Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th September 1813.
Reference Number: 18130915
Reference Number: f18130915-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 15th of SEPTEMBER, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Henry Dampier , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. Christopher Magnay , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Peter Duvol ,

George Trundle ,

Thomas Cogan ,

James Barrow ,

John Robins ,

James Ewer ,

Thomas Sabine ,

Thomas Bowler ,

Thomas Beech ,

George Pritchard ,

Thomas Nertsall ,

John Traile .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Grimsdale ,

John Lemeine ,

Thomas Layton ,

William France ,

William Wheeler ,

Robert Whitlock ,

Harry James Blunt ,

James Moss ,

Thomas Joseph Moore ,

Richard Williams ,

Richard Willmott ,

Thomas Skinner .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Mills ,

James Watson ,

Thomas Potts,

William Richards ,

Thomas Newman ,

Edward Harland ,

John Rutt ,

John Lock ,

James Jesse ,

Edward Richards ,

James Self ,

Robert Paynton,

Reference Number: t18130915-1

825. SARAH BAKER, alias HOWARD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , a dress, value 5 s. a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. five pair of stockings, value 6 s. a table-cover, value 2 s. a pillow-case, value 2 s. a counterpane, value 10 s. seven silver spoons, value 14 s. a handkerchief, value 6 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a pair of blankets, value 10 s. and a tablecloth, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Linfitt .

JOSEPH LINFITT . I live at the Bell tavern, in Foster-lane, Cheapside . The prisoner lived with me a servant five months; she left my service on the 24th of June; I did not miss my property until I was informed she had them in her possession. On the 27th of July, I learned she lived at Mr. Blunts', at the Belvidere, Pentonville; I went there with Wilson, the officer; I was shewn into a room where she slept by the waiter; the prisoner was in the room with the officer, the waiter, and myself.

Q. Did you see her do any thing - A. I saw her attempt to leap out of the window, the officer pulled her back. In that room I found a pair of blankets, and several other things; the officer took charge of them; a silk handkerchief, a gown, and a duplicate were found while I was present. I went with the duplicate, and found the property; I took the prisoner with me, and the duplicate, and found the property at the pawnbrokers at Islington.

Q. What property did you find there - A. Only one tea-spoon at that time. I knew the tea-spoon was mine.

RICHARD BLUNT . I keep the Belvidere, Pentonville, The prisoner was my servant in July last. On the 27th of July, the officer, and the last witness came to my house.

Q. Did you go up to the room where the prisoner slept - A. I went up when the officer was searching her box, the prisoner was there; Mr. Linfitt owned some things the officer found in the prisoner's box.

Q. Did any other servant sleep in the same room - A. Yes, her name is Branwell.

Q. The box which the officer was searching was it the other servant's box, or the prisoner's box - A. The prisoner's box. The officer took the prisoner away. I locked the door that nobody should go in, and I kept the key. On Wednesday morning, between nine and ten, I went up into the room to examine it again; I did not suffer the other servant to sleep in that room. I searched her box; I found some more things, a red pocket-book at the bottom of the box; in that pocket-book were some duplicates; I gave that pocket-book to the officer. Then Mrs. Linfitt and the officer came to my house to see if they could find any more property; they found some more things in the prisoner's box, in that room. I kept the door locked, and I kept the key.

Q. Did you receive any thing from Mary Elwall - A. A pair of sheets, and other things, they were claimed by Mrs. Linfitt; I took them to Worship-street office.

MARY ELWALL . Q. Did you produce a pair of sheets to Mr. Blunt - A. I did; on the 29th of July last; I received the sheets from Sarah Baker , I was to wash them.

MARY JONES . On the 10th of June the prisoner brought me half a dozen silver tea-spoons; she asked me to pawn them; one she gave me; I pledged five of them at Mr. Wildman's, Islington, for ten shillings.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer. On the 27th of July I apprehended the prisoner at the Belvidere; she was servant there. The waiter shewed me the room where she slept. I took the prisoner and Mrs. Linfitt into her room. There was only one bed in the room; the prisoner said it was her room. Between the bed and the sacking I found a pair of blankets; they were claimed by Mr. Linfitt. I found a silk handkerchief and a cambric dress; they were in the room, but I cannot now say whether they were found in the box or on the bed, because the prisoner attempted to throw herself out of the window. I prevented her. It was the upper room, the four pair, I believe. I searched the room again the next day; the prosecutrix was there; I found several articles that she claimed. On Wednesday the 28th, I received the pocket-book of the prosecutor at the Bell inn, Noble-street, and one silver spoon. I went with the prosecutrix on Saturday, the 31st, I received this pair of sheets of Mr. Blunt at the office. The pawnbroker has the spoon; they are here.

(The spoons produced.)

Q. to Mary Linfitt . Look at these things that the officer produces - A. I have seen them before; I know them all to be my husband's property, and the spoons are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I never pawned any thing in my life.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-2

826. WILLIAM GOODENOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a watch, value 2 l. a chain, value 6 d. a seal, value 6 d. and a watch-key, 6 d. the property of John Martin , from his person .

JOHN MARTIN . I am a horse-keeper ; I live in Milford-lane Strand. I lost my watch on a Monday. I do not know the day of the month; it was between the hours of two to five.

Q. Who took the watch - A. We supposed Goodenough; he was sitting by the side of me.

Q. Were you drunk - A. No; I went off to sleep, being heavy; and when I awoke I lost my watch.

JOHN BOWEN . I took the watch in pawn of the prisoner for one pound ten shillings. I am sure he is the man. This is the watch.

RICHARD WESTBROOK . On the 13th of July, the prosecutor came to the office, and said he had lost his watch. On the 17th of July, Martin came to

me again, he said he had found his watch over in the Borough; I went with him to the pawnbroker, and got a description of the man.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the watch - A. It is my watch. I went on the next morning after I lost it to the office.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-3

827. JAMES LEARY was indicted for that he, on the 26th of July , upon Edward Clifford , feloniously did make an assault, and that he, with a certain hammer, him, the said Edward Clifford , feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought did strike and beat, thereby giving to him in and upon his head, one mortal bruise on his scull .

SECOND COUNT. that he, on the same day, upon the said Edward Clifford , did make an assault, and that he, with a certain hammer, him, the said Edward Clifford , in and upon his left temple did strike and beat, thereby giving to him, in and upon his left temple, a mortal wound of the length of an inch and a half, and the depth of one inch; and so the jurors say, that he, the said James Leary, him, the said Edward Clifford did kill and murder. He also stood charged for the like murder upon the Coroner's inquisition.

The case was stated by Mr. Andrews.

WILLIAM BROUGHTON . Q. What are you - A. I am a brick-maker; I live in Paradise-street, No. 2. I work for Mr. Lucock.

Q. On the morning of the 26th of July, did you happen to be at the bottom of Gray's-inn-lane - A. Yes, in Mr. Adams's brick-field.

Q. Is there a pond there - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any thing that was said did you go to that pond - A. I did not go until the boy came to me.

Q. You did go then - A. Yes.

Q. When you came to the pond what did you see - A. I saw a shoe, and a hat laying by the side of the pond, and something in the pond; then I went in the pond after this something; it turned out to be the body of a man.

Q. How was the body dressed - A. A brown coat, yellow waistcoat, and corderoy breeches.

Q. When you got the body out of the water, did you examine it - A. No, otherwise than I found some great cuts on the side of the head.

Q. Where did you take the body to - A. To the Prince Regent public-house.

Mr. Adolphus. What time in the morning was it - A. A quarter after five.

Q. Did you examine the pockets - A. My mate did.

ROBERT SHUTTLEWORTH . Q. Did you go to the pond on the morning of the 26th of July - A. I went as soon as I heard of it; it was as nigh as I can guess about ten minutes past five; he was taken out of the pond by Broughton. I examined his pockets myself; he had only three halfpence in his pockets; one was a crooked halfpenny, and I believe one of his pockets were turned inside out, and three halfpence only was found. I saw the hat by the side of the pond; it had a blow; it seemed as if it was broken; I saw a little bit of hair upon the hat.

Q. Did you look upon the ground carefully as a man would seeing a murder had been committed there - A. I did not perceive any thing at first; I did afterwards. After I had lifted up the deceased a mob assembled; I went again, I saw three holes in the ground as if struck by a hammer.

Q. Was there any thing remarkable at the spot were these holes were - A. I saw something upon the plantain leaves, some brains; I took them up, they certainly were brains; I found them about a yard from the holes.

Q. Did you see any thing else - A. No, sir, no more after that. I gave them to Daniel Brewer ; he took them to the public-house.

COURT. You gave what - A. The brains.

Mr. Andrews. What became of the hat and shoe - A. They were taken to the public-house.

Q. Did you see any thing else found besides what you told me - A. No.

Q. Had the deceased a coat on - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any appearance about it that you noticed in particular - A. No, none in the least.

Mr. Adolphus. A great number of persons you say were there at a quarter past five - A. Yes.

Q. Who of course would go away and talk of what they had seen - A. Of course, sir.

DANIEL BREWER . I am a brick-maker; I live at No. 4, Paradise-street, Battle-bridge.

Q. Did you happen to go to this spot on the morning of the 26th of July - A. Yes, to my work.

Q. Did you see the deceased taken out of the water - A. No; I saw him just after he was taken out of the water; I helped to carry him up the bank; there was blood and brains about the spot; the blood and brains were on the spot where the holes were made with the hammer; I took it to the Prince Regent public-house.

PHILIP PRICE . I am a publican. I keep the Prince Regent public-house, where the body of this unhappy man was brought The knife was given to me by a young man of the name of Law; I gave it to Higginbotham, the officer; it was a black handled knife with a broken point.

Q. Was any thing else given to you - A. Shuttle-worth brought some brains that he found upon the plantain leaves; he took it away again.

Q. What became of the hat and shoe - A I kept them in my possession until Cook, the officer, had them.

JOHN LAW . I am a bricklayer; I live in Cow-lane; at the Golden Bell public-house.

Q. On the 26th of July did you happen to be at the bottom of Gray's-inn-lane, where this body was found - A. Yes, between six and seven. I found a knife where the murder was committed, on the edge of the pond.

Q. Did you see any marks of blood where the knife laid - A. I did, but not on the knife. I took the knife to the Prince Regent, and delivered it to Mr. Price, the landlord of the Prince Regent.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office.

Q. Have you got the hat - A. I have, sir.

Q. From whom did you get it - A. From Mr. Price, the landlord of the Prince Regent; the hat was there, and there was blood just inside of the lining, it corresponded with the cut upon his head; there is a break in the hat; the break seems to have been hit with the thick part of the hammer, and the cut with the sharp part; it was coloured with some blood, and there was some white upon the hat.

- HIGGINBOTHAM. I produce the knife; I received it of Mr. Price, the landlord of the Prince Regent public-house. I have kept it ever since.

MARY BURKE , alias CLIFFORD. Q. What is your name - A. Mary Burke .

Q. Did you cohabit with a person of the name of Edward Clifford - A. Yes.

Q. How long had he and you been intimate before this unhappy transaction - A. Five weeks either the Wednesday before or after.

Q. Did you bring any money with you from Ireland - A. Yes. I got my money by selling a little place, and he got his by his work and labour. I had but seven pound when I came into London, and he had six one-pound notes and a five pound note, two guineas in gold, and sixteen shillings in silver. I am speaking now of what money he had when he was killed. He gave me before that a two pound note.

Q. Where did you go to lodge when you first came into London - A. We came out of the waggon into the street; Leary's wife was in the street; she asked me if I was from Ireland. I had never seen Leary or his wife before.

Q. Did you go, in consequence of your forming an acquaintance with them, to their place - A. I asked her where I could find a lodging for the children, as I was so much a stranger here. She said, as you are so much in distress I will invite you to my own bed. No more passed. I went along with her, and I lodged there four nights.

Q. Did Clifford go there to live with you - You once stated that Clifford was your husband - A. Yes.

Q. That was not true - A. He behaved to me as a husband. I lived with him as his wife. My real name is Burke.

Q. Where did you go to live after the four nights - A. She charged me half-a-crown a night for the four nights. I met Slattery; I told him that I was paying so much; he said it was too dear; there was a room to be let in Church-lane.

Q. And Slattery engaged to lodge with you - A. Yes, as soon as I got a bed.

Q. At Mrs. Singleton's, was it - A. Yes.

Q. And to that room you moved from Mr. Leary's - A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. Did Leary after you got to your apartment come to visit you - A. No, not till the Saturday before this unhappy transaction; he came about eleven o'clock into my room on Saturday night.

Q. Had Leary or his wife any means of knowing whether you or your husband had money before Saturday - A. She knew that I had money.

Q. Did Leary know that your husband had money - A. No, not till I told him; that was on the Sunday.

Q. Where was Leary when you told him that - A. On the Saturday night when he came to me, and it was late. I asked him what made him come out at that late hour of night; he said that he had come to let Clifford know that he had work for him on the Monday.

Q. Where did you see Leary on the Sunday - A. Clifford went on the Sunday morning to look after him.

Q. You had told Clifford what Leary had told you, had you - A. Yes. I could not find my way to Leary's room; I begged Slattery to shew me. Clifford had told me that he should go. Slattery went to Leary's room. It was half after seven when I went out of my own home. When I came to Leary's place, I found no one but Leary's wife. I asked her where Clifford was; she said he was out. While I was there Leary returned; I asked him where Clifford was; Leary said he will be here in a few minutes, and when he came I asked him if it was not time to go home; he told me as soon as he could buy a hat he would go home: he went out to buy the hat; I went along with him. Slattery and Leary and his wife were left in the room.

Q. Was the person's name that you bought the hat of, Mr. Barnet - A. I do not know.

Q. Was any body with you when Clifford bought the hat but Clifford - A. No, there was not. This is the hat; I know the hat by the lining and the band that is on it. My little girl bought the band, and put it on the hat; he changed a one pound note, and gave four shillings for the hat.

Q. When he took his money out to pay for the hat did you see what money he had - A. He counted the notes; I saw what money he had; he had six one pound notes before he bought the hat; he paid for the hat with a one pound note; he had then five one pound notes and a five pound note, two guineas in gold, and sixteen shillings that he got in change for the hat.

Q. Leary was never with you at the hatter's shop - A. No.

Q. Having bought the hat did you return to Leary's - A. We did, for Slattery to go home with us. Clifford had the hat he had purchased in his hand. I put off the old hat, and put the new purchased hat on. Leary said, Clifford, remember I have invited you to dinner to-day. Leary then said to me, do you know this man is going home to Ireland at night; I said, no, I never heard any thing of it; he then said, for your life do not tell him that I told you any such thing. Leary said he is to go. This passed in Leary's room. I asked Clifford if it was true. Clifford said, no, who told you of it. I would not tell him. I took it in my mind that he was going; I said I will not give you your riding coat; do, said he, laughing; he said, I will give you my silk handkerchief for a token. We came home then and had our breakfast in our room. Slattery returned with us.

Q. Was Leary in the room all the time that you and your husband had the conversation - A. Yes.

Q. Did Leary hear it - A. I don't know. I think he could not but hear it.

Q. Was there any quarrel between you and your

husband in Leary's room - A. Not one word but what I am telling you.

Q. When you got home did Clifford stay at home with you - A. Yes, he was in and out until I had my dinner in the afternoon.

Q. He was never long from you - A. No.

Q. What time had you your dinner in the afternoon - A. I had it between four and five o'clock.

Q. Is that the time that you usually dine - A. No, I was employed in getting some furniture up to my beds, that made me longer.

Q. At five o'clock you dined - A. Yes.

Q. Who came first to your house, Leary or your friend Champion - A. Leary and his wife came first; they came between four and five to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you expect them - A. No; Leary's wife said if I was uneasy about my furniture she would take it, and give me my money for it.

Q. Did Leary and his wife come by your asking - A. They came, but I never spoke a word about it.

Q. You were surprised at seeing them - A. Yes; I could not take a bit of my dinner at the time.

Q. Why - A. The wife was quite drunk, and Leary was sober.

Q. Why did not you eat your dinner - A. She alarmed me by being so very drunk, and by using bad language, cursing and swearing.

Q. Did either Leary or his wife say what they came for - A. No, they did not.

Q. Did your husband eat any dinner - A. He did.

Q. Did he eat much or little - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you mean to say you do not know whether he ate or not - A. I do not know, sir; I saw him take something.

Q. Did you take notice what your husband had - A. I did not.

Q. Tell me all that Leary said or did when they came - A. I was sending out for half a gallon of beer, Leary said, make it up a gallon, and I will pay for the other half, and the gallon was brought.

Q. Did Leary drink of the beer - A. He drank some; I cannot tell how much; he partook of it.

Q. Did your husband drink freely of it - A. Yes, he drank.

Q. How long did Leary and his wife stay with you - A. I don't know.

Q. Did Mrs. Champion come in while he was there - A. Yes, they were going away as Mrs. Champion came in.

Q. Mrs. Champion is a relation of yours - A. Yes.

Q. Was Slattery there too - A. Yes, he was

Q. When Leary and his wife were going away what time was it - A. I think about eight o'clock: Leary called Clifford out, and he went with him.

Q. It was by Leary's desire that he went out - A. - A. Yes, he called him out; Mrs. Champion and I were talking together when Leary called him out; I did not hear what was said. After Leary and his wife had departed Mrs. Champion asked me to go and see her son; I made answer that I could not, I was not so well as I could wish. I remained at home in my apartment until after eight o'clock. Before I went out to look after Clifford I went to the corner of the street that I lived in; I did not go any farther at first.

Q. Did you find him there - A. No, I did not. I came back and told the children that I could not find him. I sat in the window a bit; I went off to Leary's room. I went off alone to go to Leary's room.

Q. Did you meet with him before you got to Leary's room - A. No.

Q. When you got to Leary's room whom did you find - A. I found both Leary and his wife standing at their own street door.

Q. Now what time might it be when you got to Leary's house, and found them standing at the street door - A. It was after nine o'clock; it was day-light then.

Q. What passed between you and Leary and his wife - A. Nothing, but the wife was quite drunk. I asked them about Clifford; she made answer that he was up in the room; I asked her who was along with him; she said, no one; he was quite tipsey: she went and brought him down; I did not choose to go up stairs.

Q. Why did not you go up stairs yourself - A. I wanted to get back to my children; I did not go up stairs for fear of being kept.

Q. Was Clifford drunk, as Mrs. Leary told you - A. He was tipsy. When I had got Clifford I asked him to come home; he said he would.

Q. Did he set out to go home with you - A. He did.

Q. What became of the Leary's - A. Clifford and I came together, Leary followed him.

Q. Did he tell you when you came away that he should go home with you - A. No, he did not; I had but just got out of the court where he lived when he followed us; he said that he was come to get Clifford work against the morning; he took him into a public-house.

Q. What public-house was it - A. A public-house at the corner of the lane where he lived.

Q. You say that Leary took him in; your husband did not propose going then - A. No, it was Leary. I spoke against Leary taking him in.

Q. You thought he had liquor enough - A. Yes; Leary said he would only let him take one glass of gin.

Q. Did Leary drink - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you drink - A. No.

Q. Who paid for the liquor - A. Leary paid for the glass of gin; we all came out of this gin-shop together, and then we turned into another public-house and had one pot of beer.

Q. Do you know the name of that other public-house - A. No, I do not.

Q. Who proposed going to have the beer - A. I cannot recollect about that; Leary turned in first, because we did not know anything about the public-houses.

Q. Who drank the beer - A. I took a drop of the beer, they took the rest. I paid for the beer to prevent Clifford drawing anything out, because he was so tipsey.

Q. What became of you when you had the beer - A. Then we were coming on.

Q. Did you sit down in that public-house - A. I did not, but they did.

Q. You are sure you did not sit - A. No, I did not.

Q. Had you any stick or any thing hard at your breast - A. No, I never had anything.

Q. Had you any hammer in your bosom - A. No, sir, I had not. I asked Clifford to come home; Leary said to me, you seem to be uneasy; my hand and my word to you I will have this man in work against Monday morning then they were going on quick.

Q. They got a little bit before you - A. Yes; I begged of them to wait, not to leave me by myself; Leary said, I am going to take this man to my master's house to settle with him against the morning. I said it was a late hour to go to a gentleman's house, and especially of a Sunday night.

Q. What time of night was it at this time - A. It was after ten o'clock.

Q. Had the watch gone ten - A. I don't know. I think it was about ten, or between ten and eleven.

Q. You are not very certain about the time - A. No. Leary said, walk easy, and don't distress yourself, and we will be up in your room and have a gallon of beer.

Q. What did you understand by that - A. I don't know. I thought he meant to get him in work.

Q. Did you suffer them to go on first - A. I said no more. They left me to go home at my own pace.

Q. Had you any where in your way proposed going round by any square; which way were you going by at this time - A. A place they called Holborn.

Q. You knew Holborn by this time, did not you - A. No, I did not, only as they called it. They went before me.

Q. Then they there parted with you - A. Yes.

Q. Before Leary parted with you, had you asked him to go a different way to that you were going - - A. I never spoke a word to him than what I am telling you.

Q. Are you quite a stranger to London - A. Yes After Leary left me I came straight as far as St. Giles's.

Q. When you came home did you find any body there - A. The children and Slattery. I got a candle at the chandler's shop; I slit it, and brought it in.

Q. Was the name of the man that kept the chandler's shop where you got the candle Macklarin - A Yes. I looked up at the window and saw there was no light; I returned back and got a candle.

Q. Have you now any knowledge of the time when you came - A. No further than as I was taking my pipe it struck twelve o'clock. I was a good while getting home. It struck twelve soon after I got home, and neither Clifford or Leary had come home.

Q. Had Slattery come home - A. He was in bed; his bed was in my room that I and my children slept in. I sat and smoked my pipe, and then I went to bed.

Q. Did you sleep - A. No, I did not; I did not rest much. I got up at two o'clock; I was awake; I heard the clock striking two; I was quite uneasy in my mind. I sat in the window until it was between three and four. I was uneasy not having him at home, and thinking that he was gone off to Ireland. I thought he might have done so, and between three and four o'clock I went to Leary's room.

Q. What room did Leary occupy - A. An up stair room. I found the street door open; they are stone steps to go up from the street. I went to Leary's room door; I found the key outside of the door. I unlocked the door.

Q. Had you observed the key of Leary's door before that morning - A. No, I never noticed it.

Q. When you found the key in the door what did you do - A. I unlocked the door; the wife asked me if that was Jem.

Q. Leary's name is Jem - A. I suppose it is. I said, it is me.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Leary or not - A. She was in bed. I stood at the door; I asked her where was her husband; that was, Jem Leary.

Q. You went there and did not find Leary - A. No. I went away when she told me what she said.

Q. Did you go into the room and put any thing out of your hand - A. I did not go into the room at all. I stood at the door, with the door in my hand.

Q. What did you do after you found that Leary was not there - A. I came home again to my own place, and went to Mrs. Champion.

Q. Does she live near Leary - A. No, she lives in a place called Drury-lane. I enquired my way to Mrs. Champion's.

Q. Can you tell me what time in the morning it was when you got to Mrs. Champion's - A. I cannot. I told her what had passed.

Q. Did you stay with Mrs. Champion, or what did you do - A. I went home to my lodging; she went to my brother first and told him what had happened; after that she came to me in my place.

Q. What time in the morning was it when she got to you - A. I think it was between eight and nine.

Q. Were the people up, and about their business - A. Yes.

Q. Had you at that time heard what had happened to Clifford - A. No, I had not.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Singleton before you heard what had happened to Clifford - A. The woman at the door told me what had happened to Clifford; they said there was a man hurted last night.

Q. Had not Mrs. Champion proposed to go along with you - A. She proposed my going with her to my own brother; my brother said he would interfere to get me pass, as I thought of following Clifford that I might save what little money I had to help me on the road.

Q. What time in the day on Monday was it when you heard about Clifford being murdered - A. Between eight and nine, as I told you.

Q. And Mrs. Singleton was by when the woman told you of it - A. She was in her own room. I then went out with Mrs. Champion, and a good many more women to see the body.

Q. Where was the body when you saw it - A. At Mr. Price's public-house.

Q. Was it Clifford's body you saw there - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Did you know it when you saw it - A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. From the time of Leary and Clifford parting hih you in Holborn, he told you he was going with wim to his master, did you ever see Clifford afterward until you saw him a corpse - A. Never, sir.

Q. When you came home between eight and nine, you found Slattery in bed, did you - A. When I came home at night Slattery was in bed.

Q. Now, you told me that Mrs. Leary did know that you had some money - A. Yes, sir, she did.

Q. Have you any reason to know that Leary knew Clifford had any money - A. No further than as I tell you, Leary asked me, as I told you before, and I was so foolish as to tell him; this was on the Sunday morning.

Q. What time on Sunday was it that he came to your room, he and his wife - A. At my dinner time.

Q. Now, what did he ask you, and what did you say - A. He asked me whether it was he or I that kept the money; I said I had a trifle of my own, and he had his own; that was all that passed.

Q. Did you use to carry what money you had about you, or did you leave it at home - A. I had it about me at the time that this body laid dead; I had no place to leave it at home; it was sewed in the waist of my petticoat. When I found his body was a corpse I ripped it out of my petticoat to give the men something to drink that brought the body home.

Q. Have you ever denied that you had money - A. I have; because the place was so wicked; I did not wish to own it. I then gave it to Mr. Lawrence, not to conceal it, but for safety.

Q. You have been delivered since you have been in prison of a child - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. Mrs. Burke attend to me a little. You came to London quite a stranger, Mrs. Leary let you have a lodging for four days - A. Yes.

Q. Before that you had never seen them - A. No.

Q. And you had no reason to believe that Clifford ever saw them - A. No.

Q. Where does Leary live - A. In Fleet-lane, near Fleet-market.

Q. He never called upon you from the time that you left him until the Saturday - A. No.

Q. You never mentioned before that time of your husband having any money; on the Sunday morning nothing passed about the money until he and his wife came in the afternoon - A. No more than what I am telling you; the woman was drunk, and the man was sober.

Q. After you had been with Leary four days you met Slattery - A. Yes, he was an old acquaintance, he came from the same neighbourhood.

Q. He found you out this lodging, he knew what money your husband had - A. No.

Q. Was it never communicated to him that your husband had money - A. No, it never was.

Q. Had you ever been in London before you came with Clifford - A. Yes, I came when I was a child.

Q. How old were you when you left London - A. I do not know; my brother knows.

Q. Were did you live then - A. With my brother, in Parker's-lane.

Q. How long did you live there then - A. I don't know.

Q. Two years - A. I can't tell.

Q. Were you not at least twelve years when you left London - A. I don't know.

Q. How old are you now - A. I suppose I am three or four and thirty years of age; I have been married twenty years.

Q. You were married to Mr. Burke - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been as little as six months in London - A. Yes. I cannot give a particular account.

Q. Had you been there a year or two with your brother - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean for the jury to believe that you were so ignorant of London that you did not know the place called Holborn - A. I did not know where Holborn was.

Q. Were you capable of running about the streets - A. I suppose I was.

Q. Were you at least a girl of seven or eight years old - A. I was that at least.

Q. Perhaps ten or twelve - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you go on errands - A. Yes, I used to go in and out

Q. How came it when you came to London that you did not go to your brother - A. Because it was very early in the morning when the children got out of the waggon; the children were fatigued; I went to my brother the next day; he came to see me at Leary's; he proposed to get me another lodging. Slattery took me a lodging.

Q. You told me that the money that you had you obtained from selling a little property of yours - A. Yes. Clifford obtained his money from his hard work.

Q. That is true - A. Yes.

Q. Have you always given the same account how he got his money - A. Yes, he sold cattle, and got money. I sold a little house, and some land; it was near Clare, in the County of Tipperary.

Q. How long had you sold it before you came to England - A. About three months.

Q. What did it produce - A. Some of it was corn; it was sold for thirty pound.

Q. Who had the thirty pound - A. I had it. I was obliged to part with fifteen pound to pay some debts.

Q. The thirty pound, what was it paid to you in - A. Notes of the Bank of Ireland.

Q. What notes did you give to Mr. Lawrence, English or Irish Bank notes - A. English; I changed them Irish Bank bank notes for English notes in Cork. Clifford knew that I had it.

Q. Did not you say that the money that Clifford had was part of the produce of this house and land, and of a horse - A. I don't think I have.

Q. If you have said so it is not true then - A. No part of the produce of that house ever was Clifford's; I sold the horse for nine guineas.

Q. Then you had thirty-nine pounds - A. I was obliged to pay the debts; I sold the horse, and Clifford had none of the money.

Q. You said Clifford was your husband, did you ever disclose the contrary until it afterwards came from Ireland - A. No.

Q. How many examinations did you undergo before the magistrate, before you told the magistrate that Clifford was not your husband - A. I don't know, I did not tell the first examination.

Q. Nor the second - A. I don't know.

Q. The reason that made you tell it you knew that they had got intelligence from Ireland that you was not married, and then you told them - A. I don't know.

Q. Clifford and you while in London lived very happy together, you had no words with one-another at any time, that is as true as the rest that you are telling - A. I am telling the truth; we had no words at any time.

Q. Had you never heard Clifford threaten to go away to Ireland, and leave you - A. He said very often he wished to be in his own country; he did not disagree with me at any time.

Q. On Sunday morning you breakfasted at home, and Slattery with you - A. Yes.

Q. Slattery went with you to Leary's - A. Yes.

Q. Slattery staid behind when you went with your husband to buy the hat, did not he - A. He staid in the room with Leary.

Q. Did you at that time observe any hammer in Leary's room - A. No.

Q. Clifford and you bought the hat together - A. Yes; Leary was not there.

Q. Slattery was not there - A. No. We went back to Leary's room, and Slattery came home with us, and we breakfasted together.

Q. Slattery dined with you - A. He did.

Q. Did he drink any of this gallon of beer - A. He was there at the time the beer was drinking.

Q. When you went home at night, you say you found Slattery in bed; you heard the clock strike twelve when you were taking you pipe - A. Yes.

Q. You continued very uneasy, was Slattery asleep then - A. I don't know.

Q. You say that Slattery was in bed - A. Yes.

Q. You did not speak to him one word, good or bad - A. I cannot recollect; I spoke to the children.

Q. When you got up at two o'clock did you speak to Slattery - A. No.

Q. You went to Leary's room - A. Yes, and when I left Leary's room I went to Mrs. Champion, I spoke to her husband, the husband was up, but she was not up; Mrs. Champion dressed herself, she wanted me to breakfast with her.

Q. You saw her and spoke to her at that time in the morning that you came from Leary's; when you went home was Slattery in bed then - A. No, he was got up and gone to work.

Q. But how are you sure that he was in bed when you was at home at two o'clock in the morning - A. Because his coat was on the table; it was at four o'clock when I went out to Leary; he was in bed then. I did not speak a word. It was from my uneasiness that I was going to Leary.

Q. You did not give Mr. Lawrence your money, or any body else until after the murder; who is Mr. Lawrence - A. I don't know; he keeps a chandler's shopover right where I live.

Q. What did you tell him when you gave him that money - A. I did not tell him any thing.

Q. How soon did you tell the magistrate that you had any money - A. The first time; I told him I had a trifle, but I did not tell him what it was, nor to what amount.

Q. When you got up at three o'clock and went to Leary's you knew your way well enough - A. I did not, I enquired.

Q. You did not ask Slattery to go with you - A. No, because I knew he was going to work.

Q. You are quite sure you did not go into Leary's room at all - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Andrews. You say you got thirty pound by selling your property in Ireland, was the price of the horse part of that thirty-pound - A. No.

Q. The whole sum that you got was thirty pound and nine guineas - A. Yes.

Q. You don't know what age you were of when you were here with your brother - A. I do not.

Q. Did you go much about - A. I don't know no more about it then a baby.

Q. Could you speak English when you were here - A. I believe I was learned; I don't recollect any thing about it at all.

Charles Cook . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office.

Q. In consequence of information did you go to where the body was - A. Yes; Mrs. Clifford came to the public-house while I was there; I think I was there about an hour before she came. I went to Leary's lodgings; he was not at home; the door was locked; Thisselton was with me; we broke it open; I and Thisselton searched his lodgings; while I was searching the box Thisselton picked up this hammer under some coals; just by the fire-place.

Q. Did you find any thing else in that apartment - A. There were some clothes, but we had not time to look at them. Thisselton and I came back to the magistrate; we then went to where Leary was at work; Thisselton and I found him, there were two or three men at work; Leary had got a hod upon his shoulder. I said to Leary, where is your master; he said it is not my master you want, it is me: I said it was. We apprehended him; he said let me speak to my master; I said yes, certainly, where is he; we went into a place about twenty yards; his master met us; he said to his master I am going with these gentlemen to Hatton Garden; he came along with us directly: Thisselton laid hold of his arm, I walked behind him; we took him to Hatton Garden office.

Q. You said you found the hammer among the coals; was there anything about it that excited your attention - A. Nothing more than the hat I saw at the public-house; I thought it was done with that hammer; there is nothing about the hammer particular. It was very rusty. I could not tell whether there was any blood upon it or no. The other hammer Thisselton produces. I know no more.

Mr Adolphus. What time in the morning was this - A. I did not go to the public-house until half after twelve, and from there I went to Leary's lodgings.

Q. You found Leary at his usual work in his usual place - A. Yes

Q. Was he searched - A. He was, nothing was found upon him but an eighteen-penny piece.

Q. Nor any property was found in his room whatever - A. No; there was some white upon the hammer at the time it was found in his room. The hammer was more rusty than it is now; it is a shoemaker's hammer.

Mr. Andrews. What is Leary by business - A. A bricklayer's labourer ; he was carrying the hod (it was between two and three o'clock) when we apprehended him.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office.

Q. In consequence of the murder of Clifford being discovered did you go to apprehend Leary - A. I did, in Windmill-court, Giltspur-street; that was where he was at work; he had got a hold on his shoulder. I asked him for his master: some one said, he is backwards. He was coming down with the hod; he said, it is not the master you want, it is me. Mr. Helston, the prisoner's master, asked what was the matter; we told him there had been a murder. Leary did not hear that. I said I thought Leary could give some information about it. Crossing Giltspur-street, Leary said he had heard of the poor man; I asked him, how? he said, never mind.

Q. Was he in his working dress at this time - A. He was. I found this shoemaker's hammer under some coals in Leary's room. This shoemaker's hammer found in a corner by the fire-place, under some coals. I put my stick in and found the hammer, and this hammer I found Mrs. Clifford's apartment in Fitzroy-market.

Q. Do you remember a man of the name of M'Carthy coming to Leary when he was in confinement - A. I do. I understood that Leary wished to see M'Carthy. I had just locked him up in a private place, and coming from there one of my brother officers said that Leary wished to see M'Carthy. M'Carthy was there. I said I had no objection of his seeing Leary if he would speak English. When M'Carthy first went into Leary, Leary said, what do you think of this job of mine; M'Carthy said, it is a bad case, and I think the evidence that has been brought against you, will be sufficient to hang you. He urged him, if he was guilty to acknowledge it, to clear the rest of his countrymen that were in the country. Leary said, if he could get a person to prove that he was at home and in bed at ten o'clock on the night of the murder, it would be all right. They were the very words as well as I can remember. M'Carthy replied, suppose you could get a person to do that, where were you between the time that you parted with Mrs. Clifford and ten o'clock. Leary answered, that is where I should be lost. M'Carthy said he thought nothing would get the prisoner through it. Leary said, there is nothing but one thing that is, to fix it on some one else. M'Carthy said, if that is what you sent to me for I will leave you to your fate, and you may be hanged like a dog, and none of your countryman shall come forward to give you a shilling. I unlocked the door then, and M'Carthy came out. No more passed. That conversation was on Thursday, what I call the first examination. I know nothing more.

Mr. Adolphus. The second hammer you found at Mr. Burke's lodging - A. I did.

Q. That hammer has a wooden handle, if that was put in a woman's stays it would form a thing like a busk - A. I cannot form any idea of that.

Q. At the time of this interview with M'Carthy there had been interviews with the magistrate; on Thursday Mrs. Burke was examined in his presence - A. She was.

Q. Therefore that was the first of what he had heard what she could allege against him, she then stated pretty much the same circumstances that she stated to day - A. She did so.

Q. Where were you when this interview was with Leary and with M'Carthy - A. In the passage, close to the door. There is a grating over the door; we can hear what is said if they speak in a common tone of voice.

Q. You had taken him into the strong room, had not you - A. Yes, I had, in the strong room in our office.

Q. You opened the door and put M'Carthy in - A. That is the fact. I do not know whether I did not speak to M'Carthy while I was unlocking the door that he must speak in English.

Q. Did Leary hear it - A. I should think not.

Q. How soon did Mrs. Burke give any account of her not being Mrs. Clifford - A. I was not present when that disclosure was made.

Q. Who was with you when you heard this conversation - A. Wood, another officer. I do not know whether he heard it or not; it was Wood that told me that Leary wished to see M'Carthy.

THOMAS M'CARTHY . I am a boot and shoemaker. I have known the prisoner almost ever since he was born.

Q. Do you remember seeing him at the lock-up-room at Hatton Garden office - A. I do; he sent for me; I saw the prisoner there; I and the prisoner were alone together. When I went in I asked him what he wanted with me; he asked me what I thought of him. I told him that I thought him in an aukward situation, and that I thought him guilty of the murder; he said he felt himself very uneasy at my having thought so, I being one of his nearest friends. He said he was innocent of the man's murder; he knew nothing of it. I said, if that be the case, what time in the morning did you go to your work, and who had seen you. He said, a person of the name of Richard White , and fifty others saw him go to work. I then said, why does not White come here and prove that on your part, and suppose he had come and proved that, how can you account for going to bed at ten o'clock, as you say you have done. There, said he, is where I am lost; if any body could be got to prove that, I should be free, said he. I told him that I considered him guilty of the murder, and not to suffer two of his countrymen, after whom there was a pursuit, to participate in his guilt. I told him he would be hanged; he said, I am sure I shall. I said, you have no means of getting over it. Leary said, none but the one. What is that, said I. Leary said, to fix it upon some one else. I said, upon whom do you mean to fix it, who is implicated. I think, said he, when I sat in

the Union Arms public-house I felt in her right hand pocket a hammer. Here ended the conversation. I believe I told him that he was the man that committed the murder, and that he should have no friendship from me. As near as I can recollect these were the words. Then I went away.

Q. Were you ever with him alone ever since - A. Never. I would not go to him. I disclosed this conversation to the officers, and told them to mention it to the magistrate if they thought it material.

Mr. Adolphus. When you went to him you had made up your mind that he was the guilty man - A. Yes. He said, I know I shall be hanged, and the moment I am hanged may I go into Hell if I am guilty of the man's murder.

Q. He did not ask you to do any such thing as to get a person to prove that he had seen him go to bed - A. Just as I have stated to you.

Q. You went further into the difficulty; he stated the circumstance that he felt a hammer in the woman's pocket - A. Yes. Now I recollect the phrase that he used, that if somebody could be procured to prove that he had seen him go to bed; there is where I am lost.

Robert Shuttleworth . Q. You told me in your former examination that you had found some holes in the ground near where the body was found: look at these implements, and tell me whether you see any instrument that these holes were made with - A. I am sure it could not be the little hammer; I think this shoemaker's hammer resembles the holes that I saw there.

JOSEPH BECKIT . Q. You are a turnkey at the house of correction - A. Yes.

Q. Had you at any time while Leary was in your care, any conversation with him - A. Yes; the first conversation the expression was, faith, I will tell you the truth. This conversation was taken in writing. I said nothing to him about confessing. This declaration was taken in writing the same morning. He said he did not commit the murder himself, but he was there present at the time of the murder. He told me that Mrs. Burke had committed the deed. I asked him what distance he was off Mrs. Burke when the murder was committed; he told me he might be three yards distant. I then asked him respecting his dress; I do not remember his answer. I asked him if there was any blood on any part of his clothes; he said there might be some on his shoes; the deceased bled fresh; it spurted from him; he might have got blood though a yard or two distant. I then asked him what the implement was that the murder was committed, whether it was the shoemaker's hammer; his answer was, no, he did not think it was; he believed not. I then asked him where the implement was concealed, where it was to be found; he told me I should find it at his master's, and gave me the direction where his master lived. Mr. Helston delivered it up to me. Leary told me the hammer had been in use one week since the murder.

Q. You got the hammer of his master - A. I did. I asked him respecting of the knife; he denied any knowledge of the knife on the Monday and the Tuesday, but on the Wednesday he said that he had an old knife at home, and described it to me; he told me that it was a broken pointed knife, and the top part of the handle was broken off. This is the knife; Lee gave it to Mr. Price, and Mr. Price to Higginbotham. I shewed the knife to Leary, and asked him if that was the knife that he had described to me; he said it was. Leary added, that Mrs. Burke might have taken it from Clifford, and Clifford had taken it from his apartment, and put it into his pocket. I asked him how he knew that was the hammer; he said he saw Mrs. Clifford lift up the hammer with both her hands; he was within a yard or two of her. He always denied having any hand in the murder, only that he was present.

DAVID HELSTON . I am a bricklayer in Cock-lane. The prisoner was in my employ at the time he was apprehended.

Q. Tell me if you know that large hammer - A. A. Yes, that is a tool belonging to me; I saw it on the Saturday before Leary was apprehended.

Q. That hammer was it, where we are told the prisoner was apprehended - A. Yes. I believe all the men used it.

Q. Do you generally find tools for your men, or do they find tools for themselves - A. The labourers generally find tools for themselves.

Q. Are you sure that you saw that hammer on your premises on the Saturday preceding the time that Leary was apprehended - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. What has been the character of Leary while in your employment - A. I had a good character with him: he was a quiet, sober, industrious man. He has worked for me a twelvemonth.

HYAM BARNETT . I live at No. 7, Field-lane, Holborn.

Q. Do you remember any body coming to you on a Sunday in June to buy a hat of you - A. Yes, Mr. Clifford; he came by himself to buy a hat; I sold him this hat for four shillings; he was receiving the change of a one pound note when the woman came in; I asked her what she wanted. I did not know she belonged to him. When the deceased took the money out to pay for the hat he turned himself round; he would not let me see what he had. The deceased said the woman that came in belonged to him; she took hold of him; he ran into the parlour, as if frightened at her. They seemed as if they had been quarrelling before they came in. It was about noon when he came in, I am quite certain.

Mr. Adolphus. They came in between twelve and one about this hat - A. Yes.

Q. And they appeared as if they had been quarrelling - A. He seemed terrified at her. She wanted to get the change of him; he would not let her have it.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I produce the prisoner's clothes, the coat and the waistcoat, and I got these breeches out of the prisoner's room; there seems only to be dirt upon these. This other coat I got from another person in George-court; they were shewn to the prisoner in my presence; he did not say anything at all about it.

HANNAH SINGLETON . I live at No. 4, Church-street, St. Giles's. The deceased and Mary Burke lodged in my house. I did not know of their being

out on the Sunday at all. I have but two other lodgers in the house. I saw Clifford on the Saturday night; I did not see him at all on the Sunday. I saw Mrs. Burke on the Monday morning.

Q. Had you heard of the murder when you saw Mrs. Burke on the Monday morning - A. No, I had not; Mrs. Burke came into my room about half after seven o'clock, she appeared to be in trouble, she told me that she suspected Clifford had gone away from her to Ireland; I asked her what she was to do; she told me she did not know.

Q. Now, at this time had you heard of the murder having taken place - A. No, not for a long time after that.

Q. Did Mrs. Clifford go out after that - A. She did. Mrs. Champion came to the door at the time the alarm was made.

Q. Did you see her brother there - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Adolphus. Clifford and his supposed wife had lived with you some time, what part of the house did they occupy - A. The second floor; I live down lower to the street. On Saturday night I heard some little noise on the stairs; I brought the candle out, I saw Clifford on the stairs.

CATHERINE CHAMPION . Q. You are related to Mrs. Burke - A. Yes, the first cousin to Mrs. Burke. I went to the lodging at seven o'clock on the Sunday afternoon; just as I got to the room door Clifford came out, and Leary and Mrs. Leary walked out after him; Mrs. Clifford stopped in the room along with me, and Slattery was in the room; I and Slattery went to a court in the Haymarket.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Clifford again that night - A. I asked Mrs. Clifford to come along with me; she declined; she said she was too dirty to come out. I saw Mrs. Clifford again the next time on Monday morning; she knocked at my room door; she told me that Clifford was gone away. I went with Mrs. Clifford to No. 4, in Church-street; she told me then that Clifford was gone to Ireland, and therefore she wanted to go too. I went with her to her house, and then I heard that Clifford had been killed.

Q. While you were there did you see Mr. Clifford's brother - A. I did not.

Q. What is his name - A. Thomas Lines .

Q. Did you observe Leary's dress at Clifford's on Sunday afternoon - A. I did not observe his dress.

Q. to Mary Burke . Take these black breeches in your hand and look at them, have you seen them before - A. Yes. All I know he had a pair of black breeches on when he was in my room on the Sunday.

Mr. Adolphus. Could Clifford speak English - A. No; he understood it; he could only speak a few words. I never heard him speak one word of English.

Mr. Andrews, Q. to Cook. Have you seen these breeches which were found at Leary's lodging - A. Yes; I observed no marks upon them. They are not the breeches he had on when apprehended.

MR. SAMUEL HOUGHAM . I am a surgeon.

Q. Did you examine the body of the deceased - A. Yes.

Q. To what was his death owing - A. To the wounds he received; his scull was fractured, and there was a wound about the left eye; his death was occasioned by one of these blows. The assertion of the brains being brought to the public-house is not correct; it was not brains, it was coagulated blood; it is a mistake.

Q. Could the blood flow for the space of three yards when the blow was given - A. No doubt it did from the vessel of the eye.

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG . Q. During the time that the prisoner was in the house of correction had you any conversation with him about this murder - A. No, not till I took the writing.

Q. Did you take any thing down in writing what Leary said - A. I did, on the 28th of July, from his own mouth. I wrote it as he spoke it at the time it bears date.

Q. Tell us what passed - A. James Leary saith, a little before ten at night I left the Union Arms public-house in Holborn with Edward Clifford and his wife. I walked with both until we came to Ely-place, and then we walked faster. It was Clifford's intention to get his clothes out before his wife came home. When we got to Holborn Bars Mrs. Clifford was about thirty yards behind; there we met Slattery. Slattery came and said, Ned, you have disappointed us very much this afternoon; I am very much obliged to you for the civility. I then left them altogether. In my way back, at Shoe-lane, I met Clifford's wife, and passed her without speaking to her. That is the substance of the first confession. After this a message came from Leary to Mr. Adkins the governor, stating that what he said on the 28th of July was false. Then I took this in writing from Leary's mouth, dated the 1st of August; he then said he would give a true account. I reduced it to writing. This is the same. It was signed first by Mr. Adkins, and then by Leary. I saw Leary sign it, and then Mr. Adkins.

James Leary saith, that on Sunday morning, between three and four o'clock, Edward Clifford came to my lodgings; he told me that he wanted to get away on Sunday night if he could; he said, I will lay myself down here and go to sleep. I put him three chairs together; he laid down there for two or three hours. I put my great coat over him. He then requested me to go with him to his house and ask his wife for the clothes that she had got. A little after eight he went away; I did not go with him. After he went away his wife came after him. I think it must be between eight and nine. When Clifford came back, Slattery and his wife were there. He said he would go back to Ireland. His wife took hold of him; they quarrelled together. He said, it was of no use, he would go back to Ireland. He then offered her a silk handkerchief that he said he gave nine shillings for, if she would give him the great coat. He opened the window and attempted to throw himself out. She laid hold of him and prevented him going out; he said he was determined to go to Ireland; she said she was determined to go after him. My wife opened the door; he went down stairs; Mrs. Clifford pulled off his hat. Between two and three in the afternoon I and my wife went to their lodging with intention to buy the bed

bed and what things they had got. They were getting the dinner ready. She asked Slattery to fetch half a gallon of beer. She gave him the money, and before he went out I said I thought he had better bring a gallon, and I would pay for half a gallon. I did pay for half a gallon, all we were in the room. They all dined together except Clifford; they all seemed agreeable together. I did not say a word about buying the bed. Clifford kept by the door, holding a shoemaker's hammer in his hand. When I and my wife went out of the room we met Mr. Harrington and his wife; we agreed to go to Mr. Griffiths's house in Church-street; Clifford came after us and partook of the beer. My wife was tipsey; she wanted to go home. As we were coming along Clifford complained that he was hungry; I said, if he would go along with me I would give him something to eat; accordingly he did. I gave him some bread, meat, and cabbage. As near as I can say this was about nine o'clock. While he was there Mrs. Clifford came; they began quarrelling. Clifford and his wife and me went out; we went to the Union Arms, Union-court; I had a glass of gin, Clifford had one, Mrs. Clifford had none. Coming along I accidentally hit my elbow against her side: I felt something hard, like a stick. She complained of being ill; she did not wish to go up Holborn, as the people would push against her. She asked Clifford to come this way through Gray's-inn, as then they would have an opportunity of going through the squares. I said, I wish you good night, madam; she said, no, go a little further with me, if I am taken ill this man knows nothing, he will be of no use to me. As we got towards the brick fields he said he would be gone in the night, he would not stop by any means. They began quarrelling again; she took the hammer from her breast and struck him down; she then struck him two or three times very hard. I moved a little nearer to him, and saw the blood flow from him. I made my way across the fields as well as I could. I went home about eleven o'clock; my wife was fast asleep in bed. I undressed and went to bed. About three o'clock Mary Clifford came and said, are you at home, Leary. She did not come into the room, but put this hammer into the room. She went down stairs without speaking one word. When I got up I found the hammer by the door, which made me suspect that she had put it there. I got up about half after five. I went to my work, and took this hammer with me. I came back to breakfast about eight o'clock my wife said Mary Clifford had been enquiring about her husband. When I went to dinner I met my wife; she said how Ned had been murdered, she hoped I had no hand in it. After dinner I went to work until about three o'clock. The great coat that I had on when Clifford was killed there might be some blood it.

MR. FORD. James Leary further saith, that at the time the deceased and Mrs. Clifford were in the brick fields, about ten yards further was Slattery. Slattery said, is that you Mary, we are well met; I have been about five minutes looking for you. The deceased requested Slattery to give him the great coat. Slattery had the coat on. Mrs. Clifford struck the deceased; he fell, and Slattery took hold of his legs and dragged him to the pond.

Mr Walford, Q. to Armstrong. There was something in that paper that you were going to relate - A. Merely about buying the beds; Leary told me he had no money.

WILLIAM SLATTERY . Q. You are the same man that lodged in Clifford's room - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. Did you come over to England with Clifford and his wife - A. No, I came about three months before.

Q. Did you know Mrs. Burke before - A. Yes, I did. I met her by accident.

Q. Was Clifford in England for the first time - A. I do not suppose he was here before; he spoke Irish.

Q. You went to her apartment and lodged with her - A. I did; I went out sometimes with her.

Q. Did she know her way about town - A. I think she did not.

Q. Did you ever go with her to Leary - A. I did; on Sunday morning when her husband was gone out of the house.

Q. Do you remember his being turned out of the room on the Saturday, and sleeping on the stairs - A. No, I do not. About eight o'clock on Sunday morning we went to Leary's.

Q. Was that when you went to buy the hat - A. I was not present when they purchased the hat.

Q. Had not you heard him say before that Sunday morning that he would leave her and go to Ireland - A. Yes, more than once.

Q. Used not they to quarrel - A. No; he said the place would not agree with him, and she at eight o'clock on Sunday morning asked him if he was going to leave her and go to Ireland; after that he went out and bought the hat, and we went home together and got our breakfast; this was about nine o'clock. I helped her to put up the beds, and Clifford remained in the room until about five o'clock. When Leary and his wife came in Leary ate some dinner. Leary told Clifford he would get Clifford a job of work at his master's; they went out; I never saw Leary afterwards until I saw him the next day at Hatton Garden office. Mrs. Clifford remained in the room; Mrs. Champion came next, I went out with her; I came home about nine o'clock, there was nobody at home but the children.

Q. You slept in the same room with Mrs. Clifford - A. I did.

Q. Did you see her up in the night - A. I did not; I do not know that I was awake all night; I knew nothing that passed, nor of the murder until I heard of it at one o'clock; the next day I got up at six o'clock and went to work in Camden Town; I breakfasted in Camden Town; I heard nothing of the murder until I returned home to dinner in Clifford's room.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury. I hope you will grant me the indulgence of having my defence read, and if there appears any guilt before you that I was the hand that murdered Clifford I will not ask my hte at you hand; but if my story be true, and if I prove some part by the evidence of proper persons who may be believed, then I shall look for a verdict of an acquittal. I am very low in spirits, not having the same kind of living that I used to have. Some gentlemen have come forward and have employed the learned lawyer in my behalf, as

I had no money. I do not doubt that if I have a patient hearing I shall disprove the unconnected evidence against me. Clifford came to me to know what he was to do, the same as another of my countrymen did, and because I can write, (my father was a schoolmaster they call me) Mr. Leary. Gentlemen, I did not kill the man, nor did I lend my assistance, nor thought of the affair until it was actually done; we never had a quarrel or ever fell out. If I was a thief, but I am not, I might easily have robbed him without murdering him; this never entered my head; I never would suffer men to overreach one-another at pay-table; my master knows I never was found committing such tricks as journeymen bricklayers are used to commit; I have told the masters about them, and they have been discharged, although they have been good workmen. Gentlemen, I am not a thief, nor ever did I covet other mens property, or liked to see one man overreach another; if a reason is assigned why I am accused of this horrid deed it must arise from something higher; although I am very poor I am as sensible as some that are better off. The statement published by the keeper of the House of Correction you are well acquainted with, as it has been stated in the public-newspapers, and other paragraphs, stating further proofs as they said Leary's of guilt. I trust this honourable court will not believe that I am guilty of this murder from the depositions that have been inserted in the newspapers; they call the papers that I signed at the House of Correction a confession. On the night of this lamented murder I was tipsy; the women were all tipsy, and if I have mistaken one house for another it will not be thought I am guilty of this crime, or knew of it before it took place. I will now return to the newspapers, I am ill used by them, they have raised a strong perjudice against me; they have offered false assertions for facts, told the public that the examinations tended to prove Leary's guilt, when truely they did not tend to any such thing; for God's sake gentlemen do not take in your minds these newspaper reports; his lordship I hope will tell you that the only way you can give the proper verdict is to take into your consideration only what has occured in court to day, that is the only way you can give the proper verdict on my case; there have been verdicts passed on prisoners by the evidence of police officers, which verdicts have been lamented afterwards; you see I speak of the danger of deciding from circumstantial evidence, on account of Holloway, Haggerty, and others. Gentlemen, there have been shewn to you three hammers, a knife, and my great coat; the large hammer is the property of my master, and was brought from the building where it was used on the building by all the men; I being the oldest man in the employ it was carried home by me; I knew Mrs. Helston was ill, I did not like to disturb her, so I carried it to my own home, I had often taken home tools before. I am told it was the small hammer that killed the man, but I am fearful it was the large one; as to the other hammer being covered with coals, I had not coals enough to cover it; I never had it in my hand. At the third examination several witnesses were bought up to prove that this knife was mine, but failed; I think Clifford put it in his pocket after supper; we had but three knives, one I had, the other my wife had, and Clifford had this. My coat was said to be bloody, and then it was said to be scowered; this was disproved by Martin during the examination; Cook and Thisselton harangued at me, and said they should have other evidence to prove my guilt, that I should be hanged, that I was done, and many other such expressions, it certainly induced me to say to them you want my life, take it; this was natural, for it is better to die at once than live under such.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-4

828. FRANCES CARNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , a tea-spoon, value 2 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. and a child's frock, value 1 s. the property of John William D'Almaine .

JOHN WILLIAM D'ALMAINE . Q. Was the prisoner in your service - A. Yes, she quitted my house abruptly, on last Friday, at ten o'clock at night.

Q. Was there any wages due to her at that time - A. Yes, there was. She said she would send for her box before six o'clock the following morning; that was the reason of my suspecting her. I can swear to the property when produced.

RICHARD WILSON . I produce the property. I searched the prisoner's box in the prisoner's presence. I found a silver spoon wrapped up in this bit of paper. I then went to her lodgings in Union-street; the prisoner was there, and in her lodgings I found a child's frock, and two pair of cotton stockings.

Prosecutor. The spoon is mine, and I believe the other articles to be mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-5

829. CATHERINE CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , a pair of breeches, value 16 s. the property of John Watson .

CATHERINE WATSON . I am the wife of John Watson , No. 18, Willmott-street, St. Luke's . On the morning of the 24th of July, I went out; I returned about one o'clock; I saw the prisoner; my little girl had hold of her in the street; the prisoner had a pair of breeches in her apron; I took them out of her apron; the breeches belonged to Mr. Walker. My husband is a scowerer ; he had them to clean; they hang in the window; I left them there when I went out. These are the breeches I took from the prisoner; they are valued at ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the breeches up going along the street.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-6

830. EDWARD GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , from the person of Thomas Slate , a pocket-book, value 6 d. and a bank note, value 100 l. his property .

THOMAS SLATE was called, and not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-7

831. ABRAHAM BALASCO was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Hill , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. a watch-chain, value 1 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. his property .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-8

832. ELIZABETH MASH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a watch value 2 l. a seal, value 1 l. and a watch-key, value 6 d. the property of John Bressington , from his person

JOHN BRESSINGTON . I am a gentleman's servant . On the 26th of August. I met the prisoner in Cranbourne-alley ; I had been at my benefit society. I was going home, between twelve and one o'clock at night: the prisoner spoke to me, and asked me to go home with her; she took my watch, and gold seal from me; I did not perceive it until I saw it in her hand; I was trying to take my watch out of her hand, another girl came by, she held her hand out and gave the watch to her; the other girl took the watch out of her hand; I then took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Liecester-fields, I saw that gentleman, he had hold of two girls, and a great many men were about him; he said he had lost his watch; he was very much in liquor; I went to the watchhouse, there was nothing found on me: he took another girl to the watchhouse, she was discharged. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-9

833. THOMAS MOON was indicted for that he, on the 11th of August , in and upon John Larman , feloniously did make an assault, that he with a certain gun, charged with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, at and against the said John Larman did shoot off and discharge, and with a leaden bullet the said Joseph Larman did strike, penetrate and wound, and thereby giving to him one mortal wound of the breadth of one inch, and the depth of six inches, of which he instantly died, and so the jurors say that he Thomas Moon , the said Joseph Larman did kill and murder

The prisoner also stood indicted upon the coroners inquisition.

CHARLES DALE . Q. On the 11th of August were you working in a field near Finchley-common - A. Yes, and the deceased Joseph Larman was working with me. He was a boy like myself.

Q. How far from the road - A. I cannot rightly say.

Q. While Larman was working with you what happened - A. We were looking at some slugs, he happened to get up and he fell. I heard a report of a gun.

Q. Did you find what had occasioned that fall - A. No, I saw the blood come from his body by the ribs.

Q. Did you find a ball - A. No. I found a hole in his ribs, and blood come from that hole.

Q. Did you look towards the part where you heard the report of a gun - A. I did, up the high road, there I saw two soldiers, they had both a gun, each they were dressed in blue; like the prisoner.

Q. Did you see any other persons near the spot from whence the report came except these two - A. No, I did not; I ran away to Whetstone for assistance; I passed them. One of these two men that I passed was the prisoner now at the bar; when they got to Whetstone they were stopped and examined.

Q. Did you see his gun examined - A. Yes, it appeared to have been lately discharged. It was quite we, when you put your finger in the mouth of the gun.

Q. Did his companions gun appear to be loaded - A. They were all loaded but this one.

Mr. Knapp. You knew nothing of the prisoner before this time - A. No.

Q. Nor did he knew Larman - A. No.

Q. Where were you in the field - A. Against some paling which my master had lately put up.

Q. How high was the paling - A. Higher than me a good deal, and higher than Larman.

Q. Could the soldiers who were in the road on account of Larman stooping see him - A Yes.

Q. And the person whoever he was that hred did not you know - A. No.

Q. Was there any fence between where you stood and the soldiers - A. There were low rails, he shot over two or three rails, we could see those in the road and they could see us. The rails are open rails.

HESTER SCUTCHINS . On Wednesday, the 11th of August, I was on Finchley common, about half past three in the afternoon, first I saw three soldiers and a deserter going across the common towards Whetstone, after that I saw two more coming on behind.

Q. How far were these two men behind the three A. Within a quarter of a mile.

Q. When these two men came near Mr. Collins's field did you see either of them do any thing - A. I was not looking as they were coming along, I saw one the soldier s take up his piece and put it to his breast or his shoulder; he took two or three steps before he fired it off.

Q. Did it appear to you to be fired at random or taking aim - A. He was taking aim, sir.

Q. Did you shortly after see the body of the boy who was killed - A. I did; I went down to him as quick as I could.

Q. Now, in what direction did it appear to you that the soldier's gun was pointed - A. It was pointed to the boy as near as could be.

Q. It was pointed to that part of the field where the boy was - A. Yes, and when I got to the boy I found him dead. The ball went through one side and out of the other.

Q. Were the wounds even - A. No, one was higher than the other. It went in one side and came out of the other. I cannot say which side the wound was highest. One side the hole was about two inches higher than the other.

Mr. Knapp. You say, the pointing of the gun was towards that part of the field where the boy was, and whether it was pointed towards the boy you cannot say - A. No.

Q. There is a paling to that field - A. Yes.

Q. Then whether he was shooting at the paling or the boy you cannot say - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. The paling was behind the boy - A. Yes; the soldiers were in the path-way; that is a great way higher than the road, and higher than the field.

JOHN SATCHWELL . I live at Whetstone.

Q. Upon the alarm occasioned by this did you assist in taking the prisoner into custody - A. I did. I saw his carbine examined; it appeared to me to be lately discharged. This is the carbine.

Q. Was the spot where the soldier fired pointed out to you afterwards - A. Yes, by the woman. I measured the distance to where the boy fell it was between one hundred and sixty and one hundred and seventy yards. I saw the other soldiers carbines all examined; they were all loaded.

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of manslaughter only, not of the wilful murder .

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-10

834. SIMON WINTER was indicted for that he, on the 6th of February, 1802 , upon John Cole Steele , together with Robert Newton , feloniously did make an assault, and that they with a certain bludgeon of no value, the said John Cole Steele in and upon his head feloniously and with malice aforethought did strike and beat, and thereby with such striking and beating the said John Cole Steele , feloniously did give unto him one mortal fracture on his scull, and also divers mortal bruises and contusions, of which mortal bruises and contusions the said John Cole Steele did die, and so the jurors say that the said Simon Winter (the prisoner), and Robert Newton , the said John Cole Steele did kill and murder .

SECOND COUNT, that they, on the same day, upon John Cole Steele did make an assault, by tying a certain leather strap around the neck of the said John Cole Steele , did bind, tie, and fasten, and that they with the said leather strap, so bound, tied, and fastened, him (the said John Cole Steele) did choke and strangle, of which choking and strangling he died.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, under the direction of the court declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-11

835. DAVID WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a leaden clock-weight, value 5 s. the property of Sarah Turner .

SARAH TURNER . I am a single woman . I keep the Feathers public-house, Featherstone-street, City-road . On Friday the 3d of December the prisoner came in my house; he placed himself under the dial; he called for half a pint of porter; I gave it him. I pretended to go into the back yard; he watched me. I opened the door that leads into the kitchen, and banged it to again; he thought I was gone out; I was not. The prisoner took out a key, unlocked the dial, and took the weight out of the case. I sent for an officer. The prisoner went down upon his knees. I said, you old villain, what are you doing there.

- DAVISON. I am a constable. I found this key on the prisoner: it unlocked the clock-case. The weight laid on the table when I went there. The prisoner denied ever touching the weight.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the weight; I only went in for half a pint of beer.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-12

836. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , one hundred and twenty halfpence , the property of William Galloway .

WILLIAM GALLOWAY . I live in Spitalfields-market . I am a salesman . On the 17th of July I was in my warehouse at four o'clock in the morning. I put four crown papers of halfpence upon a desk that I had in the accompting house. After I had put them there I took one paper away; I went out and locked my accompting-house door. I went to another warehouse that I have; that warehouse is opposite of my accompting-house.

Q. When you came out of that warehouse did you go to your accompting-house - A. I did, directly. I saw the prisoner and a woman looking into my accompting-house; they were looking in at the front window; the halfpence were on the desk, near to the accompting-house door. When I returned to my accompting-house I found one paper of halfpence taken away. There were but two left. The prisoner was close by. I detained the prisoner; the woman escaped.

Q. You did not find any halfpence upon the prisoner - A. No.

MARTHA DALLIARD . I live opposite of Mr. Galloway's warehouse, in the market. On the 17th I saw him put his hand through a broken pane in the accompting-house and take out a brown paper parcel. I saw the paper parcel in his hand; he gave it to a woman in a red cloak. I went and told Mr. Galloway; he took the prisoner; the woman went off.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up in the morning to buy a little fruit to sell. When the girl accused me I was forty yards from the place. I was in the market.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined 1 Month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-13

837. SARAH POOLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , two silver tablespoons, value 30 s. the property of Robert Fearn .

ROBERT FEARN . I am a pianoforte maker . The prisoner had been in my service near six months.

JOHN MARTIN . I live with Mr. Everett, pawnbroker, Berner's-street. The prisoner pawned with me two spoons for twenty-four shillings. I produce the spoons.

Prosecutor. I believe they are my spoons.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-14

838. HENRY WYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , one ounce five pennyweights of silver filings, value 7 s. the property of Robert Rutland .

ROBERT RUTLAND . I am a silver spoon and fork maker ; I live in Lisle-street, Leicester-square . The prisoner was in my employ. On the 7th of September the prisoner was searched in my presence, and two small paper parcels of filings were found on him; they were one ounce five pennyweights. I believe them to be my property.

PETER PERRY . I am an officer. On the 7th of September I searched the prisoner in Rutland's house. I found in his coat pocket two paper parcels of silver filings. The prisoner said some one must have put them in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know how the silver filings came in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-15

839. HANNAH BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , sixteen pounds weight of bacon, value 8 s. the property of Francis Holberry .

FRANCIS HOLBERRY . I keep a shop, and sell bacon . On the 20th of July, I saw the prisoner looking at my bacon; she went out of the shop. The next witness saw her take this bacon; she informed me. I missed the piece of bacon. I had seen it a minute before.

LYDIA MOORE . I saw the prisoner take the piece of bacon out of the shop, just by the door. I told Mr. Holberry; he pursued her, and brought her back.

Prosecutor. The bacon that the prisoner had was my bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-16

840. JOHN CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a gown, value 5 s. and an apron, value 2 s. the property of Jane Lamas .

JANE LAMAS . I live at Mr. Rimington's, the Blue Anchor, Savoy-hill . On the 30th of April the prisoner came into the house; he called for a glass of ale; he asked me to go backwards; I shewed him the place, and when he came out my mistress stopped him, and took from him my gown and apron that had been hanging up in the kitchen.

SARAH RIMINGTON . I keep the Blue Anchor public-house. On the 30th of April I saw the prisoner go out with the gown and apron under his arm. I took them from him. This is the gown and apron.

Jane Lamas . That is my gown and apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I had spent all my money; I could get no work. I went into this house.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-17

841. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , two shirts, va- value 4 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a waistcoat, value 9 s. the property of Jane Pilkington .

JANE PILKINGTON . I deal in second hand clothes . On Saturday last, between nine and ten in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop; he agreed to buy two shirts for eight shillings, two pair of stockings for three shillings, and a waistcoat at seven shillings and sixpence. He told me to fold them up; he would pay me for them. I folded them up; he seemed to feel in his pocket for the money. In a little time I turned my head of one side, he throwed a quantity of snuff in my face. He took the bundle and ran away. He was pursued and taken, and brought back with the property.

JOHN GOLDSMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with the property about him. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-18

842. THOMAS WHITTEL and WILLIAM WOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , three pigs, value 8 l. the property of Thomas Harrison .

THOMAS TRURO . I live in Wilson-street, Somers Town. On the 1st of September I saw the two prisoners, Whittel and Wood, between five and six o'clock, they were coming along the road from Hampstead, just by the turnpike gate. They were driving three pigs, two little ones and a big one. The pigs were dirty; they appeared to be disguised with some stuff. I do not know what, and appeared as if they had been driven some way. I told the man at the turnpike I thought them pigs were stolen. I then fetched Avory, the officer; he took them.

JOHN AVORY . I am an officer. On the evening of the 1st of September. Truro called upon me; I went with him to the New-road, near Pentonville chapel. I observed the prisoner Wood coming out of a public-house door; directly he saw me he turned back and ran in doors. I met Whittel just as he was coming out of the Lord Vernon's Arms door, the same public-house. The sow and pigs at that time were laying opposite of the said public-house; they appeared very much fatigued. The pigs were very much splashed over with tar. When I secured Whittel, Wood absconded; he was brought to me by Dobson. I asked the prisoners where they brought the

pigs from. They said they knew nothing of them. I took the pigs to my own home until they were sworn to at Bow-street office.

THOMAS MALLOY . I am a labourer; I live in Kentish Town. I saw the sow and pigs in Avory's possession on the 1st of September.

Q. Whose sow and pigs were they - A. Thomas Harrison 's, Grove-farm, Kentish Town ; he had the sow five years; the young ones were about five or six months old. I have worked in Mr. Harrison's family thirty years. I know they are the property of Mr. Harrison. I had the care of them.

Q. When had you seen them last at Harrison's - Q Between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day.

WILLIAM DOBSON . Being a neighbour I went with Avory to the Lord Vernon's Arms. I went into the public-house with him. I found the prisoner Wood behind the cellar door. I delivered him to Avory.

Whittel's Defence. I was coming along Kentish Town; there were some pigs in the road. I know nothing of the pigs. The three pigs were going a different road to what I was.

Wood's Defence. I was coming along Battle-bridge, I met this man; I went into the public-house and had half a pint of beer; this man catched hold of me.

WHITTEL, GUILTY , aged 26.

WOOD, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-19

843. SAMUEL CUBIT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a pair of boots, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Jones .

LUCY JONES . I am the wife of Thomas Jones ; we live in Golden-lane . Samuel Cubit (the prisoner) lodged with us. On the 19th of August I missed a pair of boots; they were my brother's boots, but they were left in my care. On the day I missed the boots the prisoner got up about eight o'clock. I went after him to a neighbour's house. I asked the prisoner what he had done with my brother's boots; he said he had pawned them for five shillings.

WILLIAM JOHN FRY . I took in the boots of the prisoner on the 19th of August. I lent him five shillings upon them. These are the boots.

Prosecutrix. I know the boots well.

ROBERT BOOTH . I am a Bow-street officer. I searched the prisoner; I found this duplicate in his pocket for the boots pawned for five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I offered all the restitution I could make. It was necessity drove me to do it.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-20

844. ELIZABETH JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of September , twenty-five pint pewter pots, value 2 l. and eight pewter quart pots, value 5 s. the property of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I keep the Feathers public-house, the corner of Brownlow-street, Edgware-road . I have lost nineteen poundsworth of pots since last April, and I have no doubt but this woman took three parts of them. On the 2nd of this month I had information that the prisoner had some pots in her possession. I went to Mr. Walker. The prisoner lodges in Mr. Walker's house. I asked Mr. Walker to go and look for my pots in the back garret: The prisoner lodged in the back garret in Mr. Walker's house. The prisoner then was not at home. I went the second time; Mr. Walker delivered five pint pots and one quart. About seven o'clock they sent over to me, and told me there was a strap full of pots. I went over; I brought out of the prisoner's room twenty pint pewter pots and seven quarts. These are the pots; they are every one of them mine.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner about your premises - A. Yes, she often came there. She fetched beer for Mrs. Large in the first floor in the same house.

MAETHEW WALKER . The prisoner lodged in my house, in the back garret. From the information of Mr. Smith I went into the prisoner's room. I went up stairs with her when she came home; I told her I wished to go into the room; I was informed there were some pots there. She refused. At last I went in; I found five pints and one quart. She said the pots had been brought there in a mistake. About seven o'clock I went into the room again; she had absconded then. I found twenty pints and seven quarts in a bag by the side of the bed. In searching the room I found an old frying pan; in it were the remains of pewter.

Prisoner's Defence. These pots were carried up stairs by Mrs. Large's children. The frying pan was in the room when I first entered it; that belongs to Mr. Walker.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-21

845. RICHARD EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Ward Chapman , from his person .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be taken from the person of a person to the jurors unknown.

JOHN ELDRIDGE . I am a messenger. On the 7th of August I was passing up Fleet-street , I saw the prisoner and three or four others hustling several gentlemen. I watched them up and down Fleet-street three different times. On my return from Temple-bar, I saw the prisoner, Richard Evans , put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, and he pulled out his silk handkerchief. He took his hat off and put it into his hat. I catched hold of his collar and told him to give the gentleman his handkerchief I told the gentleman that he had his pocket picked of a handkerchief, and to convince the gentleman I took the prisoner's hat off, and the handkerchief was in it. The gentleman desired me to seek for an officer. I could not find any. I took the prisoner to Guildhall; there the gentleman swore to his handkerchief. I have never seen the gentleman since. I saw the prisoner take it out of the gentleman's pocket, I am sure of that.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am a marshalman. The last witness brought the prisoner to Guildhall in

a coach; I took him in custody, and took him before the alderman. This handkerchief was given to me by the gentleman; the gentleman said it was marked with his initials and No. 7; the gentleman said his name was Ward Chapman , he was going to America, He was not bound over.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, I picked the handkerchief up and put it into my hat.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-22

846. RICHARD WRIGHT and RICHARD CLARK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , seven pounds weight of coffee, value 11 s. and eight ounces of raisins, value 1 s. the property of William Alexander Frampton and Thomas Day Frampton .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER FRAMPTON . My partner's name is Thomas Day Frampton , we are wholesale grocer s in Leadenhall-street . On the 16th of July, in consequence of suspicion after the men were paid I followed the prisoners out of the warehouse, and called Pinner, the constable, and searched them; he found coffee and Smyrna raisins about them both. I employed the prisoners occasionally in roasting coffee.

JAMES EATON . I am clerk to Messrs. Frampton. In consequence of suspicion I watched the prisoners, I saw Wright enter the warehouse and go to a cask of red Smyrna's or Turkey raisins, and take from the cask some of them and put them into his apron or in a scoop; he then went into the back yard where we roast the coffee and secreted them about his person.

THOMAS PINNER . I am a constable. I was sent for at Mr. Framptons warehouse, on the 16th of July. I searched Wright; in his hat and small clothes I found four pounds six ounces of coffee in a bag concealed in his breeches, and some loose raisins in his waistcoat pocket; upon Richard Clark in his hat and breeches three pounds twelve ounces of coffee, and some loose raisins in his waistcoat pocket.

Mr. Frampton. That is the coffee that was taken from them; I believe it to be our coffee.

Wright's Defence. I worked for Mr. Frampton between six and seven months. I had two days work and when I had done work I had about me what I should not have had.

Clark's Defence. I never worked but eleven days for Messrs. Framptons.

WRIGHT, GUILTY , aged 54.

CLARK, GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-23

847. WILLIAM FAZAKERLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of June , one printed bound book, value 4 l. one other printed bound book, called the Bible, value 4 l. and three other printed bound books, called Young's Works, value 2 l. the property of Robert Saunders , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT SAUNDERS . I am an auctioneer , Poets-gallery, Fleet-street . It is my house and premises; I have no partner; I cannot say exactly the day I lost the books; they were missed between the 3rd and the 7th of June; I missed this Bible bound in blue morocco, and Young's Works, large paper; they were missed from my premises; I do not know who took them.

THOMAS HODGES . I am clerk to Mr. Saunders. I can identify the Bible to be Mr. Saunder's property.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a pawnbroker. I took this Bible in of the prisoner, he pledged it on the 29th of May, for one pound fifteen shillings; I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I took the prisoner in custody, on the 8th of July, at the Auction-mart, Bartholomew-lane; I then went to his lodging in Cannon-street; I there found a quantity of duplicates for books. This is the duplicate for the Bible.

Hodges. That is my master's Bible.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing at all to say.

GUILTY, aged 50.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-24

848. JAMES COFFEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , six wineglasses, value 6 s. the property of James Underhill Mist .

JAMES UNDERHILL MIST . I live in Fleet-street ; I am a glass seller . On Saturday evening, the 31st of August last, I placed myself in a situation where I could see the prisoner, knowing that he would be sent into a room to look out goods for an order. When he had looked out the goods he took six wineglasses, and concealed them in his breeches and his waistcoat, he was sent out with the goods that he was desired to look out, into Holborn; after he had left my premises and gone into Shoe-lane I went out and desired him to return, which he did without any hesitation. In the mean time I had sent for a constable, and on the prisoner's return I accused him of having property of mine about his person; they were taken from him in the presence of one of my shopmen.

JAMES KEMELLER . I am a constable. I produce six wine-glasses.

Prosecutor. I can swear to their being my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been thirty years in London, and never was brought into a court of justice for dishonesty before.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-25

849. JOHN DENTON was indicted for that he, on the 13th of June , upon Catherine Denton, feloniously did make an assault, and that he, with a certain carving knife, her, the said Catherine Denton, in and upon her left arm, did strike, stab, thrust, and penetrate, thereby giving to her one mortal wound of the breadth of two inches, and depth of

four inches, and so the jurors say that you, the said John Denton, her, the said Catherine Denton , did ill and murder .

The prisoner also stood charged upon the coroner's inquisition.

ISAAC PUDDIFORD . Q. You knew the deceased Catherine Denton - A. Yes.

Q. On the 13th of June last, were you in her room - A. Yes; she lived in Bow-lane-buildings, in the parish of Bromley .

Q. What time in the evening was it - A. It might be between the hours of six and seven.

Q. Who was in the room when you went first - A. Nobody but Mrs. Denton and her daughter; her husband was dead; she was a widow .

Q. While you, and Mrs. Denton, and her daughter was in the room did the prisoner come into the room - A. He came into the room about seven o'clock. When he came into the room his right hand was in the breast of his waistcoat, and a bottle of liquor in the other hand. He sat the bottle upon the table.

Q. Did he sit down - A. I did not observe him sit down; I sat by the fire place; I am rather deaf; I could not hear what was said.

Q. Did Mrs. Denton give you any gin - A. We had a friend come in before the prisoner came in she drank some and I drank some.

Q. Did any conversation take place between the prisoner and Mrs. Denton - A. There might be, if there was I did not hear it. Mrs. Denton was in the corner against the clock; I saw the prisoner look very stedfast at her, and then he rushed against her; she screamed, and the blood flew into the corner; I saw the knife when his hand drew from her.

Q. Was it bloody - A. I did not take notice. The woman ran out directly screaming, the daughter took hold of her: I jumped up instantly and catched hold of the prisoner by the wrist; I said for God Almighty sake, Denton, what have you been doing; he made no answer; I made my escape out of the house, and left him in the house; he was shortly after secured. I ran to Mrs. Denton at the top of the lane, about forty-yards off.

Q. How long did she live after this - A. Until the 13th of July. She died in her own house.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. You had known Denton and the deceased a long time - A. Yes, some years.

Q. You knew there was a great intimacy between them, did not you - A. I cannot say that I did.

Q. This was Bow fair time this affray happened - A. Yes.

Q. The mother and daughter lived together - A. Yes.

Q. When Denton came in he had some liquor in his hand - A. Yes; he did not offer it to any one, he sat it on the table.

Q. You saw the woman after she was wounded - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Denton make the same attempt upon himself - A. It was in my absence if he did.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He was working in the homeward bound dock .

Q. What are you - A. I am a foreman lumper. I work on board ships and warehouses.

Q. You saw the deceased between the time of her receiving this wound and her dying - A. Yes, I did; she was at her own house, and continued there till she died.

MARY ANN DENTON . Q. The deceased Mrs. Denton was your mother was she not - A. She was.

Q. The prisoner and your mother for some months had been very intimate - A. No further than coming to and fro the house, as his sister was my mother's acquaintance.

Q. They had become very much acquainted - A. Yes.

Q. On the 13th of June, in the morning, had your mother expressed any displeasure to him - A. Not as I know of; he was there in the morning, he went away, and come again in the evening, then Mr. Puddiford was there; he came with a bottle in his hand, he offered the bottle to my mother when he came down again; she refused taking it.

Q. Did not your mother give Puddiford any - A. Yes, I brought in a quartern of gin, my mother gave Puddiford a glass. When the prisoner came in he said something to my mother; the words I cannot repeat. My mother told him to go out of her house, for he was a disgrace to his sex, while my mother was winding up the clock. He said, what am I, a disgrace? My mother said, yes, you are. As soon as she said that he ran up to her. I did not perceive the knife until I saw him draw it out of her arm. Then my mother ran to the top of the alley. I held Denton by the right hand while he had the knife in his right hand. He shifted the knife into his left hand. My mother ran to the neighbours for assistance.

Q. How long did your mother live - A. A month, sir. On that day month she died.

Q. You say he had been there the fore part of the day, and there was some difference - A. Yes; he struck a woman of the name of Whitehead; my mother went up to him and told him he ought to be ashamed of striking a woman; then he turned round and hit my mother, I believe on her arm. She desired him to go away. Mrs. Whitehead came into the room; he followed her home. My mother told him not to strike a woman, and told him to go away.

JARVIS DOUBLEDAY . I am a constable. I produce the knife.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mary Ann Denton. Does that knife belong to you - A. No, it belongs to his sister.

Mr. Adolphus. You are the daughter of the deceased - A. Yes. I lived in the house.

Q. Her husband who was dead his name was John Denton also - A. Yes.

Q. Since the death of her husband, this John Denton and she have been together a good deal - A. Yes; no more than usually, sir. I did not see that he made more free with the house than before.

Q. John Denton was your father - A. Yes.

Q. Your father died at sea. He had been at sea a considerable time and your mother had claim to a pension - A. Yes. It was not settled.

Q. Upon this day there had been some words in the morning; you had been to Bow fair the night before - A. Yes.

Q. When the prisoner came in, whatever words there had been in the morning, he came in with liquor in his hand - A. Yes; he offered the bottle to my mother.

Q. With a view to settle all differences, had you any doubt about that - A. No, I had not.

Q. And she refused to drink with him, and drank with Puddiford - A. Yes.

Q. He started up and did the deed in a moment - A. No, he sat down in the arm chair. While my mother was drawing the weight of the clock up he said am I a disgrace to my sex?

Q. Your mother said, yes; he jumped up directly - A. Yes.

Q. What did he do to himself afterwards - A. I don't know, I went out immediately.

Q. Had you observed his conduct before - A. No.

Q. to Doubleday. Upon the alarm of this violence, did you take up the prisoner - A. I did, at my sister's dwelling house. This knife was given to me as soon as I got there; I asked the prisoner how he came to be guilty of that rash act; he said it was love. I do not recollect any thing else being confessed; when I took him in custody I found him laying on the floor, he seemed in a melancholy way at the time.

Mr. Adolphus. Had he made any attempt on himself - A. He had a slight wound on his side. This knife was given to me in a bloody state.

FRANCIS HENRY BEAL . I am a surgeon. I attended the unfortunate woman until the time of her death. The wound in her arm was about two inches in length, and four inches in depth; it was inflicted by a sharp instrument; it had nearly divided the arteries; that was the occasion of a great effusion of blood; she died of a mortification from that wound and the great loss of blood from the part. In consequence of the disease of the part I attended her until the time of her death; the wound in the side was not the cause of her death.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. Another person was called in before you - A. Yes, there was; I found the prisoner laying in the front room, with a wound on the left side, it was only a superficial wound. I went to the deceased, I found her in an exhausted state, it must be a period, from my seeing her from the time of the accident. It was the principal artery that nourished the arm; I never knew that artery to be wounded in a less degree but what it was fatal.

GEORGE HARRING . I am a pensioner in Greenwich College.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I knew him when he served on board the Indefatigable; I sailed with him five years; he belonged to the gunners crew; he had a wound in his head before he served there; he was a very good character; he was taken with a lightness in his head very often, he was then confined and put in irons; when the freek was on him he was completely mad, and then they lashed him to his hammock; at other times when this freak was not on him he was a quiet man.

Q. Perhaps these times when he was mad was when he had too much grog - A. No, when he had no grog; this was five years ago.

JOSEPH ROBINS . The prisoner was a messmate of mine in the Indefatigable five years; he was subject to freaks, running about like a wild man; I have taken two or three turns in lashing him in bed, or else he would have killed all the birth if we had not confined him; we were obliged to confine him when these freaks were on him.

JAMES FITZGERALD . I was ships corporal on board the Royal George. While the prisoner was on board his character was very good, only at certain times he was taken with a lightness in his head; the cause was he fell down the main hatchway, and got his scull fractured; that caused him to be wild and mad; once he jumped over board off the gangway; the captain put him in irons; on the next day he had him brought up and was going to flog him, he found out he was in this state, he gave him his liberty; he then cautioned the ship's company never to agitate him any more; he was reckoned a good man in the ship as could be, only when these freaks took him. I and he, and the whole ship's company were discharged together; he was discharged twelve years ago; about four years after I saw him he was much the same, and looked wild in his eyes.

Mr. Gurney. Did he talk rational - A. Yes, he did.

ELLEN STARLEY . I am sister to the prisoner. Since he has been discharged from the Navy he has resided with me; I am a married woman; I live in Bow-lane-buildings. He has frequently been outrageous; I have not been able to live in the house with him; I have been obliged to hide the knives out of his way. He was particularly so at the time of the full moon; he was light headed and mad frequently.

Q. Do you remember the day this affair happened between him and Mrs. Denton - A. Yes, that morning he came in and struck me with his hand more than once; Mrs. Whitehead was there at the time, Mrs. Whitehead bid him beat me more until I gave him some money; he struck her.

Q. Do you know on what terms he lived with the deceased before this affair happened - A. He was particularly fond of her; she has frequently fetched him out of my house to go home to sleep with her; he was so fond of her that he did not follow his employ after he got in liege with her.

Q. What was his employment - A. He worked in the East India Docks as a labourer, and sometimes at rigging. I saw the deceased after this accident; I was with her ten minutes before she died; she did not speak to me. On the Thursday before I had some conversation with her, she did not at that time think she should die. On the 26th of December I went to market a little way from our house, I was not gone above twenty minutes from the house; when I came back he was suspended to the bed by an apron of mine; he had slit it down; it was tied round his neck.

Q. Was he suffered to walk about - A. Yes, and he had his wages; he gave me his money, and I laid it out for him. I never consulted any medical man upon him. I had it not in my power.

JOHN GRAY . I am a shipwright; I live in Cottage-street, No. 8. I have known the prisoner

about six months; I never saw any thing of him but a peaceful man. On Sunday I saw him near the East India gate with a quart pot in his hand; it was near twelve o'clock in the day I was making towards him to speak to him; he was looking in the quart pot, he dropped it down, he looked up at the sky, and away he ran.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-26

850. JOHN SYLVESTER was indicted for that he, on the 20th of June , feloniously did make an assault upon Richard Gunning , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, four 5 l. bank notes, his property .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the like bank notes.

RICHARD GUNNING . I am a hatter ; I live at 266, in Oxford-street.

Q. On the 20th of June last were you out - A. Yes; on my return to my house about twelve o'clock, I was going from the upper part of Wimpole-street to my house, through Millhill-mews ; I had occasion to make water; I turned to the wall for that purpose under a gateway; while I was doing that the prisoner crossed upon me with his breeches unbuttoned, he turned round and collared me and said, why do you handle my private parts.

Q. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, had you touched him, or his private parts - A. No, I had not gone near him; he might have touched the back of my hand by rubbing against me; I had not gone to him, he came to me; he said why will you handle my private parts; I said, I touch your private parts. He said yes, and I'll make you know it; he look hold of my collar. I resisted; I said you have not a blackguard to deal with, I will give you my address; on which I gave him my card; on receiving the card he held his hand on my collar, and looked on the card. I told him if he was not satisfied with that, he might watch me home; he would see me let myself in with my own key, which I had in my pocket, that he would not be deceived where to find me. He then said you are an opulent tradesman, twenty pound will not be an object to you; I must have that sum, or I'll expose you, and you'll be pillored. Upon this I proceeded towards my own house. He had hold of the sleeve of my coath; e went with me, and insisted upon the money being paid, or he would carry his threat into execution. I felt myself greatly terrified at that, saying, I believed I had not twenty pound in the house; would not ten pound or less do. He went home with me, and followed me into the house.

Q. What servant had you in the house - A. Only my female servant in the house, that servant was gone to bed. I let him into my house; I remonstrated with him; he insisted in it, that he would swear the charge against me if I did not give him twenty pound, no less sum would he take. I went to my drawer, and took out my pocket-book; I then thought I had done wrong by letting such a man into my house; I went into the passage and took out the money to give him; I took out four five-pound Bank of England notes; I gave them him instantly; when he had got the money he immediately made way to the door; he went out; he told me I never should hear from him again, he was going to sea, or abroad; he was going out of the country. This was on Sunday, the 20th of June. On Monday, the 21st of June, I was going through Saville-row, I believe about five o'clock in the afternoon, I passed the prisoner, he was with an old man; upon passing him the prisoner followed me, he put his hand on my shoulder; he said, do you know me; I said, no; at that instant I did not recollect him. Upon my saying no, he said, do you recollect on the Sunday night how you gave me your address; I then said you are the man that extorted twenty pound from me; on that he went up to the old man, he said father this is the man that I spoke to you about; the old man then came close to me, he said sir, (in the hearing of the prisoner,) this is my son, but he is a d - d rascal, I want to send him to sea, and from what he has told me about you, you will not have any hesitation to assist me; I have not money to send him; we will go into some house sir, and have a bottle of wine, and talk this matter over. I excused myself going into any house with them, saying, I had not time, I would, meet them on the Wednesday; we appointed to meet on the Wednesday morning, at the Cumberland Arms, in Oxford-street, nearly opposite of my own house.

Q. Against the Wednesday did you provide yourself with a Bow-street officer - A. I went immediately to Dyer's-buildings, to Mr. Townes, my attorney.

Q. Did you in point of fact get a Bow-street officer - A. Yes; I kept my appointment, and was there five minutes before them; I saw the old man come in after me, and called for a glass of beer at the bar; the prisoner came in about five minutes after. I sat myself down between them in the parlour; Adkins, the officer, was in the same room; Adkins and I were not seen to go into the room in company together. Then I being with these two men, I said, now gentlemen, what do you want with me; I said I understand on Monday you wanted more money, I can muster ten pound more to the twenty you have already had of me, and looked at the young man. The old man said, no, sir, if you give money it must be your own voluntary act. I perceived the old man's eyes to be particularly upon Adkins. The old man said, I want your interest; I know your interest is great; I want you to get my son out to sea, as I told you before, I want you to get a captain for him to get him out; I said I know no captain, all I can do, is to give you ten pound to the twenty pound you have already had. I got up and said Mr. Adkins that is the man, take him into custody; Mr. Adkins took the prisoner into custody, and I called a coach; upon this the old man went to the door, and said, what is all this about; when he saw Adkins push him into the coach, Adkins said to the old man you must go with us; the old man said no, I must go to get some men to come and speak in behalf of my son's character. I have never seen him since.

Q. At the time that you parted with these five-pound

notes under what impression did you do it - A. Under fear from a threat of a rascal, who had no hesitation in swearing any thing; I did it for fear that he would swear that abominable thing that he charged me with.

Mr. Adolphus. Where had you been on the 20th of June - A. I was walking in the afternoon with some friends over Westminster-bridge, and then after that I called on Mr. Roberts; finding that it was earlier than twelve o'clock I went into the Rose public-house, in Wimpole-street, looked at the paper, and had a pint of porter.

Q. You then went in your way home through Mill-hill-mews - A. It was my nearest way home.

Q. Had you seen any body at the Rose public-house that you knew - A. No; I am not in the habit of frequenting public-house, unless to see the paper.

Q. What sort of a night, was it a light night - A. Not moon light, but cloudy.

Q. Mill-hill-mews, is that a light place - A. No, it is a dark place; it was light enough to see to read the name on the card; he held it up as though he read it.

Q. How far is Mill-hill-mews from your house - A. Perhaps five or six hundred yards; it may be near a quarter a mile; I think it is less than half a mile

Q. This man walked with you, holding you by the sleeve to your house at twelve o'clock at night. How many watchman did you pass - A. Not one, I believe.

Q. There is a watchhouse there for the inhabitants of Marybone - A. There may be. In my way home I do not recollect meeting a single watchman; my fears and terrors were great; I do not know that I met one single person.

HARRY ADKINS . I am a Bow-street officer.

Q. Did you by the desire of the prosecuter, go to the Cumberland Arms - A. By the desire of Mr. Read, the Magistrate, I did at the instance of the prosecutor. I got into the house first, after I was in the prosecutor came in, the prisoner came in, and an old man.

Q. After they were all in the room did you bear any part of the conversation - A. I did; there was a conversation about the young man going to sea in a faint voice by the old man; Mr. Gunning said, I understand that money was your object, I have mustered up ten pound, and that with the twenty pound you have already had if that will do I will give you that; Mr. Gunning appeared to be holding a note in his hand, in his waistcoat pocket. The old man's eyes were fixed on me. The prosecutor got up and said that is the man who obtained the twenty pound; I told the prisoner who I was, and took him in custody The old man said this now must be settled before the magistrate; I asked the old man to go with me; he said, he would go and get persons to speak in his son's character; he would be down there as soon as me. I have never seen him since.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge that is alleged against me. I never demanded a farthing of the man in my life; he never gave me any money at all.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-27

851. ELIZABETH WATERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of September , three yards of lace, value 15 s. the property of George Brown .

THOMAS WEST . I am shopman to George Brown ; he is a silk mercer . On the 3rd of September, the prisoner came into my master's shop, looked at some lace, and while I was measuring a piece of lace I saw her take a piece of lace off the counter. She went off with it.

RICHARD WILSON . I took the prisoner in custody. This lace laid on the floor in the shop.

Thomas West . I saw her take it and chuck it behind her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-28

852. JOHN OATS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , two sides of veal, value 6 l. the property of Thomas Coates

THOMAS COATES . I am a salesman . I lost two sides of veal from Smithfield , on the 14th of August, I believe they were hanging at Mrs. George's butcher's-shop in Smithfield-market; I bought the celves in Smithfield; I agreed to give her two shillings and sixpence for slaughtering; she was to deliver them at Newgate-market the next morning to the shop where I sell them; I am a salesman. Her man brought two, and when he went back for the third he came and said they were lost.

THOMAS WESTON . I am servant to Mr. Boyce, salesman, in Newgate-market. On the 14th of August, William Thorowgood brought a side of veal to Mr. Boyce, he said he had another side to bring from Mr. King's; he asked me if I would fetch it from Mr. King's, the next door; I said no, I had not time to fetch it, and while I was gone to hook some meet Thorowgood brought the other side of veal; Mr. Boyce asked me whose calf it was; I said I did not know; I knew the young man who brought it. I described the young man; he was taken in custody.

WILLIAM THOROWGOOD . I am a butcher. The veal was given to me to take to Newgate-market by John Oats .

Q. What is John Oats - A. He is a butcher by trade; I was to carry it from Fleet-market to Mr. King's shop, Newgate-market, next door to Mr. Boyce I took it to Mr. King's shop; I was hanging it up, he told me to take it away; I then took it to Mr. Boyce; I went back to Fleet-market, and then I was taken in custody.

Q. to Proscutor. How these sides of veal were taken away from Mrs. George's shop you do not know, do you - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-29

853. PHILIP EDWARD HITCHCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , thirty-five yards of cloth, value 20 l. and one pair of boots, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of Thomas Humphries .

THOMAS HUMPHRIES . I am an agent and broker .

Q. When did you lose this cloth - A. It has been lost since May; it was stolen from my house in Broad-street . The wife of the prisoner has had the care of that house for the last two years. The house is mine. I pay the prisoner's wife for taking care of the house, and allow her part of the house to live in, and during the period of two years it has been repeatedly robbed, and for the last three weeks I have not been able to trace it to anybody but the prisoner. I lost a pair of new boots and thirty-five yards of black superfine cloth.

Q. I suppose the prisoner kept company with his wife - A. He resided with her; he was allowed to be with her. How I came to discover the prisoner was the thief some duplicates were brought to me by the prisoner's master; he is an attorney, in Holborn-court.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a writer ; he wrote for him. I saw the name on the duplicates. I discovered the boots were mine, and some of my cloth I found at Mr. Furse's, the pawnbroker, London Wall.

GEORGE BARBER . I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 70, London Wall. On the 4th of June I took in these boots of the prisoner; I lent him twelve shillings upon them, and on the 21st of May a remnant of broad cloth for ten shillings, and on the 11th of August another remnant of broad cloth, ten shillings.

Q. What colour was the cloth - A. Black. I took them in of the prisoner, I am sure of that. These are the boots, and this is the cloth.

Prosecutor. The boots and the cloth are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The cloth was given to me by a near relation, too near to mention.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-30

890. HUGH TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a watch, value 2 l. a watch-chain, value 2 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. the property of John Gillingwater .

JOHN GILLINGWATER . I am a serjeant in the 15th regiment of Hussars . On the 6th of September I had to attend Bartholomew fair to enlist recruits, which induced me to stop to a late hour. In the evening I went to the sign of the Bull in Cow-lane , where I remained till four o'clock of the morning of the 7th. After I drank in company I came down stairs in company with the serjeant of the 18th Hussars and four privates, and hearing a noise in the parlour where there were more than twenty people, it induced me to go into the room to see whether there was a man that would wish to engage with me. On my entering the room there were four coal porters; one of them asked me whether I was not a Don Cossack; I said I belonged to the 15th Hussars; they asked me if I thought they would do for recruits. I said I should be glad to take such fine men as them, and as I was going to the door I found the prisoner had got hold of my watch-chain and seals. I felt the watch go from my pocket. I seized the prisoner, took the watch from him, and pulled him into the room by force. Immediately the company arose in a disturbance; they said I was not robbed. I persisted that I was. The prisoner went and concealed himself at the upper end of the room; he was there five minutes. A man got upon the top of the chair or stool, he said, you scoundrel, how dare you say you have been robbed; do you know who robbed you; am I the person? I said, no. I went to the upper end of the room, and discovered the prisoner under the table. I gave charge of the prisoner, and surrendered my watch to the constable. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOHN ABRAHAM CLARK . I saw the prisoner making his escape out of the room. I stopped him, and would not let him go out of the room.

THOMAS CHESTERMAN . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in custody of the serjeant, at the Bull. They endeavoured to rescue the prisoner as I took him to the Compter. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I had an holliday to go to the fair. I am innocent of taking his watch.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-31

855. JOHN LARY was indicted for that he, on the 29th of August , in and upon James Folcher did make an assault, and that he in a forcible manner demanded the monies of him the said James Folcher , with intent the monies of the said James Folcher to take and carry away .

JAMES FOLCHER . I am in the post-chaise line . On the 29th of August, about one o'clock in the night, I was walking in London Wall , the prisoner followed me; he took hold of me, said he had no money at all, money he wanted, and money he would have. Before I could give him an answer he fastened on my throat, he struck my feet from under me; he was endeavouring to pick my pocket with his other hand. The watchman was coming forward; the prisoner got up and went off.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes. When he demanded my money I looked very hard at him. I can swear to the prisoner; he was taken in a very few minutes.

JOHN FIELD . I am a patrol in Broker-row, Moorfields. About a quarter after one on the 29th I heard the cry of murder in London Wall. I saw the prisoner running towards me, and as he came near me I drove my elbow into his side and threw him down. The watchman came up and assisted me; the prosecutor then came up; he said the prisoner was the man, he would swear to him. The prisoner was searched at the watchhouse; nothing was found on him but a cork screw and a knife.

JOHN LANE . I am a watchman. About a quarter after one on the 29th of August I heard the cry of murder. I ran towards the place whence I heard the cry; I saw the prosecutor; he said a man had seized him by the throat; he told me which way he was gone. I saw the prisoner and the patrol both in the kennel. The patrol was on him.

JOHN BARNET . I was officer of the night. I searched the prisoner in the watchhouse; I found on him an old cork-screw and a pen-knife.

Prisoner's Defence. I am taken at a nonplus. I never saw the prosecutor until he swore against me. Is it likely that I would go a robbing within a few doors of my own lodging.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-32

856. THOMAS OAKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , from the person of John M'Ritchie , fifty 1 l. bank-notes, his property .

JOHN M'RITCHIE. I am a navigator in the Prince Regent's park . On the 29th of August I had been up all the over night. Coming home between four and five in the morning I met with a gentleman that I owed some money to. I said if he would stop at the public-house I would go home, fetch the money, and pay him. I paid him, and I had fifty one-pound notes over in my pocket; and after parting with him the prisoner, Thomas Oakley , asked me to drink with him. I told him that I did not know him. He said he had wrought many a day with me at the East India dock. I sat down and drank with him, and having some drink the over night I fell asleep alongside of him. I stopped all day with Oakley at the public-house; at night my wife and a friend fetched me home. I was not sober when they fetched me home. The next morning I missed my bundle of notes. It was in a bundle as it came from the Bank.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On Monday the 30th of August I received private information that the prisoner was shewing a great number of notes; it was strongly suspected that he had stolen them. I went to the Roebuck public-house, Mill-bank ; I found the prisoner there sleeping on one of the benches outside of the door. I took him in the house and searched him; I found five one-pound notes in his breeches pocket, and four watches, and some silver. I then took him to Tothill-fields bridewell. In the jail I again searched him, and in the lining of his waistcoat I found thirty-one pounds more in one-pound bank notes. They are nearly following numbers. These are the notes. I asked him how he came by the notes; he told me they were from his hard earnings; he had been down in Lincolnshire. The notes are all dated the 9th of August. He told me where he had bought the watches. I went to the house where he told me in Moorfields; I found he had bought them with one pound notes. I advertised the notes; Mr. M'Ritchie came forward and owned them.

Prosecutor. These are the notes that I received from Mr. Mackintosh's clerk on the Saturday night. They are the same numbers and the same notes, all of them.

ANN M'RITCHIE . I am the wife of John M'Ritchie. I went to fetch my husband home. I am quite sure the the prisoner was in the public-house when I took my husband away.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-33

857. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , one pound eight ounces weight of tea, value 7 s. the property of the East India Company .

WALTER SALTER . I am an Excise officer. On the 15th of July I was stationed at the East India dock . The prisoner was working there. Upon searching him; I found upon him a pound of tea concealed in a bag in his breeches. Upon my finding this bag of tea in his breeches he said he was sorry it happened. I gave the prisoner in charge of Mr. Over. Mr. Brooks came to him. I did not see any thing that was found afterwards. The bag appears to be a new bag; I don't think it has been used before. The company had tea there where the prisoner was employed.

RICHARD OVER . I am a Thames police officer. On the 15th of July the prisoner was given into my charge by the last witness. I said I was sorry to see him in such a situation. He said he had been working on board the Cumberland, East Indiaman. He said it was a new bag; it was the first offence.

THOMAS BROOKS . I am superintendant on the part of the East India Company, at their dock. The property in question is their property, and it was taken from their dock. I saw the prisoner in the Exciseman's office. On my seeing this bag I thought it was a systematick proceeding. I took the prisoner's hat; I found this bag; it went round the prisoner's hat. I then told the prisoner this seemed to be a systematick plan. The prisoner said it was the first time he had been persuaded by a man at Camberwell, a tailor, who had made these things. He said he got the tea from the Cumberland. I have seen the chests on board the Cumberland. I found a great number of the chests had been plundered of this tea.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-34

858. RICHARD RAWLINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , six pounds weight of tea, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

THOMAS ROOT . On the 21st of August last I was working in the East India dock . I had occasion to go to the privy at the dock. I found it occupied. I waited some considerable time. After the person left it I went in and discovered some loose tea on the seat. I looked under the privy, and on the side under the seat was a gimblet, upon that gimblet hung two bags of tea. I went to Mr. Murdock and gave the information. I took the gimblet out and carried the bags of tea into the office. I examined the bags; one of the bags I am positive to be the same. After Mr. Murdock and Captain Saunders had examined them I hung them in the same place upon the gimblet again. I have not seen the bags since.

Mr. Arabin. Did you see the man that was in the privy come out - A. I did, that was not the prisoner.

Q. You do not know how long the tea had been concealed in the premises - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. Did you leave the scattered tea there - A. No, I swept it away, and hung up the bags again.

RICHARD OVER . I am a Thames police officer. On the 21st of August I watched this privy; I observed the prisoner go there. I saw him come out of the privy and go into the caravan shed. I searched him before he went out of the dock; about an hour after I searched him upon his coming out; his nose-bags were hanging on the shafts of the waggon, and these three bags of tea in it, and some hay on the top. The bags contained six pounds of green tea. I asked the prisoner how he came by it; he said he found it in the privy, and he wished to God that he had left it. He said the first time he saw it in the privy he was afraid of taking it for fear of being detected with it, but the second time he was determined to take it; and the first time he saw it there was only two bags, the second time there were three bags; he then took it; he was going out of the dock with it if I had not stopped him.

Root. This is the bag I am positive to that was on the gimblet; which of these two I am not positive. I only saw two bags.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-35

859. JAMES COOPER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Wells , about the hour of three in the night of the 21st of August , and burglariously stealing therein six gowns, value 30 s. eight frocks, value 1 l. three shifts, value 3 s. five pinafores, value 7 s. three caps, value 9 s. four bed-gowns, value 6 s. a child's flannel, value 1 s. three petticoats, value 2 s. six children's petticoats, value 8 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. two yards of Irish cloth, value 5 s. two aprons, value 3 s. three pillow-cases, value 4 s. five towels, value 2 s. 6 d. a tablecloth, value 3 s. a shawl, value 2 s. a looking-glass, value 10 s. ten waiscoats, value 1 l. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a set of bed furniture, value 20 s. three shirts, value 3 s. fifty pounds weight of bacon, value 50 s. the property of Thomas Wells . And ELIZABETH COOPER , for receiving the said goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS WELLS . I live at 32, Goswell-street, St. Luke's . My house was broken open in August last. I was the last person up; I fastened the doors and the windows; I went to bed about one o'clock. On the Sunday morning I was the first that came down stairs about half after eight; I found my street door open. On the night before I left it locked and bolted, and the key in it.

Q. Did you lose any property - A. Yes; part of it is here.

MARY ANN WELLS . I am the wife of Thomas Wells .

Q. What do you know about this matter - A. We found the window open in the morning, and the drawers were open and the property gone.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I produce an apron; I got it in the prisoner's room, a two pair of stairs room, Draper's-place, Old-street.

Q. Did the prisoner tell you how he came by it - A. No.

Q. to Prosecutrix. When did you see the property the last time before you missed it - A. On the Saturday evening it was in the drawer in the parlour.

Q. Look at the property, is that yours - A. The apron is mine, and the three handkerchiefs are mine. They are my own work.

Mr. Arabin. What was the day they were taken - A. The 21st.

Prince. The day the prisoner was taken was the 26th.

THOMAS SIER . I am an officer of St. Luke's. In the drawer of the prisoner's apartment I found a book containing duplicates

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a servant to Messrs. Lucock and Pratt, pawnbrokers, Whitecross-street. I produce a gown pledged on the 25th of August by the prisoner's wife.

James Cooper's Defence. The prosecutrix could not swear to the property when I was taken to Worship-street office.

JAMES COOPER , GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of the burglary

ELIZABETH COOPER , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

860. JAMES COOPER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Kempster , about the hour of five in the forenoon on the 15th of June , Harriet his wife being therein, and stealing therein, a shawl, value 1 l. the property of William Kempster .

HARRIET KEMPSTER . My husband is a warehouseman . I live at 62, Grove-place .

Q. In June last was any thing done to your back parlour in that house - A. In the night when I went to bed the window was whole of the back parlour, and just before six o'clock I got up; the window was open, and my shawl was taken away. The window was shut when I went to bed. There was a little hole cut in the window big enough to put something in to move the fastening that fastened it down. I missed my shawl from off the line. I had seen my shawl the night before; it was wet; I hung it upon the line when I went to bed.

Q. What was the value of the shawl - A. It cost me a pound when new; it was worth six shillings and sixpence.

Q. Was there any mark upon it that you should know it - A. There was some oil upon it.

JAMES WALTER . I am shopman to Mrs. Fothergill, a pawnbroker, No. 106, Aldersgate-street. This shawl was pledged on the 15th of June, in the name of John Foster , for six shillings and sixpence.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, James Cooper - A. Yes, I have seen him before; I cannot say that he pawned it. I gave the person that pledged it a duplicate.

Q. Should you know that duplicate again - A. Yes.

THOMAS SIER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodging; he said it was his apartment. I

found thirty duplicates there in the top little drawer of a chest of drawers in his room.

Q. to Walter. See whether that is the duplicate you gave the person that pawned it - A. Yes, it is.

Prosecutrix. It is my shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the ticket of a young man. I gave three shillings for the duplicate. The young man is at sea.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-36

861. BARNET LEVY and HENRY ABRAHAMS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Robinson , in the King's highway, on the 3d of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch seal, value 2 l. and a watch-key, value 1 s. his property .

JOHN ROBINSON . I was robbed on Monday the 3d of this month, about nine o'clock in the evening.

Q. What are you - A. I was a baker formerly; I am in no business now. I am an officer in the court of Requests . I was going home along Brick-lane, Spitalfields ; I live in Booth-street, Spitalfields. I had occasion to turn round Mr. Bullwinkle's shop, and in returning back five or six persons met me round the corner; Barnet Levy caught hold of me by the throat; he hit me by the throat and nearly strangled me; whether it was his elbow or fist I am not able to say; he then caught hold of my watch seal; he took my seal and chain from my watch, and key; he broke the pendant off, and ran away I called stop thief, and ran after him. I ran about one hundred and fifty yards; Abrahams then came and hit me at the back of my neck, and another person struck me against the wall. I was then nearly in the act of taking Levy, with that I stopped. A young man came up, and said, do not pursue them, you will be murdered. I did not see the prisoners after until the Wednesday following; I then saw them at Lambeth-street office; Levy and Abrahams both. I knew both the prisoners before from children. Abrahams' father lived right opposite of me in Houndsditch when I was a baker, and the other I have known for thirteen or fourteen years. I have known Abrahams fifteen years and upwards.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the Monday following I apprehended Levy. I know nothing of the transaction.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

COURT. Q. to prosecutor. You have known these two men, what do you say to their character - A. For this last three or four years they have been reputed thieves.

MOSES LEVY . I am the father of Barnet Levy; I sell goods about the country. Last Friday fortnight, in the evening, a young man came and said Mr. Johnson had got an execution against me and my house, so that I could not go out of town; that very night I gave my son supper. Barnet Levy, my son, was at my house a quarter after seven; he staid with me until almost ten o'clock. It was last Friday fortnight.

COURT. How many are you in family - A. My wife, three sons, and two daughters.

Q. Are they grown up - A. There was nobody at home but my wife, me, and him. My family are all grown up.

Prosecutor. On Saturday last this witness came into the court of Requests, and desired to speak with Mr. Johnson; he came and said to me, here are two fine gold seals, you will have a gold chain to match it if you will make a flaw in the indictment. I said, I would not do it.

Q. to Miller. Look at this paper; do you know the magistrate's hand-writing - A. Yes; that is the writing of Daniel Williams , the magistrate.

COURT.

"Levy saith, it is of no use to say any thing here. The prisoner, Abrahams, saith, I was not out of my house that night"

LEVY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

ABRAHAMS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-37

862. SARAH STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Freeman , two dollars, value 11 s. three bank tokens, value 9 s. and a 1 l. bank note, her property .

ELIZABETH FREEMAN . I am a single woman ; I live in Ebenezer-street, City-road . Sarah Stevens lodged in my house; her husband's name is William Stevens ; they lodged in the first floor.

Q. Where do you sleep - A. In the back parlour below.

Q. On the evening of the 9th of August were you going out - A. Yes.

Q. Did you put any thing by before when you went out - A. Yes, a one-pound note, two bank dollars, and three three-shilling bank tokens. I put them in the looking-glass drawer in the room. The prisoner was in the room; she saw where I put them, and she went out with me, and she returned first. I did not go to that drawer again until the next morning, about half after nine o'clock. The servant was in the room at the time that I missed it. The prisoner was called; I told her what had happened; she said she knew nothing at all of it. I sent for an officer; his name is Kennedy.

Q. Have you seen any three-shilling token since - A. Yes, I saw them on the 10th; I know that three-shilling piece.

Q. Was the prisoner taken up and searched in your presence - A. Yes, she was, and two dollars and a one pound note was found in her bosom. The three-shilling tokens were found first on her bed.

Q. At the time that they were found did you know the note and one of the tokens - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was Elizabeth Wilson there - A. She was.

ELIZABETH WILSON . I live at No. 8, in Monmouth-street, City-road. I went with Mrs. Freeman to get an officer, and then I went with the officer to Mrs. Freeman's house. The prisoner was charged with this; she said that she had three three-shilling pieces given to her. She said that she had not taken any thing from Mrs. Freeman. Mrs. Freeman, she, and I, went into her bed-room; she unlaced her stays, and took a paper from her bosom. She gave me the paper that came from her stays. I gave it

to the officer; he opened it, in it was a one-pound note, and two dollars; the three three-shilling pieces were laying on the bed.

MARY ROSE . I am servant to Mrs. Freeman.

Q. On the 10th of August was a note shewn you - A I saw my mistress put the money in the looking-glass-drawer; the prisoner was in the room at the time.

Q. Did you take any notice of the note - A. Not then; on Monday morning I did. I saw the note laying on the drawer; I took it up; the note was marked July 14, and it was torn at the right hand corner.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody on the 10th of August; after the prisoner denied the charge I told her I must search her, as I had got the charge; she said that she had no pockets; she said she had three three-shillings pieces in her hand; she said she had no other money about her or in her bed-room. She put the three three-shilling pieces into my hand; she said she got them of a friend that slept with her the last night; I laid them on the bed. She denied having any more money; Mrs. Wilson insisted upon her being searched and stripped naked. I stepped out of the room; I heard Wilson exclaim, here is the money. She gave me a paper; I went into the room and asked the prisoner was this money found upon you; she said it was, but it was not Mrs. Freeman's. I produce the one-pound note, two dollars, and three three-shilling pieces.

Prosecutrix. It is my note, I know it by a small bit being torn out of it, and it being dated July 14th and one of the three-shilling pieces is marked with a T. I had observed that before.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing to the value of 23 s. only .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-38

863. SAMUEL M'CRAE and JAMES WOODLAND were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , in the dwelling-house of Alice Wheeler , a coat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a pair of boots, value 5 s. a silver pint mug, value 2 l. two guineas, two shillings, and sixpence, in monies numbered, two 20 l. bank notes, a 25 l. bank note. two 5 l. bank notes, and three 1 l. bank notes, the property of John Hammond .

JOHN HAMMOND . I am a servant to Lord Aylesbury . I came to town near three weeks before this happened; this happened on the 22nd of July.

Q. Did you meet the prisoners any where - A. I was enquiring for a lodging in the street, in Whitechapel near about twelve o'clock at night. I happened to meet with a friend and stopped too long with him; I was the worse for liquor.

Q. Where did you meet with the prisoners - A. In Whitechapel, near about twelve o'clock at night; I asked the watchman where I could get a lodging, they heard me, they were by; they said they could get a lodging, they took me to a place near Dillon's-court ; I got a lodging and went to bed there; I awoke about three o'clock in the morning, I missed all my clothes, except a pair of stockings, and a shirt; I had two twenty-pound notes, a twenty-five-pound note, two five-pound bank notes, three one-pound notes, all bank notes, and two guineas in gold.

Q. The number of the three large notes, the two twenty-pound and the twenty-five-pound note, did you take the number of the notes before you were robbed - A. After I was robbed I went to the bankers I took them of.

Q. That will not do; is there any mark upon them independant of the numbers you should know them - A. Yes; the mark over May, there is a kind of an impression on the paper that I had observed before I had lost them. It was over the letter M in May. The prisoners are the persons that shewed me the lodgings.

Q. When did you see them afterwards - A. I saw them the next morning, about ten o'clock at Lambeth-street.

Mr. Arabin. On that evening you fell in with your friends - A. Yes.

Q. You were very fresh indeed - A. No, I was not.

Q. How long had you been drinking - A. About two hours.

Q. What sort of friends were they - A. Men. I had my notes in my hand when I went to bed.

Q. Were you sober enough to know that - A. Yes, I was, because I looked at them; I went to the Bank and ordered them to stop the three large notes.

LUKE SEVERN . I am an officer. I apprehended M'Crae; they were both together at the time. I apprehended him in the Commercial-road, about three quarter of a mile from Dillon's-court; the prisoners were searched in my presence; they was found upon M'Crae the twenty-five-pound note, six one's, and three three-shilling pieces, and two shillings and sixpence, and five one's upon Woodland.

- SOLOMON. I am an officer. I found upon Woodland five one-pound notes; upon M'Crae the twenty-five-pound, six one-pound notes, seven three-shilling pieces, and two shillings and sixpence in silver.

JANE DAVIS . I live in Dillon's-court.

Q. Do you remember either of the prisoners coming to your house at this time - A. M'Crae came in about twelve o'clock at night, he asked me if I would sell him a bit of candle; he took a bit of candle off the table.

JOHN GEORGE . I an apprentice to Mr. Cording, a pawnbroker, 163, Ratcliffe-highway. Two men came in, in the morning, and asked to look at some shirts; M'Crae bought a shirt, it came to eight shillings, he gave me a one-pound note; I paid it away to some person that came in to pledge something.

SAMUEL STOKES . I am an apprentice to Mr. Atkinson, hatter. I sold to M'Crae one hat, and one hat to Woodland; they gave me a note each. I have the notes in my pocket.

Q. Now, let the prosecutor look at the notes.

Prosecutor. I do not know either of them notes.

Q. Now, look at the notes Solomon produced - A. I can swear to that note.

Q. to Solomon. Upon whom was that note found - A. Upon M'Crae.

Prosecutor. There is the mark over May; I don't know any other note. That note with the mark over May I received it of Mr. Bliss.

Mr. Arabin. Looking at that note, it seems to me to be the mark in the copper plate.

Prosecutor. It appears to me to be in the paper.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel; called one witness each, who gave them a good character.

M'CRAE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

WOODLAND, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-39

864. CATHERINE BRYANT and MARY WHEELER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , seven handkerchiefs, value 40 s. the property of Edward Richardson , privately in his shop .

EDWARD RICHARDSON . I live in Great Russell-street, Covent Garden . On the 28th of August, the two prisoners came into the shop to buy a handkerchief; the price was eight shillings; they paid three shillings, and said they would call again in about half an hour, pay the remainder, and take the handkerchief; they then left the shop; upon their leaving the shop I missed two pieces of handkerchiefs, they were on the counter when they were there, I was shewing them; when they were in my shop; I went after them I desired them to walk back; they did; I walked behind them to see that they did not drop any thing; I saw Catherine Bryant when they came into the shop throw two pieces behind the counter. These are the two pieces; they have been in my possession ever since; they are those that I lost; they are mine; the prime cost is over forty shillings.

Bryant's Defence. I paid three shillings off one of the handkerchiefs. I saw nothing of the handkerchiefs.

BRYANT, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

WHEELER, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-40

865. JOSEPH PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Upton , from his person .

JOSEPH UPTON . I am a tailor . On Monday, the 10th of May, I was in Oxford-street, coming past Cumberland-gate . I felt something at my pockets; I turned round and my handkerchief was in the prisoner's hand; the officer, Bacon, was by and took him in custody.

- BACON. I am an officer. On coming through Cumberland-gate, I saw the prisoner draw from Mr. Upton's pocket this handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it; I work hard for my living.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-41

866. DANIEL FITZPATRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , two pint, of brandy, value 3 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

DANIEL CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On the 14th of July, I was stationed at the London Docks . The prisoner was a watchman , about six o'clock in the morning, he was coming off duty; it is my duty to rub the watchman down when they came off duty. The prisoner had a bottle in his hand with a cork in it carelessly; I asked him what he had got; he said it was cold tea. When I found it was a full bottle I handed him over to my brother officer.

JAMES SLATER . I am an officer. I went up, when the former witness was talking to the prisoner; the prisoner said it was tea; it was handed over to me; he then said it was brandy; that it was given to him by a sailor two nights before. There was brandy where the prisoner was stationed, and in the next station too.

THOMAS LEGG . I am a cooper, at the London Docks, near the prisoner's station. There was a brandy cask that had been been recently plundered. On the 14th of July, I examined it about nine o'clock in the morning, it had been bored in the bouge of the cask; it appeared to me to be recently done; the cask contained brandy rather paler than is usually shipped to an English market. This bottle appeared to contain the same liquor; I have no doubt about it; the liquor in the stone bottle is the same that was in the cask.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 12th a sailor, an old lodger of mine brought me this brandy on the South key, I told him I did not want any more than a glass. I put it by the side of the dock. On the 14th I took this brandy out from where I put it; when Clements asked me what it was; I said brandy; I got it from an old lodger of mine on the South key. I begged Mr. Slater to come with me to the ship on the South key to compare the brandy with the brandy on board the ship near the South key.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-42

867. PETER GESTOM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , two pair of trowsers, value 18 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a bag, value 2 d. the property of Joseph Williamson .

JOSEPH WILLIAMSON . I am the commander of a ship in the London Dock . On the 18th of August, my chest was broken open; I had seen it safe the night before; I found it broken open about half past eight the next day; I missed two pair of trowsers, two handkerchiefs, and a bag.

Q. Was the prisoner a seaman on board - A. He had been paid off five weeks before that. On this day I saw him on board, I stopped him, and searched him; I found two handkerchiefs, and a little bag in his pocket; the handkerchiefs I had all the voyage, I know they are mine, and the trowsers, I

know they are mine; they have a patch on each knee; they were found on the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-43

867. JAMES LOCKHEART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , nine books, value 10 s. the property of Richard Bowden .

HENRY DIXON . I am a painter and glazier; No. 7, Kent-row, City-road. The prisoner was my journeyman .

Q. In August were you employed to paint Dr. Bowden's house - A. I was, in Islington . On the 30th of August the prisoner was at work in that house, painting the inside of the house.

Q. In consequence of what you heard did you that night go home to see after the prisoner - A. Yes, I did; when I came home he was in my garden; I went to him. I asked him what he had been doing that day; he said he had been painting the dining-room and the parlour. I observed that he had something inside of his waistcoat; I asked him what it was; he said it was nothing that belonged to me. He took a book out of his pocket; he said that he had brought it from home to read. This is the book that he took out of his pocket; I then said it belongs to Mr. Richard Bowden , the person that I am doing work for; my wife said he had some more, and took four books out of his pocket. This is called Hudibras; I was present when Brettel searched him; he found four more books upon him; they were concealed in his breeches.

SARAH DIXON . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. When your husband came back did you observe any books the prisoner had got - A. I took the book out of his hand; as he turned round I took four from his left hand pocket; we then sent for Mr. Brettel.

THOMAS HENRY DIXON . I am the son of Mr. Dixon. I was at work at Dr. Bowden's when Lockheart was; I saw the prisoner put one book in his side pocket; I brought the prisoner home with me to my father.

MR. BRETTEL. I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody on the 30th of August. I searched him, and found four books; they were taken out of his breeches. These are the books; they have been in my custody eversince.

Prisoner. He made no search, I gave them up.

DR. RICHARD BOWDEN . Q. I understand that Mr. Dixon, the painter, was employed in painting your house - A. He was.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I know him well; he was at work there.

Q. Look at these books that have been produced, and tell me whether they are your property - A. They are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say in my defence. I leave it to the mercy of court.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-44

868. LYDIA MOYES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of July , a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. a reading-glass, value 1 s. and eight yards of lace, value 1 l. the property of Robert Ellis .

SARAH ELLIS . I am the wife of Robert Ellis , he is an army tailor . The prisoner was in my employ.

Q. Had she slept in your house from time to time - A. Yes, Her apartment was searched; in her apartment I found a reading-glass, and a duplicate of a spoon; the lace I have not found.

Q. Can you swear that it is your husband's property - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a tea-spoon with me for eighteen-pence, on the 29th of July.

Prosecutrix. This is my silver spoon; I have had it above twenty years.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix said if I would own to the lace she would forgive me of the spoon; the lace I never saw; the spy-glass tumbled out of the child's clothes.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-45

869. THOMAS MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , fifty-one yards of Irish cloth, value 8 l. 12 s. 3 d. thirty-five yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 15 s. and one yard of printed cotton, value 14 d. the property of Timothy Beech .

GEORGE BEECH . I am shopman to Timothy Beech , linen-draper , 14, Beech-street, Barbican. On the morning of the 13th of August, the prisoner came to my brother's house; he asked me to shew him a piece of shirting cotton; which I shewed him. He then asked to look at some Irish linens; he selected two pieces of Irish linen, and one of shirting cotton; one piece of Irish at three shillings and three-pence, and the other three shillings and sixpence; the shirting cotton was fifteen-pence a yard; he asked for our young man to go with him; he said he wanted to shew them to a customer, who lived in the Spa-fields; he said the man was to bring back either the money or the goods; I gave the goods to Richard Hall , and a yard measure also; the prisoner and Hall went away together, I gave Hall directions to bring back either the goods or the money.

Q. Was any body in the shop when the goods were shewn to him except Hall - A. My brother, Timothy, was there.

RICHARD HALL . Q. On the 13th were you sent with the property and the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any directions of George Beech as to the money or goods - A. Yes, that was given to me privately.

Q. Where did you go to with the prisoner - A. To the King's Arms in Spa-fields ; he called for a pint of beer, and paid for it; the goods were put on the table; the prisoner took the good away out of the room, said he was going to shew them to a lady at the corner house; I got up to go with him; he said I had better not go, he said the lady thought he kept a shop of his own. He was gone about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you let him go - A. Yes; he came back without the goods, he said the lady was not at home; he sat about ten minutes, went out, and returned; he said then the lady was come home, she approved of the shirting cotton; she wished for the whole of the goods until her husband came home.

Q. Did you say any thing about not having the goods or the money - A. No; he said I had better not wait, he would bring the goods or the money to Mr. Beech.

Q. Did you come home without the money or the goods, having been told not to part with them - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-46

870. WILLIAM WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , two planes, value 3 s. and two sashes, value 12 s. the property of George Gissing .

GEORGE GISSING . Q. Did you lose these things in an empty house - A. Yes, on the 7th of August. I left them in the house at eight o'clock in the evening.

CHARLES HAYES . I am a constable. I went by this house about ten minutes after three in the morning. I was looking after the watchmen; I heard a creeking in the house, which induced me to stop; in about twenty minutes I saw the prisoner coming out at the back gate; I told him to stop or I would shoot him; I took him by the collar, and took him to the watchhouse, a young woman followed me out of the gate; I told her to follow me; after I had taken him to the watchhouse I went back to the house; I found two planes in a handkerchief that I had heard drop, and I found these two sashes, they had been taken out of the back parlour, and were taken up into the front bed-room.

Q. to Gissing. How was this house left - A. The front door was locked, and the back door bolted.

Mr. Adolphus. There was a young woman taken up with him - A. Yes, she was discharged by the magistrate.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-47

871. MARIA DALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , two silver salt-spoons, value 5 s. the property of John Clowsley .

JOHN CLOWSLEY . I am a journeyman carpenter ; I live at 36, Wheeler-street, Shoreditch .

Q. In August did the prisoner lodge in your house - A. Yes, in the one pair of stairs front room; I slept in the back room on the same floor.

Q. Had you any salt spoons there - A. Yes, two; they were silver; I missed them out of the trunk in that room: I charged the prisoner with having taken them; she gave me the duplicate; I went to the pawnbrokers; I there found my two silver salt-spoons; I knew them to be mine.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 31st of August, the prisoner pledged these two silver salt-spoons. I lent her three shillings and sixpence upon them.

Prosecutor. They are my spoons.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress; I had been without victuals three days.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-48

872. HENRIETTA GREGORY was indicted for that she, on the 28th of August , had in her custody and possession, divers forged bank notes for the payment of 1 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-49

873. HENRIETTA GREGORY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 27th of August , a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-50

875. THOMAS FOSS was indicted for that he, on the 26th July , feloniously did forge a certain bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be a promissory note, with like intention.

The case was stated by Mr. Attorney General.

THOMAS NORMAN . I am a baker by trade. I have known the prisoner about five or six months; when I first knew him he lodged in Carnaby-market; he afterwards lodged at Somers-town, about two or three months after I removed his goods from Somers-town up to St. John's-lane, Paddington. Mr. Fidlers man assisted me; his name is Taylor.

Q. After that, did the prisoner apply to you to remove any thing else - A. Yes, about a month after that, it was on a Sunday, I do not know the day of the month; it is now about two or three months ago that I moved the press for him, on a Sunday morning, about a month after I moved the other goods; I removed the press from Baldwyn's-place, Baldwyn's-gardens, to Gwyn's stable, by the assistance of Richard Taylor .

Q. Where was Gwyn's stable - A. In Grafton-mews. He said there was something to pay, if I would move it and find a place to put it in for a little time, he would satisfy me for it.

Q. Whose house was it removed from - A. I did not know the name then; I paid three shillings; they said that was owing for rent of the room; the prisoner told me there was some rent owing; they said that was the rent. I removed it into Gwyn's stable, and asked the favour for me to put it there a few days according to the prisoner's order; after that the prisoner came to me at the Three Compasses, in Holborn; he asked me if had ever seen any bad bank notes, and if I should like to pass any; (I lodged at the Compasses public-house then,) I

said I should not like to pass them, I thought it was a dangerous case to pass them; we parted then. He called again upon me, after that he asked me to take some; I drank with him; he then said that he had worked at the Bank; he said if I would pass some I should soon make my fortune; I consented. I saw Gwyn after that; he said a young man had called upon him, and asked if that press was for sale; I said I did not know. I would enquire. I saw Foss after that; told him there was a person that wished to buy the press if it was for sale; he said he should not sell it; put it out of sight and let no one see it.

Q. Did you afterwards do any thing with the press - A. Yes; Gwyn and me removed it over to the coach-house, opposite his stable.

Q. Did you afterwards see the prisoner there - A. Yes; he called upon me afterwards, he asked me to walk up to his house; I went to him one evening, and Gwyn with me; he was not at home then; his wife said he was down at the shop in Crawford-street; we saw him at a public-house in Crawford-street. He asked me then to get him a stone as soft as I possibly could; I said I did not know that I could get a stone; I though Gwyn might, as he was so much among the stone-masons. Gwyn got the stone, and we walked up with it to Foss's house.

Q. Who was the stone given to - A. After that we gave the stone to Foss in the public-house, Crawford-street.

Q. Did you afterwards do any thing with the press - A. Yes; he came down to us; we walked down to the stable together; he desired us to move the press from the coach-house into the stall in the stable; he said that would do for the purpose that he should want it for. We moved it there by his order.

Q. Did you do any thing with it - A. Not that time; soon afterwards the press was put up in the stall.

COURT. When - A. When we removed the press over, then it was put up; after that he came with some paper, and wished us to go the Grafton Arms. Grafton-mews, and in the parlour he produced some paper of two sorts; he asked which would be the best to make Bank notes; I told him I did not know; I thought he was the best judge; he said that was what they called Bank post paper; he thought that would be the best to make Bank notes of. After that we met at the Goat and Compasses Fitzroy-square; he desired Gwyn and me to get some old coal or charcoal, and a saucepan to make a fire; we got charcoal on the Friday evening. He met us again between eight and nine o'clock at the Goat and Compases; Gwyn and we went down to the stable to get a light; Foss got whiting and some oil himself; Gwyn got a light; we all went up stairs together in the room over the coach-house; Gwyn and I lit the fire; Foss made a rim round the stone to pour the pewter in the stone, and I and Gwyn melted the pewter; when the pewter was melted and poured on the stone Foss said he thought it would not do; he touched the stone up again with a knife, and made a rim round the stone; we melted the pewter; he poured the pewter on the stone again.

Q. What then - A. After that he turned it out again; he said he thought the pewter would do very well; then he mixed some oil and some black on the back part of the stone; we all three went down stairs together; he tried the pewter plate on some of the blank paper; he said it would do; after that he rubbed the blacking on the copper plate, rubbed it off with a rag, and rubbed the copper plate with his hand.

Q. Who produced the copper plate - A. Mr. Foss produced it; he wiped his hand over with whiting and laid the plate on the plank, after he rubbed it over he put a slip of paper over the line of London and the date of the year; he told me it was London and the date of the year.

Q. You cannot read yourself - A. No, I am no scholar myself. He applied another piece of paper for the purpose of making a Bank note, and run it through the press; after that he applied another plate with the line of London, and the date of the year; he told me so; after that we run it through the press again; I turned the press, and Gwyn held the light; we made five or six that evening.

Q. You said something about the water mark - A. We run it through the press for the water mark. This is the pewter plate; the paper was put on this, and run through the press afterwards. This is the stone; here is where he mixed the blacking on it; after this was done we went up stairs all three of us together; he wrote on one corner of all the notes, six of them; he gave me two, Gwyn two, and kept the rest himself. We parted that evening; he appointed to meet us on the Saturday again.

Q. What became of the plates and materials in the mean time - A. We left them on the table up stairs. Gwyn had the key of the room.

Q. After that did he say any thing to you about these notes that had been made - A. He appointed to meet us again, told us not to part with these notes, they would not do, he would make some better. He met us on the Saturday evening to tell us not to part with the Bank notes; then he appointed to meet us on the Sunday morning if I could get any burnt oil in Long Acre. I got it early on Monday morning, I took it to Gwyn, and we met on the Monday night at the Goat and Compasses, and the same thing was done again in the same manner as before; about forty only were made.

Q. Was any thing written upon them - A. Yes, Mr. Foss wrote upon them at the corner; Mr. Foss took some away with him. I did not take any that evening. The room was locked up as before, and the notes were left on the table.

Q. Did he give any direction what was to be done with the materials - A. He told me to remove the press, and take it away as soon as I could, and the plates likewise, except one plate he wished to be left. There were three plates. I took them to John French 's, in Bayswater-road, all the things. Some part of the press was put into a hair trunk.

Q. What became of the stone and the pewter - A. They were likewise put into it.

Q. Were all the plates put in - A. No, one plate

was left behind; he desired one plate to be left behind, because he would take the number out in the line of London, and date of the year.

Q. Who kept the key of the hair trunk - A. I kept it until I delivered it to the officer, Foy.

Q. Did you afterwards take any of the notes - A. Yes, I took some on the Sunday morning that I went down to Billericay fair. I took them from Gwyn's stable, where they were made. Gwyn was with me.

Q. Did any body write upon these notes before you went - A. I saw Gwyn write upon some of them; then we went with them to Billericay fair. I passed one at a butcher's shop, another at a public-house, and the remainder I bid fifteen pound for a horse; I gave nine of them for a horse, and the other six pound in good money.

Mr. Pooley. Who did you tell first this transaction - A. To Mr. Foy.

Q. You never made a representation of this until you were taken up and charged - A. No; they asked me. I thought I would tell the truth for the good of me and others.

Q. Now, you state that this man asked you if you would take bad bank notes and pass them - A. Yes.

Q. You never knew any thing of them before - A. No, I never saw a bad bank note before.

ANDREW GWYN . I am a baker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Foss - A. Yes. The first time I ever saw him was about six weeks before I was taken in custody. It is now about thirteen weeks since I first saw him. I first knew him by going with Norman to his house in St. John's-lane. The first transaction was, he asked me to get him a stone.

Q. Before that, some things had been removed to a place of yours - A. Not to my knowledge that it was his then. A press had been removed; that was first placed in my stable.

Q. Was that a stable to which persons had occasionally to resort - A. Yes; I kept a horse and cart first. The first press stood public just as you opened the door.

Q. After that, you say the prisoner asked you to procure him a stone - A. Yes, a soft stone as I could possibly get, about ten inches by six. I procured him the stone, and delivered it him. I afterwards saw the stone in his possession, about a week after I had given it him.

Q. What was the appearance of the stone after it had been in his possession about a week - A. There was the word one, and flourishes round it.

Q. Look at that stone, and say whether that is it - A. I have every reason to believe that is the stone. When he first shewed me that stone he had hid it in a field. He gave me the stone to take care of until I should see him again. The next time we met at the Goat and Compasses. Thomas Norman was with me and Foss at the Goat and Compasses; he asked to go down to my stable. We went there to look at the press. The press was removed; it had been removed by me and Norman to the opposite side of the mews, to a coach-house. He asked us to move it into the stable, at one particular place in the stable; he said that would answer the purpose that he wanted at present. It was removed accordingly. He said he would meet us again in a few days at the Goat and Compasses. We met there. He asked us to go to a public-house where we were not so well known. We went from the Goat and Compasses to another public-house. We went into the front parlour to ourselves entirely; there was no one it: we had a pot of porter; he pulled out a sample of paper, which he shewed to Norman; he called it bank post paper, and asked Norman which he thought was best to make bank notes. Norman told him he did not exactly know, the prisoner must be the best judge. The prisoner fixed upon one; he said he thought that would do. He said that was what they called bank post paper. He said he would call again in a few days and leave the plates. He came again on the following Monday or Tuesday, and brought the plates to me. He brought three copper-plates. I had not seen any before he left them in my possession. I looked at them. He told me he would meet me and Norman in a few days.

Q. Were they plates of this description - A. Yes, sir; this is one of them, and that is another.

Q. You can read - A. Yes. I can swear to these two; that is one of three that he left me. He mentioned the night that he would meet us again, which was the Thursday evening, at the same public-house, the Goat and Compasses, and told us to get some charcoal or old coal to make a fire to melt some pewter down. We got some charcoal. We went to the stable where the press was; Norman, me, and Foss went to the stable. On Friday the prisoner met me and Norman at the Goat and Compasses; he ordered me to light a fire with the charcoal. He made a rim round this stone with some whiting and water while we melted the pewter. He poured the pewter into the mould, and after it was hard he turned it over and looked at it.

Q. Did the marks resemble the marks on the pewter plate - A. It did. He said that would not do, there was a deficiency in it. The marks then were not so strong as they are now. He ordered us to melt the pewter over again, and while we were melting the pewter he touched the stone with a knife that he took out of his pocket to make the impression deeper, and then the mould was run over again, and when it was hard he turned it over again and thought it would do. I believe that to be the pewter plate in the amended form. After that he turned the stone on the other side, and mixed some blacking and oil, which I delivered to him. Norman, me, and the prisoner went to the stable where the press was fixed by the prisoner's order; the first thing he tried was the pewter plate upon a piece of blank paper, to see whether it would do or not. He put the pewter upon the plank of the press, with the blank paper on it, and run it through the press. After it came off he said he thought it would do, it had the appearance of water marks. The next thing he rubbed some of the blacking that he had been mixing up on this copper plate, and after that he rubbed the blacking off.

Mr. Attorney General. Mr. Harper, attend to this part of the witness's evidence; perhaps you may be asked some questions upon it by-and-by.

Gwyn. He rubbed some blacking over the copperplate marked No. 1, and then he wiped it off with a rag. After he had prepared the plate he put it on the plank of the press; he put a slip of paper over the date line; he put a piece of paper over it, and run it through the press; then he took the plate, No. 2, rubbed the ink in the date line only, and rubbed it off as before. He put the same paper over it, in order that the paper should take the number from No. 2. The next thing we went up stairs; he wrote the signature to each of them.

Q. How many did he make - A. To the best of my knowledge, six or seven. He went up stairs, carrying those which had been printed into the room above; he there sat down and wrote the signature to each of them.

Q. Do you recollect what the signature was - A. The signature of White. He then gave me two and Norman two, and the rest he kept himself. He said he would meet us on the next evening at the Goat and Compasses, between eight and nine o'clock. He met us accordingly at the same house; he said it was too late to get some burnt oil; he asked Norman to get him some on the following morning; if he could get it to bring it to him: he could go to work without us. Foss came on the Sunday morning to me; we had not got the oil, being Sunday. At that meeting on the Sunday morning he told us if we had not passed the notes not to pass them; they were bad, and would not do. I had not passed them, nor Norman. We both destroyed them together. We met again on the Monday evening at the Goat and Compasses between eight and nine o'clock. We then went to the stable as before, and made about forty.

Q. When you say we, you mean you three - A. Yes. They were made the same way as the others. After the impressions had been taken from the plate we went up stairs. The prisoner then put the signature as before, the same name.

Q. Now, look at this, and tell me whether you believe this to be one made of that batch on the Monday - A. I have reason to believe this to be one of them by the signature, and by the general face of it; 1813 in the date line, and then in the Bank of England line there the year is 1812.

Mr. Attorney General. The top of the note is 1812, the other is 1813. What name is written on the back of that note - A. Thorowgood. I wrote that upon the back of it by the prisoner's order, for it to appear as though it had passed to other people before.

Q. Did you follow that direction of his by writing a name to every one of the notes for the purpose of circulating them - A. Yes, upon all, I believe.

Q. Then seeing the name of Thorowgood written by yourself, have you any doubt that is one of the notes you took of him for the purpose of circulation - A. I am certain of it.

Q. Norman cannot write - A. No, to the best of my knowledge he cannot. I wrote the name upon them; any name that first came into my head; no name in particular.

Q. Look at these notes, and see if there is any thing written by you upon each of them - A. Yes, there is. I find some name written by me upon every one of them. I am certain they are every one the notes of his making.

Q. After these forty were made what was done next - A. He went up stairs and wrote the signature upon each of them, and then ordered me and Norman to move the press as soon as we possibly could. We were to move the press, and all the plates but this No. 1, that was to be left behind. He intended to take the date line out, and the number line out, and put a fresh one in.

Q. Was there any distribution of notes made - A. No. He ordered us to take a house in the country, that he might; have an house to go to work. He said by that means we should soon make our fortunes. He was to work two or three days in a week. He wrote upon the back of the notes, them he took away with him, and left the rest for me and Norman to circulate as soon as we could. I passed two to a woman of the name of Jones; these were two that the prisoner made in my presence.

Q. Did you afterwards go with Norman to Billericay - A. Yes; that is my native place.

Q. Did you pass any - A. No. Norman bought a horse; he paid nine of these notes that were made by the prisoner, upon which I wrote some names on the Sunday morning before we started.

Q. Are you certain that the nine that he paid in part of fifteen pound for the mare were part of those that you saw him make - A. I am certain of it.

Q. After Norman had made his payment he was suspected and apprehended, and you were apprehended too - A. Yes.

Q. After you were taken did you state this circumstance - A. Not while I was in the country.

Q. I say, when you were in custody - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that you stated this circumstance to Mr. Kay did you know that Norman had made any confession - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. How many notes did you utter - A. Five.

Q. That is five capital offences. Are you out of employment - A. No, I am in the yeast line.

Q. You did not know, I dare say, there was any harm in it - Witness paused.

Q. Will you give me an answer. Why are you so dumb all at once; you have been so glib in telling your story - A. I have been telling the truth.

Q. I do not believe all that men swear - A. I do believe there is harm in it now.

Q. When did you make the discovery - A. I do not know.

Q. Was it at the time that you were in the hands of the officer that you made the discovery. You must have known at the time that these things were made in a coach-house that there was harm in it at that time - A. I could not think it was any good.

Q. Did not you know it was a very wicked crime - A. I did not then.

Q. How long have you been in this great town - A. Some years. I do not know exactly.

Q. Norman was caught at Billericay - A. Yes.

Q. Each of you thought it better to save your

own necks - A. We thought it better to tell the truth.

Q. You would rather any man to be hanged than yourself - A. I suppose that is every man's feeling.

Mr. Attorney General. You have given a true account of the circumstance - A. Yes.

Q. And you did not know that Norman had given any account - A. I did not, sir.

JOHN WINTER . Q. You are foreman to Mr. Hanson, printing press maker - A. Yes. His manufactory is in Drury-lane. Mr. Foss came to me in the beginning of February to come and look at two presses that he wanted to sell then; while he was there he looked at a press. He afterwards came back and asked the price of the press that was at our shop. I have seen the press since. That is the press that he had of us. This is the plank to the press, and these are the blocks that belong to it. Mr. Hanson agreed with him for the press; he offered eight guineas and the two presses. I was not there when it was finished.

Q. Look at this paper - A. That is the paper which was left at Mr. Hanson's when I delivered the press.

SAMUEL CASER . I am a porter.

Q. Were you at any time employed by the prisoner to fetch a press from Mr. Hanson's - A. I was. He said he had got a job for me to get a press as soon as he could get a place to put it in; he said it was only to work at a few hours over his time, any room would do. I told him there was a room in the house where I lived, if that would do, in Baldwin's-gardens. I agreed with the landlady of my house for the room for eighteen-pence a week. I carried the press from Mr. Hanson's with another porter, and put it up in that room. I think I took a written order for it. I put the press up at No. 4, Baldwin's-place, Baldwin's-gardens .

Q. Did you ever pay any rent for that room - A. I did; I told her I would see her paid. I got the money from Mr. Foss, sometimes one week and sometimes two weeks.

Q. Do you know any thing of the press being removed from that house - A. I do. On Sunday morning Thomas Norman came to my place; he said he came for the press of Mr. Foss. I told him he could not have it unless the rent was paid. There was two or three weeks; he paid it. I helped him down with it. There was another man; I have never seen him since; his name is Taylor. I assisted in putting it in the cart.

RICHARD TAYLOR . Q. Did you at any time move a press from Baldwin's place - A. Yes, I did. Norman assisted me. We carried it to Grafton-mews. I think it was to a stable. It was on a Sunday morning.

SARAH CHRISTIE , Q. You keep the house, No. 4, Baldwin's-place, Baldwin's-gardens - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a press being brought to your house in February last - A. I believe it was about that time. It was placed in the two pair back room. Samuel Caser agreed with me for that room. It was taken away on a Sunday morning. I did not know any of the persons. I was paid three shillings for two weeks.

Q. During the time the press was in your house do you remember seeing the prisoner there - A. Not to my knowledge. I saw a young man there once.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the person - A. Yes, that is the person. I did not know whether he belonged to it or not. I remember his coming there.

Q. Had he any thing else there to do; was he a lodger there - A. No, not at all.

JOHN FRENCH . I live at Bayswater.

Q. Do you know Norman and Gwyn - A. I know Norman and that young man by sight; I knew him by the name of Andrew.

Q. Do you remember their bringing any press to your house - A. Yes. I cannot say the day; I was bad in bed.

Q. Is that the same press that was afterwards found by the officer, Foy - A. Yes; there was no other there; it is the same the officer fetched away.

Q. Was any box brought - A. They brought the press on Friday; on Saturday they brought the box; that is the same box that the officer found; I saw them bring it in; I was in the room when they brought it in.

JOHN FOY . Q. You are an officer of the police - A. I am. I took the prisoner into custody: in consequence of information I searched the stable, No. 10, Grafton-mews, Fitzroy-square. This copper-plate, No. 1, was delivered to me by Ann Elms ; she took it from under the sill of the stable door. At the house of French I found a press which is now at the door, and a box containing two copperplates, No. 2 and 3. This pewter plate is to make the water-mark, and this stone which has been the mould to cast the pewter-plate for the watermark; two printers blocks to the press, two sliding boards to the press, and the loading, and a rubber with ink on it. They are in the same state now as I found them, except the marks that I put on them to identify them.

Q. Does it appear that these plates have been used for printing on that plank - A. The impression on the board is the same size as the plate.

ANN ELMS . I am the wife of a coachman in Grafton Mews. I delivered a copper plate to Mr. Foy that I found in a basket over the coach-house; there was nothing else in the basket. The plate that I found there I threw behind the fire; when I took it out I knocked it with the poker; I threw it under the grate when I had knocked a piece off, and then I took it down and put it under the sill of the coach-house; it remained there until I gave it to Mr. Foy.

Q. Had you any occasion to go into that room over the stable - A. Yes, I had occasion to go into it to get some things; it was locked.

Q. Is that plate, No. 1, the same that you found in the basket - A. It appears like it. The one that I found in the basket I gave to Mr. Foy the next day, on the Wednesday. I also found some notes, I threw them in the fire.

Q. You do not usually throw good notes in the fire - A. No; I found them in the clothes-pegs bag.

ELIZABETH VICKREY . Q. Do you live in Somers Town - A. No, I have left it now. I knew the prisoner when I lived there.

Q. Do you know Thomas Norman - A. Yes; I have seen the prisoner and Norman together down at the Compasses in Holborn, and also at my own house.

MR. HARPER. I am an engraver and printer, employed by the Bank of England. Early in April, 1806, I became acquainted with the prisoner; he was my assistant in that employ from April, 1806, to November, 1810; he was only a printer .

Q. Look at these plates, you have examined them before - A. I have looked at the notes, and the body of the notes is taken from No. 1, excluding the date line; the date line, excluding every thing else, is taken from No. 2; so there is the circumstance of 12 and 13 occurring in two parts of the note. The witness gave a very correct description of it, putting a piece of paper over it; I have no doubt it is so manufactured.

Q. Look at the signature, T. White do you believe that to be the prisoner's hand writing - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Look at the back of that bank note I now hand to you; do you find the name of Johnson upon the back of it - A. I do.

Q. Do you find the word cash upon the back of it - A. I do; I think that is the prisoner's hand writing.

Q. Now look at the face of that, and see whether it appears to be made in the same manner as note A. appears to be - A. Yes; I am sure it is composed of part of these two plates. The name of the signing clerk is much the characters of the prisoner's.

Q. As to all that is printed, you have no doubt it is printed from these two plates - A. I am sure of it, by stopping out each with a piece of paper.

Q. Now, I hand you a bundle of notes, which I call C. these eight notes upon the outside is marked C. - A. These all appear to be manufactured in the same way. I believe the signatures to be the hand writing of the prisoner.

Q. Be so good as to look at that plank, apply one of these plates to it, does it appear to you that plates of that size have been used to that plank - A. It exactly covers the marks. One of these plates called A, is on it now; these plates are capable of making that impression on it. I have no doubt it has been so used. I have examined the pewter plate; there is every thing necessary for making bad bank notes This pewter plate has been cast from this stone; it would give the water mark by bruising the surface of the paper.

THOMAS FIDLER . I am an auctioneer.

Q. Did the prisoner carry on any business in your auction-room - A. Yes, he carried on copper-plate printing in the same house where my auction-rooms are, in Holborn.

Q. Did you, sir, at any time enter into any partnership with him - A. Yes, for printing copper-plate prints; that was carried on at my house in Crawford-street; he had two presses.

Q. Did you ever know the prisoner having any other press besides the two - A. No, sir.

Q. How long is it ago that you were you in partnership with him - A. I think about four months back.

Q. Was the prisoner much occupied in his business - A. He appeared to me to be a good deal occupied.

Q. Do you know Thomas Norman - A. Yes, I know his person; the first time I saw him with the prisoner he was moving his goods from his lodging; I was present at the time; my man was assisting him.

Q. You did not know of his having any other press than the two in Crawford-street - A. No, certainly not.

SAMUEL LESTER . I am an apprentice to the prisoner. I have been his apprentice about two or three years from the present time.

Q. Where was the last place that he was carrying on his business - A. In Crawford-street, No 59; he had two presses at work there; one person besides himself.

Q. For the last month before he was apprehended had you any employ - A. My master had no employ for me.

Q. Did you hear or know that he had any other press except these two - A I did not.

Q. Have you seen the press that was found by Foy - A. Yes; I never saw it before.

JOHN LAND . Q. Do you live at Chelmsford in Essex - A. I do.

Q. Were you at Billericay fair - A Yes; I sold a horse to a man of the name of Thomas Norman ; I sold the horse for fifteen pounds in bank notes; nine of them were bad. As soon as there was suspicion they were bad I went to the bank; I handed them over to William Rolfe : these notes that I delivered to Rolfe were nine out of the price that I received of Norman for the horse.

WILLIAM ROLFE . I am clerk in the banking-house at Billerieay. I received nine notes of the last witness; I gave them to him again; I saw they were not genuine notes. They were never out of my sight. My brother George saw them; I marked each note before I gave them to my brother; he handed them over to Mr. Fish.

Q. If your brother gave you back the same they were those that you put your mark on them - A. Yes.

GEORGE ROLFE . Q. Are you in the bank of Billericay - A. No, my brother is the agent. I am a shopkeeper. He shewed me nine papers, purporting to be bank notes. I delivered back to him the same notes that I received of him.

William Rolfe . These are the same notes.

(Three of the notes read.)

Mr. Attorney General. Q. to Mr. Harper. Are these forged - A. There is no doubt of it; they are in imitation of bank of England notes.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentleman of the Jury, I stand before you with all the fortitude a man in my situation can be supposed to possess; not from the effect of hardihood or want of knowing that a just application and impartiality in which every men's case is treated by the jury, assisted by the learned charge, which is delivered by the learned judge, to each man accused; I must take the chance

as well as other men, and trust my case with the Court and Jury. If this had been an action for forty I night have had the assistance of counsel to have pleaded in my behalf. Not so now; I am compelled to explain the circumstances which may have run in my favour, although I am obliged to go by the established practice of our criminal code. With deference I submit how improbable it is that I, who have been four years and a half in the Bank of England, should send out notes with 1812 at the top, and 1813 at the bottom, which at first inspection would appear to be bad notes; but how much unlike myself, who had been in the habit of printing bank notes. A man not invested with education would not have acted so as to be accessary to such base conduct. Surely it cannot but be supposed that I should have acted otherwise, instead of bringing forth such things as were sure of detection. With respect to the evidence of Mrs. Elms, can it be supposed that she would destroy the plate of a stranger. No, gentlemen, it was her brother's property; her brother prompted her to do it, them knowing the circumstance of Norman and Gwyn. They disowned each other, and persisted in it, until they were informed the other party had impeached; then the plan of my destruction was fabricated, and these men, to save themselves, would sacrifice not only me, but the whole court. Gentlemen, you see the danger of relying on circumstantial evidence. The present aweful sessions exhibits a melancholy instance of the danger of circumstantial evidence. Some time ago the late Haggerty and Holloway forfeited their lives upon evidence founded solely upon an accomplice, and now at this sessions another person has been indicted for the same offence.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-51

876. JAMES FELLOWS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 13th of September , upon Jonathan Whittaker , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. a seal, value 10 s. a key, value 1 d. and five 3 s. bank tokens, his property .

JONATHAN WHITTAKER . On last Monday night, about twelve o'clock, I was crossing Lombard-street; at the corner of Abchurch-lane the prisoner came up to me, collared me, and shook me, and when he had shaken me a little while he said, d - n you, deliver me all you have got. I tried to keep him off when two others came up; one of them held my arms; then the prisoner took out my money. I cried out once or twice at the time, and struggled, and when he tried for my watch I was so tired with struggling that I could not cry out; then they were about three minutes in getting my watch out of my pocket. When they had got my watch they let loose my arms; then the prisoner gave something to one of the other men; I thought it was my watch that he had given him. I collared him as soon as I had power; I took him by the coat, and the other two men ran towards Gracechurch-street; he ran the contrary way, with me holding him. I cried out, stop thief, as long as I well could, and when he had ran a few yards he stopped; he took hold of me round by the body; he lifted me off the stones two or three times, and twisted me about to fling me. I put out all my strength, and would not let him fling me. He got loose from me; I followed him, and kept nearly up to the side of him; as he ran I cried out stop thief, until he was stopped. I am sure he is the man; I never lost sight of him. He took my watch, a seal to my ribbon and key, and five three-shilling pieces.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. Yes, it was found in the road.

Q. How far did you run - A. A good distance; there was nobody came to my assistance until the young man stopped him.

JOHN GOODMAN . I am a constable. On the 13th it was my night to be out; I heard the cry of stop thief, as I was in Lombard-street watchhouse; I immediately ran down the street; I laid hold of the prisoner by the Post office; I asked who it was that he had robbed. The prosecutor came and said that he had been robbed of his watch and money. I found the box of the watch close to us. The case was blown off; the watch was in the street; there is some dirt on it now. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

WILLIAM READ . About a quarter past twelve, I was proceeding up Lombard-street in my way home, on Monday night, I heard the cry of stop thief; I immediately looked round, and saw the prisoner running very fast, as though he was pursued; before he came to the spot where I seized him, he upset a man; a man attempted to seize him before me, and at the corner of St. Swithin's-lane I seized him; he instantly cried out he was not the man, but I still kept hold of him; when he found that I would not let him go he stooped down, and threw the watch into the street; I kept hold of him until the constable came up, and took him to the watchhouse. I looked round for the watch, and found it, and the case; I gave it into the custody of the constable.

Prisoner's Defence On this night I was coming down Cheapside; I had been drinking with a cousin, a west country-bargeman; this gentleman was fighting in the street; I picked up his hat off the the ground; I put it on his head; he had a woman with him; she said he had lost his watch; I said you had better see whether he has lost his watch or no. I then proceeded up Lombard-street, then I run, and when I came in the watchhouse he did not say any thing about his money.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-52

877. JOSEPH HICKEY GROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , twelve bank notes, for the payment of five pound each, value 60 l. and eleven shillings in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Thornton , Senior, George Mantell Hoare , David Walter , Thomas Wildman

Goodwin , Thomas Thornton , Junior, and William Everett .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing like bank notes, the property of John Pooley Kensington , Edward Kensington , and Daniel Adams .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . Q. Were you clerk to the late firm of Kensington and Company, bankers - A. Yes; the names of the partner s were John Pooley Kensington , Henry Kensington, and Daniel Adams.

Q. On the 8th of July, last year, did you pay a check for Messrs. Goodwin and Company, for sixty pounds eleven shillings - A. I did, that is the check.

(The check read.)

"London, July, 8th, 1812.

Pay to Messrs. Boller and Co. or bearer, sixty pounds eleven shillings, for Goodwyn and Company.

60 l. 11 s. 0 d. THOMAS THORNTON , JUN."

Q. to Mr. Taylor. I take it for granted that you have no recollection of the person to whom you paid it - A. No; that is impossible. I paid it in twelve five-pound notes, from 5,189, to 5,200, both inclusive, dated 4th of June, 1812, all of them; they were successive numbers; I had received them all at the Bank that day, and eleven shillings in change.

MR. THOMAS THORNTON, JUN. Q. Are you a partner in the house of Messrs. Goodwin and Company, brewer s - A. Yes. The names of the partners are Thomas Thornton , senior, George Mantell Hoare, David Walter , Thomas Wildman Goodwin , Thomas Thornton, junior, and William Everett ; we are brewers, in Lower East Smithfield .

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar in your service as clerk - A. Yes; he quitted the service about a twelvemonth ago; he had been in our service about a year.

Q. Did you serve a public-house in Grub-street with beer - A. Yes; the Weavers Arms.

Q. Was it the custom for the benefit society that was held at that house to deposit money in your hands - A. Yes, it was.

Q. At that time who were the trustees of that benefit, society - A. John Rickards , and Thomas Boller .

Q. At that time had they money in your hands - A. They had considerably above sixty pounds.

Q. Is that check your signature - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Whose hand writing is the body of that check - A. Mr. Grose's, the prisoner; the filling up is in the hand writing of the prisoner.

Q. Do you hold in your hand the check-book, with the counterpart of the check - A. Yes.

Q. Read the counterpart - A. 8th of July, Rickards and Boller, sixty pounds, interest eleven shillings, and by the side of it is casting up the interest, which is usual sixty-six days interest, from May the 3rd; that is the prisoner's hand writing. I rather think I was engaged at the time that I signed it. The accompting house that I sit in is remote from the accompting-house to which persons come.

Q. By the number of the checks signed that day, does it appear to be late or early in that day - A. There are but three checks signed that day. I cannot exactly tell by that.

Q. Now, sir, refer to your books for the entry I have already alluded to; how lately before had you made your annual rest - A. I cannot exactly say; the time we finish is the nearest Saturday to Michaelmas day. June the 27th was he rest day in this instance.

Q. Do you find any entry in the prisoner's hand writing which applies to this transaction - A. Yes; there is one through three of the books of his hand writing; this is the Trade Ledger; the entry that I fix upon there is Bollam and Company, on the debtor side, to cash sixty pound eleven shillings; that is the hand writing of the prisoner; on the credit side, 27th June, by stock sixty pound, and July 10th, profit and loss, interest, sixty pounds eleven shillings; these entries are in the prisoner's hand writing. The next book in which you find it is the Trade Journal; on the 10th of July, Bollen and Company, to cash paid them, sixty pounds eleven shillings. The Cash Journal, 10th July, Boller and Company, notes and interest, sixty pounds eleven shillings; I believe it is note and interest.

Q. Had you any concern with any such person as Bollam and Company - A. No, sir; nor Ballon.

Q. Had you any concern with Boller, excepting Rickards and Boller - A. No.

Q. Are these entries ticked off, as if they had been examined - A. Yes, in the New Ledger; I cannot say by whom the ticking is, the writing; except in the Cash Journal, the note and interest, one part is Mr. Howson's, and other part Mr. Thorton senior; that is a superscription from the back of the counter check.

Q. Do these entries in the book, copied as they are from the counter part of the check, did they serve to prevent any detection until they made their next annual rest - A. They did.

Q. That next next annual rest you made last Midsummer - A. As near to it as we could, and when we came to that we found a deficiency of sixty pounds eleven shillings; that caused a great deal of examination, and ended in this discovery.

COURT. Then you had no connection with Bollam and Company, or Bollen and Company - A. No, our only connection was with Rickards and Boller.

JOHN RICKARDS . Q. Are you and Mr. Boller stewards of the benefit society, which lodge their money in Messrs. Goodwin and Thorntons hands - A We did; I am a steward with Thomas Boller ; he and I had money in Messrs Goodwin and Company's hands; we received their note for the money; the promissory note paid is May 5th, 1812.

"I promise to pay on demand to John Rickards and Thomas Boller , the sum of eighty-five pounds, valued received." Our society held that note for the money, signed Goodwin and Co. Weavers Arms.

Q. Now, on the 8th of July last, or at any time, had you applied to the prisoner, as a clerk of Goodwin and Company, for sixty pounds eleven shillings - A. I did not; nor did I receive any check for it; I had no power to receive the money.

THOMAS BOLLER . Q. You are the other steward with Mr. Rickards - A. Yes.

Q. On the 8th of July, had you made any application to the prisoner - A. No, I had not; nor did I receive any money of him.

CHARLES DARWIN . Q. Are you clerk to this benefit society - A. Yes.

Q. In July last, and before that, was this note in your hands, as the clerk of that society - A. Yes, in my hand, and then I deposit it in the box.

Q. Had you or any of the members made any application to Messrs. Goodwin and Co. for sixty pounds eleven shillings - A. No, nobody can go without my going with them, and I never went.

WILLIAM JETTS . I am a clerk in the Bank of England; I bring from the office twelve bank notes for five-pound each, they have come from the Bank, and have been cancelled; they are 5,189, to 5,200, inclusive, all dated 4th June, 1812.

Q. to Mr. Thornton. Take these notes into your hand, and tell me whether you find the prisoner's hand writing upon any of them; look at the 5,200 - A. I. H. Grose, the prisoner's name, and East Smithfield, and Goodwin and Company.

Q. Who kept the Ledger - A. The prisoner.

Q. to Mr. Howson. Look at these notes, do you find any entry upon the back of them - A. Yes, I do; 5,193, and 93, here is Mr. Grose's name, written by himself; I suppose I received them of the prisoner. I know no other person of that name.

Prisoner. Q. I wish to ask the present witness whether he was in the habit of paying money for Messrs. Goodwin and Co. - A. I was; the prisoner and other clerks likewise did, I believe.

Q. Whose business was it to make the entries in the Cash Journal - A. I have generally done it; it appears I was absent that day, and I suppose the prisoner put it in; there are three or four entries of mine before that, and I believe the prisoner asked me to put it in.

Q. Can you swear that I asked you to put it in - A. No. I cannot; I suppose so. I should have entered it without. There was a counter part in the Check book.

Q. There is no money paid but what goes through your hands - A. Yes, there is; I have been in the habit of paying cash, but not checks.

Q. Have you put any date to the note that you received of me, or had it been endorsed before - A. That I cannot say; if it had I should have put the name of the person upon it that I received it of.

Q. You received it as a private note, and not in the way of business - A. I can say I received it of you.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not prepared to make any defence for myself; the gentlemen of the jury as well as your lordship, have heard the crime that I am charged with; the last witness has summed up the whole of it; he does not know when he received it of me, or whether it was in his possession before, and to the last question I put to him he gave a very evasive answer. I am perfectly innocent of it. I trust you have seen enough of the case.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-53

878. FREDERICK KESLICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , ten pounds weight of borax, value 2 l. the property of John Maud .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Maud and Robert Biggen .

ROBERT BIGGEN . I am clerk to Mr. John Maud , wholesale chemist in Aldersgate-street . The prisoner was Mr. Maud's servant ; the prisoner was detected with the borax. On Monday morning last, I stopped him as he was going out to his breakfast, and conducted him into the accompting-house; he was told that he was suspected that he had borax in his pocket, which he for some time denied; after some hesitation he took a piece of borax out of his pocket, and said that was all he had, that it was only a little bit he was going to give to a friend. On the constable being sent for, and proceeding to search him it was found I think in three other pockets, different parcels; the whole weighed three pounds and a half; he was then conducted into the work-room, where he worked in a box, of which he kept the key, we found six pounds and half more; the prisoner acknowledged that he had taken it from Mr. Maud's premises, and hoped we would not hurt him for it.

Q. What is the value of it - A. Two shillings and nine-pence a pound.

JOHN MAUD . The prisoner is an operator of mine, in a particular part of the business. I know no more than what Mr. Biggen has stated, and what he has related passed; six pounds and a half was locked up in his box; I did not know he had a box.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. I took this three pounds and a half of borax out of the prisoner's coat pockets on Monday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I took three pounds and a half; Mr. Maud took from me all perquisites. I was the proper refiner of it in the manufactory; Mr. Maud knew nothing of it untill came there, and now old cripple as I am he wants to transport me.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-54

879. LUDOVICK MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , a watch, value 5 l. a seal, value 6 d. a watch-kep, value 1 d. half a yard of ribbon, value 1 d. seven yards of woollen cloth, value 5 l. eight yards of kerseymere, value 2 l. two yards and a half of velveteen, value 10 s. one yard and a half of quilting, value 10 s. 6 d. three yards and three quarters of woollen cloth, value 38 s. five coats, value 3 l. a pelisse, value 20 s. one pair of pantaloons, value 30 s. and two yards and a half of nankeen, value 3 s. the property of George Thomas Cook , in the dwelling-house of Peter Woodward .

GEORGE THOMAS COOK . I live at 53, Watling-street . On Monday morning, the 9th of August, I was out; my wife was at home, but she saw no person come in, and while I was absent the things were taken; I had some bills printed, and in consequence of that Mr. Dyer came forward.

MARY ANN COOK . I am the wife of the last witness; we have one room of Peter Woodward 's house. On the 9th of August, about a quarter after eleven, I went from the one pair of stairs room into the kitchen to make a pudding. I made it, and made

it boil, and went up stairs about a quarter after twelve; when I came up all the articles in the indictment were gone; I had seen them before I went down into the kitchen; Mr. Woodward was in the next room to mine, learning his daughter to write. I heard nor saw any person go up or come down.

WILLIAM JOHN DYER . I am a salesman, in the Minories. On Monday, the 9th of August, between twelve and one, the prisoner came to me; he asked me whether I would buy a few clothes; I said, yes. In about half an hour afterwards he brought the articles in question; I agreed to give him seven guineas for the whole; four pounds he took in money, and the remainder he was to have the next day in two jackets and a pair of trowsers. I did not buy the watch, nor did I see the watch. He called on the next day; I said, I do not like these goods, if you will return me the four pounds you shall have the things again; he said he would bring the four pounds if I would give him the goods back, he could get a ready market for them any where; when I paid him the four pounds I saw him give the money to somebody at the door; he told the Lord Mayor that he sold them for another person. On my seeing the hand-bill I gave the description of the man to Mr. Cook.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. On the 10th of August, I was sent for by Mr. Dyer. I apprehended the prisoner; I knew nothing of the transaction, or of the prisoner. I produce the property.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that your property - A. Yes; there is a coat deficient, and the marsello quilting.

Q. to Mr. Dyer. All these these things you were to give seven pounds for; I would advise you not to be so fond of buying bargains for the future - A. No. I told him the next day they were things out of my way.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold the things for another man; Mr. Cook told me he did not wish to hurt me if I could tell him where the watch was; I told him I could not tell him where the watch was. The officer took my watch and fourteen shillings from me.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-55

880. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a great coat, value 3 s. a jacket, value 3 s. a pair of trowsers, value 4 s. a pair of drawers, value 1 s. and a wrapper, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Gardner .

SARAH NOWLAND and CATHERINE COOK were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-56

881. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , sixteen yards of ribbon, value 7 s. the property of George Swan .

WILLIAM THISSELTON , the officer, was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-57

882. RICHARD CUMBERLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Henry Furneaux , from his person .

HENRY FURNEAUX . I am a clerk in Queen-street, Clerkenwell. I am a house-keeper. I lost my handkerchief on Monday the 12th of July, between the hours of twelve and one at noon, in Newgate-street . I was going up Skinner-street, towards the city; I heard a person close after me; I looked behind me, and I saw the prisoner close behind me. I went on; he kept close after me until I got into Newgate-street; I clapped my hand to my pocket, put my handkerchief further in. When I came into Newgate-street, at a bookseller's shop, people were standing there; I could not pass so well. The prisoner was closer to me than before. I kept on, but not quite so fast as before, and then the prisoner was closer upon me than before; then I felt a twitch at my pocket. I immediately put my hand into my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I looked round, and saw the prisoner going on the other side of the street, and I had lost my handkerchief. I followed the prisoner. As soon as I began to follow him he began to run. I cried stop thief, and he threw the handkerchief into a cart; I saw him do that; he threw the handkerchief in the cart; I took it out, and still pursued him. He ran into Christ's Hospital, and in the square he was caught. I have no doubt he was the person. I saw his person previous to his doing the act. I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the man. There was no person running away but himself; there were several pursuing of him. He appeared to have no accomplice whatever. The officer has the handkerchief.

Q. What was the worth of this handkerchief - A. Four shillings. That is a low value.

GEORGE DUDLEY . I did not see any thing of this business. He was delivered to me. The prisoner was stopped before I came up. The handkerchief was delivered over to me; I produce it.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief; I delivered it to the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running through the hospital; two men stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-58

883. RICHARD HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , one pound weight of copper nails, value 14 d. two metal weights, value 4 d. and one metal key, value 4 d. the property of William Pontifex , the elder, William Pontifex , the younger, and James Wood .

JAMES WOOD . My partners are William Pontifex , senior, William Pontifex , junior; we are coppersmiths and founders . The prisoner was our labourer . On Saturday, the 17th of July, in the evening, the prisoner was ordered to sweep out the shop; a piece of metal was laid by Francis Dyson ; after the shop was swept Dyson gave me some information; I immediately took the prisoner down to the shop again; he denied having any metal. I told him to pull it out, I was confident that he had some; he pulled a part of it out, a metal key. I taxed him

with having more; he denied it. I took him to the accompting-house, and coming up the yard to the accompting-house he dropped two weights. Dyson picked them up, and in the accompting-house he took a pound of nails out of his breeches. These are them; they are the property of me and my partners.

FRANCIS DYSON. I saw the metal weights drop from the prisoner; I picked them up. These are them; they are my masters property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry to say the property was found on me; I did not intend to take it away; I meaned to put it back before I went out.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18130915-59

884. ELIZABETH LECK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , four handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. and a candlestick, value 6 d. the property of Jane Beeney ; a petticoat, value 1 s. one pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Mary Lovel ; a gown, value 1 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Eleanor Lamb .

JANE BEENEY . I am a publican ; I keep the Three Mariners, Wapping-wall . Mrs. Leck, the prisoner, came to my house, and asked for a gentleman; she asked me if she could sleep at my house that night; I told her, yes; she came again about ten o'clock; she had a bit of bread and cheese, she went to bed; I saw no more of her until she came and asked for a night cap.

Q. Do you know any thing of her taking the things - A. No, I was not in the room when she took them.

MARY LOVEL . I am a servant to Mrs. Beeney. On the 14th of August, the prisoner came for a lodging, we let her have a room; my things were in the room where the prisoner slept; the drawers were not locked; my mistress sent me up for the things, they were not there; the prisoner left the lodgings, and said she would call and pay for what she had; she never called. I am sure the things were in the drawer, the night before I had seen them there.

ELEANOR LAMB . I am niece to Mrs. Beeney. My things were in the same room where Mrs. Leck slept, in the servant's drawers; she took all the things out of the drawer; they were found upon her just as she got out of the door; she went away between nine and ten; she was stopped by Mary Lovell.

Q. to Mary Lovell . You stopped her - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner come down stairs; she throwed some of the things down; I stopped her; she had some of the things in her pocket.

- SMITH. I am a constable. I took these things from the prisoner; part of the things were wrapped under her gown and her apron.

Mr. Andrews. Q. to Mary Lovell . You know that she is deranged in her mind - A. I think so.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . These things were delivered to me by Smith.

COURT. Who is the magistrate - A. Mr. Martin.

Q. Tell him from me, that he must not multiply witnesses in that way; if Mr. Smith is an honest man he is sufficient; if he is not, he is not. fit to be a constable.

Prosecutrix. I know all the things.

JOHN COOPER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Leek, he is a shipright and boat-builder. Mrs. Leek has been deranged for some time.

MR. LEGGERT. I have worked for Mr. Leek sixteen years. Mrs. Leek is quite out of her mind.

MR. LESLEY. I am a surgeon and apothecary. Mr. Leek is a woman not in her right mind.

Verdict of the jury.

Insane .

To be detained in Prison .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-60

885. EDWARD DOUCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Jame Masey , in his dweling-house .

MRS. MASEY. I am the wife of James Masey . This watch was hanging over the chimney on a nail; I last saw it about a quarter before seven in the evening, on the 11th of August.

Q. When did you miss it - A. Directly after

Q. You do not know of your own knowledge that the prisoner took it - A. There was no one else in the house; he came to enquire for a lodging; I saw the prisoner and spoke to him; he was in the room where the watch was hanging; he was not in the room above a quarter of an hour before the watch was gone.

JOHN BENNETT . I am an apprentice to Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this watch on the 12th of August, in the name of Harry Williams .

JAMES MASEY . It is my watch.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-61

886. JAMES WATSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Judd , about the hour of eight on the night of the 1st of September , and stealing therein a pair of breeches, value 28 s. and a pair of braces, value 3 s. his property .

ROBERT JUDD . I am a breeches maker , in Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square . I lost my property on the 1st of September.

Q. Did you hear any thing at the shop window - A. I heard the cracking of the glass by a violent blow, about half after eight in the evening; it was quite dark; I came down immediately and attempted to go out of the door; the door was fastened by a cord; I opened the door, the evening being dark I could not see any body; I returned to the shop, I missed a pair of cord breeches. I missed the braces the next day. I have seen the braces since, the breeches I have not.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 2nd of September. I searched him, and found these braces in his waistcoat pocket.

ROBERT JUDD , JUNIOR. They are my father's property. They were hanging up in the shop window.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the braces of a woman on Monday on Blackfriars-bridge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-62

887. JAMES WATSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Partington , about the hour of nine on the night of the 2nd of September , and burglariously stealing therein five watches, value 21 l. the property of William Partington .

WILLIAM PARTINGTON . I am a watchmaker ; I keep a shop in Paddington-street , and sell watches; it is my mother, Jane Partington 's house. I lost five watches. I was at work in the shop at the time they were taken. My watches were hanging close to the window. It was a quarter before nine on the night of the 2nd of September. I heard a pane of glass break; I was tied in; I could not get out. When I looked over my watches I missed five. None of the watches have been found.

HENRY DOW . I am a butcher. About a quarter before nine o'clock I was near my master's door; his name is Dexter; he lives opposite of Mr. Partington. I heard the pane of glass break; I crossed the road, and saw the prisoner with his hand through the window; he was leaning over the rails; he ran away; I pursued him, and never lost sight of him. I only found upon him a small hook that the watch hung upon. This is the hook.

JOHN LAYLEY . I produce the hook that was found in his pocket with the braces. His hand was very bloody when I took him.

Prosecutor. I can swear to this hook being mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the call of stop thief; I saw two or three men running; four or five tumbled down together. When the picked me up they found nothing about me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 46.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-63

888. JACINTO BARRERO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , fourteen silk handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 14 s. the property of John Hayward and John Jones , in the dwelling-house of John Hayward .

JOHN HAYWARD . I live at 92, in the Minories . My partner's name is John Jones ; we are linen-draper s. On Saturday the 7th of August the prisoner came into our shop and asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs. Bradley attended to him; he shewed him a bundle. Bradley, after he had shewed them the prisoner, brought to me to count them; he said he missed a piece. I counted them; there were nine pieces. Bradley said he counted them before he shewed them the prisoner; there were then ten pieces. Bradley left that bundle with me. He went to get another parcel to shew the prisoner, and after some time he missed a piece from that parcel; he then told me that the prisoner had got another piece from that parcel. There was no other customer at the counter where the prisoner was. The prisoner hesitated a long time, and said there was none to suit him. I then went up to the prisoner, and said, as you do not want to buy, I must take from you what you have stolen. I lifted up his waistcoat, and saw ten black silk handkerchiefs under one arm. I took them from him, and four coloured silk handkerchiefs dropped from under his other arm. They cost me more than fifty-four shillings.

ROBERT BRADLEY . I shewed the prisoner the black silk handkerchiefs; first I counted them; there were ten pieces in that bundle; he did not choose any of them. I perceived they were one piece short; I took them to Mr. Hayward to count; he made nine; there should have been ten. I shewed him some coloured ones. I laid six pieces before him; they contained different quantities; he said they were too dear. I missed one piece from them. I saw Mr. Hayward take one parcel from the prisoner, and I saw the other parcel drop from him. The prisoner bought nothing; he spoke English very well then.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I took the prisoner into custody. These handkerchiefs I produce were delivered to me.

Mr. Hayward. These are the handkerchiefs I took from him. This parcel I saw drop from him. They are our property.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope the prosecutor will have mercy on me. I have a wife and three children in Spain.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Tried by a Jury of half English and half foreigners,

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-64

889. ABDULAH was indicted for the wilful murder of Sedee Sidah .

SACK PARMENT. I am a Lascar; I was cook of the Lady Casmer, East Indiaman.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A Malay.

Q. Did you see a Malay and Sidah do any thing - A. Yes, I saw Sidah roasting a potatoe.

Q. Did a quarrel arise between them about a potatoe - A. Yes; the quarrel began with them both; one said it is mine, and the other said it was his; at last they began fighting; the Malay took his shoe, and knocked him; Sidah, after being knocked by the Malay, he set off. The Malays wanted to tie up Sidah and flog him.

Q. How many Malays were there at first - A. Seven or eight. They took him to tie him up; they did not tie him up; they said they would fight.

Q. Who talked of fighting - A. The Malays. The prisoner said, what do you want; come along, and fight. All the Sidahs were quiet, but when the Malays came out against the Sidahs then they began fighting.

Q. Did they fight - A. Yes, the Sidahs had sticks, and the Malays had knives and scrapers.

Q. Did you see what the prisoner had - A. The prisoner had a Batavian knife.

Q. Did you stay to see them fight - A. I saw the fighting; I ran away into my own room. The Sidahs came into the same room where I was sitting.

Q. What did the Sidahs come into that room for - A. To hide themselves from flogging.

Q. Did the man that is dead come into that room - A. Sidah was sitting in that room; he ran away first. The Sidahs shut the door; the Malays got in at the window. Abdulah got in at the window. When the Malays came in, the Malays beat the Sidahs with their sticks.

Q. Did you see Abdulah do any thing - A. I saw him stab Sidah with a knife upon his belly. I saw him stab Sidah with the knife with my own eyes.

Q. What nation are the Sidahs - A. Madsgascars.

MR. CRESSEY. I am a pupil at the London hospital. I was there when the deceased was brought in. The deceased had a wound in the belly, on the right side of the abdomen, which extended into the cavity; likewise a wound in his right loins. I attended him until his death. He died in two days.

Q. What was the cause of his death - A. The wound in his belly; it appeared to be done with a knife. He was brought in a dying state. He had received a mortal wound.

Prisoner's Defence. We were fighting. I do not know who stabbed the knife.

GUILTY,

Of manslaughter only .

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-65

890. ANDREAS VEGREEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lindsay , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 5th of August , and stealing therein, a watch, value 2 l. six silver tea-spoons, value 30 s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 30 s. three plated tea-spoons, value 2 s. one plated table-spoon, value 1 s. four shirts, value 8 s. three pair of pantaloons, value 12 s. four waistcoats, value 10 s. a hat, value 4 s. an handkerchief, value 1 s. and 1 l. 16 s. in monies numbered, his property .

JANE LINDSAY . I am the wife of John Lindsay , he lives in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell . On the night of the 5th of August, about eleven o'clock, I and my servant shut up the house; we fastened the doors and the windows. I called my servant up at six o'clock the next morning; she came down stairs and came up to me. I saw the street door open as I came down stairs. The kitchen window was open, but not the parlour window. Upon my looking about I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Have you since seen the watch, the plated teaspoons, and the handkerchief - A. Yes, in the prisoner's possession; the silver tea-spoons, they were sold. On the 6th, in the afternoon, the prisoner came to me. I saw my handkerchief hanging out at his pocket; it struck me that it was mine. I told him so. He took it out, and said it was not mine. I knew it then. I then had him taken in custody. He ran away from me; I called for assistance. He told me he was not the person that broke my house; I told him he was.

SARAH GWYN . I am servant to Mrs. Lindsay. She and I fastened up the doors on the 5th, and the windows. I got up at six o'clock the next morning; I went into the kitchen first; the window was open, I had left it shut; the street door was open, that I had shut. The shirts were in the kitchen, hanging on the line. The watch and silver spoons were all on the sideboard the over night.

Q. Whereabouts is this house situated - A. In Fox-lane, Shadwell.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a pawbroker. On the 6th of August, the prisoner pledged this watch with me for one pound fifteen shillings. I am certain it was him.

Prosecutrix. That is my husband's watch.

JAMES URQUHART . Q. On the afternoon of the 6th did you see Mr. Lindsay pursuing the prisoner - A. I did; she was crying out stop thief; I helped to secure him.

JOSEPH JANSON . I helped to secure the prisoner with the last witness. I took him to the watch-house; he was searched by the headborough; there were forty-one shillings found upon him, a one pound note, a pair of sugar-tongs, a plated table-spoon, and two plated tea-spoons.

WILLIAM FRANCIS . I am an headborough. I produce the property I found on the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. The sugar-tongs and spoons are mine.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-66

891. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon James Fago , on the 26th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, two pair of shoes, value 6 s. and an handkerchief, value 6 d. his property .

JAMES FAGO . I am a shoemaker . On the 26th of July I was going into Tower-street; I was crossing from Monmouth-court to Lumber-court , I received a blow upon the pole of my neck by a man; it felled me to the ground, but my wife, who had hold of my arm prevented me from falling to the ground. The prisoner snatched the bundle out of my hand, and ran away. I have known the prisoner from a child; he lived in the same neighbourhood where I lived. On the next day I was crossing the Dials when I saw the prisoner and the man that knocked me down, in company together. I went up to the prisoner; the other man ran away. I immediately collared the prisoner; he knocked me down and made his escape. In about an hour and a half after I was crossing the Dials, the prisoner came up to me and made a laugh at me taking him in custody. I took hold of him by the collar, and held him until Mr. Bennet came up and took him in custody.

Mr. Adolphus. Are you the gentleman in whose house there were found some housebreaking tools - A. No, never in my life, so help me God. I had six months for being out a late hour in the night.

Q. Who sent you to the house of correction - A. The sessions at Clerkenwell.

Q. How many times since have you been in prison - A. About twice, upon charges of the same kind. I was committed, and referred to the sessions for the opinion of the Jury. I was tried on a suspicion of

burglary first; the second time on charge of a street robbery

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-67

892. ELIZABETH SHEHAN and JEREMIAH NEALE were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Peter Joseph , on the 20th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, six 3 s. bank tokens, a 25 l. bank note, a 2 l. bank note, and a 1 l. bank note, his property .

PETER JOSEPH . I am a Spanish sailor ; I live in Poplar. On the 20th of August I went with a person of the name of Crowder to the Black Horse public-house; I had a twenty-five pound note, a two pound note, and a one pound note in my pocket. I had my shipmate, Roberts, with me. My shipmate got into conversation with Elizabeth Shehan , and took her into the Black Horse; he asked me if I would go with them; I said, yes. We went together to her house in Poplar .

Q. When you came there did you find any person in the room - A. Yes; there were two men sitting in the room. I sent for some supper; I paid for it. I gave the man an eighteen-penny piece.

Q. After supper did your shipmate go away - A. Yes, they took him away out of the house.

Q. Did you go to the door - A. Yes; I saw Crowder standing at the door of his lodging; I asked him, and he came in with me; we had some beer.

Q. A little after supper did the woman do any thing to you - A. Yes, she came close to me, and took out of my pocket six three-shilling pieces. Jeremiah Neale got up with a stick in his hand; he struck me over my head with a stick. Jack Shehan , after that blow, jumped up and catched hold of me by the throat, and took the notes out of my pocket. I put on my hat, and wanted to go away.

Q. Neale struck you, did the woman strike you - A. No. They all rose upon me to prevent my going out of the house. I got out of the house af- afterwards. I went back to the house with some watchman.

Q. The next day did you see the woman - A. Yes, by the Blue Posts. I followed her; she ran down an alley, and got into a privy. I then took her into custody.

Q. Did Crowder go out of the house before you did - A. They beat him out of the house before I went out.

THOMAS CROWDER . I live at Poplar.

Q. Did Joseph, the last witness, invite you into the house this night - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Did you find two men and a woman there - A. I did, and Roberts. Joseph gave me an eighteen-penny piece to get half a gallon of beer and sixpennyworth of bread.

Q. When you were trying to go away did either of the prisoners do anything to you - A. The woman struck me with a poker, and Jack Shehan made at me with a piece of wood. The door was open; I got out, leaving the prosecutor there.

Neale's Defence. This man and his wife were quarrelling down stairs, I was in bed, I came down, I saw the man striving to put this men out of the room; he said he had taken some money from him, and after he had gone out of the house he came back and said he had lost his money. Jack Shehan followed him out of the house. I do not know any thing about it.

Elizabeth Shehan 's Defence. I went to the public-house for a pot of beer.

ELIZABETH SHEHAN , NOT GUILTY .

NEALE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-68

893. EDWARD TAYLOR , JOHN TURNER , and ANN SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , four waistcoats, value 10 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 3 s. the property of Edward Willis , privately in his shop .

SUSANNAH FEAST . I live in Bull's Head-court, King-street, Peter-street. On the 1st of this month I was near Mr. Willis's shop upon Clerkenwell-green , I saw Edward Taylor and Ann Smith at Mr. Willis's shop door; Ann Smith went into Mr. Willis's shop; I saw her take something out of the window; she gave it to Taylor; he put it under his coat; he ran up the green. I saw no further of that. She then went into the shop again; she took something out of the window, put it into her apron, and then run up the green. I then went and gave information to Mr. Willis; he was in the back parlour. He pursued Ann Smith . I saw her brought back with the property in her apron. That is all I know.

EDWARD WILLIS . I keep a clothes-shop upon Clerkenwell-green. On the 1st of September, in consequence of what the little girl told me, I pursued the prisoner, Ann Smith . I overtook her, and brought her back with the four waistcoats in her apron. I did not see the men prisoners until afterwards. These are the waistcoats; they are my property.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . Limbrick and I took the woman in custody about five o'clock. After Smith had been before the magistrate Taylor and Turner, at eight o'clock, followed her; as we were conveying her to New prison they asked us to let her have something to drink at the Jolly Cooper. They drank together, and talked together. Limbrick told me these men answered the description that he had of them; he took them in custody.

TAYLOR, GUILTY, aged 21.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

TURNER, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-69

894. ELEANOR FRAME was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , a yard of cambric, value 6 s. the property of William Brown and Thomas Farley , privately in their shop .

GEORGE PARSONS . I am shopman to William Brown and Thomas Farley, No. 16, Ship-alley, Wellclose-square . On the 21st of July, the prisoner came to their shop.

Q. Was John Black an assistant there - A. He was. The prisoner asked to look at some calico;

she gave me a five shilling and sixpenny dollar, and asked me to give her change for it; at the same time she asked me to let her look at some French cambric, and when I shewed it her and opened it I told over the pieces. I observed her hand upon that single piece of cambric, that made me look more particular at her. I had suspicion of her when she came in. At last she fixed upon a cambric, and asked for three nails, and while I was cutting it I observed her take a piece of cambric from the counter, and throw it under her arm. I cut the piece of cambric for her, and moved the cambric from off the counter. I gave her the change, and while I was stooping for the paper I observed her put the cambric that she had stolen under her apron. After I had given her the change I charged her with stealing a piece of cambric.

Q. You observed her steal it - A. Yes. She denied having the cambric at first; I told her I must search her, upon which she put her hand into her apron and threw the cambric behind the counter. This is the piece of cambric; it is the property of my employers. The value of it is six shillings.

JOHN BLACK . I am an assistant in this shop. When Parsons said he must search her I saw her throw the piece of cambric from out of her apron to the other side of the counter. I picked it up. There then was the shop mark upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-70

895. JOHN HOPKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23th of Aust , eight trumpets, value 8 l. thirteen horns, value 3 l. 15 s. and twenty-five music books, value 3 l. 15 s. the property of James Powers .

JAMES POWERS . I am a musical instrument and music seller , No. 24, in the Strand . The prisoner was a servant in my employ.

THOMAS EDWARD JONES . I am a pawnbroker, shopman to Mr. Benton, High Holborn. The prisoner pawned with me bugle horns, trumpets, and music books at different times.

Q. Did he bring any more than one trumpet at a time - A. No. On the 19th of January last he pawned two bugle horns for one pound one shilling in the name of Turner. He has pawned several times at our house. I am positive to his person. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. This trumpet is my property; it is worth twenty shillings.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-71

896. JOHN FURLONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , thirty-six yards of carpetting, value 3 l. the property of John Paulin , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN PAULIN . I am an upholsterer , in Broad-street, Ratcliffe . On the 27th of July I missed a piece of carpetting, value three pound. I saw it at Joseph Radnall 's. I had not sold the carpetting to any body.

Q. Where did you keep this carpetting - A. In my warehouse open to the street.

Q. The morning that you missed the carpetting had the prisoner Furlong been to your house - A. Yes. I never saw him before that. He came to ask charity. He was not five minutes on my premises as I know of.

Q. Was the carpetting that was found yours - A. Yes; the piece is worth three pounds.

MARTIN ORAM . I am a stationer; I live in Broad-street, Ratcliffe.

Q. On any day were you going along Whitechapel - A. I was; I cannot exactly say the day. It was on the day that Mr. Paulin missed a piece of carpetting. I saw the prisoner going towards Aldgate; he had a piece of carpetting on his shoulder.

Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. I had seen him once or twice before; he stopped at a house nearly opposite the London hospital, at a broker's shop. I did not see him go in.

JOSEPH RADNALL . I am a broker, No. 80, Whitechapel-road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. On the 27th of July he came into my shop; he said he had taken a piece of carpet for a bad debt. I gave him two pound for it. I delivered it to the officer. I bought another piece before of him on the 21st.

JOHN WILLAN . I am an officer. I produce the carpet.

Prosecutor. That is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the carpet from Mr. Paulin. I took it of a person to sell for him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 61.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of his age .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-72

897. ELIZABETH THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of William Williams , three 5 l. bank notes, and two 1 l. bank notes, his property .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I keep a public-house at Ealing . The prisoner was my servant . I did not miss any bank notes; they were found on the prisoner. My notes were put in a tea-chest. I can only say that it is from the prisoner's confession that I know any thing about it. The notes are here. I did not know what number of notes there were in the tea-chest. We did not miss them on that account, nor can I identify them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-73

898. JOHN CHALKLY was indicted for that he, on the 12th of September , one mare, value 5 l. the property of Edward Kimpton , unlawfully did kill .

SECOND COUNT, a mare, value 5 l. he unlawfully did wound.

EDWARD KIMPTON . I live at Highgate. I am an harness-maker .

Q. Had you in September a mare and a colt - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he is a servant to Mr. Stringer at Highgate.

Q. Has Stringer a field near that way where you kept your mare and colt - A. Yes, adjourning to it, in the parish of Hornsey ; my mare and colt used to stray into Mr. Stringer's field; they were usually driven back by Chalkly; he used to come and said I have just driven your mare and colt out of our field, I hope you will give me something to drink.

Q. On Saturday, before the 13th of September, did he come to your house - A. Yes; he quarrelled with a boy of the name of Getty that works for me, he charged him with turning the mare and colt into the field; I told him if he did not go away I would kick his backside; he stood against the door and made a multitude of words; he went away jawing to himself.

Q. Thomas Jennings was there - A. He was; in consequence of Jennings's information I sent my mare and colt to another field, about a mile off Stringer's field.

Q. On Sunday, in consequence of what you heard, did you go to Stringer's field - A. Yes; I heard the mare and colt was in the field; I found the mare and the colt there, with the colt's entrails out; it appeared as if it had been cut.

Q. At eight o'clock in the morning did the colt die - A. Yes; the prisoner came in and asked me if the colt's entrails were all out; I said yes, you old blackguard, you have done it. He said, I know I did, and I told you I would; he said he should be there in the morning, mind there be no more there.

Q. What did he mean by there - A. He should be in the field.

Q. The colt was yours - A. Yes.

THOMAS JENNINGS . I live at Highgate, near Mr. Kimpton.

Q. Were you at your door on the day when Kimpton and the prisoner were having words - A. Yes: I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Kimpton's gate; he swore that if he catched the mare again in the field she never should come out alive.

SAMUEL MILLER . Q. Were you near the prisoner and Kimpton on the Sunday morning, when the prisoner came - A. Yes; the prisoner asked whether the colt's bowels were all out; Kimpton said yes, you know they are, you old blackguard, and you have done it; he said, I know I did it.

THOMAS WOODMAN . I was in Kmipton's yard when the prisoner came; he said, Ned, is the entrails of the colt quite out; he said, yes, you know it, you old blackguard, and you know you have done it; he said, I know I did it; I told you I would do it.

WILLIAM READ . I took the prisoner into custody; he denied doing it.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, we had some cows milked in the field on Wednesday morning; on Saturday morning one was milked again, Mr. Kimpton's horse was in the field; I told him there were four of Kimpton's horses in the field; on Saturday morning there were two there again; I told Kimpton of it: he called me a liar. On Sunday morning master sent me into the field to see if any body was milking the cows; the mare and colt were there, the colt had her bowels out; a man was sent to let him know; about eight o'clock I let him know; he said I did it; I said I did not; I cannot say whether the cow did or not. One of the cows had lost her calf, it was vicious; she might have done it.

Q. to Kimpton. Q. Did you observe the wound - A. Yes, it was cut with a knife; it was not torn as a cow's horn would have ripped it up.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 56.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-74

899. ROBERT TUCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , twenty-four pounds weight of cheese, value 20 s. the property of William Copley , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM COPLEY . I am a cheesemonger , No. 12, Whitechapel . I saw a man take the cheese, I cannot say the prisoner is the man, I did not pursue him; he was pursued, and a man was brought back. I am not certain the prisoner is the man that took the cheese.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-75

900. FREDERICK CORDEROY was indicted for feloniously stealing; on the 5th of August , one hundred and thirty-two pounds weight of candles, value 6 l. and two boxes, value 8 s. the property of John Brooks , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BROOKS . I am a wholesale tallow-chandler , at Ratcliffe . The prisoner was my servant . I have for a considerable time missed fat and candles; on the 5th of August, I called Corderoy to me; I told him I had strong suspicion that he robbed me; he denied it. I told him I should search his house; he went with me to his house at Stepney-causeway; in a closet in his cellar I found tallow, fat, and four dozen pounds of candles in a box, and several papers of candles containing two pounds each; he at first said he bought them in Holborn, at last he said he took them from my house; they were my candles; some of the candles were short size candles that we make particularly for sail-makers. I told him I knew they were my property.

MR. BECKHAM. After the candles were found the prosecutor said to the prisoner what have you to say; these candles are mine; the prisoner said, yes, sir, they are.

JOHN BUTLER . I am an officer. After Mr. Brooks had searched I went and made a further search; I found this box in the cellar, concealed under a parcel of rubbish; it contains seventy pounds of candles.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt they are my property.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-76

901. MARY LIZZY BLANCHE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a gown, value 12 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s. four petticoats, value 15 s. thirteen neck-handkerchiefs, value 12 s. two shawls, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value

3 s. four towels, value 1 s. a thimble, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a pair of scissars, value 6 d. the property of Catherine Hayes .

CATHERINE HAYES . I am a poor woman. I have only one room; the house I live in is let out in lodgings; the prisoner lodged with me. On the 9th of July, I went out between nine and ten in the morning; I left the prisoner in the room, and I left all my property in a box; I used to see it every Sunday; on the Monday following it was taken; I returned to my lodging about two o'clock, the prisoner was gone off; when I came into my place I found my box was broken open with a hatchet; the hatchet was upon a chair; the prisoner locked my door, and took the key with her; in eight days time I catched the prisoner upon London-bridge; I found my key upon her.

WILLIAM BERRY DOBSON . I am a constable. I took these things from the prisoner.

Q. Shew them to the prosecutrix -

Prosecutrix. This shawl, and this half tablecloth is mine; this muslin handkerchief, petticoat, and scissars are mine.

GUILTY, age 36.

Of stealing to the value of 5 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-77

902. BENJAMIN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Betcy Johnson , on the 14th of September , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a lace veil, value 1 l. and a miniature picture, value 3 l. her property .

BETCY JOHNSON . I live in Lisle-street. On the night of the 13th of September, about one o'clock, I was coming home, coming along Cranbourn-street I saw the prisoner with two other men; the prisoner took hold of me by the hair of my head, and snatched the veil from my face; he strove to get the miniature that was round my neck, there was glass before it, it was set in gold, and marked with G. E. He snatched that away from me; I cried out for help. The prisoner struck me three or four times; after that Mr. Webb came up; he secured the prisoner; I never lost sight of the prisoner. I saw Mr. Webb pick up the veil. The prisoner did not strike me until after he got the veil. It was a sudden snatch, the taking of the veil, and the miniature.

WILLIAM WEBB . I live at 19, Wardour-street, Soho. I had seen Betcy Johnson at the play; I had left her, and was happening to go up the same passage that she went up; I saw three men surround her; I saw the prisoner take the veil; I seized the prisoner; he dropped the veal. I did not see the miniature taken; he dropped the veil; I picked it up, and delivered it to the constable.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner in the custody of Mr. Webb; in taking him to the watchhouse he offered me a shilling not to take him; I delivered him up to the constable; after that I went back, and found the glass.

GEORGE ALEXANDER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me; this veil was delivered to me by Mr. Webb.

Prosecutrix. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, I did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-78

903. ELIZABETH COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a gold ring, value 14 s. a thimble, value 6 d. a gown, value 5 s. three petticoats, value 3 s. six caps, value 3 s. seven children's shirts, value 3 s. 6 d. a frill, 6 d. a silver spoon, value 12 s. and one shilling, the property of John Parker , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN PARKER . I am a house keeper; I live at No. 2, New-road, St. George's in the East . The prisoner was my servant ; I applied at the office for a search-warrant; I searched her box, and in the prisoner's pocket I found a shilling that I had marked in the morning; she had taken it out of my breeches pocket; I also found a gold ring, that was my property; I saw several things taken out of her box that is not in the indictment.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I searched the prisoner's box; I found this property now produced, and in her pocket the gold ring was, in her pocket-book, in her pocket, one shilling and a silver thimble.

Prosecutor. The ring was my wife's ring, it was missed the day that she died, or the day after; she died on the 10th of July; I found it on the prisoner on the 16th of August.

MARTHA PARKER . I am the daughter of the prosecutor.

Q. Look at that property, what is it - A. A petticoat, five frocks, seven infant's shirts, a muslin gown, and other things; they were my mother's property.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-79

904. JOHN MEASUM and MARY HARVEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of August , a man's hat, value 5 s. forty eight shillings, in monies numbered, and four 1 l. bank notes , the property of Henry Campbell . And THOMAS HARVEY for feloniously receiving on the same day, a man's hat, value 5 s. he knowing it to be stolen .

HENRY CAMPBELL . I am a Marine in the Woolwich division . On the 23rd of August last, I was in company with Measum, he was with me when I bought the hat; we then went to the Crown in Wheeler-street ; we had three quarterns of rum; Measum said he would go for his good woman; he brought Mary Harvey in; he called her his wife; he desired me to go and lay down in her room as I was in liquor, and to have a sleep; I went there and laid down on the bed.

Q. Was Measum or Harvey there - A. Mrs. Harvey was there, but Thomas Harvey I don't know. I went to sleep.

Q. How much money had you in your pocket when you went - A. Four one-pound notes and forty-eight shillings in silver, and a hat that I had bought.

Q. When did you see the notes and silver last, before you went into the public-house - A. About an hour before; that was before I was in liquor. I awoke about a quarter of an hour, my money and notes were gone, and this hat was there.

Measum. Q. When you came out of Mary Harvey 's room, did not you ask me to go along with you to your friends in the Tower; I said I would not go, because I had no money; you then said, you would give me a pound note - A. I did not.

COURT. What is Measum - A. He belongs to the Tower Hamlets.

JAMES KENNEDY . I apprehended the prisoners; they denied any knowledge of the robbery; Mrs. Harvey said the prosecutor had been there with Measum; Measum said Campbell gave him a one-pound note, that he took his hat, and left his new hat. I produce the hat. Measum said Campbell had got his hat. I searched the prisoner; I found nothing on them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-80

905. MARY DILLON and ELIZABETH DILLON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , two handkerchiefs, value 18 d. two shirts, value 8 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Robert Bridges ; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. two habit-shirts, value 2 s. the property of John Berry ; and a set of bed-furniture, value 5 s. the property of William Giles .

ROBERT BRIDGES . Q. Did you on the 24th of July lose a handkerchief, stockings, and shirts - A. Yes; Mrs. Berry had them to wash.

JOHN BERRY . I live in Mr. Giles's house; my wife takes in washing; I only know the property belongs to my wife. I saw the property hanging on the line to dry, on the morning of the 24th of July, about four o'clock; a little while after I was alarmed by Mr. Lilley; I saw Mary Dillon in the yard; the things were off the line, and laid together; she begged for mercy.

MR. LILLEY. I am a pork butcher; I live at 44, Pennyfields, Poplar ; next door to Mr. Giles. On the morning of the 24th of July, about a quarter after four, I saw the two prisoner in Mr. Giles's yard; I went round to see what they were doing, I asked them what they were doing there; they said gathering sticks to light the fire. One of them had a bundle; they both went away. I think Mary Dillon dropped the bundle; I picked up the bundle, pursued her, and took her, and the bundle to Mr. Giles's yard, and Elizabeth Dillon was brought there; I called Mr. Giles, and gave him the bundle; the constable, John Wheel, had it afterwards.

WILLIAM GILES . I am the landlord of the house that Mr. Berry lives in; I was alarmed; I came down, and saw the prisoners; they begged me to forgive them.

JOHN WHEEL . I am a constable. I produce the property.

MARY DILLON , GUILTY , aged 20.

ELIZABETH DILLON , GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-81

906. CHARLES FREDERICK BEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , seven hundred and twenty pounds weight of curled hair, value 20 l. four yards of hair-cloth, value 10 l. and one thousand brass nails, value 20 s. the property of Alexander M'Kenzie and James Percy Blissett .

ALEXANDER M'KENZIE . I am an upholsterer , 32, Mary-le-bone-street, Golden-square ; Jame Percy Blissett is my partner. The prisoner was our foreman of the upholsterers ; he had the charge of the upholstery business to himself; he had seven shillings and sixpence a day, and the leisure time he worked over that he was paid for, and an apprentice he was allowed to have, that he was paid for also.

Q. Did you at any time miss any curled hair - A. Yes, not till I got the hair merchan'ts accompt.

Q. What steps did you take to find out who had stolen the curled hair - A. I consulted the prisoner, and then I went to Bow-street; I consulted the prisoner, and desired him not to let it be known.

Q. Did your suspicion at last fall upon the prisoner - A. Not before I received information. The prisoner's house is next door to mine; his yard is in a direct line to mine, with a wall about seventeen feet high.

Q. Did the prisoner carry on any business with your permission - A. Certainly he did, and I wished him to do it; I had a good opinion of him; he was my confidential man.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you recollect any body going out of your house on the very day that the prisoner desired you to mark the hair - A. On the night it was stolen I certainly did observe one of the women go out bulky.

JAMES HAYES . I am an upholsterer.

Q. Did you in June last, do any work for the prisoner - A. Yes, at his own house I did; I covered half a dozen chairs.

Q. Did the prisoner give you the hair cloth for that purpose - A. He did; from Mr. M'Kenzie's premises into his own; he handed it over the wall.

Q. Did he hand over the quantity that you wanted, or a larger quantity - A. A larger quantity.

Q. How much did you by his desire cut off for the work - A. Four yards and a half, which covered the seats of six chairs; I cut it off on the prisoner's premises in the back-house; I took the remainder into his parlour, because it should not lay in the back-shop.

Q. After you had given information to the prosecutors were you shewn the hair-cloth again - A. I said I should know it again by some marks that were on it; it was a chalk mark that I found on it. This is the hair-cloth that was fetched from Mr. M'Kenzie's press, and shewn me; it is in small pieces now; it has the marks on it.

Q. Who were these chairs for - A. A customer of the prisoner's; I fetched them in, and took them back again.

Q. Where did you receive the brass nail - A. I received one thousand over the wall, by Mr. Best; they were used when they were wanted for this job; the covering of the chairs took about a day; this

was about the middle of June; it was handed over to me in the middle of the day.

ELIZABETH BLAKEY . Q. Did you work with the prosecutors, M'Kenzie and Blissett - A. I did.

Q. In the month of June last, did you see any curled-hair go from your masters to any other place - A. I have seen curled-hair, canvas, and tick, put over the wall by Mr. Best; I cannot say what the quantity was; there was no secrecy in this a I know off, all the work people could see it publicly.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to M'Kenzie. The prisoner, by your consent, worked for himself - A. Yes, and we let him have articles at prime cost, either upon credit or ready money, which he chosed; but he was to accompt to me or my partner, and to get the clerk to book it.

COURT. Is your partner here - A. Yes.

Q. Had he ever applied to you for hair-cloth in June last - A. Certainly not.

Q. Did he apply for nails - A. Certainly not; nor for any bundles of curled hair. I knew nothing of his having them until we received information from the witnesses, nor did the prisoner apprise me of taking them.

Q. When was it that you received the intelligence - A. I think it will be a fortnight to-morrow.

JAMES LARGE . Q. You are clerk to the prosecutors - A. I am. This is the book in which the articles are entered that the prisoner had.

Q. Is there the entry of articles which the prisoner had of his master - A. There is one and only one that I know of; this article was in March, 1812 thirty yards of baize; none since that time.

Q. to Mr. M'Kenzie. What would be the value of this baize - A. Three pound ten shillings.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did not he at Christmas lend you a large quantity of horse hair - A. I have been told so since, but I did not know so then.

Q. Do you not know that he did - A. To be sure he did.

COURT. Who told you so - A. Best, himself; I heard it at Bow-street office.

Q. Do you believe that he had lent you horse hair - A. I believe it; I have no doubt but he did.

Q. Has he been credited in the book for it - A. It is not credited to him, nor has he debited to himself the horse hair that was put over the wall.

ELIZABETH LAFIELD . Q. Do you remember the prisoner asking you to buy a thousand nails - A. Yes; I purchased them of the person that the prosecutor dealt with; I delivered them to Mr. Best's servant, at his own house.

Q. to Large. Did the prisoner any time in June last, apply to you for permission to take any haircloth, curled hair, or nails - A. Never; if he had I should have put them down in the Waste-book.

COURT. We have heard from your master that the prisoner advanced to the partnership a quantity of horse hair, and he believes that to be so; did you make any entry of that for the credit of the prisoner - A. I never did; I never knew it until I learned it here.

Q. Whose duty would it have been to have made an entry of that - A. Mine, undoubtedly.

JAMES BLISSETT . I am partner with Mr. M'Kenzie.

Q. Had the prisoner ever applied to you to take this hair-cloth, curled-hair, or nails - A. He had not.

Q. Now, we have heard of something that passed at Bow-street, that he lent to your manufactory; did you know that - A. I did know of an advance.

Q. How much was that - A. One dozen only; that was not entered; he said Christmas was very near, he would lend us that, and pay himself.

Prisoner. I asked Mr. Blissett's leave to take this double hair-cloth.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Mr. Blissett. The whole piece originally was the prisoner's, you did not want so large a quantity as that - A. No; I told him if he wanted any of the hair-cloth to take it from us, and put it down in the book.

COURT. Is he credited in the book a whole piece - A. He is; this is the book; twenty-two yards of satin hair-cloth, sixty-four pounds and seven-pence, April, 1813. It is still remaining in account between us, and the balance not settled; he was to have any part of it; I said, take it if you want it, put it down in the book.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-82

907. WILLIAM LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , one hundred and seventy-six halfpence, value 7 s. 4 d. the property of Francis Roberts .

FRANCIS ROBERTS . I keep a ham and beef shop in Bear-street, Leicester-square . On the 15th of August, near nine in the evening, the prisoner with another lad came into my shop; they were both strangers; they asked me for two ounces of ham; I turned my back to cut it; I served them, and took the money of the other person, and during the time that I was cutting the ham, the prisoner took the halfpence; they paid for the ham, and both went out of the shop, and as soon as they went out of the door I heard the cry of stop thief; I heard my neighbour, Mr. Guest, cry out, Roberts; I heard the halfpence rattle; the neighbours had got the prisoner into custody. There were two five shilling papers of halfpence; gone some of the people might have picked some of them up; the papers broke, and the halfpence were scattered about. I saw the prisoner pull off his hat, and both the papers broke on the stones, by the fall; the prisoner was brought back.

RICHARD GUEST . At nine o'clock, on the 15th of August, I was looking through my window, which is opposite of Mr. Roberts's window of his shop; I saw the prisoner, Long, and another go into the shop. I saw Long look sharp round him; I saw him whip a five shilling paper of halfpence into his pocket, and another paper parcel of halfpence into his hat, and put his hat on his head; I could see they were paper parcels of halfpence plain; I ran out into the street, I laid hold of him; he pulled off his hat, and the halfpence fell on the stones, both the papers broke; I brought the prisoner back to Mr. Roberts's shop; as the prisoner was running I saw him pull off his hat, both papers of halfpence fell out

on the stones; I brought the prisoner back; Edward Farlow picked up the money.

EDWARD FARLOW . I saw the last witness lay hold of the prisoner; when we were coming back I head something fall like money; I picked up one paper; I delivered it into Mr. Roberts's possession.

Prosecutor. The halfpence were brought into the shop, one hundred and seventy-six; that is all we could find; the rest had been lost in the fall.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the halfpence until they were shewed me.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-83

908. AMELIA EWER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a set of bed furniture, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Inch .

ELIZABETH INCH . I am the wife of Thomas Inch ; I live at 35, Checquer-alley, Whitechapel . The prisoner charred for me ; on the 31st of August, I went out, about ten in the morning, I left the prisoner in charge of the house; she had to go out to get water, whether she left the door open I am not certain, and some other person might have got in.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-84

909. ANN LUMMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a watch, value 2 l. the property of George Saul , from his person . And WILLIAM DAVIS, alias PERKINS , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the said goods, he knowing it to be stolen .

GEORGE SAUL . I am a Greenwich pensioner, and work in the Dock-yard . On the 27th of June, about half after ten at night, I fell in company with the prisoner in Whitechapel; I had been to see an acquaintance in Spitalfields; I fell in company with the woman at the corner of Essex-street, Whitechapel; I asked her the way to Execution-dock, I wanted to go to Deptford; I thought I could cross from Execution-dock to Deptford. I was the worse for liquor. She said it was late, I had better come and get a bed; I said. I would rather go home. She catched me by the breast, she said come along, go to bed, you cannot get home. I went up stairs with her into a room in Essex-street ; she called to a man to bring her a candle; I did not like the room. I said, I would not sleep there; she shoved me down, and said I must strip and go to bed; she pushed me down on the bed, she pulled my watch out of my fob; she ran out of the room with my watch, and shut the door. It was a silver watch.

Q. Have you ever seen the watch since - A. Yes; at the pawnbroker's. I gave five guineas for it; I had it three years; it is worth two guineas. I remained in the room about a quarter of an hour; being a stranger I did not know what to do, and then a man shoved the door open, and muttered some words in a threating tone of voice; he collared me, and knocked me down; I got up, and struck him, and scratched his face; he did not say what he was. When I scratched his face, he knocked me down again, and when I was getting up, he shoved me out of the room; my hat fell off; he took it up and looked at it, and threw it out of the room after me.

Q. Have you seen him since - A. No. He followed me into the passage, and struck me; this room was up two pair of stairs. A man opened the door in his shirt, with a candle in his hand; the man left me alone, and went to him, he called him Jack; he said see the way this fellow has left my face, shewing his face to the man; I saw his face then, it was all over blood.

Q. Was that man the prisoner at the bar - A. He was about the size of him, I cannot swear to the man. Jack shut the door, and he knocked me down again in the passage, and there I laid till day light.

Q. Did the last blow deprive you of your senses - A. Yes, entirely; I lay in a gore of blood until the morning; I could not see out of my eyes; when I got up I went into the opposite room to where I had been robbed; I told a woman and a man how I had been robbed; they directed me to go to Lambeth-street office. I went to the office; I described the woman to Dalton, the officer, and the prisoner; the woman was brought to the office; I knew her again. I told the officer I was quite sure she was the woman that robbed me of my watch, and I now say upon my oath, she is the woman.

EBENEZER DALTON . I am an officer. On Monday, the 28th of June, in the morning, I was at the Flying Horse, next door to the office in Lambeth-street; Saul came and said he had been robbed of a watch and a few shillings, and from his description of the woman I apprehended the woman prisoner. The prosecutor gave a description of the man who had beaten him; I apprehended the man. The prosecutor said he could not swear to him, he was like him.

THOMAS BATEMAN . I am servant to Deer and Lions, pawnbrokers, Three Colt-street, Limehouse. I produce a watch pawned there; I was in the shop when it was pledged; Francis Lion took it in pledge. I have no knowledge whatever of the prisoner. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. I am quite sure it is my watch, that the woman prisoner took from me.

Lummes's Defence. I know nothing about the watch. The man must be mistaken in the person he has sworn to.

Davis was not put on his defence.

LUMMES, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Life .

DAVIS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-85

910. WILLIAM LACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , three seals, value 30 s. a ring, value 2 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. the property of William Robinson .

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am a servant ; I live in Montague-square. On the 12th of August I was in Providence-court, in the neighbourhood of Grosvenor-square . There had been a fire there. I was looking at the engine playing; I heard the cutting of a pair of scissars.

Q. Had you three seals to your watch, a ring, and a key - A. Yes, they were fastened by a ribbon. On my hearing the blades of the scissars move I put my hand down and saw my seals were gone. I saw the prisoner run away from me; I ran after him, and caught hold of him by the collar; he struggled to get away: he asked me what I wanted; he put his hand to his jacket pocket, and appeared to throw something away. I charged him with stealing my seals; he said he had not got them. They were picked up near to where he stood. The person that picked them up does not appear. These are the seals that were cut from my ribbon. A pair of scissars was picked up; another person, his name is Catling; he produced the scissars from behind the prisoner; he put them on his shoulder. The prisoner said they were not his.

DAVID CATLING . At that time I was a servant to Dr. Armstrong.

Q. Were you in Providence-court on the day mentioned - A. Yes. I saw the prosecutor collar the prisoner; I saw the prisoner throw away a pair of scissars away behind him. I picked them up, and offered them to the prisoner; he told me to throw them away. I put them on his shoulder.

WILLIAM WARD . I am an apprentice to Samuel Carpenter , a shoemaker, in North-row, Grosvenor-square. I was in Providence-court on the day mentioned; I saw the prosecutor lay hold of the prisoner; he scuffled to get away; he put his hand into his jacket pocket; he threw the seals behind him. They were picked up and given to the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. These are the seals that were cut off. The seals, key, and ribbon, cost me thirty-five shillings; I value them at that.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived in the neighbourhood where the fire was. I am innocent of what I am accused of. I am a lamplighter.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-86

911. CHARLOTTE HARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of August , one hundred and thirty-eight apples, value 18 d. the property of Alexander Pitt .

ALEXANDER PITT . I am a market-gardener ; I live at Hammersmith . The prisoner is the wife of a labouring man. I was not present when the prisoner took the apples.

- FARMER. I live at Hammersmith; I work in the gardens. The prisoner came into Mr. Pitts' ground; she took apples off the tree, and carried them off immediately. I cannot say how many she took.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-87

912. MARGARET M'MAHON was indicted for that she, on the 29th of May , twenty-two pieces of false milled money and coin, made to the likeness of a good shilling, unlawfully did put off to John Herbert for ten shillings .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

JOHN HERBERT . I am a working silversmith .

Q. In consequence of information that you received were you induced to go to M'Gibbs's house, in Fitzroy-square - A. I was. That was on the 27th of May last. I was there introduced to the prisoner. I knew her before; she gets her bread by making bad money, and putting it off. A conversation arose that I wanted some bad money; she said that she could serve me with any quantity; her mother was by at the time; I knew her. The prisoner whispered to me, and told me that she took a good deal more pains with her goods than her mother did.

Q. What did you understand by goods - A. Counterfeit shillings. She finished the counterfeit shillings better than her mother did. I asked her how she sold them; she said forty-four for a pound, two bad ones for a good one, and four over in a pounds-worth. She appointed to meet me at a public-house in St. Martin's-lane. On the 28th I agreed to meet her in St. Martin's-lane; a man came with her; she called him her husband: his name is Sam Quilter . She told him that she wanted to speak to me. I left the man in doors; she said she had some very good ones. She left the child with him. We walked down St. Martin's-lane , She went into another public-house to a man of the name of Roach; she said, Roach was a shy man, he would not like to be served before me. I waited in the street until she came out; she said she had another person to serve and then she would go in doors and serve me. She went up a court to this person, and then returned to me. We walked together to a gateway, and then there she gave me twenty-two counterfeit shillings; I gave her ten shillings, two three-shilling bank tokens and four shillings in silver.

Q. How did you get that money that you paid her - A. Matthews, the officer, marked it and gave it me.

Q. Did you see the money afterwards - A. It was produced to me. It was the same money that Matthews had given to me, and had marked in my presence before he gave it me.

Q. What did you do with these twenty-two shillings - A. Matthews, the officer, has got them.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I met the last witness at the Sun public-house on the 29th of May I marked two three-shilling bank tokens and four shillings; I gave them to Herbert. This is the marked money that I took from the prisoner, and these are the twenty-two shillings that I had of Herbert.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are the assistant solicitor of the Mint. You have been long in the habit of proving money: look at these twenty-two, and tell me whether they are all counterfeit - A. These twenty-two are all counterfeits; they appear all alike, and they appear not to have been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Mrs. Fitzroy; she made me a gown. I went up to her on Sunday night; I saw Mrs. Tuhoy and this man, Herbert; they deal in bad shillings and bad notes; they asked me if I wanted any. I said I wanted nothing of the kind.

I had but fourteen shillings and sixpence. On the Saturday Mrs. Tuhoy borrowed ten shillings of me; they both said would I have any thing to drink. We went to the corner of the street, to the wine vaults. Herbert treated me. I said to Mrs. Tuhoy, will you give me the ten shillings that I lent you on Saturday; she said she had not got it; here is twenty-two shillings. I replied I would have nothing of the kind. She said, Mr. Herbert, if you will lend me ten shillings I will pay you on the Monday. Herbert gave me the ten shillings, but the twenty-two shillings I did not give him at all. They found the ten shillings on me which they say is marked.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-88

913. CATHERINE MALTBY was indicted for that she, on the 27th of May , six pieces of false counterfeit milled money made to the likeness of a good shilling, did put off to John Herbert for three shillings .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

JOHN HERBERT . I have known the prisoner for several years about the town, but not where her place of dealing was until I had information of Tuhoy. I went with Tuhoy to the house of Mr. M'Gibbs, in a passage leading from Fitzroy-market to Tottenham-court-road. I think it was on the 25th of May I was introduced to her by Tuhoy; we got in conversation; she gave me to understand that she served the person who owned the house with bad money; she agreed to serve me also; she said she sold two for one. She agreed to let me have five or six in the evening; she could not let me have more; Old Abel, the cutter, had got drunk and disappointed her. I have heard Abel talked of, he is a button-maker. She came in the evening to M'Gibbs in the court; she served me six counterfeit shillings; I gave her her a three shilling bank token. We had something to drink; these parties were there; I drank with them. She produced a quantity of bad shillings with rough edges, just as they came from the cutter. She then said I might have any quantity I wanted the next day. I met with her on the next day at M'Gibbs's, and then I gave information to the assistant solicitor of the Mint. Matthews was waiting on the opposite side of the way, and a son of mine was present too. I bought some more money of the prisoner. We thought of detecting her then. She was apprehended on Sunday the 28th.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I accompanied Herbert and his son on both days when he went to the house of M'Gibbs; I staid at a public-house right opposite. I saw Herbert go in. On Sunday I apprehended the prisoner in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square; her husband was with her; she nudged him and said, there is one of the Hatton Garden traps. I stepped up some steps of a gentleman's door; I saw her give a blueish rag in his hand, there appeared to be something wrapped in it. I came down the steps; they both ran away immediately; she ran into a public-house. When I got in she was having a glass of gin at the bar. I took her to the office. I went after the man; I met him in Tottenham-street. He came behind me and struck me. He threw a blue rag from him that was like the rag that had passed from the prisoner. Herbert gave me the money.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Look at the money, and tell me whether it is counterfeit or not - A. They are all counterfeits; they appear fresh, not to have been in circulation, and all of the same make.

Prisoner's Defence. I never gave him one in my life. Every one in Clerkenwell prison, and in this prison, says, Matthews will swear anything. He is a most infamous villain.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-89

914. CLARA SWEENEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , in the dwelling-house of Jeremiah Burke , two 5 l. bank-notes, and five 1 l. bank notes, the property of Jonathan Markin .

JONATHAN MARKIN . I am a foreigner.

Q. On the 23d of August did you meet with the prisoner any where - A. Yes, in Ratcliffe-highway . I went with her home to her lodging.

Q. Did you sleep there - A. I was very much intoxicated in liquor at the time.

Q. Do you know how much money you had when you went into her lodging - A. I had fifteen pound in bank notes, two five-pound notes, and five one-pound notes.

Q. When had you seen them the last time before they were taken - A. I changed a note in the morning at eight o'clock. I had not seen them from that time until they were lost.

Q. What time of the night was this - A. I fell in with her between the hours of nine and ten. I missed them between two and three in the morning.

Q. Did the prisoner sleep with you - A. No, she did not.

Q. How do you know that she took them - A. By expecting her to be in the room when I awoke. There was a bed in the room; I laid upon the bed.

Q. All your ground of suspicion is, you awoke between two or three in the morning and she was not there - A. Yes; the numbers of the notes were told me by the gentleman that paid me.

Q. How soon did you see her again after your loss - A. I think between two and three hours I saw her in her lodgings.

Q. She had not left her lodgings when you saw her after your loss - A. No.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody about seven o'clock in the morning. Untying her petticoat strings this five pound bank note dropped from her, No. 8847, 20th July, 1813.

JOHN JORDAN . Q. Did you pay the prosecutor any bank notes - A. On the 20th of August I paid Jonathan Markin two five-pound bank notes; the numbers of the two five-pound notes were 8847 and 8848, 20th July, 1813.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did you give the prisoner any of these notes - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I will tell you the truth if you please. I was going home; the gentleman was in liquor; he asked me what he should give me to sleep with me, and in the room he asked me for that he had given me; I said I would not give it him. He went out and brought a gentleman in. The gentleman found the note at the bottom of the chair.

COURT, Q. to Hope. In what parish is this house - A. St. George.

Q. Who keeps the house - A. Jeremiah Burke .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the prosecutor being in liquor .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-90

915. JAMES SAUNDERS and WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for that they, on the 12th of August , one sheep, value 30 s. the property of William Hill , unlawfully did kill, with intent to steal the whole carcase of the said sheep .

WILLIAM HILL . I am a butcher; I live in Kentish-town .

Q. In August last had you any sheep there in a field - A. Yes, from twenty to thirty sheep and lambs.

Q. On the 11th of August, upon hearing something did you go to your field and count your sheep - A. We sent for them; we missed a sheep.

Q. Did you find any skin or entrails in the field - The skin was found in an adjoining field. I saw the skin; I believed it to be my skin. The skin was cut; there was none of my marks to be seen; my mark was cut off. It was cut across in three or four different directions.

Q. Did you see afterwards parts of a sheep - A. I saw the head and entrails after the boy brought them out of the field; they were brought from the adjoining field. From the appearance of the sheep it appeared to have been killed by a butcher.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer.

Q. On the 12th of August were you in Church-row, Pancras - A. I was, a little after four in the morning; I there saw Saunders, the prisoner; he was in the field opposite of Church-row, Pancras; he had a butcher's tray on his shoulder. I saw him lower it on a post; it was covered. I went round to him; I asked him what he had in the tray; he said he had got a sheep; he was going to Newgate-market with it. I uncovered it; it was quite hot; it was the hind quarters of a carcase of mutton; there was a knife and steel with it, and a gambol and hook.

Q. Did you know the prisoner, Saunders; what is he - A. A butcher. He attempted to get away, and struggled very much with me. I asked a man to assist me in taking the mutton. I went to Mr. Hill's field; I found the sheep's head, that is all I found there. Mr. Hill's lad found the entrails, the skin was produced by Mr. Hill, and the entrails all but the heart. Bousey produced the fore quarters to these hind quarter of mutton; it tallied with the hind quarters. Whitehair produced the heart; it tallied with the rest of the entrails.

- BOLSEY. Q. You are a Somers-town patrol - A. Yes.

Q. On Thursday morning, the 12th, did you see the prisoner, Thompson - A. Yes, at five o'clock in the morning, as I was coming off my duty; he was coming from Charlton-street, Somers-town; he had a bundle on his shoulder, tied up in a blue apron; I asked him what he had there; he said, I might feel; he put it down; I felt it was meat. I examined the bundle; it was two fore-quarters of a sheep, the pluck, and fat; it weighed forty-three pounds; the heart was not weighed in it; about a minute or two I looked behind the prisoner, there I saw a heart in a paper; I picked it up; the mutton appeared to be fresh killed, but I cannot say it was warm; I delivered the mutton and the heart into Whitehair's custody.

CHARLES MARSHALL . I went to Mr. Hill's field; a man came to me in the morning, and asked me if I had lost a sheep. I said I had not; he said there was a skin in the adjoining field. I found the skin in the field adjoining Mr. Hill's field, and the pluck without the heart. I gave the skin to Mr. Hill's son.

PETER WHITEHAIR . I am constable and watch-house-keeper of Somers-town. Mr. Limbrick first brought the two hind quarters of mutton; in about half an hour after Bousey brought in Thomas with a bundle containing the two fore quarters of a sheep and the fat, and while I was searching him the patrol asked him what was laying down there; he picked up a heart. I felt the meat, it was quite warm.

JOHN EADY . I found the skin; I gave it to Marshall; I saw him give it to young Hill.

Saunder's Defence. I was going to work in the morning, I bought a pair of hind quarters; I bought the tray and all. I was going to Newgate-market to sell it to get two or three shillings by it.

Thomas's Defence. I was going to work, I saw the bundle lay; I picked it up; a watchman asked me what I had got; I told him, mutton. I said if he wanted it he might take it.

SAUNDERS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 56.

THOMAS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 64.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-91

916. SARAH ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , from the person of John Eitheridge , a leather bag, value 1 d. and five 1 l. bank notes, his property .

JOHN EITHERIDGE . On the 15th of August I met with the prisoner at Limehouse. I was quite sober. Between six and seven in the evening I and Thomas Jarvis went into a public-house; we were getting a pot of beer. The prisoner came in; Jarvis asked her to drink; the prisoner drank; he then asked her to take a walk with us; she did; the prisoner went with us to Whitechapel . My friend Jarvis slept with the prisoner; I slept with another woman.

Q. What money had you - A. I had five one-pound notes in a leather bag.

Q. When had you seen the leather bag and the five one-pound notes - A. I had the notes about nine o'clock the evening before I lost them. I missed them on Monday morning, between the hours of two and three o'clock.

Q. Have you ever seen them since - A. Yes, at Shadwell office. I cannot say who took them from me. They were found upon the prisoner. On the Sunday evening we returned to Limehouse again. It was on the Saturday I and my friend slept with the girls.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner; on her I found a leather bag containing five one-pound notes. She said she found them by the side of the prosecutor. These are the notes.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that your bag - A. It is my bag; in it is the rag that the notes were wrapped up in.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched his pocket; I picked the bag up. I never saw it in his possession. The man that I slept with had a great deal of property. I did not touch his money.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-92

917. THOMAS WRIGHT and WILLIAM FARTHING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Benjamin Parkes , from his person .

BENJAMIN PARKES . On the evening of the 24th of July, about half past nine, I was in the Strand, between the New Church and Clement's-lane . I felt some one behind me at my pocket. I turned round and observed the prisoner's (Farthing's) hand in my pocket. I had a silk handkerchief in my pocket at that time.

Q. At that time did you see the other prisoner - A. I did, he was on the left of Farthing, and in order to let them pass I looked into a shop; they passed me and proceeded forward two or three doors; I had a full view of the prisoners; I am certain they are the same men that was behind me when I felt Farthing's hand in my pocket. I then passed them. They followed me. I did not observe that until a little time afterwards, when I felt some one behind me again. I looked round; the prisoner, Farthing, was on my right hand, and Wright on his left hand, the same as before. Soon afterwards I felt a hand in my pocket; my handkerchief was there then, and when I felt two doors further my handkerchief was gone. I immediately turned round when my handkerchief was gone, and the prisoners were gone. I then went back to Temple-bar; I saw two officers; I told them the circumstance, and that I could swear to my handkerchief. They went after the prisoners. I saw them searched; my handkerchief was found upon Wright.

Q. They were together when you found them - A. They were.

JOHN THOMAS . On this evening I was in company with Alverando; we apprehended the prisoners between the New Church and St. Clement's church. They were together. We searched them; in Wright's hat there was found two cotton handkerchiefs, and in his pocket three silk handkerchiefs. This is the handkerchief the prosecutor claimed.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief.

- ALVERANDO. I am an officer. I was with Thomas. I can only corroborate what he has said.

Wright's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

Farthing's Defence. What Mr. Parkes says is very wrong. Wright and I were not together.

WRIGHT, GUILTY , aged 21.

FARTHING, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-93

918. MARY ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , sixteen pounds weight of flour, value 6 s. the property of John Jennings .

JOHN JENNINGS . I am a baker , in Judd-street, New-road . On the 21st of July I was alarmed by the watchman about one o'clock in the morning; I went into the bake-house; I saw the prisoner behind the door; afterwards we found a bag of flour concealed in an empty sack that weighed upwards of sixteen pounds. It was exactly the same quality as my own flour. The prisoner asked me to forgive her, and let her go about her business. I ordered the watchman to take her to the watch-house.

JOHN WALLER . I am the watchman. I gave the alarm to Mr. Jennings. I have heard what he has said, it is so exactly. This is the bag.

Prisoner's Defence. The door was open, I went in, and that is how I am brought here.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Health.

Reference Number: t18130915-94

919. EDWARD CHURCHMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , a pair of sheets, value 1 l. and a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of Hugh Auden , in a lodging-room .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-95

920. ANN HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a sheet, value 3 s. the property of William Gates .

WILLIAM GATES . I live in Rosemary-lane . I lost my sheet on the 13th of August. The prisoner was charged with stealing it; she acknowledge it, and gave me the duplicate, and begged for forgiveness.

THOMAS PARSONS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 10th of August I took this sheet in pawn of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. That is not the sheet in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-96

921. JOHN VAUGHN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , a pair of boots, value 18 s. the property of Alexander Wilson .

The witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-97

922. MARGARET M'KENNEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a counterpane, value 5 s. a blanket, value 2 s. and a sheet, value 7 s. the property of Elizabeth Jewster , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH JEWSTER . I let the lodgings to the prisoner; she was to give six shillings a-week; it was furnished with a bed and bedding, and every thing for her use. I let it to her about ten weeks before the things were missing. I missed a counterpane, blanket, and a sheet. I asked the prisoner where they were; she said they were gone to wash.

Q. Did the prisoner ever leave her lodging - A. No.

JOHN GEORGE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Cording, 163, Ratcliffe-highway. I produce a sheet and a blanket pledged by a woman; the woman came to the office. The prisoner acknowledged that she sent her with it, and the woman was discharged.

Prosecutrix. It is my sheet and blanket.

Prisoner's Defence. It was distress that made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-98

923. HENRY SKINNER was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 13th of September , a 3 s. bank token , the property of Francis Holborough .

FRANCIS HOLBOROUGH . I live in Vere-street, Clare-market . I am a cheesemonger . The prisoner was my servant . In consequence of suspicion, I marked nine three-shilling bank tokens. I put them in the till on Monday the 13th of August; between seven and eight o'clock I went out, I left the prisoner in the shop, and when I came back I looked in the till, there was only eight. I then sent for Clark, the constable; he came and searched him, and found the three-shilling piece upon him that I had marked.

- CLARK. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner; I found upon him this marked three-shilling piece. The prisoner confessed that he had taken fifty shillings out of the till at different times.

Prisoner's Defence. When I took that three-shilling-piece out I took it out before my fellow shop-man's face, but not with an intent to keep it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-99

924. THOMAS WINDRED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a cart, value 14 l. the property of Henry Lemmon .

HENRY LEMMON . I live at Woburn . On Thursday night, my cart was in the cart-house. I saw it again on the Monday morning at the King's Arm public-house in Oxford-street. I am sure it is my cart.

Q. Did you go to the house of one Panton - A. I did. I did not see my cart there.

MR. ABEL. I am a surveyor of the turnpike road at Woburn. On the 3d of September I was at White's-hill, that is about a mile from Mr. Lemmon's house; I saw three men there; the prisoner was one of them, I am sure of it. There was a horse grazing under the hedge on the road side.

JAMES CLARK . I am a chimney-sweeper in Paddington parish.

Q. Do you know the house in which one Panton lives - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he lives in the same alley in which I live. I saw him shoot the pigs out of a cart, and Panton took them into his possession. There was a chalk name upon the cart. I cannot read.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-100

925. THOMAS WINDRED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , two pigs, value 12 l. the property of William Forrester .

WILLIAM FORRESTER . I am a farmer, a meal-man, and baker : I live at Woburn . I missed two pigs on the 3rd, I saw them in the afternoon of the 2nd. They were two white pigs, one was larger than the other. Woodberry, the officer, pursued them. The heads of the two pigs were brought to me by Woodberry. The pigs had rings in their noses when I bought them. I observed, before they were taken out of the sack, if they were the heads of the pigs that I had lost, one was larger than the other. On the day before I lost them one of the pigs had got the ring out of his nose. The other the ring was in, and when the heads were brought to me that which had the ring before had got the ring in; that was the larger pig. I have no doubt of their being the heads of my pigs. They were of the value of twelve guineas.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I went to Panton's house on the 4th; I saw the head laying on a dresser in a back shed; the entrails were in a tub. I found none of the carcase besides four feet. One of the heads had a ring in its nose, the other one had not.

Q. Did you find Panton - A. No, he made his escape. The cart was not on his premises at that time.

JAMES CLARK . I am a chimney-sweeper. I know Panton's house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come there with any thing - A. No, I saw him at the door. I saw a cart at the door.

Q. Did you see any thing taken out of the cart into Panton's house - A. Yes two pigs.

Q. Who drove the cart - A. I did not see the cart drove. The prisoner shoved the pigs out of the cart; he was at the tail of the cart. Samuel Panton took them into his own yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through this place, the cart stopped the passage up; I helped to push the cart into the road that I might go past.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-101

926. JOHN WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , two pair of shoes, value 11 s. the property of Richard Joshua .

RICHARD JOSHUA . I am a shoe-maker . The prisoner at times worked for me. On the 7th of this month. I lost two pair of shoes; I enquired who had been in the shop; they told me nobody but the prisoner.

MR. SALTKELL. I am a pawnbroker, 23, in the Strand. I produce a pair of shoes, pledged on the 7th of September.

Prosecutor. They are my shoes. The prisoner gave me this pair of shoes; he said he took two pair of shoes from off my shelf; I took this pair of shoes from him, and he gave me the duplicate of the shoes the pawnbroker has produced.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-102

927. JOHN DIGBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , two planes, value 4 s. a saw, value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. and a basket, value 1 s. the property of James Painter .

JAMES PAINTER . I am a carpenter . On the 27th of July, I left my tools in a building at Kilburn ; I went to my dinner, and when I returned my tools were gone.

HASWELL HARRIS . I am a butcher at Hampstead. On the 29th of July I gave the prisoner eighteen-pence for this plane.

PETER MANDER . I bought this smoothing-plane of the prisoner; he left the basket at my lodging.

Prosecutor. The planes and the basket are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The planes I received of a man to sell.

GUILTY , aged 48

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-103

928. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a pocket-book, value 2 s. the property of Drummond Deering , from his person .

DRUMMOND DEERING . I lost my pocket-book on Friday night; I had been drinking.

Q. Did you feel it go from you - A. Yes; the prisoner took my pocket-book out of my pocket as I was walking along the street; I ran after him; I asked him for my pocket-book; he would not give it me I sung out; the officers came round directly.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. On the 10th of September, I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor struggling in Well-street ; my friend laid hold of the prisoner, and I took the pocket-book from him. This is the pocket-book.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Well-street, he asked me the way to St. Catherine-street. I directed him. He said he had lost his pocket-book; this gentleman took me in custody.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-104

929. JAMES SESSFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , two jackets, value 4 l. the property of Thomas Cochrane .

THOMAS COCHRANE . I am a taylor ; I live in Cartwright-square, East Smithfield . On the 13th of July, I delivered to Margaret Traile , my servant, two jackets, I ordered her to carry them to Mr. Brown, at Cock-hill. The prisoner worked for me; he asked me to go home with them; I denied him twice; he was present when I gave the girl this order, the girl went out; in two minutes after the girl went out the prisoner, went out, he said he would take a walk. The jackets never got to Mr. Brown.

MARGARET TRAILE . I am a servant to Mr. Cochrane. On the 13th of July, he gave me two jackets to carry home; I was to carry them to Mr. Brown, at Cock-hill; I went out with them; Sessford came behind me, he snatched the jackets from under my arm; he told me to run home as fast as I could, he was going with them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I leave myself to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-105

930. ELIZABETH BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3th of August , from the person of Charles Myers , a watch, value 2 l. and three 10 l. bank notes, his property .

CHARLES MYERS . I am a sailor . On the 3rd of August, I was in the Almonry, Westminster, about nine o'clock at night; I met with the prisoner; I went to her lodgings; I was with her from nine o'clock until two in the morning; I missed her about two in the morning, and I missed my property at the same time.

Q. How many notes did you lose - A. I had eighty pounds in my pocket; there were three or four ten-pound notes; they were in my pocket-book.

Q. When had you seen these notes the last time before they were taken - A. I had seen them when I was at Somerset House, and drawed my money; I saw the money last in the prisoner's house. I belong to a man-of-war; it was my wages.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. I produce a ten-pound note, and a one-pound note; I found it in the prisoner's stocking; I took her in a court near Charles-street, Westminster.

Prosecutor. There is no mark on the notes that I can swear to.

JAMES GILLMORE . We apprehended the prisoner between twelve and one o'clock at noon. I produce a watch which Bly took out of the prisoner's pocket.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentlemen gave me the money to buy things, to go with him to get his prize money.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-106

931. JEREMIAH MUNDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , a coach-glass and frame, value 30 s. the property of William Bignall .

WILLIAM BIGNALL . I am a stable-keeper .

Q. In August, did you lose a coach-glass and frame - A. I did; I value it at about thirty shillings.

Q. Had you ever seen Munday on your premises - A. Yes; he came down to the yard very much in liquor one evening in August, about eight o'clock; he had no business there.

JAMES BLY . On Sunday, the 15th of August, I saw the prisoner in Dean-street, Westminster; he had a bag in his hand, and a coach-glass in it; I knew him; I asked him where he got it; he said, of a man; he gave two or three shillings for it; he thought he should make five or six of it. I took him in custody; he shewed me his room; on the top of the drawers in his room, I saw a coach-glass frame; I took it away. This is it.

Prosecutor. I am certain the frame is mine; and I believe the glass to be mine.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-107

932. MARY MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a coat, value 10 s. the property of Robert George .

ROBERT GEORGE . I keep an hotel in Covent Garden . On the 7th of September, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I heard a person in the passage; I saw the prisoner; I asked her what she wanted; she said, a Mr. Williams. I told her there was no Mr. Williams in the house, and as she was going out of the door I asked her what she had got in the bundle; she said what she had brought in the market, I had no right see it; I opened the bundle; I saw a coat, and waistcoat; the waistcoat I knew nothing about. My servant said, sir, do not you know that coat, it is your own coat; I examined it, and saw it was my coat. This is the coat, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me the coat to pawn.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-108

933. GEORGE LANCASTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 7th of September , a flock-bed, value 15 s. a sheet, value 10 s. a tea-kettle, value 6 d. a frying-pan, value 1 s. and a saucepan, value 9 d. the property of William Payne .

WILLIAM PAYNE . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . I let my house out in tenements, part furnished.

Q. You found some property of yours - A. Yes; it was taken from a room in the furnishing part of my house, that I let to a woman; I had seen the goods in my house two hours before it was taken.

Q. What was it - A. A flock-bed, a sheet, a kettle, frying pan, and saucepan; I saw them at the Southampton Arms; the prisoner said he brought them there; the woman that he had been with had robbed him, and he had taken them goods, he did not think it was any harm.

THOMAS PAYNE . I am the father of the last witness. On the 7th of September, a little before six in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a bed on his back in Broad-street; St. Giles's; he was without shoes or stockings; I said you are padding the hoof, if you have far to go you will want shoening; he said I shall, like a horse. I saw him put the bed in the private door of the Southampton Arms, Tottenham-court-road. I went with another constable to the Southampton Arms, after I found the bed and things were my son's; the prisoner then said that he had been robbed by the woman that belonged to the room; he took the things out of spite. These are the things.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman took me to that room; she robbed me of three pound eight shillings; I, out of vexation, took these goods. I was destressed to the utmost.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Dampier.

Reference Number: t18130915-109

934. ABRAHAM HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , six glass decanters, value 16 s. the property of Mordecai Lazarus and Joseph Casmer .

MORDECAI LAZARUS . The prisoner worked for me. I saw six decanters at Stephen Long 's; I have every reason to believe they are mine.

STEPHEN LONG . I am a dealer in glass. The prisoner sold me six decanters. The prosecutor claimed them. The prisoner said he was a glass-cutter; he took the decanters for work that he had done to the trade.

Prisoner's Defence. These decanters are my own; I received them of Mr. Simons.

MR. SIMONS. I have employed the prisoner, and always paid him in goods; I have given him decanters.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18130915-110

935. RICHARD FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a shirt, value 4 s. 6 d. a frock, value 3 s. 6 d. a pair of drawers, value 1 s. 6 d. a jacket, value 1 s. a bridle, value 2 d. an halter, value 2 d. and a sack, value 1 s. the property Thomas Sparkes .

THOMAS SPARKES . I am a labourer . On the 29th of August, I lost my things at the Blakeney'e Head, Islington ; I went to sleep, and when I awoke my bundle was gone.

SARAH ARCHER . I keep the Blakeney's Head, Islington. On Sunday the prosecutor came into the tap-room, he had two pints of porter; he laid his head on the table and fell asleep; I saw a sack by his side. The prisoner knocked at the door; (he had lodged with me one week,) I let him in; he went into the tap-room. He brought a sack to the bar; he took the sack into the tap-room; he brought me a clean calico shirt, and asked me to take care of

it for him; I took the shirt, and put it away; he took the sack and went out of doors; all this time Sparkes was asleep. When Sparkes awoke he missed the sack; he made an alarm about it; I said, Dick had gone out with a sack. None of the property has been found.

Q. to Sparkes. Have you ever found your things - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor; I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-111

936. FRANCES EBDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , a quilt, value 4 s. a sheet, value 18 d. a candlestick, value 6 d. a bed-tick, value 5 s. a tea-kettle, value 2 s. a set of bed-furniture, value 2 s. a shovel, value 3 d. and a pair of tongs, value 6 d. the property of John Cray , in a lodging-room .

ANN CRAY . My husband's name is John Cray ; I live in Charles-street, Wapping-wall . I let one room ready furnished to the prisoner at four shillings and sixpence a week; she came in on the 2nd of July; she continued in it until the 17th of July; she went away in the morning; she paid me one week's rent; I got an officer to break open the door; when I went in I missed the curtains of the bed, the bed-tick; the feathers were scattered about. I missed two blankets, one sheet, a pillow, two pillow-cases, the quilt of the bed, a tea-kettle, candlestick, shovel, and tongs.

Q. Did you find your things again - A. Yes.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker's servant to Mr. Flemming, Whitechapel. I produce a tea-kettle, a candlestick, pillow, and a blanket; I took them in pawn of a woman. I don't know the prisoner.

CHARLES SULLIDGE . I am a pawnbroker, 128, in the Minories. I produce a blanket, two pillowcases, shovel, tongs, and a bed-tick; I do not know who pawned them.

MR. WILDMAN. I was a pawnbroker in Cannon-street-road. I produce a quilt pawned for four shillings.

JOHN PAWLEY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Barker, Commercial-road. I produce a tent-furniture, pawned by the prisoner, on the 16th of July.

JOHN BUTLER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody; I found these ten duplicates on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pledge them with intent to defraud. My husband is on board the Shannon Frigate. I meaned to replace them when I got my husband's money.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-112

937. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of July , six hundred pounds weight of hemp, value 24 l. the property of John Soames .

JOHN SOAMES . I am a rope-maker ; I live at Stepney . On the morning of the 23rd of July, one of my men called me up, and told me my premises had been broken open: I got up and found that my premises had been broken open, and some hemp was missing.

JAMES ALLEN . I am a journeyman rope-maker. On the morning that Mr. Soames lost his property I saw the prisoner going along with a cart load of hemp, about a quarter past three; he was coming from Bethanal-green towards Shoreditch. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOHN BADNELL . I am a watchman of Shoreditch parish, and when I was crying the hour of past four o'clock I saw the cart standing at the back of the White Hart public-house the prisoner was standing at the tail of the cart; the hemp was taken out. I am positive that he is the man that had possession of the hemp, and was driving the horse and cart.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-113

938. WILLIAM STUNNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , seven wooden tubs, value 2 s. and three hundred and fifty pounds weight of butter, value 20 l. the property of John Murrell .

JOHN MURRELL . I am a cheesemonger, No. 24. Pitfield-street, Hoxton . I lost my butter on the 28th of July. I hired the prisoner to work for me; I ordered him to go to the waggon warehouse, in Sun-street, for six firkins and a half of butter; he never returned with it. I procured a warrant, and found my butter in the possession of John Old . Leonard-square, Shoredith; I found them the same morning as I sent the prisoner for it. I never received any information of the prisoner.

JOSEPH SCOTT . I am book-keeper at the waggon office, in Sun-street. On the 28th of July. I delivered six firkins and a half of butter to the prisoner, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock, in the morning. I am sure the prisoner is the man; I saw the same butter that I had delivered to him at Worship-street office.

WILLIAM BLAKE . I live at 22, Pitfield-street, near Mr. Murrell. On the 28th of June, I was absent from home about my business; I saw the truck that Mr. Murrell borrowed of me at a door in Leonard-square; it was my truck; it was standing at Mr. Old's door. I informed Mr. Murrell.

Q. Did you see any person with the truck - A. Not that I knew; it was not the prisoner.

SAMUEL JONES . I am a grocer. I saw a person carry the butter to Mr. Old's shop; that is all I know; I don't know who the man was.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On the 28th of July, I went in company with Mr. Murrell to Old's, in Leonard-square, Shoreditch; in Old's cellar we found six firkins and a half of butter; the butter was brought to the office; it was there identified. This is one of the casks.

Mr. Scott. That is one of the casks that I delivered to the prisoner on the 28th of July.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the goods of Mr. Scott; I took them as far as the end of Crown-street

I went down some ruins to ease myself, and when I came back the goods were gone. I was afraid to go back to my master.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-114

939. JAMES TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a parasol, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Nutting .

JOSEPH NUTTING . I am an umbrella-maker , I live at 53, High Holborn . On the 13th of September I lost my parasol, between two and three in the afternoon, As I was engaged at the back end of the shop I saw the prisoner step in and take it off the door inside, and run off with it; being lame myself I could not pursue him, but requested my servant, who brought back the parasol. The prisoner escaped.

Q. How do you know it is the same man - A. I saw him take it.

Q. It was momently done - A. Yes, it was. In about three hours afterwards I saw the prisoner at Hatton Garden office. I am sure he is the same man. He was taken up for a similar offence the same evening.

ELIZABETH FAULKENER . I am shop-woman to Mr. Nutting. My master said a man had taken a parasol from the door. I ran after him down Hand-court; he put the parasol under his apron; he was stopped by the populace in Warwick-court. I know he is the same man. He hoped I would have mercy on him, and many gentlemen said I had better let him go, as I had the parasol. I let him go. This is the parasol; it is Mr. Nutting's. I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated in liquor all day long; the next morning I found myself in prison.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-115

840. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , a silver tablespoon, value 10 s. and a silver salt spoon, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Foster .

WILLIAM HARRIETT . I am a waiter at the Cambridge coffee-house, the corner of Newman-street and Charles-street, Middlesex-hospital . On the 17th of July, the prisoner came into the coffee-room he ordered a bason of soup, he paid for it on delivery. He staid in the coffee-room about ten minutes; he then went out. In about three minutes after he was gone I found a table-spoon and a salt-spoon were gone. I went to look for the prisoner; I could not see any thing of him. I did not see any thing of the prisoner until he was apprehended and taken to the office. I am certain he is the same man.

Q. Who keeps the coffee-house - A. Thomas Foster . These are the spoons; they belong to our house.

Prisoner's Defence. Early in life I had the honour to have a commission in the British Army; I rose to the rank of Captain ; I served in the American war in the West Indies: a declining state of health; in consequence of several severe accidents, induced me to retire from the service, and enter into business in this town. Providence blessed my endeavours, until some severe losses I became a bankrupt. Most my wife, my principal support by her I have now two sons serving their king and country. I had the severity to inflict a severe wound in my throat, God forgive me. I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-116

941. THOMAS SHARP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of August , a three-shilling bank token, and an eighteen-penny bank token, and a shilling, the property of Stephen Harman , from his person .

STEPHEN HARMAN . I am a gentleman's servant . I lodge at No. 36, Mary-le-bone-lane . The prisoner lodged in the same room. On the Thursday night I missed two three-shilling pieces, on Friday morning I missed one three-shilling piece; on the Saturday morning I mentioned it to the landlord of the house, he desired me to mark the money. I marked four three-shilling pieces, an eighteen-penny piece, and a shilling. I marked them on the tail side, and my landlord on the head. I had been in bed about a quarter a quarter of an hour when the prisoner came up in the dark. I then heard the prisoner taking more money; he drawed the breeches from under the pillow. He got up the morning between five and six; I got up, and ran down stairs; I called for assistance. My landlord and I went up stairs; we accused him of taking a three-shilling piece, an eighteen-penny piece, and a shilling; he denied it.

Q. What is he - A. A tin-plate worker .

JOHN ROPER . I am a chandler. On Saturday morning the prosecutor told me that he had been robbed by the prisoner. I advised him to mark some money, and in the night I would fasten him in that he should not get out. On Sunday morning he said he had been robbed. I went up stairs and insisted upon his taking the money out of his pocket. He took out a three-shilling piece, an eighteen-penny piece, and a shilling that I had marked the preceding evening.

WILLIAM LEWIS . That is the money that the prisoner pulled out of his pocket. The prosecutor said it was his money. The prisoner owned he took it from the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the money off the ground; I did not know it was the prosecutor's.

Prosecutor. It is my money.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-117

942. WILLIAM BIRD and DANIEL PEERLESS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a mahogany tea-chest, value 5 s. a tin cannister, value 1 s. and two ounces of tea, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Ballance .

MARY BALLANCE . My husband's name is Thomas

Ballance ; he keeps the Dial public-house, in Long-alley, Moorfields . I lost my tea-chest on the 23d of August. The prisoners in passing through from the back yard took it out of the bar window. I was informed so by one of the witnesses who followed them, and took it from them.

THOMAS RAYMOND . I am a chair-maker; I live at No. 9, Claxton's-buildings. My work-shop looks into the back yard of the Dial public-house. I saw the two prisoners come out of the skittle-ground. The back window of the bar is in the yard; they stopped there. Peerless put his hand in, took out the tea-chest, and then they walked away together. I came down and told Mrs. Ballance; I and another person went in pursuit of them. I overtook Perless at the top of Long-alley, in Sun-street. I knocked him down, and took the tea-chest out of his hand. This is the tea-chest.

JAMES LEGG . I accompanied Raymond; he took Peerless; I took Bird. We took them to the office.

Prosecutrix. It is my tea-chest.

Peerless's Defence. I was intoxicated. I understand Raymond has taken money of my mother to compound felony.

Bird's Defence. I know nothing about it.

BIRD, GUILTY , aged 20.

PEERLESS, GUILTY , aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-118

943. GEORGE PERKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , twenty-six horse-shoes, value 8 s. the property of John Truman Villebois , Henry Villebois , Sampson Hanbury , and Thomas Fowell Buxton .

THOMAS DIBBEN . I am a clerk in Truman's house. The names of the partner s are, John Truman Villebois, Henry Villebois, Sampson Hanbury, and Thomas Fowell Buxton .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do, he has been employed there ten years. In consequence of information I watched the prisoner. On Thursday the 5th of August, as the men were going to breakfast at half past eight in the morning, I watched the prisoner into an old iron shop, kept by Mr. Whitehead; after two or three minutes had elapsed I went into the shop and saw six horse-shoes in the scale; I asked him what he was selling there; he said, nothing. He was taking sixpence of Mr. Whitehead for six horse-shoes. He had sold six horse-shoes for sixpence. They were old horse-shoes. I knew these horse-shoes perfectly well; one of the six had a private mark that I had made with a punch. I have no doubt they are my masters property. I saw some more in the shop. There was more than twenty. I believe them all to be my master's property. The prisoner said they are none of yours. I took them one by one out of the scale, and when I came to the marked one, I said, George, these are certainly ours, why did you sell them? He said distress made him do it. The horse-shoes were taken from our farrier's shop.

JAMES WHITEHEAD . I keep an iron-shop in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; I have seen him often come to our shop for the purpose of selling brass cocks and horse-shoes, and different things. On the 16th and 17th of June he came there; I considered from the mode the goods were brought in he did not come honestly by them. I went to Messrs. Hanbury, and made enquiry. He came to my shop; he said he had carried them some horse-shoes to sell; I bought them of him. I down Hanbury's accompting-house, and asked the people if they were not theirs. They told me to continue to buy them, they would stamp them to know them again. On the 5th of August he came to sell some horse-shoes that weighed twelve pounds. I bought them of him, and paid him sixpence. Mr. Dibben took them with him. They are the same that the prisoner sold. I was present when Dibben stopped him.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I produce the horse-shoes. I took the prisoner into custody. I told the prisoner he was not bound to speak without he liked. He said he took them out of Mr. Hanbury's farrier's shop; he did it for hunger; he had not a bit of bread to eat.

Mr. Dibben. These six horse-shoes are my employer's property. The prisoner had worked for us some years occasionally.

Prisoner's Defence. Sometimes I was in work and sometimes not.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-119

944. THOMAS AYLIFFE GEE was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of March , was clerk to George Hodgson and Frederick Hodgson , and that he did receive 96 l. 5 s. from one Arthur Newman for his masters, and that he afterwards did embezzle, steal, and secrete the same .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

ARTHUR NEWMAN . I am a publican, at Limehouse-hole.

Q. Do you deal with Messrs. Hodgson's for beer - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do, he was a servant to Messrs. Hodgson's. In March last I paid him ninety-six pounds five shillings. This is the receipt that I had of the prisoner. (The receipt read.) I cannot say whether I paid him at my own house, or whether I paid it in the accompting-house of the Bow brewhouse. I paid him in a check and bank notes.

GEORGE HODGSON . Q. This brewhouse was formerly your father's - A. It was.

Q. Who are the persons that carry on the business - A. Myself and my brother Frederick. The business is carried on in the name of my father's executors; my mother, Mary Hodgson , David Rimington , and Nicholas Charrington . They carry on the business for the benefit of myself and brother. I superintend the whole business.

Q. Has the prisoner been for some time a clerk in your brewhouse - A. He was a clerk to my father, he was continued by the executors; he was entrusted

by them to receive money for the house. When he received he was first to make an entry in his own cash book. That is the cash book in which he was to make the entry. That book is all his hand-writing. He strikes a balance once a week.

Q. Did he ever pay over to you the ninety-six pounds five shillings received of Mr. Arthur Newman - A. He did not.

Q. On the 22d of March last do you find in his cash book any such entry - A. No; between the 20th and 27th of March there but three items of five shillings each.

Q. When he paid over money to you did you make entries in your own cash book - A. I did. I have carefully examined it; he never paid over that money to me.

Q. How long did he continue in your service - A. Until the early part of July. I then discharged him.

Q. Are you the only person to whom the prisoner accompted - A. I was the only person. The executors do not interfere in the business. Directly after he was discharged I made the discovery of his embezzling the monies.

Q. In consequence of that did you cause warrants to be issued - A. Yes, and offered a reward for the apprehending him. A few days after I had done that I received this letter from him.

"SIR, Enclosed I return you three bills which I had in my pocket-book; at the same time on my past misconduct allow me to say a few words; I have committed a crime. I do most sincerely acknowledge I deserve every step you have taken. My life is forfeited to the laws of my country, I readily allow. For myself I care not; I am ready to meet death: 'tis for others. This occasions me to place myself in a secure asylum, where it will be surprising to me that I should be discovered. If, by any untoward circumstance, my abode should be traced. I hope my Maker will excuse me if I should be my own executioner. Consider your own sentiments under my sufferings. I am happy to hear that most that profess themselves friends for you and your family with me will most cordially pray for you.

I remain, sir,

Your repentant humble servant,

T. A. GEE."

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Mr. Hodgson. When was he apprehended - A. He was apprehended last September, about ten days ago.

Prisoner's Defence. I was born of respectable parents. I throw myself on your mercy. I hope you will take that into consideration.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-120

945. DANIEL MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a pair of gold ear-rings, value 7 s. 6 d. and one gold-keeper, value 1 s. the property of William Wilton , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM WILTON . I live at No 7, Calender-yard, Long-alley, Moorfields . I keep a shop, and sell gold size and varnish for the gilders .

Q. You do not keep a shop for jewellery - A. No, I cut drops for ear-rings.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to my place; he took a pair of gold ear-rings and a gold keeper. The rings were my wife's; they lay on my bench. It was on the 30th of August that he took them.

Q. Did you ever find them again - A. Yes, his wife gave me intelligence that he had got them. I went with the officer up to his place. I found the ring upon Mrs. Murray's hand.

Q. What, were the ear-rings upon her finger - A. No, the keeper; the ear-rings were in pledge; the officer has got them. The prisoner confessed to me and to Mr. Smith that he took the rings; distress (he said) drove him to it.

Q. What is he - A. A clock-maker.

MR. SMITH. I am an headborough. I have got a pair of ear-rings and a metal keeper. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner. I asked the woman that lived with the prisoner to let me look at her hand. She gave me the keeper off her finger. The woman went out and fetched these two ear-rings. The prisoner then said he was sorry; distress drove him to do it.

Prosecutor. The ear-rings and the keeper are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased them of a person at the Pied Horse public-house, Chiswell-street.

GUILTY, aged 38,

Of stealing only .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-121

946 ELIZABETH PRICE , ELIZABETH HOLLAND , and MARY WHITE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of John Bartlett and John Sutton , privately in their shop .

JOHN BARTLETT . I am a boot and shoe-maker , No. 200, High-street, St. Giles's . My partner's name is John Sutton . On the 30th of August, about half past seven in the evening, I was called out of my parlour to assist in serving some customers that came in. I saw Price and Holland in a little room that I have backwards for the ladies. White was in the front shop, they did not appear to know each other. Price made an offer that could not to be taken. She went out; White followed her, and just at that moment Huggins, the officer, brought Price back with a pair of shoes in her hand, which he saw her take from a nail.

JOHN HUGGINS . I am an assistant officer of the court of Requests. On the 23d of August I was waiting at the corner of Denmark-street, about half after seven o'clock, close by the side of Mr. Bartlett's shop; these three women came by me in company together; they stood talking to each other; presently two of them went in; Price and Holland went into a little shop backwards; White went in with a little boy that she had with her; Holland was trying some shoes on. I saw Price take a pair of shoes and put them under her apron. As soon as Mary White saw that she came out of the shop first, Price followed her. Price pulled the shoes out, and

was going to give them to Mary White. I took hold of her arm. I took the shoes from her, and went into the shop with her. Holland was in the shop at the time; White went away.

Q. Are you sure that White was the other woman - A. Yes; she went to the watchhouse after the other woman; Mr. Baxter took her. I assisted in taking Price and Holland to the watchhouse.

JOHN BAXTER . I produce that shoes. I am the keeper of the watchhouse. In about a quarter of an hour after I had taken charge of Holland and Price, a woman came to the watchhouse door; she said, Mary. I desired Mr. Bartlett to go round and see whether that was the woman that had made her escape: he went out, and brought her in. I searched her, and found some money about her. These are the shoes that I received of Mr. Bartlett.

Prosecutor. The shoes are mine.

Price's Defence. I never saw White before she was brought into the watchhouse. I was in the shop looking at a pair of shoes; that man said, whereever he could catch me he would do me an injury.

Holland's Defence. I never saw any shoes taken.

White's Defence. I did not see the shoes taken. I know nothing of the other women.

PRICE, GUILTY, aged 36.

HOLLAND, GUILTY, aged 37.

WHITE, GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-122

947. MARY GIBBONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , six yards of bed ticking, value 18 s. and two pounds weight of feathers, value 4 s. the property of Francis Search .

FRANCES SEARCH . I live on Clerkenwell-green . I keep a feather bed and mattrass warehouse . I employ a good many women. The prisoner was one of my women. From suspicion I measured some bed-ticking; the roll contained forty-nine yards. I cut sixteen yards off it. I left thirty-three yards. This was on the shop where the women were at work.

Q. Was there no other woman there but the prisoner - A. There was one. I sent the other woman out. I went out at the warehouse door, and went into my house by the private door. I saw the woman when she came back by the window. The prisoner was left alone in the shop where the ticking was, the thirty-three yards. I went into the shop immediately the other woman returned. There was no opportunity for any person to take the ticking but the prisoner. I then measured the ticking; I missed about six yards and a half; suspecting my women, I determined to detain them when they left work. I sent for a constable. The prisoner went away at seven o'clock. After she had gone about twenty yards I called her back; she came willingly. Read, the officer, was in the shop. When she was brought back, I told her before several of my women that I had lost several yards of ticking. I was determined to find out the thief. The prisoner asserted her innocence, and said she was very willing to be searched. Read searched her in my presence; he found concealed under her clothes two bags of feathers; they were made to fasten round her waist. The bags hanged low, and were not perceptible. She acknowledged they were my feathers; she said she had taken them out of my picking room. The officer then took her into a room to undress her, and when I entered the room the officer said she had confessed where the ticking was, and she would shew us. She went with Read and myself into a back room; there under a shelf she pointed it out. It was six yards and a half, the quantity that I missed. This is the first offence of hers that I know of.

WILLIAM READ . Q. You searched the prisoner, she told you something about the ticking - A. Yes, I found it in the place she referred to; it was put under a shelf; these two bags of feathers I found under her petticoats. She told me that she had a very bad husband.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-123

948. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , a table-clock, value 1 l. the property of William Francis Verdier .

WILLIAM FRANCIS VERDIER . I keep a broker's shop in Drury-lane.

Q. When did you lose your clock - A. I was absent from home; it was some time in July.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 22nd of July I observed the prisoner and another man hanging about Mr. Verdier's shop. I saw the prisoner take the clock. I took him in custody. This is the clock.

Prosecutor. It is my clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-124

949. MARY DONNOVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , three pair of men's shoes, value 15 s. and a pair of women's shoes, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Green .

MRS. GREEN. I am the wife of Thomas Green ; we live at No. 6, Ray-street, Clerkenwell . On Monday, the 9th of August, about half past two o'clock, the prisoner and another woman came into my shop, I had occasion to leave the shop, and while I was gone up stairs a child called me down; when I came down the prisoner and another woman was in the shop; she asked me the price of a pair of shoes, which hung in the window, and pointed to them; I reached them down to her. She said they were too small. I reached her another pair; she gave me the shoes again; she said she would call in the afternoon. Directly she was gone; I espied a pair of shoes on the table, I was sure they were not there when I went up stairs; I looked in the window; I

saw there was a quantity gone; which proved to be three pair of men's, and one pair of women's were taken out of the window; I directly called to my husband, and went into the middle of the street; I saw the woman; my neighbour pursued them, and took the prisoner with the property on her.

JOHN ROLFE . I am a butcher. I live opposite; I saw the prisoner go in, and come out; there was another woman with her; I followed the prisoner, and took her; I gave her into the charge of Matthews, the officer, with the property on her.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with the property on her.

THOMAS GREEN . I am the proprietor of the shop. The shoes belong to me.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going along I saw a man drop the bundle; I picked them up.

Rolfe. There was a man went it the shop with the women; he did not come out with them; I did not see him drop any thing. I followed the women, and I took the prisoner.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-125

950. HENRY JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , seventy-two yards of galloon, value 10 s. the property of Edward Scott .

EDWARD SCOTT . I keep a shoemaker's shop , the corner of St. Martin's-court . The prisoner is an apprentice to one of the men I employed. In consequence of suspicion I counted my pieces of galloon on the over night. On the 9th of August, about nine o'clock, I came down stairs; I heard some person talking to my errand-boy; I got on the stairs to see what was going forward; the errand-boy went outside of the shop, was taking the bar, down of the shutters, and the prisoner at that time was coming from the glass case; he had taken something from the shop; I then asked him what he was doing there; he said he was come for work for his master. I counted the pieces of galloon in the drawer; I found two pieces short. The constable searched him, and found two pieces of galloon under the bib of his apron. This is the galloon; it is mine.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-126

951. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , ten pounds weight of bacon, value 10 s. the property of Richard Hall , privately in his shop .

RICHARD HALL . I am a cheesemonger , 204, Whitecross-street . On the 19th of July, about a quarter before ten at night, the bacon was hanging at the hook at the door-post, inside of the shop. The witness saw him take it; we pursued him, and took him in Red-lion-market.

ENOCK MATTHEWS . I was going by; I saw the prisoner take the bacon off the hook at the door, I holloaed out; he dropped the bacon.

JAMES MUNROS . I took the prisoner. I produce the bacon.

Prosecutor. It is my bacon.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-127

952. SARAH SMITH and MARGARET GOBAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , from the person of John Davis , four. three-shilling pieces, an eighteen-penny bank token, two halfpence, a 200 l. bank note, and a 15 l. bank note, the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a messenger in the Ordnance office . On the 14th of August, I received this property laid in the indictment, and being out late on the afternoon I received the parcel; on my going towards the Horse Guards I met the prisoners with several others that stood there; they accosted me to give them something to drink; I said, I had no objection, provided they were going my way. Upon which they accompanied me; we went to a house of one of the prisoners, in New-court, Duck-lane, Westminster , to Sarah Smith 's room. They were both in company; I gave them something to drink, as they asked me, and gave them some silver. They never parted, nor left the room until they came out with me, and when I came to the top of Duck-lane they wished me good morning, and I the same; it was then about three o'clock. I turned the corner of the Broad-way, I put my hand in my pocket, I discovered that the parcel I had in my possession was gone; I turned back to go in pursuit of these two women that I had been with; I met two watchman; I asked them to go along with me; at that time I did not know what the parcel contained. I went back to the house that I came from, along with two watchman; I rapped at the door; I had no answer. I went away, and came again, and rapped at the door; one of the watchman went for Bly, the officer, to take them into custody. I searched the room; nothing was found in the room.

Q. Was any thing found afterwards - A. Yes; about five weeks afterwards.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had been drinking a little. I knew the parcel contained money, but not what sum. I am confident these are the women, and I am clear that I lost the parcel containing the money in this room, with the two women.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 14th of August, about five o'clock in the morning, I was called up by the watchman; who said, that two women were charged with robbery; I immediately went to the room in New-court, Duck-lane. The prosecutor charged the prisoners with robbing him; I searched them, and also the room; I found nothing. I took the prisoners to Tothill-fields; I returned and made enquiry; I discovered that Gohan lived in a room nearly opposite; I went to that room, and upon the table I found this handkerchief, and

on searching the bed I discovered a hole big enough to put my hand in; I did not at that moment search the bed diligently; I pulled my coat off, and put my arm in; but the bed was so dirty I was afraid of getting something; I must confess I did not search the bed so much as I ought. On Friday, the 10th of the present month, I received information that a publican had stopped a note of a great amount, and suspected that was one of the notes that were lost; I traced the fifteen-pound note. This was a month after the robbery all but one day.

JANE PAINTER . I go out a charing; I live at No, 5, New-court, Duck-lane. Goban lived in the same room that I do; before I took the room Mr. Bly was there. On Saturday I was charing there; that was the room that Goban lived in, my landlady told me so. On Thursday night, I was shaking the bed, it rattled; I got a knife and ripped the bed; put my hand in; I pulled out three three-shilling pieces, an eighteen-penny piece, and an halfpenny; then I felt again, and pulled out two notes. I cannot read. I kept them in my pocket until the next morning, and then I gave the landlord of the White Horse one of the notes; he said it was a fifteen-pound note; he gave it me again; I put it in my pocket. I went again to that house; the landlord said, here has been a woman here that has had a lucky find; I said, I had. He said, have you got them; I said, yes; I took one out; I gave it him. He said, it was not the note that I gave him before; he said he would keep that; I said are you going to keep that, and to give me nothing for it; he said there would be something given for it, he would give it me; he would not wrong me of a halfpenny. I unfortunately changed the fifteen-pound note; I gave the note to Ann Scott ; she changed it. The other I gave to the landlord of the White Horse.

MR. AKENHEAD. I am a publican. On Friday, the 10th of September, a woman came to me; she gave me a note; Bly, the officer has got it. She first came a quarter past six in the morning, on the 10th; she said, she had been lucky this morning and found something; she a fifteen-pound note in my hand; I told her if she was an honest woman that was a good find; I gave it her; she came again in a quarter of an hour afterwards; I began telling her what a lucky find a woman had, not knowing it was her. She said, this is the note. I took it. I said, this is not the note you shewed me in the morning. I stopped it; it was a two hundred-pound note. I went to Gosling's house, in Fleet-street; I shewed Mr. Sharp the note, and told him the circumstance; he searched his books, and found the note came from Mr. Bosanquet's house in Lombard-street. This is the note that I received of that woman.

ANN SCOTT . Jane Painter gave me a note to get it changed; I gave it to Mrs. Luff.

MRS. LUFF. The note that Ann Scott gave me to get changed, I changed it at Mr. Bradmore's; Mrs. Scott received the change.

JAMES BRADMORE . I keep a shop in Ship-yard, Temple-bar. The note that I received of Mrs. Luff I gave to Bly, the officer.

James Bly . This is the note that I received of Mr. Bradmore. I went to Smith's room; between the ashes in the grate I found this burnt paper. In Goban's room on the table I found this handkerchief; Goban said it was the prosecutor's handkerchief, that she had carried it there.

THOMAS MORRIS . I am a clerk under the master of the Ordnance.

Q. Look at these notes; do you know them - A. the numbers correspond with the notes that I issued, and the sum. I put them into a parcel with thirteen shillings and seven pence in silver; the silver was three three-shilling pieces, I believe I am not certain; the notes one two-hundred pounds, the other fifteen pounds; the notes produced correspond with the numbers and date. I delivered the parcel to Cook.

MR. COOK. I am a messenger in the Ordnance office. The parcel that I received of Mr. Morris I delivered it to Potts unopened.

DAVID POTTS . I am a messenger. I gave the parcel to John Davis the same afternoon.

Q. to Davis. Look at the handkerchief that Bly produces - A. It is my handkerchief, and the papers found is mine.

Smith's Defence. Mr. Davis went home with us, he gave us five shillings each; he came and searched my place; nothing was found.

Goban's Defence. We first met Mr. Davis by the Horse Guards; he went home with us; he afterwards returned with two watchmen; we were searched, and nothing was found but the silver that was given to us; he said, he would give me five-pound if I would own to the money; I said, I could not own to that I never had seen.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 26.

GOBAN, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-128

953. MARY WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , three gold rings, value 25 s. two bed-gowns, value 3 s. two tablecloths, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. half a yard of muslin, value 18 d. a cap, value 1 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Humphrey Jacob , in his dwelling-house .

HUMPHREY JACOBS . I am a hatter , 54, Lower East Smitfield . My wife knows betters than I do of this transaction.

ROSE JACOBS . The prisoner lived with me as a servant ; I missed things two or three times in July; I gave her in charge of an constable; she denied at first taking my things; when the constable came she told him where the property was.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr. Jacobs; he told me he had been robbed by his servant. I asked the prisoner what she had done with the things that she had taken out of the house; she said, she had not taken any. I began to search her; she said, I will give you no further trouble, I will shew you where they are; she took me to a woman's apartment, No. 16, George's-court, Wapping; the woman delivered me all the things. I produce them.

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing to the value of 20 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-129

954. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , five napkins, value 15 s. three handkerchief, value 15 s. a pillowcase, value 1 s. and a waistcoat, value 6 s. the property of Murdock Saunders .

MURDOCK SAUNDERS . I keep a tavern , known by the name of the Blacksmith's Arms, Lower East Smithfield . I lost my things at different times.

Mr. Adolphus. Is your husband here - A. No, he is not.

Q. What is his name - A. John Saunders .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-130

955. JACOBUS CLAUSMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of July , two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of Henry Cohen .

HENRY COHEN . I keep a slop-shop . I lost two handkerchiefs on the 4th of July; they were taken out of my shop.

Q. Did you see the person take it - A. No; I was up stairs. My shopman called me down; he told me he saw the prisoner take them; I found them in his hat.

FREDERICK LEVY . I was standing in the shop. The prisoner came in, and asked me if I would buy a bed quilt of him. I told him I was not in the habit of buying these articles; I would shew them to my master. In the mean time he sat on the counter, and took two handkerchiefs off the shelves; he put them in his hat. I called my master down; he came down; I told him. He took the prisoner's hat off, and found these handkerchiefs. These are the handkerchiefs.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-131

956. THOMAS WYATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , sixty yards of canvas, value 40 s. the property of Samuel Corp .

SAMUEL CORP . I am a silk-weaver . I lost my canvas between the 16th and 17th of last May, in the night it was stolen; I cannot say by whom. I found my canvas at a shew in Black Horse-fields, Kingsland-road; I saw the canvas in the prisoner's custody; I asked the prisoner about it; he said, he had been a long while looking for an owner for it, he was very glad he had found one. I cannot say who stole it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-132

957. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , an eighteen-penny bank token , the property of William Bush .

WILLIAM BUSH . I am a baker . I lost my eighteen-penny piece in the night on the 20th of July; the prisoner slept with me, I lost money at different times; I marked my money before I went to bed; I went into the room about five o'clock; I looked at my clothes; I saw they had been moved; I said to the prisoner that I had lost money out of my pocket; I must see whether he had it; he said, he had not; he took some halfpence out of his pocket; my eighteen penny-piece was among them; he went to work that day; at night I gave him into the charge of an officer.

Q. Has he been in custody ever since the 20th of July - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that eighteen-penny piece was in your pocket - A. Yes; I did not mark it; I took particular notice of it, and the mark upon it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-133

958. ANN ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a waistcoat, value 18 d. the property of Richard Evans .

RICHARD EVANS . On the 16th of August, I met the prisoner in Broad-street, St. Giles's; I went home with her; in the morning when I got up I missed my waistcoat and handkerchief; the watchman took her into custody. The next night the prisoner before the magistrate confessed to taking the things, and pledged them at Mr. Lane's.

THOMAS HARTLEY . I live with Mr. Lane, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. The waistcoat and handkerchief was pawned by the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-134

959. MARY COVENTRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Fisher .

JOSEPH FISHER and JOHN BARNLEY were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-135

960. MARY BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a gown, value 6 s. the property of Mary Hogg , spinster.

MARY HOGG . I live in Oxford-street . I gave the prisoner a few things to wash for the children; I went for them on the Saturday; she was tipsey in bed; my husband went on the Sunday morning; she said, the gown was safe; he found this duplicate on the mantle-piece.

MR. SIMS. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this gown with me on the 18th of September.

Prisoner's Defence. Poverty made me pawn it.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-136

961. JOHN BRADNUM and ROBERT BURRIDGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , three coats, value 28 s. three umbrellas, value 16 s. four pair of spurs, value 6 . two pair of boots, value 2 l. a pair of overalls, value 6 s. and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. the property of Lewis D'Fontaine and William Matthews .

LEWIS D'FONTAINE . My partner's name is William Matthews ; we are stable keeper s, in Worship-street . The stables had been broken open; I missed the articles in the indictment. The prisoners, both of them, had been servant s in my employ.

WILLIAM PICKETT . I am head ostler to the

prosecutors. On the 2nd of September, about ten minutes before six, when I came to my work, I crossed the yard to feed my horses; I saw the back window open of the room where I put the gentlemen's coats; I am sure I shut it the night before. I then went into the riding school; I saw the marks of many people's feet, more than usual. I went to the other side of the stables; I saw that window pushed up, and the shutter just shut down; I fastened it the over night. I found four pair of spurs missing, and three umbrellas. I saw the saddle-room was broken open, and two box-coats gone; I had locked them in the over night and in the cupboard of the stable, I missed two pair of boots; a chaise-bit was found by the officer at John Bradnum 's house. I went with the officer to Bradnum's house; he opened the door to me; Bishop, the officer, was with me; I went up stairs with him; Burridge was in bed, and Smith, (who is not taken.) I came down stairs; I saw my coat in the parlour, and a bit: they are both my master's property.

THOMAS WILLIAM WISE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two box-coats, two umbrellas, and a pair of overalls; I received them on the 2nd of September, of a man who stated his name to be John Smith , I lent him two pound ten shillings on them.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street office. I apprehended the prisoners on the 7th of September; Bradnum let me in; Burridge was in bed, and some other person, who made his escape; Bradnum ran up stairs. I found a coat on the table in the lower room; I found three duplicates on the bed; one for an umbrella, and a pair of overalls, in the name of Smith, and I found a chaise-bit. As I was searching under the stairs, I observed Bradnum push something of one side; I went immediately there, and took this crow. I have matched it to the doors that were broken open; it exactly corresponds. Bradnum said it was a bar that they occasionally fastened the gates with.

Q. to Pickett. Look at the great coat, and the chaise-bit - A. They are my masters property, and the other box-coats are my masters property.

Bradnum's Defence. On the day stated in the indictment, Burridge and Smith were lodgers in my house; I thought they were honest characters; the crow was certainly taken by Smith, as well as the coats; every thing was pledged in his name; he has escaped. I am innocent of this charge, so help me God.

Burridge's Defence. I know nothing about it; I am innocent.

BRADNUM, GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

BURRIDGE, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-137

962. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a handkerchief value 4 s. the property of George Winter , from his person .

GEORGE WINTER , On the 13th of last month, I was in Parliament-street , between eleven and twelve o'clock.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. On the 13th of September, I was in Parliament-street; I observed the prisoner with another much taller than himself, following the prosecutor; when they got close to the prosecutor the other nudged the prisoner by the shoulder; he immediately put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and took this handkerchief from it; he put it into his breeches pocket, and crossed over towards me; I took him into custody. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. I believe that to be my property.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-138

963. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a padlock, value 5 s. a jacket, value 5 s. and a child's coat, value 1 s. the property of John Barber .

JOHN BARBER . I am the driver of the Atlas fire engine . On the 10th of September, I had just locked the engine-house; I laid the padlock down on the bin in the engine-house; I live over the engine-house in Bow-street ; I went up stairs to ask my wife if breakfast was ready, and returning to the place the padlock was gone; I went after the prisoner, and found her in Short's-garden's; I laid hold of the prisoner; she threw the padlock away. She had only come out of prison the day before.

Prisoner's Defence. Please your honour, I was going up Bow-street, I saw a parcel of rags and bones, I pick them up to get my living.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-139

964. GEORGE ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a bushel, of oats, value 6 s. the property of David Wilcox and William Clark .

DAVID WILCOX . My partner 's name is William Clark ; he lives in Manchester-street, at one yard, I live in Turner's-mews, in another yard; we are partners in this job of Mr. Hunt's; Mr. Hunt lives in Russell-square .

Q. Is it your custom to find the horses provender - A. Certainly it is.

Q. Had you supplied Mr. Hunt's horses with a sufficient stock of corn and hay - A. Yes. My ostler knows more about it than I do.

Q. Have you examined any of the corn found in the basket - A. I have; I compared it with the corn in Mr. Hunt's bin; the corn agrees with the corn in Mr. Hunt's stable, and that corn came from my place; I believe it to be some of my corn.

Q. Has Mr. Hunt any horses but those that you lend him - A. I believe not; I never saw any horses in his stable but my own.

Q. Has the prisoner any occasion to borrow corn - A. Certainly not.

Q. How many horses has Mr. Hunt of you - A. Two. There was a third horse one or two nights.

WILLIAM CAVE . I am a Bow-street officer. I apprehended the prisoner. I saw him with something under his arm; it appeared heavy. I asked him what he had; he said, nothing. I felt it, and told him he had oats. It was covered with a cloth

in a basket; he said he had brought it from the stable, he was going to take it to No. 17, Keppel-mews; he did not know the man's name. I then asked him whether it was with the knowledge of his master he had borrowed this corn; he said he did not know it. He had told me that he had borrowed corn of this man, and he was going to return it.

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am ostler to Mr. Wilcox and Clark. It is my duty to give the corn to the prisoner for Mr. Hunt's horses. I deliver him corn every fortnight; seven bushels of oats for two horses for a fortnight, eight trusses of hay, four trusses of straw, and two bushels of chaff for a fortnight. Six weeks ago he had an extra horse for two nights.

Prisoner's Defence. About six weeks ago I had a lame horse; I was obliged to have an extra horse. I borrowed a bushel of oats for the extra horse. I asked the ostler for a bushel of oats for the extra horse. He said I should have it. He sent it me. I was going to pay the coachman I had borrowed of, with this bushel, when the officer stopped me.

THOMAS WOOD . I am coachman to William Nanson , esq. I have been in my service thirteen years and a half. Near five or six weeks ago I lent the prisoner a bushel of oats; he said he had three horses. The oats were to be returned on the 17th. They have not been returned.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130915-140

965. SAINT PETER AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of September , half an ounce of silver, value 4 s. the property of William Lindsay .

WILLIAM LINDSAY . I am a watch-case-maker . On the 2nd of this month I suspected the prisoner was robbing me, in consequence of which I requested several of my men before they left work, to mark the pieces of silver, and to leave them in their usual places. In the evening, when the prisoner was about to leave my premises, I searched him; I found these pieces of silver in his shoes; he denied taking them; he said they must have fallen into his shoes. These are the pieces of silver. I directed them to be marked. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg pardon for what I have done.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-141

966. DANIEL WARDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 11th of September , two coach-glasses, value 55 s. the property of Lion Lukin , John Allen , and William Banner .

RICHARD THORNTON . I am a coach-maker, a journeyman to the firm of Lion Lukin , John Allen , and William Banner , in Long Acre . I heard that some glasses of my masters had been stolen. I went to Bow-street to identify them; I saw two post-chaise glasses. The prisoner was in custody charged with the offence. The officer brought them on Monday, and fitted them to the carriage in the shop. The prisoner was a labourer to my masters.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . On Saturday the 11th of September I saw the prisoner in Eagle-street; he had something in a mat under his arm. I asked him what he had got; he said they were glasses; he had them given to him by Lord Bathurst's coachman, to sell. On my taking him to the office he told me that he worked for Messrs. Lukin and Allen, and that he had taken them out of their shop, and if I would let him go I might keep the glasses. I then sent to the shop; Messrs. Lukin and Allen's foreman, came and identified them. I went and examined the carriages; I saw a post chaise that had two glasses taken from it. I enquired into the prisoner's character; he bears an undeniable character for honesty and sobriety.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-142

967. THOMAS PUGH and FRANCIS PARKER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of September , two ducks, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Soames .

WILLIAM MANNELL . I am a servant to Samuel Soames . He lost some ducks on the 3rd of September. I saw the ducks in the field about seven in the morning; between two and three I received an alarm. I went into the field, and missed the ducks. I saw them again between eight and nine, at Mr. Justice Thelwall's office. I knew they were my master's ducks. They were dead.

JOHN WATTS . I live at Bow. I have known the prisoners about three years. On the 3rd of September, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw them with some ducks. This Pugh came to me, and asked me if I would buy them. Parker was with him. He had got two live ducks and two dead ducks, and an old hen. I asked Pugh where he got them; he said, it was all right; they came far enough off. I said I would not buy them. I told Pugh I should detain the ducks until I heard further about them.

THOMAS PRIGMORE . I am a constable. On last Friday I apprehended both the prisoners. Parker signified that Pugh had been the cause of his going with him.

Q. to Mannell. Were the two ducks that Watts produced to you your masters - A. Yes.

PUGH, GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

PARKER, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-143

968. SARAH ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of August , a frock, unmade, value 4 s. the property of Samuel Marlow , from the person of Mary Ann Marlow .

ELIZABETH EDWARDS . I am an ironer; I work for Mrs. Marlow, a laundress, at Lisson-green. I left her at one o'clock to go to my dinner. I met Mary Ann Marlow in the New-road, about two o'clock; she had a new frock under her arm, unmade. She was going to school. In about half an hour afterwards she returned; the frock was then gone. I saw the prisoner about seven o'clock; I charged her with taking the frock from her: she then delivered it up to me.

MARY ANN MARLOW . I am about eleven years

old. I was going to school about two o'clock; I had my sister's frock under my arm; I was going to make it; I met with the prisoner; she asked me to go up Lisson-grove with her. I went with her. She said, if I would come a little further she would give me a halfpenny. She then gave me a halfpenny to fetch a halfpennyworth of cherries; she asked me to let her hold the frock while I got the cherries. I did, and then I went to top of Stingo-lane, and when I came back the woman was gone and the frock too.

Q. Would you let her have the frock if you had not thought that she would keep it for you - A. No, I would not.

Prosecutrix. This is the same frock the child was going to take to school.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me the frock.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-144

969. SARAH ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of August , a frock, value 2 s. a pinafore, value 1 s. the property of John Johnson , from the person of Harriet Johnson .

CATHERINE JOHNSON . I live at No. 5, Lisson-row, Lisson-grove. My husband's name is John Johnson .

Q. Have you a child of the name of Harriet - A. Yes, she is three years old.

Q. How was your child dress - A. On the 2nd of August she had nothing on but a frock and a pinafore; the weather was very warm; I put nothing else on her; she went to play on the green. I saw her about half past nine at my door; I went out; about eleven I returned, the child was missing then; her sister was looking for her. Her sister's name is Mary Ann Watkins . About one o'clock I found her; she had nothing on then but her shift; she had been stripped of her frock and pinafore. About half past six in the evening I saw the prisoner I stopped her myself. I told her she had stripped my child; she said, me, woman, I have plenty of clothes for my child; the prisoner went into a public-house; I saw my child's frock at the public-house; from there I followed her to her home, No. 24, Mitcham-street, Lisson-green. She threw my child's pinafore down the stairs, over the people's heads. She was afterwards taken in custody. The frock was worth two shillings, and the pinafore one shilling.

MARY ANN WATKINS . Q. This little child that had been stripped was your sister, was she - A. Yes; I saw her about ten; she had her clothes on; she went to play on the green; I missed her about eleven o'clock; I looked on the green; I could not see her there. My mother saw her before me. About half past six, I saw the prisoner; I stopped her by the account of the children. I told her she was the person that had stripped this child. She said, me, woman, my child has plenty of clothes. I stopped her until Mrs. Marlow came up. The prisoner went into the public-house, and there I saw my sister's frock. I saw the prisoner take it from under her petticoats. I asked her for the pinafore; she said she had lost it. I went with her to her home; she chucked the pinafore over the stairs to me. This is the frock and pinafore. I am sure it is my sister's.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave them to me in the street to carry them for her; she said she would pay me for it.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-145

970. CHARLOTTE THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a sheet, value 9 s. the property of John Cummings .

ANN CHAMPION was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-146

971. JOHN GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , sixty pounds weight of feathers, value 30 s. two pillows, value 6 s. two blankets, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 4 s. a saucepan, value 1 s. a frying-pan, value 18 d. and two flat irons, value 18 d. the property of Robert Heath , in a lodging-room .

ROBERT HEATH . I live at No. 7, Woburn-court, Bloomsbury . The prisoner lodged about a year with me; he had all the articles in the indictment for his use in the lodging; he was to pay five shillings a-week. He left me, and in about a week after he was gone the key of the room was sent me in a paper. On my opening the door I missed the several articles in the indictment. About a month afterwards I met him; I laid hold of him; I told him he was the person I wanted. I have the duplicates of all the things.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-147

972. BRIGHTON COTTON and WILLIAM JACOBS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , ten shillings in monies numbered , the property of John Seal .

JOHN SEAL . I am a pork-butcher , 25, High-street, Kensington . On the 22nd of September I happened to go into my yard; one of these men came in and asked me if I had lost any thing. I had left ten shillings in copper in the shop. I missed no shillings; it was all copper.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-148

973. JAMES HOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a coat, value 35 s. the property of John Inworth .

JOHN INWORTH . I am a coachman . On Tuesday, the 14th of September, the coach was in Foley-street ; I set a friend of mine down there just at dusk. I saw the prisoner running away with the coat. I ran after him; he dropped the coat; I picked it up, and caught him. This is the coat; it is worth thirty-five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the coat.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Whipped in Jail and discharged

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-149

974. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Philip Barker , from his person .

PHILIP BARKER was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-150

975. THOMAS PAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , three quires of paper, value 2 s. the property of John Playton .

JOHN PLAYTON . I am a paper-maker ; I live in Baldwyn's-place, Baldwyn's-gardens . The prisoner was my apprentice. On last Saturday, I went out with the cart and took the man with me, and I got home as soon as I could; I waited for the prisoner going home to dinner; he is an out-door apprentice; when he came out to dinner I stopped him; I laid hold of his coat, and asked what he had got; he said, a little paper to make him a book. I took him home, and took it out of his bosom; it might be about three quires; I went for an officer; the officer and me went to his lodging, and there we found about three quires.

Prisoner's Defence. The paper is not saleable.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 1 week in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-151

976. FRANCIS CORBIT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , from the person of Peter Buckland , two dollars, a three-shilling bank token, two shillings, a 2 l. bank note, and six 1 l. bank notes, the property of Peter Buckland .

JOHN HAYWOOD . I am the publisher of the Courier. On the 7th of this month Peter Buckland was in our office to pay for his Couriers; he offered me his money; he was a newspaper carrier ; he sat down in the office, and the prisoner sat next to him.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a newspaper carrier . Peter Buckland offered me his money; I was busy. He sat down with the money in his pocket, as I was busy; the prisoner sat next to him, and when Buckland felt for his money he missed it; he told me; I asked him who sat next to him; he said, the prisoner; the prisoner was in our office. I called Corbit up; he was then gone, and when he came back I charged him with having Buckland's money, and I asked him where he had been; he said to Durham-yard, to ease himself; he shewed me himself where he had hid the money.

Q. What money was it - A. Eight pounds sixteen shillings; he took me to the spot, and there was eight pounds sixteen shillings.

PETER BUCKLAND . I was in the Courier office, I had eight pounds sixteen shillings of my master's money; it was in my possession; I went to pay it to Mr. Haywood; he was too busy to settle the accompt; I sat down, the prisoner sat next to me; the money was in my jacket pocket; there was no person sitting but him; after I had sit down about five minutes; I missed my money; when I missed my money the prisoner was gone out of the office. I was present when the money was brought back; it was the same quantity, and the same kind of money that I had in my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the money in the street.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and discharged

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-152

977. JOHN SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM SYKES . I am a silk manufacturer ; I live Milk-street, Cheapside ; George Parsons is my partner. On the 1st of February, in the early part of the day, the prisoner came to my warehouse; he stated that he was sent by Robert Jupp , New Bond-street, for a piece of black twilled sarcenet; he represented himself as the servant to Mr. Jupp.

Q. What is Mr. Jupp - A. A haberdasher; he had been a customer in a house in which I had been a partner recently. I was perfectly known to Mr. Jupp. He said, that he was sent for a piece of black twilled sarcenet; he afterwards stated that he wanted a shot sarcenet, and produced a pattern of a coloured shot sarcenet; he had accordingly fifteen yards and a half cut off the piece, that was about three pounds twelve shillings and four-pence. He had a whole piece of black twilled sarcenet. In the afternoon of that day he brought back the piece, stating that only thirty-five yards and a half were wanting of it; the thirty-five yards and a half were cut off; the amount of that is eleven pounds and odd; he took it with him.

Q. You did not know the prisoner before, did you - A. His person was familiar to me; he lived in the neighboured; I had no reason to doubt at that moment but that he came from the person as stated.

Q. Did you ever receive the value for these - A. Not a farthing; I neither got the property or the value; I was totally defrauded of them all.

ROBERT JUPP . I am an haberdasher; I live in New Bond-street.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. I do; he lived servant with me near about thirteen years ago; I have never employed him since; I never gave him authority to go to the house of Messrs. Sykes and Co. in London; nor had I ever such articles of him as he is indicted for; I am not a customer to Messrs. Sykes and Co.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing whatever of the charge that is brought against me.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-153

978. JOHN GEORGE was indicted for that he, on the 24th of August , unlawfully did utter to Eleanor Roberts , a false and counterfeit token,

resembling a three shilling token, circulated and stamped by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I am a pastry-cook; I keep a shop No. 144, Fleet-street, and 118, Cheapside . On the 4th of August, in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop in Cheapside, first my servant, Jemima Brooks , served him with two cheesecakes, he offered her a three-shilling token; my wife jumped up, and said this is a bad one by the ring of it; I told the prisoner it was a bad one; I would thank him for another; he said, he had not another. I returned it him, and asked him for the articles; I then said, now, young man, beware, I have been a great sufferer, and the first man I detect I will make an example of him; he was told to go about his business; I got on my hat, and followed him; he saw me outside of the door; he caught hold of another person outside of the door, away they brushed; I lost sight of them. I went to my other shop in Fleet-street; I was having my supper, a person came in that shop; my wife said, there is the same man again; she put out the light because he should not see us; he had two two-penny cheesecakes there of Eleanor Roberts , and tendered her a three-shilling piece; she rang it; my wife jumped up, and said give it to me; it dropped out of her hand into the till; it was given out of the till to my wife; my wife said, Carpenter, this is a bad one; I looked at it; it was a counterfeit one; I marked it, and gave it over to the Solicitor of the Bank. I seized hold of the prisoner, and took him to the watchhouse; he was searched, and a good shilling was found upon him, no other coin.

ELEANOR ROBERTS . My mistress took the three-shilling piece out of the till; it was the same as that the prisoner gave me; there were no other in the till.

SUSANNAH CARPENTER . I am the wife of the first witness. I took out of the till the three-shilling piece that the last witness put in; I gave it to my husband; I am sure it is the same.

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . I received the three-shilling bank token of Mr. Carpenter; I have had it ever since. I produce it.

MR. HAMERTON. I am a teller at the Bank.

Q. Look at that three-shilling token - A. It is a counterfeit; it resembles a three-shillings token.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of going to fairs; that three-shilling piece was given me; I did not know it was a bad one.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined in Newgate 6 months , and to find sureties for good behaviour .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-154

679. LEWIS LEVY and JOHN FONE were indicted for a conspiracy .

JOHN BROWN . I am a City officer. In consequence of intelligence, on the 15th of February, I went to the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street, and in the coach-office there I found two bags directed to Thomas Cooper , to be left at the Cross Keys until called for: I immediately opened one of those bags; it contained copper bolts; there is one hundred and twenty-three pounds in both bags of copper bolts, rings, and clinching plates. Branscomb was with me; we waited some time; he at one part of the yard, and I at the other; and after some time Levy came there, he went into the coach-office; I followed him in, from what I heard before. I asked the book-keeper if this was the gentleman who had left the bundle; he told me it was. I then asked Levy if he had not come for these two bags; he said, no. I asked the book-keeper if this was not the gentleman who generally paid for such things; he told me yes. I then told him that he must go with me; I took him to a public-house in Gracechurch-street; there I searched him; on him I found a pocketbook; I handed over the book to Branscomb, and while I was searching him further, Branscomb produced me a letter; I saw him take it out of the prisoner's pocket-book. (The letter read.) I read the letter, and told him there were facts to prove these things were directed to him; it corresponded with the weight. I said, I had facts that these were directed to him; he then, told me that he thought every thing that was sent up was fair, that was what he agreed for. I then asked him who he had them from; he said John Fone at Chatham, he kept a shop, and his name was Levy, he lived near Shadwell church. We then took him to the Solicitor of the Admiralty, in the Temple, and then locked him up in the Poultry Compter, and immediately went to find out Levy's house, where he had directed us, near Shadwell church, we went to several neighbours, we could not find it; then we went to the Prince of Denmark, near Wellclose-square; we there asked if there was a letter directed to Mr. Lee.

Q. Is that the letter - A. It is; I opened it, and paid for the postage.

WILLIAM PRESTON MORGAN . I am clerk to Mr. Stevens, an attorney, at Chatham.

Q. Do you know the defendant, Fone - A. Yes, perfectly well; he was a clerk to Mr. Stevens. I have seen him write several times; I believe these two letters to be his hand writing. Letter dated February 14th, 1813. (Read.) Signed O. P.

"Sir, I have sent up this day by Holliday, two parcels of copper, to be left at the Cross Keys, to be left till called for; send the money down as I have none to go on with; copper, one hundred and twenty-three pounds, 3 l. 7 s. 9 d. at seven pence per pound. I have not received the other money."

Brown. We then took a boat crossed the water, and went to Chatham; Branscomb was with me. In the morning we went to Fone's house; we got a warrant and searched Fone's house; I found some letters, and Branscomb found some. I found this letter in the desk below; the other was found in the chest of drawers; I shewed these letters to Levy; he said, he had sent them.

(The letters read.)

THOMAS BRANSCOMB . I was with Brown. I can only say as he has said.

THOMAS MILLER . I am the book-keeper at the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street.

Q. You remember the officers coming, and taking these two bags of copper - A. I do, The prisoner, Levy, had been there that morning, before

the officers came. Levy came and said he had come for the two bags that came the over night.

Q. Did he ask in what name directed - A. No, he had been in the habit of having the bags previous to that in the name of Thomas Cooper . I told him they were come; he left a bundle, and said he would call again.

Q. For how long time had he received bags in that direction - A. Six months. They came mostly twice a week. The bags were much about that size.

Q. Did he always fetch them himself - A. No, he desired they might be sent to Mr. Swan, of Wapping, and he would call and pay for them. I have sent bags directed to Cooper to Mr. Swan, of Wapping-wall. Levy desired they might be sent in a hackney coach as a safer way, and he used to call and pay. The bags were sent by Proudly, our porter.

COURT. Did you ever learn Levy's name - A. No. The parcels were all directed to Thomas Cooper .

JOHN PROUDLY . I am a porter at the Cross Keys.

Q. Did you, by the desire of Levy, take parcels directed to Cooper to Mr. Swan's - A. I did; Levy directed me to take them to Swan's foundery, Wapping-wall, in a hackney coach. The bags contained heavy metal.

JAMES HOLLIDAY . I am a stage coachman in the employ of Chapman, at Chatham.

Q. Do you remember taking any parcels directed to Thomas Cooper in February last - A. Yes, I took it up at the Globe at Chatham. This is the waybill.

"14th of February. Chatham . Two bags, six shillings, carriage." Two bags in the name of Cooper. I saw them the next morning in the office. Brown and Branscomb seized them. I have seen Levy at the office after the bags, and money has been brought to the office by Levy, as they told me, and I have taken it down to Chatham to Fone.

JOHN HODGKINS . I am a store-keeper at the Dock-yard, Deptford. I have seen all the copper, now produced before. I have no doubt but they are, every piece, part of his Majesty's stores, but they have been particular in punching out the marks. The Monarch, a 74 gun ship, was breaking up at that time at Chatham .

Mr. Walford addressed the Jury in behalf of Levy, and Mr. Adolphus, in behalf of Fone.

LEVY, GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

FONE, GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined 2 years in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130915-155

980. THOMAS JOB MOBREY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The plaintiff was called, and not appearing in court, the defendant was

ACQUITTED.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant .


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