Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th July 1813.
Reference Number: 18130714
Reference Number: f18130714-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 14th of JULY, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London, Sir Vicary Gibbs , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart; Alderman of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Smith , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John William Laurie ,

Samuel Burton ,

James Bramwell ,

George Nightingale ,

William Price ,

William Bott ,

William Paine ,

Timothy Janson ,

William Davis ,

Thomas Walker ,

Joshua Nevill ,

Charles Depree .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Bryant ,

Thomas Handy ,

Samuel Cutherst ,

Samuel Turner ,

Thomas Laidler ,

James Pitts ,

John Pounds ,

Thomas Wood ,

Joseph Winder ,

Charles Swannett ,

Thomas Norris ,

Joseph Kelly .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Edward Bolter ,

Isaac Webb Moore ,

Thomas Settree ,

Thomas Kingham ,

Edward Wood ,

John Stubbs ,

Thomas Haley ,

John Blake ,

Charles Fuller ,

William Cave ,

John Chambers ,

Thomas Chandler .

Reference Number: t18130714-1

687. JOSEPH HOUSELY was indicted for feloniously being at large within this kingdom before the expiration of the term of seven years for which he was ordered to be transported .

SAMUEL WILSON . I am the assistant jailer at York castle. I produce the certificate of the conviction of the prisoner. I received it of Mr. Rigg, clerk of the assizes of the county of York. I saw Mr. Rigg sign it.

(The certificate read.)

Q. to Wilson. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. I know the person of the prisoner; I was present when he was tried and convicted. He was ordered to be transported for seven years.

Q. He was the person to whom that certificate applies - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver him over afterwards to the hulk for the purpose of being transported - A. I did, in the month of April, 1810. I delivered him at Portsmouth, in the execution of that judgement. I delivered him to Captain Thompson: he was captain of the Captivity hulk at that time; he is now dead. Since that time I have not seen him until he was taken up. I have no doubt at all that he is the man.

HARRY ADKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23d of May last, in the parish of St. Pancras, in the county of Middlesex . I apprehended him for being a returned transport. He was at large at that time.

Q. Did you tell him what you apprehended him for - A. Not at that moment; when he was brought to Bow-street it was made known to him. I do not recollect that he said any thing. He was committed for this offence.

Mr. Adolphus. Whereabouts in the parish of Pancras did you apprehend him - A. In the New-road.

COURT. Did you search him - A. I did not; he was not searched in my presence.

Prisoner. I should like your lordship to ask Adkins what character he has heard of me.

Adkins. I know nothing of my own knowledge. The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Q. to Wilson. Did you know the prisoner before he was tried and convicted at York - A. I did. We had him before in our prison. He came into our jail for an offence. He was tried by a jury at the Sessions, and was in York castle the first time I think a twelvemonth. I was in the habit of seeing him many times in a day.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a boy when I went in first. It was for an assault. It is twelve years ago.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of his good character .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-2

688. CHARLES WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a promissory note for the payment of 10 l. the property of Simon Bathgate .

SIMON BATHGATE . On the 24th of November I was going through Holborn; a man spoke to me. We went up Brook-street, and after a little conversation we went into a public-house in Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. You walked from Holborn with that man, did you - A. No, not that man; the man that was tried here last sessions; I enquired of him where I could get my ten-pound note changed, and in the public-house another man came in.

Q. Do you know who the other man is - A. I do not.

Q. Was it the prisoner - A. I cannot positively say whether it was the prisoner or not. He was a stout tall man. The other man enquired of the first man that came into the room, if there had been a woman there. We told him, no. He said, he expected to find one there; he was going to be married to her. I did not pay a deal of attention to him.

Q. Though you did not pay a deal of attention to him, can you say whether it was the prisoner or not - A. I cannot indeed; he was not long in the room. I paid very little attention to him while he was in the room. He told the man that was along with me that he had been gambling with some soldiers. The man with me told him that he was foolish, and he would shew him how he had lost his money, and for each of them to put down a guinea. He took my note out of my hand; he said it was only to shew him the way he lost his money. He asked me to turn my hat over; I did, and then he said he had gained it, and shoved my note into the other man's hand. He was going out of the house. I went and asked him for my note. I returned, thinking I was in bad company. I went back to the man that had got my note.

Q. You have given an awkward account of all this; where were your eyes; have you no recollection who the man was - A. I never saw the man before. I would not wish to say any thing but the truth. I do not recollect the man. I was perfectly certain of the other man.

Prisoner. I know nothing of the witness, nor any thing of the transaction. The other man you say had your note - A. Yes.

JAMES HODGES . I am a beadle of St. Andrew's. On the 24th of November, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner and his brother come out of a public-house in Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. to Bathgate. What time was it when you was with these men - A. Perhaps it was about twelve o'clock at noon when I met the first man.

Mr. Hodges. It was about one o'clock, as near as possible, when I met the prisoner and his brother coming out of the Marquis of Granby public-house, Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. to Bathgate. Do you know whether that was the house you were at - A. Yes, that was the house.

Mr. Hodges. The brother of the prisoner, as soon as he passed me, he ran down the lane; about four or five minutes afterwards I met the prisoner; he spoke to me, and asked me how I did, and when I came to the door of this public-house I saw this man come out very much confused apparently. I learned that he had been rubbed of a ten pound note. He described that it was done by two lusty men; he asked me if I knew which way they were gone. He was going to run after them.

Q. to Bathgate. What was the name of the man which you knew - A. James Wheeler ; he was tried here.

Mr. Hedges. I told him it was of no use his running after the prisoners, if he would stop a minute I would go with him. I went with him to Hatton Garden office; I gave information. He informed me going along that he had been robbed of a ten pound country note, of the Suffolk and Essex bank. I gave information at the office, and requested them to send an officer to the banking-house to stop the note. The note was stopped, and the prisoner afterwards was taken. I know nothing more of the transaction than I saw the parties coming out, and knowing them well. They both came out of the house. The first run away, and the other spoke to me. James passed me in the street. The prisoner was about six or seven yards behind him.

JOHN ROSE . I am a clerk at Messrs. Barclay's. On the 24th of November last, the prosecutor came and said he had lost a ten pound country note, and requested that we would stop it. He described the particulars of the note as well as he could. In about half an hour afterwards a young woman brought the note. This is the note. I detained the note. It is a promissory note for ten pound; it was then unpaid. I told the young woman that I had directions to stop a note. I requested her to come the next day, if this was not the note I would give her the money. She never came.

WILLIAM MANN . I keep the Marquis of Granby public-house in Gray's-inn-lane . On the 24th of November, about twelve o'clock at noon, Simon Bathgate and James Wheeler came into my house; they went into the parlour, and called for a pint of porter. I served it them, and came out. In about five or ten minutes another man walked in, whom I believe to be the prisoner.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. I have seen him for some years about the neighbourhood. I never saw him in the house before. He called for a pint of ale; I served him. I left them all three in the parlour. There was no other person there. I went down into the cellar, and when I came out of the cellar into the parlour, the parlour was empty. Simon Bathgate was looking after them. I asked him if any thing was the matter. He said he had lost a ten pound note. Mr. Hodges, the beadle, came up. I asked him if he had met any body. I have not the least doubt the prisoner is the man.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the note; is that the note you lost - A. I believe it to be the note; it answers in all particulars.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction. I was not in the house that day. I don't know that ever I was in the house. If I had been in the house the young man must recollect me, I should presume, as it was a gambling transaction. The man that was in the room with my brother represented himself as a stranger. It would have been impossible for me to represent myself as a stranger; my brother and me were twins.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-3

689. PETER PEARCE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Waddilove , about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 8th of February , and stealing a hat, value 5 s. his property .

MARGARET WADDILOVE . I am the wife of James Waddilove ; he lives at No. 1, Phoenix-street, Hackney-road . My husband occupies the whole house. On the 8th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I came down stairs; I was going out; I pushed open the parlour door; I saw the pri-prisoner getting in at the window. I asked him what he did there. His reply was, that he slipped in. His body was in the window; he was overbalanced. I said it was impossible, for the window was shut. I told him he was a thief; he was going to steal. He had drawn the table, which stood in the room, close to the window, with the hat upon it. I said, you are going to steal that hat. His hands were upon the hat, and he had removed the hat. It is a small table, about a yard square. He had removed the table a yard nearer the window. He ran away. Mr. Waddilove pursued him, and brought him back. When the prisoner ran away he left the hat upon the table. I am sure the prisoner is the same person that was brought back, and I am sure he is the same person that I saw leaning in the window. I had been in the room about a quarter of an hour before, and put the window down; there was nothing to fasten it. It lifts up and down, with a Venetian blind to it. No person had been in that room, to my knowledge, but myself.

JAMES WADDILOVE . I am the husband of the last witness. I occupy this house, No. 1, Phoenix-street, Hackney-road. I was alarmed by the cry of my wife, saying, here is some person getting in. In consequence I pursued, and when I came out of my door I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of the row. As soon as he saw me he ran away; I pursued, and called out, stop him. He was stopped, and delivered into my hands, and I brought him into my house. I charged him with opening my window, and endeavouring to take my hat. He said, if I would forgive him he would never do so any more. I took the prisoner to Worship-street office; they there knew him very well. This is the hat; it cost me twenty-six shillings. I value it at seven shillings.

Q. Are you sure it is worth a shilling - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the window at all. The lady has declared all false against me. I was here eighteen months ago for this, and I was discharged by proclamation.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-4

690. WILLIAM GEORGE WELLS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Smith , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 4th of April , and stealing therein six shirts, value 6 s. a shawl, value 18 d. two tablecloths, value 18 d. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. three caps, value 3 s. a shift, value 1 s. two pieces of nankeen, value 18 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. three coats, value 6 s. an umbrella, value 2 s. a pair of drawers, value 3 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 3 s. and a waistcoat, value 6 d. the property of Charles Wright .

ANN WRIGHT . I live at 19, Great Pulteney-street, in the parish of St. James .

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. About twelve years.

Q. Did he come in April last to your house - A. Yes. He went to school with my son, and from that there was a family intimacy.

Q. He was suffered to come to your house - A. Yes; he was like one of my own family. I acted as a friend and mother to him always. On the 1st of April he came to me and mentioned that he was, very poor and low; that he had not eat any food. He asked me for three shillings. I got him something to take, and gave him a cup of tea. My friend gave him sixpence, and I got him three shillings; that was three shillings and sixpence. On Saturday morning, the 3d of April, he asked me could I take a letter for him. I said, I have children of my own; I will do it for you. I then went to my friends, and collected ten shillings for him, in charity. He came to me on Sunday, and took share of what I had; he dined with me; and on Sunday evening, the 4th of April, I was sent for to a friend. I told him he could not stay if I went. I had a son that was at church. I am in the habit of putting the key of my room, which is the garret, under the mat, for my son, or any of the family, to come in. I had not gone from my house half an hour when he returned back, and stripped me of all I had. He took all my things out of my trunk.

Q. What time did you go out - A. At half past eight o'clock. I returned about ten; it was dark.

Q. It was dark when you went out, was it not - A. It was between the dark and light; the moon was coming on. The day-light had ceased. When I returned I found the key in the place where I had left it, and the candlestick where I had left it, and when my son went to bed I found every thing that the trunk contained was gone, except some old rags at the bottom.

Q. Now tell me what you lost - A. A pair of new cotton sheets, two pieces of new nankeen, five pair of new cotton stockings, three or four pocket handkerchiefs, a tablecloth, a napkin, a bottle-green coat, a great coat, and a black coat, a pair of black pantaloons, a black waistcoat, a pair of cotton drawers, and sundry other articles; that is what were in the trunk; and in the bundle there were six shirts; they were old and bad ones; a night handkerchief, and several night and day caps, and one old shirt. They were my husband's property: his name is Charles Wright .

Q. Have you seen any of these things since - A. Yes. I saw them on the 27th of April, in the prisoner's lodgings. I there saw a bottle-green coat, a pair of drawers, and at the bottom of the same house, a chandler's shop, she had given some other things for victuals. I there saw a coat, a pair of drawers, a night cap, and a bottle-green coat.

Q. No; the bottle-green coat you said you saw in his room - A. I made a mistake; it is in the same house.

Q. You saw a great coat in his room - A. Yes, and the black coat was in his room, and I think the black waistcoat, but not the pantaloons. The best part of the articles were not found, an umbrella and several other things. Humphreys was with me when I found the articles. He stopped the prisoner when he came home at night.

Prisoner. Mrs. Wright, had not you a knowledge that I had the things for three weeks before I was apprehended - A. I did. Suppose that, you was the robber.

Q. Did not you give me the things, or lend them me - A. I never gave them, or lent them you.

Q. Did not you send your eldest daughter to tell me not to say that you lent them me, and that if your husband knew it he would be the death of both - A. I never sent such a message. Such a message was never sent by me, or any of the family.

Q. Mrs. Wright, when we went out of your room about eight o'clock did not we go to the wine vaults, did not you then desire me to go home and take the things out - A. I did not.

Q. Did not you send your daughter, desiring her to give me that permission, and did not say that you had placed the key of the door under the mat of the landing-place - A. I never sent my daughter at all with any such message.

Q. Did not you request me to write a letter to you, which letter you might shew your husband, that he might see there was no intimacy between us - A. Never, nor never knew any thing of it.

Q. After I was taken to Newgate did not you, Mrs. Wright, write to me, requesting me to write again to you - A. I never did.

Q. I will now ask you whether you have any knowledge of any person calling on me on the 28th of last month, requesting me to write a letter to you, denying any knowledge of that which letter had fallen into your husband's hands, and had caused a quarrel between you - A. I know nothing of it. I never desired any thing of the kind.

Q. Did not you send a person of the name of Williams, a tailor, who works for the same master as your son Charles did, in Hatton Garden - A. I never saw him. I do not know any such name.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings, No. 4, King-street, Soho; the two pair of stairs front room. I first went there one at noon, he was not at home; in the room I found a drab great coat, a black coat, a black waistcoat, some neck handkerchiefs, three shirts, a pair of stockings; and on his person I found two duplicates

of five pair of stocking, pledged in Russel-street; I found afterwards a twenty-pound, a three-Pound, and a two-pound bad notes. I waited in his room until one o'clock; he then came in, and I apprehended him on the night of the 26th of April. It is a double house, with a chandler's shop below; and at the chandler's shop I found a bottle green coat, a pair of drawers with the name taken out of the hands, and a night-cap.

Q. to Mrs. Wright. Look at the drab coat, the black coat, and the waistcoat, are these the things that you lost - A. Yes; all these things are my husband's property.

Q. to Humphreys. Where did you find these things - A. About the room; some were in a trunk. I asked him whether all the things in the roombelonged to him except the bed; he said, yes; he asked me who had thrown them about; I said the person that to them. He said nobody belonged to them but himself; I asked him particularly twice.

CHARLES WRIGHT . Look at these clothes, first at the black coat, is that your coat - A. Yes, it is; it is the coat that I missed; it was taken out of my house; the black waistcoat is not mine; the bottle green coat, and the drab great coat is mine.

Prisoner. Will you allow me to ask Mr. Wright to put that coat on.

COURT. Just step into a room and put the coat on. (Mr. Wright withdrew and came into court with the black coat on; said it was his coat to the best of his knowledge.)

THOMAS WINTER ALLEN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of April, the prisoner pawned three pair of stockings for five shillings, a tablecloth, and a napkin for half-a-crown.

Prosecutrix. I am certain all these articles are mine.

JOSEPH GREENSTEAD was called, and not appearing, in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at that letter, is that his hand writing - A. It is. (The letter read.) And so is the other letter.

Wednesday, April 28th, 1813.

Addressed, in haste, to Mrs. Wright, Great Pulteney-street, Golden-square.

"My dear Mrs. Wright, I beg for God's sake you will not prosecute me, if I am committed to Newgate to-morrow I shall be transported; for Gods sake intercede with Mr. Wright for him to consider what distress I was in that made me do what I have; I will not attempt to make any excuse for my conduct; I am almost mad; if I was sure of being hanged I would not ask you for any mercy, as my misery would be at an end. Consider the many years misery I shall be doomed to bear if I am transported; you know I have no friend in the world, and you will be sorry one time or the other hereafter; as I have had a deal of property left and settled on me since I saw you, but the Procter of the Commons will not pay me while I am under a charge of felony; you are not obliged to prosecute without you like, the officers will persuade you for the sake of the reward; pray speak well of me to the magistrate, ask leave for me to go to sea; they will consent. It note nly a matter of form being bound over. Pray swer er I am almost dead; be merciful, and God will be so to you; pray consider your unfortunate Georg W. Wells Clerkenwell prison.

Another letter written by the prisoner. (Read. Addressed to Mrs. Wright Great Pulteney-street.

Tuesday, June 15th, 1813.

"Dear Madam, I shall be very much obliged to you if you will call and see me as soon as possible; I have something very particular to tell you that will be of consequence to you. I cannot mention the particulars to you here; if you will come you will not be sorry for it; I beg you will not delay coming. I am very ill; the short allowance of bread scarce keeps me alive. I have no friends to come and see me in my distress. I have a good chance to be fortunate and rich, I will explain particulars. Pray come, you will do yourself a material service, and me great kindness. Excuse my writing to you once more; let me beg to see you. Still I remain your unfortunate friend, George W. Wells , master side of Newgate. Inside it is more comfortable than it appears outside, any of the turnkeys will shew you where I am. There was a time when you did not fail to oblige a friend; best respects to Mr. Wright.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Wright has sworn to a coat that is not his. I acknowledge these letters to be mine; I wish not to deviate from the truth; I wrote some of them at the request of Mrs. Wright. My lord and gentleman of the jury, I am quite unprepared either by counsel or attorney to defend me. And I always understood from Mrs. Wright that she never would appear against me; I am fully convinced that I must appear guilty in the eyes of this court. I have now no other means of vindicating my cause then a true relation of the facts that has caused this unjust prosecution against me; it was not my wish to divulge disagreeable truths. I am forced to it by Mrs. Wright, who has wickedly come forth and accused me of the robbery, she being convinced that the whole of the prosecution is to screen herself and her daughter from the anger of Mr. Wright. I have no other witness on my part than a Mr. Cox, who I have every reason to believe is gone to Bath, or keeps out of the way, knowing his evidence would establish my innocence. I do not mean to accuse Mr. Wright of being the principal instrument of prosecuting me, I wrote to him several times begged he would see me; I told him plainly if he prosecuted me it would cause a great exposure. I have no doubt he has been exasperated against me by the wife and daughter. I shall now endeavour to relate the particulars.

I have been acquainted with Mrs. Wright and family several years. I went to school with her eldest son; through him I was unfortunately introduced to the rest of the family. Mr. Wright then was a stay-maker ; since then he has been a bankrupt. I was ever a friend to them, and did myself material harm through them. They know their daughter has gone upon the town. I was continually distressing myself for some of the family; of late I have not been upon very good terms with them. I thought it necessary to keep out of the way. A short time back I called upon Mrs. Wright, telling her how I was situated. She begged that I would come and live with her a few days, which I accepted of, and took some things with me. She agreed that Mr. Wright should not be acquainted with it, and gave me the

key of the street door to let myself in and out, during which time Mrs. Wright was continually complaining of the ill treatment of her husband, and proposed me to take her daughter in keeping, and she to live with us; which I objected having to live with both. I told Mrs. Wright it was impossible for me to do as she wished, as I had promised to marry a young lady. I told Mrs. Wright I must have the bill of sixty-three pounds; that I was in danger of being arrested for it. This she cannot deny. I had many documents in my possession, which I have mislaid or destroyed. On Friday the 2nd of April it was understood that Mr. Wright was coming home. I was plain, and asked Mrs. Wright for my clothes. On the next morning I breakfasted with her. I was very much surprised when she told me they could not be found; at length I understood that they were all pledged. I insisted upon having them restored, or I would take such steps as would get them. She said, if I would call on Sunday the 4th of April, the day she states the robbery to be committed. I should have them. When I went the next day Mrs. Wright said she was unwell. I asked Mrs. Wright if she had got my clothes. She said, if Mr. Wright knew it he would be the death of us both, as he did not like me to be there. She said, if I would wait a few days she would have it in her power to redeem them for me; Mr. Wright would bring some money home with him; she would lend me a few things. I told Mrs. Wright I would wait, if she would let me have a few necessary things. I stopped with Mrs. Wright and her daughter until eight o'clock in the evening, when we went out together. We went to the wine vaults, where I treated them with some drams. Mrs. Wright said she would bring the things down with her, meaning the things now produced. After we came out of the wine vaults I asked her if she brought the things down with her. She excused herself by saying she would send her daughter, Mary, home with them in the morning. I said I wished to have them then. Mrs. Wright desired her daughter to bring the bundle down, and told her the key was under the mat. Mrs. Wright and daughter walked home with me to my lodging. She remarked that the shirts were not very good; they were very clean. Notwithstanding how I had been used I promised to lend her some money to redeem the things she had pledged. After this Mrs. Wright and daughter told me that Mr. Wright missed some of his things, but did not know that they were lent to me, and begged that I would not let him know, as he would kill them. When I left Mrs. Wright she promised to call on me in two or three days. At half after twelve o'clock at night I went home to my lodgings; Humphreys seized me, and asked me what I had in my room. I said nothing but my own, and what I had given to me. On the morning Mary Wright came to me, and told me to keep my spirits up. She said, her father had found me out by watching her mother, and had beaten her violently for letting me have these things; that her father had taken me up for robbing them, as they dare not tell the truth. She said her mother was afraid of seeing me herself for fear of being known; she must appear against me, as Mr. Wright would be present. She begged for God's sake I would not tell the truth; they should be ruined. I promised if her mother would clear me I would not. Mrs. Wright sent to me, persuading me to write a letter to Mr. Wright, which I did. I was committed to Bridewell, since which time Mrs. Wright has been buoying me up that nobody would appear against me. I put off my trial last sessions by her desire, that at this time Mr. Wright would be out of the way. This way I have been kept in prison eleven weeks, and find myself the dupe of Mrs. Wright and daughter, who I wonder is not present, as she came to me almost every day in prison. I declare I am innocent of what I am accused of.

Q. to Mrs. Wright. Is it true that you and your daughter met him every day until he was apprehended - A. No, never.

Q. Is it true that you have lent him several things - A. Never in my life.

Q. Then it is not true that you lent him these things that you charge him with stealing - A. No, never.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-5

691. RICHARD STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , four pair of silk stockings, value 2 l. 3 s. sixty-eight dozen of buttons, value 13 s. eighteen yards of silk and cotton cord, value 1 s. 6 d. two ounces of cotton, value 2 s. and four yards of lace, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Flint and John Ray , in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM NICHOLSON . I am shopman to Thomas Flint and John Ray , No. 15, Grafton-street ; they are haberdasher s. Mr. Ray lives in the house; Mr. Flint does not. On Friday the 25th of June the prisoner was in the cellar, which is a warehouse. I went and called him out rather in haste. I perceived him put a small key in his pocket. On Saturday evening I made a search; I searched a little box in the cellar. I saw sundry articles in the box; I did not proceed any further, as my employers were not at home. On Sunday the 27th I opened this box in the cellar, and found a pair of silk stockings. No one was with me. After that Slade and me opened his box up stairs. I found in that a number of articles, and three pair of new silk stockings. These are them. I know the silk stockings; they have our private mark upon them. In his jacket pocket I found a few buttons. I know they were the prisoner's boxes; I have seen him lock and unlock them. The prisoner had the keys of both the boxes about him. This is the paper that the stockings were in. They were in our shop September the 4th, 1812. The stockings are new they have not been worn.

JOHN RAY . My partner's name is Thomas Flint . There is no other partner. The prisoner has lived with me almost three years.

Q. Were you there when the box was searched - A. No, I was out of town. When I came home I went up stairs with the prisoner, and informed him that his boxes had been searched.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-6

692. JOHN GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , three hundred and sixty-four pounds weight of coffee, value 6 l. the property of James Betts and Benjamin Betts , in a certain lighter belonging to them in the navigable river Thames .

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames police surveyor.

Q. Do you remember any time in June, seeing the prisoner in the river Thames - A. I did, on the 19th of June, about half past one in the morning. I was on my duty. I was going down the river; I saw three men in a boat; the boat came round the stern of a lighter. The moment they saw me in my boat they shoved on shore; two of the men ran out of the boat and escaped. The prisoner jumped into the mud, and in trying to extricate himself he fell on his hands, which enabled me to take him. I found in the boat three bags of coffee. The three bags of coffee weighed three hundred weight and a quarter. I afterwards went on board the lighter. The name of the lighter was the Castle Douglas. I found her laying at the entrance of the West India docks. The hatches were on, and the main hatch bar ran along the hatch. One hatch was fast, and the other unlocked. One of the hatch bars were down, with an excise lock, and the other was not locked at all. The starboard was loose; the larboard was secure. By shifting the starboard bar off you might get all the hatches off.

Q. Was there any one on board - A. No. When I first saw the wherry she was about one hundred and fifty yards off. She was rowing up the river, but whether her head was inclining on the shore I cannot say; I should suppose not, by the direction she was going in. They landed on the same side at Limehouse-hole. I searched the prisoner. I found a key on him that unlocked the hatch, where they may go out of the weather. It has no communication but to where the cargo was.

Mr. Knapp. So you never saw him but one hundred and fifty yards off the lighter - A. Yes.

Q. Where they were exactly coming from, you could not ascertain - A. No, I could not. When I got in the boat he told me he was a watchman to Mr. Betts. The prisoner desired me to go after the other two men. He said, they were going to Mackilbery's, a house down the stairs; I should find the two men there. I asked him where the coffee came from. He told me that they were watchman of Mr. Betts's, and that they had got it out of the lighter; that himself had been on shore in the watchhouse at the West India docks, and had fell asleep there, and on his coming down to his coming down to his craft he perceived two men heaving something out of the lighter into the boat. He called to them, and asked what they had got there. He then found it was coffee from out of the lighter, and requested them to put it back, but finding they would not put it back he went with them. On my asking him how they came to get out of the boat; first he said they were rowing, and he was sitting aft.

Q. He told you very freely where they were going to take the property to - A. He did, and he told me he was asleep at the time these persons took the property.

JAMES BETTS . Q. Who does this coffee belong to on board this lighter - A. Messrs. Abbey and Co. They were entrusted to my care as the lighterman. I am an apprentice to James and Benjamin Betts, owners of the lighter . This was the coffee on board.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he was employed on board as watchman . He ought to have staid on board all night.

Q. What time had you seen this coffee on board - A. Between seven and eight. I am a servant to James and Benjamin Betts . No other than these gentlemen have any interest in the business. The prisoner had been in their service, on and off, sixteen years. His character has been very fair.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a few friends to come forward to give me a character.

Q. to James Betts . How much is this coffee worth - A. Forty shillings a hundred weight.

Q. There is three hundred pounds weight - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-7

693. JAMES HILLIARD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Haines , about the hour of five in the night of the 26th of January , and stealing therein, four coats, value 6 l. three waistcoats, value 30 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. a pair of trowsers, value 1 l. a pair of pantaloons, value 1 l. four shirts, value 1 l. a ring, value 2 l. a counterpane, value 2 s. and a guinea, the property of Thomas Haines ; three coats, value 5 l. a pair of breeches, value 15 s. a pair of braces, value 2 s. a watch, value 3 l. a seal, value 1 l. and a key, value 5 s. the property of Edward Smith Slate , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Haines .

THOMAS HAINES . I live in Newport-alley, Newport-market .

Q. Was your house broken open in January last - A. It was, on the 26th of January.

Q. What articles did you lose - A. Three suits of clothes, shirts, table-spoons, and other things.

Q. What time did you go to bed - A. It was broken open before I went to bed, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, it was near twelve. I was not at home.

Q. What time did you go out - A. I went out early in the evening, before six o'clock. I went back about eleven o'clock it was all then safe; I went out again within about three doors off. I had a glass of rum and water. I went home again upon the stroke of twelve; as I coming out of the public-house I met my man, Edward Smith Slate ; I said have you been home; he said, no, I had just left James Hilliard , I had supper with him. I found my house-door open.

Q. Is Slate your apprentice - A. No, my journeyman . I went to the shop door; that was open.

Q. Are you able to judge how they got in at the cellar - A. I went down into my cellar. I found my cellar-door unbolted.

Q. Did you observe to see how they got in at your cellar - A. Yes, they must have unbolted the doors; the only entrance to the cellar from the street would have been through a door and a flap; the door was open, and the flap down; the flap was unbolted at that time. I had been in the cellar five or six times in the morning. I cannot say whether the flap was bolted or not in the morning. We have stairs from the cellar that leads into the shop, and at the front there is another way to get into the cellar.

Q. Have you since seen any of the property - A. Yes; there are some spoons found, an accompt-book, a coat, and a watch-key of Slate's; that is all that is found.

Q. What articles in the whole did you lose - A. I lost three suits of clothes, a great coat, four or five shirts, some neck handkerchiefs, and a ring; I had seen them all safe at eleven in the evening in the two pair I had been up stairs; and when I came back at twelve they were gone. The coats were worth about seven pounds; there was one suit of clothes was entirely new that I had never worn. The spoons are here.

JOHN STOCKS . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two tea-spoons pledged on the 26th of January. I do not know who pledged them.

Prosecutor. I know the spoons are mine by the make and shape; I have others to match them.

ROBERT LEWIS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this counterpane. I do not know who pledged it.

Prosecutor. It is my counterpane.

EDWARD SMITH SLATE . I am shopman to Mr. Haines. I was in company with the prisoner on the 26th of January; he came to our house about half past nine o'clock, him and Charles Wright ; they continued with me until I shut up shop; when I went out about a quarter past ten they went with me. I left the house fast at the time I went away.

Q. Do you know in what state the cellar was left - A. No, not at that time. I was in the cellar between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; the cellar-door and flap were bolted then.

Q. At a quarter past ten where did you go to - A. The public-house where I got my supper; they went with me. They continued in the tap until had eat our supper; then we went into the parlour; the prisoner whispered to Wright, and they both went out. It then was near twelve o'clock. I continued two or three minutes longer in the public-house, then I went home; I and master went home together; we found the door open; some of my property was gone.

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-8

694. JOHN GOODHALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Day , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 5th of June , and burglariously stealing therein a tea-pot, value 6 d. a cup, value 3 d. and a saucer, value 3 d. the property of Elizabeth Goodman

JOHN DAY . I am a shoe-maker ; I live at No. 7, Bull-court, Shoreditch . On the night of the illumination I went out about ten. I left the door safely locked, and the window shutters closed, and the sashes down; I went out with Elizabeth Goodman , and two other neighbours; on my return home I picked up part of a broken tea-pot in the street opposite of Swan-yard, in Shoreditch. A man met me, I went to the watchhouse; I went home soon after twelve, when I came home I missed nothing out of my room; Elizabeth Goodman missed a tea-pot, a cup and saucer. Elizabeth Goodman is my tenant. I picked the pieces of crockery-ware up, and took it home.

ELIZABETH GOODMAN . I lodge in the house of the last witness; I went out with him to see the illumination. The window shutters were put to, but not bolted. In consequence of the alarm I went home. I unlocked the door and went in; the window curtain was torn down; I looked on the table, and found my crockery-ware gone, a cup, a saucer, a tea-pot, and two plates besides. I was told that the prisoner was in the watchhouse.

JOHN LABRAM . I live nearly opposite of Day. On the night of the illumination I remember coming home that night, and when I came into the court I observed the prisoner half way in the window, I asked if that was Mr. Day; he said, yes; and when I passed by him I collared him; he got away from me; I cried stop thief, and pursued him and opposite of Swan-yard he threw down what he had, some cups and saucer; I picked up he pieces, and threw them down again.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a watchman. The prisoner was brought to our watchhouse; I searched him; he pulled this lid out of his right hand great coat pocket; he attempted to throw it out into Swan-yard; I stopped him immediately.

Q. to Elizabeth Goodman . Look at that lid, is that the lid of your tea-pot - A. Yes, and this is the crockery-ware that he throwed in the street, Mr. Day picked it up opposite of Swan-yard. This is my lid, and these pieces of the tea-pot are the same pattern.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nobody to speak for me. I come some hundred miles off.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 51.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-9

695. JOHN HOSIER BOYS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Patrick Sullivan , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 7th of July , with intent the goods and chattels therein being burglariously to steal.

SIMON BERRY . Q. Do you live with Mr. Sullivan - A. Yes; his house is in Whitechapel . On last Wednesday night, the 7th of July, I sat up. I heard the tiles rattle a little before one; in a short time I heard a bolt draw of the back-room that comes into the tap-room.

Q. You heard one bolt of the back door drawn - A. Yes, and I heard the other bolt drawn; afterwards the latch gently lifted up, and the door opened; I heard a light footstep close by the bar.

Q. Then when you are through that door are you in the house - A. Yes. I heard the button that fastens the bar-window undone; I ran out of the

bar, at the bar-door. I ran backwards to the place where I heard the noise.

Q. When you are in the bar and look into that window, where does it look into - A. It faces the back-door; that window is between the parlour-door and the kitchen-door.

Q. Does the back-door open into the house, or into the yard - A. Into the house.

Q. Then as soon as you are through the back-door you are in the house, are you - A. Yes.

Q. You ran round to the place where you heard the noise - A. Yes; I ran up against a man. it was dark; I had no light, nor he had no light. I seized the man as soon as I run against him.

Q. Did you keep fast hold of him - A. Yes, I did; and it was the prisoner now at the bar.

Q. Are you able to say whether the prisoner was in any part of the house - A. Yes, he was in the house; the outside of the bar-window is within the house.

Q. When you heard a light footstep could you tell where that footstep was - A. Yes, close by that bar-window. When I seized him, he said it is me Mr. Berry.

Q. Then you knew him before, did you - A. Yes; he had been employed about the house some time ago. I brought him into the tap-room.

Q. Did you find any thing about him - A. Yes, a piece of wire, match, astick, and a tinder-box. These are them. I sat him down in the tap-room, and underneath where he was sitting I found the tinder-box.

Q. Was that tinder-box within the tap-room or not before he came in - A. No, it was not. This piece of wire was to force the bolt back from the outside. I said, I was sorry to catch him; we were robbed a great many times.

Mr. Gurney. Is this your house or Sullivan's - A. It is Sullivan's house. I have the tap to myself; I have nothing but the tap; Sullivan has nothing to do with the tap; I sell beer by commission for him; I have so much a but; I pay no rent. There were four gimblet holes, and through them holes that wire was put in, it forced the bolt back.

Q. This man formery kept the house himself - A. Yes, he did.

COURT. Had you examined the bolts of the back-door; do you know whether the back-door was bolted or not - A. It was bolted a little before eleven. I know that of my own knowledge.

Q. As soon as ever you go through the back-door are you under the roof of the house or not - A. No, there is a light; it is not covered up; it is open all the way up to the sky; the bar-window is under cover, and within the house.

Q. Supposing you were coming in at the door you heard him unbolt, as soon as he came in there where would he be - A. Under the roof; as soon as he got through he was within side of the house; he might have gone anywhere in the house that he liked.

Q. Did you ask the prisoner what he wanted, or was anything said what he came there for - A. He said, now, Berry, I will hang myself, I have got rope in my pocket. I had got hold of him then.

Q. He never said why he came in - A. Not a

PATRICK SULLIVAN . Q. This house you occupy - A. Yes. I rent the whole of the house, and sleep in part of it.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner what was the reason of his coming there - A. No.

Q. Had the prisoner lived with you - A. Yes, he had: I took him in the house as a confident to take money and give change, and every thing I trusted him with.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer. I tried the door with this wire; there was a hole at the top, and one underneath; I put the wire under, it undid the bolt. I searched the prisoner's house, I found a cag of gin, a vast many beer bottles, and about a dozen keys; two or three picklock keys, one of them opened the bar-door.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 68.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-10

696. SAMUEL WINSTANLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 5th of July , one hundred and twenty-four yards of canvas, value 7 l. 0 s. 10 d. the property of John Park .

ALEXANDER ANDERSON . I am clerk to John Park; he is a warehouseman in Swithins-lane . The prisoner was a soldier in the first guards , he lodged in Charles's-court, in the Strand. On the 5th of July, I employed the prisoner to carry one hundred and twenty-four yards of canvas to Mr. Mercer, in Sise-lane; I afterwards learned that Mr. Mercer had not received it. This was on Monday, and on Wednesday he was apprehended.

MR. MERCER. I am a warehouseman, in Sise-lane. I looked the canvas out at Mr. Park's, and I expected it on Monday. It never came to my warehouse; it has never been found since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated in liquor when I took the canvas, and in the street I put the canvas down; I went a little way off to make water, and when I returned it was gone.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I apprehended the prisoner I went with him into Charles's-court, in the Strand. The prisoner said he would shew me where he sold it if I would let one hand be at liberty; I told him I would not. He then said he would not tell me at all.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-11

697. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a pound weight of pins, value 3 s . the property of James Hall and John Lander .

JAMES HALL . I am a pin and needle-maker , my partner's name is John Lander ; I live at 47, Gracechurch-street .

JAMES NICHOLSON . I am shopman to James Hall and John Lander . On the 9th of July, I put down twelve pounds of pins on the counter; the prisoner came in, and tendered some caulliflowers for sale; I told her we did not want any. She then turned round and walked towards the door, and just

as she had got out of the door a person came in and told me that the woman that had gone out had taken a parcel up and put it in her apron. I looked on the counter, and immediately missed one pound out of the twelve; I followed the prisoner, and took her in the next shop but one; I took a pound of pins out of her apron; she said she hoped we would not prosecute her, she was drunk and did not know what she did.

Q. Was she drunk - A. I cannot say. These are the pins; here is the witness that saw her take them.

SARAH BROWN . I was waiting to cross the road there were so many carriages; I saw the prisoner go to the counter; she took a parcel the counter and put it in her apron; I immediately went and told the young man. I am sure the prisoner is the person. The young man went and took her immediately.

Prisoner's Defence. How I came to take the pins up I do not know. I am fifty years of age. I will never be guilty of the like again.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-12

698. JAMES ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , twenty-eight pounds weight of butter, value 38 s. and one tub, value 1 s. the property of Robert Russell .

LEVI VICKREY . I am a book-keeper at Axminster, to Robert Russell 's waggon. I saw the tub of butter put in the waggon. This is my book where I entered it, it was on the 24th of May, 1813; it was marked N. B. No. 1745; this is the farmer's iron that marked it: I helped to load the waggon myself.

JOHN PREEN . I am a porter at the Bull-inn, Friday-street, Cheapside . The Axminster waggon inns there. The Axminster waggon arrived on Friday night; on Saturday morning I saw this tub of butter in Robert Russell 's hay-loft; the tub of butter was under some hay; James Arnold has the care of that hay-loft. Arnold was Mr. Russell's horse-keeper ; the tub of butter was concealed in the hay-loft.

JOSEPH ANSTWICK . I am a book-keeper at the Bell-inn, Friday-street. I apprehended the prisoner with the half firkin of butter done up very curious in a frail-basket. The basket was sewed up so that you could not see the contents of the basket. I followed him and asked him what he had got in their ail. I took it from him. This is the firkin that was in the frail-basket.

Vickrey. That is the firkin I loaded in the waggon; it corresponds with the marking iron.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of that butter - A. Fifteen or sixteen shillings at Axminster.

Q. to Anstwick. What time of the day was it when you stopped him - A. About nine o'clock on Sunday morning; the waggon arrived late on Friday night. When the waggon arrives the gates are shut, no one has access to it until the next morning; it is a private inn, and on Saturday morning I saw the firkin of butter in the hay-loft.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-13

699 WILLIAM BADCOCK was indicted for that he, on the 5th of September, in the 52nd year of Majesty's reign , feloniously did dispose of, and put away a certain forged order for the payment of 500 l. with intention to defraud Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , bart . Abraham Wilde Robarts , and William Curtis , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

ANOTHER COUNT, for the like offence only stating the forged instrument to be a bill of exchange instead of an order for the payment of money .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, stating it to be to defraud John Henry Burchell , William Walford , and Charles Green . And SYLVESTER, (alias JOHN) HILL , and ROBERT BRADY , for that they, before the said felonies were committed, to wit, on the 18th of August , feloniously did incite and abet the said William Badcock , the said felony to do and commit .

SAMUEL RICHARDSON -

Mr. Serjeant Pell. Q. to Mr. Shellon. Produce sir the record of the conviction of Samuel Richardson .

(Read.)

" Samuel Richardson was indicted for that he, on the 5th of September, in the 41st year in his Majesty's reign, was servant to John Berry , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession fifty pounds for and on account of the said John Berry , and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the same, and the jurors upon their oath say, that the said Samuel Richardson , on the 5th of September aforesaid, feloniously did steal and carry away the said fifty pounds, the property of John Berry whereupon he was ordered and adjudged by the court to be transported for the term of seven years; on Wednesday, the 16th of December, 1811.

GEORGE BELLMEANE . In the year 1801, I was headborough of Kensington parish. I apprehended Samuel Richardson about the 6th of September, 1801; that is the man; he was tried here. I was present as a witness at the trial.

WILLIAM HOMEDON . Q. Just turn round and look behind you, do you see that man - A. Yes, very well; his name is Samuel Richardson I saw him when he came on board the hulks, I think it was in the year 1801. One morning he was told out with the gang to go to work; he escaped from the gang and got away; he was absent from the morning before dinner until the next day, the whole of the night; he missed the muster three times. I was on board at the time; I saw him brought back by the persons employed to look after them when they escape.

COURT. When was he brought back - A. Rather before dinner time, and it was before dinner time that he made his escape.

Mr. Gurney. And staid the whole seven years there - A. The captain will prove that.

MR. ALEXANDER. Q. You were mate of the

Captivity Hulk in the year 1801 - A. Yes, she was the receiving ship for convicts; she was laying along side of the Dock-yard at Portsmouth.

Q. Look round, and tell me whether you know Richardson - A. Yes, that is the man.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Hamudon. Did you speak of the same hulk - A. Yes, sir.

Q. to Alexander. You say you knew Richardson, was be a convict at that time - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the log-book - A. We have looked for the log-book and cannot find it we have the book that he was received on board the ship and discharge.

Q. From your own recollection can you say that he was absent from the ship - A. Yes, twice; the first time he went away before ten o'clock in the morning; he was brought back early the next morning.

Q. How long was he absent the second time - A. Not an hour. I brought him back the second time myself; he was in the Dock-yard; a soldier brought him up to the sentinel-box, I took him in custody from the soldier; he was punished both times.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. I propose to his lordship that he is not a competent witness.

Mr. Justice Gibbs. I have no doubt of his being a competent witness.

Mr. Justice Bailey. The objection is not sufficient to stop the evidence of this witness.

Mr. Justice Gibbs. I have no objection of reserving it for the opinion of the judges.

Q. to Samuel Richardson . Are you acquainted with the prisoners - A. I am. I have known Brady two years, Badcock more than a twelvemonth, and I know Hill.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Cook - A. I do.

Q. Had you any transactions with these four persons respecting any bankers in the City - A. I had, in the course of last year, in the month of August I believe it was; it was agreed between the whole that forgeries should be committed between me, Cook. Hill, and Brady; that forgeries should be committed upon the bankers in the City.

Q. Was any banker named - A. At that time no particular banker was named.

Q. Was any particular part assigned - A. It agreed that Badcock should utter the checks, and that Cook should forge them. The genuine checks were to be obtained by Hill.

Q. Was Brady do any thing - A. He was to be concerned.

Q. Did you hold any meetings for the purpose of carrying this agreement into effect - A. We did several, principally at the Horn tavern.

Q. Did you hold any meeting at the Horn tavern in August - A. We did; the Horn tavern is in Godliman-street, Doctor's-commons, in London .

Q. Who was present at these meetings - A. Badcock, Hill, and myself, at one occasion, at another occasion I was present with Hill, Cook, and myself.

Q. Where any drafts procured in agreement of this proposal - A. Some drafts were produced by Hill at the Horn tavern; myself Cook, and Hill, were present.

Q. On or about the 20th of August, were any drafts produced on that occasion - A. I think there where three drafts delivered to Cook on that occasion.

Q. By whom were these drafts produced - A. By Hill, and delivered by him to Cook, which I believe was on or about the 20th of August; they were delivered to Cook for the purpose of forging other drafts by them.

Q. And what was to be done with the forged drafts - A. The forged drafts were to be sent to the banker s for payment, to the house of Robarts and Company.

Q. Did you learn from Hill where he got these, drafts - A. I did not learn from Hill; I understood they were to be got from Parsons.

Q. Before that meeting on the 20th of August, had you learned from Hill where he could get them - A. Not from Hill.

Q. Did you learn from any person in Hill's presence - A. I learned that Hill was to get them from Parsons. I did not learn it of Hill myself, I learned it from Cook.

Q. Did Hill tell at the meeting where he got them - A. No.

Q. Had Hill been present at the former meetings when it was agreed that any draft should be obtained - A. He had; that was at the Horne tavern.

COURT. Hill was present at Horn tavern when it was agreed that drafts should be procured - A. Yes.

Q. Who was to get them - A. It was then agreed that Hill was to procure them: I think Cook, Hill, Brady, and myself were there: I am not positive as to that.

Mr. Bosanquet. You had one meeting besides, afterwards - A. We had, at the Swan in Sloane-street ; that was a few days afterwards we had the meeting at the Swan in Sloane-street, Hill, Cook, and myself, were present.

Q. What was the subject of conversation of that meeting - A. Hill delivered either one or two drafts to Cook.

COURT. Was this meeting after the 20th - A. Yes, after that.

Q. You say Hill was present at the Horn tavern, when it was agreed that genuine drafts should be procured by him; after that time Hill produced three, where was that - A. That was at the Horn tavern, at a subsequent meeting.

Q. It was after the meeting at the Swan in Sloane-street, it was after that time was it - A. It was.

Mr. Bosanquet. Look at these three drafts, you say these three were produced by him at the Horn tavern - A. These are the three drafts produced, which I believe to be the three.

Q. These are all upon the house of Robarts, the first drawn by John Burchall and Company, 12th August 1812; 9 l. 10 s. The second drawn by Samuel Walker and son, same date, for 6 l. the next drawn by Priest Shrubb, for Magnay and Pickering, 9 l. 10 s. 17th.

Q. Then a few days after, you say there was a meeting in Sloane-street - A. Yes.

Q. Was any paper produced upon that occasion - A. Yes, there were two produced and given to Cook.

Q. What was the subject of your conversation at that time - A. I cannot recollect exactly what the conversation was.

Q. What was it about - A. I do not think any thing particular passed that I can speak to. The papers produced were to copy the same as the others, but they were never made use of.

Q. Do you recollect whether you took any refreshment upon that occasion at the Swan tavern - A. Yes, I think some tongues and wiches, and some sherry.

Q. After that, in the month of September, had you any meeting at the Horn tavern - A. Yes, we met both on Friday the 4th, and Saturday the 5th.

Q. Were these drafts received previous to that time - A. Yes, they were received on the 3rd of September; the money was received for them genuine checks on the 3rd of September, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Did you present them together or separate - A. Together, sir.

Q. How was you paid for them - A. I think I received a twenty-pound note, and some small notes in payment.

Q. Was Hill in town at that time - A. No, I think not; I understood he was out of town, sir.

Q. When he gave the checks was any thing said - A. Not by Hill to me.

Q. Now, you say you had a meeting at the Horn on the 4th, you were there then - A. Yes, Badcock, Cook myself, and I think Brady was there. Brady was there on the 5th I am sure; I am not positive as to the 4th; I am positive Badcock was on the 4th.

Q. What was done on the 4th - A. There were some forged drafts sent out for payment then; the check in question was presented on the 5th. It was agreed on the 4th that the whole should be sent for payment; the mode was settled, Badcock was to send them by a porter for the bankers to pay them.

COURT. When you say they should be sent, you mean the forged checks - A. Yes, a number of them. I was to go and see if they were paid.

Mr. Bosanquet. You met again on the 5th - A Yes, at the Horn tavern; there were myself, Badcock, Cook, and Brady, on the 5th; we four were present. Soon after I went there Brady and Cook went away; I saw them no more.

Q. Had any thing been agreed on before Cook, and Brady, went away - A. There were other people in the coffee-room, little could be said; we were to send the check to the house of Robarts and Company, which we did do; Badcock delivered them to a porter; Badcock and I went together; we went to several places, and sent several checks. The check of Burchall and Company that was sent from the White Bear in Basinghall-street; Badcock delivered it to the porter to take to the house of Robarts and Company for payment; I followed the porter to the house of Robarts. I kept him in sight all the way; I followed him into Robarts's house; I saw the check presented; it was received and paid. I had some country notes payable at Robarts's house at the same time; I obtained the country notes for that purpose of having something to do when the check was presented, the plan was my own entirely; it was well understood by them that I should go in under that pretence.

Q. You saw the check actually received - A. I did; I followed the porter to where he was sent off, to near the White Bear; I think he came to him in the street; I saw Badcock receive it. The moment the check was paid I went and informed Badcock of it; I had but little way to go; he was in the neighbourhood; I came out of the house with the porter and got a little way before him; I went and told Badcock that the man had succeeded, before the porter saw him and that evening I accompanied Badcock to the Bolt and Tun Bouvierie-street, there we divided three thousand eight hundred pounds. Badcock retained three fifths, and delivered me two for Cook and myself; the other three were for Hill, Brady, and himself, as I understood. I saw Brady on the following Monday that something was done on the house of Ladbroke. I never saw him afterwards.

Q. What day of the month was Monday - A. I think the 7th; I never saw him afterwards.

Q. Did you pay him any money then - A. I do not recollect.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. You have been on board the hulks, have not you - A. Yes, for seven years.

Q. Did it ever happen during the period of your life that you have been tried for any other felony, and punished besides that which you have told us - A. Never.

Q. How long have you known Cook - A. About three years.

Q. What business is he - A. A hosier, I have heard.

Q. He has not been an hosier since you have been acquainted with him - A. I believe not.

Q. How has he got his living since you have been acquainted with him - A. That has already been explained in court.

Q. How long have you known Brady - A. I have known him some years, sir.

Q. Did you know Hill when he kept a public-house in Whitechapel - A. No, I did not; Hill kept a house in Newgate-market. I have seen him once there about two years ago. It may be rather more.

Q. I understand you to say, Richardson, the plan for putting off the forged bills was determined on the 4th of July; it was agreed that Badcock should send them to the bankers; you were to go and see that they were paid; that part of the plan was your own - A. Certainly, sir.

Q. What was done on the 4th of September was, that Badcock was to send the bills by a porter; it was determined that Badcock should send them by a porter - A. Yes.

Q. By any person that Badcock knew - A. I think not, a stranger.

Q. Was it at that meeting on the 4th that it was determined by you, that you were to be at the bankers and see them paid - A. I agreed to be there to see them paid, certainly.

Q. How long did you stay at the tavern in Sloane-street, where you had the sandwiches, and sherry, that you have told us - A. Not long. It might be half an hour.

Q. What was the longest time that any of you might have staid at the Horn tavern - A. I never kept any account.

Q. Did you stay half an hour. Most likely a waiter came to you - A. Yes.

Q. Where you sitting in an open box - A. Yes. It was daylight.

Q. You were at the Horn tavern various times and had refreshment there - A. Yes.

Q. Did I understand you to say when the three drafts were put into your hand you were sure these were those that were delivered to Cook, or you only believed them to be the same - A. I have reason to believe them to be the same.

Q. There is nothing about them that makes you sure them are the same - A. I have reason to believe one is the same, because there was the name of Magnay and Pickering on it.

Mr. Pooley. At Sloane-street Brady was not there - A. No, sir.

Q. On the 4th of September, when some of them met at the Horn, Brady was not there, only on the 5th - A. I am not sure he was there on the 4th, only on the 5th.

Q. That was the day that you and Badcock left the Horn to go with this note - A. Yes: Brady and Cook went away; I saw no more of them. Badcock and I went about this transaction with ourselves. I did not see Brady again till the following Monday; we met upon another transaction, and after that time I never saw him until he was taken in custody.

Q. At the division of the money he was not present - A. There was no person present at the divideing of the money but me and Badcock.

Mr. Bosanquet. From whom did you receive the three genuine drafts - A. From Cook. The three drafts that I received payment for were the very same that I received of Cook I have no doubt.

JAMES COOK . Q. In the summer of last year were you acquainted with the three prisoners at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Were you also acquainted with the last witness Richardson - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of August, last year, had you all meetings together - A. We had.

Q. What was the object of these meetings - A. To commit forgeries, sir.

Q. Who was to be the hand by which the forgeries were to be committed - A. I was.

Q. By what means were you to be enabled them to be forged - A. By genuine checks, which I understood were to be procured by Hill.

Q. Do you remember, in the month of August, receiving any checks of Hill - A. I believe I received three at the Horn tavern, Doctors' Commons, Godliman-street .

Q. Who was present when you received these three from Hill - A. Richardson, and I believe Brady.

Q. Look at these three, and tell me whether you believe these to be the three - A. I would not swear to these three. They were checks upon Robarts's house.

Q. From the three that were presented to you did you effect forgeries - A. I did.

Q. Look at the draft for five hundred and sixty pounds; did you forge that from the check of Burchall of nine pounds ten shillings - A. I did.

Q. After you had done that to whom did you give them three genuine checks - A. I gave it to Richardson for the forged one for five hundred and sixty pounds.

Q. You have mentioned that you received the three from Hill; did you know at the time from whom Hill received them - A. I understood from Richardson. Hill obtained them from a man of the name of Parsons. I was informed of that by Richardson only.

Q. Do you remember meeting Hill at any other place besides the Horns tavern - A. We met at the Swan in Sloane-street. I cannot recollect the time. It was about the time that we met at the Horn tavern.

Q. How many met of you at the Swan in Sloane-street - A. Richardson, Hill, and I think Brady was there once.

Q. Was Brady with Hill - A. I cannot say for certainty. We met once with Hill, and once with Brady. I do not recollect their being together. When I met Hill there we had some sandwiches and some sherry wine. That was when Hill was there.

Q. For what purpose did Hill give you those genuine checks - A. It was understood that I should commit forgeries from them. That was the subject of the conversation.

Q. Was it all settled what should become of Hill when you had done this part of the business - A. I understood he was to be out of town. He was not to be in town when they were presented.

Q. Did you see him again until after they had been presented - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you remember that day on which they were presented - A. Yes; I think it was on the 5th of September.

Q. On the 4th do you remember meeting at the Horn tavern - A. Yes.

Q. On the day in which it was presented do you remember who you met that morning at the Horn tavern - A. Yes, Brady, Badcock, and Richardson.

Q. Either on the 5th, or on the preceding day's meeting, was it engaged in what manner this and other drafts were to be uttered - A. It was.

Q. Had you and these persons various meetings - A. We had three or four.

Q. What was the mode that you arranged for uttering of the draft; do you remember whether that was talked on that day or the preceding day - A. On both, the 4th and the 5th. It was planned that Badcock should hire a porter, and give him the forged check, on purpose to receive the money at the bankers. Richardson was to see that all was safe. Brady and I left them at the Horn tavern, and went to Moorgate coffee-house, and left them to do the business.

Q. Did you on that day, or the next day, receive your share of the business of that day - A. I did, from Richardson. The notes were sold at twenty pound per cent. discount. I received the product after that.

Q. to Richardson. When you had got two-fifths for yourself and Cook, what did you do with them - A. I sold them at a discount of 20 per cent to Birkett. He knew what we were about; he was to dispose of the bank note, the immediate produce of the forgery.

Q. Who is Birkett - A. The man that was convicted last sessions.

Q. What business was he - A. I do not know.

Q. to Cook. You say you received the produce of the forged check after the discount - A. I received the produce after that. I received the money at two or three different times. I received from Richardson two hundred pounds at different times.

Q. When were you taken up - A. On the 1st of January last, on suspicion of forgery; and when I was in custody I made a disclosure.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. How long were you connected in this business - A. I decline to answer that question.

Q. You are a hosier - A. Yes; I carried on a little business in the honest way.

Q. Where did you keep a shop six months ago - A. I kept no shop.

Q. Where did you carry on the business of a hosier - A. At my house. I have no shop in my house.

Q. Did you keep the goods in the house, and people come there - A. No, not altogether. I sold them to my friends.

Q. Where was this house that you carried on the business, such as it was - A. In the King's-road. I lived there a twelvemonth. I lived in Sloane-street before that. I have not had a shop for twelve or fourteen years.

Q. How long did you live in Sloane-street carrying on the business of a hosier - A. I believe about a year and a half. I lived before that in Sloane-square. I lived about a twelvemonth there.

Q. Where did you live before that time - A. Upon my oath, I cannot recollect. I lived in many places.

Q. I ask you where you lived four years ago - A. I think at Pancras.

Q. Do you mean to say that for the last fourteen years you have obtained your livelihood by hosiery alone - A. No, I do not, but by these depredations now before me, or nearly.

Q. How long, sir, has Hill the misfortune of knowing you - A. I believe about two years: he may not have known me above one year. I have known him about two years. I have been at his house in Newgate-market. I do not know that he knew me then.

Q. Where was it that you executed the forgery - A. At my house in King's-road, Chelsea.

CHARLES GREEN . Q. You are a partner in the house of Messrs. Burchall and Company - A. I am. The names of the partners are John Henry Burchall , William Walford , and Charles Green .

Q. Look at this draft; was it drawn by you on the day in. which it bears date - A Yes; it was bought to pay for some hay bought in Whitechapel. I delivered it to our carman, John King .

JOHN KING . I am carman to Messrs. Burchall and Company. I received a draft of Mr. Green. I paid it to Mr. Parsons, that I am sure of.

BENJAMIN PARSONS . I am a hay salesman in Whitechapel market.

Q. In the month of August, last year, do you remember being possessed of a check of Burchall and Company, Magnay and Pickering, and Walker and Son, for hay you had sold - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these checks, and tell me whether you believe them to be the same - A. I have seen them before. I believe them to be the same.

Q. About a month afterwards you were taken up and examined - A. I was.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Mr. Hill - A. I do. I knew him before, and at that time.

Q. Was he in the habit of taking the checks that you received in business, and giving you cash for them - A. Sometimes.

Q. Did you ever part with your checks to any other person besides Hill - A. Yes, to Mr. Nash, the clerk of the market; to no one else besides.

Q. In the month of August, last year, do you remember Hill taking of you some checks one day - A. It might be two, three, or four, or five. I am not certain.

Q. You are not able to speak to these three checks - A. No, not exactly. They may be the checks. I have no doubt but they are the same.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. You have had some little doubt whether these are the three drafts; whether you gave these these drafts to Hill; you now have no doubt - A. I have no doubt particular whether they are or are not.

Q. You are in the habit of receiving drafts for which you sell hay, and taking the drafts into the city to get cash - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Hill and Mr. Nash has taken them of you. It is more convenient for you to give them to them instead of your going into the city - A. Yes. Sometimes I have given them to farmers.

Q. When you have given drafts to Hill it was for your accommodation - A. I thought so. I have given four or or five drafts to a farmer at a time.

Q. You deal very largely - A. In a middling way; as much as some of them.

Q. You are indebted to Hill - A. Yes; there is not much likelihood of my paying it. I am losing my connections.

Q. Hill lived in Newgate-market, did not he - A. Yes. He used to ask me for drafts when he was going to pay his brewer or distiller; he used to say, have you any thing in the city. I used to say, I have a check or two, if you will take them I will thank you.

Mr. Gurney. At the time this transaction took place where did Hill live - A. He had left Newgate-market.

Q. Did he apply to you or you to him - A. I never applied to him, except in saying are you going into the city.

Q. Look in your account book the 17th of August; do you find any entry in your account book of the receipt of these checks - A. Yes.

Q. On what day did you receive them - A. I believe the day after the hay was sold.

Q. Burchall and Company; what day did you receive that - A. I think I received it on the 15th of August, and Magnay and Pickering is on the 15th.

Q. When you pay the check to the farmers do you or not make an entry in your book - A. No.

Q. Have you any reason respecting these drafts for saving that you gave them to Hill, except your receiving them. Is is it your belief that you did give these three checks to Hill - A. They might be some others. I cannot say any further than that.

THOMAS NASH . I am the clerk of Whitechapel-market.

Q. You have been sometimes in the habit of taking bankers checks of Parsons and giving him your own checks in return - A. Yes, I have.

WILLIAM BLAKESLEY . Q. I believe you are a clerk in the house of Robarts and Company - A. I am. The names of the partners are Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , bart. Abraham Wilde Robarts , and William Curtis .

Q. Did you pay these checks - A. Yes, I did, on the 3d of September. I paid them in one payment; one twenty pound, and five ones.

Q. What was the number of the twenty pound - A. 9167, dated 15th June, 1812.

JAMES PATRIDGE . I am a stock-broker.

Q. Did either of the prisoners apply to you to purchase stock - A. Yes. The man of the name of Brady. He applied to me by the name of Robert Hazard, to purchase Navy 5 per cent. annuity; four hundred and ninety pounds he gave me; I returned thirty pound ten-shillings.

Q. In that paper was that note paid to you by him - A. Yes; my initials are upon it in my own handwriting.

Mr. Bosanquet. This is a twenty pound note, dated 15th of June, 1812, No. 9167.

Q. For whom did he say the stock was to be bought - A. In the name of William Swann , Suffolk-street, Manchester.

Mr. Pooley. You have bought stock for him before - A. Yes, I have, in the name of Hazard.

Q. How long have you known him - A. In the month of July previous.

JOHN MUNDREL . Q. You are comptroller of taxes at Manchester - A. Yes.

Q. That situation gives you a knowledge of residences at Manchester - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any such street as Suffolk-street, Manchester - A. No, there is no such street, nor do I know any person of the name of William Swann in Manchester.

JAMES GOODWIN . Q. In the summer and autumn of last year were you waiter at the Horn tavern, Doctors Commons - A. Yes, I was.

Q. When did you quit - A. On the 22nd of September.

Q. Do you remember seeing either of the prisoners there - A. Yes, Badcock.

Q. Do you recollect the others - A. No. I have seen Cook and Richardson there in company with Badcock.

Q. How long before you quitted the Horn had you seen them there - A. About a month. Two or three times.

Q. You have spoken to three persons: do you recollect a fourth - A. No; there might be. I do not recollect.

WILLIAM FOREST . I keep the Swan tavern in Sloane-street.

Q. Do you know Cook and Richardson - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing them at your house about the month of August last year - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember seeing them more than once - A. Cook and Richardson I do. There was a third person with them that day; that person I do not remember. They had some sandwiches and some sherry; one pint and then another. There were some papers before them on the table, and memorandums; something like business.

Mr. Serjeant Pill. They were there some time, were they not - A. They might be there an hour. It is a small coffee-room. I went in the room frequently.

Q. So that you had a full opportunity of seeing the people there - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Cook and Richardson you had seen upon other occasions - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN ALLEN . I ply as a porter in Basinghall-street.

Q. On the 5th of September last do you remember which of the men at the bar spoke to you - A. The middle of the three; the middle one in the blue coat. He came and called me out to go to Robarts and Company for five hundred and sixty pounds, for which I went. I kept looking him hard in the face; I asked him where I was to bring it to. He told me to the White Bear coffee-house. When I came there he met me there by the gateway. I gave him the notes; he gave me eighteen pence; he put them in his pocket, and never counted them.

COURT. Which man - A. The middle man.

Q. Go down in front of the prisoners, and consider before you speak, and then point out the man that gave you the draft. Look in their faces, and say who the person was - A. The middle man.

(Witness pointing to Hill.)

COURT. You have not looked at their faces now, porter. Now come back, Allen; which of the three men was it that delivered the draft to you - A. The middle man in the blue coat, as I pointed out to you.

Q. Did you see him at Bow-street - A. I did.

Q. Did you point him out there as the person that delivered it you - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure that you saw him at Bow-street; have you ever seen the other prisoner - A. Yes, I have seen Badcock there.

Q. Then it was not Badcock that delivered the note to you - A. No, sir; it was not.

Q. Which is Badcock - A. The outside one, in the green coat.

Q. Who is the other - A. I never saw him before.

Q. You never saw the last man at Bow-street, did you - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. And you always said it was Hill that you received it of, and not Badcock A. Yes.

Q. You carried the notes back to Hill - A. I did, and he set off, and went through the courts into Coleman-street.

Q. Did he count them - A. No, he put them into his pocket as I gave them to him.

MR. FRESHFIELD. Q. Where you present at the examination at Bow-street - A. I was, when Allen, the porter, was examined.

Q. Who was the person under examination - A. Badcock alone; Hill did not appear at Bow-street, only his attorney; it was agreed that the examination should go on; the attorney of Hill only attended.

GEORGE HENDERSON . I am clerk in the house of Robarts and Company.

Q. Does Messrs. Burchall and Company keep cash at their house - A. They do, and did so in September last.

Q. Was that check presented in September last - A. It was on Saturday, the 5th of September; I paid it to the porter, the last witness.

Q. to Mr. Green. Take this draft into your hands, is that the signature of the house of Burchall and Company - A. It is not.

(The forged draft read.)

The prisoners left their defence to their councel.

BADCOCK, GUILTY - Death , aged 23.

HILL, GUILTY , aged 43.

BRADY, GUILTY - Death , aged 33.

Judgment respited for the opinion of the judges .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

The opinion of the judges on William Badcock, Sylvester (alias John) Hill, and Robert Brady , as delivered by Mr. Recorder.

William Badcock , Sylvester (alias John) Hill , and Robert Brady , upon your trial two objections were made; the first was to the competency of the witness, Richardson, the accomplice; and the other whether you, Hill, and Brady, were accessaries before the fact. The judges have all met together; they are unanimously of opinion that Richardson was a competent witnessin that trial. They have taken into consideration the objection of you, Hill and Brady, whether you were accessaries before the fact, and they are unanimously of opinion that you were accessaries before the fact.

The record of the conviction of Sylvester (alias John) Hill, read, and the counterplea also read.

John Hill . Mr. Shelton. The prisoner, John Hill, stands convicted of felony, and he has pleaded the benefit of the statute to which a counterplea has been put in that he was allowed the benefit of the statute; he has pleaded that he is not the same person; gentleman of the jury, you are to try whether he is the same person or not.

Mr. Gurney. May it please your lordship, Gentlemen of the jury, you are assembled for the purpose of trying a mere question, in point of fact the prisoner at the bar has been indicted at this sessions of being concerned as an accessary before the fact in a forgery; he has been convicted of that crime, that is a crime not punished by death the law allows the benefit of the clergy, but the law does not allow the benefit of the clergy twice; it has been pleaded on part of the crown that he has had that benefit of the clergy on a former sessions, that in the month of October, in this place, in the year 1795; the prisoner was convicted of a clergyble felony; he was convicted of assaulting a person with attempting to rob him; the sentence of the court was to be transported for seven years; having been convicted of that offence he prays the benefit of the clergy. Gentlemen, all that will be requiste for me to prove will be to introduce the record of his former conviction; he denies that he is the same person. I will call to you Mr. Kirby, who was the clerk of the papers, who remembers his trial, his conviction, and remaining in Newgate three years in execution of his sentence; I have the police officer who gave evidence against him. The single question to the jury is whether he is the same person.

EDWARD KIRBY . Q. I believe, sir, you were the keeper of the Poultry Compter - A. Yes.

Q. You were clerk of the papers in Newgate - A. Yes. The prisoner was in my custody in Newgate; my uncle was keeper of Newgate then; he was near a year and a half or more in Newgate. I had frequent opportunity of seeing him during that time.

Q. During that time was he tried in this court for any offence - A. He was tried previous to that time I have been speaking.

Q. Did you see him tried - A. I do not know that I might.

Q. What was he in Newgate for - A. He was under sentence of transportation for seven years for a felony.

Q. What year was that - A. In the year 1795.

Q. Do you recollect his person - A. I do. I remember his being in Newgate under sentence of transportation. I have no doubt of his person.

Mr. Bosanquet. The record is on the table stating that he was under sentence.

(Read.)

At the sessions holden for the county of Middlesex, on Wednesday, the 28th of October, in the 36th year of his Majesty reign Sylvester Hill was indicted for an assault upon one William Spencer , and was tried and convicted, and sentenced by the court to be transported for the term of seven years.

Q. to Mr. Kirby. Do you know whether he was that person who was under sentence - A. Yes, he was.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. Of course there were a vast quantity of people in Newgate at the time you were acquainted with the jail - A. A great number.

Q. Have you seen Hill since the time he was in Newgate - A. Several times, I have met him.

Q. Were you present in court when he was tried - A. I don't know that I was.

Q. Were you present in the court when Hill at the bar was supposed to receive his sentence that is upon the record - A. I was.

Q. Were there any other persons that you recollect that received sentence with him at the time - A. I do not know that I can say that.

Q. Do you happen to recollect what day it was that he received sentence - A. I am sure I cannot.

Q. How long is it before this present time that he was going at large - A. I have been in the habit of seeing him frequently for the last five years passing in the street.

Q. Have you any distinct recollection independant of any thing that you may have heard what year it was that this man received sentence - A. No, certainly not.

Q. Have you any recollection how he was dressed - A. No, I have left the prison nine years. It is a long time ago.

Q. Considering the time he must be a young man then - A. Yes; it is seventeen or eighteen years ago.

Q. Now, how long might it be from the time that you saw the person of the prisoner, Hill, before you saw him again; how many years might be that - A. I was in the habit of going into the prison six or seven times of a day for a year and a half.

Q. How many years might escape from the time he was removed to the time you saw him again - A. Eight years; I have seen him within these nine years I think; may be eight years or seven. I have seen him since I left.

Mr. Bosanquet. Q. Have you any doubt whatever that the prisoner at the bar is the person whom you heard receive sentence, and who remained in Newgate a year and a half in consequence of that sentence - A. I have no doubt whatever.

THOMAS HANSON . I am one of the Bow-street patrols.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. In the month of September, 1795, did you apprehend him - A. Yes, upon an alarm of stop thief, murder, with an attempt to rob Ann Eaves along with Mr. Spicer; I was present when he was afterwards tried for attempting to rob William Spicer ; I gave evidence against him; he was found guilty. it was on a Friday night, eighteen years ago next September; I have not seen him since he was at the bar, before now, to my knowledge. From that time the present is eighteen years ago.

Q. Was he in appearance just as he is now - A. He was a better looking man then, and younger then now; he is stouter now rather then he was then, but no great deal.

Q. Where was this done - A. At the back of Newington-green-fields; the first sessions his trial was put off; he was tried the next sessions. I can swear to his person.

Mr. Serjeant Pell addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant.

Verdict of the jury; we believe him to be the man named in the record; he is the man.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-14

700. CHARLES JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Herbert , from his person .

JOHN HERBERT . On Friday last, as I was passing from Old-street to Foster-lane, I crossed Falcon-square; on my coming through Falcon-square there were many people assembled to see two boys fight; I was curious, and before I stopped two minutes I felt something in my pocket; I turned round, and the prisoner had my handkerchief in his hand; I believe there were two or three in company with him; I immediately asked him how he came in possession of the handkerchief; he dropped it, and ran off; I pursued him, and ran near a quarter of a mile, and some gentleman stopped him; I am certain he is the same person; I picked up the handkerchief as soon as he dropped it; I then pursued him and came up to him; he full of his knees, and begged that I would not send him to prison. On Monday I begged that he might be sent on board the Tender; he went there, and they would not accept him. This is the handkerchief; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the handkerchief out of the pocket; the boy that stood along side of me took it; he had the handkerchief in his hand; he dropped it.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-15

701. BENJAMIN HOLINGSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , twelve halfpence , the property of William Shackle .

WILLIAM SHACKLE . I am in the employ of Mr. Flint, a printer, in the Old Bailey . Things have been repeatedly stolen from Mr. Flint's men. On Monday night last, I placed this sixpenny worth of halfpence in one of the men's drawers, and in about twenty minutes afterwards I found it in the prisoner's pocket; I had marked them with a scratch on the head side with a penknife.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. An apprentice to Mr. Flint; he has served about two years and a half. The halfpence were loose in the drawer.

Q. You found them upon him - A. Yes; he pulled them out of his coat pocket; he began crying, and said he would not do so any more. These are the halfpence; they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-16

702. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a watch, value 30 s. a watch-chain, value 3 d. a seal, value 6 d. a watch-key, value 1 d. a coat, value 1 l. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. and a shirt, value 2 s. the property of John Herbert .

JOHN HERBERT . I am a coachman ; I live in Coleman-street . On the 25th of May, my master ordered me to wait on dinner; I went to my wife to see if my things were ready; I found a disturbance in the house. I was not at home when the things were taken: my wife was.

CHARLOTTE PERRY . I live in the same house as Mrs. Herbert. I went up to Mrs. Herbert to borrow a pair of bellows, I saw a strange person in her room; I asked her who she wanted; she answered Mrs. Brown; no Mrs. Brown lived in the house I then called Mrs. Herbert. The prisoner had a coat, smallclothes, stockings, and shirt, on her arm, and in her hand was the watch; when I called Mrs. Herbert down she dropped the clothes on the chair, and the watch on the floor; this was in the two pair; I live in the one pair.

ELIZABETH HERBERT . I am the wife of John Herbert , the coachman. When I was called down to my room I found my things had been moved from where I had placed them, and the watch on the floor; I had put the cloaths on a chair by the fire

to air them. When I came down stairs they were not where I had put them.

ROBERT WHITEMAN . I am an officer. I produce a pair of breeches, a pair of drawers, a handkerchief, neckcloth, shirt, a coat, and this is the watch.

Prosecutor. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this house to have a bonnet altered. I knocked at the door three times, nobody answered. As I was coming down stairs the lady in the blue bonnet called Mrs. Herbert down, and said I had stolen something from the place.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-17

703. TIMOTHY M'CARTHY was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon George Watson , on the 14th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 5 l. three seals, value 2 l. a watch-chain, value 1 l. and a watch-key, value 2 s. 6 d. his property .

GEORGE WATSON . I am clerk in the house of Scholey and Atkinson, Old Swan-lane. On the 14th of June, a few minutes before ten, I was passing down Bishopsgate-street with Mr. Lovett. We were arm in arm. The prisoner M'Carthy from behind rushed upon us, and with force separated us. I immediately told him it would be much better if he would go about his business. With that he rushed upon me, and seized me by the collar, and tore my coat so much that with difficulty I kept it on. I attempted to keep him from me; with that he closed, and I with difficulty threw him down, and my self upon him. There appeared to be a gang of eight or ten upon me, some crying release him, and an immense pressure upon my body, and as I was attempting to rise the prisoner kept holding of me; at last I succeeded in rising; I extricated myself with my torn coat, which the officer has, which with my hat Mr. Lovett took charge of. I then felt that I had my watch in my pocket, and wished to see Mr. Lovett to give it him, but before I could see Mr. Lovett M'Carthy again rushed upon me, and I again threw him in the same situation as before. I found the pressure much greater the second time than before, and was two or three minutes before I could succeed in getting my knees upon him. I immediately placed my hand to my fob: I found that my watch was gone. M'Carthy when I observed I was robbed, immediately let go his hold. I with some difficulty got up; he then pretended to be in a stupified state. The watchman was just coming upon his duty; I gave him in charge, and went with him to Bishopsgate watchhouse. There was a party when I gave him in charge; they went away.

Q. Was the prisoner intoxicated - A. He was.

ANTHONY LOVETT . On Monday evening, the 4th of June, Mr. Watson and I were walking down Bishopsgate-street, arm in arm. The prisoner came behind us, and struck us both at one time on our shoulders, and likewise parted us at the same time we turned round. The prisoner was behind us; he was just in the act of striking me. I got of one side to avoid his striking me. He then went to Mr. Watson; he struck Mr. Watson; they both fell down together. Mr. Watson endeavouring to get up M'Carthy tore his coat completely off his back. Mr. Watson, when he got up, took the remaining part of his coat off; it was very little for certain. He then told M'Carthy to go about his business; he did not wish to have any thing further to say to him. M'Carthy soon after that struck him again; they both fell down; he kept him down for two or three minutes. When Mr. Watson got up the second time he said, Lovett, I have lost my watch. There appeared to be a gang of them. There were several persons that pretended to help Mr. Watson up; I rather thought they were keeping him down. The watch has never been found.

WILLIAM LONG . I am a constable. I produce the torn coat. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house. I found nothing on him but a knife and eight shillings and sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in such a state of insensibility that I did not know what I was about.

Long. He was forward in liquor.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

Of stealing the watch, but guilty of the assault .

COURT. He stands committed for the assault.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-18

704. MALACHI MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a pair of men's shoes, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Hallett .

THOMAS HALLETT . I live at Deal's hotel in Jermyn-street ; a widow woman keeps it. On the 21st of May we had a family from India, and a gentleman, Major Horsley. They left town on Saturday morning to go to Seven Oaks in Kent. After they were gone I received a pair of shoes for Major Horsley. The prisoner was then standing by me. The prisoner was valet and butler to the Reverend D. French. I received the shoes, and put them in a desk in the hall. On the Monday following I had occasion to put some things in the desk; I discovered that the shoes were taken out of the desk; the desk was not locked. I made every enquiry in the house among our people; the prisoner denied any knowledge of it. We had lost several other things in the house, and suspicion fell on the lad I had; he was discharged his service on suspicion. This went on three or four days; we lost other things, and on looking in Murray's room I discovered this pair of shoes that belonged to Major Horsley, and because it should not hurt the house I paid fifteen shillings for the shoes. I mentioned it to Murray's master that I had found the shoes, and I told Murray that the shoes were in his possession. I went in his room, and saw the shoes were taken away. The officer found the shoes at his washerwoman's house.

- TOWNSEND. I am an officer. I found these shoes at the prisoner's washerwoman's, 151, Swallow-street. They were tied in an handkerchief with two other pair of shoes. There is Major Horsley's name in them.

MRS. SAYER. I live at 151, Swallow-street; I am a washerwoman. The prisoner came to my

house, and asked me to let him leave a bundle, and he would call again. That is the same bundle that Townsend found.

Prisoner's Defence. I bespoke a pair of shoes; they were to be sent home on Friday or Saturday; and when I came home to the hotel, she house-maid told me my things were in the desk; I took them up to my room. I thought they were the shoes that came from Mr. Vaughan, my shoe-maker; I tried them on, they fitted me.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-19

705. RICHARD HUCKNALL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 29th of November , a receipt for 186 l. 5 s. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a forged receipt, with the same intention.

And TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, stating the intention to be to defraud David M'Neale .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, to defraud Thomas Thompson .

DAVID M'NEALE . Q. You are a baker , I believe - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar - A. Ten years. He was a stock-broker .

Q. Did you employ him in the year 1809 to purchase stock for you - A. I did, in November I believe, 1809; he was to purchase stock in the Long Annuities, at ten pound a year, more or less. I gave him the money to buy that. I gave him between one and two hundred pounds. I cannot exactly remember the sum. He undertook to make the purchase.

Q. After that did he give you any paper printed receipt - A. Yes. I gave him the money in the morning; he came in the evening, and gave me this paper either that day or the next day. This is the paper he gave to me. There is my mark upon the paper, at the back. I put this mark to it after I had been to the Bank. It was never out of my possession.

Q. How soon afterwards did you find that any thing was wrong - A. Not until he was gone. I applied in the April following. I got my dividend at the Bank. In October following, when I came to compare my receipt with the Bank book I found I was wrong, but I am not the loser by it; he had placed the money there.

COURT. You went in April and received your dividend, did you - A. Yes.

Q. And did you receive your dividend in October - A. Yes, and ever since.

Q. Then the sum of ten pounds four shillings was properly transferred into your name - A. Yes.

Q. And that sum was properly transferred into your name before you made any enquiry about that money - A. Certainly.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge when the prisoner left town - A. I cannot say to a day.

Q. Did he leave town before April - A. No.

Q. Then before he left town the money was properly transferred into your name - A. It was.

THOMAS RENNELL . Q. I believe you are a clerk in the Long Annuities office - A. I am, at the Bank of England. I have known the prisoner twelve or fourteen-years. I always understood he was a stock broker.

Q. During that long acquaintance have you been acquainted with his hand-writing - A. I have seen his writing repeatedly. I do not recollect that I have seen him write his name. I think I know it, I have seen it so often.

Q. Look at that receipt, and tell me whose writing you believe the body of the receipt to be - A. I cannot say. I believe the word, Hucknall, stock-broker, to be his writing. I do not know sufficiently the body of the receipt to say it is his. I believe Hucknall, stock-broker, to be his.

Q. Did you see the name of T. Thompson - A. I do; I know a person of that name very well. I know his hand-writing perfectly; he is proprietor of stock in the Long Annuities, and was so at this time. I have seen him write many times. I am persuaded it is not Thomas Thompson, stock-broker 's, hand-writing. I have seen him write repeatedly.

Q. Was there another person of the name of Thomas Thompson , bearing that description that had any stock in the Long Annuities at that time - A. There was not, sir.

Q. Was there any transfer Long Annuities corresponding with that receipt - A. Not on this day by Thomas Thompson .

Q. Was there any transfer subsequent, and when if it was by Thomas Thompson - A. None that I can recollect.

Q. Look at the books. You have got the books there, have not you - A. Yes. On the 29th of November there was a transfer that day to a person of the name of Richard Peake , but not to M'Neale from Thompson.

Q. Does there appear any transfer subsequent of M'Neale between April, 1809, and April, 1810 - A. There does not appear to be the sum upon any transfer up to April, 1810.

RICHARD GALE . Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing - A. I have seen it frequently. I am a clerk in the Bank.

Q. Look at the body of the receipt, and tell me whether you believe that is his hand-writing - A. I cannot say as to the body of the receipt. The signature of Hucknall I believe to be his hand-writing.

Q. Do you see Thompson's name - A. Yes. I know Thompson well; I have seen him write a great many times; a hundred times and a thousand. It certainly is not Thompson's writing.

Q. Whose hand-writing do you believe T. Thompson to be - A. I cannot say. It is not Thompson's.

Q. Is that the signature of Thomas Thompson who has annuities standing in that stock - A. Certainly not.

COURT. I apprehend it is the duty of the broker to take care that the money is transferred - A. It is.

Q. In the ordinary course of business he does not pay the transfer until he sees a corresponded entry of

the transfer in the book - A. Sometimes it must happen so in the hurry of business; they will pay the transfer.

Q. Before the transfer is made - A. Yes.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a dealer in the funds, more frequently called a stock-jobber.

Q. Look at the signature of that receipt; is that your hand-writing - A. No, it is not.

Q. Did you sell any stock to Hucknall at the time that receipt refers - A. I examined my books last week, and I find I had some trifling transaction.

COURT. Did you sell him ten pounds - A. I did not.

Mr. Bosanquet. Did you ever sign that receipt of Hucknall's - A. No, I never saw it until two months ago; Mr. M'Neale put it into my hands.

CHARLES WALTON PULLEN . Q. You are subscribing witness to that release - A. I am.

Q. Did you see it executed - A. I did.

COURT. What is the release - A. A special, agreement of the one hundred and eighty-six pounds to Mr. Thompson.

Q. to Mr. Thompson. That is a release, sir, to you; is that your hand writing - A. No, it is not; my signature is very different.

(The receipt read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little embarrassed for money at that time; as soon as I could I replaced the stock.

COURT. Where did you receive this from the prisoner - A. I believe at my house in Witcomb-street; he passed by my house in his way from the Exchange to go home; it was his usual way to leave it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 63.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-20

706. JOSEPH MOLLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , fourteen coats, value 14 l. twenty-seven waistcoats, value 6 l. thirteen pair of breeches, value 3 l. one pair of pantaloons, value 1 s. and one pelisse, value 1 l. the property of Matthew Swift .

MATTHEW SWIFT. I am a clothes salesman , No. 3, Sparrow-corner, Minories .

Q. In March, 1811, did you lose any things - A. No, I lost them about Christmas, 1810; the prisoner was in my employ as principal salesman ; he had the management of the shop, No. 3; I had another house. I attended the other house in 1810. I missed a great quantity of clothes; I afterwards found some part; the officer, Cook, has a waistcoat. This is the waistcoat; I know it to be mine, by the make and the stuff; no other part of the property is here.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I had that waistcoat of a pawnbroker.

Q. You cannot tell of which pawnbrokers you had that waistcoat - A. No, I cannot.

MARY DENHAM . The sister of the prisoner took a lodging at my house. There was a considerable property brought backwards and forwards to my house.

Q. You cannot tell whose property it was - A. No.

Prosecutor. There was about forty pounds worth of goods produced at a former time; they were pawned by different persons, in different names, at several pawnbrokers. The prisoner was in Newgate sixteen months back; the pawnbrokers said it was of no use there coming here, they had sold the goods; they could not any of them swear to the prisoner's person.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-21

707. ANN JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , in the dwelling-house of John Taylor , a shirt, value 2 s. the property of Charles Taylor ; and a 2 l. bank note the property of George Taylor .

JANE TAYLOR . I am the wife of Charles Taylor ; I live in St. Martin's Church-yard , in my father-in-law's house, Charles Taylor ; my husband also lives there; it is in the parish of St. Martin's in the fields. The prisoner lived servant in the house.

Q. Did you at any time miss any property - A. Yes, a shirt on the 20th of June.

Q. Was any thing else missed - A. Yes, George Taylor , my brother-in-law, missed two one pound notes; in consequence of that the servant 's box was searched, on the Saturday following, and the shift was found in it. I searched her. I found a one-pound note on her, and eighteen shillings in her pocket; I delivered all the property to Lavender. The shirt was my own.

JOHN WILSON LAVENDER . I produce a shift; I received it of Mrs. Taylor.

MR. TAYLOR. It is my shift, the mark she had taken out; I am sure it is mine.

Lavender. I produce a one-pound note, and six three-shilling pieces, which the prisoner confessed to me was the produce of the other note; she had bought a pair of stockings. When Mrs. Taylor, gave me the money I asked the prisoner if the silver was the produce of the other note; she said yes; and went with me to a stocking shop in the Strand, where she had bought a pair of stockings; the linen draper remembered taking the note, but he had paid it away. This note George Taylor can speak to; he said it was one of the two notes that he had lost.

Q. Did she tell you how she came by it - A. Yes. she said, she was going up stairs on Sunday, she saw a man came in at the window; he hove a jug of water over her; she saw this bundle laying on the stairs; she was tempted to take it, and convert it to her own use.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I had two one-pound bank notes; I remember the mark upon the back of them, Daniel Baker , Cambridge; I wrote upon the back of this. They were in a pocket-book in a small portmanteau in the dwelling-house of my father, John Taylor . I lost them on the night of the 20th of June. I am sure that is one of them, and there was a one-pound bank note. I do not recollect the number of either of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gills.

Reference Number: t18130714-22

708. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , in the dwelling-house of James Young , a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. two shirts, value 8 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a hat, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. and nine 2 l. bank notes, the property of Hugh Campbell .

HUGH CAMPBELL . I am a mariner .

Q. Where were you on the 9th of June last - A. I lodged at Mrs. Young's; she is here,

Q. How many of you slept in the same room with you - A. Two more; the prisoner slept in the same room. I saw him come in about eleven o'clock at night; he went to bed The mistress took one of the children out of bed to make room for him. I slept in a bed by myself.

Q. What time did you awake in the morning - A. About half past four, or near five, when an alarm was given that the other man got up; when that alarm was given the prisoner was gone.

Q. Did you search to see whether you had lost any of your own property - A. Not at that time; between seven and eight I missed a pair of shoes, and a hat. I thought nothing of it.

Q. How soon afterwards did you miss any thing else - A. About eight o'clock I got up. I missed the key of a trunk out of my pocket-book, and I missed a three-shilling piece out of my other pocket; then I suspected that my trunk was robbed; I went to my trunk and found it locked, then I took out my trunk, and under some old clothes behind my trunk I found my key hid; I opened my trunk and missed nine two-pound notes, a one-pound note, two shirts, a pair of stockings, a pair of trowsers; my hat, and shoes, were gone. I have seen some of my things since; they are in the officers custody. These are the things; I have not seen the notes since; the prisoner took them out of his pocket, and delivered them to the officer. The second day after I lost them I saw the prisoner in Golden lane; he was searched in my presence; all was found on him except a few shillings of the money that he had taken from me, one one-pound note, seven two-pound notes, and some silver; the silver and shirts, where found at the house where he lodged. I was present when the things were found.

Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner how he got these things - A. Yes; I said, you rascal, where is the notes that you took from me; he put his hand into his pocket, took out the notes, and put them into Mettingley, the officer's hands.

Q. When before this, had you seen these notes in your box - A. The same evening that I was robbed; I took the money out to make a payment to a shoemaker; I put them in my trunk again. The trowsers is mine; these are my shoes, and this is my hat; I had not taken any of the numbers of the notes. I went to the bankers afterwards; they told me they did not take any numbers of notes under five-pound.

Prisoner. Q. I wish him to be asked why he saw me come into the room - A. I saw him come into the room; he slept with another man.

Q. What was your reason for following me - A. I wanted to apprehend you,

WILLIAM MATTINGLEY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of June.

Q. Did you search any room - A. No, the landlady informed me his bag was up stairs; I asked her to let me have it. I went to the house of Mrs. Sullivan, and I received from her the bag with all these things in it. The hat was found on the third examination; Mrs. Sullivan gave it to M'Clone, my brother officer; I received these notes of the prisoner seven two-pound bank note, and one one-pound note. I have two pound fourteen shillings in silver, and four five shilling papers of halfpence.

MRS. SULLIVAN. I live in Golden-lane.

Q. Do you remember the officer, Mattingley, coming to your house one day - A. I do; I gave him a bundle.

Q. Who brought that bundle to your house - A. I don't know. I got it in the garret.

Q. Who lodged in the garret - A. Four men besides the prisoner; the prisoner lodged there one night; on Wednesday night he lodged there, the night before the officer came, and four other men.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come in the night before - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you see him go out - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say any thing to you about his bundle - A. No, he did not.

Q. Then of your own knowledge, you cannot tell who brought the bundle there - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Had he lodged there before - A. He had lodged two nights before this.

CORNELIUS M'CLONE . I am an officer. Mrs. Sullivan brought this hat to my house.

Q. to Mrs Sullivan. From where did you get that hat - A. I got that hat in the same room where he was taken.

MRS. YOUNG. Q. Are you the wife of James Young - A. Yes.

Q. Does he occupy the house in which Campbell slept on the 9th of June - A. Yes; he occupies the upper part of the house; No, 10, Nightingale-lane , the lower part is a shoe-maker's shop; he rents it of the parish, not of the shoe-maker.

Q. Do you know the room in which Campbell slept - A. Yes, it is an even room to mine; that is a part my husband rents.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming there to sleep that night - A. Yes; he was at our house a fortnight before, all but one day

Q. Did you know that he meaned to quit - A. No; he came in about a quarter before eleven; I told him if he came in so late he should not come to sleep there any more. He slept in the same room that Campbell did.

- GWYER. I saw the prisoner on the evening of the 9th of June; he told me he had only two shillings.

Q. to Mattingley. What day of the week did you apprehend him - A. On Thursday, the 10th of June.

Q. to Campbell. You were robbed on the Tuesday evening, were not you - A. I was robbed between the night of Tuesday, and the morning of Wednesday.

JOHN WALTER GRIFFITHS . Q. Do you know this house, No. 10, Nightingale-lane - A. I know it very well, it is in the parish of St. Botolph, Lower Aldgate, the upper part of the parish is in the City; the lower part in the county of Middlesex .

Prisoner's Defence. I assure you that the money of which I am accused of stealing is the produce of my wages and prize money, and also the clothes which the prosecutor says is his will not fit him. The reason I left my lodgings as I did. I was going over to Ireland; I was afraid of being pressed. All I can say that the money and the clothes are my own.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-23

709. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a silver gravy spoon, value 10 s. five silver table-spoons, value 50 s. and one tea-spoon, value 1 s. the property of George Gaviller , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE GAVILLER . I live at Clapton, in the parish of Hackney . On the morning of the 7th of June I brought the basket of plate down; I put it on the sideboard. I do not know the contents of the side board; my servant that is here does.

ELIZABETH BROCKMAN . I am a servant to Mr. Gaviller. On the 7th of June, in the morning, I saw my master bring down the plate; he put it on the sideboard; half a dozen fish-forks, one gravy-spoon, half a dozen table-spoons, and one dozen teaspoons. I put them them into the drawer of the sideboard. A little before three o'clock in the afternoon we missed five table-spoons, a gravy spoon, and a tea-spoon.

GEORGE GARROD . I am shopman to Mr. Imbleby, a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned at our shop two table spoons for seventeen shillings.

THOMAS WOOD . I am a constable.

Q. Did you at any time see the prisoner in the house of Mrs. Prior - A. Yes, on the 11th of June, between four and five in the afternoon. Mr. Prior is a quaker. I saw them in close conversation. I went up and asked what was the matter. The prisoner said Mr. Prior had three spoons of his, and he wanted to keep them. Mr. Prior thought there was some suspicion attached to them. He would not let him have them: he gave them up to me before the Justice.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the spoons produced by Garrod - A. They are my spoons, and the three produced by Wood are mine. The prisoner told me he sold the other two to a person of the name of Bland. I went to Bland. Bland said he did not buy spoons to keep: he bought them to sell; therefore he took the cypher out. He told me he sold the two tablespoons for twenty-six shillings and sixpence; that would be nearly the value of old silver.

Q. Where does Bland live - A. In Norton Falgate.

Q. What do you think to be the value of the whole that you lost - A. I do not know; I put them down ten shillings each, the table-spoons, and the tea-spoon one shilling, nominal value.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentlemen gave them to me as I was in distress; he said, go and pawn these for me: I said I would

JURY. to Wood. When you saw the prisoner at Mr. Prior's did he refer you to any person that had gave him them to pledge - A. No; he claimed them as his own.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-24

710. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , two watches, value 3 l. a silver milk pot, value 18 s. two table-spoons, value 18 s. six tea-spoons, value 18 s. two salt-sillers and glasses, value 1 l. a pencil-case, value 1 s. a toothpick, value 1 s. a lancet, value 1 s. two boatswain's calls, value 4 s. a ring, value 5 s. a bottle of essence, value 1 s. a knife and fork, value 1 s. a watch-chain, value 2 s. and three seals, value 3 s. the property of Richard Baker , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS PERCY . I am an officer of the Thames police.

Q. Did you stop the prisoner - A. I did, on the 6th of this month, about eleven in the forenoon. I stopped him in Star-street, St. Paul's, Shadwell. He was walking with the property in question under his coat. He had it at the back of his coat; it was between his coat and his back, in this box. I have had it in my possession ever since.

MRS. BAKER. I am the wife of Richard Baker . This box is my husband's, and all the things that are in it

Q. When did you lose the box - A. On the 6th of July. I saw it at eleven o'clock; it was in the back parlour. My street door was wide open, and my parlour door was wide open. The box was locked; the key had been lost for six months. I know both the watches; they are my husband's. The spoons are marked with the initials of my husband's name, and his first wife's name. The tea-spoons and the two salt-sillers are silver; they are marked in the same way. The cream jug, that is silver, with the same mark.

Q. You did not see anybody come in - A. No.

LOUISA PHILLIPS . I live at Mrs. Baker's. On the morning of the 6th of July I saw a man go out of the house; he wore a shabby coat; by the prisoner's appearance he is the same man; he has the same coat on. It was between eleven and twelve o'clock. I did not see his face. He was the same size as the prisoner. He turned his back towards me, and turned up Coleman-street; it was impossible for me to see whether he had any thing about him.

Q. As near as you can tell what o'clock was it - A. About a quarter to twelve.

RICHARD BAKER . Q. Do you occupy this house - A. I do.

Q. to Percy When you found the prisoner was the box locked or open - A. It was locked. I searched him for the key; he said he had no key. I stopped him in Star-street; that is about two hundred yards from Gravel-lane. I saw him come down Coleman-street, and go into Star-street. I followed him.

Q. Was he coming from Coleman-street in the direction as he would be coming from Gravel-lane - A. Yes. When I asked him what he had he said he had a box which he took from a sailor at New Crane-stairs out of a waterman's boat: he had it at the back of his coat, and he was smoking a pipe also. He told me he was going to take it to a lodging-house; he could not tell me the sailor's name, nor the person's name, nor who occupied the house,

New Crane-stairs is about as far from where I first saw him as New Gravel-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. A sailor gave it me to carry.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 39.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the temptation of the door being open, and not knowing the contents of the caddy .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-25

711. THOMAS SIMPLE, alias SIMKINS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , two watches, value 1 l. 14 s. a ring, value 3 s. two breast buckles, value 2 s. a silver spoon, value 2 s. and one handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Philip Dawkins the elder, in the dwelling-house of Philip Dawkins the younger .

SARAH DAWKINS . I am the wife of Philip Dawkins; we live in Grantham-place, St. George's, Hanover-square . The house belongs to my son, Philip Dawkins ; he does not live there himself, nor any of his servants. On Saturday the 19th of June I lost two watches, two breast buckles, a tea spoon, and a handkerchief. I came home and found my door open. It was shut and locked when I went out.

ALEXANDER BALL . I searched the prisoner first and then I searched his lodgings. By his bed I found a silver spoon marked P D. I found two breast buckles, the duplicate of a watch, and a gold ring.

EDWARD CLARK . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse. The next morning I went to his lodging; I found this handkerchief.

THOMAS KEEN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 19th of June the prisoner pledged two watches with me.

Prosecutrix. These watches are my husband's; the ring is my wedding ring, the breast buckles are my husband's, and the tea-spoon.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-26

712. SUSANNAH GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , four gowns, value 30 s. three shifts, value 9 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. two shirts, value 8 s. two tablecloths, value 12 s. an apron, value 6 d. and one coat, value 10 s. the property of Giles Bird , in his dwelling-house .

DOROTHY BIRD . I am the wife of Giles Bird ; we live at 49, Perceval-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell . My husband keeps the whole house. On the 5th of July, about three o'clock in the day, I was coming into the passage; I saw the prisoner going along the passage towards the street door. I halloaed out to her to stop. She had a bundle with her. She stopped in the passage. I called a man to stop her; she went away a few steps from the door; the man made her come in. She had still the bundle on her arm. I examined the bundle. The articles all belonged to me.

Prosecutrix. This gown is mine. She came down stairs with this apron tied before her; two tablecloths are mine; a pair of stockings, two shirts, and three shifts, and one coat, that is mine, and the shawl is mine.

Q. Where had these things been - A. They were taken from a closet in the two pair of stairs front room. I never saw the prisoner before. I asked the prisoner where she found them things; she said, a tall man in black gave them to her. I had seen the things safe in the morning. I asked the prisoner a second time where she got the property; she then said, are they yours? I said, yes, they are mine.

GILES BIRD . I occupy this house in Perceval-street. In my judgment the articles are worth three pounds.

THOMAS PARRY . I was at work in the back parlour. Mrs. Bird called me; I stopped the prisoner; she had this bundle about her.

JOHN TURNER . When I took the prisoner in custody she was intoxicated in liquor. I asked her how she came by the bundle; she said she met a man on the stairs, he gave her the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by the door, a man gave me the bundle; he asked me to take it to the bottom of the street and he would give me a shilling. If I had not been in liquor I should not have done so.

Q. to Prosecutrix. When you first saw her she was in your passage - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether she had been up stairs - A. Yes, she must have been up stairs, because the things were taken from up stairs.

GUILTY, aged 29,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-27

713. JOHN WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a gelding, value 5 l. the property of George Cooper .

GEORGE COOPER . I live at Old Ford, in the parish of Bow . On the 10th of June I sent this gelding with the rest of the horses to Old Ford Marshes. He was missing in the morning. The horse-keeper went for the horses about five o'clock; one horse came home short. I went in search after him directly. I thought he might be in the ditches, but however he was not. About two o'clock I heard there was a horse in Hackney marshes; I went to Hackney marsh. I saw the horse; he had his throat cut.

Q. What was your horse worth - A. I valued him at five pounds. He was an old horse. I was sure it was my horse.

Q. Is the prisoner any relation to you - A. No; I have known him for many years; his father and mother are in my employ now.

Q. What is the general character of the prisoner - A. Why, he has been at sea .

Q. Who did you send with the horse; was it the prisoner - A. No. The prisoner has not been in my employ lately. His father and mother have been for many years, and are now. He has been to sea away from me some time.

- GOSLING. I am a servant to Mr. Monk, a horse-boiler. On the 10th of June, the prisoner

offered me a horse; he told me it was in Hackney marsh; he took me to see it. He told me that the horse was dead. He said it was his master's, and he was authorised to sell it by his master's order. He said his master cut the horses throat before he left the horse. When I came to the horse he asked two pound; I bid thirty-five shillings for it. We agreed to the price. I told him I should not pay him until I saw somebody that belonged to the horse. The prisoner proposed going to the Five Bells; he said they knew his master. When we got about half way between the two bridges he jumped into the river. I never saw him again until he was taken.

WILLIAM CURLING . I live at Hackney. On the 10th of June I was in Hackney marsh. I saw the last witness and the prisoner bargaining about the horse. After they had bargained I started with them. Upon going to the Five Bells I saw the horse lay with its throat cut. The prisoner said he cut it. By commission of his master the horse was killed. He said if we went to the Five Bells, Old Ford, we should find every thing satisfactory. In the way he jumped into the river, and swam across. That is all I know.

JOHN COX . I pursued the prisoner after he got over the river, and caught him. He said he had been up to many things, and he should get through it as well as the rest. He desired me to take him to Mr. Cooper, who was his uncle; he would forgive him.

ROBERT BOSSLEY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; I found a knife upon him; he said the knife was his own property. I asked him whether with this knife he had done the deed. He said, no, it was not; he had taken good care of that.

Prisoner's Defence. In the morning I was coming from Lea-bridge; a bargeman asked me to go as far as Whitechapel, and tell one of the horse-boilers to come down. I went, as he said he would pay me for it, and when I came back I could not see any bargeman there, and seeing the horse lay in an open place I thought I had as much right to it as he had. I never was in any trouble before.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-28

714. WILLIAM PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , two pair of boots, value 2 l. 9 s. the property of Samuel Myers , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Harrison .

GEORGE WILSON . I live at the Tavistock hotel . Thomas Harrison keeps it and lives there.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Myers - A. Yes, he was a customer there; I had the charge of his boots; his name is Samuel Myers . On Wednesday the 30th of June, about twenty minutes after eight, I missed two pair of boots; one a pair of top-boots, the other a pair of Hessian boots. I had seen them half an hour before I lost them, and they were produced at Bow-street office by Godfrey. These are the top boots; there is the name inside. Aaron Aaron produced the Hessian boots, and these are the Hessian boots. Samuel Myers was in the room, No. 10. We always put the number on the bottom of the boots with chalk; the number is on them now; that is my own chalking. They were taken from the lobby, one flight high, and they go three steps downwards. At the Bunch of Grapes in Bow-street the prisoner said he would take us to a place where he had sold one pair, and to another house where he had deposited the other pair.

JOHN DEANE . I am a porter in the Bedford hotel. I saw the prisoner at our door; I asked him what he wanted; he said he wanted to enquire about Mr. Watts, of Yorkshire. I told him Mr. Watts was not there, nor expected to be in town. He had no boots with him then. I saw him go to the Tavistock hotel, and when he came out he had a pair of Hessian boots. This was about eight o'clock in the morning.

AARON AARON . I am a salesman in Russell-court, Covent Garden. I bought these Hessian boots of the prisoner. I bought them on the 30th of June, about a quarter to nine o'clock. I gave him nine shillings for them. He told me his master gave them him; they were too tight for him.

WILLIAM GODFREY . The prisoner went with me to a room, No. 20, Hart-street, Covent Garden. It was about three o'clock on the 30th of June. He said he had left these top boots there.

Q. to Wilson. Can you form any judgment of the value of the boots - A. The top boots were bought about twelve hours before they were stolen; they cost three pounds.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-29

715. HANNAH BROWN and SARAH DEERING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , four yards of muslin, value 24 s. the property of Thomas Sonby , privately in his shop .

THOMAS SONBY . Q. I believe you did not know the prisoner until the officers took them; after they had taken them was there any muslin produced to you - A. Yes, which was my property.

THOMAS WHITLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Sonby. On Monday the 5th of July, about two o'clock, the prisoners came into Mr. Sonby's shop; they asked for Japan muslin; I shewed them some sprigged muslin; they said it was too dear. They did not buy any. They went away.

Q. Did you miss any thing - A. I did not. About five o'clock, Read, the officer, came; he produced some muslin. I knew it belonged to my master. I sent for Mr. Sonby from the next door immediately. I had seen the piece of muslin in the shop three hours before the prisoners came in.

Q. to Prosecutor. The piece of muslin that was brought back by Read, was it yours - A. Yes, it was. I had seen it the evening before. My house is in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoners into custody. This piece of sprigged muslin I found in the bundle that was delivered up to me by Mr. Bennett, where they had committed another robbery, in the city. Mr. Bennett, when he delivered

it up to me, said they dropped it. This is the muslin that I shewed to Mr. Sonby.

MR. BENNETT. I am a linen-draper. The prisoners came into my shop, both of them, on the 5th of July, about four o'clock; they asked me for some muslins; I shewed them some; they purchased a quarter of a yard of muslin. Soon after the prisoners were gone I was called down; there was a shawl missing. I overtook the prisoners about three hundred, yards from my shop; I brought them back again. Hannah Brown dropped from under her shawl a bundle; she dropped it on my foot just as I got them back again. This is the bundle that she dropped. I sent for an officer immediately.

Prosecutor. This piece of sprigged muslin I can positively say is my property, by the private mark, and by the peculiar pattern. It is worth about twenty-four shillings.

Brown's Defence. It was given me. The other prisoner is innocent of it.

Deering's Defence. I am as innocent of it as the child in my arms. I always worked hard for my living.

Deering called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

BROWN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

DEERING, NOT GUILTY .

[ The prisoner, Brown, was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the smallness of the property .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-30

716. HENRY CHAMBERS and JAMES BAINBRIDGE were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Chater , in the King's highway, on the 19th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person six 1 l. bank-notes, his property .

WILLIAM CHATER . I am servant to a lady in Edgware-road.

Q. Did any thing happen to you at any time - A. Yes, on a Wednesday, about six weeks ago, at about half past nine in the evening, I was sent with a letter by my lady.

Q. Where was you when any thing happened to you - A. At the White Horse, Clare-market . I fell asleep in the house. I was very tipsy before I went in.

Q. Were you afterwards robbed of any thing - A. I was, in a passage just below the White Horse. I was robbed of six one-pound notes. I cannot tell who robbed me.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners that night - A. I saw Chambers; the other I cannot recollect. I think he came out of the public-house with me. I cannot swear that.

JOHN IRWIN . I am the landlord of the public-house. I remember Chater being at my house. The prisoners went out of the house about an hour before Chater went. I saw nothing of the transaction, nor heard of it until an hour after it happened.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-31

717. JAMES CHAPMAN , JAMES SCULTHORP , and FREDERICK SLATER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a saddle, value 5 s. a bridle, value 6 d. and a brass cock, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Symons .

THOMAS SYMONS . On Sunday morning, the 4th of July, my servant informed me my stable was robbed. Soon after I heard they were taken by the watchman.

JOSEPH HODSON . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, the 4th of July, I apprehended Slater with the saddle upon him. The prisoner, Chapman, was with him. Chapman made his escape. I halloaed out stop thieves. When Chapman and the other escaped me Sculthorp was taken by another man. Slater said the saddle belonged to Sculthorp. I told him I apprehended him with the saddle; he should go to the watchhouse.

- MAYBANK. I am a constable. I searched Slater when he was brought into the watchhouse. In his left hand waistcoat pocket I found this brass cock. Hodson delivered me this saddle. I went and apprehended Sculthorp about two o'clock on Sunday, in the middle of the day. I had information from Slater that he had been in his company.

BENJAMIN JAMES SCULTHORP . I am clerk to Messrs. Rogers and Sons, attornies. On the 3d of July I supped with my brother; my brother and I slept together; he continued in the same bed with me all night. He got up in the morning and breakfasted with me. He was taken up the next day as he was walking in the park to see the soldiers.

CHAPMAN, NOT GUILTY .

SCULTHORP, NOT GUILTY .

SLATER, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined 1 year in the house of Correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-32

718. MICHAEL JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a great coat, value 10 s. and a hat, value 5 s. the property of William Ely Cooke .

HEZEKIAH JONES . I am servant to Mr. Cooke. On the morning of the 26th of June, I had just gone round the corner; I came home, went in, and shut the door after me. I went into the office, and on my return from the office I saw the prisoner going out with my master's coat on his back, and the hat in his hand.

Q. Was he wearing then himself the coat - A. Yes, and the hat was in a handkerchief; he went out of the house; I pursued him to the end of the Terrrce; he dropped one end of the handkerchief, and the hat fell out, I picked it up; I saw him run into Denmark-court, in the Strand; he went into a woman's passage up the court; the woman turned him out.

Q. When you saw him in that woman passage had he your master's coat on or not - A. It was off; he chucked it down that woman's kitchen stairs. I am sure the prisoner is the person that I saw come out of my master's house. This is the hat; I know it is my master's hat

CHARLOTTE WELCH . I live in Denmark-court, No. 20. On the 26th of June, a man ran into my

house; I insisted upon his going out. He had a coat on when he came into my shop; he pulled it off, and kept it in his arm; when I pushed him out of the shop into the passage I heard somebody cry out, have you seen a man go up here; I said, yes; here he is. I could not get him out. He tried to get in the yard, to see if he could go that way. Jones came into my house; the prisoner as soon as he heard a footstep on my door he threw the coat down the kitchen stairs; he ran to the street door; my child got the coat; I threw it in the court. Jones got it.

Q. to Jones. Did you receive the coat - A. Yes: this is the coat, it is my master's coat; this coat was left in the closet. I had seen it the over night; I looked in the closet and saw it was gone.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 1 year in the house of Correction , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-33

719. THOMAS CRIPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , six ounces weight of tea, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Percival North , William Nanson , and Thomas Simpson .

JOHN PERKINS . I am a warehouseman to Percival North , William Nanson , and Thomas Simpson , tea-dealer s, in Bridge-street . The prisoner was a porter there. On the 18th of June, I was watching the prisoner; I hid myself behind the chests about a quarter before five in the afternoon. I saw him take the tea out of the tray, and put it into his pocket; I immediately challenged him with it. He took it out of his breeches pocket, and admitted that he had done so before.

Q. What was the quantity of tea - A. About six ounces, value about half a crown.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot deny it; I am sorry for it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-34

720. WILLIAM HALL and THOMAS HANNAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of a person to the jurs unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I am a City constable. On Friday, the 11th of June, about eleven o'clock, I saw the two prisoners follow two gentlemen up Ludgate-hill, towards St. Paul's; they returned back again to the picture shop: they then followed a gentleman part of the way up Fleet-street ; I kept an eye upon them all the time; there were three in company: I saw Hall put his hand into the gentleman's right hand coat pocket; he pulled a handkerchief part of the way out; Hall tried again the second time at the handkerchief. I was of oneside of the way, and they were on the other; and when I came to the end of Fetter-lane I crossed over; at that time the handkerchief was three parts out; Hall tried at it the third time; there was a hackney coach coming past; I was at the horses head; I saw Hall take the handkerchief further out; on my going round to them I saw Hall pull it out of his breeches, and give it to Hannan; Hannan put it under his armpit, under his coat. I laid hold of them both, the third made his escape, and got off. I should know him again if I was to see him. I took the two prisoners into a fishmonger's shop; a mob collected. I could not find the owner of the handkerchief, I think the gentleman did not know that the handkerchief was taken from him; it was the fourth attempt that it was taken, it was taken a little at a time. Hannan said he never picked a gentleman's pocket in his life; he said so before the magistrate. This is the handkerchief; I have kept it ever since. It is a very good one; it is worth two shillings.

Hall's Defence. As I came from Mr. Milbourne's in the Strand, on Ludgate-hill I met with Hannan; I walked with him until we came to Fleet-street I felt something at my foot; I said here is a pretty handkerchief. I am quite innocent of it.

Hannan's Defence. I know nothing about the handkerchief, nor which way it come.

Hall called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HALL, GUILTY , aged 15.

HANNAN, GUILTY , aged 22.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-35

721. HANNAH BROWN and SARAH DEERING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a shawl, value 4 s. the property of John Bennett .

JOHN BENNETT . I am a linen-draper , Lower Holborn . On the 5th of July the two prisoner's came together to my shop, they asked to look at some sprigged muslin; my wife served them.

Q. Were you by at the time - A. No, I was not; nothing was missed until after the prisoners went out; in about two minutes after they were gone a shawl was said to be missing, that was on a stool in the shop. I had seen it not ten minutes before the prisoners came in. I followed the prisoners, and asked them to walk back with me; they came back; I charged them with having taken a shawl, and as soon as they came into the shop Hannah Brown dropped a bundle from under her shawl, as soon as she entered the shop. I picked up the bundle and gave her in charge of a constable. The shawl was in that bundle; it lay on the top of every thing else. The stool was by the other counter, not the counter where my wife was serving. Nothing was found on the other prisoner. The shawl is worth four shillings.

WILLIAM READ . The prisoners were delivered to me, and the shawl. This is the shawl.

Prosecutor. I know it is my shawl

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 20.

DEERING, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

722. HANNAH BROWN and SARAH DEERING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a yard of lace, value 4 s. 3 d. the property of Henry Gray .

HENRY GRAY . I am a laceman , 22, Lower Holborn . On the 5th of July, the two prisoners came into my shop together; one of them asked to look at some lace; my lad attended them. I did not miss

the lace until Read, from Hatton Garden office, brought the lace. I saw both of them look at the lace; they were close to each other; they were in the shop about ten minutes; they bought nothing. It was between six and seven when Read brought the lace; I knewit tomine by the marks; I know I never sold it, and I am quite certain the prisoners bought nothing at my shop; I never saw them before. The lace has never been in wear; it is worth four shillings and three-pence. I am certain it is my lace; there are figures on it the hand writing of my servant.

WILLIAM READ . I was sent for to take charge of this woman and the bundle; directly I untied the bundle the lace was on the top; I asked them how they came by the bundle; Brown said in the hearing of Deering, it was given to them.

Q. What did the bundle contain - A. A piece of muslin, and articles of haberdashery; they were not articles that had ever been in wear.

Brown's Defence. The bundle was given to me by a person that ran away from me. The person at the bar is innocent of every thing as a child unborn.

Deering's Defence. I know nothing at all about it; I am innocent.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 20.

DEERING, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-36

723. THOMAS WOLSTONCROFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , twenty-five knives, value 40 s. twenty-five forks, value 20 s. five pencil-cases, value 5 s. five tooth-pick-cases, value 1 s. a diamond set in gold, value 5 l. and twelve books, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD . I am an auctioneer , I live at No. 64, Bartholomew-lane . The prisoner was in my employ two years as porter at the different sales at which I am auctioneer. These goods were lost from the Auction-mart.

JOHN BROWN . I am a constable of the City. On Monday, the 21st of June, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; Mr. Wood charged the prisoner of robbing him of many articles. I searched him, and in a pocket on his person, I found a diamond, and two duplicates; in consequence of these duplicates, I went to one of the places; one is for two pencil-cases, and two toothpick-cases; the other four pencil-cases, and a fork. This is the diamond I found on his person.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt this diamond was in my possession; we missed diamonds to the amount of seventy-five pounds in one sale.

BENJAMIN CHARLTON . I am shopman to Mr. Robinson; two pencil-cases, and two toothpick-cases, were pawned with me by a person of the name of Avery. These are the articles.

THEOPHILUS AVERY . I pawned these two pencil-case, and toothpick-cases at Mr. Robinson's for the prisoner; the prisoner delivered these articles to me; he desired me to pawn them for him; I pawned them in his name, and gave my own name also.

Prosecutor. The pencil and toothpick-cases are my property; I had them from Birmingham.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . In consequence of a search warrant I went with Mr. Wood to the prisoner's lodgings, White Rose-court, Bishopsgate-street in searching the room I found more than twelve books. These are them; and here are some little silver ornaments. I searched the prisoner's wife; I found a duplicate on her.

Prosecutor. I know the books to be my own.

JAMES STEWART . I am a pawnbroker in Chiswell-street. I produce a knife, and a pencil-case; I took them in of a woman.

Prosecutor. This knife was consigned to me for sale, and the pencil-cases I know them to be my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I stand before you a guilty sinner, and do promise if mercy is extended towards me, to do what is right.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-37

724. JOHN HOPGOOD was indicted for that he, on the 19th of June , feloniously and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, two forged bank notes, value 1 l. each, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-38

725. JOHN HOPGOOD was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a forged 1 l. note with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-39

726. WILLIAM WILLMOTT was indicted for that he, at the general delivery of the goal of Newgate, holden at the Justice Hall in the Old-Bailey, on the 28th of October, in the 48th year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of grand larceny, and was sentenced to be transported for the term of fourteen years, and that he afterwards on 14th of July last at the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell , was at large before the expiration of the term of fourteen years .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-40

727. BENJAMIN WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , twenty yards of woollen cloth, value 20 s. twenty remnants of other woollen cloth, value 20 s. and ten yards of kerseymere, value 10 s. the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of Edward Shaw and Richard Taylor .

THOMAS MILLER . I am foreman to Edward Shaw and Richard Taylor . I hired the prisoner as a cutter ; he worked fifteen days, and then he left.

RICHARD TAYLOR . My partner's name is Edward Shaw ; we are army clothier s; we receive cloth belonging to his Majesty; we make up clothes, and return it to the Ordnance warehouse.

The cloth that we receive is the cloth of his Majesty, we are accountable for it.

Q. Look at the contents of that box, and tell me whether you know any part of it to be stores of his Majesty - A. I have seen a great deal of this cloth before; it is the same as what we receive; it is marked with the broad arrow, and S G. That is the cloth that is so delivered out to us. I have no doubt that cloth is the property of his Majesty. This is a long piece, near two yards. That mark is upon the cloth of the Store-keeper General. The blue, there are some pieces two yards, and there is some a yard, and some green.

Q. You are sure it is part of the stores sent to your house to be worked up for the army - A. We believe so. There is no other house that is delivered to us to make up.

MR. STACY. Q. I believe from your department the cloth is furnished to the maker - A. Yes.

Q. Has it that mark upon it for the purpose of being delivered - A. All cloth now has.

Q. And there are tickets upon them the names of Shaw and Taylor - A. Yes, on two pieces.

HENRY QUICK . I am in the employ of Messrs. Taylor and Shaw.

Q. Look at some of the blue cloth and see whether there are any tickets that you know - A. These are two tickets on these two pieces of blue; they are put on by my direction.

Prisoner's Defence. I suppose there are none of the gentlemen can swear to any thing but the letters S G. It was found in my possession. It was taken to my lodging; that is all the account I can give. I know I had the cutting of such pieces of cloth; I returned the same compliment as the other men did. I returned more respecting the green cloth; the other men cut eighteen, I cut nineteen out of it. I am sure there is not a man that has seen me take a piece of cloth. It was strictly looked into that no man should take a piece of cloth.

- READ. I am an officer. He told me it was perquisites.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-41

727. CHARLES STANLEY was indicted for that he, on the 31st of May , had in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange for 50 l. upon which was contained four false forged and counterfeit endorsements, and that he feloniously did utter and publish as true the said false forged endorsements in the said bill of exchange, he knowing them to be forged, with intention to defraud Charles Miller .

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

GEORGE GRANT . Q. Have you the books of your firm - A. Yes. The entries in this book are my hand-writing. I am a son of Mr. Grant, of Portsmouth, and a clerk in the house of Grant, Burby, and Company.

Q. Who are the partners of that firm - A. William Grant , Richard Burby , George Grant , and Thomas Grant .

Q. Now, look at the entry of that bank post bill - A. Here it is. There was a bill drawn on John Lindergreen, a merchant at Portsmouth. I presented that bill for payment. I received various notes to the amount of two hundred pound. On the 11th of April, 1812, I received this Bank post bill among others of Mr. John Lindergreen ; it then had Mr. Hilgrove's endorsement on it. 344 are my figures on the bill.

Q. Now, look at the endorsement upon that bill; the endorsement purports to be Grant, Burby, and Company; is that the writing of any one of the firm - A. No, that is not the hand-writing of any one of that firm.

Q. Does any other person endorse for them - A. No others but the firm.

Q. Do you know any thing but that that bill was at your house - A. It was in a parcel. I did not put it in the parcel myself. I placed it among other bills; it was disposed of afterwards.

ALEXANDER MACKLANE . I am in the house of Grant, Burby, and Company. On the 11th of April, I assisted in making a parcel to be sent to London.

Q. Do you know whether the bill which is here, this bank post bill, was in that parcel - A. I know this bill was in our house on the 11th of April, and I have an entry here that denotes that I handed it to another clerk. That clerk's name is Mr. Barr; he is not here.

Q. Did you do any thing to get that bill endorsed by Grant and Company - A. I generally write the endorsement of Messrs. Ladbroke and Company, for them to sign it. The endorsement to Ladbroke and Company is all taken out. This entry is in my own handwriting, as transmitted to Ladbroke, and it is debitted to Ladbroke. I certainly did write the endorsement of Ladbroke, although there is no trace of it now. In the regular course of my business I should write

"pay Ladbroke and Company," from which it is handed over to one of the partners, and then it is handed over to another clerk to make the parcel up.

Q. Look at that bill, and see whether there is any trace of that endorsement - A. There appears the remains of part of the flourish to one of the partners names: the flourish is not taken out.

Q. Whose name is that - A. Mr. George Grant , and there are marks upon this bill. I am convinced it must have been endorsed. This book has the description of the bank post bill: it is my hand writing. It was sent to Ladbroke on the 11th of April. It was sent to Ladbroke; I then handed it over to Barr.

CHARLES MILLER . I am a silversmith , No. 13, Aldgate High-street . On the 30th of May, the prisoner, Stanley, came to me; he purchased of me gold coin to the amount of one hundred pound. On the 1st of June he came again, and bought more gold coin. I took the bank post bill then. He paid me in cut bank notes joined together, and a fifty-pound bank post bill.

Q. Is that the bank post bill - A. This is the bill. I objected to taking the bill at first; he said he received it among other bank notes in a remittance from Liverpool; he had no doubt it was perfectly

correct. He gave me his name captain Henry Hunter . I paid the bill in at the bank; it was stopped.

SAMUEL RICHARDSON . Q. Do you know Stanley - A. I do.

Q. Had you ever a bank post bill in your possession; look at that - A. I had. I received that in a parcel. It was sent to me at my house in Chelsea, from Robert Brady , I believe. I took that bank post bill to Birkett.

Q. Did you ever see Birkett and Stanley together after you had delivered that bill to Birkett - A. I did. I accompanied Birkett to St. James's park; we there met Stanley. Birkett then delivered the bill to him with other notes, telling him they were some notes that were stolen. I understood it was to purchase some gold coin.

Q. Had Birkett seen Stanley in your presence before - A. No.

Q. What state was that bill in when you gave it to Birkett; was it in the same state when Birkett gave it to Stanley or not - A. No, not in the same condition as I gave it to Birkett. When Birkett gave it to Stanley an endorsement had been extracted. I delivered it to Birkett in the month of April. About a month afterwards I and Birkett went to meet Stanley in St. James's park.

Q. Had you seen Stanley before that upon that business - A. No, I had no communication myself upon the business.

Q. You say an endorsement had been extracted - A. Yes. I should know the bill again if I was to see it.

Q. Was it in that state when it was delivered by Birkett to Stanley - A. I have no doubt it was.

COURT. How did the endorsement stand when you delivered it to Birkett - A. I think it was,

"pay Ladbroke and Company." I think it is all regular now except that which is extracted, which was,

"pay Ladbroke and Company."

Q. Do you think the words,

"Grant, Burby, and Company," were there before - A. I think it was.

COURT. And nothing was extracted but,

"pay Ladbroke and Company" - A. I think so.

Mr. Alley. Richardson, I thought I heard you say that at the time that Stanley got possession of the note the names of Grant and Burby were upon the note, the same as it is now - A. It was.

Q. Had the prisoner any reason for knowing that any alteration was made upon that bill - A. None, whatever; he only knew they were stolen. Stanley had no knowledge of any alteration on this bill; Birkett told me he had not.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-42

728. SAMUEL ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Simon Cope .

THOMAS HARMINGTON . I am a surgeon. I have been in practice twelve or thirteen years. On the 26th of June I examined the body of Simon Cope , about one in the day; he was then alive. I attended him until he died. On the Tuesday morning following he died. The 26th was Saturday; the Tuesday was the 29th.

Q. Did you after his death open his body - A. I did not. I think his death arose from a fever which always attends a mortification.

Q. Was that mortification occasioned by any wound - A. There was a wound on the leg.

Q. Had that wound in your judgment produced the mortification - A. I should conceive that the wound was of such a situation that without some other cause there would not have been a mortification.

Q. Would there have been a mortification if there had not been a wound - A. I should suppose not.

Q. Do you impute to that wound upon the leg that the mortification that arised from that wound was from the diseased state of the body - A. I compute it entirely arised from the diseased state of the body.

Q. Was the body in that state that a mortification would have come on if there had been a wound - A. I think if his body had not been in that state there would have come no mortification from that wound.

Q. Was his state of body such that without any blow there would have been a probability of a mortification - A. I am not acquainted with any circumstance likely to produce mortification without a blow.

Q. Upon which part of the leg was it - A. Nearly between the ankle, and the knee rather on the outside.

Q. Could you judge by what means that wound was produced - A. I should imagine by the blunt edge of a hard body: the kick of a shoe might produce it.

JOHN HANWICH BROWNING . Q. Did you see an affray between Roberts and Cope - A. On Tuesday evening, the 22nd of last month, I saw the deceased, Cope, strike the prisoner, Roberts, when Roberts had a child in his arms. The deceased struck him violently on the nose; his nose bled profusely. The prisoner put the child down, and struck the deceased with his fist. I then saw the prisoner take the deceased by his collar, and he dragged him into the street. I saw no more.

JOHN CUTBUSH . I saw the affray between Roberts and Cope. I saw the prisoner and the deceased struggling in the rood for the space of half a minute, they were then parted by a woman. I saw them both endeavouring to throw one another down. I cannot say whether Roberts kicked Cope or not.

JOHN WARNER . I saw Cope and Roberts together; I saw Roberts with his foot up, attempting to kick Cope, but whether he kicked him or not I cannot tell.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-43

729. CHARLES JOHN CLIFFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a watch, value 10 l. and a silver spoon, value 5 s. the property of Donald M'Neil , in the dwelling-house of James Nichols .

ELIZABETH M'NEIL . I am the wife of Donald M'Neil ; he is deputy inspector of the hospital at Guadaloupe . On the 11th of June, I met the prisoner

in Fleet-street; I never knew him before; he said he thought he had the pleasure of seeing me at Lady Seymonr's I told him, no, he was mistaken; then he named Captain Austin; I told him that I knew Captain and Mrs. Austin most intimately. He came home with me.

Q. You asked him to come home - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live - A. At Knightsbridge, in Mr. James Nichols 's house, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea .

Q. Mr. Nichols lives in the house, and let you an apartment - A. Yes.

Q. What passed when the prisoner came home with you - A. He did not stay a quarter of an hour then; he went away, and returned on the Sunday. I invited him to come on Sunday. On Sunday he dined with me; he went away between seven and eight.

Q. Had you been with him during the whole time - A. Not during the whole time; he had been down in the yard with a sailor boy that he called his servant.

Q. Had he any opportunity of taking any thing from your house - A. No, it was not on that day. On Wednesday the 16th he came again; I was at home.

Q. Was any body with him then - A. Not any body.

Q. How long did he stay - A. I believe he came between twelve and one o'clock; he staid until about half after five. I went out at four o'clock, and left him in the house.

Q. You considered him as a boy connected with Captain Austin, your friend - A. Yes. I invited him to go with me; he said his shoes were dirty; he went down stairs, and the girl was going to brush his shoes. I went down; I said, are you ready, sir; he said, no, his clothes were not brushed. I went without him, leaving him behind. I told him he might follow me; we would walk slow. I returned about half after five; he was then gone. I missed my gold watch and a silver spoon from off the sideboard.

Q. Where was your gold watch - A. Hanging over the fire-place, in the drawing-room.

Q. Where was the sideboard - A. Near the same place in the drawing-room. I have seen both the watch and the spoon since. I saw them at Bow-street; the pawnbroker produced them. I am sure they are mine.

MARY GISSEN . I am a servant to Mrs. M'Neil.

Q. Do you remember her leaving the prisoner behind and going out - A. Yes; my mistress told me to brush his shoes and clothes, and when she was gone out he said he would not go after her; he said he would go up in the drawing-room and read, and go out for half an hour, and return before she came home.

THOMAS PEART . I am a pawnbroker in Blackfriars-road. This watch was pawned with me on the 17th of June.

BENJAMIN SOLOMON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; I found this duplicate on him.

Q. to Mr. Peart. Is that your duplicate - A. It is. This watch was pawned by a man I have known many years; his name is Robertson; he pawned it for three pounds. With respect to the spoon I produced it at Bow-street. The spoon is the property of her landlord.

ANN PRESLAND . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No; I never saw him but three times. My husband is an hair dresser. In our shop the prisoner produced a gold watch; he asked me to pawn it in my name; I said, no, my name was not known at the pawnbrokers. I got Mr. Robertson to pawn it for him. He said the admiral gave it him for his intrepidity in an action. Mr. Robertson pawned it for him. The prisoner had the money and the duplicate; he gave Mr. Robertson a shilling.

Benjamin Solomon . I found a powder-horn on the prisoner, and a screw-driver. This pistol he had left at a shop to be mended; it is broken in the pan.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the watch is that your watch - A. It is, and this is the fellow spoon to that taken away. It is Mr. Nichols's. I must make the other good.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Glibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-44

730. RICHARD RALPH was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Ralph , his wife .

ELIZABETH BELL . I lodge at No. 27, Rose-lane, Spitalfields . The prisoner and his wife Mary lodged in the same house, in the next room to me. On Saturday the 26th of June, almost at ten o'clock at night, I saw the deceased: she opened my door, and spoke to me very smiling; she did not converse with me long; she wished me good night. She appeared well and sober. She then went into her own room; I never saw her more.

Q. How early the next morning (Sunday) did you see the prisoner - A. I had been out on Sunday morning; about eleven o'clock the prisoner opened my door; he said, neighbour, will you be so kind as to step into my room; he said, I do not know what is the matter with my wife; she came home last night very drunk; she tumbled down, and never moved more. I went into his room; I saw the poor creature on the ground; she looked black and blue, and blood was coming out of her mouth. She was lying on the floor on her right side. I said, your wife is dead. He said, do not say so. I felt her hand; she was cold. Her face appeared black and blue. I then called in the other inhabitants.

Q. Was she a sober or drunken woman - A. I never saw her drunk in my life.

Q. Upon what terms did she and her husband live, did they live happily or very unhappy - A. Very unhappy.

Q. Had you been frequently disturbed by them - A. No; they kept themselves to themselves, and so I did. They lodged in the house three or four months.

Prisoner. Did you ever hear my wife and I fight, or only have words - A. Only have words.

COURT. How far was your room from the prisoner's room - A. There is a little passage between; his is a back room and mine is a back room.

Q. When there was any noise in his room was your room in such a situation that you could hear

it - A. I could hear, but I could not understand what they said.

Q. When the deceased came into your room on the Saturday night was the prisoner in his own room or not - A. I do not know. I continued up about an hour after I saw the deceased. I think I went to bed about an hour after.

Q. Did you hear any noise in their room that night - A. Never a word.

Q. When the deceased left you did she go into her own room or go out - A. She went into her own room.

Q. Was there any other person that lodged on the same floor - A. There are two front rooms, and lodgers in both these front rooms.

ELIZABETH HADLEY . I lodged on the same floor with the prisoner and his wife; they lived very unhappy indeed. I have heard the deceased as she went down stairs call him a murdering rogue. I have heard them wrangle, but I did not notice the words.

Q. Had you seen her on Saturday night - A. No.

Q. Did you hear any noise in that room on Saturday night - A. Yes, at almost ten o'clock, as I was unlocking my door, I heard a violent blow against the partition, and when I came into my room I heard another small blow come against the other side of the partition. I neither heard a word or a groan.

Q. Are you quite sure that noise was in the prisoner's room.

Q. How early did you see the prisoner the next morning - A. I heard him before I saw him. About ten o'clock a little girl came with a pair of shoes; he and his wife blacked shoes . The prisoner said he could not take them shoes to black under the course of an hour. The prisoner then was standing with the door in his hand. About half an hour after that I was walking across the passage, I heard him say, Mary, why do not you get up.

Q. How soon after that was the alarm given that she was dead - A. About half an hour after that, and upon the alarm being given I went into the room; I found her laying on the floor on her right side. All her clothes were on. She was dead. I could not tell from the appearance of her face whether she was a black woman or a white woman. I was frightened. I ran out of the room immediately.

Prisoner. Did you hear me have any words or fighting with my wife that night - A. No, I did not.

COURT. You say it was almost ten o'clock at night when you heard the noise in the prisoner's room - A. Yes.

Q. Did you continue at home the whole of the evening after that - A. No, my husband and I went out together.

Q. Do you know who was in the prisoner's room at that time you heard that noise - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was in the room - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner's door open after you heard this noise - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was the noise you heard like a person falling against a partition - A. I think that was the first noise, the other noise was a very small noise indeed. I neither heard a voice or a groan.

Q. Was it at that part of the room in which you found the body the next morning - A. Yes, it was.

Q. What aged woman was the deceased - A. I don't know indeed. I think she was between fifty and sixty; a little woman, not infirm; she used to go up and down stairs very well. She was a very hard working woman.

Q. Was the place that you heard the noise near their bed, or not - A. Yes, close to their bed

Q. Your room was close to the prisoner's - A. Yes.

Q. Could the prisoner walk without your hearing - A. Yes, he might; I did not hear the sound of his footstep after I heard the noise.

ESTHER WEBSTER , Q. I believe you lodge in the same floor - A. Yes, in one of the front rooms.

Q. On the night before you say this poor woman died had you seen her - A. Yes, I met her on the stairs at half past nine; she was coming up stairs with some beer in her hand; it was in a mug, what she fetched it in every night; it was rather dark; I said, who comes here; she said, it is me, neighbour. I said, come along. She was quite sober. I never saw her otherways.

Q. How long have you lodged there - A. I cannot say exactly. I have been there going on of three years. They have lived very unhappily. I heard them quarrelling frequently.

Q. What age was she - A. I suppose between fifty and sixty.

Q. When she went up stairs did you hear her go into her own room - A. I knew she went into her room. I never heard any words at all. I was up until half after two.

Q. The next morning how early did you hear any person stirring in that room - A. About half after seven I went down to get some water, and he went down stairs before me. He said nothing about his wife then. I saw him go up and down stairs two or three times before eleven o'clock. On neither of these occasions did I speak to him. He saw me.

Q. How many people are there in the house altogether - A. There are eight people altogether.

Q. How soon did you hear the alarm of her being dead - A. I went in the room upon Mrs. Bell calling me at eleven o'clock; I saw the deceased on the floor; she was very black; I said to the prisoner; you old wretch, you have murdered your wife. He said, go along, look and see if you can find any marks upon her.

Prisoner. Did you hear any words or fighting betwixt me and my wife - A. No words or blows.

COURT. You say at about half after nine you met the deceased - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home all that night - A. I went out about ten, and returned home about eleven. I was at home from eleven until after two; I then went to bed, and during that time I heard no noise at all.

CATHERINE WELLS . Q. Did you lodge on the same floor - A. No, in the first pair; theirs is the two pair.

Q. On Saturday evening did you see the deceased

- A. Yes, about eight o'clock; she and I spoke together; she appeared to be sober; I never saw her otherwise; and I heard her speak to Mrs. Webster about half after nine.

Q. After you heard her speak to Mrs. Webster, did you hear any noise that came from the room - A. Yes, something like a fall, in about half an hour after she got up stairs. It was in her room I am sure.

Q. The next-morning how early were you up - A. A little after five.

Q. How soon after you were up did you see the prisoner - A. I heard him between five and six go up and down twice.

Q. You heard him I suppose by his wooden leg - A. Yes.

Q. Between six and ten o'clock did you see him - A. Yes, twice; a little after six; when I first heard him he made way for me to go by him to go down stairs for water

Q. Did he upon either of these occasions say any thing to you about his wife - A. No, he did not.

Q. How early have you seen him up of a morning - A. Never before eleven o'clock. I have frequently heard his wife call him at eight, and from that till nine. I never saw him but once a day, and that was about the middle of the day.

Q. Have you ever heard him up so early as seven before - A. No.

Q. On Sunday forenoon, about eleven o'clock, did you hear the alarm of her being dead - A. Yes; upon that I went into her room, her face was very black, the front of her throat was black, and the side of her neck was some white; there were two white marks on one side, and one on the other, but to say which side were the two white marks I cannot.

Q. Was she cold - A. I did not touch her I said to the prisoner, you old villain, you have killed her; he told me he had not, and if I said so again he would serve me the same. We went down in the street and gave the alarm, and in about three quarters of an hour he was taken in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever hear me fight, or quarrel with my wife - A. I have heard you quarrel, and you have throwed crockery-ware after her down stairs.

COURT. Were you at home all the Saturday evening - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was in the the room at the time that you heard the noise - A. I cannot say.

Q. What time did you go to bed - A. About half past ten; it was before I went to bed that I heard the noise.

Q. You did not hear the diceased go to Mrs. Bell's room and speak to her - A. No, I did not.

Q. Can you tell at about what time it was that you heard that noise - A. Yes, about ten o'clock.

Q. Was it before you heard the deceased speak to Webster on the stairs - A. It was after; it was about half an hour after she met Mrs. Webster on the stairs.

Q. to Mrs. Bell. I think you said you went to bed about an hour after you saw the deceased - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go out of your house at all after you saw her that night - A. No.

Q. When she came to you did she come from her own room - A. She came up the stairs; she opened the door, and spoke to me.

Q. Did you hear her speak to any body on the stairs - A. No.

Q. Had she any thing in her hand - A. I cannot say: I saw nothing.

Q. What o'clock do you think it was - A. Almost ten.

Q. You did not hear any noise in her room that night, did you - A. No, not a word; nor any noise.

Q. Could there have been a noise of a person tumbling down without your hearing it - A. If I had been looking out of my window I could not hear any thing.

Q. Were you looking out of your window that evening - A. I cannot remember any more.

MARY FOY . Q. Do you lodge in the same house - A. Yes, in the one pair front room.

Q. On Saturday evening did you see the deceased - A. Yes, about half past nine; I saw her on the stairs as I was going to market; she gave me the wall, she was coming up.

Q. Was it light enough for you to see what she had in her hand - A. I cannot say whether she had any thing in her hand or not.

Q. On the next morning how soon did you hear the prisoner up - A. By five o'clock. I heard him stumping up and down stairs.

Q. Had you ever heard him up so early on a former occasion - A. No, his wife; used to call him at eight; she was an early riser.

Q. Upon the alarm of her death did you go into her room - A. Yes; her face was quite black; her eye was large, starting out of her head; upon her throat were marks of white; her hand was over her face; she was dressed; her apron and bonnet were off; the ribbon of her cup was on; her shoes I think were off her feet; her cap was tied under her chin with two little tapes. I cannot say it was tied tight. I said to the prisoner, you old villian, you have throttled your wife; the prisoner was very angry; he drew back; he said, a nasty wretch, if I said so again he would serve me the same. I was frightened, and ran into the street.

Prisoner. If she knew any thing against me to speak, that is all.

THOMAS HART . I am parish beadle, and headborough. On Sunday, the 22nd of June, I was sent for, upon the alarm of this woman's death; I came to the house about a quarter past eleven. The deceased was laying upon some rags, which they call a bed; there was a bedstead in the room, but no bed; only some rags like taylor's cuttings; the rags were on the floor; the bedstead was turned up, nothing was on it. The deceased's face was very black; her right eye was swelled very much, as if from a very violent blow.

Q. Did the prisoner give you any account how she came by her death - A. He said, she came home about eleven o'clock very much in liquor; she was in the act of making the bed, and fell over the leg of the bedstead which was turned up, and she fell against the wainscoting, and struck her eye; she go, up after that fall, and fetched herself some beer,

and ate her supper; he went to bed; she would not come to bed; she laid down by the side of the bed. He said in the morning he called her to get up; I think he said about eight o'clock, I will not be certain about it; she making no answer he took her by the hand to wake her, and finding that she was cold he ran into his next neighbour and begged her to come in. I sent for Mr. Brown, and Mr. Wright came.

COURT. You were examined before Mr. Moser - A. I was.

Q. Then you did not give this conversation - A. No, I did not. The bed seemed to be made of taylor's cuttings, or something of that kind. I looked round the room to see if I could see any thing that could have done the murder; I found this rope.

ANN LEFEURE . I lodge in the house, in the one pair front room.

Q. Did you see the deceased on Saturday night - A. Yes, when the bell rang eight o'clock; I did not see her afterwards. I was at home from eight until half past ten, and during the time that I was at home I heard no noise in the prisoner's room.

Q. The next morning how soon did you see or hear the prisoner - A. I did not see or hear him untill eleven o'clock.

Prisoner. Can you say any thing against me, my dear - A. You were always having words.

JAMES WRIGHT . I am a surgeon; altogether I have been a surgeon for twelve or fourteen years. I was called in; I examined the deceased; I found there was a considerable distortion of the integuments of the face and neck.

COURT. That is the outside of the face and neck was a good deal discoloured - A. It was; the transparent of the corner of the eye was extraversated with blood.

Q. Do you mean the white of the eye - A. Yes.

Q. Use language that the jury might all understand.

Mr. Gurney. We are not all surgeons. Was there any bruise upon any part of the face - A. Upon the temple there was a bruise.

Q. Had that bruise any thing to do with her death - A. No.

Q. Did you observe any appearance of the jugular vein - A. I opened the integuments of the neck, the skin, and several membranes; I found a small quantity of coagulated blood in different parts of the jugular vein; on dividing the jugular vein there was a considerable quantity of coagulated blood issued out of the jugular vein. I opened the windpipe; there issued a quantity of mucus, and a quantity of lymph.

Q. What death did these symptions indicate - A. Suspension of circulation; in consequence of pressure.

Q. Pressure, where? -

COURT. There had been a pressure upon the jugular vein that stopped circulation - A. Exactly so.

Mr. Gurney. Did you see any marks outside - A. I saw a small mark.

COURT. Was there this pressure of the jugular vein on both sides, or only one - A. Only on one side, on the right jugular vein; no pressure at all on the other. There was a small mark on the outside of the neck.

Q. What colour was that mark - A. A black colour, strictly upon the jugular vein.

Mr. Gurney. In your judgment could she inflict that upon herself - A. That is impossible for me to say, sir; the pressure on circulation occasioned her death.

Prisoner. Did you see any marks of violence on her neck - A. One mark on the temple, and one on the neck.

Prisoner. That was occasioned by the fall.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Wright. Did you observe a mark upon the neck before you made the incision - A. I did.

Q. How came you not to open the neck - A. Conceiving the woman died in suffocation, in consequence of stopping circulation.

Q. Had the woman a cap on - A. No, I believe it was off.

Q. Was the mark upon the temple of considerable violence - A. It was of considerable violence.

Q. Was the mark such as might be produced by the woman's falling or not - A. Yes.

Q. Supposing the woman to be stunned by a fall and her cap in ordinary tightness, could that cause the pressure of the jugular vein - A. No, it could not.

Q. Supposing her to have fallen down in a fit, and her cap tied tight on, would that have caused a pressure upon the jugular vein to have occasioned this appearance - A. No, I do not think it would; it might.

Q. Then you cannot be sure but her death might be caused by apoplexy - A. No.

Q. Might that bruise on her temple be occasioned by her falling down in an apoplectic fit - A. It might.

Q. Could not you have formed a more distinct judgment whether she had died of apoplexy if you had opened her head - A. Yes, a much more accurate account if I had opened the head.

Q. Would death ensue by stopping one jugular vein - A. Yes.

Q. Supposing there had been a pressure upon one jugular vein would that cause death - A. That depends upon the pressure.

Q. A strong pressure upon one jugular vein, the other being left free, would the pressure on one jugular vein produce death - A. No, it would not.

Q. You saw no more to indicate a pressure but upon one jugular vein - A. But on one jugular vein.

Q. Would a fall in an apoplectic fit produce blood in the white of the eye - A. Yes.

Q. Were there no symptoms but what would be referable to a death occasioned from apoplexy - A. Not one.

Q. You say there was a bruise on the jugular vein - A. Yes, on the same side as the bruise on the temple.

Q. From the situation of the two bruises, is it possible that they might be received at one, and the same time by a fall - A. No, not by a fall.

Q. Would a fit of apoplexy produce a considerable swelling of the neck, or considerable exertion on the jugular vein - A. If it is attended with much convulsion it would.

Q. Supposing considerable convulsion to be produce in a fit appoplexy, and any thing tied tight round her, either cap or any thing, might that produce such a wound upon the neck - A. Yes, if the knot was extensive.

Q. Suppose the knot of the cap had been tied tight and there had been considerable convulsion, might the knot produce that mark - A. Yes, if the knot had been large.

Q. Supposing the deceased to have been killed by a pressure upon the jugular vein inflicted by another person, would the death have been instantaneous, or would there have been a good deal of struggle on her part - A. A great deal of struggle.

Q. And is it not probable that she would have screamed - A. There is a possibility of it, but there would have been a great deal of strugling.

Q. What would have prevented her screaming - A. - A. The extreme pressure might have prevented her screaming.

Q. Was this woman of a full habit or not - A. Of a spare habit. She had the appearance of being much younger than the prisoner.

Q. Had she the appearance of so much strength as to be able to resist - A. She appeared thin, and feeble.

Q. There was nothing that indicated that there had been a struggle, was there - A. No.

Q. If she had been throtled by any person is it likely that she would have struggled so that to have been heard in the next room - A. Her voice could not be heard.

Q. Could she have struggled without being heard in some one or other of the adjoining rooms - A. That might depend on the position in which he had her.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I am innocent as there is a God in heaven; the neighbours are all here; they cannot accuse me of fighting, and beating my wife.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-45

731. JOHN DOHLBERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a waistcoat, value 8 s. the property of Richard Lloyd ; privately in his shop .

RICHARD LLOYD . I am a taylor and slop-seller , 196, Shadwell High-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell . On Friday evening, the 9th of July, the prisoner came to my shop; he asked my wife to see some waistcoats. I was at home, and almost as soon as he was in the shop I came forward to speak to a person who was there. He looked at several, and asked the price of several; at last he asked for some cheaper. She asked him five shillings for one, he bid half-a-crown. I told him he ought to be kicked out of the shop for offering half-a-crown; he then reeled out of the shop. About half an hour after he was gone my lad went to look up some clothes that were to go home; he could not find one of the waistcoats; it struck me that the sailor must have taken it. It stood over until the next afternoon; he was in custody then. The prisoner was coming past with my waistcoat on him. The officer has the

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person you saw in your shop bargaining with your wife A. I have no doubt of it. I do not think I could speak to his person without the assistance of other circumstances. When I saw him I told the officer that he had stolen the waistcoat that was on him from my shop. This is the waistcoat; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. That waistcoat I bought of a sailor when I was groggy. I gave him a good blue jacket for it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-46

732. ELIZABETH BEADLE was indicted for felonously stealing, on the 4th of June , a bed, value 3 l. a pillow, value 1 s. a bolster, value 2 s. 6 d. and a pillow-case, value 2 s. the property of Michael Allen , in his dwelling-house .

MICHAEL ALLEN . I am a printer . I live in Paternoster-row; I am the housekeeper. It is in the parish of St. Faith under St. Paul's . I lost these things at various times from the beginning of October to the present time.

HANNAH MARIA ALLEN . I am the wife of Michael Allen . I missed these things on last Sunday was a week, and on the Monday I went to Mr. Flemming's, the pawnbroker, and found them. I know they are my property; they were taken out of my house. The prisoner was my servant .

- MILLS. I am a servant to Mr. Flemming's, pawnbroker, No. 90, Newgate-street. I produce a bed, pillow, bolster, and pillow-cases. I took in the pillow and bolster of the prisoner myself. I cannot say who pawned the bed.

Q. to Mrs. Allen. Can you swear to the pillow and bolster - A. I can; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 6 d.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-47

733. THOMAS MASCARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , one hat, value 15 s. the property of William Wiltshire ; and one other hat, value 15 s. the property of George Blackwell .

- JOHNSON. I am a waiter at Tom's coffee-house in Cor nhill. On Monday the 12th of this month the prisoner came to our house, and soon after he had left the seat we observed we had lost two hats, and having noticed the prisoner coming for some length of time in a very suspicious manner, always with a green bag, caused our suspicion. After we had lost the hats I said I was sure he had taken the hats. About an hour after the hats were missing I was in Gracechurch-street; the prisoner passed me with the bag in his hand. I clearly perceived that there were two hats in the bag. I followed him; he observed me follow him; he attempted in a manner to avoid me. I followed him into the gateway of the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street. As soon as he saw I followed him there, he went up the yard; I still followed him, until he came into Bell-alley, where I stopped him, and told him a little time ago he was

at Tom's coffee-house, and drank a glass of punch. I told him there was a friend of his would be very glad to see him there. He answered, he would come by-and-by. I told him I would not leave him until he went to the coffee-house He resisted; I still kept hold of him. By a good deal of persuasion I took him there. I took him up stairs into a private room; I immediately sent for an officer. In the mean time that the officer was gone for, he acknowledged that he had got the hats, but that he would give them up to me. He offered me a pound note to let him go. I told him, that I could not do. I delivered him into Harrison, the officer's charge. Soon after, we took him to the Poultry Compter, where the hats were taken out of the bag.

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . I am a waiter at Tom's coffee-house. One of these hats are mine; the other is George Blackwell 's.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a constable. On Monday evening, about half after eight, I was fetched by the waiter to Tom's coffee-house, Cornhill. The prisoner was given in my charge for stealing two hats. These are the two hats. There was also in the green bag this mat tied up as it is now. I searched the prisoner: I found on him: one pound note, a shilling, and a sixpence, two duplicates of eight waistcoats in pawn, and a pencil-case.

Q. to Johnson. What time of day was he at your house - A. He left the house about seven o'clock in the evening; it was about eight when I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of this honourable court.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-48

734. THOMAS JEFFREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , fifteen pounds weight of bacon, value 15 s. ten pound weight of cheese, value 10 s. three pounds weight of butter, value 3 s. one quire of paper, value 1 s. and three pounds in monies numbered, the property of William Green , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH GREEN . I am brother to William Green , cheesemonger , Holborn-hill, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . The prisoner was employed of an evening to assist in my brother's shop, and he slept there. He was by business a farrier. He used to go away at six o'clock of a morning. He used always to call me and my brother James. I and James slept in the accompting-house. On the morning of the 9th of July I was disturbed by a noise in the shop about five o'clock. I got out of bed and looked through the window into the shop; I there saw the prisoner behind the shop counter, making a noise among the halfpence. We kept halfpence there, in three tubs. Directly after, I saw him come from behind the counter with two tubs, one in each hand. The tubs are about twice the size of my hat. He was without shoes, his stockings were on; he could walk softly; and finding he was coming towards me with the tubs I stepped forwards and seized him. Upon my seizing him he begged my pardon, and said he hoped Mr. Green would forgive him; it was his first offence. I sent for an officer directly.

Q. What quantity of halfpence did you find in them tubs - A. Ten shillings and upwards in each of the tubs. When the officer came we searched his pockets; we found above thirty shillings.

Q. Now, among those that you found in his pocket were there any five shilling papers - A. Two five shillings that I had left in the tub. Two of the tubs contained ten shillings each, and the third contained thirty shillings, not less, and the tub which contained the thirty shillings was empty except three halfpence.

Q. And you counted above thirty shillings in his pockets - A. I did. Some of the halfpence were good and some bad.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. I was sent for about half after five; upon coming there I found the prisoner in custody. I searched him, and found to the amount of thirty shillings in copper upon him. He said it was the first offence he ever had committed, he was sorry, and he hoped Mr. Green would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the money for my wages. Some Saturday nights I received five shillings in halfpence, sometimes ten shillings, and sometimes fifteen shillings in halfpence. I took them home, and what I did not lay out I put by. Some I had loose, and some were tied up.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-49

735. MARY STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , a watch, value 4 l. and a watch-key, value 5 s. the property of Roger M'Donald .

ROGER M'DONALD . I am a publican . I live at the Anchor and Hope, New-street, Shadwell. On the 4th of June, between eleven and twelve at night, I was going doing down the Minories , the prisoner came running after me, catched hold of me, and asked me to go back with her home. I wanted to get away from her. She put her arm round my body, got hold of my watch-chain, and took it out of my pocket. Then I called the watch; the watchman came, and as the watchman came I took my watch out of her hand. The watchman took her to the watchhouse; I went with him.

Q. You had not been to any house with the woman had you - A. No. I never saw her before. This is the watch; it is mine.

JAMES PARTON . M'Donald called watch; I came and took charge of her. I saw him take the watch out of her hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through the Minories on the evening mentioned; I met the gentleman; I asked him where was the Mitre. When he was before the Lord Mayor he did not know that I was the person. He was intoxicated on that evening.

Prosecutor. I was not sober.

Q. to Parton. When you came up you saw him taking the watch out of her hand - A. Yes, I did, and she said he had torn her gown.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-50

736. MORDECAI ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon John Mold , on the 19th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, two 10 l. bank notes, two 2 l. bank notes, and two 1 l. bank notes, his property .

JOHN MOLD . I am a farmer ; I live at Cheshunt in Hertfortshire. I was robbed on the 19th of June, about half past nine o'clock, within twenty minutes one way or the other, at night, at a place called Church-row, at the back of Aldgate pump . I came from the Coach and Horses, Whitechapel; I came up Whitechapel to the end of Church-row. The prisoner seized hold of me by the collar. I had one foot on the curb of the pavement, and the other off. The prisoner seized hold of my handkerchief by the collar. I asked him what he wanted. I took him a little pat by the side of his head. I had two behind me; one took hold of my arm, and the other my leg, and pulled me so that I laid sideways by the post, some part of me up and some part down, while I kept my hold. When they caught hold of me I seized hold of the prisoner, but I did not hold him long. I found myself pretty well choked; I could not halloa. They tore my breeches, and my breeches pocket was turned inside out. Then when I recovered myself I found they had taken two ten-pound notes, two two-pound, and two one's, all bank notes, and I believe there were two three-shilling pieces and an eighteen-penny piece, but I will not be certain. I said I was robbed. I jumped up; they ran away up the alley and I after them. I caught hold of a lad that I supposed to be one of them. He told me he was not one of them. He took me to a place where I knew his master; he was not one of them. I went into a public-house, and described the man. I described the man to an officer. On Monday the man was taken, and when they brought him out of a public-house, I said that is the man, I should know him out of five thousand. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I intended to hit him under the eye, and that is where I took the features of his face. I have never had him out of my sight. I do not know that the prisoner took the money out of my pocket; one of the three did. This is the one that seized me by the collar. I do not know which of the three took the money. It was about half after nine o'clock. There was a kind of a picture shop by; I had a view of his features all over.

Q. Was your notes ever found - A. No.

Mr. Adolphus. You came from the Coach and Horses - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of clothes had the man on that seized you - A. I do not know; I saw nothing but his face.

Q. Was it a rainy or a moon-light - A. I do not know.

Q. Had you drank a good deal at the Coach and Horses? You went up to a lad and seized him, and said he was one that had robbed you - A. I supposed he was. I am quite sure the prisoner is the man that had me by the collar, and no other. I always said I should know him out of five thousand.

Q. Have you heard there is a forty pound reward - A. I have. I do not want a shilling.

WILLIAM WARBOYS . I am an apprentice to Mr. William Homan , a butcher, 71, Aldgate High-street. On Saturday evening, the 19th of June, between nine and ten o'clock, I had been to Mr. Chapman, greengrocer, Aldgate, for a peck and a half of pease; from there I went to Mr. Whitfield, the butter shop for a pound of fresh butter; after that, I was going to Houndsditch, through Church-row, because it was nearest, and just as I came against the public-house there I met Mordecai Abrahams , on the side of the way where the church is. He was walking quite fast; he passed me then. He came by me again before I came to the top.

Q. He passed you, returned, and came by you again - A. Yes. I thought he did not want to take my pease and butter away.

Q. You knew him before, did you - A. Yes, and before I went a step further I saw Mr. Mold coming by at the Library, the corner of the passage, in Church-row, by the picture-shop. I saw Mordecai Abrahams catch him by the handkerchief by the throat, and two more men were behind him. I stood still a small time; I cannot say how long; it was done in a short time. In the course of a little while I saw them all run away towards Aldgate; I heard Mordecai Abrahams say, have you got it? I passed Mr. Mold; I saw him lean over a post as if he was nearly strangled; his handkerchief was drawn quite tight. He followed me in Church-row to the cork-cutters; he catched hold of me, and insisted knowing who I was I told him it was immaterial who I was. He said he was robbed; he never was done so in his life. I told him he was robbed by the three men that run away, if he run after them most likely he would catch them towards Aldgate. I told him I lived with Mr. Homan He let me go, and walked home with me to Mr. Homan's He told Mr. Homan that he had been robbed in Church-row of twenty-six pounds. I told him then that I knew the man by seeing him in the street at different times, where I am in the habit of going with meat.

Q. You knew the person of Abrahams well, did you - A. I knew him well by sight. I did not know his name at that time. I am quite sure he is the person.

JURY. Was it light enough for you distinctly to see his face - A. Yes, it was a light night, and at this picture shop in the corner there were two candles in the window. There is where I saw Mr. Mold. I never saw the face of the other men then.

EBENEZER DALTON , I am an officer. On the 22nd of June, I apprehended the prisoner; I found him in bed at his lodging. I searched his clothes before he put them on. I found about five or six shillings. I took him to the office; there I saw Mr. Mold; Mr. Mold said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more about it than the child that is unborn; I am as innocent as any man in the world.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-51

737. SARAH STEVENS, alias VERGO , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a bed-curtain, value 4 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. and a candlestick, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Miatt , in a lodging-room .

SECOND COUNT. for like offence, only stating the lodging to be let to Sarah Stevens , alias Vergo, and Henry Stubbs .

JOSEPH MIATT . I am a a jeweller ; I live at No. 11, Plow-court, Fetter-lane . My wife let the lodging to the prisoner.

MARY MIATT . I am the wife of the last witness. I let the lodging to the prisoner. On the 25th of June last, I let her a one pair back-room at six shillings and sixpence a week, furnished; the prisoner called herself Vergo; I wished to have a reference. She asked me if I knew Mrs. Scott; I said, yes. She fetched Mrs. Scott. The prisoner came on Thursday. On Saturday I met her in the passage with something in her apron; she said Mrs. Miatt, I am going home with my work, I shall pay you in the evening. I did not see her for two or three days after that: she went away on the 4th of July.

Q. How long did she continue in your lodging - A. About nine days. She never paid me any thing, only the earnest. I found my things on Saturday after she went away.

Q. What was missing - A. The bed-curtains, a candlestick, and a flat iron. I found the things on the premises of Mrs. Scott; I let the things to the prisoner.

Q. Who is Stubbs - A. The person she called her husband; he came there on Sunday, and dined there; Stubbs made no agreement with me. I am sure the prisoner is the person I let the lodging to.

Q. Did you find your things again - A. Yes, I had Mr. Scott taken up; she well knew them to be my property.

Q. May be she took it - A. I cannot say who took it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-52

738. MOSES MOSES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , a pocket-book, value 3 d. and seven 1 l. bank notes, the property of William Beard , from his person .

WILLIAM BEARD . On the evening of the 22nd of June, I was going up Holborn ; after I had passed Gray's-inn-lane I was met by four persons; they pushed against me; all four appeared in a bustle; it was done in that kind of a manner that shewed me it was not an accidental thing They said, how do you do; I proceeded up Holborn; a second time I was met as the first time; I had only got a short distance; I then took my pocket-book out of my inside coat pocket, and put it into my inside breeches pocket, and proceeded up Brownlow-street, Holborn; when I got near Bedford-row four persons came sharp round the corner, pushed against me. in like manner, exclaiming at the same time, how do you do, just as before; they came as if they had gone round by Hand-court. At the moment the four men ran against me I was alarmed, and felt something at my breeches pocket; I put my hand in my breeches pocket, and felt my book was gone. The same moment three of the four went towards Gray's-inn-lane, the fourth, (the prisoner,) crossed over to Brownlow-street, and came towards Holborn; I pursued him, and took him momently.

Q. What did your pocket-book contain - A. Seven one-pound bank notes, and a check for thirty-five pound; it is not dated, and sundry memorandums. The next morning my book, and check was found.

THOMAS GRANT . I found the pocket-book about three o'clock at day light in Warwick-court, under the water-cock. The same contents are in it now as when I found it.

Prosecutor. This is my book, and this is the check I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a glass-cutter. I was going to the other end of the town to look for work. This gentleman came to me, and said he had I pocket-book; he said are not you one of the that passed me before; I said I am willing to go to the watchhouse. The gentleman was intoxicated; I could have easy got from him if I had been one of the parties.

Prosecutor. I was sober.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-53

739. HENRY DALE was indicted for that he, on the 24th of November , feloniously without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, two forged 2 l. bank notes, he knowing them to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, for having in his custody and possession, another forged bank note, he knowing that to be forged.

THOMAS AUSTIN . Q. You keep a jeweller's shop in Cannon-street, Ratcliffe-highway - A. I did at the time of this transaction. On the evening of the 24th of November, the prisoner came to my shop with a lady, and asked to look at some ear-rings; I produced them. They looked at several pair; at last the lady chosed a pair of cornelian ear-rings; the gentleman said, take them if you like them, if they are a shilling dearer then you can get them elsewhere. He took out of his pocket-book a bit of paper; he paid me: it appeared to be a two-pound note; I asked him for his name, and address; he said, he would write his name on himself; he took the pen, and wrote the name that now stands on it. That is the note; he wrote on it. William Hudson , No. 11, Great Tower-street; that was written by the prisoner in my presence; under which I made a memorandum, 24th of November, 1812; that is my hand writing.

Q. Have you any doubt of the person of the prisoner - A. No doubt whatever. I had a suspicion of the note when I took it; I looked particularly at him; I went to Tower-street, no person answering the description of the prisoner resided there.

THOMAS HILL . I am shopman to Mr. Capper, No. 11, Tower-street. I have lived with him eight years; there has no person resided there of the name of Hudson during the time I have resided there, nor the prisoner by any name.

JOHN GOLD DUTHEY . I am a grocer and tea

dealer, in Cable-street, Goodman's-fields. I know the prisoner's person. On the 24th of November, 1812, he came to my house, he asked for coffee, and a loaf of sugar; he gave me an order for a few shillings; he offered me a two-pound note apparently. Upon my taking it I asked his name, and address; he gave me the name of Williams, which I wrote on the note; the address, New-road, 17: I wrote it at the time in his presence. I have no doubt he is the same person that gave me the note. I had seen him before.

Q. Did you make any enquiry at No. 17, New-road - A. Yes, a clerk in the Bank went with me all thereabout; we found no person of that name.

JOHN SEWARD . I keep the house No. 17, New-road, St. George's in the East; I commenced business there in September last.

Q. Has there been any person of the name of Williams lodging at your house - A. I have never had a lodger in the house since I have been there. I know nothing of the prisoner.

MARY GLOVER . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; I have known him between five and six years.

Q. What name has he gone by - A. The name of Dale.

Q. In May last, did you receive from the officers, Foy, and Johnson, any note for the purpose of going to the prisoner's house - A. I received two one-pound notes of Foy; I was searched; I had no other money about me; after receiving the notes of Foy, I went to the prisoner's house, Gloucester-place, Vauxhall-walk; Dale's first question was to me, is there any thing the matter with Walker; I answered no. I asked him if he had any more notes, we wanted some; those that we had were so pale we could not offer them; he said he believed he had none except five's; he would look, and if I would return the others he would alter them for me. He asked me if I could send my son with them, and he would alter them for me against the evening; he shewed me a two-pound note; he asked me if I thought it would do; I said, yes, it would do, and took it. I understood that he had done them with Camel's hair pencils, and Indian ink. He delivered me the two-pound note; I brought it away. I told him I was going to the Royal Oak; my husband was there; I asked him if he would go there with me; he said as he was in his dishabille, he would rather not. I went to the Royal Oak; Foy took the note from me. I had no other in my possession.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. I employed the last witness to go to the house of the prisoner; I searched her before she went, she had only the two one-pound notes that I gave her. Upon her return I searched her again, and found a two-pound note; I delivered it to Mr. Glover, who marked it in my presence.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a City officer. I was in company with Foy. When Mrs. Glover was sent to Dale's house I watched her from the Royal Oak to Dale's house; I saw her come out; I directly went in the house, and apprehended Dale. Foy searched the house; I took Dale off to town.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am one of the inspector of the Bank.

Q. Do you remember being present when Foy found upon the woman a two-pound bank note - A. I do; I marked it. This is the note. It is a forged note, it appears to have been touched over to make it stronger.

Q. Look at these notes, are they genuine notes of the Bank of England, or are they forgeries - A. They are forgeries.

Q. Look at them two notes, and the one I gave you first; do they appear to be of the same plate - A. They appear to me to be impressions taken from the same plate; they are all forgeries; the signatures appear to be the same hand writing, though all three different names.

(The note read)

Prisoner's Defence. So far as relates to the two first charges I am ignorant of it. I was out of town at the time. On the 24th of November, I was at the Bush tavern, Bristol; from thence I came to Bath, where I remained until the ensuing day, the 27th; from thence I came to London. I was in company with a gentleman, who I have subpoenaed, merely to prove that I was at the Bush tavern. Mrs. Walker is a wicked abandoned woman; as to the note she says she had of me she might as well say ten. If her evidence it taken in any shape I, as well as all the world, might be hanged.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a butcher, and cattle dealer in November, 1812, I lived at No. 3, Britain-street Marybone-buildings, Portsmouth, about three quarters of a mile from the Point; I now live at the Magdalen coffee-house, Blackfriars-road; that is my residence now when I am at home; I have left Portsmouth.

Q. Where you in Bristol in November last - A. Yes. I frequently go round to Bristol buying cattle.

Q. When did you arrive at Bristol - A. I cannot say to a day exactly when I arrived; I left the Bush tavern Bristol on the 24th of November, 1812; I had been four or five days about Bristol, and left on the 24th of that month; I got on the coach that runs from Bristol to Bath; I got acquainted with a person of the name of Dale on the coach. The prisoner is the same gentleman that was on the stage coach with me from Bristol to Bath; I am positive sure of that; he told me what business he was, that he lived at No. 5, Union-street, Lambeth-road. I called on him there, and staid with him two or three hours.

Q. How long have you been in town now - A. Eight or nine weeks, I cannot remember the day of the month I came to town.

THOMAS BOVERLEY WESTWOOD . Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner, Dale, on the subject of the witnesses at Chester - A. I had; he sent for me for the purpose of making the communication to me about a week before last sessions; he then stated to me that he had been employed in keeping the accounts of two persons, who were then resident at Chester, at the time he was charged with uttering the forged bank notes, and that by sending for these witnesses he could prove an alibi; he asked me whether he ought to send for them; I told him he knew best whether they could prove what he stated, and if they could, he should lose no time in sending for them.

Q. Did he in the course of that conversation say one word about Bristol - A. Not a word. He told me he could bring two witnesses from Chester, and upon this he put off his trial; no opposition was made.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Austin. Have you any doubt the prisoner being the person that came to you on the 24th of November - A. I have no doubt but the prisoner is the person that came to me.

Q. to John Duthey . Have you any doubt about the prisoner being the person who came to your shop - A. None in the least.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-54

740. WILLIAM KEMP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of July , a saddle, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Johnson , from the person of George Johnson .

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am a sadler ; I live at No. 19, Church-street, Soho. On Saturday, the 3rd of July, I sent my son to Mr. Blackwell, in Oxford-street. After the prisoner was taken I went and claimed the saddle.

GEORGE JOHNSON . On Saturday, the 3rd of July, my father sent me with the saddle to Mr. Blackwell, Oxford-street. As I was coming from Church-street a man came and asked me which was the way to Hanover-square; he asked me what my father was, and where he lived; I told him he was a sadler, and lived at No. 19, Church-street, Soho. He asked me where I was going with the saddle; I told him. He gave me three cherries, said, good bye, make haste home, and then when I got a little further another man came up, and said holloa, what was I about; Mr. Blackwell had been waiting for the saddle ever so long; and after I had walked a little way further a third man came up, and asked the prisoner which was the way to Church-street; then the prisoner said I was to give him the saddle: I said, no; I must take it. He then untied the string that fastened the saddle to my shoulders. The person that came up, and asked the way to Church-street said he would give me some money to shew him the to Church-street. Then we went as far as Samuel Ridge 's, where I had to call; he said he had to call there too. I went into Mr. Ridge's; the man had gone away with the saddle, and left me. I went home, and told my father what had happened.

Q. Look at the bar - A. That is the man, I am quite sure of it. I had seen him before.

RICHARD COLLINS . I am a porter to Mr. Richardson, in Oxford-street. I was going along Oxford-street ; I saw this little boy with the saddle at his back; I saw the man come up to him; the prisoner untied the saddle, and took it away from him; he passed me with it; I saw him go into St. George's market. I am sure he is the same man. I have known him for years.

Q. Why did not you take hold of him - A. I did not know that he was that kind of character.

JOHN WILDMAN . I am stable-keeper. I had been at Mr. Kendall's mews; after I came out of his stable I met two men, one of them had a saddle. I said friend, is that saddle to be sold; he said, yes, for three pounds. I said two pounds ten shillings will do, but I will have the girts with it. They left the saddle at Mr. Prior's. I called again about seven o'clock in the evening; they never brought the girts. The officer came and claimed the saddle as being a stolen one. The prisoner is the man I bought the saddle of, and I paid him for it.

Prosecutor. I am the maker of the saddle; it is my property; it is the saddle that was taken from the boy .

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-55

741. HARRIET FAWCETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , a gown, value 5 s. and a petticoat, value 4 s. the property of Sarah Richards .

SARAH RICHARDS . I am a single woman ; I live at No. 8, Maples-court, Shoreditch . I lost my gown, and petticoat last Monday week; I had left them in the cupboard up stairs in the prisoner's room.

MARTHA RICHARDS . I keep the house; the prisoner took a one pair of stairs room of me; Sarah Richards is my sister; she lodged with me on the ground floor; my sister left her things in one of the cupboards in the prisoner's room, and on Monday she missed her gown and petticoat out of that cupboard. The prisoner left the house on Sunday on Tuesday. I found the prisoner with the gown on her.

JOHN DAY . I took the prisoner in custody; I produce the gown and petticoat.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown, and petticoat.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-56

742. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , in the dwelling-house of John Freeman , two 20 l. bank notes, his property .

JOHN FREEMAN . I am an auctioneer in Newgate-street; my house is in the parish of Christ's church . The prisoner was my clerk ; he ceased to be my clerk about the latter end of May.

Q. Did you receive any letter to go to the West end of the town - A. On the 15th of July, I did; in consequence of that I went off; I sent out my errand boy; I left my house in the care of the prisoner's sister; she acted as my servant, and when I went to the West end of the town I found it was a trick, I was not wanted. Upon my coming home I looked into my scrutoire; I missed two twenty-pound notes. I deposited the notes in the scrutoire on Saturday, the 12th of June; my boy received them of Bond and Company, and marked them. In about six or seven days after the robbery I went down to Gosport; I there found the the prisoner in a public-house. I employed a constable; the prisoner pointed out his trunk at his lodging; the bill of parcels was

found in the prisoner's box in my presence. It is a bill of parcels of the Belfast company for nine pounds eighteen shillings and nine-pence. I told the prisoner he had robbed me of two twenty-pound notes; he said nothing then; he did afterwards. I said he had better open his mind.

DAVID LAZARUS . I am a constable of Portsmouth. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22nd of June. On him I found this key at his lodgings; he pointed out his trunk to me; I opened it with this key. I found in his trunk this bill of parcels for nine pounds eighteen shillings and nine pence.

EDWARD BURTON . I am a partner in the Belfast Company. On the 16th of June, the prisoner purchased the articles in this bill of parcels of me. The bill of parcels is my own hand-writing; he tendered me a twenty pound note, marked Bond and Company; he wrote the name of John Cole upon it as his own name. It is not his name. This is the note he paid to me.

Q. to Prosecutor. After the prisoner was taken up did you receive from him that letter - A. I did.

Q. Whose writing is it - A. The signature is Charles Smith 's: I cannot say the body is.

Q. Was it written by your desire - A. No; I always told him I would prosecute. I received it about the 9th of July; signed Charles Smith ; dated June the 9th, 1813.

"Most excellent sir, from a genuine conviction of your humanity alone I implore your pardon, and hope you will have commisseration on my unhappy fate. By a deviation from my duty I have involved not only myself, but an amiable and heart-broken wife. This is the cause which makes me hope you will grant my request. Impressed with this hope I will be making reparation for the past by pursuing the paths of honest industry. I trust you will not be a sufferer by my error. Spare me from becoming an exile from my wife, family, and friends. You well know that I can procure respectable persons to whom you are no stranger, who will step forward and be security for the sum which you are deprived of, and if necessary for the amount for which you are bound over to prosecute, should it be in your power to withhold the prosecution, I and my family join.

I am, sir, CHARLES SMITH ."

Prosecutor. This is the note that I put into my secretaire, and that is one of the two that I missed when I came home.

Prisoner's Defence. I acquainted the prosecutor how I received the notes; he gave me his promise that the man should be apprehended.

Prosecutor. I deny that.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-57

743. WILLIAM EPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , twenty-three yards of cambric, value 3 l. and five shawls, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of George Cox .

GEORGE COX . I live at 27, Watling-street . About the 16th of May last the prisoner came and looked out a parcel of goods to the amount of sixty-three pounds, for which he wanted me to give him credit until he had sold them. I told him it never entered into my mind to give any credit whatever. I told him my young man should go with him, and whatever he sold he was to pay him, and whatever he got above the sum I charged to him was to be his profit. I sent my porter with the goods with a charge not to give them up to him upon any account whatever. The goods were cambric, shawls, and long shawls.

- LLOYD. I am a porter to Mr. Cox. On the 18th of May I took the goods, scarfs, two pieces of cambric, and five silk shawls to the White Bear in Bride-lane. The prisoner then took me to a street in Holborn; he did not sell any there. He then took me to a house in Holborn; he sold ten yards of cambric there, and one scarf. He got the money for it. We came from there to the same house in Bride-lane, Fleet-street; we there sat down together. He asked for the parcel of goods; he said he thought he could sell them to the landlady of the house. He took the goods with him. I did not see any thing of him afterwards. I thought the prisoner long in selling them; I enquired; the landlord told me he had been gone out of the house with the goods some time. The prisoner never returned with the goods or the money.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-58

744. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a saddle, value 1 l. a bridle, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Travers , esq .

THOMAS REEVES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of June, in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital. I was coming by at the time that Sabine was running after him. The prisoner said that he had taken the saddle and bridle entirely for want; necessity drove him to do it. I found the saddle and bridle at Mr. Hill's, in Swallow-street, where he told me he sold it. I believe at that time he was in considerable distress.

RICHARD HILL . I am a saddle and harness maker, in Swallow-street. On Saturday morning, the prisoner brought a saddle and bridle to me. I gave him a guinea for it. On the Wednesday following it was claimed by Mr. Travers.

WILLIAM SABINE . I am a servant to Mr. Travers; he is a surgeon in Broad-street. His stables are in White Hart mews, London Wall . I gave the prisoner leave to sleep in the stable, as he appeared in distress. On the 12th I missed the saddle and bridle. I afterwards saw the saddle and bridle in Marlborough-street office. I first saw the prisoner in Newman-street, Oxford-street; I called to him; he ran away. I pursued him until I got into Suffolk-street, where he was taken. This is the saddle and bridle; it is my master's property; they are worth a guinea

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-59

745. JAMES HILL was indicted for that he, on

the 5th of May , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a 1 l. bank note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, stating the intention to be to defraud Robert M'Leish .

ROBERT M'LEISH . I keep the Royal Tent public-house, near Grovesnor-square . I have known the prisoner about a dozen years. On the 5th of May, I met him at the end of Golden-square; I said, how do you do; Mr. Hill, I have not seen you some years. He said, I have been in the country; do you live in the old house still? I said, I do. He then said, I am going to have some beer; I may as well have a pint of beer at the old house. I said, very well, I am going on an errand, and when I came back I found Mr. Hill in my house. He asked me for change of a one pound note. I gave him the change, deducting for the pint of porter. I gave nineteen shillings and nine pence, deducting three pence.

Q. Look at that note; is that the note that you changed - A. It is. I wrote Mr. Hill upon the note, Marshalsea office. I thought that would be sufficient for me to remember the man I took it of. I never heard any thing bad of Mr. Hill.

ANN DERHAM . I am servant at the public-house called the Shades, Charing-cross. In the month of April last, I saw the prisoner at our house; he came there with a person named Withey; he had some ale; he offered me a pound note. I went out to get change at Mr. Wright's, a baker's shop next door; he could not change it without taking ten shillings-worth of halfpence. I went back to the prisoner, and told him; he made no objection to the halfpence I received of Mr. Wright the full change, and left with him the note. I gave the prisoner the change. I tore the note by accident. A gentleman came from the Bank and said it was a bad note.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a baker, 27, Charing-cross. In April last, I changed this note for the girl, the last witness I wrote her master's name on it. The note was torn. This is the same note. The note appeared to me to be so well done that I could not detect it.

HARMAN DOWLING . I keep the Ben Johnson public-house, Stepney. The prisoner came to my house in January. I had known him a good many years. He told me he lived at Bristol. He had some beer to drink; he asked me to let him have some Dutch drops. I was in the habit of taking them: he said he could not get them at Bristol. He had some drops and some beer; it came somewhere about five shillings; he gave me a one pound note, and I gave him the change. I wrote on the note M of Bristol. That is the note.

MR. LUCAS. I am a dealer in spirits. I reside in the Old Market, at Bristol. In April last the prisoner came to my shop; he came in, and asked for something, whether it was rum or brandy I served him; I cannot say which: he tendered me this one pound note, being a stranger, I asked him his name; he told me, James Hill; he lived on the Quay. I wrote on the note, James Hill, on the Quay.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am one of the inspectors of bank notes.

Q. Take that note, and tell me whether it is a genuine or a forged note - A. It is a forged note in all respects, paper, signature, and all.

Q. Look at these other three - A. These three are all forged. They appear to be impressions taken from the same plate, and they appear to me to be signed by the same hand-writing: the signatures are different names. They are so well done they would deceive any body.

(The note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been some time an inhabitant of Bristol, and I have been in the habit of trading from place to place frequently. I have taken country notes. I have been glad to take bank notes, because country notes would not go in London. I never had a bank note, but what I paid twenty shillings for it. I have received upwards of forty pounds since last February, from that time downwards. In the first place, I received of Mr. Davis half a year's annuities, ten one-pound notes. My finances were poor. I have had a sick wife and a large family. I never gave a false address to man or mortal. I took out a licence to sell any things where I could. On Monday, after my licence was dated, I went from Bristol, and was coming to London. My licence was dated the 29th of February. I carried a good deal of goods with me. I went with the coach to Chippenham. I went to the Antelope; I supped there and breakfasted there; my dinner came to six shillings. I gave a ten pound note. I received change, nine pound and fourteen shillings. There were three or four recruiting serjeants there. I sold dominos there; they gave me another pound note. I got a returned chaise, which took me to Marlborough. I slept at Mr. Cole's, the Coach and Horses. I sold dominos there. On the day following I sold one dozen pair of shoes for one pound two shillings and sixpence; then I sold two pieces of straw plat for one pound in Marlborough. From Marlborough, on the Wednesday night, I went to Hungerford; on the morning following I went to Newbury; and on the morning following I went with a returned chaise to Reading; and the next morning I was looking for a returned chaise to come towards London. There was a returned chaise at Maidenhead, and just at that moment I had to repack my goods; a man came and looked over my goods; he said he was a corn-cutter. He shewed me some boxes of salve, which sold at one shilling a box; he said he would sell me them at eight shillings a dozen. He lived at No. 1, City-road, the corner of Old-street. He paid me three one-pound bank notes for straw plat, and thirty shillings. Then after I came to London I went to Fry's banking-house, facing the Mansion-house, up a court; I there exchanged four country notes for bank notes, and some other notes I changed in Birchin-lane, to about four pound. I was here last October. I came to the Admiralty office to get a discharge for my son; I then went to that public-house, the Shades, with Mr. Withey, and when the girl told Mr. Withey the note I gave her was a bad one, Mr. Withey told them I should come again. I never passed a bad note knowingly. I never had one but what I paid twenty shillings for in trade.

CATHERINE HILL . I am the prisoner's daughter. This is my father's licence. I took the licence out myself. I paid four pound for it. It was after I took the licence out that we set off for London. He carried list shoes, straw platt, and boxes of dominos. My mother was ill; she was left in Bristol with my sister.

Q. Do you know what money your father took with him from Bristol A. Not exactly. He changed a ten pound note at Chippenham; the change was nine pound fourteen shillings; at Chippenham he sold some dominos; he received a one pound bank note; from there we went to Marlborough; we slept at Mr. Coles, the Coach and Horses. He received three one-pound bank notes at Marlborough of different people; he gave change for one of the notes. My father generally asked for bank notes. He left Marlborough to go to Hungerford. I got up the next morning at seven o'clock to go by the Marlborough coach to Newbury. I cannot say whether he took any money at Hungerford. He met me at Newbury at one o'clock. We left Newbury at seven o'clock the next morning. At Newbury he took three one-pound notes and thirty shillings in silver, of a man who said he was a corn-cutter; he bought plat to the amount of four pounds ten shillings. He said his salve was sold at a shilling a box; he would allow my father three pence a box for selling it. He gave his direction, No. 1, Old-street. the corner of the City-road. I saw this corn cutter pay my father three one-pound bank notes, and thirty shillings in silver My father never marked the notes he took. I cannot speak to them. My father never gave a false name or address.

ELIZABETH SALTER . I keep the Antelope inn at Chippenham. The prisoner and his daughter were at my house on the 22nd of February; he was selling toys. I bought a toy of him; I had some dominos of him the next morning; I won them at a raffle. I changed him a ten pound note. I sent to the bank for change. We had a recruiting serjeant there.

JOHN WISEMAN . I live at 25. Accommodation-row, Kent-road On the 27th of February the prisoner slept at my house. I went with him the next day to enquire for the corn-cutter. We called at the public-house the corner of Old-street-road, in the City-road. We enquired of the publican for the corn-cutter; he sent us to a chaff-cutter, and then made a laugh of it.

DANIEL BRADLEY . I went with Mr. Hill by his desire to search for a man called a corn-doctor. We called at the public-house, No. 1, the corner of Old-street-road, in the City-road. They directed us to a chaff-cutter. We could not find him out.

WILLIAM CLARIDGE . I live at the Star, No. 1, in the City-road, the corner of Old-street-road. I remember two or three persons enquiring for a corn-cutter. I told them I knew no such person.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-60

746. JAMES SHELEY was indicted for that he, on the 5th of May , feloniously, and without lawful excuse had in his custody and possession a forged 1 l. bank note, he knowing it to be forged .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-61

747. WILLIAM HUGHES was indicted for that he, on the 17th June , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note, value 1 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with like intention, he knowing it be forged.

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating the forged instrument to be a promissory note for payment of money instead of a bank note.

GEORGE ROBERTS . Q. You lodge at Windsor-terrace in the City-road - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go on the 17th of June to John Hopgood 's lodging A. I did, in consequence of directions I received.

Q. From whom did you receive your directions - A. From Herbert, a person employed by the bank.

Q. Where were these lodgings - A. No. 14, Percival-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Who did you find there - A. Mrs. Hopgood, the wife of John Hopgood. The prisoner came in soon after I was there; on the prisoner coming in he was asked to sit down; Mrs. Hopgood said she was glad to see him; he said John was gone to purchase some things for me; meaning her husband. The prisoner then said he had just come from Birmingham, where he was able to get all sort of things; he produced a one-pound note; he said it was one of the things that he had brought with him. It purported to be a bank of England note; he shewed it to Mrs. Hopgood; on which I requested, I believe myself to look at it, and asked him if he had any objection to sell me one; to which he assented. I then paid him; he gave me that same note that I had seen.

Q. You had that note in your possession at the time, had not you - A. I don't think that I had it in my possession at the time; it was handed back again, and then given to him. I then asked Hughes to sell me one I believe; I had returned him that note, considering that note to be dirty, and not sufficiently clean; upon which I received another of him, that was a one-pound note; I put the note in my pocket, remained there some time, and came away.

Q. Did you do any thing with the note - A. I did not, except keeping it in my possession until the following morning, then I put the mark upon it the following morning.

Q. Are you sure that the note you put the mark upon the following morning was the note that the prisoner gave you - A. I am certain of it, because I ever had it out of my possession; I delivered that note up, into the hands of Mr. Westwood, the clerk in the solicitor of the Bank.

Q. When was it that you delivered it to Mr. Westwood - A. About twelve or one o'clock the day following.

Q. Look at this one-pound note, and say whether that is the one you received of the prisoner, and afterwards gave it, to Mr. Westwood - A. It is the same.

Q. I observe on it there is the prisoner's name, and Thursday, the 17th of June, 1813 - A. Yes, that is my writing.

MARY HOPGOOD . Q. On the 17th of June do you remember the last witness coming to your lodging - A. He came once when the prisoner, Hughes, was there; I remember Mr. Roberts produced a five-pound bad country note, and he asked thirty shillings for it.

Q. Do you remember Hughes producing any thing - A. I saw two bank notes that Hughes had; Hughes had a great many notes; a one-pound note was shewn between Roberts and Hughes; they handed it one to the other; I never had it in my possession.

Q. Did you see Hughes do any thing with that note - A. Nothing further than give it to Roberts; Roberts said here Mr. Hughes is the ten shillings. I did not see the money.

Q. Do you recollect before this took place any conversation about Birmingham - A. Hughes said he came from Birmingham; that is all that I heard.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. How long have you known Roberts at this time - A. A very short time.

Q. Perhaps you had seen more of the five-pound notes in his possession - A. Yes, several.

Q. He was a dealer in them five-pound notes - A. I am not sure.

Q. Had he ever told you that he had got rid of many of them - A. Yes, sir.

Q. He offered you one of these notes for thirty shillings - A. Yes.

Q. And you saw one or two bad notes produced by Hughes - A. Yes, I saw two.

Q. Therefore the ten shillings that passed would be the balance for one of these notes - A. I did not see the money; he said here is ten shillings. I did not see whether any notes passed between them; he did not say; I could not swear for they sent me out.

Q. Did not Hughes come there to enquire after one Blissard - A. Yes, I think he did.

Q. It is your husband who is in a distressful situation - A. It is.

Q. How many notes had Roberts of Hughes - A. I believe he had one.

COURT. Did Hughes take from Roberts a five-pound note - A. I think he did not, I am not certain.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner; Roberts was with him; I passed them several times before I apprehended him. I apprehended him in Gloucester-court, No. 13, Portman-square; I searched the prisoner; I found nothing on him; I got a coach and took him to the watchhouse. While I was in the the coach I asked him if he knew Roberts; he said d - n him, he wished he had never seen him; the first time he saw him was in Hopgood's room. He asked me if I had apprehended Hopgood; I told him I had, for the same offence.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of the Bank.

Q. Is that a genuine note or a forged one - A. It is a forged note; it is not from a plate used by the Bank of England, nor the paper, nor the water marks; it is forged throughout, in every respect.

(The note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Hopgood's house to enquire for Mr. Blissard; he rented a coach-house of me, in which he made a coal-shed; when I enquired for him Roberts was there; Roberts said it is no matter where he is, he is a d - d rogue. He produced these country notes; he asked me if I would purchase one of them; I told him if I was tired of my life, and when I was I should take up such things as them; I had bank notes in my pocket, good ones. He offered me one of the five-pound notes for thirty shillings; I told him I would not pick up such things if I saw then in the highway.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-62

748. JAMES GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a plated coffee-pot, value 2 l. a silver goblet-cup, value 2 l four tea-spoons, value 12 s. eleven silver table-spoons, value 5 l. three silver dessert-spoons, value 10 s. two dessert-forks, value 8 s. a salt-spoon, value 2 s. a plated waiter, value 1 l. a silver marrow-spoon, value 1 l. two waistcoats, value 2 l. a coat, value 3 l. a pair of drawers, value 5 s. and a hat, value 1 l. the property of Margaret Hunloke , widow , in her dwelling-house .

LADY HUNLOKE. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; early in May he offered himself as a servant to me, at my house in Saville-row, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . I received a certain character with him; he told me that he lived with a Mrs. Montague Jackson , at Brighton. I wrote a letter to her; I got an answer to my letter, which induced me to take him; he came into my service about the middle of May; he had almost a new dress of livery; besides that he had a new blue coat with gold lace button-holes on each side of the collar, and a new linen jacket; he had a dress livery as good as new, that he left; he took with him the new blue coat, two waistcoats, and also two new pair of breeches.

Q. I believe you had some friends to dine with you on Monday the 23rd - A. I had to dine, and sup; I had not a vast deal of plate; the knives and forks must be in use. On the 24th I was out to an evening party in Saville-row; I was disappointed of my friend calling for me; when I came home I called for my servant; he was not at home. I was determined to set up until he did come home; indeed I let him in myself. He had the new livery on. I told him that was the last time that the door should be opened to him. The prisoner quitted my service the next morning. I never saw him until after he was apprehended; he never applied to me for any wages.

Q. Does your ladyship know whether any of your plate was missing - A. I went and examined it, and found the articles missing in this charge.

Q. Are you competent to speak to the value of this property - A. No, I am not.

MARY HODGKINSON. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; he came to live in lady Hunloke's family about eight weeks ago.

Q. Had he an inventory of the plate delivered out to him - A. He had, a day or two after he came. I compared the plate to the list, and counted it out to him; I saw that it was right; he was to keep it in the plate cupboard, in his own room; it was all right when I delivered it to him.

Q. Was there a silver cup among the articles - A. - A. Two, four tea-spoons, two silver soup-ladles, twenty-five silver forks, six silver dessert-spoons, six silver dessert-forks, six dessert knives, seventeen table-spoons, a plate and waiter, one large waiter, one small, and a marrow-spoon

Q. Are you acquainted with these articles - A. Not particularly.

Q. When lady Hunloke had a party was the plate used on that occasion - A. I saw both the cups I am sure; I am not certain as to the others. I saw the plate in use; I did not make any particular observation.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being out late and coming home on the night of the 24th - A. Yes, he came home between two and three in the morning.

Q. Did he go to bed that night after coming home - A. That I do not know.

Q. He was not refused a Imittance - A. No. I heard what lady Hunloke said to him when he came in; she told him it was the last time he should come into the house; I expected to see him about in the morning, but he did not make his appearance; in the morning I went into his room myself about eleven o'clock.

Q. Did the bed appear as if any body had been laying in it - A. Yes. I looked at the plate-closet, the plate was intermixed one thing with another, it was all confusion.

Q. Did you compare it with the list - A. I did; after a time I think I went up stairs and I told her ladyship; she sn me for her nephew, Captain Digby; he came and we counted it; I counted the plate, and missed the articles in the indictment. The plated coffee-pot was missing, one silver goblet-cup, four tea-spoons, a soup-ladle, eleven table-spoons, were gone; one silver fork, two or three dessert-forks, and one salt-spoon was missing, and the small plated waiter was gone, and the marrow-spoon.

Q. Did you find lady Hunloke's livery missing - A. One of the new livery, not the dress livery.

Q. Was the plate that was left where it was his duty to keep it - A. It was; he never returned to lady Hunloke after the 25th any more.

Q. Did you find any apparel that he left - A. Yes, a coat, a waistcoat, an old pair of breeches, and an old shirt; I believe the clothes that he has on were left behind.

ANN WALKER . I am house maid to lady Hunloke. Mary Hodgkinson is lady's maid.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell when you say the plate in his custody - A. Yes, on Sunday.

Q. Did the prisoner come to lady Hunloke's after the 25th - A. No.

Q. Lady Hunloke's family consists of Mary Hodgkinson , yourself, and Jane Truman - A. Yes. I put my hand into the pocket of the coat that the prisoner left behind him. This is the paper that I found in his coat pocket.

JANE TRUMAN . I am cook in lady Hunloke's family.

Q. Had her ladyship most of her plate in use on the 23d - A. I cannot say; I had seen the plate in the prisoner's care, but not to notice it particular.

CHALES JEFEREYS . I am a constable of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner in Bermondsey-street, on the 9th of July; he had on this coat and waistcoat; the gold lace on the button holes has been taken off.

Q. to lady Hunloke. What is your livery - A. Blue and gold.

WILLIAM BADON . I am a taylor; I work for Mr. Wilson.

Q. Look at that coat and waistcoat, did you ever see it before - A Yes, I worked at it; that coat was made at Mr. Wilson's, he is a taylor, in lady Hunloke's employ; this coat was delivered at lady Hunloke's house; there were two gold lace holes upon the collar; the gold lace was taken off, now it looks a plain blue coat.

Q. to lady Hunloke. Look at that paper found in the prisoner's pocket, tell me if you know it - A. Yes, there is my own direction that I sent to Mrs. Montague Jackson; it is my own hand writing; it enveloped my letter that I sent.

Q. Lady Hunloke, can you ascertain the value of any one of these articles of plate - A. I gave five pounds for both the cups, they were my mother's; I bought them at the sale after my mother's death by weight, before the rise of silver; they are nearly of the same size it is some years ago.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not had time to bring my witnesses forward; her ladyship knows that I was not in a state to bring any thing away; I must leave myself entirely to your mercy. I went out of the house as soon as her ladyship told me she was provided with another servant, and her ladyship said the plate was not missed till the next day.

Lady Hunloke. The examination of the plate did take place the same morning; I went down myself, and examined the plate as soon as I was dressed.

Q. to Mrs. Hodgkinson. Do you know of any other person taking part of this plate - A. No.

Q. Have you any reason to suspect any other person - A. No.

Q. Did you take any part of it yourself - A. No.

Q. to Mrs. Walker. Have you any reason to think any other person took part of this plate - A. No.

Q. Did you take any part of it yourself - A. No.

Q. to Jane Truman . Have you any reason to suppose that any other person took part of this plate - A. No.

Q. Did you take any part of it - A. No.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18130714-63

749. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 16th of April , a clock, value 5 l. the property of Gideon Grisdale .

JOHN DUNN GARMSAY . I am a clock-maker , in the employ of Mr. Grisdale; I made the clock for Mr. Grisdale; he told me the clock was stolen out of the shop.

Q. Did you afterwards see the clock in the possession of the prisoner - A. No.

JAMES BLAND . I am a silversmith; I live in Norton Falgate. I bought the clock of the prisoner about four months ago; that clock was afterwards claimed to be Mr. Grisdale's property; I delivered it to Hewitt, the officer. I did not ask him how he came by it, nor he did not tell me.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer. I produce this clock; it was delivered to me by Mr. Bland; Mr. Garmsay saw the clock in Bland's window; I went and took the clock, and directed Bland to stop the prisoner if he ever saw him again. I know nothing more then finding the prisoner in custody.

John Garmsay . This clock is the property of Mr. Grisdale. Elizabeth Grisdale is too ill to attend.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-64

750. SARAH SPENCER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Valentine Costello , about the hour of five in the forenoon, on the 15th of July , he and others of his family being therein, and stealing therein a carpet, value 20 s. his property .

SARAH COSTELLO . I am the wife of Valentine Costello; my husband rents the house, No. 13, Archer-street, Windmill-street .

Q. Did you lose a carpet from the house any time - A. I did not miss it until the patrol alarmed me. About five o'clock in the morning the patrol informed me of the street door being open. My husband and I occupy the parlour only, the other rooms in the house are let to lodgers.

Q. Was your husband at home when the patrol gave you this alarm - A. Yes, he was, but not awake until I awoke him.

Q. Were you the last person up the night before - A. I was I left it on the spring-lock; the door was left unbolted; there is a small string goes through the door for the lodgers to let themselves in.

Q. Might not one of the lodgers come in and have the door open - A. It might happen so, but I do not know it. When the patrol gave me the alarm he had the prisoner in his possession. There had been no force at all used to the door.

Q. What part of the house did that carpet belong to - A. My own parlour; the carpet was taken up and moved in the yard, at the back of the house, to have it swept before I put it on the parlour again; no person could have got to the back yard without coming through the house.

- SAUNDERS. I stopped the prisoner; I had a suspicion that she had stolen the carpet. I first saw her in Archer-street, about a yard from Mrs. Costello's door. I brought her back, and knocked at the door. Mrs. Costello claimed the carpet as soon as she saw it. This is the carpet.

Prosecutrix. It is my carpet; it is worth twenty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the carpet and a shawl together in the street.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined 1 year in the house of Correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-65

751. ANN LACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a cloak, value 2 l. the property of Margaret Roach , in the dwelling-house of Daniel Mayer .

MARGARET ROACH . I am a widow woman: I live at No. 5, Steward's-rents, Drury-lane . I lodge in the same house with Daniel Mayer . I lost my cloak last Sunday week; it hung on a line in my room where I lodge. I was not at home at the time it was taken away. It was a black silk cloak, worth two pound. I have not seen it since. The prisoner was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to the house where I lodged.

Q. When was this woman taken up on suspicion of having taken this cloak - A. The same day I missed it I charged her with having taken my cloak. Daniel Mayer told her he saw her take it. The prisoner said she did not take the cloak. I lodge in the same room with Daniel Mayer and his wife.

DANIEL MAYER . On Sunday evening the prisoner came into my room. Mrs. Roach and my wife were out. Mrs. Roach's cloak was hanging on the line; I saw the prisoner take it. I thought Mrs. Roach had sent her for it. I said nothing to her. On the next day Mrs. Roach enquired for the cloak; I said Mrs. Lacey took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the cloak. She gave no more for the cloak than one shilling.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-66

752. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Susannah Clark , on the 13th of July , putting her in fear and taking from her person, a watch, value 3 l. her property .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of Peter Feeret .

SUSANNAH CLARK . I live in Angel-court, Nightingale-lane.

Q. On the 13th of July were you robbed of any thing - A. Yes, I was robbed of a watch. I had been in the Red Lion Nightingale-lane , and as I was coming home a quarter after twelve.

Q. Who was the man you went with to the Red Lion - A. A sailor, a stranger to me; he asked me to go in and have a drink of beer; the sailor 's name was Peter Feeret .

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he answered for the landlord in the house that I live in; he was well known to me; I paid him my rent.

Q. How long were you and this sailor drinking at this public-house - A. He went out about five minutes before me; I told him I would not be long.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was; I went out to go home; the prisoner asked me for the watch out of my bosom; he was in the public-house, and saw the sailor give it me; when he demanded the watch I asked him what he wanted with it. I said it did not belong to him; I would not give it him; the sailor

sailor gave it me for safety Feeret was rather in liquor.

Q. Were you going to his lodging - A. No, he was going to mine. I refused giving him the watch; the prisoner took hold of me and kicked me down in the kennel, and took the watch out of my bosom; then Mr. Turnbridge came up and took us both to the watchhouse. Mr. Turnbridge took the watch from the prisoner; he has kept it ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman robbed one of my lodgers. I took the watch from her to take care of it for him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-67

753. THOMAS SARGENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a saw, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Horberry .

THOMAS HORBERRY . I am a sawyer . My saw was taken away on the 7th of June; it was on the premises of Mr. Cave, Theobalds-road .

EDMUND CAVE . I am a carpenter. The saw was taken away on Whit-monday, the 7th of June; I saw the prisoner there; I saw the saw there ten minutes before the prisoner came into the yard.

EDMUND GIBBS . I am a servant. On Whit- Monday, the 7th of June, I was in Mr. Cave's yard; the prisoner came down, and asked me if the sawyers had been at work; I said, yes, they were breakfasting. The prisoner then said he supposed they were gone holiday keeping. I said I believed not, they would be there by-and-by; he then went into Mr. Cave's shop; the prisoner went in without any thing; he came out with a saw; he then came up to me and said if the sawyers come tell them I want saw to cut one cut down; he said he was at work at the corner of Red Lion-passage, in Ormond-street. That is all that past. I rather suspected it was not an honest thing. I saw no more of him until the owner of the saw apprehended him.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did this man work in Ormond-street - A. No; I understood he is a sawyer; he has not been at work for many years. The saw has never been found; from the description of the man I took him in custody.

Gibbs. I am sure he is the same man.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-68

754. WILLIAM STUART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a book, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of George Leigh and Samuel Southerly .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different persons.

MR. WHEATLEY. I am in the house of George Leigh and Samuel Southerly ; they are bookseller s in the Strand .

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him - A. Yes.

Q. Had Messrs Leigh and Southerly a sale on the 3rd of June last year - A. Yes, the prisoner attended that sale for about three months.

Q. Do you know his name - A. I do not. Immediately he purchased a lot he said; money; he was at this sale on the 30th of June.

Q. In consequence of something that arose, did you tell William Gibbs to watch the prisoner - A. I did; and in consequence of something that Gibbs told me I went to the prisoner, and told him he had got a book that was not his own; I took it out of his pocket; he then told me that he had bought it. I sent down to Mr. Leigh to know who had purchased it; I was answered that Mr. Prest had bought it for sixteen shillings; we immediately sent for an officer. The prisoner had bought two lots at the sale that day, one six-pence, and the other two shillings and six-pence.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a servant to Messrs. Leigh and Southerby. On the 30th of June, in consequence of instructions that I had received from Wheatley I watched the prisoner; he took this book off the shelf, put it under his catalogue, went and sat down upon a form, and then he put it into his pocket. I informed Mr. Wheatley what I had seen; Mr. Wheatley went up and spoke to the prisoner, and took the book out of his pocket. The prisoner said he had bought it, and he would pay for it. Mr. Wheatley called out who had bought it; I looked in the catalogue, and found that Mr. Prest had bought it.

MR. SOUTHERBY. I am a partner with Mr. Leigh. When Adkins, the officer, came, the prisoner said he had purchased the book, and wished to pay for It; I said that was not sufficient for me from what I had heard of my servant. The prisoner then was in the accompting-house; he offered twenty pounds, I think he said, rather than it should come public.

Prisoner's Defence. I attended different sales of books, where frequent opportunities offered to purchase at a quarter price they were published at. I had two objects; the first was to collect the prices at which the books sold; secondly, to purchase whaever books might be useful to me, and was offered at a low price; I held the book in question under my catalogue as a prop to write on.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-69

755. WILLIAM STUART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , fifteen books, value 5 l. the property of George Leigh and Samuel Southerby .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

HARRY ADKINS . I am a Bow-street officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner, Stuart, in custody on the 30th of June last; I accompanied him to his lodging in the Borough; on my way there I asked him what books he had at his lodging; he said a vast quatity; he said they were his own; he had purchased the greater part at Edinburgh, and part at the West end of the town and some at Saunders's, the auctioneer, in Fleet-street.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am in the house of Leigh and Southerby. I accompanied the officer to the

prisoner's lodgings, on the 30th of June. I, and Mr. Southerby selected the books in the prisoner's room; I selected most of them. I selected Drunken Barnaby's journal; it was in Dr Johnson's sale, which began on the 17th of June; that book was sold, but had not been delivered; Lewis's history of the translation of the Bible was also in Dr. Johnson's sale; it was sold to Mr. Ogle, but had not been delivered; Massey's Origin of Letters was in the Doctor's sale; I believe it was sold to Mr. Willoughby, but not delivered; Dr. Oakes's history, I missed that day it was to be sold; the grammer of seven languages, that book had not been sold; I remember it wanted a title, this was in Dr. Johnson's sale; also Whittaker's History of the Britons, that I do not speak to.

Q. Was there any that Mr. Southerby selected that you can speak to - A. I remember this book by it wanting four leaves; it is the art of wooing; it does not mention imperfect in the catalogue; Coleby's Cape of Good Hope, I know that; it is only one volume we have the other volume I left on the shelf, that was in Dr. Johnson's sale; Levi's Jewish ceremonies, I remember this book very well it was lost; and Granville on Witches had not been sold; I know all these books.

Q. Now look at Balaam's Ass - A. I know that by the coat of arms; that was in Dr. Gossack's sale; it was not sold.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-70

756. HENRY ROBINSON, alias MYERS , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Dame Caroline Briscoe , widow, about the hour of six in the forenoon of the 11th of July , and stealing therein three silver spoons, value 10 s. and one-knife, value 3 s. the property of Dame Caroline Briscoe ; a case, value 6 d. a pencil-case, value 18 d. a ring, value 3 s. a gold ear-ring, value 2 s. a pin, value 1 s. and two shillings in monies, the property of Elizabeth Miles .

LADY BRISCOE. Q. What is your Christian name - A. Caroline Alicia. I am a widow. I live at 40, Southampton-row, in the parish of St. George Bloomsbury ; the whole house is my own.

Q. Were you dwelling there the morning this affair happened - A. I was, and at home at that time.

HENRY CHAVE . I live in Southampton-row; I keep a hotel two doors from Lady Briscoe's house.

Q. What morning was it that you observed the prisoner and any other person - A. The morning of last Sunday week.

Q. What first drew your attention to them - A. Some conversation I heard in the street; I was induced to look out for my own safety; I saw several persons walking; I saw the prisoner there; another person was with him; they were talking under my window; they were watching about, walking backwards and forwards; I thought they were no good. I saw the person that was with the prisoner, he went and unlocked the gate, came under my window again, and the prisoner went very diligently and opened the area-gate; he went down the area-steps; I watched him close for about five minutes; I then put on my clothes, and down I went; I opened my door, and out I went to the person in company with the prisoner; I said what are you; he said he was calling the servant up. I said, I will soon see what you are about; he ran away; he was off in an instant; I went down Lady Briscoe's steps, and went into the kitchen. I hollooed out holloo, what are you, who are you; in about a minute I heard the prisoner running along the passage, over my head; I saw him coming out of the front door; I called out to the people coming along opposite, to stop him; I saw him running as fast as he could; he then crossed the way; I kept as close to him as possibly I could; I pursued him; he went into Southampton-court, that court leads into Queen-square; a man stopped him between the posts.

Q. What time in the morning was this - A. The time he stopped him was about twenty minutes after six. It was broad day light.

COURT. The sun arose before four, you had an opportunity of seeing him before he went into Lady Briscoe's house so as to see his person minutely - A. I had a particular view of him just as I might be looking at you.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him from the time he ran away until he was stopped - A. Yes, I lost sight of him about half a minute; there was no person intervening but the person that stopped him. I lost sight of him when he turned the conter. When I saw him I was sure he was the same person; I had been watching him a quarter an hour. I saw him searched; when I went down in the kitchen I saw some keys taken out of his pocket, thirty skeleton keys, and a small crow.

Q. When you went down in the kitchen tell us what you saw, and where - A. The kitchen was dark except at the door where he entered; I saw a knife and three silver tea-spoons laying on the dresser in the front kitchen close to the door.

WILLIAM HIND . I am a servant to Lady Briscoe.

Q. On the Saturday night before this robbery happened had you fastened up the house - A. Yes.

Q. Had you gone out that morning before this breaking in was effected - A. Yes, out of the kitchen door, and up the area steps, and out of the area gate. When I went out I locked both the doors after me. I went out just after the clock struck six.

Q. Look at the things, the spoons and the knife, whose property are they - A. Lady Briscoe's. The spoons are for the use of the servants in the kitchen; they were in the cook's care; Elizabeth Miles has the washing them up and the putting them away. I know the knife; that is lady Briscoe's.

ELIZABETH MILES . I am in Lady Briscoe's service.

Q. Look at these spoons; can you recollect they being in your hands the night before; that is, on the Saturday - A. Yes; I put them in the cupboard the night before, I suppose about seven o'clock after I had my tea. They were never taken out all that evening. That cupboard is never locked. The knife I believe was in the cupboard; I know the spoons were.

Q. Now look at the things in the little case, whose property are they - A. They belong to me. The case and the silver pencil case, a silver thimble, a good

MARY MALING . My husband's name is William Maling ; I live just by the Maypole side, in Barking, Essex. I come to London to sell poultry occasionally. On the 29th of July I was selling poultry in Whitechapel at the corner of Winfield-street.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner near you part of the time - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any thing to do with a gentleman of the name of Sims - A. Yes; I sold him sixteen chickens, and took two one-pound notes of him. I at that time had a one-pound note in my purse; that two pound made three. After I had dealt with Mr. Sims I put it into my bosom, and when I came to Petticoat-lane I had my purse in my bosom until I came to Winfield-street. Mr. Sims bought the Poultry at his house near Sun-tavern fields, and when I got to Winfield-street I sold two geese to a man; I took a one pound note of him; then I had four pounds. I took the purse out of my bosom, put the note in my purse, and put the purse into my pocket. After I had done so I saw the prisoner near me; I sold one chicken to a woman that keeps a green-stall. I put my hand into my pocket to take my purse out to put the shillings in; I missed my purse.

Q. Was the prisoner near you when you missed your purse - A. No; he was gone when I missed it. I judged the man that bought the two geese. I judged that he must know where my purse was.

Q. How soon was the prisoner taken after you missed your purse - A. About half an hour; he was brought into Winfield-street, where I was; he was searched; there was found upon him five one-pound notes; I had but four; they were altogether in his pocket.

Q. Have you sworn to the notes - A. No. Mr. Sims was sent for at the magistrate's.

Q. Are you quite sure that the note that you had of Mr. Sims was in your purse when your purse was taken away - A. Yes, and I put my purse safe into my pocket.

SIMON SOLOMON . I am an headborough of Whitechapel parish. I took the prisoner in Winfield-street, adjoining Petticoat-lane. I took him to a neighbour's house, and searched him along with the prosecutrix. I found five one-pound notes upon him. These are the notes; they are all one parcel, folded up just the same as they are now. Another man took the prisoner in hold for me.

Mr. Knapp, Q. to Prosecutrix. Had you charged any body else with taking the notes - A. I told the man that bought the geese it was likely he must see the purse, or know of the taking it. When I accused that man he went into a place where the men were gambling, and picked the boy out, and held him until the constable went and took him.

JACOB SIMS . I live in Sun-tavern fields. I am a rope-maker.

Q. Did you, on the morning of the 9th of July deal with the prosecutrix for any poultry - A. I did. I shall know a note again that I paid her. This is the note, 25960; that is one of the two notes that I paid her. I know that note by the date and the number, and my name is also on it.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Did you ever part with the notes that Mr. Sims paid you - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I took four of the five pound notes a week before. I took the fifth note of a gentleman that bought six pottles of strawberries of me. He gave me a one pound note; I gave him fourteen shillings change.

Q. to Solomon. Did the prisoner say to you how he got these notes - A. He said he found them.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-71

759. WILLIAM KEMP was indicted for feloniously assaulting Maria Turpie , in the King's highway, upon the 27th of June , putting her in fear, and taking from her person three shirts, value 1 l. three pocket handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. and a shawl, value 6 s. the property of Alexander Turpie .

MARIA TURPIE . I am eleven years old. My mother washes for my brother, James Turpie . On the 27th of June last I was going from my mother's with a bundle containing all the articles mentioned in the indictment to my brother, at Wrougham's, 161, New Bond-street.

Q. Did any body take the bundle away from you - A. Yes, the prisoner, at the top of Major Forlie's passage.

Q. Did you know him before - A. I had seen him before; I knew him by sight; I never spoke to him. He said, my little girl you are carrying a bundle to Mr. Wrougham's; I have just been up to your mother; give me the bundle, and you can run home. I said I must not leave it with anybody whatever; he said he would give me a shilling if I would let him have it. I told him I must take it myself; he then again said he would give me a shilling. I told him I wanted to see the young man; then he swore, and used threatening language. He knocked me down, took my bundle from me, and run away. I ran after him, hallooed out stop thief, and got close up to him. He said he would cut my throat if I did not hold my tongue. I ran after him until I was out of breath. I lost him at last.

Q. What time of the day or night was this - A. About half after eleven on Sunday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of it. I never saw the girl until she was brought to me at the office.

GEORGE BENNET . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. I searched his lodgings. I found a number of duplicates, but nothing that related to this charge.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-72

760. THOMAS BRIANT and FREDERICK HILDRITH were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Richard Champney , on the 9th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silk handkerchief, value 8 s three pound weight of cherries, value 1 s. one pound weight of strawberries, value 6 d. and twelve oranges, value 1 s. his property .

RICHARD CHAMPNEY . I work for Mr. Wilberforce,

in Kensington Moor. I live in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane. On the 9th of July, about half after ten, I was in Broad-street , in my way home from Kensington. I had some cherries, strawberries, and oranges in a silk handkerchief. The gardener had given me them. I was met by a female; she said I had a nice bundle. I kept on, and I felt the the bundle jirk out of my hand. I turned sharp round to seize the bundle, and these men made up to me; Briant struck me.

Q. Could you see when you turned round who took your bundle - A. Yes. I saw the woman had it; I made my way after the woman that had got my bundle, and after I had almost overtook her Briant gave me another blow. I put my hand out to take the woman; he gave me another blow. I collared him; then Hildrith came to trip me up; then after that I found that one of them had got hold of my neck. I called out for help; a watchman came up. When the watchman came up Hildrith was in company still.

Q. What countryman are you - A. I came from Jamaica.

Q. Had you no conversation with that girl at all - A. No.

WILLIAM KELLY . I am a watchman. On the night of the 9th I was in Broad-street; I heard the row; I heard a man call watch. I went up. I said, what is the matter with you. He gave me charge of Briant: he made no charge against any body else. Hildrith was close to Briant and Champney. He said, watchman, let that man go, he has done nothing. Hildrith followed to the watchhouse of his own accord.

Briant's Defence. I did not lay my hand upon the prosecutor at all.

Hildrith's Defence. I did not see Briant strike the prosecutor at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-73

761. THOMAS WOODS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of June , a mare, value 5 l. a cart, value 3 l. a cart harness, value 10 s. three casks, value 1 l. an apron, value 6 d. and one peck of pease, value 10 d. the property of William Bates .

WILLIAM BATES . I am a dealear in yeast . I live in Hewitt's-court, Mutton-lane, Mile-end.

Q. Did you at any time lose a horse and cart, and cart harness - A. Yes, on the 22nd of June. It was a mare that was in the cart.

Q. Where was the horse and cart at the time it was stolen - A. Standing in Chiswell-street, Moorfields . About half after three I left the mare and the cart, and went to talk with a brother of mine at Whitbread's brewhouse.

Q. How long did you stay with your brother - A. Not long. I came out, and perceived that the mare and the cart were gone.

Q. What was there in the cart - A. Three casks, the apron with a peck of peas in it. They were empty casks that I had brought for yeast. The two casks that I lost were worth about one pound, the cart and harness three pound ten shillings, my apron sixpence, and the peck of peas ten pence. The mare was worth five pound: she was old, but in good condition.

Q. Did you ever see the mare, cart, and harness again - A. Yes, on the next evening I saw the mare and one cask in the cart. I think it was about half past eight. I saw it in Mile-end-road. There were two men in the cart, driving it with reins.

Q. On the 22nd of June, the day the cart was taken away from Chiswell-street, do you recollect seeing the prisoner that day - A. No, I did not; he was a perfect stranger to me.

Q. Who were these two men in the cart, was the prisoner either of them - A. No. My neighbour went on and stopped the cart, in consequence of seeing my cart going along. They said that somebody had it at St. Giles's. These two men brought me back my cart. It was the same mare that had been taken away my apron and peas, and two casks were gone.

Q. Then of your own knowledge you do not know any thing that leads you to say the prisoner was the man that took it - A. I do not know any thing of the prisoner taking it. It was the same mare.

EDWARD SKINNER . I am an ostler at the Maidenhead inn, George-street, Bloomsbury. The prisoner brought me the mare in on the 22nd.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No, I never saw him before. I am quite sure of his person. The prisoner came in with the mare and the cart between six and seven in the evening; he asked me if I would take the horse in. It was a mare in the cart.

Q. What was there in the cart - A. One cask in the cart.

Q. Did you see any green pease in the cart or any apron - A. No. He asked me if I would take the mare. I took it in, the same as I would any other horse. I took in the mare, and he went away. He never came near it until the next morning about six o'clock. The cart was left in the yard, and the cask. I am sure the same man returned in the morning as he came in on the evening with the mare. He brought another man with him in the morning. In the evening he was by himself.

Q. Who paid for what the mare had - A. The prisoner that brought her in.

Q. Did the prisoner act in all respects as the owner of the mare and the cart - A. Yes; he told me that he had given ten pounds for the mare and cart. He asked me what he had to pay for the mare's keep; I told him eighteen-pence; he paid me; he and the man went out of the yard with the mare and the cart; they both went away together.

Q. When was it that you saw him again - A. He came again twice towards the evening; he said he had lost his horse and cart; he came to know whether the other man had brought it back again, and he came again the next day.

Q. Had you heard that this had been a stolen horse and cart - A. No; I never heard it until afterwards. He came again the third day to know whether I had seen any thing about the horse and cart.

Q. I suppose the prisoner was a stranger to you - A. Yes; I had never seen him before to my knowledge.

ring, and two shillings in silver I left in the dresser drawer the over night.

Mr. Chave. I saw the knife and three tea-spoons, and that case on the dresser.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I was coming through Southampton-court; I saw the pursuit, and I stopped the prisoner at the posts.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner. I found these skeleton keys about the prisoner, thirty-three skeleton keys and a small crow.

Q. to Mrs. Miles. What is the value of these tea-spoons - A. They are worth a shilling a piece.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-74

757. PETER HUSSEY was indicted for that he, on the 28th of May , feloniously did personate and falsely assume the name and character of John Ring , a soldier and person in the army, entitled to certain prize money, to wit 6 l. 8 s. 9 d. for services done in a certain conjunct expedition of his Majesty's army and naval forces, the said being due to the said John Ring , with intent to defraud his Majesty .

AND SEVERAL COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOSEPH EDWARD BUTTS . Q. You are an officer in the Muster office of the Commissary General - A. I am.

Q. Have you got the Muster roll for July and August, 1809, of the 68th regiment - A. Yes.

Q. Was that regiment in the expedition at Walcheren - A. It was. There was serjeant John Ring in Captain George Denham 's company.

Q. Have you any other serjeant John Ring belonging to that regiment - A. No other, nor any other soldier of that name. There is a Peter Hussey , a private in the same company with Ring.

WILLIAM HENRY SPICER . Q. I believe, sir, you are the deputy treasurer of Chelsea hospital - A. I am.

Q. Who are the treasurers - A. The right-honorable Charles Long , and the right-honorable Charles Henry Somersett .

Q. Is that a list delivered to you by the agent of the regiment - A. By the prize agent, Colonel Carey. It is a list that is properly authenticated and verified.

Q. Is that a list upon which you receive and pay prize money - A. It is.

Q. Does it appear by that list whether any prize money was due to serjeant John Ring , of that regiment - A. There is six pounds eight shillings and nine pence due to serjeant John Ring, of that regiment.

RICHARD DOWNHAM . Q. I believe you are the chief clerk of the deputy treasurer of Chelsea hospital - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the 25th of May last, seeing the prisoner come to you at Chelsea - A. Yes, he is the same person.

Q. to Colonel Spicer. Were you present at that expedition - A. I was.

Q. It was a conjunct expedition of army and navy, was it sir - A. It was.

Q. Was six pound eight shillings and nine pence due to Ring for service done by that conjunct expedition - A. It was.

Q. Did you know the man, Ring, or not - A. I did not.

Q. Would that list contain an account of every man in the regiment at the time the regiment was on the expedition, or would it contain those who survived the expedition - A It contains the whole.

Q. It would contain the names of the men who were killed in the service - A. Certainly. There are returns made of those who survive, and who not.

Q. to Mr. Butts. Look at the Muster roll after the expedition - A. John Ring appears to be reduced to a private in Captain Anderson's company. I have traced him through all the Muster rolls to see whether he is the same person or not.

Q. Have you got the Muster roll after the expedition; the first Muster roll, in respect of which the prize money was due - A. I have, September, 1809. This note is dated on board the Nile. John Ring was then belonging to Captain Denham's company.

Q. to Captain Downham. Tell us what passed between you and the prisoner at Chelsea - A. On the 25th of May the prisoner came to my office to enquire about his prize money. I asked him his name; he told me his name was John Ring , a serjeant in the 68th regiment of foot. He said, before he left England he left an order for his wife to receive it; he wished to know if she had received it. I was at that time very busy; I desired him to call on the Friday, the next pay day.

Q. How was he dressed that day - A. In a green jacket; the uniform, as I judged, like the 95th.

Q. Did you say any thing about his dress - A. I will not be certain whether it was on that day or the 28th. I believe nothing more particular passed on that day. I saw him again on Friday the 28th; I asked him if he was come to claim his prize money; he said, yes; he produced a certificate. From the manner the certificate was wrote I suspected it was not genuine. I looked into the prize list; I found serjeant John Ring's entry for payment. I looked into the prize list to see if I could find Captain George M'Coy , as the signature was signed, and I likewise looked into the army list; I could not find any such thing at all. I asked him how he came by that certificate; he said he got it at the Northumberland coffee-house. I asked him whether he saw Captain George M'Coy ; he said, no. How did you come by that certificate? He said the Captain's servant brought it to him from his master. I at that time found myself a little embarrassed by the man's behaviour. I gave him the certificate back, and desired him to bring the servant. He went, and returned in about an hour, or an hour and a half, and produced this paper document.

Q. This paper appears to be a letter signed M'Coy, not a certificate from Captain M'Coy that he gave to you - A. That he gave to me. It is addressed to the chief clerk at the office, Chelsea hospital, Charing-cross, May 28th 1813.

"Sir, I hope you will excuse me for disappointing

the man; it is on account of my being ill; I cannot perform every thing to my wish; but the said John Ring 's certificate is wrong altogether It was my servant drew it out, and signed it, on account of the man troubling here so often. I hope you will not blame the man. I am, sir, WILLIAM M'Coy , Captain of the 68th regiment."

"This is to certify, that serjeant John Ring , of the 68th regiment, was at the capture of Walcheren, and is entitled to the prize money. Given under my hand; signed, William M'Coy, his mark, Captain of the 68th regiment."

Q. Upon his bringing you that did you have any conversation with the prisoner - A, I told him I was surprised, and that he was doing himself a great injury. I suspected him, and had him taken in custody afterwards. I went to Queen-square office.

COURT. After he brought you his letter when did you see him again - A. I never saw him after until he was brought to the office.

Q. When was he taken - A. A serjeant was sent down to the Tower, and he was taken in custody. He was not taken in custody at Chelsea hospital. He was brought to the office in some little time after.

Prisoner. When I went first I asked whether serjeant Ring's wife had received his prize money; he asked me what I wanted to know for; I said, a person sent me there.

COURT, Q. to Mr. Downham. When he went there first did he say his name was John Ring - A. Most assuredly. He said, I have given my wife an order to receive my prize money.

JOSEPH PARKER . Q. Are you a private in the 68th regiment - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose that is the uniform of the regiment that you have on - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at Walcheren - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know serjeant John Ring - A. I do, very well.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he was a private in the same company with serjeant Ring.

Q. Is he serjeant John Ring - A. He is not; his name is Peter Hussey . That is the name he passed by in the regiment as a private soldier.

Prisoner. Does Parker know any thing bad of me.

Parker. No, a very good character indeed, and a very good soldier.

COURT. Was his character for honesty in the regiment good - A. It was.

GEORGE ANDERSON . I am a private in the 68th regiment.

Q. Do you know serjeant John Ring - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Is that the prisoner - A. No, it is not. I know the prisoner.

Q. Were you at Walcheren - A. No, I was not. I have been in the regiment two years. The prisoner was considered in Spain a good and honest soldier.

COURT, Q. to Mr. Spicer. Can you tell me whether Peter Hussey 's prize money has been paid - A. It was in October, 1812.

Q. to Mr. Parker. You say you were at Walcheren, was John John Ring there - A. Yes, and so was the prisoner. They were both at the taking of Flushing.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I was taken in entirely altogether by a man that came to me at the Tower; he stated himself to be an old soldier of the regiment; he asked me some names, whether I knew them. He asked me of serjeant Ring, whether I knew him. After that, he met me again in about eight days; he told me on Tuesday to draw this prize money. We were drinking together; he told me if they asked me any questions, to say I was the man, and to ask if serjeant Ring's wife had drew this money. When he asked me was I the man, I said yes. He then told me to come another day. I went back and told the man; he asked me which day I should go again; I told him I was ordered on the Friday. I gave him the certificate back. On the Friday following I was going up to Chelsea with two letters; one for the serjeant-major, and the other for the quarter-master-serjeant at the depot, Chelsea. This man laid his head down on the table; he said he had been up the night before; he told me I might do his business as well as himself. He handed me the certificate. I went and told them that I had come for John Ring 's prize money. He asked me if there was a George M'Coy in the regiment. I said no. I told him what the man told me. I told him there was a William M'Coy, whom he thought was in town, and lived at the Cumberland coffee-house; he told me to bring the servant that gave me this certificate. I went back to the man at Charing-cross, and told him what this gentleman said. He said, do you go presently and say Mr. M'Coy is at the coffee-house; he gave me this letter with the certificate: he said that would get the money, and he would give me a drink out of it. He said they would not ask any questions when they saw this. I gave the letter to the gentleman, not knowing what was in it; he kept the letter; he said it was a defraud between me and the servant, or somebody else; he told me to go away, and come another day. I went off, and went to the Tower barracks. In the evening a serjeant ordered me out of the ranks, and ordered me up to Chelsea.

COURT, Q. to Mr. Downham. Do you remember asking him whether there was a M'Coy in the regiment - A. I asked him whether there was a Captain George M'Coy, in the regiment; he said, yes.

Prisoner. I did not; I said there was a William Coy in the regiment. I am quite innocent of this. This man brought me into it.

COURT, Q. to Mr. Downham. Did he or not either on Tuesday or Friday undeceive you, and tell you that he was not John Ring - A. I understood from every word he said that he was serjeant John Ring , positively.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of his good character and service .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130714-75

758. DAVID JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , from the person of Mary the wife of William Maling , four 1 l. bank notes, his property .

Q. Did you see him again before he was in custody - A. I never saw him afterwards until he was taken up, that was a day or two after I saw him in custody for stealing the mare and the cart.

Q. Were you quite sure then that he was the same person that brought the mare and the cart to the stable to you - A. Yes; the officer brought him down to me; he owned to me that he was the same man.

Q. You knew him, and he owned that he had been in your yard with the horse and cart - A. Yes, he owned that he was there.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in George-street, St. Giles's. I told him for what I had taking him; I asked him what he had done with the horse and cart; he said he did not know where it was; the man that he had with him had drove it away. I asked him how he came to drive the man's cart and horse away; he said he was afraid he had made a bad job of it; he had taken it, and he did it through distress. I asked him if he had any friends; he said he had, but they all turned their backs upon him, and he did not care how soon he was hung.

Q. In what manner did he say this to you, did he appear to be perfect in his senses - A. He did; he appeared to be perfectly in his right senses when he was apprehended, but when he came before the magistrate he acted as he does here. The magistrates were loath to commit him until they had seen his brother, and had an interview with his wife.

Q. to Prosecutor. I suppose you have kept your mare and cart ever since it was restored to you - A. Yes; I have not brought it here. The same cart and mare was restored to me that was taken away; I took it to the office in Whitechapel.

Q. to Skinner. Was the mare and cart that you saw at the office the same that was brought to your yard by the prisoner - A. Yes, the same.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-76

762. SAMUEL PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , two shirts, value 10 s. the property of Ann Philpot .

ANN TANNS . I am neice to Ann Philpot; she lives at the village of Hampstead ; she is a laundress .

Q. Had you any linen put out to dry upon your premises - A. Yes, two shirts among the rest, they were out on the common to dry, at no great distance from our door; we missed them on the 7th of July, between eleven and twelve. Sarah Cook gave the alarm, and I saw the two shirts taken from the prisoner.

SARAH COOK . On the 7th of July, I saw the prisoner take two shirts off Mrs. Philpot's line, he put them in a blue bag, he ran away with them; then I gave the alarm; he was pursued and stopped, and then the two shirts were taken from his bag.

BENJAMIN HARRISON . I live at the Castle. I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running. I ran after him, and took the two shirts out of his blue bag; I gave him in charge of the constable.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner; he said he was starving to death; he had not a bit to eat all day, and that was the reason of his taking them. I produce the two shirts.

Ann Tanns. They are my aunt's property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-77

763. JULIANA RANKLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 14 s. a pair of ear-rings, value 4 s. a coat, value 10 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s. a shirt, value 5 s. two jackets, value 13 s. two bed-curtains, value 2 s. two shifts, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a bible, value 1 s. the property of William Potter .

SARAH POTTER . I am the wife of William Potter ; I live at 16, Osborne-place, Brick-lane, in Whitechapel parish ; my husband rents the whole house.

Q. How long have you known this little girl - A. Her mother took a room, and has lodged in my house since the 6th of May last; she brought this child and two more younger children with her.

Q. Do you know the age of that girl - A. Her mother says eleven.

Q. When was it that you missed any thing from your house - A. On the 25th of June, in the evening. I had been out to work, and when I came home I missed the things.

Q. I suppose they might be taken at different times - A. They were, by the duplicates. When I came home on the 26th I missed a shift, and a dirty gown from the clothes-bag.

Q. Did you miss a pair of silver sugar-tongs - A. Yes, they are worth fourteen shillings, and a coat of my husband's, a shirt, two shifts, two bed-curtains, a pair of stockings, and a bible; I am quite sure that they were in my house at the time the lodgings was taken.

Q. Had the child a father - A. The father was at sea.

Q. What induced you to charge this girl with taking them - A. There was nobody in the house but the girl and her mother; I have seen my things since at the pawnbroker's.

THOMAS PETTO . I am a servant to Mr. Killingsworth, pawnbroker, 200, Brick-lane. On the 16th of June the prisoner pledged a shirt, and on the 18th of June I received another shirt of her. I am quite sure it is the girl at the bar; she said she brought them from her mother; they were pawned in the the name of Taylor. She pawned all the articles I produced.

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-78

764. JEREMIAH SULLIVAN was indicted for

feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July a leg of mutton, value 6 s. the property of William Palmer , privately in his shop .

MARY PALMER . I am the wife of William Palmer . No. 9, Coppice-row, Clerkenwell, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell . On the 16th of July I had just turned my back to the shop; I was going into the yard to the butt of water; I heard the witness, Brookbank, call out, have you sold a leg of mutton; I returned into the shop and saw the leg of mutton was gone; I asked him to run after the man; the prisoner was brought back in less than ten minutes with the leg of mutton under his arm. That was my leg of mutton: the leg of mutton is disposed off by order of the magistrate, as it was an article that would not keep.

JOHN BROOKBANK . I live at No. 4, Coppice-row, opposite of the butcher's shop. On the 16th of July, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with a leg of mutton; he put it under his coat; I immediately went over the way and enquired of Mrs. Palmer if she had sold it, and in consequence of what she told me I pursued the prisoner, I stopped him at the top of Saffron-hill; I told him he had taken a leg of mutton; he came back with me to Mrs. Palmer's shop. The leg of mutton was claimed Mrs. Palmer.

Prosecutrix. It was a very fine leg of mutton.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Publickly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-79

765. MARY MALONEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a coat, value 3 l. the property of James Bartlett .

JAMES BARTLETT . I live at 23, Ridinghouse-lane, Cavendish-square; I am a lodger; I am a taylor .

Q. Did you lose a coat in June last - A. On the 17th of June between eleven and twelve in the forenoon, I sent the coat with a little girl of eight years of age to take to a customer, No. 12, Mount-street, Barkley-square, and after my child was stopped by a woman. I was sent for to go to a public-house in Grovesnor-mews; from there I went to Marlborough-street office; I there saw my coat, and the prisoner in custody. I am quite sure it was the same coat that I had sent out by my daughter; the coat was worth three pounds sixteen shillings to me.

JOHN WATKINS . I am a plane-maker. On the 17th of June, between eleven and twelve, I was passing along David-street , I heard the child Mary Bartlett cry; I immediately turned back, and enquired the cause. In consequence of what Mary Bartlett told me I pursued after the prisoner in the direction that the child pointed, and after some search I found her in a public-house in Grovesnor-mews; she there had the coat with her; I told her that she had robbed the child of that coat; she said she had done a bad job. I sent for an officer, and she was taken to the police office. The coat was claimed at the office by the child's father.

RICHARD BARCLAY . I am an officer. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I saw the little girl at the public-house. This is the coat I took from the prisoner; the child said it was her father's coat.

MARY BARTLETT . On Friday, the 17th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was carrying the coat to Mount-street, the prisoner spoke to me and asked me if I was in an hurry; I told her yes. The coat was done up in that handkerchief. She asked me to carry her bundle, done up in a towel round the corner to a butcher's shop in Grovesnor-street; I took the bundle of her: I was to tell them that Mrs. Johnson would call to-morrow. She asked me then for my bundle; I told her I could not spare it. She said upon her word and honor, she would not go away; I gave her the bundle; I turned round and saw the prisoner running away: I hallooed out. I could not overtake her; I told Mr. Watkins what had happened; Mr. Watkins pursued her. I stopped at the corner of Mount-street; he sent a boy for me; I went to the public-house, and saw the very same woman that run away with my coat. I told Mr. Watkins that was the same woman that run away with my coat; my father afterwards came and claimed the coat.

Barclay. This is the coat, and this is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my coat; I made it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the child in my life, until I saw her in Marlborough-street office; I met a young woman in Grovesnor-square, she took me to this public-house; she saw these men coming in, she gave me the coat in the handkerchief, and ran out at the back door; I stood there, I had not sat down.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-80

766. MARY COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , three yards of cloth, value 6 s. a gown, value 5 s. and a handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of John Ellington .

SUSAN ELLINGTON . I keep a house in Newton-street, Holborn ; my husband's name is John Ellington .

Q. Did you at any time lose three yards of cloth, a gown, and an handkerchief - A. Yes, on Friday, the 30th of June; I had seen them in the parlour at eleven o'clock at night, and the next morning at seven o'clock they were gone. The prisoner worked for a lodger in my one pair of stairs; the prisoner told me that she slept on the stairs all night, and that she went out in the morning.

Q. How long after these things were missed was this woman taken up - A. Three days after. The linen cloth is worth six shillings, the gown five shillings, and the handkerchief eighteen-pence; they are all here in the officer's custody. They were taken from my room.

JAMES JOSEPH JONES . I am a pawnbroker; I live at Mr. Benten's Holborn. I produce a gown pawned with me on the 3rd of June.

HUGH ORDIN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in my own house; I keep a chandler's shop. The prisoner came into my shop; I took her

for Mrs. Ellington's robbery; she said she destroyed the duplicates; she told me where she had pledged the articles. I found at Mr. Lamb's the linen cloth, and the shawl at Mr. Liegh's.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress when I took them.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-81

767. JOSEPH NEWTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a flask of salad oil, value 3 s. the property of Mark Taylor .

MARK TAYLOR . I live in Whitechapel-road ; I am an oil-man . On the 25th of June, about half after seven o'clock, I was behind the counter; the prisoner came in the shop; he asked me for a pennyworth of tobacco; I told him I would let him have half an ounce, that was five farthings. I served him with the tobacco. This flask of oil was within his reach; I saw him take something from where the oil stood, and on my coming round the counter I missed the flask of oil. I took the prisoner within ten yards of the door, with the flask of oil under his coat. This is the flask of oil; it is mine; I had seen it two minutes before the prisoner came in, and I missed it as he turned out.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the flask of oil in the road.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Publickly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-82

768. WILLIAM GRIERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , two saws, value 9 s. three planes, value 6 s. a screw-driver, value 6 d. an oil-stone, value 18 d. six chissels, value 6 s. a stock, value 7 s. a basket, value 1 s. and a jacket, value 2 s. the property of William Moore ; three planes, value 5 s. two saws, value 4 s. six chissels, value 4 s. a stock, value 7 s. and a basket, value 1 s. the property of Edmund Burgess .

(The prisoner being a deaf and dumb man was allowed an interpreter.)

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a carpenter . I left my tools in the new building at the corner of the Haymarket, in Piccadilly . On the 15th of June we went to dinner at twelve o'clock, and left the plumber and his labourer in the building; a little before one a person came to us, saying, that a person had broken in, and the man was detained; we went back, and saw the prisoner detained, and the tools were laying in different directions in the room, and one basket was packed up entirely; the tools were my property and Burgess's. The prisoner is a carpenter, and a very good workman.

THOMAS COMBER . I am a plumber's labourer. Me and my partner were at work in the building, in the two pair back-room about half past two o'clock. I had to go down to the back kitchen; we had a fire there; we were making a joint to a leaden pipe; I was going down the kitchen stairs; I heard a rustling noise in the shop, I cast my head round; I saw the prisoner with a basket, and one or two saws; he threw the basket down with the tools, and pushed by me, making a queer sort of noise. He endeavoured to escape along the passage; I called to him to know who he was; he made no answer. I followed him; he got through the place where the board was loose, that he had come in at; I catched hold of him by the skirt of his coat, and the board being on the swing struck me on the head; the prisoner did that, which made me leave my hold; I followed immediately afterwards, and secured him; I never lost sight of him; he went only to the next door the wine-vaults. This is the basket he had.

Moore. These are my tools.

Burgess. These are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little in liquor; I went in the place, looked at the tools, but did not take any thing away; the man came and took hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-83

769. MARY M'CABE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , a hat, value 5 s. two blankets, value 6 s. two shirts, value 6 s. a pair of breeches, value 9 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of John Green .

ELEANOR GREEN , the prosecutrix, was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-84

770. ELIZABETH KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a gown, value 2 s. and a child's hat value 4 s. the property of Anthony Grainger .

ANN GRAINGER . My husband's name is Anthony Grainger ; he is at sea ; I go out to washing. On the 9th of June, I went out to my work at six o'clock. The prisoner robbed me of my gown; I took the prisoner to take care of my family while I went out to work; I returned home at one o'clock; I missed the prisoner out of my room, and I missed my gown at night; when I came home the prisoner was there; I asked her where my gown was; she told me that she had left it at a person's place for sixpence. She told the officer what she had done with it afterwards; the child's hat she asked me to take to her sister to have it done up; I have never seen it from that time to this.

- CAVILLIER. I am an officer. On the 9th of June, I took the prisoner into custody. I asked her what she had done with the gown; she said she had pawned it at Mr. Thimbleby's for eighteen-pence, in the name of Davis. I went to the pawnbroker, and there I found it. Mrs. Grainger saw the gown before the magistrate.

Q. to Prosecutrix. The gown that you saw at the magistrate's, is that yours - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of pledging things for her, and she has pledged my things; I told her I had left the gown for eighteen-pence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-85

771. WILLIAM GOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , three shillings and two sixpences , the property of John Gray .

MARY MASSEY . I live with my brother-in-law, as horsekeeper; he is a porkman , 105, Drury-lane ; his name is John Gray .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is employed in carrying newspapers . On the 15th of June, about four o'clock, the prisoner entered my brother's shop; I was in the back parlour; I cast my head round; I saw the prisoner behind the counter. When the prisoner saw me he ran away. I stopped him going out of the door. I saw him throw down three shillings and two sixpences. I had seen his hand in the till.

- ALEXANDER. I was coming by at the time; I saw the struggling at the door; the prosecutrix asked me to assist her; I did, and afterwards the prisoner threw the money down. I picked up two shillings and two sixpences.

CHARLES WHITFIELD . I live with Mr. Gray. I picked up one shilling. I saw the struggling at the door.

Q. Where is the shilling - A. It was put in the till again.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw any of the money at all.

Q. Did you take it without looking at it - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-86

772. ELIZABETH WHITE, alias CARTER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a muff, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 2 s. and two quilts, value 4 s. the property of William Wilson .

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a printer ; I live at No. 4, Greville-street, Hatton Garden .

JANE WILSON . I am the wife of William Wilson . I lost my muff, counterpane, and quilt on the 9th of July, about six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Did the prisoner live in your house - A. No. I was coming out of the parlour; I met the prisoner; I stopped her; she had the articles on her arm. I rang the bell; Mr. Wilson came down.

Prosecutor. I know nothing more than being called down, and seeing the prisoner standing in the passage with the property. I sent for an officer immediately.

JEREMIAH MAWMAN . I am a constable. I produce the property.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to enquire for a person; as I was coming down the lady stopped me. I never saw the things. I found I was in the wrong house. I never had the things in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-87

773. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a pair of boots, value 4 s. the property of Benjamin Hanson .

BENJAMIN HANSON . I live at Woodford . I lost my boots on the 20th of June, from my house; they were stopped by the patrol.

- EVERTON. I am a patrol. On Saturday, the 19th of June, near twelve at night, I met William Mitchell in Lee-bridge-road, near Clapton, with a bottle of cream in his hand, a bag at his back, and a pair of boots hanging to it in the front. I asked him what he had got; he said a pair of boots and some grub. He said he had a brother lived at Woodford; he gave it to him. He put the bag down; I found there was no grub in it; there was a pair of boots and about a pound of butter fresh from the churn, not made up, three cabbages, some beef, mutton, and bacon, some cheese and some dripping. The constable went down to Woodford, and found where it came from.

MR. GARVER. I am a constable of Hackney. Between twelve and one o'clock on Sunday morning, the 20th, the patrol brought the prisoner to the watch-house, and the things that he has described. The prisoner first said his brother gave them him, and afterwards he said it was his wife; she lived with Mr. Inglish, in Snakes-lane. I went down in the evening and saw his wife; she said she gave him all the things the bag contained, and that they were given to her.

Prosecutor. I have every reason to believe the prisoner's wife gave them to him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-88

774. THOMAS MOULDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , two bushels of coals, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Farmery .

THOMAS FARMERY . I am a coal-merchant ; I live at Clapton, Hackney. I only know that I lost the coals out of my barge at Old Ford wharf .

MR. GARVER. I am a constable. On the 15th of June, Mr. Wright, the proprietor of the wharf, informed me that some coals had been taken from Mr. Farmery's barge. I apprehended the prisoner, and took him to the office.

Q. You do not know that he took these coals, do you - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-89

775. MARY CURWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , a sheet, value 1 s. and an umbrella, value 2 s. the property of Ann Mackley , widow .

ANN MACKLEY . I am a widow. I took the prisoner in as a lodger; I went out for some bread, and left the prisoner in the house. I missed the sheet and umbrella when I was going to bed. The prisoner owned that she took it.

MARTHA THOMPSON . I bought this umbrella and sheet of the prisoner; I gave her three shillings for them.

Prosecutrix. The sheet and umbrella are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It was extreme distress that made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-90

776. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a pair of shoes,

value 7 s. the property of Thomas Doyle , privately in his shop .

THOMAS DOYLE . I am a shoemaker ; I live at No 1, Henry-street, Gray's-inn-lane . The prisoner and another man went by my door, and stole a pair of shoes. The shoes were hanging at the door post, withinside of the shop.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. Two o'clock in the day.

Q. How do you know that he took them - A. I am well aware that he took them, because he and the other person run; I pursued him, and by the assistance of a guardian of the night he was taken to the watchhouse. The shoes were taken from him by the beadle of the watchhouse. I pursued him directly the goods were gone; I saw him run away.

Q. Did you see them taken away - A. Yes; I did not exactly see them taken away, but seeing the man run I came out and pursued him. They snatched the goods, and away they run. I cannot say exactly whether the prisoner stole the shoes or the other.

Q. At the watchhouse did you see the shoes drop from the prisoner - A. Yes. They were new shoes. I think it was the other man in the smock frock that stole the shoes, but the prisoner was in his company.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 45,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 6 d. only .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , find 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-91

777. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , one auger, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Langley .

EDWARD LANGLEY . I am a plumbers turner ; the prisoner worked for me; he came into my employ the beginning of last September; since then I was frequently losing tools. I remonstrated with him on the impropriety; he denied taking any; and he being an old man I did not like to prosecute him. On the 24th of June I and Kennedy, the officer, went to his lodgings; I looked about his place; I found this anger. The prisoner was very saucy; he told me I had better look in the cupboard, I should find more. This is the augur; I am sure it is mine; I never lent it him.

JAMES KENNEDY . I accompanied Mr. Langley to the prisoner's house in Hackney-road. Mr. Langley saw this hanging up. I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Langley lent me the auger to bore three or four holes; I did not return it.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-92

778. CORNELIUS CAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a wooden sign, value 1 l. the property of William Pugh .

WILLIAM PUGH . I keep the Bell at Hendon . I lost my sign from the 27th to the 27th I saw it on the 29th, and on the 29th I missed it.

SAMUEL READING . I am a patrol of the parish of Hackey. On the 27th of June I stopped the prisoner in Back-lane, Clapton, between five and six in the morning; he had a wooden sign of a bunch of grapes in his hand, and some other articles, which turned out to be his own. I asked him what he had there; he said they were all his own, except the wooden sign, and that he picked up in an hedge a little of this side Highgate. He said he had been bay-making. I took him to the watchhouse, and delivered him up to Mr. Carver.

MR. CARVER. I produce the wooden sign; the prisoner said he found it.

Prosecutor. The wooden sign is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-93

779. ANN ROWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Richard Gentery .

RICHARD GENTERY . I am a bricklayer ; I live at 51, Thornaugh-street. I lost my watch on the 30th of June. It was my business that night to get some nightmen together; coming out of the public-house in the New-road, very near the four crossings, I was accosted by two females. I cannot swear to the prisoner's person; I was accosted by her or some one; this one, if she is the same, she turned back; she appeared to be frightened and agitated; some conversation passed respecting the weather. She asked me if I was a married man; I told her yes; and when we came to the corner she left me and crossed to the Hampstead-road . I went to this public-house, I went to take my watch out to see what o'clock it was, my watch was gone. I saw an officer; I told him I had lost my watch. I heard of my watch on Saturday; I attended Bow-street, and saw my watch there.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Friday night, the 2nd of July, I received information from Gentery that he had been robbed of his watch. The next morning I apprehended the prisoner at her lodging; I desired her to give me the watch, or the duplicate of the watch that she had taken from a person a night or two back; she accordingly fetched it me, stating that she had had taken it from a person on Wednesday; he had only gave her four pence; she did not think that enough. This is the watch.

Prisoner. He asked me for a ticket of a thimble; I said I had a ticket of a watch; I went and got it him.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The duplicate was in my room. The pawnbroker knows the young woman that pledged it.

- I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner is the person that pledged the watch.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-94

780. JAMES LAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , a child's mantle, value 2 s. two gowns, value 2 s. two petticoats, value 4 s. an apron, value 1 s. a frock, value 2 s. two pillow-cases, value 2 s. two tablecloths, value 4 s. a sheet, value 6 s.

six towels, value 3 s. and a coffee-mill, value 6 d. the property of Mary Ronalds , widow .

MARY RONALDS . I am a widow. I am a servant at the Cocoa Tree in St. James's-street . On the morning of the 3d of July, Mr. Claxton came and told me that my things were taken away. I had left my boxes in Mrs. Claxton's care; they had been there for eight years.

JULIA CLAXTON . I live at Hoxton; my husband is a cotton manufacturer. Mrs. Ronalds left two boxes in my care; they were both locked; when brought one of them fell down, and the lock burst. On the 30th of June I saw several articles behind a bag of wood in our house. I looked at it, and found it belong to these boxes left under my care. I informed my husband of it. They were afterwards removed by the prisoner. There was no other person had access to the place besides our own family. The prisoner was a porter at our house. They were placed between the cotton bags, and were taken away at different times. I informed my husband of it; he had an officer. The prisoner was taken up, and searched in my presence, and a towel was found about him that belonged to Mr. Ronalds; it was marked with her name.

JOSEPH CLAXTON . On the 30th of June, I was informed by my wife of the things being concealed in the warehouse. The prisoner had access to that warehouse; none of my other workmen had. In the evening I went into the warehouse; I found several things concealed under a wood bag, and on the Saturday the officer apprehended him as he was going home, brought him back, and searched him, and a towel of Mrs. Ronalds' was found on him. I had no reason to suspect the prisoner until this unfortunate affair.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On Friday the 2nd of July, in the evening, I went to Mr. Claxton's house; Mr. Claxton informed me that he had suspicion of the prisoner taking some things that were under his care. At eight o'clock at night I saw the prisoner going out; I did not conceive that he had got any thing upon him; I would not interrupt him, and stop him. On Saturday I attended again at one o'clock at noon; the prisoner went out to his dinner. Mrs. Claxton went into the warehouse, and informed me that the towel was gone, which she had seen there a few minutes before. I then immediately went after the prisoner, and apprehended him within two doors of his own house; I told him his master wanted to speak to him. I took him into his master's parlour, and searched him; I found two candles in his jacket pocket; they are the property of his master; they are not in the indictment. He took his hat off, and in the hat I found this towell marked I R. I searched him. I searched his lodging; his wife was in the room. I told her I had apprehended her husband; I was come to search the lodging; in the drawers, and upon the top of the drawers I found all the things in the indictment.

Prosecutrix. They are all my property.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-95

781. SUSANNAH SWANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , eight blankets, value 2 l. the property of Edward Pike .

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am shopman to Edward Pike , Ratcliffe Highway; he is a linen-draper . On Saturday the 3d of July, I sold eight blankets to a person of the name of Hawkins; she lived in the same row as the prisoner. I sent the blankets to Mrs. Hawkins, by the witness, Coe, to No. 3, Church-row .

WILLIAM COE . I am shopman to Mr. Pike. On Saturday the 3d of July, John Griffiths sent me with a parcel of blankets to Mrs. Hawkins, No. 3, Church-row. At No. 3, no person was at home. I went to No. 4; I asked the person there if she knew Mrs. Hawkins, at the next door; she said she did not; there was a young woman lived there, her husband was a sailor, and by the information I had no doubt it was the same person that had bought the blankets. I left them with the person at No. 4, to be delivered at No. 3. Mrs. Hawkins is not here, nor have the blankets been recovered. The person that I left the blankets with delivered them to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-96

782. JOHN HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. twenty shillings, one penny, and one halfpenny, the property of Charles Cox , from his person .

CHARLES COX . I keep the Cecil coffee-house in the Strand . On Tuesday week, the 13th of July, between four and five in the afternoon, I was at Highbury tavern; the prisoner came as a waiter ; I had just before taken some wine; the prisoner came and called me by name; he told me he came for employ; he could not get it; he said it was hard times. I gave him some ale; after that I went into the billiard room, and took part of two or three pints of wine, gave the prisoner some, and some sandwiches. When the gentlemen had done playing he played two or three games of billiards, and we were coming home; it was half past ten, or rather later. I was a little forward in liquor; a coach was there waiting for me. I told the prisoner he might ride home to town: he got into the coach, and sat on the right hand side; I sat on the left. After I had been in some time I fell asleep; he awoke me with his right hand in my waistcoat pocket; he took some silver out of my waistcoat pocket: I had a watch without a chain in my pocket; he took that out, and took the silver that was under it; he let the watch fall; that awoke me. After a few minutes he put his hand into my breeches pocket, and took all my silver out of that; he then took my silk handkerchief out of my right hand coat pocket. I let the coach go on until I came near the Angel, Islington , expecting to find a watchman or an officer there. I stopped the coach, and told the prisoner I would have some ale. I got out of the coach, and gave charge of him immediately.

Q. What silver did you lose - A. Twenty shillings. I had more in my pocket. I cannot swear to the silver; I can swear to the handkerchief. The prisoner was forward in liquor, and so was I.

- I am the watchman. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

- . I am a constable. I took this money and handkerchief from John Hunt 's pocket.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-97

783. JOHN LILLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , eighteen pounds weight of hogslard, value 18 s. the property of John Anderson and John Brown .

CHARLES HOWARD BLUNDLE . I am clerk in the house of John Anderson and John Brown; they are general merchant s. We had hogsheads of hogs-lard in our warehouse; one of the bladders of hogs-lard was taken out of the hogshead.

MR. DREW. The prisoner offered me a bladder of hogslard at nine-pence a pound; from the price that he asked for it I considered he did not come honestly by it; an officer came by, I gave him in charge.

- CAVILLIAR. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of May; I asked him how he came by the lard; he said he bought it of John Dodd in Hackney-road; he was driving the Cambridge waggon.

SAMUEL SUMMERS . I am an errand-boy to Messrs. Anderson and Brown. I know that hogs-lard was in the cellar; it was taken out of a hogshead for a sample, and it being a little one I took notice of it; I believe that to be the one. The prisoner had free access to the warehouse.

Mr. Drew. That is the lard he offered me for nine-pence a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the lard, thinking I might get a shilling or two by it.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-98

784. EDMUND READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , a pistol, value 5 s. and seven handkerchiefs, value 10 s. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown, from their persons .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the 6th of July, I was at Carlton-house during the illumination, I saw the prisoner in the mob, I followed him; I saw him take a handkerchief from a persons pocket. I followed him an hour at least. I took the prisoner out of the mob, and searched him; I found upon him these seven handkerchiefs, and one pistol, it was loaded with gunpowder only; I have advertized the things, nobody has come forward to own them. I have made a particular enquiry of the prisoner, and found he has an excellent character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-99

785. DAVID TRUMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , two bags of nails, value 6 l. the property of Thomas Wright

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am an ironmonger , 74, West Smithfield . The prisoner worked for me.

Q. When did you lose your nails - A. I cannot say exactly the day; I was directed where to find the goods, and the moment I heard he was in the habit of selling these things; I examined the property. He had been selling to Mr. D'Valky; I told the prisoner that he had been selling nails to Mr. D'Valky, and I suspected they were mine; he told me he had bought them at a sale. I said I was surprized that he should have money to go to market that way; he then said he took them for a bad debt. In a day or two I went to Mr. D'Valky, I looked at the first bag, I saw they were mine, they had been returned from a customer.

MR. D'VALKY. I live upon Saffron-hill. I bough the nails of Mr. Truman, I gave either five-pence or five-pence halfpenny a pound for them. The prisoner brought his wife and children for me to suit with shoes; he then said I'll go and fetch the nails.

Prosecutor. They are my property; the value of both the bags of nails was about nine pounds before any of them were used. I can swear that I never sold either of the bags.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-100

786. THOMAS ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , a goose, value 8 s. the property of Harry Waters .

HARRY WATERS . I am poulterer ; my partner's name is William Rice .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-101

787. JOHN DAHLBERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of William Harper .

SARAH HARPER . My husband's name is William Harper ; he is on board a Man-of-war . On the 5th of July, I lost my handkerchief off my bed; I live at the corner of Elbow-lane, New Gravel-lane ; on the 5th of July the prisoner came up stairs, into my two pair of stairs room, and asked for a person I did not know; I asked the prisoner to sit down, and as soon as I put my cap on I missed my handkerchief immediately. He said he would go down stairs, and he would stop for me; I was going to enquire about the street for the person that he enquired after; I went down after the prisoner; he went into a stocking shop; he came out of that shop, and went across Cow-lane; in about a quarter of an hour after he was taken, and my handkerchief was found in his hat.

JOHN BUTLER . I am an officer. Another officer gave the prisoner into my charge; the handkerchief was found before he was delivered to me. The woman swore to the handkerchief immediately she saw it; she said it was hers. The prisoner was intoxicated. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutrix. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry to my heart to find myself in this long miserable confinement, and great starvation. On last Saturday evening I was drunk; I never was guilty of any theft, or scandalous act in my life; I am a poor foreigner; I was born

in Stockholm, of good honest parents; I have no friend in England.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-102

788. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a hammock, value 2 s. a bed, value 8 s. a pillow, value 1 s. a shirt, value 1 s. two blankets, value 5 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Wigstrom .

JOHN WIGSTROM . I live at Ratcliffe-cross; I am a sailor ; I lost these things on board a ship, on the Wapping side of the River; the ships's name is the Great Amethyst . This happened on Sunday, the 4th of July. I was on shore at the time my things were taken away. On Wednesday following I met the prisoner coming along with a bundle of clothes; I stopped him, and found they were my property. He said if I said nothing about it I should have them all again.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I belong to the Amethyst. On Wednesday morning, I and the prosecutor were together; I said, Clark, you have got my handkerchief; he said we should have all our property again if we said nothing about it; he had two blankets in the handkerchief of Wigstrom's; after we got along side of the ship the prisoner have the handkerchief with all his might into the river; it sunk; he said he did not want it.

MARY THOMPSON . The prisoner was a lodger of mine; I live in Shakespeare's-walk. On Sunday afternoon he brought in a hammock, and two bundles besides, they looked to me to contain blankets. On Wednesday morning he was charged with having stolen the things. When I got up I missed a blanket off my bed; he left a pillow, and a hammock behind him, and a shirt; they are here.

RICHARD DALBY . I am an officer. I found in Mary Thompson's house, a hammock, pillow, and a red shirt; they were claimed by Wigstrom.

Prosecutor. This is my hammock, pillow, and shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor; I did not know what I was doing of.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-103

789. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , eleven handkerchiefs, value 11 s. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown, from their persons .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 64.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-104

709. ANN ARNETT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 6th of July , eight handkerchiefs, value 8 s. being part and parcel of the goods whereof James Smith confessed himself guilty of stealing .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I apprehended the prisoner, Smith, on the 6th of July, it was facing of Carlton-house; that was the day the rejoising took place; I saw him picking pockets opposite of Carlton-house; at the time he was picking of pockets Arnett was waiting for him at the corner of the Haymarket ; I saw him take some of the handkerchiefs out of his pockets, and some out of his breeches, and deliver them to the prisoner, Arnett; she put them all in her pocket; he left Arnett, and went into the mob again. I left Jeffreys, the Marlborough-street officer, to watch him; I took Arnett into custody while he was absent; I took Arnett into the Opera-house, and searched her; I found eight handkerchiefs upon her, cotton and silk together; four silk handkerchiefs. I saw James Smith deliver them to her; there is not one of them but what is marked, and all of them have different initials. I seized James Smith at the corner of the Haymarket. I took from him a bunch of keys, a cork-screw, and three handkerchiefs; he had been at work again; I knew Smith before. All the handkerchiefs were marked with initials.

CHARLES JEFFREYS . I watched Smith in the mob; he picked as many persons pockets in the mob as he could.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to see the lights; I lost my acquaintance; Smith came up to me; he said would I hold the handkerchiefs until he came back.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-105

791. JOHN BENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Neville , from his person .

JOHN NEVILLE . I am a surveyor of timber ; I live at 32, Bedford-row.

Q. Did you at any time lose a silk handkerchief - A. I did; on Tuesday the 13th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening. I was coming along Holborn . I was looking at two boys fighting, and while I was looking at the boys fighting I felt my pocket move; I turned round, and found the prisoner putting something into his smallclothes; I felt my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone; a minute before that I had occasion to know that my handkerchief was safe in my pocket. I kept an eye upon the prisoner; I saw him leave the crowd; I followed him into Berry-street; I charged him with it; he denied it, I conveyed him into a public-house; the landlord would not send for a constable; the landlord of the public-house at last said to one of the men in the house, you know where the constable lives, tell him. When I took the handkerchief out of his breeches he begged my pardon; he said, he had never done such a thing before; if I would forgive him he would never would do the like again. The keeper of the watchhouse has the handkerchief.

JOHN BAXTER . I am the watchhouse-keeper. I took charge of the prisoner at the watchhouse; the gentleman had taken the handkerchief from the prisoner before he came to the watchhouse. This is the handkerchief; I have kept it ever since.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief; it is worth four or five shillings; I gave ten shillings for it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-106

792. JAMES WILLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a Bow-street officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of June, near twelve at night; he was in company with another. I knew the other very well. I first saw them at the corner of Bow-street ; I saw the other in company with the prisoner attempt to pick a gentleman's pocket; he pulled his handkerchief out a little way; a link boy ran against him, turned him round, and prevented him from getting it. They then both followed two gentlemen into Bridges-street, opposite of Drury-lane ; there I saw the prisoner attempt to pick a gentleman's pocket, but did not get any thing there. They both returned back to Bow-street again. I saw them both attempting there to pick pockets. They left there, and went under the Piazza's; two gentlemen came from the play-house door into King-street; I saw the prisoner try at a pocket once or twice before he got the handkerchief out, and as they were walking along I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out in King-street ; his companion was by at the time, and as soon as I catched hold of him he chucked the handkerchief down. I called out to the gentleman, and told him that he had lost his handkerchief; he said, yes, I have. I told him I was an officer of Bow-street. He said he would attend in the morning; he never did attend. The gentlemen were both strangers to me. As soon as I apprehended the prisoner his companion took to his heels, took a handkerchief out of his hat, and threw it away. I have both the handkerchiefs. This is the handkerchief the prisoner took; I think it is worth five shillings; the other handkerchief is worth two shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down King-street; a strange boy was walking by the side of me; as soon as I was laid hold of he threw something away, what it was I do not know.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-107

793. THOMAS UPCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a coach glass, value 10 s. the property of Christopher Wilson .

WILLIAM MACKLEAN . I am a coachman; I live with Mr. Wilson; I drive for him; he lives at an hotel; he is a Yorkshire gentleman. The coach belongs to Mr. Collingridge.

Q. Did you lose any glass from the coach - A. Yes, on the 17th of June, a little before twelve at night, at Drury-lane . I was waiting to take my master home. I had been waiting better than an hour.

Q. Are you quite sure the coach-glasses were all safe when you came to take up your master - A. Yes. I did not see the glasses taken away. When I moved I saw the coach door open; I got down to see whether all was right, and the glass was gone. It is a plate glass; it is worth ten shillings. I saw the glass again in two or three days afterwards at the office, and the prisoner then was in custody. I know it to be my master's glass.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am an officer of Bow-street office.

Q. Did you see the prisoner near the play-house - A. Yes, and I have seen him at the watering-house in Charles-street; he is one of the cadee's to hackney coachmen. On the evening of the 17th, I was watching him and two more in his company some time; they were hanging about the carriages. I saw the prisoner go to the carriage door, and take the glass out. I was looking through the spokes of a hackney coach wheel; I saw him take the glass; he put the glass under his coat, and walked away; the other two walked away from him. He was between the carriages, towards Covent Garden. I pursued him, and got up to him; I laid hold of him at the end of Russell-street, the end nearest Covent Garden; he made way for me to pass him; I told him I did not want to go by; I wanted to see what he had got under his coat. I took it from him. I said, it is a glass; he said, no, it cannot be a glass. I took him by the collar with one hand, and the glass in the other. At the corner of Bow-street he resisted. The hackney coachmen at the end of Bow-street formed a line to prevent me from going by, and attempted to break the glass. This is the glass. I got him into the Bunch of Grapes, and secured him. I gave the glass to the landlady; she ran down stairs with it, or else the glass would have been broke.

Q. You perhaps did not know the very carriage again from whence it was taken - A. No, I did not. I made it known to all the coachmen, and the man appeared and claimed the glass for Mr. Wilson.

Prisoner's Defence. He has taken a false oath; he did not see me take it out of the carriage.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-108

794. WILLIAM WELLS and JOSEPH GOSLING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of July , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of a person to the Jurors unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city officer. On the 2nd of July, I was going down Holborn , I saw three men, the two prisoners and another; they were following a gentleman close; knowing them, I turned back. I knew the prisoner, Gosling, by the name of Lad; I saw him follow a gentleman; he pulled the gentleman's handkerchief out a little way; the other two were close by. Then the prisoner Wells pulled it a little further out; then Gosling took it right out. Gosling wiped his nose with it, and put it in his pocket. While the handkerchief was being pulled out in my judgment the gentleman did not perceive it. The prisoner Gosling turned round and saw me; he went across the road, and left the other two immediately. I took hold of Gosling; I told him it would not do. I took the handkerchief, and sent to the gentleman; the gentleman returned; he claimed the handkerchief in Gosling's hearing. The prisoner said he was sorry for it; he was in distress, and had had no work for some time. The

gentleman gave me his address; his name, I think, was James Norman . I took the prisoner to Marlborough-street office; the gentleman appeared, and begged to be excused prosecuting, as he was going to sea. He lived in New North-street, Red Lion-square. I was present when the gentleman was examined: the gentleman gave in his name, and swore to that being his handkerchief. He said his ship was waiting for him.

NOT GUILTY .

To be detained till next session.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-109

795. ANN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Maria Sheen .

ANN MARIA SHEEN . I live near the four mile stone, Hammersmith . I keep a bonnet shop . The prisoner brought a box containing a young woman's clothes, to my house. I asked her to have some refreshment, as I thought she was in distress.

Q. Where was this dollar - A. In the drawer of a pembroke-table, in the parlour where she was. I opened the drawer after she was in the house to give her a sixpence; the dollar was then in the drawer.

Q. Did she take any refreshment - A. Yes; she asked me to let her rest herself, as she was a little tired. I saw her shut the drawer of the table; she opened the door, and went away directly. We overtook her in Chiswick-fields; she saw us, and ran and hid herself in a ditch. She had spent eight pence out of the dollar.

Prisoner. I spent nine pence out of the dollar.

MARY JOINER . I saw the prisoner in the house; I joined in the pursuit. I only know that she was pursued and taken in about twenty minutes after she left the house.

GEORGE TIBBOTT . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner. I found upon her four shillings and nine pence, and a sixpence that Mary Sheen gave her. The prisoner said the money was given her by a gentleman near Kew-bridge. I traced the dollar to a chandler's shop; the woman gave it up The prosecutrix described the dollar before she saw it. There was a stamp mark on the head side of the dollar.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the dollar before she gave me sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-110

796. BENJAMIN HASTINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of July , four loaves of bread, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of John Smart .

GEORGE JOYS was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-111

797. JAMES YOUNG , JOSEPH MOLLOY , and JOHN RALPH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , seventeen pounds weight of silk, value 44 l. the property of Richard Brant and Richard Delannay .

JOHN DICKMAN. I am shopman to Richard Brant and John Delannay ; they are silkmen , in Cheapside . On the 15th of June, the prisoner, Young, came to our shop, about half past six in the evening; he said, have you got any good silk twist. I shewed him some of various sizes; he asked the price; I told him forty-eight shillings a pound; he said, weigh me out ten pounds, which done he asked me if we had any white three cord silk. I shewed him some of various sizes; then he said, weigh me out five pounds. He then asked if we had any blue three cord; I shewed him some; he desired me to weigh him up two pounds weight. There was not quite enough of the blue; I put in two skeins of the white to make up the two pounds. He then said that he was recommended by Mr. John Ralph , of St. James's-street. He had been a customer of ours some years back. We had no dealings with Mr. John Ralph for some time previous to this.

Q. Is the John Ralph at the bar now, the Ralph who had been a customer to your master - A. No. Young then said that he had been purchasing that morning, and had laid out one hundred and forty pound, and had paid ready money; now, he said, I hope you you will let me have this as low as you can. At this time Young was alone. He then requested a bill of parcels to be made. I asked him his name; he said, James Young . I made out the bill of parcels, and took the discount off. These goods were to be sent, and a bill of parcels with them, and the money was to be returned by the bearer.

JURY. Was the discount that you took off a discount for ready money - A. Yes, and I delivered the bill of parcels myself into the prisoner. Young's, hands. The porter took the receipt in his pocket. I deducted the discount by his request. He told me he should pay me ready money when he took the bill of parcels. He said, make them up securely, to keep them dry, and send them up to the Cross Keys, St. John-street. He introduced himself that he kept a grinder's shop at St. Alban's. A grinder's shop is a-shop that supplies shoemakers with what they want.

Q. Does the St. Alban's coach go from the Cross Keys in St. John-street - A. No, I believe not. I believe he repeated the second time to send them to St. John-street as soon as possible, and when he left the shop he said I shall trust to your honour. I packed them up in three parcels, and put the name of Young upon them. I then wrote a receipt, and gave it the porter, (his name is Price) together with instructions not to leave them without the money. The prisoner, Young, said, send the goods and the receipt by the porter, to the Cross Keys, and I will return the money by the bearer.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a porter to Messrs. Brant and Delannay. I saw the prisoner, Young, at my master's house on the 15th of June last. I have no doubt of his person in the least.

Q. Were you ordered by the witness to take a parcel - A. Yes, three parcels directed to Mr. James Young each parcel, and tied up in brown paper. I put the parcels in a bag when I went out, to keep them dry. Mr. Dickman gave me a receipt; I put the receipt in my pocket, I was to deliver the goods

to the prisoner Young. I met him in the gateway. On my delivering the goods the money was to be returned. Forty-two, pounds seven shillings was the money I was to receive. I met the prisoner, Young, in the gateway; he asked me if I had not got some goods for him. I said, yes. He asked me to walk into the parlour, and the money, he said, should be paid immediately. He asked me to drink. I had some rum and water with him. I took the goods out of the bag; I placed them on the table near me; I asked the prisoner, Young, whether Molloy belonged to him; he said he did; Young said he was his servant. Molloy heard this. Young said he always took him with him; he had a horse and chaise up the yard. Young took the parcels off the table, and gave them to Molloy; he said, take them up to your mistress. and bring down forty-two pounds seven shillings. I should not have let the parcel have been taken out of the room if the money had not been talked of. I, at the moment, believed that the money would be brought down directly. The prisoner said that he had a house and a little land at St. Alban's, (that was after the goods were taken up stairs), which enabled him to pay ready money for the goods he bought. In the mean time he called for another glass of rum and water. I told him I did not wish for any more; I was waiting for the money. He then said his servant was gone a good while for the money, but his wife had got some friends up stairs in one part, and he had his friends in another. He then said, you will excuse me, I'll go up stairs and fetch down the money. My curiosity led me to enquire at the bar. I then went home. I have since seen the silk at the office.

COURT. Did you ever see Ralph during this - A. No, I did not. On my going home I met Mr. Dickman; I told him every thing that had taken place. Then Mr. Dickman and I went back to the Cross Keys; we made enquiries after Young and Molloy; we were unsuccessful. There were no such persons there, nor had there been any horse and chaise in the yard of theirs.

JAMES LINE . In June last I was waiter at the Cross Keys; I saw Young and Molloy there on the 15th of June, and I remember Price, the porter, being there the same evening.

Q. Was Young living there at the time - A. No, sir, he never slept there to my knowledge.

Q. Had he any wife occupying any part of the house - A. Never to my knowledge. I never saw him in the house before that day. He had not any horse and chaise there. He had been in our house before once in the course of the same day. I saw Molloy go along the passage, towards the front door. I did not see him go out of the house. He did not go up stairs. I did not see Young go out. I demanded the money for the two glasses of rum and water of Price, the porter. I knew nothing of the parties.

CHARLES HURRELL . I am a coachman, and know St. Alban's very well. I have drove the St. Alban's coach in and out every day for seven years I have known St. Alban's fifteen years. There is no such a man as James Young , a shop-keeper, at St. Alban's. I have made every enquiry, and cannot find any such man out. There is no James Young living there.

JAMES CARR . I am a shoemaker.

Q. Are you the landlord of the house in which Young lived - A. Yes, No. 66, Red-lion-street, Holborn.

Q. How long has Young lodged at your house - A. Not a week. On the 16th, I think Young and Ralph brought the silk in, at ten o'clock at night, I saw the parcels, I found they contained silk when they were opened. Young lodged in the garret. Read, the officer, came and took the silk after Molloy and Ralph were apprehended.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I apprehended Ralph and Molloy in Red-lion-square, on Thursday, the 17th of June, about one o'clock. I told them I took them about silk. They laid it all to Young. I apprehended Young on the same day, in Kingsgate-street. I told him what he was taken for. He said his wife had brought him into a great deal of trouble. I went to Carr's house after I took Molloy and Ralph, and brought the silk to the office. This is the silk.

Dickman. This is the same silk and the same writing on the parcel. It is the property of Messrs. Brant and Delannay.

Young's Defence. I bought the goods with intention to pay for them. I sent for the money. I had been deceived by my wife. These other men had no concern in it.

Molloy's Defence. Young told me he wanted a suit of clothes; he asked me to take measure of him, and to go with him to St John-street to buy the cloth. He gave me a pound note at the Cross Keys; he said take this to the bar to my wife, and tell her to come in with the contents of the bill. He came after me, and said, is she here? I said, no. He then said, she must be in Gray's-inn-lane, give me the parcel. I gave him the parcel, and he went out.

Ralph was not put on his defence.

YOUNG, GUILTY , aged 36.

MOLLOY, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

RALPH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-112

798. WILLIAM FEAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a carpet, value 2 l. and a rug, value 10 s. the property of Sarah Figan , spinster.

SARAH FIGAN . I am a single woman I live at 21, Lower Chapman-street, Cannon-street-road . I lost six duplicates; they were taken out of a drawer in my parlour. When I looked over my duplicates I missed six of them. I cannot say when I missed them I afterwards saw my carpet for sale at a broker's shop in Mile-end-road, in April, I believe.

Q. All you know you lost your duplicates of a carpet and a rug - A. Yes, that I had pawned with Mr. Williamson, in Back-lane.

Q Had this man access to your room - A. I don't know. I was sometimes out. I had always the key of my room. The prisoner was the landlord of the house where I rented two rooms.

THOMAS MACE . I am a broker, 253, Whitechapel-road. On the 22nd of April I was out, and when I came home my wife told me that she had bought a

carpet, and the man would come again that evening or the next morning, with a rug to sell. I bought the rug of the prisoner. I am sure he is the man. He asked me ten shillings; I gave him eight shillings for it. He said his name was George Long ; he lived at No. 20, Cannon-street. I am sure he is the man. He said he had sold the carpet to my wife too cheap. I told him, no, it was three shillings and sixpence a yard, which was the full value to sell again.

MARTHA MACE . The prisoner is the person that I bought the carpet of on the 22nd of April. I saw him again in the evening. I told my husband he was the man that I had bought the carpet of, in the prisoner's hearing. When he came in with the carpet he asked me two pounds five shillings for it. I bid him one pound fifteen shillings; he took it. It was between three and four o'clock when he sold me the carpet.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. The prosecutrix applied to the magistrate at Shadwell office. She said that she had lost a carpet and a hearth rug; that she saw it a broker's in Whitechapel-road. I apprehended the prisoner at his house. I brought away this carpet and this rug from the broker's.

Mace. That is the carpet and rug we bought of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. That is my carpet and rug. The prisoner went by the name of Fear. I rented two rooms of him at sixteen pounds a year.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work at the time.

Williams. I found two picklock keys in this man's house.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-113

799. CHARLOTTE MAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a watch, value 3 l. a seal, value 1 l. and a watch key, value 5 s. the property of William Newman , from his person .

WILLIAM NEWMAN . I am a smith . On the 20th of June I lost my watch, between eleven and twelve at night. I was the worse for liquor. I had my watch safe at eleven o'clock. I met the prisoner in Drury-lane; I went with her to her house in Parker's-street . As soon as I went into her room she asked me to give her something to drink. I gave her a three-shilling piece. After she went out I had my watch, and before she returned I fell asleep. The first thing when I awoke I missed my watch. The prisoner was in the room. I charged her with taking my watch; she denied it. The watchman was going by. I called the watchman in. The watchman saw the prisoner pull the watch out of her pocket. He took it from her in my presence.

JOHN READING . I am a watchman. The prosecutor asked the prisoner for his watch. She took the watch out of her pocket. I seized her right hand and with difficulty I got the watch from her.

JOHN BAXTER . I am the watchhouse-keeper. The prisoner was delivered to my charge for having robbed Newman of his watch. The prisoner pretended that she took it out of a joke. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The watchman snatched the watch out of my hand. The prosecutor did not wish to hurt me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-114

800. MARY BAKER, alias CATHERINE M'CAWLEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , ten yards of ribbon, value 2 s. the property of Edward Robson .

MARTHA ROBSON . I am the wife of Edward Robson ; I keep a haberdasher's shop. On the 9th of June the prisoner came to our shop between five and six o'clock; she asked for some narrow ribbon. I shewed her a drawer of narrow ribbon. She said none of that suited her. She asked to look at another drawer. I put in the first drawer of ribbon before I took out the other. She did not approve of any thing in the second drawer. She staid some time. I asked her if there was nothing that suited her. She said, no, she had come for another person. She was in the shop ten or fifteen minutes. I asked her if any thing had dropped. She said, no. I looked at her hand; under it I saw a piece of narrow ribbon that had been in the drawer. That ribbon is worth about two shillings. I insisted upon seeing what was in her right hand. She drew her hand off the counter, and threw the ribbon behind the counter. My husband was behind the counter; he picked it up. She then said she did not throw it down. I know her person, and always suspected her.

JURY. Was the ribbon on the counter - A. Yes, I saw it between her fingers.

JAMES HODGES . I was going by the door; I was called in. The prisoner was charged with stealing this new ribbon. I searched her. She had no money about her, nor no pockets on. This is the ribbon; it was delivered to me in the shop.

Prosecutrix. It is my ribbon.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 9th of June, about six o'clock in the evening, I went into this shop to buy a bit of narrow ribbon. After she had shewn me the second drawer, she said, is not there a piece fallen down. I said, yes. I had not meddled with the ribbons, nor had I my hands in the drawer. I had money in my bosom.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-115

801. THOMAS COVENTRY was indicted for that he, on the 17th of September, in the 37th year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields, was married to Elizabeth Saunders , and that he afterwards on the 24th of November, in the 53rd year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish of St. Mary, Islington , did marry Hannah Martin , his former wife being then alive .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am clerk of the parish church of St. Martin's; I produce the register book of marriages; 17 September, 1797, Thomas Coventry and Elizabeth Saunders , both of this parish, were

married this day by banns, by me, James Fell , curate. I am the subscribing witness to that marriage.

Q. I suppose you do not know any of the party - A. No.

JONATHAN DOUGHTY . I live in William-street, Curtain-road, Shoreditch: I am a bricklayer. Elizabeth Saunders was my wife's sister; she was married in the year 97; I was at the church, and was present at the marriage; the prisoner is the person that was married to my wife's sister.

Q. When did you see your sister, Mrs. Coventry - A. On Saturday last; I saw her at Tottenham, in Middlesex.

Q. How long did he live with her - A. About six months; she came to me black and blue, from her head to her feet. When he left her he went and enlisted in the army of reserve; he deserted from that, and went into the King's service.

REV. MR. ROSE. I am the curate of St. Mary Islington. I produce the register books of our parish; 24th of November, 1812; Thomas Coventry of this parish, and Hannah Martin of the same, were married in this church by banns.

Q. Can you undertake to speak to the person of Thomas Coventry - A. I cannot. The person, whoever he was, signed that book in my presence, and Hannah Martin signed her name.

Q. to Mr. Doughty. Look at the signature of Thomas Coventry - A. I believe it to be his writing; it appears to be the same letters; I saw him write his name in the first book.

JOSHUA MARTIN . I live at 42, Old-street. Hannah Martin is my sister; I never saw the prisoner until after the marriage took place. I was in the habit of seeing him with my sister at Matthew-street, Shoreditch.

Q. Did they ever produce a paper to you - A. Yes; my sister did; I rather think Coventry was present.

Q. Did you ever hear the prisoner say whether he was married or not - A. Once in the course of conversation about his being married, I told him that was a matter of doubt; he made a smile at it; he said that they were married. I have seen Coventry write; and I have seen a dozen of his letters I can swear to his hand writing.

Q. Look at that book, is that signature his hand writing - A. Thomas Coventry is his hand writing, and Hannah Martin is my sister's hand writing, I am certain of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny the whole to be my hand writing. I know nothing of the marriages at all.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-116

802. HANNAH WARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a candlestick, value 6 d. and three pewter pint pots, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Robson .

THOMAS ROBSON . I am a publican ; live at the King's Head, in the Tower .

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am an officer. I was sent for to a public-house in Rosemary-lane. I found the prisoner in custody of Samuel Norton . I searched her, and found three pots about her, and a candlestick.

SAMUEL NORTON . I lodge at this public-house, in Rosemary-lane; between eight and nine in the evening I was coming down stairs; I saw the prisoner on the stairs with something in her apron, which proved to be these pots; I sent for an officer: she searched her, and found these pots upon her.

Q. What was she doing in your house - A. She was enquiring for a Mrs. Hamilton.

Q. to Mr. Robson. Look at these pots - A. Two of the pots are mine, and the candlestick; the other pot belongs to a man that keeps the Fourteen Stars, in Rosemary-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it; I was in liquor at the time.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-117

803. JOSEPH WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Adam Cotton .

ADAM COTTON . I am the master of a ship . I lost my stockings on the 21st of June. On the 18th of June, I discharged all my ship's company off; after that Wilson asked me to stop and work; he was to have his victuals and two shillings a day. On the 19th I said, remain on board, and do what is necessary with the apprentice; on that day I had a basket of clothes in the cabin; this was on the Sunday. On Monday morning I came on board, Wilson was on shore; I looked at my basket, and found my clothes were all gone; it was all safe on the Sunday. The apprentice's chest, the lock was drawn, and a suit of clothes were taken out.

Q. Did you find any of the property at any time - A. I did, on last Tuesday these stockings I found in a bundle under his arm.

JOHN TURNER . I am a City officer. I took these stockings out of the the prisoner's handkerchief.

Prosecutor. They are my stockings; I lost them when I lost the other clothes.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-118

804. ISABELLA VALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a silver teaspoon, value 3 s . the property of James Smith ; And WILLIAM ASLICK for receiving on the same day the said goods, he knowing it to be stolen .

SOPHIA SMITH . My husband's name is James Smith , he is a sailor ; we live in London-terrace, Commercial-road . On the 10th of this month, Isabella Vale came to me, she asked for a drink of water; I gave her some. She was intoxicated; she said she could not go home, because she had got the hiccups on her; I gave her a cup of tea with a silver spoon; she went away. I missed my spoon. On the Tuesday following the prisoner came by, I went to the door, and asked her to come in; she

came in immediately. I asked her if she remembered me giving her a cup of tea; she said, yes. I sent for an officer. I am sure there was a tea-spoon in the cup when I gave it her.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. On the 14th I apprehended the prisoners; the woman said she gave the spoon to the man. He said he sold it to the pawnbroker.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker. On Monday, I gave the prisoner, Aslick, two shillings and sixpence for this spoon. On the following day he came, and said the spoon I sold you I am informed it is a stolen one; he said he wanted it back again; he did not know it was stolen at the time he sold it.

Prosecutrix. This is my spoon.

Vale's Defence. I know nothing about it.

Aslick's Defence. I received the spoon as a gift; she told me she found it; I believed it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-119

805. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a silver tea-spoon, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Laver .

THOMAS LAVER . I keep the Three Tuns tavern, Fetter-lane . I can only prove the spoon to be mine.

THOMAS CHESTERMAN . I am broker, No. 5, Prescot-street, Goodman's-fields. John Smith brought the spoon to me on the 30th of June he told me that he had received the spoon of a man of the name of Denham, that he had taken the spoon out of pawn that day, it was pawned for a shilling, and seeing the mark Three Tuns, Fetter-lane, upon it, I thought it was not right. He went with me to the pawnbrokers, and nothing of the sort had been pledged there; from there I took him to Lambeth-street office, and there left him, and the spoon.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me by Chesterman, and I received the spoon of him. The next day I went to Mr. Laver; I asked him if he had lost any spoon; he looked over them, and missed one. This is the spoon.

Prosecutor. That is my spoon; I do not recollect seeing the prisoner at my house.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning this happened I met Denham in Houndsditch; he said he had a silver spoon in pawn, he would sell it me; I gave him an eighteen-penny token. He said it was in pawn in the Minories; he went and brought me the spoon, and gave me two-pence halfpenny; and when I shewed Chesterman the spoon I saw the spoon was marked. I went to the pawnbroker; Mr. Matthews in the Minories said, no spoon had been taken out there; I was not in custody; I went voluntary to the office.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-120

806. ISAAC MOOR , WILLIAM CROUCH , and ANN KIRK , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , seventy-five bottles of wine, value 15 l. nine bottles of rum, value 39 s. and two bottles of brandy, value 21 s. the property of Edward Aspernall .

EDWARD ASPERNALL . I live in Newton-place, New-road . I received information on the 1st of June, that my cellar was broken open; there were wine, rum, and brandy in my cellar; my wine cellar was opened by forcing the staple of a padlock. I never saw the prisoners about my premises.

JOHN EDWARD CLARK . On the 1st of June, I went into the field at the back of the prosecutor's house, accompanied by William Campbell , a lad; I saw, Moore, Crouch, and Ann Kirk , sitting under the garden wall; it was about half past two in the middle of the day; it was behind the Bedford nursery; that is near Mr. Aspernall's. Me and Campbell went and sat down there, about twenty yards from the house; the two men came up to us, and were going to beat us, and used very improper language; William Crouch said that I had taken three; I supposed he meaned bottles. Ann Kirk told him to smash the b - is; meaning me and my companion. We went behind a wall, and watched them; we saw them take the bottles up, not knowing what was in them at the time; they took it out of a hole, under a fence, in the Bedford nursery; it is about an hundred yards from Mr. Aspernall's house. We found out afterwards that the fence was marked with chalk from whence the wine came, with a kind of a cross. They got up and went up Grafton-street East; Isaac Moore took the bottles up from under the fence; I saw the girl take one from the field. They went to the hollow in Fitzroy-square; they returned from the hollow, and went to the same field where the wine came from; I saw Moor and Crouch take bottles of wine from the same place; when they had taken wine again they went up a new street with two or three houses in it; in Hason-place my father laid hold of Moore; the other two ran away.

WILLIAM CAMPBELL . I live in Steven's-street, Tottenham-court-road. I met John Edward Clark on the 1st of June; he and me went into the field; we sat down; the three prisoners came up to us, they used bad language, and told us to go out of the field; we went on further, and stood behind a wall; we watched them taking the wine from under a fence in the Bedford nursery; I watched the prisoners; they went into a stone-mason's shed, in the hollow in Fitzroy-square; all the prisoners went from the field to the hollow; Crouch went into the shed, the others stood at the door; they handed the wine to Crouch, I believe; I watched them back again, and then I went home.

JOHN CLARK . I am an headborough of the parish of St. Pancras. On the first of June, I saw these two young fellows, and a young woman with them, they went into the Bedford nursery field; in about half an hour after that I saw Moore coming with a bundle; I asked Moore what he had got: he said what is that to you. I said you know me very well, I have a right to enquire; I seized him by the collar; the other two went across the ditch, and Crouch threw a bottle of wine away; Moore drew a bottle out, and struch me; I thought it was a knife. I got the better of him, and got up again; that was the first fall I had; the blow brought me down. We went about six yards further, there he and me had another scuffle, we went down again; I begged my

boy to take the wine up. He took hold of the apron, and the bottles fell in the ditch. We went a little further; we were down again; he got hold of me by the throat, and I got hold of his throat; he tore my throat and neck all to pieces; at last I secured him by the assistance of a baker: he resisted desperately; I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you go afterwards to any place, and find any wine - A. I did, at a stone-mason's yard, down at the hollow in Fitzroy-square; that was by the direction of the boys that I went there. I took Crouch the next day; I found these five bottles on Moore, and these six bottles we found in the drain.

Prosecutor. The bottles produced by Clark are marked as my bottles were.

Moore's Defence. At the time I was taken I was out of his district.

Crouch's Defence. We found these bottles of wine in the Duke of Bedford's field, among some grass, in a hole.

Kirk's Defence. The same.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-121

807. THOMAS KEY and JOHN PEGGS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , eighty-five pounds weight of hay, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH . Q. Did you lose any hay any time - A. I lost a great deal several times; the hay was in a field; I lost so much that I set a watchman to guard it. I watched the fore part of the night, and then I went home to bed; at half past one in the night I was called up by the man that was watching; I went to the field, and found the two men in custody.

Q. Where is this field of yours - A. At Chelsey, adjoining to the Harrow-road , about two miles from Paddington. The man charged them with taking hay out of the field, and putting it into a boat; there were two boats near the hay, and one boat with hay in it; they said they did not take it; Peeping Ned had taken it. The boats were in Paddington-canal.

JOHN AKERMAN . I am a labourer. I was employed by Mr. Smith to watch the meadows. About half past one in the morning, I saw two men come into the field, and take a large cock of hay, and put into the barge: there were three men, I only saw two active. The short prisoner steered the boat, and the other was steering; there was only hay in their boat; there was no hay in the other boat. We weighed the hay, it weighed eighty-five pounds. I saw them put it in the boat quite plain.

Key's Defence. I have nothing to say.

Pegg's Defence. The same.

KEY, GUILTY , aged 10.

PEGG, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-122

808. ANN MAHONY and MARY SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , coat, value 39 s. and a pair of boots, value 39 s. the property of Alexander Bouch , from his person .

ALEXANDER BOUCH . I lost this coat on the 6th of June, and the boots. I was coming along Holborn , I was accosted by Mary Mahony ; I unguardedly went to her home; going along we met Mary Smith , and when we went into her room; she asked me for two or three shillings; I laid down on the bed. I took my boots off, and my coat, and when the patrol came in I missed my coat, and my boots. I have never found my boots since.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a patrol. I stopped Mary Smith on the night of the 6th of June, about two o'clock; she had this coat; I asked her how she came by this coat. She said a man gave it her that was at her room. I went to the room, I saw the man; he was then asleep. When he awoke he said he had lost his coat, and his boots.

- GORDEN. I am a patrol. I laid hold of Mahony; she took me to the room. The prosecutor said he had lost his coat, and his boots.

Mahony's Defence. I met this man by St. Giles's church, he asked me if he might go home with me; I said I did not care; he gave me some money to get something to drink, and when I went for it, the patrol stopped me.

Smith's Defence. I am innocent of what I am accused of.

MAHONY, GUILTY , aged. 18.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-123

809. THOMAS M'KENZIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a watch, value 3 l. two waistcoats, value 4 s. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. a pocket-book, value 6 d. a bank note, value 10 l. four 1 l. bank notes, and a two 2 l. bank note , the property of Samuel Falkland .

SAMUEL FALKLAND . I am a seaman . I lost these things on board a ship; I came on shore, and left my chest on board; I was pressed, and taken on board the Tender, and in the mean time my chest was broken open, and my clothes and sixteen pounds were taken out; the notes were in my pocket-book.

WILLIAM BURTON . I am a seaman. When I went out of the London Docks I left the prisoner on board the ship; in two hours afterwards I saw that he had plenty of money; he had not a copper for three or four weeks before; he had the waistcoat, and trowsers on, and Falkland's watch in his pocket.

- JACKSON. I am an officer. On Sunday evening, the 4th of June, the prisoner was given into my custody by Burton, and another seaman; I searched his bundle; I found this waistcoat on him, and this waistcoat was in the bundle; the watch and the trowsers were handed over to me by another seaman, who is not present; the pocket-book was in the bundle, and the trowsers. I found out where he paid away three pound out of the notes.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Jackson has got some clothes of mine.

Jackson. They are all new, and were bought with the prosecutor's money.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-124

810. BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a gown, value 26 s. a petticoat, value 12 s. and three half handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Catherine Reagan .

CATHERINE REAGAN . I am servant in a public-house , No. 6, Tottenham-court-road . I lost these things on the 25th of last month; they were taken out of my bed-room. The prisoner came into the house, he called for a pint of beer; he asked my mistress to go backwards; she said, yes. Instead of going backwards he went up stairs, into the one pair room; he took my clothes that I wore in the afternoon; he brought no bundle in. My mistress saw him with a bundle; she ran after him, and brought him back; my shawl was in his pocket, and my petticoat and gown was in his handkerchief.

MRS. PARVIS. On the 25th of June, in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and asked for a pint of porter; when he came in he had no bundle, as he went out he had a bundle; I called the people to help me in with him; he said if this is yours take it, and threw it down. The servant came in, she saw her shawl in his pocket. We secured him, and took him to Marlborough-street office.

Prosecutrix. This is my gown, petticoat, and shawl.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-125

811. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , four pair of mens shoes unfinished, value 12 s. and three lasts, value 18 d. the property of Joseph Hobbs .

JOSEPH HOBBS . I am a shoe-maker . I keep a stall in Tavistock-street, Covent Garden . On last Wednesday I locked up my stall with the materials in it. On Thursday morning I went down to my stall; the padlock was taken off. I missed four pair of shoes unfinished, and three lasts. On Friday morning, news was brought to me that a man was in custody at St. Martin's watchhouse, and we had information that he had a stall in High-street, Bloomsbury; Westcoat, the officer, broke his stall open, and there was my property.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I searched the prisoner's stall; I found these three lasts, four quarters and two vamps unclosed of three pair of shoes.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 1 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-126

812. ALEXANDER COLLIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , copper, value 2 l. and six pounds weight of iron, value 2 s. the property of Gilbert Cushion , affixed to a building of his .

GILBERT CUSHION . I am a farmer ; I live at Pinner .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a gardener .

Q. Did you lose a copper at any time - A. Yes, on the 30th of March, in the evening, or early the next morning; the staple of the door was broken, and the copper was taken; the copper was affixed; all I know I lost the copper.

JOHN MASON . I am a carter. The prisoner came to my fellow servant, and asked us to take a parcel up at the bottom of Harrow-hill; we had a hay cart coming to town; he asked if it was heavy; he said no it was only a parcel of sieves that he had bought at a sale. When it came day light we perceived that it was a copper; the prisoner walked with me several miles; I am sure as to his person.

JAMES ROBERTS . I was coming to town with a hay cart along with Mason, about two miles from Mr. Cushion's; the prisoner said, carter, will you take up a parcel; he said he would give me a shilling. At day light; I saw it was a copper; I delivered it from the top of my cart at the top of Seymour-street, to a carriers cart, which came from the wharf. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM BOND . I am an officer. On the 12th of June, just as I got to Walham-green, Smithers, a parish constable, called me. I went with him to Golden-lane, Barbican, and when we came to a public-house Smithers said here is the man in the house. I then said to the prisoner where do you live; he said fifteen miles down in Kent. I said I am sure you do not, what made you here; he said let me have a drop of porter, and send to my wife. I took the prisoner in custody. On the Monday after the prisoner had his hearing I went down to Pinner to find the prosecutor, and the lads, the witnesses; I slept at the King's Head, kept by Ball; I asked Mrs. Ball if ever she remembered Collie coming there; yes, she said, very well; he was in the house the evening that Mr. Cushion's copper was taken away. The copper has not been found.

GEORGE SMITHERS . I apprehended the prisoner first from the dress he had on; his whiskers were large at the time, as described in the hand bill; he made his escape from the magistrates; he was left in the care of a constable in the yard; I went to his house, and there I found a red waistcoat, the same as was described in the hand bill.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person that took Mr. Cushion's copper; as for making my escape I did not; I walked about in the magistrates yard half an hour, I then went away having a wife and four small children to support.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-127

821. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 11th of June , unlawfully and against the will of Thomas Every , did put and force his hand into his pocket, with intention the property therein to steal.

THOMAS EMERY . I am an ostler ; I live at the White Horse, Cripplegate. On the 11th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; I was in Bridgewater-gardens , having a game of skittles; the prisoner came into the ground and set the skittles up; he attempted to put his hands into my pocket, but I prevented him. I got up and walked into the house; I sat down, and he came and sat down by me again; he cut my breeches down; I caught his hand in my pocket, I collared him, and took him to the watchhouse, and gave him in charge of

the officer; he was searched, the knife was not found on him; he had given that to a man in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130714-128

822. MATTHEW DALEY was indicted for that he, on the 17th of March , falsely did pretend to Samuel Waldgrave , that he was then sent by Robert Johnson , for the sum of 2 l. 16 s. which was due from Samuel Waldgrave to Robert Johnson , and by means thereof did obtain 2 l. 16 s. whereas the said Matthew Daley was not sent by Robert Johnson was not sent for any sum whatever

SAMUEL WALDGRAVE . I keep the Bull inn, Bishopsgate-street . I have dealt with Robert Johnson of Greek-street for soda water. The prisoner was the person who received the orders of my man.

Q. In the Spring of this year did he happen to call upon you for any sum of money for Mr. Johnson for soda water - A. Yes, two pounds sixteen shillings; I think he first applied about February; I told him I believed it was paid; he assured me upon his honor it was not. I told him the person that conducted my business had delivered up all the receipts; he assured me it was not discharged, and I had no reason to doubt his integrity; I told him if he would call again in a few days I should be able to meet with the person who had conducted my business; I should be able to ask him more fully upon the subject; upon that he went away. In about a week he came again; he brought me a letter purporting to be writ by Mr. Johnson; stating that he requested immediate payment of the money, or he should prosecute him, and discharge him from his situation; I then told him to make my best respectful compliments to Mr. Johnson, if in the course of three days I did not see this man that carried on that part of my business, I would then pay it.

COURT. What was the name of the man who attended your business. - A. Richard Starkey . I think the defendant said he would deliver that message to Mr. Johnson, but he was that kind of positive character it would be of no use; he left me, and returned in the afternoon of the same day, he then presented me a summons, and said Mr. Johnson's compliments, he believed that was the best way of settling this; I did not attend the summons; one of the commissioners sent their compliments, and fixed another day, on which my son attended; I paid the defendant on the 17th of March; he said he had positive instructions from Mr. Johnson unless I paid he should take out an execution. This is the receipt.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-129

823. JOHN WHALE was indicted for that he, on the 10th of April , did falsely pretend to Zachariah Hill , warehouseman to Thomas Swift , John Swift , and John Bell , that he was sent by Mrs. Porter, meaning Eliza Porter , who was a customer to Messrs. Swift and Bell for a dozen of men's ribbed cotton stockings, a dozen of men's cotton stockings, and one dozen of woman's cotton stockings, and by means of this false pretence he did obtain of Zachariah Hill one dozen of men's ribbed cotton stockings, value 2 l. 8 s. one dozen of men's white cotton stockings, value 2 l. 6 s. and one dozen of woman's cotton stockings, value 1 l. 16 s. with intent to cheat and defraud them thereof .

ZACHARIAH HILL . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Swift and Bell, the names of the firm are John Swift , Thomas Swift , and John Bell; they are hosier s at the corner of Lime-street .

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. I saw him on the 10th of April; he called at our shop; he brought me a written note; he said he brought it from Mrs. Porter of Ealing; I understood him to mean the wife of Charles Porter , a customer of ours at Ealing.

MR. SWIFT. I produce the note.

Hill. That is the note the prisoner delivered to me; he said his name was Thomas; he kept a light chaise cart, and that he carried parcels for Mrs. Porter. (The note read.) I delivered him three dozen cotton stocking accordings to that note and he took them away with him.

Q. Did you afterwards see him again - A. Not till the 24th, he was stopped on the 24th in consequence of information from the house of Luck and White; I saw him stopped at the house of Luck and White, on the 24th of April. I am certain he is the person that I delivered the stockings to on the 17th of April. As soon as he saw me enter the warehouse he said he received the stockings of me. We never got the stockings again.

ELIZA PORTER . I am the wife of Charles Porter of Ealing. My husband deals with Messrs. Swift and Bell.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. He is a stranger to me; I never gave him any order, nor ever received the goods.

THOMAS SWIFT . I am one of the partners in the house of Swift and Luck. I took the prisoner in custody, in consequence of a message from Luck and White; I know nothing of the transaction.

Prisoner's Defence. I was led into the error; I was in a public-house in Whitechapel, a man said young man, are you of the mind to go of an errand for me, he gave me a note, told me to go with it to Messrs. Swift and Bell.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130714-130

824. HENRY NATHAN was indicted for wickedly making an affidavit that Joel Joseph was indebted to him in the sum of 42 l .

MR. BRAITHWAITE. I am an officer of the Court of King's Bench .

Q. You produce the affidavit sworn to, in Joseph the defendant, and Nathan the plaintiff - A. This is it; it was sworn before me; he was sworn by the Pentateuch.

Q. Do you know whether he is a jew, or not - A. I do not. I swear a jew by the Old Testament.

Mr. Gurney. If a man of the name of Price, Jones, or Smith, you would give him the New Testament - A. Yes, and if a man of the name of Nathan I should give him the Old.

COURT. How are the words in the affidavit - A. That he was then, and there duly sworn by the Holy Gospels of God.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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