrence said he went away, and said I will get a person to prove it. He brought a person that said, watchman, it is all right, and therefore Lawrence said upon this occasion it is all right. I said, I don't think it is all right. I told the prisoner to go on. I saw a watchman going along; I told him to follow me. I saw the prisoner go down White-horse yard; he took a key from his pocket, and unlocked a padlock, and rolled the hay in; he shut the door, and locked it up again. I was with him all the time. I told him I was not satisfied about the hay; he must give me something more satisfactory than what he had told me. I asked the prisoner what his master's name was? he said, that was not altogether his master where he had put the hay; he said he worked there occasionally for this man, his name was Hughes; he said he worked for Mr. Ashton at that time. I did not know who Mr. Ashton was. I asked him whether he got the hay from Mr. Ashton; he said he did not, he had it at a corn chandler's shop. the corner of Little James-street, going into Grays Inn lane. I asked him if he meaned to say he got it at the corn chandler's at that time in the morning; he said yes, Sir, I bid the watchman see that nobody took the hay out of the place, while I went to the corn chandler's to know whether any body had hay there at that time in the morning. I went and found no hay had been sold there. I returned immediately. When I came to the place the watchman was there with the hay, but the prisoner was gone. I called Lawrence to stay while I went up to the watch-house to know whether I was empowered to take the man that had received the hay, and while I was gone Lawrence had apprehended the prisoner.

ROBERT ADAMS . I am a servant to Mr. Ashton. I found this hay. I knew the hay by the hands and the tying up, and the bandage of the hay; it is hay from Mr. Ashton's farm; the two trusses are worth 6 s.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday morning Mr. Hughes asked me to lend him two trusses of hay until Tuesday morning, when he went to market he would bring them back again.

Q. Did you ask your master whether he had any objection - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-88

86. SARAH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , 14 yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Blower .

THOMAS BLOWER . I live at 163, Tottenham Court road . I am a linen draper . I lost my cotton on the 10th of November. Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner was brought into my shop with a piece of printed cotton concealed under her cloak. Before that I had seen the cotton hanging inside of the door at an iron. I know it is my property.

JOHN FUSEY . I am shopman to Mr. Blower. On Wednesday afternoon, about three o'clock, Mr. Blower sent me out to receive a bill of a neighbour. I missed a piece of cotton from within the door. As I was going out I looked in the street, and saw the prisoner about ten yards off. I overtook her, and asked her whether she had got a piece of print. She looked confused, and did not answer. I pulled her cloak open, she had this piece of cotton under her arm, it is Mr. Blower's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child; a woman gave it me.

GUILTY , aged 70.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-89

87. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a watch, value 30 s. the property of James Stanton .

JAMES STANTON . I am a plater . I live in Great Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. I lost my watch on Friday night, the 5th of November. I lost it out of my pocket about half past ten o'clock.

Q. Where were you - A. By Wych-street theatre . I had been to see the lights at Somerset House. I went up the gateway. She asked me to give her sixpence; I gave it her; and when I had been with her about two minutes, I was coming away from her; she laid hold of me, and said if I went away from her she would pummel my head. I felt her hand at my watch, trying to get my watch out of my pocket. In about two minutes after she went away from me. I felt if I had my watch in my pocket; it was gone. I went to see if I could see her, I could not. The next morning I went round to the pawnbroker's. I told them if they saw an old fashioned watch, to stop it. The watch came to a pawnbroker's in Holborn; there it was stopped.

MR. BERTON. I am a pawnbroker in Holborn; this is the watch. It was not pledged; the watch was brought by a man; it was given into the hands of the lad; he gave it to me. I sent to Bow-street for an officer; the officer went with the man that brought the watch to the Wheatsheaf, Drury-lane. I was present when the woman said she sent the man.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the watch in a court by the Playhouse in Wych-street; I sent a man to pledge it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-90

88. JOHN SLOMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , from the person of Mary Williams , widow , a pocket-book, value 6 d. and a 1 l. bank note, her property .

MARY WILLIAMS . I go out a nursing . I lost my money on the 4th of November, between twelve and one in the middle of the day; I was in Gray's-inn-lane when I lost it, there had been a fire, there was a Bit of a crowd; the prisoner stood by another man; the prisoner said he would come to my aid; he put his right arm over my left arm, and put his left hand into my pocket; at the same time he took an old pocket-book with a one-pound note in it, and some duplicates; he let me go then. I went a step or two, I put my hand in my pocket, and missed my pocket-book; I turned back immediately to look for him, but he was gone.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. I hope I am not wrong, I have sworn to him three times before. The prisoner is the man that had his hand in my pocket.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . The prosecutrix came to the office, said, she had been robbed; she described his person. I went and apprehended the prisoner. I searched him; I found nothing on him, neither bank note or pocket-book. I told the prosecutrix there was another person of the same description, a person that we suspected, he had only one eye, like the prisoner; I thought she was mistaken.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-91

89. MARY HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , thirty-seven penny pieces, and one hundred and ninety halfpence , the property of John Bullman .

JOHN BULLMAN . I am a publican . I keep the Red Lion, City-road . The prisoner was my servant , her pocket string broke as she was going along the passage, and her pocket being weighty the pocket dropped, copper and all; I saw the contents of the pocket, it was to the amount of eleven shillings in penny pieces and halfpence; I went into the bar, and saw all my new copper was gone out of the drawer. I had seen the copper money in the drawer the over night; it was to the amount of fourteen shillings. The prisoner's pocket fell off just before I came down stairs about ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. What time in the evening before did you see the halfpence - A. I do not know; my son was down in the morning before me.

ANN BAKER . I am a servant to Mr. Bullman. On the 3d of December, between nine and ten o'clock, I was going past the bar into the back-parlour, I saw the prisoner take some halfpence out of a drawer.

Q. Did she use to go to the till to take out halfpence to give change to the customers - A. Yes. She continued in the bar about ten minutes, some time after I followed her to the cellar-door, her pocket dropped off, the prisoner took the pocket up, and put in the drawer. When my master came down the constable was sent for, and she was taken in custody, charged with having stolen the halfpence; she said, the pocket was hers, the copper she had to pay for her shoes.

Q. Had you any dispute with her - A. Yes, the same morning; we very often used to have words.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-92

90. GEORGE VIRGO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , two shirts, value 55 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. two aprons, value 2 s. and a night-cap, value 6 d. the property of James Fisher .

SARAH FISHER . I am the wife of James Fisher ; we live in Mount Pleasant, near Poplar . On Wednesday, the 1st of December, I brought the things in out of the yard, and laid them on the table by the window; this was about a quarter before five at night. I went out to the yard to fetch some more in, and when I came back the things were gone; my lodger came in; he saw the prisoner take the two shirts, stockings, aprons, and night-cap, out of the window. I pursued the prisoner; he was about twenty yards from my house. I made an alarm; the prisoner then threw the things down; I picked up the things, and in about five minutes the prisoner was brought back to my door.

JOHN WHEEL . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner, and the property This is the linen.

Prosecutrix. That is the same linen that was taken from my house.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the linen lie in the road as I walked past, I took it up.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Whipped in jail and discharged .

Reference Number: t18131201-93

91. ALEXANDER CRAYTON , alias CHRISTIE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , two sheets, value 8 s. the property of Daniel Macklaren .

DANIEL MACKLAREN . I live at No. 14, Puckeridge-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner lodged in my house one night, he paid me sixpence for his lodging, he had two sheets to his bed. On the next morning I was sent for to the Fountain public-house; there I saw the prisoner, and my sheets under his arm; I know them to be my sheets; here is my name in full length upon them.

WILLIAM LUFF . I am a publican. I keep the Fountain public-house. On the 28th of October I went into the tap-room, I saw the prisoner offering these sheets for sale; I saw the direction on the sheets; I sent for Mr. Macklaren, he came, and claimed the sheets.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court, being out of employment I took them sheets away; I had no supper on the over night.

GUILTY , aged 36.

To be whipped and passed to his parish .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-94

69. JOHN LITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a sash frame, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Pindar .

JOSEPH PINDAR . I am a carpenter ; I live in the neighbourhood of Brunswick-square. I caught the prisoner with my sash frame in his possession; I took it from him. This is the sash frame; I am sure it is mine. It belonged to a house not finished, about three hundred yards from where I first saw him.

WILLIAM POOLEY . I am a carpenter. I was enquiring after work of Mr. Pindar, as we were going I said, there goes a suspicious man across the field; the person I pointed to was the prisoner. I saw the prisoner going with a sash under his arm; Mr. Pindar ran towards the prisoner, and took the sash from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been eight or nine years in his Majesty's service, at the East Indies. I was out of work, a bricklayer told me to carry this sash for him to the corner of Gray's-inn-lane; I did not know it was stolen; the man was a stranger to me.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131201-95

70. CHARLES HARDING was indicted for that he, on the 8th of November , unlawfully against the will of James Pritchard , did force, and put his left hand into the left pocket of James Pritchard , with intent the goods and chattels therein feloniously to steal and carry away .

JAMES PRITCHARD . I reside at No. 6, Church-row, Fenchurch-street; I am a cooper . On the 8th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, in my way home at the corner of Church-row , at least within a yard of the corner of Church-row, I was met by the prisoner and another man in the front; I was pressed inwards, towards the wall, by his accomplice, while another man, a third person, nearer to me pressed me forwards, towards the prisoner, and the other young man; in this situation I felt the prisoner's hand in the inside of my coat; feeling the prisoner's hand there, I clasped my hands to my breast. My pocket-book being in that pocket, I seized the prisoner by the coller; the other two men decamped. I conveyed him to Mr. Stackwood's; an officer was sent for, and the prisoner was taken to the Compter. I never let him go.

Q. Therefore you did not lose your pocket-book - A. No. I am certain his hand was in my pocket.

Mr. Adolphus addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131201-96

71. HENRY NATHAN was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The plaintiff, and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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