Old Bailey Proceedings, 27th October 1813.
Reference Number: 18131027
Reference Number: f18131027-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 27th of OCTOBER, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Right Honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alexander Thompson , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Christopher Smith , esq. George Bridges , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Payne ,

George Edwards ,

Isaac Norris ,

Thomas Clay ,

William Patten ,

George Vipond ,

Humphrey Messenger ,

Joseph Cottingham ,

Thomas Church ,

James Wilkinson ,

James Lamming ,

Thomas Jones .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Warburton ,

John King ,

John Birt ,

John Stevens ,

John Stainton ,

Christopher Coates ,

Richard Josling ,

James Brown ,

David Steel ,

William Seymour ,

George Bell ,

John Green .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Greenham ,

Thomas Bedell ,

George James ,

Joseph Daniel ,

Richard Langley ,

John Rourke ,

Stephen Bird ,

Saint Hill Lindsay ,

George Warren ,

Owen Morris ,

William Boyle ,

John Morris .

Reference Number: t18131027-1

981. JOHN HOLDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , two bushels of oats, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Bembridge , esq . And THOMAS JONES for feloniously receiving, on the same day and the same place, the aforesaid goods, he knowing it to be stolen .

THOMAS BEMBRIDGE. I know very little of the circumstance of my own knowledge. The officer detected the prisoners.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am a conductor of the patrol of St. Giles's. On the 19th of September I met the prisoner Jones crossing Guildford-street, Russell-square; he had a bag at his back; he waited at Grenville-street. I asked him what he had got there; he threw the bag off his shoulder; I felt it, and said it was corn. He said he had bought it at a corn chandler's. I asked him where the corn chandler lived; he then said, for God's sake let me go. I then took him into a public-house; I told him I must be satisfied where he got it. He then said he had it of Mr. Bembridge's groom, at Mr. Bembridge's stables. I asked him where the groom was to be found. He said, at the mews opposite. I then sent my brother officer to bring the groom to the public-house; he brought him there. When he came in the parlour I asked Jones if that was the man that he had the corn of; he said it was. I then said I should take them both in custody. They both begged I would let them go. Holding, the groom , said his master was a very severe man. Holding did not deny what Jones said. I then sent for a coach, and took them to the watchhouse. Holding said to Jones, it is an unfortunate circumstance, he did not believe that ever before he had given him so much at one time.

Q. How much was there in the bag - A. Two bushels of oats. When I first saw the prisoner he was within a few yards of the stable. I understood him to say that he had been in the stable, and had received them of the groom there.

THOMAS RAMSDEN . I belong to Bow-street office. I was with Salmon when he took Jones into custody. Holding, in the coach, said he gave Jones the corn. He said it was an unlucky circumstance, it was the most that ever he had given him at one time he believed. He said he had milk in return for the corn. He said it was Mr. Bembridge's corn. Jones said he had been to Mr. Bembridge's for it. He was coming in a line from the stable.

Q. to Mr. Bembridge. Holding was your groom - A. He was; he had been so about nine years. My coachman was out of town; the hay and corn at that time was entirely under his care.

Holding left his defence to his counsel.

Jones's Defence. I borrowed the corn. I intended to repay it again.

Holding called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jones called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HOLDING, GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

JONES, GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18131027-2

982. JAMES SKINNER and SOLOMON LEVY, alias LEVY LEVY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a wooden chest, value 18 d. and ninety pounds weight of tea; value 35 l. 7 s. 2 d. the property of John Challenor .

JOHN CAALLENOR. I live at the Stones-end in the Borough; I am a grocer .

Q. When was it you purchased any tea at the India House, of which it is supposed this chest to be a part - A. In June sale last I purchased five chests. I sent for these five chests on Wednesday the 18th of August, by my carman, William Prior . I sent the warrants by him. I have the East India warrant in my hand. Among the number of the chests was number 16947. I did not get that. The value of the tea contained in that chest was thirty-five pounds seven shillings and two pence. I speak now from the warrant. My carman brought four chests home. The chest 16947 was the chest not brought home; that was the one missing:

Q. Did you ever after that see the chest any where - A. Yes, on the same 18th of August, in the afternoon, I saw it in Elizabeth White 's house, in Cobley's-court, Essex-street, Whitechapel. I knew the chest. It is the same number that I have spoken of. The tea was emptied out. I saw no tea there. This is the chest.

WILLIAM HALL . I produce the chest. It was given into my custody at Lambeth-street office, by Mr. Challenor.

Prosecutor. That is the same chest I saw in Mrs. White's house.

WILLIAM PRIOR . I am a carman to Mr. Challenor. On the 18th of August of August I was sent by my master to the India House for five chests of tea. After I had the chests of tea in the cart I had to go to a sugar bakers in Wentworth-street, for a hogshead of sugar, and then I had to take the whole to my master's. I knew how the chests were marked by the permit. I recollect the number of one of the casks was 16947. When I got to Wentworth-street , to the sugar-house I left my cart in the street with five chests of tea in it. I went into the sugar-house with the order for the sugar. I had nobody with me to mind the cart. I was absent from the cart about ten minutes, and as soon as I had put the hogshead of sugar in the cart I uncovered the chests of tea. I took the tarpaulin off, I missed one chest of tea. I immediately went to the office, and acquainted the officers of it. I, on the same day, afterwards, saw the same chest at Mr. White's house, in Cobley's-court, Essex-street. That was the same chest that was missing from the cart; it had the same number on it.

ELIZABETH WHITE . I live at No. 2, Cobley's-court, Essex-street, Whitechapel.

Q. How far is that from Wentworth-street - A. A very short distance.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar - A. Yes, both of them. I never saw them until the robbery was committed, on the 18th of August; it was Wednesday I saw the two prisoners with a chest of tea in their possession. I was in my own house; the prisoners were in the archway that leads to the house where I live. It was about two o'clock in the day. The prisoner, Skinner, stamped his foot on the top of the chest; he knocked the top in; he then said if he lost any of the tea his master would make him pay for it. He then asked me and another woman to hold a bag for him. A third man had the bag.

Q. There was another man with them, was there - A. Yes. The tea was emptied out of the chest; it pinched my hand so, I let go, and would have nothing more to do with it. The two prisoners emptied the tea out of the chest into a black bag. I saw all the tea emptied into the bag, except some that fell to the ground. The other woman let go her hold. The tea was emptied in the bag by the two prisoners. The man that brought the bag he went away immediately. I could not distinguish what he said.

Q. You do not know whether that person or any other person brought the tea into the court - A. I do not.

JAMES SHIPMAN . I live at No. 6, Cobley's-court, Essex-street. I live almost facing of Mrs. White. On the 18th of August I saw the two prisoners with a chest of tea. I saw only two; they were facing my door when I saw them. I saw them empty the tea out of the chest into the black bag. Mrs. White was helping the men while they were emptying the tea. Thomas Skinner lifted the chest while it was emptied. When the tea was put in the bag Skinner took it away upon his shoulder. The other prisoner and he went away together; they left the chest in the court. Mrs. White took the chest into her house.

JOHN LITTLEJOHN . I am a shoemaker; I live at No. 18, Wentworth-street.

Q. How far is that from the sugar-house - A. About three hundred yards. I live near Essex-street. On Wednesday the 18th of August, about two o'clock, I was coming down Wentworth-street; I saw a cart standing facing of Mr. Coslett's gate, a sugar-baker. I saw the cart standing. I saw no carman. The prisoner, Skinner, I then saw standing about twelve yards from the cart. Skinner had two Jews with him. I knew Skinner before; I cannot speak to the others.

Q. Did you see what there was in the cart - A. I saw something in the cart. It was covered over with a tarpaulin. I did not know what it was. I went home. In about half an hour after I was at home some of my children were in the street; I heard them cry, that induced me to look out of the window. I saw the prisoner, Skinner, coming along with a black bag upon his back, and something heavy in it by the appearance; he was bustling on fast.

Q. Was any body with him - A. No, he went to a neighbours of mine, about six doors off. He went in there with the bag; he went into Levy's house. He goes by the name of Levy Pop .

Q. You know where Mrs. White's house is, do not you - A. Yes, he was coming from that way; he was about two minutes walk from Mrs. White's house.

Q. When was it you saw Skinner after this - A. In about half an hour after this I saw him in the hands of two officers of Lambeth-street office.

Q. Was he dressed the same as when you saw him before - A. No.

Q. You knew him - A. Yes, I had seen him before, but the other men that was with him I do not speak to.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street office. On the 18th of August, Prior (the carman) came and gave information that a chest of tea had been taken out of his cart; it was near three o'clock. Hall and I went to Lion Levy's house, in Wentworth-street. When I went into the house I saw the two prisoner and another person that is not taken; they were along with Mrs. Levy, the mistress of the house. I told Mrs. Levy that I had just got information that a chest of tea had been brought in there. She said she knew nothing of it; I said I must look over the house. I left my brother officer to take care of the three men while I went up stairs. I found no tea. Upon my search we had no information against these men. I had not seen any of the witnesses then at that time. We left the house, and when we came out we consulted, and we returned in again, and finding Skinner in the house, not knowing him, we took him with us. The others we left, we thought we should be able to find them. After Skinner was taken to the office, I saw Mrs. White. When the prosecutor saw Skinner he told him that he had seen witnesses that had seen him steal the tea. As soon as Skinner heard that he confessed the whole; he said it was done by him and the other men; he said it was the first time that he had ever done any thing of the sort, and he had received two pound of Mrs. Levy for his share of the tea; he helped Mrs. Levy to put the tea into a sheet. Levy was not taken up until after last sessions. We went back to the house of Levy, the two men were gone. We searched Levy's house the second time, we could not find the tea. Skinner said, that Levy (the prisoner) had also two pounds of Mrs. Levy. Mr. Challenor brought the tea chest to the office. It has been in my fellow officer's possession ever since.

- HALL. I was with Mr. Griffiths. I have heard his account, it is correct. I searched Skinner; I took from him a two pound note; he said that was his share that he received for the tea.

COURT, Q. to Prior. As near as you can say what time of day was it when you left your cart in Wentworth-street - A. Between two and three.

Q. What is the name of the sugar baker at whose door you stopped - A. Coslett.

Skinner said nothing in his defence.

Levy's Defence. I was coming past this alley, I saw two young men that I had never seen before in my life; they had a chest and a bag in their hands up

this alley; one of them asked me to hold the bag open for them; I held it open, and in a short time I walked away. I have never seen them since. Then after that I went into the place at the back of Mr. Levy's house, which is a large yard, and there were several people playing at ball, and different games. I went in, and played among them. I had been there a quarter of an hour when some young fellows said there is some officers coming, we had better go away. Some of them run out of the yard. I went into Mr. Levy's back room, and sat down there. I saw the prisoner, Skinner, sitting in the room with another young man.

SKINNER, GUILTY , aged 22.

LEVY, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-3

983. JOHN HARWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , a gelding, value 50 l. a saddle, value 2 l. and a bridle, value 15 s. the property of William Kerr .

JOHN LANGDON . I am a servant to Dr. Kerr; he is a physician ; his Christian name is William. The prisoner had been in Dr. Kerr's service about two months. He had left the Doctor's service about five weeks before the Doctor lost his horse.

Q. Did you see the horse on the night of the 2nd of October - A. Yes. about half past seven o'clock in the evening, on Saturday. I fed him, and left him safe in the stable. He had a halter on, and was fastened to the manger.

Q. Is there a door out of the coach-house into the stable - A. Yes, the stable door was not bolted; the coach-house door that led into the street was bolted. The prisoner had been there in the afternoon about twenty minutes. He let me in the stable yard, and passed into the street the way that he came in. He went away about a quarter before five. I saw no more of him. I went to the stable about five o'clock on Sunday morning; upon my going there I found the horse was gone. The back door of the stable was wide open; the door of the coach-house was open leading into the stable yard; the coach-house door, leading into the street, was shut, but not bolted.

Q. Was there a saddle and a bridle - A. Yes. After I missed the horse I went into the saddle room and missed the saddle and bridle. It was a curb bridle, with black reins. I then communicated to my master that the horse, saddle, and bridle were gone. I enquired of the London Mail respecting the prisoner and the horse. I got from them an account that such a man had been on the road. After that, I went to Stanmore in Middlesex; I saw the prisoner there, and Dr. Kerr's horse. I saw the prisoner at the Abercorn Arms; the horse was at Dr. Guest's, a farrier's. The horse that I saw at Dr. Guest's, was Dr. Kerr's horse. It was the same horse that I lost out of the stable; he was a chesnut horse, with a bald face. The horse appeared to me to have been rid hard; he had been down, and broken in his knee, his nose, and his head. The prisoner was in hold at that time at the Abercorn Arms, in the tap-room. I saw the saddle and the bridle in the stable at the Abercorn Arms; they were the property of my master. I am sure they were the Doctor's bridle and saddle. The next time I saw the prisoner was at the magistrate's. I am sure that the horse that I saw at Dr. Guest's, at Stanmore, was Dr. Kerr's horse.

Q. You did not see the prisoner and the horse together - A. Yes, I did, down at the magistrate's.

RICHARD ARNOLD . I am a butcher. I live at Dunstable; that is in the Northampton road from town. I first saw the prisoner as I was standing at my own door on Sunday morning, the 3d of October; he was upon a chesnut horse. I saw that horse afterwards at the magistrate's. He came along the road as if from Northampton to London. I received information; I went in pursuit of him on horseback. I came up with him at Stanmore, in Middlesex; he was standing at the stable door of the Abercorn Arms, and I saw the horse in the stable as I passed by. I sent for a constable; a constable came; his name is Chapman. I told the constable to take him in charge for stealing the horse; the prisoner denied it, and said it was not Dr. Kerr's horse.

WILLIAM ROOK . I am the ostler at the Abercorn Arms. On Sunday, a little after three in the afternoon, the prisoner came in on a chesnut horse with a bald face. The horse seemed very much tired. He desired me to give the horse some hay and water. He said he had but a very little time to stop. The horse appeared to have been rid hard, he had two broken knees, a cut on his nose, and a cut above his eye. I gave the horse a little hay and water. The horse was in the stable. Mr. Arnold, the butcher, of Dunstable, came and asked if such a person had been there. I shewed the prisoner to Arnold; he was at the stable door; the prisoner was delivered over into the charge of the constable; the horse I took care of. I believe one of the post boys took the horse to the farrier. That horse that the post boy took to the farrier was the horse that the prisoner led into the stable. There was no other chesnut horse with a bald face there. The prisoner took that horse into our house.

FRANCIS CHAPMAN . I am a constable at Stanmore. I apprehended the prisoner at the stable door of the Abercorn Arms. Arnold gave me charge of him on suspicion of stealing Dr. Kerr's horse. I asked Arnold his name and address. He told me to keep the prisoner in custody until he went to Dr. Kerr's. I kept him in custody until Tuesday, then Arnold and Dr. Kerr's coachman came to me. I took him then before the magistrate.

Q. When you had the prisoner in custody had you any conversation with him - A. Yes; he owned to every thing. I promised him no favour, nor threatened him. He owned to stealing the horse; he said he was a guilty man, that he had offended the laws of his country. I took him before the magistrate, and the ostler rode the horse down to the magistrate.

Q. to Langdon. Was the horse that the ostler rode to the magistrate, Dr. Kerr's horse - A. Yes, it was. I fed and attended the horse. My master gave fifty guineas for it. It was a riding horse.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the

Jury, there were no locks broke. I hope you will be so good as to ask the coachman if he saw any thing of that. I trust to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-4

984. ELIZA BARTLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a sheet, value 8 s. a handkerchief, value 9 d. two shifts, value 8 s. and a gold broach, value 15 s. the property of William Fassett , in his dwelling-house .

MARY FASSETT . My husband's name is William Fassett; he is an upholsterer , in Clifton-street, Finsbury-square ; he rents the house. The prisoner lodged in our house with her mother.

Q. What age is she - A. I believe she is thirteen years of age. They had lived with us five weeks before this happened. Their apartment joined my bed room up two pair of stairs.

Q. What was the mother - A. A widow. I did not know any thing of them until they came to lodge with me. On Saturday the 16th of October I missed a sheet from out of my drawer in my bed room; that drawer was not kept locked. I missed two shifts at the same time, a black and white silk handkerchief, and a gold broach. I had seen them in the drawer the Monday before.

Q. What was the mother - A. The mother worked at home at straw bonnets, and the girl worked out at sattin stitch work.

Q. You did not keep your room door locked, did you - A. No, nor the drawers. On the Monday following the Saturday I went round to the pawnbroker's. I found my sheet pawned at Mrs. Crouch's, in Paul-street, Finsbury-square. I have found nothing else. The prisoner was taken up as soon as I found the sheet.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Mrs. Crouch, pawnbroker, Paul-street, Finsbury-square. I produce a sheet pawned on the 14th of October, by the prisoner. She told me that she brought it from her mother, she was a lodger in Cilfton-street. I lent her three shillings upon it. She pawned it in the name of Ann Bartlett, her mother's name.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. It is my sheet; I marked it myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the sheet to pawn, and nothing else.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-5

985. FREDERICK BLOXAM was indicted for that he, on the 11th of May , feloniously did make an assault upon Richard Smith , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a pocket-book, value 6 d. a 20 l. bank note, a 10 l. bank note, two 5 l. bank notes, and sixteen 1 l. notes, his property .

RICHARD SMITH . I am a butcher in Cannon-street in the City .

Q. Were you in Wellclose-square any time in the month of May - A. Yes, on the 11th of May, between nine and ten at night, I was coming through the square; the prisoner run against me; I rather rebounded him from me; then he said, God bless me, it is Mr. Smith; he shook hands with me, and asked me if I had my little horse; I told him, no. He then said, do not you remember Frederick Smith that lived in the Highway. I said, I do not recollect you now, you do not follow butchering. No, said he; he said he worked at the India House. He then said, we have not seen one another a good while, shall we go and have something to drink. He took me by the arm; we went up Graces-alley, into a public-house at the end of White Lion-street, to have something to drink. We had two pints of beer there; we sat facing one another. I stopped in the house about ten minutes; we drank the beer; I got up to go home. I put my hand into my pocket to pay for the beer. I pulled my pocket-book out. I then took a shilling out to pay for the beer; I put my pocket-book in again; then directly I came to the door to go home; he said he was going my way home, he would go with me. He took me by the left arm, and we went up White Lion-street. On the left hand side there was a great deal of scaffolding; they had been repairing five or six houses; we went in and out of the scaffolding several times, and people run against me I remember.

Q. You say he had hold of your left arm - A. Yes, and I had hold of my umbrella in my right hand.

Q. Then you had no hand at liberty to guard your pockets - A. No. When we had cleared the scaffolding about ten yards he decamped all at once; he said, there, and when I had walked about ten yards by myself, as near as I can guess, I clapped my hand, I missed my pocket-book immediately. I cannot swear he took it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-6

986. THOMAS SHERVILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , half a pound weight of nutmegs, value 5 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

WILLIAM HAYES . I am a labourer in the East India Company's service. I was employed in the same warehouse as the prisoner; that warehouse contained spices. There was a great quantity of nutmegs in that warehouse. On the 17th of September I observed the prisoner; he put his hand and took a handfull of nutmegs from the sieve; he dropped a few back again; he put the rest of them into his left hand coat pocket; he went away, and came back again to the sieve, and took a few more of them; he went away, and came the third time; he took up a few more again, then he went away. Mr. Brown, the elder, came up, I reported it to him, and he reported it to the warehouse-keeper.

Q. Are you sure that the hand that put was put into the sieve belonged to the body of the prisoner - A. Yes.

ROBERT FROST . I am the chief clerk of the Spice warehouse. I directed the prisoner to be searched. Clare found upon him half a pound of nutmegs; they are of the value of five shillings.

JOHN CLARE . I am a constable. I searched the

prisoner; I found upon him half a pound of nutmegs underneath his drawers, between the drawers and his skin, and a few in his coat pocket.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-7

987. WILLIAM CONDALL and ELIZABETH MONTAGUE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a ridicule, value 2 s. five keys and a ring, value 2 s. a smelling-bottle, value 2 s. 6 d. a silver pencil-case, value 2 s. 6 d. and a pocketbook, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Mary French .

MARY FRENCH . I live with my father; he keeps an oyster-shop, Giltspur-street . On the 18th of September I left my bag on the table in the parlour. My bag contained a smelling-bottle, pocketbook, five keys, and a pencil-case. The prisoners came into the parlour; the bag with the articles was in the room when they came in; it was not there when they went out.

Q. What are the prisoners - A. I do not know: they came into the room to eat some oysters.

WILLIAM FRENCH . I keep an oyster-shop in Giltspur-street. On the 18th of September, the two prisoners came into my shop; they asked for some oysters; they had eighteen-pennyworth of oysters, and a pint of porter; no other people were in the room but the prisoners. My daughter came out, and said she had lost her bag; I came down the Old Bailey; I mentioned the circumstance to two officers; they said, they had seen him in the yard. I went home. They came to me about a quarter of an hour, and said, they had found the prisoners; they had searched them, and found my daughter's property on them.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I am an officer. I received information of Mr. French, that his daughter had been robbed. I apprehended the prisoners at the Pitt's Head. On Condall I found a smelling-bottle, and on searching Montague I found the remainder of the property, except the bags and keys. Condall acknowledged that he had done it, and said, he was very sorry for it. Montague said, that Condall gave her the property; she did not know that he had stolen it.

- SMITH. I am an officer. I was in company with Eldridge. As Eldridge found the property he gave them to me. I produce them.

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

Condall's Defence. I went into this man's shop to have some oysters; when I came out there was something on the floor; I kicked it before me; I picked it up, and when I came out I gave it to the woman; that is all I know of it.

CONDALL, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

MONTAGUE NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-8

988. THOMAS HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , nine pounds weight of bristles, value 20 s. the property of Matthew Prime Lucus , John Blenkarn , John Durkall , and Joseph Barnes .

JOHN BLENKARN was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-9

989. WILLIAM HOFFMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a silver watch, value 2 l. the property of John Croft .

JOHN CROFT . I am a Prussian. Hoffman is a Dutchman. On the 18th of October, the ship that I belong to laid at Deptford . At half past one the prisoner went below, broke my chest open, took my watch, and some shillings besides.

WILLIAM FROST . I am a patrol. On Tuesday evening, the 19th of this month, John Croft told me he had been robbed by one of his shipmates. I went into the Black Eagle public-house, and took the prisoner. He delivered me a duplicate; the officer has got it.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am an officer. I produce the duplicate.

CHARLES TERRY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a watch pawned by the prisoner on Monday. The duplicate produced by the officer is my duplicate.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-10

990. ROBERT CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , ten pigs, value 28 l. the property of Robert Moate .

ROBERT MOATE . I live at Westwood, in the parish of Abbot Langley, in Hertfordshire . On the morning of the 11th of this month I missed from my yard ten pigs; two of them sows, and eight barrow pigs. I heard that they had been stopped in Smithfield. I found the whole ten on the Monday following; my servant found them on the Sunday. I suppose they were taken on the night of the 10th.

Q. How far are you off London - A. About twenty-three miles from Smithfield.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am a butcher; I live at No. 9, Coppice-row, Clerkenwell. I saw the prisoner bring the pigs into Smithfield, and he sold them there on the 11th.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before - A. No. I am sure he is the man. My neighbour brought three at three pound each; his name is Parkes. Parkes bought a sow and two barrow pigs; Shivvell bought the rest, seven: six barrows and one sow. I thought they were sold at an under price, and that the man could not come honestly by them. Shivvell gave him a one pound note earnest for the seven; he was to give thirteen pound for them. Shivvell went home for the remainder of the money. The prisoner went into the Bell to wait for him. In the mean time he was gone I went in and asked the prisoner where he brought the pigs from. The prisoner said he brought them from near Hitchen, on Sunday he said. I asked him where he came from that morning; he said, from Edgware. I said it was out of the way to come round about that way; it is forty miles to come round that way. I fetched Joseph Lumley , an officer, to him; I gave charge of him. Soon after, the prisoner wanted to go for a

glass of Jackey, as he called it. He was permitted, but the officer went with him. As soon as he drank his gin he wanted to go out into the yard; the officer said he must go with him. He then said, what the hell do you want with me. He bent his fist; I thought he was going to knock the officer down. I told the officer if he commanded me I would assist him. I said, you had better take him before the magistrate at Guildhall; accordingly we did.

JOSEPH LUNLEY . I am an officer. Mr. Palmer gave me charge of the prisoner on the 11th of the present month. I asked the prisoner how he came by the pigs; he said, what is that to me, he wanted his money. I told him he must stop before he had his money. He said, will you let me have a glass of gin; I said, yes, and wellcome. He had his glass of gin; he went out of the back door; I said you must not go away; he doubled his fist up at me. I then took him before the Alderman.

JOSEPH ORTON . I know no more than my brother officer has stated.

WILLIAM PUDDIFORD . I am Mr. Moates's servant; I live with him. I saw the pigs in a yard in Smithfield; there were ten. I am sure they were all my master's property.

MR. SHEVVILL. I am a butcher. I bought seven pigs of the prisoner; they are the same that the officer looked at. I put them into the yard in Smithfield. I am sure the prisoner is the person that I bought them of.

CHARLES PARKES . I cheapened two barrow pigs and a sow of the prisoner; he said I should have them for three pound a piece. These were three of the same that were drove to the inn. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I followed him a week to the Compter, and fed him and the pigs, because he said they were his own property.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-11

991. WILLIAM HOGG , JOHN HILL , and JAMES BOND were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , a ham, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Benson and Charles Miles .

THOMAS BENSON . I am one of the partners at Garraway's coffee-house . Charles Miles is the other partner.

Q. What were these men - A. They were dustmen . On the morning of the 27th I was called up about seven o'clock. I went down stairs. On my coming down stairs the prisoners were secured in the cellar by our men, and the ham that was said to be taken was in the coffee-room.

GEORGE BAXTER . I am a waiter to Messrs. Benson and Miles. On the morning of the 27th of September I was apprised by my fellow servant that Bond, the prisoner, had taken a ham, and emptied it into the dust cart. I went to the cart, and there I found the ham covered with dust. I took it out of the cart, and brought it into the coffee-room. I then secured the cellar window and the top cellar door, and kept them in the cellar. I then sent my fellow servant to call my master up, and I went for an officer.

WILLIAM JONES . I am cellerman to Messrs. Benson and Miles. On Monday morning the dustmen came between six and seven. In the course of some little time afterwards I perceived the prisoner, Bond, empty the basket in a suspicious kind of a way; he threw the basket down with his left hand, and covered the dust over with his right, which made me suspect that master had lost something, I acquainted my fellow servant of it. I went down in the cellar and counted the hams; I missed one. I saw the ham after it was brought back; it was my masters by the appearance and by the size; it had got no mark on it. I am sure the the prisoner, Hill, did not see it put into the cart, nor was he there when the ham was put into the basket.

JOHN STEVENS . I am an officer. On the 27th I took these men into custody. I produce the ham.

Baxter. I have no doubt it is my master's property.

Hogg's Defence. I am innocent. I got into the dust-hole; I could not see what was in it.

Hill's Defence. I never saw any thing of it.

Bond's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn. I never had it in my hand, nor never saw it.

HOGG, NOT GUILTY .

HILL, NOT GUILTY .

BOND, GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-12

992. THOMAS ALLCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Salter , from his person .

SAMUEL SALTER. I am a watch-finisher ; I live at No. 4, Brackley-street, Golden-lane. I lost my watch on the 12th of this month in Fleet-street, by St. Dunstan's church , about four o'clock in the morning. I had carried some work home; I stopped out until that time. I was a little fresh, and unwell likewise. We stopped to have a bason of coffee, and while it was getting ready the prisoner and some others rushed against me. I lost my watch; I saw the prisoner. My friend took the prisoner the very instant it was done. My friend stood by the side of me. I did not see the prisoner take the watch. There were four or five of them altogether.

JOHN LINDSAY . I am a watch motion maker. Me and my friend were out that morning: we went to have a bason of coffee, and as we were waiting for the coffee the prisoner came up and took his watch out of his pocket. I seized the prisoner; I never let him go until I handed him into the watch-house. The watch has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was having some coffee. I know nothing of his watch.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-13

993. PETER EDINBURGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , two jackets, value 4 s. two waistcoats, value 4 s. four

shirts, value 4 s. two pair of trowsers, value 4 s. two pair of drawers, value 6 d. the property of Alexander Allen ; three shirts, value 3 s. a pair of trowsers, value 1 s. a jacket, value 4 s. and a bag, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Ellis .

ALEXANDER ALLEN . I am a seaman on board the Mansfield. The Mansfield lay at Hoare's wharf, on the Wapping side of the river .

Q. Was the prisoner a seaman belonging to the Mansfield - A. No. I lost my things on board the Mansfield; they were in a bag on the forecastle; the bag was tied up; they were taken about half past one in the morning. I had seen them safe in the bag when I went to bed at nine o'clock at night. When I was called up my clothes were on deck. The prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a seaman on board the Mansfield. On last Tuesday morning, between one and two o'clock, I stopped the prisoner, he had gone up the hatchway with the second bag; he had been in the forecastle; he had Ellis's clothes in a bag when I laid hold of him. Allen's clothes were upon the deck.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Thames police officer. The prisoner was brought to the office by the last witness and Captain Duncan. I examined the bags; one contained wearing apparel claimed by Allen, and the other bag by Ellis. I produce them.

Allen. These are my clothes.

Ellis. This bag contains my clothes.

GEORGE DUNCAN . I am master of the vessel. I heard the alarm about one o'clock. The prisoner had no right in my ship. He was seized with these clothes about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them in my hands.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-14

994. JOSEPH ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , in the dwelling-house of John Lloyd , one 20 l. bank notes, and two 10 l. bank notes, the property of James Matthews .

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a sailor : the prisoner is a sailor : I have known him these five years. On the 1st of October I met him; we went to John Lloyd 's eating-house, Wych-street, Drury-lane ; Mr. James Hall went with us.

Q. Had you a pocket-book - A. I had; I had in that pocket-book a twenty pound note, two one pound notes, a two pound note, and five one-pound notes of the Deal bank. The great notes were bank notes. I am sure I had them in my pocket when I went into Wych-street. I took the prisoner and James Hall there to dine. I laid my pocket-book alongside of me on the table; after we had done dinner I went out with Mr. Hall to pay the reckoning, and just before I got out of the door I missed my pocket-book. I said, d - n it, I have left my pocket-book behind. I immediately went back again to the box where I was sitting, and found the prisoner just coming out of the box.

Q. Had any body been in the box but you three - A. No. When I came to the box I found my pocketbook under the tablecloth; it was closed; I took it up, and put it under my pocket. I did not look into it till the next morning. I had plenty of silver about me for any thing I might want. On the next morning when I looked into my pocket-book, I missed a twenty-pound note, and two ten-pound notes. I have seen one of the ten-pound notes since. I know it by the writing upon it. That night I did not sleep at home; I left my pocket-book at a shipmate's of mine.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody; I found this ten pound note upon him.

Prosecutor. I am sure that is my note: I received it in Deal dock-yard. This is an old note, and mine was an old note.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18131027-15

995. JOSEPH FERGUS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas Trivett , on the 9th of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a handkerchief, value 18 d. a bag, value 6 d. a thimble, value 1 s. a pair of spectacles and case, value 36 s. and a eighteen-penny bank token, the goods and monies of Thomas Trivett .

ELIZABETH TRIVETT . I am a married woman: my husband's name is Thomas Trivett . I live in High-street, St. Mary-le-bone. On the 9th of October, I was coming from Piccadilly, down Albemarle-street , about nine o'clock in the evening; my eldest daughter was with me; she is in her twentieth year; I had a small bag in my hand, with the strings three times folded round my hand, and some one passing by me snatched it out of my hand; a man snatched it out of my hand with great violence; I saw the man run away with the bag in his hand; I called stop thief, and the man was taken.

Q. Do you know the person that took it - A. No. I called stop thief, and in about five minutes a black man was brought by the watchman into Albemarle-street; the black man was the prisoner. The watchman brought the prisoner and my bag; he shewed me the bag; I believe it to be mine. I told him it was mine. He said the prisoner was the person that dropped it. By the contents in it, it must be mine; there was a pair of spectacles, a pocket-book, a silver thimble, a small pin-cushion, and one eighteen-penny bank token; those things were in the bag at the time I lost it. The watchman took him to the watchhouse, and there I identified the property. I went to the watchhouse by compulsion; I did not wish to prosecute any body.

Q. That is a general rule of yours, is it - A. That of humanity is, and I hope it always will be. On Monday morning I went before the magistrate.

Q. Then you are not able to say the prisoner is the person that snatched the bag from you - A. No. I am not.

JAMES FRANCE . I am a green grocer. I was passing along Albemarle-street, at the end next to Piccadilly; on Saturday night the watch was going past nine; I heard the cry of stop thief at the other end of the street; I saw two or three

running in the middle of the street towards me; I made a stop at the corner of Stafford-street, to see who was coming; I saw the prisoner about twelve or fourteen yards before some more people; I stood there until he came almost opposite of me, thinking he was going into Piccadilly; instead of passing me he turned short and went into Stafford-street; he then had one hand under the lappel of his coat. I suspected him to be the person after whom the cry was raised. I ran after him, and overtook him before he got into Bond-street; I catched him by the collar; he said I took the wrong man. I told him he must stop until the watchman came up; at the same time a person who is here said he had dropped something. I looked and saw something on the ground about a yard from us, and just at that time the watchman came up; I saw the bag picked up and given to the watchman. The prisoner was taken to the lady, and the bag. Then we went to the watch-house. The watchman took the prisoner and the bag to the watchhouse. At the watchhouse, Mrs. Trivett owned the property. The bag was left there with the constable of the night. I saw the prisoner was a black man. He was never out of my sight from the time I saw him until I apprehended him.

RALPH GARROW . I am a servant; I live in Albemarle-street. I was coming along Stafford-street, going towards Albemarle-street; I heard the cry of stop thief; at the corner of Albemarle-street the prisoner passed me; he ran very quick; he came up from Grafton-street, towards Piccadilly, along Albemarle-street; he turned the corner of Stafford-street towards Bond-street, when a person came from the opposite side and seized him by the collar.

Q. Who is that person - A. Mr. France. I went to his assistance, and we gave him into the hands of the watchman. I perceived a bag drop from his hand, from underneath the prisoner's coat; just at that time he was given into the hands of the watchman. A person that stood by took the bag up, and gave it to the watchman, and said to the prisoner, you have dropped something. The prisoner made no answer. I did not go to the watchhouse with the prisoner. I went afterwards and gave my address to the constable of the night. The constable of the watchhouse came to me on Monday morning, and told her to attend at Marlborough-street office. When the prisoner turned the corner of Stafford-street I observed him to be a man of colour.

THOMAS GULLAN . I am a watchman. I was on duty that night at nine o'clock; soon after I was on duty I heard the cry of stop thief; I was on the side of Albemarle-street, near Dover-street. I took towards Grafton-street; I saw the prisoner running on the opposite side to me; he was running very fast towards Piccadilly. I sprang my rattle, and called out stop thief; he gained ground of me. When I came to the corner of Stafford-street I observed the prisoner stopped by Mr. France. I am confident he is the man, although I was not swift enough to take him. He was never out of my sight. I went up, and took hold of him, and told him he was my prisoner. Some person called out, watchman, he has dropped something. I did not see him drop any thing at that time. A person gave into my hands a small white bag. I took the man and the bag to the person that gave the alarm. I met Mrs. Trivett, she owned the bag. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and the bag I gave to Clark the constable.

EDWARD CLARK . I am a constable. I was at the watchhouse when the prisoner was brought there. The watchman delivered the bag to me. This is the bag; the contents in it are the same as when it was delivered to me.

Prosecutrix. It is the bag that I lost; I made it myself. The spectacles and case are mine, and the pocket handkerchief and thimble are mine; I had them in my bag, and I had an eighteen-penny piece in my bag.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Old Burlington-street; at the bottom of Albemarle-street I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw some person running from two ladies. I did not know who they were. I ran after them, and going along I saw some man at the top of Albemarle-street, coming from Piccadilly. I saw a man running before me; he went into Stafford-street; he was about twenty or five-and-twenty yards before me. When I got about a little way in Stafford-street he came across the road and caught hold of my shoulder. I asked him what he caught hold of me for; he said he did not know; he had his wife with him; he said he had heard the cry of stop thief; he thought I was the person; I said I was not. I knew myself innocent; I made no resistance. I knew nothing of the bag; it was dropped some yards off me.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-16

996. DANIEL GRIFFITHS and JOHN DURHAM were indicted for feloniously assaulting Peter Ryan , on the 18th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. a watch chain, value 6 d. and a watch-key, value 1 d. his property .

PETER RYAN . I am a turncock ; I live in Mordon-street, Commercial-road. On the 18th of September me and wife were in Whitechapel-market , by a wine-vault door, when this happened. A woman run against me, and knocked some halfpence out of my hand; I gave her a push; Griffiths came up at that moment, and said, d - n your eyes, can you strike a man? I said, I did not want to strike a man or a woman, all I wanted was to take up my halfpence. I laid down my basket to take up the halfpence, I was hit on both sides of my head, and knocked down, by Griffiths and Durham. I rushed into the public-house to protect myself; I saw the woman and the two prisoners come out of the same house; they pursued me into the public-house; my watch was gone before I went into the house; I felt them pull it out. When I got into the public-house they both began to strike me, and I struck them, with that they knocked me down again. My wife threw herself over me to save me when I was down.

They went away, and I followed them to see which way they went, and I went to Lambeth-street office.

Q. Did you endeavour to take them - A. No The prisoners went up George-yard; I did not follow them past that place; I went to the office then. The prisoners were taken in about twenty minutes, at a public-house in Wentworth-street; the officers accompanied me there, and we took them; they were then taken to the watchhouse, and searched: nothing was found upon them. I have never seen my watch since.

Q. Is your wife here - A. No.

Q. You do not know who the woman was that ran against you - A. No; nor did I ever see the prisoners before to my knowledge.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I was called on by the last witness; I and Griffiths went up George-yard as the prosecutor said they went that way; we went into the Princess of Wales public-house, in Wentworth-street; the prosecutor there pointed the two prisoners out; they were sitting with some girls; we took the two prisoners into custody; we searched them, and found nothing upon them. They denied any knowledge of the prosecutor's watch; they said, they had been striking an Irishman. Denham said, see where the Irish thief has torn my jacket; they wished they had given him more of it.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . Q. You have heard what had been said by Miller - A. Yes; I agree in what he has related exactly.

Griffith's Defence. I was coming towards Whitechapel; I met Durham; him and me went into a public-house to have something to drink, and as we were coming out the prosecutor came in; a girl with us ran against the prosecutor, and knocked some halfpence out of his hand; he struck the girl. I said, why do not you strike one of us; he struck me. Durham said, if you strike her I'll strike you; they got a fighting. The prosecutor pulled off his top-coat; they fought near a quarter of an hour; after that this man came back, and said, he had lost his watch; he never mentioned any thing about it before.

Durham's Defence. The same.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-17

997. HENRY STEWART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , three loaves of sugar, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of Thomas Boot , senior, and Thomas Boot , junior.

THOMAS BOOT , SENIOR. I am a grocer ; I live in Liecester-squrre . My son, Thomas Boot , is my partner; the house belongs to me; the shop and warehouse belongs to me and my partner. I pay the rent and taxes. The prisoner was my carman.

Q. Had you missed any tea or sugar - A. No, not till it was brought back.

JOHN HODGES . Q. You had some tea and sugar of Stewart - A. Yes; three loaves first, and then some tea. I had one loaf near two months ago; the other two loaves was about a month ago, and two the next time, and a pound and a half of tea I believe at the same time. He came in the stable yard. I drive for Mr. Fincham. The prisoner was carman to Mr. Boot; he brought the sugar to me to ask a young man of the name of Potter to buy it. I did. He bid me ask seven shillings for one loaf of sugar, and the other eight.

Q. How much were you to ask for the tea - A. Seven shillings and sixpence; there was a pound and a half; I sold Potter these things.

Q. Did you know where he got them - A. No more than the dead; I never asked him; I passed them to Potter.

- POTTER. I am a porter at No. 10, Marybone-street, Golden-square. I had the sugar of Hodges; the first loaf of sugar I paid eight shillings for, and seven for the other; the last tea I had I paid seven shillings and sixpence. I had no dealings with Stewart at all.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a City officer. On Sunday morning, the 28th of September, Barrett, the officer, and I were in company together in Thames-street, about half past six o'clock in the morning, we met Potter in Thames-street; he had a bag upon his shoulder with two loaves of sugar in it; we searched the lodgings of Potter. On Monday, afternoon we searched Stewart's lodgings; we found nothing that belonged to his master. This is the sugar that we found upon Potter. We took the prisoner in custody on Monday afternoon; he said, he knew nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18131027-18

998. WILLIAM BISHOP and THOMAS TURNER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , one sheep, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Wood , esq .

JAMES SEERS . I live in Halliford, near Banbury; I am a labourer.

Q. In September were you at any time returning from Charlton in company with a man of the name of Fitzwalter - A. Yes, about seven weeks ago; I cannot say the month.

Q. Where is Charlton - A. In Banbury parish; it was about five o'clock in the afternoon; I saw one of the prisoners against Mr. Wood's field on the road side; the other in the field; Bishop was outside, and Turner inside.

Q. Whereabouts was this field - A. The field was near Littleton, in Littleton parish . I was walking from Charlton, towards Staines.

Q. What was Turner doing - A. He drove a flock of sheep into a corner of the field; he caught one of the little sheep, he tied its legs, and he laid it down while a strange man passed along the road.

Q. While Turner was tying this sheep where was Bishop - A. Bishop was outside with a wheelbarrow, and while the strange man was going by Bishop laid down by the barrow, and when the strange man had passed by Bishop got up; Turner came out and saw how far the strange man had gone down the road; I saw him look down the road after him. Then Turner put the sheep over the bank; Bishop and Turner put the sheep into the barrow; the prisoner, Bishop, wheeled it away; he took it towards Sunbury.

Q. Did you know Turner before - A. Yes, and Bishop both; Turner was Mr. Wood's servant. I spoke to Bishop when he was going away with the sheep in the barrow; I said you have got him; he answered, yes. I am sure of him. It was a fat sheep.

JOHN FITZWALTER . I am a day labourer; I work for Mr. Hardyman. I live at Upper Hslliford. On the afternoon that the sheep was taken out; I had been to Charlton; I was going up the Staines road, together with Seers.

Q. What was your business there - A. I had done work, I went over to Charlton; I was going round to do my horses up again; I was going home to Halliford; going round that way I saw the prisoner Turner in Mr. Wood's field, and Bishop out in the road. Mr. Wood's field is in Littleton parish.

Q. Where were you when you saw the men - A. In the Charlton-road.

Q. Was there any hedge or fence between you and Mr. Wood's field - A. There was Mr. Till's fence between them and me: the field stands between two roads.

Q. You were in the Charlton-road; next to you was Mr. Till's field - A. Yes. and next to that was the Littleton-road. Mr. Wood's field is on the other side of the road; Mr. Wood's field is one side of the road, and Mr. Till's field the other.

Q. Does this fence go all round Mr. Till's field - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any fence to Mr. Wood's field - A. Yes; it is in the Charlton-road, behind the fence of Mr. Till's field.

Q. While you were standing there what did you see Turner do - A. I saw him tie a sheep's legs; I was about two hundred yards from Mr. Wood's field.

Q. Could you see at that distance from Mr. Wood's field - A. Yes; I stopped to see what they were going to do with the sheep. I saw Turner, the shepherd, drive the sheep in a corner; Bishop was in Littleton-road. Turner caught one of the sheep; Bishop had a wheelbarrow; after I came up Turner tied the sheep's legs, and after that he drove the rest away, while a strange man passed along Littleton-road.

Q. When the strange man passed the road what did Turner do - A. Turner, the shepherd, came back, and looked over the bank; that was after the man had passed. Bishop had laid down; he got up just after he had gone by. When Turner delivered the sheep to Bishop, he put it over the bank, and with the assistance of Bishop he put it into the barrow; Bishop wheeled the barrow away, towards Sunbury, along the Littleton-road.

Q. Did you afterwards speak to either of the men - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did he drive the sheep up Littleton, where is it - A. Just at the end of Charlton-road. He drove the sheep just by us.

Q. Does the Littleton-road cross the Charlton-road - A. Yes, it crosses it.

Q. How far from the place where you was standing, does the Charlton-road meet the Littleton-road - A. About an hundred yards.

Q. Did you speak to them - A. No. I did not. Seers was with me.

DANIEL NEENS . I am a bailiff to Mr. Wood.

Q. Had you the charge of all Mr. Wood's sheep - A. Yes. Turner was his shepherd, under me; he gave me an account of the sheep every Saturday. and he did the Saturday before the 24th.

Q. You then learned from him how many sheep there was - A. No more than what he killed; he said, he killed one for the house on Saturday, the th of September.

Q. Did he say how many he had left - A. No.

Q. You remember when Turner was apprehended, do not you - A. Yes; on the 24th of September.

Q. After Turner was apprehended, did you count the sheep - A. Yes, the fat ones; there were ninety then; I did not count the flock sheep.

Q. Did you find how many there was missing - A. Yes; on the 25th there were five missing of the flock sheep, and two fat ones. The five flock sheep I never saw again.

Q. At present he is only charged with stealing one sheep; was that a flock sheep or a fat sheep - A. A flock sheep, but in good order. The three fat sheep were found previous to this one being charged to be missing; this flock sheep was never found; the five were never found; they were all gone.

Q. In the field in which Fitzwalter has described, were there any other than flock sheep in that field - A. No fat sheep.

JURY. Q. Was it customary for this man to keep sheep among your master's - A. No, he never did.

Q. Are they allowed to deal in sheep - A. In many places they allow it; some do allow it, and some do not.

Q. Are you aware of that indulgence to have been allowed to the prisoner of keeping sheep of his own - A. That never was at squire Wood's.

Q. Did you ever notice a sheep without his mark to it - A. No.

Q. Had your master any particular mark to his sheep - A. Yes, T. W.

Q. Was his flock all wethers - A. All wethers.

Q. There might be such a thing as the prisoner having a sheep and you not knowing it - A. He might have it for a little time.

Q. Did you ever hear from him that he had bought any sheep - A. I never did.

Bishop's Defence. I bought the sheep of the shepherd; he told me it was his own; I gave him thirty-five shillings for it; this sheep was a ewe sheep; the esquire does not keep any ewes. There was no mark on this sheep at all; all the rest were marked; and I bought some of another shepherd, a next door neighbour; I thought it no more harm of buying of one shepherd than the other. I bought the sheep of this man; I paid him for it. As I brought it home I met Richard Puppett ; I took it home to my house on the Wednesday; there it staid till the Friday alive; I killed it on Friday; the skin hung in my place for a week afterwards. Another butcher of our place bought five of this man; he is a respectable butcher; he bought the five of him

before I bought the one of him. I am sure it was not the 'squire Wood's, because there was no mark about it; besides it was a ewe sheep; I had it home by day light; I paid for it.

Twner's Defence. I sold him the sheep; it was not Mr. Wood's; I bought it on the road of a man. I thought it no harm to sell it to Mr. Bishop. The two witnesess, Seers, and Fitzwalter, were in Mr. Wood's cover, hunting the rabbits about; I saw them in the cover a long time; I took no notice of them; they have only mentioned it out of spite; when I was taken in custody they mentioned to Mr. Wood that Mr. Bishop brought the sheep to me; it was about twelve o'clock in the day time when Mr. Bishop fetched the sheep. Mr. Bishop never laid down at all; he came over the hedge and took the sheep; I went about my business; it was my own sheep.

Bishop called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Turner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JURY. Q. to Seers. When he drove the sheep up in the corner, did he take any particular sheep, or did he take one by chance - A. He stood and looked at them about two minutes, then he took hold of one of the hind legs.

Q. to Fitzwalter. Did you observe that - A. I did not take so much notice as that.

Mr. Challenor. How long was it before you acquainted Mr. Wood's bailiff of what you had seen - A. About three weeks; I never gave any information until they were taken up. I only gave information after the shepherd was taken up.

Q. Can you give any reason why you did not tell sooner - A. No.

BISHOP, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 50.

TURNER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

[ The prisoners were recommended to mercyby the jury, on account of their good character; and on account also of the witnesses not coming forward sooner, to give information of the sheep being stolen .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-19

999. HENRY CHAMBERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a gold chain, value 2 l. and three gold seals, value 5 l. the property of William Burdon , from his person .

WILLIAM BURDON . I am an attorney . On the 18th of September, I was coming out of Fleu-de-lis-court, it was a little past nine o'clock; I had got past Wright's oyster-shop, between that and the coffee-house; a man was playing a hand organ, and a number of children collected round. When I passed Wright's oyster-shop I entered the narrow passage that leads into Fleet-street ; I suspected nothing upon earth; as soon as I had passed the children I was surrounded by three or four men; I was hustled by them in a violent manner; one of them was particularly active, both at any job and my coat pocket; I was afraid to call for assistance, knowing that these fellows have always sharp weapons about them; by mean of the lamp I was able to distinguish that one of them was a short man, with a blue coat on. That lamp casts a great light, it does almost into Fleet-street.

Q. Look at the prisoner; has he the appearance of that man - A. He has, but I cannot swear to him. After I had been hustled, and my fob and pockets attacked, the four men dispersed in all directions; immediately they were gone I felt in my pockets for my seals and chain; I found they were gone; my coat pocket had been cut with a sharp instrument, from the bottom to the top; I then went home under the impression that my watch was gone; my home was near. As soon as I got home I related the circumstance; I found my watch was not gone; the chain had been cut off as it were; there was not an article of the chain. I came immediately to the spot to try to find a patrol or a constable; I met Carlisle on the spot; I told him the description of the man. I learned from Carlisle that he saw the transaction. He told me that he should have the man before he slept. I was not present at his apprehension. I never saw him before Monday morning, before the stiting Alderman.

Q. That lamp gave you a light to discover the man; did you know his counterance or his dress - A. His dress; the clothes of the man corresponded; particularly the size, and the blue coat.

Mr. Adolphus. Do not you think the man that stopped you was shorter - A. I should think not.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am an officer. On Saturday night, the 18th of September, I was near Fleur-de-lis-court; I was coming down Fleet-street when I heard the music, the mouth organ, about nine o'clock, or a few minutes after; I was in the court when Mr. Burdon was coming down; I saw the prisoner come on before Mr. Burdon; I followed him on the left hand side; when Mr. Burdon came about half way under the arch-way one shoved him behind; they began to shove him from one to another; I kept my eye upon the prisoner, and in the hustle I saw him lay hold of the gentleman's chain with his right hand; I saw him double it up together, and put it in his right hand breeches pocket, then directly there was a word spoke, they let Mr. Burdon pass down the court, and they went away.

Q. How many of them were there - A. There were four of them; I tried to lay hold of the prisoner, but they fastened me up against the wall, and shoved all before them; I was forced down the court, and Mr. Burdon; I tapped Mr. Burdon on the shoulder; I said, sir, do not go, you have been robbed, and at the moment after he came back I went to a place and took Matthews with me, and took the prisoner at the Golden Key, in Fleet-market, there I found the prisoner; there were seven or eight of them altogether at that time.

Q. Had you known him before - A. Yes, these six or seven years, at the Golden Key. I said to him, young man, I want you; he said, you b - r, what do you want. I said, never mind, I want you, and have you I will; a tall man said directly, you shall not have him; I said, I would have him. They all got up; two more City officers came in at the same time; I turned round, and said, I want your assistance. I secured him. When my brother officers came up, he had got his knuckles under my chin, and threw me on the table; my breath was almost gone, I could not call out; luckily my brother officers came up, and we secured him.

Q. Was Mr. Burdon's chain and seals hanging down - A. Yes, they were. I saw Mr. Burdon come up, and knowing what they were, that particular made me attentive. I saw the chain before the hustling began; the prisoner had on a blue coat that night.

Mr. Burdon. It is my usual practice to put the chain and seals in my pocket, and I did so that night.

- MATTHEWS. I searched the prisoner. I was there at the time. The account that Carlisle has given is quite correct.

Prisoner's Defence. Carlisle knows nothing of me. Matthews came into the Key and pointed me out; my having a blue coat on, he told this man to swear to me; and by, a false promise of Mr. Bardon to my mother; he told her he thought I was innocent, and he would have nothing to do in it. I have got nobody to speak for me.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-20

1000. JOHN CADWALLADER and JOHN PROCTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a large key, value 1 s. thirteen other keys, and a ring value 1 s. a silver mustard-spoon, value 6 d. a silver cruet-frame, value 1 s. a pair of knee-buckles, value 5 s. a pair of other buckles, value 10 s. two pair of shoes, value 8 s. two pair of pistols, value 10 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1 s. three shirts, value 6 s. four pair of breeches, value 18 s. three coats value 12 s. a smelling-bottle and case, value 5 s. five broaches, value 10 l. a gold chain, value 10 s. a gold trinket, value 1 s. two silver clasps, value 1 s. a remnant of irish cloth, value 5 s. and a loose body of a dress, value 4 s. one guinea, seven half-guineas, a seven shilling piece, and a thread case, value 2 d. the property of Thomas Bridges Hughes , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS NUNN . I live at 19, Great James-street, Bedford-row.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hughes's house in Great Millman-street - A. I do; No. 3, his house is. I was desired by Mr. Hughes to give an eye to his house while he was out, before he went out of town. My house is in the neighbourhood of Mr. Hughes's; we are in an angle by the chapel. Mr. Hughes left town on the 6th of October, and his family. On the morning of the 7th, about half past six I stood at my own door.

Q. How is your door situated with respect to Mr. Hughes's - A. My door is direct in a corner, and Mr. Hughes's running into Millman-street is a complete angle across; mine is the corner of Great James-street, and as I stand at my corner I see direct into Mr. Hughes's house if the door is open.

Q. Now, sir, at half after six, having an opportunity of looking into the house, what did you observe - A. I stood at my door, and saw a man standing at Mr. Hughes's door; there was a man standing on the steps of the door; I did not like the appearance of this man, which caused me to watch the man; I had stood about two minutes, when I saw the two prisoners at the bar come out of Mr. Hughes's house.

COURT. Was either the prisoners the man that you saw at the steps - A. No; that was another man. I wish to observe, I first saw the third man, and afterwards the two prisoners coming out of the door.

Q. Was the door open when you first saw the man at the steps - A. No. I saw the door open when the two men come out; I have not sworn to John Procter .

Q. You first said the two prisoners; you mean to correct yourself - A. Yes; I saw two men come out of the house; I am quite sure Cadwallader is one of them: I believe Procter to be the other man that came out of the house with Cadwallader; I do not swear that; the reason I did not swear that Cadwallader coming out it struck me with such astonishment. The second man I could not ascertain his face.

Q. Then, if I understand you, Cadwallader came out first - A. Yes. I could not observe so much the face of the other man, but from his general appearance I believe him to be the other man. Cadwallader had a large white canvas bag; he swung it over his shoulder after he came out, and the man that I believe to be Proctor, he had a black bag. Upon their coming out I lost the third man altogether; I did not see what became of him.

Q. Did not you call out to him - A. I did. I do not remember the words verbatim; what are you doing there; what have you got, and what are you going to do with the property; some such words, or to that effect. They neither of them gave any answers. Cadwallader came directly before me under the chapel; the other turned down Millman-street, and crossed over the way at the end of the chapel, as if for New Ormond-street. I must observe for a moment, I came to my door nearly undressed, with my smallclothes on, and my stockings. At that moment I did not wish to go to the prisoners, but finding they did not answer me I called out stop thief, directly. Upon seeing Cadwallader take to his heels and dropping the bag, I pursued them. Cadwallader came directly before me under the chapel, walking orderly still with the bag. Upon my crying stop thief, he took to his heels. I then pursued him. He took straight along Chapel-street, which leads into Lamb's-conduit-street; he ran up Great Ormond-street. I still continued to cry stop thief, which had occasioned a number of people to pursue. When he had turned the corner, and gone up Great Ormond-street. I then thought proper to go back, from the situation I was in; I was fearful on account of my dress. I went home and dressed myself.

Q. Do you know what became of the bag that Cadwallader dropped - A. My lad went to pick it up; I told him not, but to follow the man. I believe when I came back the bag laid in the same situation that it was dropped. I saw it. A friend of ours, his foreman came and picked the bag up; his name is James Adams ; he is here; he was a person I knew.

Mr. Knapp. Was that the same bag that you saw

drop from Cadwallader - A. Yes, the white canvas bag; he brought it into my shop; I have had it in my possession ever since. About ten minutes had elapsed when I saw Cadwallader brought back again by my door. I then told the prisoner that he was the man that came out, and went with him to the watchhouse. Robert Percival , my man, brought him back. I saw him examined at the watchhouse. I saw taken from him a great number of skeleton keys, a dark lanthorn, two parcels of small keys, and the key of Mr. Hughes's chambers, some gold, one guinea, seven half guineas, a seven shilling piece, and some silver. That is all I know.

COURT. How far is your shop, (the corner where you were standing) from Mr. Hughes's door - A. It is not thirty yards, I think. Mine is a corner shop, an oil shop. When Cadwallader was walking with the bag he dropped it where I think he was not fifteen yards off me.

Q. Had you lost sight of him from the time that you saw him, in pursuing him - A. Yes, in turning round the corner of Chapel-street, into Lamb's-conduit-street, but I recovered it again. I continued in sight of him after he turned into Ormond-street, and then I left the pursuit to others who were pursuing him. Robert Percival began the pursuit when I did.

ROBERT PERCIVAL . I am a servant to Mr. Nunn. When my master gave the alarm I was in the shop; upon hearing the alarm I saw Cadwallader come over the crossing by Mr. Hughes's house; I went out immediately upon the alarm. When I first saw Cadwallader; he was about two yards from Mr. Hughes's house. I saw him drop the bag under the chapel window, in Chapel-street; directly he dropped the bag he began to run; I ran after him; he ran into Lamb's-conduit-street, down Chapel-street; he went straight from Chapel-street into Lamb's-conduit-street, and then turned to his right until he came to Great Ormond-street; he went into Great Ormond-street, running all the time, I pursuing him. He ran up Devonshire-street, turned the corner of Queen-square, through Boswell-court, into East-street, Red Lion-square. He was stopped by Mr. Mason. I saw him stopped by Mr. Mason.

Q. Had any persons joined you in pursuing him - A. Yes, there were a great many people pursuing him behind. I was about ten yards before them. I never lost sight of him.

Q. Did you go up to him after he was stopped by Mason - A. Yes. That man that was stopped was Cadwallader. and I am quite sure he is the man that I saw drop the bag; I am positive of it. I went to the bag, picked it up, and laid it down again. It was a white bag; it was the same sort of a bag as I afterwards saw in my master's possession.

Q. Who brought the prisoner back - A. I and Mitchell; Mr. Mason said he could not. We brought him back to my master.

JAMES MITCHELL . I am a mason. On the morning of the 7th of October, about half past six o'clock, I was at the corner of Chapel-street, in Great James-street; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw Cadwallader coming out of Mr. Hughes's house; I saw him come out of the door; he had a parcel with him; I followed him; he went down Chapel-street as fast as he could; he took the course the last witness has mentioned, and when he got a few yards to Queen-square I got before him; I attempted to catch at him; he offered to strike at me with this weapon, this iron crow.

Q. Did he hit you - A. No, he did not hit me; his attempting to strike, that induced me to let him go on. I was under the necessity for a moment to let him go on; seeing the weapon I made way for him. He turned into Devonshire-street, through Boswell-court; I still followed him, and never lost sight of him down into East-street; in East-street a gentleman that is here happened to run across to him and stopped him.

Q. What is that person's name -

Mr. Reynnlds. His name is Mason; I shall call him next.

Mitchell. I went up to him; I and Percival took charge of him, and brought him back to Mr. Nunn's.

Q. You have got that instrument in your hand - A. Yes, this crow I took out of his hand when I collared him.

COURT. Had he it in his hand when you collared him - A. Yes, I took it out of his right hand. I went with him to the watchhouse, and I took this iron crow to the watchhouse. I shewed it to Mr. Hatton.

CHARLES MASON . I am a potatoe dealer; I live in Boswell-court. On the morning of the 7th of October I heard the cry of stop thief, about half past six. I had just opened my door. The prisoner, Cadwallader, came running by; I suspected he was the man they were pursuing. As soon as I saw a mob of people running after him I upon that run after him; I overtook him at the end of Boswell-court; I made a catch at him; as I went to lay hold of him he up with his two arms, and turned round; he endeavoured to strike me. I did not perceive any thing in his hands. I pursued him down East-street; I laid hold of him, and held him until Percival and Mitchel came; I could not stop; they took him away.

DAVID PEARSON . I lodge next door to Mr. Nunn's, in Chapel-street. On the 7th of September I happened to be looking out of the window about half past six o'clock.

Q. Now, look round, and tell me whether you know either of the men at the bar - A. I did not take particular notice of them. I remember Mr. Nunn calling to a man; I heard him speak to him; I could not hear particularly what he said. I saw the man drop a bag opposite my window, in front of the chapel, about the middle of the foot pavement. I kept sight of the bag until Adams came and took the bag up; he laid it down again; then Adams came and took the bag, and carried it into Mr. Nunn's shop.

Q. Did the man that dropped the bag immediately run away - A. Yes, and Mr. Nunn cried out stop thief.

JOHN ADAMS . I live at 104, Lucas-street, Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. Did you happen to be in Great James-street

on the morning of the 7th of October - A. Yes, about half past six o'clock; I was going into the factory gate in Great James-street; I am foreman there. It is right opposite of Little James-street; it is a cabinet manufactory. Just as I entered the factory gate I heard the cry of stop thief, about twenty minutes past six. I directly went back to Great James-street; a young man was standing opposite of the gate leading into Little James-street; went over to him; he said, there, that is the man.

Q. I understood you crossed to the corner of Little James-street - A. I went to the man that stood at the corner; this man pointed out to me a man and a bag; his name is George Harvey . That bag was laying at the end of the chapel, about half way in Millman-street, I looked over, and saw the bag. I said, if that is the case I will stop him. I made over to the man; he took the flap of his coat under his arm, and set off running as fast as he could, and cried out stop thief.

Q. Who was the man - A. I rather believe it was Proctor; I cannot swear it. He ran up Chapel-street, into Lamb's-conduit-street. I picked the bag up, and carried it to Mr. Nunn's. That bag was dropped opposite of Mr. Nunn's door.

Q. Did you see more bags. Where was the bag lying that you picked up and carried to Mr. Nunn's - A. It was lying opposite of Mr. Nunn's, opposite the chapel; it was a white canvas bag. I saw a black bag that was dropped in Millman-street: I did not see it dropped. It was lying on the pavement, and the man when I first saw him was about five or six yards from the bag.

Q. How soon after you picked up the bag you carried into Mr. Nunn's was it that you saw a black bag I saw the black bag first.

Q. Whereabouts in Millman-street did you see that - A. On the left hand side, next to the chapel, on the foot pavement.

Q. Now, how far down the side of Millman-street, part of it is the chapel - A. Yes; it appeared to me to be better than half way down where the bag lay.

Q. And you saw that at the corner of Little James-street - A. Yes, and another witness that is here saw it. I saw that at the corner of Little James-street. At that part I could command a view of both sides of the chapel, the side of the chapel in Chapel-place, and that side in Millman-street.

Q. The next bag you saw was in Chapel-street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any body with that bag - A. I saw a man coming from the bag as it were, from the corner of Chapel-street into Chapel-street.

COURT. You did not see him drop it - A. I did not; the young man pointed out the man that dropped the black bag in Millman-street; I tried to stop him; as soon as he saw me going to take him he took up the corner of his clothes and ran off; went to stop him; he took his coat under his arm, and set a running, holloaing stop thief; he went up Chapel-street, into Lambs-couduit-street; I pursued him as far as the corner of Chapel-street, and I returned back again; that man turned up as for Ormond-street; he turned to the right.

Q. You, however, did not pursue him - A. I did not. I went back to the black bag.

Q. Did you find it in the same place - A. Yes; there was a lad stooped for it just at the time I went up; he said, he was going to take it to the watch-house, as the man was secured and taken there; the lad is here. I looked up Chapel-street, there I saw the white bag; there was nobody at the white bag; when I went up to it I picked it up, and carried it to Mr. Nunn's. The black bag the boy took charge of. I know nothing more.

Q. The man that you saw run away are you able to speak to him - A. No; I rather believe it was Procter; I cannot positively speak to his person.

GEORGE HARVEY . I am a bricklayer; I live in Whetstone Park, Lincolu's-inn-fields. On the 7th of October, Great James-street was in my journey to work. About half past six, when I got to the corner of Great James-street, I heard Mr. Nunn cry out stop thief; about a minute after I saw Procter; I am certain I saw the prisoner, Procter; I have no doubt of his being the man; he was coming towards me from Millman-street, he was walking fast, he had a dark coloured bag on his shoulder; when stop thief was called, he dropped the bag near the post, at the chapel door, in Millman-street.

Q. In what street did he drop the bag - A. In Great Millman-street, in the street in which Mr. Hughes's house is in; he was coming in a direction as if to me, he returned back again into Millman-street; he was not gone back half a minute before he returned to the bag again, the same bag that he dropped; he kicked the bag, and stooped as if to pick it up; he turned about and saw me; he then spoke to this effect, d - n them, they have left some of their things here. The prisoner, Proctor, then went down Chapel-street; he left the bag, and went towards Lamb's-conduit-street. I went after him into Lamb's-conduit-street, and followed him into New Ormond-street; I then called, stop thief, stop him, for the first time. I saw a person of the name of Nichols, catch him. Nichols took him to the Foundling watchhouse. I then went to my work. Nichols came to me where I was at work, and told me I must go to the watchhouse.

Q. How came Nichols to know where you was at work - A. He worked in the same place. I went to the Foundling watchhouse, I saw the prisoner, Proctor, sitting there. I was certain that he was the person that I have been describing. I saw Proctor searched: on his person I saw some phosphorus and matches, with brimstone at the end; the matches were broke in half, and a piece of wax candle about three or four inches long, four plaid handkerchiefs, and a plaid handkerchief with some tea in it. Three skeleton keys were brought in by some person that is here; I do not know his name.

Q. Do you know what became of the black bag - A. It was brought to the watchhouse while I was there.

Q. Had the dark coloured bag the appearance of the bag that you have been describing - A. Yes; I have no doubt in the least that it was the same.

Q. When you first saw Proctor he was coming in

a direction as if from Millman-street - A. Yes. The reason that I knew the prisoner again, I never lost sight of him; I kept my eye upon him all the time. He turned his head.

Q. Why did he then turn his head - A. I was in his front; the prisoner was stopping at that time to the bag; he turned his head, and saw me, and returned back.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . I am a painter and glazier, I live at 38, in Lamb's-conduit-street. On Thursday, about half past six o'clock in the morning, I was standing at my front door; upon my hearing the cry of stop thief I ran to the corner of Great Ormond-street, I there stopped two or three minutes before I saw Procter; after hearing the cry about two minutes I saw Procter; he was walking. I heard the cry of stop thief from different voices, Harvey likewise saying, that is the man. I pursued Procter, and stopped him; he was running when I took him. The moment I pursued him he ran; I came up to him two thirds of the way down New Ormond-street; I took him to the watchhouse at the Foundling hospital; I did not see him searched. A dark bag was brought in by James Fisher .

JOHN CLINE . I am a servant to Mr. Wilson, Theobald's-road. On Thursday the 7th of October, I heard the cry of stop thief, at the bottom of Millman-street, beyond the chapel; then I went up Millman-street, towards Great James-street. I then came up Millman-street. I got up at the upper end of Millman-street before I came up to Procter. I came up to the prisoner, Procter, pretty near the chapel; he was on the same side as the chapel; I was on the same side.

Q. When you saw him was he walking - A. No, standing still. He had a dark coloured bag with him upon his shoulder; he dropped the bag, and walked away from it. He dropped it just by the chapel door, in Millman-street.

Q. What became of him - A. He turned by the chapel in Millman-street, into Chapel-street. I went down Chapel-street after him. I then turned back after I saw somebody go after him. When I returned back again I picked up the bag where he had left it in Millman-street; a young man that is here came and took the bag out of his hand; his name is Fisher.

Q. Did you go to the watchhouse afterwards - A. No.

Q. Did you see prisoner, Procter, taken - A. I saw him caught hold of.

Q. After you saw him drop the bag you saw him going away from it - A. Yes.

Q. You returned, and there you saw the bag where you had seen it before; is that the truth of the case - A. Yes.

Q. to Harvey. What time were you speaking of - A. Half after six, rather sooner than later.

Q. You have been telling us you were going to work, you heard the cry of stop thief, you saw the prisoner going from Millman-street, what time was that - A. It was about half a minute after I heard the cry of stop thief; the alarm of stop thief made me stop to look; I saw him drop the black bag near the chapel door. Directly the man came back, I followed him; I run as fast as I could. I thought it better for me to follow him as far as I could, until I came within one door of the chapel.

Cline. It was a little below the chapel I saw the man drop the bag; when he returned to it he went up to it, and then he went away, and then it was that I followed him into Chapel-street.

JAMES FISHER . I am a poulterer; I live in Lamb's-conduit-street. On the 7th of October, about half past six, I heard the cry of stop thief; I immediately ran out of the shop, and ran down Chapel-street, into Millman-street; going into Old Millman-street, round the left, I met Cline.

COURT. That is the same Millman-street that you have been speaking of.

Mr. Knapp. Yes.

Cline. That is the man I gave the bundle to.

Fisher. I met the lad, Cline; the lad stooped and picked up the bag; the lad held the bag to me, and said this is the bag that one of the men dropped.

Q. Where was it in - A. In Millman-street, just by the chapel door. It was a dark bag; there was something in it, it felt bulky. I then took the bag into New Ormond-street. I offered the bag to the man that had taken the prisoner, his name is Nichols. He desired me to bring it down to the watchhouse. I did so. I took it to the watchhouse at the Foundling; I gave it to Lillywhite, the watchhousekeeper. It was in the same state as when I took it from Cline.

- LILLYWHITE. I am watchhouse-keeper at the Foundling estate. On the 7th of October I received charge of Procter, about twenty minutes before seven o'clock. The witness, Nichols, brought him in, in company with Fisher, with the bag. Nichols gave me charge of him. I asked him what the man had done. He said he could not inform me; he would fetch a man that could; he heard the call of stop thief. Then he left me, and fetched Harvey. Harvey came and said the prisoner was the man that dropped the bag, I searched the bag; in the bag I found two pair of boots, and two pair of shoes. It is a black bag. It contains another bag inside. I searched Procter; I found on him gold broaches, gold lace, some cotton handkerchiefs, silver knee and shoe-buckles, a silver snuff-box, a smelling-bottle and case, two gold rings, this pearl box, with gold sleeve-buttons in it, a silver thimble, a gold chain, and a garnet necklace, a silver purse, with half-a-guinea in it, a phosphorus bottle, matches, and candle, three matches and a bit of wax candle, a pen-knife, a silver ladle for wine, a seven-shilling piece, three shillings, and a small bit of silver. Here are three skeleton keys that were delivered to me by the witness, Wilson. That key opens Mr. Hughes's street door when it is on the double lock. That is a large one; the others are two smaller ones; a pair of silk gloves, and a gold band. The prisoner, Procter, said to Harvey, when he said he was the man, he said, mind be careful that he did not speak wrong. The skeleton keys were delivered to me in this green bag. Almost all these articles were in his left hand coat pocket, and a handkerchief with some tea in it was in his right hand coat

pocket, and in searching him, this box was dropped in the ashes at the watchhouse.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a plumber, In Theobalds-road. On Thursday, the 7th of October, I was in Millman-street, I heard the cry of stop thief, in the morning; I saw Procter standing nearly opposite of Mr. Hughes's house. I am sure it was Procter.

Q. Did you see any thing picked up there - A. No; I was going back to pick up these keys, on the opposite side of the way. I saw Procter standing nearly opposite of Mr. Hughes's house; I was walking towards Great James-street, Bedford-row; I picked up a green bag, containing three skeleton-keys. That is the green bag that the last witness produced; I picked it up about three doors from Mr. Hughes's house; Procter was then taken. I saw the people in pursuit of Procter, I joined the pursuit. I went back a few yards with them; when I returned I picked up this green bag about three doors from Mr. Hughes's house, on the same side. I took the bag and the keys immediately to the watchhouse, and delivered them to Lillywhite, and there I saw Procter.

Q. Now, was Procter at the watchhouse, the same man that you saw standing in Millman-street - A. Yes; I have no doubt at all of it.

Q. to Mr. Nunn. Produce the things from the other bag - A. This is the bag that Cadwallader dropped: this is the white bag spoken to first; I have had the custody of these things ever since; they are precisely the same things as were delivered to me with the bag.

MR. HUGHES. I reside at No. 3, Millman-street, Bedford-row.

Q. I believe you left town for the vocation on the 6th of October - A. I did. I requested Mr. Nunn to have an eye to my house. He is a good neighbour, and an honourable man.

Q. Was your clerk instructed to sleep in the house during each night - A. I desired my clerk to sleep in my house during my absence; his name is William Matthews .

Q. When you left your house was it in a state of perfect security - A. I left a servant in it; I cannot speak to the state of the house. Most of the articles which were produced to me before the magistrate were left in a room, and locked up by me before I went on that morning, safe in my drawing room, on the ground floor.

Q. Will you tell me whether there was a chamber key in that drawing-room - A. There was a door-key hanging up in that room, which the constable has got here; the key of my chambers in the Temple; I had left two pair of boots, and a pair of shoes, in an inner room, not in the same room; one room opens into the other; I took the key of the inner-room into the country with me. That is the key; it was produced by Hatton.

MR. HATTON. I am beadle and watchhousekeeper of St. Andrew's. The key which Mr. Hughes had in his hand just now, on searching Cadwallador, I found in his left hand coat pocket. That is the same key; I marked it.

Mr. Hughes. That is the key of my chambers in Pump-court; I have had it many years. I am perfectly sure that is my key; it was left in the room. The boots I knew perfectly well, by one pair having been let out in the front; the other old pair by having been worn of one side, only they are not right and left; the old shoes I believe are mine; there is a silver snuff-box.

COURT. These things were found upon the person of Procter - A. Yes; the snuff-box I knew perfectly well; it shuts not quite close, there is a little elevation on the upper part of it; I have had it some years, it has been but little used; I know it. I believe it to be silver; I bought it for silver; I suppose it is worth half a guinea. A pair of silver shoe buckles, I know very well; they are worth seven shillings perhaps; a pearl-box with two pair of gold sleeve buttons in it, and an odd one, I knew perfectly well; they are worth half a guinea; the box three shillings; a pair of knee-buckles; they are worth half-a-crown, I suppose; here are some pocket-handkerchiefs, they are my common ones; there are five of them, worth half a crown; nothing else of Procter's bundle. Here is a silver wine-ladle; my servant knows it, I do not.

Q. Now, look at Cadwallader's, the white bundle - A. This black kerseymere waistcoat I believe to be mine, and a black silk waistcoat, I knew that, it is mine; a great coat lined with silk; I suppose it is worth five pound, and five shillings for the waistcoat altogether; a pair of black kerseymere breeches, I believe to be mine; a black coat, I believe to be mine; it is worth a pound, it is almost new; another coat, which is older; I put that at ten shillings; a pair of blue pantaloons, there is a particular mark on them which I had noticed, there is a stich dropped in the front; they are worth four shillings. Here is a good many other things which I believe to be mine; is it needful that I should go through them all?

COURT. No - A. This pair of pistols belonged to me when I was a Light Horse Volunteer, they are marked 17 l. the mark I had in the regiment; they are worth a pound; they are good ones; here are a pair of new shoes; the clerk can speak to them; here is a shirt with my mark to it.

JEMIMA - . Q. You are a servant to Mrs. Hughes - A. Yes. On the day my master and mistress went into the country I went with them. I knew this gold locket, it is my mistress's, the broach is Mrs. Hughes's, and the smelling bottle and case, these things are all Mrs. Hughes's; these gowns I know; the gold chain and necklaces, I believe to be my mistress's.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am clerk to Mr. Hughes.

Q. By Mr. Hughes's desire you were to sleep in the house while he was out of town, were you not - A. It was so understood; I did not sleep there the first night. I left the house on Wednesday, the 6th of October, about the hour of three in the afternoon, as I considered in a state of perfect security. The servant went away about seven o'clock in the morning. I was left in charge of the house. I heard the house had been plundered on the morning of the 7th; I went to the house in Millman-street about

seven o'clock: upon my unlocking the door, the first thing that presented itself was a bed, bolster, and pillows, tied up in a bundle, in the passage, near the street-door; I then in company with an officer looked all over the house; we found a number of drawers taken out and rifled, and the property strewed about in different rooms. We went into the library, the door had been torn; the whole house had the appearance of having been rifled, and broken into, and the property gone to all intents and purposes. The new pair of shoes in Cadwallader's bag, I knew them by seeing them on Mr. Hughes's table on Wednesday, the day before. After the servants were gone I was the last person in the house. I believe them to be Mr. Hughes's, because his name is in them.

Q. Now, I ask you whether you had or not observed the key of Mr. Hughes's chambers on the day you left the house at three o'clock - A. I did observe it particularly, the key of the chambers in the Temple; it was hanging on a brass hook over the shoes, in Mr. Hughes drawing-room. This is the key; I am quite sure of it. I had the key eighteen months in my own possession.

EDWARD RICHEY . I am Mr. Hughes's footman. These labels are Mr. Hughes's; they were left in the house at the time we left town; they were in the drawer in the china-cupboard.

COURT, to Matthews. You left the house about three, and locked the door; how were the windows - A. The window shutters of the house were all shut up, from top to bottom, such rooms as bad shutters, and a card on the door, stating that all parcels were to be left at Mr. Nunn's, opposite.

REBECCA SPARROW . I am Mrs. Hughes's servant, and nursery maid.

Q. Did you loose any thing from your master's house - A. Yes, money; one or two guineas, five or six, or more, half guineas, and several seven-shilling pieces, and some silver; the silver was in this wooden box. The gold was in a box not taken; I cannot speak positively to the money. It was different coin.

Mr. Hatton. I am the beadle of St. Andrews. I produce some things I found upon Cadwallader, fifteen picklock-keys; I was proceeding to search him; he said, he would give to me all; he delivered them up at the watchhouse; he was brought there, and given to me in charge. Here is a silver mustard-spoon, a pair of pliers, and a small bunch of keys.

MRS. HUGHES. This small bunch of keys are mine; I left them in my house when I went into the country, and the boxes.

Hatton. I found upon the prisoner, Cadwallader, a dark lanthorn, a case with a pair of scissars; a silver tooth-pick, seven half-guineas, a guinea, a seven-shilling piece, fourteen shillings and sixpence in silver, and four pence halfpenny in copper; that is all.

Rebecca Sporrow . This half-guinea belongs to me. I know it by that mark on it; the mark is not on the head side, but the reverse side.

Mr. Knapp. It is a particular stamp - A. It is.

JURY. The mark is in the centre; it is different from another half-guinea.

Edward Richey . The spoon, the top of the silver pepper-box, and mustard-spoon, belongs to my master.

Q. to Mr. Hughes. Your house is in Millman-street - A. It is.

Hatton. It is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

Cadwallader's Defence. One of the witnesses has acknowledged he lost sight of the person that came out of the house; I trust you will see the improbability of the other witnesses keeping me in view all the time any more than Mr. Nunn, and one of the witnesses said I went to strike him, that I lifted up both my hands offering to strike him, but he saw nothing in my hands; the other witness said I went to hit him with the crow.

Procter said nothing in his defence.

CADWALLADER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

PROCTER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

[ The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of their not doing violence to any person, or to any part of the furniture, and the pistols being loaded they had taken out the priming and the flints .]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-21

1001. JOSEPH HYAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , from the person of Francis Molley , a pocket-book, value 2 s. a five-shilling receipt stamp, a two-shilling receipt stamp, three two-penny receipt stamps, a bill of exchange, value 26 l. 10 s. a bill of exchange, value 15 l. 10 s. and a bill of exchange, value 32 l. 8 s. 6 d. his property .

FRANCIS MOLLEY . I am a wine merchant ; my accompting-house is in Cannon-street, the corner of Green-lettuce-lane. I do not sleep in the City; I have a house in the Kent-road. I lost the pocketbook on the 29th of September, in Cannon-street , very near Green-lettuce-lane, between three and four o'clock in the day; I was crossing Abchurch-lane; just as I got upon the pavement on the opposite side, I felt a twitch at my left hand side. I clapped my hand, and missed my pocket-book; I instantly looked round, and saw the prisoner among others near me.

Q. How many - A. Two or three; I could not describe them; a number of persons were passing at the time. The prisoner crossed the way, and went on towards London-stone-church; I kept an eye upon him, and while I was considering whether it was not possible that I might have left the book at Lloyd's coffee-house, he looked round over his shoulder, and mended his pace; I immediately holloaed out stop thief; he was pursued by several persons; he crossed down towards Bush-lane; when I came up to Bush-lane, I found him in possession of two persons; they told me that he threw my pocket-book, down Jefferson and Lewis's area of the warehouse; one of Jeffersons's men shortly after produced it to me.

MICHAEL COLLIER . I keep an eating-house; I was coming up Cannon-street a little after three o'clock, I met the prisoner running; Molley was

calling stop thief. I took him by the collar. He had the pocket-book in his left hand. I saw him slide it down his thigh, through the bars, into the area of a warehouse, into the cellar. I held him until the pocket-book was brought, and an officer. The prisoner is lame on his hip, or something; he can go pretty quick with his limbs.

NORTHWAY. I took charge of the prisoner, and took him to the Compter.

Prosecutor. This is the pocket-book; the Lord Mayor desired me to take the bills of exchange out of the book. I have the stamp receipts and bills of exchange in my pocket now. They are all mine. They were in this pocket-book when I lost it, and I am sure this book is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it fairly. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-22

1002. PHILIP NORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , eight ounces weight of rhubarb, value 20 s. four pound eight ounces weight of jalap, value 18 s. two ounces weight of cloves, value 1 s. 6 d. four ounces weight of nutmegs, value 3 s. five ounces weight of lozenges, value 9 d. three quarters of an ounce weight of musk, value 12 s. two bottles, value 2 s. 6 d. three pounds eight ounces weight of barley, value 2 s. two pounds weight of linseed oil, value 2 s. two pounds weight of pepper, value 2 s. eight ounces weight of ginger powder, value 1 s. and a bottle, value 1 s. the property of Edward Cannan and John Auldjo .

EDWARD CANNAN . I am a druggist ; I live in Lothbury . My partner's name is John Auldjo . The prisoner was our porter ; he had lived with us upwards of a twelvemonth. On the 20th of this month I was making up my account of opium; I discovered I was about one hundred and fifty pounds weight short. I then called up both my porters; they both declared they knew nothing of it. I got two officers. I searched the prisoner's house. He lives in Chicksand-street, Whitechapel, and at Philip North 's apartment we found all the articles enumerated in the indictment. They are articles that I deal in. I cannot swear to drugs. I know the bottles; they are cast in my own mould.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am an officer. These things I found at different parts of the prisoner's lodging. He confessed it was his masters property. In his tea chest I found some nutmegs, and ten one-pound notes.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I was with Harrison. I heard the prisoner say all these articles were his master's property. He said he received the ten one-pound notes for his master's goods.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not own to them things. Some of them were given to me by the warehouse-man. The sponge I had in particular before I ever knew Mr. Cannan.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-23

1003. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , two pillowcases, value 2 s. a sheet, value 5 s. a napkin, value 1 s. a set of bed furniture, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Philip Simons , in a lodging-room .

SECOND COUNT, for the same offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

PHILIP SIMONS . I live at No. 3, Fell-street, Wood-street ; I am a dealer in glass . My servant, Rachel Benjamin , let the lodging to the prisoner. I was not at home.

RACHEL BENJAMIN . I am a servant to Mr. Simons. On the 25th of September. I let a lodging to the prisoner and his wife for two shillings. They came about nine o'clock at night; went up stairs, and came down; about two minutes after they said they were going out to get something for supper; they would return again. They gave me eighteen pence. He said when he returned back again he would give me the other sixpence. In the mean time they were gone I went up to get the children's clothes to put them to bed. I found the bed furniture, one sheet, a pillow-case, and napkin were gone. I directly ran out, and halloaed out stop thief, and two gentlemen laid hold of the prisoner. I am sure he is the man, I can swear to him.

SAMUEL PRESTON . I am an officer. On the 25th of September I heard the cry of stop thief; I pursued the prisoner; he was stopped at Aldermanbury. I took him to the Compter. In his pocket I found a napkin; in his hat a pillow-case. I undressed him. He had all this bed furniture wrapped round him, and pinned with this large pin in his breeches and round his body. We could not find the woman.

Rachel Benjamin . The prisoner let a sheet fall at a door; I picked it up, and gave it to the officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking freely all day with the woman that took me to this lodging; she took me to this house, and took the curtains down, as she said, from her bed. She begged me to take them with her to the pawnbrokers. I had not been out of the house long before I heard the cry of stop thief. I was stopped and taken. I looked round; the woman was missing. I was taken to the Compter. I did not know but the property belonged to the woman. Gentlemen, none but a madman or a drunken fool would have done such a barefaced robbery.

Rachel Benjamin . I can swear to all the things.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-24

1004. ANN LOCK and MARY ELWIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a watch, value 4 l. a seal, value 6 s. a watch-chain, value 4 s. and a watch-key, value 1 d. the property of John Robinson , from his person .

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a servant out of place . This happened to me on yesterday week, in the evening, about half past ten, in Bishopsgate-street , at the corner of a court. I was going along; I met these two young women; I went up the court with them; I gave them some halfpence. I put my hand

to my fob; I missed my watch. I called the watchman; he came, and I charged the watchman with them.

Q. Which of them took the watch - A. I cannot say; they both together.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was.

JOHN LEE . I am a watchman in Bishopsgate-street. I was on duty. I heard an alarm that somebody was robbed. I went up Angel-court; I seized the two prisoners; I perceived the watch in Elwin's bosom. I kept it there until I delivered her to the constable of the night; he took it out of her bosom.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . The prisoners was brought into the watchhouse by the watchman. I searched them: in the bosom of Elwin I found this watch. The prosecutor identified it immediately. The prosecutor said they were both together. He charged Elwin in the watchhouse. He said he believed Elwin took it.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Lock's Defence. There was no charge against me in the watchhouse.

Elwin's Defence. The gentleman took me up the court; he offered to give me two shillings; he said he had no change: he gave me his watch to hold. When he had connection with me I asked him for the two shillings.

Q. to Robinson. Did you give her the watch for two shillings - A. No, it is quite false.

LOCK, NOT GUILTY .

ELWIN, GUILTY ; aged 18.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-25

1005. JOHN FOSSITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , a spoon, value 10 s. the property of James Larmer .

JOHN PURSE . On the 11th of October the prisoner brought me a bowl of a spoon to sell. I observed the word Ryegate on the spoon. I asked the prisoner whose it was; he said it was his. I had some suspicion; I sent for Donaldson. The clerk at Bow-street office sent down to Ryegate.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am a Bow-street officer. I searched the prisoner; I found this book on him; it is a little diary; here is Ryegate in it, Wednesday the 6th, and a number of memorandums all over the country almost.

HENRY DAVIS . I am a waiter at the Swan inn, Ryegate . On the 6th of October I missed four spoons; this spoon is one that was missed that day. The Brighton coach stops at our house every day at half past twelve, and as soon as that was gone I missed four spoons. The spoon is worth about ten shillings. All our spoons are marked Ryegate. My master's name is James Larmer.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never at Ryegate; the spoon I bought of a man a mere stranger to me; the man told me his name was Ryegate.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-26

1006. JOHN HAREFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , six knives value 10 s. and six forks, value 6 s. the property of Joseph White .

JANE PARKER . I live at Staines. I purchased half a dozen knives and forks for ten shillings and sixpence of the prisoner's wife, about the latter end of May last, before the Epsom races. These are the knives and forks.

MRS. WHITE. I am the wife of Joseph White . The prisoner was in the employ of our house. I missed fourteen or fifteen dozen of knives and forks. These are some of the knives and forks; they are part of my husband's property. They are new; they have never been used. They were bought for a public breakfast. They were deposited in the prisoner's care. I gave him a lock and key to take care of them. They were all in the care of the prisoner. The prisoner was many years in my service, and he lived in my service during that time.

JOSEPH WHITE . I know the knives and forks to have been in my custody. I bought the knives and forks for the Queen's breakfast at Egham races. I missed fourteen or fifteen dozen of knives. I asked the prisoner what had become of them. He said he knew nothing of them at first; afterwards he said he had them at my father's sale. He said, many things went away at the same time; he thought he might as well have them as any body else. I bought them myself of Mr. Rogers, at Eton, August 25th, 1811. The sale was in the year 1809. He lived in my service between eight and ten years.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-27

1007. MARY HARRISON was indicted for that she, on the 20th of September , unlawfully did set fire to a certain house in the possession of Benjamin Bloomfield , with intention to injure him .

SECOND COUNT, for the same offence, only stating the house to belong to Jane Bloomfield .

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

SARAH TAYLOR . I am a servant to Mrs. Bloomfield, 188, Shadwell High-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell .

Q. Does Mrs. Harrison, the prisoner, live there - A. Yes, she had the first floor and the use of the kitchen, and the whole range of the house except the shop and the parlour. She was a weekly lodger, I believe.

Q. Had Mrs. Bloomfield another house - A. Yes, 151, Ratcliffe Highway, where she resided. I took care of this house in High-street, the shop and parlour, for Mrs. Bloomfield.

Q. In what part of the house did Mrs. Bloomfield carry on the business of a hatter - A. In the shop and the parlour.

Q. Which way do you go to the shop and parlour - A. I went in at the shopdoor that led to the parlour. I had not any way of getting to the stair-case: there is a door but it is locked; Mrs. Bloomfield had the key of that. Mrs. Harrison's way into the house

was the street door and passage that gave her access to the whole house except the shop and parlour, which was in my possession.

Q. Had any contrivance been done for a tea-pot to pass from Mrs. Harrison to you; had any thing been arranged for a tea pot to be let down - A. Oh, no. There was a hole through which a small tea-pot might be put down. A man had danced on the floor, and made a hole. We passed a small tea-pot through that hole once. A large one would not pass through the hole. It held a pint. After the fire the hole was the size of a small man's foot. On the night of the 20th of September I went away from this house about five minutes before eight. I left Mrs. Harrison at home, her servant, and a man, a friend of hers, up stairs. I know there was a man there. She sent down for me to put a band and buckle upon this man's hat.

Q. Before you went away did you clean up your apartment - A. I swept it up twice in the course of the afternoon. When I went away it was clear of any litter. There was not any straw or chips any where about it.

COURT. In what apartment was the hole that the tea-pot was let through - A. The parlour, and before I went away in the evening part, Mrs. Harrison could see down into the parlour. I had a person with me. I could see light through it. I saw Mrs. Harrison was at home. I put an old petticoat in the hole that I had brought there that day, and left it in the hole when I went away at night. The hole was close stopped; it could not fall out. I put out the candle, and left it there. I had no fire all the day. I locked the door and took the key with me, and went to my mistress.

Q. Was your attention called to the hole the next day, or how soon afterwards - A. At three o'clock in the morning, upon an alarm, I went to the house. I saw the straw all about; the hole was made much larger. I was once in Mrs. Harrison's room, I put my foot in it; I hurt my foot; I drawed it out; my foot stuck in it. When I saw the hole the second time; my body would have gone throught it. In the morning my petticoat was down on the floor. My mistress is not insured at all.

JOSEPH STEVENSON . I am a watchman at Shadwell.

Q. Do you know 188, where the fire took place - A. My beat goes by the door. I know the house perfectly well. I cannot say the number. I was facing the door at ten minutes before two, and five minutes before two. I was there about minutes before five; I heard a noise at the side door; I heard a child crying. I went into the passage; I saw Mrs. Harrison come out of the door, and go down the passage to Mrs. Neave. She was undressed. When I saw her in that state I thought it was prudent to walk away. She had nothing on more than her shift. I went away to cry my hour. At that time I did not perceive any appearance of fire in the house. I heard the cry of fire in about seven or eight minutes; I returned to the house. I believe Mrs. Harrison cried fire first. When I came back I saw her upon the leads over the street door, at her own window. She gave her child down to the fireman. I desired her not to jump down. I was afraid she would. I got a ladder in about ten minutes; she waited on the leads until the ladder came. I helped Mrs. Harrison down the ladder; the fire was not then extinguished. I then went down to the yard door, which leads from the passage to the kitchen. There was a fire at the foot of the stairs, somebody got a bucket of water and put it out.

MARY NEAVE . I live down the same passage where the fire happened. My husband is a sawyer. On the night of the fire, Mrs. Harrison knocked at my door just before the watch went two; she asked for a lighted candle; I gave her one She brought no candle. She said her child was very ill. Soon after this I got out of bed to give my child some drink; I saw the fire in Mrs. Harrison's house; I saw fire in Mrs. Bloomfield's kitchen; I could see it was straw in a blaze. I told my husband; he went out and gave all the assistance he could.

WILLIAM SLEEZY . I am a fireman of the Atlas Insurance office. At a few minutes past one in the morning in question I came by this house; I perceived a smell of fire at that time; I walked about five or six doors; I then thought I went away from the smell. I returned. Mrs. Harrison throwed up the one pair of stairs window. She came out on the leads on the shop window, with the infant in her arms, and a servant girl with her. She begged me to save the child, for the house was all on fire. I desired her to drop the child; she did; I catched it in my arms. A ladder was sent for, and she came down. She seemed as if she was going to jump down; I begged her not, as there was no immediate dranger, as I saw. I took her to a house nearly opposite. I then went into Mrs. Bloomfield's shop, through the door, into the back parlour. I saw a fire in the parlour nearly about the middle of the floor. The floor was burnt about eight inches by five. The boards were burnt through. The floor was burning at the time I went in, but not fiercely. There was some straw in a flame: the straw was over the part on fire. I should suppose the straw occasioned that fire.

Q. Did you find any thing besides the straw - A. I did not. There was about a small handkerchief full of straw. It did not last long in flame.

Q. Did you observe the hole in the floor above - A. I did. The hole in the floor above was nearly right over the fire below. I assisted in breaking open the door that led to the stairs. I could not get to the stairs that way, the smoke was so strong. Finding the smoke so strong I shut the door again to prevent all drafts. I then went to the back door leading out of the yard into the back kitchen; I could not discern the fire for the great body of smoke. Some water was handed to me; I throwed the water on different parts of the stairs that were on fire. I extinguished the fire with about ten or twelve pails of water. That fire on the stairs was the principal fire in the house.

Q. Where did it appear to you that fire had been kindled - A. On the ground, directly under the stairs. Two or three stairs had been burnt through.

Q. Did you find any thing combustible there - A. No, none at all.

SAMUEL NEAVE . Q. Did you to Mrs. Harrison give a light on the night the fire happened - A. Yes; I gave her a candle and light, and in about ten minutes after, we saw a fire through our window, in her kitchen; I put on my drawers directly, and snug out fire. I went through the yard door into the kitchen; the inside door was open; the outside door was fast. I was in the house first; I saw the fire on the back part of the stairs; I believe that was made with straw and shavings, I cannot say which; the smoke was so strong I could not go in.

Q. What was the size of the candle you gave Mrs. Harrison - A. About two or three inches long.

Q. When you went back did you ask for the candle - A. No; I saw Mrs. Harrison just in the same state as when she came for the candle; she was on the leads.

- PROCTOR. I am a watchman. I was calling the hour of two; I heard the alarm of fire, and I saw it was a fire; I got an axe, and broke Mrs. Bloomfield's shop door open.

Q. Did you go into the back parlour - A. I did; I did not find the floor on fire; then another person got in first; I was the second that entered the parlour. There was no fire in the back parlour at that time.

Q Did you stop to examine in what state the floor was - A. I did not.

Q. Were you one of those that forced open the door of the back parlour, that led to the stair case - A. Yes, and upon opening that door, I said, shut it again; there was a great smother coming up.

Q. Did you shortly afterwards find any thing in the back parlour - A. I did; a little loose straw tied up in a handkerchief; it laid near the fireplace; after that, I went for the fire engine, and to get water. It was extinguished without the engine working.

WILLIAM DRUMMOND . I am office keeper of the Police office, Shadwell.

Q. How early on the morning of the 21st, was your attention directed towards this house - A. Between three and four; I went to the house; the fire was out; the alarm had quite subsided. I examined the cellar; there had been water thrown down under the stairs. There had been certainly a fire, and outside of the stairs there had been another fire; I examined it minutely; the stairs were burned more on the upper side than the inner side. I then came up into the parlour, and discovered that a hole had been burnt in the middle of the floor, that hole in the floor was directly under the hole above, in the ceiling; there were two parcels of fire brands, that must have come through the ceiling in my opinion; one was upon the hearth-stone.

Q. What was the fire brand - A. Wood and straw; only this parcel was on the hearth-stone.

Q. When you say the fire brand, you mean this - A. Yes; it is straw and turpentine wood, and the straw that I found on the parlour, was oat straw, and on removing the boards where the hole was in the room above, there was some oat chaff, which corresponded with the straw I found below.

Q. Did it then appear to you, that the straw had been put through that hole, and left the chaff - A. Yes; it left no doubt in my mind.

Q. Did you discover any smoke on the ceiling - A. No; not where the hole was.

Q. Did you examine the ceiling of the back kitchen - A. I did; there was no communication to the fire on the stairs, with the fire in the parlour; the fire in the parlour must have came from above.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer of Shadwell office,

Q. Did you examine the house with Mr. Drummond - A. No; I did not go until ten in the day. I observed the floor in the parlour was burnt; it was nearly under the hole above; the ceiling was about a seven foot cieling. I have had the care of these combustibles, and I have brought them here to day.

Q. Did you examine the place above, to see whether there was any remains above - A. I saw there was some chaff littered about in the up stairs room; I examined the hole in the ceiling; I saw some chaff then, and some straw hanging at the end of the hole in the ceiling; it had the appearance of straw being thrust down there; upon that appearance I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. What was the size of the hole in the floor in the prisoner's room - A. It might be a foot by fourteen inches. When I apprehended the prisoner, I enquired of her whether she was insured; she told me that she was insured for one hundred and fifty pound; she was not at home at that time, and when she came home she said, William had got the policy; it was afterwards produced. This is it. When I examined the policy, I found it was for more than one hundred and fifty pounds. I saw her goods, thirty pound would be the utmost value of them; her stock in trade was not worth more than a pound; her stock and furniture was not worth more than twenty pound. I saw two or three candlesticks about the prisoner's apartment, but no candle.

Q. Did you examine whether there were any combustible matter of turpentine - A. There were some droppings of pitch, but that might be from the links of the men that had been there in the morning.

WILLIAM STRACEY . Q. Did you see that policy executed by the three directers of the Eagle fire office - A. I did; about the 5th of July.

Q. to Mr. Shelton. Just take the amount of the policy - A. Mary Harrison , Cock-hill, Ratcliffe, straw hat maker; Eagle insurance Company, 150 l. on household goods, linen, appearel in the apartment of the aforesaid, dwelling-house, brick building, batters, 150 l. stock in trade, utensils, and fixtures therein, dated July the 5th, 1813.

Partridge. The young man gave the policy to me in her presence.

COURT. The policy was effected in July, the fire was in September.

WILLIAM THOMAS JAMESON . I am a sail-maker; I live at Shadwell. I went into the house; the fire happened about half after two in the morning. I observed a hole in the middle of the floor, in the prisoner's apartment; that hole was as long as my foot, but not so wide; I observed a knife laying near it; it appeared to me to have been presently cut as I understood, to let a tea-pot down. I looked at the furniture about these rooms; I thought the

value of the things at that time was not more than twenty pound. I am not a competent judge of these things. It might cost a woman a great deal more; it is the furniture that I am speaking of. At another time, prior to this, I have observed a great many straw hats in the window; that was when she had the lower part of the house.

MARY RUSSELL . I am thirteen years old. I am a servant to the prisoner, Mrs. Harrison. On the night of the fire, I went to bed about ten o'clock.

Q. Who did you leave up when you went to bed - A. My mistress said, she was going out for two or three minutes; I might go to bed, she had made all safe below. At that time there was nobody with her.

Q. There was a hole in your floor we understand - A. Yes; I saw it when I first went on the next morning; the hole was much larger than it was at night.

Q. to Jameson. When was the second time that you saw the hole, was it larger - A. Yes, that was about nine or ten o'clock; the boards had been lifted up, and examined.

Q. to Mary Russell . Did you go in the room at eight o'clock in the morning - A. No; at nine o'clock. Mrs. Bloomfield put a broom up to shew how loose the boards were.

Q. Before you went to bed on the Monday night, did you see any straw in the room - A. No; my mistress had not been gone out long before a young man knocked; I took a candle and let him in.

Q. What candles were there in the house - A. Only a three-halfpenny one, which I had fetched that night.

Q. Was it burnt out - A. No. there was half of it remaining; the young man cut it in half, he took one half, and gave me the other. I went into the front room where I sleep and shut the door.

Q. Did you see your piece of candle when you got up in the morning - A. No; when I was alarmed I saw a candle burning in my chimney-piece where I had left it.

Q. At ten o'clock the young man knocked; you let him in a little after ten; where was the child - A. In bed with me.

Q. How soon did your mistress come home - A. I do not know; I was asleep. The crying of the child did not awake me at all. I awoke first with the smoke. My mistress called out Mary; she thought there was a fire; she and the child. and I got upon the leads. I did not hear the child cry all night. My mistress gave me the child whilst she opened the window; my mistress slept in the same bed with me; I was don't know whether she was a bed or no, I was so sound asleep nor do I know where her clothes were; when my mistress awaked me, the candle was burning in the fire-place; I don't know whether that it was the same candle; most likely that candle would not last so long.

Q. Look at that cloth that the straw is in, and turpentine wood - A. My mistress had a cloth like this; I saw it daily. I think it is the same; I did not see it on Sunday, or Monday.

Q. to Sarah Taylor. You say you had been frequently in the prisoner's room - A. Yes.

Q. Take that into your hand; had you at any time when you have been in the prisoner's room seen any thing of that - A. Yes up at the fire-place; I believe it to be the same because of the work. I saw Mrs. Harrison hemming this in my parlour; it was for a little fire-place; it was hung up to hide the deficiency of a stone; she was sitting by my side when she was working it; I believe it to be that piece of cloth.

Q. Have you seen her have any pieces of cloth like these - A. I had seen them fragments in the day, the fire happened on the night. I had seen in her room such fragments as these, and of this colour.

Q. Had you ever borrowed this cloth of the prisoner - A. No; I never borrowed any thing of the kind of her.

Q. Had you the smallest quarrel with her - A. No.

Q. Had she any quarrel with your mistress - A. No; she had managed my mistress's business, and after that became a lodger; my mistress called that day, and sent me up to Mrs. Harrison, with her compliments, and to know when she would settle. Mrs. Harrison said, she would come down that day or next; she was quite civil.

Q. Do you know where your mistress is - A. No. she came out before me; she said, she would be here as soon as me.

Mr. Alley. You have told me that Mrs. Bloomfield, and she had no quarrel - A. No.

Q. You know Mrs. Bloomfield does not live with her husband - A. No, sir.

Q. Do not you know that the prisoner received notice to pay her rent to her husband, and not to your mistress, and they quarrelled because she would not pay the rent to your mistress - A. I don't know it; I never heard of any dispute.

Q. Do you recollect borrowing a tin pot in which dusters were kept by the prisoner - A. No, I never borrowed any thing of the kind.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Arnott - A. I might have seen her.

Q. Have you never said to Mrs. Arnott in her presence, that your mistress did not care how soon the place was burnt, because she was insured - A. No, I never said such a word to any body.

GEORGE HINDLEY . I am an appraiser to the Eagle fire office. I looked at the prisoner's goods and effects after the fire; the full amount of the value was twenty-eight pound eighteen shillings; the whole of the things would not fetch more money.

GEORGE GOLDING . I am a surveyor. I caused this model to be made, and the plans; they are correct.

Q. to Partridge. When you were upon the premises upon the day after the fire, did you look into the drawers - A. I did; there was no wearing apparel there, except an old shirt, a pair of men's shoes, and a pair of old stays, they were not fit to wear.

WILLIAM BEETHAM . I am the secretary of the Eagle insurance Company.

BENJAMIN - . I produce the deed of the insurance company; it is enrolled. This is the deed, and this is the enrollment.

JANE BLOOMFIELD was called upon her recognizance.

Prisoner's Defence. All I have to say I am perfectly innocent of the crime of which I stand here. I leave the rest to my counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18131027-28

1008. THOMAS WILLIS was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 1st of July , a bill of exchange for the payment of 32 l. 10 s. with intent to defraud John Bunn , esq .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like bill of exchange, with the same intention.

THIRD COUNT, for disposing and putting away, a like bill of exchange, with the same intention.

AND THREE OTHER COUNTS, for forging an acceptance of a like bill of exchange, and feloniously uttering it, disposing of it, and putting it away, with intention to defraud other persons.

JOHN BUNN , ESQ. I reside at Halliford, in the parish of Shepperton . On the 1st of July, I was possessed of a mare and a gig, which I wished to dispose of; on that day the prisoner come to my house; he was a stranger to me perfectly; he asked me if I had a horse to sell; I replied I had not. I had a mare and a gig, which I wished to dispose of. He requested to see them, and finally agreed to purchase them for fifty guineas; he took from his pocket-book, twenty-two pounds in bank notes; said, as he had some money to pay in the neighbourhood, he would be glad if I would take a bill of exchange for the remainder; I replied such bargains were usually settled in ready money, but after some conversation respecting Staines, and the people about it; I was induced to take this bill in consequence of his representing himself to be a miller and baker, at Staines, and that he took this bill on the corn exchange, in the regular course of business, and that the drawer, William Sweet , was a dealer in corn, on the corn exchange, and that the acceptor, S. Ferguson, was a dealer likewise, residing in Tower-street. He left the bill as a deposit; he promised to bring the money on that day week, at four o'clock in the afternoon; for which he left the bill as security.

Q. What is the amount of the bill - A. Thirty pound ten shillings. He promised to come and redeem the bill, bringing me thirty pound ten shillings. He told me that he dealt at the corn market regularly, and that it would be a great conveience to him, as a friend of his who resided at Staines went with him, and they horsed the gig by turns. He said his own gig was nearly worn out, and my gig would suit him very well. I informed him that I should be on that day week at Birmingham.

Q. What day of the week was this - A. On Thursday, the 1st of July, and that I would leave the bill with my coachman, and begged he would be punctual. I went to Birmingham; upon my return I found the bill was not taken away; I was absent about ten days; not so long. When I returned I found the bill in the hands of my coachman.

(The bill read.)

Q. That bill would become due the 21st of August - A. It would. My partner, Mr. Johnson, sent the bill to Messrs. Lovett's, to be presented.

Q. Was this your own property - A. My own property.

THOMAS POWELL . I am a clerk to Mitchell and Venn, notaries, 16, Swithin's-lane, Cornhill. They act as notaries for Lovett's, the bankers.

Q. Did you for Lovett's and Co. present that bill - N. Yes; on the 21st of August, at No. 9, Tower-street; there was no person in the house; that house was shut up. I enquired in the neighbourhood; I could find no such person as Furguson there. I returned the bill to Messrs. Mitchell and Venn, and one of our clerks returned it to Messrs. Lovett's.

JAMES ALDIS . I am coachman to Mr. Bunn. I was present at the time Mr. Bunn took the bill of exchange.

Q. Is the account that he has given of what passed correct - A. It is.

Q. Did your master leave the bill in your hands when he went to Birmingham - A. He did. The prisoner did not come on that day week, and take back the bill. After the 21st of August, I went to Staines, and enquired after the prisoner. About a week or a fortnight after the bill became due, I met the prisoner at Kingston; I asked him why he did not come according to his promise, and leave the money for the bill; he said, he supposed master had got the money. I told him he had not; that he had been to Tower-street, that there was no such person as Ferguson there. I asked him where he was to be found, as master would be glad to see him; he said, at Staines. I said, it was wrong; I had been to to Staines, and enquired if Willis was at home; I was informed that he never came there; that he had left there. I then told him it made no odds where he was, my matter would find him; that I had heard he was in the rules of the King's Bench; with that he left me. He went on to town, and I came home.

Q. Did you see him again - A. No, not after.

Q. Now, before you parted, did any thing pass respecting any other Tower-street - A. There did; he said, that my master had been to the wrong Tower-street; he should have gone to Tower-street, Westminster-road. That was all that passed between us.

Q. to Prosecutor. I suppose your coachman informed you of this interview with the prisoner - A. He did. I went to Tower-street, Westminster-road; it was a very dirty low street. I went to No. 9. I knocked a considerable time, the first time I went, and could make no person hear; the second time I went I saw a woman, who is in court. I did not find a Mr. Ferguson. About the middle of September, I met the prisoner on a hill in the Wandsworth-road, he was riding on horseback; I spoke to him about the bill, and told him I would not be trifled with, I would stick to him like a leaf, and when I got into St. George's Fields, I told him I had got a warrant out against him; he struck me a violent blow on my head, and got away.

Mr. Knapp. I understand the prisoner was a perfect stranger to you previous to this first acquaintance - A. Perfectly, sir.

Q. You took the bill upon the faith between you - A. I believed what he said.

BARNARD BRUSHAW . In July last, the prisoner was committed in custody of the Marshasely; on the 22nd of May he immediately almost got the rules; he remained in custody of the marshal; on the 20th of August, he was removed to Newgate, by Habeas Corpus.

Q. Then, on the 1st of July, and other days, he was out, he ought to have been in the rules - A. He ought to have been in the rules.

GEORGE KEENE . I am a lighterman, granary-keeper and corn-dealer. I have frequented the Corn Exchange thirty-six years.

Q. Did you know any corn-dealer of the name of Sweet - A. I do not know him, nor ever did.

Q. Do you know a Mr. Ferguson, a corn-dealer - A. No. I never heard of Sweet or Ferguson.

MR. SCRIVENER. I am a corn-dealer. I attend the corn-market every day.

Q. Do you know Sweet or Ferguson, corn-dealers - A. I do not; I have attended the corn-market these forty years.

Q. to Mr. Bunn. When you met the prisoner near Wandsworth-hill, did you enquire of him where Ferguson was to be found - A. He then described Sweet to be a horse dealer at Birmingham; he said Ferguson was to be found at No. 9, Tower-street, and if he did not pay the bill he must. He said, he took the bill of Sweet himself, in the Corn Exchange, in the regular course of business; that was when he gave me the bill first.

COURT. Look at that bill; does it appear to be endorsed by the name of Sweet - A. Yes; the name of William Sweet was endorsed upon the note when he delivered it me; he endorsed Thomas Willis in my presence.

ELIZABETH PRIOR . I keep the house, No, 9, Tower-street, Westminster-road.

Q. At any time last summer, did a person of the name of Ferguson lodge with you - A. He did; he came in May; he left me in July. He was a gentleman. I understood he came to get a commission in the Army; he occupied a dining-room, and a bed-room.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the bill of a person of the name of Sweet, for a mare of twenty-seven pound; he represented to me at the time that Mr. Ferguson was in the corn-way, and himself a butcher at Bristol. I gave him the change out of the bill, which was three pound ten shillings; I received it of Sweet, at the Crown public-house, opposite of the Obelisk, in the presence of several people.

THOMAS DAVIS . Q. You come up by Habeas Corpus from the King's Bench prison - A. Yes. I know the prisoner very well; I have know him two years; he lived at Staines; he is a baker, and horse-dealer. His wife lives there now I believe.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of William Sweet - A. I do; I have seen Sweet and the prisoner together several times in the King's Bench. In June last, I was in company with the prisoner and Sweet, at the Crown public-house. I remember the conversation; Sweet bought a mare of Willis for twenty-seven pound; he gave a bill of thirty pound and ten shillings; Willis gave him the change. I saw the endorsement of William Sweet ; I did not see him write It. The acceptance was Ferguson. I have seen William Sweet write at different times; the endorsement on the bill is Sweet's writing, I am positive of it, and I am positive this is the bill that Sweet tended it to the prisoner for the purchase of the mare. I am no trade now; I have been a horse-dealer; I have been in the King's Bench about a twelve-month.

DUNCAN FERGUSON . I am in no business. I am now unfortunately situated in Giltspur-street Compter. I accepted a bill of the name of William Sweet . I lived at that time at No. 9, Tower-street, Westminster-road. Sweet represented himself to be a carcase butcher, in Bristol; I knew him two months previous to my accepting the bill; I owed him the money, and I accepted the bill to pay him; I expected remittances from Scotland. I expected to be able to honour the bill; that is my acceptance on the bill. I have made no acceptances except on that bill. I live here by remittances from Scotland.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-29

1009. FRANCIS SLEIGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one yard of woollen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of our Lord the King.

GEORGE PARKER . I am a clerk to Mr. Maberley; he is an Army clother ; his manufactory is in Paul's-wharf, in the City of London . The prisoner was a cutter in the employ of Mr. Maberley; he was employed to cut out clothes. On the 5th of October, I was upon the watch, but not placed with the constables; this was about seven o'clock in the evening, the usual time of the men leaving their work.

Q. In what way do the men go out when they have done their work - A. They had to pass through a passage before they could go out, and there were gates to the passage; there are two gates; one at the end of Maberley's premises, and the other gate at the extremity of the premises.

Q. Upon a signal given, were the gates fastened - A. The outside gate was shut only. Sleigh was one endeavouring to get out; he ran past Mr. Stevens to get out of the yard; I seized him; Mr. Bartlett assisted me. I found this piece of cloth upon him; it was concealed under his coat; I took it from him. I am sure it is the same cloth that was concealed under his coat.

Mr. Alley. Pray, what situation do you occupy - A. I am a cashier in that house.

Q. In what way is the cloth delivered out to the men - A. It is delivered out by certificate.

MR. STEVENS. I am the principal clerk to Mr. Maberley.

Q. On the night in question, you consulted a plan to stop and search all your men - A. We did.

Q. Look at the cloth produced by the last witness - A. That is the same cloth that we receive on contract for government. We receive it of the Store-keeper General. It is marked S G, and the broad arrow is stamped upon a variety of places in every yard.

JURY. What is the value of it - A. Five shillings and ten pence a yard, or six shillings.

Mr. Arabin. That cloth you receive from the Store-keeper General - A. We do.

Q. You return so many garments for every piece - A. To a certain quantity of cloth we return so many garments; if we have any surplus we return. If there is any deficiency Mr. Maberley purchases cloth to make good his contract.

Q. You deliver out to each man a piece - A. Yes. We had near fifty cutters. The prisoner was a cutter. When we deliver it to the men they are to return as many garments as they can cut out. The pieces are given out by weight. The shreads are to be returned. We deliver it out with this kind of ticket.

COURT. You deliver them the cloth by weight, therefore they are to return the weight; to make up the weight they must return the shreads - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. What does a piece of cloth weigh - A. A piece of cloth of thirty yards, or rather better, will weigh about fifty pounds.

Q. Out of this fifty pounds you expect a certain number of garments - A. We do.

Q. Has this man ever failed to return the quantity of garments you expected - A. I cannot say. I don't know. But by the present practice we get more out of the cloth than we did, and I know that cloth to be the cloth of the Store-keeper General. There is about a yard of it. It is about six quarters wide. Mr. Maberly has no partner in this contract. His name is John.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-30

1010. TIMOTHY ASQUITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one yard of woollen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of our Lord the King .

- BAILEY. I am a constable. On this day fortnight I was stationed at Paul's wharf, at Mr. Maberley's, just as the men were coming out; they came out at seven o'clock, as the clock was striking. As the men were coming to the outside gate I rushed upon the prisoner Asquith: he resisted as much as a man could possibly do. After I seized him I never let him go, and inside of his waistcoat I saw Trustey (the patrol) take the cloth from him. This is the cloth. I think there is nigh a yard and a half.

Mr. Andrews. How many men were there in the place when you seized this man - A. A great number of them. This piece of cloth was taken from behind the man. I saw this piece of cloth taken as he was getting rid of it from behind him.

EDWARD TRUSTEY . I saw the prisoner endeavouring to get away from Bailey. I saw the prisoner squatting down and pulling the cloth from him. I took the cloth from him.

Mr. Adolphus. There was a general seizure among these journeyman that caused a general row - A. Yes; we were ordered for that purpose.

Q. For the purpose of making confusion - A. No.

Q. What other tailor was near this man - A. Mr. Bailey was nearest him. He was getting the better of Mr. Bailey; I had to take care he should not. I drove the prisoner up against the wall. I saw the rest of the men; nobody was near him but Mr. Bailey.

JOHN STEVENS . Q. Is that the cloth of Mr. Maberley - A. It is the same cloth that we receive from the Store-keeper General. The prisoner was one of the cutters in Mr. Maberley's employ.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-31

1011. JOHN BANNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one yard of woollen cloth, value 3 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, the property of our Lord the King .

MR. WYATT. I am a constable. On this day fortnight I attended at Mr. Maberley's, to intercept the tailors as they were coming out. When the clock struck seven they were coming out. I saw Banner throw things against the wall. This piece of cloth was under his coat; I took it out.

MR. STEVENS. The prisoner was a cutter employed by Maberley. This is a piece of white kersey, about two yards; it is a woollen cloth. There is a broad arrow upon it. It is worth eighteen pence a yard; there is two yards of it. The cutters receive thirty-six shillings a-week, and come and work in our warehouses.

Prisoner's Defence. The charge laid against me is totally false. I throw myself upon the mercy of the Jury.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-32

1012. JOHN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one yard of woollen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, the property of our Lord the King .

HENRY MACKERELL . I am one of the clerks of Maberley. I assisted in searching the cutter s. Mr.

Edwards caught hold of the prisoner's waist. I caught hold of his collar. I drew from under his waistcoat this piece of blue cloth; there is rather better than a yard of it, and there is the broad arrow upon it.

MR. STEVENS. The prisoner was a cutter in Mr. Maberley's employ. The cloth is the property of John Maberley .

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-33

1013. THOMAS HENTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one yard of woollen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, the property of our Lord the King .

RICHARD FITZGERALD . I am a constable. I attended at Mr. Maberley's to search the cutters. I laid hold of the prisoner; I took from him this piece of cloth; it was wrapped round his body. I am sure he is the man.

MR. STEVENS. The prisoner was a cutter there. There is the same mark upon that cloth as all the others. There is about a yard and a quarter.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, during the time I was in Mr. Maberley's employ I have been extremely careful in cutting the articles entrusted to me, and having saved a yard out of the cloth delivered to me, I did not think any harm in taking it, as I had the satisfaction that every garment I delivered was right. I never had my integrity suspected.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-34

1014. JAMES STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a yard of woollen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, the property of our Lord the King .

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am beadle of the ward. I marshalled the constable this night. I gave the general order for each man to seize his man, and to be very particular with the man they seized, and to take the property from them. I seized one man, searched him, and found no property on him. The prisoner stood near me; from him fell this piece of cloth; I felt it fall: he was the only person that it could fall from. It fell from him. His waistcoat and coat were both unbuttoned when I seized him. The cloth brushed me all the way down, and fell on my instep. The prisoner was close to me. No other person was near me by a yard and a half. I have no doubt but that it fell from the prisoner. I had many offers made me by the prisoner to let him go. He offered me a pound note. I told him fifty pound would not let me do that. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found more cloth.

MR. STEVENS. The prisoner was a cutter . That cloth has the King's mark upon it, the broad arrow.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny the charge. I had no property about me, nor did I drop any belonging to Mr. Maberley.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-35

1015. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , one yard of woolen cloth, value 3 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, the property of our Lord the King .

WILLIAM CANNON . I found this piece of cloth in the prisoner's breeches, one part; and the other under his braces and under his waistcoat, buttoned over: it was so concealed.

THOMAS BUTCHER . I was in the employ of Mr. Maberley. I am inspector of the cloth; I prepare it for the tailors. This was used for waistbands of breeches; here is my hand-writing upon it, for waistbands. That is my writing; it is wrote with red chalk.

MR. STEVENS. The prisoner was one of the cutter s in the employ of Mr. Maberley. The value of that cloth is three shillings and sixpence.

Q. What is the value of all the cloth you found taken that night - A. Twenty pound.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-36

1016. ROBERT CROKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , seventeen pounds weight of goats hair, value 3 l. the property of John Oakey , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN OAKEY . I am a hat manufacturer ; I live in Poland-street . On the 23d of September there was a bale of goats wool laying in the gateway of my yard. A bale of goats wool, or hair, whichever you may please to call it. The prisoner was suspected of having cut one end of the bale.

Q. You did not see that - A. No. I knew nothing of it until the man was secured.

RICHARD TOWNSEND . I am a hatter. Having occasion to call on Mr. Oakey, on the 23d of September, between six and seven in the evening, I discovered a man at the corner of Mr. Oakley's gateway, in the act of making water; he having been a carman in our employment, that caused me to have suspicion. Knowing that Mr. Oakey always had goods laying in the gateway. I immediately went into the warehouse, and mentioned to Mr. Oakey's foreman my suspicion: he requested me and one of the porters to go with him to the gateway. We went down the gateway. It was dark. I then said to Mr. Oakey's foreman, there is the bale I suspected the man was taking something from. He put his

hand down and felt a man; he laid hold of him, and said, who is there? I knew it was the prisoner by his voice. We waited until a light came, and then we secured him. When the light was brought we discovered it was the prisoner, and that this bale had been cut, out of which there had been sixteen or seventeen pound weight taken.

Q. What did it contain - A. Goats wool. Part of that quantity was put in a small bag by the side of it, the remainder was laying upon the ground. He was charged by Mr. Oakey's foreman with having cut the bale, and taking it out. He denied it positively. He was asked what he was doing there; he said, making water. We got a light; there was no wet at all. There was a sharp knife taken from him, upon which there were some particles of hair attached. I know no more; and a small particle of hair was attached to his clothes. The goats wool, or hair, is here. This is the bag and the wool.

Prosecutor. The bale had been seen whole a few minutes before. I have no doubt but that goats wool, or hair, is mine. The bag is not mine; the contents are. The prisoner had been in the habit of fetching goats wool or Spanish wool to card.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was making water two men came down the gateway and knocked me down. Mr. Oakey accused me because of that. That knife I carried about me to cut my victuals.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-37

1017. THOMAS ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , two hundred blankets, value 100 l. the property of John Collier .

JOHN COLLIER . I am a blanket manufacturer , at Newbury, in Berkshire. The prisoner was my servant in London. He lived at my warehouse, 26, Broad-street-place . He was my weekly servant , at twenty-five shillings per week. He was to sell and deliver goods to my customers, for me. On my coming to town in July I missed a particular sort of blankets; I could not find them in my warehouse. I enquired of the prisoner where they were; he told me his wife had pawned them; and on my leaving town he gave me a quantity of duplicates. I went home into the country.

Q. How many duplicates - A. I suppose fifty or sixty. In about three months I came up to town. I continued him in the same situation all the time. I remonstrated with him; he said his wife had pawned them; and after he had promised to put up running shutters to keep his wife out of the warehouse from the blankets I then left town again. These duplicates are all in the wife's name; some Hannah Rose and others Hannah Rowe . I returned to town, and found the warehouse as was promised, locked up. I missed some more blankets, and no account in the book of these blankets. When I missed the blankets I looked over the stock, and found there was a great quantity deficient. I applied to an officer.

Q. You do not know whether they were sold or not - A. He told me they were pawned.

Q. That is the first part. When you came to town did he tell you what had become of the second parcel of blankets - A He wrote that he was obliged to pawn them. I had him taken up. I knew then that he must be accessary to it. I went to the pawnbrokers, and found my blankets; some that were made for the Canada trade.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-38

1018. THOMAS ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , two blankets, value 6 s. the property of John Collier .

Mr. Arabin, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-39

1019. THOMAS ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , two blankets, value 6 s. the property of John Collier .

Mr. Arabin, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-40

1020. THOMAS ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , two blankets, value 6 s. the property of John Collier .

Mr. Arabin, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-41

1021. MARY DALLINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , two silver table-spoons, value 30 s. the property of the Rev. Andrew Hatt , clerk.

REV. ANDREW HATT . Q. You are chaplain to an hospital - A. Yes. The prisoner was in the service of the hospital.

Q. As servant of the hospital had she access to your apartment - A. Yes. She was discharged on the 11th of November last, and shortly after she was discharged I discovered that two silver spoons were missing.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday the 12th of this month. I found a silver table spoon in her pocket.

JOHN BAKER . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the 10th of October the prisoner pawned a spoon with me. She said her name was Mary Holden .

Q. Did it not create suspicion in your mind, seeing something tried to be rubbed out on the spoon - A. She came a week after that with another spoon; she said her name was Mary Holden ; she lived in Colchester-street, along with her friends. I said, it did not correspond with the mark of the spoon. It is marked D. I gave her the spoon back; I told her I could have nothing to do with it.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Prosecutor. The other spoon is marked D, were your spoon marked D - A. Yes, and the other spoon has the trace of D. My spoons are marked D. They are both mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I most humbly entreat pardon. I beg that mercy will be shewn and should I be so fortunate to have mercy shewn me, my future conduct will convince you that I am truly penitent, by a strict adherence to honesty and rectitude.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-42

1022. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Harris , from his person .

THOMAS HARRIS. On the 17th of October I was in Wych-street ; I felt something twitch my great coat. I turned round; I observed the prisoner; he had a handkerchief in his hand at that time; he clapped his hand behind him, and dropped the handkerchief behind him on the ground. This is the handkerchief: it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along. The handkerchief was not in my hand.

- . I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket. I was looking out of my first floor window.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-43

1023. THOMAS RICKETTS LYON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 23d of March , a certain letter of attorney, in order to receive certain prize money due to John Ormsby , for certain service done on board a certain ship of our Lord the King .

AND SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

HUGH THOMPSON . I am a navy agent. I live at No. 4, Copthall-buildings . The prisoner came to me on the 20th or 21st of March, in the evening; he said he was late of his Majesty's ship the Raisonable, now of the Namure. He said that he wanted an agent; he was recommended to my office. He shewed me a ticket of leave, purporting to be signed by the Captain. I then asked for his certificate, signed by the Captain of the Namure, laying at the Nore, He shewed me a certificate, signed Captain Rowley of the Raisonable, where he had served six years as Midshipman. That is the very paper. He said he was on leave only for a few days to see his mother and aunt that lived near West Barnet. He said further that he was quite out of money, and begged that I would let him have some in advance. He said that he had served six years in the Raisonable, that he was entitled to Buenos Ayres prize money, for service on board the Raisonable, for which he had only received a tenth; that he had received a payment for each prize. He stated further that his Captain advised him to get a respectable agent to look after his prize money; that he said he would have upwards of an hundred pound to take. He stated that he was at the taking of a number of ships on the service. He said if I would give him a list he would tell me which he had received and which he had not. I shewed him the list. He pointed out the prizes of the Raisonable; some he had been paid, and some not; he drew a line of distinction between. When I saw the number of ships I saw it would be as much as his Captain said he was entitled to. I gave him a pound. He returned the next day according to promise. I sent to Wetherby, the law-stationer, and got a stamp for the power of attorney. I got one, and filled it up for him; he told me the captain of the Namure was in town, that he left him at the west end of the town. This is the one that I filled up.

Q. When you had filled it up what did you do with it - A. I told him I wished him to get it signed by the Captain of the ship, and another officer to make me certain that he was the man. I gave it into his hand. He put it into his pocket, and said he would immediately wait upon the Captain.

Q. Did you make him any advance - A. No further than the stamp, and the pound the night before. He came upon the 23d, after dinner.

Q. What day was the blank filled up - A. On the 22d, the day after I first saw him. He came on the 23d, at my own office, No. 4, Copthall-buildings, in the City. I believe it is in Coleman-street ward. He gave me the power which I now hold in my hand; he said, the captain had signed it; he had put his initials in the margin, and that of Keene, the other officer, his initials was there. He said, Keene (the other witness) acted as lieutenant. He wanted a further loan. I stated that I must have his last will and testament, as a guarrantee. He waited, and signed that: he left both these with me. I gave him a check for ten pound; that was paid to him in the morning. He said he wanted some clothes and some necessaries.

Q. How much did you advance to him upon the whole - A. About twenty-seven pounds odd, I gave him.

Q. Do you recollect his stating who the agent was for that service - A. He stated that Mr. Davison was the agent for Buenos Ayres. I knew the fact before. After he went away that evening I did not see him until the month of June following; I met him in Holborn.

Q. You did not see him from March until the month of June following - A. No. I met him then accidentally in Holborn. I never saw him again until then. I applied on the 25th or 26th of March, at Mr. Davison's office. I did not obtain a shilling of the prize money. When he came to me he told me his name was John Ormsby . That ticket of leave is in the exact state as when I received it of the prisoner.

COURT. Did he alledge himself to be Ormsby, and that he had a ticket of leave - A. He did.

(The ticket of leave read.)

"Mr. Ormsby served under my command until the date hereof, during which time he behaved with diligence and sobriety. Given under my hand, Cape of Good Hope, March 20, 1810.

JOSEPH ROWLEY ."

COURT, Q. to Mr. Thompson. Is that the ticket of leave he produced - A. Yes. I never took it out of his hand.

OSBORN STANLEY , ESQ. Q. I believe, sir, you are agent to Mr. Ormsby - A. Yes, my son is.

Q. Are you acquainted with the character, and hand writing of Mr. Ormsby - A. I am.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand writing or not - A. I do not believe it to be his hand writing at all.

Q. Are you acquainted with Captain Rowley 's hand writing - A. I cannot say I am. Mr. Ormsby generally signed to me John B. Ormsby.

JOHN ORMSBY. Q. What is your name - A. John Bodaller Ormsby . I served on board his Majesty's ship Raisonable, as midshipman .

Q. Did you become entitled to prise money - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. I am; he came on board that ship as midshipman; he served in that ship with me.

Q. What name did you serve by - A. John Ormsby , on board the Raisonable; my name is John Bodaller Ormsby .

MR. STANLEY. That is John Ormsby , that gentleman; whose hand writing I believe it not to be.

COURT. Is there any other person of the name of John Ormsby , without Bodaller, that served on board that ship - A. No, there is not.

CHARLES JOHN AUSTIN . I am Captain of his Majesty's ship Namure.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether the signature of your name upon that, is your hand writing - A. This is not my hand writing.

Q. Have you any Lieutenant of the name of Keene on board your ship - A. No. John Ormsby has never belonged to the Namure since I have commanded her; that is two years. I have no knowledge of him.

Q. Have you had any knowledge of the prisoner on board your ship - A. No; I never saw him at all.

JOHN TAYLOR . Q. You are a schoolmaster, living in Baltie-street, St. Lukes - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner ever employ you in your business to do any writing for him - A. He applied to me; I cannot rightly say the time; it must be about seven or eight months ago. He came to me one evening, and requested me to write a certificate for him; he brought a copy. I made a certificate from that copy.

Q. Is that the certificate that you made from the copy he gave you - A. No, it is not. Not any part of it is my writing. I wrote one certificate for him; that is not the one.

ANN NICHOLS . Q. Where do you live - A. I live at No. 10, Walbrook-place, City-road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did he at any time lodge in your house - A. Yes; he came there on the 26th of May; he remained there seven weeks. I knew him by the name of Thomas Bailey ; that is the name he gave me; that is the name I called him. I never knew him by any other name.

ROBERT STEWART . I am a clerk in the Navy office, Somerset House. In the office where the muster books are kept of his Majesty's ships.

Q. Have you got the muster books of the Raisonable, from March, 1804, until July, 1811 - A. I have.

Q. Do you find a gentleman serving on board that ship during that time, of the name of Ormsby - A. I do; his name in the books is John Ormsby only; I have looked through the book to ascertain that fact.

Q. Do you find any other gentleman of the name of John Ormsby during that period I mentioned - A. I do not.

Q. Do you find the prisoner also serving on board that ship - A. I do; Thomas Ricketts Lyon ; he entered on board the Raisonable, 26th of August, 1806, and continued until the 14th of June, 1809; then he run away.

Q. Have you got the muster-books of the Namure, in the month of March; do you find that Ormsby was serving on board the Namure in that month - A. I do not.

COURT. That is the only name he is signed by in that book - A. Yes, John Ormsby only.

(The power of attorney read.)

"Know all men by these presents, that I, John Ormsby , late of his Majesty's ship Raisonable, now of the Namure, for divers good causes have, and do hereby make and constitute Hugh Thompson , of No. 4, Copthall-buildings, my true and lawful attorney to my use, to ask, claim, and recover my right or honourable demand over his Majesty's Navy, at Greenwich Hospital; all such wages, prize money, smart money, and all such sums of money, as now is, and shall be due or payable to me, or order, in any of his Majesty's ships, frigates or vessels, and all other sums of money, merchandize, debts, duties, and demands whatever, which now is, and shall be due, owing, payable, and belonging to me, by any right or title howsoever, coming unto my attorney, or his substitute, my power of attorney, for receiving, obtaining, and recovering as full as I might possibly do, being personally present release, or any other discharge in my name as one attorney, or more shall make or substitute, he retifying and consuming his substitute, or assigns shall lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue of these presents. In witness hereof, I have set my hand and seal, the 23rd day of March, 1813, John Ormsby , of his Majesty's ship, the Namure; signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of Captain Austin, W. H. Keene."

COURT. Prisoner have you any thing to say in your defence -

Prisoner. Nothing my lord.

COURT. Will you call any witnesses -

Prisoner. None.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

London jury before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18131027-44

1024. JOHN FREDERICK SPUR was indicted for that he, on the 12th of March, feloniously did steal, and take out of a certain house for the receipt of letters, to be sent by the Post of Great Britain, one letter then lately brought to the said house, to be sent by the Post to the City of Exeter, to be delivered to one Sophia Wateley , and one other letter .

AND OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be packets, instead of letters.

MR. HARRISON. I am a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Child.

Q. Are you acquainted with a lady of the name of Mrs. Milner - A. Yes; she called at the house of Mr. Child. On the 12th of March, she received a ten-pound bank note, No. 3611, dated 10th of February, 1813. She is a lady who keeps cash at our house.

MRS. ELIZABETH MILNER . Q. Had you occasion in the month of March last, to remit a ten-pound note to Mrs. Wately, at Exeter - A. I had. I received a ten-pound note I believe at the house of Mr. Child; I do not recollect the gentleman that I received it of.

Q. A note you took for this especial remittance - A. That I cannot recollect.

Q. Do you recollect what you did with the note that you received of Mr. Child's - A. I came home previous to my going into the country; I delivered to my sister a ten-pound note to remit to Mrs. Wateley.

Mr. Attorney General. Q. to Thomas Croker. Ask Mrs. Milner whether her sister can attend to day - A. I can answer myself, that she cannot without endangering her health.

Mr. Attorney General. In absence of the sister of Mrs. Milner, there is a considerable difficulty in the identity of the note; it would ill become me to proceed further.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-45

1025. MARIA CLARK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isaac Dunkley , about the hour of nine at night, on the night of the 17th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, a watch, value 2 l. two coats, value 36 s. two waistcoats, value 10 s. a sheet, value 10 s. five handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a pair of breeches, value 10 s. his property .

ELEANOR DUNKLEY . I am the wife of Isaac Dunkley ; we live at No. 5, Vinegar-yard, St. Giles's .

Q. Do you remember going up into the bed-room on the 17th of September, in the afternoon - A. I do; about four o'clock. The first thing I saw was my husband's watch with a gold key, a great coat, a new coat, a pair of smallclothes, two waistcoats, a sheet, and five neck handkerchiefs; one a silk one. I saw all the things then. I locked the room door about four o'clock; I had made the bed. I went down stairs; I left the room door locked.

Q. In what part of the room was the watch - A. It hung on the chimney-piece. I missed these things at eleven o'clock; when I went to bed.

ISAAC DUNKLEY . I am the husband of the last witness. When we went to bed, I went to wind up my watch; it was gone. All I know is, the articles were missing; I have seen part of them since.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am a constable. On Friday, the 17th of September, between eleven and twelve at night, Mr. Dunkley came to me; I went with him; but I made no discovery until Monday. I had some information that the prisoner and another woman had been selling some clothes; I apprehended the other woman first, and when I went to No. 5, Leg-alley, where the prisoner had lodged; she was gone from there; I then went to a court in Clare-market, there I found the prisoner in bed. In that room I found a waistcoat; Mr. Dunkley was with me; he said, it was his, he had had it fourteen years. I took the prisoner in custody, and likewise the woman who had purchased the things of her; the other woman acknowledged that she had purchased them of the prisoner, a coat, waistcoat, and smallclothes, for her husband. I took with me the waistcoat only; there was no other clothes there. Mrs. Homer said the things should be forth coming. In about half a hour after, Mrs. Homer, the landlady, came up to the watchhouse, and brought me a pair of smallclothes; she requested me to look in the pocket; in the pocket of the breeches, I found a duplicate of a blue coat; the blue coat and the breeches are here. Mrs. Dunkley went with the duplicate, and took her husband's blue coat out; she did not understand it. I produce the blue coat, waistcoat, and breeches.

Prosecutor. They are mine. I have never seen my watch again, nor my great coat again.

REBECCA WITHERS . I live at No. 17, Broad-street, Bloomsbury. I lodge with Mrs. Hians.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have seen her; I never spoke to her before Mrs. Hians sent me to her, to get her daughter's clothes that she had enticed away. On Sunday morning, the 19th of September, I went for the young woman's clothes; I went to No. 5, Leg-alley, Long Acre; I found the prisoner in bed; I told her that Mrs. Hians had sent me for her daughter's clothes; the prisoner told me to tell Elizabeth Hians to keep out of the way, it was a pity she should be taken up, as she knew nothing of the robbery. The prisoner told me, she herself, committed the robbery; she said, she took some keys, she unlocked the door, put on her apron to bring the property away, and she locked the door, and took the keys back again; she expected Mr. Dunkley up to search the room, but they could not find any thing in the room; she had sold all the property, but the sheet she had pledged; she did not say where. She gave me Elizabeth Hians 's things; she told me to tell Betty Hians to swear she did not know her, as she supposed Betty Hians would be taken up, because she lived with her. She told me that Betty Hians was never near the place. She saw a man painting the door; he said to her, am I in your way; she said, no; but he little thought she had his property.

MARY HOMER . On the 18th of September, the prisoner brought me a coat, and a pair of small clothes, I gave her ten shillings for them; the waistcoat she gave me in with the clothes. I bought them for my husband; after I had bought them my husband pledged the coat. She was taken up in my place.

Prisoner's Defence Elizabeth Hians brought the things to me; whether she received the money I cannot say.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing only, not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-46

1026. EDWARD HARRISON was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon George Henry , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch; value 3 l. his property .

GEORGE HENRY. On the 27th of September , about half past ten at night, I was going home; I was facing of Drury-lane Playhouse ; a centinel was on duty; I went and spoke to him; as I was speaking to him a man came from the coaches, struck me with the back part of his hand, and drawed my watch; it was not a very hard blow. At that instant he hit me, he seized my watch. I ran after him, and cried stop thief; he made his escape between the coaches; I lost him.

Q. When did you see your watch again - A. I came round to the spot again; in about a quarter of an hour; there was a man there that I understood to be a Bow-street officer; he said, young man, it is of no use of you standing and waiting here, he will not be here any more to night, if I would call on him on the next morning at the Yorkshire Grey, he would speak to me. On the next morning I went to that house; I asked the landlord if he had seen a Bow-street officer there. The landlord's name is Harding. He said, what do you want with a Bow-street officer; I told him that I had lost my watch; it was a silver watch, with a steel chain and key only to it. The landlord afterwards produced me the watch. This is the watch; it is mine.

Mr. Gurney. Was this a blow or a tap that the man gave you - A. A tap with the back of his hand; I did not receive any injury by it.

THOMAS HARDING . I keep the Yorkshire Grey public-house. The prisoner brought the watch to me to sell about ten o'clock at night; he had a whip in his hand; I have known the prisoner some time; he is a hackney coachman. He said, Harding, I want to sell a watch for twenty-two shillings; I told him, I had no money to purchase watches. He turned round and went away; directly after, Henry, the prosecutor, came to me with another man, and called for a pint of beer, asked me if I had a Bow-street officer in the way, one had promised to meet him there that morning; I told him there was no one there. I asked him his business; he said, he had lost a silver watch, with a steel chain, and a key at the end of it; he said, he was a journeyman carpenter, it was very hard for him to lose it; I said, it was. I told him on the over night I had such a one offered to me for sale, perhaps I might find it out. I went then to the watering-house in Charles-street, Covent Garden; there was some coachmen there at breakfast; I told them the circumstance of Ned, the coachman; he goes by that name; one of the men said he lived in Charles-street, Drury-lane; the feeder of the horses went and shewed me the house. I went up in the two pair room; I found the prisoner at breakfast there with his wife; I said to the prisoner, Edward, the watch you offered me last night is a stolen watch. The prisoner took me to Crown-street, Seven Dials, to the Plough public-house; I stopped in the public-house about a quarter of an hour the prisoner brought John Tappen in with him; the prisoner told John Tappen that the watch that he left in his hands the over night he must give to me; he did so. I left the prisoner and Tappen together and came home. The prosecutor has the watch now. I have no recollection of the watch, only it had a steel chain. When I told the prisoner that the watch he offered me last night was a stolen watch; he said, he picked it up. The prisoner was taken in custody the next morning in Tottenham-court-road.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the prisoner, is he the man that gave you the blow on the breast - A. To the best of my recollection he is; I took particular notice of his dress; his dress tallies. I described his dress to the landlord.

JOHN TAPPEN . I am a hackney coachman. The prisoner brought this watch to me on the 27th of September, he asked me to lend him two shillings upon it; I had one shilling about me, and a shilling he owed me before, that is all he had for it. I had the watch in my possession until next morning, then Mr. Harding and another man came for it; I delivered up the watch; the watch had a steel chain to it. I cannot swear to the watch.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing from the person, but not violently .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18131027-47

1027. JOHN WELCH was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Rebecca the wife of Thomas Selwyn , on the 10th of October , taking from her person and against her will, an umbrella, value 10 s. the property of the said Thomas Selwyn .

REBECCA SELWYN . My husband's name is Thomas Selwyn ; we live at No. 1, Glass-lane, Pimlico. On Sunday evening, the 10th of October, about twenty minutes past nine o'clock, as near an I can guess, we had been to chapel; my husband was with me. After chapel we went to No. 44, Lower Sloane-street; on our returning from there nobody else but my husband was in my company; we were in a place called Jew's-row , we perceived two men meeting us. There is a paved foot-path there; we were upon that. We gave way for the two men to pass; they both shoved me on that side which I had made way for them to pass; there was room enough for them to pass there.

Q. Did you perceive a shove from one of them - A. I did; I had hold of my husband's arm; the shove appeared to me as if done on purpose, and my being driven against my husband, shoved my husband off the pavement down in the road; I let go my husband to save myself from going down. At that time my husband asked the men what they did it for; the prisoner, Welch, turned round immediately after the push, and twisted the umbrella out of my hand.

Q. Did you make any endeavour to resist - A. I did; I held it tight in my hand; he got it out of my hand in a short struggle between us; as soon as he got it, I asked him for it; instead of his giving me the umbrella, he struck me a blow on my face with

his fist; that blow drove me against some shutters. My husband asked him what made him strike me. He asked him to give me the umbrella. My husband was going forward to seize the man. I caught hold of my husband to prevent him. The prisoner immediately turned round and ran away.

Q. What was your reason for endeavouring to prevent your husband from following him - A. For fear he should receive a blow. He is in the army; they are not suffered to have any marks of violence upon them. My husband broke from me, and ran after him. They ran down George-street. My husband ran down Jews-row after the prisoner, and turned into George-street. My husband returned to me again.

Q. Was there only one man run away, or both - A. Both run away. It was the prisoner that took the umbrella.

Q. Which of them run against you - A. It appeared to me to be the prisoner by his dress and look.

Q. When did you see the man again that took your umbrella - A. He was down in Jews-row, walking quietly by himself. I turned down the corner of George-street to see after my husband. He returned back to me in a few minutes; he said he had lost sight of the prisoner. I was in Jews-row when I saw the prisoner again. I had just returned back to the same place when I saw him again.

Q. Had he your umbrella then - A. No.

Q. Did you know him again - A. Yes, I knew him to he the man. He was at large when. I saw him. In a very few minutes my husband went up to him. I saw my husband take him.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same man - A. Yes. When he struck me I looked very hard in his face. I am very sure he is the same man. It was a moonlight evening. After my husband took the prisoner, he was taken to the watchhouse; he said he would fetch the umbrella if we would let him go after it; he said that in my hearing. I have never seen my umbrella again.

THOMAS SELWYN . I am a serjeant in the guards , and I am the husband of the last witness. On the Sunday night she has mentioned I was walking home with her; it was near twenty minutes or half past nine. We were returning down what is called Jews-row: we saw two men meeting of us; we gave them the inside walk, we taking the outside place just before they came to us. When they came opposite the side of us they gave a jut or a shove of a sudden against my wife. My wife came all of a sudden against me, and I went off the curb, down into a gutter.

Q. The effect of that jerk was to drive your wife against you, and to drive you off the curb - A. Yes, it appeared to be done designedly. I saw the men come up; my wife let go my arm to keep herself on the walk. I immediately said, what do you mean by that. I saw at the time the prisoner came up he was the inner man next my wife.

Q. Do you mean to say it was the prisoner that put himself in the attitude when he shoved against your wife - A. They both apparently did it together; they were either arm in arm, or close together. After I asked why he did it, I stepped forward through the dirt to recover myself upon the causeway, and before I could recover myself the umbrella was wrested out of my wife's hands. I heard my wife say, give me the umbrella. I heard her scream. Immediately I was going to make a dart to catch the prisoner, to catch the person that had the umbrella.

Q. You say that was the prisoner - A. I am not positive to the person of the prisoner that had the umbrella at that time. The person that had the umbrella, he held the umbrella as I supposed to strike me. My wife catched hold of me.

Q. The person that held the umbrella up, that person, whoever it was, you had not so clear a view of him as to know it was the prisoner - A. I had not. To the best of my knowledge it was the same person. My wife took hold of me, they turned about and run away.

Q. Did both the persons run away together - A. Yes, a little way. They parted at the corner of George-street. I pursued one down George-street, through Charles's-market, into Lower Sloane-street. In Lower Sloane-street I fell. In rising I saw the person I was pursuing turn into Red Lion-street; near Jews-row I lost sight of him; that run into the same street I came from. I turned back to look for my wife; I met her. We went into Jews-row, to the place where it happened.

Q. The person that you were pursuing went into Jews-row - A. Yes. We were going towards home, on my turning round I saw the prisoner coming towards me; he was upon the causeway when I saw him; he went off the pavement, and turned into the road among some people. I told the prisoner he was one of the men that had insulted us, and had run away with the umbrella. He denied it. My wife immediately came up, and recollected that he was the man that wrested the umbrella out of her hand, and struck her. I was persuaded to take the prisoner into custody by some one standing about. The prisoner turned round, and ran away. I pursued him, and another person. The other person came up with the prisoner first. I was close to him. I also laid hold of the prisoner. We took him to the watchhouse. At the watchhouse, the prisoner said if we would let him go out he would get us the umbrella; that was denied. He said he could not tell the people's names, nor the number of the house where the umbrella was. There was something said if he would tell me where the umbrella was I would not think any more about it. I said that.

JOHN GIBBS . I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street office. On the 10th of this month, about half after nine o'clock, I was in Jews-row, in company with Whaley and Nixon, and two other patrols of the same office. I saw some people standing in the road way; they were talking loudly. I made up to them. I heard some person say, why do not you take him in custody. The moment that word passed I saw some man run away. He was brought back again.

Q. Who was the person that was so brought back - A. The prisoner. At the watchhouse the prisoner said he would go and shew us where the umbrella was, but he could not tell the number.

- WHALEY. I came up at the time with Gibbs; I saw the prisoner run away; he was brought back again. We took him in custody, and took him to the watchhouse. At the watchhouse, he said if they would let him go he would go and get the umbrella; he did not know the number nor the name of the people that kept the house.

LUKE NIXON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw the prisoner in the watchhouse; he said if they would let him go he would go and get the umbrella; the watchhouse-keeper said he could not let him go, you tell these people, they will go and fetch it. He said he did not know the man's name, or the number of the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

[ The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-48

1028. WILLIAM KING was indicted for feloniously assaulting, in the King's highway, William Edward Westcote , on the 27th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a pair of boots, value 4 s. the property of James Westcote .

WILLIAM EDWARD WESTCOTE . Q. How old are you - A. Ten years and a half. I live at No. 9, Upper Crown-street. I live with my father. I go to school in Little Queen-street.

Q. Is the place where you live near Birdcage-walk - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being in Birdcage-walk - A. Yes. I was playing there on the 27th of September. It was almost ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. Who had gone with you there - A. My brother and my father. There were several boys playing with me there.

Q. Did your father leave you there - A. Yes. While I was at play, a man told me to spin my top.

Q. Did you know the man before - A. No.

Q. Should you know that man if you were to see him. Look round about, and see if you see him - Yes, I do. It is the prisoner at the bar; he had on the same dress as now, only a little apron on.

Q. When he told you to spin your top what did you do - A. I could not do it myself; I gave it to another boy to spin it. He then came to me, and said, if you will come along with me I will give you a goldfinches nest and a mouth organ. He took me to Tothill-fields; my brother went with me, and another little boy. He asked my brother to go along with him; he told him if he would go along with him he would give him a bird's nest and a cage and a mouth organ. When I got into Tothill-fields, he told me to pull off my boots, to run round the cricket ground, and my brother and the other little boy. I said I would not pull my boots off; he said I should. Then he put his hand to my collar, and laid me down on my face. He laid his elbow the pole of my neck; he turned up my feet, and cut off my half boots with a clasp knife.

Q. How were the boots fastened before he cut them - A. They were laced up and tied, and when he got up he said he would be d - d if I should not have the boots again, and if I was to meet any man I was to say he was my father; he then said I was to run round the cricket ground, and I was to have my boots again after I had ran round the cricket ground. I run, and the other boys run with me.

Q. While you were running what became of the prisoner - A. The prisoner told me if I met any gentleman I was to tell them that the prisoner was my father, and he would be d - d if I should not have my boots again, and while I was running he went off.

Q. Did you see him go off - A. No, sir.

Q. Did you observe what he did with the half boots after he took them off - A. He put them in his apron, and then he kept on trying to get away.

Q. Did you say anything to him about his wishing to get away - A. No.

JAMES WESTCOTE . I was nine years old last July. I go to school along with my brother. I was in the Birdcage-walk along with my brother when the prisoner came up to him.

Q. Look at him; do you remember him - A. Yes, I know his person. I did not pull my boots off.

Q. You have heard the account that has been given by your brother; you were in court all the time - A. Yes.

Q. What do you say to the story that he has told; is it all true that he has told - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any thing more that you have to mention - A. No. The prisoner made my brother lay down upon his face. The prisoner cut his half boots off with a clasp knife. I saw it done

JAMES WESTCOTE , SEN. I am the father of the two little boys that have been examined. I took my children to the park on the 27th; I took them to the Birdcage walk, opposite Queen-square gate. I staid with them there scarce five minutes, and I left them there. While I was staying there I heard the prisoner come up and ask one of the children to spin his top. I heard him; I did not see him at the first. On hearing him speak to the children it induced me to look round. When I looked round I observed the prisoner speaking to the children.

Q. Did that induce you to take particular notice of his person - A. It did. I had no suspicion of the man. I went off with a child in my arms not a twelvemonth old. I noticed the dress of the prisoner: it was identically the same as to the jacket, but he had a short apron on.

Q. How soon afterwards did you hear what had happened - A. I went round with the child, and walked. I returned to my own house in about an hour and a half, No. 9, Upper Crown-street, about half past eleven o'clock. When I came to the door I knocked; my wife opened the door; she appeared in agitation, and said, your child has been robbed. I asked, which of them; she said, William. I called the child forward. The child was there. I received information of him. I went to Queen-square office, which was then in the same street.

Q. What parish are you in - A. In St. Margaret's, Westminster. They directed me to go with the children to the same spot where they had been robbed. I went with the children, and they directed me to the field where they had been robbed, to Tothill-fields; when I came there, I found the deputy ranger had seen something of the transaction. I could find no trace of the prisoner then. I gave my children direction if they saw him again, one was to watch him, and the other to come and give me information. That was to my own two children.

Q. What day of the week was this - A. Monday, the 27th. On Tuesday, the 28th, I desired my children to go into Great Russell-street. Covent Garden; as they were going down Suffolk-steps, into St. James's-park, the eldest ran against the prisoner. I received the information from the eldest child. I pursued after the prisoner into King-street, and in Frederick-street I saw the prisoner standing at the bottom of Frederick-street; I made towards him; the instant the prisoner saw me making toward him, he walked off; he was going a quick pace; he looked over his left shoulder, saw me coming after him, he then ran off; as soon as he run I cried stop thief; the prisoner cried stop thief. I then ran after him; seeing the prisoner getting a head of me, I desired the sentry at the gateway, to drop his musquet across the gateway, so as to prevent his running through, which the soldier did, but the prisoner got through, and got into the park, and ran towards the corner of the Treasury-gardens, the wall where another sentry stands; I still crying stop thief; the prisoner continuing the same. He then made towards the Horse Guards; when I cried out stop thief, stop that man, that is the thief; I then saw a soldier move, and seized him; the soldier was going on sentry. As soon as I saw the prisoner was seized I desisted from running, being out of breath, until I came up to him. When I came up I desired they would let the children come up to see if it was the same man when the eldest came up, I asked him if this was the man that took his half boots, in the hearing of the prisoner; the soldier had him fast. When I mentioned the word to him, as soon as the child came up, he said, papa, that is the man that had my half boots. I desired the soldier to take him to Queen-square office with me; the soldier refused. I took him by the collar, and led him as far as Suffolk-steps, there I gave him up into the hands of an officer.

Q. You were shewn the place in Tothill-fields - A. Yes, I was shewn the place where it was done.

Q. Was it in the high road - A. No, it was in a grass field, by the road.

Q. How near was it to the road - A. I cannot exactly say how near it was to the road.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that you are speaking of - A. Yes; I am positive of it.

Q. The man that you saw in Bird-cage-walk, and the man that you afterwards seized in the manner you have described - A. Yes; I am positive of it.

Q. Have you seen the boots since - A. No part of them; they were new boots. I had them of the maker on Saturday night.

Q. to William Edward Westcote . Where was the boots cut from your legs - A. In Tothill-fields, in the open field.

Q. Not in the road - A. No.

Q. How near to the road - A. It was not very near to the road.

Q. Your father sent you to Russell-street, to look after the prisoner - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner at Lady Suffolk's steps; I ran home and told my papa where I saw him. I saw my father chase him, and I came up to look at him.

Q. Did your father ask you if that was the man that had taken the boots - A. Yes; I knew him again. I am sure it is the same man.

RICHARD PARSLOW . I am the keeper of the College-ground, Tothill-fields.

Q. Had you heard of any man offering a reward for boys to go along with him - A. I did; on the 27th of September; he offered birds nests.

Q. Were there any birds nests at that time - A. No; that excited my suspicion. I was upon the look out from nine o'clock until near eleven; I had heard of the man while I was at breakfast at nine o'clock. About a quarter before eleven, I was looking over the garden rails; I observed a man laying down by our play ground, and three children round him; there appeared to me to be one girl, that had a white pinafore on. After they had played some time until some person was going across on the foot pavement, when the man had got a considerable distance, the child with a white pinafore got up first, then I discovered it was a boy; shortly after, the two boys got up, and the man with them; he went behind them, and placed them all of a row; I discovered two of the children had no shoes on, which struck me all was not right; I waited until the children came up; I called to them for some time; they refused to come; after a short time, the biggest of the three came up, that was Mr. Westcote's boy; I asked what that man had been doing, or saying to him; he said, nothing. I said, do not tell me a story; where is your boots; he said his father had got them. I said, are you sure it is your father; he said, yes, sir, it is; with that I walked away to my own door; after that, when I came to my own door, I saw the prisoner; he went round by the Ducking-pond, and returned towards the Horse-ferry-road; I pursued him, but did not overtake him; I said to my friend, it is a trick; he pursued, and did not over take him. Afterwards I gave Mr. Wescote the particulars of every thing that I knew.

Q. What is the name of the other boy - A. Wilson.

- WILSON. I am going of nine years.

Q. Do you know the two boys of the name of Westcote - A. Yes; I went with him, and his brother to Tothill-fields, and I saw the prisoner; the prisoner asked William Westcote , whether he would come and get a birds nest; I went with them. I saw the prisoner run off with the boots in his apron. I did not see the boots taken off.

JAMES GILLMORE . I produce the mouth-organ; I took it out of the prisoner's pocket. The prisoner was brought to me by a man of the name of Miller. I took his apron off him. When he was examined before the magistrate, there were not less than

sixteen children to identify him to be the person that took the boots off.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge that is given against me; I hope you will take into consideration the witnesses; I have no witness but God Almighty to justify me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

Of the robbery, but not in the King's highway.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-49

1029. JOHN HEARN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , eight ounces weight of pins, value 4 l. 8 s. and three thousand one hundred and fifty glass diamond drops, value 40 l. the property of Benjamin Neale and Thomas Bailey .

BENJAMIN NEALE. I am a glass-manufacturer, and seller , in St. Paul's-church-yard ; my partner's name is Thomas Bailey . I have no other partner. The prisoner had been in our service for a continuance for the last fourteen or fifteen years; his business was mounting lustres with the drops. He was entrusted with the care of the drops entirely.

Q. From some information that you had received, did you go to Stepney workhouse to see a girl of the name of Emma Grig - A. Yes; this day fortnight, the first time.

Q. Was it after or before that you went there, that the prisoner spoke to you respecting her - A. It was on the Thursday before. He said he was afraid of the reports that were circulated about the neighbourhood would come to Mr. Bailey, or to me, that he had been stealing drops; he said, the report had arisen from Mr. Grig's daughter. I asked him how such reports could have got in circulation; he said, through Grig's daughter; he said, after he had been so many years in our service we could not suppose him guilty of such an action. I then only asked him where the girl was; he said, she was in some workhouse, but he did not know where; he gave her a very bad character, because she had robbed her father; but he did not know to what workhouse she was sent.

Q. Did you know at that time at what workhouse she had been sent - A. No. I believe the next day I learned from some other information.

Q. How soon after this did the suicide of Mr. Grig occur - A. On the Monday after.

Q. Mr. Grig lived, I believe, in Creed-lane - A. Yes.

Q. Upon that taking place did the prisoner say any thing more to you respecting this subject - A. Yes. He said, now, things looked very black against him, but he was perfectly innocent.

Q. How soon after that did Mrs. Grig put into your hands any quantity of drops - A. The Monday after that, last Monday; she put a quantity of drops, and made the disclosure.

Q. Had you seen the daughter, Emma, before this transpired - A. On the Saturday before, I saw the daughter, and on the Monday I went.

Q. This day fortnight you saw her, and last Monday week you went to Mrs. Grig's - A. Yes; two days after I saw Emma.

Q. Did you see the drops that were delivered up to you at Mrs. Grig's house - A. Yes, about twenty-two gross, rather more.

Q. A gross of one hundred and forty-four to the gross; twenty-two gross, that would be more than three thousand - A. Above twenty-two gross.

Q. What is the value of them - A. About forty pounds.

Q. Was the lustre mounted when you saw them - A. Part of them was on the lustre, and part not; a part of them had not been mounted.

Q. Did this lustre form a lustre of this kind - A. Something of that form. This is the identical lustre; the lustre was entirely formed; there were a considerable number of drops that remained over and above to mount that lustre.

Q. What was the prisoner's wages - A. He had twenty-six shillings a week; exclusive of his Christmas-box; his Christmas-box was six or seven guineas.

Q. Upon your first receiving this information, did you resort to the prisoner's house - A. He was taken up last Monday; I then went to his house, No. 62, Union-street, in the Borough.

THOMAS BAILEY . Q. Did you receive the drops at Mrs. Grig's - A. I did; from the daughter, and Mrs. Grig.

EMMA GRIG . Q. Did your father and mother live in Creed-lane - A. Yes, they kept the whole house. My father was a glass-seeller.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Mr. Hearn - A. Yes; he used to visit my father frequently; frequently three or four times a day; he had been in the habit of coming for twelve years past.

Q. Do you remember his bringing any parcel or basket there about three months ago - A. Yes, in the evening; he brought the basket, and took some brown paper parcels out of it. He put the brown paper parcels on the back counter.

Q. Had you any lodgers - A. No, not in our house. He came again the next morning; I saw him open the parcels; the parcels contained drops. I saw the prisoner put the pins in for mounting, and I saw the prisoner mount them on the back counter; he hung them round the lustre; they were all used to the lustre. The lustre was completely fitted up. They were all returned to Mr. Bailey; I did not see any left. The lustre was completely fitted up with these drops; there was quite enough for that.

Q. Now, after this, were you sent by your father and mother out of their house - A. Yes, to Stepney-green-workhouse by my father, and my head shaved.

Q. Did the prisoner know where you were sent to - A. Yes, because his wife was in the shop at the time I went.

Q. You had done something naughty some time ago - A. Yes; I had taken a forty pound bank note out of my father's pocket-book; it happened to be upon the hearth; that was a twelve month ago. I was sent to the workhouse on the 3rd of September.

Q. Before your father sent you to the workhouse had you talked in the neighbourhood of the visits of the prisoner to your father - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH GRIG . I am the widow of Mr. Grig who lived in Creed-lane.

Q. A few days ago we understand you delivered

to Mr. Bailey, a number of drops mounted on a lustre, and a number besides - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought the drops to your house - A. John Hearn , and John Hearn mounted them on the lustre; my husband did not understand mounting of lustres. The prisoner mounted the lustres The prisoner came to our house often three or four times a day. I knew he was in the employ of Neale and Bailey, and that he brought the drops from Neale and Bailey. I have asked him if he was not afraid he would be found out. I asked him because my husband took them of him. He said, no; he was not afraid of taking them. He took a great many drops away from us the week before last, before my husband died. I knew there were reports in the neighbourhood about this transaction; I suspected my daughter telling; my daughter said that she had told the neighbours. I had talked to Hearn about these reports.

Q. Your husband committed suicide; you delivered up the drops in question to Mr. Bailey last Monday, we understand - A. Yes; the drops that were mounted on the lustre, and the drops that were not.

COURT. Had you any suspicion that your husband had given away any of his effects to the prisoner - A. My husband told me he had, and my husband told me there was no will.

Mr. Gurney. You may not have seen the paper; has not the prisoner intimated that your husband had made a will in his favour - A. My husband told me in the morning before he died, that he had left his property to Hearn, and Mrs. Hearn came the same morning, and demanded the keys. My husband died about eleven o'clock.

Q. When were the drops brought that the lustre was made of - A. About three months ago; he brought them about eleven o'clock in the day, in two or three brown paper parcels; they were brought before my daughter went to Stepney; besides them drops, he had been bringing drops for nine years.

Mr. Andrews. You knowing he had stolen drops for nine years, you never thought of complaining until you found John Hearn had got possession of your property - A. I did not like to hurt my husband.

Q. Now, Mrs. Grig, how soon after your husband died was it that you saw that paper; look at it, and tell me if it is your husband's writing - A. Yes, it is. I have seen it before. he was writing of this the Monday, before I got up; I knew the contents of it from him.

Q. Now, I ask you upon the oath you have taken, whether it was not after you and Emma had been told the contents of this paper, that for the first time the news was raised abroad of this transaction of Hearn with your husband - A. The girl told the people at the workhouse that she would open the secret.

Q. Did not Emma know by this paper, that your husband had cut her off with a shilling - A. Yes, she did, and my husband told me that he must lose his life, because John Hearn had stolen the drops from Messrs. Neale and Bailey; he could bear it no longer. My husband came down to me, and said, Betty, hear this, shut the door, because the runners will be here after me, and I heard it read; Mr. Blinkow came the same day that my husband destroyed himself Mr. Blinkow came to claim the property for Hearn.

Q. And you told John Hearn , if he did not give up his claim you would be the cause of his death - A. Yes. Before my husband destroyed himself, he wrote this paper.

(The paper read.)

ELIZABETH PRINCEP . I live at 102, Norton-street, Portland-place.

Q. Did you know Mr. and Mrs. Grig - A. Yes. I have seen the prisoner at their house very frequently.

ELIZABETH BOUCHER . I live in Creed-lane, next door to Mrs. Grig.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Hearn - A. Yes. I have seen him at Grig's house two or three times a day.

JOSEPH NORTH . I am a watch-maker in Creed-lane, opposite of Grig's house. I know the prisoner, Hearn; I have seen him frequently at Grig's house three or four times a day, for this half year.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am the ward-beadle. I produce the drops; Mr. Bailey delivered them to me in this court.

Mr. Bailey. I received the drops of Mrs. Grig; they have they been in my custody until I delivered them to Kerridge.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Kerridge. After the prisoner was taken was he in your custody - A. He was; I and another officer took him to Newgate. In our way to Newgate, I told the prisoner, I was sorry to see him in that situation; I had known him many years. He told me, he hoped his master would have more mercy upon him than he had upon his property.

GEORGE READ . I heard what the prisoner said to Kerridge; he said he hoped his master would have more mercy on him than he had on his master's property.

THOMAS WILTSHIRE . I am in the employ of Messrs. Neale and Bailey; I am a drop moulder and cutter.

Q. Look at these drops, and tell me whether you know any of them - A. Here is one, I know the manufactory of it, by the mould and cutting; this is the mould in which the drops are cast; the cutting is also my own. I have examined the drops carefully before, I can speak to thirty or forty; there was never more than one gross moulded out of it. These are cut by me; I speak to my own cutting as well as the mould. I can speak with more certainty to the cutting than of the mould.

ISAAC MANNING . I am in the service of Messrs. Neale and Bailey. I am a moulder and cutter. I know some of these drops; I picked out twenty-one at the Hall, they are my cutting. I believe them all to have been cut for Messrs. Neale and Bailey.

Mr. Bailey. I believe these drops to be my property, and my partner's. I never learned from the prisoner that he had disposed of them.

Mr. Neale. Q. Do you believe these drops to be the property of you and your partner - A. They are. I never authorized him to sell them; the drops disposed of to Stanton was a pale yellow; these are white.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-50

1030. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a sack, value 2 s. a horse-cloth, value 7 s. and a girth, value 3 s. the property of John White , the elder, John White , the younger, and Henry Camphell White .

THOMAS SOUTHAM . Messrs. White live in Whitehall-wharf, Cannon-row, Westminster ; their names are John White , senior, John White, junior, and Henry Camphell White.

Q. Have they a stable on their wharf - A. Yes; they keep horses in their business; the gateway to the wharf is always open, and the stable door is generally open; the sack, horse-cloth, and girth, were taken from their stable. Read saw them take them. I laid hold of the prisoner in the street. I saw him come out of the stable, and out of the yard. I laid hold of him in Derby-street; I told him I thought he had robbed the stable; he said, no. This was about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 20th of October. He had a sack on his back; in the sack was a horse-cloth, and a girth. I took him into the accompting-house, and sent for an officer.

THOMAS READ . I am a servant to Mr. Read. I had seen the prisoner in the yard the day before. The prisoner was a labourer to the man that was hired to pave the yard. I saw him go into the stable. After he had been in about five minutes he came out with a sack across his shoulder. I informed Southam of it. The sack contained the horse cloth and the girth. I saw the sack come out of the stable.

JOSEPH DOLLY . I am Messrs. White's groom. This sack and its contents were delivered to me. I know these things to be my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-51

1031. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a handkerchief, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Lyon .

THOMAS LYON. I live in Old Burlington-street. I am a coachman . On the 9th of October, a quarter past twelve o'clock at night, I had been having a little beer; I had my senses about me. This happened to me nearly opposite of Newtoner's-lane, in Drury-lane . In crossing the street I hit my foot against the curb; I fell down, and my hat came off. The prisoner and another came up; the prisoner took hold of my hat when the other picked me up. I then questioned the prisoner concerning the handkerchief in my hat; he put himself in a threatening posture; the other man run away. They came up together; they were in company. I can be upon my oath when my hat fell off my head the handkerchief was in my hat. The prisoner was a stranger to me, and when the other run away I gave him in charge of the watchman. As the prisoner was going to the watchhouse he said he had not the handkerchief, and if he had his liberty he would serve me out. I have never seen the handkerchief again; it is worth five shillings; it cost me nine shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from the cook's shop, I saw the man laying down; his eye was cut, and his nose was bleeding. I picked up his hat. He fell down again. I gave him his hat. He said, give me the handkerchief. I said, you are a pretty one to get a man in a hobble. The man that assisted him in getting him up, ran away. He then gave me in charge of the watchman. I know nothing of the handkerchief. The prosecutor has been at my house, and offered to make it up for five shillings.

Prosecutor. His mother came to me at Marlborough-street office; I told his mother I did not wish to hurt a hair of his head.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-52

1032. JAMES RUTHWHITE was indicted for that he, on the 21st of October , upon James Harris , the younger, a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and that he with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut him in and upon his left side, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, to disable him: and

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MARY GEE . I live at Mr. Harris's, the father of the young man. On last Thursday, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was in company with Mrs. Harris and her daughters, and her son-in-law. We had been to the Old Bailey with some people that came from Harris's. On our returning home, Mrs. Harris proposed to go through Long-alley, and call at a public-house for her husband. She did. Her husband came out and joined our company, and as we were coming up Long-alley, the prisoner and a young woman were standing in Long-alley . I said, we will go on first. Mrs. Harris and I passed the prisoner and the young woman, and then I heard a quarrelling. I went back. I then heard some indecent words come from the young woman that was with the prisoner. James Harris , the young man, then came up.

Q. He had not been of your party before - A. No.

Q. When you saw him come up what did you see done - A. He said to his father, do not fight with him, I will fight him. Then the prisoner and young Harris fought. I saw them fight together about a minute; the prisoner went up the alley; Harris, the younger, followed him up the alley, and directly young Harris came out of the alley, he said, father, I am stabbed, I think I am dying. I went to him and lifted up his arm. I saw the blood coming down his waistcoat. He was taken to a surgeon in Sun-street.

JAMES HARRIS . I am the son of James Harris . I was at home waiting for my father and mother coming home. I came home about eleven o'clock; the house was locked up. I waited at my father's

door in Worship-street; I waited at my father's door until one o'clock in the morning I heard a noise; I went up to it, and when I came up it was my father, mother, and sister, quarrelling with the prisoner.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No. The prisoner was following my father; I pushed the prisoner away. There was a young woman with the prisoner. My father was quarrelling with the prisoner. The prisoner went to hit my father; I told him not to hit my father, to hit me. The prisoner hit me, and I struck him again; with that he shuffled up a dark passage, and I followed him. He then stuck me in my side. I thought it was with some sharp instrument. I came out of this little alley; I called to my father; I said, I am stabbed. I was taken to the surgeon.

Q. You are now recovered - A. Yes. My father apprehended the prisoner the same morning.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-53

1033. JAMES BROWN, alias WILD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a mare, value 8 l. a cart saddle, value 10 s. a bridle, value 3 s. a leather collar, value 3 s. a pair of haimes, value 3 s. and a pair of reins, value 3 s. the property of Walter Pritchard .

WALTER PRITCHARD . I am a tallow-chandler . I live in Kingsland-road . On the 19th of October I lost a mare and harness. The mare was in my stable on the 19th of October. I had not used her that day.

Q. You had not lent it to any person to make use of, had you - A. No. I saw it in my stable myself about three o'clock; I missed it about seven o'clock the next morning, and a cart, saddle, bridle, collar, a pair of reins. On the next morning I enquired at several places. I had information on the Wednesday evening.

Q. What day was the 19th - A. Tuesday was the 19th, and on the Wednesday I received information that the mare was in the custody of Mr. Jaques. On Friday I saw the mare in Mr. Jaques's possession.

Q. How had you left the stable - A. Locked up; the lock was broken. When I went the next morning I found all these articles gone, as well as the mare. The mare is now in the possession of Mr. Jaques. I went to Shadwell office; they persuaded me to prosecute the man. The mare I saw in the possession of Mr. Jaques, is my own mare.

Q. Is there any mark upon it - A. Yes, a faint white mark upon the forehead. I had it about four months. I had used her in my cart near to the very day. I am quite certain it is the very same. I only know that the lock was broken, and the mare and harness was gone.

JOHN HOLLINGSOOD . I am a watchman of Stepney-green. I was on duty on the 20th of this month, between the hours of three and four in the morning, the prisoner was coming along Stepney-green with a horse and a cart; he was going towards Mile-end-road. I asked him what he had got in that cart.

Q. What induced you to ask him what he had got in the cart - A. Because I thought he had something he should not have; he told me all was right. I was not satisfied with that. I ran after the cart. I then asked him what he had got in the cart; he said, flax. I followed him along Stepney-green about seven or eight hundred yards, or more. After following of him I asked him where he brought it from. He said, Limehouse-stairs. He told me he was going to take it to Birdcage-walk.

Q. Where is Birdcage-walk - A. One part is on Bethnal-green and the other part in Hackney-road. I followed him, and I went and acquainted Mr. Jaques, the constable of the night, of him. Mr. Jaques was in the watchhouse when I called him. The cart came very near to the watchhouse. Mr. Jaques came out of the watchhouse after him. We brought him back to the watchhouse.

Q. What became of the horse and cart - A. We put the horse and the property he had got, in the engine-house, adjoining the watchhouse. It was locked up there. The cart was put in Mr. Charrington's turning; the mare and the property in the engine-house. The night constable has the key of that in the watch-house.

Q. Was it a horse or a mare - A. A mare. I observed particularly that.

Q. Was the harness put up with the property - A. Every thing together. We never took it off. Mr. Jaques took care of the mare. I had nothing more to do with it.

MR. JAQUES. I was constable of the night. On this occasion I was called upon by Hollingsood, between five and six in the morning, to watch him. We went about sixty yards: I then took the prisoner by the collar, on the road. The prisoner was then sitting in the cart, driving it along the road. I caught him by the collar, and asked him what he had got in his cart. He said it contained flax and twine, he was going to Birdcage-walk with it. I took him to the watchhouse, and locked him up, as he did not give me a satisfactory account of himself. I took the property out of the cart, and put it into the engine-house, likewise the mare, and locked it up. Then after we came to the office we put the mare into the livery stable. On Thursday, Mr. Pritchard came to my house. I refused shewing him the mare that day, as the prisoner said it was his own. The prisoner was then committed. Mr. Pritchard came again on the Friday morning, and the mare proved to be his property. The mare and the harness Mr. Pritchard said was his property.

Prisoner's Defence. The cart and horse was lent me by a person of the name of Carrol, whose stable the horse was in, as I understood. We had a glass of gin together at the Basing-house. I agreed to meet him at the Nag's Head, Old-street-road. He met me there, and there I agreed for the loan of the horse.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-54

1034. BRIGHTON COTTEN was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Brown , on the 9th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. his property .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a groom out of a situation . I get a job where I can. I live at No. 10, Gloucester-court, Holborn.

Q. What day was it this happened - A. On Saturday the 9th of October, about half after nine in the evening, I went into the Wheatsheaf public-house, in Drury-lane , another man went in with me. I had a pint of beer there, and when I came out the man that went in with me he was at the bar. I left him there. I went into the back room. I was told there was a man that wanted me there, the man that I wanted to see, but I did not find him. In about five minutes I left the room, and went to the front door. As I was going along the passage, about the middle of the passage I was struck by a man on my breast, that met me. He drawed my watch out immediately. I got hold of his clothes, and closed with him; in the scuffle we fell, both of us. I still kept my hold, and he was drawed to the street door; some of the people in the house came and drawed him to the street door. They opened the door, and drew him out. I laid hold of him by the legs before he was drawed out.

Q. Was any violence offered to you while they were drawing out - A. They kept heating my hands. Several people said I should have my watch in the morning.

Q. How long had you hold of him by the legs before they dragged him out - A. Not above two minutes. When I had hold of his leg I perceived he had a high shoe on. I saw the prisoner on the Tuesday afterwards at Bow-street office. I described his foot on Monday, at the office.

Q. Did you see his person in the passage - A. He took me so unawares I cannot swear to his person. The person that was down with me in the passage was the man that had my watch. His name was Brighton Cotten. I cannot swear to the person of the prisoner. I never got my watch again. I never was in this public-house before. The landlord's name is Bennett.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am the landlord of the Wheatsheaf public-house. I have kept it near three months.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have seen two or three times at my house.

Q. On Saturday night, the 9th of October, were you at home - A. I was. I saw the prisoner in my house that night, and I saw Brown also there that night.

Q. Did you see a bustle in the passage - A. I only saw a bustle in the passage. The passage leads from the back room to the tap. I was in the taproom; I could see the bustle, but not those that were in it. I was at that time in the act of turning a man out of the tap room that came in with Brown; he was tipsey and troublesome, and so was Brown. There were a great many people in the passage. The prosecutor went to the door; the person that was with him said that he had no watch with him when he came into the house. Brown was by; he made no reply to what the man said

Brown. I am very sure I had my watch with me when I came into the house. The man that went with me he was very tipsey. The witness, Bennett, saw the seal at my watch pocket.

Bennett. I cannot say that he had a watch I saw he had one seal and a key.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 12th of October I apprehended Brighton Cotten in Drury-lane. The prosecutor, before the magistrate, said that Brighton Cotten had on a high shoe with a buckle to it.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was before the magistrate, Brown said he would swear to me by the buckle in my shoe. I asked for time to bring people forward to prove that I had no buckle shoes on at the time; they would not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-55

1035. JOHN GRIFFEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Robert Humphries , in the dwelling-house of Margaret Wynn .

ROBERT HUMPHRIES . I live at the Sun Dial public-house, Goswell-street, in the parish of St. Luke . I am a lodger. Margaret Wynn keeps the house. I am a mason's labourer. The prisoner lodged in the same house, and slept in the same bed with me. On the 6th of October we went to bed about twelve o'clock. I had a silver watch at that time; the dial plate was broken. When I went to bed I placed it on the chair by the bed side; it was there when I fell asleep. I awoke about six o'clock on the 7th of October; when I awoke I missed the watch off the chair. The prisoner was then gone. He was in bed when I put the watch on the chair on the over night. The prisoner did not return to his lodging. I never saw him until I saw him in custody; I then asked him how he came to do it; he said he had the watch, and he had pawned it over Blackfriars-bridge, and he had sold the duplicate to the man that keeps the Magdalen coffee-house; I value the watch at three guineas; I gave four guineas for it. I have had it for seven or eight years.

WILLIAM WHITE . I bought the ticket of the watch of the prisoner. I am a servant at the Magdalen coffee-house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I cannot say I do know him: I cannot say that he is the person I bought the duplicate of. I purchased the duplicate of a man for my master, Mr. Eastall. After I had purchased the duplicate I went to the pawnbrokers and took the watch out. I brought the watch to my master, and the man was asked whether that was the watch or not; he said it was. I gave the watch to my master.

Q. Does your master deal in articles of this sort - A. No, never before, or since. The young man, whoever he is, asked me if I would buy the duplicate of a watch. I asked him if it was his own; he said it was. I told him I did not want such a thing, if it was his own I would ask my master. My master came; I shewed him the duplicate, and told him the man asked three shillings for the duplicate. Master gave me the money to buy the duplicate. The watch was pawned for thirty shillings. I went to the pawnbrokers, and took the watch. I then gave it to my master.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. On the 18th of October, the prisoner was delivered into my custody by a City officer. I then had some knowledge of his face; he is a tailor. The prisoner said he knew me; his master had worked for me. I told him what he was in custody for, and asked him how he came to do it. He said he did it through distress; he had pawned the watch for thirty shillings, and sold the duplicate to the publican that kept the Magdalen coffee-house. The landlord produced the watch at the office; the prosecutor swore to it. The watch is very remarkable; the dial plate is broken. The publican is here with the watch.

JAMES EASTALL . I am the keeper of the Magdalen coffee-house. On the 8th of October, the prisoner was at my house; my waiter brought the watch to me; I took the watch to the prisoner, I asked him if this was the watch that he had pledged; he said, it was. This is the watch: I have had it ever since; it is a remarkable watch, there is a bit of the face broken. The watch was pledged for thirty shillings; the prisoner said he wanted three shillings to make up some money that he had spent the day before, before he could go home; I gave him the three shillings, and told him he might have the watch again any day he pleased. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-56

1036. JOHN SYNCK and LEVY SYNCK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , eight yards of velveteen, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Butler , privately in his shop . And JOHN SYNCK , the elder, for receiving the same velveteen, he knowing it to be stolen .

JANE BUTLER . I live at 32, Bedfordbury, Covent Garden ; my husband's name is Joseph Butler; he keeps a piece-broker's shop . On the 21st of October, about three o'clock, I was in my shop then by myself; these two children came in, the biggest of the two asked for half an ounce of whitey-brown thread, and when I was getting it, he told me it was to make shirts with; I sent him back to ask his mother what kind of linen it was, that I might know what thread send; they both went out, and went down the steps only, they went no further; I saw that very plain. They came in again; the boy said he must have that thread; I then served him, and told him if he had that thread he must keep it; he paid me two-pence for it. They went away, and directly they were gone away I missed the velveteen. It was a remnant of blue cotton velveteen; it was rolled up. I called my daughter down, described the children to her, and sent her out to look after them; she could not find them. On the next morning I had private information, and Donaldson, the constable, went with me to No. 10, Vine-street; we went up into the one pair of stairs, we went in, and the two children and their parents were at dinner. I knew the children; the father said he had beat his children for bringing the velveteen home. There was nothing found there. I was at Bow-street office when the velveteen was produced; I know the velveteen; there were no marks to it that I can swear to it.

GEORGE DONALDSON . On Friday, the 22nd of last month, Mrs. Butler and I went to No. 10, Vine-street. As soon as I went into the room I saw the two poor children, the elder prisoner, who is their father, and the mother also; they were all at dinner. I asked them where is the velveteen; the boys mother said to the father, if you know any thing about it, for God's sake tell, for the sake of the children. The father said he had pawned it in Brydies-street; he said one of his little boys brought it home, and said they found it; he said he had beaten the boy that brought it home and said he found it. I went to the pawnbroker; he produced the velveteen at the office. This is the velveteen.

Prosecutrix. That is the velveteen that I missed out of my window; I did not see the boy s take it; there is no mark that I can swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18131027-57

1037. THOMAS BISHOP was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Tullit , about the hour of two in the night, on the 15th of October , with intention the goods therein being burglariously to steal .

RICHARD TULLIT . I keep the Wheatsheaf public-house, Upper Chapman-street, St. George's in the East . On the night of the 15th of October, I was alarmed by my wife; she was alarmed by thieves; my wife got out of bed; I did likewise; my wife stamped her foot on the floor to disturb the thieves, that we understood were in the house, and immediately after we sprang the rattle; the watchman came and got into the back yard; the watchman got over the paling, to a skittle-ground; my boy went to look, and let him into the house; I went down immediately afterwards.

Q. In what state did you find the back of your house - A. The back parlour window was open, one window: that window had been fastened the night before, by my servant; it was opened on the inside; there was not the least appearance of violence having been used. I found an old stool and a pot-horse, they were standing by the washhouse door; they had been left in the skittle-ground; I found them removed to the washhouse door.

Q. By means of them could any person get access to your house - A. Yes, to a window of the room we call the lumber-room, over the washhouse side.

Q. Did you find that window open - A. No, there were no fastenings; the sash had been lifted up and put down again. I found the shutters of my bar forced.

Q. Is your bar inside of your house - A. Yes, on the ground-floor, in a room in my house.

Q. Therefore, any person could not force these shutters, except they had been in the house, on the ground-floor - A. Impossible.

Q. Had you left these bar shutters secure when you went to bed - A. Yes, I had fastened them myself.

Q. Did you find any thing left in the house - A. Nothing. The shoes the watchman found outside of the door; I found nothing.

Q. Now, you told me your back-parlour window had been opened - A. Yes, on the inside.

Q. How soon was the prisoner taken - A. In less than twenty minutes.

Q. Where was he taken - A. In a neighbour's premises adjoining of mine; I saw him directly after he was taken.

Q. In the space of two minutes before he was taken, had the watchman shewn you any shoes that he had found near the back door, or window - A. Yes, he had; that watchman's name is Swinland. When the prisoner was taken he had no shoes on

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. I had known him three years; he had been in the house four months before I took possession of it; he acted for Mr. Petrom fifteen weeks, very near four months.

Q. Did you lose any thing from the bar - A. I did not. They were disturbed too soon.

Q. You found no tool to force your shutters - A. No; a person that knew my shutters might easily force them without any tool.

JOHN SLEIGHTHOLD . I am a watchman. On my hearing the prosecutrix call out watch, I came to the house; I went to the back part of the house; as I was going over the pales to the skittle-ground, I saw a man come out of the window, at the lower part of house, and as I was upon the tiles of the skittle-ground, he ran under my legs, then I lost sight of him; I pursued him over the tiles as quick as I could, into the adjoining yard.

Q. I believe, you did not at that moment find him - A. No. That is all I know.

JOHN SWINLAND . I am a watchman. I came immediately upon the alarm; I picked up a pair of shoes close under the back-parlour window, in the yard.

Q. At that window that was found open, was it - A. Yes.

JONATHAN RIGGLEWORTH . Q. Upon the alarm of thieves, did you go to the house of the prosecutor - A. Yes; I assisted in searching for the thief, who made his escape.

Q. Did you find him - A. Not on the first search; in about five minutes after the first search, I went to step from the fence in an adjoining yard, then I found him in Mr. Jewell's yard; I placed my foot upon something, I did not know what it was at first; I stooped, and discovered it was the prisoner.

Q. Did you step upon him - A. I did.

Q. Where was he - A. He was crouched down to the ground; he was without any shoes; he had an oil-skin hat on. I took him in custody, and took him to the watchhouse.

BARNARD JEWELL . I am next door neighbour to the prosecutor. I was present when the last witness took the prisoner; the prisoner was found by a fence that parts my yard from the garden, about eight yards from the prosecutor's skittle-ground.

ELIZABETH THOMAS . I am servant to the prosecutor. I secured the parlour window on the over night.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-58

1038. JAMES GARRARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , two skins of leather, value 8 s. the property of William West .

JOHN SMITH . I am in the service of William West; he is a currier , residing in Bride-lane, Fleet-street . The prisoner was in his service; he is a shaver and parer of leather . In the month of September last, I made an observation, the prisoner's coat was hanging on a peg in the work-shop, and while he was receiving his earnings, I put my hand into his coat pocket; I saw two skins of leather; the prisoner came back into the room; I told the prisoner what I had observed; he went down stairs again; I followed him. The prisoner returned up again; he took down his coat, and he look confused; he afterwards took the coat upon his arm, went down stairs with it, and laid it on the counter, in the back warehouse, and went into the yard; in the mean time Mr. Ticknell, the other workman, came and asked whether that was his coat; the prisoner said, it was. Mr. Ticknell put his hand in the pocket, and took out the other skin.

Q. When was the first taken out - A. I followed him up stairs the first time; he went then to his coat, took out a skin, and throwed it down. I told the prisoner he need not have done that, I knew it was there. He said, that was more than I could prove. I told him I had been a long time suspicious of him; I had then detected him. The prisoner said, good God, it is the first time; he then said, blast me, and rubbed his hands; he said, he did not think I would have served him so. I told him I had only done my duty, and Mr. West was made acquainted of it by Mr. Ticknell. He then said, by God, I am ruined; he then took his coat, and went down stairs, and at that time Ticknell went to the prisoner, and asked if that coat was his; he said, yes, it was. Ticknell then took the other skin out of his pocket. Mr. West then said to the prisoner, this is the way you have been robbing me; he said, it was the first time. He dropped upon his knees, and asked Mr. West's pardon.

MR. TICKNELL. I am in the service of Mr. West. Mr. Smith gave me some information respecting the prisoner, Garrard; I saw the prisoner's coat upon the counter; I asked the prisoner if it was his coat; he said, it was. I found one of these skins in his coat pocket; Mr. West was present; he said, this is the way you have been robbing me. Garrard fell on knees begged for mercy, and said it was the first time; he said, he had taken it to bind some books for himself. It was near eight o'clock at night, when I found the skin in his pocket.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called six witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-59

1039. SUSANNAH BROWN was indicted for

feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , two shawls, value 7 s. the property of John Bennet .

FANNY BENNET . My husband's name is John Bennet; he is a linen-draper , 144, Lower Holborn . I lost the shawls on the 11th of October.

Q. How did you lose it - A. Susannah Brown came into the shop, and took them off the counter. I can swear to the shawls.

MARGARET CUMMINGS . I sell fruit in the street. I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Bennet's shop, and take the shawls off the counter. She brought them out in her hand. I collared her, and called for assistance.

GEORGE ANDREWS . I am a porter. On Monday, the 11th of October, I was returning from the West end of the town; the prisoner was coming out of Mr. Bennet's shop: as I passed, she dropped a shawl on my foot. I saw Mrs. Cummings jump up and seize the prisoner. I picked up the shawl, and delivered it to Mrs. Bennet.

Q. Did you stop her - A. No.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. The prisoner was delivered into my custody, and the two shawls. These are the two shawls.

JOHN BENNET . They are my shawls.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in this shop. I had injured this woman; she owed me a spite; she pushed me into the shop, and said I took the shawls. I did not.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 2 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-60

1040. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 13th of August , a certain acquittance and receipt for the sum of 20 l. 2 s. with intention to defraud Thomas Thornton , George Matthew Hoare , David Walters , Thomas Wildman Goodwyn , Thomas Thornton , the younger, and William Everest .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a ticket porter.

Q. In the month of August, last year, were you employed by any person to go to the house of Goodwyn and Company - A. I am not sure of the month. I was employed on the regular stand, the North side of the Royal Exchange, by the prisoner, to carry a letter and to bring back an answer. He paid me before hand. I went to Messrs. Goodwyn's accompting-house, I saw Mr. Howson, the clerk there. I gave Mr. Howson the same letter which the prisoner had given me. He opened it, and looked at it. I saw him take a paper out of the letter.

Q. Did you take back any message to the prisoner - A. Yes; if there was any money owing at the house of Goodwyn's, they were to call themselves. I delivered back that message to the prisoner. The clerk gave me the receipt and the cover.

Q. Did you look at the receipt - A. I did. This is the receipt to the best of my knowledge; it was such a receipt as this. I looked at the names, and particularly at Goodwyn. I took this receipt of the prisoner. There were two of them in company together. The prisoner employed me. The other man gave me eighteen pence. I took back the receipt to the prisoner; there were then two in company. The prisoner and the other man came up to me; I told them they did not like to pay me; they must call themselves. I am quite sure the prisoner is the person.

COURT. He did not pay you - A. No, the other man paid me. The other man had no concern with me. The prisoner asked the other man if he had eighteen pence. It was a wafered letter.

Mr. Adolphus. If it was a wafered letter it might be delivered to you without the prisoner knowing its contents. You read the receipt yourself - A. I did, on the 'Change, while I waiting until the prisoner came up. I gave the receipt back to the prisoner.

Q. Did not he hand it to the other man - A. No, they walked arm in arm together. The prisoner employed me. I received the letter of the prisoner, and I returned the receipt and cover to the prisoner.

EDMUND HOWSON . I am a clerk in the house of Goodwyn and Company. The names of the partner s are, Thomas Thornton , senior, George Matthew Hoare , David Walters , Thomas Wildman Goodwyn , Thomas Thornton , junior, and William Everest .

Q. Do you remember the last witness coming to you in August, last year - A I do, I believe on the 13th of August; he presented to me a letter; on opening the letter it contained a receipt for twenty-two pounds two shillings.

Q. Look at that receipt - A. This is the same. I delivered it back to the porter.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-61

1041. JAMES DACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , twenty shillings in monies numbered, a 5 l. bank note, and four 1 l. bank notes , the property of Thomas Kempster .

THOMAS KEMPSTER . I am a rope-maker , 46, Goswell-street . I have a warehouse in Thames-street . I had two persons down there who employed the prisoner.

WILLIAM HUNT . I live with Mr. Kempster. I was employed in Thames-street.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. A soldier . He was employed at our warehouse on the 10th of October. I employed him to do a job for me, one in Bishopsgate-street, the other into Thames-street; he came back; for one I paid him nine pence, and the other three pence. He then asked me whether I had another job. I told him no, not at present. After that, I went to the public-house and had half a pint of beer. I went back to the warehouse. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards I was coming down stairs; I met the prisoner three parts of the way up stairs. As I was coming out he ran down stairs. I ran after him. He began to throw some dirt about that lay at the bottom of the stairs, and said what time in the morning shall I come to you to see if you have any thing for me to do; he said, about twelve o'clock? I said, yes, he might. He said he should not go home directly; he should go to the

wharf to see if he could get a job there. I saw no more of him after that. This was about half after five. I went to the door the next morning; I found the warehouse door open. This was about nine o'clock in the morning. I went to the desk, I found ten pound was gone; nine pound in notes, and about a pound in silver and copper. I went over to Mr. Kempster's young man, and told him of it.

Q. Do you know what notes they were - A. Yes, a five pound note and four ones.

Q. Were they ever found, any of them - A. Yes, a five pound note.

Q. What business had he at the warehouse when you saw him coming down stairs - A. He had no business there at all.

ROBERT PATTERSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and took him to the Compter. I then went to his lodgings, with the officer of the Compter with me, and in searching we found in the cover of a tureen forty-one shillings, seven three-shilling pieces, five eighteen-pieces, and twelve shillings and sixpence in silver. In a cartouch box we found three one-pound notes. We then went to the Compter, and asked the prisoner what he had done with the five-pound note. He told us that he had bought a pair of shoes, and had given eight shillings and two pence for them, and changed the five-pound note with the shoemaker to pay for them. We went to the shoemaker; he had paid it away. We traced the note until we got it.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I produce the five-pound note and the three ones. The shoes are here also that the prisoner changed the note for.

William Hunt. I know the five pound note; it is my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court. I have a wife and two children. I was in distress, and I was in debt with my serjeant. I had not a bit of bread to eat for two days.

GEORGE MESSENGER . I am a shoemaker. I sold a pair of shoes to the prisoner; he paid me eight shillings and two pence for them. That five pound note is the note he paid me for the shoes, and these three ones that are here are the notes I gave him in change.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-62

1042. JOHN LANGDON was indicted for that he, on the 16th of April, in the 38th year year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish church of Stoke Tameron in the county of Devon, was married to Sarah Morris , spinster, and that he afterwards, on the 22nd of December, in the 52nd year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish church of St. Pancras, in the county of Middlesex , feloniously did marry Mary Ann Robertson , spinster , and that he afterwards, in the City of London, was apprehended for the felony aforesaid .

GEORGE SNOWDON . I live at Plymouth Dock, in the parish of Stoke Tameron. I was churchwarden last year. I produce the register books of marriages of the parish. April 16th 1798, John Langdon , of this parish, a joiner in the dock yard, and Sarah Morris , were married by banns, this 16th day of April, 1798, by me, Isaac Saunders , curate. This marriage was solemnised between us. John Langdon . The mark of Sarah Morris X.

Q. Did you know the witnesses to the marriage - A. Perfectly well. They are both dead.

Q. Did you know the prisoner and Sarah Morris before their marriage - A. I did.

Q. Did you know the prisoner and her after they were married - A. I have not seen the prisoner since until I see him now. The witness, Charles Bowler , was his uncle; he lived next door to me. I was not present at the marriage. The wife I have seen in the workhouse, in a deranged state. I called on Sarah Morris . I have seen her within four months. She is living.

Q. Did you know that he belonged to the dock yard - A. He never belonged to the dock yard. It is a false thing in putting it down.

JAMES LANE . I live at Plymouth dock, in the parish of Stoke Tameron.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do.

Q. Did you know him in the year 98 - A. I knew him in the year 97, he was a carpenter, and I knew Sarah Morris. I knew them both. I do not know in what part of the town they lived after they were married. I visited her and her father previous to their marriage.

Q. Did they live together afterwards as man and wife - A. I know nothing to the contrary. They lived in the same town; they passed as man and wife. Before she was married she went by the name of Sarah Morris; afterwards she went by the name of Langdon. They had two children. I am sure he is the same man.

MR. ROBERTSON. Q. I believe you are the uncle of the lady whom the prisoner has lately married - A. I am.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner write - A. Yes, I am well acquainted with his writing.

Q. Look at the signature in that book,

"John Langdon," and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand-writing - A. To the best of my belief it is. There is no doubt of it.

Q. to Mr. Snowdon. Do you know the hand-writing of Bowler and Roberts, that are dead - A. I can swear to the hand-writing of Mr. Roberts: he was clerk of the church. I do not know Mr. Bowler's hand-writing.

REV. WILLIAM BATTEN CHAPMAN . I am the curate of St. Pancras. On the 22nd of December, 1810, John Langdon of this parish, batchelor, and Mary Ann Robertson , of this parish, spinster, were married in this church by banns, by me, this 22nd day of December, 1810. W. B. Chapman, in the presence of William Upton and Moses Smith .

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. I do not.

MARY ANN ROBERTSON . Q. When did you become acquainted with the prisoner - A. About eight months previous to my being married to him. He addressed me as a single man. He was a carpenter. and builder.

Q. When did you discover that he had a wife

living - A. It is three months since I discovered it, and since I discovered it I have ceased to live with him.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I am one of the Bow-street patrols. Is apprehended the prisoner last month, in the parish of St. Lawrence Jury, in Cheap ward, in the City of London.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-63

1043. JAMES RYDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , a silver skewer, value 25 s. a gown, value 30 s. and a bunch of artificial flowers, value 3 s. the property of Charles Kaye ; and a pelisse, value 2 l. the property of Ann Bridget , in the dwelling-house of Charles Kaye .

ELIZABETH GOLD . I am a servant to Mr. Charles Kaye , Hunter-street, Brunswick-square, in the parish of St. Pancras .

Q. On the 11th of July last, did Mr. Kaye and his family leave the house for the purpose of repair - A. Yes; the prisoner was one of the carpenters that came into the house for the purpose of repairing it.

JAMES GILEAD . I am servant to Mr. Armstrong, pawnbroker, Baldwyn's-gardens. On the 16th of July, the prisoner pawned a sattin gown for eight shillings; on the 23rd of the same month he pawned with me a cloth pelisse for sixteen shillings; on the 29th of September, he pawned a skewer for fifteen shillings; on my master examining it, he sent for the officer.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner from the information of Mr. Armstrong. I searched his lodgings; I found this bunch of artificial flowers, a remnant of silk, a remnant of muslin, a bed watch-pocket, and a pocket looking-glass.

Elizabeth Gold. The sattin gown is my mistress's, and the bunch of artificial flowers.

ANN BRIDGET . I am a servant to Mr. Kaye. The cloth pelisse belongs to me; the silver skewer is my master's property; it has his crest upon it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 2 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-64

1044. WILLIAM PLOMER was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Patterson , on the 18th of October , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. and a seal, value 10 s. his property ,

JOHN PATTERSON . I am a gentleman's servant out of employment ; I live at No. 88, Fore-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I have known him not more than six or seven weeks. On the 18th of October met him in the Strand; he asked me to have something to drink; we went into a public-house, and had something to drink; we were not have a minute in the house; he said he had to call on a friend of Smithfield. At Smithfield we went into a public-house and had a dram, and then he took me up to Compton-street, that is where the accident happened; we arrived in Compton-street about four o'clock; it was about one o'clock when I met him, and in Compton-street we went into a public-house; I don't know the sign, or name. We had not been there a moment before the prisoner struck me, and drawed my watch out of my pocket; he made a bolt out of the room; I pursued him, and called stop thief.

Q. Did you attempt to stop him in the room - A. I should have taken him at the time, but it was not what I expected; it was quite unawares.

Q. Were there any body else in the room - A. There was a woman with a child; she is not here.

Q. When you ran out, and pursued him, and called stop thief, how far did you pursue him - A. Not more than ten or a dozen yards up Compton-street; I returned back to the public-house before he was taken. The prisoner was brought back in two or three or minutes.

Q. What became of the watch - A. It is in the possession of a person who now has it. I thought at first it was a joke, and said if he would pay the expence he might go, but when he run out of the house I followed him, and cried stop thief.

WILLIAM GRAY . I am a painter. On the 13th of October, between for and five in the afternoon, I was painting a house at the top of Northampton-street, in Compton-street; I heard the cry of stop thief; I turned round, and saw the prisoner coming up the street; I crossed over and laid hold of the flap of his coat; he said, let me go, it is only a lark; We returned, and I took him back to the George public-house, the corner of Compton-street; the prosecutor was there, and a number of people. The prosecutor said, he thought it was only a lark, he did not wish to hurt him, if he could get his watch, and expences if the watch was damaged; the prisoner said, he and the prosecutor had been drinking all day together; the prosecutor and the prisoner were both fresh.

CHARLOTTE BURRIDGE . I live in Compton-street. I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutor calling to him. I observed the prisoner throw something into Mrs. Williams's passage, No. 4, Northampton-street; I told James Brown that the prisoner had thrown something into Mrs. Williams's passage; Mr. Brown went and got the watch. That is all I know.

JAMES BROWN . I live in Compton-street. I observed the prosecutor pursuing the prisoner. Charlotte Burridge asked me if I did not see the man throw something into Mrs. Williams's house; I went to Mrs. Williams, she put the watch in my hand; the prosecutor came up and asked for his watch. This is the watch. I went to the George public-house; the prosecutor said, he did not wish to prosecute the prisoner.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I and the prosecutor had been drinking freely all the afternoon; I cannot say rightly what passed, I was so intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18131027-65

1045. ASHER HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , one pair of diamond ear-rings, value 18 l. the property of Alexander Levi and George Livi .

ALEXANDER LEVI . I am in partnership with George Levi ; we are jewellers , in Bury-street, St. Mary Axe .

Q. On the 14th of September, did you lose some diamond-rings - A. I did, and we lost some gold watches, they were stolen out of the warehouse; I had looked them out for an order, and that is the way they were missed; I had seen the ear-rings so late as three o'clock in the afternoon, and on the next morning, the 15th, I missed them, and the watches.

Q. On the 16th did your neighbour come to you - A. He did; he produced to me the ear-rings that I had lost on the 15th; in the morning Mr. Davis produced them; some conversation took place; I went to Mr. Davis's house; I found the prisoner there. I told the prisoner, that the ear-rings that Mr. Davis produced at our house were stolen the day before; I said, provided he would tell how he came by them, I would give him no trouble; he said, he could not tell. I then said, I must be under the necessity of sending for an officer; he must know how he came by them. Mr. Davis told him he thought he replied very improperly, that perhaps he did not know what situation he was placing himself in, and therefore he would recommend him to be candid, and say how he came by them; he then said, that he would; that he was to meet a man at two o'clock.

Q. Did he say what man he had them off - A. No. He said, he was to meet a man of whom he had them the day before, he was to meat him on that day, at the Red Lion in Whitechapel; that is the corner of Red-lion-street, at which place an appointment was made for some more property to be brought. I rather think he said watches, I am not certain. I then told him if he would be candid, I would go with him, I would stay there to detect the property that was brought to him; this was about eleven o'clock in the morning; he was to go at two o'clock at the Red Lion public-house, to see the person again; he then begged to go by himself, as he could bring the person earlier; I refused that; I told him I did not wish to see him, but an officer; the officer then came, and we went together, to the Red Lion public-house, Whitechapel; the officer, me, Davis, and the prisoner. It was understood that the officer should be in the tap-room with the prisoner; I and Mr. Davis were to be up stairs; we waited until near three o'clock; this person never came. I told the prisoner it appeared very strange that the appointment was not kept; the prisoner said he could not account for it; he bought an old coat the day before, and he found the ear-rings in the pocket of an old coat. He was then taken to the Compter.

Q. What is the value of these ear-rings - A Eighteen guineas; they are all loose diamonds.

GEORGE YOUNG . I am a servant of Mr. Flemming, a pawnbroker, 105, Whitechapel. On the 15th of September, these ear-rings were pawned with me, I think about the middle of the day, by the prisoner; I advanced six pounds on them, and the next day Mr. Davis's servant came and redeemed them.

DAVID DAVIS . I live in James-court, Bury-street, St. Mary Axe.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; he is an old clothes man. On Thursday, the 16th of September, he came to me between seven and eight in the morning; he produced the duplicate of a pair of earrings, saying, these ear-rings he had of a friend on Saturday, for which he gave six pounds; he had obtained the money on pledge; requesting I would take them out, as they were worth more; the pawnbroker said they were worth ten pounds, a few pounds might be of service to me, and the difference would be of service to him; I then replied, I would do it, but I never did any thing without my brother's consent, and he never was with me until ten o'clock. He went, and came again. I shewed my brother the ticket; we then sent for the ear-rings.

Q. Did the prisoner mention any thing else to you than the ear-rings - A. He expected the person that had the diamond ear-rings would bring some watches. He said he had the ear-rings of a friend: he paid six pounds for them.

MOSES DAVIS . Q. Did you see the prisoner when he came the second time to your house in the morning - A. That was between eleven and twelve; I sent my servant for the ear-rings; the prisoner requested I would purchase them; I looked at them. I told him it was not our purpose of taking them, but to sell them, it was for the purpose of serving him, as he had left the duplicate with my brother; I told him he might sell them, and return me six pounds, which I had paid to the pawnbroker. He said, he wished I would purchase them. I told him he might wait a minute or two, I would take them to a friend of mine.

Q. Did you mention the name of that friend - A. I did not; I then took them to Mr. Levi; he claimed the ear-rings as his own as soon as he saw them; I took Mr. Levi to my house, to the prisoner; he was then asked how he came by them; he said he bought them of a man, he was to meet the same man again at two o'clock, at the Red Lion public-house; at two o'clock I went with Mr. Levi, a constable, and the prisoner, to the Red Lion public-house; after I had been there I came down into the tap-room; the prisoner was absent; he returned afterwards; he told the constable that he found them in the pocket of an old coat.

LAWRENCE LEVINGSTONE . I am a servant to Mr. Davis. I took the duplicate to the pawnbroker's and brought the diamond ear-rings to Mr. Davis.

PETER MOUNT . I am a constable. I accompanied the prisoner to the Red Lion public-house; when he had been there five or six minutes, I let him go. There was no charge against him; he was not gone ten minutes; he came back of his own accord.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-66

1046. JOHN TABORER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , two reams of paper, value 36 s. the property of John Morgan , John Minter Morgan , and George Meadow Morgan .

JOSEPH BOLLER . Q. You live in Bell-square, St. Martin's-le-grand - A. Yes.

Q. On the 11th of October last, did a man of the name of Faint lodge there - A. Yes; he was a porter to Messrs. Morgan's, Ludgate-hill , and the prisoner was a carman there. On the day stated in the indictment the prisoner came into my lodgings; he brought a bag upon his shoulders; he asked for a light; he left the paper there. He said, Charles has got a bill of parcels; he knows where to take it to. He carried them up stairs in a bag to Faint's apartment, and left them there. I took particular notice of the bag. I saw one of the bundles was a ream of paper. I saw at the time there was a ream of paper in the bag. I could not see what the other was. I then sent for Mr. Whitehorn, of Foster-lane, to come and look at the parcel.

WILLIAM WHITEHORN . I am a publican. On the 11th of October, from the information of the last witness, I went to Faint's lodgings; the last witness shewed me a bag; it contained a large quantity of paper. Mr. Thompson, one of Messrs. Morgan's clerks, saw the paper afterwards.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a clerk to John Morgan , John Minter Morgan , and George Meadow Morgan , No. 39, Ludgate-hill. On the 11th of October, between seven and eight at night, I went to Faint's lodging; I there saw a bag which contained two reams of paper. That paper was the prosecutor's property, I have not the least doubt of it. The paper is worth about thirty-six shillings. Faint absconded that evening.

- KIMBER. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of October, after the clock had struck nine. The prisoner said he was innocent; he should not have done it if it had not been for Faint; he had put it in the waggon, and he took it to Faint's lodging. In Faint's lodging I found the paper, in this bag. I believe the bag belongs to Mr. Morgan.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-67

1047. ELIZA WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a watch, value 3 l. a quarter of a yard of ribbon, value 1 d. and two seals set in gold, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Rice , from his person .

THOMAS RICE . I live in Union-street, in the Minories. On the evening of the 17th of September, I had been to the Red Cow in Long-lane, Aldersgate. I had been there to take home a hat to the landlord of the house. I went there about eight o'clock, and staid there till near twelve. When I go out of an evening it is always my rule to put my chain in. I came out to make water, and I know the chain was in. On my going up Houndsditch, in my way home, I met the prisoner; she asked me to go with her. I told her to go about her business. She took hold of my arm; I shoved her away. She kept walking by my side. I thought I had out walked her, and when I came to the corner of Aldgate church I had occasion to make water; the prisoner came up and drawed my watch out, and away she ran. I called stop thief; she was stopped. I have never seen my watch since. After she was taken to the watchhouse they found a watch paper. The watch paper I out myself; I knew it belonged to my watch. It was a silver watch. It was worth between thirty and forty shillings.

JAMES DOWDY . I am a watchman. On the night of the 17th of September, I was standing near my box, about half after one; I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor walking together; the prisoner had hold of his arm; they were in conversation together. In about two minutes after, I heard the cry of stop thief. I stopped the prisoner; she was running. I took her to the watchhouse. The prosecutor charged her with robbing him, and at the watchhouse he said she had robbed him of his watch. The officer went out and found a watch paper.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered into my charge. I was officer of the night. I searched the prisoner; I found nothing upon her. I went out and looked about the road; I found a watch paper. I found no watch, chain, or seal. I shewed the watch paper to Mr. Rice, in the watchhouse. He said he could not rightly tell then whether it was his; he could tell better in the morning. In the morning he swore to it before the Lord Mayor. This is the watch paper; there is not a soil upon it; it was a dry night. At the watchhouse the prisoner denied her robbing of him.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . Q. Do you know that gentleman of the name of Rice - A. I do.

Q. In the course of your duty have you visited him - A. Yes, I have, but not where he lives now.

Q. Is he a gentleman that you would believe upon his oath - A. No, certainly not. When he lived near St. Paul's, I, with another officer, searched his house; he charged me with taking a fifty pound note, and afterwards at the Mansion House he denied saying any such a thing.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. Do you know Mr. Rice - A. I do. I accompanied Leadbetter to search his place. I knew that to be false which he charged Leadbetter. I would not believe him upon his oath.

Q. You believe him to be a gross liar - A. I do.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-68

1048. DANIEL HIBBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , sixteen pounds weight of sugar, value 16 s. the property of James Soppitt , Matthew Beachcroft , William Soppitt , and Thomas Seward Beachcroft .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a city constable. On the 17th of September, about half past eight in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Cheapside, between Bread-street and Wood-street; he had a bag on his shoulder. I searched the bag; I found a loaf of sugar in it. I asked him he came by it; he told me the sugar came out of the country by the waggon. I took him to the Compter, and then I went to the house of Beachcroft and Soppitt. I produce the sugar.

JAMES SOPPITT . I am a wholesale grocer . My partner's names are Matthew Beachcroft , William Soppitt, and Thomas Seward Beachcroft. The prisoner was our porter for near two years. The loaf of sugar produced by the officer, marked 38, that number is put on before the sugar is dried. I examined our sugar, and missed one loaf of that parcel. It is about twenty pound; it is worth twenty-five shillings.

JOHN TULL . I am a carman to the person who serves for Messrs. Beachcroft and Soppitt. On the 17th of September, I went there at half after seven o'clock in the morning; I loaded my cart with two hogsheads of sugar. In the first place, Daniel Hibbest told me to untie my cart; I told him I would not; he said he wanted to put something in my cart. I said he should not put anything into my cart. He called me an old sleepy fool. He brought a loaf of sugar out of the warehouse, and put it in the cart, and between six and seven o'clock at night I took it out of the cart, and took it to house, and delivered it to Hibbert. I did not tell my master. I did not know what to do.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-69

1049. ELIZABETH BOYCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , one shawl, value 4 l. the property of Matthias Long , from the person of Catherine his wife .

CATHERINE LONG . My husband's name is Matthias Long ; I live at No. 11, Cumberland-street, Curtain-road . On last Friday evening, as I was passing through Bishopsgate-street, my shawl was snatched off my neck. My niece was with me, she cried, stop thief. The prisoner ran away. She was stopped in Primrose-street, by the watchman.

CATHERINE JAMES . I was with my aunt in Bishopsgate-street the night she lost her shawl. I saw the prisoner take it from my aunt's shoulder; she run up Primrose-street. I saw her drop the shawl when she was taken.

JOHN HODSON I heard the cry of stop thief; I pursued the prisoner. The watchman stopped her. She dropped the shawl on my knee. This is

Prosecutrix. It is my shawl.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-70

1050. THOMAS PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a mould, value 4 l. the property of John Frederick Checkeni .

JOHN FREDERICK CHECKENI. I am a plaster of paris figure maker . I live in Giltspur-street .

Q. You were possessed of a mould of the Centaur, were not you - A. Yes, I missed it from my premises; I bought it in November; I missed it last February. I gave a great deal of money for it. There is not a mould in the trade that will make the figure of the Centaur like it. I gave information to Bruchani; I told him that I had lost the mould. On the 13th of October I got a warrant, and went to Bruchani. The officer, in searching, found the mould. The prisoner was apprehended the same evening. The prisoner said if I would let him go, he would make up every thing to me. This is the mould that was found at Bruchani's; it is mine.

LEWIS BRUCHANI . I am a figure maker I live at Newington. I bought the mould of the Centaur of the prisoner, I gave him eighteen shillings for it. The prisoner is a mould maker; I think he can make a mould like that.

MR. WORRALL. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at the White Hart, in Giltspur-street, on the 13th of September; he acknowledged that he had stolen this mould from Checkeni, and had sold it to Bruchani for eighteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I emplore mercy of my prosecutor; I was driven to the greatest distress; I was in a state of starvation by my prosecutor not paying me my wages; it is a ionspiracy of Mr. Checkeni to get me out of the way, he having used other tradesmen's moulds; there are many prosecutions coming against him, he knews I am the principal witness. Many times I have been down of a Saturday night when he has owed me three or four pounds, and not got any.

Prosecutor. I never owed him three or four pounds, nor am I afraid of any prosecution; it is all false what he has said.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-71

1051. JOHN WALLER and JOSEPH BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , three sheets, value 22 s. two shifts, value 8 s. and a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Edward Horton .

EDWARD HORTON . I live at Hackney-wick ; I am a journeyman tanner ; my wife takes in washing. On the 28th of September, about twelve o'clock in the day, I heard an alarm that the lines had been robbed. I followed the two prisoners across the the marsh, after I had crossed the marsh; I saw the two prisoners walking by the river side, Waller had a bundle tied up in a red handkerchief; they took the water; I followed them through the river, one of them throwed me a bundle, desired me to take that, and not to take him; that was Brown. Waller dropped something in a ditch; I pursued them, and took them.

EDWARD GUSKIN . I am a labouring man, I was at work at Temple-mills; I heard the alarm of stop thief; I joined in the pursuit, and I picked up the linen; one bundle about two hundred yards off, and the other in a ditch. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. This is the linen that I had to wash.

Waller's Defence. I went into a turnip field, I took at ship; I saw these men were following me, it bought because is took a turnip; I ran away.

Brown's Defence. I happened to be in company with Waller when I was taken.

WALLER, GUILTY, aged 22.

BROWN, GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-72

1052. JAMES MACKDONALD was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon James Farthing , on the 28th of September , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. the property of James Farguhar Fraser .

JAMES FARTHING . I am a tailor ; I live at No. 4, Great Wild-street. About a quarter before eleven on the 28th of September, I was in Upper King-street, Holborn .

Q. Did you see Mr. Fraser in King-street - A. Yes; Mr. Fraser was on the left hand side of the way; I saw a mob; I went, and asked what was the matter; I saw Mr. Fraser; I was going away; Mackdonald said, he would take Mr. Fraser to the watchhouse; Mr. Oxberry said, he would sooner give a guinea for a bed than Mr. Fraser should go to the watchhouse; Mr. Fraser fell down, the seals of his watch were not outside his chain could be seen. I took the watch to give it to Mr. Oxberry, Mackdonald, the watchman, seized hold of the watch; he said, give it to him; I said, nobody should have it but Mr. Oxberry. Mackdonald had hold of the watch, he took the watch out of my hands.

COURT. Are you sure Mackdonald took the watch out of your hands - A. Yes; I intended to give it to Mr. Oxberry. Mackdonald was stronger than me, he took it. I said, you, nor no one else should have it than Mr. Oxberry; I said to Mr. Oxberry, here is the chain and seals, Mackdonald has got the watch. Mackdonald, at the watchhouse, said he knew nothing of it; he then said he had it, and somebody took it from him. When he denied having the watch, I said I have got the chain and seals, the watchman has got the watch; he said, no, he had not; I shall charge you for robbing the man. A girl, was standing by, she said, what is this on your finger; that was the ring that parted the chain from the watch.

WILLIAM OXBERRY . I am a performer at Drury-lane. On the 28th of September, between eleven and twelve, I was in King-street.

Q. Did you see the last witness there - A. Not there; I saw him, but not his features, until he came to the watchhouse. Mr. Fraser was there. I came up while the mob was about him; I saw a number of persons assembled at the window of a watch-maker's shop, that is the corner of Orange-street; I asked the reason of their being assembled there; a watchman said, it was a gentleman who had been dining at the O. P. and P. S. tavern, and was very much in liquor. I said, if that is the case, I must know the gentleman; I had been dining there also; the O. P. is in Russell-court, Drury-lane. I immediately looked down, and saw Mr. Fraser upon the ground; I told him who I was, and requested him to get up; with the assistance of some persons he was raised from the ground. I asked the watchman what they meaned to do with him; they said, take him to the watch-house. I replied, there was no necessity for that: there was a public-house a few doors from the place where we then were, they perhaps might get a bed there; if not, it would be better to deposit what property he had about him, and send him home in a coach; if not, they could convey him a part of the way home, as far as their best extend, and then give him in charge of two others. I also offered to reward them for so doing; I don't know whether I mentioned the sum; they said, no, and persisted in taking him to the watchhouse; I followed, and we had got into Hart-street; I think Mr. Fraser said, take care of my watch; a voice said, you had better give it to Mr. Oxberry, who seems to be the only person who knows any thing of you, and several others said, aye, do; many more persons now had come up, and I was removed from Mr. Fraser about two arms-length; a minute or two now elapsed. I saw the chain that I imagined belonged to Mr. Fraser's watch held out towards me; I had not got near enough to lay hold of that chain; some one held the other part very tight, the watch end, with a little force; I got possession of the watch-chain without the watch, no watch attached to it; there then was a scuffle; I exclaimed, I had got possession of the chain without the watch. A watchman, I will not say it was the prisoner, demanded of me the chain, and appendages, the seals; I don't know who that watchman was, as they meaned to take Mr. Fraser to the watchhouse; I there delivered it up.

Q. You do not know who had got the watch - A. No, I do not. A watchman proceeded to force me, I pushed him from me; I cannot say the watchman's name; two watchman seized me very forcible; we now came to the watchhouse, leaving Mr. Fraser behind, he was still in custody of some other watchmen. I deposited the chain and seals at the watch-house, in the custody of Mr. Davis, the constable of the night. A person, whom I understand his name to be Farthing, that man is here; he came into the watchhouse not in charge; he came with a number of other persons; he there accused the prisoner of forcing the watch from the chain, while he was in the act of giving it to me; he threw off his watchman's coat in a violent manner, and said, search me; a general search took place; this watch was not found. He then gave charge of Farthing, and said, he had stolen the watch.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I was constable of the night.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Fraser and Mr. Oxberry coming to the watchhouse - A. Perfectly well. Mackdonald brought in Mr. Oxberry, he said, he had got the gentleman's property; I saw in Mr. Oxberry's hand a gold chain and seals. The prisoner said to Mr. Oxberry, I'll have it; Mr. Oxberry said, you d - d rascal, you shall not; a scuffle ensued; I am not certain whether Mr. Oxberry struck the watchman, or not. After peace was obtained, the watchman held out a ring to me, he said, that was the gentleman's property; after that Mr. Oxberry handed me over the chain and seals; then a person of the name of Farthing came in, he said to Mackdonald, you are the watchman that has got the gentleman's watch; Mackdonald declared he had not; I searched him; there was not less than sixty persons

searched; no watch was found. I desired Mr. Fraser might he put to bed.

GRACE BAXTER . I am the watchhouse-keeper's daughter. I was at the watchhouse this night; Mackdonald brought Mr. Oxberry in with the chain in his hand; Farthing came in, said he handed the watch over to Mr. Oxberry. Mackdonald charged Farthing and Mr. Oxberry with robbing Mr. Fraser; Mr. Fraser was brought in; no watch was found about him. Mackdonald was still holding his hand out, still persevering that Farthing and Mr. Oxberry had stolen the watch. I saw a ring on the watchman's finger; I asked what it was; he said, it was the ring that belonged to the gentleman's chain, the watch had been wrenched out of his hands, he could not tell by who.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came in the watch-house Mr. Oxberry had the chain and seals; I said, sir, this is part of the gentleman's property; therefore I gave him in charge.

BENJAMIN WYATT . I am a patrol of Bloomsbury. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw a mob; Mr. Fraser was down, I lifted him up, and Mr. Farthing took his watch out of his pocket; Farthing said, I'll give it to Mr. Oxberry; I heard the watchman say, he has taken the gentleman's watch out of his pocket. I saw Farthing hold out his hand to Mr. Oxberry, there were several trying to get the watch, who had it I don't know; the prisoner took Mr. Oxberry to the watchhouse.

Q. Did the prisoner get the watch - A. I don't know; I saw no more. I was conducting Mr. Fraser to the watchhouse.

JAMES HOWSE . On the 28th of September, in my way home, facing the upper end of King-street, in Hart-street, I saw ten or twelve people together; I saw Mr. Fraser intoxicated, I saw Mr. Oxberry speak to him; I saw Farthing take Mr. Fraser's watch, and hand it to Mr. Oxberry. I persuaded Farthing to give the watch to the watchman; Farthing said, he did not know the watchman. I said, nor do I know you; we will soon know who the watchman is. He said, he would deliver it to no one but Mr. Oxberry, as he was Mr. Fraser's friend; Mr. Oxberry came near, Farthing extended his hands towards Mr. Oxberry with the watch; the watchman collared Farthing, and demanded the watch.

Q. Do you know whether the watchman got the watch or no - A. No, I did not see in whose hand the watch fell. I am sure Mackdonald is the watchman that collared Farthing, and demanded the watch.

GUILTY, aged 38,

Of the larceny only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-73

1053. JOHN TELFOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a pair of boots, value 10 s. a hat, value 5 s. a pair of trowsers, value 6 s. three yards of ribbon, value 3 s. and one pair of buckles, value 10 s. the property of John Philip Kemble and Thomas Harris ; two hats, value 10 s. a handkerchief, value 2 s. three pair of buckles, value 30 s. three pair of stockings, value 18 s. a pair of boots, value 10 s. and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of Charles Taylor ; a broach, value 10 s. and a key, value 6 d. the property of Charles Farley ; two pair of buckle, value 1 l. the property of Charles Matthews ; a pair of buckles, value 10 s. and a pair of stockings, value 10 s. the property of John Liston .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the like goods, the property of Thomas Harris and John Philip Kemble .

THIRD COUNT, the property of William Brandon .

WILLIAM BRANDON . I am the box-keeper of Covent Gardon Theatre ; I have the custody of the house.

Q. Who are the proprietors of the Theatre - A. Thomas Harris and John Philip Kemble . I am the house-keeper, and have the care of the house. The prisoner was a dresser , we employed him many years.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker, 42, Compton-street, Soho. The prisoner pawned at my shop these articles; I produce a pair of boots, two pair of stocking, and a pair of shoes, in one pledge, the 11th of October; a broach, on the 21st of June; 15th of July, two pair of buckles, and a pair of stockings; a handkerchief, on the 18th of October; a pair of buckles, on the 17th of September; two remnants of velveteen, the 16th of October; a shirt, the 1st of October; and the 8th of October, a broach and a ring.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I apprehended the prisoner; I found upon his person this pair of buckles, and this key. I afterwards searched his lodgings. I found a quantity of duplicates, and these boots in a closet.

MR. TAYLOR. I am a performer. These two pair of buckles are mine; a pair of silk stockings, and the boots are mine; I left them in a drawer in the Theatre.

MR. LISTON. I am a performer . These buckles are mine.

MR. MATTHEWS. I am certain the buckles are mine; they were taken from my room, and my dresser was suspected.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took some of the things; I meaned to replace them. I throw myself upon your mercy, for the sake of my wife and children.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-74

1054. PETER PEARCE and JAMES WOODLING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , four silver table-spoons, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of James Henderson , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES HENDERSON . I am a wine-merchant ; I live at Kingsland-green, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington ; I keep the house, and I can identify the property.

ELIZABETH - . I am a servant to Mr. Henderson. I lost the spoons on the 23rd of September, about half past two; they were lost from off the side-board, in the parlour; the door and the gate were both left open; our house stands back, with a garden before it. I was going into my

mistress's room; I saw Woodling against the rails of the garden gate, and Pearce walked out of the house with his hands in his bosom; I went down, and told my mistress, I thought there had been a man in the house. I went out, and the man I first saw was a baker; I spoke to him; he went after them, and caught them both; they had got up to Ball's-pond-road. I am sure Pearce is the man I saw come out of the house.

Q. What did you lose - A. Four silver tablespoons; they had been on the side-board, in the parlour.

WILLIAM BUSH . I am a baker. I was delivering my bread on the green, I saw the prisoners pass me about half past ten; they had not passed me a couple of minutes before they turned back again; I saw the servant come out of the house; she said, the men had robbed the house; I immediately pursued them, I did not quite come up to Pearce; I saw a man in the road, I called to him to stop him; he stopped him, and I came up to them; I took them to Mr. Henderson's house; an officer searched them, and found the spoons.

JOHN HUNTER . I am an headborough. I went to Mr. Henderson's house; the two prisoners were in Mr. Henderson's parlour. I searched Pearce, and found on him these four silver table-spoons, they were inside of his waistcoat and shirt.

Prosecutor. They are my property; I know them by the engraving on the edge.

Pearce's Defence. I am innocent.

Woodling said nothing in his defence.

PEARCE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

WOODLING, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-75

1055. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a plated dish and cover, value 2 l. and a tablecloth, value 10 s. the property of John Wilson , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL BOLEY . I am a servant to Mr. Wilson; he is a commissioner of his Majesty, for the West Indies ; he has an office No. 10, Spring-gardens. I lost these things on the 9th of October, at half after nine o'clock in the morning, from No. 16, Devonshire-street, Portland-place ; I lost them out of the pantry; I left the pantry locked, at that time the key was outside in the door. I went into the kitchen to take some bread up stairs for breakfast. The area gate is left open until a certain time in the day, in order to prevent dirt from coming in at the front door. It is a regular rule to lock it up at two o'clock in the day. The key is given to my master every night; he puts the key out in the morning; it is unlocked at eight o'clock, or near nine sometimes. I went up stairs to take some bread, I returned in five minutes, not more than six, to the outside; I found the door open, I missed the dish and cover, which I had left facing the pantry-door; I immediately went into the street, supposing somebody had been there, and saw the prisoner running with a parcel before him; the parcel was supported with his two hands before him; I pursued him, and overtook him in Norton-street; we saw about six hundred yards altogether, before I overtook him; when I got within twenty yards of him, I called stop thief; he then let the dish and cover fall, continuing to run as fast as he could; there were two men approaching at that time in Buckingham-street, they attempted to stop him, he crossed over; I laid hold of him, I collared him; he said, he hoped I would let him go at liberty as it was his first offence. I took him back to my master's house; another man carried the dish and cover, and tablecloth. They are here.

ELIZABETH ANDERSON. I was up stairs, about half past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner go down the area, and come up again; my fellow servant came up the area steps. I asked him if he wanted that man that came up the area, I could not hear whether he made any answer or not. I said he was gone up Portland-place; he pursued him. When the prisoner came up the area, he had a parcel before him covered with a white cloth.

JOHN FOY . The dish, tablecloth, and cover, I received it into my custody. I produce them.

Anderson. The tablecloth is my master's, it has the initials of his name and the dish and cover; is my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work some time; coming along Devonshire-street a gentleman asked me to carry this parcel; as I was out of work I carried it for him.

Q. to Boley. This is your master's dwelling-house, is it - A. Yes; it is in the parish of Mary-le-bone.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-76

1056. MARY SMITH, alias CRAWFORD, alias MADDEN , SARAH THORN, alias THORNTON , and ANN WILLIAMS, alias HARKETT , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , three cards of lace, value 3 l. 7 s. 6 d. the property of William Scrivener , privately in his shop .

JOHN RICHARD ELLEBY . I am shopman to Mr. Scrivener, No 96, Oxford-street .

Q. When did you lose any lace - A. On Tuesday, the 5th of October, about half past three o'clock, the two prisoners, Smith, and Thorn, came into our shop, and wished to look at some broad lace; I shewed them some of different breadth; there was none that suited them, they went out, saying, that they would call again if they did not suit themselves. Directly after they were gone the officer came in.

Q. Where was the other prisoner - A. I never saw the other prisoner. The officer, Johnson, came in, and asked me if I had lost any thing; he said, they were shop-lifters, he suspected them. I looked over the box; I missed one piece of lace: I saw the piece of lace afterwards.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a City officer. On the 5th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning. I saw the three prisoners in Bunhill-row; in consequence of seeing them altogether, I watched them from ten o'clock in the morning until three o'clock in the afternoon; they went round Piccadilly, and Bond-street, into Oxford-street; I saw Smith and Thorn go into Mr. Serivener's shop, and Williams staid outside of the door; directly they came out, I went in, and asked the shopman if he had lost any

thing. When they came out of the shop, I saw them give Williams a signal, which gave me suspicion that they had robbed the shop; I followed them into the market, a short distance from the house; they went into a public-house in Oxford-market; they there went into the back yard of the public-house; by their going in so quick I had strong suspicion that they had got something; when they came out of there, I made them all go into the parlour; I then began to search them. In searching Smith, I believe this handkerchief dropped from Williams; I picked the handkerchief up, it contained three carde of lace. I could not discover from whom it fell; they stood close together. I believe it fell from Williams; the handkerchief contained three cards of lace; I sent for a coach, and took them to Mr. Scrivener's door; I made the shopman come to the coach. I asked him if he knew any these cards; he said, he did; they were his master's property. I am confident it did not drop from Thorn.

Elleby. I know the cards of lace well; they are the property of Mr. Scrivener.

Q. Has Mr. Scrivener any partner - A. He has not. There is no other shopman but myself. Mr. Scrivener was not in the shop at the time.

Williams's Defence. When we were taken in the public-house parlour, there were two or three women sitting there, and two or three men; the officer searched us, he found nothing; after we were searched the property was brought forward; I knew nothing of it.

Smith's Defence. I am the only the person that is guilty, the others knew nothing of it.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

THORN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-77

1057. JAMES THACKERY was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's on the 25th of October , upon Peter Andra , taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 10 l. his property .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-78

1058 THOMAS LAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , seven pounds weight of sugar, value 5 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

DANIEL CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On the 28th of September, I stopped the prisoner at the West gate of the London Dock ; he was coming out; he had this handkerchief, and this piece of sugar in his hand; I and Clark searched him; he had sugar in his hat, pocket, and in his breeches. The sugar altogether is worth five shillings; it is defined sugar, brought there for exportation. The prisoner said nothing; he seemed alarmed, and in mistress; his wages was eighteen shillings a week.

Prisoner's Defence. After a life of honesty, I stand at your bar; this calamity involves the fate of a wife and three children. Necessity, the fatal power which generally breaks through every thing, implied me in an unguarded moment to do this, which has added to my grief; no language can express the anguish I feel, and whatever misery I may be doomed to suffer, I feel it a duty to clasp every means that present itself; though nothing can remove the remorse that I feel yet in commiseration of my hopeless family, I hope your lordship will shew some lenity.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-79

1059. LODOWICK MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , two silver gravy-spoons, value 2 l. five silver table spoons, value 50. two silver salt-spoons, value 5 s. and seven dessert-spoons, value 2 l. the property of Charles Fry .

CHARLES ROBERTS . I am a servant to Mr. Fry, 72, Tower-street . I missed the spoons in this indictment on the 18th of September, in two days after I saw the spoons again.

ELIZABETH TROKE . I am house-keeper to Mr. Fry.

Q. Look at the person of the prisoner, do you recollect him - A. Yes; I saw him on the landing-place of the three pair of stairs from the street, in Mr. Fry's house, on the 18th, a little before four in the afternoon, he was quite a stranger to me; I watched him down at that time. I did not know my master had lost any thing. I saw him a second time on the one pair of stairs, and then I shewed him into the accompting-house.

FREDERICK HENRY CHURCHHILL , I am a clerk to the prosecutor. On the 18th of September, the prisoner came into the accompting-house he enquired for William Davis; I told him he had come to the wrong house; he went away.

THOMAS BIRT . I live with Mr. Murray, a pawnbroker, East Smithfield. On the 18th of September, in the evening, the prisoner offered to pledge these dessert-spoons; I suspected him, and sent for an officer. These are the spoons.

CHARLES FRY . These seven spoons are mine.

FREDERICK PRURO . I keep the Blue Mare and Magpie St. Catherine's. The prisoner lodged with me at the time he was taken in custody; he desired me to remove the property that was not his own, Here are five table-spoons, two gravy-spoons, two salt-spoons, and two tea-spoons.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man gave me the spoons to pawn, and the other spoons he told me to take home to my lodging.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-80

1060. EDWARD PIKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , two hundred and forty-nine thousand of nails, value 15 l. 8 s. 6 d. and three dozen of files, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Wright . And JOHN PEAKE for

receiving the aforesaid goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am an ironmonger , in Smithfield . In consequence of information that I received that the prisoner, Peake, was in the habit of receiving a large quantity of my goods, I obtained a search warrant, and with the officer, I went to look after my property at the prisoner, Peake's house, in Bath-street , at the back of St. Luke's Hospital.

Q. What business is he - A. He keeps an iron shop . I went to his shop; I there found a large quantity of nails, files, and ironmongery in general. I examined the papers carefully; I found a deal of circumspection had been used; the parts of the papers that had been marked were cut off, and had been marked in another place. I selected one parcel of files, with my mark upon the files; they are a particular sort, and never sold in London; it was three dozen, marked S. W. I never sold them in London. There were several bags of nails, most of them had my marks upon the bags. After I had removed all the property away from Peake's house, I called Pike into my accompting-house, I questioned him concerning the business; he denied it at first, but when he saw I had all the property away from Peake, he began to paulter, he sent to me just before he was going to be put into the Compter; I went to him. He then told me that he had regularly sold a large quantity of goods to Peake; he said, he stole the files. He nearly enumerated all the articles I have got here; he sold them to Peake for three-pence a pound.

CHARLES READ . I am an apprentice to Mr. Wright. This paper found in Peake's possession is my marking.

SAMUEL FOWLER . I marked one paper of nails found in Peake's possession.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. On the 15th of October, a search warrant was obtained, I and Brown searched Peake's house, Bath-street, St. Luke's; we found a great quantity of nails, files, screws, locks and brass cocks.

Prosecutor. The property is all mine.

CHARLES BROWN . I am an officer. I was in company with Read and the prosecutor. In searching the prisoner, Peake's house, I found these three dozen of files, and I apprehended Peake about eight o'clock in the evening.

MARY TACKLE . I am a servant to Mr. Peake. I have been there three months the 9th of this month.

Q. Do you know Pike, the other man - A. I know him very well, because he snuffles; he used to come almost every day with parcels in a bag, and particularly of a Sunday; Peake took the parcels of him. I never saw any money pass between them. This bag of nails was brought by Pike.

Mr. Wright. That bag of nails is my property.

Pike's Defence. I hope my master will be merciful to me.

Peake's Defence. It is a piece of business made up by this man to get his liberty; it is of no use my talking.

PIKE, GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

PEAKE, GUILTY , aged 63.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-81

1061. MARY GEORGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , from the person of Andrew Johnson , a watch, value 1 l. fifteen shillings in monies numbered, and three 1 l. bank notes, his property .

ANDREW JOHNSON . I am a Swedish sailor . On the 12th of October, about eleven o'clock, I met the prisoner in Shakespeare's-walk, Shadwell ; I went to her room with her; I gave the girl five shillings; I undressed and went to bed. In the morning at five o'clock, I turned out; I looked under the pillow for my watch; it was not there. I looked in my pockets for my protection-box, and three one-pound notes; they were not there. I said to the prisoner, my good girl, let me have my protection-box; I do not mind the money, or the watch; she said, I had no such thing in the house, I got an officer to search the girl; he searched her, and found no more than ten shillings My notes, watch, and protection-box, were not found.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening of the 18th of this month, I met the prosecutor, he appeared to be in liquor; he accompanied me home; he sent for several half pints of liquor; he asked me what he should give me to sleep all night with me; I said, eight shillings. We went to bed; he gave me three shillings, and his watch to keep for the other five shillings, saying, that was all he had. I went out for more liquor, on my return he was a sleep. I then undressed and went to bed. In the morning he asked me for his watch; I told him he gave it me to keep for five shillings. He sent me out for some liquor; I pledged the watch to get the gin. When the officer came he said, he had lost three pounds, and his protection-box.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-82

1062. CHARLES RYVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , five pounds weight of white-lead, value 2 s. 6 d. and one pint of spirits of turpentine, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a wheelwright ; I live in White Horse-street, Commercial-road . From information I watched the prisoner, when he went from work of a night; I detected him with a bottle of turpentine, and a stone jar of white-lead; I took him with the property before a magistrate.

RICHARD RICHARDS . On the 7th of October, I saw an empty bottle and an empty jar under the bench, where the paint stood, and almost instantly I missed them; I told Mr. Green. He unlocked the prisoner's cupboard; the bottle was there full of turpentine, and the jar full of white lead; he desired me to keep an eye on the prisoner. In the evening, about half past six, I heard the prisoner unlock the cupboard; he then went out; after he was gone, I looked in the cupboard; the bottle of turpentine was gone, and the jar of white-lead also. Mr. Green pursued him, and took him, and brought him back

with the property on him; he said he hoped Mr. Green would forgive him.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-83

1063. JOHN HENRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. the property of John Rose .

JOHN ROSE . I am a slop-seller , No. 2, Manor-row, Tower-hill . I lost the trowsers on the 11th of October, about ten in the morning; they hung up against the door post, outside of the door. I saw the trowsers move, presently the prisoner gave them a snatch, and away they went. I pursued the prisoner, and took him; the prisoner said, he was going to buy them. He had run about three hundred yards down East Smithfield.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not going to steal them, but to look at them, to try if I could buy them.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-84

1064. GEORGE FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , one pewter liquor crane, value 15 s. the property of Charles Naylor .

CHARLES NAYLOR . I keep a wine-vaults , 21, James-street, Covent Garden . On the 7th of October, the prisoner and two other men came into my house; they all stood at the end of the counter, where this liquor crane stood. After a little time they all went away together. I then received some information from a young man going by.

JOHN WADDINGTON . On the 7th of October, between eight and nine, I saw the prisoner with two more come out of Mr. Naylor's gin shop; two men came out first; the prisoner followed them. The prisoner gave the liquor crane to the other two men. I saw the prisoner bring it out of the house with him. I then went and asked Mr. Naylor if he had missed such a thing. He said he had. He came out, and took the prisoner in Hart-street.

Q. Had the prisoner the crane with him - A. No, he gave it to the other men; they went off. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-85

1065. PRUDENCE WOOD and ANN CLARK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a shawl, value 18 d. a pelisse, value 2 l. four pair of stockings, value 7 s. a tippet, value 18 d. a gold broach, value 12 s. a piece of patch work, value 18 d. a bag, value 6 d. two aprons, value 1 s. and four napkins, value 6 d. the property of Margaret Day , in the dwelling-house of Solomon Williams .

MARGARET DAY . The property was taken from Solomon Williams 's house while I was in the country. On the 5th of July I left Solomon Williams 's house to go into the country.

Q. Where is Solomon Williams 's house - A. No. 4, Great Montague-court, Little Britain . When I left Mr. Williams's house I left all the articles in the indictment in my box. On the 16th of October I returned, and all the property was gone. I have seen my pelisse since.

ANN WILLIAMS . I am the wife of Solomon Williams .

Q. Did Margaret Day lodge in your house on the 5th of July - A. Yes; she had lodged there one week; she had the front room up two pair of stairs.

Q. Had she any wearing apparel in her box - A. I never saw the box open: she left the box while she went into the country, and told me not to let any body have the box until she called for it.

Q. Did you know her box had been robbed - A. This day month, Prudence Wood, and Ann Clark , left the room; I cleaned the room out. I saw the box was broken open. Prudence Wood came in the room three-weeks after Day was gone, and Ann Clark lodged in the same room too. When I opened the box, there was nothing but bits of patch-work in it. On the Friday following, I saw Prudence Wood ; I asked her to come home with me; she did. I told her I was very unhappy about the box being broken open, and there was nothing but the rags in it; she said, as Margaret Day had left it there so long, she dare say there was nothing else in it. Afterwards the two prisoners were taken up.

MARY ANN MARR . I live with Mrs. Williams. I lived there when Day lived there; Margaret Day claimed an apron that Prudence Wood gave me.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. I apprehended both the prisoners on the 17th. I found a shawl upon Prudence Wood ; the prosecutrix claimed it. Wood told me there was a pelisse at Mr. Essex's, in Aldersgate-street. The pelisse is now here.

JOHN WHALE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Essex, pawnbroker, 25, Aldersgate-street. I produce a pelisse, pledged at our shop, in the name of Ann Frog , for five shillings. I do not know either of the prisoners; it was brought by a female. I don't know who that person was.

Prosecutrix. That pelisse is mine; I made it myself, and the apron is mine.

Wood's Defence. I throw myself on your lordship's mercy.

Clark was not put on her defence.

Wood called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Clark called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

WOOD, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

CLARK, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-86

1066. JOHN FELIX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , six pails, value 18 s. the property of Edward Minton .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-87

1067. SHECK FORED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , eight handkerchiefs, value 12 s. the property of Edward Pike , privately in his shop .

MR. CHAPMAN. I am shopman to Edward Pike , 21 Ratcliffe-highway ; he is a linen draper . The handkerchiefs were pinned to a pile of flannels at the door, inside of the door. I went to the door; I saw the prisoner about four yards from the door, with the handkerchiefs in his possession; I pursued him. He dropped the handkerchiefs; a man picked them up, and gave them to me. These are the handkerchiefs; they are my master's property.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-88

1068. WILLIAM DAGNEASH and SIMEON DAGNEASH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , one hundred and ninety-six feet of timber, value 47 l. the property of Gilbert Fox .

GILBERT FOX. I live at Wapping High-street; I am a mast-maker .

Q. In the latter end of September, did you purchase some timber of Mr. Smith - A. I did; some ten fine timber, at six pounds ten shillings per load. This is the bill of parcels. (The bill of parcels read.) The timber corresponds to that bill of parcels.

Q. You did not see where the timber was taken to, you agreed with your man where to place it - A. I did.

Q. After that, you went into the country - A. I did; on Sunday. On Wednesday, the 29th I made the purchase. In consequence of some information, I came up to town on Monday, the 4th of October; I then went to the premises of Mr. Dagneash.

Q. How far is that distant from Richardson's wharf - A. Two hundred yards if it went under the bridge; going round would make it three hundred yards. When I got to Dagneash's wharf, I there saw the six pieces of timber that I had lost; which had been my property. They were the six same pieces of timber; they were placed under the wharf, under the crane, ready for landing.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners - A. I did; Simeon Dagneash , the younger; this was about half after four in the afternoon. I asked the younger Dagneash, if these six pieces of timber belonged to him; I pointed out the individual pieces to him. He said, they belonged to him. I asked him if they were to sell; he said, yes, at ten guineas a load. I told him I thought that was too much; he said, he would take ten pounds for ready money. I then said, I would take the six pieces I dare say, if he would give me until ten o'clock to consider of it; he said, he would. I went home, and went to Shadwell office. At eight o'clock, the same night, I saw Simeon Dagneash and his brother; I told them that I came about the timber, that I agreed with him for; that I met the gentleman for whom I purchased it; that I would be glad to take the contents of the timber; I went upon it, and took the measure; we took the contents of all but one piece. I then asked them if they had a racing iron; that is a thing that marks timber; they said, they had no such thing. I then recollected that I had one in my pocket; I marked a T. upon each, that I might know that was the very timber when day light came; we then came off the timber. I asked Mr. Dagneash to give me the contents, that I might know how much money to send; he gave me the contents. This is it. It corresponded with the bill of parcels, and it corresponds with the timber I bought of Mr. Smith; I can speak with positive certainty to that.

Q. In pursuance of that arrangement, did you call again the next morning - A. I did, and Hope, the officer, with me, and Nicholas Wall, my own man; I then saw Simeon Dagneash , and his father; I told them that I had come about the timber that I had purchased, and asked them when I could have it away; they told me they would land it or ship it for me whenever I thought proper. They were both close by, one heard what the other said. I asked then where they got the timber; William Dagneash said, why do you ask me this question. I told him it was a fair question, and said again, where did you get this timber; he then said, he purchased it at Chatfield and Arnott's. Before that I told him the property was mine, and it had been stolen; before that I said, if he purchased it of these people, I suppose he had a bill of parcels; all this time they were both standing together. No, he said, he did not think he had a bill of parcels.

Q. Where is Chatfield and Arnott's premises - A. Somewhere about Westminster-bridge. I then asked William Dagneash , who it was got the timber there, to that wharf; he then replied, my son, his name is Simeon Dagneash . I told him to tell his son, to take it back from where he brought it from; he replied, he shall. The timber was nearly a-ground. I then said, I should not wait his taking it, my servant should take it, who was then on the timber; he said, they might, and they did.

NICHOLAS WALL . I am in the employ of Mr. Fox.

Q. On the 29th of September, did you get some timber from Mr. Smith - A. Yes, six pieces; they were delivered out of St. Saviour's Dock, Dock-head; took them down to Limehouse, and left them in the care of Samuel Arnon . I delivered them to Arnon between six and seven in the evening; I delivered them to Arnon just below Limehouse cut, and on the 4th of October, between five and six, I saw them along side of Dagneash's wharf, by the crane.

SAMUEL ARNON . I am a lighterman. On the 29th of September. I was employed by the servant of Mr. Fox, to take twelve pieces of timber altogether; I received twelve pieces of timber; they were all fastened together by ropes. On Sunday morning, I took them into the New-cut, I made them fast to a barge laying in Mr. Richardson's dock, near seven o'clock in the morning; it is a still water place. On the 4th of October, Monday morning, I missed them from there; there were eight pieces of timber gone; there were four remaining, and when

I came to Dagneash's wharf there were there seven pieces of timber; six out of the seven pieces of timber were six that I lost. It lay alongside of the wharf. I afterwards communicated it to Mr. Fox. I told him where the timber laid.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer of Shadwell office. On the 4th of October I went with the prosecutor to Dagneash's wharf, about half past eight, I saw the two sons of Mr. Dagneash, the father, who stands at the bar. Mr. Fox knocked at the door; he informed Mr. Dagneash's son, that he had brought the person for whom he had bought the timber; he wished to have the contents in order to send down the checks the next morning for the money. It being very dark a light was produced; we went down the wharf; Simeon Dagneash and his brother went with me and Mr. Fox. Simeon Dagneash gave the contents to his brother, and his brother put it down upon a piece of paper; he gave the contents of six pieces. Mr. Fox put a mark upon the timber, a F. We then came up to the accompting-house, and Mr. Fox received the contents upon a piece of paper. He then enquired if the timber was sound. They said, it was perfectly sound, they had opened a great deal of it. On the next morning, Tuesday, we went down again between eight and nine; Mr. Fox went down the wharf himself; he would not let me go that time. What conversation passed I cannot say, I was not present. I went down afterwards; Mr. Dagneash, the elder, and Simeon, were both there. Mr. Fox then claimed the timber; he requested Simeon Dagneash to take the timber from where he brought it. Mr Fox then said, my man is here; a man may take his own property wherever he finds it. The timber was there on the wharf, and Mr. Fox's man took it away. No objection was made on the part of the prisoner to his taking it away. I then desired Mr. Dagneash and and his son to attend at the office; they did from time to time.

EBENEZER CORNELL . I am a clerk to Mr. Smith, a timber-merchant. This is the note of delivery; I wrote it myself.

Q. to Mr. Fox. What is the price you paid; what is the amount of that quality - A. That is the bill, forty-nine pounds for the whole of it.

Q. What would be the price of it at ten pound a load - A. Forty pound.

William Dagneash 's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, on the 2nd of October last, as I was coming down my timber yard, a man who is repairing a barge for me, he called out, sir, there is a man wants to speak to you. I came down to the river, the New-Cut, Limehouse: I saw a person, his name is Pennington, who is in the employ of Mr. Richardson and son; he asked me if I had lost any timber. I told him, I could not tell, I would look and see. I examined my wharf, at which there is a sharp point which goes into the river, or New Cut, where I drew up timber. I then saw a vacancy in my dock, where there were some timber missing. I could not tell the number of pieces. I I then told Pennington that I had, but I could not tell the number of pieces. They put their boats into my dock; I supposed they took the timber to put themselves over; it is a still water place. This is all that passed. Pennington walked away. I came to the accompting-house; my eldest son was there; he is clerk; my youngest son, William, he attends the loading. I said to my eldest son, Sim, Pennington says there is some timber drifted down to Richardsons, you must go and take Bill with you, take some rope and staple, and push through the lock. If any timber comes there they push it away. This was my order to my son. The timber I never saw. This was on Saturday. On Monday the 4th of October, about dusk, my son said a man has bought six pieces of timber; he says he knows you very well. I came home the next morning, one of my then said a gentleman wanted to speak to me. I said to my son, Sim, I dare say this is the gentleman that has purchased the timber of you last night, as you are the person that agreed with him, you are the most proper person to go. I then said, as he said he knew me, I had better go; however, my son went down before me. When I came near the dock where this timber laid, I said, good morning, Mr. Fox; he made no reply, but said, pray, sir, where did you purchase that timber. I was surprised. I had no doubt I purchased it of Chatfield and Arnott. He replied, you are a liar, sir; your son has sold me my own property; well you may build houses; there are many poor men transported for a lesser crime. I do not know that ever I saw the timber before. Upon a narrow inspection I saw it was not our timber. I said, upon my word, Mr. Fox, I am very sorry. He then said, villain, I will not hear it. I then said, Mr. Fox, if I have offended the laws I am very willing to go along with you where you think proper. If my timber had been marked this would not have occurred.

Simeon Dagneash 's Defence. On Saturday the 2nd of October, my father told me there was some, timber adrift. According to my father's request I got ropes and staples, and collected this timber together. It was similar to our timber. William Boxall was upon Mr. Richardson's wharf; I asked him if that was our timber; he said he did not know who they belonged to, as William Pennington had made them fast he supposed they belonged to us. I admit I untied the rope, and took them away in the presence of Mr. Boxall. I saw another piece laying opposite of Mr. Rossiter's, the boat-builder; which William Coglan made fast to the six pieces which Mr. Fox claimed as his property; then after making them fast to our wharf I went to breakfast, when one of our men called to me in the accompting-house, and said a gentleman wished to speak to me in the yard. I went out; it was Mr. Fox; he enquired of me if we had got any red pine timber for sale. I told him we had. I shewed him some in the yard; he said that did not suit his purpose; he said, these six will suit me as well as any. He asked the price; I told him ten guineas; he agreed at ten pound a load. In the evening Mr. Fox came again; I gave him the contents of the timber. The next morning Mr. Fox came again; after a good morning to each other had passed, my father came down the yard; he said, how do you do, Mr. Fox, Mr. Fox made no reply. He said, sir, where did you purchase

this timber. I answered, at Messrs. Chatfield and Arnott's; then he said, I suppose you have got a bill of parcels. My father answered, he did not know that he had; then he said, I have got you, your son has sold me six pieces of my own timber. My father turned to me and said, Sim, this is a bad job indeed; you must have brought this timber by mistake. He turned to Mr. Fox and begged his pardon, and said, he has collected this timber by mistake. He abused him, called him a thief, a villain. My father said, he was not afraid of the laws of his country. Then we went to the office.

The prisoners called twenty witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-89

1069. JANE CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , two sheets, value 15 s. two blankets, value 11 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 18 d. a flat iron, value 6 d. and a tea-pot, value 6 d. the property of Richard Hedger , in a lodging-room .

ANN HEDGER . I live at No. 90, George-street Shoreditch . My husband's name is Richard Hedger . On the 5th of September, the prisoner and a man she lived with came to lodge at my house; she continued to lodge in the room a month, and then she left it. She always paid me the rent when it was due, every week.

Q. Why do you accuse her of taking the things - A. She went away on the Monday, her husband he came home and slept in the lodging. I let the lodgings to the prisoner and a man of the name of Hyde. I did not know but they were married until they went away.

Q. Why did not you take him up - A. The woman went away first, and we found the duplicates in the lodgings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-90

1070. ANN DOWNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , a shift, value 6 s. the property of Sarah Quinland .

SARAH QUINLAND . I am a servant to Mrs. Warrener, in Margaret-street, Fitzroy-square . In the course of the summer I went with my mistress to Brighton. I left my box locked, and took the key with me. After I returned I missed a shift from my box. The prisoner is the wife of a groom. My mistress left her in care of the house while she went to Brighton. I asked the prisoner what had become of the shift; she told me that a friend of my mistress had been there; she might have taken it. Soon after, I discovered a duplicate of a sheet and a shift in the kitchen drawer.

CHARLES WILLIAM AUBREY . I am a pawnbroker, 31, Fitzroy-square. On the 11th of September, a sheet and a shift were pledged with me. This is the shift. I have no recollection of the person that pawned it.

Prosecutrix. That is my shift.

JOHN ING . I saw the four shillings paid for the shirt to the prosecutrix.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-91

1071. ALEXANDER BOWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a yard of woollen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Maberley .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of his Majesty .

JOHN BOND . I am a clerk to Mr. Maberley; he is an army clothier . The prisoner was one of his cutter s; he was employed by Mr. Maberley on the 15th of October.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a clerk to Maberley. Paul's wharf . I accompanied the constable on the 15th of October to the prisoner's lodgings the Eagle and Child, St. Martin's-lane. I found this cloth there. The prisoner was in his room when the officer and I went there. The prisoner said it was his room. On our entering the room I told him I was come to see if there was any property there belonging to Mr. Maberley. His key was in his box. The first thing that struck my sight in his box was a piece of blue cloth with the broad arrow and S G. I found in his room six pieces of cloth in the whole. It is worth five shillings and ten pence a yard It is Mr. Maberley's property.

GEORGE MARTIN . I saw Mr. Smith take the cloth out of the box. I had the prisoner in my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in a court of justice before.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-92

1072. THOMAS SURR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , six yards of green cloth, value 30 s. six jackets, value 18 s. six pair of shoes, value 30 s. five yards of blue cloth, value 50 s. twenty-six yards of Irish linen, value 2 l. 5 s. a sword, value 20 s. and three yards of scarlet cloth, value 30 s. the property of Arthur Oates Hepden , James Croome and Henry Deakin ,

ARTHUR OATES HEPDEN . My partner 's names Jame Croome and Henry Deakin . I carry on my business in Parliament-street . The prisoner has been my labourer about fifteen months. In consequence of suspicion about a month or six weeks ago I caused a search warrant to be issued to search the prisoner's house.

JOHN NELSON LAVENDAR . I am an officer. I went with the search warrant to search the prisoner's lodgings in an alley in the New Cut, Lambeth. I there found all these articles I produce. I told the prisoner I had come to search his place. He turned very pale, he said the devil must be in him; he wished he had taken his wife's advice; the pitcher never went to the well so often but it came home cracked at last.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-93

1073. PHILIP WAGSTAFFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a remnant of canvas, value 1 s. two remnants of duffel, value 1 s. one piece of sponge, 6 d. the property of Arthur Oates Hepden , James Croom , and Henry Deakin .

ARTHER OATES HEPDEN. My partnersnames are James Croom and Henry Deakin ; we are army clothier s, in Parliament-street . The prisoner was labourer in my employ; I caused his lodgings to be searched.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodging on the 14th of October; I found a piece of sponge, some remnants of brown linen, and some duffel. The prisoner was then in the custody of Lavender. I shewed the things to the prisoner at the office; he first denied taking any thing but the sponge. This apron that I have in my hand, he said, was given to him by Mr. Wilson. I then said, I suppose you have taken the other pieces; he said, yes.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-94

1074. JOSEPH LUNNON was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of October , a watch, value 1 l. and a seal, value 5 s. the property of Stephen Clay , from his person .

STEPHEN CLAY . I am a servant to Mr. Paris, 28, Saville-place, Mile-end-road. I lost my watch on Sunday night, the 3rd of October. I was going down Whitechapel , and the prisoner overtook me about ten o'clock at night, I was in company with a young man of the name of William Larter ; the prisoner knew him, and he saw me rather in liquor; he told William Larter , he was going as far as the Blue Anchor-public-house, and he would see us as as far there, and as I was going to bed, I supposed he took my watch; all I know I lost my watch, but how I cannot tell.

ELIZABETH ABBOTT . I am a drover's wife. The prisoner is a drover ; he brought me the watch on the 4th of October, between ten and eleven in the morning to pledge. I pledged it.

JOHN DAVIS . I produce the watch; it was pawned with me by Mrs. Abbott.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday morning, I met a lad, knowing me, he asked me to pawn the watch. I took the watch to that woman.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-95

1075. JOHN DALE was indicted for that he, on the 19th of October , feloniously did steal from the person of Daniel Law , three shillings and threepence, in monies numbered, and a 1 l. bank note, the property of Tobias Gainsford .

HANNAH GAINSFORD . I am the wife of Tobias Gainsford , wax and tallow-chandler , Oxford-street. On the 19th of October, the prisoner came into the shop, and ordered candles to the amount of sixteen shillings and nine-pence, to be sent to No. 26, Sackville-street, with change of a two-pound note. I gave Daniel Law a three-shilling token, three pennyworth of halfpence, and a one-pound note.

DANIEL LAW . I am a servant to Mr. Gainsford On the 19th of October, I went out with the candles and the change; as I got into Sackville-street, the prisoner asked me where I was going; I told him to No. 26, Sackville-street . He said, I had been a long while, he was going to tell my master. He then pulled out a pocket-book, and shewed me a paper, which I took for a two-pound note. He then took the change from me; he told me to go and leave the candles, and he would go and order two pound of wax candles; I told him I would not without the two-pound note. He said, he would go back with me; I went with him, he gave a double knock at the door; he then asked me to take the candles in, he would go to the public-house to see what o'clock it was. I followed him, to see whether he went into the public-house; he pushed the door, and ran off; I ran after him, and cried stop thief; he was taken by two witnesses. I lost my money in Sackville-street; he took it out of my hand, and after he was taken, I found the money in my basket.

THOMAS BERLYSON . I am a coal-merchant. I heard the boy call out, stop thief; I pursued the prisoner, took him, and held him until the boy came up, and said, that is the man that robbed me of my change. The prisoner said, he had not got the change, told the boy to look in the basket; the boy found the change in the basket, after he had been there some time.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I never received the money at all.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-96

1076. FRANCES BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , ten pair of children's shoes, value 10 s. three pair of children's boots, value 3 s. seven pair of women's shoes, value 14 s. and three pair of pattens, value 3 s. the property of George Jolly . And ANN JEFFREYS for receiving the said goods, she knowing them to be stolen .

GEORGE JOLLY . I am a shoe-maker , No. 3, Ryder's-court, Liecester-square . Frances Burn was my servant . I lost these shoes and boots from the first week in December, till the 27th. From information I got an officer, and searched the prisoner, Jeffreys's, apartment, No. 13, Knightsbridge; I enquired of Jeffreys for the shoes my servant had sent her, that was stolen; she denied all knowledge that any thing come whatever. I told her my information was so correct, and if she did not deliver up the property I would give her in charge of the officer. She then said, that she had but one half of the room to herself, and another person had the other half, her name was Athlick; she was not at home. I saw a box in the room with Robert Jeffreys upon it, on a plate; she said, it was her husband's box, but she had lent it to the other woman, for her use. The officer broke that box open, and the contents of that box were the articles stated in the indictment. Mrs. Jeffreys said, she knew nothing of the goods in the box, they did not being to her. The officer searched the bed, and found a pair of boots. There

was another box in the room; Jeffreys said, that was her box; I searched that box; in it was a pair of jean shoes, my property. She said my servant had made her a present of them the preceding day, and in searching the box, I found another pair of shoes; by this time Mrs. Athlick came in; she said, she brought away thirteen pair of shoes when she called at my house, my servant gave them to take to Jeffreys. The officer took the property and the prisoners, to Marlborough-street office, and left them there. He came to my house; I asked my servant if she knew any thing of the property; she denied all knowledge. I told her I had been to a house in Knightsbridge, and found the property, and her accomplices were in custody; she said, she had taken the goods, and sent them to Jeffreys.

MRS. ATHLICK. I am a soldier's wife. We all three lived together before the prisoner went to service; the prisoner is the wife of a soldier. I brought a bundle of shoes home to Jeffreys; the prisoner, Burn, gave them me.

Burn said nothing in her defence.

Jeffreys's Defence. I am innocent of the charge; I did not know the things were stolen.

BURN, GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

JEFFREYS, GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-97

1077. JOHN BROWN and CHARLES MILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , two fowls, value 2 s. the property of John Lewis .

ANN JEARY . I live at Pentonville . On the 23rd of October, I saw the two prisoners catching Mr. Lewis's fowls; they put one each of them into their aprons. I am sure they are the men; it was about half after eleven, in the middle of the day; I saw them again when they were taken.

MR. BURR. I pursued the prisoners from the information of Mrs. Lewis; I saw Brown throw something away; it was white. He run across a ditch. Miles fell down; I saw a fowl drop from him. Brown said, he was willing to pay for it. The fowl that I saw dropped was dead.

MICHAEL M'CARTHY . On the 23rd of October, I was working in my master's garden; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the two prisoners running; I caught Miles, and brought him back; he said, it was nothing but a fowl.

RICHARD BRADBURY . I heard the cry of stop thief. I stopped Brown. They both said, they had only knocked down a fowl. These are the heads of the fowls.

JOHN LEWIS . I am confident they are the heads of my fowls.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 19.

MILES, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-98

1078. MARY BATEMAN and ANN WITHERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , from the person of James Wagstaffe , a watch, value 2 l. two seals, value 10 s. and a 1 l. bank note his property .

JAMES WAGSTAFFE . I am a journeyman carpenter . On Sunday evening, the 16th of October, between eleven and twelve at night, I met the two prisoners near Westminster-abbey; they asked me to give them something to drink; I went into a public-house with them, and gave them a glass of something to drink; coming out they met a soldier, and I met Edward Humphreys , a friend of mine; he asked me where I was going; I said home. He said, so am I. We both went with these girls and the soldier into Duck-lane . In the prisoners room, the soldier asked us to send for something to drink; I said, I had no money but a pound note. I was sitting by Mary Batenram , she took a pound note out of my pocket; I said, I was robbed of my note, and I wished to have it again; the soldier turned me out of the room, and knocked me down, and when I was out of the door, I missed my watch; who took that I cannot tell. The next morning I informed Gillmore, the officer. I am sure the two prisoners are the women. The officer has got the watch, and the supposed change of the one-pound note.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On Sunday morning, Wagstaffe came to me; I went to No. 13, Duck-lane, we found the two prisoners, the soldier, and three girls. My brother officer, Pace, was with me, he searched Withers's box.

THOMAS PACE . I searched a box in the prisoner's room; Withers said, it was her box; in the box I found a pair of pockets containing four three-shilling tokens, and in this cotton handkerchief this watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Bateman's Defence. The prosecutor treated us with a glass of liquor; going home we met a dragoon we knew, and the prosecutor met his friend; when the prosecutor was in our room he was sick, he laid back on the bed, he challenged the soldier with stealing a pound-note; the dragoon knocked him down. When we made the bed we found the watch; Withers said she would keep the watch for the prosecutor. If he had come for the watch he would have had it.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did you leave the watch in bed - A. I cannot say I did.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-99

1079. CHARLES BRANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , a gold chain, value 2 l. two gold seals, value 6 l. and a key, value 3 d. the property of William Mitchell , from his person .

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a carpenter ; I live at No. 5, Stalder-street, near Brunswick-square. On the evening of the 11th of October, I was coming through John-street, Golden-square , about half past eleven, I saw the prisoner, Brannon, on the other side of the way, he made a dart across the way, caught hold of my seals and chain; the chain broke, he ran off; I followed him into Golden-square, crying stop thief; he was stopped in Golden-square.

I never lost sight of him; I took him back into John-street; I met the patrol, he took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Where is the chain and seals - A. He threw that away. I heard something drop about ten yards from us: I went back afterwards, there was nothing found. I then gave him in charge to the constable of the night for stealing my watch, chain, and seals; the prisoner said; no, not your watch, you have got the watch in your pocket. I clapped my hand to my pocket, there was my watch, but no chain and seals.

MR. FISHER. About half after eleven I was going through John-street, into Golden-square; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner stopped; Mr. Mitchell came up, and laid hold of him, and he was taken to the watchhouse.

MICHAEL MURPHY . I am a patrol. On the 11th of October, I was going along John-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was stopped, and when I got up Mr. Mitchel had hold of the prisoner; I took the prisoner to the watch-house. At the watchhouse the prosecutor said the prisoner had robbed him of his watch, chain, and seals; the prisoner said, you have got your watch in your pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. At the watchhouse he said, I had robbed him of his watch, chain, and seals; he felt in his pocket for his watch; he then said, I had robbed him of his chain, and seals; I was searched, they found no property about me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-100

1080. CHARLES CARTWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a coach-glass value 1 l. the property Robert Newman .

ROBERT NEWMAN . I am a hackney coachman ; I live in Sadler's-arms-yard, Swallow-street. I lost my glass on Saturday, the 16th of October, in the evening; I lost it from Bull-yard, in Swallow-street , it was a hired chariot. Two officers from Bow-street office came and asked me to go down to Bull-yard, and see if I had lost any property; I went and examined the chariot; I found a glass missing.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. He was a servant of mine; the neighbours told me he bore a bad character; I then discharged him.

RICHARD BRISTOW . I am a coachman to Mr. Newman. I drove the chariot the glass was taken from; I was in the chariot between seven and eight o'clock: the glass was there at that time; I did not hear it was gone until the next morning; I heard the prisoner was taken with it.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 16th of October, a little after eight in the evening, I was standing at the corner of Union-street, Swallow-street, the prisoner passed me with something under his coat; I ran after him, and stopped him; I took the glass from under his coat; I asked him where he got it from; he said, he did not know, he had it from a man. I took him into a public-house, and searched him. He begged hard for me to let him go, he had done it, he said, through distress, if I would let him go, he would take the glass to where he stole it from; going along to the office he said, he had it out of Bull-yard, Swallow-street. This is the glass.

Prosecutor. I know it to be my glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-101

1081. JAMES CLEUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a case of cutlery, value 7 l. and four dozen of knives, value 1 l. the property of William Barry .

WILLIAM BARRY . I am a ship-broker , on Tower-hill . I only know from the patrol's information.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a watchman on Tower-hill. At half past three I was going my beat, I saw a person at different hours of the night; I observed a man lurking about; I went into my box. I blowed the light out. This man came and rubbed his hand across my box; I took no notice. I sat still until I heard him go away; I then came out of my box, and followed him; he went up to Mr. Barrs's accompting-house; I asked him what he wanted there; he said he was waiting for work. This gentleman's accompting-house had been attempted twice before. I immediately made up to the door, and when I came to the door James Cleugh came out.

Q. He came out of the accompting-house - A. Yes. I ran after him about fifty yards, he then threw this large crow from him; he said the man is gone that way. I said, you are the man for me; two patrols came up; I told them if they would stick to him, I would go and find the crow. I went, and picked it up; they sticked to him. I am sure he is the same man; I never had my eyes off him; we went back to the accompting house; the goods were packed up in two bags at the door.

Q. to Prosecutor. What were the goods - A. It is wrote down on this piece of paper; they were removed from the inner counting-house; these things were taken from different packages. They brought the bags, and left them behind them. A trunk was broken open containing wearing apparel, and put into bags; a parcel containing different parcels of knives were removed to the door in a case; the case was directed to the Commissary General at the Indies; they were all removed from the place where I put them, from one room to another. The property belonged to me, and to no one but myself.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-102

1082. JOHN DALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of October , a dollar, the property of Samuel Robinson , from his person .

SAMUEL ROBINSON . I am a whip-maker , I live at 42, London wall. On Saturday night, the 2nd of October, somewhere near eleven, I went into the Wheatsheaf public-house, near Drury-lane , with intention to have a drop of porter; as soon as I got in the door my hat was taken off; I looked about after it, it was gone; there were a many people

crowding about. I said, I did not like to go home as far as London-wall without my hat; I should like to have my hat; one of them said, if I would stand half a pint of gin he would fetch my hat. I agreed. The prisoner put a glass of gin to my mouth; he took a dollar from me. I put up my hand to prevent him spilling the liquor over my clothes, to lay hold of the glass. He put his hand into my left hand pocket, and took out the dollar. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Q. What became of the dollar - A. I don't know. As soon as I challenged him with it, his companions shoved me from one side of the bar to the other. On last Sunday morning, near Charing Cross, I saw him on the opposite side of the way; as soon as he saw me he was surrounded with fourteen young men of his companions; that was Sunday morning, the following morning.

Q. Are you sure he is the same man - A. That is the man. I had a young man with me; I looked at him; his companions called me to go to Bow-street, and get a nurse; accordingly I went; I could see no one then. In the evening I saw Mr. Nicolls he went with me, and apprehended him.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . On Sunday evening, the 3rd of October, the prosecutor applied at the office. I went with him and Limerick to the Wheatsheaf public-house; the prosecutor pointed him out. The Wheatsheaf is a very bad house.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. He tells a great falsity; I am as innocent as you are my lord; I know no more of it than the gentlemen do; I declare I am innocent.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-103

1083. ELIZABETH GILES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , two penny-pieces, and one hundred and ninety-seven halfpence , the property of George Rapin .

GEORGE RAPIN . I am a fruiterer , in Covent Garden-market . The prisoner kept a stand adjoining mine, in the market. On the 25th of September, in the evening, I went to sleep; my boy came and told me that my basin of halfpence was missing. The boy's name is Boswell.

WILLIAM BOSWELL . I am a servant to Mr. Rapin. On that evening, I took two-pence; I went to chuck it into the basin; I missed the basin; I told my master of it.

Q. Was the bason ever found - A. Yes, at the prisoner's house, she brought it down stairs to my master's father.

JAMES RAPIN , SENIOR. My son came and told me the loss of his basin and halfpence. I went to the prisoner; she wished God might sink her into hell if she had got the bason; I told my son. I saw the watchman with her; she then said, if you will give me some gin and water, I will tell you where the basin is; she went in doors, and brought me out the basin. This is the basin with the halfpence that she returned.

George Rupin. That is my basin.

Mr. Adolphus. Was it not for an assault upon her that you and your father were convicted at Westminster sessions - A. Not my father, my brother was.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-104

1084. JOHN OFENBAUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , a pocketbook, value 6 d. four 10 l. bank notes, a 5 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note , the property of Thomas Crisp .

THOMAS CRISP . I am a carpenter ; I live at No. 2, Trinity-lane, Rotherhithe. On the 23rd of September last, I went into Mr. Burns and Holmes's shop, grocers, Ratcliffe-highway ; I there bought some articles. I pulled out my pocket-book, and took out a two-pound note to pay for them; I put my hand to my pocket and put the pocket-book in, as I thought, and when I came out of the shop I missed the pocket-book; I ran into the shop, I thought I might have dropped it instead of putting it into my pocket.

Q. How came you to accuse any person of stealing it - A. I do not accuse any person of stealing it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-105

1085. WILLIAM HENRY PEYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a leg of pork, value 4 s. the property of Charles Proll .

CHARLES PROLL . I am a pork-butcher ; in Red Lion-street, Goodman's fields . On the 7th of October, between nine and ten in the morning, I was sitting at home, I saw a man outside take a leg of pork through a broken pane of glass, in the shop window; I ran out of doors, and took the prisoner; the leg of pork was close by him, on the pavement.

GUILTY , aged 16.

To go to Sea .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-106

1086. MARY RUBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of September , six yards of ribbon, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Jonathan Orme .

SARAH ORME . I am the daughter of Jonathan Orme , haberdasher , Princes-street, Drury-lane . On the 23rd of September, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop with another person; she asked for some ribbons; I shewed her some. I saw her take a ribbon out of the box; I was very much frightened, nobody was at home but myself; I let her go to the door; then I had courage to ask her for it; she held the ribbon out, she dropped it in the mud; I asked her if she was not ashamed of taking the ribbon; she said, no. She gave me a blow, and ran away; I ran after her; an officer was coming by, he took her. I am sure she is the same person; I never lost sight of her.

- CAVE. I am an officer. I was going by, I took the prisoner in custody.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes;

she was always at the Wheatsheaf among these characters.

Prisoner's Defence. The person that was with me took the ribbon, and dropped it.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-107

1087. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , five pieces of leather, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Branch .

(The prisoner being a deaf and dumb man, was allowed an Interpreter.)

THOMAS BRANCH . I am a carrier and leather-cutter , 88, White-cross-street . On the 20th of October, this man came in; he had a quantity of leather shewn; he pointed for it; I had suspicion of him. About nine o'clock he came again; I came down stairs, and watched him; he secreted these five pieces of leather under his coat. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-108

1088. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , eight pounds weight of bacon, value 8 s. the property of Stephen Buck .

STEPHEN BUCK . I am a cheesemonger and poulterer . On the 6th of October, in the afternoon, about two o'clock, a gentleman came and told me there was a man had taken a piece of bacon from the side of my door. I pursued the prisoner, and overtook him. He had my bacon upon him, a goose, and two pint pots. This is the bacon; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It is true the bacon was found upon me; I was not the person that took it.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-109

1089. SAMUEL PAMMENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , seven loaves of bread, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Peter Brighty .

PETER BRIGHTY . I live at 15, Banner-street, St. Luke's ; I am a baker . The prisoner was my foreman ; he was generally at home; he only went out with the bread occasionally. On the 6th of October I went with my other servant to the truck outside of the door, about half after ten in the morning. I found in the truck four half quartern loaves, and two half quartern loaves and a quartern tied up in this handkerchief. I am sure this is the prisoner's handkerchief. I shewed the prisoner the handkerchief; he said he knew nothing about it.

ROBERT PRIOR . I am sure these are my master's loaves.

Q. Did you put the bread in the truck - A. I did not.

ANN BRIGHTY . I am the prosecutor's wife. I knew that handkerchief to be the prisoner's handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge that is laid against me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-110

1090. SARAH ANN BARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a sheet, value 6 s. the property of John Barton .

SARAH BARTON . I am the wife of John Barton , I live at the back of St. George's-row, Tyburn turnpike . The prisoner is my husband's brother's wife .

Q. What reason have you to charge her with the theft - A. On the 28th I went out to my employ; I left my children in my house. I returned home at half past past nine at night; I missed the sheet from my bed. I am sure it was on my bed when I went out. I saw my sheet again on the 18th of October, at Mr. Brooks's, the pawnbroker's.

Q. You do not know of your own knowledge that the prisoner was at your house that day, do you - A. No, not of my own knowledge.

AMELIA BAILEY . I lodge in the prisoner's house. Her house is opposite of the prosecutrix, I saw her come out of Mrs. Barton's house with the sheet in her hand. She put it into her apron because I should not see it.

Q. Were they upon good terms - A. No. The next morning Mrs. Barton came into our house; my mother told her what I had seen. Mrs. Barton promised to forgive her if she would bring the sheet home; she did not, and then she prosecuted her.

JAMES BEST . I am a constable. On the 18th of October I apprehended the prisoner. She was accused of stealing the sheet. She said she had pledged it at Mr. Brooks's, Paddington; she had lost the duplicate. I went to Mr. Brooks's; he delivered the sheet up. This is the sheet.

Prosecutrix. It is my sheet; it is worth six shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. It is done for spite as much as any thing else.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-111

1091. SARAH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a cap, value 1 s. a frock, value 3 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Georgina Collins , spinster .

GEORGINA COLLINS . I lost a frock, cap, and petticoat on the 9th of October. I live at No. 9, Well-street, Whitechapel . I lodge there in the one pair back room. On Thursday morning I took the prisoner in out of charity. I had occasion to go out on Saturday morning, about ten o'clock; when I went out I left the frock and petticoat hanging on the line. The cap was in the bed at three o'clock in the afternoon. I met the prisoner in Newgate-street, I said Sarah, what do you do here with this handkerchief; she said, I do not know. She put her hand behind her, and gave it to another girl. The bundle was stopped, it contained these things in the indictment. When she came to me she said she was without parents. Her father and mother are outside of

the door. These are the things that the prisoner had. They are all my property.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-112

1092. MARY GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a great coat, value 5 s. two hats, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 8 s. the property of Robert Moore Whiteside .

ROBERT MOORE WHITESIDE . I am an accomptant . I live in Old Gravel-lane .

Q. Did you at any time lose a great coat and two hats - A. I did, on the 5th of October; they were taken out of my passage. I was not at home at the time; my servant is here, who saw it.

ANN JOHNSON . I am a servant to Mr. Whitesides. On the 5th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, these things were lost, when the street door was open. I had been sweeping the passage, I turned back to put the broom away in the kitchen. I was not in the kitchen five minutes; I heard somebody in the passage. I came out; I saw the prisoner in the passage; I asked her what she was doing there; she said, nothing. At that time the great coat and the hats were removed from the pegs; she had got them in her apron. I followed her to the street door, brought her back to the passage, and took the coat and hats out of her apron. The handkerchief was in the great coat pocket. These are the things.

Prosecutor. They are mine; they are worth ten shillings altogether.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-113

1093. ELIZABETH HIGGENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a pair of women's shoes, value 4 s. the property of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a shoemaker ; I live in Princes-street, Drury-lane ; I keep a shop. On Saturday the 9th of October, I lost the shoes; about three o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner came into the shop with another young woman, and asked to look at some shoes, and while I was shewing the other girl some shoes, the prisoner took this pair of shoes off the horse, and put them into her apron. I suspected it; I took them from her as she was going out of the door. These are the shoes; they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. The child must have taken the shoes; I never had the shoes.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-114

1094. WILLIAM STERNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a plane, value 3 s. the property of William Purkiss .

WILLIAM PURKISS . I am a carpenter . I lost my plane on the 12th of October, at dinner time. I went out of the building at the front door; I locked it. The back door was not locked. When I returned the prisoner was in custody, and the plane was shewn me. The plane is mine.

WILLIAM JARVIS . I am a carpenter. On my going into the house I observed the prisoner standing by my bench-side; I found a smoothing-plane of Mr. Purkiss's in one of his pockets, and a saw of mine in the other. I know the plane, it is Mr. Purkiss's. This is the plane, and the saw.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-115

1095. WILLIAM STERNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a saw, value 6 s. the property of William Jarvis .

No evidence being adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-116

1096. ELIZABETH MACKGEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a great coat, value 6 s. the property of John Divine .

JOHN DIVINE . I am a weaver ; I live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields . I lost my great coat on Sunday, the 27th of September; I lost it out of my room; I work there; my great coat laid on the bed. I gave the prisoner a three-shilling piece to get a quartern of gin, she was quite a stranger to me before; she took the great coat with her, and did not return. I did not see her take it away. She brushed off with the three-shilling piece, and the great coat too; I was a little in liquor. I am sure this is the same woman; I knew her well again. I saw my great coat the next morning at Mr. Matthews's, the pawnbroker, in Wheeler-street; she was taken up the next day; she has been in prison ever since.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. On Monday, the 27th of September, the prisoner pawned this great coat with me, for five shillings; she said, the money was to get her husband out of prison. In about half an hour after she had pawned it, the prosecutor came, and asked me if I had taken in such a coat; I told him, yes. I am sure it was the prisoner; I have known her some years. This is the coat.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. John Divine , when you gave me the three-shilling piece to go out for some liquor, did not you put the coat round my shoulders because my stays were off.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-117

1097. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , from the person of John Adams , ten 1 l. bank notes, and one 5 l: bank note, his property .

JOHN ADAMS . I am a carpenter ; I live at Hackney. I lost my notes on the night of the 8th of October. I was coming along Chiswell-street , about a quarter past nine at night; at the corner of Type-street a person took hold of my arm, she asked me to go with her; I said, go where? she said down here, meaning down Type-street; during the conversation I was robbed; the person left me that had been conversing with me.

Q. Do you mean the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure it was her - A. I cannot say it was her; I found my property in her apartment. I did not perceive the notes taken from me; the notes were loose in my pocket. I missed them in Type-street.

Q. You went down Type-street - A. Yes; during the time the conversation past. When the person that robbed me, left me, she ran up Red Lion-passage; I went up there, and told the people in the court that I was robbed, and I supposed the prisoner had run into one of the houses; they said, no. A young man came up, and said, you had better leave this place, they are bad characters here; you had better go to the watchhouse. I went to the watchhouse; I told the constable I thought she was a Welch girl; he told me to call upon him the next morning. During the time I was in the watchhouse, they took up Abrahams; she said, she knew a person of the name of Jones, that she lived in some court in Goswell-street; an officer went with me to her room. The officer found ten pounds in notes; I can swear to their being mine. I cannot swear that the prisoner robbed me; I believe she might be the woman.

MR. DAVISON. I am a constable. On Saturday morning, John Adams came to me: he said, he had been robbed of fifteen pounds, and he had some information that the prisoner lodged in a court in Goswell-street. I found out the prisoner's room, and as soon as I went in, the prisoner went down upon her knees. The prosecutor said, if she would give him the notes, he would forgive her. She told me if I would go down stairs, she would give him the property. I went down stairs half way; there is a vacancy under the door; I could see the prisoner take something out of the bed. I went in the room, and told the prosecutor he must give me the notes; he gave me five one-pound notes, and a five-pound bank note. These are them.

Prosecutor. I am sure they are my notes; she gave them me, I took the five-pound note of Esdaile and Co. bankers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-118

1098. WILLIAM CROSSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , a coach-glass, value 1 l. the property of George Villiers .

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a helper to George Villiers . I was standing with the carriage in Bow-street ; I was watching the off side of the carriage, I observed a person put his hand to the coach-door; I gave the alarm, and missed the coach-glass; it was a lantelet barouche. The officer came up, and asked me if I had lost a glass; I said, yes.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am an officer. I was in company with Lack, in Bow-street. I saw the prisoner with his coat spread out; I judged what he had got; I seized the glass, and laid hold of him. I received a blow, I fell, and broke the glass; and by the fall my finger was broken.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the glass by the hackney coach wheels, it had no frame at all. I am innocent of thieving the glass.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. I saw him coming away from the door of the carriage.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-119

1099. JAMES ALNUT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a coat, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Harrison .

WILLIAM NOTT . I am a pawnbroker's servant to Mr. Harrison. On the 6th of October, about half past nine in the evening, while I was selling some shoes to a woman, I saw something snatched away from the door; I immediately crossed the counter, and saw a person crossing the road; I ran some distance up the street, and caught the prisoner; the prisoner threw the coat from him. I picked the coat up, and took the prisoner and the coat back to Mr. Harrison. This is the coat; it is Mr. Harrison's property.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-120

1100. ANN MYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a sheet, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Lawrence , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE . My husband's name is Joseph; we live in Tabernacle-square . I let the prisoner a furnished lodging about three months ago. On the 29th of September, she left the lodging; when she went she took two bundles with her. I opened the prisoner's room door, took down the bed; I missed a sheet. I have never found my sheet. There was every thing else safe in the room but the sheet.

EDWARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody; the prisoner told me there was a sheet lost, she had not got it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-121

1101. JOSEPH EMERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , seven pounds weight of lamb, value 6 s. three pounds weight of mutton, value 3 s. and three pounds weight of beef, value 3 s. the property of William Ricketts .

MRS. RICKETTS. My husband's name is William Ricketts ; he is a butcher , 48, Leather-lane . On the 27th of October, the prisoner came into our shop, between six and seven o'clock. I was in the parlour, with my back towards the door; I saw the prisoner take something out of the pan; I went into the shop to catch hold of him, he then went out of the door sideways; he went out of the door, and whistled. I went into back-hill; I saw him, a cook-shop man was running after him, the man was beating the boy; when I came up I bid him stop; I said, that boy had been in our shop, and had robbed the shop. The man asked me if I saw the meat in his hand; I said, I did not; his back was towards me. I am sure the prisoner is the boy; he had something before him, and kept his back towards me. I lost a leg of lamb, a piece of salt beef, and some breast of mutton. It appeared to me as though he had

crossed the shop twice, by the marks of his feet on the floor.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-122

1102. JACOB BOWICK and THOMAS BYE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , two pigs, value 4 l. the property of Thomas Thornton . And GEORGE ELWORTHY for receiving them, he knowing them to be stolen .

THOMAS THORNTON . I am a lighterman ; I live in Whitechapel-road , opposite of the Hospital. On Wednesday, the 20th of October, I lost my pigs; they were gone from my yard. I found them again in one of the prisoner's houses, in Well-street, Mile-end, New-town ; my pigs were both hanging up dead.

Q. Whose shop was it - A. Elworthy's. I found them a little past one, on the same day.

Q. Do you know who took them - A. I asked Elworthy what became of the two pigs that came in a little while ago; he said, they had not come in that day. There was another man of the name of Bye, with him; he said, there was none came in that day. The shop was shut up, and very dark; I procured a light, and went into the shop. I saw my two pigs hanging up in the shop, quite dead. I am sure they were my pigs; I had them ever since they were a month old. I told him, they were my pigs. Elworthy said, she bought them of a strange man, he agreed to give four pounds for them, he gave a three-shilling piece earnest; the man was to come again for the money. I left a man there to see whether the man came I took the pigs away. Bye said, he was a bricklayer, he only came there to do a job; he only helped to get the pigs in.

JOSEPH VAUX . I am a servant to Mr. Thornton. I had the care of the pigs. I went to Elworthy's along with my master; I knew the pigs to be my master's, by the marks on the cars.

- FLETCHER. I am a labourer. I was left in Elworthy's house. When Bowick came, I asked him if he had come for the remainder of the money for the two pigs; he said, he was. I told him, Elworthy was my prisoner. I then took Bowick into custody.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. Elworthy was brought to the office, and the two pigs that were dead. Elworthy said, he bought the pigs of a man, he was to give four pounds for them.

Q. to Prosecutor. What were the pigs worth when alive - A. Six guineas; they were about half grown.

Bowick's Defence. I was coming along Mile-end-road, and seeing these two pigs astray I drove them to Elworthy's house.

BOWICK, GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

BYE, NOT GUILTY .

ELWORTHY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-123

1103. CHARLOTTE HOLMES and MARTHA NAGLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , from the person of Daniel Merritt , a 10 l. bank note, his property .

DANIEL MERRITT . I am a clerk in the Custom House . I lost my note on the 22nd of October. I was going along the Strand, I met the two prisoners between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; they took me into a house in Ship-yard . We had a bed there; we all three slept there. I had a ten-pound note; I held the note to the landlady of the house; she said it was too late to get change, she would change it in the morning. In the night Martha Nagle went out of the room; in about an hour after that Holmes got up, she told the woman of the house that she wanted some snuff. The woman of the house came up to me, and asked if all was right; I said, no; I had missed a note. I asked Holmes if she had any objection to go with me to a constable; she said, no. I could not find a constable. She wanted to go away; I brought her back. I could not trace the note at all.

JANE ARMSTRONG . I keep the Rose tavern, Ship-lane. On the morning the prosecutor has been speaking about, one of the prisoners came down stairs, she said, she wanted some gin; the other came down stairs, and said, she wanted some snuff. I enquired if all was right.

Q. to Prosecutor. Were you sober - A. I had been drinking to be sure.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-124

1104. BENJAMIN HASTINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , three loaves of bread, value 3 s. 10 d. the property of Thomas Blunt .

EDWARD STRAW . I am a servant to Mr. Blunt, the baker . On the 8th of October, I left my barrow at the corner of Paradise-place ; I saw the prisoner about four or five yards from the barrow. I returned in five minutes; I missed three loaves of bread. I enquired which way the prisoner went; I traced him to Hoxton; I found him in a room there. I asked him where the bread was. I saw one of the loaves was partly cut up. He produced the other two. I am sure the prisoner is the boy that I saw by the barrow. These are the loaves; they are the property of my master.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no concern with the bread at all.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-125

1105. ANN RICKWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of William Knight .

ANN KNIGHT , My husband's name is William Knight , he lives at No. 32, Old-street . On the 19th of October, I lost a pair of stockings; they were taken out of the dirty clothes bag. The prisoner lived; in my house, she was a servant out of place. I have seen the stockings again, they were pledged.

WILLIAM CLARK . I produce a pair of stockings pledged by the prisoner, on the 19th of October.

Prosecutrix. They are my stockings.

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged them for eighteen-pence, for the prosecutrix.

Prosecutrix. She never pledged them for me.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-126

1006. ELIZA BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , from the person of Hans Henry Palm , a pocket-book, value 6 d. and four 1 l. notes, his property .

HANS HENRY PALM . I am a seaman . On the 26th of October, I met the prisoner at the bottom of Old Gravel-lane, I took her to the Sun public-house. I went home with her, to her lodging in Sir William Warren's-square . I changed a fifteen-pound note in the afternoon; I had four one-pound notes in change in my pocket-book; I was certain of it, because my pocket-book was never out of my pocket until I found it in her bosom in her room. She told me to lie down in the bed while she went down to get a light, and when she was gone for the light, I missed my pocket-book; when she came up with the light I asked her for my pocket-book; she took the pocket-book out of her bosom, she threw it of one side of the room; I took the pocket-book up, and looked for my notes; they were gone. I have never found the notes since. I took her down stairs, called the watch, and gave charge of her.

Q. Had you ever been in her company before - A. Yes; former voyages. I never had any dispute with her before about money, as I had this time.

Q. Then she was an old acquaintance of yours; you used to visit her when you came on shore. Are you sure you did not give her this pocket-book to keep for you - A. I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. He told me I had robbed him of four one-pound notes, that he had in change for a five-pound note of Mrs. Miles. I went with him to Mrs. Miles; she had no knowledge of him; she said, it was his companion that she gave change; not to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-127

1007. WILLIAM ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , twenty-eight pounds weight of cast-iron, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Fulham .

THOMAS FULHAM . I am a stove-grate manufacturer , No. 4, Mitchel-street, Old-street . The prisoner was my servant . I can speak to the iron when produced. I had some information that some of my metal was in Mr. Peters's shop; I went to Mr. Peter's shop, and brought some metal away, that I knew to be cast in my patterns. The prisoner came to the office to meet the charge voluntarily.

THOMAS PETERS . I live in Wilson-street, Moorfields.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; about three months ago, he brought me two cheeks, two hobbs, and one back, of a stove; I paid him for them at the rate of twenty-two shillings the hundred, that is the usual price. He said, he was going to pay for them at the foundery. I rather think he was going to pay for them at Mr. Gilbert's; he makes for Mr. Fulham.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-128

1008. WILLIAM DUFFETT and JOSEPH HEARNE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , thirty-five penny-pieces, and fifty halfpence , the property of Thomas Butters and Samuel Chandler .

THOMAS BUTTERS . I am a grocer and confectioner ; my partner's name is Samuel Chandler . About seven o'clock in the evening, I observed the two prisoners in the shop in, custody of an officer, of the name of Johnson; Johnson asked me if I had not missed a five shilling paper off the desk; I looked on the desk, and said, yes. I found a five shilling paper was gone; the officer took the prisoners into the accompting-house, and searched them, and out of Duffett's pocket, he took out a five shilling paper of halfpence together; I had seen the paper of halfpence on the desk about half an hour before the officer came in.

THOMAS GRIFFIN . I am a shopman to Mr. Chandler and Butters, Princes-street, Soho . On the 13th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, Hearne came into the shop, and bought half an ounce of lemon-peal and peppermint drops, to the amount of three-pence. The halfpence were on the desk, about a yard from Hearne. Hearne went out. Duffett came in, and asked for half an ounce of refined liquorice, as I was making up the liquorice, the officer brought in Hearne, and seized Duffett: the officer called me to help to hold the prisoners.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On my coming up Compton-street, into Princes-street, I saw the two prisoners in company together; they walked up and down Princes-street together, looking into different shops; they went to the corner house, and sat upon the steps, both the prisoners; it was opposite of Chandler and Butters's shop. Hearne went into Chandler and Butters's shop, and when he came out Duffett went in; he asked for something as I supposed, and while the shopman went into the accompting-house, he took something from between the rails of the desk, and put it into his pocket; Hearne was watching him. I took Hearne into the shop, and seized Duffett. I asked the shopman if he had missed any thing off the desk; he looked on the desk, and saw the paper of halfpence were gone. I took this paper of halfpence out of Duffett's pocket. They are mostly new halfpence and penny-pieces.

Mr. Butters. I believe that paper of halfpence and penny-pieces to be mine; I tied it up the evening before.

DUFFETT, GUILTY , aged 18.

HEARN, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-129

1009. ANN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a tin tea kettle, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Joyce .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-130

1010. JAMES YATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , two frocks, value 8 s. two shifts, value 4 s. two petticoats, value 4 s. two night-gowns, value 3 s. five pinafores, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and a curtain, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Flanner , from the person of Charles Stubbs .

SARAH FLANNER . I live at 52. High-street, St. Giles's. Mr. Flanner is an ironmonger . I lost the articles in the indictment on the 18th of October; I put them in possession of Charles Stubbs , he was to take them to my child's grandfather, at 41, Duke-street, West Smithfield. I sent him with them about seven o'clock in the evening.

CHARLES STUBBS . About half past six o'clock, on the night of the 18th of October, I was sent by my mistress to take a bundle to Duke-street, West Smithfield. I was looking in a silversmith's shop, the corner of Castle-street, Holborn ; the prisoner asked what made me so long; I said, I had not been long coming from our house. He said, I had been an hour; I said I had not. I had a bundle under my arm; he said, then my master was very ill indeed; he said, you must give me the bundle, go back, and tell your master to come to my master directly; he gave me two-pence. I thought a good while, and gave him the bundle; I thought he had come from the place at whose house I was going to take the bundle to. I walked a little way, and I thought I had done wrong; he run across the road, down Leather-lane; I run after him, and holloaed out stop thief; he was stopped in Leather-lane; he chucked the bundle down; a groom picked it up. I knew it to be the same bundle that I carried. The prisoner was taken to Hatton Garden office.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a ostler at the Horse and Groom yard, Leather-lane. I did not see the prisoner; I picked up the bundle close to our gate; the boy claimed it; I took the bundle to Hatton Garden office.

WILLIAM MURPHY . I live at No. 1, Greek-street, Soho. I was at the corner of Leather-lane; I heard the alarm of a thief; I pursued, and stopped him in Greville-street; the boy, Stubbs, came up, and said, that is the man that took his bundle away.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. The bundle and the prisoner, were delivered to me. This is the bundle.

Prosecutrix. The bundle is all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-131

1111. JOHN EADY was indicted for that he, on the 8th of October , was servant to John Hinckesman , and was entrusted to receive and take into his possession for his said master divers goods and chattels, that he being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive eight ox-feet, value 3 s. did secrete, steal, and carry away. And the prisoner, JAMES STRADLEY , was present, aiding and abetting, the said John Eady , the felony to do and commit .

JOHN HINCKESMAN . I am a tripe-dresser , in Clare-market. The prisoner, John Eady , was my servant. On the 8th of October, I sent out my cart to my different customers; John Eady was the principal person to go with the cart, and in consequence of information I employed the officer, Lee.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. I watched the prisoner, Eady, and the prosecutor's cart, on the 6th, in the evening. I saw Mr. Hiackesman's cart stand at the end of Red Lion-alley, Cow-cross .

Q. Was Eady with the cart - A. No; he was gone down to Mr. Bacon's slaughter-house. I placed myself on the opposite side of the way. I saw Eady come with a basket on his shoulder, and put some offal into the cart.

Mr. Alley. Did you see the prisoner go into that slaughter-house - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-132

1112. JAMES VALENTINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a sheet, value 3 s. and a candlestick, value 1 s. the property of George Jones .

GEORGE JONES . I keep the Loggerhead's public-house, Virginia-row . On the 8th of October, the prisoner came to my house for a lodging; I agreed he should lodge there; I shewed him no part of the house. He came about noon time for the lodging; he went out, and came again in the evening, after dark.

Q. When did you find your sheet missing - A. That was after, when the servant went to make the bed.

CATHERINE HOLLOWAY . I am a servant at Mr. Jones's public-house.

Q. Do you remember this man coming to ask for a lodging - A. Yes; he came again in the evening, he went into the tap-room, and sat down; about a quarter after six he went away, and came no more. About two hours after, I went to make the bed; I found a sheet was missing from the bed; the candlestick was in the same room as the sheet. The candlestick was not missed until a week after. When I went up to make the bed I saw the prisoner on the landing-place; I took no notice, as I found he was going to sleep there. I came down stairs, and told my mistress I missed a sheet.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday, 12th of October, in Wentworth-street, he had this sheet and candlestick with him; I asked him how he came by these things; he said, he brought them from the ship Ceres, in the West India Dock. I went down to the West India Dock; the ship Ceres was there; I could not find that James Valentine belonged to that ship; he was detained three days, and then discharged; Mr. Jones came in the company of the prisoner, and claimed the sheet.

Prosecutor. It is my sheet, and candlestick.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-133

1113. JAMES NASH was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 24th of October , from the person of Jeremiah Leary , a pocket-book, value 6 d. a three-shilling bank token, an eighteen-penny bank token, a 10 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note, his property .

JEREMIAH LEARY . I am a native of the County of Cork; I have been a seaman; I am now invalided by the War .

Q. Did you, on the 24th of October, lose a three-shilling bank token, one eighteen-penny bank token, a ten-pound bank note, and a one-pound bank note - A. Yes; it was last Sunday week, between two and three in the morning; I was sitting in a public-house, in the Kingsland-road ; I lodge in that public-house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. I did. I lost my pocket-book and money. The prisoner and another man were sitting in the same box with me, in one and the same seat.

Q. Which was the nearest to you - A. I do not know. I was troubled with the tooth-ache; I was laying my head down. They were in the box when I first went into it. I sat at the end of the box, and they set on my right hand side. I am sure I had my pocket-book, I had just put it in my pocket a little time before I sat down there. I set in the box with them about half an hour; then they both went out together. In about a quarter of an hour after they were gone, I missed my pocket-book; I have never seen my pocket-book since. I told the persons in the house that my pocket was picked. The prisoner came into the house as I was going to bed; when he came in I told him I suspected he had taken my pocket-book and notes; he denied it.

ROBERT CROCKWELL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner about half past nine in the evening, on Sunday, the 24th of October; I took him to the watchhouse; he was charged with robbing this man of a pocket-book, bank notes, and money; I searched him; I found no money upon him. He had on a jacket, a new hat, and a new pair of trowsers; I asked him how he came by them; he said, he bought them. I locked him in the cage until the next morning. I then told him I had seen Gladman, that he had owned to the robbery; he said, b - r him, has he; they will not twist me, will they; I said, no. He then said, they will lag me, but I have got but one fin; they will make a fine of me. The prisoner has got but one arm.

JOSEPH SMITH . I keep the Bull public-house, Kingsland-road. I saw Leary there; the prisoner and another person were sitting with him; Gladman was the nearest to him. This happened about three o'clock. The prisoner came back about nine o'clock very drunk; Leary charged him with picking his pocket; he was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I know I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-134

1114. JOHN BOND was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Mr. Arabin, counsel for the plaintiff, declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-135

1115. JOHN WALSH was indicted, for unlawfully receiving stolen goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM WIGGENS . I am one of the partners in the house of Messrs. Hale, brewers, Red-cross-street; the names of the partners are Joseph Hale , George Hale , Wall Lynn, and William Wiggens , myself. On the 22nd of January, we missed a cask of ale; I received information of it being missed about six o'clock in the evening. On the next morning we obtained a search warrant to search the defendant's house, the sign of the Sun and Punch Bowl, Long-lane; the officer told him what we had come for; we found the ale in the cellar, behind a butt; we found parts of the head of the cask in the coal cellar adjoining, with the remainder of the two heads; the body of the cask was in the cellar where the other beer was. The inside of the cask was wet with the ale; the rushes between the staves were full of ale; the hoops on the outside of the cask were rather bright, from friction of being rolled. I then searched for the ale itself. The size cask that we lost was thirty-six gallons. In the cellar adjoining it, we found the ale in another cask, with the bung out; we tasted it; I have no doubt it was our ale; he did not take ale of us. There was no other ale in the cellar like it.

Q. Did you find your marks upon the cask - A. Yes; there was the name Hale, Red-cross-street. It had been nearly obliterated by an adze. I do not think the ale had been brewed three months.

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am a cooper. I know the cask; it is my masters cask. I am sure it was fresh broken up.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I went with a search warrant to search the defendant's house. I told him what I came for, to search for a cask of ale, and he could save me some trouble if he would shew me where it was; he said, he knew nothing about the cask, it had been about the premises two years. It appeared to me to have been broken up recently.

Mr. Barry addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , publickly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-136

1116. SARAH SMITH and MARY EATON were indicted for that they, on the 5th of October , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to John Roberts , they well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a City constable. On the 5th of October, I saw the two prisoners, they were in company with another woman, and a man; I saw them about two o'clock in the afternoon, at the corner of Jewin-street, Aldersgate-street; I followed them to St. Martin's-le-grand; they stopped there,

and conversed together for five minutes. Easton then left them for five minutes; she returned back again, and joined them again in conversation: then Smith crossed the road, and went to Mr. Roberts's house, an eating-house in St. Martin's-le-grand . She came out of the house as if she had bought something; she joined the same parties; then Easton crossed the road, and went into Mr. Roberts's shop; she came out with something; then they all joined in conversation together. I then went to Mr. Roberts shop, and made enquiry what they had been doing, that confirmed my suspicion. I went after them; they all four were in conversation together, three women and one man, and what they had purchased they gave to the others who escaped from me; they separated; I went after Easton and Smith; I caught hold of both their hands, and insisted of them keeping their hands out of their pockets. In the mean time Easton dropped two counterfeit sixpences; I picked them up, and I have kept them ever since. I instantly took the two prisoners into a fishmonger's shop in Foster-lane, and searched them. On Easton I found two pence halfpenny in copper; on Smith two good sixpences, and a penny in copper. I received two shillings of Mr. Roberts afterwards.

JOHN ROBERTS . I keep an eating house in St. Martin's-le-grand. The two prisoners, both of them, came into my shop on the day they were taken up. Easton came in first; she asked for eight pennyworth of veal; it was a bone. I served her with it; she gave me a shilling; I looked at the shilling; I did not discover it was a bad one; I put it in the till. There was not any other shilling in the till. As soon as she went out, Smith came in; she bought beef, and gave me a shilling. I gave her change. I put the shilling in the till. There was only them two shillings in the till. I delivered them to Barrett.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the Solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these two shillings first - A. They are both counterfeits; they are tolerably well done, but they are counterfeit.

Q. Look at the two sixpences that dropped from Easton - A. They are both counterfeits.

Smith's Defence. The gentleman came and laid hold of my hands; he told me not to put my hands in my pocket; I said I could not, he held them so tight.

Easton's Defence. I had not been in Aldersgate-street that day, and as to say that two sixpences dropped from me, they could not, he held my hands so tight.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 18.

EASTON, GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour for 6 months to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18131027-137

1117. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for a libel .

The plaintiff was called, and not appearing in court, the defendant was

ACQUITTED.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-138

1118. JAMES MILNER was indicted for that he on the 27th of August , about the hour of twelve a night, a certain shop belonging to a person of the name of Mason , did break and enter, with intent to commit a felony .

JOHN STEVENS . I am a watchman at the bottom of Newcastle-street, Fleet-market . On Monday the 27th of August last; I called the hour of twelve; I then went to my box, and leaned over the latch. I heard an uncommon noise in the market; I went over to Mr. Mason's shop, on the other side of the market. I found the shutters up, but loose; one of the shutters I took down; I found the prisoner inside, sitting on the block. I asked him what brought him there; he said he was Mr. Mason's servant, he came there to sleep. I told him I was pretty sure he was not Mason's servant, I knew all the men that were in his employ; if he wanted to sleep there why did not he get the key of Mr. Mason. I took him in custody; I took him to the watchhouse, and gave him in charge of the constable, and on searching him we found a saw upon him.

GEORGE WORRALL . I was constable of the night. When the prisoner was brought in the watchhouse I found these tools upon him, a saw, a gimblet, a large spike, a tinder box with a candle; the tinder box had tinder in it, a flint, steel, and matches, and a screw-driver. Finding these on him, I booked the charge, and took him to the Compter. William Mason is dead. When Mr. Mason was sent for at the watchhouse I went down with Mr. Mason to his shop; I tried the gimblet to a hole in the shulters that the prisoner had bored; it fitted, and this spike nail I fitted to the mark of the shulter at the bottom, where the prisoner had wrenched it down. Mr. Mason went with us to prefer the hill; he is since dead.

Stevens. I was a watchman there three years. Mr. Mason's shop is in the front of my box. The prisoner had not been Mr. Mason's servant for three or four years past.

Q. What did he say when you took him up - A. He appeared tipsey, but when I took him to the watchhouse he appeared quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. Seeing the shutters down, I went to sleep there

Stevens. The shutters were not down. I had been by there half an hour before; it was all fast, and shut up.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-139

1119, JOSEPH LEVY was indicted for that he, on the 10th of November , one piece of foreign counterfeit money, made to the likeness and similitude of good foreign money called a pugado, unlawfully did utter to Robert Mackgrew , he well knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

ROBERT MACKGLEW . I live at No. 19, on the pavement; Moorfields ; I am a linen draper . On the 10th of last November, the prisoner came to my shop in a sailor's dress, with large whiskers. When I saw him at Union-hall he had them shaved off; now they are grown again. When he called upon me he affected

to be intoxicated. I judged so. He said he wanted to look at some linen for shirts. I shewed him a small quantity, and he scarcely looking at the cloth, pulled out of his jacket pocket two gold pugado's and a Spanish dollar, saying, do you take such money as that. I said, yes, when we know the value of it we take it. I called Thomas Phillips to go and know the value of it. The boy went, and returned in a quarter of an hour. During that time he affected intoxication, reeling about as if he was tipsey. Phillips returned, and said the value of the pugados were six shillings and ten pence or seven shillings, and five shillings and sixpence the Spanish dollar. I said, reach me down a piece of cloth, and while I was looking at the cloth, one of the pugados was gone; he produced these forty-three pugados in paper, wrapped up, and while I was counting them he said, come let us go into the cabin, seeing the accompting-house. I supposed they being precious metal took them with me; he said he must have the brass, meaning the change. In the accompting-house I endeavoured to ascertain the value of them, supposing them to be good, and after calculating them I found they would come to fourteen or fifteen pounds. I had nine pounds laying on the desk; I offered him that until they were sold. He wanted the cloth or the other change to make it up. I told him I would give him no more at present, nor should he have the cloth. I moved the cloth out of his reach, as he seemed to want to take it. I gave him no more. I told him in an hour he should have the whole of the change. I then put the forty-three pugados towards him, and told him he should have no more. He would not give me the nine pounds back again, but seemed to wish to get off. I gave him a card of our shop, and told him to call in an hour; he promised me he would. As soon as he was gone I sent Nicholson to ascertain their value, and sent Phillips with him to ascertain their value, and to bring me the produce back. Phillips came back; I then found they were good for nothing. I am quite sure he is the man.

SAMUEL NICHOLSON . I was in Mr. Mackglew's shop. Mr. Mackglew delivered to me forty-three pugados. I took them to a friend of mine in Red-lion-court, Watling-street. I intended to dispose of them; the person would have nothing to do with them. I returned them to Phillips. They were the same pugados that I received of Mr. Mackglew, the same I returned to Phillips.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a servant to Mr. Mackglew. I received the two first pugados; I took them to Mr. Smith to ascertain their value. I took them back again to my master. I am not sure whether I delivered them back to the prisoner or my master. I afterwards went with Nicholson to Watling-street, and I went with him to Bow-lane. He returned me the forty-three same pugados that he had received of my master. I made enquiry about them in Leadenhall-street, they were brass.

JOHN SMITH . I am a goldsmith; I live in Cornhill; I deal in foreign coin. I am well acquainted with pugados; they are foreign East India coin.

Q. Look at these forty-three - A. They are all of them false metal, gilt, merely copper washed over. They are of no value whatever. The two first produced by the boy were good; they are worth six shillings and eight pence or seven shillings. They are the coin of Bombay.

Q. to Mr. Mackglew. Did he ever return for the cloth - A. No. The cloth came to three pounds odd; I gave him nine pounds, keeping a balance in my hand for the difference of the value of the coin.

GUILTY .

Confined 6 months in Newgate , and to find sureties for good behaviour at the end of that time for six months to come .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18131027-140

1120. WILLIAM DRAPER was indicted for that he, on the 8th of October , at the parish of Isle-worth , unlawfully did enter into a certain yard of the dwelling-house of the most noble Hugh duke and earl of Northamberland in which yard there was and still is a pond of water used for the keeping of fish, that he did steal and carry away, one hundred brace of tench, value 15 l. and fifteen brace of carp, value 15 s. being the property of the duke and earl, without the consent of the duke and earl .

RICHARD NEALE . I am land steward and bailiff of the duke of Northumberland. I reside in his premises. On the 30th of September, we had been drawing the ponds in the Commons. We collected the fish to put in the yard of the dwelling-house; they were stolen on the 8th of October.

Q. What quantity do you suppose there were of fish there - A. Of tench, ninety brace had been put in just at the time of the robbery; carp, exactly thirty brace were put in. On the 8th of October, in the morning, I came down the yard between the hours of six and seven; I came down the yard and gave the men orders. I perceived a net had been drawn, I then immediately called the keeper, and traced where the net had gone, by the droppings of the mud, as it was carried along to the Back-lane to a gate; there I saw they had throwed the net down and taken the fish out. I saw where the net had been throwed down, and the fish taken out in the night; the dew being so strong upon the grass, I followed the track across the lawn into the meadow, to a river at the old bridge that leads down to the Thames; it is part of the Old Brent; there I could see very plain a boat had been, and left its mark. I could also see tracks of men's feet where they put the net in, it being heavy; there were not less than three or four tracks across the meadow.

Q. Did you drag the pond afterwards - A. I did. I am perfectly aware that they had dragged the pond. I traced the tracks to the old bridge, and then to ascertain the loss I directed our boats to be got, and a net to drag the pond of carp. I should think about thirty brace were gone, and perhaps sixty brace of tench gone; the carp were large, and the tench small.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner fishing at the old bridge before - A. I had; he is a fisherman. In the duke's pond no person has a right to fish there. The duke gives nobody leave to fish there.

WILLIAM HENRY SAVORY . I am a fish salesman,

at Billingsgate. On Saturday, the 9th of October, the prisoner came to me at Billingsgate; he offered me a lot of tench and carp, which he said, lay alive in his boat off Billingsgate. I bought seventy-five pounds weight of tench, at eight-pence a pound; they were very small. There were near one hundred brace, and a lot of carp. I gave him eighteen shillings for the lot. I saw a small pike, and two or three roaches, and some perches. I asked him how he came by these fish; he said, he had been employed to drag Lord Essex's pond, at Watford, and that the steward, or bailiff, had sold him this lot. He then brought the tench home in a basket, and had them weighed. He gave me his direction, Hermitage Bagley, at Teddington, Middlesex; he called himself a fisherman. I asked him if he was one of the Bagley's family, who lived at Stranham-green: he told me he was, but he lived at Teddington. I am sure he is the man that I had the fish of.

MR. COLLINS. I am park-keeper to Lord Essex, his name is John Hollingshead .

Q. On the 8th of October, you did not drag any pond of Lord Essex's, did you - A. No, none had been drawn; they never draw any without me, and Lord Essex's pond has not been robbed for this ten years.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I apprehended the prisoner at Brentford. I went to Teddington; I could not find him. In the road to Brentford I apprehended him. The prisoner went by the name of William Bagley , at Brentford. After I had taken him, I told him he was charged with robbing a certain pond; he denied it. He said, he bought the fish of a man in a cart at Brentford. He gave in the name of William Draper at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them on Wednesday morning at Kew-bridge, of a man with a horse and cart; I put them in my boat to take them to town for sale.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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